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Sample records for transduced irradiated prostate

  1. Ultrasonic Transducer Irradiation Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daw, Joshua [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Palmer, Joe [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Keller, Paul [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Montgomery, Robert [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chien, Hual-Te [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kohse, Gordon [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Tittmann, Bernhard [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Reinhardt, Brian [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Rempe, Joy [Rempe and Associates, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high-accuracy and -resolution in-pile measurement of a range of parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other ongoing efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of identified ultrasonic transducer materials capable of long term performance under irradiation test conditions. For this reason, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an ATR NSUF project to evaluate the performance of promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducers in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 1021 n/cm2. The goal of this research is to characterize and demonstrate magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer operation during irradiation, enabling the development of novel radiation-tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material Testing Reactors (MTRs). As such, this test is an instrumented lead test and real-time transducer performance data is collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers. To date, one piezoelectric

  2. Irradiation Testing of Ultrasonic Transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daw, J.; Rempe, J.; Palmer, J.; Tittmann, B.; Reinhardt, B.; Kohse, G.; Ramuhalli, P.; Montgomery, R.; Chien, H.T.; Villard, J.F.

    2013-06-01

    Ultrasonic technologies offer the potential for high accuracy and resolution in-pile measurement of numerous parameters, including geometry changes, temperature, crack initiation and growth, gas pressure and composition, and microstructural changes. Many Department of Energy-Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs are exploring the use of ultrasonic technologies to provide enhanced sensors for in-pile instrumentation during irradiation testing. For example, the ability of single, small diameter ultrasonic thermometers (UTs) to provide a temperature profile in candidate metallic and oxide fuel would provide much needed data for validating new fuel performance models. Other efforts include an ultrasonic technique to detect morphology changes (such as crack initiation and growth) and acoustic techniques to evaluate fission gas composition and pressure. These efforts are limited by the lack of existing knowledge of ultrasonic transducer material survivability under irradiation conditions. To address this need, the Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was awarded an Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) project to evaluate promising magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer performance in the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) up to a fast fluence of at least 10 21 n/cm 2 (E> 0.1 MeV). This test will be an instrumented lead test; and real-time transducer performance data will be collected along with temperature and neutron and gamma flux data. By characterizing magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducer survivability during irradiation, test results will enable the development of novel radiation tolerant ultrasonic sensors for use in Material and Test Reactors (MTRs). The current work bridges the gap between proven out-of-pile ultrasonic techniques and in-pile deployment of ultrasonic sensors by acquiring the data necessary to demonstrate the performance of ultrasonic transducers. (authors)

  3. Neutron Irradiation Tests of Pressure Transducers in Liquid Helium

    CERN Document Server

    Amand, J F; Casas-Cubillos, J; Thermeau, J P

    1999-01-01

    The superconducting magnets of the future Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN will operate in pressurised superfluid helium (1 bar, 1.9 K). About 500 pressure transducers will be placed in the liquid helium bath for monitoring the filling and the pressure transients after resistive transitions. Their precision must remain better than 100 mbar at pressures below 2 bar and better than 5% for higher pressures (up to 20 bar), with temperatures ranging from 1.8 K to 300 K. All the tested transducers are based on the same principle: the fluid or gas is separated from a sealed reference vacuum by an elastic membrane; its deformation indicates the pressure. The transducers will be exposed to high neutron fluence (2 kGy, 1014 n/cm2 per year) during the 20 years of machine operation. This irradiation may induce changes both on the membranes characteristics (leakage, modification of elasticity) and on gauges which measure their deformations. To investigate these effects and select the transducer to be used in the LHC, a...

  4. Radical irradiation for carcinoma of the prostate

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-09-15

    Sep 15, 1990 ... 309. Radical irradiation for carcinoma of the prostate. R. P. ABRATT, P. S. CRAIGHEAD, V. B. REDDI,, ... treated by hormones for at least 2 months and who were subsequently irradiated, are also discussed ... Hospital, Port Elizabeth; and Frere Hospital, East London, in. 1979. S Atr MedJ 1990; 78: 309-311.

  5. Irradiation Behavior and Post-Irradiation Examinations of an Acoustic Sensor Using a Piezoelectric Transducer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambert, T.; Zacharie-Aubrun, I.; Hanifi, K.; Valot, Ch.; Fayette, L.; Rosenkantz, E.; Ferrandis, J.Y.; Tiratay, X.

    2013-06-01

    The development of advanced instrumentation for in-pile experiments in Material Testing Reactor constitutes a main goal for the improvement of the nuclear fuel behavior knowledge. In the framework of high burn-up fuel experiments under transient operating conditions, an innovative sensor based on acoustic method was developed by CEA and IES (Southern Electronic Institute).This sensor is used to determine the on-line composition of the gases located in fuel rodlet free volume and thus, allows calculating the molar fractions of fission gases and helium. The main principle of the composition determination by acoustic method consists in measuring the time of flight of an acoustic signal emitted and reflected in a specific cavity. A piezoelectric transducer, driven by a pulse generator, generates the acoustic wave in the cavity. The piezoelectric transducer is a PZT ceramic disk, mainly consisting of lead, zirconium and titanium. This acoustic method was tested with success during a first experiment called REMORA 3, and the results were used to differentiate helium and fission gas release kinetics under transient operating conditions. However, during the irradiation test, acoustic signal degradation was observed, mainly due to irradiation effect but also due to the increasing of the gas temperature. Despite this acoustic signal degradation, the time of flight measurements were carried out with good accuracy throughout the test, thanks to the development of a more efficient signal processing. After experiment, neutronic calculations were performed in order to determine neutron fluence at the level of the piezoelectric transducer. In order to have a better understanding of the acoustic sensor behavior under irradiation, Post Irradiation Examination program was done on piezoelectric transducer and on acoustic coupling material too. These examinations were also realized on a non-irradiated acoustic sensor built in the same conditions and with the same materials and the same

  6. Prostatic carcinoma: limited field irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rounsaville, M.C.; Green, J.P.; Vaeth, J.M.; Purdon, R.P.; Heltzel, M.M.

    1987-07-01

    This is a retrospective study of 251 patients with histologically proven adenocarcinoma treated primarily with limited field radiotherapy techniques, under the principle direction of authors JMV and JPG, between 1968 and 1981 in San Francisco, California. All patients are followed for a minimum of 3 years; mean follow-up is 7.3 years. Routine clinical staging procedures included: HandP, digital prostate exam, cystoscopy, biopsy, blood studies including serum acid phosphatase, and imaging studies including chest X ray, IVP, bone survey or radionucleotide bone scan, and in recent years, pelvic CT scans. Twelve patients are Stage A1, 37-Stage A2, 50-Stage B, 140-Stage C1 and 12-Stage C2. Ninety percent of all cases and 85% of Stage C patients were treated with limited fields to the prostate and periprostatic volume only. Total doses were prescribed at midplane or isocenter and were generally 6500-7000 cGy, daily doses of 180-200 cGy, 5 days per week. Actuarial 5- and 10-year survival rates are: entire population-69% and 47%; Stage A1-74% and 50%; Stage A2-81% and 67%; Stage B-84% and 53%; Stage C1-63% and 42%; Stage C2-32% and 11%. The 5- and 10-year disease-free actuarial survivals are: entire population-71% and 50%; Stage A1-89% and 74%; Stage A2-82% and 69%; Stage B-71% and 52%; Stage C1-67% and 44%; Stage C2-0%. Sites of recurrence, alone or as a component of the failure pattern are: 37 (15%) local, 11 (4%) symptomatic regional recurrence (lower extremity edema, pelvic pain/sciatica, hydroureteronephrosis), and 87 (35%) distant metastasis. Seven (3%) had unknown sites of failure. Local-regional failure occurred in 42% of Stage C2 patients.

  7. The effectiveness of immobilization during prostate irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentel, Gunilla C.; Marks, Lawrence B.; Sherouse, George W.; Spencer, David P.; Anscher, Mitchell S.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of a hemibody foam cradle on the reproducibility of patient setup during external beam radiation treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 1992 and April 1993, 74 patients received external beam radiation treatment to the prostate ± nodes, generally with a four-field box technique. Forty-four of the 74 patients had a custom-made hemibody foam cast used in an attempt to improve setup accuracy. A review of the routine weekly port films was performed following the completion of therapy to determine the reproducibility of patient setup in all 74 patients. The physician's request of an isocenter shift was used as an indicator of reproducibility. Neither the treating technologists nor the physicians knew at the time the films were taken that the port films would be reviewed for setup reproducibility at a later date. The results were compared between the patients treated with (44) and without (30) an immobilization device. Results: In the 44 immobilized patients, 213 routine checks of the isocenter were performed during the 7-week course of radiation therapy. In 17.4% of these instances (37 out of 213), an isocenter shift was requested. This rate is compared to 23.1% (30 out of 130) in the 30 patients who did not have the immobilization device (p < 0.2). There was a statistically significant reduction in isocenter shifts requested in the anterior to posterior direction in the patients who were immobilized, 5.1% (9 out of 175) vs. 12.6% (13 out of 103) (p < 0.05, two tailed chi-square test). There was no significant improvement in the reproducibility of isocenter placement in the cephalad to caudal or right to left directions. Conclusions: This custom-made hemibody foam cradle appears to improve the reproducibility of patient setup during the 7-week course of fractionated external beam irradiation for patients with adenocarcinoma of the prostate. This type of immobilization device is now routinely used in our

  8. A novel classification of prostate specific antigen (PSA) biosensors based on transducing elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najeeb, Mansoor Ani; Ahmad, Zubair; Shakoor, R A; Mohamed, A M A; Kahraman, Ramazan

    2017-06-01

    During the last few decades, there has been a tremendous rise in the number of research studies dedicated towards the development of diagnostic tools based on bio-sensing technology for the early detection of various diseases like cardiovascular diseases (CVD), many types of cancer, diabetes mellitus (DM) and many infectious diseases. Many breakthroughs have been developed in the areas of improving specificity, selectivity and repeatability of the biosensor devices. Innovations in the interdisciplinary areas like biotechnology, genetics, organic electronics and nanotechnology also had a great positive impact on the growth of bio-sensing technology. As a product of these improvements, fast and consistent sensing policies have been productively created for precise and ultrasensitive biomarker-based disease diagnostics. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is widely considered as an important biomarker used for diagnosing prostate cancer. There have been many publications based on various biosensors used for PSA detection, but a limited review was available for the classification of these biosensors used for the detection of PSA. This review highlights the various biosensors used for PSA detection and proposes a novel classification for PSA biosensors based on the transducer type used. We also highlight the advantages, disadvantages and limitations of each technique used for PSA biosensing which will make this article a complete reference tool for the future researches in PSA biosensing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Thermoacoustic contrast of prostate cancer due to heating by very high frequency irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patch, S K; Hull, D; Thomas, M; Jacobsohn, K; See, WA; Griep, SK

    2015-01-01

    Applying the thermoacoustic (TA) effect to diagnostic imaging was first proposed in the 1980s. The object under test is irradiated by high-power pulses of electromagnetic energy, which heat tissue and cause thermal expansion. Outgoing TA pressure pulses are detected by ultrasound transducers and reconstructed to provide images of the object. The TA contrast mechanism is strongly dependent upon the frequency of the irradiating electromagnetic pulse. When very high frequency (VHF) electromagnetic irradiation is utilized, TA signal production is driven by ionic content. Prostatic fluids contain high levels of ionic metabolites, including citrate, zinc, calcium, and magnesium. Healthy prostate glands produce more ionic metabolites than diseased glands. VHF pulses are therefore expected to generate stronger TA signal in healthy prostate glands than in diseased glands. A benchtop system for performing ex vivo TA computed tomography with VHF energy is described and images are presented. The system utilizes irradiation pulses of 700 ns duration exceeding 20 kW power. Reconstructions frequently visualize anatomic landmarks such as the urethra and verumontanum. TA reconstructions from three freshly excised human prostate glands with little, moderate, and severe cancerous involvement are compared with histology. TA signal strength is negatively correlated with percent cancerous involvement in this small sample size. For the 45 regions of interest analyzed, a reconstruction value of 0.4 mV provides 100% sensitivity but only 29% specificity. This sample size is far too small to draw sweeping conclusions, but the results warrant a larger volume study including comparison of TA images to the gold standard, histology. (paper)

  10. Low-dose irradiation for controlling prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuttler, J.M.

    2003-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer among North American men and the second leading cause of death in those aged 65 and over. The American Cancer Society recommends testing those over age 50 who are expected to live at least 10 years, even though the ability of early detection to decrease prostate cancer mortality has not been demonstrated. So controversy exists about the appropriateness of screening because of the considerable economic and social burden of diagnosing and treating prostate cancer, coupled with the projected large increase in the number of new cases as the population ages. This very important public health issue could be addressed at low cost by total-body low-dose irradiation therapy to stimulate the patient's own defences to prevent and control most cancers, including prostate cancer, with no symptomatic side effects. (author)

  11. Radical irradiation for carcinoma of the prostate | Abratt | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ninety-three patients treated by radical irradiation for stage A2, Band C1 carcinoma of the prostate between 1979 and 1988 at a joint radiotherapy service were reviewed. The average age was 63 years, 84% of the patients were white and on histological examination the tumours were well or moderately differentiated in ...

  12. Combined immunotherapy with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-transduced allogeneic prostate cancer cells and ipilimumab in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer: a phase 1 dose-escalation trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eertwegh, A.J. van den; Versluis, J.; van den Berg, H.P.; Santegoets, S.J.; van Moorselaar, R.J.; van der Sluis, T.M.; Gall, H.E.; Harding, T.C.; Jooss, K.; Lowy, I.; Pinedo, H.M.; Scheper, R.J.; Stam, A.G.; Blomberg, B.M. von; Gruijl, T.D. de; Hege, K.; Sacks, N.; Gerritsen, W.R.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-transduced allogeneic prostate cancer cells vaccine (GVAX) has antitumour activity against prostate cancer; preclinical studies have shown potent synergy when combined with ipilimumab, an antibody that blocks cytotoxic T-lymphocyte

  13. Prostate cancer: experience with definitive irradiation in the aged

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, N.; Bodner, H.; Broth, E.

    1985-01-01

    When considering therapeutic options for localized prostate cancer, stage and grade of disease have been the most important determinants. In the elderly, the nominal age has assumed increasing importance in the final decision. A balanced judgment must be reached between the patient's normal life expectancy and the rapidity with which the cancer may be expected to express its malignant potential. By careful attention to patient selection and the details of treatment, definitive irradiation can improve quality of life and survival. Of 63 patients aged seventy-three to ninety years referred for irradiation, 56 were found medically suitable for definitive treatment. A review of the authors experience is presented

  14. Evaluation of Candidate Linear Variable Displacement Transducers for High Temperature Irradiations in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudson, D.L.; Rempe, J.L.; Daw, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to promote nuclear science and technology in the U.S. Given this designation, the ATR is supporting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry as they conduct basic and applied nuclear research and development to advance the nation's energy security needs. A fundamental component of the ATR NSUF program is to develop in-pile instrumentation capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation experiments. Dimensional change is a key parameter that must be monitored during irradiation of new materials being considered for fuel, cladding, and structures in next generation and existing nuclear reactors. Such materials can experience significant changes during high temperature irradiation. Currently, dimensional changes are determined by repeatedly irradiating a specimen for a defined period of time in the ATR and then removing it from the reactor for evaluation. The time and labor to remove, examine, and return irradiated samples for each measurement makes this approach very expensive. In addition, such techniques provide limited data (i.e., only characterizing the end state when samples are removed from the reactor) and may disturb the phenomena of interest. To address these issues, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) recently initiated efforts to evaluate candidate linear variable displacement transducers (LVDTs) for use during high temperature irradiation experiments in typical ATR test locations. Two nuclear grade LVDT vendor designs were identified for consideration - a smaller diameter design qualified for temperatures up to 350 C and a larger design with capabilities to 500 C. Initial evaluation efforts include collecting calibration data as a function of temperature, long duration testing of LVDT response while held at high temperature, and the assessment of changes

  15. The role of imaging based prostate biopsy morphology in a data fusion paradigm for transducing prognostic predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Faisal M.; Kulikowski, Casimir A.

    2016-03-01

    A major focus area for precision medicine is in managing the treatment of newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients. For patients with a positive biopsy, clinicians aim to develop an individualized treatment plan based on a mechanistic understanding of the disease factors unique to each patient. Recently, there has been a movement towards a multi-modal view of the cancer through the fusion of quantitative information from multiple sources, imaging and otherwise. Simultaneously, there have been significant advances in machine learning methods for medical prognostics which integrate a multitude of predictive factors to develop an individualized risk assessment and prognosis for patients. An emerging area of research is in semi-supervised approaches which transduce the appropriate survival time for censored patients. In this work, we apply a novel semi-supervised approach for support vector regression to predict the prognosis for newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients. We integrate clinical characteristics of a patient's disease with imaging derived metrics for biomarker expression as well as glandular and nuclear morphology. In particular, our goal was to explore the performance of nuclear and glandular architecture within the transduction algorithm and assess their predictive power when compared with the Gleason score manually assigned by a pathologist. Our analysis in a multi-institutional cohort of 1027 patients indicates that not only do glandular and morphometric characteristics improve the predictive power of the semi-supervised transduction algorithm; they perform better when the pathological Gleason is absent. This work represents one of the first assessments of quantitative prostate biopsy architecture versus the Gleason grade in the context of a data fusion paradigm which leverages a semi-supervised approach for risk prognosis.

  16. SU-E-J-95: Predicting Treatment Outcomes for Prostate Cancer: Irradiation Responses of Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, K

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Most prostate cancers are slow-growing diseases but normally require much higher doses (80Gy) with conventional fractionation radiotherapy, comparing to other more aggressive cancers. This study is to disclose the radiobiological basis of this discrepancy by proposing the concept of prostate cancer stem cells (CSCs) and examining their specific irradiation responses. Methods: There are overwhelming evidences that CSC may keep their stemness, e.g. the competency of cell differentiation, in hypoxic microenvironments and hence become radiation resistive, though the probability is tiny for aggressiveness cancers. Tumor hypoxia used to be considered as an independent reason for poor treatment outcomes, and recent evidences showed that even prostate cancers were also hypoxic though they are very slow-growing. In addition, to achieve comparable outcomes to other much more aggressive cancers, much higher doses (rather than lower doses) are always needed for prostate cancers, regardless of its non-aggressiveness. All these abnormal facts can only be possibly interpreted by the irradiation responses characteristics of prostate CSCs. Results: Both normal cancer cells (NCCs) and CSCs exiting in tumors, in which NCCs are mainly for symptoms whereas killing all CSCs achieves disease-free. Since prostate cancers are slow-growing, the hypoxia in prostate cancers cannot possibly from NCCs, thus it is caused by hypoxic CSCs. However, single hypoxic cell cannot be imaged due to limitation of imaging techniques, unless a large group of hypoxic cells exist together, thus most of CSCs in prostate cancers are virtually hypoxic, i.e. not in working mode because CSCs in proliferating mode have to be normoxic, and this explains why prostate cancers are unaggressive. Conclusion: The fractional dose in conventional radiotherapy (∼2Gy) could only kill NCCs and CSCs in proliferating modes, whereas most CSCs survived fractional treatments since they were hypoxic, thus to eliminate all

  17. Prostatic irradiation is not associated with any measurable increase in the risk of subsequent rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendal, Wayne S.; Eapen, Libni; MacRae, Robert; Malone, Shawn; Nicholas, Garth

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate a putative increased risk of rectal cancer subsequent to prostatic radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: In an analysis of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry, we compared men who had radiotherapy for prostatic carcinoma with those treated surgically and those treated with neither modality. Kaplan-Meier analyses for the time to failure from rectal cancer were performed between age-matched subgroups of the three cohorts. Cox proportional hazards analyses were performed to ascertain what influences might affect the incidence of subsequent rectal cancer. Results: In all, 33,831 men were irradiated, 167,607 were treated surgically, and 36,335 received neither modality. Rectal cancers developed in 243 (0.7%) of those irradiated (mean age, 70.7 years), 578 (0.3%) of those treated surgically (68.7 years), and 227 (0.8%) of those treated with neither modality (74.2 years). When age effects and the differences between the surgical and untreated cohorts were controlled for, we were unable to demonstrate any significant increased incidence of rectal cancer in men irradiated for prostatic cancer. Conclusions: An increased frequency of rectal cancer after prostatic irradiation, apparent on crude analysis, could be attributed to age confounding and other unmeasured confounders associated with prostate cancer treatment and rectal cancer risk

  18. Potential benefits of combining cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine gene therapy and irradiation for prostate cancer. Experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Hiroaki; Koshida, Kiyoshi; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Mizokami, Atsushi; Namiki, Mikio [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of combining cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine (CD/5-FC) gene therapy and radiation therapy (either external beam radiation or radioimmunotherapy [RIT]), for the treatment of prostate cancer. Tumor xenografts of CD-transduced LNCaP cells grown in the testes of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice were used to evaluate antitumor effect. The mice were injected intraperitoneally with 500 mg/kg of 5-FC, or with 5, 15 or 30 mg/kg of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), for 9 days. The tumors were treated with fractionated radiation at a dose of 1 or 3 Gy/day for 3 days, or I-131 labelled anti-prostate specific antigen (anti-PSA) monoclonal antibody (mAb) administration at a subtherapeutic dose of 20 or 80 {mu}Ci. Intratumoral and serum concentrations of 5-FU were measured using high performance liquid chromatography. Mice treated with CD/5-FC gene therapy presented a significant tumor growth inhibition comparable to that obtained with 15 mg/kg, 5-FU systemic administration without marked weight loss. Treatment with CD/5-FC gene therapy resulted in higher tumor but lower serum concentrations of 5-FU than treatment with systemic 5-FU chemotherapy. An additive antitumor effect was obtained when CD/5-FC therapy was combined with 1 Gy irradiation, which by itself did not produce a significant antitumor effect. However, the efficacy of CD/5-FC therapy was not enhanced when combined with RIT, probably due to poor accumulation of the mAb as the tumor/blood ratio never exceeded 1. These findings indicate that CD/5-FC gene therapy for prostate cancer may function with enhanced antitumor effect when combined with external beam radiation. However, combining CD/5-FC gene therapy and RIT using an anti-PSA mAb may not be effective because of insufficient accumulation of the mAb at the target tumors. (author)

  19. Potential benefits of combining cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine gene therapy and irradiation for prostate cancer. Experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hiroaki; Koshida, Kiyoshi; Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Mizokami, Atsushi; Namiki, Mikio

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of combining cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine (CD/5-FC) gene therapy and radiation therapy (either external beam radiation or radioimmunotherapy [RIT]), for the treatment of prostate cancer. Tumor xenografts of CD-transduced LNCaP cells grown in the testes of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice were used to evaluate antitumor effect. The mice were injected intraperitoneally with 500 mg/kg of 5-FC, or with 5, 15 or 30 mg/kg of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), for 9 days. The tumors were treated with fractionated radiation at a dose of 1 or 3 Gy/day for 3 days, or I-131 labelled anti-prostate specific antigen (anti-PSA) monoclonal antibody (mAb) administration at a subtherapeutic dose of 20 or 80 μCi. Intratumoral and serum concentrations of 5-FU were measured using high performance liquid chromatography. Mice treated with CD/5-FC gene therapy presented a significant tumor growth inhibition comparable to that obtained with 15 mg/kg, 5-FU systemic administration without marked weight loss. Treatment with CD/5-FC gene therapy resulted in higher tumor but lower serum concentrations of 5-FU than treatment with systemic 5-FU chemotherapy. An additive antitumor effect was obtained when CD/5-FC therapy was combined with 1 Gy irradiation, which by itself did not produce a significant antitumor effect. However, the efficacy of CD/5-FC therapy was not enhanced when combined with RIT, probably due to poor accumulation of the mAb as the tumor/blood ratio never exceeded 1. These findings indicate that CD/5-FC gene therapy for prostate cancer may function with enhanced antitumor effect when combined with external beam radiation. However, combining CD/5-FC gene therapy and RIT using an anti-PSA mAb may not be effective because of insufficient accumulation of the mAb at the target tumors. (author)

  20. Studies on 192Ir afterloading irradiation of the canine prostate with special consideration of thermoluminescent dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, M.

    1986-01-01

    A method for high dose rate afterloading irradiation of the prostate with iridium 192 was developed. The isodoses of the urethra and rectum, which were measured by means of thermoluminescent dosimetry, showed deviations from the doses pre-calculated by computer (BRACHY), because this calculation is based on an anatomically ideal condition. (MBC) [de

  1. Pre-estrogen breast irradiation for patients with carcinoma of the prostate: a critical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagnon, J.D.; Moss, W.T.; Stevens, K.R.

    1979-02-01

    We studied 38 patients with prostatic cancer who received breast irradiation before oral estrogen administration. Our data are combined with those from other institutions to determine the effectiveness of pre-estrogen breast irradiation in minimizing gynecomastia and/or pain. Based on our review the incidence of estrogen-induced breast changes is 70%. Irradiation given before estrogen administration can prevent or minimize these changes in 89.3% of the treated patients. Histologic changes of gynecomastia are reviewed and recommendations for optimum radiation therapy technique are included.

  2. Prostate-specific antigen for pretreatment prediction and posttreatment evaluation of outcome after definitive irradiation for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuban, Deborah A.; El-Mahdi, Anas M.; Schellhammer, Paul F.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to assess the predictive value of pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and the difference between clinical and PSA disease-free status in patients with long-term follow-up after irradiation for prostatic carcinoma. Comparison of the distribution of prognostic factors between surgical and radiation series was also made. Methods and Materials: From 1975-1989, 652 patients with clinical Stage A2-C prostatic adenocarcinoma were definitively irradiated using external beam therapy. One hundred and fifty patients with banked serum and up to 14 years follow-up have pretreatment PSA levels and 355 patients with up to 17 years follow-up have posttreatment values. Treatment failure was analyzed by tumor stage, grade, and four pretreatment PSA categories. Disease-progression was evaluated by clinical and biochemical (PSA) endpoints. Prognostic factors were compared to two surgical series. Results: A significant difference was seen in clinical and PSA disease-free (PSA ≤ 4.0 ng/ml) status based on tumor grade, stage, and pretreatment PSA category. Although the expected clinical outcome has been well-documented previously, results based on posttreatment PSA levels show 5-year disease-free survivals reduced by 10-16% and 10-year survivals lessened by 15-39% depending upon the particular tumor grade and stage. The earlier stage, lower grade tumors showed the largest difference between clinical and biochemical recurrence rates at the longest interval from treatment. Even more notable were the differences in the clinical and PSA disease-free rates based on the pretreatment PSA level. Comparing the irradiated patients to two surgical series showed that the former had a larger percentage of more advanced stage tumors with more unfavorable PSA levels as compared to prostatectomy patients. Conclusion: With long-term follow-up, the pretreatment PSA level continues to be a powerful predictor of clinical and biochemical outcome in patients

  3. Daily CT planning during boost irradiation of prostate cancer. Feasibility and time requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geinitz, H.; Zimmermann, F.B.; Kuzmany, A.; Kneschaurek, P.

    2000-01-01

    Background: In the irradiation of prostate cancer internal organ movement leads to uncertainties in the daily localization of the clinical target volume. Therefore more or less large safety margins are added when designing the treatment portals. With daily CT planning internal organ movement can be compensated to some extent, safety margins can be reduced and irradiated normal tissue can be spared. The feasibility of daily CT-based 3D treatment planning is studied in a patient with localized prostate carcinoma using a new patient positioning system. Methods: Daily CT planning was applied during boost irradiation of a patient with prostate cancer: After patient immobilization the pelvis was scanned in 3 mm CT slices. Planning was done with the BrainSCAN planning system for stereotactic body irradiation. The prostate was contoured in all slices and the safety margins of the micromultileafs were automatically set to the distance chosen by the physician (0.8 cm). Patient positioning was done with the BrainLAB ExacTrac positioning system on the basis of skin attached stereotactic body markers. Before each treatment verification images of the isocenter were taken. Results: The total time requirement for planning and irradiation was about 1 hour 15 minutes. Patient positioning on the treatment couch took about 10 minutes. The accuracy of the positioning system was good (75% of the deviations were smaller than 3 mm). The shift of the single markers from CT scan to CT scan was more extensive than those of the center of all 7 markers combined (47% of the deviations were smaller than 3 mm). The location of the markers seems to influence the magnitude of their dislocation. Conclusion: Daily CT planning is feasible but time consuming. The new patient positioning system ExacTrac is an interesting tool especially for daily CT planning since conventional simulation can be omitted. (orig.) [de

  4. Metastasizing, Luciferase Transduced MAT‑Lu Rat Prostate Cancer Models: Follow up of Bolus and Metronomic Therapy with Doxorubicin as Model Drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Woias

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The most fatal outcomes of prostate carcinoma (PCa result from hormone-refractory variants of the tumor, especially from metastatic spread rather than from primary tumor burden. The goal of the study was to establish and apply rat MAT-Lu prostate cancer tumor models for improved non-invasive live follow up of tumor growth and metastasis by in vivo bioluminescence. We established luciferase transduced MAT-Lu rat PCa cells and studied tumor growth and metastatic processes in an ectopic as well as orthotopic setting. An intravenous bolus treatment with doxorubicin was used to demonstrate the basic applicability of in vivo imaging to follow up therapeutic intervention in these models. In vitro analysis of tissue homogenates confirmed major metastatic spread of subcutaneous tumors into the lung. Our sensitive method, however, for the first time detects metastasis also in lymph node (11/24, spleen (3/24, kidney (4/24, liver (5/24, and bone tissue (femur or spinal cord - 5/20 and 12/20, respectively. Preliminary data of orthotopic implantation (three animals showed metastatic invasion to investigated organs in all animals but with varying preference (e.g., to lymph nodes. Intravenous bolus treatment of MAT-Lu PCa with doxorubicin reduced subcutaneous tumor growth by about 50% and the number of animals affected by metastatic lesions in lymph nodes (0/4, lung (3/6 or lumbar spine (0/2, as determined by in vivo imaging and in vitro analysis. Additionally, the possible applicability of the luciferase transduced MAT-Lu model(s to study basic principles of metronomic therapies via jugular vein catheter, using newly established active microport pumping systems, is presented.

  5. Metastasizing, Luciferase Transduced MAT-Lu Rat Prostate Cancer Models: Follow up of Bolus and Metronomic Therapy with Doxorubicin as Model Drug

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantscheff, Peter, E-mail: jantscheff@tumorbio.uni-freiburg.de [Tumour Biology Center, Clinical Research, Department Lipids & Liposomes, Breisacher Str.117, D-79106 Freiburg (Germany); Esser, Norbert [ProQinase GmbH, Breisacher Str. 117, D-79106 Freiburg (Germany); Geipel, Andreas; Woias, Peter [Laboratory for Design of Microsystems, Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), Georges-Köhler-Allee 106, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany); Ziroli, Vittorio [Tumour Biology Center, Clinical Research, Department Lipids & Liposomes, Breisacher Str.117, D-79106 Freiburg (Germany); Goldschmidtboing, Frank [Laboratory for Design of Microsystems, Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK), Georges-Köhler-Allee 106, D-79110 Freiburg (Germany); Massing, Ulrich [Tumour Biology Center, Clinical Research, Department Lipids & Liposomes, Breisacher Str.117, D-79106 Freiburg (Germany)

    2011-06-17

    The most fatal outcomes of prostate carcinoma (PCa) result from hormone-refractory variants of the tumor, especially from metastatic spread rather than from primary tumor burden. The goal of the study was to establish and apply rat MAT-Lu prostate cancer tumor models for improved non-invasive live follow up of tumor growth and metastasis by in vivo bioluminescence. We established luciferase transduced MAT-Lu rat PCa cells and studied tumor growth and metastatic processes in an ectopic as well as orthotopic setting. An intravenous bolus treatment with doxorubicin was used to demonstrate the basic applicability of in vivo imaging to follow up therapeutic intervention in these models. In vitro analysis of tissue homogenates confirmed major metastatic spread of subcutaneous tumors into the lung. Our sensitive method, however, for the first time detects metastasis also in lymph node (11/24), spleen (3/24), kidney (4/24), liver (5/24), and bone tissue (femur or spinal cord - 5/20 and 12/20, respectively). Preliminary data of orthotopic implantation (three animals) showed metastatic invasion to investigated organs in all animals but with varying preference (e.g., to lymph nodes). Intravenous bolus treatment of MAT-Lu PCa with doxorubicin reduced subcutaneous tumor growth by about 50% and the number of animals affected by metastatic lesions in lymph nodes (0/4), lung (3/6) or lumbar spine (0/2), as determined by in vivo imaging and in vitro analysis. Additionally, the possible applicability of the luciferase transduced MAT-Lu model(s) to study basic principles of metronomic therapies via jugular vein catheter, using newly established active microport pumping systems, is presented.

  6. High dose rate interstitial brachytherapy with external beam irradiation for localized prostate cancer. Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiratsuka, Junichi; Jo, Yoshimasa; Yoden, Eisaku; Tanaka, Hiroyoshi; Imajo, Yoshinari [Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Okayama (Japan); Nagase, Naomi; Narihiro, Naomasa; Kubota, Juichi

    2000-12-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the biochemical and pathological results of combined external beam radiotherapy and high dose rate Ir-192 brachytherapy (HDR-Ir192) for clinically localized prostate cancer. Between October 1997 and August 1999, 39 evaluable patients with adenocarcinoma of prostate diagnosed by biopsy were treated with interstitial and external beam irradiation. Patients ranged in age from 58-82 years, with a mean of 69.7 years. T1c, T2 and T3 tumors, according to the UICC classification system (1997), were found in 7, 21 and 11 cases respectively. The mean initial pre-treatment PSA was 35.9 ng/ml (median 13.2), with 77% of the patients having had a pre-treatment PSA greater than 10 ng/ml. Of all patients, 17 had received pre-treatment hormonal therapy. Hormonal pretreatment was stopped at the beginning of radiotherapy in all cases. External beam four-field box irradiation was given to the small pelvis to a dose of 45 Gy/25 fractions. Three HDR-Ir192 treatments were given over a 30-h period, with 5.5 Gy per fraction at the circumference of the prostate gland over the course of this study. Biochemical failure was defined as a PSA level >1.5 ng/ml and rising on three consecutive values. If serial post-treatment PSA levels showed a continuous downward trend, failure was not scored. The patient with clinical evidence of progression was classified as a clinical failure. The median follow-up at the time of evaluation was 19.6 months. A post-treatment PSA level {<=}1.0 ng/ml was seen in 26 (67%) patients, and values from >1.0 to {<=}2.0 ng/ml were seen in 10 (26%) patients. Biochemical failure was not seen in 38 patients except for one patient who developed a distant bone metastasis with negative prostatic biopsy 15 months after treatment. Biochemical control rate was 100% (38/38) except for the patient with bone metastasis classified as clinical failure. Negative biopsies 18 months after treatment were found in 93% (14/15) of patients. Only one patient

  7. Sexual dysfunctions after prostate cancer radiation therapy; Dysfonctions sexuelles apres irradiation pour cancer de la prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droupy, S. [Service d' urologie-andrologie, CHU Caremeau, 30 - Nimes (France)

    2010-10-15

    Sexual dysfunctions are a quality of life main concern following prostate cancer treatment. After both radiotherapy and brachytherapy, sexual function declines progressively, the onset of occurrence of erectile dysfunction being 12-18 months after both treatments. The pathophysiological pathways by which radiotherapy and brachytherapy cause erectile dysfunction are multi-factorial, as patient co-morbidities, arterial damage, exposure of neurovascular bundle to high levels of radiation, and radiation dose received by the corpora cavernosa at the crurae of the penis may be important in the aetiology of erectile dysfunction. Diagnosis and treatment of postradiation sexual dysfunctions must integrate pre-therapeutic evaluation and information to provide to the patient and his partner a multidisciplinary sexual medicine management. (authors)

  8. Is there an increased risk of second primaries following prostate irradiation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Movsas, Benjamin; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Pinover, Wayne; Hanks, Gerald E.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the risk of developing a second primary cancer following prostate irradiation compared to the underlying risk in patients with prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: The baseline rate of secondary cancers following prostate cancer was obtained from a study of 18,135 patients from the Connecticut Tumor Registry, of whom only 12.5% received radiotherapy. These patients, with a mean age of 72 and a mean follow-up of 3.9 years, were compared to a cohort of 543 patients (median age 70) with similar follow-up (median 3.9 years), all of whom were treated with definitive radiotherapy at Fox Chase Cancer Center. The possible association between various covariates (age, dose, palpation stage, field size, Gleason score, pretreatment PSA) and the development of a secondary cancer was assessed. Results: 1,053 of 18,135 patients (5.8%) in the Connecticut Tumor Registry developed a second primary cancer compared with 31 of 543 (5.7%) patients treated with prostate radiation (p = 0.99). Although this risk increases gradually over time, it is not significantly different, at any time period, between the two groups of patients. Of the 31 secondary primaries in the irradiated group, 82% had a history of tobacco and/or alcohol use. Only melanomas were significantly increased compared to the expected rate in an age-matched population (p <0.001). Five of the 31 secondary cancers occurred within the radiation field (four bladder, one colon), four within 3 years and only one occurred 9 years after radiotherapy. No association was found between age (<70 vs. ≥70 and as a continuous variable), dose (<74 vs. ≥74 Gy), palpation stage (< T2C vs. ≥T2C), field size (prostate vs. pelvic), radiation technique (conventional vs. conformal), Gleason score (2-6 vs. 7-10), or pretreatment PSA (<15 vs. ≥15 and as a continuous variable) and the risk of developing a second primary. Although a lower radiation dose (as a continuous variable) correlated with an increased risk of

  9. Study on apoptosis of prostate cancer cell induced by 125I seed irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Anyan; Wang Junjie; Wang Jidong; Zhuang Hongqing; Zhao Yong

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the mechanism of apoptosis induced by 125 I seed irradiation on PC3 cells. Methods: Human prostate cancer cell line PC3 was treated by irradiation of 125 I (2.77 cGy/h) with various dose. Agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA and flows cytometry were used to detect the apoptosis of PC3 cells and indirect immunofluorescence assay was used to detect the expression of Bcl-2. The activity of Caspase-3 was measured by Caspase Colorimetric Assay Kits. Results: Apoptosis of PC3 cells could be efficiently induced by 125 I seed irradiation. The apoptotic peaks were found by flow cytometry and DNA ladder appeared on 1.8% agarose gel. The activity of Caspase-3 on PC3 cells treated by 125 I seed irradiation was not changed significantly. Bcl-2 gene expression was down-regulated with the sample concentration increased. Conclusion: 125 I irradiation can induce the apoptosis of PC3 cells and the mechanism of apoptosis is related with down regulation of Bcl-2 gene expression and is not related with Caspase-3 activity. (authors)

  10. Initial results of irradiation for prostatic cancer following three-dimensional treatment planning. Irradiation technique and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiegel, T.; Schmidt, R.; Baumann, M.; Schwarz, R.; Steiner, P.; Arps, H.; Goeckel-Beining, B.

    1994-01-01

    During the period from June 91 until May 93 thirty-three patients suffering from histologically confirmed carcinoms of the prostate were assigned to four treatment groups and subjected to irradiation of the prostate and, if required, efferent lymphatic system of the minor pelvis that was performed according to a three-dimensional prospective treatment plan. The doses used for localized radiotherapy of the tumour tissue were in the range between 62 and 70 Gy, the efferent lymph system of the minor pelvis was irradiated with doses of up to 50 Gy. The local or boost treatments were carried out using four (box technique) or five irregular fields, while radiotherapy of the minor pelvis was solely based on the box technique using four fields of irregular shape. The immediate and long-term toxicity was evaluated in a prospective approach according to the RTOG score for the rectum, urinary bladder and skin. Twenty-five of the thirty-three patients (76%) developed immediate toxic symptoms. Immediate reactions classifiable with degree II of the rating scale were, however, only observed in four patients (15%) for the rectum (2), bladder (1) and skin (1). Immediate toxic reactions compatible with RTOG grades III or IV were not recorded. In all patients, the untoward effects were completely reversed within a maximum period of 6 weeks following termination of treatment. Two patients from the study cohort (6%), which has so far been followed up for an average period of 16 months, showed long-term grade I effects in the rectum and a further long-term effect observed in the urinary bladder of another patient was classified with degree II. Two patients died intercurrently and two patients developed metastases remote from the primary tumour. Local tumour control can currently be reported for 96%. (orig.) [de

  11. Molecular Ultrasound Imaging of Early Vascular Response in Prostate Tumors Irradiated with Carbon Ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz Palmowski

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Individualized treatments with combination of radiotherapy and targeted drugs require knowledge about the behavior of molecular targets after irradiation. Angiogenic marker expression has been studied after conventional radiotherapy, but little is known about marker response to charged particles. For the very first time, we used molecular ultrasound imaging to intraindividually track changes in angiogenic marker expression after carbon ion irradiation in experimental tumors. Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 and of αvβ3-integrin in subcutaneous AT-1 prostate cancers in rats treated with carbon ions (16 Gy was studied using molecular ultrasound and immunohistochemistry. For this purpose, cyanoacrylate microbubbles were synthesized and linked to specific ligands. The accumulation of targeted microbubbles in tumors was quantified before and 36 hours after irradiation. In addition, tumor vascularization was analyzed using volumetric Doppler ultrasound. In tumors, the accumulation of targeted microbubbles was significantly higher than in nonspecific ones and could be inhibited competitively. Before irradiation, no difference in binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific or ICAM-1-specific microbubbles was observed in treated and untreated animals. After irradiation, however, treated animals showed a significantly higher binding of αvβ3-integrin-specific microbubbles and an enhanced binding of ICAM-1-specific microbubbles than untreated controls. In both groups, a decrease in vascularization occurred during tumor growth, but no significant difference was observed between irradiated and nonirradiated tumors. In conclusion, carbon ion irradiation upregulates ICAM-1 and αvβ3-integrin expression in tumor neovasculature. Molecular ultrasound can indicate the regulation of these markers and thus may help to identify the optimal drugs and time points in individualized therapy regimens.

  12. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... physician during a routine physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty ... vessels or to detect abnormal masses, such as tumors. In an ultrasound examination, a transducer both sends ...

  13. Prognosis in patients with local recurrence after definitive irradiation for prostatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuban, D.A.; el-Mahdi, A.M.; Schellhammer, P.F.

    1989-01-01

    Of 414 patients with Stage A2-C disease, all with a minimum follow-up period of 3 years, who have been definitively irradiated by external beam therapy or iodine-125 (I-125) implantation for biopsy-proven prostatic adenocarcinoma, 83 patients (20%) have experienced local recurrences. The incidence of distant metastasis was significantly higher in patients with local tumor recurrence (56 of 83; 68%), as compared with those with local control (64 of 331; 19%; P less than 0.001). This difference remained significant within each tumor grade and stage. Subsequently, survival in patients with local recurrence was significantly shorter than in those with local tumor control (66% vs. 89% at 5 years; P = 0.001). Of the 83 patients with local tumor recurrence, 56 had local recurrence and distant metastasis, and 27 had local failure alone, with a median follow-up of 76 months for the latter group. Fifteen of 83 patients with local recurrence (18%) developed major complications secondary to local disease. Three of the 83 (4%) patients were known to die of prostatic recurrence alone and another 11 of 83 (13%) as a result of some combination of local and distant disease. Therefore, in reference to the entire group of definitively irradiated patients, only 0.72% expired solely of complications associated with local tumor recurrence and an additional 2.7% expired of a combination of both local and distant disease

  14. Long-term results of ultrasonically guided implantation of 125-I seeds combined with external irradiation in localized prostatic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, P; Rasmussen, F; Holm, H H

    1991-01-01

    Transperineal 125-iodine seed implantation guided by transrectal ultrasonography and subsequent external beam irradiation was employed in the treatment of 32 patients with localized prostatic carcinoma (16 poorly differentiated). Follow-up is currently 35-98 months with a median of 65 months. Dis...

  15. Prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R.; Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results

  16. Prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R., Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results.

  17. Intracavitary irradiation of prostatic carcinoma by a high dose-rate afterloading technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odelberg-Johnson, O.; Underskog, I.; Johansson, J.E.; Bernshaw, D.; Sorbe, B.; Persson, J.E. (Oerebro Medical Center Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology Oerebro Medical Center Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Urology Oerebro Medical Center Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Gynecologic Oncology Oerebro Medical Center Hospital (Sweden). Dept. of Radiation Physics)

    1991-01-01

    A high dose-rate ({sup 60}Co) afterloading technique was evaluated in a series of 73 patients with prostatic carcinoma stages I-IV. The intraurethral irradiation was combined with external pelvic radiotherapy. A minimum total dose of 78 Gy was delivered to the target volume. In a subgroup of patients extramustine (Estracyt) was given as adjuvant chemohormonal therapy during irradiation. The median follow-up for the whole group was 63 months. The crude 5-year survival rate was 60% and the corrected survival rate 90%. Survival was related to the tumor grade. Local pelvic recurrences were recorded in 17.8%. 'Viable cells' in posttherapy aspiration biopsy were not associated with tumor recurrences or survival. Four patients (5%) had grade 3 late radiation reactions with urethral structure or bladder fibrosis. Urinary tract infections and prior transurethral resections were not associated with a higher frequency of reactions. Concurrent estramustine therapy seemed to increase the frequency of both acute and chronic radiation reactions. Local control, recurrence, and survival were not affected by chemohormonal therapy. The use of tomography, magnetic resonance, and ultrasound as aids to computerized dosimetry may improve local dose distribution and reduce the irradiated volume. (orig.).

  18. Ion Prostate Irradiation (IPI) - a pilot study to establish the safety and feasibility of primary hypofractionated irradiation of the prostate with protons and carbon ions in a raster scan technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habl, Gregor; Hatiboglu, Gencay; Edler, Lutz; Uhl, Matthias; Krause, Sonja; Roethke, Matthias; Schlemmer, Heinz P; Hadaschik, Boris; Debus, Juergen; Herfarth, Klaus

    2014-03-19

    Due to physical characteristics, ions like protons or carbon ions can administer the dose to the target volume more efficiently than photons since the dose can be lowered at the surrounding normal tissue. Radiation biological considerations are based on the assumption that the α/β value for prostate cancer cells is 1.5 Gy, so that a biologically more effective dose could be administered due to hypofractionation without increasing risks of late effects of bladder (α/β = 4.0) and rectum (α/β = 3.9). The IPI study is a prospective randomized phase II study exploring the safety and feasibility of primary hypofractionated irradiation of the prostate with protons and carbon ions in a raster scan technique. The study is designed to enroll 92 patients with localized prostate cancer. Primary aim is the assessment of the safety and feasibility of the study treatment on the basis of incidence grade III and IV NCI-CTC-AE (v. 4.02) toxicity and/or the dropout of the patient from the planned therapy due to any reason. Secondary endpoints are PSA-progression free survival (PSA-PFS), overall survival (OS) and quality-of-life (QoL). This pilot study aims at the evaluation of the safety and feasibility of hypofractionated irradiation of the prostate with protons and carbon ions in prostate cancer patients in an active beam technique. Additionally, the safety results will be compared with Japanese results recently published for carbon ion irradiation. Due to the missing data of protons in this hypofractionated scheme, an in depth evaluation of the toxicity will be created to gain basic data for a following comparison study with carbon ion irradiation. Clinical Trial Identifier: NCT01641185 (clinicaltrials.gov).

  19. Microinterferometer transducer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steger, P.J.

    1978-01-01

    An air-bearing microinterferometer transducer is being developed to provide for increased accuracy, range, and linearity over conventional linear variable differential transformer (LVDT) transducers. The conventional LVDT's are used on multiple-probe sweep gauges to measure deviation from true surfaces of revolution. These LVDT transducers are null devices, and their high accuracy deteriorates rapidly as they move from zero setting. It is desirable to have a transducer with extended range to measure parts that deviate from conventional paths. The length-measuring interferometer is a well-established inspection device. However, constructing a microinterferometer that will fit inside a conventional 1/2-in. o.d transducer housing is a formidable task. Departure from the conventional interferometer construction is required. It will be necessary to transmit the laser beam into the microinterferometer with a self-focusing fiber optic cable. Miniature glassware has been obtained and a microinterferometer constructed inside a 0.315-in. i.d transducer. Fringes have been obtained by directing a laser beam into the transducer housing

  20. Carbon ion irradiation of the human prostate cancer cell line PC3: A whole genome microarray study

    Science.gov (United States)

    SUETENS, ANNELIES; MOREELS, MARJAN; QUINTENS, ROEL; CHIRIOTTI, SABINA; TABURY, KEVIN; MICHAUX, ARLETTE; GRÉGOIRE, VINCENT; BAATOUT, SARAH

    2014-01-01

    Hadrontherapy is a form of external radiation therapy, which uses beams of charged particles such as carbon ions. Compared to conventional radiotherapy with photons, the main advantage of carbon ion therapy is the precise dose localization along with an increased biological effectiveness. The first results obtained from prostate cancer patients treated with carbon ion therapy showed good local tumor control and survival rates. In view of this advanced treatment modality we investigated the effects of irradiation with different beam qualities on gene expression changes in the PC3 prostate adenocarcinoma cell line. For this purpose, PC3 cells were irradiated with various doses (0.0, 0.5 and 2.0 Gy) of carbon ions (LET=33.7 keV/μm) at the beam of the Grand Accélérateur National d’Ions Lourds (Caen, France). Comparative experiments with X-rays were performed at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre. Genome-wide gene expression was analyzed using microarrays. Our results show a downregulation in many genes involved in cell cycle and cell organization processes after 2.0 Gy irradiation. This effect was more pronounced after carbon ion irradiation compared with X-rays. Furthermore, we found a significant downregulation of many genes related to cell motility. Several of these changes were confirmed using qPCR. In addition, recurrence-free survival analysis of prostate cancer patients based on one of these motility genes (FN1) revealed that patients with low expression levels had a prolonged recurrence-free survival time, indicating that this gene may be a potential prognostic biomarker for prostate cancer. Understanding how different radiation qualities affect the cellular behavior of prostate cancer cells is important to improve the clinical outcome of cancer radiation therapy. PMID:24504141

  1. 18F-fluorocholine PET-guided target volume delineation techniques for partial prostate re-irradiation in local recurrent prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Vees, Hansjörg; Miralbell, Raymond; Wissmeyer, Michael; Steiner, Charles; Ratib, Osman; Senthamizhchelvan, Srinivasan; Zaidi, Habib

    2009-11-01

    We evaluate the contribution of (18)F-choline PET/CT in the delineation of gross tumour volume (GTV) in local recurrent prostate cancer after initial irradiation using various PET image segmentation techniques. Seventeen patients with local-only recurrent prostate cancer (median=5.7 years) after initial irradiation were included in the study. Rebiopsies were performed in 10 patients that confirmed the local recurrence. Following injection of 300 MBq of (18)F-fluorocholine, dynamic PET frames (3 min each) were reconstructed from the list-mode acquisition. Five PET image segmentation techniques were used to delineate the (18)F-choline-based GTVs. These included manual delineation of contours (GTV(man)) by two teams consisting of a radiation oncologist and a nuclear medicine physician each, a fixed threshold of 40% and 50% of the maximum signal intensity (GTV(40%) and GTV(50%)), signal-to-background ratio-based adaptive thresholding (GTV(SBR)), and a region growing (GTV(RG)) algorithm. Geographic mismatches between the GTVs were also assessed using overlap analysis. Inter-observer variability for manual delineation of GTVs was high but not statistically significant (p=0.459). In addition, the volumes and shapes of GTVs delineated using semi-automated techniques were significantly higher than those of GTVs defined manually. Semi-automated segmentation techniques for (18)F-choline PET-guided GTV delineation resulted in substantially higher GTVs compared to manual delineation and might replace the latter for determination of recurrent prostate cancer for partial prostate re-irradiation. The selection of the most appropriate segmentation algorithm still needs to be determined.

  2. Coaxial Transducer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ruffa, Anthony A

    2008-01-01

    The invention as disclosed is of a coaxial transducer that uses lead zirconate titanate ceramic or other suitable material as an isolator between the conductors in a coaxial cable to transmit acoustic...

  3. Cell Survival and DNA Damage in Normal Prostate Cells Irradiated Out-of-Field.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shields, L

    2014-10-31

    Interest in out-of-field radiation dose has been increasing with the introduction of new techniques, such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). These new techniques offer superior conformity of high-dose regions to the target compared to conventional techniques, however more normal tissue is exposed to low-dose radiation with VMAT. There is a potential increase in radiobiological effectiveness associated with lower energy photons delivered during VMAT as normal cells are exposed to a temporal change in incident photon energy spectrum. During VMAT deliveries, normal cells can be exposed to the primary radiation beam, as well as to transmission and scatter radiation. The impact of low-dose radiation, radiation-induced bystander effect and change in energy spectrum on normal cells are not well understood. The current study examined cell survival and DNA damage in normal prostate cells after exposure to out-of-field radiation both with and without the transfer of bystander factors. The effect of a change in energy spectrum out-of-field compared to in-field was also investigated. Prostate cancer (LNCaP) and normal prostate (PNT1A) cells were placed in-field and out-of-field, respectively, with the PNT1A cells being located 1 cm from the field edge when in-field cells were being irradiated with 2 Gy. Clonogenic and γ-H2AX assays were performed postirradiation to examine cell survival and DNA damage. The assays were repeated when bystander factors from the LNCaP cells were transferred to the PNT1A cells and also when the PNT1A cells were irradiated in-field to a different energy spectrum. An average out-of-field dose of 10.8 ± 4.2 cGy produced a significant reduction in colony volume and increase in the number of γ-H2AX foci\\/cell in the PNT1A cells compared to the sham-irradiated control cells. An adaptive response was observed in the PNT1A cells having first received a low out-of-field dose and then the bystander factors. The PNT1A cells showed a significant

  4. The combined treatment of prostate cancer (stage C) with definitive megavoltage irradiation and fast neutrons (DT, 14 MeV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franke, H.D.; Hess, A.; Langendorff, G.; Borchers, H.D.

    1980-01-01

    We treated between 1977 and 1979 patients with low differentiated prostate cancer stage C with megavoltage irradiation (42 MeV-X-rays) in the whole pelvis, including the prostate, up to 30-45 Gy/3-4,5 weeks; thereafter we irradiated a boost on the primary with 6-8 isocentric fields of fast neutrons up to 3,9-8,4 Gy/1-2 weeks. The 13 treated patients had all clinically complete regression of the tumor, they are without local recidive since 9-43 months. Biopsies of 3 patients are morphologic free of tumor cells already 8-12 months after irradiation. Distant metastases occurred in 3 patients: 2 are living since 16 and 43 months, 1 died after 24 months. All patients are free of serious chronic side effects at bladder and rectum, only 1 lives with a slight proctitis after therapy with only 2 opposing fields. The 14th patient is treated on behalf of a local recidive after prostatectomy (anaplastic prostate cancer) and a big pararectal metastasis; we irradiated the whole pelvis with fast neutrons up to a dose of 15,3 Gy/4 weeks (total dose, n + γ): The patient is free of pains since 9 months and without tumor in computer tomography, and free of serious chronic complications. (orig./MG) [de

  5. Impact of the adaptor protein GIPC1/Synectin on radioresistance and survival after irradiation of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, A. [University Hospital Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Deuse, Y.; Koch, U. [University Hospital Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; OncoRay National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology (Germany)] [and others

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: Studies have shown that GIPC1/Synectin is an essential adaptor protein of receptors that play an important role in cancer progression and therapy resistance. This is the first study to explore the role of GIPC1/Synectin in radioresistance of prostate cancer and as a possible predictive marker for outcome of primary radiation therapy. Materials and methods: The effect of RNA interference-mediated GIPC1/Synectin depletion on clonogenic cell survival after irradiation with 0, 2, 4, or 6 Gy was assayed in two different GIPC1/Synectin-expressing human prostate cancer cell lines. The clinical outcome data of 358 men who underwent radiotherapy of prostate cancer with a curative intention were analyzed retrospectively. Uni- and multivariate analysis was performed of prostate-specific antigen recurrence-free survival and overall survival in correlation with protein expression in pretreatment biopsy specimens. Protein expression was evaluated by standard immunohistochemistry methods. Results: In cell culture experiments, no change was detected in radiosensitivity after depletion of GIPC1/Synectin in GIPC1/Synectin-expressing prostate cancer cell lines. Furthermore, there was no correlation between GIPC1/Synectin expression in human pretreatment biopsy samples and overall or biochemical recurrence-free survival after radiotherapy in a retrospective analysis of the study cohort. Conclusion: Our results do not show a predictive or prognostic function of GIPC1/Synectin expression for the outcome of radiotherapy in prostate cancer. Furthermore, our in vitro results do not support a role of GIPC1 in the cellular radiation response. However, the role of GIPC1 in the progression of prostate cancer and its precursors should be subject to further research. (orig.)

  6. Transducer fundamentals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regtien, Paulus P.L.; Sydenham, Peter H.; Thorn, Richard

    2005-01-01

    A transducer is an essential part of any information process- ing system that operates in more than one physical domain. These domains are characterized by the type of quantity that provides the carrier of the relevant information. Exam- ples are the optical, electrical, mechanical, and magnetic

  7. Therapeutic results and prognostic factors after irradiation of loco-regional prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debrigode, C.; Dubois, J.; Hay, H.M.; Astre, C.; Savu, N.M.

    1994-01-01

    The present study concerns 140 patients with loco-regional prostatic cancer, treated with external beam irradiation at the CRLC Val-d'Aurelle in Montpellier, France, between 1982 and 1988, with a minimum of 54 months follow-up. The local control after radiotherapy is 78.6%, all stages and histological grades combined. The median overall survival is 114 months and the median disease-free survival 59 months. The most frequent modality of treatment failure is metastatic disease, isolated (32.8%) or combined to local relapse (10%). The rate of urinary intolerance symptoms during treatment was 87.1 and 80.6% for the digestive ones. The late urinary complications and sequellae rate was 21.4% for the cystitis-type and 12.9% for post-radiotherapy urethral structures; the latter has imposed in 2/3 of cases one or more trans-urethral resections that never showed pathological signs of recurrence. Digestive complications and sequellae occurred in 31.3% of the patients; in the latter group there were two internal digestive fistulae which needed surgical treatment and three postradiotherapeutic stenosis of the anal canal. The prognostic factors revealed by statistical analysis are clinical stage, pathological grade for overall and disease-free survival, age for overall survival and trans-urethral resection for disease-free survival, the latter being equally a risk factor for cystitis-type complications and urethral structures. (authors). 26 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs

  8. Anatomical and clinical predictors of acute bowel toxicity in whole pelvis irradiation for prostate cancer with Tomotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longobardi, Barbara; Berardi, Genoveffa; Fiorino, Claudio; Alongi, Filippo; Cozzarini, Cesare; Deli, Aniko; La Macchia, Mariangela; Perna, Lucia; Di Muzio, Nadia Gisella; Calandrino, Riccardo

    2011-12-01

    Assessing predictors of acute bowel toxicity after whole-pelvis irradiation (WPRT) Image-guided Tomotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost on prostate/prostate bed. In the period March 2005-April 2009, 178 patients were treated with radical or adjuvant/salvage intent with WPRT Tomotherapy. Median dose to the pelvic nodes was 51.8 Gy/28 fractions while concomitantly delivering 65.5-74.2 Gy to prostate/prostatic bed. The impact of many anatomical and clinical parameters on ≥ Grade 2 acute bowel toxicity was investigated by logistic analyses. Only 15/178 patients (8.4%) experienced Grade 2 toxicity (none Grade 3). Main predictors at univariate analysis were nodal CTV (CTVN ≥ 380 cc; OR: 3.7, p=0.017), treatment duration (bowel toxicity after WPRT Tomotherapy is mild, relatively rare and associated to larger CTVN and older age. While efforts to further reduce it do not appear to be relevant, the pre-treatment assessment of "high-risk" patients may help physicians in better managing symptoms. A prospective validation would be very important in confirming these results and in better refining dose-volume bowel effects including symptoms milder that the ones here investigated and retrospectively assessed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Irradiation of the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes with an adaptive algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, A. B.; Chen, J.; Nguyen, T. B.; Gottschalk, A. G.; Roach, M. R. III; Pouliot, J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The simultaneous treatment of pelvic lymph nodes and the prostate in radiotherapy for prostate cancer is complicated by the independent motion of these two target volumes. In this work, the authors study a method to adapt intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment plans so as to compensate for this motion by adaptively morphing the multileaf collimator apertures and adjusting the segment weights. Methods: The study used CT images, tumor volumes, and normal tissue contours from patients treated in our institution. An IMRT treatment plan was then created using direct aperture optimization to deliver 45 Gy to the pelvic lymph nodes and 50 Gy to the prostate and seminal vesicles. The prostate target volume was then shifted in either the anterior-posterior direction or in the superior-inferior direction. The treatment plan was adapted by adjusting the aperture shapes with or without re-optimizing the segment weighting. The dose to the target volumes was then determined for the adapted plan. Results: Without compensation for prostate motion, 1 cm shifts of the prostate resulted in an average decrease of 14% in D-95%. If the isocenter is simply shifted to match the prostate motion, the prostate receives the correct dose but the pelvic lymph nodes are underdosed by 14% ± 6%. The use of adaptive morphing (with or without segment weight optimization) reduces the average change in D-95% to less than 5% for both the pelvic lymph nodes and the prostate. Conclusions: Adaptive morphing with and without segment weight optimization can be used to compensate for the independent motion of the prostate and lymph nodes when combined with daily imaging or other methods to track the prostate motion. This method allows the delivery of the correct dose to both the prostate and lymph nodes with only small changes to the dose delivered to the target volumes.

  10. Adjuvant and salvage therapy following radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer: effect of combined transient androgen deprivation and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eulau, Stephen M.; Tate, David J.; Cox, Richard S.; Bagshaw, Malcolm A.; Hancock, Steven L.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant and salvage irradiation have been shown to improve local control after radical prostatectomy for prostatic cancer in patients with high risk pathologic features, rising PSA, or evidence of local failure. Transient androgen deprivation combined with primary irradiation has resulted in improved local control and biochemical disease free survival in patients with locally advanced, unresected, prostate cancer. This retrospective study evaluates whether transient androgen blockade improves the outcome from post-prostatectomy irradiation given as either adjuvant or salvage therapy. Methods: From August, 1985 to December, 1995, 105 patients were treated with radiotherapy to the prostatic fossa following radical prostatectomy for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. No patient had clinically or radiographically evident distant disease. Median follow-up was 4.6 years from the date of surgery and 3.2 years from completion of radiotherapy. Findings at prostatectomy included capsular penetration in 38 patients, seminal vesicle involvement in 42 patients, lymph node involvement in 15 patients, and positive surgical margins in 70 patients. Treatment was administered as adjuvant therapy for high risk pathologic features in 39 patients, for persistent or rising PSA in 52 patients, or for clinically evident local recurrence in 14 patients. Of the 105 patients, 32 received combined androgen deprivation/radiotherapy and 73 received radiotherapy alone. Both groups received 60-70 Gy in 2 Gy daily fractions to the prostatic fossa. Selected patients with poor prognostic features received pelvic irradiation to a median dose of 50 Gy. Androgen deprivation typically consisted of Lupron and Flutamide for 4 to 6 months before, during, and in selected cases, after irradiation. No patients received maintenance androgen deprivation or underwent orchiectomy. Tumor stage, lymph node status, Gleason sum, and indications for treatment did not differ significantly between the two groups

  11. The impact of race on biochemical outcome in patients receiving irradiation for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nautiyal, Jai; Vaida, Florin; Awan, Azhar; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: African-Americans tend to present with a higher stage and grade prostate cancer than whites and hence previous studies have attempted to delineate the importance of race in outcome with radiotherapy. However, these studies have had limitations including insufficient number of African-American patients, lack of a similar quality of care or uniform treatment policy. In addition, race as a prognostic variable has not been analyzed in regards to PSA based outcome criteria. The current study was performed in order to determine the impact of race on survival and biochemical control in patients with prostate cancer treated at a single center using a standardized radiation protocol. Materials and Methods: Between 1988 and 1995, 455 patients with clinically localized adenocarcinoma of the prostate received external beam irradiation for a median dose of 68 Gy using a four field technique. Of the 455 patients, 211 were African-American and 244 were white. Pretreatment PSA were: 0-4 ng/ml (51), 4-10 ng/ml (129), 10-20 ng/ml (117), > 20 ng/ml (136), unknown (22). Clinical stages were: T1 (108), T2 (238), T3 (99), not available (10). There was no significant difference in pretreatment characteristics (stage, grade and PSA) or radiation dose between the African-American and white group of patients. Median follow-up is 37.8 months. Biochemical failure was defined as two or more consecutive PSA values that are greater than the posttreatment nadir. Race, pretreatment PSA, grade, age, stage and dose were assessed with univariate and multivariate Cox regression analysis as prognostic factors for overall survival and biochemical disease free survival. Results: The 5 year actuarial overall survival (OS) was 79% and biochemical disease free survival (bNED) was 35% for the entire group of patients. There was no significant difference in 5 year OS (71% vs. 85%) (p=0.3) or bNED (26% vs. 40%) (p=0.26) for African-Americans in comparison to whites. Univariate analysis

  12. Positive resection margin and/or pathologic T3 adenocarcinoma of prostate with undetectable postoperative prostate-specific antigen after radical prostatectomy: to irradiate or not?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Richard; Hruby, George; Hong, Julie; Hong, Eugene; DeBoer, Gerrit; Danjoux, Cyril; Morton, Gerard; Klotz, Laurence; Bhak, Edward; Flavin, Aileen

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of postoperative adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for positive resection margin and/or pathologic T3 (pT3) adenocarcinoma of the prostate with undetectable postoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels. Methods and materials: We retrospectively analyzed 125 patients with a positive resection margin and/or pT3 adenocarcinoma of the prostate who had undetectable postoperative serum PSA levels after radical prostatectomy. Seventy-three patients received postoperative adjuvant RT and 52 did not. Follow-up ranged from 1.5 to 12.0 years (median 4.2 for the irradiated group and 4.9 for the nonirradiated group). PSA outcome was available for all patients. Freedom from failure was defined as the maintenance of a serum PSA level of ≤0.2 ng/mL, as well as the absence of clinical local recurrence and distant metastasis. Results: No difference was found in the 5-year actuarial overall survival between the irradiated and nonirradiated group (94% vs. 95%). However, patients receiving adjuvant RT had a statistically superior 5-year actuarial relapse-free rate, including freedom from PSA failure, compared with those treated with surgery alone (88% vs. 65%, p=0.0013). In the irradiated group, 8 patients had relapse with PSA failure alone. None had local or distant recurrence. In the nonirradiated group, 15, 1, and 2 had PSA failure, local recurrence, and distant metastasis, respectively. On Cox regression analysis, pre-radical prostatectomy PSA level and adjuvant RT were statistically significant predictive factors for relapse, and Gleason score, extracapsular invasion, and resection margin status were not. There was a suggestion that seminal vesicle invasion was associated with an increased risk of relapse. The morbidity of postoperative adjuvant RT was acceptable, with only 2 patients developing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3 genitourinary complications. Adjuvant RT had a minimal adverse effect on urinary continence and did not cause

  13. Comparison of megavoltage position verification for prostate irradiation based on bony anatomy and implanted fiducials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederveen, Aart J.; Dehnad, Homan; van der Heide, Uulke A.; van Moorselaar, R. Jeroen A.; Hofman, Pieter; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE: The patient position during radiotherapy treatment of prostate cancer can be verified with the help of portal images acquired during treatment. In this study we quantify the clinical consequences of the use of image-based verification based on the bony anatomy and the prostate target

  14. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of Prostate Ultrasound Imaging? Men who have ...

  15. Defining an outcomes management program for definitive irradiation of prostate cancer: preliminary considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seltzer, Jonathan; Valicenti, Richard K.; Dlutowski, Mark; Corn, Benjamin W.

    1996-01-01

    PURPOSE: The advent of managed medical care presents challenges to health care providers who strive to maintain a high quality of patient care at a reasonable cost. The goals of clinical guidelines and paths are to improve the quality of patient care by using outcomes to redefine the path and to eliminate ineffective steps in the clinical algorithm. The purpose of the current endeavor was to systematically develop a clinical pathway for the radiation therapy of prostate cancer which can serve as 1) a measurement tool of operational variables such as cost and utilization, 2) a treatment tool to measure satisfaction and toxicity, 3) a research framework from which questions of efficacy can be investigated. METHODS: An initial path was constructed by the physicians based on recommendations from consensus conference of the Patterns of Care Study (PCS), and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). The program was initiated by a core group of 2 attending radiation oncologists, a radiation physicist, a clinical nurse specialist, a dosimetrist, a simulation technologist, a treatment technologist, and a medical social worker. These data served as a baseline from which clinical pathway development could begin using the method of Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) as described by Berwick (New Engl J Med 320: 53, 1989). Following the creation of a draft path, the document was circulated to other staff members of the team. Simultaneously, the Clinical Financial Management System (Transition Systems Incorporated, Boston, MA) was applied to departmental and institutional records to determine treatment patterns, utilization, toxicity, and cost for prostate cancer patients irradiated between July 1, 1995 and December 31, 1995. The aforementioned staff team as well as a seven person patient group were queried by a CQI facilitator to identify process and quality factors to be included in the clinical path. RESULTS: During the period of study, 51 patients were definitively

  16. Dosimetric evaluation of three adaptive strategies for prostate cancer treatment including pelvic lymph nodes irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantin, Audrey; Gingras, Luc; Archambault, Louis, E-mail: louis.archambault@phy.ulaval.ca [Département de Physique, de génie Physique et d’optique et Centre de Recherche sur le Cancer, Université Laval, Québec, Québec G1V 0A6, Canada and Département de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec—Université Laval, 11 côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Lachance, Bernard; Foster, William [Département de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec—Université Laval, 11 côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6 (Canada); Goudreault, Julie [Département de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec, CHU de Québec—Université Laval, 11 côte du Palais, Québec, Québec G1R 2J6, Canada and Département de Radio-Oncologie, CSSS de Gatineau–Hôpital de Gatineau, 909 Boulevard La Vérendrye, Gatineau, Québec J8P 7H2 (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: The movements of the prostate relative to the pelvic lymph nodes during intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment can limit margin reduction and affect the protection of the organs at risk (OAR). In this study, the authors performed an analysis of three adaptive treatment strategies that combine information from both bony and gold marker registrations. The robustness of those treatments against the interfraction prostate movements was evaluated. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted on five prostate cancer patients with 7–13 daily cone-beam CTs (CBCTs). The clinical target volumes (CTVs) consisting of pelvic lymph nodes, prostate, and seminal vesicles as well as the OARs were delineated on each CBCT and the initial CT. Three adaptive strategies were analyzed. Two of these methods relied on a two-step patient positioning at each fraction. First step: a bony registration was used to deliver the nodal CTV prescription. Second step: a gold marker registration was then used either to (1) complete the dose delivered to the prostate (complement); (2) or give almost the entire prescription to the prostate with a weak dose gradient between the targets to compensate for possible motions (gradient). The third method (COR) used a pool of precalculated plans based on images acquired at previous treatment fractions. At each new fraction, a plan is selected from that pool based on the daily position of prostate center-of-mass. The dosimetric comparison was conducted and results are presented with and without the systematic shift in the prostate position on the CT planning. The adaptive strategies were compared to the current clinical standard where all fractions are treated with the initial nonadaptive plan. Results: The minimum daily prostate D{sub 95%} is improved by 2%, 9%, and 6% for the complement, the gradient, and the COR approaches, respectively, compared to the nonadaptive method. The average nodal CTV D{sub 95%} remains constant across the

  17. In vitro co-culture experiments on prostate cancer and small intestine cells irradiated with carbon ions and x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neubeck, C. von; Weyrather, W.-K.; Durante, M.

    2009-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) delivers the dose in many small irradiation fields of different beam direction to achieve a 3 dimensional tumour conformal dose overlapping with a maximum of normal tissue protection. In 2006 a study was started at GSI to treat prostate cancer patients with a boost irradiation of carbon ions in combination with an IMRT treatment administered at the Uniklinikum Heidelberg. The carbon ions are delivered in two opposing fields. So IMRT irradiation includes more normal tissue than carbon ion treatment but even here parts of the rectum and the bladder are in the irradiated field. This raises the question whether the irradiated tumor cells influence the normal cells (irradiated/ unirradiated) but also whether the normal irradiated cells influences normal tissue in a different way for carbon and photon irradiation. To study this problem, we established an in vitro co-culture model of prostate cancer and small intestine cells of the rat to simulate the patient treatment situation for analyzing tissue reaction exemplary. For characterization of the cells lines the parameters alpha and beta (linear quadratic model) for clonogenic survival were determined for x-rays and for carbon ions of different energies. For co-culture experiments unirradiated and irradiated cells were seeded together and the survival was analyzed

  18. Assessing the variability of outcome for patients treated with localized prostate irradiation using different definitions of biochemical control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, Eric M.; Vicini, Frank A.; Ziaja, Ellen L.; Gonzalez, Jose; Dmuchowski, Carl F.; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Brabbins, Donald S.; Hollander, Jay; Chen, Peter Y.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Biochemical control using serial posttreatment serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels is being increasingly used to assess treatment efficacy for localized prostate cancer. However, no standardized definition of biochemical control has been established. We reviewed our experience treating patients with localized prostate cancer and applied three different commonly used definitions of biochemical control to determine if differences in therapeutic outcome would be observed. Methods and Materials: Between January 1987 and December 1991, 480 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer received external beam irradiation (RT) using localized prostate fields at William Beaumont Hospital. The median dose to the prostate was 66.6 Gy (range 58-70.4) using a four-field or arc technique. Pretreatment and posttreatment serum PSA levels were recorded. Over 86% (414 of 480) of patients had a pretreatment PSA level available. Three different definitions of biochemical control were used: (a) PSA nadir 20), and 5-year actuarial rates of biochemical control were calculated using the three biochemical control and one clinical local control definitions. For Group 1, 5-year actuarial rates of biochemical control were 84%, 90%, and 96% for Definitions 1-3 and clinical local control, respectively. For Group 2, 5-year actuarial control rates were 45%, 54%, 74%, and 92% for the four definitions, respectively. For Group 3, 5-year actuarial control rates were 26%, 31%, 63%, and 100% for the four definitions, respectively. For Group 4, 5-year actuarial control rates were 24%, 24%, 50%, and 100% for the four definitions, respectively. Finally, for Group 5, 5-year actuarial control rates were 5%, 14%, 15%, and 89% for the four definitions, respectively. Depending on the definition used, statistically significant differences overall in outcome rates were observed. Differences between all four definitions for all pairwise comparisons ranged from 5 to 53% (p < 0

  19. HDR monotherapy for prostate cancer: A simulation study to determine the effect of catheter displacement on target coverage and normal tissue irradiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.-K.K. Kolkman-Deurloo (Inger-Karina); M.A. Roos (Martin); S. Aluwini (Shafak)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: The aim of this study was to systematically analyse the effect of catheter displacements both on target coverage and normal tissue irradiation in fractionated high dose rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy, using a simulation study, and to define tolerances for catheter

  20. A prospective three-dimensional analysis about the impact of differences in the clinical target volume in prostate cancer irradiation on normal-tissue exposure. A potential for increasing the benefit/risk ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hille, A.; Toews, N.; Schmidberger, H.; Hess, C.F.

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: rectal toxicity following external-beam irradiation of prostate cancer correlates with the exposed percentage of rectal volume. Recently, it has been recommended to reduce the volume of the seminal vesicles that should be included in the clinical target volume (CTV). The purpose of this study was to quantitatively assess the impact of this CTV reduction on the expected rectal and bladder dose sparing. Patients and methods: 14 patients with localized prostate cancer undergoing external-beam radiotherapy were investigated. The prostate, the prostate + entire seminal vesicles, or the prostate + proximal seminal vesicles were delineated as CTV. Treatment plans were generated and compared concerning rectum and bladder dose-volume histograms (DVHs). Results: the exposure of rectum and bladder volume was significantly lower in case of irradiation of the prostate only compared to inclusion of the proximal or entire seminal vesicles into the CTV. The reduction of the CTV from prostate + entire seminal vesicles to prostate + proximal seminal vesicles led to a significant reduction of the rectal and bladder dose exposure. Conclusion: reduction of the CTV to the prostate only, or to the prostate + proximal seminal vesicles led to significant rectal and bladder dose sparing compared to irradiation of the prostate + entire seminal vesicles. In patients with a higher risk for seminal vesicles involvement, irradiation of the prostate + proximal seminal vesicles should be preferred. In case of a need for irradiation of the entire seminal vesicles, patients should be informed about a higher risk for chronic rectal toxicity and, possibly, for bladder complications. (orig.)

  1. Thermoacoustic imaging of prostate cancer: comparison to histology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patch, S. K.; Griep, S. K.; Jacobsohn, K.; See, W. A.; Hull, D.

    2014-03-01

    Ex vivo imaging of fresh prostate specimens was performed to test the hypothesis that the thermoacoustic (TA) contrast mechanism generated with very high frequency electromagnetic (EM) irradiation is sensitive to prostate cancer. Ex vivo imaging was performed immediately after radical prostatectomy, performed as part of normal care. Irradiation pulsewidth was 700 ns and duty cycle was extremely low. Typical specific absorption rate (SAR) throughout the prostate was 70-90 kW/kg during pulsing, but time-averaged SAR was below 2 W/kg. TA pressure pulses generated by rapid heating due to EM energy deposition were detected using single element transducers. 15g/L glycine powder mixed into DI water served as acoustic couplant, which was chilled to prevent autolysis. Spatial encoding was performed by scanning in tomographic "step-and-shoot" mode, with 3 mm translation between slices and 1.8-degree rotation between tomographic views. Histology slides for 3 cases scanned with 2.25 MHz transducers were marked for comparison to TA reconstructions. These three cases showed little, moderate, and severe involvement in the histology levels surrounding the verumontanum. TA signal strength decreased with percent cancerous involvement. When VHF is used for tissue heating, the TA contrast mechanism is driven by ionic content and we observed suppressed TA signal from diseased prostate tissue in the peripheral zone. For the 45 regions of interest analyzed, a reconstruction value of 0.4 mV provides 100% sensitivity but only 29% specificity.

  2. Prophylactic irradiation of the male mammary gland - prevention of gynaecomastia as caused by endocrine treatment of carcinomas of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggerath, E.M.

    1983-01-01

    During the period between 1975 and 1980 bilateral irradiation of the mammary glands was carried out in a total of 72 bearers of carcinomas of the prostate that had previously been confirmed on a histological basis. In no less than 35 (90%) out of the 39 patients where radiotherapy was started prior to the beginning of endocrine treatment the follow-up checks revealed a prevention or suppression of gynaecomastia as a result of radiation. The effectiveness of this treatment is described in the literature as being in the order 81% and its beneficial influences are confirmed by the data of our study. If gynaecomastia has already become established, radiotherapy holds out little promise of success and a relief of the associated discomfort is the best to be expected here. (orig./MG) [de

  3. Efficacy of modest dose irradiation in combination with long-term endocrinal treatment for high-risk prostate cancer. A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Tomonari; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki

    2004-01-01

    Although radiotherapy in combination with endocrinal manipulation has been identified as an effective treatment for patients with high-risk prostate cancer, the optimal dose for locoregional control of prostate cancer in combination with hormonal therapy has not yet been determined. The efficacy of modest doses of irradiation (60-62 Gy) combined with long-term endocrinal treatment for patients with high-risk prostate cancer (defined as a pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level greater than 20 ng/ml or a Gleason's score of 8-10 or T3-T4 disease) was analyzed in 60 Japanese patients. The patients included in this study had received radical radiotherapy with long-term endocrinal manipulation in the period between 1993 and 2000. The median age of the patients was 70 years (range, 56-83). Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy with a median duration of 3.9 months was performed prior to radiotherapy, and hormonal therapy was continued until recurrence. A median dose of 61.4 Gy (range, 44-71.4) was delivered to the prostate. Pelvic node irradiation was performed in 49 patients (81.6%). After a median follow-up period of 28.5 months, the overall survival, cause-specific survival and biochemical relapse-free survival at 3 years were 94.4%, 96% and 89.8%, respectively. Local failure was observed in one patient, distant metastases were observed in three patients and a late toxic effect greater than Grade 2 was not observed in any patients. This study, though preliminary due to a short-term follow-up period, reveals the possibility that modest doses of irradiation combined with long-term endocrinal treatment could be an effective means of achieving excellent local control of high-risk prostate cancer. (author)

  4. Radical prostatectomy and postoperative irradiation in patients with pathological stage C (T3) carcinoma of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovich, Zbigniew; Lieskovsky, Gary; Langholz, Bryan; Formenti, Silvia; Baert, Luc; Streeter, Oscar; Skinner, Donald G.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Adenocarcinoma of the prostate is the most common human cancer of internal organs. Radical surgery is regarded by many to be the treatment of choice for capsule confined disease. Since accurate preoperative assessment of tumor stage is difficult to define, many patients are subsequently found to have pathological stage C (T3) disease. These patients should be considered for adjuvant radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: A group of 201 PS C (T3) unselected patients, treated with radical prostatectomy and limited pelvic lymphadenectomy, received postoperative irradiation to the prostate bed. This radiotherapy was given between 42-90 days after surgery and consisted of a median dose of 48 Gy. Patient survival, disease free survival, time to clinical and chemical relapse and the incidence of local and systemic relapse were analyzed. The influence of multiple parameters on the treatment outcome including patient age, treatment period, clinical stage, pathological stage, Gleason's score, prostate specific antigen (PSA), radiotherapy techniques and radiation dose were examined using univariate and multivariate analysis. Follow-up ranged from 3 to 15 years, with a median of 5 years. Results: The overall 5- and 10-year actuarial survival was 92% and 83% (median > 10 years), respectively and the 5- and 10-year disease-free survival (clinical and PSA) was 67% and 53% (median > 10 years), respectively. A total of 61 (30%) patients had a recurrence, including 23 (11%) patients who had clinical and 38 (19%) who had PSA recurrence. Of the 23 patients with clinical recurrence, 10 (5%) had local recurrence, including two patients who had local and systemic recurrence. Pathological stage and Gleason's score were independently predictive of recurrence (each with p 25 ng/ml) was also an important independent factor predicting tumor recurrence, p = 0.05. All other investigated parameters were not significant in predicting tumor recurrence. This treatment program was very well

  5. Associations between volume changes and spatial dose metrics for the urinary bladder during local versus pelvic irradiation for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casares-Magaz, Oscar; Moiseenko, Vitali; Hopper, Austin; Pettersson, Niclas Johan; Thor, Maria; Knopp, Rick; Deasy, Joseph O; Muren, Ludvig Paul; Einck, John

    2017-06-01

    Inter-fractional variation in urinary bladder volumes during the course of radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer causes deviations between planned and delivered doses. This study compared planned versus daily cone-beam CT (CBCT)-based spatial bladder dose distributions, for prostate cancer patients receiving local prostate treatment (local treatment) versus prostate including pelvic lymph node irradiation (pelvic treatment). Twenty-seven patients (N = 15 local treatment; N = 12 pelvic treatment) were treated using daily image-guided RT (1.8 Gy@43-45 fx), adhering to a full bladder/empty rectum protocol. For each patient, 9-10 CBCTs were registered to the planning CT, using the clinically applied translations. The urinary bladder was manually segmented on each CBCT, 3 mm inner shells were generated, and semi and quadrant sectors were created using axial/coronal cuts. Planned and delivered DVH metrics were compared across patients and between the two groups of treatment (t-test, p bladder volume variations and the dose-volume histograms (DVH) of the bladder and its sectors were evaluated (Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, r s ). Bladder volumes varied considerably during RT (coefficient of variation: 16-58%). The population-averaged planned and delivered DVH metrics were not significantly different at any dose level. Larger treatment bladder volumes resulted in increased absolute volume of the posterior/inferior bladder sector receiving intermediate-high doses, in both groups. The superior bladder sector received less dose with larger bladder volumes for local treatments (r s  ± SD: -0.47 ± 0.32), but larger doses for pelvic treatments (r s  ± SD: 0.74 ± 0.24). Substantial bladder volume changes during the treatment course occurred even though patients were treated under a full bladder/daily image-guided protocol. Larger bladder volumes resulted in less bladder wall spared at the posterior-inferior sector, regardless the

  6. Is There a Role for Pelvic Irradiation in Localized Prostate Adenocarcinoma? Update of the Long-Term Survival Results of the GETUG-01 Randomized Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pommier, Pascal, E-mail: Pascal.pommier@lyon.unicancer.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Léon Bérard, Lyon (France); Chabaud, Sylvie [Department of Clinical Research and Innovation, Centre Léon Bérard, Lyon (France); Lagrange, Jean-Leon [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire H. Mondor, Créteil (France); Richaud, Pierre [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Bergognié, Bordeaux (France); Le Prise, Elisabeth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Eugène Marquis, Rennes (France); Wagner, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Andrée Dutreix, Dunkerque (France); Azria, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut de Cancérologie de Montpellier, Montpellier (France); Beckendorf, Veronique [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut de Cancérologie de Lorraine, Nancy (France); Suchaud, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier de Roanne, Roanne (France); Bernier, Valerie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Oscar Lambret, Lille (France); Perol, David [Department of Clinical Research and Innovation, Centre Léon Bérard, Lyon (France); Carrie, Christian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Léon Bérard, Lyon (France)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To report the long-term results of the French Genitourinary Study Group (GETUG)-01 study in terms of event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) and assess the potential interaction between hormonotherapy and pelvic nodes irradiation. Patients and Methods: Between December 1998 and June 2004, 446 patients with T1b-T3, N0pNx, M0 prostate carcinoma were randomly assigned to either pelvic nodes and prostate or prostate-only radiation therapy. Patients were stratified into 2 groups: “low risk” (T1-T2 and Gleason score 6 and prostate-specific antigen <3× the upper normal limit of the laboratory) (92 patients) versus “high risk” (T3 or Gleason score >6 or prostate-specific antigen >3× the upper normal limit of the laboratory). Short-term 6-month neoadjuvant and concomitant hormonal therapy was allowed only for high-risk patients. Radiation therapy was delivered with a 3-dimensional conformal technique, using a 4-field technique for the pelvic volume (46 Gy). The total dose recommended to the prostate moved from 66 Gy to 70 Gy during the course of the study. Criteria for EFS included biologic prostate-specific antigen recurrences and/or a local or metastatic progression. Results: With a median follow-up of 11.4 years, the 10-year OS and EFS were similar in the 2 treatment arms. A higher but nonsignificant EFS was observed in the low-risk subgroup in favor of pelvic nodes radiation therapy (77.2% vs 62.5%; P=.18). A post hoc subgroup analysis showed a significant benefit of pelvic irradiation when the risk of lymph node involvement was <15% (Roach formula). This benefit seemed to be limited to patients who did not receive hormonal therapy. Conclusion: Pelvic nodes irradiation did not statistically improve EFS or OS in the whole population but may be beneficial in selected low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated with exclusive radiation therapy.

  7. Radiosensitivity of Prostate Cancer Cell Lines for Irradiation from Beta Particle-emitting Radionuclide ¹⁷⁷Lu Compared to Alpha Particles and Gamma Rays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgqvist, Jörgen; Timmermand, Oskar Vilhelmsson; Larsson, Erik; Strand, Sven-Erik

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the radiosensitivity of the prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP, DU145, and PC3 when irradiated with beta particles emitted from (177)Lu, and to compare the effect with irradiation using alpha particles or gamma rays. Cells were irradiated with beta particles emitted from (177)Lu, alpha particles from (241)Am, or gamma rays from (137)Cs. A non-specific polyclonal antibody was labeled with (177)Lu and used to irradiate cells in suspension with beta particles. A previously described in-house developed alpha-particle irradiator based on a (241)Am source was used to irradiate cells with alpha particles. External gamma-ray irradiation was achieved using a standard (137)Cs irradiator. Cells were irradiated to absorbed doses equal to 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, or 10 Gy. The absorbed doses were calculated as mean absorbed doses. For evaluation of cell survival, the tetrazolium-based WST-1 assay was used. After irradiation, WST-1 was added to the cell solutions, incubated, and then measured for level of absorbance at 450 nm, indicating the live and viable cells. LNCaP, DU145, and PC3 cell lines all had similar patterns of survival for the different radiation types. No significant difference in surviving fractions were observed between cells treated with beta-particle and gamma-ray irradiation, represented for example by the surviving fraction values (mean±SD) at 2, 6, and 10 Gy (SF2, SF6, and SF10) for DU145 after beta-particle irradiation: 0.700±0.090, 0.186±0.050 and 0.056±0.010, respectively. A strong radiosensitivity to alpha particles was observed, with SF2 values of 0.048±0.008, 0.018±0.006 and 0.015±0.005 for LNCaP, DU145, and PC3, respectively. The surviving fractions after irradiation using beta particles or gamma rays did not differ significantly at the absorbed dose levels and dose rates used. Irradiation using alpha particles led to a high level of cell killing. The results show that the beta-particle emitter

  8. Coalgebraising subsequential transducers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.H. Hansen (Helle); J. Adamek; C.A. Kupke (Clemens)

    2008-01-01

    htmlabstractSubsequential transducers generalise both classic deterministic automata and Mealy/Moore type state machines by combining (input) language recognition with transduction. In this paper we show that normalisation and taking differentials of subsequential transducers and their underlying

  9. Coalgebraising Subsequential Transducers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, H.H.

    2008-01-01

    Subsequential transducers generalise both classic deterministic automata and Mealy/Moore type state machines by combining (input) language recognition with transduction. In this paper we show that normalisation and taking differentials of subsequential transducers and their underlying structures can

  10. Investigation of normal tissue complication probabilities in prostate and partial breast irradiation radiotherapy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezak, E.; Takam, R.; Bensaleh, S.; Yeoh, E.; Marcu, L.

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Normal- Tissue-Complication Probabilities of rectum, bladder and urethra following various radiation techniques for prostate cancer were evaluated using the relative-seriality and Lyman models. NTCPs of lungs, heart and skin, their dependence on sourceposition, balloon-deformation were also investigated for HDR mammosite brachytherapy. The prostate treatment techniques included external three dimentional conformal-radiotherapy, Low-Dose-Rate brachytherapy (1-125), High-Dose-Rate brachytherapy (Ir-I92). Dose- Volume-Histograms of critical structures for prostate and breast radiotherapy, retrieved from corresponding treatment planning systems, were converted to Biological Effective Dose (BEffD)-based and Equivalent Dose(Deq)-based DVHs to account for differences in radiation delivery and fractionation schedule. Literature-based model parameters were used to calculate NTCPs. Hypofractionated 3D-CRT (2.75 Gy/fraction, total dose 55 Gy) NTCPs of rectum, bladder and urethra were less than those for standard fractionated 4-field 3D-CRT (2-Gy/fraction, 64 Gy) and dose-escalated 4- and 5-field 3D-CRT (74 Gy). Rectal and bladder NTCPs (5.2% and 6.6%) following the dose-escalated 4-field 3D-CRT (74 Gy) were the highest among analyzed techniques. The average NTCP for rectum and urethra were 0.6% and 24.7% for LDRBT and 0.5% and 11.2% for HDR-BT. For Mammosite, NTCP was estimated to be 0.1 %, 0.1 %, 1.2% and 3.5% for skin desquamation, erythema, telangiectasia and fibrosis respectively (the source positioned at the balloon centre). A 4 mm Mammosite-balloon deformation leads to overdosing of PTV regions by ∼40%, resulting in excessive skin dose and increased NTCP. Conclusions Prostate brachytherapy resulted in NTCPs lower compared to external beam techniques. Mammosite-brachytherapy resulted in no heart/lung complications regardless of balloon deformation. However, 4 mm deformation caused 0.6% increase in tissue fibrosis NTCP.

  11. Margin to CTV in simultaneous irradiation of treatment volumes attache to various anatomical frameworks: The paradigm of the CA. Of prostate in high risk with indication of lymph node irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanz Freire, C. J.; Perez Echaguen, S.; Collado chamorro, P.; Diaz Pascual, V.; Vazquez Galinanes, A.; Ossola Lentati, G. A.

    2013-01-01

    The triple objective of this work is: 1 check the effect on the positioning of the GGPP of corrections on the position of the prostate in simultaneous irradiation guided through daily image and its relationship with the filling of rectum and bladder 2. check if employees standard margins for CTV GGPP are valid for this technique 3 calculate the necessary extension of the margin to 2. is not verified. (Author)

  12. Driving electrostatic transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dennis; Knott, Arnold; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2013-01-01

    Electrostatic transducers represent a very interesting alternative to the traditional inefficient electrodynamic transducers. In order to establish the full potential of these transducers, power amplifiers which fulfill the strict requirements imposed by such loads (high impedance, frequency...... depended, nonlinear and high bias voltage for linearization) must be developed. This paper analyzes power stages and bias configurations suitable for driving an electrostatic transducer. Measurement results of a 300 V prototype amplifier are shown. Measuring THD across a high impedance source is discussed...

  13. Combination of bilateral pelvic lymphadenectomy, permanent iodine-125 implantation, and percutaneous irradiation of the locally confined prostatic cancer. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiel, H.J.; Mueller, R.; Schrott, K.M.; Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen; Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen

    1987-01-01

    Since the beginning of 1981, 32 patients at an age of 52 to 72 years who suffered from a locally confined adenocarcinoma of the prostate were treated by permanent implantation of I-125 seeds. 25 patients were evaluated after a median observation period of 30 months. The first group consisting of 19 patients was submitted to a combined percutaneous and interstitial treatment, the other 6 patients were initially treated only by interstitial therapy because of severe complications observed in the meantime. After bilateral pelvic staging lymphadenectomy, permanent I-125 seeds were implanted into the patients of stage T 1 , T 2 , early T 3 and pN 0-1 , in case of microscopic lymph node manifestation without capsular perforation also into patients of stage pN 2 and pN 4 . 8 weeks later the patients received a moving beam irradiation with 10 MV photons at the linear accelerator. The centre of the prostate was faded out by a specially constructed H absorber in such a way that the prescribed target dose of 36 Gy in 4 weeks to the 90%-isodose was only applied to a spherical surface around the implant. 1 patient died perioperatively from an embolism due to phlebothrombosis of the thigh. 22 out of the other 24 patients are in complete remission, 1 patient had a local recurrence in the right seminal vesicle which appeared 28 months after primary therapy, and 1 patient developed skeletal metastases. The objective side effects and late complications of our combined treatment are considerable with respect to their incidence as well as their severity: a slight or medium radioproctitis was found after a latent period of 1 to 2 years in 28% (5/18) of cases, after a latent time of about 1 1/2 to 2 years another 28% (5/18) developed subsequently to a proctitis an urethral stricture and an ulcer situated on the anterior rectum wall facing the prostate, and 4 patients presented finally a prostato-rectal fistula. (orig.) [de

  14. Macro tree transducers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelfriet, Joost; Vogler, Heiko

    1985-01-01

    Macro tree transducers are a combination of top-down tree transducers and macro grammars. They serve as a model for syntax-directed semantics in which context information can be handled. In this paper the formal model of macro tree transducers is studied by investigating typical automata theoretical

  15. Conformal irradiation of the prostate: estimating long-term rectal bleeding risk using dose-volume histograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartford, Alan C.; Niemierko, Andrzej; Adams, Judith A.; Urie, Marcia M.; Shipley, William U.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) may be very useful tools for estimating probability of normal tissue complications (NTCP), but there is not yet an agreed upon method for their analysis. This study introduces a statistical method of aggregating and analyzing primary data from DVHs and associated outcomes. It explores the dose-volume relationship for NTCP of the rectum, using long-term data on rectal wall bleeding following prostatic irradiation. Methods and Materials: Previously published data were reviewed and updated on 41 patients with Stages T3 and T4 prostatic carcinoma treated with photons followed by perineal proton boost, including dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of each patient's anterior rectal wall and data on the occurrence of postirradiation rectal bleeding (minimum FU > 4 years). Logistic regression was used to test whether some individual combination of dose and volume irradiated might best separate the DVHs into categories of high or low risk for rectal bleeding. Further analysis explored whether a group of such dose-volume combinations might be superior in predicting complication risk. These results were compared with results of the 'critical volume model', a mathematical model based on assumptions of underlying radiobiological interactions. Results: Ten of the 128 tested dose-volume combinations proved to be 'statistically significant combinations' (SSCs) distinguishing between bleeders (14 out of 41) and nonbleeders (27 out of 41), ranging contiguously between 60 CGE (Cobalt Gray Equivalent) to 70% of the anterior rectal wall and 75 CGE to 30%. Calculated odds ratios for each SSC were not significantly different across the individual SSCs; however, analysis combining SSCs allowed segregation of DVHs into three risk groups: low, moderate, and high. Estimates of probabilities of normal tissue complications (NTCPs) based on these risk groups correlated strongly with observed data (p = 0.003) and with biomathematical model-generated NTCPs

  16. The study of irradiation combined with targeted suicide gene therapy for prostate cancer xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Xueguan; Milas, L.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study whether RGD-4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV, one of suicide gene therapy targeting to Integrin αv, can enhance radiotherapeutic effect for DU145 prostate cancer xenografts or not. Methods: When the diameter of tumor in 48 nude mice bearing DU145 prostate cancer in the right leg attained 6.0 mm (5.8-6.3 mm), the mice were entered into the experiment. There were 6 experimental groups (8 mice per group), including the control, radiotherapy only (RT), RGD-4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV only (Targeted, RGD-4C), AAVP HSV-TK/GCV (Non-targeted, non RGD-4C ), radiotherapy plus RGD- 4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV(XRT + RGD-4C) and radiotherapy plus AAVP HSV-TK/GCV group (XRT + Non RGD-4C). The effect of treatment was assessed by tumor growth delay ( the time required when tumor grew from 6.0 mm to 12.0 mm) and tumor cure. Results: Five mice died during the treatment course. There were 6 mice without tumor after treatment, including 1 in RT group, 1 in RGD-4C group, 1 in non RGD-4C group and 3 in XRT + RGD-4C group, respectively. For tumor growth delay analysis in 37 mice, the absolute growth delay (AGD) for RGD-4C, non RGD-4C and RT group was 24.4 ± 9.0, 22.6±11.3 and 28.3 ±5.5 days, respectively. When RGD-4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV or AAVP HSV-TK/GCV combined with radiotherapy, their AGD was 64.7±23.8 and 35.4±9.6 days, and nominal growth delay (NGD) was 40.3 ± 23.8 and 12.8 ± 9.6 days, respectively. The enhancement factor of RGD-4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV and AAVP HSV-TK/GCV for radiotherapy were 1.42 and 0.45. Conclusion: RGD-4C AAVP HSV-TK/GCV can enhance radiotherapeutic effect for DU145 prostate cancer xenografts. Further study is needed. (authors)

  17. Intermittent hormonal therapy in the treatment of post-irradiation residual/recurrent prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, Aaron O; Kocherill, Paul G; Wallace, Michelle; Forman, Jeffrey D

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of intermittent hormonal therapy in the treatment of residual/recurrent prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: Seventeen patients with biochemical evidence of residual/recurrent prostate cancer were initially treated with radiation therapy (RT)(13), neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy and RT (3), or RT following prostatectomy (1). The mean follow-up time was 19.4 months from the initiation of hormonal therapy. Hormonal therapy consisted of an LH-RH agonist alone (7), an anti-androgen alone (1) or a combination of both (9). Hormonal therapy was continued until the prostatic specific antigen (PSA) level became undetectable. IHT was reinstituted when the PSA reached a pre-determined level, usually greater than or equal to 10ng/ml. Results: The mean time from completion of primary treatment to the initiation of hormonal therapy was 32.5 months. The mean PSA at the start of the first cycle of hormonal therapy was 43.9ng/ml, the second cycle, 11.9ng/ml and the third cycle, 24ng/ml. The mean PSA levels at the end of the first and second cycle of hormonal therapy were .48 and .42ng/ml, respectively. No patient has yet completed the third cycle of hormonal therapy. The average duration of hormonal therapy was 10 months for the first cycle and 4 months for the second cycle. The mean intermittent time off hormones were 9.3 months between cycles 1 and 2, and 10 months between cycles 2 and 3. No patient has yet become refractory to hormonal therapy. Currently all patients are alive. All patients experienced hot flashes and decreased libido at varying degrees during treatment. Thirty-five percent experienced gynecomastia. During the intervals between hormonal therapy, most patients reported a decrease in hot flashes. Conclusion: This analysis supplies preliminary evidence that intermittent hormonal therapy is a viable option in patients with biochemical evidence of disease following initial therapy. It is associated with less treatment

  18. Prediction of the cumulated dose for external beam irradiation of prostate cancer patients with 3D-CRT technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giżyńska Marta

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays in radiotherapy, much effort is taken to minimize the irradiated volume and consequently minimize doses to healthy tissues. In our work, we tested the hypothesis that the mean dose distribution calculated from a few first fractions can serve as prediction of the cumulated dose distribution, representing the whole treatment. We made our tests for 25 prostate cancer patients treated with three orthogonal fields technique. We did a comparison of dose distribution calculated as a sum of dose distribution from each fraction with a dose distribution calculated with isocenter shifted for a mean setup error from a few first fractions. The cumulative dose distribution and predicted dose distributions are similar in terms of gamma (3 mm 3% analysis, under condition that we know setup error from seven first fractions. We showed that the dose distribution calculated for the original plan with the isocenter shifted to the point, defined as the original isocenter corrected of the mean setup error estimated from the first seven fractions supports our hypothesis, i.e. can serve as a prediction for cumulative dose distribution.

  19. Chronic effects of therapeutic irradiation for localized prostatic carcinoma on anorectal function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeoh, Eric E.K.; Botten, Rochelle; Russo, Antonietta; McGowan, Roz; Fraser, Robert; Roos, Daniel; Penniment, Michael; Borg, Martin; Sun Weiming

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate prospectively the prevalence and pathophysiology of anorectal dysfunction following radiation therapy (RTH) for localized carcinoma of the prostate. Methods and Materials: The following parameters of anorectal function were evaluated in each of 35 patients (aged 55-82 years) with localized prostatic carcinoma treated with RTH either to a dose of 55 Gy/20 fractions/4 weeks (18 patients) or 64 Gy/32 fractions/6.5 weeks (17 patients), before RTH and 4-6 weeks and at a mean (± SD) of 1.4 (± 0.2) years after its completion: (1) anorectal symptoms (questionnaire), (2) anorectal pressures at rest and in response to voluntary squeeze and increases in intra-abdominal pressure (multiport anorectal manometry), (3) rectal sensation (balloon distension) and (4) anal sphincteric morphology (endoanal ultrasound). Results: All but 1 patient completed three series of measurements. RTH had no effect on anal sphincteric morphology. The increase in frequency of defecation and fecal urgency and incontinence scores previously reported in the patients 4-6 weeks after RTH were sustained 1 year later (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, and p < 0.05, cf. baseline, respectively). At this time, 56% (19 of 34), 50% (17 of 34) and 26% (9 of 34) of the patients had increased frequency of defecation, fecal urgency, and incontinence, respectively. Decreases in anal sphincteric pressures at rest and in response to voluntary squeeze recorded in the patients 4-6 weeks after RTH were not sustained 1 year later but the volumes of rectal distension associated with perception of the stimulus and desire to defecate were lower compared with baseline volumes (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05, respectively), reflecting heightened rectal sensitivity in the patients. There was no difference in measurements between the two radiation dose regimens. Univariate logistical regression analysis was performed on patients who had experienced increased symptom scores or decreases in recorded motor and sensory manometric

  20. Dose-Volume Relationships for Acute Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With Pelvic Nodal Irradiation for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorino, Claudio; Alongi, Filippo; Perna, Lucia; Broggi, Sara; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Cozzarini, Cesare; Di Muzio, Nadia; Fazio, Ferruccio; Calandrino, Riccardo

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To find correlation between dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the intestinal cavity (IC) and moderate-severe acute bowel toxicity in men with prostate cancer treated with pelvic nodal irradiation. Methods and Materials: The study group consisted of 191 patients with localized prostate cancer who underwent whole-pelvis radiotherapy with radical or adjuvant/salvage intent during January 2004 to November 2007. Complete planning/clinical data were available in 175 of these men, 91 of whom were treated with a conventional four-field technique (50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fraction) and 84 of whom were treated with IMRT using conventional Linac (n = 26, 50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fraction) or Helical TomoTherapy (n = 58, 50-54 Gy, 1.8-2 Gy/fraction). The IC outside the planning target volume (PTV) was contoured and the DVH for the first 6 weeks of treatment was recovered in all patients. The correlation between a number of clinical and DVH (V10-V55) variables and toxicity was investigated in univariate and multivariate analyses. The correlation between DVHs for the IC outside the PTV and DVHs for the whole IC was also assessed. Results: Twenty-two patients experienced toxicity (3/22 in the IMRT/tomotherapy group). Univariate analyses showed a significant correlation between V20-V50 and toxicity (p = 0.0002-0.001), with a higher predictive value observed for V40-V50. Previous prostatectomy (p = 0.066) and abdominal/pelvic surgery (p = 0.12) also correlated with toxicity. Multivariate analysis that included V45, abdominal/pelvic surgery, and prostatectomy showed that the most predictive parameters were V45 (p = 0.002) and abdominal/pelvic surgery (p = 0.05, HR = 2.4) Conclusions: Our avoidance IMRT approach drastically reduces the incidence of acute bowel toxicity. V40-V50 of IC and, secondarily, previous abdominal/pelvic surgery were the main predictors of acute bowel toxicity.

  1. Handbook of force transducers

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanescu, Dan Mihai

    2011-01-01

    Part I introduces the basic ""Principles and Methods of Force Measurement"" acording to a classification into a dozen of force transducers types: resistive, inductive, capacitive, piezoelectric, electromagnetic, electrodynamic, magnetoelastic, galvanomagnetic (Hall-effect), vibrating wires, (micro)resonators, acoustic and gyroscopic. Two special chapters refer to force balance techniques and to combined methods in force measurement. Part II discusses the ""(Strain Gauge) Force Transducers Components"", evolving from the classical force transducer to the digital / intelligent one, with the inco

  2. Driving electrostatic transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dennis; Knott, Arnold; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2013-01-01

    Electrostatic transducers represent a very interesting alternative to the traditional inefficient electrodynamic transducers. In order to establish the full potential of these transducers, power amplifiers which fulfill the strict requirements imposed by such loads (high impedance, frequency...... depended, nonlinear and high bias voltage for linearization) must be developed. This paper analyzes power stages and bias configurations suitable for driving an electrostatic transducer. Measurement results of a 300 V prototype amplifier are shown. Measuring THD across a high impedance source is discussed......, and a high voltage attenuation interface for an audio analyzer is presented. THD below 0:1% is reported....

  3. Peripheral photon and neutron doses from prostate cancer external beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezak, Eva; Takam, Rundgham; Marcu, Loredana G

    2015-12-01

    Peripheral photon and neutron doses from external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) are associated with increased risk of carcinogenesis in the out-of-field organs; thus, dose estimations of secondary radiation are imperative. Peripheral photon and neutron doses from EBRT of prostate carcinoma were measured in Rando phantom. (6)LiF:Mg,Cu,P and (7)LiF:Mg,Cu,P glass-rod thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLDs) were inserted in slices of a Rando phantom followed by exposure to 80 Gy with 18-MV photon four-field 3D-CRT technique. The TLDs were calibrated using 6- and 18-MV X-ray beam. Neutron dose equivalents measured with CR-39 etch-track detectors were used to derive readout-to-neutron dose conversion factor for (6)LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs. Average neutron dose equivalents per 1 Gy of isocentre dose were 3.8±0.9 mSv Gy(-1) for thyroid and 7.0±5.4 mSv Gy(-1) for colon. For photons, the average dose equivalents per 1 Gy of isocentre dose were 0.2±0.1 mSv Gy(-1) for thyroid and 8.1±9.7 mSv Gy(-1) for colon. Paired (6)LiF:Mg,Cu,P and (7)LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs can be used to measure photon and neutron doses simultaneously. Organs in close proximity to target received larger doses from photons than those from neutrons whereas distally located organs received higher neutron versus photon dose. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Characterization of adenoviral transduction profile in prostate cancer cells and normal prostate tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Jianzhong; Tai, Phillip W L; Lu, Yi; Li, Jia; Ma, Hong; Su, Qin; Wei, Qiang; Li, Hong; Gao, Guangping

    2017-09-01

    Prostate diseases are common in males worldwide with high morbidity. Gene therapy is an attractive therapeutic strategy for prostate diseases, however, it is currently underdeveloped. As well known, adeno virus (Ad) is the most widely used gene therapy vector. The aims of this study are to explore transduction efficiency of Ad in prostate cancer cells and normal prostate tissue, thus further providing guidance for future prostate pathophysiological studies and therapeutic development of prostate diseases. We produced Ad expressing enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP), and characterized the transduction efficiency of Ad in both human and mouse prostate cancer cell lines in vitro, as well as prostate tumor xenograft, and wild-type mouse prostate tissue in vivo. Ad transduction efficiency was determined by EGFP fluorescence using microscopy and flow cytometry. Cell type-specific transduction was examined by immunofluorescence staining of cell markers. Our data showed that Ad efficiently transduced human and mouse prostate cancer cells in vitro in a dose dependent manner. Following intratumoral and intraprostate injection, Ad could efficiently transduce prostate tumor xenograft and the major prostatic cell types in vivo, respectively. Our findings suggest that Ad can efficiently transduce prostate tumor cells in vitro as well as xenograft and normal prostate tissue in vivo, and further indicate that Ad could be a potentially powerful toolbox for future gene therapy of prostate diseases. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The long-term effect on PSA values of incidental prostatic irradiation in patients with pelvic malignancies other than prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zietman, Anthony L.; Zehr, Elizabeth M.; Shipley, William U.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the effect of external beam radiation therapy on serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) production by the benign prostate. Methods and Materials: We studied a cohort of 24 men receiving treatment for cancer of the bladder or rectum. The radiation fields in all cases encompassed the prostate gland, and none of the patients were known to have prostate cancer. All patients had 2 or more PSA estimations obtained in the years following their radiation treatment. A second group of 46 patients who had undergone radical external beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer and who were clinically disease free 8-22 years later were also observed, with a median of 5.8 years of PSA observations. Results: Only 3 of the 24 patients in the first group showed a significant rise of > 0.2 ng/ml in their serum PSA levels, with a median of 3.3 years follow-up from the first PSA test. Seven of 24 showed progressive declines, and 14 of 24 showed steady levels. The median PSA for this group was ≤ 0.5 ng/ml. Only 6 of the 46 in the second group showed a PSA rise of > 0.2 ng/ml. Thirty-four had stable values, and 6 had further declines. Again, the median PSA for the entire group was ≤ 0.5 ng/ml. Conclusion: Recovery of prostatic secretory function is an uncommon event after external beam radiation. The concern that this might significantly confound new definitions of biochemical failure after radical radiation for prostate cancer that are based on progressively rising PSA values thus appears to be unfounded

  6. Prostate carcinomas; Cancer de la prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toledano, A.; Chauveinc, L.; Flam, T.; Thiounn, N.; Solignac, S.; Timbert, M.; Rosenwald, J.C.; Cosset, J.M.; Ammor, A.; Bonnetain, F.; Brenier, J.P.; Maingon, P.; Peignaux, K.; Truc, G.; Bosset, M.; Crevoisier, R. de; Tucker, S.; Dong, L.; Cheung, R.; Kuban, D.; Azria, D.; Llacer Moscardo, C.; Ailleres, N.; Allaw, A.; Serre, A.; Fenoglietto, P.; Hay, M.H.; Thezenas, S.; Dubois, J.B.; Pommier, P.; Perol, D.; Lagrange, J.L.; Richaud, P.; Brune, D.; Le Prise, E.; Azria, D.; Beckendorf, V.; Chabaud, S.; Carrie, C.; Bosset, M.; Bosset, J.F.; Maingon, P.; Ammor, A.; Crehangen, G.; Truc, G.; Peignaux, K.; Bonnetain, F.; Keros, L.; Bernier, V.; Aletti, P.; Wolf, D.; Marchesia, V.; Noel, A.; Artignan, X.; Fourneret, P.; Bacconier, M.; Shestaeva, O.; Pasquier, D.; Descotes, J.L.; Balosso, J.; Bolla, M.; Burette, R.; Corbusier, A.; Germeau, F.; Crevoisier, R. de; Dong, L.; Bonnen, M.; Cheung, R.; Tucker, S.; Kuban, D.; Crevoisier, R. de; Melancon, A.; Kuban, D.; Cheung, R.; Dong, L.; Peignaux, K.; Brenier, J.P.; Truc, G.; Bosset, M.; Ammor, A.; Barillot, I.; Maingon, P.; Molines, J.C.; Berland, E.; Cornulier, J. de; Coulet-Parpillon, A.; Cohard, C.; Picone, M.; Fourneret, P.; Artignan, X.; Daanen, V.; Gastaldo, J.; Bolla, M.; Collomb, D.; Dusserre, A.; Descotes, J.L.; Troccaz, J.; Giraud, J.Y.; Quero, L.; Hennequin, C.; Ravery, V.; Desgrandschamps, F.; Maylin, C.; Boccon-Gibod, L.; Salem, N.; Bladou, F.; Gravis, G.; Tallet, A.; Simonian, M.; Serment, G.; Salem, N.; Bladou, F.; Gravis, G.; Simonian, M.; Rosello, R.; Serment, G

    2005-11-15

    Some short communications on the prostate carcinoma are given here. The impact of pelvic irradiation, conformation with intensity modulation, association of radiotherapy and chemotherapy reduction of side effects, imaging, doses escalation are such subjects studied and reported. (N.C.)

  7. Programming macro tree transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahr, Patrick; Day, Laurence E.

    2013-01-01

    A tree transducer is a set of mutually recursive functions transforming an input tree into an output tree. Macro tree transducers extend this recursion scheme by allowing each function to be defined in terms of an arbitrary number of accumulation parameters. In this paper, we show how macro tree ...

  8. Image Guided Radiation Therapy Strategies for Pelvic Lymph Node Irradiation in High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Motion and Margins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kershaw, Lucy; van Zadelhoff, Laila; Heemsbergen, Wilma; Pos, Floris; van Herk, Marcel

    2018-01-01

    To quantify the relative motion of the pelvic lymph nodes (LNs), seminal vesicles (SV) and prostate and define indicative margins for image-guided radiotherapy based on bony anatomy or prostate correction strategies for a 3 or 6 degrees-of-freedom couch. Nineteen patients had a planning computed

  9. Preparation of nanobubbles carrying androgen receptor siRNA and their inhibitory effects on androgen-independent prostate cancer when combined with ultrasonic irradiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luofu Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate nanobubbles carrying androgen receptor (AR siRNA and their in vitro and in vivo anti-tumor effects, when combined with ultrasonic irradiation, on androgen-independent prostate cancer (AIPC. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Nanobubbles carrying AR siRNA were prepared using poly-L-lysine and electrostatic adsorption methods. Using C4-2 cell activity as a testing index, the optimal irradiation parameters (including the nanobubble number/cell number ratio, mechanical index [MI], and irradiation time were determined and used for transfection of three human prostate cancer cell lines (C4-2, LNCaP, and PC-3 cells. The AR expression levels were investigated with RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. Additionally, the effects of the nanobubbles and control microbubbles named SonoVue were assessed via imaging in a C4-2 xenograft model. Finally, the growth and AR expression of seven groups of tumor tissues were assessed using the C4-2 xenograft mouse model. RESULTS: The nanobubbles had an average diameter of 609.5±15.6 nm and could effectively bind to AR siRNA. Under the optimized conditions of a nanobubble number/cell number ratio of 100∶1, an MI of 1.2, and an irradiation time of 2 min, the highest transfection rates in C4-2, LNCaP, and PC-3 cells were 67.4%, 74.0%, and 63.96%, respectively. In the C4-2 and LNCaP cells, treatment with these binding nanobubbles plus ultrasonic irradiation significantly inhibited cell growth and resulted in the suppression of AR mRNA and protein expression. Additionally, contrast-enhanced ultrasound showed that the nanobubbles achieved stronger signals than the SonoVue control in the central hypovascular area of the tumors. Finally, the anti-tumor effect of these nanobubbles plus ultrasonic irradiation was most significant in the xenograft tumor model compared with the other groups. CONCLUSION: Nanobubbles carrying AR siRNA could be potentially used as gene vectors in

  10. 501 men irradiated for clinically localized prostate cancer (1987 - 1995): preliminary analysis of the experience at UCSF and affiliated facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roach, Mack; Burton, Eugene; Kroll, Stewart; Bevins, Saleem; Ryu, Janice K.; Holland, John M.; Hunter, Darryl C.; Rosenthal, Seth; Margolis, Lawrence W; Phillips, Theodore L.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To assess the impact of the pretreatment PSA (P-PSA), Gleason Score (GS), Clinical Stage, Radiation (XRT) Dose and the use of Neoadjuvant Hormonal Therapy (NHT) on the freedom from PSA failure (FPF) in 501 men irradiated for clinically localized prostate cancer. Materials and Methods: From July of 1987 to July of 1995, 501 men underwent definitive radiotherapy (XRT) for CAP at UCSF or one of three affiliated hospitals including: Mt Zion Hospital (MtZ); Martinez Veterans Administration (MVA) and; the University of California at Davis (UCD). All patients who had at least two of the most commonly recognized major prognostic factors (P-PSA, GS, CS, XRT Dose) were included in this analysis. Prior to the closure of radiation facilities at MVA in 1991, and MtZ in 1994 and the availability of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) at UCSF in 1990, patients were treated by standard treatment techniques (STD) to doses 71.5 Gy (all at UCSF or UCD). The median follow-up from completion of treatment to the last post treatment PSA for all patients was 24.5 mo. (range 6.3 to 95 mo.), while 114 patients have PSA follow up ≥3 years. The median isocenter/Dmax dose (IDMAX) within the prostate was 70.6 Gy (range 59.4 - 87.3 Gy). Eleven percent (n=57) received NHT. Fifteen percent of patients (n=73) had a P-PSA of 0-4, 31% (n=146) a PSA of 4-10, 23% (n=110) 10-20, and 31% (n=146) a PSA > 20 ng/ml. Eighteen percent (n=90) were clinically staged as T1, 56% (n=272) T2 and 26% (n=128) (T3(T4)). Fifteen percent (n=64) had a GS of 2-4, while 22% (n=96) a GS of 5, 27% (n=118) a GS of 6, 24% (n=105) a GS of 7 and 14% (n=60) a GS of 8-10. PSA failure was defined as a consistent rise to greater than 1 ng/ml on at least two occasions consecutively separated by at least 1 month or a PSA >4 ng/ml 1 year after treatment, or > 2 ng/ml 2 years after treatment. Univariate and multivariate analysis were used to assess the impact of P-PSA, GS, CS, XRT Dose and the use of

  11. Health-related quality of life and sequelae in patients treated with brachytherapy and external beam irradiation for localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, F; Brune, D; Couette, J E; Lesaunier, F; Héron, J F; Pény, J; Henry-Amar, M

    1998-07-01

    To evaluate late physical and psychosocial sequelae in patients treated with an association of external beam irradiation (EBI) and brachytherapy (BT) for localized prostate cancer. Seventy-one patients free of disease, treated at the Centre François Baclesse from 1988 to 1992, were enrolled in a case-control study. Seventy-one healthy controls, matched on age and residence, were selected at random from electoral rolls. Two self-administered questionnaires were mailed in January 1996. The French translation of the Nottingham Health Profile questionnaire and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30 core questionnaire were used to evaluate physical, role, emotional, cognitive and social functioning, global health status as well as energy and sleep disturbance. Specific problems related to prostate cancer were explored using the prostate specific module developed by the EORTC Genito-Urinary Tract Cancer Cooperative Group. Concordance between clinical complications reported by patients and those reported by physicians was also analyzed. General health quality of life scale scores did not significantly differ between patients and controls, nor did general symptom scale scores. Furthermore, no more late psychosocial sequelae were reported by patients than by controls. No major digestive complications were observed among patients. However, statistical differences were observed concerning interest in sex (P = 0.016) and sexual activity (P pelvic pain) appraisal differed slightly between patients and physicians who generally underestimate its severity. While nocturia was reported more often by physicians than by patients (P = 0.0016), patients reported urinary incontinence and pelvic pain more often than physicians (P disorders, urinary incontinence and cystitis while digestive disorders were rare. This association could be an alternative to standard EBI in patients with localized prostate cancer. Whatever the treatment choice, patients

  12. Smart transducer with radiomodem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugach, V. N.; Voronin, E. L.

    2018-04-01

    Systems for measuring different parameters enabling metering and wireless data transmission are an urgent problem in the industry. One of the most promising solutions is the developments of metering instruments enabling radio-link and GSM data transmission. The article describes a transducer operating with temperature sensors of different types as well as with the sensors of other physical values with the output signal represented as current or voltage with subsequent measurement data transmission from the transducer to the computer via radio-link. The article provides transducer measurement accuracy check. The work confirmed the claimed temperature measurement accuracy, noted a stable data transmission via radio link and convenience of work with the transducer and software.

  13. Pressure Transducer Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Files are located here, defining the locations of the pressure transducers on the HIRENASD model. These locations also correspond to the locations that analysts...

  14. The correlation between the astro consensus panel definition of biochemical failure and clinical outcome for patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, Eric M.; Vicini, Frank A.; Ziaja, Ellen L.; Dmuchowski, Carl F.; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Matter, Richard C.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The ASTRO Consensus Panel on PSA After Radiation Therapy recently recommended a definition of biochemical failure (BF) following treatment of prostate cancer with radiation therapy. We reviewed our institution's experience treating patients with external beam irradiation (RT) to determine if the Consensus Panel definition correlates with clinical distant metastases free survival (DMFS), disease free survival (DFS), cause specific survival (CSS), and local control (LC) rates for a large group of patients from the PSA era. Methods And Materials: Between 1/1/87 and 12/31/92, 653 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer received external beam irradiation (RT) using localized prostate fields at William Beaumont Hospital. Of these patients, 568 had a minimum follow-up of 2 years and constitute the study population. The median pre-treatment PSA and Gleason score was 11 ng/ml and 6, respectively. The median dose to the prostate using megavoltage RT was 66.6 Gy (range: 60-70.4 Gy) using a four field or arc technique. No patient received hormonal therapy either prior to, during, or after radiotherapy unless local or distant failure was documented. Pre-treatment and post-treatment serum PSA levels were recorded. Biochemical failure was defined as three consecutive increases in post-treatment PSA after achieving a nadir. Biochemical failure was recorded as the time midway between the nadir and first increase in PSA. Five year actuarial rates of DMFS, DFS, CSS, and LC were calculated for patients who were biochemically controlled (BC) versus those who failed biochemically. Results: Median follow-up was 56 months (range: 24-118 months). The overall 5 year actuarial rates of DMFS, DFS, CSS, and LC were significantly better in patients who were biochemically controlled versus those who were not (p< 0.001). The median time to DM within the BF group was 21 months (range: 2-112 months). When stratifying by pre-treatment PSA, Gleason score, and T stage, these

  15. Dose- and time-dependent gene expression alterations in prostate and colon cancer cells after in vitro exposure to carbon ion and X-irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetens, Annelies; Moreels, Marjan; Quintens, Roel; Soors, Els; Buset, Jasmine; Chiriotti, Sabina; Tabury, Kevin; Gregoire, Vincent; Baatout, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Hadrontherapy is an advanced form of radiotherapy that uses beams of charged particles (such as protons and carbon ions). Compared with conventional radiotherapy, the main advantages of carbon ion therapy are the precise absorbed dose localization, along with an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE). This high ballistic accuracy of particle beams deposits the maximal dose to the tumor, while damage to the surrounding healthy tissue is limited. Currently, hadrontherapy is being used for the treatment of specific types of cancer. Previous in vitro studies have shown that, under certain circumstances, exposure to charged particles may inhibit cell motility and migration. In the present study, we investigated the expression of four motility-related genes in prostate (PC3) and colon (Caco-2) cancer cell lines after exposure to different radiation types. Cells were irradiated with various absorbed doses (0, 0.5 and 2 Gy) of accelerated 13C-ions at the GANIL facility (Caen, France) or with X-rays. Clonogenic assays were performed to determine the RBE. RT-qPCR analysis showed dose- and time-dependent changes in the expression of CCDC88A, FN1, MYH9 and ROCK1 in both cell lines. However, whereas in PC3 cells the response to carbon ion irradiation was enhanced compared with X-irradiation, the effect was the opposite in Caco-2 cells, indicating cell-type–specific responses to the different radiation types. PMID:25190155

  16. Modeling of ultrasound transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David

    deviation of 5.5 % to 11.0 %. Finite element modeling of piezoceramics in combination with Field II is addressed and reveals the influence of restricting the modeling of transducers to the one-dimensional case. An investigation on modeling capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUT)s with Field...... II is addressed. It is shown how a single circular CMUT cell can be well approximated with a simple square transducer encapsulating the cell, and how this influence the modeling of full array elements. An optimal cell discretization with Field II’s mathematical elements is addressed as well....... The error in modeling CMUT cells as squares or flat circular plates instead of curved circular cells is also addressed....

  17. Hypofractionated Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy with simultaneous Elective Nodal Irradiation is feasible in prostate cancer patients: A single institution experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed W. Hegazy

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: Hypo-fractionation dose escalation VMAT–SIB–ENI–WPRT using 2 arcs is a feasible technique for intermediate/high risk OC prostate cancer patients, with acceptable rates of acute/late toxicities, much favorable planning target volume (PTV coverage, and shorter overall treatment time. Prospective randomized controlled trials are encouraged to confirm its equivalence to other fractionation schemes.

  18. Vibration transducer calibration techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkley, D. J.

    1980-09-01

    Techniques for the calibration of vibration transducers used in the Aeronautical Quality Assurance Directorate of the British Ministry of Defence are presented. Following a review of the types of measurements necessary in the calibration of vibration transducers, the performance requirements of vibration transducers, which can be used to measure acceleration, velocity or vibration amplitude, are discussed, with particular attention given to the piezoelectric accelerometer. Techniques for the accurate measurement of sinusoidal vibration amplitude in reference-grade transducers are then considered, including the use of a position sensitive photocell and the use of a Michelson laser interferometer. Means of comparing the output of working-grade accelerometers with that of previously calibrated reference-grade devices are then outlined, with attention given to a method employing a capacitance bridge technique and a method to be used at temperatures between -50 and 200 C. Automatic calibration procedures developed to speed up the calibration process are outlined, and future possible extensions of system software are indicated.

  19. Transduced space and transvisuality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Anders Ib

    2017-01-01

    feeds into the matter of architecture in new ways. On this background, the chapter discusses the ideas behind the drawing material of Architecture, Time and Form as presented in this book, as a relationship between transduced space and transvisual aesthetics. The material of drawing treated in this book...

  20. Magnetoelastic Generator Type Transducer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Efremov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Some issues relating to usage of magnetoelectric generator type transducers as the means of measuring intense dynamic loads and as a sensitive element of fuse contact target sensor (CTS are considered. Particular attention is paid to the magnetoanisotropic transducer (MAT, the principle of operation of which is based on the change of the magnetic field form caused by the applied mechanical load leading to the appearance of EMF in the output winding. The MAT, especially monolithic, has such advantages as high strength, reliability, endurance and design simplicity.The functional transducer schemes have been analyzed and for the first time it was shown that there is a possibility of using a version with only one output winding arranged in the magnetic conductor made of magnetically soft material such as structural steel. A mathematical model of transducer is proposed showing that the input signal formed by the external load is proportional to its derivative. With a sufficiently large time constant of the electric circuit and the implementation of a number of additional conditions the transducer may function as an integrator. By that it becomes possible to measure the parameters of dynamic processes having the duration of a few to tens of microseconds. Unlike the traditional transducers such as piezoelectric the output signal is not “masked” by the natural oscillations.The mechanism of the generator effect was considered leading to the “piezomagnetodynamic” model, which includes a number of phenomenological parameters. Some corresponding experimentally derived hysteresis curves are presented. Their vertical shift quantifies the generator effect and does not depend on the intensity of the magnetic field.As an example of practical application of the MAT some results of evaluation of the dynamic force characteristic of the heading part of a piezoelectric fuse are presented. The MAT was also used for the evaluation of back effects of the bullet

  1. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the prostate is enlarged, also known as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) , with measurements acquired as needed for any ... size with caption Related Articles and Media Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) (Enlargement of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- ...

  2. The correlation between the ASTRO consensus panel definition of biochemical failure and clinical outcome for patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, Eric M.; Vicini, Frank A.; Ziaja, Ellen L.; Dmuchowski, Carl F.; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: We reviewed our institution's experience treating patients with external beam irradiation (RT) to determine if the ASTRO Consensus Panel definition of biochemical failure (BF) following radiation therapy correlates with clinical distant metastases free survival (DMFS), disease-free survival (DFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and local control (LC). Methods and Materials: Between 1/1/87 and 12/31/92, 568 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer received external beam irradiation (RT) using localized prostate fields at William Beaumont Hospital (median total dose 66.6 Gy; range: 60-70.4 Gy). Biochemical failure was defined as three consecutive increases in post-treatment prostate specific antigen (PSA) after achieving a nadir. Biochemical failure was recorded as the time midway between the nadir and the first rising PSA. Five-year actuarial rates of clinical DMFS, DFS, CSS, and LC were calculated for patients who were biochemically controlled (BC) versus those who failed biochemically. Median follow-up was 56 months (range: 24-118 months). Results: Five-year actuarial rates of DMFS, DFS, CSS, and LC were significantly greater in patients who were biochemically controlled versus those who were not (p < 0.001). In patients who were BC, the 5-year actuarial rates of DMFS, DFS, CSS, and LC were 99%, 99%, 98%, and 99% respectively. For patients who failed biochemically, the 5-year actuarial rates of DMFS, DFS, CSS, and LC were 74%, 64%, 89%, and 86% respectively. When stratifying by pretreatment PSA, Gleason score, and T stage these differences remained significant for DMFS, DFS, and CSS. The Cox proportional hazards model demonstrated that BC was the single most important predictor of clinical outcome for DMFS, DFS, CSS, and LC. Pretreatment PSA and Gleason score were also independent predictors of outcome for DMFS and DFS. Conclusions: The ASTRO Consensus Panel definition of BF following radiation therapy correlates well with clinical DMFS, DFS

  3. Moderate hypofractionated radiotherapy with volumetric modulated arc therapy and simultaneous integrated boost for pelvic irradiation in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzese, C; Fogliata, A; D'Agostino, G R; Di Brina, L; Comito, T; Navarria, P; Cozzi, L; Scorsetti, M

    2017-07-01

    The optimal treatment for unfavourable intermediate/high-risk prostate cancer is still debated. In the present study, the pattern of toxicity and early clinical outcome of patients with localized prostate cancer was analyzed. A cohort of 90 patients treated on pelvic lymph nodes from 2010 to 2015 was selected. All patients were treated with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT), and Simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in 28 fractions; the prostate, the seminal vesicle and the pelvic lymph node received total doses of 74.2, 65.5, and 51.8 Gy, respectively. End points were the detection of acute and late toxicities graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria CTCAE version 3, evaluating the rectal, genito-urinary and gastro-intestinal toxicity. Correlation of OARs dose parameters and related toxicities was explored. Preliminary overall survival and Progression-free survival (PFS) were evaluated. With a median follow-up of 25 months, no interruptions for treatment-related toxicity were recorded. Univariate analysis among dosimetric data and acute toxicities showed no correlations. Regarding late toxicity: the dose received by a rectal volume of 90 cm 3 was found to be significant for toxicity prediction (p = 0.024). PFS was 90.6% and 60.2% at 2 and 4 years, respectively. PFS correlates with age (p = 0.011) and Gleason score (p = 0.011). Stratifying the PSA nadir in quartiles, its value was significant (p = 0.016) in predicting PFS, showing a reduction of PFS of 2 months for each PSA-nadir increase of 0.1 ng/ml. HRT with VMAT and SIB on the whole pelvis in unfavourable prostate cancer patients is effective with a mild pattern of toxicity.

  4. Chromosome Damage and Cell Proliferation Rates in In Vitro Irradiated Whole Blood as Markers of Late Radiation Toxicity After Radiation Therapy to the Prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaton, Lindsay A., E-mail: Lindsay.Beaton@hc-sc.gc.ca [Environmental and Radiation Health Sciences Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Ferrarotto, Catherine; Marro, Leonora [Environmental and Radiation Health Sciences Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Samiee, Sara; Malone, Shawn; Grimes, Scott; Malone, Kyle [The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, University of Ottawa, 501 Smyth Rd, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Wilkins, Ruth C. [Environmental and Radiation Health Sciences Directorate, Health Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: In vitro irradiated blood samples from prostate cancer patients showing late normal tissue damage were examined for lymphocyte response by measuring chromosomal aberrations and proliferation rate. Methods and Materials: Patients were selected from a randomized trial evaluating the optimal timing of dose-escalated radiation and short-course androgen deprivation therapy. Of 438 patients, 3% experienced grade 3 late radiation proctitis and were considered to be radiosensitive. Blood samples were taken from 10 of these patients along with 20 matched samples from patients with grade 0 proctitis. The samples were irradiated at 6 Gy and, along with control samples, were analyzed for dicentric chromosomes and excess fragments per cell. Cells in first and second metaphase were also enumerated to determine the lymphocyte proliferation rate. Results: At 6 Gy, there were statistically significant differences between the radiosensitive and control cohorts for 3 endpoints: the mean number of dicentric chromosomes per cell (3.26 ± 0.31, 2.91 ± 0.32; P=.0258), the mean number of excess fragments per cell (2.27 ± 0.23, 1.43 ± 0.37; P<.0001), and the proportion of cells in second metaphase (0.27 ± 0.10, 0.46 ± 0.09; P=.0007). Conclusions: These results may be a valuable indicator for identifying radiosensitive patients and for tailoring radiation therapy.

  5. Field displacement during external radiotherapy in prostatic adenocarcinoma treated with radioactive 198Au implants and external irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennernaes, B.; Letocha, H.; Rikner, G.; Magnusson, A.; Nilsson, S.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to study displacement error and internal movements of the prostate during external beam radiotherapy. Verification films in the frontal (n=194) and lateral (n=64) portals were investigated in 14 patients treated with radioactive 198 Au implants. Displacement errors of two implants were investigated. In seven patients, filling of the rectum and the bladder with contrast medium or isotonic saline was performed during CT investigation for planning purposes to detect movements of the prostate. Most (95%) of the displacement errors were less than 10 mm in the frontal portal and less than 15 mm in the lateral portals. No correlation to the patient's weight was found. The displacement errors were randomly distributed. The spatial relations between the implants were not altered during the treatments. Small movements of the prostate were observed. To conclude, the positioning system employed at present (laser) can be sufficient for the margins used (2 cm). In lateral portals, however, the system did not have the ability to detect a possible systematic displacement error from simulator to accelerator. The intention is to decrease the margins to 1 cm, which will necessitate a better positioning system. (orig.)

  6. Nano-optomechanical transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakich, Peter T; El-Kady, Ihab F; Olsson, Roy H; Su, Mehmet Fatih; Reinke, Charles; Camacho, Ryan; Wang, Zheng; Davids, Paul

    2013-12-03

    A nano-optomechanical transducer provides ultrabroadband coherent optomechanical transduction based on Mach-wave emission that uses enhanced photon-phonon coupling efficiencies by low impedance effective phononic medium, both electrostriction and radiation pressure to boost and tailor optomechanical forces, and highly dispersive electromagnetic modes that amplify both electrostriction and radiation pressure. The optomechanical transducer provides a large operating bandwidth and high efficiency while simultaneously having a small size and minimal power consumption, enabling a host of transformative phonon and signal processing capabilities. These capabilities include optomechanical transduction via pulsed phonon emission and up-conversion, broadband stimulated phonon emission and amplification, picosecond pulsed phonon lasers, broadband phononic modulators, and ultrahigh bandwidth true time delay and signal processing technologies.

  7. Numerical transducer modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cutanda, Vicente

    1999-01-01

    Numerical modelling is of importance for the design, improvement and study of acoustic transducers such as microphones and accelerometers. Techniques like the boundary element method and the finite element method are the most common supplement to the traditional empirical and analytical approaches...... errors and instabilities in the computations of numerical solutions. An investigation to deal with this narrow-gap problem has been carried out....

  8. Steerable Doppler transducer probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidel, H.F.; Greenwood, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    An ultrasonic diagnostic probe is described which is capable of performing ultrasonic imaging and Doppler measurement consisting of: a hollow case having an acoustic window which passes ultrasonic energy and including chamber means for containing fluid located within the hollow case and adjacent to a portion of the acoustic window; imaging transducer means, located in the hollow case and outside the fluid chamber means, and oriented to direct ultrasonic energy through the acoustic window toward an area which is to be imaged; Doppler transducer means, located in the hollow case within the fluid chamber means, and movably oriented to direct Doppler signals through the acoustic window toward the imaged area; means located within the fluid chamber means and externally controlled for controllably moving the Doppler transducer means to select one of a plurality of axes in the imaged area along which the Doppler signals are to be directed; and means, located external to the fluid chamber means and responsive to the means for moving, for providing an indication signal for identifying the selected axis

  9. The impact of gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity on health related quality of life among irradiated prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaake, Wouter; Wiegman, Erwin M.; Groot, Martijn de; Laan, Hans Paul van der; Schans, Cees P. van der; Bergh, Alfons C.M. van den; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the impact of late radiation-induced toxicity on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) among patients with prostate cancer. Patients and methods: The study sample was composed of 227 patients, treated with external beam radiotherapy. Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 were used to grade late genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicity. The European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of life Questionnaire C30 (EORTC QLQ-C30) was used to assess HRQoL at baseline, and 6, 12 and 24 months after completion of radiotherapy. Statistical analysis was performed using a multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). Results: Urinary incontinence and rectal discomfort significantly affected HRQoL. The impact of urinary incontinence on HRQoL was most pronounced 6 months after radiotherapy and gradually decreased over time. The impact of rectal discomfort on HRQoL was predominant at 6 months after radiotherapy, decreased at 12 months and increased again 2 years after radiotherapy. No significant impact on HRQoL was observed for any of the other toxicity endpoints, or non-toxicity related factors such as hormonal therapy, radiotherapy technique or age. Conclusion: Urinary incontinence and rectal discomfort have a significant impact on HRQoL. Prevention of these side effects may likely improve quality of life of prostate cancer patients after completion of treatment

  10. Piezoelectric transducer array microspeaker

    KAUST Repository

    Carreno, Armando Arpys Arevalo

    2016-12-19

    In this paper we present the fabrication and characterization of a piezoelectric micro-speaker. The speaker is an array of micro-machined piezoelectric membranes, fabricated on silicon wafer using advanced micro-machining techniques. Each array contains 2n piezoelectric transducer membranes, where “n” is the bit number. Every element of the array has a circular shape structure. The membrane is made out four layers: 300nm of platinum for the bottom electrode, 250nm or lead zirconate titanate (PZT), a top electrode of 300nm and a structural layer of 50

  11. Evaluation of the radio modifier effect of propolis on chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) and human prostate cancer (PC3) cells, irradiated with 60-CO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Geyza Spigoti

    2011-01-01

    In the last decades, it has been given a great interest to investigations concerning natural, effective, nontoxic compounds with radioprotective potential together with the increasing utilization of different types of ionizing radiation for various applications. Among them propolis, a resinous compound produced by honeybees (Apis mellifera), has been considered quite promising, since it presents several advantageous biological characteristics, i. e., anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anticarcinogenic, antioxidant and also free radical scavenging action. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Brazilian propolis, collected in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) and human prostate cancer (PC3) cells, irradiated with 60 Co γ radiation. For this purpose, three interlinked parameters were analyzed: micronucleus induction, cell viability and clonogenic death. The choice of these parameters was justified by their biological significance, in addition to the fact that they are readily observable and measurable in irradiated cells. The cytogenetic data obtained showed a radioprotective effect of propolis (5-100 μg/ml) in the induction of DNA damage for both cell lines, irradiated with doses of 1 - 4 Gy. The cytotoxicity assay, however, showed a prominent antiproliferative effect of propolis (50 - 400μ/ml) in PC3 cells irradiated with 5 Gγ. The survival curves obtained were adequately fitted by a linear-quadratic model, where the α coefficient was higher in CHO-K1 cells. Concerning the clonogenic capacity, PC3 cells were more radiosensitive than CHO-K1 cells at the higher doses of the survival curve. Propolis at the concentrations of 30 - 100 μg/ml, did not influence the clonogenic potential of PC3 cells, since the survival curves, associated or not with propolis, were found similar, although the combined treatment in CHO-K1 cells exhibited a stimulating proliferative effect. The data obtained in vitro showed a

  12. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as detailed as with the transrectal probe. An MRI of the pelvis may be obtained as an ... Enlargement of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate ...

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound or with a rectal examination, an ultrasound-guided biopsy can be performed. This procedure involves advancing ... of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored ...

  14. Ultrasonic Transducers for Fourier Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    1995-01-01

    Describes an experiment that uses the ultrasonic transducer for demonstrating the Fourier components of waveshapes such as the square and triangular waves produced by laboratory function generators. (JRH)

  15. The importance of adequate follow-up in defining treatment success after external beam irradiation for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicini, Frank A.; Kestin, Larry L.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: We reviewed our institution's experience treating patients with localized prostate cancer with external beam radiation therapy (RT) to determine how differences in the length of follow-up affect the determination of treatment outcome using the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) Consensus Panel Definition of biochemical failure (BF). Methods and Materials: From January 1987 through December 1997, 1109 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with definitive external beam RT at William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, Michigan. All patients received external beam RT to a median total prostate dose of 66.6 Gy (range: 59.4-70.4 Gy). A total of 1096 patients (99%) had sufficient prostate-specific antigen (PSA) follow-up to determine their biochemical status. To test the impact of differences in follow-up on the calculation of BF, 389 patients with at least 5 years of PSA follow-up were selected as the reference group for the initial analysis. BF was then retrospectively determined using the Consensus Panel definition at yearly intervals, ignoring the remainder of each patient's follow-up. The median follow-up for this group of patients was 6.6 years (range: 5.0-11.6 years). In a second analysis, patient cohorts were randomly selected with varying median PSA follow-up intervals in order to more accurately represent a population whose follow-up is distributed continuously over a defined range. Seven cohorts were randomly selected with 200 patients in each cohort. Cohorts were individually identified such that half of the patients (100) had 2 years or less follow-up than the stated time point for analysis and half (100) had up to 2 years more follow-up than the time point chosen for analysis. For example, in the cohort with a median follow-up of 3 years, 100 patients with a PSA follow-up from 1 to 3 years were randomly selected, and 100 patients with a follow-up from 3 to 5 years were randomly selected, thus generating a

  16. Optically transduced MEMS magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Gregory N; Langlois, Eric

    2014-03-18

    MEMS magnetometers with optically transduced resonator displacement are described herein. Improved sensitivity, crosstalk reduction, and extended dynamic range may be achieved with devices including a deflectable resonator suspended from the support, a first grating extending from the support and disposed over the resonator, a pair of drive electrodes to drive an alternating current through the resonator, and a second grating in the resonator overlapping the first grating to form a multi-layer grating having apertures that vary dimensionally in response to deflection occurring as the resonator mechanically resonates in a plane parallel to the first grating in the presence of a magnetic field as a function of the Lorentz force resulting from the alternating current. A plurality of such multi-layer gratings may be disposed across a length of the resonator to provide greater dynamic range and/or accommodate fabrication tolerances.

  17. Numerical Transducer Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriquez, Vicente Cutanda

    This thesis describes the development of a numerical model of the propagation of sound waves in fluids with viscous and thermal losses, with application to the simulation of acoustic transducers, in particular condenser microphones for measurement. The theoretical basis is presented, numerical...... tools and implementation techniques are described and performance tests are carried out. The equations that govern the motion of fluids with losses and the corresponding boundary conditions are reduced to a form that is tractable for the Boundary Element Method (BEM) by adopting some hypotheses...... that are allowable in this case: linear variations, absence of flow, harmonic time variation, thermodynamical equilibrium and physical dimensions much larger than the molecular mean free path. A formulation of the BEM is also developed with an improvement designed to cope with the numerical difficulty associated...

  18. Margin to CTV in simultaneous irradiation of treatment volumes attache to various anatomical frameworks: The paradigm of the CA. Of prostate in high risk with indication of lymph node irradiation; Margen al CTV en irradiacion simultanea de volumenes de tratamiento adscritos a distintos marcos anatomicos: El paradigma del CA. de prostata de alto riesgo con indicacion de irradiacion ganglionar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanz Freire, C. J.; Perez Echaguen, S.; Collado chamorro, P.; Diaz Pascual, V.; Vazquez Galinanes, A.; Ossola Lentati, G. A.

    2013-07-01

    The triple objective of this work is: 1 check the effect on the positioning of the GGPP of corrections on the position of the prostate in simultaneous irradiation guided through daily image and its relationship with the filling of rectum and bladder 2. check if employees standard margins for CTV GGPP are valid for this technique 3 calculate the necessary extension of the margin to 2. is not verified. (Author)

  19. Calibration of Underwater Sound Transducers

    OpenAIRE

    H.R.S. Sastry

    1983-01-01

    The techniques of calibration of underwater sound transducers for farfield, near-field and closed environment conditions are reviewed in this paper .The design of acoustic calibration tank is mentioned. The facilities available at Naval Physical & Oceanographic Laboratory, Cochin for calibration of transducers are also listed.

  20. Scrutiny of the ASTRO consensus definition of biochemical failure in irradiated prostate cancer patients demonstrates its usefulness and robustness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Hanks, Gerald E.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: The goals of this study are: (1) to establish the robustness of the Fox Chase Cancer Center (FCCC) and the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ASTRO) consensus definitions of failure by comparing biochemical estimates under various modifications of the censoring and failure time components to their respective unaltered definitions; (2) to isolate the source of variation between the two definitions of failure; and (3) to describe the hazard of failure over time for each definition. Methods: Between May 1989 and May 1997, 670 men were treated at Fox Chase Cancer Center for localized prostate cancer using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT). These men were stratified into three groups for analysis: 111 men treated with adjuvant hormones; 204 men treated with radiation therapy alone and presenting with more favorable prognosis tumor characteristics; 255 men treated with radiation therapy alone and presenting with less favorable prognosis tumor characteristics. For each group, biochemical failure was estimated and compared using the FCCC and ASTRO definitions of failure. The robustness of each definition was evaluated by comparing estimates under the definition as stated to those under various modifications of the censoring and failure components. Analyses were also performed while excluding slow-progressing patients. To isolate the source of variation between the two failure definitions, estimates were compared for patients with agreement in failure status. Estimates of biochemical failure, and thus hazard rates, were made using Kaplan-Meier methodology. Results: ASTRO biochemical failure estimates were higher than the FCCC failure estimates in the first 5 years post-treatment. Beyond 5 years, ASTRO estimates level off, while the FCCC failure estimates continued to increase. These failure patterns were similar in all patient groups; however, patients treated with adjuvant hormones had a much higher risk of failure

  1. Dose-volume effects for pelvic bone marrow in predicting hematological toxicity in prostate cancer radiotherapy with pelvic node irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sini, Carla; Fiorino, Claudio; Perna, Lucia; Noris Chiorda, Barbara; Deantoni, Chiara Lucrezia; Bianchi, Marco; Sacco, Vincenzo; Briganti, Alberto; Montorsi, Francesco; Calandrino, Riccardo; Di Muzio, Nadia; Cozzarini, Cesare

    2016-01-01

    To prospectively identify clinical/dosimetric predictors of acute/late hematologic toxicity (HT) in chemo-naÏve patients treated with whole-pelvis radiotherapy (WPRT) for prostate cancer. Data of 121 patients treated with adjuvant/salvage WPRT were analyzed (static-field IMRT n=19; VMAT/Rapidarc n=57; Tomotherapy n=45). Pelvic bone marrow (BM) was delineated as ilium (IL), lumbosacral, lower and whole pelvis (WP), and the relative DVHs were calculated. HT was graded both according to CTCAE v4.03 and as variation in percentage relative to baseline. Logistic regression was used to analyze association between HT and clinical/DVHs factors. Significant differences (p<0.005) in the DVH of BM volumes between different techniques were found: Tomotherapy was associated with larger volumes receiving low doses (3-20 Gy) and smaller receiving 40-50 Gy. Lower baseline absolute values of WBC, neutrophils and lymphocytes (ALC) predicted acute/late HT (p ⩽ 0.001). Higher BM V40 was associated with higher risk of acute Grade3 (OR=1.018) or late Grade2 lymphopenia (OR=1.005). Two models predicting lymphopenia were developed, both including baseline ALC, and BM WP-V40 (AUC=0.73) and IL-V40+smoking (AUC=0.904) for acute/late respectively. Specific regions of pelvic BM predicting acute/late lymphopenia, a risk factor for viral infections, were identified. The 2-variable models including specific constraints to BM may help reduce HT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Micromachined Integrated Transducers for Ultrasound Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, Mette Funding

    The purpose of this project is to develop capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) for medical imaging. Medical ultrasound transducers used today are fabricated using piezoelectric materials and bulk processing. To fabricate transducers capable of delivering a higher imaging...

  3. Micromachined silicon seismic transducers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barron, C.C.; Fleming, J.G.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Armour, D.L.; Fleming, R.P.

    1995-08-01

    Batch-fabricated silicon seismic transducers could revolutionize the discipline of CTBT monitoring by providing inexpensive, easily depolyable sensor arrays. Although our goal is to fabricate seismic sensors that provide the same performance level as the current state-of-the-art ``macro`` systems, if necessary one could deploy a larger number of these small sensors at closer proximity to the location being monitored in order to compensate for lower performance. We have chosen a modified pendulum design and are manufacturing prototypes in two different silicon micromachining fabrication technologies. The first set of prototypes, fabricated in our advanced surface- micromachining technology, are currently being packaged for testing in servo circuits -- we anticipate that these devices, which have masses in the 1--10 {mu}g range, will resolve sub-mG signals. Concurrently, we are developing a novel ``mold`` micromachining technology that promises to make proof masses in the 1--10 mg range possible -- our calculations indicate that devices made in this new technology will resolve down to at least sub-{mu}G signals, and may even approach to 10{sup {minus}10} G/{radical}Hz acceleration levels found in the low-earth-noise model.

  4. HDR monotherapy for prostate cancer: A simulation study to determine the effect of catheter displacement on target coverage and normal tissue irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karine K.; Roos, Martin A.; Aluwini, Shafak

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to systematically analyse the effect of catheter displacements both on target coverage and normal tissue irradiation in fractionated high dose rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy, using a simulation study, and to define tolerances for catheter displacement ensuring that both target coverage and normal tissue doses remain clinically acceptable. Besides the effect of total implant displacement, also displacements of catheters belonging to selected template rows only were evaluated in terms of target coverage and normal tissue dose, in order to analyse the change in dose distribution as a function of catheter dwell weight and catheter location. Material and methods: Five representative implant geometries, with 17 catheters each, were selected. The clinical treatment plan was compared to treatment plans in which an entire implant displacement in caudal direction over 3, 5, 7 and 10 mm was simulated. Besides, treatment plans were simulated considering a displacement of either the central, most ventral or most dorsal catheter rows only, over 5 mm caudally. Results: Due to displacement of the entire implant the target coverage drops below the tolerance of 93% for all displacements studied. The effect of displacement of the entire implant on organs at risk strongly depended on the patient anatomy; e.g., for 80% of the implant geometries the V 80 of the rectum exceeded its tolerance for all displacements. The effect of displacement of catheters belonging to selected template rows depended strongly on the relative weight of each catheter row when considering the target coverage and on its location when considering the dose in the organs at risk. Conclusion: This study supports the need for a check of the catheter locations before each fraction and correction of deviations of the catheter position exceeding 3 mm.

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate uses sound waves to produce pictures of a man’s prostate ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Prostate Ultrasound Imaging? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Prostate? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A transrectal ultrasound of the prostate gland ...

  7. Transducer Field Imaging Using Acoustography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaswinder S. Sandhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A common current practice for transducer field mapping is to scan, point-by-point, a hydrophone element in a 2D raster at various distances from the transducer radiating surface. This approach is tedious, requiring hours of scanning time to generate full cross-sectional and/or axial field distributions. Moreover, the lateral resolution of the field distribution image is dependent on the indexing steps between data points. Acoustography is an imaging process in which an acousto-optical (AO area sensor is employed to record the intensity of an ultrasound wavefield on a two-dimensional plane. This paper reports on the application of acoustography as a simple but practical method for assessing transducer field characteristics. A case study performed on a commercial transducer is reported, where the radiated fields are imaged using acoustography and compared to the corresponding quantities that are predicted numerically.

  8. Characterization of Dielectric Electroactive Polymer transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dennis; Møller, Martin B.; Sarban, Rahimullah

    2014-01-01

    This paper analysis the small-signal model of the Dielectric Electro Active Polymer (DEAP) transducer. The DEAP transducer have been proposed as an alternative to the electrodynamic transducer in sound reproduction systems. In order to understand how the DEAP transducer works, and provide guideli...

  9. Imaging and prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, Lawrence H.

    1996-01-01

    The use of imaging in evaluating patients with prostate cancer is highly dependent upon the purpose of the evaluation. Ultrasound, Computed Tomography, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, TC-99m Bone Scanning, and Positron Emission Tomography may all be utilized for imaging in prostate cancer. The utility of each of these modalities depends upon the intended purpose: for instance, screening, staging, or evaluating for progression of disease in patients with prostate cancer. Transrectal ultrasound is performed by placing a 5MHz to 7.5 MHz transducer in the rectum and imaging the prostate in the coronal and sagittal planes. Prostate cancer generally appears as an area of diminished echogenocity in the peripheral zone of the prostate gland. However, up to 24% of prostate cancers are isoechoic and cannot be well distinguished from the remainder of the peripheral zone. In addition, the incidence of malignancy in a lesion judged to be suspicious on ultrasound is between 20% and 25%. Therefore, while ultrasound is the least expensive of the three cross sectional imaging modalities, its relatively low specificity precludes it from being used as a screening examination. Investigators have also looked at the ability of ultrasound to evaluate the presence and extent of extracapsular spread of prostate cancer. The RDOG (Radiology Diagnostic Oncology Group) multi-institutional cooperative trial reported a disappointing overall accuracy of ultrasound of 58% for staging prostate cancer. The accuracy was somewhat higher 63%, for patients with advanced disease. The other cross-sectional imaging modalities available for imaging the prostate include Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Computed Tomography is useful as an 'anatomic' imaging technique to detect lymph node enlargement. It is not sensitive in detecting microscopic nodal involvement with tumor, or tumor in non-enlarged pelvic lymph nodes. The primary prostate neoplasm is generally the same attenuation as the normal

  10. Auto-positioning ultrasonic transducer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Randy K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An ultrasonic transducer apparatus and process for determining the optimal transducer position for flow measurement along a conduit outer surface. The apparatus includes a transmitting transducer for transmitting an ultrasonic signal, said transducer affixed to a conduit outer surface; a guide rail attached to a receiving transducer for guiding movement of a receiving transducer along the conduit outer surface, wherein the receiving transducer receives an ultrasonic signal from the transmitting transducer and sends a signal to a data acquisition system; and a motor for moving the receiving transducer along the guide rail, wherein the motor is controlled by a controller. The method includes affixing a transmitting transducer to an outer surface of a conduit; moving a receiving transducer on the conduit outer surface, wherein the receiving transducer is moved along a guide rail by a motor; transmitting an ultrasonic signal from the transmitting transducer that is received by the receiving transducer; communicating the signal received by the receiving transducer to a data acquisition and control system; and repeating the moving, transmitting, and communicating along a length of the conduit.

  11. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... No Please type your comment or suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! Please help us improve RadiologyInfo.org by taking our brief survey: Survey Do ... Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) (Enlargement of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate ...

  12. Progress towards developing neutron tolerant magnetostrictive and piezoelectric transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Brian; Tittmann, Bernhard; Rempe, Joy; Daw, Joshua; Kohse, Gordon; Carpenter, David; Ames, Michael; Ostrovsky, Yakov; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Montgomery, Robert; Chien, Hualte; Wernsman, Bernard

    2015-03-01

    Current generation light water reactors (LWRs), sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs), small modular reactors (SMRs), and next generation nuclear plants (NGNPs) produce harsh environments in and near the reactor core that can severely tax material performance and limit component operational life. To address this issue, several Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) research programs are evaluating the long duration irradiation performance of fuel and structural materials used in existing and new reactors. In order to maximize the amount of information obtained from Material Testing Reactor (MTR) irradiations, DOE is also funding development of enhanced instrumentation that will be able to obtain in-situ, real-time data on key material characteristics and properties, with unprecedented accuracy and resolution. Such data are required to validate new multi-scale, multi-physics modeling tools under development as part of a science-based, engineering driven approach to reactor development. It is not feasible to obtain high resolution/microscale data with the current state of instrumentation technology. However, ultrasound-based sensors offer the ability to obtain such data if it is demonstrated that these sensors and their associated transducers are resistant to high neutron flux, high gamma radiation, and high temperature. To address this need, the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR-NSUF) is funding an irradiation, led by PSU, at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor to test the survivability of ultrasound transducers. As part of this effort, PSU and collaborators have designed, fabricated, and provided piezoelectric and magnetostrictive transducers that are optimized to perform in harsh, high flux, environments. Four piezoelectric transducers were fabricated with either aluminum nitride, zinc oxide, or bismuth titanate as the active element that were coupled to either Kovar or aluminum waveguides and two

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... scanner by a cord. Some exams may use different transducers (with different capabilities) during a single exam. The transducer sends ... into the rectum. The images are obtained from different angles to get the best view of the ...

  14. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a transducer that ... signal to return from the area within the patient that is being examined to the transducer (the ...

  15. diagnostic values of digital rectal examination, prostate

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-09-09

    Sep 9, 2009 ... Subjects:Ninety four consecutive admissions of men aged 50 years and above admitted with urinary symptoms suggestive of prostatism. Main outcome measures: Primary outcome measures included race and age of patient;. Positive predictive values ... MHz transducer probe; with the patient in the left.

  16. Calculations for Piezoelectric Ultrasonic Transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik

    1986-01-01

    Analysis of piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers implies a solution of a boundary value problem, for a boay which consists of different materials, including a piezoelectric part. The problem is dynamic at frequencies, where a typical wavelength is somewhat less than the size of the body. Radiation...... and in particular the finite element method are considered. The finite element method is utilized for analysis of axisymmetric transducers. An explicit, fully piezoelectric, triangular ring element, with linear variations in displacememnt and electric potential is given. The influence of a fluid half-space is also...

  17. Rugged Direct-Current Transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1991-01-01

    Direct-current transducer withstands thermal and mechanical shocks. Operates from single, nominally 15-V power supply and nearly insensitive to both large variations in temperature and variations of as much as plus or minus 5 V in supply voltage. Its output voltage highly linear function of sensed current, with full-scale value of about 3 Vdc and offset of about 0.1 Vdc at 0 sensed current. Ruggedness of transducer due in large part to novel magnetic core, machined from solid block of nickel/iron high-permeability, low-hysteresis alloy.

  18. Potential interest to combine an intensity modulated conformal radiotherapy (I.M.C.R.T.) with a daily repositioning on intra-prostate implants to reduce sexual toxicity induced by exclusive irradiation of prostate cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapet, O.; Sotton, M.P.; Vial, L.; Belliere, A.; Ardiet, J.M.; Mornex, F.; Sentenac, I.; Romestaing, P.; Bouffard, J.

    2007-01-01

    A reduction in margins defining the forecast target volume thanks to a daily repositioning on intra prostate implants would reduce the doses delivered to the penis bulb, corpora cavernosa penis and a. pudendae internae left and right. An optimization of the I.M.C.R.T. on the same anatomical structures amplifies this earnings. The combination of the two could improve the sexual preservation and be proposed for patients with favourable stage prostate cancer. A study of Phase 2 begins soon. (N.C.)

  19. An analysis of clinical and treatment related prognostic factors on outcome using biochemical control as an end-point in patients with prostate cancer treated with external beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horwitz, Eric M.; Vicini, Frank A.; Ziaja, Ellen L.; Dmuchowski, Carl F.; Stromberg, Jannifer S.; Gustafson, Gary S.; Martinez, Alvaro A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: We reviewed our institution's experience in treating patients with clinically localized prostate cancer with external beam irradiation (RT) to determine if previously analyzed clinical and treatment related prognostic factors affected outcome when biochemical control was used as an end-point to evaluate results. Materials and methods: Between 1 January 1987 and 31 December 1991, 470 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with external beam RT using localized prostate fields at William Beaumont Hospital. Biochemical control was defined as PSA nadir ≤1.5 ng/ml within 1 year of treatment. After achieving nadir, if two consecutive increases of PSA were noted, the patient was scored a failure at the time of the first increase. Prognostic factors, including the total number of days in treatment, the method of diagnosis, a history of any pretreatment transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) and the type of boost were analyzed. Results: Median follow-up was 48 months. No statistically significant difference in rates of biochemical control were noted for treatment time, overall time (date of biopsy to completion of RT), history of any pretreatment TURP, history of diagnosis by TURP, or boost techniques. Patients diagnosed by TURP had a significant improvement in the overall rate of biochemical control (P < 0.03) compared to transrectal/transperineal biopsy. The 5-year actuarial rates were 58 versus 39%, respectively. This improvement was not evident when pretreatment PSA, T stage, or Gleason score were controlled for. On multivariate analysis, no variable was associated with outcome. When analysis was limited to a more favorable group of patients (T1/T2 tumors, pretreatment PSA ≤20 ng/ml and Gleason score <7), none of these variables were significantly predictive of biochemical control when controlling for pretreatment PSA, T stage and Gleason score. Conclusions: No significant effect of treatment time, overall time, pretreatment

  20. In vivo studies on the efficiency of irradiation with carbon ions at the syngeneic prostate carcinoma model R3327; In vivo Untersuchungen zur Wirksamkeit von Bestrahlungen mit Kohlenstoffionen am syngenen Prostatakarzinom Modell R3327

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glowa, Christin

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study is to characterize differential effects after carbon ion ({sup 12}C) relative to photon irradiations in vivo in three different sublines of the syngeneic rat prostate adenocarcinoma (PCa) R3327 (AT1, HI, and H) as well as to identify tumor specific influence factors of the radiation response. Subcutaneous PCa tumor fragments in rats were irradiated with single (1 Fx) or split (2 Fx) doses of photons or carbon ions (75 keV/μ), respectively. Primary endpoint was local tumor control after 300 days. Based on dose-response curves, the TCD{sub 50{sup -}} values (dose at 50% tumor control probability) were used to calculate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of carbon ions. Additionally, potential carbon ion specific irradiation effects were studied. For this, in vivo tumor-physiological changes, structural and functional radiation- induced effects of gene expression as well as tumor subpopulations with tumor-inducing properties were investigated. For {sup 12}C- irradiations with 1 Fx or 2 Fx, the RBEs were 1.62 (H), 2.08 (HI) and 2.3 (AT1) and 1.9 (H), 2.1 (HI) and 2.67 (AT1), respectively. Isoeffective irradiation with photons and {sup 12}C- ions showed different kinetics of the radiation response. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histology showed a faster and stronger increase of tumor vessel permeability after {sup 12}C- irradiation compared to photons. After irradiation, DNA-repair mechanisms, immune system components and migration were induced, in contrast cell cycle progression, adhesion, angiogenesis, and the aerobic metabolism were downregulated. Especially, the kinetics of signaling cascades, apoptosis and stress-response were dependent on irradiation modality. In HI- and H-tumors CD24{sup +}/CD45{sup -} cells were identified as tumor inducing cells (TICs) in vivo. All three sublines were established under cell culture conditions to enable further molecular biological analyses. In conclusion, {sup 12}C- irradiation is

  1. Multi-institutional Evaluation of Elective Nodal Irradiation and/or Androgen Deprivation Therapy with Postprostatectomy Salvage Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Stephen J; Agrawal, Shree; Abramowitz, Matthew C; Moghanaki, Drew; Pisansky, Thomas M; Efstathiou, Jason A; Michalski, Jeff M; Spratt, Daniel E; Hearn, Jason W D; Koontz, Bridget F; Liauw, Stanley L; Pollack, Alan; Anscher, Mitchell S; Den, Robert B; Stephans, Kevin L; Zietman, Anthony L; Lee, W Robert; Stephenson, Andrew J; Tendulkar, Rahul D

    2017-11-09

    Outcomes with postprostatectomy salvage radiation therapy (SRT) are not ideal. Little evidence exists regarding potential benefits of adding whole pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT) alone or in combination with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). To explore whether WPRT and/or ADT added to prostate bed radiation therapy (PBRT) improves freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF) or distant metastases (DM). A database was compiled from 10 academic institutions of patients with postprostatectomy prostate-specific antigen (PSA) >0.01 ng/ml; pT1-4, Nx/0, cM0; and Gleason score (GS) ≥7 treated between 1987 and 2013. Median follow-up was 51 mo. WPRT and/or ADT in addition to PBRT. FFBF and DM were calculated using cumulative incidence estimation. Multivariable analysis (MVA) utilized cumulative incidence regression. Median pre-SRT PSA was 0.5 ng/ml for 1861 patients. Median follow-up for patients not experiencing biochemical failure (BF) was 55 mo. MVA showed increased BF for PBRT versus WPRT (hazard ratio [HR] 1.82, pevaluated patients with prostate cancer treated with radiation after surgery to remove the prostate. Both radiation to the pelvic lymph nodes and suppression of testosterone lowered the chance of increasing prostate-specific antigen (a marker for cancer returning). Copyright © 2017 European Association of Urology. All rights reserved.

  2. A Direct Driver for Electrostatic Transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dennis; Knott, Arnold; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2014-01-01

    Electrostatic transducers represent a very interesting alternative to the traditional inefficient electrodynamic transducers. In order to establish the full potential of these transducers, power amplifiers which fulfill the strict requirements imposed by such loads (high impedance, frequency...... depended, nonlinear and high bias voltage for linearization) must be developed. This paper analyzes a power stage suitable for driving an electrostatic transducer under biasing. Measurement results of a ±400 V prototype amplifier are shown. THD below 1% is reported....

  3. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a physician during a routine physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty ... Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page This page was reviewed on ...

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... uses sound waves to produce pictures of a man’s prostate gland and to help diagnose symptoms such ... also called transrectal ultrasound, provides images of a man's prostate gland and surrounding tissue. The exam typically ...

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... View full size with caption Related Articles and Media Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) (Enlargement of the Prostate) ... or your insurance provider to get a better understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web ...

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of Prostate Ultrasound Imaging? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Prostate? Ultrasound is ... in front of the rectum. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A ...

  8. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Radiologist and patient consultation. View full size with caption Related Articles and Media Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) (Enlargement of the Prostate) ...

  9. Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... man's bladder that produces fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is common among older men. It is rare ... younger than 40. Risk factors for developing prostate cancer include being over 65 years of age, family ...

  10. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is used to guide the biopsy to specific regions of the prostate gland. When the examination is ... is relatively insensitive to the pain in the region of the prostate. A biopsy will add time ...

  11. Neoadjuvant hormonal therapy and external-beam radiotherapy versus external-beam irradiation alone for prostate cancer. A quality-of-life analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkawa, Michael; Piroth, Marc D.; Asadpour, Branka; Gagel, Bernd; Fischedick, Karin; Siluschek, Jaroslav; Kehl, Mareike; Krenkel, Barbara; Eble, Michael J. [RWTH Aachen (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2009-02-15

    To evaluate the impact of neoadjuvant hormonal therapy (NHT) on quality of life after external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer. A group of 170 patients (85 with and 85 without NHT) has been surveyed prospectively before EBRT (70.2-72 Gy), at the last day of EBRT, a median time of 2 months and 15 months after EBRT using a validated questionnaire (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite). Pairs with and without NHT (median treatment time of 3.5 months before EBRT) were matched according to the respective planning target volume and prostate volume. Before EBRT, significantly lower urinary function/bother, sexual function and hormonal function/bother scores were found for patients with NHT. More than 1 year after EBRT, only sexual function scores remained lower. In a multivariate analysis, NHT and adjuvant hormonal therapy (HT) versus NHT only (hazard ratio 14; 95% confidence interval 2.7-183; p = 0.02) and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists versus antiandrogens (hazard ratio 3.6; 95% confidence interval 1.1-12; p = 0.04) proved to be independent risk factors for long-term erectile dysfunction (no or very poor ability to have an erection). With the exception of sexual function (additional adjuvant HT and application of LHRH analog independently adverse), short-term NHT was not found to decrease quality of life after EBRT for prostate cancer. (orig.)

  12. Digital electrostatic acoustic transducer array

    KAUST Repository

    Carreno, Armando Arpys Arevalo

    2016-12-19

    In this paper we present the fabrication and characterization of an array of electrostatic acoustic transducers. The array is micromachined on a silicon wafer using standard micro-machining techniques. Each array contains 2n electrostatic transducer membranes, where “n” is the bit number. Every element of the array has a hexagonal membrane shape structure, which is separated from the substrate by 3µm air gap. The membrane is made out 5µm thick polyimide layer that has a bottom gold electrode on the substrate and a gold top electrode on top of the membrane (250nm). The wafer layout design was diced in nine chips with different array configurations, with variation of the membrane dimensions. The device was tested with 90 V giving and sound output level as high as 35dB, while actuating all the elements at the same time.

  13. Multi Resonance Shear Mode Transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-21

    engineering in the single crystal lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMNT) system has uncovered a very unique piezoelectric shear mode. Contrary to...ABSTRACT Crystallographic engineering of single crystal relaxor-based ferroelectrics was used to design broadband, compact, high power, low frequency...utilize the d36 shear piezoelectric coefficient, which has advantages for compact low frequency sonar transducers. The d36 cut is unique in that large

  14. Superconducting Qubit Optical Transducer (SQOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-05

    has photon loss in the optical fibre would appear has an effective T1 process and destroy any entanglement. 2.2.3 TEMPORAL MODE FILTER FUNCTION To...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The SQOT (Superconducting Qubit Optical Transducer) project proposes to build a novel electro- optic system which can...exchange quantum information between optical qubits at telecom frequencies and superconducting qubits. A direct quantum information transfer between

  15. Optical transducers with frequency output

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osadchuk, Oleksandr V.; Osadchuk, Volodymyr S.; Osadchuk, Iaroslav O.; Kolimoldayev, Maksat; Komada, Paweł; Mussabekov, Kanat

    2017-08-01

    In this work the characteristics research of microelectronic transducers of optical radiation with a frequency output signal on the basis of a hybrid integrated circuit consisting of a bipolar and a field-effect transistor with a Schottky barrier is presented. The connection of an external inductance to electrodes a collector - drain allows to implement the auto generating device. The frequency of the device generation depends on power of optical radiation falling on photosensing elements as a photoresistor, photodiode and photosensing transistors switched on in a circuit of the self-excited oscillator. The impedance on electrodes the collector - drain of bipolar and field transistors has capacitive reactive part and negative active resistance, which compensates power losses in a tuning circuit of the device. On the base of a nonlinear equivalent circuit of the transducer on an alternating current the analytical expressions of function of transformation and equation of sensitivity are obtained. The sensitivity of optical transducers lays in a range from 25 kHz/μWt/cm2 up to 150 kHz/μWt/cm2.

  16. Calculations for piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, H.

    1986-05-01

    Analysis of piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers implies a solution of a boundary value problem, for a body which consists of different materials, including a piezoelectric part. The problem is dynamic at frequencies, where a typical wavelength is somewhat less than the size of the body. Radiation losses as well as internal losses may be important. Due to the complexity of the problem, a closed form solution is the exception rather than the rule. For this reason, it is necessary to use approximate methods for the analysis. Equivalent circuits, the Rayleigh-Ritz method, Mindlin plate theory and in particular the finite element method are considered. The finite element method is utilized for analysis of axisymmetric transducers. An explicit, fully piezoelectric, triangular ring element, with linear variations in displacement and electric potential is given. The influence of a fluid half-space is also given, in the form of a complex stiffness matrix. A special stacking procedure, for analysis of the backing has been developed. This procedure gives a saving, which is similar to that of the fast fourier transform algorithm, and is also wellsuited for analysis of finite and infinite waveguides. Results obtained by the finite element method are shown and compared with measurements and exact solutions. Good agreement is obtained. It is concluded that the finite element method can be a valueable tool in analysis and design of ultrasonic transducers. (author)

  17. Transducers

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, B.

    stream_size 27 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Encycl_Microcomputers_18_335.pdf.txt stream_source_info Encycl_Microcomputers_18_335.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  18. Margin Evaluation in the Presence of Deformation, Rotation, and Translation in Prostate and Entire Seminal Vesicle Irradiation With Daily Marker-Based Setup Corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutanga, Theodore F.; Boer, Hans C.J. de; Wielen, Gerard J. van der; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Incrocci, Luca; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a method for margin evaluation accounting for all measured displacements during treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: For 21 patients treated with stereographic targeting marker-based online translation corrections, dose distributions with varying margins and gradients were created. Sets of possible cumulative delivered dose distributions were simulated by moving voxels and accumulating dose per voxel. Voxel motion was simulated consistent with measured distributions of systematic and random displacements due to stereographic targeting inaccuracies, deformation, rotation, and intrafraction motion. The method of simulation maintained measured correlation of voxel motions due to organ deformation. Results: For the clinical target volume including prostate and seminal vesicles (SV), the probability that some part receives <95% of the prescribed dose, the changes in minimum dose, and volume receiving 95% of prescription dose compared with planning were 80.5% ± 19.2%, 9.0 ± 6.8 Gy, and 3.0% ± 3.7%, respectively, for the smallest studied margins (3 mm prostate, 5 mm SV) and steepest dose gradients. Corresponding values for largest margins (5 mm prostate, 8 mm SV) with a clinical intensity-modulated radiotherapy dose distribution were 46.5% ± 34.7%, 6.7 ± 5.8 Gy, and 1.6% ± 2.3%. For prostate-only clinical target volume, the values were 51.8% ± 17.7%, 3.3 ± 1.6 Gy, and 0.6% ± 0.5% with the smallest margins and 5.2% ± 7.4%, 1.8 ± 0.9 Gy, and 0.1% ± 0.1% for the largest margins. Addition of three-dimensional rotation corrections only improved these values slightly. All rectal planning constraints were met in the actual reconstructed doses for all studied margins. Conclusion: We developed a system for margin validation in the presence of deformations. In our population, a 5-mm margin provided sufficient dosimetric coverage for the prostate. In contrast, an 8-mm SV margin was still insufficient owing to deformations. Addition of

  19. LAVA Pressure Transducer Trade Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltman, Samuel B.

    2016-01-01

    The Regolith and Environment Science and Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE) payload will transport the (LAVA) subsystem to hydrogen-rich locations on the moon supporting NASA's in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) programs. There, the LAVA subsystem will analyze volatiles that evolve from heated regolith samples in order to quantify how much water is present. To do this, the system needs resilient pressure transducers (PTs) to calculate the moles in the gas samples. The PT trade study includes a comparison of newly-procured models to a baseline unit with prior flight history in order to determine the PT model with the best survivability in flight-forward conditions.

  20. Prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bey, P.; Beckendorf, V.; Stines, J.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation therapy of prostate carcinoma with a curative intent implies to treat the whole prostate at high dose (at least 66 Gy). According to clinical stage, PSA level, Gleason's score, the clinical target volume may include seminal vesicles and less often pelvic lymph nodes. Microscopic extra-capsular extension is found in 15 to 60% of T1-T2 operated on, specially in apex tumors. On contrary, cancers developing from the transitional zone may stay limited to the prostate even with a big volume and with a high PSA level. Zonal anatomy of the prostate identifies internal prostate, including the transitional zone (5% of the prostate in young people). External prostate includes central and peripheral zones. The inferior limit of the prostate is not lower than the inferior border of the pubic symphysis. Clinical and radiological examination: ultrasonography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), CT-scan identify prognostic factors as tumor volume, capsule effraction, seminal vesicles invasion and lymph node extension. The identification of the clinical target volume is now done mainly by CT-Scan which identifies prostate and seminal vesicles. NMR could be helpful to identify more precisely prostate apex. The definition of margins around the clinical target volume has to take in account daily reproducibility and organ motion and of course the maximum tolerable dose for organs at risk. (authors)

  1. Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers for 3-D Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann

    of state-of-the-art 3-D ultrasound systems. The focus is on row-column addressed transducer arrays. This previously sparsely investigated addressing scheme offers a highly reduced number of transducer elements, resulting in reduced transducer manufacturing costs and data processing. To produce...... such transducer arrays, capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) technology is chosen for this project. Properties such as high bandwidth and high design flexibility makes this an attractive transducer technology, which is under continuous development in the research community. A theoretical...... capable of producing 62+62-element row-column addressed CMUT arrays with negligible charging issues. The arrays include an integrated apodization, which reduces the ghost echoes produced by the edge waves in such arrays by 15:8 dB. The acoustical cross-talk is measured on fabricated arrays, showing a 24 d...

  2. Transducers and arrays for underwater sound

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, John L

    2016-01-01

    This improved and updated second edition covers the theory, development, and design of electro-acoustic transducers for underwater applications. This highly regarded text discusses the basics of piezoelectric and magnetostrictive transducers that are currently being used as well as promising new designs. It presents the basic acoustics as well as the specific acoustics data needed in transducer design and evaluation. A broad range of designs of projectors and hydrophones are described in detail along with methods of modeling, evaluation, and measurement. Analysis of projector and hydrophone transducer arrays, including the effects of mutual radiation impedance and numerical models for elements and arrays, are also covered. The book includes new advances in transducer design and transducer materials and has been completely reorganized to be suitable for use as a textbook, as well as a reference or handbook. The new edition contains updates to the first edition, end-of-chapter exercises, and solutions to select...

  3. Performance of Honeywell silicon pressure transducers

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    VijayKumar, K.; Joseph, A.; Desai, R.G.P.; Nagvekar, S.; Prabhudesai, S.; Damodaran, V.

    to elucidate the performance characteristics of the pressure transducer such as zero-point offset, standard deviation, hysteresis effect, linearity, accuracy, temperature-sensitivity, repeatability, and so forth. 3.1 Calibration Device In the present work... pressure transducers 184 the pressure-calibrator, whose output was considered as the true value of pressure. Amongst the currently available pressure standards, those that provide the finest pressure resolution are these quartz pressure transducers [3...

  4. High-dose irradiation for prostate cancer via a high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost: Results of a phase I to II study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vargas, Carlos E.; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Boike, Thomas P.; Spencer, William; Goldstein, Neal; Gustafson, Gary S.; Krauss, Daniel J.; Gonzalez, Jose

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate outcomes of intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer patients on a prospective dose-escalation study of pelvic external-beam radiation therapy (EBRT) combined with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost. Methods: From November 1991 to April 2003, 197 patients were treated for intermediate- and high-risk disease features. All patients had prostate-specific antigen >10 ng/ml, Gleason score ≥7, or clinical stage ≥T2b, and all received pelvic EBRT (46 Gy) while receiving either two or three HDR boost treatments. HDR dose fractionation increased progressively and was divided into two dose levels. The mean prostate biologic equivalency dose was 88.2 Gy for the low-dose group and 116.8 Gy for the high-dose group (α/β = 1.2). Clinical failure was either local failure or distant metastasis; clinical event-free survival (cEFS) was defined as patients who lived free of clinical failure. Results: Median follow-up was 4.9 years. The 5-year rates were as follows: biologic failure (BF), 18.6%, clinical failure (CF), 9.8%, cEFS 84.8%, cause-specific survival (CSS), 98.3%, and overall survival (OS), 92.9%. Five-year biochemical failure (68.7% vs. 86%, p < 0.001), CF (6.1% vs. 15.6%, p = 0.04), cEFS (75.5% vs. 91.7%, p = 0.003), CSS (95.4% vs. 100%, p = 0.02), and OS (86.2% vs. 97.8%, p = 0.002) were significantly better for the high-dose group. Multivariate analysis showed that high-dose group (p = 0.01, HR 0.35) and Gleason score (p = 0.01, HR 1.84) were significant variables for cEFS. Multivariate analysis showed that high-dose group (p = 0.01, HR 0.14) and age (p = 0.03, HR 1.09 per year) were significant variables for overall survival. Conclusion: There is a strong dose-response relationship for intermediate- to high-risk prostate cancer patients. Improved locoregional control with higher radiation doses alone can significantly decrease biochemical and clinical failures

  5. Prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spera, G.

    2010-01-01

    This work is about diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of prostate cancer. The techniques used are: transrectal ultrasound, laparascopy, bone scan, chest x-ray, radiography, chemoterapy and radiotherapy

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Prostate ultrasound, also called transrectal ultrasound, provides ...

  7. Progress in Gene Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Kamran A.; Davis, Brian J.; Wilson, Torrence M.; Wiseman, Gregory A.; Federspiel, Mark J.; Morris, John C.

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy has held promise to correct various disease processes. Prostate cancer represents the second leading cause of cancer death in American men. A number of clinical trials involving gene therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer have been reported. The ability to efficiently transduce tumors with effective levels of therapeutic genes has been identified as a fundamental barrier to effective cancer gene therapy. The approach utilizing gene therapy in prostate cancer patients at our institution attempts to address this deficiency. The sodium-iodide symporter (NIS) is responsible for the ability of the thyroid gland to transport and concentrate iodide. The characteristics of the NIS gene suggest that it could represent an ideal therapeutic gene for cancer therapy. Published results from Mayo Clinic researchers have indicated several important successes with the use of the NIS gene and prostate gene therapy. Studies have demonstrated that transfer of the human NIS gene into prostate cancer using adenovirus vectors in vitro and in vivo results in efficient uptake of radioactive iodine and significant tumor growth delay with prolongation of survival. Preclinical successes have culminated in the opening of a phase I trial for patients with advanced prostate disease which is currently accruing patients. Further study will reveal the clinical promise of NIS gene therapy in the treatment of prostate as well as other malignancies.

  8. Identification and comparison of predictive models of rectal and bladder toxicity in the case of prostatic irradiation; Identification et comparaison de modeles predictifs de toxicite rectale et vesicale en cas d'irradiation prostatique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnep, K.; Chira, C.; Le Prise, E.; Crevoisier, R. de [Centre Eugene-Marquis, Rennes (France); Zhu, J.; Simon, A.; Ospina Arango, J.D. [Inserm U642, Rennes (France); Messai, T.; Bossi, A. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France); Beckendorf, V. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, Nancy (France)

    2011-10-15

    More than 400 patients have been treated by conformational radiation therapy for a localized prostate adenocarcinoma and some have been selected according to the availability of dose-volume histograms. Predictive models of rectal and bladder toxicity have been compared: LKB, Logit EUD and Poisson EUD for rectal toxicity, LKB, Logit EUD, Poisson EUD and Schultheiss for bladder toxicity. Results suggest that these models could be used during the inverse planning of intensity-modulated radiation therapy in order to decrease toxicity. Short communication

  9. Targeting Radiation Therapy for Developing Dendritic Cell Based Immunotherapy of Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chakravarty, Prabir K

    2006-01-01

    .... The hypothesis was tested using a murine prostate cancer model, RM-1. The study showed that irradiation induces apoptosis and the irradiated tumor cells were able to activate dendritic cells and stimulate tumor specific immune response in vitro...

  10. Evaluating baculovirus as a vector for human prostate cancer gene therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie L Swift

    Full Text Available Gene therapy represents an attractive strategy for the non-invasive treatment of prostate cancer, where current clinical interventions show limited efficacy. Here, we evaluate the use of the insect virus, baculovirus (BV, as a novel vector for human prostate cancer gene therapy. Since prostate tumours represent a heterogeneous environment, a therapeutic approach that achieves long-term regression must be capable of targeting multiple transformed cell populations. Furthermore, discrimination in the targeting of malignant compared to non-malignant cells would have value in minimising side effects. We employed a number of prostate cancer models to analyse the potential for BV to achieve these goals. In vitro, both traditional prostate cell lines as well as primary epithelial or stromal cells derived from patient prostate biopsies, in two- or three-dimensional cultures, were used. We also evaluated BV in vivo in murine prostate cancer xenograft models. BV was capable of preferentially transducing invasive malignant prostate cancer cell lines compared to early stage cancers and non-malignant samples, a restriction that was not a function of nuclear import. Of more clinical relevance, primary patient-derived prostate cancer cells were also efficiently transduced by BV, with robust rates observed in epithelial cells of basal phenotype, which expressed BV-encoded transgenes faster than epithelial cells of a more differentiated, luminal phenotype. Maximum transduction capacity was observed in stromal cells. BV was able to penetrate through three-dimensional structures, including in vitro spheroids and in vivo orthotopic xenografts. BV vectors containing a nitroreductase transgene in a gene-directed enzyme pro-drug therapy approach were capable of efficiently killing malignant prostate targets following administration of the pro-drug, CB1954. Thus, BV is capable of transducing a large proportion of prostate cell types within a heterogeneous 3-D prostate

  11. Opto-acoustic transducer for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benett, W.; Celliers, P.; Da Silva, L.; Glinsky, M.; London, R.; Maitland, D.; Matthews, D.; Krulevich, P.; Lee, A.

    1999-08-31

    This invention is an optically activated transducer for generating acoustic vibrations in a biological medium. The transducer is located at the end of a fiber optic which may be located within a catheter. Energy for operating the transducer is provided optically by laser light transmitted through the fiber optic to the transducer. Pulsed laser light is absorbed in the working fluid of the transducer to generate a thermal pressure and consequent adiabatic expansion of the transducer head such that it does work against the ambient medium. The transducer returns to its original state by a process of thermal cooling. The motion of the transducer within the ambient medium couples acoustic energy into the medium. By pulsing the laser at a high repetition rate (which may vary from CW to 100 kHz) an ultrasonic radiation field can be established locally in the medium. This method of producing ultrasonic vibrations can be used in vivo for the treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans, particularly for dissolving thrombus. The catheter may also incorporate anti-thrombolytic drug treatments as an adjunct therapy and it may be operated in conjunction with ultrasonic detection equipment for imaging and feedback control. 7 figs.

  12. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... BPH) , with measurements acquired as needed for any treatment planning. detect an abnormal growth within the prostate. help diagnose the cause of a man's infertility. A transrectal ultrasound of the prostate gland is typically used to help diagnose symptoms such as: a nodule felt by a physician ...

  13. Using Portable Transducers to Measure Tremor Severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodger Elble

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Portable motion transducers, suitable for measuring tremor, are now available at a reasonable cost. The use of these transducers requires knowledge of their limitations and data analysis. The purpose of this review is to provide a practical overview and example software for using portable motion transducers in the quantification of tremor. Methods: Medline was searched via PubMed.gov in December 2015 using the Boolean expression “tremor AND (accelerometer OR accelerometry OR gyroscope OR inertial measurement unit OR digitizing tablet OR transducer.” Abstracts of 419 papers dating back to 1964 were reviewed for relevant portable transducers and methods of tremor analysis, and 105 papers written in English were reviewed in detail. Results: Accelerometers, gyroscopes, and digitizing tablets are used most commonly, but few are sold for the purpose of measuring tremor. Consequently, most software for tremor analysis is developed by the user. Wearable transducers are capable of recording tremor continuously, in the absence of a clinician. Tremor amplitude, frequency, and occurrence (percentage of time with tremor can be computed. Tremor amplitude and occurrence correlate strongly with clinical ratings of tremor severity. Discussion: Transducers provide measurements of tremor amplitude that are objective, precise, and valid, but the precision and accuracy of transducers are mitigated by natural variability in tremor amplitude. This variability is so great that the minimum detectable change in amplitude, exceeding random variability, is comparable for scales and transducers. Research is needed to determine the feasibility of detecting smaller change using averaged data from continuous long-term recordings with wearable transducers.

  14. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... whether the object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes ... As the sound waves bounce off internal organs, fluids and tissues, the sensitive receiver in the transducer ...

  15. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and produces pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound ... from the probe through the gel into the body. The transducer collects the sounds that bounce back ...

  16. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... your knees toward your chest. To obtain high-quality images, an ultrasound transducer – a plastic cylinder about ... standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the ...

  17. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... than 20 minutes. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound exams in which the transducer is inserted into an opening of the body may produce minimal discomfort. If no biopsy is ...

  18. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... composition of body tissue through which the sound travels. A small amount of gel is put on the skin to allow the sound waves to travel from the transducer to the examined area within ...

  19. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... rectum. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A transrectal ultrasound of the ... the scanner by a cord. Some exams may use different transducers (with different capabilities) during a single ...

  20. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound exams in which the transducer ... in the sperm or urine following the procedure. After an ultrasound examination, you should be able to ...

  1. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... obtain high-quality images, an ultrasound transducer – a plastic cylinder about the size of a finger – is ... end of their bowel (rectum) removed during prior surgery are not good candidates for ultrasound of the ...

  2. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the transducer is pressed against the skin, it directs small pulses of inaudible, high-frequency sound waves ... of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying ...

  3. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, size or contour of organs, tissues, ... the sensitive receiver in the transducer records tiny changes in the sound's pitch and direction. These signature ...

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a transducer that ... blood, may be administered to determine if a patient is at high risk for cancer. In this ...

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a transducer that ... suggestion into the following text box: Comment: E-mail: Area code: Phone no: Thank you! Please help ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... gel. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... the transducer is pressed against the skin, it directs small pulses of inaudible, high-frequency sound waves ...

  7. Prostate Cancer Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prostate cancer A man whose father, brother, or son has had prostate cancer has a higher-than- ... known if these drugs lower the risk of death from prostate cancer. The Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial ( ...

  8. Screening for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Force reviewed research studies on the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening test for prostate cancer. It concluded that ... used to screen for prostate cancer: • Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test: This test looks for PSA, a ...

  9. Understanding Prostate Cancer: Newly Diagnosed

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... vs Cancer Contact Us Newly Diagnosed with Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Basics About the Prostate Risk Factors Prostate ... when my.. Donors Patient Stories About the Prostate Cancer Foundation The Prostate Cancer Foundation (PCF) is the world’s leading philanthropic ...

  10. Measurements of doses from photon beam irradiation and scattered neutrons in an anthropomorphic phantom model of prostate cancer: a comparison between 3DCRT, IMRT and tomotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalik Anna

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The rapid development of new radiotherapy technologies, such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT or tomotherapy, has resulted in the capacity to deliver a more homogenous dose in the target. However, the higher doses associated with these techniques are a reason for concern because they may increase the dose outside the target. In the present study, we compared 3DCRT, IMRT and tomotherapy to assess the doses to organs at risk (OARs resulting from photon beam irradiation and scattered neutrons.

  11. Potential interest to combine an intensity modulated conformal radiotherapy (I.M.C.R.T.) with a daily repositioning on intra-prostate implants to reduce sexual toxicity induced by exclusive irradiation of prostate cancers; Interets potentiels de combiner une radiotherapie de conformation avec modulation d'intensite (RCMI) avec un repositionnement journalier sur implants intraprostatiques pour reduire la toxicite sexuelle induite par l'irradiation exclusive des cancers de prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapet, O.; Sotton, M.P.; Vial, L.; Belliere, A.; Ardiet, J.M.; Mornex, F.; Sentenac, I.; Romestaing, P. [Centre Hospitalier Lyon-Sud, Dept. de Radiotherapie-oncologie, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France); Bouffard, J. [Centre Hospitalier Lyon-Sud, Service de Radiologie, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France)

    2007-11-15

    A reduction in margins defining the forecast target volume thanks to a daily repositioning on intra prostate implants would reduce the doses delivered to the penis bulb, corpora cavernosa penis and a. pudendae internae left and right. An optimization of the I.M.C.R.T. on the same anatomical structures amplifies this earnings. The combination of the two could improve the sexual preservation and be proposed for patients with favourable stage prostate cancer. A study of Phase 2 begins soon. (N.C.)

  12. Benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH); Prostate enlargement resources; BPH resources ... The following organizations provide information on benign prostatic hyperplasia ( prostate enlargement ... Urology Care Foundation -- www. ...

  13. RapidArc, intensity modulated photon and proton techniques for recurrent prostate cancer in previously irradiated patients: a treatment planning comparison study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Damien C; Miralbell, Raymond; Wang, Hui; Cozzi, Luca; Dipasquale, Giovanna; Khan, Haleem G; Ratib, Osman; Rouzaud, Michel; Vees, Hansjoerg; Zaidi, Habib

    2009-01-01

    A study was performed comparing volumetric modulated arcs (RA) and intensity modulation (with photons, IMRT, or protons, IMPT) radiation therapy (RT) for patients with recurrent prostate cancer after RT. Plans for RA, IMRT and IMPT were optimized for 7 patients. Prescribed dose was 56 Gy in 14 fractions. The recurrent gross tumor volume (GTV) was defined on 18 F-fluorocholine PET/CT scans. Plans aimed to cover at least 95% of the planning target volume with a dose > 50.4 Gy. A maximum dose (D Max ) of 61.6 Gy was allowed to 5% of the GTV. For the urethra, D Max was constrained to 37 Gy. Rectal D Median was < 17 Gy. Results were analyzed using Dose-Volume Histogram and conformity index (CI 90 ) parameters. Tumor coverage (GTV and PTV) was improved with RA (V 95% 92.6 ± 7.9 and 83.7 ± 3.3%), when compared to IMRT (V 95% 88.6 ± 10.8 and 77.2 ± 2.2%). The corresponding values for IMPT were intermediate for the GTV (V 95% 88.9 ± 10.5%) and better for the PTV (V 95% 85.6 ± 5.0%). The percentages of rectal and urethral volumes receiving intermediate doses (35 Gy) were significantly decreased with RA (5.1 ± 3.0 and 38.0 ± 25.3%) and IMPT (3.9 ± 2.7 and 25.1 ± 21.1%), when compared to IMRT (9.8 ± 5.3 and 60.7 ± 41.7%). CI 90 was 1.3 ± 0.1 for photons and 1.6 ± 0.2 for protons. Integral Dose was 1.1 ± 0.5 Gy*cm 3 *10 5 for IMPT and about a factor three higher for all photon's techniques. RA and IMPT showed improvements in conformal avoidance relative to fixed beam IMRT for 7 patients with recurrent prostate cancer. IMPT showed further sparing of organs at risk

  14. A Critical Role of the PTEN/PDGF Signaling Network for the Regulation of Radiosensitivity in Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, Michael; Najy, Abdo J.; Snyder, Michael; Movilla, Lisa S.; Kim, Hyeong-Reh Choi

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Loss or mutation of the phosphate and tensin homologue (PTEN) is a common genetic abnormality in prostate cancer (PCa) and induces platelet-derived growth factor D (PDGF D) signaling. We examined the role of the PTEN/PDGF axis on radioresponse using a murine PTEN null prostate epithelial cell model. Methods and Materials: PTEN wild-type (PTEN +/+ ) and PTEN knockout (PTEN −/− ) murine prostate epithelial cell lines were used to examine the relationship between the PTEN status and radiosensitivity and also to modulate the PDGF D expression levels. PTEN −/− cells were transduced with a small hairpin RNA (shRNA) lentiviral vector containing either scrambled nucleotides (SCRM) or sequences targeted to PDGF D (shPDGF D). Tumorigenesis and morphogenesis of these cell lines were evaluated in vivo via subcutaneous injection of male nude mice and in vitro using Matrigel 3-dimensional (3D) culture. Effects of irradiation on clonogenic survival, cell migration, and invasion were measured with respect to the PTEN status and the PDGF D expression level. In addition, apoptosis and cell cycle redistribution were examined as potential mechanisms for differences seen. Results: PTEN −/− cells were highly tumorigenic in animals and effectively formed foci in 3D culture. Importantly, loss of PDGF D in these cell lines drastically diminished these phenotypes. Furthermore, PTEN −/− cells demonstrated increased clonogenic survival in vitro compared to PTEN +/+ , and attenuation of PDGF D significantly reversed this radioresistant phenotype. PTEN −/− cells displayed greater migratory and invasive potential at baseline as well as after irradiation. Both the basal and radiation-induced migratory and invasive phenotypes in PTEN −/− cells required PDGF D expression. Interestingly, these differences were independent of apoptosis and cell cycle redistribution, as they showed no significant difference. Conclusions: We propose that PDGF D represents a potentially

  15. Xanthogranulomatous Prostatitis, a Rare Prostatic Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Noyola

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There are several benign prostatic pathologies that can clinically mimic a prostate adenocarcinoma. Xanthogranulomatous prostatitis is a benign inflammatory condition of the prostate and a rare entity. A 47-year old male, with 3 years of lower urinary tract symptoms, with a palpable hypogastric tumor, digital rectal examination: solid prostate, of approximately 60 g. Initial PSA was 0.90 ng/mL. He underwent surgical excision of the lower abdominal nodule and prostatectomy. Histopathology showed xanthogranulomatous prostatitis, without malignancy. Xanthogranulomatous prostatitis is an extremely rare entity that can simulate prostate adenocarcinoma, therefore having a correct histopathological diagnosis is essential.

  16. Role Of Shark Cartilage In Reducing Changes In Gene Expression Of Some Enzymes Induced By N-Nitroso-N-Methyl Urea In Prostate Of Irradiated Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ELMAGHRABY, T.; YACOUB, S.; IBRAHIM, N.K.

    2009-01-01

    There is overwhelming evidence to indicate that free radicals cause oxidative damage to lipids, proteins and nucleic acids and are involved in the pathogenesis of several diseases. Therefore, antioxidants, which can neutralize free radicals, may be of central importance in the prevention of these diseases. Recent studies demonstrated the role of shark cartilage in protecting cells against reactive oxygen species induced DNA damage and mutagenesis. Reactive oxygen species and other free radicals are known to be the mediators of phenotypic and genotypic changes that lead from mutation to neoplasia. There are some primary antioxidants such as glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx), glutathione-S-transferase (GST-π) and super oxide dismutase (SOD), which protects against cellular and molecular damage caused by the reactive oxygen metabolites (ROMs).In this study, the effect of shark cartilage against the N-nitroso-N-methyl urea + testosterone and/or gamma radiation-induced mutagens and carcinogens in rat prostate were investigated.The data showed significant decrease in gene expression of manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), glutathione peroxidase 1 (GSHPx1) , enzyme activities of total superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) and non-significant increase in glutathione-S-transferase (GST-π) in N-nitroso-N-methyl urea + testosterone, N-nitroso-N-methyl urea + testosterone + gamma radiation groups as compared to control group.The results revealed that shark cartilage administration afford a significant protective effect against N-nitroso-N-methyl urea + testosterone and/or gamma radiation- induced oxidative injury.

  17. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as ... bowel (rectum) removed during prior surgery are not good candidates for ultrasound of the prostate gland because ...

  18. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... receiver coil. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top ... To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR- ...

  19. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  20. Prostate Biopsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include "prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia" and "atypical small acinar proliferation." Cancer grading. If the pathologist finds cancer, it's ... does not endorse any of the third party products and services advertised. Advertising and sponsorship policy Advertising ...

  1. Prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the prostate. The doctor may use a computerized robot to do this. The radioactive material is removed ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  2. Prostatitis - bacterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or tender scrotum The provider may perform a digital rectal exam to examine your prostate. During this ... Bennett's Principles and Practice of Infectious Diseases, Updated Edition . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap ...

  3. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... rectum into the prostate gland which is situated right in front of the rectum. top of page ... bats, ships and fishermen. When a sound wave strikes an object, it bounces back, or echoes. By ...

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... phased array) receiver coil. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Prostate ... Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking for? Yes No Please type ...

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to investigate a nodule found during a rectal exam, detect abnormalities, and determine whether the gland is ... a man's prostate gland and surrounding tissue. The exam typically requires insertion of an ultrasound probe into ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... nodule felt by a physician during a routine physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time ...

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... patient consultation. View full size with caption Related Articles and Media Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) (Enlargement of ... facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The costs for specific medical imaging tests, treatments ...

  8. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the rectal wall is relatively insensitive to the pain in the region of the prostate. A biopsy ... needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ...

  9. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... physician during a routine physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty ... if a patient is at high risk for cancer. In this case, a biopsy is performed and ...

  10. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... abnormal growth within the prostate. help diagnose the cause of a man's infertility. A transrectal ultrasound of ... show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health problems and may be repeated as ...

  11. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... be necessary. Your doctor will explain the exact reason why another exam is requested. Sometimes a follow- ... and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page This page was reviewed on ...

  12. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This procedure requires little to no special preparation. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. ... BPH) , with measurements acquired as needed for any treatment planning. detect an abnormal growth within the prostate. ...

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... probe). A prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test, which measures the amount of PSA in the blood, may ... RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your physician with specific medical questions or for ...

  14. Prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... who eat a diet high in fat, especially animal fat Obese men Tire plant workers Painters Men ... your doctor Radical prostatectomy - discharge Images Male reproductive anatomy Male urinary tract BPH Prostate cancer PSA blood ...

  15. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... abnormal area in the prostate gland for later laboratory testing. top of page How should I prepare? ... needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ...

  16. Frequency Steered Acoustic Transducer, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase II project is to fabricate, characterize, and verify performance of a new type of frequency steered acoustic transducer...

  17. Frequency Steered Acoustic Transducer, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project is to develop, fabricate, and characterize a novel frequency steered acoustic transducer (FSAT) for the...

  18. Prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chabanova, Elizaveta; Balslev, Ingegerd; Logager, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    To investigate diagnostic accuracy of detection of prostate cancer by magnetic resonance: to evaluate the performance of T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI and to correlate the results with biopsy and radical prostatectomy histopathological data.......To investigate diagnostic accuracy of detection of prostate cancer by magnetic resonance: to evaluate the performance of T2WI, DCEMRI and CSI and to correlate the results with biopsy and radical prostatectomy histopathological data....

  19. Ultrasonic transducer for extreme temperature environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Glenn M.; Cervantes, Richard A.; Alcazar, David G.

    1993-03-23

    An ultrasonic piezoelectric transducer that is operable in very high and very low temperatures. The transducer has a dual housing structure that isolates the expansion and contraction of the piezoelectric element from the expansion and contraction of the housing. Also, the internal components are made from materials having similar coefficients of expansion so that they do not interfere with the motion of the piezoelectric element.

  20. Ultrasound transducer disinfection in emergency medicine practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riley Hoyer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background External ultrasound transducer disinfection is common practice in medicine. Unfortunately, clinically significant organisms, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumonia spread throughout healthcare facilities via direct contact despite disinfection protocols. Ultrasound transducers and coupling gel provide potential vectors for pathogen transmission, especially in immunocompromised and high-risk patient populations. Our objective was to conduct a survey to investigate the variety of cleaning solutions or sanitary wipes used and evaluate current standard practice for transducer disinfection across emergency medicine training programs in the United States. Findings Eighty-three academic emergency medicine programs participated in this study. Eighty-seven percent (95 % CI 80–94 % of responding programs do not have a mandated protocol or standard contact time for transducer disinfection. Ninety percent (95 % CI 84–96 % of institutions use disinfectant solution or disinfectant wipes, as the standard of practice, to cleanse ultrasound transducers after every use. Conclusions Currently, there is a great deal of variability with regard to non-endocavitary transducer disinfection protocols that seems to stem from the vast number of disinfectant products and ultrasound manufacturer disparate recommendations. In order to mitigate risk to patients and reduce health care costs linked to nosocomial infections; healthcare providers, ultrasound companies, and disinfectant manufacturers must develop a universal use disinfectant and a standard protocol for ultrasound device disinfection for noncritical device disinfection in the emergency department.

  1. Ultrasound transducer disinfection in emergency medicine practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Riley; Adhikari, Srikar; Amini, Richard

    2016-01-01

    External ultrasound transducer disinfection is common practice in medicine. Unfortunately, clinically significant organisms, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Klebsiella pneumonia spread throughout healthcare facilities via direct contact despite disinfection protocols. Ultrasound transducers and coupling gel provide potential vectors for pathogen transmission, especially in immunocompromised and high-risk patient populations. Our objective was to conduct a survey to investigate the variety of cleaning solutions or sanitary wipes used and evaluate current standard practice for transducer disinfection across emergency medicine training programs in the United States. Eighty-three academic emergency medicine programs participated in this study. Eighty-seven percent (95 % CI 80-94 %) of responding programs do not have a mandated protocol or standard contact time for transducer disinfection. Ninety percent (95 % CI 84-96 %) of institutions use disinfectant solution or disinfectant wipes, as the standard of practice, to cleanse ultrasound transducers after every use. Currently, there is a great deal of variability with regard to non-endocavitary transducer disinfection protocols that seems to stem from the vast number of disinfectant products and ultrasound manufacturer disparate recommendations. In order to mitigate risk to patients and reduce health care costs linked to nosocomial infections; healthcare providers, ultrasound companies, and disinfectant manufacturers must develop a universal use disinfectant and a standard protocol for ultrasound device disinfection for noncritical device disinfection in the emergency department.

  2. Handbook of force transducers. Principles and components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanescu, Dan Mihai [Romanian Measurement Society, Bucharest (Romania)

    2011-07-01

    Part I introduces the basic ''Principles and Methods of Force Measurement'' according to a classification into a dozen of force transducers types: resistive, inductive, capacitive, piezoelectric, electromagnetic, electrodynamic, magnetoelastic, galvanomagnetic (Hall-effect), vibrating wires, (micro)resonators, acoustic and gyroscopic. Two special chapters refer to force balance techniques and to combined methods in force measurement. Part II discusses the ''(Strain Gauge) Force Transducers Components'', evolving from the classical force transducer to the digital / intelligent one, with the incorporation of three subsystems (sensors, electromechanics and informatics). The elastic element (EE) is the ''heart'' of the force transducer and basically determines its performance. A 12-type elastic element classification is proposed (stretched / compressed column or tube, bending beam, bending and/or torsion shaft, middle bent bar with fixed ends, shear beam, bending ring, yoke or frame, diaphragm, axial-stressed torus, axisymmetrical and voluminous EE), with emphasis on the optimum location of the strain gauges. The main properties of the associated Wheatstone bridge, best suited for the parametrical transducers, are examined, together with the appropriate electronic circuits for SGFTs. The handbook fills a gap in the field of Force Measurement, both experts and newcomers, no matter of their particular interest, finding a lot of useful and valuable subjects in the area of Force Transducers; in fact, it is the first specialized monograph in this inter- and multidisciplinary field. (orig.)

  3. Failure-free survival following brachytherapy alone or external beam irradiation alone for T1-2 prostate tumors in 2222 patients: results from a single practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachman, David G.; Thomas, Theresa; Hilbe, Joseph; Beyer, David C.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate failure-free survival (FFS) for brachytherapy (BT) alone compared to external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) alone for Stage T1-2 Nx-No Mo patients over the same time period by a single community-based practice in the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) era. Materials and Methods: The database of Arizona Oncology Services (a multiphysician radiation oncology practice in the Phoenix metropolitan area) was reviewed for patients meeting the following criteria: (1) T1 or T2 Nx-No Mo prostate cancer; (2) no prior or concurrent therapy including hormones; (3) treatment period 12/88-12/95; and (4) treatment with either EBRT alone or BT alone ( 125 I or 103 Pd). This yielded 1527 EBRT and 695 BT patients; no patients meeting the above criteria were excluded from analysis. Median follow-up for EBRT patients was 41.3 months and, for BT patients, 51.3 months. Patients were not randomized to either therapy but rather received EBRT or BT based upon patient, treating, and/or referring physician preference. PSA failure was defined according to the ASTRO consensus guidelines. The median patient age was 74 years for both groups. Results: Failure-free survival at 5 years for EBRT and BT are 69% and 71%, respectively (p = 0.91). For T stage, no significant difference in FFS at 5 years is observed between EBRT and BT for either T1 (78% vs. 83%, p = 0.47) or T2 (67% vs. 67%, p = 0.89) tumors. Analysis by Gleason score shows superior outcomes for Gleason 8-10 lesions treated with EBRT vs. BT (5-year FFS 52% vs. 28%, p = 0.04); outcomes for lower grade lesions (Gleason 4-6) when analyzed by Gleason score alone do not significantly differ according to treatment received. Patients with initial PSA values of 10-20 ng/dL have an improved FFS with EBRT vs. BT at 5 years (70% vs. 53%, p = 0.001); outcomes for patients with initial PSA ranges of 0-4 ng/dL, of > 4-10 ng/dL, and > 20 ng/dL did not differ significantly by treatment received. FFS was also determined for presenting

  4. Prostatitis: Inflammation of the Prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2011: 805–810. [3] Murphy AB, Macejko A, Taylor A, Nadler RB. Chronic prostatitis: management strategies. Drugs. ... would like to thank: Mark Litwin, M.D., University of California at Los Angeles; Anthony Schaeffer, M. ...

  5. Introduction to special session on "ultrasonic transducers for harsh environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tittmann, B. R.; Reinhardt, B.; Daw, J.

    2018-04-01

    This work describes the results of experiments conducted as part of an instrumented lead test in-core in a nuclear reactor with the piezoelectric and magnetostrictive materials. The experiments exposed AlN, ZnO, BiT, Remendur, and Galfenol to more neutron radiation than found in the literature. The magnetostrictive sensors produce stable ultrasonic pulse-echoes throughout much of the irradiation. The BiT transducers could operate up until approximate 5 × 10^20 n/cm^2 (E>1MeV). The piezoelectric AlN operated well during the entire experiment. The results imply that now available are candidates for operation in harsh environments found in nuclear reactors and steam generator plants.

  6. Prostatic paracoccidioidomycosis: differential diagnosis of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lima Lopes

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Symptomatic prostatic paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM is a very rare condition; however, it may express as a typical benign prostatic hyperplasia or a simulating prostatic adenocarcinoma. This case report presents PCM mimicking prostatic adenocarcinoma. The purpose of this paper is to call the general physician's attention to this important differential diagnosis.

  7. Photoacoustic imaging of early gastric cancer diagnosis based on long focal area ultrasound transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huaqin; Li, Zuoran; Liu, Lantian; Li, Zhifang; Wu, Shulian; Li, Hui

    2017-06-01

    We illustrated a novel imaging method to diagnose gastric neoplasms via photoacoustic tomography (PAT). Depending on the structural characteristics of gastric cavity, we used column diffusion fiber to irradiate the stomach tissue through the esophagus, and the externally placed telecentric focus ultrasonic transducer detected photoacoustic signals from the gastric tissue. We reconstructed the distribution of light energy deposition of the simulated gastric tumor, and obtained the location and size information of gastric tumor.

  8. External beam radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, Jeffrey D.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The intent of this course is to review the issues involved in the management of non-metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate. -- The value of pre-treatment prognostic factors including stage, grade and PSA value will be presented, and their value in determining therapeutic strategies will be discussed. -- Controversies involving the simulation process and treatment design will be presented. The value of CT scanning, Beams-Eye View, 3-D planning, intravesicle, intraurethral and rectal contrast will be presented. The significance of prostate and patient movement and strategies for dealing with them will be presented. -- The management of low stage, low to intermediate grade prostate cancer will be discussed. The dose, volume and timing of irradiation will be discussed as will the role of neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy, neutron irradiation and brachytherapy. The current status of radical prostatectomy and cryotherapy will be summarized. Treatment of locally advanced, poorly differentiated prostate cancer will be presented including a discussion of neo-adjuvant and adjuvant hormones, dose-escalation and neutron irradiation. -- Strategies for post-radiation failures will be presented including data on cryotherapy, salvage prostatectomy and hormonal therapy (immediate, delayed and/or intermittent). New areas for investigation will be reviewed. -- The management of patients post prostatectomy will be reviewed. Data on adjuvant radiation and therapeutic radiation for biochemical or clinically relapsed patients will be presented. This course hopes to present a realistic and pragmatic overview for treating patients with non-metastatic prostatic cancer

  9. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... As the sound waves bounce off internal organs, fluids and tissues, the sensitive receiver in the transducer records tiny changes in the sound's pitch and direction. These signature waves are instantly measured and displayed by a computer, which in turn creates a real-time picture ...

  10. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pitch) and time it takes for the ultrasound signal to return from the area within the patient that is being examined to the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and receive the returning sound waves), as well as the type of body ...

  11. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then listens for the returning echoes from ... transducer is inserted into an opening of the body may produce minimal ... humans. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  12. High Temperature, High Power Piezoelectric Composite Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeong Jae Lee

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined.

  13. High Temperature, High Power Piezoelectric Composite Transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, StewarT.

    2014-01-01

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined. PMID:25111242

  14. High temperature, high power piezoelectric composite transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeong Jae; Zhang, Shujun; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Sherrit, Stewart

    2014-08-08

    Piezoelectric composites are a class of functional materials consisting of piezoelectric active materials and non-piezoelectric passive polymers, mechanically attached together to form different connectivities. These composites have several advantages compared to conventional piezoelectric ceramics and polymers, including improved electromechanical properties, mechanical flexibility and the ability to tailor properties by using several different connectivity patterns. These advantages have led to the improvement of overall transducer performance, such as transducer sensitivity and bandwidth, resulting in rapid implementation of piezoelectric composites in medical imaging ultrasounds and other acoustic transducers. Recently, new piezoelectric composite transducers have been developed with optimized composite components that have improved thermal stability and mechanical quality factors, making them promising candidates for high temperature, high power transducer applications, such as therapeutic ultrasound, high power ultrasonic wirebonding, high temperature non-destructive testing, and downhole energy harvesting. This paper will present recent developments of piezoelectric composite technology for high temperature and high power applications. The concerns and limitations of using piezoelectric composites will also be discussed, and the expected future research directions will be outlined.

  15. Modeling Displacement Measurement using Vibration Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AGOSTON Katalin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents some aspects regarding to small displacement measurement using vibration transducers. Mechanical faults, usages, slackness’s, cause different noises and vibrations with different amplitude and frequency against the normal sound and movement of the equipment. The vibration transducers, accelerometers and microphone are used for noise and/or sound and vibration detection with fault detection purpose. The output signal of the vibration transducers or accelerometers is an acceleration signal and can be converted to either velocity or displacement, depending on the preferred measurement parameter. Displacement characteristics are used to indicate when the machine condition has changed. There are many problems using accelerometers to measure position or displacement. It is important to determine displacement over time. To determinate the movement from acceleration a double integration is needed. A transfer function and Simulink model was determinate for accelerometers with capacitive sensing element. Using these models the displacement was reproduced by low frequency input.

  16. Rapid prototyping fabrication of focused ultrasound transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yohan; Maxwell, Adam D; Hall, Timothy L; Xu, Zhen; Lin, Kuang-Wei; Cain, Charles A

    2014-09-01

    Rapid prototyping (RP) fabrication techniques are currently widely used in diverse industrial and medical fields, providing substantial advantages in development time and costs in comparison to more traditional manufacturing processes. This paper presents a new method for the fabrication of high-intensity focused ultrasound transducers using RP technology. The construction of a large-aperture hemispherical transducer designed by computer software is described to demonstrate the process. The transducer was conceived as a modular design consisting of 32 individually focused 50.8-mm (2-in) PZT-8 element modules distributed in a 300-mm hemispherical scaffold with a geometric focus of 150 mm. The entire structure of the array, including the module housings and the hemispherical scaffold was fabricated through a stereolithography (SLA) system using a proprietary photopolymer. The PZT elements were bonded to the lenses through a quarter-wave tungsten-epoxy matching layer developed in-house specifically for this purpose. Modules constructed in this manner displayed a high degree of electroacoustic consistency, with an electrical impedance mean and standard deviation of 109 ± 10.2 Ω for the 32 elements. Time-of-flight measurements for individually pulsed modules mounted on the hemispherical scaffold showed that all pulses arrived at the focus within a 350 ns range, indicating a good degree of element alignment. Pressure profile measurements of the fully assembled transducer also showed close agreement with simulated results. The measured focal beam FWHM dimensions were 1.9 × 4.0 mm (1.9 × 3.9 mm simulated) in the transversal and axial directions respectively. Total material expenses associated with the construction of the transducer were approximately 5000 USD (as of 2011). The versatility and lower fabrication costs afforded by RP methods may be beneficial in the development of complex transducer geometries suitable for a variety of research and clinical applications.

  17. Immune Algorithm Complex Method for Transducer Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YU Jiangming

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available As a key link in engineering test tasks, the transducer calibration has significant influence on accuracy and reliability of test results. Because of unknown and complex nonlinear characteristics, conventional method can’t achieve satisfactory accuracy. An Immune algorithm complex modeling approach is proposed, and the simulated studies on the calibration of third multiple output transducers is made respectively by use of the developed complex modeling. The simulated and experimental results show that the Immune algorithm complex modeling approach can improve significantly calibration precision comparison with traditional calibration methods.

  18. Using XBee transducers for wireless data collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayars, Eric; Lai, Estella

    2010-07-01

    This article describes how to use XBee transducers to create small and lightweight wireless sensors, which send data to a base station for collection and analysis. Data collection is limited to 10-bit accuracy by the XBee hardware. Depending on the type of XBee used, up to six data channels can be transmitted over a range of up to 15 miles. We describe the technical details of the process using the low-power version of the XBee transducer and a three-axis accelerometer chip.

  19. Prostate Cancer Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fundraise for PCF: Many vs Cancer Contact Us Prostate Cancer Symptoms and Signs Prostate Cancer Basics About the ... earlier. So what are the warning signs of prostate cancer? Unfortunately, there usually aren’t any early warning ...

  20. Prostate Cancer FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fundraise for PCF: Many vs Cancer Contact Us Prostate Cancer FAQs Top 10 Things You Should Know About ... prostate cancer detected? What are the symptoms of prostate cancer? If the cancer is caught at its earliest ...

  1. President's categorical course on prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leibel, Steven A.

    1996-01-01

    Impressive advances in medical technology allow earlier diagnosis and better treatment of localized prostatic cancer. Prostate cancer has also been a subject of considerable discussion in the lay press. Therefore, it is timely that we review this subject in a comprehensive fashion. This course is designed to meet the broad educational needs required for the effective care of prostate cancer patients. The faculty includes many of the leaders in the various clinical disciplines dealing with prostate cancer, and they will address a variety of scientific and clinical topics. A highlight of the course will be a discussion on the funding of new prostate cancer research initiatives. The course begins with discussions of biology, genetics, tumor markers, pathology and imaging of prostate cancer. It will cover the state-of-the-art in the management of localized prostatic cancer, including the outcomes of external beam irradiation, brachytherapy, and prostatectomy. The technique and outcome of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy will be discussed. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group clinical trials for locally advanced prostatic cancer will be updated, and the biological rationale for combining anti-androgen therapy with radiation therapy will be presented. The use of PSA for the early detection of failure following radiation therapy is an important clinical issue. This topic will be the subject of an ASTRO consensus conference, and the conclusions will be summarized here. With the prospect for early detection of recurrences after surgery and radiotherapy using PSA, the discussions of external irradiation after surgery and of prostatectomy after radiotherapy are especially important. The course concludes with an overview of the treatment of metastatic disease

  2. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of ...

  3. Prostate Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If you have BPH, you may need to wake up often to urinate when you sleep. If you can’t urinate at all, you should get medical help right away. Your doctor will know if you have a prostate problem based on ...

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page This page was reviewed on March 17, 2016 Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking for? Yes No Please type your comment or suggestion into the following text ...

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of the pelvis may be obtained as an alternative imaging test, because it may be obtained with an external (phased array) receiver coil. top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page This page ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will I experience during and after the procedure? Who interprets the results and how do I get them? What are the benefits vs. risks? What are the limitations of Prostate Ultrasound Imaging? ...

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... symptoms such as difficulty urinating or an elevated blood test result. It’s also used to investigate a nodule ... exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time ...

  8. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it also can be used to guide procedures such as needle biopsies , in which a needle is used to sample cells (tissue) from an abnormal area in the ...

  9. Thermoacoustic power conversion using a piezoelectric transducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Carl; Raspet, Richard

    2010-07-01

    The predicted efficiency of a simple thermoacoustic waste heat power conversion device has been investigated as part of a collaborative effort combining a thermoacoustic engine with a piezoelectric transducer. Symko et al. [Microelectron. J. 35, 185-191 (2004)] at the University of Utah built high frequency demonstration engines for this application, and Lynn [ASMDC report, accession number ADA491030 (2008)] at the University of Washington designed and built a high efficiency piezoelectric unimorph transducer for electroacoustic conversion. The design presented in this paper is put forward to investigate the potential of a simple high frequency, air filled, standing wave thermoacoustic device to be competitive with other small generator technologies such as thermoelectric devices. The thermoacoustic generator is simulated using a low-amplitude approximation for thermoacoustics and the acoustic impedance of the transducer is modeled using an equivalent circuit model calculated from the transducer's mechanical and electrical properties. The calculations demonstrate that a device performance of around 10% of Carnot efficiency could be expected from the design which is competitive with currently available thermoelectric generators.

  10. Ferroelectret non-contact ultrasonic transducers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bovtun, Viktor; Döring, J.; Bartusch, J.; Beck, U.; Erhard, A.; Yakymenko, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 88, č. 4 (2007), s. 737-743 ISSN 0947-8396 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/06/0403 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : ferroelectrets * polymers * ultrasonic transducers Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.857, year: 2007

  11. Linearization of resistance thermometers and other transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, Joseph M.

    1970-01-01

    deflection output or to null balance output. The application to the common temperature transducers is considered. It is shown that thermistors, linear metals (e.g., copper), and nickel can be linearized in terms of temperature, but platinum cannot be. If linearization is desired in terms of the reciprocal...

  12. Fiber-optic coupled pressure transducer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tallman, C.R.; Wingate, F.P.; Ballard, E.O.

    1979-01-01

    A fiber-optic coupled pressure transducer was developed for measurement of pressure transients produced by fast electrical discharges in laser cavities. A detailed description of the design and performance will be given. Shock tube performance and measurements in direct electrical discharge regions will be presented

  13. Pushdown machines for the macro tree transducer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelfriet, Joost; Vogler, Heiko

    1986-01-01

    The macro tree transducer can be considered as a system of recursive function procedures with parameters, where the recursion is on a tree (e.g., the syntax tree of a program). We investigate characterizations of the class of tree (tree-to-string) translations which is induced by macro tree

  14. Eliminating transducer distortion in acoustic measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerkvist, Finn T.; Torras Rosell, Antoni; McWalter, Richard Ian

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the in uence of nonlinear components that contaminate the linear response of acoustic transducer, and presents a method for eliminating the in uence of nonlinearities in acoustic measurements. The method is evaluated on simulated as well as experimental data, and is shown ...

  15. Biasing of Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliano, Giosue; Matrone, Giulia; Savoia, Alessandro Stuart

    2017-02-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) represent an effective alternative to piezoelectric transducers for medical ultrasound imaging applications. They are microelectromechanical devices fabricated using silicon micromachining techniques, developed in the last two decades in many laboratories. The interest for this novel transducer technology relies on its full compatibility with standard integrated circuit technology that makes it possible to integrate on the same chip the transducers and the electronics, thus enabling the realization of extremely low-cost and high-performance devices, including both 1-D or 2-D arrays. Being capacitive transducers, CMUTs require a high bias voltage to be properly operated in pulse-echo imaging applications. The typical bias supply residual ripple of high-quality high-voltage (HV) generators is in the millivolt range, which is comparable with the amplitude of the received echo signals, and it is particularly difficult to minimize. The aim of this paper is to analyze the classical CMUT biasing circuits, highlighting the features of each one, and to propose two novel HV generator architectures optimized for CMUT biasing applications. The first circuit proposed is an ultralow-residual ripple (CMUT by charging a buffer capacitor synchronously with the pulsing sequence, thus reducing the impact of the switching noise on the received echo signals. The small area of the circuit (about 1.5 cm 2 ) makes it possible to generate the bias voltage inside the probe, very close to the CMUT, making the proposed solution attractive for portable applications. Measurements and experiments are shown to demonstrate the effectiveness of the new approaches presented.

  16. [Prostate cancer. Treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, G; Valeri, A; Mangin, P; Cussenot, O

    2004-10-01

    The discovery and the utilisation of the prostate specific antigen (PSA) that allows early diagnosis of prostate cancer, have considerably improved the management of this disease. Before the PSA era, prostate cancer was just a disease of the old man, generally detected at an advanced stage and incurable, with a fatal outcome delayed by the androgenic deprivation. Since early 1990's, prostate cancer has become primarily a disease of the man of 60 years, detectable earlier, and curable provided no extraprostatic dissemination has occurred. Early treatment of prostate cancer has benefited from important advances in surgical and radio-therapeutic techniques (conformational irradiation, brachytherapy), with, as principal goal, the combination of a better survival and the reduction of the potential adverse effects that alter quality of life. A better definition of the characteristics of the tumours in terms of progression regarding various parameters (clinical stage, PSA, tumoral differentiation) have resulted, despite the heterogeneity of the disease, in the determination of subgroups of tumours with different prognosis, which leads to an improved therapeutic strategy. The assessment of men's life expectancy ( 10 years) is the second primary parameter on which is based the indication for curative or non curative therapy in case of localized tumour. Roughly, before the age of 75, a curative therapy is indicated whereas after this age a surveillance is reasonable as first-line treatment, followed by hormone therapy in case of onset of symptoms indicating some progression of the disease (urinary symptoms, bone lesion). At a Later stage, in case of a metastatic or locally advanced cancer, hormone therapy by androgenic deprivation is highly indicated. The hormone sensitivity characterizes prostate cancer; it has been discovered more than 50 years ago by Charles Huggins (Nobel prize-winner). This hormone therapy is a palliative treatment since its efficacy is transient

  17. Capacitive pressure transducer using flexible films. Junan film wo mochiita seiden yoryoshiki atsukaku transducer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, Y.; Tsuchida, N.; Imai, K. (Toyota Technological Institute, Aichi (Japan)); Fujita, K. (Nitto Denko Corp., Osaka (Japan)): Tsuboi, O. (Fujitsu Corp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-12-20

    This paper describes the design, manufacture, and evaluation of a capacitive pressure transducer made of polyimide films. The structure of a pressure transducer cell was first determined, and then, the deflection-stress and capacitance-load characteristics of the surface film were analyzed using finite element methods. For the practical stage of manufacture, a polyimide film was emboss processed and electrodes were deposited on the film to construct a pressure transducer cell to which a Schmidt-trigger detecting circuit was connected. As a consequence of the examination of operational characteristics of the cell, it was found that the actual relation between the deflection and load approximately agreed with the linear analyses, and that the capacitance depended with little hysteresis on the gap regardless of the native visco-elasticity of the film. Furthermore, small stick-slip vibration of a contact rubber surface was detected by the transducer to verify its high sensitivity. 17 refs., 18 figs.

  18. New type pressure transducer for severe thermal environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    Pressure transducer used in a rocket motor chamber to measure the amplitudes and frequencies of dynamic pressures /exceeding 2000 psi/ occurring during unstable combustion. the transducer utilizes a transpirational cooled porous beryllium plug and pressure transmitting column.

  19. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page This page was reviewed on March 17, 2016 Send us your feedback Did you find the information you were looking for? ... or for a referral to a radiologist or other physician. To locate a medical imaging or radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search ...

  20. Piezoelectric hollow sphere transducers: The 'BBs'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkoy, Sedat

    This thesis describes the design, fabrication, modeling and device characteristics of ultrasound transducers developed from millimeter size piezoelectric ceramic hollow spheres. Green ceramic hollow spheres were produced using a coaxial nozzle slurry process and a sacrificial core coating process in the size range of 1-6 mm in diameter and 12-200 μm in wall thickness. Ceramic powders with the morphotropic phase boundary compositions of lead zirconate titanate solid solution known as PZT-4 and PZT-5A, and a modified lead titanate composition were used in these two processes. After sintering, the desired shapes were obtained by drilling, grinding, or polishing. Sphere surfaces were then coated with an electrode material in desired shapes and area of coverage. Two main poling configurations were studied: a radial poling configuration with inside and outside electrodes, and a tangential poling with top and bottom outside electrodes with several different electrode patterns. Dielectric, piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties of these transducers were measured. Vibration modes were determined using the ATILA™ finite element analysis (FEA) code, and associated resonance frequencies were measured and compared to the calculated values. The effect of sphere dimensions, materials and electrode configurations were analyzed using FEA. It was determined from the finite elements analysis of the structure that wall thickness variations do not have a pronounced affect on the vibrations of the structure at lower frequencies (from kHz to low MHz). Focused transducers were prepared for biomedical ultrasound imaging from dish-shape shell sections of the hollow spheres. Pulse-echo characteristics such as, insertion loss, waveform and bandwidth were measured. These transducers were also modeled using the FEA. Transducer operation frequencies of up to 50 MHz were achieved with f-numbers down to 1. Omnidirectional miniature hydrophones were prepared from radially poled hollow

  1. Studies of a novel photosensitizer palladium-bacteriopheophorbide (Tookad) for the treatment of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zheng; Chen, Qun; Brun, Pierre-Herve; Wilson, Brian C.; Scherz, Avigdor; Salomon, Yoram; Luck, David L.; Beckers, Jill; Hetzel, Fred W.

    2003-06-01

    In this study, photodynamic therapy (PDT) mediated with a novel, second generation photosensitizer Tookad (palladium-bacteriopheophorbide, WST09, STEBA Biotech, France), is investigated as an alternative modality in the treatment of prostate cancer. In vivo normal canine prostate and spontaneous advanced prostate cancer are used as the animal model. PDT was performed by irradiating the surgically exposed prostates with a diode laser (763 nm, 150 mW/cm) to activate the i.v. infused photosensitizer. The effects of drug concentration, drug-light interval, and light fluence rate on the PDT efficacy were studied. The prostates and adjacent tissues (bladder and underlying colon) were harvested and subjected to histopathological examination. During the one-week to 3-month period post PDT treatment, the dogs recovered well with little or no urethral complications. Prostatic urethra and prostate adjacent tissues (bladder and underlying colon) were well preserved. Light irradiation delivered during drug infusion or within 15 min post drug infusion induced the similar extend of damages. PDT induced prostate lesions in both normal and cancerous prostate were characterized by marked hemorrhagic necrosis and atrophy. Maximum lesion size of over 3 cm in dimension could be achieved with a single 1-cm interstitial treatment, suggesting the therapy is very effective in ablating cancerous prostatic tissue. In conclusion, the second generation photosensitizer Tookad mediated PDT may provide an effective alternative to treat prostate cancer.

  2. Local high voltage radiotherapy with curative intent for prostatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobi, G.H.; Kurth, K.H.; Hohenfellner, R.

    1979-01-01

    In a 10-year interval 179 patients with prostatic carcinoma were treated by cobalt-60 teletherapy (7600 R). A selected group of 47 patients with localized disease and irradiated with curative intent had serial prostatic biopsies and were analized after a minimum follow-up of 1 year. Biopsies of half of the patients rendered definitively negative, on an average 14 months after radiotherapy. 8 patients with initial negative biopsy changed to positive secondarily. In one third of the patients histological conversion was missed, considered as radiation persister. Persistent carcinoma were of predominant low grade. 5 patients developed distant metastases 30 months after irradiation on an average. These patients had persistent positive tissue studies. Over all cumulative 5-years survival was 89%. In patients with prostatic carcinoma and local high voltage radiotherapy with curative intent (stage A through C) serial prostatic biopsies to document therapy effect seen mandatory. (orig.) 891 AJ/orig. 892 BRE [de

  3. Magnetoelastic Transducer Materials - a Plateable Possibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Dahl; Møller, Per

    2001-01-01

    A short presentation of the magnetostriction theory as well as a series of possible applications for magnetoelastic transducers are given. A review of the present state of development for these materials is discussed with relation to the various ways of manufacture. The paper is concluded with th...... as the reference material Terfenol-D were obtained, but reproduction of exact magnetic properties is still critical with the new plating technique.......A short presentation of the magnetostriction theory as well as a series of possible applications for magnetoelastic transducers are given. A review of the present state of development for these materials is discussed with relation to the various ways of manufacture. The paper is concluded...... with the presentation of a method for making magnetoelastic materials by electrochemical deposition (electroless) as tried by the authors in collaboration with the Daimler-Chrysler research centre in Ulm, Germany. First results of this work are both promising and intriguing: Sensitivities of the same order...

  4. Acousto-optical Transducer with Surface Plasmons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolomenskii, A. A.; Surovic, E.; Schuessler, H. A.

    2018-04-01

    The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) is a sensitive technique for the detection of changes in dielectric parameters in close proximity to a metal film supporting surface plasmon waves. Here we study the application of the SPR effect to an efficient conversion of an acoustic signal into an optical one. Such a transducer potentially has a large bandwidth and good sensitivity. When an acoustic wave is incident onto a receiving plate positioned within the penetration depth of the surface plasmons, it creates displacements of the surface of the plate and, thus, modulates the dielectric properties in the proximity of the gold film. This modulation, in turn, modifies the light reflection under surface plasmon resonance conditions. We simulate characteristics of this acousto-optical transducer with surface plasmons and provide sets of parameters at the optical wavelength of 800 nm and 633 nm for its realization.

  5. Cymbal and BB underwater transducers and arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newnham, R.E.; Zhang, J.; Alkoy, S.; Meyer, R.; Hughes, W.J.; Hladky-Hennion, A.C.; Cochran, J.; Markley, D. [Materials Research Laboratory, Penn State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2002-09-01

    The cymbal is a miniaturized class V flextensional transducer that was developed for use as a shallow water sound projector and receiver. Single elements are characterized by high Q, low efficiency, and medium power output capability. Its low cost and thin profile allow the transducer to be assembled into large flexible arrays. Efforts were made to model both single elements and arrays using the ATILA code and the integral equation formulation (EQI).Millimeter size microprobe hydrophones (BBs) have been designed and fabricated from miniature piezoelectric hollow ceramic spheres for underwater applications such as mapping acoustic fields of projectors, and flow noise sensors for complex underwater structures. Green spheres are prepared from soft lead zirconate titanate powders using a coaxial nozzle slurry process. A compact hydrophone with a radially-poled sphere is investigated using inside and outside electrodes. Characterization of these hydrophones is done through measurement of hydrostatic piezoelectric charge coefficients, free field voltage sensitivities and directivity beam patterns. (orig.)

  6. Dissipation in vibrating superleak second sound transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giordano, N.

    1985-01-01

    We have performed an experimental study of the generation and detection of second sound in 4 He using vibrating superleak second sound transducers. At temperatures well below T/sub lambda/ and for low driving amplitudes, the magnitude of the generated second sound wave is proportional to the drive amplitude. However, near T/sub lambda/ and for high drive amplitudes this is no longer the case--instead, the second sound amplitude saturates. In this regime we also find that overtones of the drive frequency are generated. Our results suggest that this behavior is due to critical velocity effects in the pores of the superleak in the generator transducer. This type of measurement may prove to be a useful way in which to study critical velocity effects in confined geometries

  7. Passive Mode Carbon Nanotube Underwater Acoustic Transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-20

    irreversible Joule heat) by an electric light bulb . The reciprocal (or reverse) of this process by supplying heat and shining light to the same electric bulb ...limit the invention to the precise form disclosed; and obviously many modifications and variations are possible in light of the above teaching...300151 1 of 14 PASSIVE MODE CARBON NANOTUBE UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC TRANSDUCER STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described

  8. Turbine transducer developed for adverse conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, D.R.; Edson, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reviews the latest developments that the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has made on a turbine transducer used in measurement of two-phase flow. It is operated in a modular configuration with a drag transducer to provide mass flow data. Current configurations allow its use in single modules or in multiples to provide flow profile information. The turbine can also provide mass flow data when used with associated instrumentation such as a densitometer. The transducer, which is the product of long investigations and test series, is subject to high vibration loading and high temperatures as well as a borated liquid environment; flow conditions range from all liquid to all steam and from ambient temperatures to over 600 0 F at pressures up to 2200 psi. Graphite bearing and carbide shaft materials were selected to provide corrosion resistance along with mechanical integrity, and resistance to wear. The new turbine design has met all operational requirements in actual use and in extended lifetime tests

  9. Language of Transducer Manipulation: Codifying Terms for Effective Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahner, David P; Blickendorf, J Matthew; Bockbrader, Marcia; Adkins, Eric; Vira, Amar; Boulger, Creagh; Panchal, Ashish R

    2016-01-01

    There is a need for consistent, repetitive, and reliable terminology to describe the basic manipulations of the ultrasound transducer. Previously, 5 basic transducer motions have been defined and used in education. However, even with this effort, there is still a lack of consistency and clarity in describing transducer manipulation and motion. In this technical innovation, we describe an expanded definition of transducer motions, which include movements to change the transducer's angle of insonation to the target as well as the location on the body to optimize the ultrasound image. This new terminology may allow for consistent teaching and improved communication in the process of image acquisition.

  10. Ultrasonic properties of all-printed piezoelectric polymer transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagle, Sanat; Decharat, Adit; Bodö, Peter; Melandsø, Frank

    2013-12-01

    The ability of producing ultrasonic transducers from screen-printing has been explored experimentally, through printing and characterization of a large number of transducers. In an all-printed test design, 124 transducers with four different electrode sizes ranging from 1 to 4.9 mm2, were printed layer-by-layer on a high performance polyethyleneimine polymer. Inks from ferroelectric and conductive polymers were applied to the active part of a transducer, to provide a good acoustical match between the individual layers. Ultrasonic characterizations of the transducers done by two independent methods provided a broad-banded frequency response with a maximum response around 100 MHz.

  11. Real-Time Motion Management of Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pommer, Tobias

    of this thesis is to manage prostate motion in real-time by aligning the radiation beam to the prostate using the novel dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) tracking method. Specifically, the delivered dose with tracking was compared to the planned dose, and the impact of treatment plan complexity and limitations...... to the prostate, while the dose to the risk organs varied as the motion either moved them towards or away from the irradiated region. Finally, we investigated the usefulness of plan complexity metrics for untracked treatments. We found clear relationships between plan complexity and the agreement between...

  12. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) for photoacoustic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaithilingam, Srikant; Wygant, Ira O.; Kuo, Paulina S.; Zhuang, Xuefeng; Oralkan, Ömer; Olcott, Peter D.; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    2006-02-01

    In photoacoustic (optoacoustic) medical imaging, short laser pulses irradiate absorbing structures found in tissue, such as blood vessels, causing brief thermal expansions that in turn generate ultrasound waves. These ultrasound waves which correspond to the optical absorption distribution were imaged using a two dimensional array of capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs). Advantages of CMUT technology for photoacoustic imaging include the ease of integration with electronics, ability to fabricate large two dimensional arrays, arrays with arbitrary geometries, wide-bandwidth arrays and high-frequency arrays. In this study, a phantom consisting of three 0.86-mm inner diameter polyethylene tubes inside a tissue mimicking material was imaged using a 16 x 16 element CMUT array. The center tube was filled with India-ink to provide optical contrast. Traditional pulse-echo data as well as photoacoustic image data were taken. 2D cross-sectional slices and 3D volume rendered images are shown. Simple array tiling was attempted, whereby a 48 x 48 element array was simulated, to illustrate the advantages of larger arrays. Finally, the sensitivity of the photoacoustics setup to the concentration of ink in the tube was also explored. For the sensitivity experiment a different phantom consisting of only one 1.14-mm inner diameter polyethylene tube inside a tissue mimicking material was used. The concentration of the ink inside the tube was varied and images were taken.

  13. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soothill, R.

    1987-01-01

    The issue of food irradiation has become important in Australia and overseas. This article discusses the results of the Australian Consumers' Association's (ACA) Inquiry into food irradiation, commissioned by the Federal Government. Issues discussed include: what is food irradiation; why irradiate food; how much food is consumer rights; and national regulations

  14. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munasiri, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    Gives details of sources used for food irradiation, brief description of the process, safety of food irradiation process, practical applications and the amount of doses used for spices, condiments, mangoes etc., limitations of food irradiation, international status of clearance of irradiated foods, versatility of the process

  15. Radiation therapy for prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Akira; Minowada, Shigeru; Tomoishi, Junzo; Kinoshita, Kenji; Matsuda, Tadayoshi

    1983-01-01

    A conformation radiotherapy system with collimators, whose openings can be controlled symmetrically by computerized techniques during rotational irradiation by a linear accelerator, has been developed for routine use in our hospital. Forty-four patients underwent radiation therapy, including this particular modality of radiotherapy, for prostatic cancer during the period of July 1976 through December 1981. Eight patients were classified as stage A, 10 stage B, 10 stage C, and 16 as stage D. Twenty-nine patients underwent conformation radiotherapy, two rotation radiotherapy, eight 2-port opposing technique radiotherapy, one 4-field radiotherapy, and four underwent a combination of 2-port opposing technique and conformation radiotherapy. Transient mild side effects such as diarrhea occurred in seven cases, while severe side effects such as rectal stricture or contracted bladder occurred in three cases. The latter occurred only in one case among 29 of conformation radiotherapy and in two among eight of 2-port opposing technique radiotherapy. The results of the treatment of short intervals in stage B, C, and D are as follows: prostatic size was reduced in 26 cases among 36, serum acid phosphatase level was reduced in 15 among 18 who had showed high acid phosphatase levels before treatment, although almost all cases underwent simultaneous hormonal therapy. The effects of radiotherapy alone were verified in two cases of stage B in which radiotherapy preceded hormonal therapy. Prostatic size and serum acid phosphatase level were reduced by radiotherapy alone. (author)

  16. Suppression of PC-1/PrLZ sensitizes prostate cancer cells to ionizing radiation by attenuating DNA damage repair and inducing autophagic cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Shang, Zeng-Fu; Wei, Qiang; Yu, Lan; Huang, Fang; Xiao, Bei-Bei; Wang, Hongtao; Song, Man; Wang, Li; Zhou, Jianguang; Wang, Jian; Li, Shanhu

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy is promising and effective for treating prostate cancer but the addition of a tumor cell radiosensitizer would improve therapeutic outcomes. PC-1/PrLZ, a TPD52 protein family member is frequently upregulated in advanced prostate cancer cells and may be a biomarker of aggressive prostate cancer. Therefore, we investigated the potential role of PC-1/PrLZ for increasing radioresistance in human prostate cancer cell lines. Growth curves and survival assays after g-ray irradiation con...

  17. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer based tilt sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hongbin; Guo, Bin; Haridas, Kuruveettil; Lin, Tsu-Hui; Hao Cheong, Jia; Lin Tsai, Ming; Boon Yee, Tack

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, a tilt sensing mechanism based on the capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducers (CMUTs) is presented. By measuring the difference in the time of flight of various pulse-echo signals from different CMUT transmitting elements to one common receiving element in the oil bath, the tilt angle of the oil surface can be determined. With the proposed device, the maximum tilt angles of 20° and 28° have been measured in the clockwise and counterclockwise directions, respectively, and the difference between the measured and the theoretical values of the tilt angle was found to be within 0.05° during the whole test.

  18. Na, K-ATPase as signaling transducer

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Juan

    2007-01-01

    It is now generally agreed that Na,K-ATPase (NKA), in addition to its role in the maintenance of Na+ and K+ gradients across the cell membrane, is a signal transducer. Our group has identified a novel signaling pathway where NKA interact with IP3R to form a signaling microdomain. Ouabain, a specific ligand of NKA, activates this pathway, triggers slow Ca2+ oscillations and activates NF-κB. In current study, the molecular mechanisms and some important downstream effects of NK...

  19. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindqvist, H.

    1996-01-01

    This paper is a review of food irradiation and lists plants for food irradiation in the world. Possible applications for irradiation are discussed, and changes induced in food from radiation, nutritional as well as organoleptic, are reviewed. Possible toxicological risks with irradiated food and risks from alternative methods for treatment are also brought up. Ways to analyze weather food has been irradiated or not are presented. 8 refs

  20. [Benign prostatic hypertrophy and prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourey, Loïc; Doumerc, Nicolas; Gaudin, Clément; Gérard, Stéphane; Balardy, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Prostatic diseases are extremely common, especially in older men. Amongst them, benign prostatic hypertrophy may affect significantly the quality of life of patients by the symptoms it causes. It requires appropriate care. Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men after lung cancer and the fifth leading cause of cancer deaths in the world. It affects preferentially older men. An oncogeriatric approach is required for personalised care.

  1. Parameter sensitivity study of a Field II multilayer transducer model on a convex transducer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Willatzen, Morten

    2009-01-01

    ultrasound imaging transducer (Bæk et al. ICU 2009). The model benefits from its 1D simplicity and hasshown to give an amplitude error around 1.7‐2 dB. However, any prediction of amplitude, phase, and attenuation of pulses relies on the accuracy of manufacturer supplied material characteristics, which may...

  2. Underwater pipeline impact localization using piezoceramic transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junxiao; Ho, Siu Chun Michael; Patil, Devendra; Wang, Ning; Hirsch, Rachel; Song, Gangbing

    2017-10-01

    Reports indicated that impact events accounted for 47% of offshore pipeline failures, which calls for impact detection and localization for subsea pipelines. In this paper, an innovative method for rapid localization of impacts on underwater pipelines utilizing a novel determination technique for both arrival-time and group velocity (ATGV) of ultrasonic guided waves with lead zirconate titanate (PZT) transducers is described. PZT transducers mounted on the outer surface of a model pipeline were utilized to measure ultrasonic guided waves generated by impact events. Based on the signals from PZT sensors, the ATGV technique integrates wavelet decomposition, Hilbert transform and statistical analysis to pinpoint the arrival-time of the designated ultrasonic guided waves with a specific group velocity. Experimental results have verified the effectiveness and the localization accuracy for eight impact points along a model underwater pipeline. All estimations errors were small and were comparable with the wavelength of the designated ultrasonic guided waves. Furthermore, the method is robust against the low frequency structural vibration introduced by other external forces.

  3. Acoustic lens for capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chienliu; Firouzi, Kamyar; Park, Kwan Kyu; Sarioglu, Ali Fatih; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Yoon, Hyo-Seon; Vaithilingam, Srikant; Carver, Thomas; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    2014-08-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) have great potential to compete with traditional piezoelectric transducers in therapeutic ultrasound applications. In this paper we have designed, fabricated and developed an acoustic lens formed on the CMUT to mechanically focus ultrasound. The acoustic lens was designed based on the paraxial theory and made of silicone rubber for acoustic impedance matching and encapsulation. The CMUT was fabricated based on the local oxidation of silicon (LOCOS) and fusion-bonding. The fabricated CMUT was verified to behave like an electromechanical resonator in air and exhibited wideband response with a center frequency of 2.2 MHz in immersion. The fabrication for the acoustic lens contained two consecutive mold castings and directly formed on the surface of the CMUT. Applied with ac burst input voltages at the center frequency, the CMUT with the acoustic lens generated an output pressure of 1.89 MPa (peak-to-peak) at the focal point with an effective focal gain of 3.43 in immersion. Compared to the same CMUT without a lens, the CMUT with the acoustic lens demonstrated the ability to successfully focus ultrasound and provided a viable solution to the miniaturization of the multi-modality forward-looking endoscopes without electrical focusing.

  4. Acoustic lens for capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Chienliu; Firouzi, Kamyar; Sarioglu, Ali Fatih; Nikoozadeh, Amin; Yoon, Hyo-Seon; Vaithilingam, Srikant; Carver, Thomas; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T; Kyu Park, Kwan

    2014-01-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) have great potential to compete with traditional piezoelectric transducers in therapeutic ultrasound applications. In this paper we have designed, fabricated and developed an acoustic lens formed on the CMUT to mechanically focus ultrasound. The acoustic lens was designed based on the paraxial theory and made of silicone rubber for acoustic impedance matching and encapsulation. The CMUT was fabricated based on the local oxidation of silicon (LOCOS) and fusion-bonding. The fabricated CMUT was verified to behave like an electromechanical resonator in air and exhibited wideband response with a center frequency of 2.2 MHz in immersion. The fabrication for the acoustic lens contained two consecutive mold castings and directly formed on the surface of the CMUT. Applied with ac burst input voltages at the center frequency, the CMUT with the acoustic lens generated an output pressure of 1.89 MPa (peak-to-peak) at the focal point with an effective focal gain of 3.43 in immersion. Compared to the same CMUT without a lens, the CMUT with the acoustic lens demonstrated the ability to successfully focus ultrasound and provided a viable solution to the miniaturization of the multi-modality forward-looking endoscopes without electrical focusing. (paper)

  5. Enlarged prostate - after care

    Science.gov (United States)

    BPH - self-care; Benign prostatic hypertrophy - self-care; Benign prostatic hyperplasia - self-care ... exercises ( Kegel exercises ) that strengthen the pelvic floor muscles. Doing these exercise may help with leaking or ...

  6. Cryotherapy for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000907.htm Cryotherapy for prostate cancer To use the sharing features ... first treatment for prostate cancer. What Happens During Cryotherapy Before the procedure, you will be given medicine ...

  7. Prostate cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, K; Friis, S; Kjaer, S K

    1998-01-01

    To review the trends in prostate cancer (PC) incidence and mortality rates in Denmark during a 50-year period.......To review the trends in prostate cancer (PC) incidence and mortality rates in Denmark during a 50-year period....

  8. Prostate cancer staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000397.htm Prostate cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... trials you may be able to join How Prostate Cancer Staging is Done Initial staging is based on ...

  9. Prostate cancer - treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000403.htm Prostate cancer - treatment To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Treatment for your prostate cancer is chosen after a thorough evaluation. Your doctor ...

  10. [Which modality for prostate brachytherapy?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossi, A

    2010-10-01

    Brachytherapy techniques by permanent implant of radioactive sources or by temporary high-dose-rate (HDR) fractions are nowadays extensively used for the treatment of prostatic carcinoma. Long-term results (at 20 years) concerning large amount of patients have been published by major centers confirming both in terms of efficacy and toxicities that permanent implant of radioactive iodine-125 seeds yields at least the same good results of surgery and of external beam irradiation when proposed to patients affected by low-risk disease. For intermediate to high-risk tumors, HDR temporary implants are proposed as a boost for dose escalation. For both techniques, several topics still need to be clarified dealing with a recent enlargement of indications (HDR alone for low-risk, iodine-125 seeds boost for intermediate-high-risk cancers), or with technical aspects (loose seeds versus linked ones, number of fractions and dose for HDR protocols), while dosimetric issues have only recently been addressed by cooperatives groups. Last but not least, there is a real need to address and clearly characterize the correct definition of biochemical disease control both for iodine permanent implant and for HDR implant. New challenges are facing the prostate-brachytherapy community in the near future: local relapse after external beam radiotherapy are currently managed by several salvage treatments (prostatectomy, cryo, high intensity focused ultrasounds [HIFU]) but the role of reirradiation by brachytherapy is also actively investigated. Focal therapy has gained considerable interest in the last 5 years aiming at treating only the area of cancer foci inside the prostate and preserving nearby healthy tissues. Encouraging results have been obtained with the so-called "minimally invasive" approaches and both permanent seed implantation and HDR brachytherapy techniques may be worthwhile testing in this setting because of their capability of exactly sculpting the dose inside the prostatic

  11. Cancer Patient T Cells Genetically Targeted to Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen Specifically Lyse Prostate Cancer Cells and Release Cytokines in Response to Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C. Gong

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The expression of immunoglobulin-based artificial receptors in normal T lymphocytes provides a means to target lymphocytes to cell surface antigens independently of major histocompatibility complex restriction. Such artificial receptors have been previously shown to confer antigen-specific tumoricidal properties in murine T cells. We constructed a novel ζ chain fusion receptor specific for prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA termed Pz-1. PSMA is a cell-surface glycoprotein expressed on prostate cancer cells and the neovascular endothelium of multiple carcinomas. We show that primary T cells harvested from five of five patients with different stages of prostate cancer and transduced with the Pz-1 receptor readily lyse prostate cancer cells. Having established a culture system using fibroblasts that express PSMA, we next show that T cells expressing the Pz-1 receptor release cytokines in response to cell-bound PSMA. Furthermore, we show that the cytokine release is greatly augmented by B7.1-mediated costimulation. Thus, our findings support the feasibility of adoptive cell therapy by using genetically engineered T cells in prostate cancer patients and suggest that both CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte functions can be synergistically targeted against tumor cells.

  12. A structural health monitoring system with ultrasonic MEMS transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guldiken, Rasim O.; Onen, Onursal; Gul, Mustafa; Catbas, F. Necati

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we will summarize our efforts on exploring guided acoustic waves generated by MEMS ultrasonic transducers enabling a non-destructive, ultra-low powered, wireless SHM system. State-of-the-art SHM systems employ bulk piezoelectric transducers. However, they are not environmentally benign (contain lead), not cost feasible for monitoring every bridge in the U.S., require significant power for operation, lack integration capability for wireless interrogation, need precise matching layers, and have only 25-50 percent fractional bandwidth, limiting the detection resolution. To alleviate most of these shortcomings, a low impedance MEMS transducer, called a capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT), is explored.

  13. Calibration of Field II using a Convex Ultrasound Transducer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Willatzen, Morten

    2010-01-01

    of the transducer. For such simulations to reflect actual measured intensities and pressure levels, the transducer impulse response is to be known. This work presents the results of combining a modified form of a 1D linear transducer model originally suggested by Willatzen with the Field II program to calibrate...... BK-Medical (Herlev, Denmark). As input waveform for the Field model we measured the output voltage of the research amplifier, which peak voltage was limited to 31 V to avoid too high non linear effects. We measured the hydrophone output from three transducer front elements by averaging 40 shoot...

  14. Transducers for Sound and Vibration - FEM Based Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Bin

    2001-01-01

    Design of transducers for measurement of vibration (piezoelectric accelerometers) and sound (condenser microphones) is a very labour intensive work. The design work is mostly based on experience and on simple analogies to electrical circuit design. Often a time consuming itterative loop is used......: Specification of the transducer, production of a physical prototype, measurements on the prototype, changed specification of the transducer etc. Furthermore are many transducers made based on customer requirements which also increases the amount of required design work. For these reasons there is a need...

  15. Comprehensive overview of prostatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Farhan Ullah; Ihsan, Awais Ullah; Khan, Hidayat Ullah; Jana, Ruby; Wazir, Junaid; Khongorzul, Puregmaa; Waqar, Muhammad; Zhou, Xiaohui

    2017-10-01

    Prostatitis is a common urinary tract syndrome that many doctors find problematic to treat effectively. It is the third most commonly found urinary tract disease in men after prostate cancer and Benign Prostate Hyperplasia (BPH). Prostatitis may account for 25% of all office visits made to the urological clinics complaining about the genital and urinary systems all over the world. In the present study, we classified prostatitis and comprehensively elaborated the etiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of acute bacterial prostatitis (category I), chronic bacterial prostatitis (category II), chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) (category III), and asymptomatic prostatitis (category IV). In addition, we also tried to get some insights about other types of prostatitis-like fungal, viral and gonococcal prostatitis. The aim of this review is to present the detail current perspective of prostatitis in a single review. To the best of our knowledge currently, there is not a single comprehensive review, which can completely elaborate this important topic in an effective way. Furthermore, this review will provide a solid platform to conduct future studies on different aspects such as risk factors, mechanism of pathogenesis, proper diagnosis, and rational treatment plans for fungal, viral, and gonococcal prostatitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Use of high-intensity focused ultrasound in the treatment of both benign and malignant prostatic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernen, Kenneth M.; Miles, Brian J.

    2000-05-01

    Prostate cancer, the most common malignancy in men in the United States, accounts for more than 29% of all male cancers diagnosed and 13% of all cancer deaths. This translates into approximately 200,000 men diagnosed and 37,000 men who will die from the disease this year in this country. A significant number of patients ultimately choose external beam radiation or interstitial radioactive implants (brachytherapy) combined with external beam radiotherapy as their primary treatment. Approximately 25 - 35% of external beam irradiation patients and 20 - 30% of interstitial implants combined with external beam radiotherapy will fail within 10 years. The treatment options for patients with localized radiorecurrent disease include watchful waiting, endocrine therapy, salvage radiotherapy, and salvage radical prostatectomy, cryotherapy and now high intensity focused ultrasound therapy (HIFU). Although some studies regarding watchful waiting demonstrated comparable results to formal treatment for early prostate cancer, other studies have shown metastatic and mortality rates that are significantly higher, and that radiorecurrent patients would have even greater rates of metastasis and progression to death. Prostate cancer cure by means of endocrine therapy is highly unlikely and its role is still one of palliation with a side effect profile which includes hot flashes, osteoporosis, fatigue, loss of muscle mass, anemia, loss of libido and potency. The role of salvage radiotherapy may offer local control, however long term efficacy has yet to be determined. In a recent series, only 50% of the patients were controlled for a mean of four years with salvage radiotherapy. Salvage prostatectomy has the advantage of providing excellent local control and even a cure if the cancer is confined to the prostate or within the surrounding periprostatic tissue. Historically, salvage prostatectomy is technically demanding and fraught with higher complications. In one large series

  17. Highly reliable multisensor array (MSA) smart transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, José; Lucena, Angel; Mackey, Paul; Mata, Carlos; Immer, Christopher

    2006-05-01

    Many developments in the field of multisensor array (MSA) transducers have taken place in the last few years. Advancements in fabrication technology, such as Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) and nanotechnology, have made implementation of MSA devices a reality. NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been developing this type of technology because of the increases in safety, reliability, and performance and the reduction in operational and maintenance costs that can be achieved with these devices. To demonstrate the MSA technology benefits, KSC quantified the relationship between the number of sensors (N) and the associated improvement in sensor life and reliability. A software algorithm was developed to monitor and assess the health of each element and the overall MSA. Furthermore, the software algorithm implemented criteria on how these elements would contribute to the MSA-calculated output to ensure required performance. The hypothesis was that a greater number of statistically independent sensor elements would provide a measurable increase in measurement reliability. A computer simulation was created to answer this question. An array of N sensors underwent random failures in the simulation and a life extension factor (LEF equals the percentage of the life of a single sensor) was calculated by the program. When LEF was plotted as a function of N, a quasiexponential behavior was detected with marginal improvement above N = 30. The hypothesis and follow-on simulation results were then corroborated experimentally. An array composed of eight independent pressure sensors was fabricated. To accelerate sensor life cycle and failure and to simulate degradation over time, the MSA was exposed to an environmental tem-perature of 125°C. Every 24 hours, the experiment's environmental temperature was returned to ambient temperature (27°C), and the outputs of all the MSA sensor elements were measured. Once per week, the MSA calibration was verified at five different

  18. A Critical Role of the PTEN/PDGF Signaling Network for the Regulation of Radiosensitivity in Adenocarcinoma of the Prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, Michael, E-mail: mechristense@uwalumni.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Center, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Najy, Abdo J. [Department of Pathology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Center, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Snyder, Michael; Movilla, Lisa S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Center, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Kim, Hyeong-Reh Choi [Department of Pathology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Center, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Loss or mutation of the phosphate and tensin homologue (PTEN) is a common genetic abnormality in prostate cancer (PCa) and induces platelet-derived growth factor D (PDGF D) signaling. We examined the role of the PTEN/PDGF axis on radioresponse using a murine PTEN null prostate epithelial cell model. Methods and Materials: PTEN wild-type (PTEN{sup +/+}) and PTEN knockout (PTEN{sup −/−}) murine prostate epithelial cell lines were used to examine the relationship between the PTEN status and radiosensitivity and also to modulate the PDGF D expression levels. PTEN{sup −/−} cells were transduced with a small hairpin RNA (shRNA) lentiviral vector containing either scrambled nucleotides (SCRM) or sequences targeted to PDGF D (shPDGF D). Tumorigenesis and morphogenesis of these cell lines were evaluated in vivo via subcutaneous injection of male nude mice and in vitro using Matrigel 3-dimensional (3D) culture. Effects of irradiation on clonogenic survival, cell migration, and invasion were measured with respect to the PTEN status and the PDGF D expression level. In addition, apoptosis and cell cycle redistribution were examined as potential mechanisms for differences seen. Results: PTEN{sup −/−} cells were highly tumorigenic in animals and effectively formed foci in 3D culture. Importantly, loss of PDGF D in these cell lines drastically diminished these phenotypes. Furthermore, PTEN{sup −/−} cells demonstrated increased clonogenic survival in vitro compared to PTEN{sup +/+}, and attenuation of PDGF D significantly reversed this radioresistant phenotype. PTEN{sup −/−} cells displayed greater migratory and invasive potential at baseline as well as after irradiation. Both the basal and radiation-induced migratory and invasive phenotypes in PTEN{sup −/−} cells required PDGF D expression. Interestingly, these differences were independent of apoptosis and cell cycle redistribution, as they showed no significant difference. Conclusions: We propose

  19. The management of localized and locally advanced prostate cancer - 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forman, Jeffrey D.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The intent of this course is to review the issues involved in the management of non-metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate. - The value of pre-treatment prognostic factors including stage, grade and PSA value will be presented, and their value in determining therapeutic strategies will be discussed. - Controversies involving the simulation process and treatment design will be presented. The value of CT scanning, Beams-Eye View, 3-D planning, intravesicle, intraurethral and rectal contrast will be presented. The significance of prostate and patient movement and strategies for dealing with them will be presented. - The management of low stage, low to intermediate grade prostate cancer will be discussed. The dose, volume and timing of irradiation will be discussed as will the role of neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy, neutron irradiation and brachy therapy. The current status of radical prostatectomy and cryotherapy will be summarized. - Treatment of locally advanced, poorly differentiated prostate cancer will be presented including a discussion of neo-adjuvant and adjuvant hormones, dose-escalation and neutron irradiation. - Strategies for post-radiation failures will be presented including data on cryotherapy, salvage prostatectomy and hormonal therapy (immediate, delayed and/or intermittent). New areas for investigation will be reviewed. - The management of patients post prostatectomy will be reviewed. Data on adjuvant radiation and therapeutic radiation for biochemical or clinically relapsed patients will be presented. This course hopes to present a realistic and pragmatic overview for treating patients with non-metastatic prostatic cancer

  20. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tomotaro; Aoki, Shohei

    1976-01-01

    Definition and significance of food irradiation were described. The details of its development and present state were also described. The effect of the irradiation on Irish potatoes, onions, wiener sausages, kamaboko (boiled fish-paste), and mandarin oranges was evaluated; and healthiness of food irradiation was discussed. Studies of the irradiation equipment for Irish potatoes in a large-sized container, and the silo-typed irradiation equipment for rice and wheat were mentioned. Shihoro RI center in Hokkaido which was put to practical use for the irradiation of Irish potatoes was introduced. The state of permission of food irradiation in foreign countries in 1975 was introduced. As a view of the food irradiation in the future, its utilization for the prevention of epidemics due to imported foods was mentioned. (Serizawa, K.)

  1. HOLOGRAPHIC VISUALIZATION OF CYLINDRICAL PIEZOCERAMIC TRANSDUCERS VIBRATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Vasiliauskas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The piezomaterial used in cylindrical piezoceramic transducers vibrations requiring high precision displacements indicates that accuracy depends on design and technological factors. The analyzed criteria have made possible to choose the piezomaterial for optimal mechatronic system having a maximal displacement. The experimental investigation of precision vibrosystems by means of 3D holographic visualization enables one to obtain appreciably larger amount of information about the vibrating surface in comparison with traditional methods. On the basis of the developed methodology of analyzing the experimental data derived from 3D holographic visualization and by using the experimental holography stand, we have obtained results making it possible to optimize the design of operation of the piezoceramic mechatronic system or its separate elements.

  2. Development of piezoelectric composites for transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, A.

    1994-07-01

    For the past decade and a half, many different types of piezoelectric ceramic-polymer composites have been developed intended for transducer applications. These diphasic composites are prepared from non-active polymer, such as epoxy, and piezoelectric ceramic, such as PZT, in the form of filler powders, elongated fibers, multilayer and more complex three-dimensional structures. For the last four years, most of the efforts have been given to producing large area and fine scale PZT fiber composites. In this paper, processing of piezoelectric ceramic-polymer composites with various connectivity patterns are reviewed. Development of fine scale piezoelectric composites by lost mold, injection molding and the relic method are described. Research activities of different groups for preparing large area piezocomposites for hydrophone and actuator applications are briefly reviewed. Initial development of electrostrictive ceramics and composites are also

  3. Modeling piezoelectric ultrasonic transducers for physiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias, E.; Frutos, J. de; Montero de Espinosa, F.

    2015-01-01

    Applications of ultrasound are well known in medical and aesthetic skin and subcutaneous fatty tissue mobilization treatments. The basic transducer used consists of a piezoelectric disk adhered to a metal delay line in capsule shape. The capsule design is critical since the two bonded elements have vibration modes which can cause very inefficient designs and vibration distributions very irregular if they are not properly studied and utilized. This must be known to avoid distributions of heat and sound pressure that could be ineffective or harmful. In this paper, using Finite Element Method and laser interferometric vibrational analysis, it has reached a piston-type solution that allows properly implement sound pressure vibration dose. (Author)

  4. Design optimization of embedded ultrasonic transducers for concrete structures assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumoulin, Cédric; Deraemaeker, Arnaud

    2017-08-01

    In the last decades, the field of structural health monitoring and damage detection has been intensively explored. Active vibration techniques allow to excite structures at high frequency vibrations which are sensitive to small damage. Piezoelectric PZT transducers are perfect candidates for such testing due to their small size, low cost and large bandwidth. Current ultrasonic systems are based on external piezoelectric transducers which need to be placed on two faces of the concrete specimen. The limited accessibility of in-service structures makes such an arrangement often impractical. An alternative is to embed permanently low-cost transducers inside the structure. Such types of transducers have been applied successfully for the in-situ estimation of the P-wave velocity in fresh concrete, and for crack monitoring. Up to now, the design of such transducers was essentially based on trial and error, or in a few cases, on the limitation of the acoustic impedance mismatch between the PZT and concrete. In the present study, we explore the working principles of embedded piezoelectric transducers which are found to be significantly different from external transducers. One of the major challenges concerning embedded transducers is to produce very low cost transducers. We show that a practical way to achieve this imperative is to consider the radial mode of actuation of bulk PZT elements. This is done by developing a simple finite element model of a piezoelectric transducer embedded in an infinite medium. The model is coupled with a multi-objective genetic algorithm which is used to design specific ultrasonic embedded transducers both for hard and fresh concrete monitoring. The results show the efficiency of the approach and a few designs are proposed which are optimal for hard concrete, fresh concrete, or both, in a given frequency band of interest. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Danish Prostate Cancer Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgstrand, J Thomas; Klemann, Nina; Røder, Martin Andreas

    2016-01-01

    of the prostate (TUR-Ps), and the remaining 22,028 (13.6%) specimens were derived from radical prostatectomies, bladder interventions, etc. A total of 48,078 (42.2%) males had histopathologically verified prostate cancer, and of these, 78.8% and 16.8% were diagnosed on prostate biopsies and TUR-Ps, respectively....... FUTURE PERSPECTIVES: A validated algorithm was successfully developed to convert complex prostate SNOMED codes into clinical useful data. A unique database, including males with both normal and cancerous histopathological data, was created to form the most comprehensive national prostate database to date...

  6. Gamma irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonet, G.

    1986-09-01

    Fiability of devices set around reactors depends on material resistance under irradiation noticeably joints, insulators, which belongs to composition of technical, safety or physical incasurement devices. The irradiated fuel elements, during their desactivation in a pool, are an interesting gamma irradiation device to simulate damages created in a nuclear environment. The existing facility at Osiris allows to generate an homogeneous rate dose in an important volume. The control of the element distances to irradiation box allows to control this dose rate [fr

  7. Prostate-specific antigen density: correlation with histological diagnosis of prostate cancer, benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Iersel, M. P.; Witjes, W. P.; de la Rosette, J. J.; Oosterhof, G. O.

    1995-01-01

    To assess the additional value of prostate-specific antigen density in the diagnosis of prostate cancer in patients who undergo prostate biopsies. The study comprised 376 patients with symptoms of prostatism who were undergoing prostate biopsy. Digital rectal examination (DRE) and transrectal

  8. Usefulness of CT-MRI fusion in radiotherapy planning for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hidekazu; Hayashi, Shinya; Ohtakara, Kazuhiro; Hoshi, Hiroaki; Iida, Takayoshi

    2011-01-01

    We compared the prostate volumes and rectal doses calculated by CT and CT-MRI fusion, and verified the usefulness of CT-MRI fusion in three-dimensional (3D) radiotherapy planning for localized prostate cancer. Three observers contoured the prostate and rectum of 13 patients with CT and CT-MRI fusion. Prostate delineations were classified into three sub-parts, and the volumes and distances to the rectum (partial response (PR) distance) were calculated. 3D radiotherapy plans were generated. A dose-volume histogram (DVH) was constructed for the rectum. The intermodality and interobserver variations were assessed. CT-MRI fusion yielded a significantly lower prostate volume by 31%. In the sub-part analysis, the greatest difference was seen for the apical side. The PR distance was significantly extended by 3.5-mm, and the greatest difference was seen for the basal side. The irradiated rectal volume was reduced in the CT-MRI fusion-based plan. The reduction rates were greater in the relatively high-dose regions. The decrease of the prostate volume and length alteration of the distance between the prostate and rectum were correlated with the decrease of the irradiated rectal volume. The prostate volume delineated by CT-MRI fusion was negatively correlated with the decrease of the irradiated rectal volume. CT showed a tendency towards overestimation of the prostate volume and underestimation of the PR distance as compared to CT-MRI fusion. The rectal dose was significantly reduced in CT-MRI fusion-based plan. Using CT-MRI fusion, especially in cases with a small prostate, the irradiated rectal volume can be reduced, with consequent reduction in rectal complications. (author)

  9. A comparison of ventilatory prostate movement in four treatment positions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, Laura A.; Litzenberg, Dale W.; Brock, Kristy K.; Sanda, Martin; Sullivan, Molly; Sandler, Howard M.; Balter, James M.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To ensure target coverage during radiotherapy, all sources of geometric uncertainty in target position must be considered. Movement of the prostate due to breathing has not traditionally been considered in prostate radiotherapy. The purpose of this study is to report the influence of patient orientation and immobilization on prostate movement due to breathing. Methods and Materials: Four patients had radiopaque markers implanted in the prostate. Fluoroscopy was performed in four different positions: prone in alpha cradle, prone with an aquaplast mold, supine on a flat table, and supine with a false table under the buttocks. Fluoroscopic movies were videotaped and digitized. Frames were analyzed using 2D-alignment software to determine the extent of movement of the prostate markers and the skeleton for each position during normal and deep breathing. Results: During normal breathing, maximal movement of the prostate markers was seen in the prone position (cranial-caudal [CC] range: 0.9-5.1 mm; anterior-posterior [AP] range: up to 3.5 mm). In the supine position, prostate movement during normal breathing was less than 1 mm in all directions. Deep breathing resulted in CC movements of 3.8-10.5 mm in the prone position (with and without an aquaplast mold). This range was reduced to 2.0-7.3 mm in the supine position and 0.5-2.1 mm with the use of the false table top. Deep breathing resulted in AP skeletal movements of 2.7-13.1 mm in the prone position, whereas AP skeletal movements in the supine position were negligible. Conclusion: Ventilatory movement of the prostate is substantial in the prone position and is reduced in the supine position. The potential for breathing to influence prostate movement, and thus the dose delivered to the prostate and normal tissues, should be considered when positioning and planning patients for conformal irradiation

  10. 5-ALA-assisted photodynamic therapy in canine prostates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka, Ronald; Muschter, Rolf; Knuechel, Ruth; Steinbach, Pia; Perlmutter, Aaron P.; Martin, Thomas; Baumgartner, Reinhold

    1996-05-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and interstitial thermotherapy are well known treatment modalities in urology. The approach of this study is to combine both to achieve a selective treatment procedure for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate carcinoma. Measurements of thy in-vivo pharmacokinetics of 5-ALA induced porphyrins by means of fiber assisted ratiofluorometry showed a maximum fluorescence intensity at time intervals of 3 - 4 h post administration. Fluorescence microscopy at that time showed bright fluorescence in epithelial cells while in the stroma fluorescence could not be observed. Interstitial PDT using a 635-nm dye laser with an irradiation of 50 J/cm2 resulted in a nonthermic hemorrhagic lesion. The lesion size did not change significantly when an irradiation of 100 J/cm2 was used. The usefulness of PDT for treating BPH as well as prostate carcinoma has to be proven in further studies.

  11. Respiratory Belt Transducer Constructed Using a Singing Greeting Card Beeper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, Anand; Subramani, Selvam; Ojha, Rajdeep

    2013-01-01

    An article by Belusic and Zupancic described the construction of a finger pulse sensor using a singing greeting card beeper. These authors felt that this beeper made of piezoelectric material could be easily modified to function as a respiratory belt transducer to monitor respiratory movements. Commercially available respiratory belt transducers,…

  12. Dynamics Characterisation of Cymbal Transducers for Power Ultrasonics Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, Andrew; Bejarano, Fernando; Lucas, Margaret

    A class V cymbal flextensional transducer is composed of a piezoceramic disc sandwiched between two cymbal-shaped shell end-caps. Depending on the type of piezoceramic, there exists a maximum voltage that can be reached without depolarisation, but also, at higher voltage levels, amplitude saturation can occur. In addition, there is a restriction imposed by the mechanical strength of the bonding agent. The effects of input voltage level on the vibration response of two cymbal transducers are studied. The first cymbal transducer has a standard configuration of end-caps bonded to a piezoceramic disc, whereas the second cymbal transducer is a modified design which includes a metal ring to improve the mechanical coupling with the end-caps, to enable the transducer to operate at higher voltages, thereby generating higher displacement amplitudes. This would allow the transducer to be suitable for power ultrasonics applications. Furthermore, the input voltages to each transducer are increased incrementally to determine the linearity in the dynamic responses. Through a combination of numerical modelling and experiments, it is shown how the improved mechanical coupling in the modified cymbal transducer allows higher vibration amplitudes to be reached.

  13. Top-down tree transducers with regular look-ahead

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelfriet, Joost

    1977-01-01

    Top-down tree transducers with regular look-ahead are introduced. It is shown how these can be decomposed and composed, and how this leads to closure properties of surface sets and tree transformation languages. Particular attention is paid to deterministic tree transducers.

  14. A method for determining losses in magnetostrictive transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krysin, V. N.; Ketlerov, A. S.

    A method for estimating energy losses in magnetostrictive transducers is described. It is shown that domain remagnetization is responsible for the greatest energy loss in magnetostrictive transducers. Energy losses associated with Foucault currents and Joule heat are an order of magnitude less.

  15. [The manufacture of the pressure transducer for medical Solos Insufflator].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, X

    2001-07-01

    A 0-10 Kpa pressure transducer and its circuit are presented in the paper, which can be used as a substitute for the integrated pressure transducer in medical Solos Insufflator and can be used too in other devices and equipments.

  16. Broadband tonpilz underwater acoustic transducers based on multimode optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Qingshan; Jensen, Leif Bjørnø

    1997-01-01

    Head flapping has often been considered to be deleterious for obtaining a tonpilz transducer with broadband, high power performance. In the present work, broadband, high power tonpilz transducers have been designed using the finite element (FE) method. Optimized vibrational modes including the fl...

  17. A rotary ultrasonic motor using bending vibration transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingxiang; Chen, Weishan; Liu, Junkao; Shi, Shengjun

    2010-10-01

    A rotary ultrasonic motor using bending vibration transducers is proposed. In each transducer, two orthogonal bending vibrations are superimposed and an elliptical trajectory is generated at the driving foot. Typical output of the prototype is a no-load speed of 58 rpm and maximum torque of 9·5 Nm under an exciting voltage of 200 V(rms).

  18. Prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elkjær, Maria Carlsen; Andersen, Morten Heebøll; Høyer, Søren

    2017-01-01

    Background Active surveillance (AS) of low-risk prostate cancer (PCa) is an accepted alternative to active treatment. However, the conventional diagnostic trans-rectal ultrasound guided biopsies (TRUS-bx) underestimate PCa aggressiveness in almost half of the cases, when compared with the surgical...... lesions. Significant cancer was defined as GS > 6 or GS 6 (3 + 3) lesions with ≥ 6 mm maximal cancer core length (MCCL). Results A total of 78 patients were included and in 21 patients a total of 22 PIRADS-score 4 or 5 lesions were detected. MRGB pathology revealed that 17 (81%) of these and 22......% of the entire AS population harbored significant cancers at AS inclusion. In eight (38%) cases, the GS was upgraded. Also, nine patients (43%) had GS 6 (3 + 3) foci with MCCL ≥ 6 mm. Conclusion In an AS cohort based on TRUS and TRUS-bx diagnostic strategies, supplemental mpMRI and in-bore MRGB were able...

  19. Transducer hygiene: comparison of procedures for decontamination of ultrasound transducers and their use in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häggström, Mikael; Spira, Jack; Edelstam, Greta

    2015-02-01

    To determine whether current hygiene practices are appropriate during sonographic examinations. Five major hospitals in Sweden were investigated with a survey. At each hospital, the departments corresponding to the main types of sonographic examination were chosen. Personnel who were responsible for or acquainted with the local hygiene procedures completed a standardardized questionnaire. The surveys were completed by 25 departments, where the total number of sonographic examinations was approximately 20,000 per month. For transvaginal and transrectal sonographic examinations, the most common method for decontamination of the transducer was barrier protection during the procedure followed by cleansing with alcohol. Latex was the predominant cover material, but one department used polyethylene gloves, and another department used nitrile gloves. Both of these involved transvaginal ultrasonography. In transcutaneous examinations, all hospitals were using alcohol and paper or cloth for decontamination at a minimum. Transesophageal examinations were carried out without barrier protection, and decontamination was performed with an alkylating substance. The hygiene practices appear to be appropriate at most hospitals, but there is a prevalence of transducer cover materials of unacceptable permeability, as well as use of gloves on transducers despite insufficient evidence of safety. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. An improved method for computerized tomography-planned transperineal 125iodine prostate implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallner, K.; Chiu-Tsao, S.T.; Roy, J.; Arterbery, V.E.; Whitmore, W.; Jain, S.; Minsky, B.; Russo, P.; Fuks, Z.

    1991-01-01

    Transperineal 125iodine implants of the prostate can be performed with ultrasound guidance, a simple technique that has met with widespread acceptance. However, ultrasound does not allow good visualization of the pubic bones in relation to the pelvic outlet, and the pubic bones may interfere with needle placement in the anterior peripheral aspect of the prostate. Adequate irradiation of the entire periphery of the prostate is important to assure tumor control, since most tumors are multicentric and may involve the anterior aspect of the prostate. A computerized tomography-based treatment planning procedure that allows for angulation of transperineal needles to avoid the pubic bones and still reaches the most peripheral aspects of the gland is described. The technique also allows for the use of transrectal ultrasound and fluoroscopy to verify correct needle placement in the prostate at the procedure. Early treatment results, based on prostate specific antigen and regression of palpable tumors, are encouraging

  1. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchacek, V.

    1989-01-01

    The ranges of doses used for food irradiation and their effect on the processed foods are outlined. The wholesomeness of irradiated foods is discussed. The present food irradiation technology development in the world is described. A review of the irradiated foods permitted for public consumption, the purposes of food irradiaton, the doses used and a review of the commercial-scale food irradiators are tabulated. The history and the present state of food processing in Czechoslovakia are described. (author). 1 fig., 3 tabs., 13 refs

  2. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macklin, M.

    1987-01-01

    The Queensland Government has given its support the establishment of a food irradiation plant in Queensland. The decision to press ahead with a food irradiation plant is astonishing given that there are two independent inquiries being carried out into food irradiation - a Parliamentary Committee inquiry and an inquiry by the Australian Consumers Association, both of which have still to table their Reports. It is fair to assume from the Queensland Government's response to date, therefore, that the Government will proceed with its food irradiation proposals regardless of the outcomes of the various federal inquiries. The reasons for the Australian Democrats' opposition to food irradiation which are also those of concerned citizens are outlined

  3. SOCS2 mediates the cross talk between androgen and growth hormone signaling in prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iglesias Gato, Diego; Chuan, Yin Choy; Wikström, Pernilla

    2014-01-01

    Anabolic signals such as androgens and the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 (GH/IGF-1) axis play an essential role in the normal development of the prostate but also in its malignant transformation. In this study, we investigated the role of suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 (SOCS2...... with benign tissue. In contrast, however, castration-resistant bone metastases exhibit reduced levels of SOCS2 in comparison with localized or hormone naive, untreated metastatic tumors. In PCa cells, SOCS2 expression is induced by androgens through a mechanism that requires signal transducer and activator......) as mediator of the cross talk between androgens and GH signals in the prostate and its potential role as tumor suppressor in prostate cancer (PCa). We observed that SOCS2 protein levels assayed by immunohistochemistry are elevated in hormone therapy-naive localized prostatic adenocarcinoma in comparison...

  4. Methods and analysis of processing signals of incremental optoelectronic transducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szcześniak, Adam; Szcześniak, Zbigniew

    2009-09-01

    This article is a presentation of designed methods which interpolate signals from the optoelectronic transducer. This enables a way to distinguish the motion direction of the optoelectronic transducer and also to increase its accuracy. In this article methods based on logic functions, logic functions and RC circuits, phase processing were analyzed. In methods which are based on processing logic functions of transducer's signals there is a possibility of two times and four times increase in the transducer glass scale. The presented method of generating and processing sine signals with 18 degrees of the shift enables the reception of square signals with five times higher frequency compared to the basic signals. This method is universal and it can be used to the different scale of frequency multiplication of the optoelectronic transducer. The simulations of the methods were performed by using the MATLAB-SIMULINK software.

  5. 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Prostate Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... for early screening. Photo: AP Photo/Danny Moloshok Prostate Cancer The prostate gland is a walnut-sized structure ...

  6. Combined radio- and hormone therapy of the prostate carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papic, R.

    1979-08-01

    Intention of this study is to detect in 49 patients suffering from prostate carcinomas, effects and side effects of radiotherapy. According to the present results, there is not any doubt that prostate carcinomas are radiosensitive. In all patients radiotherapy induced a prostate shrinkage and an increasing of consistency. It resulted that a prostate biopsy must be carried out in order to control the success of therapy. The success of the treatment depends upon tumour spreading and on its degree of differentiation. Within the observation period only in four cases metastasation of the prostate carcinoma occurred after radiotherapy. According to literature, the 5-year survival rate with an organ-defined prostate carcinoma ranges between 70 and 80% when radiotherapeutic methods are applied. The same authors indicate a 5-year survival rate between 42 and 48% for scattered carcinomas. Only minor side effects are provoked by radiotherapy. In 75% of the patients pollakisuria and dysuria resulted. After irradiation was finished, the symptoms disappeared and did not cause in any case any late complications. In 12% of the cases proctitic pain occurred during irradiation, which in 6% remained even after the treatment was terminated. We could prove unequivocally on our patients that passage impairments caused by a prostate carcinoma are improved by radiotherapy. Finally it can be said that this treatment is applicable for curing carcinoma which is localised on the prostate. In the case of an undefined, scattered carcinoma radiotherapy combined with hormone therapy is the treatment of choice. With regards to undesired side effects radiotherapy is superior to other therapeutic measures. (orig./MG) [de

  7. Quantification of prostate movements during radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artignana, X.; Rastkhah, M.; Balosso, J.; Bolla, M.; Fourneret, P.; Gilliot, O.

    2006-01-01

    Decrease treatment uncertainties is one of the most important challenge in radiation oncology. Numerous techniques are available to quantify prostate motion and visualize prostate location day after day before each irradiation: CT-scan, cone-beam-CT-Scan, ultrasound, prostatic markers... The knowledge of prostate motion is necessary to define the minimal margin around the target volume needed to avoid mis-positioning during treatment session. Different kind of prostate movement have been studied and are reported in the present work: namely, those having a large amplitude extending through out the whole treatment period on one hand; and those with a shorter amplitude happening during treatment session one the other hand. The long lasting movement are mostly anterior posterior (3 mm standard deviation), secondary in cranial-caudal (1-2 mm standard deviation) and lateral directions (0.5-1 mm standard deviation). They are mostly due to the rectal state of filling and mildly due to bladder filling or inferior limbs position. On the other hand the shorter movement that occurs during the treatment session is mostly variation of position around a steady point represented by the apex. Ones again, the rectal filling state is the principle cause. This way, during the 20 minutes of a treatment session, including the positioning of the patient, a movement of less than 3 mm could be expected when the rectum is empty. Ideally, real time imaging tools should allow an accurate localisation of the prostate and the adaptation of the dosimetry before each treatment session in a time envelope not exceeding 20 minutes. (author)

  8. Results of a randomized Phase-3 trial to evaluate the efficacy of strontium-89 adjuvant to local field external beam irradiation in the management of endocrine resistant metastatic prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, A.T.; McEwan, A.J.B.; McGowan, D.G.; Powe, J.E.; Reid, R.; Lukka, H.; Sathyanarayana, J.R.; Yakemchuk, V.N.; Thomas, G.M.; Erlich, L.E.; Crook, J.; Gulenchyn, K.Y.; Hong, K.E.; Wesolowski, C.; Yardley, J.

    1993-01-01

    A large proportion of the practice of radiotherapy in the management of metastatic adenocarcinoma of the prostate is associated with palliation of pain from osseous metastases and improving quality of life. Strontium-89 is a systemic radionuclide that has clinical efficacy in the palliation of pain from bony metastases. The study was a Phase-3 randomized placebo control trial performed in eight Canadian Cancer Centers to evaluate the effectiveness of strontium-89 as an adjunct to local field radiotherapy. Patients with endocrine refractory metastatic prostate cancer received local field radiotherapy and either strontium-89 as a single injection of 10.8 mCi or placebo. One hundred twenty-six patients were recruited. No significant differences in survival or in relief of pain at the index site were noted. Intake of analgesics over time demonstrated a significant reduction in the arm treated with strontium-89. Progression of pain as measured by sites of new pain or the requirement for radiotherapy showed statistically significant differences between the arms in favor of strontium-89. Tumor markers including prostate specific antigen, acid phosphatase, and alkaline phosphatase were also reduced in patients receiving strontium-89. A Quality-of-Life analysis was performed as a multivariate data set and demonstrated an overall superiority of strontium-89 with alleviation of pain and improvement in physical activity being statistically significant. Toxicity was evaluated and demonstrated increased hematological toxicity in the group receiving strontium-89. It is concluded that the addition of strontium-89 is an effective adjuvant therapy to local field radiotherapy reducing progression of disease as evidenced by new sites of pain and the requirement of further radiotherapy and improving quality-of-life and need for analgesic support in this group of patients. 24 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  9. TORCs: transducers of regulated CREB activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conkright, Michael D; Canettieri, Gianluca; Screaton, Robert; Guzman, Ernesto; Miraglia, Loren; Hogenesch, John B; Montminy, Marc

    2003-08-01

    The cAMP responsive factor CREB stimulates gene expression, following its phosphorylation at Ser133, via recruitment of the coactivator CBP. In certain cell types, CREB also functions as a constitutive activator, although the underlying mechanisms are not understood. Here, we characterize a conserved family of coactivators, designated TORCs, for Transducers of Regulated CREB activity, that enhances CRE-dependent transcription via a phosphorylation-independent interaction with the bZIP DNA binding/dimerization domain of CREB. TORC recruitment does not appear to modulate CREB DNA binding activity, but rather enhances the interaction of CREB with the TAF(II)130 component of TFIID following its recruitment to the promoter. Remarkably, in certain mucoepidermoid carcinomas, a chromosomal translocation fuses the CREB binding domain of TORC1 to the Notch coactivator Mastermind (MAML2). As expression of the TORC1-MAML2 chimera strongly induced target gene expression via CREB, our results reveal a mechanism by which CREB stimulates transcription in normal and transformed cells.

  10. Performance Improvement of High Frequency Aluminum Nitride Ultrasonic Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yangjie Wei

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents three methods to improve the performance of a high frequency aluminum nitride (AlN ultrasonic transducer. For a high frequency AlN ultrasonic transducer, its properties are related with its top electrode size, electrical impedance matching and layers of the piezoelectric plate. However, until now, no research has been published to analyze their influence on the performance of AlN ultrasonic transducers, especially in the frequency range above 200 MHz. First, two factors related with the top electrode size are proposed based on transmission coefficient and stored energy, and analysis is performed on an Al-AlN-Al on silicon wafers with different electrode sizes. The result proves when the electrode size is 1mm2, the transducer can provide the maximum output voltage and the maximal signal- to-noise ratio (SNR. Then, electrical impedance matching is conducted to improve the performance of transducers, and the experiment result shows that after matching, the resolution and sensitivity have been improved. Finally, a stacked AlN transducer is developed and its model is constructed to analyze its properties in time domain and frequency domain. The comparison between the simulation and the experiment shows the effectiveness of the proposed model, and a stacked structure can be used to improve the sensitivity of a high frequency AlN ultrasonic transducer.

  11. Piezoelectric Nanotube Array for Broadband High-Frequency Ultrasonic Transducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Weng Heng; Yao, Kui; Chen, Shuting; Tay, Francis Eng Hock

    2018-03-01

    Piezoelectric materials are vital in determining ultrasonic transducer and imaging performance as they offer the function for conversion between mechanical and electrical energy. Ultrasonic transducers with high-frequency operation suffer from performance degradation and fabrication difficulty of the demanded piezoelectric materials. Hence, we propose 1-D polymeric piezoelectric nanostructure with controlled nanoscale features to overcome the technical limitations of high-frequency ultrasonic transducers. For the first time, we demonstrate the integration of a well-aligned piezoelectric nanotube array to produce a high-frequency ultrasonic transducer with outstanding performance. We find that nanoconfinement-induced polarization orientation and unique nanotube structure lead to significantly improved piezoelectric and ultrasonic transducing performance over the conventional piezoelectric thin film. A large bandwidth, 126% (-6 dB), is achieved at high center frequency, 108 MHz. Transmission sensitivity of nanotube array is found to be 46% higher than that of the monolithic thin film transducer attributed to the improved electromechanical coupling effectiveness and impedance match. We further demonstrate high-resolution scanning, ultrasonic imaging, and photoacoustic imaging using the obtained nanotube array transducers, which is valuable for biomedical imaging applications in the future.

  12. WSTO9 (TOOKAD) mediated photodynamic therapy as an alternative modality in the treatment of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qun; Huang, Zheng; Luck, David L.; Beckers, Jill; Brun, Pierre-Herve; Wilson, Brian C.; Scherz, Avigdor; Salomon, Yoram; Hetzel, Fred W.

    2002-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) utilizes optical energy to activate a pre-administered photosensitizer drug to achieve a localized tumor control. In the presented study, PDT mediated with a second-generation photosensitizer, WST09 (TOOKAD, Steba Biotech, The Netherlands), is investigated as an alternative therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer. In vivo canine prostate is used as the animal model. PDT was performed by irradiating the surgically exposed prostates both superficially and interstitially with a diode laser (763 nm) to activate the intra-operatively i.v. infused photosensitizer. During light irradiation, tissue optical properties, and temperature were monitored. During the one-week to 3-month period post PDT treatment, the dogs recovered well with little or no complications. The prostates were harvested and subjected to histopathological evaluations. Maximum lesion size of over 3 cm in dimension could be achieved with a single treatment, suggesting the therapy is extremely effective in destroying prostatic tissue. Although we found there was loss of epithelial lining in prostatic urethra, there was no evidence it had caused urinary tract side effects as reported in those studies utilizing transurethral irradiation. In conclusion, we found second generation photosensitizer WST09 mediated PDT may provide an excellent alternative to treat prostate cancer.

  13. Bonding and impedance matching of acoustic transducers using silver epoxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Kyu Tak; Lee, Chin C

    2012-04-01

    Silver epoxy was selected to bond transducer plates on glass substrates. The properties and thickness of the bonding medium affect the electrical input impedance of the transducer. Thus, the thickness of the silver epoxy bonding layer was used as a design parameter to optimize the structure for the transducer input impedance to match the 50 Ω output impedance of most radio frequency (RF) generators. Simulation and experimental results show that nearly perfect matching is achieved without using any matching circuit. At the matching condition, the transducer operates at a frequency band a little bit below the half-wavelength resonant frequency of the piezoelectric plate. In experiments, lead titanate (PT) piezoelectric plates were employed. Both full-size, 11.5 mm × 2 mm × 0.4 mm, and half-size, 5.75 mm × 2 mm × 0.4 mm, can be well matched using optimal silver epoxy thickness. The transducer assemblies demonstrate high efficiency. The conversion loss from electrical power to acoustic power in soda-lime glass is 4.3 dB. This loss is low considering the fact that the transducers operate at off-resonance by 12%. With proper choice of silver epoxy thickness, the transducer can be matched at the fundamental, the 3rd and 5th harmonic frequencies. This leads to the possible realization of triple-band transducers. Reliability was assessed with thermal cycling test according to Telcordia GR-468-Core recommendation. Of the 30 transducer assemblies tested, none broke until 2900 cycles and 27 have sustained beyond 4050 cycles. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Foodstuff irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Report written on behalf of the Danish Food Institute summarizes national and international rules and developments within food irradiation technology, chemical changes in irradiated foodstuffs, microbiological and health-related aspects of irradiation and finally technological prospects of this conservation form. Food irradiatin has not been hitherto applied in Denmark. Radiation sources and secondary radiation doses in processed food are characterized. Chemical changes due to irradiation are compared to those due to p.ex. food heating. Toxicological and microbiological tests and their results give no unequivocal answer to the problem whether a foodstuff has been irradiated. The most likely application fields in Denmark are for low radiation dosis inhibition of germination, riping delay and insecticide. Medium dosis (1-10 kGy) can reduce bacteria number while high dosis (10-50 kGy) will enable total elimination of microorganisms and viruses. Food irradiation can be acceptable as technological possibility with reservation, that further studies follow. (EG)

  15. On cribriform prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Kweldam, Charlotte

    2018-01-01

    markdownabstractThis general aim of the thesis is to study the clinical relevance, interobserver reproducibility, and genetics of cribriform growth in prostate cancer. More specifically, the aims and outline of this thesis are • To study the metastatic potential of modified Gleason score 3+3 prostate cancer in radical prostatectomies. (Chapter 2) • To examine the prognostic value of individual Gleason grade 4 patterns in prostate cancer in radical prostatectomy and diagnostic biopsy specimens...

  16. USE OF PELTIER COOLERS AS SOIL HEAT FLUX TRANSDUCERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, H.L.; Campbell, G.S.

    1985-01-01

    Peltier coolers were modified and calibrated to serve as soil heat flux transducers. The modification was to fill their interiors with epoxy. The average calibration constant on 21 units was 13. 6 plus or minus 0. 8 kW m** minus **2 V** minus **1 at 20 degree C. This sensitivity is about eight times that of the two thermopile transducers with which comparisons were made. The thermal conductivity of the Peltier cooler transducers was 0. 4 W m** minus **1 degree C** minus **1, which is comparable to that of dry soil.

  17. Ultrasonic Transducer Peak-to-Peak Optical Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Skarvada

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Possible optical setups for measurement of the peak-to-peak value of an ultrasonic transducer are described in this work. The Michelson interferometer with the calibrated nanopositioner in reference path and laser Doppler vibrometer were used for the basic measurement of vibration displacement. Langevin type of ultrasonic transducer is used for the purposes of Electro-Ultrasonic Nonlinear Spectroscopy (EUNS. Parameters of produced mechanical vibration have to been well known for EUNS. Moreover, a monitoring of mechanical vibration frequency shift with a mass load and sample-transducer coupling is important for EUNS measurement.

  18. An ultrasonic fuel identification system for liquid metal cooled reactors resilient against multiple transducer failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van-Dyck, Dries; Dierckx, Marc

    2013-06-01

    We describe a fuel assembly identification system developed for the MYRRHA reactor - a new multi-purpose flexible irradiation facility to replace the aging BR2. MYRRHA is a fast spectrum research reactor cooled with lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) and conceived as an accelerator driven system capable of operating in sub-critical and critical modes. As liquid metal is opaque to visual light, the conventional optical fuel assembly identification system, as used by water cooled reactors, has to be replaced by a system not hindered by the opacity of the coolant. As already suggested in the late sixties, we use ultrasound for this purpose and present an encoding especially designed to enhance the robustness of the ultrasonic read-out. The encoding is based on notches of varying depth on the inflow nozzle of a fuel assembly. The depth of each notch is used to encode two bits and is measured by a dedicated transducer aligned over the notch. To increase the reliability of the fuel identification process, the identification number is protected by an error correcting code based on Hamming codes. We describe the ultrasonic system used to read out the vector of depths which is subsequently converted to a vector of bits. We explain the encoding of the twelve bit fuel identification numbers to a 22-bit error correcting code and discuss how Hamming decoding can be used to correct single bit errors, detect two bit errors or fill in the missing bits of a failing transducer. We also present a method based on solving a linear system over Boolean variables to (partially) reconstruct the fuel identification number in case multiple transducers fail. We show that the probability on full reconstruction is 100% for up to two transducer failures, 98% for three, 79% for four and 20% for five failing transducers. Finally, we present validation results in water and lead-bismuth eutectic for the differential measurement method used to measure the depth of the notches which form the basis for the

  19. Postoperative Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in High Risk Prostate Cancer: A Dosimetric Comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Digesu, Cinzia; Cilla, Savino; De Gaetano, Andrea; Massaccesi, Mariangela; Macchia, Gabriella; Ippolito, Edy; Deodato, Francesco; Panunzi, Simona; Iapalucci, Chiara; Mattiucci, Gian Carlo; D'Angelo, Elisa; Padula, Gilbert D.A.; Valentini, Vincenzo; Cellini, Numa

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with 3D conformal technique (3D-CRT), with respect to target coverage and irradiation of organs at risk for high dose postoperative radiotherapy (PORT) of the prostate fossa. 3D-CRT and IMRT treatment plans were compared with respect to dose to the rectum and bladder. The dosimetric comparison was carried out in 15 patients considering 2 different scenarios: (1) exclusive prostate fossa irradiation, and (2) pelvic node irradiation followed by a boost on the prostate fossa. In scenario (1), a 3D-CRT plan (box technique) and an IMRT plan were calculated and compared for each patient. In scenario (2), 3 treatment plans were calculated and compared for each patient: (a) 3D-CRT box technique for both pelvic (prophylactic nodal irradiation) and prostate fossa irradiation (3D-CRT only); (b) 3D-CRT box technique for pelvic irradiation followed by an IMRT boost to the prostatic fossa (hybrid 3D-CRT and IMRT); and (c) IMRT for both pelvic and prostate fossa irradiation (IMRT only). For exclusive prostate fossa irradiation, IMRT significantly reduced the dose to the rectum (lower Dmean, V50%, V75%, V90%, V100%, EUD, and NTCP) and the bladder (lower Dmean, V50%, V90%, EUD and NTCP). When prophylactic irradiation of the pelvis was also considered, plan C (IMRT only) performed better than plan B (hybrid 3D-CRT and IMRT) as respect to both rectum and bladder irradiation (reduction of Dmean, V50%, V75%, V90%, equivalent uniform dose [EUD], and normal tissue complication probability [NTCP]). Plan (b) (hybrid 3D-CRT and IMRT) performed better than plan (a) (3D-CRT only) with respect to dose to the rectum (lower Dmean, V75%, V90%, V100%, EUD, and NTCP) and the bladder (Dmean, EUD, and NTCP). Postoperative IMRT in prostate cancer significantly reduces rectum and bladder irradiation compared with 3D-CRT.

  20. Hemibody irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schen, B.C.; Mella, O.; Dahl, O.

    1992-01-01

    In a large number of cancer patients, extensive skeletal metastases or myelomatosis induce vast suffering, such as intolerable pain and local complications of neoplastic bone destruction. Analgetic drugs frequently do not yield sufficient palliation. Irradiation of local fields often has to be repeated, because of tumour growth outside previously irradiated volumes. Wide field irradiation of the lower or upper half of the body causes significant relief of pain in most patients. Adequate pretreatment handling of patients, method of irradiation, and follow-up are of importance to reduce side effects, and are described as they are carried out at the Department of Oncology, Haukeland Hospital, Norway. 16 refs., 2 figs

  1. Prostate imaging. An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franiel, T.; Teichgraeber, U.; Asbach, P.; Hamm, B.; Foller, S.

    2015-01-01

    New technical and clinical developments of sonography and magnetic resonance imaging include improved detection, localization and staging as well as active surveillance of prostate cancer. Multiparametric MRI can best answer these typical clinical questions. However, ultrasound elastography seems to be suitable for the detection of significant prostate cancer as well. The structured reporting system for multiparametric MRI of the prostate according to PI-RADS Version 1 led to improved and reproducible diagnosis of prostate cancer. The new PI-RADS Version 2 aims to minimize the limitations of Version 1 and make PI-RADS standardization more globally acceptable.

  2. Screening for prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weirich, Stephen A.

    1993-01-01

    Despite recent advances in both the survival and cure rates for many forms of cancer, unfortunately the same has not been true for prostate cancer. In fact, the age-adjusted death rate from prostate cancer has not significantly improved since 1949, and prostate cancer remains the most common cancer in American men, causing the second highest cancer mortality rate. Topics discussed include the following: serum testosterone levels; diagnosis; mortality statistics; prostate-sppecific antigen (PSA) tests; and the Occupational Medicine Services policy at LeRC.

  3. Studies of vascular acting photosensitizer Tookad for the photodynamic therapy of prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zheng; Chen, Qun; Blanc, Dominique; Hetzel, Fred W.

    2005-01-01

    In this pre-clinical study, photodynamic therapy (PDT) mediated with a vascular acting photosensitizer Tookad (palladium-bacteriopheophorbide) is investigated as an alternative treatment modality for the ablation of prostate cancer. Canine prostate was used as the animal model. PDT was performed by interstitially irradiating the surgically exposed prostates with a diode laser (763 nm) to activate the IV infused photosensitizer. The effects of drug dose, drug-light interval, and light fluence rate on PDT efficacy were evaluated. The prostates and adjacent tissues were harvested at one-week post PDT and subjected to histopathological examination. The dogs recovered well with little or no urethral complications. Urinalysis showed trace blood. Histological examination showed minimal damage to the prostatic urethra. These indicated that the urethra was well preserved. PDT induced prostate lesions were characterized by marked hemorrhagic necrosis with a clear demarcation. Maximum lesion volume of ~3 cm3 could be achieved with a single 1-cm diffuser fiber at a dose level of 1 mg/kg and 200 J/cm, suggesting the therapy is very effective in ablating prostatic tissue. PDT induced lesion could reach the capsule layers but adjacent tissues were well preserved. The novel photosensitizer is a vascular drug and cleared rapidly from the circulation. Light irradiation can be performed during drug infusion thereby eliminating waiting time. The novel vascular acting photosensitizer Tookad-mediated PDT could provide an effective alternative to treat prostate cancer.

  4. Evaluation of the radio modifier effect of propolis on chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) and human prostate cancer (PC3) cells, irradiated with 60-CO; Avaliacao do efeito radiomodificador da propolis em celulas de ovario de hamster chines (CHO-K1) e em celulas tumorais de prostata (PC3), irradiadas com CO-60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Geyza Spigoti

    2011-07-01

    In the last decades, it has been given a great interest to investigations concerning natural, effective, nontoxic compounds with radioprotective potential together with the increasing utilization of different types of ionizing radiation for various applications. Among them propolis, a resinous compound produced by honeybees (Apis mellifera), has been considered quite promising, since it presents several advantageous biological characteristics, i. e., anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, anticarcinogenic, antioxidant and also free radical scavenging action. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effect of Brazilian propolis, collected in the State of Rio Grande do Sul, on Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) and human prostate cancer (PC3) cells, irradiated with {sup 60}Co {gamma} radiation. For this purpose, three interlinked parameters were analyzed: micronucleus induction, cell viability and clonogenic death. The choice of these parameters was justified by their biological significance, in addition to the fact that they are readily observable and measurable in irradiated cells. The cytogenetic data obtained showed a radioprotective effect of propolis (5-100 {mu}g/ml) in the induction of DNA damage for both cell lines, irradiated with doses of 1 - 4 Gy. The cytotoxicity assay, however, showed a prominent antiproliferative effect of propolis (50 - 400{mu}/ml) in PC3 cells irradiated with 5 G{gamma}. The survival curves obtained were adequately fitted by a linear-quadratic model, where the {alpha} coefficient was higher in CHO-K1 cells. Concerning the clonogenic capacity, PC3 cells were more radiosensitive than CHO-K1 cells at the higher doses of the survival curve. Propolis at the concentrations of 30 - 100 {mu}g/ml, did not influence the clonogenic potential of PC3 cells, since the survival curves, associated or not with propolis, were found similar, although the combined treatment in CHO-K1 cells exhibited a stimulating proliferative effect. The data

  5. Electromechanically active polymer transducers: research in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpi, Federico; Graz, Ingrid; Jager, Edwin; Ladegaard Skov, Anne; Vidal, Frédéric

    2013-10-01

    Smart materials and structures based on electromechanically active polymers (EAPs) represent a fast growing and stimulating field of research and development. EAPs are materials capable of changing dimensions and/or shape in response to suitable electrical stimuli. They are commonly classified in two major families: ionic EAPs (activated by an electrically induced transport of ions and/or solvent) and electronic EAPs (activated by electrostatic forces). These polymers show interesting properties, such as sizable active strains and/or stresses in response to electrical driving, high mechanical flexibility, low density, structural simplicity, ease of processing and scalability, no acoustic noise and, in most cases, low costs. Since many of these characteristics can also describe natural muscle tissues from an engineering standpoint, it is not surprising that EAP transducers are sometimes also referred to as 'muscle-like smart materials' or 'artificial muscles'. They are used not only to generate motion, but also to sense or harvest energy from it. In particular, EAP electromechanical transducers are studied for applications that can benefit from their 'biomimetic' characteristics, with possible usages from the micro- to the macro-scale, spanning several disciplines, such as mechatronics, robotics, automation, biotechnology and biomedical engineering, haptics, fluidics, optics and acoustics. Currently, the EAP field is just undergoing its initial transition from academic research into commercialization, with companies starting to invest in this technology and the first products appearing on the market. This focus issue is intentionally aimed at gathering contributions from the most influential European groups working in the EAP field. In fact, today Europe hosts the broadest EAP community worldwide. The rapid expansion of the EAP field in Europe, where it historically has strong roots, has stimulated the creation of the 'European Scientific Network for Artificial

  6. Review article: Prostate cancer screening using prostate specific ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Prostate cancer is the commonest cancer among men in Nigeria and early detection is key to cure and survival but its screening through prostate specific antigen (PSA) has remain controversial in literature. Screening with prostate specific antigen (PSA) has led to more men diagnosed with prostate cancer than ...

  7. Performance Evaluation of Pressure Transducers for Water Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.; Stegall, David E.; Treadway, Sean

    2012-01-01

    The Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle is being designed for water landings. In order to benchmark the ability of engineering tools to predict water landing loads, test programs are underway for scale model and full-scale water impacts. These test programs are predicated on the reliable measurement of impact pressure histories. Tests have been performed with a variety of pressure transducers from various manufacturers. Both piezoelectric and piezoresistive devices have been tested. Effects such as thermal shock, pinching of the transducer head, and flushness of the transducer mounting have been studied. Data acquisition issues such as sampling rate and anti-aliasing filtering also have been studied. The response of pressure transducers have been compared side-by-side on an impulse test rig and on a 20-inch diameter hemisphere dropped into a pool of water. The results have identified a range of viable configurations for pressure measurement dependent on the objectives of the test program.

  8. Failure Analysis of High-Power Piezoelectric Transducers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gabrielson, T. B

    2005-01-01

    ... and stress in a piezoelectric material. For a transducer operated near resonance, there will be "hot spots" or regions of locally intense stress and electric field that precipitate premature failure...

  9. Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers (CMUTs for Underwater Imaging Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinlong Song

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer structure for use in underwater imaging is designed, fabricated and tested in this paper. In this structure, a silicon dioxide insulation layer is inserted between the top electrodes and the vibration membrane to prevent ohmic contact. The capacitance-voltage (C-V characteristic curve shows that the transducer offers suitable levels of hysteresis and repeatability performance. The −6 dB center frequency is 540 kHz and the transducer has a bandwidth of 840 kHz for a relative bandwidth of 155%. Underwater pressure of 143.43 Pa is achieved 1 m away from the capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer under 20  excitation. Two-dimensional underwater ultrasonic imaging, which is able to prove that a rectangular object is present underwater, is achieved. The results presented here indicate that our work will be highly beneficial for the establishment of an underwater ultrasonic imaging system.

  10. Tunable interdigital transducers made of piezoelectric macro-fiber composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mańka, Michał; Martowicz, Adam; Rosiek, Mateusz; Stepinski, Tadeusz; Uhl, Tadeusz

    2016-11-01

    The number of applications of Lamb waves (LWs) based structural health monitoring (SHM) has significantly increased in recent decades. The growth of interest results from several advantages of this diagnostic technique, that is, considerable mode selectivity and directivity that allow for the assessment of the technical condition of a monitored structure. Successful applications of LWs in the field of SHM stimulate continuous improvement of the transducers’ design to enable capturing more reliable diagnostic data. The paper introduces a new type of transducer that may be used in the LWs based SHM systems, namely tunable-interdigital transducer (T-IDT) based on macro-fiber composites (MFC). The authors provide a short overview on different types of transducers that may be used in SHM applications, followed by a detailed description of the structure of proposed T-IDT. Finally, the results of numerical and experimental tests carried out employing the proposed transducer are discussed and compared to those obtained with a traditional IDT.

  11. Active Metamaterial Based Ultrasonic Guided Wave Transducer System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An active and tunable metamaterial phased array transducer for guided wave mode selection with high intensity per driving channel and with dramatically lower modal...

  12. Spatial impulse response of a rectangular double curved transducer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Willatzen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Calculation of the pressure field from transducers having both a convex and a concave surface geometry is a complicated assignment that often is accomplished by subdividing the transducer surface into smaller flat elements of which the spatial impulse response is known. This method is often seen...... applied to curved transducers because an analytical solution is un-known. In this work a semi-analytical algorithm for the exact solution to a first order in diffraction effect of the spatial impulse response of rectangular shaped double curved transducers is presented. The algorithm and an approximation...... approximations ranging from 0.03 % to 0.8 % relative to a numerical solution for the spatial impulse response. It is shown that the presented algorithm gives consistent results with Field II for a linear flat, a linear focused, and a convex non-focused element. Best solution was found to be 0.01 % with a three...

  13. Wideband Single Crystal Transducer for Bone Characterization, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — TRS proposes to develop a simple-to-use, launch capable, ultrasound transducer that is capable of producing the necessary bandwidth to accurately determine in vivo...

  14. Integration of Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasound Transducers to Microfluidic Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Viržonis, Darius

    2013-10-22

    The design and manufacturing flexibility of capacitive micromachined ultrasound transducers (CMUT) makes them attractive option for integration with microfluidic devices both for sensing and fluid manipulation. CMUT concept is introduced here by presentin

  15. Thermal properties photonic crystal fiber transducers with ferromagnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przybysz, N.; Marć, P.; Kisielewska, A.; Jaroszewicz, L. R.

    2015-12-01

    The main aim of the research is to design new types of fiber optic transducers based on filled photonic crystal fibers for sensor applications. In our research we propose to use as a filling material nanoparticles' ferrofluids (Fe3O4 NPs). Optical properties of such transducers are studied by measurements of spectral characteristics' changes when transducers are exposed to temperature and magnetic field changes. From synthesized ferrofluid several mixtures with different NPs' concentrations were prepared. Partially filled commercially available photonic crystal fiber LMA 10 (NKT Photonics) was used to design PCF transducers. Their thermo-optic properties were tested in a temperature chamber. Taking into account magnetic properties of synthetized NPs the patch cords based on a partially filled PM 1550 PCF were measured.

  16. FEM model based optimization of transducer geometry for photoacoustic imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xia, W.; Piras, D.; van Veldhoven, S.; Prins, C; van Leeuwen, Ton; Steenbergen, Wiendelt; Manohar, Srirang

    2012-01-01

    We optimize the design of an ultrasound transducer for photoacoustic breast imaging using FEM analysis. We arrive at a detector design which shows significant improvement in image quality when used in photoacoustic tomographic simulations.

  17. A 63 element 1.75 dimensional ultrasound phased array for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Nadine

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia are very common diseases in older American men, thus having a reliable treatment modality for both diseases is of great importance. The currently used treating options, mainly surgical ones, have numerous complications, which include the many side effects that accompany such procedures, besides the invasive nature of such techniques. Focused ultrasound is a relatively new treating modality that is showing promising results in treating prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. Thus this technique is gaining more attention in the past decade as a non-invasive method to treat both diseases. Methods In this paper, the design, construction and evaluation of a 1.75 dimensional ultrasound phased array to be used for treating prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia is presented. With this array, the position of the focus can be controlled by changing the electrical power and phase to the individual elements for electronically focusing and steering in a three dimensional volume. The array was designed with a maximum steering angle of ± 13.5° in the transverse direction and a maximum depth of penetration of 11 cm, which allows the treatment of large prostates. The transducer piezoelectric ceramic, matching layers and cable impedance have been designed for maximum power transfer to tissue. Results To verify the capability of the transducer for focusing and steering, exposimetry was performed and the results correlated well with the calculated field. Ex vivo experiments using bovine tissue were performed with various lesion sizes and indicated the capability of the transducer to ablate tissue using short sonications. Conclusion A 1.75 dimensional array, that overcame the drawbacks associated with one-dimensional arrays, has been designed, built and successfully tested. Design issues, such as cable and ceramic capacitances, were taken into account when designing this

  18. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercader, J.P.; Emily Leong

    1985-01-01

    The paper discusses the need for effective and efficient technologies in improving the food handling system. It defines the basic premises for the development of food handling. The application of food irradiation technology is briefly discussed. The paper points out key considerations for the adoption of food irradiation technology in the ASEAN region (author)

  19. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodburn, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    The use of food preservation by irradiation over 30 years is reviewed in outline. Sprout inhibition, soft fruit preservation, suppression of salmonella in poultry, radiolytic products in foods, the detection of irradiated foods and safety studies so far are considered. (U.K.)

  20. Irradiation proctitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minami, Akira

    1977-01-01

    Literatures on late rectal injuries are discussed, referring to two patients with uterine cervical cancer in whom irradiation proctitis occurred after telecobalt irradiation following uterine extirpation. To one patients, a total of 5000 rads was irradiated, dividing into 250 rads at one time, and after 3 months, irradiation with a total of 2000 rads, dividing into 200 rads at one time, was further given. In another one patient, two parallel opposing portal irradiation with a total of 6000 rads was given. About a year after the irradiation, rectal injuries and cystitis, accompanying with hemorrhage, were found in both of the patients. Rectal amputation and proctotoreusis were performed. Cystitis was treated by cystic irradiation in the urological department. Pathohistological studies of the rectal specimen revealed atrophic mucosa, and dilatation of the blood vessels and edema in the colonic submucosa. Incidence of this disease, term when the disease occurs, irradiation dose, type of the disease, treatment and prevention are described on the basis of the literatures. (Kanao, N.)

  1. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, Akira

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews researches, commentaries, and conference and public records of food irradiation, published mainly during the period 1987-1989, focusing on the current conditions of food irradiation that may pose not only scientific or technologic problems but also political issues or consumerism. Approximately 50 kinds of food, although not enough to fill economic benefit, are now permitted for food irradiation in the world. Consumerism is pointed out as the major factor that precludes the feasibility of food irradiation in the world. In the United States, irradiation is feasible only for spices. Food irradiation has already been feasible in France, Hollands, Belgium, and the Soviet Union; has under consideration in the Great Britain, and has been rejected in the West Germany. Although the feasibility of food irradiation is projected to increase gradually in the future, commercial success or failure depends on the final selection of consumers. In this respect, the role of education and public information are stressed. Meat radicidation and recent progress in the method for detecting irradiated food are referred to. (N.K.) 128 refs

  2. Finite-State Complexity and the Size of Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Calude

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Finite-state complexity is a variant of algorithmic information theory obtained by replacing Turing machines with finite transducers. We consider the state-size of transducers needed for minimal descriptions of arbitrary strings and, as our main result, we show that the state-size hierarchy with respect to a standard encoding is infinite. We consider also hierarchies yielded by more general computable encodings.

  3. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, T.; Lang, T.

    1990-01-01

    There is a growing tendency worldwide to apply ionizing radiation for food preservation, or for delaying growth or ripening processes. However, research into the effects of such irradiation with ionizing radiation is lagging behind, leaving the knowledge about effects and possible hazards incomplete. The authors very carefully have analysed the available research results and present a detailed account of the current scientific knowledge and assessments. Their conclusion is: irradiated food is to be considered noxious unless its wholesomeness has been unambiguously proven. Consumers so far had not much chance to raise their voice in the debate about the wholesomeness of food irradiation, or have not been heard, the authors say. They call for establishing a European and a worldwide information network to bring together opponents to and information speaking against food irradiation, in order to create a counterweight to the market strategies of the pro-irradiation industry, and to launch initiatives on the political level. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Estrogen receptors in the human male prostatic urethra and prostate in prostatic cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, A; Bruun, J; Balslev, E

    1999-01-01

    demonstrated in the prostatic stroma and/or prostatic urethra in 6 out of 11 cases. In both BPH and PC patients, immunoreactivity was weak and confined to few cells, indicating low ER content in the prostate as well as in the prostatic urethra. Dextran-coated charcoal (DCC) analysis was used for detection...

  5. A novel robotic arm driven by sandwich piezoelectric transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zheng; Wang, Liang; Jin, Jiamei

    2018-03-01

    In this work, a novel robotic arm driven by sandwich piezoelectric transducers is proposed. The proposed robotic arm is composed of three arms and four joints. Each arm consists of a sandwich piezoelectric transducer and an H-shaped hollow frame. The sandwich piezoelectric transducer utilizes frictional force to drive the joints on its both sides to rotate simultaneously. The joint between two arms can be driven to rotate in two perpendicular directions by two sandwich piezoelectric transducers. The rotation of joints results in the arm motion. Utilizing the finite element method, the optimized geometrical parameters of the sandwiched piezoelectric transducer are obtained, and the operating principle is demonstrated. A prototype of the robotic arm is also fabricated and assembled, it is 573 g in weight and 412 mm in length, and the maximum rotation angle of each joint is 160°. The mechanical characteristics of the robotic arm prototype are investigated by experiments. The results indicate that, when the excitation frequency of one sandwich piezoelectric transducer is 37.4 kHz, the arms on its two sides rotate in opposite directions with an average rotational velocity of 320 deg/s at 330 V pp , a resolution of 100 μrad at 230 V pp , and a startup and shutdown response time of 40 ms and 30 ms at 230 V pp , respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. High Frequency Longitudinal Damped Vibrations of a Cylindrical Ultrasonic Transducer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Valentin Predoi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasonic piezoelectric transducers used in classical nondestructive testing are producing in general longitudinal vibrations in the MHz range. A simple mechanical model of these transducers would be very useful for wave propagation numerical simulations, avoiding the existing complicated models in which the real components of the transducer are modeled by finite elements. The classical model for longitudinal vibrations is not adequate because the generated longitudinal wave is not dispersive, the velocity being the same at any frequency. We have adopted the Rayleigh-Bishop model, which avoids these limitations, even if it is not converging to the first but to the second exact longitudinal mode in an elastic rod, as obtained from the complicated Pochhammer-Chree equations. Since real transducers have significant vibrations damping, we have introduced a damping term in the Rayleigh-Bishop model, increasing the imaginary part and keeping almost identical real part of the wavenumber. Common transducers produce amplitude modulated signals, completely attenuated after several periods. This can be modeled by two close frequencies, producing a “beat” phenomenon, superposed on the high damping. For this reason, we introduce a two-rod Rayleigh-Bishop model with damping. Agreement with measured normal velocity on the transducer free surface is encouraging for continuation of the research.

  7. Experimental Evaluation of Three Designs of Electrodynamic Flexural Transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Tobias J R; Laws, Michael; Kang, Lei; Fan, Yichao; Ramadas, Sivaram N; Dixon, Steve

    2016-08-25

    Three designs for electrodynamic flexural transducers (EDFT) for air-coupled ultrasonics are presented and compared. An all-metal housing was used for robustness, which makes the designs more suitable for industrial applications. The housing is designed such that there is a thin metal plate at the front, with a fundamental flexural vibration mode at ∼50 kHz. By using a flexural resonance mode, good coupling to the load medium was achieved without the use of matching layers. The front radiating plate is actuated electrodynamically by a spiral coil inside the transducer, which produces an induced magnetic field when an AC current is applied to it. The transducers operate without the use of piezoelectric materials, which can simplify manufacturing and prolong the lifetime of the transducers, as well as open up possibilities for high-temperature applications. The results show that different designs perform best for the generation and reception of ultrasound. All three designs produced large acoustic pressure outputs, with a recorded sound pressure level (SPL) above 120 dB at a 40 cm distance from the highest output transducer. The sensitivity of the transducers was low, however, with single shot signal-to-noise ratio ( SNR ) ≃ 15 dB in transmit-receive mode, with transmitter and receiver 40 cm apart.

  8. Receive-Noise Analysis of Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt, Ayhan; Yaralioglu, G Goksenin

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents an analysis of thermal (Johnson) noise received from the radiation medium by otherwise noiseless capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducer (CMUT) membranes operating in their fundamental resonance mode. Determination of thermal noise received by multiple numbers of transducers or a transducer array requires the assessment of cross-coupling through the radiation medium, as well as the self-radiation impedance of the individual transducer. We show that the total thermal noise received by the cells of a CMUT has insignificant correlation, and is independent of the radiation impedance, but is only determined by the mass of each membrane and the electromechanical transformer ratio. The proof is based on the analytical derivations for a simple transducer with two cells, and extended to transducers with numerous cells using circuit simulators. We used a first-order model, which incorporates the fundamental resonance of the CMUT. Noise power is calculated by integrating over the entire spectrum; hence, the presented figures are an upper bound for the noise. The presented analyses are valid for a transimpedance amplifier in the receive path. We use the analysis results to calculate the minimum detectable pressure of a CMUT. We also provide an analysis based on the experimental data to show that output noise power is limited by and comparable to the theoretical upper limit.

  9. Home Automation System Based on Intelligent Transducer Enablers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Albela, Manuel; Fraga-Lamas, Paula; Fernández-Caramés, Tiago M.; Dapena, Adriana; González-López, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel home automation system named HASITE (Home Automation System based on Intelligent Transducer Enablers), which has been specifically designed to identify and configure transducers easily and quickly. These features are especially useful in situations where many transducers are deployed, since their setup becomes a cumbersome task that consumes a significant amount of time and human resources. HASITE simplifies the deployment of a home automation system by using wireless networks and both self-configuration and self-registration protocols. Thanks to the application of these three elements, HASITE is able to add new transducers by just powering them up. According to the tests performed in different realistic scenarios, a transducer is ready to be used in less than 13 s. Moreover, all HASITE functionalities can be accessed through an API, which also allows for the integration of third-party systems. As an example, an Android application based on the API is presented. Remote users can use it to interact with transducers by just using a regular smartphone or a tablet. PMID:27690031

  10. Software for Correcting the Dynamic Error of Force Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Miyashita

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Software which corrects the dynamic error of force transducers in impact force measurements using their own output signal has been developed. The software corrects the output waveform of the transducers using the output waveform itself, estimates its uncertainty and displays the results. In the experiment, the dynamic error of three transducers of the same model are evaluated using the Levitation Mass Method (LMM, in which the impact forces applied to the transducers are accurately determined as the inertial force of the moving part of the aerostatic linear bearing. The parameters for correcting the dynamic error are determined from the results of one set of impact measurements of one transducer. Then, the validity of the obtained parameters is evaluated using the results of the other sets of measurements of all the three transducers. The uncertainties in the uncorrected force and those in the corrected force are also estimated. If manufacturers determine the correction parameters for each model using the proposed method, and provide the software with the parameters corresponding to each model, then users can obtain the waveform corrected against dynamic error and its uncertainty. The present status and the future prospects of the developed software are discussed in this paper.

  11. DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF POTENTIOMETER-BASED NONLINEAR TRANSDUCER EMULATOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheroz Khan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This work attempts to design and implement in hardware a transducer with a nonlinear response using potentiometer. Potentiometer is regarded as a linear transducer, while a the response of a nonlinear transducer can be treated as a concatenation of linear segments made out of the response curve of an actual nonlinear transducer at the points of inflections being exhibited by the nonlinear curve. Each straight line segment is characterized by its slope and a constant, called the y-intercept, which is ultimately realized by a corresponding electronic circuit. The complete circuit diagram is made of three stages: (i the input stage for range selection, (ii a digital logic to make appropriate selection, (iii a conditioning circuit for realizing a given straight-line segment identified by its relevant slope and reference voltage. The simulation of the circuit is carried using MULTISIM, and the designed circuit is afterward tested to verify that variations of the input voltage give us an output voltage very close to the response pattern envisaged in the analytical stage of the design. The utility of this work lies in its applications in emulating purpose built transducers that could be used to nicely emulate a transducer in a real world system that is to be controlled by a programmable digital system.

  12. Damage detection in concrete structures with smart piezoceramic transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidu, Akshay S. K.; Bhalla, Suresh

    2003-10-01

    Detection of damages and progressive deterioration in structures is a critical issue. Visual inspections are tedious and unreliable. Incipient damages are often not discernible by low frequency dynamic response and other NDE techniques. Smart piezoelectric ceramic (PZT) transducers are emerging as an effective alternative in health monitoring of structures. The electro-mechanical impedance method employs the self-actuating and sensing characteristics of the PZT, without having to use actuators and sensors separately. When excited by an ac source, the PZT transducers bonded to the host structure activates the higher modes of vibration locally. Changes in the admittance response of the transducer serves as an indicator of damage around the transducer. In this paper, the effectiveness of PZT transducers for characterizing damages in concrete, in terms of the damage extent and location, is experimentally examined. The root mean square deviation (RMSD) index, adopted to quantify the changes in the admittance signatures, correlates with the damage extent. The damages on the surface that is not mounted by the PZT are also discernible. An array of transducers proves effective in detecting the damaged zone. The progressive incipient crack can be detected much before it actually becomes visible to the naked eye.

  13. Home Automation System Based on Intelligent Transducer Enablers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Suárez-Albela

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel home automation system named HASITE (Home Automation System based on Intelligent Transducer Enablers, which has been specifically designed to identify and configure transducers easily and quickly. These features are especially useful in situations where many transducers are deployed, since their setup becomes a cumbersome task that consumes a significant amount of time and human resources. HASITE simplifies the deployment of a home automation system by using wireless networks and both self-configuration and self-registration protocols. Thanks to the application of these three elements, HASITE is able to add new transducers by just powering them up. According to the tests performed in different realistic scenarios, a transducer is ready to be used in less than 13 s. Moreover, all HASITE functionalities can be accessed through an API, which also allows for the integration of third-party systems. As an example, an Android application based on the API is presented. Remote users can use it to interact with transducers by just using a regular smartphone or a tablet.

  14. Home Automation System Based on Intelligent Transducer Enablers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Albela, Manuel; Fraga-Lamas, Paula; Fernández-Caramés, Tiago M; Dapena, Adriana; González-López, Miguel

    2016-09-28

    This paper presents a novel home automation system named HASITE (Home Automation System based on Intelligent Transducer Enablers), which has been specifically designed to identify and configure transducers easily and quickly. These features are especially useful in situations where many transducers are deployed, since their setup becomes a cumbersome task that consumes a significant amount of time and human resources. HASITE simplifies the deployment of a home automation system by using wireless networks and both self-configuration and self-registration protocols. Thanks to the application of these three elements, HASITE is able to add new transducers by just powering them up. According to the tests performed in different realistic scenarios, a transducer is ready to be used in less than 13 s. Moreover, all HASITE functionalities can be accessed through an API, which also allows for the integration of third-party systems. As an example, an Android application based on the API is presented. Remote users can use it to interact with transducers by just using a regular smartphone or a tablet.

  15. Highly directional transurethral ultrasound applicators with rotational control for MRI-guided prostatic thermal therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, Anthony B [Thermal Therapy Research Group, UCSF Radiation Oncology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Diederich, Chris J [Thermal Therapy Research Group, UCSF Radiation Oncology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Nau, William H [Thermal Therapy Research Group, UCSF Radiation Oncology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Gill, Harcharan [Department of Urology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Bouley, Donna M [Department of Comparative Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Daniel, Bruce [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Rieke, Viola [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Butts, R Kim [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Sommer, Graham [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2004-01-21

    Transurethral ultrasound applicators with highly directional energy deposition and rotational control were investigated for precise treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and adenocarcinoma of the prostate (CaP). Two types of catheter-based applicators were fabricated, using either sectored tubular (3.5 mm OD x 10 mm) or planar transducers (3.5 mm x 10 mm). They were constructed to be MRI compatible, minimally invasive and allow for manual rotation of the transducer array within a 10 mm cooling balloon. In vivo evaluations of the applicators were performed in canine prostates (n 3) using MRI guidance (0.5 T interventional magnet). MR temperature imaging (MRTI) utilizing the proton resonance frequency shift method was used to acquire multiple-slice temperature overlays in real time for monitoring and guiding the thermal treatments. Post-treatment T1-weighted contrast-enhanced imaging and triphenyl tetrazolium chloride stained tissue sections were used to define regions of tissue coagulation. Single sonications with the tubular applicator ) produced coagulated zones covering a wedge of the prostate extending from 1-2 mm outside the urethra to the outer boundary of the gland (16 mm radial coagulation). Single sonications with the planar applicator (15-20 W, 10 min, {approx}8 MHz) generated thermal lesions of {approx}30 extending to the prostate boundary. Multiple sequential sonications (sweeping) of a planar applicator (12 W with eight rotations of 30 each) demonstrated controllable coagulation of a 270 contiguous section of the prostate extending to the capsule boundary. The feasibility of using highly directional transurethral ultrasound applicators with rotational capabilities to selectively coagulate regions of the prostate while monitoring and controlling the treatments with MRTI was demonstrated in this study.

  16. Prostate cancer in a man with a BRCA2 mutation and a personal history of bilateral breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, C F; Rappaport-Fuerhauser, C; Sopik, V; Narod, S A

    2015-08-01

    Men with a BRCA2 mutation face substantial lifetime risks for the development of both breast and prostate cancer. A male who was initially diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 32 was subsequently diagnosed at age 77 with both contralateral breast cancer and prostate cancer. He was found to be BRCA2 mutation carrier. The patient was treated with contralateral mastectomy, breast irradiation, prostate irradiation and adjuvant endocrine therapy. At age 83 he died of metastatic prostate cancer. Our case underscores the observation that BRCA2 mutation carriers are at risk for multiple cancers, including contralateral breast cancer, and illustrates the need for current practice recommendations for the early detection of breast and prostate cancer in men with BRCA2 mutations. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. On complex preparation for radiotherapy of prostatic tumor patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkachev, S.I.

    1980-01-01

    An experience with the treatment of 62 patients with prostatic gland tumor has contributed to the elaboration of some approaches to the utilization of modern diagnostic facilities in order to define the spread of neoplastic process and select therapeutic tactics. A sequence of methods to be used has been described, including clinical and X-ray, radioisotope and ultrasonic methods of examination. The matter of particular attention is a newly developed method of the prostatic gland cranio-caudal size determination. The latter together with ultrasonic data enable one to detect the size of the tumor and select an adequate physico-technical regime of irradiation for each individual patient

  18. Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... completely empty the bladder Less common signs and symptoms include: Urinary tract infection Inability to urinate Blood in the urine The size of your prostate doesn't necessarily determine the severity of your symptoms. Some men with only slightly enlarged prostates can ...

  19. Prostate brachytherapy - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nausea or vomiting Any new or unusual symptoms Alternative Names Implant therapy - prostate cancer - discharge; Radioactive seed placement - discharge References D'Amico AV, Nguyen PL, Crook JM, et al. Radiation therapy for prostate cancer. In: Wein AJ, Kavoussi LR, Partin AW, Peters CA, ...

  20. A new ultrasonic transducer sample cell for in situ small-angle scattering experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sudipta; Bleuel, Markus; Schneider, Gerald J.

    2018-01-01

    Ultrasound irradiation is a commonly used technique for nondestructive diagnostics or targeted destruction. We report on a new versatile sonication device that fits in a variety of standard sample environments for neutron and X-ray scattering instruments. A piezoelectric transducer permits measuring of the time-dependent response of the sample in situ during or after sonication. We use small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) to demonstrate the effect of a time-dependent perturbation on the structure factor of micelles formed from sodium dodecyl sulfate surfactant molecules. We observe a substantial change in the micellar structure during and after exposure to ultrasonic irradiation. We also observe a time-dependent relaxation to the equilibrium values of the unperturbed system. The strength of the perturbation of the structure factor depends systematically on the duration of sonication. The relaxation behavior can be well reproduced after multiple times of sonication. Accumulation of the recorded intensities of the different sonication cycles improves the signal-to-noise ratio and permits reaching very short relaxation times. In addition, we present SANS data for the micellar form factor on alkyl-poly (ethylene oxide) surfactant molecules irradiated by ultrasound. Due to the flexibility of our new in situ sonication device, different experiments can be performed, e.g., to explore molecular potentials in more detail by introducing a systematic time-dependent perturbation.

  1. Urethral dose and increment of international prostate symptom score (IPSS) in transperineal permanent interstitial implant (TPI) of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, N.; Itami, J.; Okuma, K.; Marino, H.; Ban, T.; Nakazato, M.; Kanai, K.; Naoi, K.; Fuse, M.; Nakagawa, K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: to find the factors which influence the acute increment of international prostate symptom score (IPSS) after transperineal permanent interstitial implant (TPI) using 125 I seeds. Patients and methods: from April 2004 through September 2006, 104 patients with nonmetastatic prostate cancer underwent TPI without external-beam irradiation. Median patient age was 70 years with a median follow-up of 13.0 months. 73 patients (70%) received neoadjuvant hormone therapy. The increment of IPSS was defined as the difference between pre- and postimplant maximal IPSS. Clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters evaluated included age, initial prostate-specific antigen, Gleason Score, neoadjuvant hormone therapy, initial IPSS, post-TPI prostatic volume, number of implanted seeds, prostate V 100 , V 150 , D 90 , urethral D max , and urethral D 90 . In order to further evaluate detailed urethral doses, the base and apical urethra were defined and the dosimetric parameters were calculated. Results: the IPSS peaked 3 months after TPI and returned to baseline at 12-15 months. Multivariate analysis demonstrated a statistically significant correlation of post-TPI prostatic volume, number of implanted seeds, and the dosimetric parameters of the base urethra with IPSS increment. Conclusion: the base urethra appears to be susceptible to radiation and the increased dose to this region deteriorates IPSS. It remains unclear whether the base urethral dose relates to the incidence of late urinary morbidities. (orig.)

  2. A novel method for somatic transgenesis of the mouse prostate using the Sleeping Beauty transposon system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Kimberly D P; Alsop, James D; Buresh-Stiemke, Rita A; Frantskevich, Katsiaryna; Malinowski, Rita L; Roethe, Laura S; Powers, Ginny L; Marker, Paul C

    2014-05-01

    In vivo ectopic gene expression is a common approach for prostate research through the use of transgenes in germline transgenic mice. For some other organs, somatic transgenesis with the Sleeping Beauty transposon system has allowed in vivo ectopic gene expression with higher throughput and lower cost than germline transgenic approaches. Mouse e16 urogenital sinuses (UGSs) were co-injected with plasmids expressing the Sleeping Beauty transposase and plasmids with control or activated BRAF expressing transposons. Following electroporation, the transduced UGSs were grown as allografts in mouse hosts for 8 weeks, and the resulting allografts were evaluated for several endpoints. Transposon-transduced UGS allografts developed into prostatic tissue with normal tissue structure and cellular differentiation. Integration of transposon vectors into the genomes of transduced allografts was confirmed using linker-mediated PCR, sequencing, and in situ PCR. Transduction of UGS allografts with transposons expressing activated BRAF resulted in ectopic BRAF expression that was detectable at both the mRNA and protein levels. Prostatic ducts over-expressing activated BRAF also had ectopic activation of the ERK1/2 mitogen activated kinases and increased epithelial cell proliferation. The Sleeping Beauty transposon system can be used to achieve somatic transgenesis of prostatic allografts. This new method for achieving ectopic gene expression in the prostate will complement other existing approaches such as ectopic gene expression in cell lines and in germline transgenic mice. Advantages of this new approach include preservation of stromal-epithelial interactions not possible with cell lines, and higher throughput and lower cost than traditional germline transgenic approaches. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cormick, C.

    1987-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of food irradiation are discussed. Research into food irradiation has been going on for 40 years, yet studies have yet to demonstrate conclusively whether it is safe or harmful. The Australian House of Representatives has established an inquiry into food irradiation conducted by the Standing Committee on Environment and Conservation. It will inquire into the use of ionising radiation for commercial sterilisation, disinfestation, food preservation and other purposes with particular reference to human health and safety, environmental impacts and the adequacy of assessment and regulatory procedures

  4. A quarter Wheatstone bridge strain gage force transducer for recording gut motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowles, V E; Condon, R E; Schulte, W J; Woods, J H; Sillin, L F

    1978-10-01

    Quarter and half Wheatstone bridge extraluminal force transducers for recording of gastrointestinal motility are compared. Modification of the transducer to a quarter bridge is economical, simplifies construction, and improves longevity by eliminating the crossover wire which frequently short circuits. The quarter bridge transducer was found to be as accurate and sensitive as the half bridge transducer.

  5. Time trend of patient setup deviations during pelvic irradiation using electronic portal imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    el-Gayed, A. A.; Bel, A.; Vijlbrief, R.; Bartelink, H.; Lebesque, J. V.

    1993-01-01

    An electronic portal imaging device (EPID) was used to detect patient setup displacement during the course of a 3-field pelvic irradiation of two groups of patients: 10 rectal and 10 prostate carcinomas. These patients were irradiated with conventional treatment techniques in routine clinical

  6. Prostate inflammation. Association with benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Meguid, Taha A; Mosli, Hisham A; Al-Maghrabi, Jaudah A

    2009-12-01

    To study the association and possible relationship of prostate inflammation with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and prostate cancer. The medical records and pathological findings of all Saudi patients who underwent transrectal ultrasound guided prostatic needle biopsies in King Abdulaziz University Medical City, Jeddah,Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from June 2003 to June 2008 were reviewed retrospectively. The indications for biopsy were elevated levels of serum prostate specific antigen, abnormal findings on digital rectal examination, or both. The specimens harboring inflammation, adenocarcinoma, BPH, or their combinations, were selected and included in the study. A total of 214 patients were selected with an age ranging from 37-100 years (median=68). Inflammation was histologically evident in 88 patients. Of them, only one demonstrated acute inflammation, while 87/88 demonstrated chronic inflammation with, or without acute inflammation. Histopathologic features were categorized into 3 main categories: inflammation alone (12/214, 5.6%), BPH category (126/214, 58.9%), and cancer category (76/214, 35.5%) patients. The last 2 categories also included cases associated with inflammation. In the overall analysis of 214 specimens, BPH with inflammation was more prevalent than cancer with inflammation (43/214 [20.1%] versus 33/214 [15.4%]). In a subgroup analysis within each category, inflammation was less prevalent in the BPH category compared to the cancer category (43/126 [34.1%] versus 33/76 [43.4%]). The association between chronic inflammation and both BPH and cancer is obvious in our study. Further studies are needed to substantiate this observation, and to clarify the magnitude of association of inflammation with BPH compared to cancer.

  7. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paganini, M.C.

    1991-06-01

    Food treatment by means of ionizing energy, or irradiation, is an innovative method for its preservation. In order to treat important volumes of food, it is necessary to have industrial irradiation installations. The effect of radiations on food is analyzed in the present special work and a calculus scheme for an Irradiation Plant is proposed, discussing different aspects related to its project and design: ionizing radiation sources, adequate civil work, security and auxiliary systems to the installations, dosimetric methods and financing evaluation methods of the project. Finally, the conceptual design and calculus of an irradiation industrial plant of tubercles is made, based on the actual needs of a specific agricultural zone of our country. (Author) [es

  8. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Food preservation by irradiation is one part of Eisenhower's Atoms for Peace program that is enjoying renewed interest. Classified as a food additive by the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act of 1958 instead of a processing technique, irradiation lost public acceptance. Experiments have not been done to prove that there are no health hazards from gamma radiation, but there are new pressures to get Food and Drug Administration approval for testing in order to make commercial use of some radioactive wastes. Irradiation causes chemical reactions and nutritional changes, including the destruction of several vitamins, as well as the production of radiolytic products not normally found in food that could have adverse effects. The author concludes that, lacking epidemiological evidence, willing buyers should be able to purchase irradiated food as long as it is properly labeled

  9. Prognostic role of serum prostatic acid phosphatase for 103Pd-based radiation for prostatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dattoli, Michael; Wallner, Kent; True, Lawrence; Sorace, Richard; Koval, John; Cash, Jennifer; Acosta, Rudolph; Biswas, Mohendra; Binder, Michael; Sullivan, Brent; Lastarria, Emilio; Kirwan, Novelle; Stein, Douglas

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To establish the prognostic role of serum enzymatic prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) in patients treated with palladium ( 103 Pd) and supplemental external beam irradiation (EBRT) for clinically localized, high-risk prostate carcinoma. Methods and Materials: One hundred twenty-four consecutive patients with Stage T2a-T3 prostatic carcinoma were treated from 1992 through 1995. Each patient had at least one of the following risk factors for extracapsular disease extension: Stage T2b or greater (100 patients), Gleason score 7-10 (40 patients), pretreatment prostate specific antigen (PSA) > 15 ng/ml (32 patients), or elevated serum PAP (25 patients). Patients received 41 Gy conformal EBRT to a limited pelvic field, followed 4 weeks later by a 103 Pd boost (prescription dose 80 Gy). Biochemical failure was defined as a PSA greater than 1 ng/ml (normal < 4 ng/ml). Results: The overall, actuarial freedom from biochemical failure at 4 years after treatment was 79%. In Cox-proportional hazard multivariate analysis, the strongest predictor of failure was elevated pretreatment acid phosphatase (p = 0.02), followed by Gleason score (p = 0.1), and PSA (p = 0.14). Conclusion: PAP was the strongest predictor of long-term biochemical failure. It may be a more accurate indicator of micrometastatic disease than PSA, and as such, we suggest that it be reconsidered for general use in radiation-treated patients

  10. Fruit irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Food spoilage is a common problem when marketing agricultural products. Promising results have already been obtained on a number of food irradiating applications. A process is described in this paper where irradiation of sub-tropical fruits, especially mangoes and papayas, combined with conventional heat treatment results in effective insect and fungal control, delays ripening and greatly improves the quality of fruit at both export and internal markets

  11. Blood irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandy, Mammen

    1998-01-01

    Viable lymphocytes are present in blood and cellular blood components used for transfusion. If the patient who receives a blood transfusion is immunocompetent these lymphocytes are destroyed immediately. However if the patient is immunodefficient or immunosuppressed the transfused lymphocytes survive, recognize the recipient as foreign and react producing a devastating and most often fatal syndrome of transfusion graft versus host disease [T-GVHD]. Even immunocompetent individuals can develop T-GVHD if the donor is a first degree relative since like the Trojan horse the transfused lymphocytes escape detection by the recipient's immune system, multiply and attack recipient tissues. T-GVHD can be prevented by irradiating the blood and different centers use doses ranging from 1.5 to 4.5 Gy. All transfusions where the donor is a first degree relative and transfusions to neonates, immunosuppressed patients and bone marrow transplant recipients need to be irradiated. Commercial irradiators specifically designed for irradiation of blood and cellular blood components are available: however they are expensive. India needs to have blood irradiation facilities available in all large tertiary institutions where immunosuppressed patients are treated. The Atomic Energy Commission of India needs to develop a blood irradiator which meets international standards for use in tertiary medical institutions in the country. (author)

  12. Tissue irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hungate, F.P.; Riemath, W.F.; Bunnell, L.R.

    1975-01-01

    A tissue irradiator is provided for the in-vivo irradiation of body tissue. The irradiator comprises a radiation source material contained and completely encapsulated within vitreous carbon. An embodiment for use as an in-vivo blood irradiator comprises a cylindrical body having an axial bore therethrough. A radioisotope is contained within a first portion of vitreous carbon cylindrically surrounding the axial bore, and a containment portion of vitreous carbon surrounds the radioisotope containing portion, the two portions of vitreous carbon being integrally formed as a single unit. Connecting means are provided at each end of the cylindrical body to permit connections to blood-carrying vessels and to provide for passage of blood through the bore. In a preferred embodiment, the radioisotope is thulium-170 which is present in the irradiator in the form of thulium oxide. A method of producing the preferred blood irradiator is also provided, whereby nonradioactive thulium-169 is dispersed within a polyfurfuryl alcohol resin which is carbonized and fired to form the integral vitreous carbon body and the device is activated by neutron bombardment of the thulium-169 to produce the beta-emitting thulium-170

  13. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Processing of food with low levels of radiation has the potential to contribute to reducing both spoilage of food during storage - a particular problem in developing countries - and the high incidence of food-borne disease currently seen in all countries. Approval has been granted for the treatment of more than 30 products with radiation in over 30 countries but, in general, governments have been slow to authorize the use of this new technique. One reason for this slowness is a lack of understanding of what food irradiation entails. This book aims to increase understanding by providing information on the process of food irradiation in simple, non-technical language. It describes the effects that irradiation has on food, and the plant and equipment that are necessary to carry it out safely. The legislation and control mechanisms required to ensure the safety of food irradiation facilities are also discussed. Education is seen as the key to gaining the confidence of the consumers in the safety of irradiated food, and to promoting understanding of the benefits that irradiation can provide. (orig.) With 4 figs., 1 tab [de

  14. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migdal, W.

    1995-01-01

    A worldwide standard on food irradiation was adopted in 1983 by codex Alimentarius Commission of the Joint Food Standard Programme of the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations and The World Health Organization (WHO). As a result, 41 countries have approved the use of irradiation for treating one or more food items and the number is increasing. Generally, irradiation is used to: food loses, food spoilage, disinfestation, safety and hygiene. The number of countries which use irradiation for processing food for commercial purposes has been increasing steadily from 19 in 1987 to 33 today. In the frames of the national programme on the application of irradiation for food preservation and hygienization an experimental plant for electron beam processing has been established in Inst. of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology. The plant is equipped with a small research accelerator Pilot (19 MeV, 1 kW) and industrial unit Electronika (10 MeV, 10 kW). On the basis of the research there were performed at different scientific institutions in Poland, health authorities have issued permissions for irradiation for; spices, garlic, onions, mushrooms, potatoes, dry mushrooms and vegetables. (author)

  15. Vibration characterisation of cymbal transducers for power ultrasonic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano, F.; Feeney, A.; Lucas, M.

    2012-08-01

    A Class V cymbal flextensional transducer is composed of a piezoceramic disc or ring sandwiched between two cymbal-shaped shell end-caps. These end-caps act as mechanical transformers to convert high impedance, low radial displacement of the piezoceramic into low impedance, large axial motion of the end-cap. The cymbal transducer was developed in the early 1990's at Penn State University, and is an improvement of the moonie transducer which has been in use since the 1980's. Despite the fact that cymbal transducers have been used in many fields, both as sensors and actuators, due to its physical limitations its use has been mainly at low power intensities. It is only very recently that its suitability for high amplitude and high power applications has been studied, and consequently implementation in this area of research remains undeveloped. This paper employs experimental modal analysis (EMA), vibration response measurements and electrical impedance measurements to characterise two variations of the cymbal transducer design, both aimed at incorporation in ultrasonic cutting devices. The transducers are fabricated using the commercial Eccobond 45LV epoxy adhesive as the bonding agent. The first cymbal transducer is of the classic design where the piezoceramic disc is bonded directly to the end-caps. The second cymbal transducer includes a metal ring bonded to the outer edge of the piezoceramic disc. The reason for the inclusion of this metal ring is to improve the mechanical coupling with the end-caps. This would therefore make this design particularly suitable for power ultrasonic applications, reducing the possibility of debonding at the higher ultrasonic amplitudes. The experimental results demonstrate that the second cymbal design is a significant improvement on the more classic design, allowing the transducer to operate at higher voltages and higher amplitudes, exhibiting a linear response over a practical power ultrasonic device driving voltage range. The

  16. A cylindrical standing wave ultrasonic motor using bending vibration transducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingxiang; Chen, Weishan; Liu, Junkao; Shi, Shengjun

    2011-07-01

    A cylindrical standing wave ultrasonic motor using bending vibration transducer was proposed in this paper. The proposed stator contains a cylinder and a bending vibration transducer. The two combining sites between the cylinder and the transducer locate at the adjacent wave loops of bending vibration of the transducer and have a distance that equal to the half wave length of bending standing wave excited in the cylinder. Thus, the bending mode of the cylinder can be excited by the bending vibration of the transducer. Two circular cone type rotors are pressed in contact to the end rims of the teeth, and the preload between the rotors and stator is accomplished by a spring and nut system. The working principle of the proposed motor was analyzed. The motion trajectories of teeth were deduced. The stator was designed and analyzed with FEM. A prototype motor was fabricated and measured. Typical output of the prototype is no-load speed of 165rpm and maximum torque of 0.45Nm at an exciting voltage of 200V(rms). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Resonance tracking and vibration stablilization for high power ultrasonic transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Y; Jin, Y; Cochran, S; Huang, Z

    2014-01-01

    Resonant frequency shift and electrical impedance variation are common phenomena in the application of high power ultrasonic transducers, e.g. in focused ultrasound surgery and in cutting. They result in low power efficiency and unstable vibration amplitude. To solve this problem, a driving and measurement system has been developed to track the resonance of high power transducers and to stabilise their vibration velocity. This has the ability to monitor the operating and performance parameters of the ultrasonic transducers in real time. The configuration of the system, with its control algorithm implemented in LabVIEW (National Instruments, Newbury, UK), ensures flexibility to suit different transducers and load conditions. In addition, with different programs, it can be utilised as a high power impedance analyser or an instantaneous electrical power measurement system for frequencies in the MHz range. The effectiveness of this system has been demonstrated in detailed studies. With it, high transducer performance at high power can be achieved and monitored in real time. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Aircraft components structural health monitoring using flexible ultrasonic transducer arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W.-L.; Jen, C.-K.; Kobayashi, M.; Mrad, N.

    2011-04-01

    A damage detection capability based on a flexible ultrasonic transducer (FUT) array bonded onto a planar and a curved surface is presented. The FUT array was fabricated on a 75 μm titanium substrate using sol-gel spray technique. Room temperature curable adhesive is used as the bonding agent and ultrasonic couplant between the transducer and the test article. The bonding agent was successfully tested for aircraft environmental temperatures between -80 °C and 100 °C. For a planar test article, selected FUT arrays were able to detect fasteners damage within a planar distance of 176 mm, when used in the pulse-echo mode. Such results illustrate the effectiveness of the developed FUT transducer as compared to commercial 10MHz ultrasonic transducer (UT). These FUT arrays were further demonstrated on a curved test article. Pulse-echo measurements confirmed the reflected echoes from the specimen. Such measurement was not possible with commercial UTs due to the curved nature of the test article and its accessibility, thus demonstrating the suitability and superiority of the developed flexible ultrasonic transducer capability.

  19. A Driver for Piezoelectric Transducers with Control of Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, F. J.; Ximenes, R. L.; Arthur, R.; Mühlen, S. S.

    Variations in electric impedance curves of piezoeletric transducers occur under influence of mechanical load, temperature, electric excitation, among others. Electronic circuits for driving these transducers should correct the tune to maintain the performance of the transducer. Considering the changes at resonance, we have developed a circuit for a laboratory bench that performs two functions. The first, working on low power, by swapping frequencies around resonance, allows to the user define electric impedance and frequency operation that intend to apply in the experiment. The operation of this circuit is based on detection of magnitude of current in the transducer. A microcontroller and Labview are used to obtain the results. In the second, while under high power operation, deviations from original impedance are corrected by using a feedback network that evaluates amplitude of impedance. In this circuit, a class D MOSFET amplifier is used for exciting the transducer. Also, a microcontroller system controls the feedback network. Experiments with variation of mechanical loads have shown the effectiveness of the system.

  20. [Consensus of prostate cancer screening].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The incidence of prostate cancer is increasing rapidly in China, the clinical stage of prostate cancer patients is comparatively late and the overall survival rate is inferior to that reported in the developed countries. Prostate cancer screening is an effective measure to reduce the risk of death through early detection. In order to identify the best way of prostate cancer screening in China, the Chinese Anti-Cancer Association Genitourinary Cancer Committee Prostate Cancer Working Group reviewed all published data concerning the benefits and harms of screening for prostate caner and created the consensus. The consensus include the following points: screening asymptomatic men for prostate cancer by prostate specific antigen(PSA)testing in the general population is the potential measure to reduce mortality rates through early detection, PSA testing should be offered earlier in men with life expectancy over 10 years and men at high risk of prostate cancer.

  1. An evaluation of intrafraction motion of the prostate in the prone and supine positions using electromagnetic tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Amish P.; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Langen, Katja M.; Meeks, Sanford L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate differences in target motion during prostate irradiation in the prone versus supine position using electromagnetic tracking to measure prostate mobility. Materials/methods: Twenty patients received prostate radiotherapy in the supine position utilizing the Calypso Localization System (registered) for prostate positioning and monitoring. For each patient, 10 treatment fractions were followed by a session in which the patient was repositioned prone, and prostate mobility was tracked. The fraction of time that the prostate was displaced by >3, 5, 7, and 10 mm was calculated for each patient, for both positions (400 tracking sessions). Results: Clear patterns of respiratory motion were seen in the prone tracks due to the influence of increased abdominal motion. Averaged over all patients, the prostate was displaced >3 and 5 mm for 37.8% and 10.1% of the total tracking time in the prone position, respectively. In the supine position, the prostate was displaced >3 and 5 mm for 12.6% and 2.9%, respectively. With both patient setups, inferior and posterior drifts of the prostate position were observed. Averaged over all prone tracking sessions, the prostate was displaced >3 mm in the posterior and inferior directions for 11.7% and 9.5% of the total time, respectively. Conclusions: With real-time tracking of the prostate, it is possible to study the effects of different setup positions on the prostate mobility. The percentage of time the prostate moved >3 and 5 mm was increased by a factor of three in the prone versus supine position. For larger displacements (>7 mm) no difference in prostate mobility was observed between prone and supine positions. To reduce rectal toxicity, radiotherapy in the prone position may be a suitable alternative provided respiratory motion is accounted for during treatment. Acute and late toxicity results remain to be evaluated for both patient positions.

  2. Interstitially implanted I125 for prostate cancer using transrectal ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenburg, S.; Petersen, J.; Hansen-Peters, I.; Baylinson, W.

    1990-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the third leading cause of death from cancer among men in the United States. Traditional treatments for prostate cancer are prostatectomy, external beam irradiation, and interstitial implantation of Iodine125 (I125) via laparotomy. These treatments are associated with significant morbidity and limitations. Based on experience with I125 interstitial implantation by transrectal ultrasound guidance for early-stage prostate cancer, it seems that this newer method of treatment has greater accuracy of placement and distribution of the isotope and has had few reported complications. The need for a surgical incision has been eliminated. Hospitalization time also has been decreased, creating the need for ambulatory and inpatient nurses to understand the importance of their respective roles in providing coordinated quality care for these patients. Nurses in these departments must have knowledge of the procedure, radiation safety, and common side effects related to the implant

  3. Obesity and prostate enlargement in men with localized prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Ryan P; Han, Misop; Partin, Alan W; Humphreys, Elizabeth; Freedland, Stephen J; Parsons, J Kellogg

    2011-12-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Obesity is associated with prostate enlargement in men without prostate cancer. This study demonstrates an association between obesity and prostate enlargement in men with prostate cancer, and leads to possible implications for prostate cancer screening and diagnosis. • To determine if obesity is associated with prostate size in men with prostate cancer. • We examined preoperative body mass index (BMI) and whole prostate weight in a cohort of 16,325 patients undergoing radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer from 1975 to 2008 at a single institution. • We used multivariable regression modelling adjusting for age, year of surgery, preoperative serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA), pathological stage and Gleason grade. • Of the entire cohort, 13,343 (82%) patients had a prostate weight of at least 40 g. These men were older (P men with BMI men with a BMI ≥35 kg/m(2) had a 40% (odds ratio 1.40, 95% CI 1.01-1.95) increased risk of prostate weight of at least 40 g and a 70% (odds ratio 1.70, 95% CI 1.32-2.20) increased risk of prostate weight of at least 50 g. • In men with localized prostate cancer, obesity is associated with an increased risk of prostate enlargement. • These data validate other observations linking obesity with prostate enlargement and may have important ramifications for prostate cancer diagnosis in obese men. © 2011 THE AUTHORS. BJU INTERNATIONAL © 2011 BJU INTERNATIONAL.

  4. Reducing the Effect of Transducer Mount Induced Noise on Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel Testing Data with a New Transducer Mount Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, A. J.; Reed, D. K.; Nance, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of launch vehicle unsteady aerodynamics is a field best studied through experimentation, which is often carried out in the form of large scale wind tunnel testing. Measurement of the fluctuating pressures induced by the boundary layer noise is customarily made with miniature pressure transducers installed into a model of the vehicle of interest. Literature shows that noise level increases between two to five decibels (dB referenced to 20 micropascal) can be induced when the transducer surface is not mounted perfectly flush with the model outer surface. To reduce this artificially induced noise, special transducer holders have been used for aeroacoustic wind tunnel testing by NASA. This holder is a sleeve into which the transducer fits, with a cap that allows it to be mounted in a recessed hole in the model. A single hole in the holder allows the transport of the tunnel medium so the transducer can discriminate the fluctuating pressure due to the turbulent boundary layer noise. The holder is first dry fitted into the model and any difference in height between the holder and the model surface can be sanded flush. The holder is then removed from the model, the transducer glued inside the holder, and the holder replaced in the model, secured also with glue, thus eliminating the problem of noise level increases due to lack of flushness. In order to work with this holder design, special transducers have been ordered with their standard screen removed and the diaphragm moved as close to the top of the casing as possible to minimize any cavity volume. Although this greatly reduces induced noise due to the transducers being out of flush, the holders can also induce a cavity resonance that is usually at a very high frequency. This noise is termed transducer mount induced noise (XMIN). The peak of the mode can vary with the cavity depth, boundary layer noise that can excite the mode, tunnel flow medium, and the build of the transducers. Because the boundary

  5. Class D audio amplifiers for high voltage capacitive transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dennis

    Audio reproduction systems contains two key components, the amplifier and the loudspeaker. In the last 20 – 30 years the technology of audio amplifiers have performed a fundamental shift of paradigm. Class D audio amplifiers have replaced the linear amplifiers, suffering from the well-known issues...... of high volume, weight, and cost. High efficient class D amplifiers are now widely available offering power densities, that their linear counterparts can not match. Unlike the technology of audio amplifiers, the loudspeaker is still based on the traditional electrodynamic transducer invented by C.W. Rice...... and E.W. Kellog in 1925 [1]. The poor efficiency of the electrodynamic transducer remains a key issue, and a significant limit of the efficiency of the complete audio reproduction systems. Also the geometric limits of the electrodynamic transducer imposes significant limits on the design of loudspeakers...

  6. Magnetometer with a miniature transducer and automatic scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnam, W. J. J.; Fales, C. L., Jr.; Breckenridge, R. A.; Pohm, A. V. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The magnetometer is based on the time variation of the magnetic permeability in the magnetic material of its transducer; however, its operation is substantially different from the ordinary flux-gate magnetometer. The transducer uses 0.05 mm diameter plated magnetic wire and is made flat enabling it to make measurements of transverse magnetic fields as close as 0.08 mm from the surface, and it has very good spatial resolution because of its small active region of approximately 0.64 mm by 0.76 mm. The magnetometer uses an inexpensive clip-on millimeter for driving and processing the electrical signals and readout. It also utilizes an automatic scanning technique which is made possible by a specially designed transducer holding mechanism that replaces the ink pen on an X-Y recorder.

  7. Inspection of complex geometry pieces with an intelligent contact transducer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chatillon, S.; Roy, O.; Mahaut, St.

    2000-01-01

    A new multi-element contact transducer has been developed to improve the inspection of components with complex geometry. The emitting surface is flexible in order to optimize the contact with pieces. An algorithm, based on a simplified geometric model, has been used to determine the delays law which allows to control the focal characteristics of the transmitted field. Acquisition data lead in transmission with an articulated transducer validate the behavior provided by simulation. Thus the optimization of the delays law ensures the transmission of a beam which is homogeneous and controlled during the moving of the transducer. Inspections in echo-pulse mode are implemented on a sample simulating a component controlled on site. Results show that the dynamical adaptation of the delays law to the geometry of the piece leads to very good performances

  8. Design and numerical simulation of novel giant magnetostrictive ultrasonic transducer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengyang Li

    Full Text Available This paper provides a design method of a novel giant magnetostrictive ultrasonic transducer utilized in incremental sheet metal forming. The frequency equations of the ultrasonic vibrator were deduced and the corresponding correctness verified by the modal and harmonic response characteristic through the finite element method (FEM and ANSYS software. In addition, the magnetic field of the vibrator system was designed and verified by the ANSYS. Finally, the frequency tests based on the impedance response analysis and the amplitude measurements based on the laser displacement sensor were performed on the prototype. The results confirmed the appropriate design of this transducer, setting the foundation for a low mechanical quality factor and satisfying amplitude. Keywords: Magnetostrictive, Incremental sheet forming, Ultrasonic transducer

  9. Inter digital transducer modelling through Mason equivalent circuit model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishra, Dipti; Singh, Abhishek; Hussain, Dil muhammed Akbar

    2016-01-01

    The frequency reliance of inter-digital transducer is analyzed with the help of MASON's Equivalent circuit which is based on Smith's Equivalent circuit which is further based on Foster's Network. An inter-digital transducer has been demonstrated as a RLC network. The circuit is simulated...... by Simulation program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis (HSPICE), a well-liked electronic path simulator. The acoustic wave devices are not suitable to simulation through circuit simulator. In this paper, an electrical model of Mason's Equivalent electrical circuit for an inter-digital transducer (IDT......) is projected which is well-suited with a broadly cast-off universal resolution circuit simulator SPICE built-in out with the proficiency to simulate the negative capacitances and inductances. The investigation is done to prove the straightforwardness of establishing the frequency and time domain physical...

  10. Optimizing the shape of ultrasound transducers for interstitial thermal ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafon, Cyril; Melo de Lima, David; Theillere, Yves; Prat, Frederic; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Cathignol, Dominique

    2002-01-01

    Heat deposition by interstitial routes, especially with ultrasound-based instruments, is becoming a valuable therapeutic option for the treatments of sites, which are difficult to access from outside of the body. The active part of most interstitial ultrasound applicators described in the literature is logically tubular to induce cylindrical volumes of coagulation necrosis. Because the pressure generated by such tubular transducers falls off rapidly with radial distance, we previously proposed using a rotating plane transducer. For a plane wave, the pressure fall-off is only due to attenuation, which makes deeper lesions and shorter treatment times possible. This work represents an advance in the development of ultrasound applicators designed for interstitial applications. This new applicator used a rotating slightly focused transducer. A brief theoretical analysis resulted in the choice of a long focal distance of 22 mm to obtain a nearly constant pressure all along the therapeutic depth. To experimentally validate this focal distance, pressure measurements were made in a tissue mimicking liquid phantom and the results were compared with those obtained with a plane transducer. In vitro experiments showed that necrosis could be induced at a depth of 15 mm. In the same conditions, the greatest depth attained with a plane transducer was only 10 mm. Because each individual lesion is narrower, more lesions and more time are required to necrose a cylindrical volume. The main advantage of this new type of applicator is that it can be used to induce necrosis at a greater depth without varying either the frequency, the intensity or the transducer cooling efficiency

  11. Research and development of capacitive transducer with linear acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobova, Natalia; Kochurina, Elena; Timoshenkov, Sergey; Chaplygin, Yuriy; Anchutin, Stepan; Kosolapov, Andrey

    2015-05-01

    Paper presents the study results and modeling of functional characteristics of the linear acceleration transducers, enabling sensors creation with the specified parameters. Sensing element made for linear acceleration transducer with torsion cruciform section has been proposed on the based design and technological principles. It allows minimizing the impact of cross-acceleration and gives the maximum of center mass displacement for high sensors sensitivity in the given dimensions. The range of measured acceleration from ± 0.2g to ± 50g was provided by changing the torsion bar thickness n = 34 ÷ 56 microns. The transducers frequency range of linear acceleration 100-150 Hz depends on the gas pressure P = 700-800Pa in which the sensor element was located. Methods converting displacement of sensing element in the sensor output have been provided. On their basis the linear acceleration transducers with analog output signal having a predetermined frequency range and high linearity of the transformation (nonlinearity 0.2-1.5%) was developed. Also the linear acceleration transducers with digital signal consuming little (no more than 850 μA), low noisy (standard deviation to 0.1mg/rt-Hz) and high sensitivity (up to 0.1mg) to the accelerations was made. Errors in manufacturing process of sensitive elements and operating environment temperature affect the changes in the characteristics of the linear acceleration transducers. It has been established that different plate thickness up to 3.6% leads to the scale factor error to 4.7%. Irreproducibility of depth anisotropic etching of silicon up to 6.6% introduces an error in the output signal of 2.9 ... 13.8mg.

  12. Treating Localized Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the future can talk with their doctor about "banking" their sperm before surgery to remove the prostate ... 1-800-358-9295 or place your order online on the AHRQ Publications Clearinghouse Web page. When ...

  13. Learning about Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov] There are companies that will soon be marketing and selling genetic tests that will predict a ... enzyme made by the prostate gland, and a digital rectal examination (DRE) are two tests that are ...

  14. Prostate Cancer Foundation News

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and getting big traps, six-pack abs and “gun show” biceps, your prostate would like to disagree. ... Guides Receive PCF news in your inbox Spam Control Text: Please leave this field empty EIN #95- ...

  15. Epigenetics in Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costantine Albany

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PC is the most commonly diagnosed nonskin malignancy and the second most common cause of cancer death among men in the United States. Epigenetics is the study of heritable changes in gene expression caused by mechanisms other than changes in the underlying DNA sequences. Two common epigenetic mechanisms, DNA methylation and histone modification, have demonstrated critical roles in prostate cancer growth and metastasis. DNA hypermethylation of cytosine-guanine (CpG rich sequence islands within gene promoter regions is widespread during neoplastic transformation of prostate cells, suggesting that treatment-induced restoration of a “normal” epigenome could be clinically beneficial. Histone modification leads to altered tumor gene function by changing chromosome structure and the level of gene transcription. The reversibility of epigenetic aberrations and restoration of tumor suppression gene function have made them attractive targets for prostate cancer treatment with modulators that demethylate DNA and inhibit histone deacetylases.

  16. Stages of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of bisphosphonate drugs to prevent or slow the growth of bone metastases is being studied in clinical trials. There are treatments for bone pain caused by bone metastases or hormone therapy. Prostate cancer that has spread to the ...

  17. Development of new eardrum-inspired acoustic transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gi-Woo; Jung, Gwang-Yong; Kim, Kyu-Sung

    2017-04-01

    The eardrum (also known as tympanic membrane, TM) in human auditory system has a curved conical shape with the apex pointing medially. It generally receives airborne sound waves collected by the outer ear, transforms them into mechanical vibrations in the eardrum, and eventually transmits the vibrations to the middle ear, which is similar with acoustic transducers such as microphones. In this research, new approach inspired by the human auditory system is explored to address the challenging difficulties for developing advanced acoustic transducers. In addition, a frequency response function analysis is performed to validate the inverse anti-resonance vibrating structure inspired by human middle ear including ear-drum.

  18. Prostatic cancer: intolerance and morbidity of external radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douchez, J.; Fregevu, Y.; Allain, Y.M.; Cellier, P.; Fenton, J.; Hay, M.; Le Bourgeois, J.P.; Vincent, F.

    1985-01-01

    The pertherapeutic intolerance and morbidity are analyzed in a groupe of 597 patients with localized prostatic carcinoma treated by definitive radiotherapy between 1975 and 1982. Minimum follow-up is 2 years, median is 46 months. The results are compared to following parameters: associated diseases, associated surgical treatments, doses and irradiated target volumes. Pertherapeutic intolerance manifestations were found in 73% of patients and lead to complications. Urinary incontinence and chronic cystitis were more frequent after transurethral resection or prostatic target volume and by split course irradiation. Chronic diarrhea was more frequent when using large target volume. Leg edema was closely associated with pelvic lymphadenectomy. The control of pertherapeutic manifestations and the prevention of complications should improve survival in patients treated by external radiotherapy [fr

  19. Presence of PSA auto-antibodies in men with prostate abnormalities (prostate cancer/benign prostatic hyperplasia/prostatitis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokant, M T; Naz, R K

    2015-04-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), produced by the prostate, liquefies post-ejaculate semen. PSA is detected in semen and blood. Increased circulating PSA levels indicate prostate abnormality [prostate cancer (PC), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), prostatitis (PTIS)], with variance among individuals. As the prostate has been proposed as an immune organ, we hypothesise that variation in PSA levels among men may be due to presence of auto-antibodies against PSA. Sera from healthy men (n = 28) and men having prostatitis (n = 25), BPH (n = 30) or PC (n = 29) were tested for PSA antibody presence using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) values converted to standard deviation (SD) units, and Western blotting. Taking ≥2 SD units as cut-off for positive immunoreactivity, 0% of normal men, 0% with prostatitis, 33% with BPH and 3.45% with PC demonstrated PSA antibodies. One-way analysis of variance (anova) performed on the mean absorbance values and SD units of each group showed BPH as significantly different (P prostatitis. All others were nonsignificant (P prostate abnormalities, especially differentiating BPH from prostate cancer and prostatitis. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beishon, J.

    1991-01-01

    Food irradiation has been the subject of concern and controversy for many years. The advantages of food irradiation include the reduction or elimination of dangerous bacterial organisms, the control of pests and insects which destroy certain foods, the extension of the shelf-life of many products, for example fruit, and its ability to treat products such as seafood which may be eaten raw. It can also replace existing methods of treatment which are believed to have hazardous side-effects. However, after examining the evidence produced by the proponents of food irradiation, the author questions whether it has any major contribution to make to the problems of foodborne diseases or world food shortages. More acceptable solutions, he suggests, may be found in educating food handlers to ensure that hygienic conditions prevail in the production, storage and serving of food. (author)

  1. Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0168 TITLE: Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jackilen...Imaging Prostatic Lipids to Distinguish Aggressive Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0168 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...overexpression, lipid accumulation, lipid oxidation, and tumor aggressiveness will be explored using metabolomics. Plan: Employing a cross-sectional

  2. Conformal treatment of prostate cancer with improved targeting: superior prostate-specific antigen response compared to standard treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corn, Benjamin W.; Hanks, Gerald E.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Hunt, Margie A.; Lee, W. Robert; Coia, Lawrence R.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Conformal radiation therapy (CRT) decreases the morbidity of prostate cancer treatment, but no published data attest to the improved ability of CRT to control disease. Therefore, we compared Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) response at 1 year among similarly staged patients treated by conformal techniques to those treated with conventional approaches, looking for an early indicator of tumor response. Method and Materials: Patients with locally advanced disease were treated by pelvic fields followed by prostate field conedowns; those with early stage/low grade disease received only prostate field irradiation. Between October, 1987 and November, 1991, conventional treatments used rectangular beams with or without corner blocks. Neither urethrography nor immobilization casts were used for conventionally treated patients. Between April, 1989 and December, 1992, conformal treatments have used rigid immobilization and Computed Tomography-based, beams-eye-view field design. As such, our conformal approach allowed improved targeting. Median prescribed doses (minimal doses to the Planning Target Volume) were 70 Gy (66-73 Gy) and 70.2 Gy (64.8-75 Gy) for conventionally and conformally treated patients, respectively. Median daily fraction size was 1.8 Gy for conventional treatment and 2.0 Gy for conformal therapy. Baseline PSA data were available on 170 consecutive patients treated conformally and 90 consecutive patients treated conventionally. Results: Among those receiving only prostatic field irradiation, 12-month PSA values returned to normal in 96% and 85% of conformally and conventionally treated patients, respectively, when normalization was defined as ≤ 4 ng/ml (p 15), and the use of conformal irradiation were statistically significant prognostic discriminants of PSA normalization at 1 year while total irradiation dose, clinical stage, and the addition of pelvic fields were not significant. Conclusions: As measured by PSA normalization, conformal techniques

  3. Irradiance gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, G.J.; Heckbert, P.S.; Technische Hogeschool Delft

    1992-04-01

    A new method for improving the accuracy of a diffuse interreflection calculation is introduced in a ray tracing context. The information from a hemispherical sampling of the luminous environment is interpreted in a new way to predict the change in irradiance as a function of position and surface orientation. The additional computation involved is modest and the benefit is substantial. An improved interpolation of irradiance resulting from the gradient calculation produces smoother, more accurate renderings. This result is achieved through better utilization of ray samples rather than additional samples or alternate sampling strategies. Thus, the technique is applicable to a variety of global illumination algorithms that use hemicubes or Monte Carlo sampling techniques

  4. Treatment of cancer of the prostate by use of physiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballanger, R.; Ballanger, P.

    1987-01-01

    For more than twenty five years, the authors have been physical agents in the treatment of cancer of the prostate at its initial stage. Obviously, in the course of this long period the technique of external irradiation has been improved upon (high energy photons, location of the irradiated mass using C-T scan, multiple beams) and also the screening of patients thanks to transrectal ultrasonography, bone scinitscans and lympography with cyto-puncture. It is hence probable that the results the authors are presenting in the forthcoming years will even be enhanced

  5. New Visual Prostate Symptom Score versus International Prostate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in men with lower urinary tract symptoms. Urology 2011;78:17-20. 10. Cam K, Akman Y, Cicekci B, Senel F, Erol A. Mode of administration of international prostate symptom score in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms: Physician vs self. Prostate. Cancer Prostatic Dis 2004;7:41-4. 11. Johnson TV, Abbasi A, Ehrlich SS, ...

  6. Prevalence of histological prostatitis in men with benign prostatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rectal examination, prostate volume, haemoglobin concentration, serum creatinine and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels, and histological findings. Results. Prostatic tissue of 385 men without urinary retention at presentation was obtained via biopsy (48.3% of cases), transurethral prostatectomy (62.9%), retropubic ...

  7. Understanding your prostate cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... older. Family history. Having a father, brother, or son with prostate cancer increases your risk. Having one immediate family member with prostate cancer doubles a man's own risk. A man who has 2 or ...

  8. Hyaluronan Biosynthesis in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McCarthy, James B

    2006-01-01

    Despite advances in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer in the last several years metastasis represents the major cause of frustration and failure in the successful treatment of prostate cancer patients. Hyaluronan (HA...

  9. Hyaluronan Biosynthesis in Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McCarthy, James B

    2005-01-01

    Despite advances in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer in the last several years, metastasis represents the major cause of frustration and failure in the successful treatment of prostate cancer patients. Hyaluronan (HA...

  10. MR imaging of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asbach, P.; Haas, M.; Hamm, B.

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the most common form of cancer in men in Germany; however, there is a distinct difference between incidence and mortality. The detection of prostate cancer is based on clinical and laboratory testing using serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and transrectal ultrasound with randomized biopsy. Multiparametric MR imaging of the prostate can provide valuable diagnostic information for detection of prostate cancer, especially after negative results of a biopsy prior to repeat biopsy. In addition the use of MR ultrasound fusion-guided biopsy has gained in diagnostic importance and has increased the prostate cancer detection rate. The prostate imaging reporting and data system (PI-RADS) classification has standardized the reporting of prostate MRI which has positively influenced the acceptance by urologists. (orig.) [de

  11. Molecular Epidemiology of Prostate Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Trock, Bruce J

    2005-01-01

    .... The objective of this case-control study is to determine whether oxidative damage is a risk factor for prostate cancer, and whether this mechanism mediates the association between dietary fat and prostate cancer risk...

  12. Center for Prostate Disease Research

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Center for Prostate Disease Research is the only free-standing prostate cancer research center in the U.S. This 20,000 square foot state-of-the-art basic science...

  13. Angiogenesis Regulates Prostate Cancer Metastasis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pettaway, Curtis

    1999-01-01

    .... We are evaluating the relationship of the expression of the angiogenesis factors bFGF, VEGF, and IL-8 with prostate cancer growth and metastasis, using our orthotopic model of metastatic prostate cancer in nude mice...

  14. New Prostate Cancer Treatment Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Researchers have identified a potential alternative approach to blocking a key molecular driver of an advanced form of prostate cancer, called androgen-independent or castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  15. Localized prostate cancer: result of radical treatment with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Villalba, S.; Magallon Sebastian, R.; Gonzalez Garcia-Cuellar, I.; Velasco Jimenez, J.; Valcarcel Sancho, F.; Millan Santos, I.; Torre Tomas, A. de la; Aragon de la Cruz, G.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to evaluate the long-term survival and the patterns of failure of clinically localized prostate cancer patients treated with radical radiotherapy. Methods and materials: We reviewed 118 patients with localized biopsy proven prostate cancer without previous irradiation or radical prostatectomy who were treated radical radiotherapy at the Department of Radiation Oncology between July 1964 and December 1991. Results: The adjusted survival probability was 69% at 5 years and 62% at 10 years. The disease free survival probability was 56% at years and 48% at 10 years. The local relapse free survival probability (prostatic and peri prostatic tissue failure) was 91% at 5 and 10 years. The locoregional relapse free survival probability (local and lymph pelvic pelvic nodes recurrence) was 85% at 5 years 75% at 10 years. The distant relapse free survival probability was 68% at 5 years and 65% at 10 years. Conclusion: External-beam radiotherapy is a highly effective modality of therapy for patients with localized prostate cancer. This curative therapy can now be offered with little morbidity and good results, equal to the survival rates reported in surgical series. External-beam radiation therapy achieves high rates of locoregional control and the outcome of patients with advanced disease is determined by the risk of developing distant metastases. (65 refs.)

  16. Dose optimization in simulated permanent interstitial implant of prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faria, Fernando Pereira de

    2006-01-01

    Any treatment of cancer that uses some modality of radiotherapy is planned before being executed. In general the goal in radiotherapy is to irradiate the target to be treated minimizing the incidence of radiation in healthy surrounding tissues. The planning differ among themselves according to the modality of radiotherapy, the type of cancer and where it is located. This work approaches the problem of dose optimization for the planning of prostate cancer treatment through the modality of low dose-rate brachytherapy with Iodine 125 or Palladium 103 seeds. An algorithm for dose calculation and optimization was constructed to find the seeds configuration that better fits the relevant clinical criteria such as as the tolerated dose by the urethra and rectum and the desired dose for prostate. The algorithm automatically finds this configuration from the prostate geometry established in two or three dimensions by using images of ultrasound, magnetic resonance or tomography and from the establishment of minimum restrictions to the positions of the seeds in the prostate and needles in a template. Six patterns of seeds distribution based on clinical criteria were suggested and tested in this work. Each one of these patterns generated a space of possible seeds configurations for the prostate tested by the dose calculation and optimization algorithm. The configurations that satisfied the clinical criteria were submitted to a test according to an optimization function suggested in this work. The configuration that produced maximum value for this function was considered the optimized one. (author)

  17. Chromosomal radiosensitivity of prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McRobbie, M.L.; Riches, A.; Baxby, K.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Radiosensitivity of peripheral blood lymphocytes from prostate cancer patients is being investigated using the G2 assay and the Cytokinesis Block Micronucleus(CBMN)assay. The G2 assay evaluates chromosomal damage caused by irradiating cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. The CBMN assay quantifies the post mitotic micronuclei, which are the expression of damage incurred during G0. An association between hypersensitivity to the chromosome damaging effects of ionising radiation and cancer predispostion has been demonstrated in a number of heritable conditions by using the aforementioned techniques. Recently, increased chromosomal radiosensitivity has been demonstrated in a significant proportion of patients with no obvious family history of malignancy. The aim of this study is to establish whether a group of prostatic carcinoma patients exists and if so whether there are any correlations between their G2 and G0 sensitivities. The study has shown there is no correlation between G2 and G0 sensitivity, confirming the general trend that individuals exhibiting chromosomal radiosensitivity are defective in only one mechanism and G2 and G0 sensitivity are largely independent. Current data indicates that there is an identifiable group of men within the prostate cancer population with increased chromosomal radiosensitivity. Using the G2 assay and the 90th percentile of the controls as a cut off point for sensitivity, no significant difference between the controls and the patient population has been found. However, using the CBMN assay and again the 90th percentile, approximately 11% of the control group are sensitive compared with approximately 40% of the carcinoma cases. The implications of this increased radiosensitivity are as yet unclear, but it is indicative of increased chromosomal fragility and therefore, possibly associated with malignant transformation. Hence, it may prove a useful tool in identifying individuals at increased risk of developing

  18. The prostate health index selectively identifies clinically significant prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Stacy; Sanda, Martin G; Broyles, Dennis L; Shin, Sanghyuk S; Bangma, Chris H; Wei, John T; Partin, Alan W; Klee, George G; Slawin, Kevin M; Marks, Leonard S; van Schaik, Ron H N; Chan, Daniel W; Sokoll, Lori J; Cruz, Amabelle B; Mizrahi, Isaac A; Catalona, William J

    2015-04-01

    The Prostate Health Index (phi) is a new test combining total, free and [-2]proPSA into a single score. It was recently approved by the FDA and is now commercially available in the U.S., Europe and Australia. We investigate whether phi improves specificity for detecting clinically significant prostate cancer and can help reduce prostate cancer over diagnosis. From a multicenter prospective trial we identified 658 men age 50 years or older with prostate specific antigen 4 to 10 ng/ml and normal digital rectal examination who underwent prostate biopsy. In this population we compared the performance of prostate specific antigen, % free prostate specific antigen, [-2]proPSA and phi to predict biopsy results and, specifically, the presence of clinically significant prostate cancer using multiple criteria. The Prostate Health Index was significantly higher in men with Gleason 7 or greater and "Epstein significant" cancer. On receiver operating characteristic analysis phi had the highest AUC for overall prostate cancer (AUCs phi 0.708, percent free prostate specific antigen 0.648, [-2]proPSA 0.550 and prostate specific antigen 0.516), Gleason 7 or greater (AUCs phi 0.707, percent free prostate specific antigen 0.661, [-2]proPSA 0.558, prostate specific antigen 0.551) and significant prostate cancer (AUCs phi 0.698, percent free prostate specific antigen 0.654, [-2]proPSA 0.550, prostate specific antigen 0.549). At the 90% sensitivity cut point for phi (a score less than 28.6) 30.1% of patients could have been spared an unnecessary biopsy for benign disease or insignificant prostate cancer compared to 21.7% using percent free prostate specific antigen. The new phi test outperforms its individual components of total, free and [-2]proPSA for the identification of clinically significant prostate cancer. Phi may be useful as part of a multivariable approach to reduce prostate biopsies and over diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 American Urological Association Education and Research

  19. Tunable-angle wedge transducer for improved acoustophoretic control in a microfluidic chip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iranmanesh, I.; Barnkob, Rune; Bruus, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    We present a tunable-angle wedge ultrasound transducer for improved control of microparticle acoustophoresis in a microfluidic chip. The transducer is investigated by analyzing the pattern of aligned particles and induced acoustic energy density while varying the system geometry, transducer......-angle transducer are compared with the results from actuation by a standard planar transducer in order to decouple the influence from change in coupling angle and change in system geometry. We find in this work that the transducer coupling angle is the more important parameter compared to the concomitant change...

  20. Analysis of eigenfrequencies in piezoelectric transducers using the finite element method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik

    1988-01-01

    It is noted that the finite-element method is a valuable supplement to the traditional methods for design of novel transducer types because it can determine the vibrational pattern of piezoelectric transducers and is applicable to any geometry. Computer programs for analysis of axisymmetric...... transducers, which include the complete set of piezoelectric equations, have been included. They can find eigenfrequencies for undamped transducers and perform forced-response analysis for transducers with internal and radiation damping. The superelement technique is used to model the transducer backing...

  1. Determination of the response time of pressure transducers using the direct method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perillo, S.R.P.

    1994-01-01

    The available methods to determine the response time of nuclear safety related pressure transducers are discussed, with emphasis to the direct method. In order to perform the experiments, a Hydraulic Ramp Generator was built. The equipment produces ramp pressure transients simultaneously to a reference transducer and to the transducer under test. The time lag between the output of the two transducers, when they reach a predetermined setpoint, is measured as the time delay of the transducer under test. Some results using the direct method to determine the time delay of pressure transducers (1 E Class Conventional) are presented. (author). 18 refs, 35 figs, 12 tabs

  2. Instantaneous input electrical power measurements of HITU transducer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karaboece, B; Guelmez, Y; Rajagapol, S; Shaw, A

    2011-01-01

    HITU (High Intensity Theraupetic Ultrasound) transducers are widely used in therapeutic ultrasound in medicine. The output ultrasonic power of HITU transducer can be measured in number of methods described in IEC 61161 standard [1]. New IEC standards specifically for measurement of HITU equipment are under development. The ultrasound power radiated from a transducer is dependent on applied input electrical voltage and current and consequently power. But, up to now, no standardised method has been developed and adopted for the input electrical power measurements. Hence, a workpackage was carried out for the establishment of such method in the frequency range of 1 to 3 MHz as a part of EURAMET EMRP Era-net plus 'External Beam Cancer Therapy' project. Several current shunts were developed and evaluated. Current measurements were also realized with Philips current probe and preamplifier at NPL and Agilent current probe at UME. In this paper, a method for the measurement of instantaneous electrical power delivered to a reactive ultrasound transducer in the required frequency range is explored.

  3. A capacitive ultrasonic transducer based on parametric resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surappa, Sushruta; Satir, Sarp; Levent Degertekin, F

    2017-07-24

    A capacitive ultrasonic transducer based on a parametric resonator structure is described and experimentally demonstrated. The transducer structure, which we call capacitive parametric ultrasonic transducer (CPUT), uses a parallel plate capacitor with a movable membrane as part of a degenerate parametric series RLC resonator circuit with a resonance frequency of f o . When the capacitor plate is driven with an incident harmonic ultrasonic wave at the pump frequency of 2f o with sufficient amplitude, the RLC circuit becomes unstable and ultrasonic energy can be efficiently converted to an electrical signal at f o frequency in the RLC circuit. An important characteristic of the CPUT is that unlike other electrostatic transducers, it does not require DC bias or permanent charging to be used as a receiver. We describe the operation of the CPUT using an analytical model and numerical simulations, which shows drive amplitude dependent operation regimes including parametric resonance when a certain threshold is exceeded. We verify these predictions by experiments with a micromachined membrane based capacitor structure in immersion where ultrasonic waves incident at 4.28 MHz parametrically drive a signal with significant amplitude in the 2.14 MHz RLC circuit. With its unique features, the CPUT can be particularly advantageous for applications such as wireless power transfer for biomedical implants and acoustic sensing.

  4. A capacitive ultrasonic transducer based on parametric resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surappa, Sushruta; Satir, Sarp; Levent Degertekin, F.

    2017-07-01

    A capacitive ultrasonic transducer based on a parametric resonator structure is described and experimentally demonstrated. The transducer structure, which we call capacitive parametric ultrasonic transducer (CPUT), uses a parallel plate capacitor with a movable membrane as part of a degenerate parametric series RLC resonator circuit with a resonance frequency of fo. When the capacitor plate is driven with an incident harmonic ultrasonic wave at the pump frequency of 2fo with sufficient amplitude, the RLC circuit becomes unstable and ultrasonic energy can be efficiently converted to an electrical signal at fo frequency in the RLC circuit. An important characteristic of the CPUT is that unlike other electrostatic transducers, it does not require DC bias or permanent charging to be used as a receiver. We describe the operation of the CPUT using an analytical model and numerical simulations, which shows drive amplitude dependent operation regimes including parametric resonance when a certain threshold is exceeded. We verify these predictions by experiments with a micromachined membrane based capacitor structure in immersion where ultrasonic waves incident at 4.28 MHz parametrically drive a signal with significant amplitude in the 2.14 MHz RLC circuit. With its unique features, the CPUT can be particularly advantageous for applications such as wireless power transfer for biomedical implants and acoustic sensing.

  5. Multilevel inverter based class D audio amplifier for capacitive transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dennis; Knott, Arnold; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2014-01-01

    The reduced semiconductor voltage stress makes the multilevel inverters especially interesting, when driving capacitive transducers for audio applications. A ± 300 V flying capacitor class D audio amplifier driving a 100 nF load in the midrange region of 0.1-3.5 kHz with Total Harmonic Distortion...

  6. Analysis of the conical piezoelectric acoustic emission transducer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Červená, Olga; Hora, Petr

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 1 (2008), s. 13-24 ISSN 1802-680X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/06/1689 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : acoustic emission * conical transducer * FEM Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  7. The Current State of Silicone-Based Dielectric Elastomer Transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Frederikke Bahrt; Daugaard, Anders Egede; Hvilsted, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Silicone elastomers are promising materials for dielectric elastomer transducers (DETs) due to their superior properties such as high efficiency, reliability and fast response times. DETs consist of thin elastomer films sandwiched between compliant electrodes, and they consti- tute an interesting...

  8. Simulating Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers (CMUTs) using Field II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bæk, David; Oralkan, Omer; Kupnik, Mario

    2010-01-01

    which it calculates the SIR responses. The program features predefined models for classical transducer geometries, but currently none for the fast advancing CMUTs. This work addresses the assumptions required for modeling CMUTs with Field II. It is shown that rectangular array elements, populated...

  9. High Temperature Ultrasonic Transducers : Material Selection and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bruno, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    The task of my two-months internship was to test different materials to be used to build an high temperature transducer, to develop some prototypes and to test their performance, to assess the reliability of commercial product rated for such a temperature, as well as to collaborate in developing the signal processing code to measure the condensed water levels.

  10. Air-borne radiation from bone conduction transducers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightfoot, G R

    1979-05-01

    The relative magnitudes of air-borne radiation and mechanical vibration from three types of bone conduction transducer have been measured. The study suggests that the presence of excess air-borne radiation can lead to the observation of a false air-bone gap in audiometry. Some methods of overcoming this effect are considered.

  11. Frequency wavenumber design of spiral macro fiber composite directional transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrara, Matteo; Ruzzene, Massimo

    2015-04-01

    This work is focused on design and testing of a novel class of transducers for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM), able to perform directional interrogation of plate-like structures. These transducers leverage guided waves (GWs), and in particular Lamb waves, that have emerged as a very prominent option for assessing the state of a structure during operation. GW-SHM approaches greatly benefit from the use of transducers with controllable directional characteristics, so that selective scanning of a surface can be performed to locate damage, impacts, or cracks. In the concepts that we propose, continuous beam steering and directional actuation are achieved through proper selection of the excitation frequency. The design procedure takes advantage of the wavenumber representation of the device, and formulates the problem using a Fourier-based approach. The active layer of the transducer is made of piezoelectric fibers embedded into an epoxy matrix, allowing the device to be flexible, and thus suitable for application on non{ at surfaces. Proper shaping of the electrodes pattern through a compensation function allows taking into account the anisotropy level introduced by the active layer. The resulting spiral frequency steerable acoustic actuator is a configuration that features (i) enhanced performance, (ii) reduced complexity, and (iii) reduced hardware requirements of such devices.

  12. Characterization of a novel Optical Micro-machined Ultrasound Transducer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leinders, S.M.

    2017-01-01

    We design and demonstrate a prototype ultrasound sensor based on a photonic micro-ring resonator integrated on a silicon membrane, and show that it can detect very low pressure ultrasound waves. The use of integrated photonics in future array transducers has several benefits: for instance it

  13. Transducer frequency response variations investigated by time reversal calibration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kober, Jan; Převorovský, Zdeněk

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 2 (2016), A16-A16 ISSN 1213-3825. [Europen Conference on Acoustic Emission Testing /32./. 07.09.2016-09.09.2016, Praha] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : calibration * time reversal * transducer * frequency response Subject RIV: BI - Acoustic s

  14. Instantaneous input electrical power measurements of HITU transducer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaboece, B; Guelmez, Y [Tuebitak Ulusal Metroloji Enstituesue (UME), P.K. 54 41470 Gebze-Kocaeli (Turkey); Rajagapol, S; Shaw, A, E-mail: baki.karaboce@ume.tubitak.gov.t [National Physical Laboratory (NPL), Hampton Road, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-01

    HITU (High Intensity Theraupetic Ultrasound) transducers are widely used in therapeutic ultrasound in medicine. The output ultrasonic power of HITU transducer can be measured in number of methods described in IEC 61161 standard [1]. New IEC standards specifically for measurement of HITU equipment are under development. The ultrasound power radiated from a transducer is dependent on applied input electrical voltage and current and consequently power. But, up to now, no standardised method has been developed and adopted for the input electrical power measurements. Hence, a workpackage was carried out for the establishment of such method in the frequency range of 1 to 3 MHz as a part of EURAMET EMRP Era-net plus 'External Beam Cancer Therapy' project. Several current shunts were developed and evaluated. Current measurements were also realized with Philips current probe and preamplifier at NPL and Agilent current probe at UME. In this paper, a method for the measurement of instantaneous electrical power delivered to a reactive ultrasound transducer in the required frequency range is explored.

  15. Power doppler 'blanching' after the application of transducer pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshua, F.; Edmonds, J.; Lassere, M.; De Carle, R.; Rayment, M.; Bryant, C.; Shnier, R.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if transducer pressure modifies power Doppler assessments of rheumatoid arthritis synovium at the metacarpophalangeal joints and metatarsophalangeal joints. Five rheumatoid arthritis patients of varying degrees of 'disease activity' and damage were assessed with power Doppler ultrasound scanning of the dominant hand second to fifth metacarpophalangeal joints. Two rheumatoid arthritis patients had their dominant foot first to fifth metatarsophalangeal joints assessed with power Doppler ultrasound. Ultrasonography was performed with a high frequency transducer (14 MHz) with a colour mode frequency of 10 Mhz, and a standard colour box and gain. In the joint that showed the highest power Doppler signal, an image was made. A further image was taken after transducer pressure was applied. In all patients, there was increased flow to at least one joint. After pressure was applied, power Doppler signal intensity markedly reduced in all images and in some there was no recordable power Doppler signal. Increased transducer pressure can result in a marked reduction or obliteration in power Doppler signal. This power Doppler 'blanching' shows the need for further studies to evaluate sources of error and standardization before power Doppler ultrasound becomes a routine measure of 'disease activity' in rheumatoid arthritis. Copyright (2005) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  16. Electrical capacity and resistance determination of emitting electric transducer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alba Fernandez, J.; Ramis Soriano, J.

    2000-01-01

    In this work we calculate the electrical resistance and capacity of emitting electric transducer, which is mainly formed, in direct relationship with its properties, by a ceramic capacitor. Our aim is to motivate the students with an attractive element in order to carry out traditional measurements of the charge and discharge transients of a capacitor, implementing high resistance setups. (Author) 5 refs

  17. A Novel Rotary Piezoelectric Motor Using First Bending Hybrid Transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingxiang Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a novel rotary piezoelectric motor using bending transducers in this work. Three transducers are used to drive a disk-shaped rotor together by the elliptical movements of their driving tips; these motions are produced by the hybrid of two first bending vibration modes. The proposed piezoelectric transducer has a simple structure as it only contains an aluminum alloy beam and four pieces of PZT plates. Symmetrical structure is the only necessary condition in the design process as it will ensure the resonance frequencies of the two orthogonal first bending modes are equal. Transducers with first bending resonance frequency of about 53 kHz were fabricated and assembled into a rotary motor. The proposed motor exhibits good performance on speed and torque control. Under a working frequency of 53.2 kHz, the maximum no-load speed and the maximum torque of the prototype are tested to be 53.3 rpm and of 27 mN·m.

  18. Enhancing endosomal escape of transduced proteins by photochemical internalisation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Mellert

    Full Text Available Induced internalisation of functional proteins into cultured cells has become an important aspect in a rising number of in vitro and in vivo assays. The endo-lysosomal entrapment of the transduced proteins remains the major problem in all transduction protocols. In this study we compared the efficiency, cytotoxicity and protein targeting of different commercially available transduction reagents by transducing a well-studied fluorescently labelled protein (Atto488-bovine serum albumin into cultured human sarcoma cells. The amount of internalised protein and toxicity differed between the different reagents, but the percentage of transduced cells was consistently high. Furthermore, in all protocols the signals of the transduced Atto488-BSA were predominantly punctual consistent with an endosomal localisation. To overcome the endosomal entrapment, the transduction protocols were combined with a photochemical internalisation (PCI treatment. Using this combination revealed that an endosomal disruption is highly effective in cell penetrating peptide (CPP mediated transduction, whereas lipid-mediated transductions lead to a lower signal spreading throughout the cytosol. No change in the signal distribution could be achieved in treatments using non-lipid polymers as a transduction reagent. Therefore, the combination of protein transduction protocols based on CPPs with the endosomolytic treatment PCI can facilitate protein transduction experiments in vitro.

  19. Enhancing endosomal escape of transduced proteins by photochemical internalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellert, Kevin; Lamla, Markus; Scheffzek, Klaus; Wittig, Rainer; Kaufmann, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    Induced internalisation of functional proteins into cultured cells has become an important aspect in a rising number of in vitro and in vivo assays. The endo-lysosomal entrapment of the transduced proteins remains the major problem in all transduction protocols. In this study we compared the efficiency, cytotoxicity and protein targeting of different commercially available transduction reagents by transducing a well-studied fluorescently labelled protein (Atto488-bovine serum albumin) into cultured human sarcoma cells. The amount of internalised protein and toxicity differed between the different reagents, but the percentage of transduced cells was consistently high. Furthermore, in all protocols the signals of the transduced Atto488-BSA were predominantly punctual consistent with an endosomal localisation. To overcome the endosomal entrapment, the transduction protocols were combined with a photochemical internalisation (PCI) treatment. Using this combination revealed that an endosomal disruption is highly effective in cell penetrating peptide (CPP) mediated transduction, whereas lipid-mediated transductions lead to a lower signal spreading throughout the cytosol. No change in the signal distribution could be achieved in treatments using non-lipid polymers as a transduction reagent. Therefore, the combination of protein transduction protocols based on CPPs with the endosomolytic treatment PCI can facilitate protein transduction experiments in vitro.

  20. Multilevel inverter based class D audio amplifier for capacitive transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dennis; Knott, Arnold; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2014-01-01

    The reduced semiconductor voltage stress makes the multilevel inverters especially interesting, when driving capacitive transducers for audio applications. A ± 300 V flying capacitor class D audio amplifier driving a 100 nF load in the midrange region of 0.1-3.5 kHz with Total Harmonic Distortion...... plus Noise (THD+N) belo w1%is presented....

  1. Microwave Irradiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 3. Microwave Irradiation - Way to Eco-friendly, Green Chemistry. Rashmi Sanghi. General Article Volume 5 Issue 3 March 2000 pp 77-81. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  2. Gonadal Irradiation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    division either by mitosis or meiosis show the least degree of radiation tolerance. This can be readily demonstrated histologically. Two hours after irradiation the spermatogenetic cell column starts to shrink because of a reduction in the number of spermatogonia, some of which are undergoing abnormal mitosis. Four days ...

  3. ion irradiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Swift heavy ions interact predominantly through inelastic scattering while traversing any polymer medium and produce excited/ionized atoms. Here samples of the polycarbonate Makrofol of approximate thickness 20 m, spin coated on GaAs substrate were irradiated with 50 MeV Li ion (+3 charge state). Build-in ...

  4. Microwave Irradiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Microwave Irradiation. Way to Eco-friendly, Green Chemistry. Rashmi Sanghi. This article highlights with examples, the usefulness of microwaves for carrying out a'variety of organic transfor- mations. Introduction and Background. The rapid heating of food in the kitchen using microwave ovens prompted a number of ...

  5. Unusual Giant Prostatic Urethral Calculus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-06-29

    Jun 29, 2010 ... They are typically asymptomatic and may be associated with benign prostatic hyperplasia, and prostatic cancer.[1] Primary prostatic urethral calculi are usually associated with urethral strictures, posterior urethral valve or diverticula. Acute urinary retention might result secondary to a large urethral calculus.

  6. Prostate biopsy: indications and technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlaga, Brian R; Eskew, L Andrew; McCullough, David L

    2003-01-01

    The last decade has seen numerous modifications in the way prostate cancer is diagnosed. We review the current indications for and methods of prostate biopsy. The English language literature was reviewed regarding major indications for and methods of prostate biopsy. Pertinent peer reviewed articles were collated and analyzed. The most widely accepted indication for prostate biopsy is a prostate specific antigen (PSA) value of greater than 4.0 ng./ml. However, some investigators advocate prostate biopsy for men with a PSA value in the 2.5 to 4.0 ng./ml. range, believing that use of this parameter results in detection of a greater number of cases of curable disease. Age specific PSA range, percent free PSA and presence of prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia or atypia are all considered to be relative indications for prostate biopsy. The current literature describes a trend toward increasing the number of cores obtained and the sites biopsied beyond those of the standard sextant technique. The additional cores in many series are obtained from more lateral regions of the gland. Although several criteria are used as indications for initial prostate biopsy, all are based on PSA level and/or abnormal digital rectal examination. Future improvements in currently used prostate cancer markers may result in better selection of cases to biopsy. There is no universally accepted technique of prostate gland biopsy. The current literature supports use of more extensive biopsy techniques to increase the likelihood of prostate cancer detection.

  7. Ultrasonography and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in differential diagnosis of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechev, D.S.; Shcherbyina, O.V.; Yatsik, V.Yi.; Gladka, L.Yu.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the work is analysis of diagnostic possibilities of transrectal ultrasonography and PSA in differential diagnosis of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. 142 patients have been investigated by transrectal ultrasonography. he transrectal ultrasonography and PSA are sensible tests in diagnosis of prostate cancer and in differential diagnosis of benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer

  8. The link between benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsted, David Dynnes; Bojesen, Stig E

    2013-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer are among the most common diseases of the prostate gland and represent significant burdens for patients and health-care systems in many countries. The two diseases share traits such as hormone-dependent growth and response to antiandrogen...... therapy. Furthermore, risk factors such as prostate inflammation and metabolic disruption have key roles in the development of both diseases. Despite these commonalities, BPH and prostate cancer exhibit important differences in terms of histology and localization. Although large-scale epidemiological...... studies have shown that men with BPH have an increased risk of prostate cancer and prostate-cancer-related mortality, it remains unclear whether this association reflects a causal link, shared risk factors or pathophysiological mechanisms, or detection bias upon statistical analysis. Establishing BPH...

  9. Granulomatous prostatitis after intravesical immunotherapy mimicking prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Białek

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Intravesical immunotherapy with attenuated strains of Mycobacterium bovis is a widely used therapeutic option in patients with non-muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. A rare complication of intravesical therapy with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine is granulomatous prostatitis, which due to increasing levels of prostate-specific antigen and abnormalities found in transrectal examination of the prostate may suggest concomitant prostate cancer. A case of extensive granulomatous prostatitis in a 61-year-old patient which occurred after the first course of a well-tolerated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy is presented. Due to abnormalities found in rectal examination and an abnormal transrectal ultrasound image of the prostate with extensive infiltration mimicking neoplastic hyperplasia a core biopsy of the prostate was performed. Histopathological examination revealed inflammatory infiltration sites of tuberculosis origin.

  10. Food irradiation: An update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, Rosanna M.

    1984-01-01

    Recent regulatory and commercial activity regarding food irradiation is highlighted. The effects of irradiation, used to kill insects and microorganisms which cause food spoilage, are discussed. Special attention is given to the current regulatory status of food irradiation in the USA; proposed FDA regulation regarding the use of irradiation; pending irradiation legislation in the US Congress; and industrial applications of irradiation

  11. [Sexuality and prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Droupy, S; Al Said, B; Lechevallier, E; Colson, M-H; Giuliano, F

    2013-07-01

    All treatments for prostate cancer have a negative impact on sexuality. The objective of this review is to highlight recent developments in the management of sexual dysfunction associated with prostate cancer. We performed a literature search in the Pubmed database to select relevant articles. There is a specific profile of changes in the fields of sexual, urinary, bowel and general quality of life, according to the treatment modalities chosen. Maintenance of a satisfying sex life is a major concern of a majority of men facing prostate cancer and its treatments. It is essential to assess the couple's sexuality before treating prostate cancer in order to deliver comprehensive information and consider early therapeutic solutions adapted to the couple's expectations. The results of randomized studies show that robotic radical prostatectomy allows a faster recovery of natural erections compared to classic laparoscopy. Active pharmacological erectile rehabilitation (intracavernous injections or phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors [PDE5i] on demand, during the month following surgery) or passive (daily PDE5i after surgery) might improve the quality of erections especially in response to PDE5i. Unimpaired aspects of sexual response (orgasm) may, when the erection is not yet recovered, represent an alternative allowing the couple to preserve intimacy and complicity. Androgen blockade is a major barrier to maintain or return to a satisfying sex. After the treatment of prostate cancer, one specific support sometimes assisted by networking will optimize satisfying sex life recovery. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiation protection effect of selenium on the Rat's prostate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyung Seok; Choi, Jun Hyeok; Jung, Do Young; Kim, Jang Oh; Shin, Ji Hye; Kim, Joo Hee; Min, Byung In [Inje University, Kimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    High-tech medical equipment has increased the utilization of radiation in the medical field. As a result, research on radiation protection using natural materials has become an important social issue. Selenium is a natural substance that is highly expressed in prostate known that an essential role in prostate cells. Selenium was orally administered to Rat and irradiated with 10 Gy of radiation. Then, the prostate tissue was used as a target organ for 1 day, 7 days and 21 days to investigate the radiation protection effect of selenium through changes of blood components, Superoxide Dismutase and histological changes. As a result, there was a significant protective effect of hematopoietic immune system(hemoglobin concentration, neutrophil, platelet) in the group irradiated with selenium(p<0.05). The observation of tissue changes selenium is an effective component to increase Superoxide Dismutase activity, and it was confirmed that it has an effect of inhibiting the expression of hypertrophy of prostate by irradiation. Therefore, it is considered that selenium can be utilized as a radioprotective agent by inducing prevention of prostate-related diseases.

  13. Dihydroisotanshinone I combined with radiation inhibits the migration ability of prostate cancer cells through DNA damage and CCL2 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I-Yun; Lin, Yin-Yin; Yang, Yao-Hsu; Lin, Yu-Shin; Lin, Chun-Liang; Lin, Wei-Yu; Cheng, Yu-Ching; Shu, Li-Hsin; Wu, Ching-Yuan

    2018-01-31

    Radiotherapy plays an important role in the treatment of prostate cancer. Despite that sophisticated techniques of radiotherapy and radiation combined with chemotherapy were applied to the patients, some tumors may recur. Therefore, the study investigated the effect of dihydroisotanshinone I (DT) and the combination treatment of 5 μM DT and 5Gy irradiation (IR) against the migration ability of prostate cancer cells. DT and the combination treatment were studied for its biological activity against migration ability of prostate cancer cells with transwell migration assay. Subsequently, we tried to explore the underlying mechanism with ELISA, flow cytometry and Western's blotting assay. The results showed that DT and the combination treatment substantially inhibited the migration ability of prostate cancer cells. DT and the combined treatment can decrease the ability of macrophages to recruit prostate cancer cells. Mechanistically, DT and the combination treatment reduced the secretion of chemokine (C-C Motif) Ligand 2 (CCL2) from prostate cancer cells. We also found that DT treatment induced the cell cycle of prostate cancer cells entering S phase and increased the protein expression of DNA damage response proteins (rH2AX and phosphorylated ataxia telangiectasia-mutated [ATM]) in DU145 cells and PC-3 cells. DT displays radiosensitization and antimigration effects in prostate cancer cells by inducing DNA damage and inhibiting CCL2 secretion. We suggest that DT can be used as a novel antimetastatic cancer drug or radiosensitizer in the armamentarium of prostate cancer management.

  14. Six-Axis Force-Torque Transducer for Mars 2018 Mission, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A transducer element that is hearty enough for a Mars lander mission needs to be developed so that a six-axis force and torque transducer is possible. The technical...

  15. Food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beerens, H.; Saint-Lebe, L.

    1979-01-01

    Various aspects of food treatment by cobalt 60 or caesium 137 gamma radiation are reviewed. One of the main applications of irradiation on foodstuffs lies in its ability to kill micro-organisms, lethal doses being all the lower as the organism concerned is more complex. The effect on parasites is also spectacular. Doses of 200 to 300 krad are recommended to destroy all parasites with no survival period and no resistance phenomenon has ever been observed. The action of gamma radiation on macromolecules was also investigated, the bactericide treatment giving rise to side effects by transformation of food components. Three examples were studied: starch, nucleic acids and a whole food, the egg. The organoleptic aspect of irradiation was examined for different treated foods, then the physical transformations of unpasteurized, heat-pasteurized and radio-pasteurized eggs were compared. The report ends with a brief analysis of the toxicity and conditions of application of the treatment [fr

  16. Eddy Current Transducer Dedicated for Sigma Phase Evaluation in Duplex Stainless Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Psuj

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a new transducer dedicated for evaluation of a duplex stainless steel (DSS. Different phases which exist in DSS have influence on mechanical as well as on electrical properties. Therefore, an eddy current transducer was utilized. In order to achieve high sensitivity, a differential type of the transducer was selected. The performance of the transducer was verified by utilizing the samples which had a different amount of sigma phase.

  17. Osteoporosis and prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Mads Hvid; Nielsen, Morten Frost Munk; Abrahamsen, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective. The aim of this study was to analyse the prevalence of osteoporosis and risk factors of osteoporotic fractures before androgen deprivation in Danish men. Treatment and prognosis of prostate cancer necessitate management of long-term consequences of androgen deprivation therapy...... (ADT), including accelerated bone loss resulting in osteoporosis. Osteoporotic fractures are associated with excess morbidity and mortality. Material and methods. Patients with prostate cancer awaiting initiation of ADT were consecutively included. Half of the patients had localized disease and were...... level was 30.5 g/l (1-5714 g/l). The average Gleason score was 7.8 (range 5-10, SD 1.1). Fifty patients had localized prostate cancer and the other 55 patients had disseminated disease. The prevalence of osteoporosis was 10% and the prevalence of osteopenia was 58% before ADT. There was no significant...

  18. [Chronic prostatitis and biofilm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoletti, R; Cai, T

    2009-06-01

    Nowadays, inflammatory prostatic diseases represent one of the main social and economic problems that affect male gender in our country. The disease's prevalence is estimated at 11-14% in European countries, and males aged between 20 and 50 years are the most affected subjects. Bacterial prostatitis is documented at a very low prevalence (7-13% of prostatitis overall considered) due to either reduced utilization of viral and bacteriological tests (Meares test, urethral swab, bacterial and viral PCR) or to the possibility that individual patients show a scarce expression of bacterial disease in biological fluids, because of intraglandular biofilm presence, with subsequent spreading of the sole plankton microrganisms. Actually, the presence of a biofilm may possibly represent the reason for difficult diagnoses and ineffective antibacterial treatments.

  19. [Electrovaporization of the prostate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchi, M; Sepich, C A; Pagni, G; Ippolito, C; Summonti, D; Fiorentini, L

    1996-01-01

    Electrovaporization is a new and potentially useful modification of transurethral resection of the prostate which is rapidly becoming a treatment of choice for symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia. We report our experience with 22 patients treated using the Circon Acmi Grooved Vaportrode vaporization electrode. Procedures were carried out using the standard technique of electrovaporization with general or regional anaesthesia. Mean operative time was 40 minutes (range 25-65 minutes) and all patients were discharged without catheter after 1 or 2 days. Symptom score, peak uroflow and postvoid residual urine showed statistically significant improvement at 3 months (p < 0.01). There were no significant complications. Transurethral electrovaporization of the prostate seems to be a easy and safe procedure with significantly lower costs and excellent results. However, long-term efficacy and complications need to be evaluated in multicentre clinical trials.

  20. The Utility of PET/CT in the Planning of External Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calais, Jeremie; Cao, Minsong; Nickols, Nicholas G

    2018-04-01

    Radiotherapy and radical prostatectomy are the definitive treatment options for patients with localized prostate cancer. A rising level of prostate-specific antigen after radical prostatectomy indicates prostate cancer recurrence, and these patients may still be cured with salvage radiotherapy. To maximize chance for cure, the irradiated volumes should completely encompass the extent of disease. Therefore, accurate estimation of the location of disease is critical for radiotherapy planning in both the definitive and the salvage settings. Current first-line imaging for prostate cancer has limited sensitivity for detection of disease both at initial staging and at biochemical recurrence. Integration of PET into routine evaluation of prostate cancer patients may improve both staging accuracy and radiotherapy planning. 18 F-FDG PET/CT is now routinely used in radiation planning for several cancer types. However, 18 F-FDG PET/CT has low sensitivity for prostate cancer. Additional PET probes evaluated in prostate cancer include 18 F-sodium fluoride, 11 C-acetate, 11 C- or 18 F-choline, 18 F-fluciclovine, and 68 Ga- or 18 F-labeled ligands that bind prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA). PSMA ligands appear to be the most sensitive and specific but have not yet received Food and Drug Administration New Drug Application approval for use in the United States. Retrospective and prospective investigations suggest a potential major impact of PET/CT on prostate radiation treatment planning. Prospective trials randomizing patients to routine radiotherapy planning versus PET/CT-aided planning may show meaningful clinical outcomes. Prospective clinical trials evaluating the addition of 18 F-fluciclovine PET/CT for planning of salvage radiotherapy with clinical endpoints are under way. Prospective trials evaluating the clinical impact of PSMA PET/CT on prostate radiation planning are indicated. © 2018 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  1. Urethrography and ischial intertuberosity line in radiation therapy planning for prostate carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghi, Ahmad; Kuisk, Hans; Tran, Luu; St Royal, Leslie

    1996-01-01

    We analyzed our urethrography procedure regarding the validity of using the ischial tuberosity line (ITL) as the caudal margin of treatment portals for prostate carcinoma. The distances of the external urethral sphincter and the lowest margin of the opacified urinary bladder were analyzed in one hundred fifteen consecutive urethrograms. None showed the urethral sphincter to be caudal to the ITL. Ten percent of the sphincters were located less than 1.0 cm cephalad to the ITL, yielding inadequate treatment coverage if the ITL was relied on. Arbitrarily considering 2.0 cm or more of the urethral irradiation to be excessive, the use of the ITL would then have resulted in unnecessary normal tissue irradiation of 42.5%. The ITL should not be used as the caudal margin for prostate treatment portals. Variation in sphincter position, as also seen on lateral projections, reveal a need for urethrography as a necessary supplement to computed tomography to plan radiation portals for prostate cancer

  2. External beam radiotherapy for palliation of pain from metastatic carcinoma of the prostate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, R.C. Jr.; Hasan, S.M.; Jones, A.G.; Schlise, S.

    1982-01-01

    Radiotherapy often is used for palliation of bone pain from metastatic cancer of the prostate but an objective evaluation of its efficacy in a large series of patients is unavailable. We report the results of external beam irradiation in 62 patients who had bone pain secondary to stage D carcinoma of the prostate. The variables used to judge pain before and after radiotherapy included subjective evaluation of pain, status of activity and quantitation of analgesic use. Complete relief of pain was achieved in 26 patients (42 per cent), partial relief in 22 (35 per cent) and no relief in 14 (23 per cent). On the basis of our experience external beam irradiation is useful palliative therapy for pain from metastatic cancer of the prostate

  3. Assessment of gold grains implanted in the prostate during an external radiotherapy; Evaluation de la migration des grains d'or implantes dans la prostate au cours d'une radiotherapie externe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Udrescu, C.; De Bari, B.; Chapet, O. [Service de radiotherapie-oncologie, centre hospitalier Lyon Sud, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France); Udrescu, C.; Jalade, P.; Michel-Amadry, G. [Service de physique medicale, centre hospitalier Lyon Sud, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France); Rouviere, O. [Service de radiologie urologique, hopital Edouard-Herriot, 69 - Lyon (France); Ruffion, A. [Service d' urologie, centre hospitalier Lyon Sud, 69 - Pierre-Benite (France)

    2010-10-15

    Gold grains are frequently implanted in the prostate for a better localization of this organ during each irradiation session. However, the prostate repositioning can be influenced by a migration of these markers over weeks of treatment. Therefore the authors studied whether these gold grains might migrate between the first and last treatment sessions. Images have been acquired every day and marker coordinates have been recorded. The authors observed a low and almost constant reduction of distances between the three markers which would mean a prostate volume reduction rather than a marker migration. Short communication

  4. The effect of 90Sr/90Y β-rays on benign prostatic hyperplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Xiangbo; Ma Qingjie; Gu Xinquan

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of 90Sr/90Y β-rays on Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Methods: In order to carry out β intracavitary irradiation, the active area of the applicator was located into prostate gland section of urethra in 37 patients. The dose was controlled 30∼50Gy in each patient and the patients were observed for 3 months. Results: After two weeks 26 cases were remarkably improved, 7 cases were improved and 4 cases were ineffective. There was significant difference on MFR, PVR, I-PSS and volume of prostate gland before and after treatment (P<0.01=. Conclusion: Clinical tests indicate that the 90Sr/90Y prostatic hyperplasia applicators provide a safe, effective ,non-invasive and economical therapeutic method for BPH. It is especially applicable for old and high-risk patients. (authors)

  5. Portable {sup 90}SR/{sup 90}Y prostatic hyperplasia applicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Shanyu; Tang, Kejian; Zhou, Changling [China Institute of Atomic Energy (China); Li, Zhi [Zhelimumen Hospital (China)

    1998-07-01

    In order to seek a new method of curing the benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), two different kinds of {sup 9} {sup 0}Sr/9{sup 0}Y intracavity applicators, including a 'urethra-type' and a 'rectum-type', have been developed in China since 1991. The structural design and radiation characteristics of the {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y prostatic hyperplasia applicator are given in this paper. The hypertrophic prostate gland can be irradiated through the wall of the urethra or rectum by {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y beta rays and small quantity of bremsstrahlung radiation from the applicator. Clinical tests indicate that the {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y prostatic hyperplasia applicators provide a safe, effective, non-invasive and economical therapeutic method for BPH. It is especially applicable for old and high-risk patients. (author)

  6. [A case of prostate carcinosarcoma successfully treated with combined modality therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuoka, Takashi; Sugino, Yoshio; Kobayashi, Takashi; Terada, Naoki; Yamasaki, Toshinari; Matsui, Yoshiyuki; Imamura, Masaaki; Okubo, Kazutoshi; Kamba, Tomomi; Yoshimura, Koji; Ogawa, Osamu

    2013-11-01

    A 58-year-old man was referred to our hospital with dysuria and elevation of prostate specific antigen (38.0 ng/ml). Prostate surface was smooth and elastic hard on digital rectal examination. Transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) indicated irregular boundary and low echoic area of the prostate. Prostate biopsy specimen included the components of adenocarcinoma (Gleason score 9) and sarcoma. The tumor had extended to the rectum and metastasized to bilateral obturator lymph nodes and right ischial bone (cT4N1M1b). We started hormone therapy for the adenocarcinoma component followed by total pelvic exenteration with colostomy and ileal conduit diversion for the sarcoma component. In addition, pelvic cavity and the bone metastasis were irradiated. The patient was free of recurrence at four and a half years after surgery.

  7. The Role of Seminal Vesicle Motion in Target Margin Assessment for Online Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Jian; Wu Qiuwen; Yan Di

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: For patients with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer, the seminal vesicles (SVs) are included in the clinical target volume (CTV). The purposes of this study are to investigate interfraction motion characteristics of the SVs and determine proper margins for online computed tomography image guidance. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four patients, each with 16 daily helical computed tomography scans, were included in this study. A binary image mask was used for image registration to determine daily organ motion. Two online image-guided radiotherapy strategies (prostate only and prostate + SVs) were simulated in a hypofractionated scheme. Three margin designs were studied for both three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). In prostate-only guidance, Margin A was uniformly applied to the whole CTV, and Margin B was applied to the SVs with a fixed 3-mm prostate margin. In prostate plus SV guidance, Margin C was uniformly applied to the CTV. The minimum margins were sought to satisfy the criterion that minimum cumulative CTV dose be more than those of the planning target volume in the plan for greater than 95% of patients. Results: The prostate and SVs move significantly more in the anterior-posterior and superior-inferior than right-left directions. The anterior-posterior motion of the prostate and SVs correlated (R 2 = 0.7). The SVs move significantly more than the prostate. The minimum margins found were 2.5 mm for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy and 4.5, 4.5, and 3.0 mm for Margins A, B, and C for IMRT, respectively. Margins for IMRT were larger, but the irradiated volume and doses to critical structures were smaller. Minimum margins of 4.5 mm to the SVs and 3 mm to the prostate are recommended for IMRT with prostate-only guidance. Conclusions: The SVs move independently from the prostate gland, and additional margins are necessary for image-guided radiotherapy

  8. Transducers for providing an electrical signal representative of physical movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncombe, E.; Roach, P.F.

    1985-01-01

    A transducer for use in hostile environments has an externally threaded rod slidable in an internally threaded tube. The threads of rod and tube are of two-start form and define slots in which inductively coupled mineral insulated conductors are located, the conductors being of hairpin form secured at the ends of the rod and tube at the hairpin bend with the hairpin tails in the slots. End diaphragms make a sealed transducer in which the rod can move axially relative to the tube by one half of one pitch of the threads without straining the diaphragms. In a modification rod and tube are arranged to rotate relative to each other up to +-180 0 which effectively also causes a one half pitch movement of the conductors. (author)

  9. Modeling of Piezoelectric Energy Harvesting Using Cymbal Transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeoungwoo; Priya, Shashank; Uchino, Kenji

    2006-07-01

    This study reports the experimental and analytical results on a piezoelectric cymbal with 29 mm diameter and 1 mm thickness operating under force of 70 N in the frequency range of 10-200 Hz. It was found that the generated power increases with the frequency and around 100 mW can be harvested at frequency of 200 Hz across a 200 kΩ resistor. Power generation from the cymbal transducer was modeled by using the theory developed for the Belleville spring. The calculated results were found to be in good agreement with the experimental results. The results indicate that the metal-ceramic composite transducer “CYMBAL” is the most promising structure for harvesting the electric energy from automobile engine vibrations. The metal cap enhances the endurance of the ceramic to sustain high loads along with stress amplification.

  10. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers for medical imaging and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.; Oralkan, Ömer

    2011-05-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) have been subject to extensive research for the last two decades. Although they were initially developed for air-coupled applications, today their main application space is medical imaging and therapy. This paper first presents a brief description of CMUTs, their basic structure and operating principles. Our progression of developing several generations of fabrication processes is discussed with an emphasis on the advantages and disadvantages of each process. Monolithic and hybrid approaches for integrating CMUTs with supporting integrated circuits are surveyed. Several prototype transducer arrays with integrated front-end electronic circuits we developed and their use for 2D and 3D, anatomical and functional imaging, and ablative therapies are described. The presented results prove the CMUT as a micro-electro-mechanical systems technology for many medical diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

  11. Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers for medical imaging and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T; Oralkan, Ömer

    2011-01-01

    Capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) have been subject to extensive research for the last two decades. Although they were initially developed for air-coupled applications, today their main application space is medical imaging and therapy. This paper first presents a brief description of CMUTs, their basic structure and operating principles. Our progression of developing several generations of fabrication processes is discussed with an emphasis on the advantages and disadvantages of each process. Monolithic and hybrid approaches for integrating CMUTs with supporting integrated circuits are surveyed. Several prototype transducer arrays with integrated front-end electronic circuits we developed and their use for 2D and 3D, anatomical and functional imaging, and ablative therapies are described. The presented results prove the CMUT as a micro-electro-mechanical systems technology for many medical diagnostic and therapeutic applications

  12. Numerical calculations of ultrasonic fields. 1: Transducer near fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. A.

    1982-04-01

    A computer code for the calculation of linear acoustic wave propagation in homogeneous fluid and solid materials has been derived from the thermal hydraulics code STEALTH. The code uses finite difference techniques in a two dimensional mesh made up of arbitrarily shaped quadrilaterals. Problems with two dimensional plane strain or two dimensional axial symmetries can be solved. Free, fixed or stressed boundaries can be used. Transducers can be modeled by time dependent boundary conditions or by moving pistons. A brief description of the method is given and the results of the calculation of the near fields of circular flat and focused transducers are shown. These results agree with analytic theory along the axis of symmetry and with other codes that use a Huygens' reconstruction technique off axis.

  13. Electromechanical modelling of tapered ionic polymer metal composites transducers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesha Chandra Dash

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ionic polymer metal composites (IPMCs are relatively new smart materials that exhibit a bidirectional electromechanical coupling. IPMCs have large number of important engineering applications such as micro robotics, biomedical devices, biomimetic robotics etc. This paper presents a comparison between tapered and uniform cantilevered Nafion based IPMCs transducer. Electromechanical modelling is done for the tapered beam. Thickness can be varied according to the requirement of force and deflection. Numerical results pertaining to the force and deflection characteristics of both type IPMCs transducer are obtained. It is shown that the desired amount of force and deflections for tapered IPMCs can be achieved for a given voltage. Different fixed end (t0 and free end (t1 thickness values have been taken to justify the results using MATLAB.

  14. Transverse Oscillation Vector Velocity Estimation using a Phased Array Transducer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcher, Jønne; Pihl, Michael Johannes; Seerup, Gert

    2012-01-01

    greater than 100 mm. Tests at depths of 72 mm and 82 mm with a peak velocity of 0.5 m/s, showed a relative mean bias ~Bvx that varied from 0 % and to 21 % and a relative mean standard deviation ~vx that varied from 18 % and to 51 %. The investigation showed an increasing bias with respect to depth, which......The Transverse Oscillation method has shown its commercial feasibility, providing the user with 2D velocity information. Todays implementation on commercial ultrasound platforms only support linear array transducers and are limited in depth. Extending the implementation to a phased array transducer...... leaves room for optimization. Despite the bias, the method has shown to work and produce reliable results, and 2D velocity estimates are provided within the entire color-box down to a depth of more than 100 mm making vector velocity imaging possible in the entire heart....

  15. Optimization of large-scale fabrication of dielectric elastomer transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassouneh, Suzan Sager

    films. Currently, the films are contacted without adhesion, in order to yield double-sided corrugations, which in turn causes friction between the layers and thus reduces the lifespan of the transducer. Furthermore, air can be trapped in the interface, thereby causing a decrease in electrical breakdown...... electrodes on the corrugated surface, and due to these corrugated surfaces the metal electrodes maintain conductivities up to more than 100% strain of the elastomer film. The films are then laminated in multiple layers to fabricate DE transducers. However, the current manufacturing process is not trouble...... the PDMS surface through plasma treatment, which demonstrated that the laminates were slightly stiffer and more fragile in respect to tearing. The other route involved modifying the surfaces through plasma treatment and by adhering the layers, which showed to be a suitable method and allowed high...

  16. Transducer modeling and compensation in high-pressure dynamic calibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Chikun; Li, Yongxin

    2005-12-01

    When the RBF neural network is used to establish and compensate the transducer model, the numbers of cluster need to be given in advance by using Kohonen algorithm, the RLS algorithm is complicated and the computational burden is much heavier by using it to regulate the output weights. In order to overcome the weakness, a new approach is proposed. The cluster center is decided by the subtractive clustering, and LMS algorithm is used to regulate the output weights. The noise elimination with correlative threshold plus wavelet packet transformation is used to improve the SNR. The study result shows that the network structure is simple and astringency is fast, the modeling and compensation by using the new algorithm is effective to correct the nonlinear dynamic character of transducer, and noise elimination with correlative threshold plus wavelet packet transformation is superior to conventional noise elimination methods.

  17. Sensitivity limits of capacitive transducer for gravitational wave resonant antennas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bassan, M.; Pizzella, G. [Rome Tor Vergata Univ. (Italy). Dip. di Fisica

    1996-12-01

    It is analyzed the performance of a resonant gravitational wave antenna equipped with a resonant, d.c. biased capacitive transducer, an untuned superconducting matching circuit and a d.c. Squid. It is derived simple relations for the detector energy sensitivity that serve as guidelines for device development and it is shown that, with reasonable improvements in Squid technology, an effective temperature for burst detection of 2miK can be achieved.

  18. Characterization of HIFU transducers designed for sonochemistry application: Acoustic streaming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallez, L; Touyeras, F; Hihn, J-Y; Bailly, Y

    2016-03-01

    Cavitation distribution in a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound sonoreactors (HIFU) has been extensively described in the recent literature, including quantification by an optical method (Sonochemiluminescence SCL). The present paper provides complementary measurements through the study of acoustic streaming generated by the same kind of HIFU transducers. To this end, results of mass transfer measurements (electrodiffusional method) were compared to optical method ones (Particle Image Velocimetry). This last one was used in various configurations: with or without an electrode in the acoustic field in order to have the same perturbation of the wave propagation. Results show that the maximum velocity is not located at the focal but shifted near the transducer, and that this shift is greater for high powers. The two cavitation modes (stationary and moving bubbles) are greatly affect the hydrodynamic behavior of our sonoreactors: acoustic streaming and the fluid generated by bubble motion. The results obtained by electrochemical measurements show the same low hydrodynamic activity in the transducer vicinity, the same shift of the active focal toward the transducer, and the same absence of activity in the post-focal axial zone. The comparison with theoretical Eckart's velocities (acoustic streaming in non-cavitating media) confirms a very high activity at the "sonochemical focal", accounted for by wave distortion, which induced greater absorption coefficients. Moreover, the equivalent liquid velocities are one order of magnitude larger than the ones measured by PIV, confirming the enhancement of mass transfer by bubbles oscillation and collapse close to the surface, rather than from a pure streaming effect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Nonlinear electromechanical response of the ferroelectret ultrasonic transducers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Döring, J.; Bovtun, Viktor; Bartusch, J.; Erhard, A.; Kreutzbruck, M.; Yakymenko, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 100, č. 2 (2010), 479-485 ISSN 0947-8396 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP204/10/0616; GA ČR(CZ) GA202/09/0682 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : piezoelectric * ferroelectret * transducer * ultrasonic Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.765, year: 2010

  20. Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducers for Therapeutic Ultrasound Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Serena H.; Kupnik, Mario; Watkins, Ronald D.; Butts-Pauly, Kim; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound guided by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a noninvasive treatment that potentially reduces mortality, lowers medical costs, and widens accessibility of treatments for patients. Recent developments in the design and fabrication of capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs) have made them competitive with piezoelectric transducers for use in therapeutic ultrasound applications. In this paper, we present the first designs and prototypes of an 8-element, concentric-ring, CMUT array to treat upper abdominal cancers. This array was simulated and designed to focus 30–50 mm into tissue and ablate a 2–3 cm diameter tumor within 1 hour. Assuming a surface acoustic output pressure of 1 MPa peak to peak (8.5 W/cm2) at 2.5 MHz, we simulated an array that produced a focal intensity of 680 W/cm2 when focusing to 35 mm. CMUT cells were then designed to meet these frequency and surface acoustic intensity specifications. These cell designs were fabricated as 2.5 mm by 2.5 mm test transducers and used to verify our models. The test transducers were shown to operate at 2.5 MHz with an output pressure of 1.4 MPa peak to peak (16.3 W/cm2). With this CMUT cell design, we fabricated a full 8-element array. Due to yield issues, we only developed electronics to focus the four center elements of the array. The beam profile of the measured array deviated from the simulated because of crosstalk effects; the beamwidth matched within 10% and sidelobes increased by 2 times, which caused the measured gain to be 16.6 compared to 27.4. PMID:19628448