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Sample records for transcriptional regulatory function

  1. Matrix formalism to describe functional states of transcriptional regulatory systems.

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    Erwin P Gianchandani

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Complex regulatory networks control the transcription state of a genome. These transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs have been mathematically described using a Boolean formalism, in which the state of a gene is represented as either transcribed or not transcribed in response to regulatory signals. The Boolean formalism results in a series of regulatory rules for the individual genes of a TRN that in turn can be used to link environmental cues to the transcription state of a genome, thereby forming a complete transcriptional regulatory system (TRS. Herein, we develop a formalism that represents such a set of regulatory rules in a matrix form. Matrix formalism allows for the systemic characterization of the properties of a TRS and facilitates the computation of the transcriptional state of the genome under any given set of environmental conditions. Additionally, it provides a means to incorporate mechanistic detail of a TRS as it becomes available. In this study, the regulatory network matrix, R, for a prototypic TRS is characterized and the fundamental subspaces of this matrix are described. We illustrate how the matrix representation of a TRS coupled with its environment (R* allows for a sampling of all possible expression states of a given network, and furthermore, how the fundamental subspaces of the matrix provide a way to study key TRS features and may assist in experimental design.

  2. Transcriptional regulatory programs underlying barley germination and regulatory functions of Gibberellin and abscisic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Seed germination is a complex multi-stage developmental process, and mainly accomplished through concerted activities of many gene products and biological pathways that are often subjected to strict developmental regulation. Gibberellins (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA) are two key phytohormones regulating seed germination and seedling growth. However, transcriptional regulatory networks underlying seed germination and its associated biological pathways are largely unknown. Results The studies examined transcriptomes of barley representing six distinct and well characterized germination stages and revealed that the transcriptional regulatory program underlying barley germination was composed of early, late, and post-germination phases. Each phase was accompanied with transcriptional up-regulation of distinct biological pathways. Cell wall synthesis and regulatory components including transcription factors, signaling and post-translational modification components were specifically and transiently up-regulated in early germination phase while histone families and many metabolic pathways were up-regulated in late germination phase. Photosynthesis and seed reserve mobilization pathways were up-regulated in post-germination phase. However, stress related pathways and seed storage proteins were suppressed through the entire course of germination. A set of genes were transiently up-regulated within three hours of imbibition, and might play roles in initiating biological pathways involved in seed germination. However, highly abundant transcripts in dry barley and Arabidopsis seeds were significantly conserved. Comparison with transcriptomes of barley aleurone in response to GA and ABA identified three sets of germination responsive genes that were regulated coordinately by GA, antagonistically by ABA, and coordinately by GA but antagonistically by ABA. Major CHO metabolism, cell wall degradation and protein degradation pathways were up-regulated by both GA and seed

  3. Information processing in the transcriptional regulatory network of yeast: Functional robustness

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    Dehmer Matthias

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene networks are considered to represent various aspects of molecular biological systems meaningfully because they naturally provide a systems perspective of molecular interactions. In this respect, the functional understanding of the transcriptional regulatory network is considered as key to elucidate the functional organization of an organism. Results In this paper we study the functional robustness of the transcriptional regulatory network of S. cerevisiae. We model the information processing in the network as a first order Markov chain and study the influence of single gene perturbations on the global, asymptotic communication among genes. Modification in the communication is measured by an information theoretic measure allowing to predict genes that are 'fragile' with respect to single gene knockouts. Our results demonstrate that the predicted set of fragile genes contains a statistically significant enrichment of so called essential genes that are experimentally found to be necessary to ensure vital yeast. Further, a structural analysis of the transcriptional regulatory network reveals that there are significant differences between fragile genes, hub genes and genes with a high betweenness centrality value. Conclusion Our study does not only demonstrate that a combination of graph theoretical, information theoretical and statistical methods leads to meaningful biological results but also that such methods allow to study information processing in gene networks instead of just their structural properties.

  4. Stability and function of regulatory T cells expressing the transcription factor T-bet.

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    Levine, Andrew G; Mendoza, Alejandra; Hemmers, Saskia; Moltedo, Bruno; Niec, Rachel E; Schizas, Michail; Hoyos, Beatrice E; Putintseva, Ekaterina V; Chaudhry, Ashutosh; Dikiy, Stanislav; Fujisawa, Sho; Chudakov, Dmitriy M; Treuting, Piper M; Rudensky, Alexander Y

    2017-06-15

    Adaptive immune responses are tailored to different types of pathogens through differentiation of naive CD4 T cells into functionally distinct subsets of effector T cells (T helper 1 (T H 1), T H 2, and T H 17) defined by expression of the key transcription factors T-bet, GATA3, and RORγt, respectively. Regulatory T (T reg ) cells comprise a distinct anti-inflammatory lineage specified by the X-linked transcription factor Foxp3 (refs 2, 3). Paradoxically, some activated T reg cells express the aforementioned effector CD4 T cell transcription factors, which have been suggested to provide T reg cells with enhanced suppressive capacity. Whether expression of these factors in T reg cells-as in effector T cells-is indicative of heterogeneity of functionally discrete and stable differentiation states, or conversely may be readily reversible, is unknown. Here we demonstrate that expression of the T H 1-associated transcription factor T-bet in mouse T reg cells, induced at steady state and following infection, gradually becomes highly stable even under non-permissive conditions. Loss of function or elimination of T-bet-expressing T reg cells-but not of T-bet expression in T reg cells-resulted in severe T H 1 autoimmunity. Conversely, following depletion of T-bet - T reg cells, the remaining T-bet + cells specifically inhibited T H 1 and CD8 T cell activation consistent with their co-localization with T-bet + effector T cells. These results suggest that T-bet + T reg cells have an essential immunosuppressive function and indicate that T reg cell functional heterogeneity is a critical feature of immunological tolerance.

  5. Identification of direct regulatory targets of the transcription factor Sox10 based on function and conservation

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    Lee Sanghyuk

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sox10, a member of the Sry-related HMG-Box gene family, is a critical transcription factor for several important cell lineages, most notably the neural crest stem cells and the derivative peripheral glial cells and melanocytes. Thus far, only a handful of direct target genes are known for this transcription factor limiting our understanding of the biological network it governs. Results We describe identification of multiple direct regulatory target genes of Sox10 through a procedure based on function and conservation. By combining RNA interference technique and DNA microarray technology, we have identified a set of genes that show significant down-regulation upon introduction of Sox10 specific siRNA into Schwannoma cells. Subsequent comparative genomics analyses led to potential binding sites for Sox10 protein conserved across several mammalian species within the genomic region proximal to these genes. Multiple sites belonging to 4 different genes (proteolipid protein, Sox10, extracellular superoxide dismutase, and pleiotrophin were shown to directly interact with Sox10 by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. We further confirmed the direct regulation through the identified cis-element for one of the genes, extracellular superoxide dismutase, using electrophoretic mobility shift assay and reporter assay. Conclusion In sum, the process of combining differential expression profiling and comparative genomics successfully led to further defining the role of Sox10, a critical transcription factor for the development of peripheral glia. Our strategy utilizing relatively accessible techniques and tools should be applicable to studying the function of other transcription factors.

  6. Functional organization of an Mbp enhancer exposes striking transcriptional regulatory diversity within myelinating glia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dionne, Nancy; Dib, Samar; Finsen, Bente

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, large caliber axons are ensheathed by myelin, a glial specialization supporting axon integrity and conferring accelerated and energy-efficient action potential conduction. Myelin basic protein (MBP) is required for normal myelin elaboration with maximal mbp transcription...... regulatory element combinations were found to drive expression in oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells with a minimal 129 bp sequence conferring expression in oligodendrocytes throughout myelin elaboration, maintenance and repair. Unexpectedly, M3 derivatives conferred markedly different spatial and temporal...... expression programs thus illuminating striking transcriptional heterogeneity within post-mitotic oligodendrocytes. Finally, one M3 derivative engaged only during primary myelination, not during adult remyelination, demonstrating that transcriptional regulation in the two states is not equivalent. GLIA 2015....

  7. Transcription factor IRF8 controls Th1-like regulatory T-cell function.

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    Lee, Wonyong; Kim, Hyeong Su; Baek, Song Yi; Lee, Gap Ryol

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies have suggested that regulatory T (Treg) cells comprise a heterogeneous population that regulates various aspects of the immune response, and that Treg cells use the factors that are expressed in their target cells to regulate them. We searched for factors that regulate Th1 response in Treg cells using a meta-analysis. In the process, we discovered that transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 8 (IRF8) was selectively expressed in Treg and Th1 cells. IRF8-deficient Treg cells showed defective expression of CXCR3 and aberrant expression of the Il4 and Il17 genes. Upon treatment with alpha galactosyl-C18-ceramide (αGal-C18-Cer), IRF8-deficient mice showed defective Treg cell recruitment in the liver. Eliciting Th1 immune response by anti-CD40 antibody injection in mice induced IRF8 expression in Treg cells. The expression of IRF8 was induced by Foxp3 in Treg cells. IRF8 had no effect on T-bet expression in Treg and vice versa. Thus, our results strongly suggest that IRF8 controls Th1 immune response in Treg cells independent of T-bet.

  8. Functional footprinting of regulatory DNA.

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    Vierstra, Jeff; Reik, Andreas; Chang, Kai-Hsin; Stehling-Sun, Sandra; Zhou, Yuanyue; Hinkley, Sarah J; Paschon, David E; Zhang, Lei; Psatha, Nikoletta; Bendana, Yuri R; O'Neil, Colleen M; Song, Alexander H; Mich, Andrea K; Liu, Pei-Qi; Lee, Gary; Bauer, Daniel E; Holmes, Michael C; Orkin, Stuart H; Papayannopoulou, Thalia; Stamatoyannopoulos, George; Rebar, Edward J; Gregory, Philip D; Urnov, Fyodor D; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A

    2015-10-01

    Regulatory regions harbor multiple transcription factor (TF) recognition sites; however, the contribution of individual sites to regulatory function remains challenging to define. We describe an approach that exploits the error-prone nature of genome editing-induced double-strand break repair to map functional elements within regulatory DNA at nucleotide resolution. We demonstrate the approach on a human erythroid enhancer, revealing single TF recognition sites that gate the majority of downstream regulatory function.

  9. Transcriptional features of genomic regulatory blocks.

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    Akalin, Altuna; Fredman, David; Arner, Erik; Dong, Xianjun; Bryne, Jan Christian; Suzuki, Harukazu; Daub, Carsten O; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Lenhard, Boris

    2009-01-01

    Genomic regulatory blocks (GRBs) are chromosomal regions spanned by highly conserved non-coding elements (HCNEs), most of which serve as regulatory inputs of one target gene in the region. The target genes are most often transcription factors involved in embryonic development and differentiation. GRBs often contain extensive gene deserts, as well as additional 'bystander' genes intertwined with HCNEs but whose expression and function are unrelated to those of the target gene. The tight regulation of target genes, complex arrangement of regulatory inputs, and the differential responsiveness of genes in the region call for the examination of fundamental rules governing transcriptional activity in GRBs. Here we use extensive CAGE tag mapping of transcription start sites across different human tissues and differentiation stages combined with expression data and a number of sequence and epigenetic features to discover these rules and patterns. We show evidence that GRB target genes have properties that set them apart from their bystanders as well as other genes in the genome: longer CpG islands, a higher number and wider spacing of alternative transcription start sites, and a distinct composition of transcription factor binding sites in their core/proximal promoters. Target gene expression correlates with the acetylation state of HCNEs in the region. Additionally, target gene promoters have a distinct combination of activating and repressing histone modifications in mouse embryonic stem cell lines. GRB targets are genes with a number of unique features that are the likely cause of their ability to respond to regulatory inputs from very long distances.

  10. An NF-κB Transcription-Factor-Dependent Lineage-Specific Transcriptional Program Promotes Regulatory T Cell Identity and Function.

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    Oh, Hyunju; Grinberg-Bleyer, Yenkel; Liao, Will; Maloney, Dillon; Wang, Pingzhang; Wu, Zikai; Wang, Jiguang; Bhatt, Dev M; Heise, Nicole; Schmid, Roland M; Hayden, Matthew S; Klein, Ulf; Rabadan, Raul; Ghosh, Sankar

    2017-09-19

    Both conventional T (Tconv) cells and regulatory T (Treg) cells are activated through ligation of the T cell receptor (TCR) complex, leading to the induction of the transcription factor NF-κB. In Tconv cells, NF-κB regulates expression of genes essential for T cell activation, proliferation, and function. However the role of NF-κB in Treg function remains unclear. We conditionally deleted canonical NF-κB members p65 and c-Rel in developing and mature Treg cells and found they have unique but partially redundant roles. c-Rel was critical for thymic Treg development while p65 was essential for mature Treg identity and maintenance of immune tolerance. Transcriptome and NF-κB p65 binding analyses demonstrated a lineage specific, NF-κB-dependent transcriptional program, enabled by enhanced chromatin accessibility. These dual roles of canonical NF-κB in Tconv and Treg cells highlight the functional plasticity of the NF-κB signaling pathway and underscores the need for more selective strategies to therapeutically target NF-κB. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5 (STAT5) paralog dose governs T cell effector and regulatory functions

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    Villarino, Alejandro; Laurence, Arian; Robinson, Gertraud W; Bonelli, Michael; Dema, Barbara; Afzali, Behdad; Shih, Han-Yu; Sun, Hong-Wei; Brooks, Stephen R; Hennighausen, Lothar; Kanno, Yuka; O'Shea, John J

    2016-01-01

    The transcription factor STAT5 is fundamental to the mammalian immune system. However, the relationship between its two paralogs, STAT5A and STAT5B, and the extent to which they are functionally distinct, remain uncertain. Using mouse models of paralog deficiency, we demonstrate that they are not equivalent for CD4+ 'helper' T cells, the principal orchestrators of adaptive immunity. Instead, we find that STAT5B is dominant for both effector and regulatory (Treg) responses and, therefore, uniquely necessary for immunological tolerance. Comparative analysis of genomic distribution and transcriptomic output confirm that STAT5B has fargreater impact but, surprisingly, the data point towards asymmetric expression (i.e. paralog dose), rather than distinct functional properties, as the key distinguishing feature. Thus, we propose a quantitative model of STAT5 paralog activity whereby relative abundance imposes functional specificity (or dominance) in the face of widespread structural homology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08384.001 PMID:26999798

  12. Transcription regulatory networks analysis using CAGE

    KAUST Repository

    Tegnér, Jesper N.

    2009-10-01

    Mapping out cellular networks in general and transcriptional networks in particular has proved to be a bottle-neck hampering our understanding of biological processes. Integrative approaches fusing computational and experimental technologies for decoding transcriptional networks at a high level of resolution is therefore of uttermost importance. Yet, this is challenging since the control of gene expression in eukaryotes is a complex multi-level process influenced by several epigenetic factors and the fine interplay between regulatory proteins and the promoter structure governing the combinatorial regulation of gene expression. In this chapter we review how the CAGE data can be integrated with other measurements such as expression, physical interactions and computational prediction of regulatory motifs, which together can provide a genome-wide picture of eukaryotic transcriptional regulatory networks at a new level of resolution. © 2010 by Pan Stanford Publishing Pte. Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Regulatory and Functional Connection of Microphthalmia-Associated Transcription Factor and Anti-Metastatic Pigment Epithelium Derived Factor in Melanoma

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    Asunción Fernández-Barral

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF, a member of the serine protease inhibitor superfamily, has potent anti-metastatic effects in cutaneous melanoma through its direct actions on endothelial and melanoma cells. Here we show that PEDF expression positively correlates with microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF in melanoma cell lines and human samples. High PEDF and MITF expression is characteristic of low aggressive melanomas classified according to molecular and pathological criteria, whereas both factors are decreased in senescent melanocytes and naevi. Importantly, MITF silencing down-regulates PEDF expression in melanoma cell lines and primary melanocytes, suggesting that the correlation in the expression reflects a causal relationship. In agreement, analysis of Chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to high throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq data sets revealed three MITF binding regions within the first intron of SERPINF1, and reporter assays demonstrated that the binding of MITF to these regions is sufficient to drive transcription. Finally, we demonstrate that exogenous PEDF expression efficiently halts in vitro migration and invasion, as well as in vivo dissemination of melanoma cells induced by MITF silencing. In summary, these results identify PEDF as a novel transcriptional target of MITF and support a relevant functional role for the MITF-PEDF axis in the biology of melanoma.

  14. The NF-κB transcription factor RelA is required for the tolerogenic function of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells.

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    Messina, Nicole; Fulford, Thomas; O'Reilly, Lorraine; Loh, Wen Xian; Motyer, Jessica M; Ellis, Darcy; McLean, Catriona; Naeem, Haroon; Lin, Ann; Gugasyan, Raffi; Slattery, Robyn M; Grumont, Raelene J; Gerondakis, Steve

    2016-06-01

    The properties of CD4(+) regulatory T cell (Treg) subsets are dictated by distinct patterns of gene expression determined by FOXP3 and different combinations of various transcription factors. Here we show the NF-κB transcription factor RelA is constitutively active in naïve and effector Tregs. The conditional inactivation of Rela in murine FOXP3(+) cells induces a rapid onset, multi-focal autoimmune disease that depends on RelA being expressed in conventional T cells. In addition to promoting Treg lineage stability, RelA determines the size of the effector Treg population, a function influenced by the presence or absence of RelA in conventional T cells. These findings showing that RelA controls Treg stability and promotes the competitive fitness of effector Tregs highlight the importance of RelA activity in peripheral Treg induced tolerance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Unraveling condition specific gene transcriptional regulatory networks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    Kluger Yuval

    2006-03-01

    's transcriptional regulatory sub-network. Sparse representation of the Alon's network where column one represents the TF and column two represents the target. Entry of 1(2 corresponds to activation (suppression Click here for file Additional File 5 The Union of Alon's and Palsson's transcriptional regulatory sub-networks. Sparse representation of this unified network where column one represents the TF and column two represents the target. Entry of 1(2 corresponds to activation (suppression Click here for file Additional File 6 Predicted transcriptional regulatory links obtained by applying the LINK model to Alon's network. Each link is accompanied by a list of experiments in which it is likely to be functional. Click here for file Additional File 7 Predicted transcriptional regulatory links obtained by applying the LINK model to the combined network obtained by unifying Alon's and Palsson's networks. Each link is accompanied by a list of experiments in which it is likely to be functional. Click here for file Additional File 8 Predicted transcriptional regulatory links obtained by applying the STAR model to Alon's network. Each link is accompanied by a list of experiments in which it is likely to be functional. Click here for file Additional File 9 Predicted transcriptional regulatory links obtained by applying the STAR model to the combined network obtained by unifying Alon's and Palsson's networks. Each link is accompanied by a list of experiments in which it is likely to be functional. Click here for file Additional File 10 Exploring the parameter space. Overlap between our condition specific predicted networks and condition specific ChIP-on-chip data. Click here for file

  16. Global analysis of photosynthesis transcriptional regulatory networks.

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    Saheed Imam

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis is a crucial biological process that depends on the interplay of many components. This work analyzed the gene targets for 4 transcription factors: FnrL, PrrA, CrpK and MppG (RSP_2888, which are known or predicted to control photosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq identified 52 operons under direct control of FnrL, illustrating its regulatory role in photosynthesis, iron homeostasis, nitrogen metabolism and regulation of sRNA synthesis. Using global gene expression analysis combined with ChIP-seq, we mapped the regulons of PrrA, CrpK and MppG. PrrA regulates ∼34 operons encoding mainly photosynthesis and electron transport functions, while CrpK, a previously uncharacterized Crp-family protein, regulates genes involved in photosynthesis and maintenance of iron homeostasis. Furthermore, CrpK and FnrL share similar DNA binding determinants, possibly explaining our observation of the ability of CrpK to partially compensate for the growth defects of a ΔFnrL mutant. We show that the Rrf2 family protein, MppG, plays an important role in photopigment biosynthesis, as part of an incoherent feed-forward loop with PrrA. Our results reveal a previously unrealized, high degree of combinatorial regulation of photosynthetic genes and significant cross-talk between their transcriptional regulators, while illustrating previously unidentified links between photosynthesis and the maintenance of iron homeostasis.

  17. Global Analysis of Photosynthesis Transcriptional Regulatory Networks

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    Imam, Saheed; Noguera, Daniel R.; Donohue, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthesis is a crucial biological process that depends on the interplay of many components. This work analyzed the gene targets for 4 transcription factors: FnrL, PrrA, CrpK and MppG (RSP_2888), which are known or predicted to control photosynthesis in Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) identified 52 operons under direct control of FnrL, illustrating its regulatory role in photosynthesis, iron homeostasis, nitrogen metabolism and regulation of sRNA synthesis. Using global gene expression analysis combined with ChIP-seq, we mapped the regulons of PrrA, CrpK and MppG. PrrA regulates ∼34 operons encoding mainly photosynthesis and electron transport functions, while CrpK, a previously uncharacterized Crp-family protein, regulates genes involved in photosynthesis and maintenance of iron homeostasis. Furthermore, CrpK and FnrL share similar DNA binding determinants, possibly explaining our observation of the ability of CrpK to partially compensate for the growth defects of a ΔFnrL mutant. We show that the Rrf2 family protein, MppG, plays an important role in photopigment biosynthesis, as part of an incoherent feed-forward loop with PrrA. Our results reveal a previously unrealized, high degree of combinatorial regulation of photosynthetic genes and significant cross-talk between their transcriptional regulators, while illustrating previously unidentified links between photosynthesis and the maintenance of iron homeostasis. PMID:25503406

  18. A stochastic differential equation model for transcriptional regulatory networks

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    Quirk Michelle D

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This work explores the quantitative characteristics of the local transcriptional regulatory network based on the availability of time dependent gene expression data sets. The dynamics of the gene expression level are fitted via a stochastic differential equation model, yielding a set of specific regulators and their contribution. Results We show that a beta sigmoid function that keeps track of temporal parameters is a novel prototype of a regulatory function, with the effect of improving the performance of the profile prediction. The stochastic differential equation model follows well the dynamic of the gene expression levels. Conclusion When adapted to biological hypotheses and combined with a promoter analysis, the method proposed here leads to improved models of the transcriptional regulatory networks.

  19. Latency of transcription factor Stp1 depends on a modular regulatory motif that functions as cytoplasmic retention determinant and nuclear degron

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    Omnus, Deike J.; Ljungdahl, Per O.

    2014-01-01

    The Ssy1-Ptr3-Ssy5 (SPS)–sensing pathway enables yeast to respond to extracellular amino acids. Stp1, the effector transcription factor, is synthesized as a latent cytoplasmic precursor with an N-terminal regulatory domain that restricts its nuclear accumulation. The negative regulatory mechanisms impinging on the N-terminal domain are poorly understood. However, Stp1 latency depends on three inner nuclear membrane proteins, Asi1, Asi2, and Asi3. We report that the N-terminal domain of Stp1 contains a small motif, designated RI, that fully accounts for latency. RI is modular, mediates interactions with the plasma membrane, and can retain histone Htb2 in the cytoplasm. A novel class of STP1 mutations affecting RI were isolated that are less efficiently retained in the cytoplasm but remain under tight negative control by the Asi proteins. Intriguingly, these mutant proteins exhibit enhanced stability in strains lacking ASI1. Our results indicate that RI mediates latency by two distinct activities: it functions as a cytoplasmic retention determinant and an Asi-dependent degron. These findings provide novel insights into the SPS-sensing pathway and demonstrate for the first time that the inner nuclear membrane Asi proteins function in a degradation pathway in the nucleus. PMID:25253722

  20. In silico discovery of transcription regulatory elements in Plasmodium falciparum

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    Le Roch Karine G

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the sequence of the Plasmodium falciparum genome and several global mRNA and protein life cycle expression profiling projects now completed, elucidating the underlying networks of transcriptional control important for the progression of the parasite life cycle is highly pertinent to the development of new anti-malarials. To date, relatively little is known regarding the specific mechanisms the parasite employs to regulate gene expression at the mRNA level, with studies of the P. falciparum genome sequence having revealed few cis-regulatory elements and associated transcription factors. Although it is possible the parasite may evoke mechanisms of transcriptional control drastically different from those used by other eukaryotic organisms, the extreme AT-rich nature of P. falciparum intergenic regions (~90% AT presents significant challenges to in silico cis-regulatory element discovery. Results We have developed an algorithm called Gene Enrichment Motif Searching (GEMS that uses a hypergeometric-based scoring function and a position-weight matrix optimization routine to identify with high-confidence regulatory elements in the nucleotide-biased and repeat sequence-rich P. falciparum genome. When applied to promoter regions of genes contained within 21 co-expression gene clusters generated from P. falciparum life cycle microarray data using the semi-supervised clustering algorithm Ontology-based Pattern Identification, GEMS identified 34 putative cis-regulatory elements associated with a variety of parasite processes including sexual development, cell invasion, antigenic variation and protein biosynthesis. Among these candidates were novel motifs, as well as many of the elements for which biological experimental evidence already exists in the Plasmodium literature. To provide evidence for the biological relevance of a cell invasion-related element predicted by GEMS, reporter gene and electrophoretic mobility shift assays

  1. Identification of active transcriptional regulatory elements with GRO-seq

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    Danko, Charles G.; Hyland, Stephanie L.; Core, Leighton J.; Martins, Andre L.; Waters, Colin T; Lee, Hyung Won; Cheung, Vivian G.; Kraus, W. Lee; Lis, John T.; Siepel, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional regulatory elements (TREs), including enhancers and promoters, determine the transcription levels of associated genes. We have recently shown that global run-on and sequencing (GRO-seq) with enrichment for 5'-capped RNAs reveals active TREs with high accuracy. Here, we demonstrate that active TREs can be identified by applying sensitive machine-learning methods to standard GRO-seq data. This approach allows TREs to be assayed together with gene expression levels and other transcriptional features in a single experiment. Our prediction method, called discriminative Regulatory Element detection from GRO-seq (dREG), summarizes GRO-seq read counts at multiple scales and uses support vector regression to identify active TREs. The predicted TREs are more strongly enriched for several marks of transcriptional activation, including eQTL, GWAS-associated SNPs, H3K27ac, and transcription factor binding than those identified by alternative functional assays. Using dREG, we survey TREs in eight human cell types and provide new insights into global patterns of TRE function. PMID:25799441

  2. Interrogating transcriptional regulatory sequences in Tol2-mediated Xenopus transgenics.

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    Gabriela G Loots

    Full Text Available Identifying gene regulatory elements and their target genes in vertebrates remains a significant challenge. It is now recognized that transcriptional regulatory sequences are critical in orchestrating dynamic controls of tissue-specific gene expression during vertebrate development and in adult tissues, and that these elements can be positioned at great distances in relation to the promoters of the genes they control. While significant progress has been made in mapping DNA binding regions by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation and next generation sequencing, functional validation remains a limiting step in improving our ability to correlate in silico predictions with biological function. We recently developed a computational method that synergistically combines genome-wide gene-expression profiling, vertebrate genome comparisons, and transcription factor binding-site analysis to predict tissue-specific enhancers in the human genome. We applied this method to 270 genes highly expressed in skeletal muscle and predicted 190 putative cis-regulatory modules. Furthermore, we optimized Tol2 transgenic constructs in Xenopus laevis to interrogate 20 of these elements for their ability to function as skeletal muscle-specific transcriptional enhancers during embryonic development. We found 45% of these elements expressed only in the fast muscle fibers that are oriented in highly organized chevrons in the Xenopus laevis tadpole. Transcription factor binding site analysis identified >2 Mef2/MyoD sites within ~200 bp regions in 6 of the validated enhancers, and systematic mutagenesis of these sites revealed that they are critical for the enhancer function. The data described herein introduces a new reporter system suitable for interrogating tissue-specific cis-regulatory elements which allows monitoring of enhancer activity in real time, throughout early stages of embryonic development, in Xenopus.

  3. Iterative reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks: an algorithmic approach.

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    Christian L Barrett

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The number of complete, publicly available genome sequences is now greater than 200, and this number is expected to rapidly grow in the near future as metagenomic and environmental sequencing efforts escalate and the cost of sequencing drops. In order to make use of this data for understanding particular organisms and for discerning general principles about how organisms function, it will be necessary to reconstruct their various biochemical reaction networks. Principal among these will be transcriptional regulatory networks. Given the physical and logical complexity of these networks, the various sources of (often noisy data that can be utilized for their elucidation, the monetary costs involved, and the huge number of potential experiments approximately 10(12 that can be performed, experiment design algorithms will be necessary for synthesizing the various computational and experimental data to maximize the efficiency of regulatory network reconstruction. This paper presents an algorithm for experimental design to systematically and efficiently reconstruct transcriptional regulatory networks. It is meant to be applied iteratively in conjunction with an experimental laboratory component. The algorithm is presented here in the context of reconstructing transcriptional regulation for metabolism in Escherichia coli, and, through a retrospective analysis with previously performed experiments, we show that the produced experiment designs conform to how a human would design experiments. The algorithm is able to utilize probability estimates based on a wide range of computational and experimental sources to suggest experiments with the highest potential of discovering the greatest amount of new regulatory knowledge.

  4. Learning transcriptional regulatory relationships using sparse graphical models.

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    Xiang Zhang

    Full Text Available Understanding the organization and function of transcriptional regulatory networks by analyzing high-throughput gene expression profiles is a key problem in computational biology. The challenges in this work are 1 the lack of complete knowledge of the regulatory relationship between the regulators and the associated genes, 2 the potential for spurious associations due to confounding factors, and 3 the number of parameters to learn is usually larger than the number of available microarray experiments. We present a sparse (L1 regularized graphical model to address these challenges. Our model incorporates known transcription factors and introduces hidden variables to represent possible unknown transcription and confounding factors. The expression level of a gene is modeled as a linear combination of the expression levels of known transcription factors and hidden factors. Using gene expression data covering 39,296 oligonucleotide probes from 1109 human liver samples, we demonstrate that our model better predicts out-of-sample data than a model with no hidden variables. We also show that some of the gene sets associated with hidden variables are strongly correlated with Gene Ontology categories. The software including source code is available at http://grnl1.codeplex.com.

  5. Transcription factor trapping by RNA in gene regulatory elements.

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    Sigova, Alla A; Abraham, Brian J; Ji, Xiong; Molinie, Benoit; Hannett, Nancy M; Guo, Yang Eric; Jangi, Mohini; Giallourakis, Cosmas C; Sharp, Phillip A; Young, Richard A

    2015-11-20

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind specific sequences in promoter-proximal and -distal DNA elements to regulate gene transcription. RNA is transcribed from both of these DNA elements, and some DNA binding TFs bind RNA. Hence, RNA transcribed from regulatory elements may contribute to stable TF occupancy at these sites. We show that the ubiquitously expressed TF Yin-Yang 1 (YY1) binds to both gene regulatory elements and their associated RNA species across the entire genome. Reduced transcription of regulatory elements diminishes YY1 occupancy, whereas artificial tethering of RNA enhances YY1 occupancy at these elements. We propose that RNA makes a modest but important contribution to the maintenance of certain TFs at gene regulatory elements and suggest that transcription of regulatory elements produces a positive-feedback loop that contributes to the stability of gene expression programs. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. FOXA and master transcription factors recruit Mediator and Cohesin to the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Michèle; Bourriquen, Gaëlle; Lamaze, Fabien C.; Côté, Maxime C.; Fournier, Éric; Joly-Beauparlant, Charles; Caron, Vicky; Gobeil, Stéphane; Droit, Arnaud; Bilodeau, Steve

    2016-10-01

    Controlling the transcriptional program is essential to maintain the identity and the biological functions of a cell. The Mediator and Cohesin complexes have been established as central cofactors controlling the transcriptional program in normal cells. However, the distribution, recruitment and importance of these complexes in cancer cells have not been fully investigated. Here we show that FOXA and master transcription factors are part of the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of cancer cells and are essential to recruit M ediator and Cohesin. Indeed, Mediator and Cohesin occupied the enhancer and promoter regions of actively transcribed genes and maintained the proliferation and colony forming potential. Through integration of publically available ChIP-Seq datasets, we predicted the core transcriptional regulatory circuitry of each cancer cell. Unexpectedly, for all cells investigated, the pioneer transcription factors FOXA1 and/or FOXA2 were identified in addition to cell-specific master transcription factors. Loss of both types of transcription factors phenocopied the loss of Mediator and Cohesin. Lastly, the master and pioneer transcription factors were essential to recruit Mediator and Cohesin to regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes. Our study proposes that maintenance of the cancer cell state is dependent on recruitment of Mediator and Cohesin through FOXA and master transcription factors.

  7. Identification of germline transcriptional regulatory elements in Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, Omar S.; Papathanos, Philippos A.; Sandler, Jeremy E.; Kennedy, Katie; Hay, Bruce A.

    2014-02-01

    The mosquito Aedes aegypti is the principal vector for the yellow fever and dengue viruses, and is also responsible for recent outbreaks of the alphavirus chikungunya. Vector control strategies utilizing engineered gene drive systems are being developed as a means of replacing wild, pathogen transmitting mosquitoes with individuals refractory to disease transmission, or bringing about population suppression. Several of these systems, including Medea, UDMEL, and site-specific nucleases, which can be used to drive genes into populations or bring about population suppression, utilize transcriptional regulatory elements that drive germline-specific expression. Here we report the identification of multiple regulatory elements able to drive gene expression specifically in the female germline, or in the male and female germline, in the mosquito Aedes aegypti. These elements can also be used as tools with which to probe the roles of specific genes in germline function and in the early embryo, through overexpression or RNA interference.

  8. Transcriptional Regulatory Network Analysis of MYB Transcription Factor Family Genes in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smita, Shuchi; Katiyar, Amit; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Pandey, Dev M; Bansal, Kailash C

    2015-01-01

    MYB transcription factor (TF) is one of the largest TF families and regulates defense responses to various stresses, hormone signaling as well as many metabolic and developmental processes in plants. Understanding these regulatory hierarchies of gene expression networks in response to developmental and environmental cues is a major challenge due to the complex interactions between the genetic elements. Correlation analyses are useful to unravel co-regulated gene pairs governing biological process as well as identification of new candidate hub genes in response to these complex processes. High throughput expression profiling data are highly useful for construction of co-expression networks. In the present study, we utilized transcriptome data for comprehensive regulatory network studies of MYB TFs by "top-down" and "guide-gene" approaches. More than 50% of OsMYBs were strongly correlated under 50 experimental conditions with 51 hub genes via "top-down" approach. Further, clusters were identified using Markov Clustering (MCL). To maximize the clustering performance, parameter evaluation of the MCL inflation score (I) was performed in terms of enriched GO categories by measuring F-score. Comparison of co-expressed cluster and clads analyzed from phylogenetic analysis signifies their evolutionarily conserved co-regulatory role. We utilized compendium of known interaction and biological role with Gene Ontology enrichment analysis to hypothesize function of coexpressed OsMYBs. In the other part, the transcriptional regulatory network analysis by "guide-gene" approach revealed 40 putative targets of 26 OsMYB TF hubs with high correlation value utilizing 815 microarray data. The putative targets with MYB-binding cis-elements enrichment in their promoter region, functional co-occurrence as well as nuclear localization supports our finding. Specially, enrichment of MYB binding regions involved in drought-inducibility implying their regulatory role in drought response in rice

  9. Transcriptional Regulatory Network Analysis of MYB Transcription Factor Family Genes in Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuchi eSmita

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available MYB transcription factor (TF is one of the largest TF families and regulates defense responses to various stresses, hormone signaling as well as many metabolic and developmental processes in plants. Understanding these regulatory hierarchies of gene expression networks in response to developmental and environmental cues is a major challenge due to the complex interactions between the genetic elements. Correlation analyses are useful to unravel co-regulated gene pairs governing biological process as well as identification of new candidate hub genes in response to these complex processes. High throughput expression profiling data are highly useful for construction of co-expression networks. In the present study, we utilized transcriptome data for comprehensive regulatory network studies of MYB TFs by top down and guide gene approaches. More than 50% of OsMYBs were strongly correlated under fifty experimental conditions with 51 hub genes via top down approach. Further, clusters were identified using Markov Clustering (MCL. To maximize the clustering performance, parameter evaluation of the MCL inflation score (I was performed in terms of enriched GO categories by measuring F-score. Comparison of co-expressed cluster and clads analyzed from phylogenetic analysis signifies their evolutionarily conserved co-regulatory role. We utilized compendium of known interaction and biological role with Gene Ontology enrichment analysis to hypothesize function of coexpressed OsMYBs. In the other part, the transcriptional regulatory network analysis by guide gene approach revealed 40 putative targets of 26 OsMYB TF hubs with high correlation value utilizing 815 microarray data. The putative targets with MYB-binding cis-elements enrichment in their promoter region, functional co-occurrence as well as nuclear localization supports our finding. Specially, enrichment of MYB binding regions involved in drought-inducibility implying their regulatory role in drought

  10. Inferring a transcription regulatory network by directed perturbation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sameith, K.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription plays a key role in cellular processes and its regulation is of paramount importance. The aim of the work described in this thesis is to study the transcription regulatory network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, employing genome-wide approaches. All the three presented research studies

  11. Transcription-factor-dependent enhancer transcription defines a gene regulatory network for cardiac rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinan H; Nadadur, Rangarajan D; Hilvering, Catharina Re; Bianchi, Valerio; Werner, Michael; Mazurek, Stefan R; Gadek, Margaret; Shen, Kaitlyn M; Goldman, Joseph Aaron; Tyan, Leonid; Bekeny, Jenna; Hall, Johnathon M; Lee, Nutishia; Perez-Cervantes, Carlos; Burnicka-Turek, Ozanna; Poss, Kenneth D; Weber, Christopher R; de Laat, Wouter; Ruthenburg, Alexander J; Moskowitz, Ivan P

    2017-12-27

    The noncoding genome is pervasively transcribed. Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) generated from enhancers have been proposed as a general facet of enhancer function and some have been shown to be required for enhancer activity. Here we examine the transcription-factor-(TF)-dependence of ncRNA expression to define enhancers and enhancer-associated ncRNAs that are involved in a TF-dependent regulatory network. TBX5, a cardiac TF, regulates a network of cardiac channel genes to maintain cardiac rhythm. We deep sequenced wildtype and Tbx5 -mutant mouse atria, identifying ~2600 novel Tbx5 -dependent ncRNAs. Tbx5-dependent ncRNAs were enriched for tissue-specific marks of active enhancers genome-wide. Tbx5-dependent ncRNAs emanated from regions that are enriched for TBX5-binding and that demonstrated Tbx5-dependent enhancer activity. Tbx5 -dependent ncRNA transcription provided a quantitative metric of Tbx5 -dependent enhancer activity, correlating with target gene expression. We identified RACER , a novel Tbx5 -dependent long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) required for the expression of the calcium-handling gene Ryr2 . We illustrate that TF-dependent enhancer transcription can illuminate components of TF-dependent gene regulatory networks.

  12. Conserved Transcriptional Regulatory Programs Underlying Rice and Barley Germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Li; Tian, Shulan; Kaeppler, Shawn; Liu, Zongrang; An, Yong-Qiang (Charles)

    2014-01-01

    Germination is a biological process important to plant development and agricultural production. Barley and rice diverged 50 million years ago, but share a similar germination process. To gain insight into the conservation of their underlying gene regulatory programs, we compared transcriptomes of barley and rice at start, middle and end points of germination, and revealed that germination regulated barley and rice genes (BRs) diverged significantly in expression patterns and/or protein sequences. However, BRs with higher protein sequence similarity tended to have more conserved expression patterns. We identified and characterized 316 sets of conserved barley and rice genes (cBRs) with high similarity in both protein sequences and expression patterns, and provided a comprehensive depiction of the transcriptional regulatory program conserved in barley and rice germination at gene, pathway and systems levels. The cBRs encoded proteins involved in a variety of biological pathways and had a wide range of expression patterns. The cBRs encoding key regulatory components in signaling pathways often had diverse expression patterns. Early germination up-regulation of cell wall metabolic pathway and peroxidases, and late germination up-regulation of chromatin structure and remodeling pathways were conserved in both barley and rice. Protein sequence and expression pattern of a gene change quickly if it is not subjected to a functional constraint. Preserving germination-regulated expression patterns and protein sequences of those cBRs for 50 million years strongly suggests that the cBRs are functionally significant and equivalent in germination, and contribute to the ancient characteristics of germination preserved in barley and rice. The functional significance and equivalence of the cBR genes predicted here can serve as a foundation to further characterize their biological functions and facilitate bridging rice and barley germination research with greater confidence. PMID

  13. A unified architecture of transcriptional regulatory elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Robin; Sandelin, Albin Gustav; Danko, Charles G.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression is precisely controlled in time and space through the integration of signals that act at gene promoters and gene-distal enhancers. Classically, promoters and enhancers are considered separate classes of regulatory elements, often distinguished by histone modifications. However, re...

  14. DNA residence time is a regulatory factor of transcription repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauß, Karen; Popp, Achim P; Schulze, Lena; Hettich, Johannes; Reisser, Matthias; Escoter Torres, Laura; Uhlenhaut, N Henriette; Gebhardt, J Christof M

    2017-11-02

    Transcription comprises a highly regulated sequence of intrinsically stochastic processes, resulting in bursts of transcription intermitted by quiescence. In transcription activation or repression, a transcription factor binds dynamically to DNA, with a residence time unique to each factor. Whether the DNA residence time is important in the transcription process is unclear. Here, we designed a series of transcription repressors differing in their DNA residence time by utilizing the modular DNA binding domain of transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) and varying the number of nucleotide-recognizing repeat domains. We characterized the DNA residence times of our repressors in living cells using single molecule tracking. The residence times depended non-linearly on the number of repeat domains and differed by more than a factor of six. The factors provoked a residence time-dependent decrease in transcript level of the glucocorticoid receptor-activated gene SGK1. Down regulation of transcription was due to a lower burst frequency in the presence of long binding repressors and is in accordance with a model of competitive inhibition of endogenous activator binding. Our single molecule experiments reveal transcription factor DNA residence time as a regulatory factor controlling transcription repression and establish TALE-DNA binding domains as tools for the temporal dissection of transcription regulation. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Controllability analysis of transcriptional regulatory networks reveals circular control patterns among transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Österlund, Tobias; Bordel, Sergio; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    we analyze the topology and organization of nine transcriptional regulatory networks for E. coli, yeast, mouse and human, and we evaluate how the structure of these networks influences two of their key properties, namely controllability and stability. We calculate the controllability for each network......Transcriptional regulation is the most committed type of regulation in living cells where transcription factors (TFs) control the expression of their target genes and TF expression is controlled by other TFs forming complex transcriptional regulatory networks that can be highly interconnected. Here...... as a measure of the organization and interconnectivity of the network. We find that the number of driver nodes n(D) needed to control the whole network is 64% of the TFs in the E. coli transcriptional regulatory network in contrast to only 17% for the yeast network, 4% for the mouse network and 8...

  16. Characterization of transcriptional regulatory domains of ankyrin repeat cofactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Aihua; Li, Chia-Wei; Chen, J. Don

    2007-01-01

    The ankyrin repeats cofactor-1 (ANCO-1) was recently identified as a p160 coactivator-interacting protein that may inhibit transcriptional activity of nuclear receptors. Here, we have characterized the transcriptional regulatory domains of ANCO-1. Two intrinsic repression domains (RD) were identified: an N-terminal RD1 at residues 318-611 and a C-terminal RD2 at 2369-2663. ANCO-1 also contains an activation domain (AD) capable of stimulating transcription in both mammalian and yeast cells. The minimal AD was delimited to a 70-amino acid region at residues 2076-2145. Overall, full-length ANCO-1 exhibited transcriptional repressor activity, suggesting that RD domains may suppress the AD activity. We further demonstrated that ANCO-1 silencing by siRNA enhanced progesterone receptor-mediated transcription. Together, these results indicate that the transcriptional potential of ANCO-1 may be modulated by a combination of repression and activation signals

  17. Identification of active transcriptional regulatory elements with GRO-seq

    OpenAIRE

    Danko, Charles G.; Hyland, Stephanie L.; Core, Leighton J.; Martins, Andre L.; Waters, Colin T; Lee, Hyung Won; Cheung, Vivian G.; Kraus, W. Lee; Lis, John T.; Siepel, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional regulatory elements (TREs), including enhancers and promoters, determine the transcription levels of associated genes. We have recently shown that global run-on and sequencing (GRO-seq) with enrichment for 5'-capped RNAs reveals active TREs with high accuracy. Here, we demonstrate that active TREs can be identified by applying sensitive machine-learning methods to standard GRO-seq data. This approach allows TREs to be assayed together with gene expression levels and other tran...

  18. Functional characterization of variations on regulatory motifs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Lapidot

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors (TFs regulate gene expression through specific interactions with short promoter elements. The same regulatory protein may recognize a variety of related sequences. Moreover, once they are detected it is hard to predict whether highly similar sequence motifs will be recognized by the same TF and regulate similar gene expression patterns, or serve as binding sites for distinct regulatory factors. We developed computational measures to assess the functional implications of variations on regulatory motifs and to compare the functions of related sites. We have developed computational means for estimating the functional outcome of substituting a single position within a binding site and applied them to a collection of putative regulatory motifs. We predict the effects of nucleotide variations within motifs on gene expression patterns. In cases where such predictions could be compared to suitable published experimental evidence, we found very good agreement. We further accumulated statistics from multiple substitutions across various binding sites in an attempt to deduce general properties that characterize nucleotide substitutions that are more likely to alter expression. We found that substitutions involving Adenine are more likely to retain the expression pattern and that substitutions involving Guanine are more likely to alter expression compared to the rest of the substitutions. Our results should facilitate the prediction of the expression outcomes of binding site variations. One typical important implication is expected to be the ability to predict the phenotypic effect of variation in regulatory motifs in promoters.

  19. Uncovering transcription factor and microRNA risk regulatory pathways associated with osteoarthritis by network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhenhua; Zhang, Chi; He, Lingxiao; Sui, Yanfang; Lin, Xiafei; Pan, Jingjing

    2018-04-27

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of joint disease. The development of inflammation have been considered to play a key role during the progression of OA. Regulatory pathways are known to play crucial roles in many pathogenic processes. Thus, deciphering these risk regulatory pathways is critical for elucidating the mechanisms underlying OA. We constructed an OA-specific regulatory network by integrating comprehensive curated transcription and post-transcriptional resource involving transcription factor (TF) and microRNA (miRNA). To deepen our understanding of underlying molecular mechanisms of OA, we developed an integrated systems approach to identify OA-specific risk regulatory pathways. In this study, we identified 89 significantly differentially expressed genes between normal and inflamed areas of OA patients. We found the OA-specific regulatory network was a standard scale-free network with small-world properties. It significant enriched many immune response-related functions including leukocyte differentiation, myeloid differentiation and T cell activation. Finally, 141 risk regulatory pathways were identified based on OA-specific regulatory network, which contains some known regulator of OA. The risk regulatory pathways may provide clues for the etiology of OA and be a potential resource for the discovery of novel OA-associated disease genes. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Aggregation of topological motifs in the Escherichia coli transcriptional regulatory network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barabási Albert-László

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcriptional regulation of cellular functions is carried out through a complex network of interactions among transcription factors and the promoter regions of genes and operons regulated by them.To better understand the system-level function of such networks simplification of their architecture was previously achieved by identifying the motifs present in the network, which are small, overrepresented, topologically distinct regulatory interaction patterns (subgraphs. However, the interaction of such motifs with each other, and their form of integration into the full network has not been previously examined. Results By studying the transcriptional regulatory network of the bacterium, Escherichia coli, we demonstrate that the two previously identified motif types in the network (i.e., feed-forward loops and bi-fan motifs do not exist in isolation, but rather aggregate into homologous motif clusters that largely overlap with known biological functions. Moreover, these clusters further coalesce into a supercluster, thus establishing distinct topological hierarchies that show global statistical properties similar to the whole network. Targeted removal of motif links disintegrates the network into small, isolated clusters, while random disruptions of equal number of links do not cause such an effect. Conclusion Individual motifs aggregate into homologous motif clusters and a supercluster forming the backbone of the E. coli transcriptional regulatory network and play a central role in defining its global topological organization.

  1. Architectural Epigenetics: Mitotic Retention of Mammalian Transcriptional Regulatory Information ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Sayyed K.; Young, Daniel W.; Montecino, Martin; Lian, Jane B.; Stein, Janet L.; van Wijnen, Andre J.; Stein, Gary S.

    2010-01-01

    Epigenetic regulatory information must be retained during mammalian cell division to sustain phenotype-specific and physiologically responsive gene expression in the progeny cells. Histone modifications, DNA methylation, and RNA-mediated silencing are well-defined epigenetic mechanisms that control the cellular phenotype by regulating gene expression. Recent results suggest that the mitotic retention of nuclease hypersensitivity, selective histone marks, as well as the lineage-specific transcription factor occupancy of promoter elements contribute to the epigenetic control of sustained cellular identity in progeny cells. We propose that these mitotic epigenetic signatures collectively constitute architectural epigenetics, a novel and essential mechanism that conveys regulatory information to sustain the control of phenotype and proliferation in progeny cells by bookmarking genes for activation or suppression. PMID:20696837

  2. Architectural epigenetics: mitotic retention of mammalian transcriptional regulatory information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Sayyed K; Young, Daniel W; Montecino, Martin; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Janet L; van Wijnen, Andre J; Stein, Gary S

    2010-10-01

    Epigenetic regulatory information must be retained during mammalian cell division to sustain phenotype-specific and physiologically responsive gene expression in the progeny cells. Histone modifications, DNA methylation, and RNA-mediated silencing are well-defined epigenetic mechanisms that control the cellular phenotype by regulating gene expression. Recent results suggest that the mitotic retention of nuclease hypersensitivity, selective histone marks, as well as the lineage-specific transcription factor occupancy of promoter elements contribute to the epigenetic control of sustained cellular identity in progeny cells. We propose that these mitotic epigenetic signatures collectively constitute architectural epigenetics, a novel and essential mechanism that conveys regulatory information to sustain the control of phenotype and proliferation in progeny cells by bookmarking genes for activation or suppression.

  3. Global transcriptional regulatory network for Escherichia coli robustly connects gene expression to transcription factor activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fang, Xin; Sastry, Anand; Mih, Nathan

    2017-01-01

    gene expression using this TRN; and (iii) how robust is our understanding of the TRN? First, we reconstructed a high-confidence TRN (hiTRN) consisting of 147 transcription factors (TFs) regulating 1,538 transcription units (TUs) encoding 1,764 genes. The 3,797 high-confidence regulatory interactions...... algorithms to predict the expression of 1,364 TUs given TF activities using 441 samples. The algorithms accurately predicted condition-specific expression for 86% (1,174 of 1,364) of the TUs, while 193 TUs (14%) were predicted better than random TRNs. Third, we identified 10 regulatory modules whose...... definitions were robust against changes to the TRN or expression compendium. Using surrogate variable analysis, we also identified three unmodeled factors that systematically influenced gene expression. Our computational workflow comprehensively characterizes the predictive capabilities and systems...

  4. Oncogenes Activate an Autonomous Transcriptional Regulatory Circuit That Drives Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh K. Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Efforts to identify and target glioblastoma (GBM drivers have primarily focused on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs. Clinical benefits, however, have been elusive. Here, we identify an SRY-related box 2 (SOX2 transcriptional regulatory network that is independent of upstream RTKs and capable of driving glioma-initiating cells. We identified oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2 (OLIG2 and zinc-finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1, which are frequently co-expressed irrespective of driver mutations, as potential SOX2 targets. In murine glioma models, we show that different combinations of tumor suppressor and oncogene mutations can activate Sox2, Olig2, and Zeb1 expression. We demonstrate that ectopic co-expression of the three transcription factors can transform tumor-suppressor-deficient astrocytes into glioma-initiating cells in the absence of an upstream RTK oncogene. Finally, we demonstrate that the transcriptional inhibitor mithramycin downregulates SOX2 and its target genes, resulting in markedly reduced proliferation of GBM cells in vivo.

  5. Oncogenes Activate an Autonomous Transcriptional Regulatory Circuit That Drives Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dinesh K; Kollipara, Rahul K; Vemireddy, Vamsidara; Yang, Xiao-Li; Sun, Yuxiao; Regmi, Nanda; Klingler, Stefan; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Raisanen, Jack; Cho, Steve K; Sirasanagandla, Shyam; Nannepaga, Suraj; Piccirillo, Sara; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Wang, Shan; Humphries, Caroline G; Mickey, Bruce; Maher, Elizabeth A; Zheng, Hongwu; Kim, Ryung S; Kittler, Ralf; Bachoo, Robert M

    2017-01-24

    Efforts to identify and target glioblastoma (GBM) drivers have primarily focused on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). Clinical benefits, however, have been elusive. Here, we identify an SRY-related box 2 (SOX2) transcriptional regulatory network that is independent of upstream RTKs and capable of driving glioma-initiating cells. We identified oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2 (OLIG2) and zinc-finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1), which are frequently co-expressed irrespective of driver mutations, as potential SOX2 targets. In murine glioma models, we show that different combinations of tumor suppressor and oncogene mutations can activate Sox2, Olig2, and Zeb1 expression. We demonstrate that ectopic co-expression of the three transcription factors can transform tumor-suppressor-deficient astrocytes into glioma-initiating cells in the absence of an upstream RTK oncogene. Finally, we demonstrate that the transcriptional inhibitor mithramycin downregulates SOX2 and its target genes, resulting in markedly reduced proliferation of GBM cells in vivo. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Integration and diversity of the regulatory network composed of Maf and CNC families of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motohashi, Hozumi; O'Connor, Tania; Katsuoka, Fumiki; Engel, James Douglas; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2002-07-10

    Recent progress in the analysis of transcriptional regulation has revealed the presence of an exquisite functional network comprising the Maf and Cap 'n' collar (CNC) families of regulatory proteins, many of which have been isolated. Among Maf factors, large Maf proteins are important in the regulation of embryonic development and cell differentiation, whereas small Maf proteins serve as obligatory heterodimeric partner molecules for members of the CNC family. Both Maf homodimers and CNC-small Maf heterodimers bind to the Maf recognition element (MARE). Since the MARE contains a consensus TRE sequence recognized by AP-1, Jun and Fos family members may act to compete or interfere with the function of CNC-small Maf heterodimers. Overall then, the quantitative balance of transcription factors interacting with the MARE determines its transcriptional activity. Many putative MARE-dependent target genes such as those induced by antioxidants and oxidative stress are under concerted regulation by the CNC family member Nrf2, as clearly proven by mouse germline mutagenesis. Since these genes represent a vital aspect of the cellular defense mechanism against oxidative stress, Nrf2-null mutant mice are highly sensitive to xenobiotic and oxidative insults. Deciphering the molecular basis of the regulatory network composed of Maf and CNC families of transcription factors will undoubtedly lead to a new paradigm for the cooperative function of transcription factors.

  7. Predictive regulatory models in Drosophila melanogaster by integrative inference of transcriptional networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbach, Daniel; Roy, Sushmita; Ay, Ferhat; Meyer, Patrick E; Candeias, Rogerio; Kahveci, Tamer; Bristow, Christopher A; Kellis, Manolis

    2012-07-01

    Gaining insights on gene regulation from large-scale functional data sets is a grand challenge in systems biology. In this article, we develop and apply methods for transcriptional regulatory network inference from diverse functional genomics data sets and demonstrate their value for gene function and gene expression prediction. We formulate the network inference problem in a machine-learning framework and use both supervised and unsupervised methods to predict regulatory edges by integrating transcription factor (TF) binding, evolutionarily conserved sequence motifs, gene expression, and chromatin modification data sets as input features. Applying these methods to Drosophila melanogaster, we predict ∼300,000 regulatory edges in a network of ∼600 TFs and 12,000 target genes. We validate our predictions using known regulatory interactions, gene functional annotations, tissue-specific expression, protein-protein interactions, and three-dimensional maps of chromosome conformation. We use the inferred network to identify putative functions for hundreds of previously uncharacterized genes, including many in nervous system development, which are independently confirmed based on their tissue-specific expression patterns. Last, we use the regulatory network to predict target gene expression levels as a function of TF expression, and find significantly higher predictive power for integrative networks than for motif or ChIP-based networks. Our work reveals the complementarity between physical evidence of regulatory interactions (TF binding, motif conservation) and functional evidence (coordinated expression or chromatin patterns) and demonstrates the power of data integration for network inference and studies of gene regulation at the systems level.

  8. Predictive regulatory models in Drosophila melanogaster by integrative inference of transcriptional networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbach, Daniel; Roy, Sushmita; Ay, Ferhat; Meyer, Patrick E.; Candeias, Rogerio; Kahveci, Tamer; Bristow, Christopher A.; Kellis, Manolis

    2012-01-01

    Gaining insights on gene regulation from large-scale functional data sets is a grand challenge in systems biology. In this article, we develop and apply methods for transcriptional regulatory network inference from diverse functional genomics data sets and demonstrate their value for gene function and gene expression prediction. We formulate the network inference problem in a machine-learning framework and use both supervised and unsupervised methods to predict regulatory edges by integrating transcription factor (TF) binding, evolutionarily conserved sequence motifs, gene expression, and chromatin modification data sets as input features. Applying these methods to Drosophila melanogaster, we predict ∼300,000 regulatory edges in a network of ∼600 TFs and 12,000 target genes. We validate our predictions using known regulatory interactions, gene functional annotations, tissue-specific expression, protein–protein interactions, and three-dimensional maps of chromosome conformation. We use the inferred network to identify putative functions for hundreds of previously uncharacterized genes, including many in nervous system development, which are independently confirmed based on their tissue-specific expression patterns. Last, we use the regulatory network to predict target gene expression levels as a function of TF expression, and find significantly higher predictive power for integrative networks than for motif or ChIP-based networks. Our work reveals the complementarity between physical evidence of regulatory interactions (TF binding, motif conservation) and functional evidence (coordinated expression or chromatin patterns) and demonstrates the power of data integration for network inference and studies of gene regulation at the systems level. PMID:22456606

  9. Effector Regulatory T Cell Differentiation and Immune Homeostasis Depend on the Transcription Factor Myb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Sheila; D'Amico, Angela; Cretney, Erika; Liao, Yang; Tellier, Julie; Bruggeman, Christine; Almeida, Francisca F; Leahy, Jamie; Belz, Gabrielle T; Smyth, Gordon K; Shi, Wei; Nutt, Stephen L

    2017-01-17

    FoxP3-expressing regulatory T (Treg) cells are essential for maintaining immune homeostasis. Activated Treg cells undergo further differentiation into an effector state that highly expresses genes critical for Treg cell function, although how this process is coordinated on a transcriptional level is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that mice lacking the transcription factor Myb in Treg cells succumbed to a multi-organ inflammatory disease. Myb was specifically expressed in, and required for the differentiation of, thymus-derived effector Treg cells. The combination of transcriptome and genomic footprint analyses revealed that Myb directly regulated a large proportion of the gene expression specific to effector Treg cells, identifying Myb as a critical component of the gene regulatory network controlling effector Treg cell differentiation and function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Allelic polymorphisms in the transcriptional regulatory region of apolipoprotein E gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artiga, M J; Bullido, M J; Sastre, I; Recuero, M; García, M A; Aldudo, J; Vázquez, J; Valdivieso, F

    1998-01-09

    In this work, we explored the existence of genetic variants within the apolipoprotein E gene transcriptional regulatory region, using a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis screening of a region comprising nucleotides -1017 to +406. Upon a population study, three new polymorphic sites (-491, -427 and -219) and two mutations were found. Functional effects of the polymorphisms, assayed by transient transfection and electrophoretic mobility shift assays in a human hepatoma cell line, showed that polymorphisms at sites -491 and -219 of the APOE promoter produce variations in the transcriptional activity of the gene, most probably through differential binding of nuclear proteins.

  11. Computational methods to dissect cis-regulatory transcriptional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The formation of diverse cell types from an invariant set of genes is governed by biochemical and molecular processes that regulate gene activity. A complete understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of gene expression is the major function of genomics. Computational genomics is a rapidly emerging area for ...

  12. REGULATORY T–CELLS: ORIGIN AND FUNCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Freidlin

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Over the past decade a population of so–called “regulatory T cells” (Treg cells has been linked to the prevention of autoimmunity. In this review we discuss the molecular mechanisms of Treg cells development and function including the identification of the unique molecular marker of Treg cells – the transcription factor Foxp3. We discuss also the mechanisms of suppression, which include the direct cell contact through binding of cell surface molecules CTLA–4 on Treg cells to CD80/CD86 molecules of effector T cells and the local secretion of cytokines (IL–10, TGFβ. Deficiency in or dysfunction of these cells can be a cause of autoimmune disease. These cells are a good target for designing ways to induce or abrogate immunological tolerance to self and non–self antigens. (Med. Immunol., 2005, vol.7, № 4, pp. 347–354

  13. Transcriptional regulatory networks underlying gene expression changes in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ament, Seth A; Pearl, Jocelynn R; Cantle, Jeffrey P; Bragg, Robert M; Skene, Peter J; Coffey, Sydney R; Bergey, Dani E; Wheeler, Vanessa C; MacDonald, Marcy E; Baliga, Nitin S; Rosinski, Jim; Hood, Leroy E; Carroll, Jeffrey B; Price, Nathan D

    2018-03-26

    Transcriptional changes occur presymptomatically and throughout Huntington's disease (HD), motivating the study of transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs) in HD We reconstructed a genome-scale model for the target genes of 718 transcription factors (TFs) in the mouse striatum by integrating a model of genomic binding sites with transcriptome profiling of striatal tissue from HD mouse models. We identified 48 differentially expressed TF-target gene modules associated with age- and CAG repeat length-dependent gene expression changes in Htt CAG knock-in mouse striatum and replicated many of these associations in independent transcriptomic and proteomic datasets. Thirteen of 48 of these predicted TF-target gene modules were also differentially expressed in striatal tissue from human disease. We experimentally validated a specific model prediction that SMAD3 regulates HD-related gene expression changes using chromatin immunoprecipitation and deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) of mouse striatum. We found CAG repeat length-dependent changes in the genomic occupancy of SMAD3 and confirmed our model's prediction that many SMAD3 target genes are downregulated early in HD. © 2018 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  14. Nsite, NsiteH and NsiteM Computer Tools for Studying Tran-scription Regulatory Elements

    KAUST Repository

    Shahmuradov, Ilham

    2015-07-02

    Summary: Gene transcription is mostly conducted through interactions of various transcription factors and their binding sites on DNA (regulatory elements, REs). Today, we are still far from understanding the real regulatory content of promoter regions. Computer methods for identification of REs remain a widely used tool for studying and understanding transcriptional regulation mechanisms. The Nsite, NsiteH and NsiteM programs perform searches for statistically significant (non-random) motifs of known human, animal and plant one-box and composite REs in a single genomic sequence, in a pair of aligned homologous sequences and in a set of functionally related sequences, respectively.

  15. Inference of Transcription Regulatory Network in Low Phytic Acid Soybean Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Redekar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A dominant loss of function mutation in myo-inositol phosphate synthase (MIPS gene and recessive loss of function mutations in two multidrug resistant protein type-ABC transporter genes not only reduce the seed phytic acid levels in soybean, but also affect the pathways associated with seed development, ultimately resulting in low emergence. To understand the regulatory mechanisms and identify key genes that intervene in the seed development process in low phytic acid crops, we performed computational inference of gene regulatory networks in low and normal phytic acid soybeans using a time course transcriptomic data and multiple network inference algorithms. We identified a set of putative candidate transcription factors and their regulatory interactions with genes that have functions in myo-inositol biosynthesis, auxin-ABA signaling, and seed dormancy. We evaluated the performance of our unsupervised network inference method by comparing the predicted regulatory network with published regulatory interactions in Arabidopsis. Some contrasting regulatory interactions were observed in low phytic acid mutants compared to non-mutant lines. These findings provide important hypotheses on expression regulation of myo-inositol metabolism and phytohormone signaling in developing low phytic acid soybeans. The computational pipeline used for unsupervised network learning in this study is provided as open source software and is freely available at https://lilabatvt.github.io/LPANetwork/.

  16. Prediction of transcriptional regulatory elements for plant hormone responses based on microarray data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamaguchi-Shinozaki Kazuko

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phytohormones organize plant development and environmental adaptation through cell-to-cell signal transduction, and their action involves transcriptional activation. Recent international efforts to establish and maintain public databases of Arabidopsis microarray data have enabled the utilization of this data in the analysis of various phytohormone responses, providing genome-wide identification of promoters targeted by phytohormones. Results We utilized such microarray data for prediction of cis-regulatory elements with an octamer-based approach. Our test prediction of a drought-responsive RD29A promoter with the aid of microarray data for response to drought, ABA and overexpression of DREB1A, a key regulator of cold and drought response, provided reasonable results that fit with the experimentally identified regulatory elements. With this succession, we expanded the prediction to various phytohormone responses, including those for abscisic acid, auxin, cytokinin, ethylene, brassinosteroid, jasmonic acid, and salicylic acid, as well as for hydrogen peroxide, drought and DREB1A overexpression. Totally 622 promoters that are activated by phytohormones were subjected to the prediction. In addition, we have assigned putative functions to 53 octamers of the Regulatory Element Group (REG that have been extracted as position-dependent cis-regulatory elements with the aid of their feature of preferential appearance in the promoter region. Conclusions Our prediction of Arabidopsis cis-regulatory elements for phytohormone responses provides guidance for experimental analysis of promoters to reveal the basis of the transcriptional network of phytohormone responses.

  17. Regulatory elements and transcriptional control of chickenvasahomologue (CVH) promoter in chicken primordial germ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, So Dam; Lee, Bo Ram; Hwang, Young Sun; Lee, Hong Jo; Rim, Jong Seop; Han, Jae Yong

    2017-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs), the precursors of functional gametes, have distinct characteristics and exhibit several unique molecular mechanisms to maintain pluripotency and germness in comparison to somatic cells. They express germ cell-specific RNA binding proteins (RBPs) by modulating tissue-specific cis - and trans -regulatory elements. Studies on gene structures of chicken vasa homologue ( CVH ), a chicken RNA binding protein, involved in temporal and spatial regulation are thus important not only for understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate germ cell fate, but also for practical applications of primordial germ cells. However, very limited studies are available on regulatory elements that control germ cell-specific expression in chicken. Therefore, we investigated the intricate regulatory mechanism(s) that governs transcriptional control of CVH . We constructed green fluorescence protein (GFP) or luciferase reporter vectors containing the various 5' flanking regions of CVH gene. From the 5' deletion and fragmented assays in chicken PGCs, we have identified a CVH promoter that locates at -316 to +275 base pair fragment with the highest luciferase activity. Additionally, we confirmed for the first time that the 5' untranslated region (UTR) containing intron 1 is required for promoter activity of the CVH gene in chicken PGCs. Furthermore, using a transcription factor binding prediction, transcriptome analysis and siRNA-mediated knockdown, we have identified that a set of transcription factors play a role in the PGC-specific CVH gene expression. These results demonstrate that cis -elements and transcription factors localizing in the 5' flanking region including the 5' UTR and an intron are important for transcriptional regulation of the CVH gene in chicken PGCs. Finally, this information will contribute to research studies in areas of reproductive biology, constructing of germ cell-specific synthetic promoter for tracing primordial germ cells as well

  18. Identification of active transcriptional regulatory elements from GRO-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danko, Charles G; Hyland, Stephanie L; Core, Leighton J; Martins, Andre L; Waters, Colin T; Lee, Hyung Won; Cheung, Vivian G; Kraus, W Lee; Lis, John T; Siepel, Adam

    2015-05-01

    Modifications to the global run-on and sequencing (GRO-seq) protocol that enrich for 5'-capped RNAs can be used to reveal active transcriptional regulatory elements (TREs) with high accuracy. Here, we introduce discriminative regulatory-element detection from GRO-seq (dREG), a sensitive machine learning method that uses support vector regression to identify active TREs from GRO-seq data without requiring cap-based enrichment (https://github.com/Danko-Lab/dREG/). This approach allows TREs to be assayed together with gene expression levels and other transcriptional features in a single experiment. Predicted TREs are more enriched for several marks of transcriptional activation—including expression quantitative trait loci, disease-associated polymorphisms, acetylated histone 3 lysine 27 (H3K27ac) and transcription factor binding—than those identified by alternative functional assays. Using dREG, we surveyed TREs in eight human cell types and provide new insights into global patterns of TRE function.

  19. Transcriptional control by two leucine-responsive regulatory proteins in Halobacterium salinarum R1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarasov Valery

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Archaea combine bacterial-as well as eukaryotic-like features to regulate cellular processes. Halobacterium salinarum R1 encodes eight leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp-homologues. The function of two of them, Irp (OE3923F and lrpA1 (OE2621R, were analyzed by gene deletion and overexpression, including genome scale impacts using microarrays. Results It was shown that Lrp affects the transcription of multiple target genes, including those encoding enzymes involved in amino acid synthesis, central metabolism, transport processes and other regulators of transcription. In contrast, LrpA1 regulates transcription in a more specific manner. The aspB3 gene, coding for an aspartate transaminase, was repressed by LrpA1 in the presence of L-aspartate. Analytical DNA-affinity chromatography was adapted to high salt, and demonstrated binding of LrpA1 to its own promoter, as well as L-aspartate dependent binding to the aspB3 promoter. Conclusion The gene expression profiles of two archaeal Lrp-homologues report in detail their role in H. salinarum R1. LrpA1 and Lrp show similar functions to those already described in bacteria, but in addition they play a key role in regulatory networks, such as controlling the transcription of other regulators. In a more detailed analysis ligand dependent binding of LrpA1 was demonstrated to its target gene aspB3.

  20. NAC transcription factors: structurally distinct, functionally diverse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Addie Nina; Ernst, Heidi A; Leggio, Leila Lo

    2005-01-01

    level and localization, and to the first indications of NAC participation in transcription factor networks. The recent determination of the DNA and protein binding NAC domain structure offers insight into the molecular functions of the protein family. Research into NAC transcription factors has...

  1. Multiple post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms in ferritin gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattia, E.; Den Blaauwen, J.; Van Renswoude, J.; Ashwell, G.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have investigated the mechanisms involved in the regulation of ferritin biosynthesis in K562 human erythroleukemia cells during prolonged exposure to iron. They show that, upon addition of hemin (an efficient iron donor) to the cell culture, the rate of ferritin biosynthesis reaches a maximum after a few hours and then decreases. During a 24-hr incubation with the iron donor the concentrations of total ferritin heavy (H) and light (L) subunit mRNAs rise 2- to 5-fold and 2- to 3-fold, respectively, over the control values, while the amount of the protein increases 10- to 30-fold. The hemin-induced increment in ferritin subunit mRNA is not prevented by deferoxamine, suggesting that it is not directly mediated by chelatable iron. In vitro nuclear transcription analyses performed on nuclei isolated from control cells and cells grown in the presence of hemin indicate that the rates of synthesis of H- and L-subunit mRNAs remain constant. They conclude that iron-induced ferritin biosynthesis is governed by multiple post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. They propose that exposure of cells to iron leads to stabilization of ferritin mRNAs, in addition to activation and translation of stored H-and L-subunit mRNAs

  2. Prediction of transcriptional regulatory sites in the complete genome sequence of Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieffry, D; Salgado, H; Huerta, A M; Collado-Vides, J

    1998-06-01

    As one of the best-characterized free-living organisms, Escherichia coli and its recently completed genomic sequence offer a special opportunity to exploit systematically the variety of regulatory data available in the literature in order to make a comprehensive set of regulatory predictions in the whole genome. The complete genome sequence of E.coli was analyzed for the binding of transcriptional regulators upstream of coding sequences. The biological information contained in RegulonDB (Huerta, A.M. et al., Nucleic Acids Res.,26,55-60, 1998) for 56 different transcriptional proteins was the support to implement a stringent strategy combining string search and weight matrices. We estimate that our search included representatives of 15-25% of the total number of regulatory binding proteins in E.coli. This search was performed on the set of 4288 putative regulatory regions, each 450 bp long. Within the regions with predicted sites, 89% are regulated by one protein and 81% involve only one site. These numbers are reasonably consistent with the distribution of experimental regulatory sites. Regulatory sites are found in 603 regions corresponding to 16% of operon regions and 10% of intra-operonic regions. Additional evidence gives stronger support to some of these predictions, including the position of the site, biological consistency with the function of the downstream gene, as well as genetic evidence for the regulatory interaction. The predictions described here were incorporated into the map presented in the paper describing the complete E.coli genome (Blattner,F.R. et al., Science, 277, 1453-1461, 1997). The complete set of predictions in GenBank format is available at the url: http://www. cifn.unam.mx/Computational_Biology/E.coli-predictions ecoli-reg@cifn.unam.mx, collado@cifn.unam.mx

  3. Coordinated Evolution of Transcriptional and Post-Transcriptional Regulation for Mitochondrial Functions in Yeast Strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuepeng Sun

    Full Text Available Evolution of gene regulation has been proposed to play an important role in environmental adaptation. Exploring mechanisms underlying coordinated evolutionary changes at various levels of gene regulation could shed new light on how organism adapt in nature. In this study, we focused on regulatory differences between a laboratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain BY4742 and a pathogenic S. cerevisiae strain, YJM789. The two strains diverge in many features, including growth rate, morphology, high temperature tolerance, and pathogenicity. Our RNA-Seq and ribosomal footprint profiling data showed that gene expression differences are pervasive, and genes functioning in mitochondria are mostly divergent between the two strains at both transcriptional and translational levels. Combining functional genomics data from other yeast strains, we further demonstrated that significant divergence of expression for genes functioning in the electron transport chain (ETC was likely caused by differential expression of a transcriptional factor, HAP4, and that post-transcriptional regulation mediated by an RNA-binding protein, PUF3, likely led to expression divergence for genes involved in mitochondrial translation. We also explored mito-nuclear interactions via mitochondrial DNA replacement between strains. Although the two mitochondrial genomes harbor substantial sequence divergence, neither growth nor gene expression were affected by mitochondrial DNA replacement in both fermentative and respiratory growth media, indicating compatible mitochondrial and nuclear genomes between these two strains in the tested conditions. Collectively, we used mitochondrial functions as an example to demonstrate for the first time that evolution at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels could lead to coordinated regulatory changes underlying strain specific functional variations.

  4. Mapping and Dynamics of Regulatory DNA and Transcription Factor Networks in A. thaliana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra M. Sullivan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Our understanding of gene regulation in plants is constrained by our limited knowledge of plant cis-regulatory DNA and its dynamics. We mapped DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs in A. thaliana seedlings and used genomic footprinting to delineate ∼700,000 sites of in vivo transcription factor (TF occupancy at nucleotide resolution. We show that variation associated with 72 diverse quantitative phenotypes localizes within DHSs. TF footprints encode an extensive cis-regulatory lexicon subject to recent evolutionary pressures, and widespread TF binding within exons may have shaped codon usage patterns. The architecture of A. thaliana TF regulatory networks is strikingly similar to that of animals in spite of diverged regulatory repertoires. We analyzed regulatory landscape dynamics during heat shock and photomorphogenesis, disclosing thousands of environmentally sensitive elements and enabling mapping of key TF regulatory circuits underlying these fundamental responses. Our results provide an extensive resource for the study of A. thaliana gene regulation and functional biology.

  5. Transcription-factor-dependent enhancer transcription defines a gene regulatory network for cardiac rhythm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Xinan H; Nadadur, Rangarajan D; Hilvering, Catharina Re; Bianchi, Valerio; Werner, Michael; Mazurek, Stefan R; Gadek, Margaret; Shen, Kaitlyn M; Goldman, Joseph Aaron; Tyan, Leonid; Bekeny, Jenna; Hall, Johnathan M; Lee, Nutishia; Perez-Cervantes, Carlos; Burnicka-Turek, Ozanna; Poss, Kenneth D; Weber, Christopher R; de Laat, Wouter; Ruthenburg, Alexander J; Moskowitz, Ivan P

    2017-01-01

    The noncoding genome is pervasively transcribed. Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) generated from enhancers have been proposed as a general facet of enhancer function and some have been shown to be required for enhancer activity. Here we examine the transcription-factor-(TF)-dependence of ncRNA expression to

  6. Transcription profile of Escherichia coli: genomic SELEX search for regulatory targets of transcription factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihama, Akira; Shimada, Tomohiro; Yamazaki, Yukiko

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial genomes are transcribed by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), which achieves gene selectivity through interaction with sigma factors that recognize promoters, and transcription factors (TFs) that control the activity and specificity of RNAP holoenzyme. To understand the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, the identification of regulatory targets is needed for all these factors. We then performed genomic SELEX screenings of targets under the control of each sigma factor and each TF. Here we describe the assembly of 156 SELEX patterns of a total of 116 TFs performed in the presence and absence of effector ligands. The results reveal several novel concepts: (i) each TF regulates more targets than hitherto recognized; (ii) each promoter is regulated by more TFs than hitherto recognized; and (iii) the binding sites of some TFs are located within operons and even inside open reading frames. The binding sites of a set of global regulators, including cAMP receptor protein, LeuO and Lrp, overlap with those of the silencer H-NS, suggesting that certain global regulators play an anti-silencing role. To facilitate sharing of these accumulated SELEX datasets with the research community, we compiled a database, ‘Transcription Profile of Escherichia coli’ (www.shigen.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/tec/). PMID:26843427

  7. Transcription profile of Escherichia coli: genomic SELEX search for regulatory targets of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihama, Akira; Shimada, Tomohiro; Yamazaki, Yukiko

    2016-03-18

    Bacterial genomes are transcribed by DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), which achieves gene selectivity through interaction with sigma factors that recognize promoters, and transcription factors (TFs) that control the activity and specificity of RNAP holoenzyme. To understand the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, the identification of regulatory targets is needed for all these factors. We then performed genomic SELEX screenings of targets under the control of each sigma factor and each TF. Here we describe the assembly of 156 SELEX patterns of a total of 116 TFs performed in the presence and absence of effector ligands. The results reveal several novel concepts: (i) each TF regulates more targets than hitherto recognized; (ii) each promoter is regulated by more TFs than hitherto recognized; and (iii) the binding sites of some TFs are located within operons and even inside open reading frames. The binding sites of a set of global regulators, including cAMP receptor protein, LeuO and Lrp, overlap with those of the silencer H-NS, suggesting that certain global regulators play an anti-silencing role. To facilitate sharing of these accumulated SELEX datasets with the research community, we compiled a database, 'Transcription Profile of Escherichia coli' (www.shigen.nig.ac.jp/ecoli/tec/). © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Deciphering Fur transcriptional regulatory network highlights its complex role beyond iron metabolism in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; Latif, Haythem

    2014-01-01

    The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) plays a critical role in the transcriptional regulation of iron metabolism. However, the full regulatory potential of Fur remains undefined. Here we comprehensively reconstruct the Fur transcriptional regulatory network in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 in response...

  9. SINCERITIES: Inferring gene regulatory networks from time-stamped single cell transcriptional expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papili Gao, Nan; Ud-Dean, S M Minhaz; Gandrillon, Olivier; Gunawan, Rudiyanto

    2017-09-14

    Single cell transcriptional profiling opens up a new avenue in studying the functional role of cell-to-cell variability in physiological processes. The analysis of single cell expression profiles creates new challenges due to the distributive nature of the data and the stochastic dynamics of gene transcription process. The reconstruction of gene regulatory networks (GRNs) using single cell transcriptional profiles is particularly challenging, especially when directed gene-gene relationships are desired. We developed SINCERITIES (SINgle CEll Regularized Inference using TIme-stamped Expression profileS) for the inference of GRNs from single cell transcriptional profiles. We focused on time-stamped cross-sectional expression data, commonly generated from transcriptional profiling of single cells collected at multiple time points after cell stimulation. SINCERITIES recovers directed regulatory relationships among genes by employing regularized linear regression (ridge regression), using temporal changes in the distributions of gene expressions. Meanwhile, the modes of the gene regulations (activation and repression) come from partial correlation analyses between pairs of genes. We demonstrated the efficacy of SINCERITIES in inferring GRNs using in silico time-stamped single cell expression data and single cell transcriptional profiles of THP-1 monocytic human leukemia cells. The case studies showed that SINCERITIES could provide accurate GRN predictions, significantly better than other GRN inference algorithms such as TSNI, GENIE3 and JUMP3. Moreover, SINCERITIES has a low computational complexity and is amenable to problems of extremely large dimensionality. Finally, an application of SINCERITIES to single cell expression data of T2EC chicken erythrocytes pointed to BATF as a candidate novel regulator of erythroid development. The MATLAB and R version of SINCERITIES is freely available from the following websites: http://www.cabsel.ethz.ch/tools/sincerities.html and

  10. Overview Article: Identifying transcriptional cis-regulatory modules in animal genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryamohan, Kushal; Halfon, Marc S.

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated through the activity of transcription factors and chromatin modifying proteins acting on specific DNA sequences, referred to as cis-regulatory elements. These include promoters, located at the transcription initiation sites of genes, and a variety of distal cis-regulatory modules (CRMs), the most common of which are transcriptional enhancers. Because regulated gene expression is fundamental to cell differentiation and acquisition of new cell fates, identifying, characterizing, and understanding the mechanisms of action of CRMs is critical for understanding development. CRM discovery has historically been challenging, as CRMs can be located far from the genes they regulate, have few readily-identifiable sequence characteristics, and for many years were not amenable to high-throughput discovery methods. However, the recent availability of complete genome sequences and the development of next-generation sequencing methods has led to an explosion of both computational and empirical methods for CRM discovery in model and non-model organisms alike. Experimentally, CRMs can be identified through chromatin immunoprecipitation directed against transcription factors or histone post-translational modifications, identification of nucleosome-depleted “open” chromatin regions, or sequencing-based high-throughput functional screening. Computational methods include comparative genomics, clustering of known or predicted transcription factor binding sites, and supervised machine-learning approaches trained on known CRMs. All of these methods have proven effective for CRM discovery, but each has its own considerations and limitations, and each is subject to a greater or lesser number of false-positive identifications. Experimental confirmation of predictions is essential, although shortcomings in current methods suggest that additional means of validation need to be developed. PMID:25704908

  11. Data-based model and parameter evaluation in dynamic transcriptional regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavelier, German; Anastassiou, Dimitris

    2004-05-01

    Finding the causality and strength of connectivity in transcriptional regulatory networks from time-series data will provide a powerful tool for the analysis of cellular states. Presented here is the design of tools for the evaluation of the network's model structure and parameters. The most effective tools are found to be based on evolution strategies. We evaluate models of increasing complexity, from lumped, algebraic phenomenological models to Hill functions and thermodynamically derived functions. These last functions provide the free energies of binding of transcription factors to their operators, as well as cooperativity energies. Optimization results based on published experimental data from a synthetic network in Escherichia coli are presented. The free energies of binding and cooperativity found by our tools are in the same physiological ranges as those experimentally derived in the bacteriophage lambda system. We also use time-series data from high-density oligonucleotide microarrays of yeast meiotic expression patterns. The algorithm appropriately finds the parameters of pairs of regulated regulatory yeast genes, showing that for related genes an overall reasonable computation effort is sufficient to find the strength and causality of the connectivity of large numbers of them. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. ChIP-Seq Data Analysis to Define Transcriptional Regulatory Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavesi, Giulio

    The first step in the definition of transcriptional regulatory networks is to establish correct relationships between transcription factors (TFs) and their target genes, together with the effect of their regulatory activity (activator or repressor). Fundamental advances in this direction have been made possible by the introduction of experimental techniques such as Chromatin Immunoprecipitation, which, coupled with next-generation sequencing technologies (ChIP-Seq), permit the genome-wide identification of TF binding sites. This chapter provides a survey on how data of this kind are to be processed and integrated with expression and other types of data to infer transcriptional regulatory rules and codes.

  13. Functional analysis of limb transcriptional enhancers in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte, Mark J; Wang, Ying; Deng, Jian Min; Swinton, Paul G; Wei, Caimiao; Guindani, Michele; Schwartz, Robert J; Behringer, Richard R

    2014-01-01

    Transcriptional enhancers are genomic sequences bound by transcription factors that act together with basal transcriptional machinery to regulate gene transcription. Several high-throughput methods have generated large datasets of tissue-specific enhancer sequences with putative roles in developmental processes. However, few enhancers have been deleted from the genome to determine their roles in development. To understand the roles of two enhancers active in the mouse embryonic limb bud we deleted them from the genome. Although the genes regulated by these enhancers are unknown, they were selected because they were identified in a screen for putative limb bud-specific enhancers associated with p300, an acetyltransferase that participates in protein complexes that promote active transcription, and because the orthologous human enhancers (H1442 and H280) drive distinct lacZ expression patterns in limb buds of embryonic day (E) 11.5 transgenic mice. We show that the orthologous mouse sequences, M1442 and M280, regulate dynamic expression in the developing limb. Although significant transcriptional differences in enhancer-proximal genes in embryonic limb buds accompany the deletion of M1442 and M280 no gross limb malformations during embryonic development were observed, demonstrating that M1442 and M280 are not required for mouse limb development. However, M280 is required for the development and/or maintenance of body size; M280 mice are significantly smaller than controls. M280 also harbors an "ultraconserved" sequence that is identical between human, rat, and mouse. This is the first report of a phenotype resulting from the deletion of an ultraconserved element. These studies highlight the importance of determining enhancer regulatory function by experiments that manipulate them in situ and suggest that some of an enhancer's regulatory capacities may be developmentally tolerated rather than developmentally required. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. A Genome-Scale Resource for the Functional Characterization of Arabidopsis Transcription Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose L. Pruneda-Paz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Extensive transcriptional networks play major roles in cellular and organismal functions. Transcript levels are in part determined by the combinatorial and overlapping functions of multiple transcription factors (TFs bound to gene promoters. Thus, TF-promoter interactions provide the basic molecular wiring of transcriptional regulatory networks. In plants, discovery of the functional roles of TFs is limited by an increased complexity of network circuitry due to a significant expansion of TF families. Here, we present the construction of a comprehensive collection of Arabidopsis TFs clones created to provide a versatile resource for uncovering TF biological functions. We leveraged this collection by implementing a high-throughput DNA binding assay and identified direct regulators of a key clock gene (CCA1 that provide molecular links between different signaling modules and the circadian clock. The resources introduced in this work will significantly contribute to a better understanding of the transcriptional regulatory landscape of plant genomes.

  15. A genomic approach to identify regulatory nodes in the transcriptional network of systemic acquired resistance in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Wang

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Many biological processes are controlled by intricate networks of transcriptional regulators. With the development of microarray technology, transcriptional changes can be examined at the whole-genome level. However, such analysis often lacks information on the hierarchical relationship between components of a given system. Systemic acquired resistance (SAR is an inducible plant defense response involving a cascade of transcriptional events induced by salicylic acid through the transcription cofactor NPR1. To identify additional regulatory nodes in the SAR network, we performed microarray analysis on Arabidopsis plants expressing the NPR1-GR (glucocorticoid receptor fusion protein. Since nuclear translocation of NPR1-GR requires dexamethasone, we were able to control NPR1-dependent transcription and identify direct transcriptional targets of NPR1. We show that NPR1 directly upregulates the expression of eight WRKY transcription factor genes. This large family of 74 transcription factors has been implicated in various defense responses, but no specific WRKY factor has been placed in the SAR network. Identification of NPR1-regulated WRKY factors allowed us to perform in-depth genetic analysis on a small number of WRKY factors and test well-defined phenotypes of single and double mutants associated with NPR1. Among these WRKY factors we found both positive and negative regulators of SAR. This genomics-directed approach unambiguously positioned five WRKY factors in the complex transcriptional regulatory network of SAR. Our work not only discovered new transcription regulatory components in the signaling network of SAR but also demonstrated that functional studies of large gene families have to take into consideration sequence similarity as well as the expression patterns of the candidates.

  16. Pleiotropy constrains the evolution of protein but not regulatory sequences in a transcription regulatory network influencing complex social behaviours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria eMolodtsova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is increasingly apparent that genes and networks that influence complex behaviour are evolutionary conserved, which is paradoxical considering that behaviour is labile over evolutionary timescales. How does adaptive change in behaviour arise if behaviour is controlled by conserved, pleiotropic, and likely evolutionary constrained genes? Pleiotropy and connectedness are known to constrain the general rate of protein evolution, prompting some to suggest that the evolution of complex traits, including behaviour, is fuelled by regulatory sequence evolution. However, we seldom have data on the strength of selection on mutations in coding and regulatory sequences, and this hinders our ability to study how pleiotropy influences coding and regulatory sequence evolution. Here we use population genomics to estimate the strength of selection on coding and regulatory mutations for a transcriptional regulatory network that influences complex behaviour of honey bees. We found that replacement mutations in highly connected transcription factors and target genes experience significantly stronger negative selection relative to weakly connected transcription factors and targets. Adaptively evolving proteins were significantly more likely to reside at the periphery of the regulatory network, while proteins with signs of negative selection were near the core of the network. Interestingly, connectedness and network structure had minimal influence on the strength of selection on putative regulatory sequences for both transcription factors and their targets. Our study indicates that adaptive evolution of complex behaviour can arise because of positive selection on protein-coding mutations in peripheral genes, and on regulatory sequence mutations in both transcription factors and their targets throughout the network.

  17. A deeper look into transcription regulatory code by preferred pair distance templates for transcription factor binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.

    2011-08-18

    Motivation: Modern experimental methods provide substantial information on protein-DNA recognition. Studying arrangements of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) of interacting transcription factors (TFs) advances understanding of the transcription regulatory code. Results: We constructed binding motifs for TFs forming a complex with HIF-1α at the erythropoietin 3\\'-enhancer. Corresponding TFBSs were predicted in the segments around transcription start sites (TSSs) of all human genes. Using the genome-wide set of regulatory regions, we observed several strongly preferred distances between hypoxia-responsive element (HRE) and binding sites of a particular cofactor protein. The set of preferred distances was called as a preferred pair distance template (PPDT). PPDT dramatically depended on the TF and orientation of its binding sites relative to HRE. PPDT evaluated from the genome-wide set of regulatory sequences was used to detect significant PPDT-consistent binding site pairs in regulatory regions of hypoxia-responsive genes. We believe PPDT can help to reveal the layout of eukaryotic regulatory segments. © The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  18. Fanconi anemia core complex gene promoters harbor conserved transcription regulatory elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Meier

    Full Text Available The Fanconi anemia (FA gene family is a recent addition to the complex network of proteins that respond to and repair certain types of DNA damage in the human genome. Since little is known about the regulation of this novel group of genes at the DNA level, we characterized the promoters of the eight genes (FANCA, B, C, E, F, G, L and M that compose the FA core complex. The promoters of these genes show the characteristic attributes of housekeeping genes, such as a high GC content and CpG islands, a lack of TATA boxes and a low conservation. The promoters functioned in a monodirectional way and were, in their most active regions, comparable in strength to the SV40 promoter in our reporter plasmids. They were also marked by a distinctive transcriptional start site (TSS. In the 5' region of each promoter, we identified a region that was able to negatively regulate the promoter activity in HeLa and HEK 293 cells in isolation. The central and 3' regions of the promoter sequences harbor binding sites for several common and rare transcription factors, including STAT, SMAD, E2F, AP1 and YY1, which indicates that there may be cross-connections to several established regulatory pathways. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and siRNA experiments confirmed the shared regulatory responses between the prominent members of the TGF-β and JAK/STAT pathways and members of the FA core complex. Although the promoters are not well conserved, they share region and sequence specific regulatory motifs and transcription factor binding sites (TBFs, and we identified a bi-partite nature to these promoters. These results support a hypothesis based on the co-evolution of the FA core complex genes that was expanded to include their promoters.

  19. Metabolic Network Topology Reveals Transcriptional Regulatory Signatures of Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zelezniak, Aleksej; Pers, Tune Hannes; Pinho Soares, Simao Pedro

    2010-01-01

    mechanisms underlying these transcriptional changes and their impact on the cellular metabolic phenotype is a challenging task due to the complexity of transcriptional regulation and the highly interconnected nature of the metabolic network. In this study we integrate skeletal muscle gene expression datasets...... with human metabolic network reconstructions to identify key metabolic regulatory features of T2DM. These features include reporter metabolites—metabolites with significant collective transcriptional response in the associated enzyme-coding genes, and transcription factors with significant enrichment...... factor regulatory network connecting several parts of metabolism. The identified transcription factors include members of the CREB, NRF1 and PPAR family, among others, and represent regulatory targets for further experimental analysis. Overall, our results provide a holistic picture of key metabolic...

  20. A guide to integrating transcriptional regulatory and metabolic networks using PROM (probabilistic regulation of metabolism).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonidis, Evangelos; Chandrasekaran, Sriram; Price, Nathan D

    2013-01-01

    The integration of transcriptional regulatory and metabolic networks is a crucial step in the process of predicting metabolic behaviors that emerge from either genetic or environmental changes. Here, we present a guide to PROM (probabilistic regulation of metabolism), an automated method for the construction and simulation of integrated metabolic and transcriptional regulatory networks that enables large-scale phenotypic predictions for a wide range of model organisms.

  1. Predicting combinatorial binding of transcription factors to regulatory elements in the human genome by association rule mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyer Vishwanath R

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cis-acting transcriptional regulatory elements in mammalian genomes typically contain specific combinations of binding sites for various transcription factors. Although some cis-regulatory elements have been well studied, the combinations of transcription factors that regulate normal expression levels for the vast majority of the 20,000 genes in the human genome are unknown. We hypothesized that it should be possible to discover transcription factor combinations that regulate gene expression in concert by identifying over-represented combinations of sequence motifs that occur together in the genome. In order to detect combinations of transcription factor binding motifs, we developed a data mining approach based on the use of association rules, which are typically used in market basket analysis. We scored each segment of the genome for the presence or absence of each of 83 transcription factor binding motifs, then used association rule mining algorithms to mine this dataset, thus identifying frequently occurring pairs of distinct motifs within a segment. Results Support for most pairs of transcription factor binding motifs was highly correlated across different chromosomes although pair significance varied. Known true positive motif pairs showed higher association rule support, confidence, and significance than background. Our subsets of high-confidence, high-significance mined pairs of transcription factors showed enrichment for co-citation in PubMed abstracts relative to all pairs, and the predicted associations were often readily verifiable in the literature. Conclusion Functional elements in the genome where transcription factors bind to regulate expression in a combinatorial manner are more likely to be predicted by identifying statistically and biologically significant combinations of transcription factor binding motifs than by simply scanning the genome for the occurrence of binding sites for a single transcription

  2. Statistical tests for natural selection on regulatory regions based on the strength of transcription factor binding sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses Alan M

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although cis-regulatory changes play an important role in evolution, it remains difficult to establish the contribution of natural selection to regulatory differences between species. For protein coding regions, powerful tests of natural selection have been developed based on comparisons of synonymous and non-synonymous substitutions, and analogous tests for regulatory regions would be of great utility. Results Here, tests for natural selection on regulatory regions are proposed based on nucleotide substitutions that occur in characterized transcription factor binding sites (an important type functional element within regulatory regions. In the absence of selection, these substitutions will tend to reduce the strength of existing binding sites. On the other hand, purifying selection will act to preserve the binding sites in regulatory regions, while positive selection can act to create or destroy binding sites, as well as change their strength. Using standard models of binding site strength and molecular evolution in the absence of selection, this intuition can be used to develop statistical tests for natural selection. Application of these tests to two well-characterized regulatory regions in Drosophila provides evidence for purifying selection. Conclusion This demonstrates that it is possible to develop tests for selection on regulatory regions based on the specific functional constrains on these sequences.

  3. Evolutionary dynamics and functional roles of regulatory systems in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berke, L.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription, the process of generating RNA copies of the genetic information stored in the DNA, is crucial for every organism. As with other essential processes in life, correct activation and repression of transcription is governed by complex regulatory mechanisms. These regulatory mechanisms

  4. A long noncoding RNA transcriptional regulatory circuit drives thermogenic adipocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xu-Yun; Li, Siming; Wang, Guo-Xiao; Yu, Qi; Lin, Jiandie D

    2014-08-07

    Brown and beige/brite fats generate heat via uncoupled respiration to defend against cold. The total mass and activity of thermogenic adipose tissues are also tightly linked to systemic energy and nutrient homeostasis. Despite originating from distinct progenitors, brown and beige adipocytes acquire remarkably similar molecular and metabolic characteristics during differentiation through the action of a network of transcription factors and cofactors. How this regulatory network interfaces with long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), an emerging class of developmental regulators, remains largely unexplored. Here, we globally profiled lncRNA gene expression during thermogenic adipocyte formation and identified Brown fat lncRNA 1 (Blnc1) as a nuclear lncRNA that promotes brown and beige adipocyte differentiation and function. Blnc1 forms a ribonucleoprotein complex with transcription factor EBF2 to stimulate the thermogenic gene program. Further, Blnc1 itself is a target of EBF2, thereby forming a feedforward regulatory loop to drive adipogenesis toward thermogenic phenotype. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Transcriptional regulatory elements in the noncoding region of human papillomavirus type 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Tzyy-Choou.

    1989-01-01

    The structure and function of the transcriptional regulatory region of human papillomavirus type 6 (HPV-6) has been investigated. To investigate tissue specific gene expression, a sensitive method to detect and localize HPV-6 viral DNA, mRNA and protein in plastic-embedded tissue sections of genital and respiratory tract papillomata by using in situ hybridization and immunoperoxidase assays has been developed. This method, using ultrathin sections and strand-specific {sup 3}H labeled riboprobes, offers the advantages of superior morphological preservation and detection of viral genomes at low copy number with good resolution, and the modified immunocytochemistry provides better sensitivity. The results suggest that genital tract epithelium is more permissive for HPV-6 replication than respiratory tract epithelium. To study the tissue tropism of HPV-6 at the level of regulation of viral gene expression, the polymerase chain reaction was used to isolate the noncoding region (NCR) of HPV-6 in independent isolates. Nucleotide sequence analysis of molecularly cloned DNA identified base substitutions, deletions/insertions and tandem duplications. Transcriptional regulatory elements in the NCR were assayed in recombinant plasmids containing the bacterial gene for chloramphenicol acetyl transferase.

  6. Cooperative transcription factor associations discovered using regulatory variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karczewski, Konrad J; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Landt, Stephen G; Yang, Xinqiong; Slifer, Teri; Altman, Russ B; Snyder, Michael

    2011-08-09

    Regulation of gene expression at the transcriptional level is achieved by complex interactions of transcription factors operating at their target genes. Dissecting the specific combination of factors that bind each target is a significant challenge. Here, we describe in detail the Allele Binding Cooperativity test, which uses variation in transcription factor binding among individuals to discover combinations of factors and their targets. We developed the ALPHABIT (a large-scale process to hunt for allele binding interacting transcription factors) pipeline, which includes statistical analysis of binding sites followed by experimental validation, and demonstrate that this method predicts transcription factors that associate with NFκB. Our method successfully identifies factors that have been known to work with NFκB (E2A, STAT1, IRF2), but whose global coassociation and sites of cooperative action were not known. In addition, we identify a unique coassociation (EBF1) that had not been reported previously. We present a general approach for discovering combinatorial models of regulation and advance our understanding of the genetic basis of variation in transcription factor binding.

  7. Regulatory Mechanisms Controlling Maturation of Serotonin Neuron Identity and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. Spencer

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The brain serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT system has been extensively studied for its role in normal physiology and behavior, as well as, neuropsychiatric disorders. The broad influence of 5-HT on brain function, is in part due to the vast connectivity pattern of 5-HT-producing neurons throughout the CNS. 5-HT neurons are born and terminally specified midway through embryogenesis, then enter a protracted period of maturation, where they functionally integrate into CNS circuitry and then are maintained throughout life. The transcriptional regulatory networks controlling progenitor cell generation and terminal specification of 5-HT neurons are relatively well-understood, yet the factors controlling 5-HT neuron maturation are only recently coming to light. In this review, we first provide an update on the regulatory network controlling 5-HT neuron development, then delve deeper into the properties and regulatory strategies governing 5-HT neuron maturation. In particular, we discuss the role of the 5-HT neuron terminal selector transcription factor (TF Pet-1 as a key regulator of 5-HT neuron maturation. Pet-1 was originally shown to positively regulate genes needed for 5-HT synthesis, reuptake and vesicular transport, hence 5-HT neuron-type transmitter identity. It has now been shown to regulate, both positively and negatively, many other categories of genes in 5-HT neurons including ion channels, GPCRs, transporters, neuropeptides, and other transcription factors. Its function as a terminal selector results in the maturation of 5-HT neuron excitability, firing characteristics, and synaptic modulation by several neurotransmitters. Furthermore, there is a temporal requirement for Pet-1 in the control of postmitotic gene expression trajectories thus indicating a direct role in 5-HT neuron maturation. Proper regulation of the maturation of cellular identity is critical for normal neuronal functioning and perturbations in the gene regulatory

  8. Identification of High-Impact cis-Regulatory Mutations Using Transcription Factor Specific Random Forest Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Svetlichnyy

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer genomes contain vast amounts of somatic mutations, many of which are passenger mutations not involved in oncogenesis. Whereas driver mutations in protein-coding genes can be distinguished from passenger mutations based on their recurrence, non-coding mutations are usually not recurrent at the same position. Therefore, it is still unclear how to identify cis-regulatory driver mutations, particularly when chromatin data from the same patient is not available, thus relying only on sequence and expression information. Here we use machine-learning methods to predict functional regulatory regions using sequence information alone, and compare the predicted activity of the mutated region with the reference sequence. This way we define the Predicted Regulatory Impact of a Mutation in an Enhancer (PRIME. We find that the recently identified driver mutation in the TAL1 enhancer has a high PRIME score, representing a "gain-of-target" for MYB, whereas the highly recurrent TERT promoter mutation has a surprisingly low PRIME score. We trained Random Forest models for 45 cancer-related transcription factors, and used these to score variations in the HeLa genome and somatic mutations across more than five hundred cancer genomes. Each model predicts only a small fraction of non-coding mutations with a potential impact on the function of the encompassing regulatory region. Nevertheless, as these few candidate driver mutations are often linked to gains in chromatin activity and gene expression, they may contribute to the oncogenic program by altering the expression levels of specific oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes.

  9. Comparative study between transcriptionally- and translationally-acting adenine riboswitches reveals key differences in riboswitch regulatory mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Lemay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many bacterial mRNAs are regulated at the transcriptional or translational level by ligand-binding elements called riboswitches. Although they both bind adenine, the adenine riboswitches of Bacillus subtilis and Vibrio vulnificus differ by controlling transcription and translation, respectively. Here, we demonstrate that, beyond the obvious difference in transcriptional and translational modulation, both adenine riboswitches exhibit different ligand binding properties and appear to operate under different regulation regimes (kinetic versus thermodynamic. While the B. subtilis pbuE riboswitch fully depends on co-transcriptional binding of adenine to function, the V. vulnificus add riboswitch can bind to adenine after transcription is completed and still perform translation regulation. Further investigation demonstrates that the rate of transcription is critical for the B. subtilis pbuE riboswitch to perform efficiently, which is in agreement with a co-transcriptional regulation. Our results suggest that the nature of gene regulation control, that is transcription or translation, may have a high importance in riboswitch regulatory mechanisms.

  10. Dynamics and function of distal regulatory elements during neurogenesis and neuroplasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakurela, Sudhir; Sahu, Sanjeeb Kumar; Garding, Angela; Tiwari, Vijay K.

    2015-01-01

    Gene regulation in mammals involves a complex interplay between promoters and distal regulatory elements that function in concert to drive precise spatiotemporal gene expression programs. However, the dynamics of the distal gene regulatory landscape and its function in the transcriptional reprogramming that underlies neurogenesis and neuronal activity remain largely unknown. Here, we performed a combinatorial analysis of genome-wide data sets for chromatin accessibility (FAIRE-seq) and the enhancer mark H3K27ac, revealing the highly dynamic nature of distal gene regulation during neurogenesis, which gets progressively restricted to distinct genomic regions as neurons acquire a post-mitotic, terminally differentiated state. We further find that the distal accessible and active regions serve as target sites for distinct transcription factors that function in a stage-specific manner to contribute to the transcriptional program underlying neuronal commitment and maturation. Mature neurons respond to a sustained activity of NMDA receptors by epigenetic reprogramming at a large number of distal regulatory regions as well as dramatic reorganization of super-enhancers. Such massive remodeling of the distal regulatory landscape in turn results in a transcriptome that confers a transient loss of neuronal identity and gain of cellular plasticity. Furthermore, NMDA receptor activity also induces many novel prosurvival genes that function in neuroprotective pathways. Taken together, these findings reveal the dynamics of the distal regulatory landscape during neurogenesis and uncover novel regulatory elements that function in concert with epigenetic mechanisms and transcription factors to generate the transcriptome underlying neuronal development and activity. PMID:26170447

  11. The transcriptional regulatory network mediated by banana (Musa acuminata) dehydration-responsive element binding (MaDREB) transcription factors in fruit ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Jian-Fei; Chen, Jian-Ye; Liu, Xun-Cheng; Han, Yan-Chao; Xiao, Yun-Yi; Shan, Wei; Tang, Yang; Wu, Ke-Qiang; He, Jun-Xian; Lu, Wang-Jin

    2017-04-01

    Fruit ripening is a complex, genetically programmed process involving the action of critical transcription factors (TFs). Despite the established significance of dehydration-responsive element binding (DREB) TFs in plant abiotic stress responses, the involvement of DREBs in fruit ripening is yet to be determined. Here, we identified four genes encoding ripening-regulated DREB TFs in banana (Musa acuminata), MaDREB1, MaDREB2, MaDREB3, and MaDREB4, and demonstrated that they play regulatory roles in fruit ripening. We showed that MaDREB1-MaDREB4 are nucleus-localized, induced by ethylene and encompass transcriptional activation activities. We performed a genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation and high-throughput sequencing (ChIP-Seq) experiment for MaDREB2 and identified 697 genomic regions as potential targets of MaDREB2. MaDREB2 binds to hundreds of loci with diverse functions and its binding sites are distributed in the promoter regions proximal to the transcriptional start site (TSS). Most of the MaDREB2-binding targets contain the conserved (A/G)CC(G/C)AC motif and MaDREB2 appears to directly regulate the expression of a number of genes involved in fruit ripening. In combination with transcriptome profiling (RNA sequencing) data, our results indicate that MaDREB2 may serve as both transcriptional activator and repressor during banana fruit ripening. In conclusion, our study suggests a hierarchical regulatory model of fruit ripening in banana and that the MaDREB TFs may act as transcriptional regulators in the regulatory network. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  12. Inferring a transcriptional regulatory network of the cytokinesis-related genes by network component analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kao Cheng-Yan

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Network Component Analysis (NCA is a network structure-driven framework for deducing regulatory signal dynamics. In contrast to principal component analysis, which can be employed to select the high-variance genes, NCA makes use of the connectivity structure from transcriptional regulatory networks to infer dynamics of transcription factor activities. Using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, we aim to deduce regulatory actions of cytokinesis-related genes, using precise spatial proximity (midbody and/or temporal synchronicity (cytokinesis to avoid full-scale computation from genome-wide databases. Results NCA was applied to infer regulatory actions of transcription factor activity from microarray data and partial transcription factor-gene connectivity information for cytokinesis-related genes, which were a subset of genome-wide datasets. No literature has so far discussed the inferred results through NCA are independent of the scale of the gene expression dataset. To avoid full-scale computation from genome-wide databases, four cytokinesis-related gene cases were selected for NCA by running computational analysis over the transcription factor database to confirm the approach being scale-free. The inferred dynamics of transcription factor activity through NCA were independent of the scale of the data matrix selected from the four cytokinesis-related gene sets. Moreover, the inferred regulatory actions were nearly identical to published observations for the selected cytokinesis-related genes in the budding yeast; namely, Mcm1, Ndd1, and Fkh2, which form a transcription factor complex to control expression of the CLB2 cluster (i.e. BUD4, CHS2, IQG1, and CDC5. Conclusion In this study, using S. cerevisiae as a model system, NCA was successfully applied to infer similar regulatory actions of transcription factor activities from two various microarray databases and several partial transcription factor

  13. Inferring a transcriptional regulatory network of the cytokinesis-related genes by network component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shun-Fu; Juang, Yue-Li; Chou, Wei-Kang; Lai, Jin-Mei; Huang, Chi-Ying F; Kao, Cheng-Yan; Wang, Feng-Sheng

    2009-11-27

    Network Component Analysis (NCA) is a network structure-driven framework for deducing regulatory signal dynamics. In contrast to principal component analysis, which can be employed to select the high-variance genes, NCA makes use of the connectivity structure from transcriptional regulatory networks to infer dynamics of transcription factor activities. Using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, we aim to deduce regulatory actions of cytokinesis-related genes, using precise spatial proximity (midbody) and/or temporal synchronicity (cytokinesis) to avoid full-scale computation from genome-wide databases. NCA was applied to infer regulatory actions of transcription factor activity from microarray data and partial transcription factor-gene connectivity information for cytokinesis-related genes, which were a subset of genome-wide datasets. No literature has so far discussed the inferred results through NCA are independent of the scale of the gene expression dataset. To avoid full-scale computation from genome-wide databases, four cytokinesis-related gene cases were selected for NCA by running computational analysis over the transcription factor database to confirm the approach being scale-free. The inferred dynamics of transcription factor activity through NCA were independent of the scale of the data matrix selected from the four cytokinesis-related gene sets. Moreover, the inferred regulatory actions were nearly identical to published observations for the selected cytokinesis-related genes in the budding yeast; namely, Mcm1, Ndd1, and Fkh2, which form a transcription factor complex to control expression of the CLB2 cluster (i.e. BUD4, CHS2, IQG1, and CDC5). In this study, using S. cerevisiae as a model system, NCA was successfully applied to infer similar regulatory actions of transcription factor activities from two various microarray databases and several partial transcription factor-gene connectivity datasets for selected cytokinesis

  14. FARNA: knowledgebase of inferred functions of non-coding RNA transcripts

    KAUST Repository

    Alam, Tanvir

    2016-10-12

    Non-coding RNA (ncRNA) genes play a major role in control of heterogeneous cellular behavior. Yet, their functions are largely uncharacterized. Current available databases lack in-depth information of ncRNA functions across spectrum of various cells/tissues. Here, we present FARNA, a knowledgebase of inferred functions of 10,289 human ncRNA transcripts (2,734 microRNA and 7,555 long ncRNA) in 119 tissues and 177 primary cells of human. Since transcription factors (TFs) and TF co-factors (TcoFs) are crucial components of regulatory machinery for activation of gene transcription, cellular processes and diseases in which TFs and TcoFs are involved suggest functions of the transcripts they regulate. In FARNA, functions of a transcript are inferred from TFs and TcoFs whose genes co-express with the transcript controlled by these TFs and TcoFs in a considered cell/tissue. Transcripts were annotated using statistically enriched GO terms, pathways and diseases across cells/tissues based on guilt-by-association principle. Expression profiles across cells/tissues based on Cap Analysis of Gene Expression (CAGE) are provided. FARNA, having the most comprehensive function annotation of considered ncRNAs across widest spectrum of human cells/tissues, has a potential to greatly contribute to our understanding of ncRNA roles and their regulatory mechanisms in human. FARNA can be accessed at: http://cbrc.kaust.edu.sa/farna

  15. Predicting combinatorial binding of transcription factors to regulatory elements in the human genome by association rule mining

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, Xochitl C; Ni, Shulin; Miranker, Daniel P; Iyer, Vishwanath R

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Cis-acting transcriptional regulatory elements in mammalian genomes typically contain specific combinations of binding sites for various transcription factors. Although some cis-regulatory elements have been well studied, the combinations of transcription factors that regulate normal expression levels for the vast majority of the 20,000 genes in the human genome are unknown. We hypothesized that it should be possible to discover transcription factor combinations that regul...

  16. Lineage-specific transcription factors and the evolution of gene regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowick, Katja; Stubbs, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Nature is replete with examples of diverse cell types, tissues and body plans, forming very different creatures from genomes with similar gene complements. However, while the genes and the structures of proteins they encode can be highly conserved, the production of those proteins in specific cell types and at specific developmental time points might differ considerably between species. A full understanding of the factors that orchestrate gene expression will be essential to fully understand evolutionary variety. Transcription factor (TF) proteins, which form gene regulatory networks (GRNs) to act in cooperative or competitive partnerships to regulate gene expression, are key components of these unique regulatory programs. Although many TFs are conserved in structure and function, certain classes of TFs display extensive levels of species diversity. In this review, we highlight families of TFs that have expanded through gene duplication events to create species-unique repertoires in different evolutionary lineages. We discuss how the hierarchical structures of GRNs allow for flexible small to large-scale phenotypic changes. We survey evidence that explains how newly evolved TFs may be integrated into an existing GRN and how molecular changes in TFs might impact the GRNs. Finally, we review examples of traits that evolved due to lineage-specific TFs and species differences in GRNs.

  17. Prediction of bipartite transcriptional regulatory elements using transcriptome data of Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yoshiharu Y; Ichida, Hiroyuki; Hieno, Ayaka; Obata, Daichi; Tokizawa, Mutsutomo; Nomoto, Mika; Tada, Yasuomi; Kusunoki, Kazutaka; Koyama, Hiroyuki; Hayami, Natsuki

    2017-06-01

    In our previous study, a methodology was established to predict transcriptional regulatory elements in promoter sequences using transcriptome data based on a frequency comparison of octamers. Some transcription factors, including the NAC family, cannot be covered by this method because their binding sequences have non-specific spacers in the middle of the two binding sites. In order to remove this blind spot in promoter prediction, we have extended our analysis by including bipartite octamers that are composed of '4 bases-a spacer with a flexible length-4 bases'. 8,044 pre-selected bipartite octamers, which had an overrepresentation of specific spacer lengths in promoter sequences and sequences related to core elements removed, were subjected to frequency comparison analysis. Prediction of ER stress-responsive elements in the BiP/BiPL promoter and an ANAC017 target sequence resulted in precise detection of true positives, judged by functional analyses of a reported article and our own in vitro protein-DNA binding assays. These results demonstrate that incorporation of bipartite octamers with continuous ones improves promoter prediction significantly. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  18. Sucrose-induced anthocyanin accumulation in vegetative tissue of Petunia plants requires anthocyanin regulatory transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Trinh Ngoc; Naing, Aung Htay; Arun, Muthukrishnan; Lim, Sun-Hyung; Kim, Chang Kil

    2016-11-01

    The effects of three different sucrose concentrations on plant growth and anthocyanin accumulation were examined in non-transgenic (NT) and transgenic (T 2 ) specimens of the Petunia hybrida cultivar 'Mirage rose' that carried the anthocyanin regulatory transcription factors B-Peru+mPAP1 or RsMYB1. Anthocyanin accumulation was not observed in NT plants in any treatments, whereas a range of anthocyanin accumulation was observed in transgenic plants. The anthocyanin content detected in transgenic plants expressing the anthocyanin regulatory transcription factors (B-Peru+mPAP1 or RsMYB1) was higher than that in NT plants. In addition, increasing sucrose concentration strongly enhanced anthocyanin content as shown by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis, wherein increased concentrations of sucrose enhanced transcript levels of the transcription factors that are responsible for the induction of biosynthetic genes involved in anthocyanin synthesis; this pattern was not observed in NT plants. In addition, sucrose affected plant growth, although the effects were different between NT and transgenic plants. Taken together, the application of sucrose could enhance anthocyanin production in vegetative tissue of transgenic Petunia carrying anthocyanin regulatory transcription factors, and this study provides insights about interactive effects of sucrose and transcription factors in anthocyanin biosynthesis in the transgenic plant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Making Sense of Multifunctional Proteins: Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Accessory and Regulatory Proteins and Connections to Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Tyler B; Binning, Jennifer M; Gross, John D; Frankel, Alan D

    2017-09-29

    Viruses are completely dependent upon cellular machinery to support replication and have therefore developed strategies to co-opt cellular processes to optimize infection and counter host immune defenses. Many viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), encode a relatively small number of genes. Viruses with limited genetic content often encode multifunctional proteins that function at multiple stages of the viral replication cycle. In this review, we discuss the functions of HIV-1 regulatory (Tat and Rev) and accessory (Vif, Vpr, Vpu, and Nef) proteins. Each of these proteins has a highly conserved primary activity; however, numerous additional activities have been attributed to these viral proteins. We explore the possibility that HIV-1 proteins leverage their multifunctional nature to alter host transcriptional networks to elicit a diverse set of cellular responses. Although these transcriptional effects appear to benefit the virus, it is not yet clear whether they are strongly selected for during viral evolution or are a ripple effect from the primary function. As our detailed knowledge of these viral proteins improves, we will undoubtedly uncover how the multifunctional nature of these HIV-1 regulatory and accessory proteins, and in particular their transcriptional functions, work to drive viral pathogenesis.

  20. Transcriptional regulatory networks underlying the reprogramming of spermatogonial stem cells to multipotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hoe-Su; Bhin, Jinhyuk; Joon Kim, Hyung; Hwang, Daehee; Ryul Lee, Dong; Kim, Kye-Seong

    2017-04-14

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are germline stem cells located along the basement membrane of seminiferous tubules in testes. Recently, SSCs were shown to be reprogrammed into multipotent SSCs (mSSCs). However, both the key factors and biological networks underlying this reprogramming remain elusive. Here, we present transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs) that control cellular processes related to the SSC-to-mSSC reprogramming. Previously, we established intermediate SSCs (iSSCs) undergoing the transition to mSSCs and generated gene expression profiles of SSCs, iSSCs and mSSCs. By comparing these profiles, we identified 2643 genes that were up-regulated during the reprogramming process and 15 key transcription factors (TFs) that regulate these genes. Using the TF-target relationships, we developed TRNs describing how these TFs regulate three pluripotency-related processes (cell proliferation, stem cell maintenance and epigenetic regulation) during the reprogramming. The TRNs showed that 4 of the 15 TFs (Oct4/Pou5f1, Cux1, Zfp143 and E2f4) regulated cell proliferation during the early stages of reprogramming, whereas 11 TFs (Oct4/Pou5f1, Foxm1, Cux1, Zfp143, Trp53, E2f4, Esrrb, Nfyb, Nanog, Sox2 and Klf4) regulated the three pluripotency-related processes during the late stages of reprogramming. Our TRNs provide a model for the temporally coordinated transcriptional regulation of pluripotency-related processes during the SSC-to-mSSC reprogramming, which can be further tested in detailed functional studies.

  1. Oct4 targets regulatory nodes to modulate stem cell function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearl A Campbell

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are characterized by two defining features, the ability to self-renew and to differentiate into highly specialized cell types. The POU homeodomain transcription factor Oct4 (Pou5f1 is an essential mediator of the embryonic stem cell state and has been implicated in lineage specific differentiation, adult stem cell identity, and cancer. Recent description of the regulatory networks which maintain 'ES' have highlighted a dual role for Oct4 in the transcriptional activation of genes required to maintain self-renewal and pluripotency while concomitantly repressing genes which facilitate lineage specific differentiation. However, the molecular mechanism by which Oct4 mediates differential activation or repression at these loci to either maintain stem cell identity or facilitate the emergence of alternate transcriptional programs required for the realization of lineage remains to be elucidated. To further investigate Oct4 function, we employed gene expression profiling together with a robust statistical analysis to identify genes highly correlated to Oct4. Gene Ontology analysis to categorize overrepresented genes has led to the identification of themes which may prove essential to stem cell identity, including chromatin structure, nuclear architecture, cell cycle control, DNA repair, and apoptosis. Our experiments have identified previously unappreciated roles for Oct4 for firstly, regulating chromatin structure in a state consistent with self-renewal and pluripotency, and secondly, facilitating the expression of genes that keeps the cell poised to respond to cues that lead to differentiation. Together, these data define the mechanism by which Oct4 orchestrates cellular regulatory pathways to enforce the stem cell state and provides important insight into stem cell function and cancer.

  2. TIGER: Toolbox for integrating genome-scale metabolic models, expression data, and transcriptional regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Paul A

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several methods have been developed for analyzing genome-scale models of metabolism and transcriptional regulation. Many of these methods, such as Flux Balance Analysis, use constrained optimization to predict relationships between metabolic flux and the genes that encode and regulate enzyme activity. Recently, mixed integer programming has been used to encode these gene-protein-reaction (GPR relationships into a single optimization problem, but these techniques are often of limited generality and lack a tool for automating the conversion of rules to a coupled regulatory/metabolic model. Results We present TIGER, a Toolbox for Integrating Genome-scale Metabolism, Expression, and Regulation. TIGER converts a series of generalized, Boolean or multilevel rules into a set of mixed integer inequalities. The package also includes implementations of existing algorithms to integrate high-throughput expression data with genome-scale models of metabolism and transcriptional regulation. We demonstrate how TIGER automates the coupling of a genome-scale metabolic model with GPR logic and models of transcriptional regulation, thereby serving as a platform for algorithm development and large-scale metabolic analysis. Additionally, we demonstrate how TIGER's algorithms can be used to identify inconsistencies and improve existing models of transcriptional regulation with examples from the reconstructed transcriptional regulatory network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Conclusion The TIGER package provides a consistent platform for algorithm development and extending existing genome-scale metabolic models with regulatory networks and high-throughput data.

  3. Transcriptional and Epigenetic Regulatory Mechanisms Affecting HTLV-1 Provirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Miyazato

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is a retrovirus associated with human diseases, such as adult T-cell leukemia (ATL and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/Tropic spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. As a retrovirus, its life cycle includes a step where HTLV-1 is integrated into the host genomic DNA and forms proviral DNA. In the chronic phase of the infection, HTLV‑1 is known to proliferate as a provirus via the mitotic division of the infected host cells. There are generally tens of thousands of infected clones within an infected individual. They exist not only in peripheral blood, but also in various lymphoid organs. Viral proteins encoded in HTLV-1 genome play a role in the proliferation and survival of the infected cells. As is the case with other chronic viral infections, HTLV-1 gene expression induces the activation of the host immunity against the virus. Thus, the transcription from HTLV-1 provirus needs to be controlled in order to evade the host immune surveillance. There should be a dynamic and complex regulation in vivo, where an equilibrium between viral antigen expression and host immune surveillance is achieved. The mechanisms regulating viral gene expression from the provirus are a key to understanding the persistent/latent infection with HTLV-1 and its pathogenesis. In this article, we would like to review our current understanding on this topic.

  4. Computational methods to dissect cis-regulatory transcriptional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SEARCHU

    SAGE) has allowed rapid and ... profiling and functional characterization are required for gene discovery and pathway elucidation ..... Dermitzakis E T, Kirkness E, Schwarz S, Birney E, Reymond A and Antonarakis S E 2004 Comparison of ...

  5. Metabolic network topology reveals transcriptional regulatory signatures of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelezniak, Aleksej; Pers, Tune H; Soares, Simão; Patti, Mary Elizabeth; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb

    2010-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a disorder characterized by both insulin resistance and impaired insulin secretion. Recent transcriptomics studies related to T2DM have revealed changes in expression of a large number of metabolic genes in a variety of tissues. Identification of the molecular mechanisms underlying these transcriptional changes and their impact on the cellular metabolic phenotype is a challenging task due to the complexity of transcriptional regulation and the highly interconnected nature of the metabolic network. In this study we integrate skeletal muscle gene expression datasets with human metabolic network reconstructions to identify key metabolic regulatory features of T2DM. These features include reporter metabolites--metabolites with significant collective transcriptional response in the associated enzyme-coding genes, and transcription factors with significant enrichment of binding sites in the promoter regions of these genes. In addition to metabolites from TCA cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, and lipid metabolism (known to be associated with T2DM), we identified several reporter metabolites representing novel biomarker candidates. For example, the highly connected metabolites NAD+/NADH and ATP/ADP were also identified as reporter metabolites that are potentially contributing to the widespread gene expression changes observed in T2DM. An algorithm based on the analysis of the promoter regions of the genes associated with reporter metabolites revealed a transcription factor regulatory network connecting several parts of metabolism. The identified transcription factors include members of the CREB, NRF1 and PPAR family, among others, and represent regulatory targets for further experimental analysis. Overall, our results provide a holistic picture of key metabolic and regulatory nodes potentially involved in the pathogenesis of T2DM.

  6. Using network component analysis to dissect regulatory networks mediated by transcription factors in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Ye

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the relationship between genetic variation and gene expression is a central question in genetics. With the availability of data from high-throughput technologies such as ChIP-Chip, expression, and genotyping arrays, we can begin to not only identify associations but to understand how genetic variations perturb the underlying transcription regulatory networks to induce differential gene expression. In this study, we describe a simple model of transcription regulation where the expression of a gene is completely characterized by two properties: the concentrations and promoter affinities of active transcription factors. We devise a method that extends Network Component Analysis (NCA to determine how genetic variations in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs perturb these two properties. Applying our method to a segregating population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found statistically significant examples of trans-acting SNPs located in regulatory hotspots that perturb transcription factor concentrations and affinities for target promoters to cause global differential expression and cis-acting genetic variations that perturb the promoter affinities of transcription factors on a single gene to cause local differential expression. Although many genetic variations linked to gene expressions have been identified, it is not clear how they perturb the underlying regulatory networks that govern gene expression. Our work begins to fill this void by showing that many genetic variations affect the concentrations of active transcription factors in a cell and their affinities for target promoters. Understanding the effects of these perturbations can help us to paint a more complete picture of the complex landscape of transcription regulation. The software package implementing the algorithms discussed in this work is available as a MATLAB package upon request.

  7. Transcriptional regulatory network refinement and quantification through kinetic modeling, gene expression microarray data and information theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayyed-Ahmad, Abdallah; Tuncay, Kagan; Ortoleva, Peter J

    2007-01-01

    Background Gene expression microarray and other multiplex data hold promise for addressing the challenges of cellular complexity, refined diagnoses and the discovery of well-targeted treatments. A new approach to the construction and quantification of transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs) is presented that integrates gene expression microarray data and cell modeling through information theory. Given a partial TRN and time series data, a probability density is constructed that is a functional of the time course of transcription factor (TF) thermodynamic activities at the site of gene control, and is a function of mRNA degradation and transcription rate coefficients, and equilibrium constants for TF/gene binding. Results Our approach yields more physicochemical information that compliments the results of network structure delineation methods, and thereby can serve as an element of a comprehensive TRN discovery/quantification system. The most probable TF time courses and values of the aforementioned parameters are obtained by maximizing the probability obtained through entropy maximization. Observed time delays between mRNA expression and activity are accounted for implicitly since the time course of the activity of a TF is coupled by probability functional maximization, and is not assumed to be proportional to expression level of the mRNA type that translates into the TF. This allows one to investigate post-translational and TF activation mechanisms of gene regulation. Accuracy and robustness of the method are evaluated. A kinetic formulation is used to facilitate the analysis of phenomena with a strongly dynamical character while a physically-motivated regularization of the TF time course is found to overcome difficulties due to omnipresent noise and data sparsity that plague other methods of gene expression data analysis. An application to Escherichia coli is presented. Conclusion Multiplex time series data can be used for the construction of the network of

  8. Identification of regulatory network topological units coordinating the genome-wide transcriptional response to glucose in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gosset Guillermo

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucose is the preferred carbon and energy source for Escherichia coli. A complex regulatory network coordinates gene expression, transport and enzyme activities in response to the presence of this sugar. To determine the extent of the cellular response to glucose, we applied an approach combining global transcriptome and regulatory network analyses. Results Transcriptome data from isogenic wild type and crp- strains grown in Luria-Bertani medium (LB or LB + 4 g/L glucose (LB+G were analyzed to identify differentially transcribed genes. We detected 180 and 200 genes displaying increased and reduced relative transcript levels in the presence of glucose, respectively. The observed expression pattern in LB was consistent with a gluconeogenic metabolic state including active transport and interconversion of small molecules and macromolecules, induction of protease-encoding genes and a partial heat shock response. In LB+G, catabolic repression was detected for transport and metabolic interconversion activities. We also detected an increased capacity for de novo synthesis of nucleotides, amino acids and proteins. Cluster analysis of a subset of genes revealed that CRP mediates catabolite repression for most of the genes displaying reduced transcript levels in LB+G, whereas Fis participates in the upregulation of genes under this condition. An analysis of the regulatory network, in terms of topological functional units, revealed 8 interconnected modules which again exposed the importance of Fis and CRP as directly responsible for the coordinated response of the cell. This effect was also seen with other not extensively connected transcription factors such as FruR and PdhR, which showed a consistent response considering media composition. Conclusion This work allowed the identification of eight interconnected regulatory network modules that includes CRP, Fis and other transcriptional factors that respond directly or indirectly to the

  9. DMPD: Type I interferon [corrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily of transcription factors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16979567 Type I interferon [corrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily...ng) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Type I interferon [corrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily...orrected] gene induction by the interferon regulatory factorfamily of transcription factors. Authors Honda K

  10. Genome-wide targeting of the epigenetic regulatory protein CTCF to gene promoters by the transcription factor TFII-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Hernández, Rodrigo; Marques, Maud; Hilmi, Khalid; Zhao, Teijun; Saad, Amine; Alaoui-Jamali, Moulay A; del Rincon, Sonia V; Ashworth, Todd; Roy, Ananda L; Emerson, Beverly M; Witcher, Michael

    2015-02-17

    CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is a key regulator of nuclear chromatin structure and gene regulation. The impact of CTCF on transcriptional output is highly varied, ranging from repression to transcriptional pausing and transactivation. The multifunctional nature of CTCF may be directed solely through remodeling chromatin architecture. However, another hypothesis is that the multifunctional nature of CTCF is mediated, in part, through differential association with protein partners having unique functions. Consistent with this hypothesis, our mass spectrometry analyses of CTCF interacting partners reveal a previously undefined association with the transcription factor general transcription factor II-I (TFII-I). Biochemical fractionation of CTCF indicates that a distinct CTCF complex incorporating TFII-I is assembled on DNA. Unexpectedly, we found that the interaction between CTCF and TFII-I is essential for directing CTCF to the promoter proximal regulatory regions of target genes across the genome, particularly at genes involved in metabolism. At genes coregulated by CTCF and TFII-I, we find knockdown of TFII-I results in diminished CTCF binding, lack of cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) recruitment, and an attenuation of RNA polymerase II phosphorylation at serine 5. Phenotypically, knockdown of TFII-I alters the cellular response to metabolic stress. Our data indicate that TFII-I directs CTCF binding to target genes, and in turn the two proteins cooperate to recruit CDK8 and enhance transcription initiation.

  11. Unraveling the regulatory network of the MADS box transcription factor RIN in fruit ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Guozheng; Wang, Yuying; Cao, Baohua; Wang, Weihao; Tian, Shiping

    2012-04-01

    The MADS box transcription factor RIN is a global regulator of fruit ripening. However, the direct targets modulated by RIN and the mechanisms underlying the transcriptional regulation remain largely unknown. Here we identified 41 protein spots representing 35 individual genes as potential targets of RIN by comparative proteomic analysis of a rin mutant in tomato fruits. Gene expression analysis showed that the mRNA level of 26 genes correlated well with the protein level. After examining the promoter regions of the candidate genes, a variable number of RIN binding sites were found. Five genes (E8, TomloxC, PNAE, PGK and ADH2) were identified as novel direct targets of RIN by chromatin immunoprecipitation. The results of a gel mobility shift assay confirmed the direct binding of RIN to the promoters of these genes. Of the direct target genes, TomloxC and ADH2, which encode lipoxygenase (LOX) and alcohol dehydrogenase, respectively, are critical for the production of characteristic tomato aromas derived from LOX pathway. Further study indicated that RIN also directly regulates the expression of HPL, which encodes hydroperoxide lyase, another rate-limiting enzyme in the LOX pathway. Loss of function of RIN causes de-regulation of the LOX pathway, leading to a specific defect in the generation of aroma compounds derived from this pathway. These results indicate that RIN modulates aroma formation by direct and rigorous regulation of expression of genes in the LOX pathway. Taken together, our findings suggest that the regulatory effect of RIN on fruit ripening is achieved by targeting specific molecular pathways. © 2011 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Functional characterization of tobacco transcription factor TGA2.1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kegler, C.; Lenk, I.; Krawczyk, S.

    2004-01-01

    Activation sequence-1 (as-1)-like regulatory cis elements mediate transcriptional activation in response to increased levels of plant signalling molecules auxin and salicylic acid (SA). Our earlier work has shown that tobacco cellular as-1-binding complex SARP (salicylic acid responsive protein...

  13. Architecture of transcriptional regulatory circuits is knitted over the topology of bio-molecular interaction networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soberano de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb; Nielsen, Jens

    2008-01-01

    is to use the topology of bio-molecular interaction networks in order to constrain the solution space. Such approaches systematically integrate the existing biological knowledge with the 'omics' data. Results: Here we introduce a hypothesis-driven method that integrates bio-molecular network topology...... with transcriptome data, thereby allowing the identification of key biological features (Reporter Features) around which transcriptional changes are significantly concentrated. We have combined transcriptome data with different biological networks in order to identify Reporter Gene Ontologies, Reporter Transcription...... Factors, Reporter Proteins and Reporter Complexes, and use this to decipher the logic of regulatory circuits playing a key role in yeast glucose repression and human diabetes. Conclusion: Reporter Features offer the opportunity to identify regulatory hot-spots in bio-molecular interaction networks...

  14. Methods of MicroRNA Promoter Prediction and Transcription Factor Mediated Regulatory Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuming; Wang, Fang; Chen, Su; Wan, Jun; Wang, Guohua

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short (~22 nucleotides) noncoding RNAs and disseminated throughout the genome, either in the intergenic regions or in the intronic sequences of protein-coding genes. MiRNAs have been proved to play important roles in regulating gene expression. Hence, understanding the transcriptional mechanism of miRNA genes is a very critical step to uncover the whole regulatory network. A number of miRNA promoter prediction models have been proposed in the past decade. This review summarized several most popular miRNA promoter prediction models which used genome sequence features, or other features, for example, histone markers, RNA Pol II binding sites, and nucleosome-free regions, achieved by high-throughput sequencing data. Some databases were described as resources for miRNA promoter information. We then performed comprehensive discussion on prediction and identification of transcription factor mediated microRNA regulatory networks.

  15. SAGA: a hybrid search algorithm for Bayesian Network structure learning of transcriptional regulatory networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adabor, Emmanuel S; Acquaah-Mensah, George K; Oduro, Francis T

    2015-02-01

    Bayesian Networks have been used for the inference of transcriptional regulatory relationships among genes, and are valuable for obtaining biological insights. However, finding optimal Bayesian Network (BN) is NP-hard. Thus, heuristic approaches have sought to effectively solve this problem. In this work, we develop a hybrid search method combining Simulated Annealing with a Greedy Algorithm (SAGA). SAGA explores most of the search space by undergoing a two-phase search: first with a Simulated Annealing search and then with a Greedy search. Three sets of background-corrected and normalized microarray datasets were used to test the algorithm. BN structure learning was also conducted using the datasets, and other established search methods as implemented in BANJO (Bayesian Network Inference with Java Objects). The Bayesian Dirichlet Equivalence (BDe) metric was used to score the networks produced with SAGA. SAGA predicted transcriptional regulatory relationships among genes in networks that evaluated to higher BDe scores with high sensitivities and specificities. Thus, the proposed method competes well with existing search algorithms for Bayesian Network structure learning of transcriptional regulatory networks. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. The global regulatory architecture of transcription during the Caulobacter cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Each Caulobacter cell cycle involves differentiation and an asymmetric cell division driven by a cyclical regulatory circuit comprised of four transcription factors (TFs and a DNA methyltransferase. Using a modified global 5' RACE protocol, we globally mapped transcription start sites (TSSs at base-pair resolution, measured their transcription levels at multiple times in the cell cycle, and identified their transcription factor binding sites. Out of 2726 TSSs, 586 were shown to be cell cycle-regulated and we identified 529 binding sites for the cell cycle master regulators. Twenty-three percent of the cell cycle-regulated promoters were found to be under the combinatorial control of two or more of the global regulators. Previously unknown features of the core cell cycle circuit were identified, including 107 antisense TSSs which exhibit cell cycle-control, and 241 genes with multiple TSSs whose transcription levels often exhibited different cell cycle timing. Cumulatively, this study uncovered novel new layers of transcriptional regulation mediating the bacterial cell cycle.

  17. Genome-wide prediction of transcriptional regulatory elements of human promoters using gene expression and promoter analysis data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Seon-Young

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A complete understanding of the regulatory mechanisms of gene expression is the next important issue of genomics. Many bioinformaticians have developed methods and algorithms for predicting transcriptional regulatory mechanisms from sequence, gene expression, and binding data. However, most of these studies involved the use of yeast which has much simpler regulatory networks than human and has many genome wide binding data and gene expression data under diverse conditions. Studies of genome wide transcriptional networks of human genomes currently lag behind those of yeast. Results We report herein a new method that combines gene expression data analysis with promoter analysis to infer transcriptional regulatory elements of human genes. The Z scores from the application of gene set analysis with gene sets of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs were successfully used to represent the activity of TFBSs in a given microarray data set. A significant correlation between the Z scores of gene sets of TFBSs and individual genes across multiple conditions permitted successful identification of many known human transcriptional regulatory elements of genes as well as the prediction of numerous putative TFBSs of many genes which will constitute a good starting point for further experiments. Using Z scores of gene sets of TFBSs produced better predictions than the use of mRNA levels of a transcription factor itself, suggesting that the Z scores of gene sets of TFBSs better represent diverse mechanisms for changing the activity of transcription factors in the cell. In addition, cis-regulatory modules, combinations of co-acting TFBSs, were readily identified by our analysis. Conclusion By a strategic combination of gene set level analysis of gene expression data sets and promoter analysis, we were able to identify and predict many transcriptional regulatory elements of human genes. We conclude that this approach will aid in decoding

  18. Identifying significant genetic regulatory networks in the prostate cancer from microarray data based on transcription factor analysis and conditional independency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeh Cheng-Yu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer is a world wide leading cancer and it is characterized by its aggressive metastasis. According to the clinical heterogeneity, prostate cancer displays different stages and grades related to the aggressive metastasis disease. Although numerous studies used microarray analysis and traditional clustering method to identify the individual genes during the disease processes, the important gene regulations remain unclear. We present a computational method for inferring genetic regulatory networks from micorarray data automatically with transcription factor analysis and conditional independence testing to explore the potential significant gene regulatory networks that are correlated with cancer, tumor grade and stage in the prostate cancer. Results To deal with missing values in microarray data, we used a K-nearest-neighbors (KNN algorithm to determine the precise expression values. We applied web services technology to wrap the bioinformatics toolkits and databases to automatically extract the promoter regions of DNA sequences and predicted the transcription factors that regulate the gene expressions. We adopt the microarray datasets consists of 62 primary tumors, 41 normal prostate tissues from Stanford Microarray Database (SMD as a target dataset to evaluate our method. The predicted results showed that the possible biomarker genes related to cancer and denoted the androgen functions and processes may be in the development of the prostate cancer and promote the cell death in cell cycle. Our predicted results showed that sub-networks of genes SREBF1, STAT6 and PBX1 are strongly related to a high extent while ETS transcription factors ELK1, JUN and EGR2 are related to a low extent. Gene SLC22A3 may explain clinically the differentiation associated with the high grade cancer compared with low grade cancer. Enhancer of Zeste Homolg 2 (EZH2 regulated by RUNX1 and STAT3 is correlated to the pathological stage

  19. The TEAD/TEF family protein Scalloped mediates transcriptional output of the Hippo growth-regulatory pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shian; Liu, Yi; Zheng, Yonggang; Dong, Jixin; Pan, Duojia

    2008-03-01

    The Hippo (Hpo) kinase cascade restricts tissue growth by inactivating the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie (Yki), which regulates the expression of target genes such as the cell death inhibitor diap1 by unknown mechanisms. Here we identify the TEAD/TEF family protein Scalloped (Sd) as a DNA-binding transcription factor that partners with Yki to mediate the transcriptional output of the Hpo growth-regulatory pathway. The diap1 (th) locus harbors a minimal Sd-binding Hpo Responsive Element (HRE) that mediates transcriptional regulation by the Hpo pathway. Sd binds directly to Yki, and a Yki missense mutation that abrogates Sd-Yki binding also inactivates Yki function in vivo. We further demonstrate that sd is required for yki-induced tissue overgrowth and target gene expression, and that sd activity is conserved in its mammalian homolog. Our results uncover a heretofore missing link in the Hpo signaling pathway and provide a glimpse of the molecular events on a Hpo-responsive enhancer element.

  20. Comparative analysis of module-based versus direct methods for reverse-engineering transcriptional regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi Anagha

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A myriad of methods to reverse-engineer transcriptional regulatory networks have been developed in recent years. Direct methods directly reconstruct a network of pairwise regulatory interactions while module-based methods predict a set of regulators for modules of coexpressed genes treated as a single unit. To date, there has been no systematic comparison of the relative strengths and weaknesses of both types of methods. Results We have compared a recently developed module-based algorithm, LeMoNe (Learning Module Networks, to a mutual information based direct algorithm, CLR (Context Likelihood of Relatedness, using benchmark expression data and databases of known transcriptional regulatory interactions for Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A global comparison using recall versus precision curves hides the topologically distinct nature of the inferred networks and is not informative about the specific subtasks for which each method is most suited. Analysis of the degree distributions and a regulator specific comparison show that CLR is 'regulator-centric', making true predictions for a higher number of regulators, while LeMoNe is 'target-centric', recovering a higher number of known targets for fewer regulators, with limited overlap in the predicted interactions between both methods. Detailed biological examples in E. coli and S. cerevisiae are used to illustrate these differences and to prove that each method is able to infer parts of the network where the other fails. Biological validation of the inferred networks cautions against over-interpreting recall and precision values computed using incomplete reference networks. Conclusion Our results indicate that module-based and direct methods retrieve largely distinct parts of the underlying transcriptional regulatory networks. The choice of algorithm should therefore be based on the particular biological problem of interest and not on global metrics which cannot be

  1. Nuclear stability and transcriptional directionality separate functionally distinct RNA species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Robin; Andersen, Peter Refsing; Valen, Eivind

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian genomes are pervasively transcribed, yielding a complex transcriptome with high variability in composition and cellular abundance. Although recent efforts have identified thousands of new long non-coding (lnc) RNAs and demonstrated a complex transcriptional repertoire produced by protei...... a vast majority of unstable transcripts. The predictive power of the approach promises to streamline the functional analysis of known and novel RNAs....

  2. Evolution of UCP1 Transcriptional Regulatory Elements Across the Mammalian Phylogeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Gaudry

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1 permits non-shivering thermogenesis (NST when highly expressed in brown adipose tissue (BAT mitochondria. Exclusive to placental mammals, BAT has commonly been regarded to be advantageous for thermoregulation in hibernators, small-bodied species, and the neonates of larger species. While numerous regulatory control motifs associated with UCP1 transcription have been proposed for murid rodents, it remains unclear whether these are conserved across the eutherian mammal phylogeny and hence essential for UCP1 expression. To address this shortcoming, we conducted a broad comparative survey of putative UCP1 transcriptional regulatory elements in 139 mammals (135 eutherians. We find no evidence for presence of a UCP1 enhancer in monotremes and marsupials, supporting the hypothesis that this control region evolved in a stem eutherian ancestor. We additionally reveal that several putative promoter elements (e.g., CRE-4, CCAAT identified in murid rodents are not conserved among BAT-expressing eutherians, and together with the putative regulatory region (PRR and CpG island do not appear to be crucial for UCP1 expression. The specificity and importance of the upTRE, dnTRE, URE1, CRE-2, RARE-2, NBRE, BRE-1, and BRE-2 enhancer elements first described from rats and mice are moreover uncertain as these motifs differ substantially—but generally remain highly conserved—in other BAT-expressing eutherians. Other UCP1 enhancer motifs (CRE-3, PPRE, and RARE-3 as well as the TATA box are also highly conserved in nearly all eutherian lineages with an intact UCP1. While these transcriptional regulatory motifs are generally also maintained in species where this gene is pseudogenized, the loss or degeneration of key basal promoter (e.g., TATA box and enhancer elements in other UCP1-lacking lineages make it unlikely that the enhancer region is pleiotropic (i.e., co-regulates additional genes. Importantly, differential losses of (or mutations

  3. The post-transcriptional regulatory system CSR controls the balance of metabolic pools in upper glycolysis of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Manon; Ropers, Delphine; Letisse, Fabien; Laguerre, Sandrine; Portais, Jean-Charles; Cocaign-Bousquet, Muriel; Enjalbert, Brice

    2016-05-01

    Metabolic control in Escherichia coli is a complex process involving multilevel regulatory systems but the involvement of post-transcriptional regulation is uncertain. The post-transcriptional factor CsrA is stated as being the only regulator essential for the use of glycolytic substrates. A dozen enzymes in the central carbon metabolism (CCM) have been reported as potentially controlled by CsrA, but its impact on the CCM functioning has not been demonstrated. Here, a multiscale analysis was performed in a wild-type strain and its isogenic mutant attenuated for CsrA (including growth parameters, gene expression levels, metabolite pools, abundance of enzymes and fluxes). Data integration and regulation analysis showed a coordinated control of the expression of glycolytic enzymes. This also revealed the imbalance of metabolite pools in the csrA mutant upper glycolysis, before the phosphofructokinase PfkA step. This imbalance is associated with a glucose-phosphate stress. Restoring PfkA activity in the csrA mutant strain suppressed this stress and increased the mutant growth rate on glucose. Thus, the carbon storage regulator system is essential for the effective functioning of the upper glycolysis mainly through its control of PfkA. This work demonstrates the pivotal role of post-transcriptional regulation to shape the carbon metabolism. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Global analysis of p53-regulated transcription identifies its direct targets and unexpected regulatory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Mary Ann; Andrysik, Zdenek; Dengler, Veronica L; Mellert, Hestia S; Guarnieri, Anna; Freeman, Justin A; Sullivan, Kelly D; Galbraith, Matthew D; Luo, Xin; Kraus, W Lee; Dowell, Robin D; Espinosa, Joaquin M

    2014-05-27

    The p53 transcription factor is a potent suppressor of tumor growth. We report here an analysis of its direct transcriptional program using Global Run-On sequencing (GRO-seq). Shortly after MDM2 inhibition by Nutlin-3, low levels of p53 rapidly activate ∼200 genes, most of them not previously established as direct targets. This immediate response involves all canonical p53 effector pathways, including apoptosis. Comparative global analysis of RNA synthesis vs steady state levels revealed that microarray profiling fails to identify low abundance transcripts directly activated by p53. Interestingly, p53 represses a subset of its activation targets before MDM2 inhibition. GRO-seq uncovered a plethora of gene-specific regulatory features affecting key survival and apoptotic genes within the p53 network. p53 regulates hundreds of enhancer-derived RNAs. Strikingly, direct p53 targets harbor pre-activated enhancers highly transcribed in p53 null cells. Altogether, these results enable the study of many uncharacterized p53 target genes and unexpected regulatory mechanisms.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02200.001. Copyright © 2014, Allen et al.

  5. Localizing potentially active post-transcriptional regulations in the Ewing's sarcoma gene regulatory network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delyon Bernard

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A wide range of techniques is now available for analyzing regulatory networks. Nonetheless, most of these techniques fail to interpret large-scale transcriptional data at the post-translational level. Results We address the question of using large-scale transcriptomic observation of a system perturbation to analyze a regulatory network which contained several types of interactions - transcriptional and post-translational. Our method consisted of post-processing the outputs of an open-source tool named BioQuali - an automatic constraint-based analysis mimicking biologist's local reasoning on a large scale. The post-processing relied on differences in the behavior of the transcriptional and post-translational levels in the network. As a case study, we analyzed a network representation of the genes and proteins controlled by an oncogene in the context of Ewing's sarcoma. The analysis allowed us to pinpoint active interactions specific to this cancer. We also identified the parts of the network which were incomplete and should be submitted for further investigation. Conclusions The proposed approach is effective for the qualitative analysis of cancer networks. It allows the integrative use of experimental data of various types in order to identify the specific information that should be considered a priority in the initial - and possibly very large - experimental dataset. Iteratively, new dataset can be introduced into the analysis to improve the network representation and make it more specific.

  6. Differential roles of epigenetic changes and Foxp3 expression in regulatory T cell-specific transcriptional regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morikawa, Hiromasa; Ohkura, Naganari; Vandenbon, Alexis; Itoh, Masayoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Standley, Daron M.; Date, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Rehli, Michael; Baillie, J. Kenneth; de Hoon, Michiel J. L.; Haberle, Vanja; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.; Lizio, Marina; Andersson, Robin; Mungall, Christopher J.; Meehan, Terrence F.; Schmeier, Sebastian; Bertin, Nicolas; Jørgensen, Mette; Dimont, Emmanuel; Arner, Erik; Schmidl, Christian; Schaefer, Ulf; Medvedeva, Yulia A.; Plessy, Charles; Vitezic, Morana; Severin, Jessica; Semple, Colin A.; Ishizu, Yuri; Francescatto, Margherita; Alam, Intikhab; Albanese, Davide; Altschuler, Gabriel M.; Archer, John A. C.; Arner, Peter; Babina, Magda; Baker, Sarah; Balwierz, Piotr J.; Beckhouse, Anthony G.; Pradhan-Bhatt, Swati; Blake, Judith A.; Blumenthal, Antje; Bodega, Beatrice; Bonetti, Alessandro; Briggs, James; Brombacher, Frank; Burroughs, A. Maxwell; Califano, Andrea; Cannistraci, Carlo V.; Carbajo, Daniel; Chen, Yun; Chierici, Marco; Ciani, Yari; Clevers, Hans C.; Dalla, Emiliano; Davis, Carrie A.; Deplancke, Bart; Detmar, Michael; Diehl, Alexander D.; Dohi, Taeko; Drabløs, Finn; Edge, Albert S. B.; Edinger, Matthias; Ekwall, Karl; Endoh, Mitsuhiro; Enomoto, Hideki; Fagiolini, Michela; Fairbairn, Lynsey; Fang, Hai; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.; Favorov, Alexander V.; Fisher, Malcolm E.; Frith, Martin C.; Fujita, Rie; Fukuda, Shiro; Furlanello, Cesare; Furuno, Masaaki; Furusawa, Jun-ichi; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B.; Gibson, Andrew; Gingeras, Thomas; Goldowitz, Daniel; Gough, Julian; Guhl, Sven; Guler, Reto; Gustincich, Stefano; Ha, Thomas J.; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Hara, Mitsuko; Harbers, Matthias; Harshbarger, Jayson; Hasegawa, Akira; Hasegawa, Yuki; Hashimoto, Takehiro; Herlyn, Meenhard; Hitchens, Kelly J.; Ho Sui, Shannan J.; Hofmann, Oliver M.; Hoof, Ilka; Hori, Fumi; Huminiecki, Lukasz; Iida, Kei; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Jankovic, Boris R.; Jia, Hui; Joshi, Anagha; Jurman, Giuseppe; Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Kai, Chieko; Kaida, Kaoru; Kaiho, Ai; Kajiyama, Kazuhiro; Kanamori-Katayama, Mutsumi; Kasianov, Artem S.; Kasukawa, Takeya; Katayama, Shintaro; Kato, Sachi; Kawaguchi, Shuji; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yuki I.; Kawashima, Tsugumi; Kempfle, Judith S.; Kenna, Tony J.; Kere, Juha; Khachigian, Levon M.; Kitamura, Toshio; Klinken, S. Peter; Knox, Alan J.; Kojima, Miki; Kojima, Soichi; Kondo, Naoto; Koseki, Haruhiko; Koyasu, Shigeo; Krampitz, Sarah; Kubosaki, Atsutaka; Kwon, Andrew T.; Laros, Jeroen F. J.; Lee, Weonju; Lennartsson, Andreas; Li, Kang; Lilje, Berit; Lipovich, Leonard; Mackay-sim, Alan; Manabe, Ri-ichiroh; Mar, Jessica C.; Marchand, Benoit; Mathelier, Anthony; Mejhert, Niklas; Meynert, Alison; Mizuno, Yosuke; Morais, David A. de Lima; Morimoto, Mitsuru; Moro, Kazuyo; Motakis, Efthymios; Motohashi, Hozumi; Mummery, Christine L.; Murata, Mitsuyoshi; Nakachi, Yutaka; Nakahara, Fumio; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Yukio; Nakazato, Kenichi; van Nimwegen, Erik; Ninomiya, Noriko; Nishiyori, Hiromi; Noma, Shohei; Nozaki, Tadasuke; Ogishima, Soichi; Ohmiya, Hiroko; Ohno, Hiroshi; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Okazaki, Yasushi; Orlando, Valerio; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A.; Pain, Arnab; Passier, Robert; Patrikakis, Margaret; Persson, Helena; Piazza, Silvano; Prendergast, James G. D.; Rackham, Owen J. L.; Ramilowski, Jordan A.; Rashid, Mamoon; Ravasi, Timothy; Rizzu, Patrizia; Roncador, Marco; Roy, Sugata; Rye, Morten B.; Saijyo, Eri; Sajantila, Antti; Saka, Akiko; Sakai, Mizuho; Sato, Hiroki; Satoh, Hironori; Savvi, Suzana; Saxena, Alka; Schneider, Claudio; Schultes, Erik A.; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula G.; Schwegmann, Anita; Sengstag, Thierry; Sheng, Guojun; Shimoji, Hisashi; Shimoni, Yishai; Shin, Jay W.; Simon, Christophe; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Takaaki; Suzuki, Masanori; Swoboda, Rolf K.; 't Hoen, Peter A. C.; Tagami, Michihira; Takahashi, Naoko; Takai, Jun; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tatsukawa, Hideki; Tatum, Zuotian; Thompson, Mark; Toyoda, Hiroo; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Valen, Eivind; van de Wetering, Marc; van den Berg, Linda M.; Verardo, Roberto; Vijayan, Dipti; Vorontsov, Ilya E.; Wasserman, Wyeth W.; Watanabe, Shoko; Wells, Christine A.; Winteringham, Louise N.; Wolvetang, Ernst; Wood, Emily J.; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yoneda, Misako; Yonekura, Yohei; Yoshida, Shigehiro; Zabierowski, Suzan E.; Zhang, Peter G.; Zhao, Xiaobei; Zucchelli, Silvia; Summers, Kim M.; Suzuki, Harukazu; Daub, Carsten O.; Kawai, Jun; Heutink, Peter; Hide, Winston; Freeman, Tom C.; Lenhard, Boris; Bajic, Vladimir B.; Taylor, Martin S.; Makeev, Vsevolod J.; Sandelin, Albin; Hume, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring regulatory T (Treg) cells, which specifically express the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), are engaged in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and homeostasis. By transcriptional start site cluster analysis, we assessed here how genome-wide patterns of DNA

  7. Identification of functional elements and regulatory circuits by Drosophila modENCODE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Sushmita; Ernst, Jason; Kharchenko, Peter V; Kheradpour, Pouya; Negre, Nicolas; Eaton, Matthew L; Landolin, Jane M; Bristow, Christopher A; Ma, Lijia; Lin, Michael F; Washietl, Stefan; Arshinoff, Bradley I; Ay, Ferhat; Meyer, Patrick E; Robine, Nicolas; Washington, Nicole L; Di Stefano, Luisa; Berezikov, Eugene; Brown, Christopher D; Candeias, Rogerio; Carlson, Joseph W; Carr, Adrian; Jungreis, Irwin; Marbach, Daniel; Sealfon, Rachel; Tolstorukov, Michael Y; Will, Sebastian; Alekseyenko, Artyom A; Artieri, Carlo; Booth, Benjamin W; Brooks, Angela N; Dai, Qi; Davis, Carrie A; Duff, Michael O; Feng, Xin; Gorchakov, Andrey A; Gu, Tingting; Henikoff, Jorja G; Kapranov, Philipp; Li, Renhua; MacAlpine, Heather K; Malone, John; Minoda, Aki; Nordman, Jared; Okamura, Katsutomo; Perry, Marc; Powell, Sara K; Riddle, Nicole C; Sakai, Akiko; Samsonova, Anastasia; Sandler, Jeremy E; Schwartz, Yuri B; Sher, Noa; Spokony, Rebecca; Sturgill, David; van Baren, Marijke; Wan, Kenneth H; Yang, Li; Yu, Charles; Feingold, Elise; Good, Peter; Guyer, Mark; Lowdon, Rebecca; Ahmad, Kami; Andrews, Justen; Berger, Bonnie; Brenner, Steven E; Brent, Michael R; Cherbas, Lucy; Elgin, Sarah C R; Gingeras, Thomas R; Grossman, Robert; Hoskins, Roger A; Kaufman, Thomas C; Kent, William; Kuroda, Mitzi I; Orr-Weaver, Terry; Perrimon, Norbert; Pirrotta, Vincenzo; Posakony, James W; Ren, Bing; Russell, Steven; Cherbas, Peter; Graveley, Brenton R; Lewis, Suzanna; Micklem, Gos; Oliver, Brian; Park, Peter J; Celniker, Susan E; Henikoff, Steven; Karpen, Gary H; Lai, Eric C; MacAlpine, David M; Stein, Lincoln D; White, Kevin P; Kellis, Manolis

    2010-12-24

    To gain insight into how genomic information is translated into cellular and developmental programs, the Drosophila model organism Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (modENCODE) project is comprehensively mapping transcripts, histone modifications, chromosomal proteins, transcription factors, replication proteins and intermediates, and nucleosome properties across a developmental time course and in multiple cell lines. We have generated more than 700 data sets and discovered protein-coding, noncoding, RNA regulatory, replication, and chromatin elements, more than tripling the annotated portion of the Drosophila genome. Correlated activity patterns of these elements reveal a functional regulatory network, which predicts putative new functions for genes, reveals stage- and tissue-specific regulators, and enables gene-expression prediction. Our results provide a foundation for directed experimental and computational studies in Drosophila and related species and also a model for systematic data integration toward comprehensive genomic and functional annotation.

  8. Elongation factor P mediates a novel post-transcriptional regulatory pathway critical for bacterial virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, S Betty; Roy, Hervé; Ibba, Michael

    2012-01-01

    of the pathogen to respond to external cues are typically attenuating. Here we discuss our recent discovery of a novel post-transcriptional regulatory pathway critical for Salmonella virulence and stress resistance. The enzymes PoxA and YjeK coordinately attach a unique beta-amino acid onto a highly conserved......Bacterial pathogens detect and integrate multiple environmental signals to coordinate appropriate changes in gene expression including the selective expression of virulence factors, changes to metabolism and the activation of stress response systems. Mutations that abolish the ability...... changes in the translation machinery during stress adaptation, indicating that the role of these factors in physiology may be broadly conserved....

  9. Methods of MicroRNA Promoter Prediction and Transcription Factor Mediated Regulatory Network

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Yuming; Wang, Fang; Chen, Su; Wan, Jun; Wang, Guohua

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short (~22 nucleotides) noncoding RNAs and disseminated throughout the genome, either in the intergenic regions or in the intronic sequences of protein-coding genes. MiRNAs have been proved to play important roles in regulating gene expression. Hence, understanding the transcriptional mechanism of miRNA genes is a very critical step to uncover the whole regulatory network. A number of miRNA promoter prediction models have been proposed in the past decade. This review su...

  10. Elongation factor P mediates a novel post-transcriptional regulatory pathway critical for bacterial virulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zou, S Betty; Roy, Hervé; Ibba, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens detect and integrate multiple environmental signals to coordinate appropriate changes in gene expression including the selective expression of virulence factors, changes to metabolism and the activation of stress response systems. Mutations that abolish the ability...... of the pathogen to respond to external cues are typically attenuating. Here we discuss our recent discovery of a novel post-transcriptional regulatory pathway critical for Salmonella virulence and stress resistance. The enzymes PoxA and YjeK coordinately attach a unique beta-amino acid onto a highly conserved...

  11. Core Transcriptional Regulatory Circuit Controlled by the TAL1 Complex in Human T Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Sanda, Takaomi; Lawton, Lee N.; Barrasa, M. Inmaculada; Fan, Zi Peng; Kohlhammer, Holger; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Ma, Wenxue; Tatarek, Jessica; Ahn, Yebin; Kelliher, Michelle A.; Jamieson, Catriona H.M.; Staudt, Louis M.; Young, Richard A.; Look, A. Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The oncogenic transcription factor TAL1/SCL is aberrantly expressed in over 40% of cases of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), emphasizing its importance in the molecular pathogenesis of T-ALL. Here we identify the core transcriptional regulatory circuit controlled by TAL1 and its regulatory partners HEB, E2A, LMO1/2, GATA3 and RUNX1. We show that TAL1 forms a positive interconnected auto-regulatory loop with GATA3 and RUNX1, and that the TAL1 complex directly activates the MY...

  12. Redefining the transcriptional regulatory dynamics of classically and alternatively activated macrophages by deepCAGE transcriptomics

    KAUST Repository

    Roy, S.

    2015-06-27

    Classically or alternatively activated macrophages (M1 and M2, respectively) play distinct and important roles for microbiocidal activity, regulation of inflammation and tissue homeostasis. Despite this, their transcriptional regulatory dynamics are poorly understood. Using promoter-level expression profiling by non-biased deepCAGE we have studied the transcriptional dynamics of classically and alternatively activated macrophages. Transcription factor (TF) binding motif activity analysis revealed four motifs, NFKB1_REL_RELA, IRF1,2, IRF7 and TBP that are commonly activated but have distinct activity dynamics in M1 and M2 activation. We observe matching changes in the expression profiles of the corresponding TFs and show that only a restricted set of TFs change expression. There is an overall drastic and transient up-regulation in M1 and a weaker and more sustainable up-regulation in M2. Novel TFs, such as Thap6, Maff, (M1) and Hivep1, Nfil3, Prdm1, (M2) among others, were suggested to be involved in the activation processes. Additionally, 52 (M1) and 67 (M2) novel differentially expressed genes and, for the first time, several differentially expressed long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) transcriptome markers were identified. In conclusion, the finding of novel motifs, TFs and protein-coding and lncRNA genes is an important step forward to fully understand the transcriptional machinery of macrophage activation.

  13. Transcriptional Regulatory Circuitries in the Human Pathogen Candida albicans Involving Sense–Antisense Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ausaf; Kravets, Anatoliy; Rustchenko, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Candida albicans, a major human fungal pathogen, usually contains a diploid genome, but controls adaptation to a toxic alternative carbon source L-sorbose, by the reversible loss of one chromosome 5 (Ch5). We have previously identified multiple unique regions on Ch5 that repress the growth on sorbose. In one of the regions, the CSU51 gene determining the repressive property of the region was identified. We report here the identification of the CSU53 gene from a different region on Ch5. Most importantly, we find that CSU51 and CSU53 are associated with novel regulatory elements, ASUs, which are embedded within CSUs in an antisense configuration. ASUs act opposite to CSUs by enhancing the growth on sorbose. In respect to the CSU transcripts, the ASU long antisense transcripts are in lesser amounts, are completely overlapped, and are inversely related. ASUs interact with CSUs in natural CSU/ASU cis configurations, as well as when extra copies of ASUs are placed in trans to the CSU/ASU configurations. We suggest that ASU long embedded antisense transcripts modulate CSU sense transcripts. PMID:22135347

  14. Transcriptional regulatory circuitries in the human pathogen Candida albicans involving sense--antisense interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Ausaf; Kravets, Anatoliy; Rustchenko, Elena

    2012-02-01

    Candida albicans, a major human fungal pathogen, usually contains a diploid genome, but controls adaptation to a toxic alternative carbon source L-sorbose, by the reversible loss of one chromosome 5 (Ch5). We have previously identified multiple unique regions on Ch5 that repress the growth on sorbose. In one of the regions, the CSU51 gene determining the repressive property of the region was identified. We report here the identification of the CSU53 gene from a different region on Ch5. Most importantly, we find that CSU51 and CSU53 are associated with novel regulatory elements, ASUs, which are embedded within CSUs in an antisense configuration. ASUs act opposite to CSUs by enhancing the growth on sorbose. In respect to the CSU transcripts, the ASU long antisense transcripts are in lesser amounts, are completely overlapped, and are inversely related. ASUs interact with CSUs in natural CSU/ASU cis configurations, as well as when extra copies of ASUs are placed in trans to the CSU/ASU configurations. We suggest that ASU long embedded antisense transcripts modulate CSU sense transcripts.

  15. The cis-regulatory logic of the mammalian photoreceptor transcriptional network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiau, Timothy H-C; Diaconu, Claudiu; Myers, Connie A; Lee, Jongwoo; Cepko, Constance L; Corbo, Joseph C

    2007-07-25

    The photoreceptor cells of the retina are subject to a greater number of genetic diseases than any other cell type in the human body. The majority of more than 120 cloned human blindness genes are highly expressed in photoreceptors. In order to establish an integrative framework in which to understand these diseases, we have undertaken an experimental and computational analysis of the network controlled by the mammalian photoreceptor transcription factors, Crx, Nrl, and Nr2e3. Using microarray and in situ hybridization datasets we have produced a model of this network which contains over 600 genes, including numerous retinal disease loci as well as previously uncharacterized photoreceptor transcription factors. To elucidate the connectivity of this network, we devised a computational algorithm to identify the photoreceptor-specific cis-regulatory elements (CREs) mediating the interactions between these transcription factors and their target genes. In vivo validation of our computational predictions resulted in the discovery of 19 novel photoreceptor-specific CREs near retinal disease genes. Examination of these CREs permitted the definition of a simple cis-regulatory grammar rule associated with high-level expression. To test the generality of this rule, we used an expanded form of it as a selection filter to evolve photoreceptor CREs from random DNA sequences in silico. When fused to fluorescent reporters, these evolved CREs drove strong, photoreceptor-specific expression in vivo. This study represents the first systematic identification and in vivo validation of CREs in a mammalian neuronal cell type and lays the groundwork for a systems biology of photoreceptor transcriptional regulation.

  16. The cis-regulatory logic of the mammalian photoreceptor transcriptional network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy H-C Hsiau

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The photoreceptor cells of the retina are subject to a greater number of genetic diseases than any other cell type in the human body. The majority of more than 120 cloned human blindness genes are highly expressed in photoreceptors. In order to establish an integrative framework in which to understand these diseases, we have undertaken an experimental and computational analysis of the network controlled by the mammalian photoreceptor transcription factors, Crx, Nrl, and Nr2e3. Using microarray and in situ hybridization datasets we have produced a model of this network which contains over 600 genes, including numerous retinal disease loci as well as previously uncharacterized photoreceptor transcription factors. To elucidate the connectivity of this network, we devised a computational algorithm to identify the photoreceptor-specific cis-regulatory elements (CREs mediating the interactions between these transcription factors and their target genes. In vivo validation of our computational predictions resulted in the discovery of 19 novel photoreceptor-specific CREs near retinal disease genes. Examination of these CREs permitted the definition of a simple cis-regulatory grammar rule associated with high-level expression. To test the generality of this rule, we used an expanded form of it as a selection filter to evolve photoreceptor CREs from random DNA sequences in silico. When fused to fluorescent reporters, these evolved CREs drove strong, photoreceptor-specific expression in vivo. This study represents the first systematic identification and in vivo validation of CREs in a mammalian neuronal cell type and lays the groundwork for a systems biology of photoreceptor transcriptional regulation.

  17. The Function of the MEF2 Family of Transcription Factors in Cardiac Development, Cardiogenomics, and Direct Reprogramming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cody A. Desjardins

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Proper formation of the mammalian heart requires precise spatiotemporal transcriptional regulation of gene programs in cardiomyocytes. Sophisticated regulatory networks have evolved to not only integrate the activities of distinct transcription factors to control tissue-specific gene programs but also, in many instances, to incorporate multiple members within these transcription factor families to ensure accuracy and specificity in the system. Unsurprisingly, perturbations in this elaborate transcriptional circuitry can lead to severe cardiac abnormalities. Myocyte enhancer factor–2 (MEF2 transcription factor belongs to the evolutionarily conserved cardiac gene regulatory network. Given its central role in muscle gene regulation and its evolutionary conservation, MEF2 is considered one of only a few core cardiac transcription factors. In addition to its firmly established role as a differentiation factor, MEF2 regulates wide variety of, sometimes antagonistic, cellular processes such as cell survival and death. Vertebrate genomes encode multiple MEF2 family members thereby expanding the transcriptional potential of this core transcription factor in the heart. This review highlights the requirement of the MEF2 family and their orthologs in cardiac development in diverse animal model systems. Furthermore, we describe the recently characterized role of MEF2 in direct reprogramming and genome-wide cardiomyocyte gene regulation. A thorough understanding of the regulatory functions of the MEF2 family in cardiac development and cardiogenomics is required in order to develop effective therapeutic strategies to repair the diseased heart.

  18. Bovine proteins containing poly-glutamine repeats are often polymorphic and enriched for components of transcriptional regulatory complexes

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Whan, Vicki

    2010-11-23

    Abstract Background About forty human diseases are caused by repeat instability mutations. A distinct subset of these diseases is the result of extreme expansions of polymorphic trinucleotide repeats; typically CAG repeats encoding poly-glutamine (poly-Q) tracts in proteins. Polymorphic repeat length variation is also apparent in human poly-Q encoding genes from normal individuals. As these coding sequence repeats are subject to selection in mammals, it has been suggested that normal variations in some of these typically highly conserved genes are implicated in morphological differences between species and phenotypic variations within species. At present, poly-Q encoding genes in non-human mammalian species are poorly documented, as are their functions and propensities for polymorphic variation. Results The current investigation identified 178 bovine poly-Q encoding genes (Q ≥ 5) and within this group, 26 genes with orthologs in both human and mouse that did not contain poly-Q repeats. The bovine poly-Q encoding genes typically had ubiquitous expression patterns although there was bias towards expression in epithelia, brain and testes. They were also characterised by unusually large sizes. Analysis of gene ontology terms revealed that the encoded proteins were strongly enriched for functions associated with transcriptional regulation and many contributed to physical interaction networks in the nucleus where they presumably act cooperatively in transcriptional regulatory complexes. In addition, the coding sequence CAG repeats in some bovine genes impacted mRNA splicing thereby generating unusual transcriptional diversity, which in at least one instance was tissue-specific. The poly-Q encoding genes were prioritised using multiple criteria for their likelihood of being polymorphic and then the highest ranking group was experimentally tested for polymorphic variation within a cattle diversity panel. Extensive and meiotically stable variation was identified

  19. Regulation of the CDP-choline pathway by sterol regulatory element binding proteins involves transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, Neale D; Lagace, Thomas A

    2003-06-15

    The synthesis of phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) by the CDP-choline pathway is under the control of the rate-limiting enzyme CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase (CCT). Sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) have been proposed to regulate CCT at the transcriptional level, or via the synthesis of lipid activators or substrates of the CDP-choline pathway. To assess the contributions of these two mechanisms, we examined CCTalpha expression and PtdCho synthesis by the CDP-choline pathway in cholesterol and fatty acid auxotrophic CHO M19 cells inducibly expressing constitutively active nuclear forms of SREBP1a or SREBP2. Induction of either SREBP resulted in increased expression of mRNAs for sterol-regulated genes, elevated fatty acid and cholesterol synthesis (>10-50-fold) and increased PtdCho synthesis (2-fold). CCTalpha mRNA was increased 2-fold by enforced expression of SREBP1a or SREBP2. The resultant increase in CCTalpha protein and activity (2-fold) was restricted primarily to the soluble fraction of cells, and increased CCTalpha activity in vivo was not detected. Inhibition of the synthesis of fatty acids or their CoA esters by cerulenin or triacsin C respectively following SREBP induction effectively blocked the accompanying elevation in PtdCho synthesis. Thus PtdCho synthesis was driven by increased synthesis of fatty acids or a product thereof. These data show that transcriptional activation of CCTalpha is modest relative to that of other SREBP-regulated genes, and that stimulation of PtdCho synthesis by SREBPs in CHO cells is due primarily to increased fatty acid synthesis.

  20. Total Binding Affinity Profiles of Regulatory Regions Predict Transcription Factor Binding and Gene Expression in Human Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Grassi

    Full Text Available Transcription factors regulate gene expression by binding regulatory DNA. Understanding the rules governing such binding is an essential step in describing the network of regulatory interactions, and its pathological alterations. We show that describing regulatory regions in terms of their profile of total binding affinities for transcription factors leads to increased predictive power compared to methods based on the identification of discrete binding sites. This applies both to the prediction of transcription factor binding as revealed by ChIP-seq experiments and to the prediction of gene expression through RNA-seq. Further significant improvements in predictive power are obtained when regulatory regions are defined based on chromatin states inferred from histone modification data.

  1. Transcription Factor and lncRNA Regulatory Networks Identify Key Elements in Lung Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed carcinoma and is the leading cause of cancer death. Although significant progress has been made towards its understanding and treatment, unraveling the complexities of lung cancer is still hampered by a lack of comprehensive knowledge on the mechanisms underlying the disease. High-throughput and multidimensional genomic data have shed new light on cancer biology. In this study, we developed a network-based approach integrating somatic mutations, the transcriptome, DNA methylation, and protein-DNA interactions to reveal the key regulators in lung adenocarcinoma (LUAD. By combining Bayesian network analysis with tissue-specific transcription factor (TF and targeted gene interactions, we inferred 15 disease-related core regulatory networks in co-expression gene modules associated with LUAD. Through target gene set enrichment analysis, we identified a set of key TFs, including known cancer genes that potentially regulate the disease networks. These TFs were significantly enriched in multiple cancer-related pathways. Specifically, our results suggest that hepatitis viruses may contribute to lung carcinogenesis, highlighting the need for further investigations into the roles that viruses play in treating lung cancer. Additionally, 13 putative regulatory long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs, including three that are known to be associated with lung cancer, and nine novel lncRNAs were revealed by our study. These lncRNAs and their target genes exhibited high interaction potentials and demonstrated significant expression correlations between normal lung and LUAD tissues. We further extended our study to include 16 solid-tissue tumor types and determined that the majority of these lncRNAs have putative regulatory roles in multiple cancers, with a few showing lung-cancer specific regulations. Our study provides a comprehensive investigation of transcription factor and lncRNA regulation in the context of LUAD

  2. Comparative Evolution of Morphological Regulatory Functions in Candida Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackey, Erika; Vipulanandan, Geethanjali; Childers, Delma S.

    2013-01-01

    Morphological transitions play an important role in virulence and virulence-related processes in a wide variety of pathogenic fungi, including the most commonly isolated human fungal pathogen Candida albicans. While environmental signals, transcriptional regulators, and target genes associated with C. albicans morphogenesis are well-characterized, considerably little is known about morphological regulatory mechanisms and the extent to which they are evolutionarily conserved in less pathogenic and less filamentous non-albicans Candida species (NACS). We have identified specific optimal filament-inducing conditions for three NACS (C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, and C. guilliermondii), which are very limited, suggesting that these species may be adapted for niche-specific filamentation in the host. Only a subset of evolutionarily conserved C. albicans filament-specific target genes were induced upon filamentation in C. tropicalis, C. parapsilosis, and C. guilliermondii. One of the genes showing conserved expression was UME6, a key filament-specific regulator of C. albicans hyphal development. Constitutive high-level expression of UME6 was sufficient to drive increased filamentation as well as biofilm formation and partly restore conserved filament-specific gene expression in both C. tropicalis and C. parapsilosis, suggesting that evolutionary differences in filamentation ability among pathogenic Candida species may be partially attributed to alterations in the expression level of a conserved filamentous growth machinery. In contrast to UME6, NRG1, an important repressor of C. albicans filamentation, showed only a partly conserved role in controlling NACS filamentation. Overall, our results suggest that C. albicans morphological regulatory functions are partially conserved in NACS and have evolved to respond to more specific sets of host environmental cues. PMID:23913541

  3. Medusa structure of the gene regulatory network: dominance of transcription factors in cancer subtype classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yuchun; Feng, Ying; Trivedi, Niraj S; Huang, Sui

    2011-05-01

    Gene expression profiles consisting of ten thousands of transcripts are used for clustering of tissue, such as tumors, into subtypes, often without considering the underlying reason that the distinct patterns of expression arise because of constraints in the realization of gene expression profiles imposed by the gene regulatory network. The topology of this network has been suggested to consist of a regulatory core of genes represented most prominently by transcription factors (TFs) and microRNAs, that influence the expression of other genes, and of a periphery of 'enslaved' effector genes that are regulated but not regulating. This 'medusa' architecture implies that the core genes are much stronger determinants of the realized gene expression profiles. To test this hypothesis, we examined the clustering of gene expression profiles into known tumor types to quantitatively demonstrate that TFs, and even more pronounced, microRNAs, are much stronger discriminators of tumor type specific gene expression patterns than a same number of randomly selected or metabolic genes. These findings lend support to the hypothesis of a medusa architecture and of the canalizing nature of regulation by microRNAs. They also reveal the degree of freedom for the expression of peripheral genes that are less stringently associated with a tissue type specific global gene expression profile.

  4. Identification of cis-regulatory sequences that activate transcription in the suspensor of plant embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Tomokazu; Wang, Xingjun; Henry, Kelli F; Bi, Yuping; Weterings, Koen; Goldberg, Robert B

    2009-03-03

    Little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which the embryo proper and suspensor of plant embryos activate specific gene sets shortly after fertilization. We analyzed the upstream region of the scarlet runner bean (Phaseolus coccineus) G564 gene to understand how genes are activated specifically within the suspensor during early embryo development. Previously, we showed that the G564 upstream region has a block of tandem repeats, which contain a conserved 10-bp motif (GAAAAG(C)/(T)GAA), and that deletion of these repeats results in a loss of suspensor transcription. Here, we use gain-of-function (GOF) experiments with transgenic globular-stage tobacco embryos to show that only 1 of the 5 tandem repeats is required to drive suspensor-specific transcription. Fine-scale deletion and scanning mutagenesis experiments with 1 tandem repeat uncovered a 54-bp region that contains all of the sequences required to activate transcription in the suspensor, including the 10-bp motif (GAAAAGCGAA) and a similar 10-bp-like motif (GAAAAACGAA). Site-directed mutagenesis and GOF experiments indicated that both the 10-bp and 10-bp-like motifs are necessary, but not sufficient to activate transcription in the suspensor, and that a sequence (TTGGT) between the 10-bp and the 10-bp-like motifs is also necessary for suspensor transcription. Together, these data identify sequences that are required to activate transcription in the suspensor of a plant embryo after fertilization.

  5. Acquired transcriptional programming in functional and exhausted virus-specific CD8 T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngblood, Ben; Wherry, E John; Ahmed, Rafi

    2012-01-01

    Failure to control viral infections such as HIV results in T-cell receptor (TCR) and inhibitory receptor driven exhaustion of antigen-specific T cells. Persistent signaling by these receptors during chronic viral infection sculpts the transcriptional regulatory programs of virus-specific T cells. The resulting gene expression profile is tailored to temper the potentially damaging effector functions of cytotoxic T cells and adapt them to an antigen-rich and inflammation-rich environment. Here we review recent studies investigating mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of effector, functional memory, and exhausted T-cell functions during acute versus chronic infections. Patterns of gene expression in virus-specific CD8 T cells are a result of a combination of pro and inhibitory signals from antigen presentation (TCR-mediated) and co-inhibitory receptor ligation (PD-1, 2B4). Further, memory-specific transcriptional regulation of 2B4 expression and signaling impose a self-limiting secondary effector response to a prolonged viral infection. Additionally, differentiation of functional memory CD8 T cells is coupled with acquisition of a repressive epigenetic program for PD-1 expression. However, chronic infection provides a signal that blocks the acquisition of these epigenetic modifications reinforcing the suppression of cytotoxic lymphocyte (CTL) functions in exhausted cells. Current findings suggest that the mechanism(s) that delineate functional memory versus exhaustion are coupled with acquisition of transcriptional programs at the effector stage of differentiation, reinforced by cessation or persistence of TCR signaling.

  6. Structural studies of bacterial transcriptional regulatory proteins by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkman, Brian Finley [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to elucidate detailed structural information for peptide and protein molecules. A small peptide was designed and synthesized, and its three-dimensional structure was calculated using distance information derived from two-dimensional NMR measurements. The peptide was used to induce antibodies in mice, and the cross-reactivity of the antibodies with a related protein was analyzed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Two proteins which are involved in regulation of transcription in bacteria were also studied. The ferric uptake regulation (Fur) protein is a metal-dependent repressor which controls iron uptake in bacteria. Two- and three-dimensional NMR techniques, coupled with uniform and selective isotope labeling allowed the nearly complete assignment of the resonances of the metal-binding domain of the Fur protein. NTRC is a transcriptional enhancer binding protein whose N-terminal domain is a "receiver domain" in the family of "two-component" regulatory systems. Phosphorylation of the N-terminal domain of NTRC activates the initiation of transcription of aeries encoding proteins involved in nitrogen regulation. Three- and four-dimensional NMR spectroscopy methods have been used to complete the resonance assignments and determine the solution structure of the N-terminal receiver domain of the NTRC protein. Comparison of the solution structure of the NTRC receiver domain with the crystal structures of the homologous protein CheY reveals a very similar fold, with the only significant difference being the position of helix 4 relative to the rest of the protein. The determination of the structure of the NTRC receiver domain is the first step toward understanding a mechanism of signal transduction which is common to many bacterial regulatory systems.

  7. Discovery of transcription factors and regulatory regions driving in vivo tumor development by ATAC-seq and FAIRE-seq open chromatin profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristofer Davie

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Genomic enhancers regulate spatio-temporal gene expression by recruiting specific combinations of transcription factors (TFs. When TFs are bound to active regulatory regions, they displace canonical nucleosomes, making these regions biochemically detectable as nucleosome-depleted regions or accessible/open chromatin. Here we ask whether open chromatin profiling can be used to identify the entire repertoire of active promoters and enhancers underlying tissue-specific gene expression during normal development and oncogenesis in vivo. To this end, we first compare two different approaches to detect open chromatin in vivo using the Drosophila eye primordium as a model system: FAIRE-seq, based on physical separation of open versus closed chromatin; and ATAC-seq, based on preferential integration of a transposon into open chromatin. We find that both methods reproducibly capture the tissue-specific chromatin activity of regulatory regions, including promoters, enhancers, and insulators. Using both techniques, we screened for regulatory regions that become ectopically active during Ras-dependent oncogenesis, and identified 3778 regions that become (over-activated during tumor development. Next, we applied motif discovery to search for candidate transcription factors that could bind these regions and identified AP-1 and Stat92E as key regulators. We validated the importance of Stat92E in the development of the tumors by introducing a loss of function Stat92E mutant, which was sufficient to rescue the tumor phenotype. Additionally we tested if the predicted Stat92E responsive regulatory regions are genuine, using ectopic induction of JAK/STAT signaling in developing eye discs, and observed that similar chromatin changes indeed occurred. Finally, we determine that these are functionally significant regulatory changes, as nearby target genes are up- or down-regulated. In conclusion, we show that FAIRE-seq and ATAC-seq based open chromatin profiling

  8. Simplified Method for Predicting a Functional Class of Proteins in Transcription Factor Complexes

    KAUST Repository

    Piatek, Marek J.

    2013-07-12

    Background:Initiation of transcription is essential for most of the cellular responses to environmental conditions and for cell and tissue specificity. This process is regulated through numerous proteins, their ligands and mutual interactions, as well as interactions with DNA. The key such regulatory proteins are transcription factors (TFs) and transcription co-factors (TcoFs). TcoFs are important since they modulate the transcription initiation process through interaction with TFs. In eukaryotes, transcription requires that TFs form different protein complexes with various nuclear proteins. To better understand transcription regulation, it is important to know the functional class of proteins interacting with TFs during transcription initiation. Such information is not fully available, since not all proteins that act as TFs or TcoFs are yet annotated as such, due to generally partial functional annotation of proteins. In this study we have developed a method to predict, using only sequence composition of the interacting proteins, the functional class of human TF binding partners to be (i) TF, (ii) TcoF, or (iii) other nuclear protein. This allows for complementing the annotation of the currently known pool of nuclear proteins. Since only the knowledge of protein sequences is required in addition to protein interaction, the method should be easily applicable to many species.Results:Based on experimentally validated interactions between human TFs with different TFs, TcoFs and other nuclear proteins, our two classification systems (implemented as a web-based application) achieve high accuracies in distinguishing TFs and TcoFs from other nuclear proteins, and TFs from TcoFs respectively.Conclusion:As demonstrated, given the fact that two proteins are capable of forming direct physical interactions and using only information about their sequence composition, we have developed a completely new method for predicting a functional class of TF interacting protein partners

  9. Review of NRC Regulatory processes and functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) has spent much time over many years observing and examining the NRC licensing process. The Committee is, consequently, in a position to comment on the situation, and it believes this review will be helpful to those examining the regulatory process by discussing how it works, where it is weak, and the opportunities for improvement. The Committee's review may also help put current proposals and discussions in perspective

  10. Human and mouse switch-like genes share common transcriptional regulatory mechanisms for bimodality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tozeren Aydin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene expression is controlled over a wide range at the transcript level through complex interplay between DNA and regulatory proteins, resulting in profiles of gene expression that can be represented as normal, graded, and bimodal (switch-like distributions. We have previously performed genome-scale identification and annotation of genes with switch-like expression at the transcript level in mouse, using large microarray datasets for healthy tissue, in order to study the cellular pathways and regulatory mechanisms involving this class of genes. We showed that a large population of bimodal mouse genes encoding for cell membrane and extracellular matrix proteins is involved in communication pathways. This study expands on previous results by annotating human bimodal genes, investigating their correspondence to bimodality in mouse orthologs and exploring possible regulatory mechanisms that contribute to bimodality in gene expression in human and mouse. Results Fourteen percent of the human genes on the HGU133A array (1847 out of 13076 were identified as bimodal or switch-like. More than 40% were found to have bimodal mouse orthologs. KEGG pathways enriched for bimodal genes included ECM-receptor interaction, focal adhesion, and tight junction, showing strong similarity to the results obtained in mouse. Tissue-specific modes of expression of bimodal genes among brain, heart, and skeletal muscle were common between human and mouse. Promoter analysis revealed a higher than average number of transcription start sites per gene within the set of bimodal genes. Moreover, the bimodal gene set had differentially methylated histones compared to the set of the remaining genes in the genome. Conclusion The fact that bimodal genes were enriched within the cell membrane and extracellular environment make these genes as candidates for biomarkers for tissue specificity. The commonality of the important roles bimodal genes play in tissue

  11. Genome-wide identification of the regulatory targets of a transcription factor using biochemical characterization and computational genomic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jolly Emmitt R

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A major challenge in computational genomics is the development of methodologies that allow accurate genome-wide prediction of the regulatory targets of a transcription factor. We present a method for target identification that combines experimental characterization of binding requirements with computational genomic analysis. Results Our method identified potential target genes of the transcription factor Ndt80, a key transcriptional regulator involved in yeast sporulation, using the combined information of binding affinity, positional distribution, and conservation of the binding sites across multiple species. We have also developed a mathematical approach to compute the false positive rate and the total number of targets in the genome based on the multiple selection criteria. Conclusion We have shown that combining biochemical characterization and computational genomic analysis leads to accurate identification of the genome-wide targets of a transcription factor. The method can be extended to other transcription factors and can complement other genomic approaches to transcriptional regulation.

  12. Single nucleotide polymorphism in transcriptional regulatory regions and expression of environmentally responsive genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xuting; Tomso, Daniel J.; Liu Xuemei; Bell, Douglas A.

    2005-01-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human genome are DNA sequence variations that can alter an individual's response to environmental exposure. SNPs in gene coding regions can lead to changes in the biological properties of the encoded protein. In contrast, SNPs in non-coding gene regulatory regions may affect gene expression levels in an allele-specific manner, and these functional polymorphisms represent an important but relatively unexplored class of genetic variation. The main challenge in analyzing these SNPs is a lack of robust computational and experimental methods. Here, we first outline mechanisms by which genetic variation can impact gene regulation, and review recent findings in this area; then, we describe a methodology for bioinformatic discovery and functional analysis of regulatory SNPs in cis-regulatory regions using the assembled human genome sequence and databases on sequence polymorphism and gene expression. Our method integrates SNP and gene databases and uses a set of computer programs that allow us to: (1) select SNPs, from among the >9 million human SNPs in the NCBI dbSNP database, that are similar to cis-regulatory element (RE) consensus sequences; (2) map the selected dbSNP entries to the human genome assembly in order to identify polymorphic REs near gene start sites; (3) prioritize the candidate polymorphic RE containing genes by searching the existing genotype and gene expression data sets. The applicability of this system has been demonstrated through studies on p53 responsive elements and is being extended to additional pathways and environmentally responsive genes

  13. Differential roles of epigenetic changes and Foxp3 expression in regulatory T cell-specific transcriptional regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Morikawa, Hiromasa; Ohkura, Naganari; Vandenbon, Alexis; Itoh, Masayoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Standley, Daron M.; Date, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Forrest, Alistair R.R.; Kawaji, Hideya

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring regulatory T (Treg) cells, which specifically express the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), are engaged in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and homeostasis. By transcriptional start site cluster analysis, we assessed here how genome-wide patterns of DNA methylation or Foxp3 binding sites were associated with Treg-specific gene expression. We found that Treg-specific DNA hypomethylated regions were closely associated with Treg up-regulated transcr...

  14. Reduced Expression of FOXP3 and Regulatory T-Cell Function in Severe Forms of Early-onset Autoimmune Enteropathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moes, Nicolette; Rieux-Laucat, Frederic; Begue, Bernadette; Verdier, Julien; Neven, Benedicte; Patey, Natacha; Torgerson, Troy T.; Picard, Capucine; Stolzenberg, Marie-Claude; Ruemmele, Corinne; Rings, Edmond Hhm; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Piloquet, Hugues; Biver, Armand; Breton, Anne; Ochs, Hans D.; Hermine, Olivier; Fischer, Alain; Goulet, Olivier; Cerf-Bensussan, Nadine; Ruemmele, Frank M.

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Little is known about the pathophysiology of early onset forms of autoimmune enteropathy (AIE). AIE has been associated with mutations in FOXP3-a transcription factor that controls regulatory T-cell development and function. We analyzed the molecular basis of neonatal or early

  15. Development of DNA affinity techniques for the functional characterization of purified RNA polymerase II transcription factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garfinkel, S.; Thompson, J.A.; Cohen, R.B.; Brendler, T.; Safer, B.

    1987-01-01

    Affinity adsorption, precipitation, and partitioning techniques have been developed to purify and characterize RNA Pol II transcription components from whole cell extracts (WCE) (HeLa) and nuclear extracts (K562). The titration of these extracts with multicopy constructs of the Ad2 MLP but not pUC8, inhibits transcriptional activity. DNA-binding factors precipitated by this technique are greatly enriched by centrifugation. Using this approach, factors binding to the upstream promoter sequence (UPS) of the Ad2 MLP have been rapidly isolated by Mono Q, Mono S, and DNA affinity chromatography. By U.V. crosslinking to nucleotides containing specific 32 P-phosphodiester bonds within the recognition sequence, this factor is identified as a M/sub r/ = 45,000 polypeptide. To generate an assay system for the functional evaluation of single transcription components, a similar approach using synthetic oligonucleotide sequences spanning single promoter binding sites has been developed. The addition of a synthetic 63-mer containing the UPS element of the Ad2 MLP to HeLa WCE inhibited transcription by 60%. The addition of partially purified UPS binding protein, but not RNA Pol II, restored transcriptional activity. The addition of synthetic oligonucleotides containing other regulatory sequences not present in the Ad2 MLP was without effect

  16. Functionally Significant, Rare Transcription Factor Variants in Tetralogy of Fallot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töpf, Ana; Griffin, Helen R.; Glen, Elise; Soemedi, Rachel; Brown, Danielle L.; Hall, Darroch; Rahman, Thahira J.; Eloranta, Jyrki J.; Jüngst, Christoph; Stuart, A. Graham; O'Sullivan, John; Keavney, Bernard D.; Goodship, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Rare variants in certain transcription factors involved in cardiac development cause Mendelian forms of congenital heart disease. The purpose of this study was to systematically assess the frequency of rare transcription factor variants in sporadic patients with the cardiac outflow tract malformation tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). Methods and Results We sequenced the coding, 5′UTR, and 3′UTR regions of twelve transcription factor genes implicated in cardiac outflow tract development (NKX2.5, GATA4, ISL1, TBX20, MEF2C, BOP/SMYD1, HAND2, FOXC1, FOXC2, FOXH, FOXA2 and TBX1) in 93 non-syndromic, non-Mendelian TOF cases. We also analysed Illumina Human 660W-Quad SNP Array data for copy number variants in these genes; none were detected. Four of the rare variants detected have previously been shown to affect transactivation in in vitro reporter assays: FOXC1 p.P297S, FOXC2 p.Q444R, FOXH1 p.S113T and TBX1 p.P43_G61del PPPPRYDPCAAAAPGAPGP. Two further rare variants, HAND2 p.A25_A26insAA and FOXC1 p.G378_G380delGGG, A488_491delAAAA, affected transactivation in in vitro reporter assays. Each of these six functionally significant variants was present in a single patient in the heterozygous state; each of the four for which parental samples were available were maternally inherited. Thus in the 93 TOF cases we identified six functionally significant mutations in the secondary heart field transcriptional network. Significance This study indicates that rare genetic variants in the secondary heart field transcriptional network with functional effects on protein function occur in 3–13% of patients with TOF. This is the first report of a functionally significant HAND2 mutation in a patient with congenital heart disease. PMID:25093829

  17. Functionally significant, rare transcription factor variants in tetralogy of Fallot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Töpf

    Full Text Available Rare variants in certain transcription factors involved in cardiac development cause Mendelian forms of congenital heart disease. The purpose of this study was to systematically assess the frequency of rare transcription factor variants in sporadic patients with the cardiac outflow tract malformation tetralogy of Fallot (TOF.We sequenced the coding, 5'UTR, and 3'UTR regions of twelve transcription factor genes implicated in cardiac outflow tract development (NKX2.5, GATA4, ISL1, TBX20, MEF2C, BOP/SMYD1, HAND2, FOXC1, FOXC2, FOXH, FOXA2 and TBX1 in 93 non-syndromic, non-Mendelian TOF cases. We also analysed Illumina Human 660W-Quad SNP Array data for copy number variants in these genes; none were detected. Four of the rare variants detected have previously been shown to affect transactivation in in vitro reporter assays: FOXC1 p.P297S, FOXC2 p.Q444R, FOXH1 p.S113T and TBX1 p.P43_G61del PPPPRYDPCAAAAPGAPGP. Two further rare variants, HAND2 p.A25_A26insAA and FOXC1 p.G378_G380delGGG, A488_491delAAAA, affected transactivation in in vitro reporter assays. Each of these six functionally significant variants was present in a single patient in the heterozygous state; each of the four for which parental samples were available were maternally inherited. Thus in the 93 TOF cases we identified six functionally significant mutations in the secondary heart field transcriptional network.This study indicates that rare genetic variants in the secondary heart field transcriptional network with functional effects on protein function occur in 3-13% of patients with TOF. This is the first report of a functionally significant HAND2 mutation in a patient with congenital heart disease.

  18. ChIPBase v2.0: decoding transcriptional regulatory networks of non-coding RNAs and protein-coding genes from ChIP-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ke-Ren; Liu, Shun; Sun, Wen-Ju; Zheng, Ling-Ling; Zhou, Hui; Yang, Jian-Hua; Qu, Liang-Hu

    2017-01-04

    The abnormal transcriptional regulation of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and protein-coding genes (PCGs) is contributed to various biological processes and linked with human diseases, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In this study, we developed ChIPBase v2.0 (http://rna.sysu.edu.cn/chipbase/) to explore the transcriptional regulatory networks of ncRNAs and PCGs. ChIPBase v2.0 has been expanded with ∼10 200 curated ChIP-seq datasets, which represent about 20 times expansion when comparing to the previous released version. We identified thousands of binding motif matrices and their binding sites from ChIP-seq data of DNA-binding proteins and predicted millions of transcriptional regulatory relationships between transcription factors (TFs) and genes. We constructed 'Regulator' module to predict hundreds of TFs and histone modifications that were involved in or affected transcription of ncRNAs and PCGs. Moreover, we built a web-based tool, Co-Expression, to explore the co-expression patterns between DNA-binding proteins and various types of genes by integrating the gene expression profiles of ∼10 000 tumor samples and ∼9100 normal tissues and cell lines. ChIPBase also provides a ChIP-Function tool and a genome browser to predict functions of diverse genes and visualize various ChIP-seq data. This study will greatly expand our understanding of the transcriptional regulations of ncRNAs and PCGs. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission organization charts and functional statements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    This document contains organization charts for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and for the five offices of the NRC. Function statements are provided delineating the major responsibilities and operations of each office. Organization and function are provided to the branch level. The head of each office, division, and branch is also listed.

  20. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission organization charts and functional statements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This document contains organization charts for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and for the five offices of the NRC. Function statements are provided delineating the major responsibilities and operations of each office. Organization and function are provided to the branch level. The head of each office, division, and branch is also listed

  1. The Rts1 regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A is required for control of G1 cyclin transcription and nutrient modulation of cell size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Artiles

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The key molecular event that marks entry into the cell cycle is transcription of G1 cyclins, which bind and activate cyclin-dependent kinases. In yeast cells, initiation of G1 cyclin transcription is linked to achievement of a critical cell size, which contributes to cell-size homeostasis. The critical cell size is modulated by nutrients, such that cells growing in poor nutrients are smaller than cells growing in rich nutrients. Nutrient modulation of cell size does not work through known critical regulators of G1 cyclin transcription and is therefore thought to work through a distinct pathway. Here, we report that Rts1, a highly conserved regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, is required for normal control of G1 cyclin transcription. Loss of Rts1 caused delayed initiation of bud growth and delayed and reduced accumulation of G1 cyclins. Expression of the G1 cyclin CLN2 from an inducible promoter rescued the delayed bud growth in rts1Delta cells, indicating that Rts1 acts at the level of transcription. Moreover, loss of Rts1 caused altered regulation of Swi6, a key component of the SBF transcription factor that controls G1 cyclin transcription. Epistasis analysis revealed that Rts1 does not work solely through several known critical upstream regulators of G1 cyclin transcription. Cells lacking Rts1 failed to undergo nutrient modulation of cell size. Together, these observations demonstrate that Rts1 is a key player in pathways that link nutrient availability, cell size, and G1 cyclin transcription. Since Rts1 is highly conserved, it may function in similar pathways in vertebrates.

  2. NAC Transcription Factors in Senescence: From Molecular Structure to Function in Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Podzimska-Sroka

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Within the last decade, NAC transcription factors have been shown to play essential roles in senescence, which is the focus of this review. Transcriptome analyses associate approximately one third of Arabidopsis NAC genes and many crop NAC genes with senescence, thereby implicating NAC genes as important regulators of the senescence process. The consensus DNA binding site of the NAC domain is used to predict NAC target genes, and protein interaction sites can be predicted for the intrinsically disordered transcription regulatory domains of NAC proteins. The molecular characteristics of these domains determine the interactions in gene regulatory networks. Emerging local NAC-centered gene regulatory networks reveal complex molecular mechanisms of stress- and hormone-regulated senescence and basic physiological steps of the senescence process. For example, through molecular interactions involving the hormone abscisic acid, Arabidopsis NAP promotes chlorophyll degradation, a hallmark of senescence. Furthermore, studies of the functional rice ortholog, OsNAP, suggest that NAC genes can be targeted to obtain specific changes in lifespan control and nutrient remobilization in crop plants. This is also exemplified by the wheat NAM1 genes which promote senescence and increase grain zinc, iron, and protein content. Thus, NAC genes are promising targets for fine-tuning senescence for increased yield and quality.

  3. Core transcriptional regulatory circuit controlled by the TAL1 complex in human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanda, Takaomi; Lawton, Lee N; Barrasa, M Inmaculada; Fan, Zi Peng; Kohlhammer, Holger; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Ma, Wenxue; Tatarek, Jessica; Ahn, Yebin; Kelliher, Michelle A; Jamieson, Catriona H M; Staudt, Louis M; Young, Richard A; Look, A Thomas

    2012-08-14

    The oncogenic transcription factor TAL1/SCL is aberrantly expressed in over 40% of cases of human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), emphasizing its importance in the molecular pathogenesis of T-ALL. Here we identify the core transcriptional regulatory circuit controlled by TAL1 and its regulatory partners HEB, E2A, LMO1/2, GATA3, and RUNX1. We show that TAL1 forms a positive interconnected autoregulatory loop with GATA3 and RUNX1 and that the TAL1 complex directly activates the MYB oncogene, forming a positive feed-forward regulatory loop that reinforces and stabilizes the TAL1-regulated oncogenic program. One of the critical downstream targets in this circuitry is the TRIB2 gene, which is oppositely regulated by TAL1 and E2A/HEB and is essential for the survival of T-ALL cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Structural and regulatory functions of keratins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magin, Thomas M.; Vijayaraj, Preethi; Leube, Rudolf E.

    2007-01-01

    The diversity of epithelial functions is reflected by the expression of distinct keratin pairs that are responsible to protect epithelial cells against mechanical stress and to act as signaling platforms. The keratin cytoskeleton integrates these functions by forming a supracellular scaffold that connects at desmosomal cell-cell adhesions. Multiple human diseases and murine knockouts in which the integrity of this system is destroyed testify to its importance as a mechanical stabilizer in certain epithelia. Yet, surprisingly little is known about the precise mechanisms responsible for assembly and disease pathology. In addition to these structural aspects of keratin function, experimental evidence accumulating in recent years has led to a much more complex view of the keratin cytoskeleton. Distinct keratins emerge as highly dynamic scaffolds in different settings and contribute to cell size determination, translation control, proliferation, cell type-specific organelle transport, malignant transformation and various stress responses. All of these properties are controlled by highly complex patterns of phosphorylation and molecular associations

  5. NAC Transcription Factors in Senescence: From Molecular Structure to Function in Crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podzimska, Dagmara Agata; O'Shea, Charlotte; Gregersen, Per L.

    2015-01-01

    Within the last decade, NAC transcription factors have been shown to play essential roles in senescence, which is the focus of this review. Transcriptome analyses associate approximately one third of Arabidopsis NAC genes and many crop NAC genes with senescence, thereby implicating NAC genes...... as important regulators of the senescence process. The consensus DNA binding site of the NAC domain is used to predict NAC target genes, and protein interaction sites can be predicted for the intrinsically disordered transcription regulatory domains of NAC proteins. The molecular characteristics...... involving the hormone abscisic acid, Arabidopsis NAP promotes chlorophyll degradation, a hallmark of senescence. Furthermore, studies of the functional rice ortholog, OsNAP, suggest that NAC genes can be targeted to obtain specific changes in lifespan control and nutrient remobilization in crop plants...

  6. A trans-acting Variant within the Transcription Factor RIM101 Interacts with Genetic Background to Determine its Regulatory Capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Read

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Most genetic variants associated with disease occur within regulatory regions of the genome, underscoring the importance of defining the mechanisms underlying differences in regulation of gene expression between individuals. We discovered a pair of co-regulated, divergently oriented transcripts, AQY2 and ncFRE6, that are expressed in one strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, ∑1278b, but not in another, S288c. By combining classical genetics techniques with high-throughput sequencing, we identified a trans-acting single nucleotide polymorphism within the transcription factor RIM101 that causes the background-dependent expression of both transcripts. Subsequent RNA-seq experiments revealed that RIM101 regulates many more targets in S288c than in ∑1278b and that deletion of RIM101 in both backgrounds abrogates the majority of differential expression between the strains. Strikingly, only three transcripts undergo a significant change in expression after swapping RIM101 alleles between backgrounds, implying that the differences in the RIM101 allele lead to a remarkably focused transcriptional response. However, hundreds of RIM101-dependent targets undergo a subtle but consistent shift in expression in the S288c RIM101-swapped strain, but not its ∑1278b counterpart. We conclude that ∑1278b may harbor a variant(s that buffers against widespread transcriptional dysregulation upon introduction of a non-native RIM101 allele, emphasizing the importance of accounting for genetic background when assessing the impact of a regulatory variant.

  7. Scoring functions for transcription factor binding site prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friberg Markus

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factor binding site (TFBS prediction is a difficult problem, which requires a good scoring function to discriminate between real binding sites and background noise. Many scoring functions have been proposed in the literature, but it is difficult to assess their relative performance, because they are implemented in different software tools using different search methods and different TFBS representations. Results Here we compare how several scoring functions perform on both real and semi-simulated data sets in a common test environment. We have also developed two new scoring functions and included them in the comparison. The data sets are from the yeast (S. cerevisiae genome. Our new scoring function LLBG (least likely under the background model performs best in this study. It achieves the best average rank for the correct motifs. Scoring functions based on positional bias performed quite poorly in this study. Conclusion LLBG may provide an interesting alternative to current scoring functions for TFBS prediction.

  8. A New Mechanism for Mendelian Dominance in Regulatory Genetic Pathways: Competitive Binding by Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Adam H; Johnson, Norman A; Tulchinsky, Alexander Y

    2017-01-01

    We report a new mechanism for allelic dominance in regulatory genetic interactions that we call binding dominance. We investigated a biophysical model of gene regulation, where the fractional occupancy of a transcription factor (TF) on the cis-regulated promoter site it binds to is determined by binding energy (-ΔG) and TF dosage. Transcription and gene expression proceed when the TF is bound to the promoter. In diploids, individuals may be heterozygous at the cis-site, at the TF's coding region, or at the TF's own promoter, which determines allele-specific dosage. We find that when the TF's coding region is heterozygous, TF alleles compete for occupancy at the cis-sites and the tighter-binding TF is dominant in proportion to the difference in binding strength. When the TF's own promoter is heterozygous, the TF produced at the higher dosage is also dominant. Cis-site heterozygotes have additive expression and therefore codominant phenotypes. Binding dominance propagates to affect the expression of downstream loci and it is sensitive in both magnitude and direction to genetic background, but its detectability often attenuates. While binding dominance is inevitable at the molecular level, it is difficult to detect in the phenotype under some biophysical conditions, more so when TF dosage is high and allele-specific binding affinities are similar. A body of empirical research on the biophysics of TF binding demonstrates the plausibility of this mechanism of dominance, but studies of gene expression under competitive binding in heterozygotes in a diversity of genetic backgrounds are needed. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  9. Functional Classification of Immune Regulatory Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubinstein, Rotem [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Ramagopal, Udupi A. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Nathenson, Stanley G. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Almo, Steven C. [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Fiser, Andras [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Members of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) control innate and adaptive immunity and are prime targets for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, infectious diseases, and malignancies. We describe a computational method, termed the Brotherhood algorithm, which utilizes intermediate sequence information to classify proteins into functionally related families. This approach identifies functional relationships within the IgSF and predicts additional receptor-ligand interactions. As a specific example, we examine the nectin/nectin-like family of cell adhesion and signaling proteins and propose receptor-ligand interactions within this family. We were guided by the Brotherhood approach and present the high-resolution structural characterization of a homophilic interaction involving the class-I MHC-restricted T-cell-associated molecule, which we now classify as a nectin-like family member. The Brotherhood algorithm is likely to have a significant impact on structural immunology by identifying those proteins and complexes for which structural characterization will be particularly informative.

  10. Transcriptional signatures of regulatory and toxic responses to benzo-[a]-pyrene exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schirmer Kristin

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small molecule ligands often have multiple effects on the transcriptional program of a cell: they trigger a receptor specific response and additional, indirect responses ("side effects". Distinguishing those responses is important for understanding side effects of drugs and for elucidating molecular mechanisms of toxic chemicals. Results We explored this problem by exposing cells to the environmental contaminant benzo-[a]-pyrene (B[a]P. B[a]P exposure activates the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (Ahr and causes toxic stress resulting in transcriptional changes that are not regulated through Ahr. We sought to distinguish these two types of responses based on a time course of expression changes measured after B[a]P exposure. Using Random Forest machine learning we classified 81 primary Ahr responders and 1,308 genes regulated as side effects. Subsequent weighted clustering gave further insight into the connection between expression pattern, mode of regulation, and biological function. Finally, the accuracy of the predictions was supported through extensive experimental validation. Conclusion Using a combination of machine learning followed by extensive experimental validation, we have further expanded the known catalog of genes regulated by the environmentally sensitive transcription factor Ahr. More broadly, this study presents a strategy for distinguishing receptor-dependent responses and side effects based on expression time courses.

  11. Uncovering packaging features of co-regulated modules based on human protein interaction and transcriptional regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Weiming

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Network co-regulated modules are believed to have the functionality of packaging multiple biological entities, and can thus be assumed to coordinate many biological functions in their network neighbouring regions. Results Here, we weighted edges of a human protein interaction network and a transcriptional regulatory network to construct an integrated network, and introduce a probabilistic model and a bipartite graph framework to exploit human co-regulated modules and uncover their specific features in packaging different biological entities (genes, protein complexes or metabolic pathways. Finally, we identified 96 human co-regulated modules based on this method, and evaluate its effectiveness by comparing it with four other methods. Conclusions Dysfunctions in co-regulated interactions often occur in the development of cancer. Therefore, we focussed on an example co-regulated module and found that it could integrate a number of cancer-related genes. This was extended to causal dysfunctions of some complexes maintained by several physically interacting proteins, thus coordinating several metabolic pathways that directly underlie cancer.

  12. Genetic Code Expansion as a Tool to Study Regulatory Processes of Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Moritz; Summerer, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    The expansion of the genetic code with noncanonical amino acids (ncAA) enables the chemical and biophysical properties of proteins to be tailored, inside cells, with a previously unattainable level of precision. A wide range of ncAA with functions not found in canonical amino acids have been genetically encoded in recent years and have delivered insights into biological processes that would be difficult to access with traditional approaches of molecular biology. A major field for the development and application of novel ncAA-functions has been transcription and its regulation. This is particularly attractive, since advanced DNA sequencing- and proteomics-techniques continue to deliver vast information on these processes on a global level, but complementing methodologies to study them on a detailed, molecular level and in living cells have been comparably scarce. In a growing number of studies, genetic code expansion has now been applied to precisely control the chemical properties of transcription factors, RNA polymerases and histones, and this has enabled new insights into their interactions, conformational changes, cellular localizations and the functional roles of posttranslational modifications.

  13. Transcription, Processing, and Function of CRISPR Cassettes in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Pougach, Ksenia; Semenova, Ekaterina; Bogdanova, Ekaterina; Datsenko, Kirill A.; Djordjevic, Marko; Wanner, Barry L.; Severinov, Konstantin

    2010-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas, bacterial and archaeal systems of interference with foreign genetic elements such as viruses or plasmids, consist of DNA loci called CRISPR cassettes (a set of variable spacers regularly separated by palindromic repeats) and associated cas genes. When a CRISPR spacer sequence exactly matches a sequence in a viral genome, the cell can become resistant to the virus. The CRISPR/Cas systems function through small RNAs originating from longer CRISPR cassette transcripts. While laborato...

  14. Regulatory elements involved in the post-transcriptional control of stage-specific gene expression in Trypanosoma cruzi: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia R Araújo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi, a protozoan parasite that causes Chagas disease, exhibits unique mechanisms for gene expression such as constitutive polycistronic transcription of protein-coding genes, RNA editing and trans-splicing. In the absence of mechanism controlling transcription initiation, organized subsets of T. cruzi genes must be post-transcriptionally co-regulated in response to extracellular signals. The mechanisms that regulate stage-specific gene expression in this parasite have become much clearer through sequencing its whole genome as well as performing various proteomic and microarray analyses, which have demonstrated that at least half of the T. cruzi genes are differentially regulated during its life cycle. In this review, we attempt to highlight the recent advances in characterising cis and trans-acting elements in the T. cruzi genome that are involved in its post-transcriptional regulatory machinery.

  15. Association of sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor gene polymorphisms with ischaemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, X; Zeng, F; Zhang, N; Huang, T; Meng, Q; Liu, Y

    2012-01-01

    To explore the association between polymorphisms of the sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor (SREBF) gene and ischaemic stroke. The SREBF1c 54G>C and SREBPF2 1784G>C genotypes were assessed using restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis in 446 Han Chinese ischaemic stroke patients and 355 Han Chinese control subjects without cerebrovascular disease. The frequencies of the SREBF2 1784G>C CC genotype and the C allele were significantly higher in the ischaemic stroke group than in controls. Patients with ischaemic stroke who had the SREBF2 1784G>C CC genotype had significantly lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL) levels, compared with ischaemic stroke patients and control subjects with the GC or GG genotypes. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed a significant positive association between SREBF2 1784G>C and ischaemic stroke; an inverse association was observed between HDL level and risk of ischaemic stroke. The CC genotype of the SREBF2 1784G>C polymorphism was associated with an increased risk of ischaemic stroke, possibly through decreasing the HDL level, which was inversely associated with the risk of ischaemic stroke.

  16. PRISM offers a comprehensive genomic approach to transcription factor function prediction

    KAUST Repository

    Wenger, A. M.

    2013-02-04

    The human genome encodes 1500-2000 different transcription factors (TFs). ChIP-seq is revealing the global binding profiles of a fraction of TFs in a fraction of their biological contexts. These data show that the majority of TFs bind directly next to a large number of context-relevant target genes, that most binding is distal, and that binding is context specific. Because of the effort and cost involved, ChIP-seq is seldom used in search of novel TF function. Such exploration is instead done using expression perturbation and genetic screens. Here we propose a comprehensive computational framework for transcription factor function prediction. We curate 332 high-quality nonredundant TF binding motifs that represent all major DNA binding domains, and improve cross-species conserved binding site prediction to obtain 3.3 million conserved, mostly distal, binding site predictions. We combine these with 2.4 million facts about all human and mouse gene functions, in a novel statistical framework, in search of enrichments of particular motifs next to groups of target genes of particular functions. Rigorous parameter tuning and a harsh null are used to minimize false positives. Our novel PRISM (predicting regulatory information from single motifs) approach obtains 2543 TF function predictions in a large variety of contexts, at a false discovery rate of 16%. The predictions are highly enriched for validated TF roles, and 45 of 67 (67%) tested binding site regions in five different contexts act as enhancers in functionally matched cells.

  17. Differential 3’ processing of specific transcripts expands regulatory and protein diversity across neuronal cell types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jereb, Saša; Hwang, Hun-Way; Van Otterloo, Eric; Govek, Eve-Ellen; Fak, John J; Yuan, Yuan; Hatten, Mary E

    2018-01-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) regulates mRNA translation, stability, and protein localization. However, it is unclear to what extent APA regulates these processes uniquely in specific cell types. Using a new technique, cTag-PAPERCLIP, we discovered significant differences in APA between the principal types of mouse cerebellar neurons, the Purkinje and granule cells, as well as between proliferating and differentiated granule cells. Transcripts that differed in APA in these comparisons were enriched in key neuronal functions and many differed in coding sequence in addition to 3’UTR length. We characterize Memo1, a transcript that shifted from expressing a short 3’UTR isoform to a longer one during granule cell differentiation. We show that Memo1 regulates granule cell precursor proliferation and that its long 3’UTR isoform is targeted by miR-124, contributing to its downregulation during development. Our findings provide insight into roles for APA in specific cell types and establish a platform for further functional studies. PMID:29578408

  18. Orthologous transcription factors in bacteria have different functions and regulate different genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan N Price

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factors (TFs form large paralogous gene families and have complex evolutionary histories. Here, we ask whether putative orthologs of TFs, from bidirectional best BLAST hits (BBHs, are evolutionary orthologs with conserved functions. We show that BBHs of TFs from distantly related bacteria are usually not evolutionary orthologs. Furthermore, the false orthologs usually respond to different signals and regulate distinct pathways, while the few BBHs that are evolutionary orthologs do have conserved functions. To test the conservation of regulatory interactions, we analyze expression patterns. We find that regulatory relationships between TFs and their regulated genes are usually not conserved for BBHs in Escherichia coli K12 and Bacillus subtilis. Even in the much more closely related bacteria Vibrio cholerae and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, predicting regulation from E. coli BBHs has high error rates. Using gene-regulon correlations, we identify genes whose expression pattern differs between E. coli and S. oneidensis. Using literature searches and sequence analysis, we show that these changes in expression patterns reflect changes in gene regulation, even for evolutionary orthologs. We conclude that the evolution of bacterial regulation should be analyzed with phylogenetic trees, rather than BBHs, and that bacterial regulatory networks evolve more rapidly than previously thought.

  19. Identification of Lineage-Specific Cis-Regulatory Modules Associated with Variation in Transcription Factor Binding and Chromatin Activity Using Ornstein–Uhlenbeck Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naval-Sánchez, Marina; Potier, Delphine; Hulselmans, Gert; Christiaens, Valerie; Aerts, Stein

    2015-01-01

    Scoring the impact of noncoding variation on the function of cis-regulatory regions, on their chromatin state, and on the qualitative and quantitative expression levels of target genes is a fundamental problem in evolutionary genomics. A particular challenge is how to model the divergence of quantitative traits and to identify relationships between the changes across the different levels of the genome, the chromatin activity landscape, and the transcriptome. Here, we examine the use of the Ornstein–Uhlenbeck (OU) model to infer selection at the level of predicted cis-regulatory modules (CRMs), and link these with changes in transcription factor binding and chromatin activity. Using publicly available cross-species ChIP-Seq and STARR-Seq data we show how OU can be applied genome-wide to identify candidate transcription factors for which binding site and CRM turnover is correlated with changes in regulatory activity. Next, we profile open chromatin in the developing eye across three Drosophila species. We identify the recognition motifs of the chromatin remodelers, Trithorax-like and Grainyhead as mostly correlating with species-specific changes in open chromatin. In conclusion, we show in this study that CRM scores can be used as quantitative traits and that motif discovery approaches can be extended towards more complex models of divergence. PMID:25944915

  20. The upstream regulatory sequence of the light harvesting complex Lhcf2 gene of the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum enhances transcription in an orientation- and distance-independent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Monia Teresa; Annunziata, Rossella; Sanges, Remo; Ferrante, Maria Immacolata; Falciatore, Angela

    2015-12-01

    Diatoms are a key phytoplankton group in the contemporary ocean, showing extraordinary adaptation capacities to rapidly changing environments. The recent availability of whole genome sequences from representative species has revealed distinct features in their genomes, like novel combinations of genes encoding distinct metabolisms and a significant number of diatom-specific genes. However, the regulatory mechanisms driving diatom gene expression are still largely uncharacterized. Considering the wide variety of fields of study orbiting diatoms, ranging from ecology, evolutionary biology to biotechnology, it is thus essential to increase our understanding of fundamental gene regulatory processes such as transcriptional regulation. To this aim, we explored the functional properties of the 5'-flanking region of the Phaeodatylum tricornutum Lhcf2 gene, encoding a member of the Light Harvesting Complex superfamily and we showed that this region enhances transcription of a GUS reporter gene in an orientation- and distance-independent fashion. This represents the first example of a cis-regulatory sequence with enhancer-like features discovered in diatoms and it is instrumental for the generation of novel genetic tools and diatom exploitation in different areas of study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Functional transcription factor target discovery via compendia of binding and expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Christopher J; Joshi, Anagha; Michoel, Tom

    2016-02-09

    Genome-wide experiments to map the DNA-binding locations of transcription-associated factors (TFs) have shown that the number of genes bound by a TF far exceeds the number of possible direct target genes. Distinguishing functional from non-functional binding is therefore a major challenge in the study of transcriptional regulation. We hypothesized that functional targets can be discovered by correlating binding and expression profiles across multiple experimental conditions. To test this hypothesis, we obtained ChIP-seq and RNA-seq data from matching cell types from the human ENCODE resource, considered promoter-proximal and distal cumulative regulatory models to map binding sites to genes, and used a combination of linear and non-linear measures to correlate binding and expression data. We found that a high degree of correlation between a gene's TF-binding and expression profiles was significantly more predictive of the gene being differentially expressed upon knockdown of that TF, compared to using binding sites in the cell type of interest only. Remarkably, TF targets predicted from correlation across a compendium of cell types were also predictive of functional targets in other cell types. Finally, correlation across a time course of ChIP-seq and RNA-seq experiments was also predictive of functional TF targets in that tissue.

  2. A model for genetic and epigenetic regulatory networks identifies rare pathways for transcription factor induced pluripotency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artyomov, Maxim; Meissner, Alex; Chakraborty, Arup

    2010-03-01

    Most cells in an organism have the same DNA. Yet, different cell types express different proteins and carry out different functions. This is because of epigenetic differences; i.e., DNA in different cell types is packaged distinctly, making it hard to express certain genes while facilitating the expression of others. During development, upon receipt of appropriate cues, pluripotent embryonic stem cells differentiate into diverse cell types that make up the organism (e.g., a human). There has long been an effort to make this process go backward -- i.e., reprogram a differentiated cell (e.g., a skin cell) to pluripotent status. Recently, this has been achieved by transfecting certain transcription factors into differentiated cells. This method does not use embryonic material and promises the development of patient-specific regenerative medicine, but it is inefficient. The mechanisms that make reprogramming rare, or even possible, are poorly understood. We have developed the first computational model of transcription factor-induced reprogramming. Results obtained from the model are consistent with diverse observations, and identify the rare pathways that allow reprogramming to occur. If validated, our model could be further developed to design optimal strategies for reprogramming and shed light on basic questions in biology.

  3. Transcript Profile of Flowering Regulatory Genes in VcFT-Overexpressing Blueberry Plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron E Walworth

    Full Text Available In order to identify genetic components in flowering pathways of highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L., a transcriptome reference composed of 254,396 transcripts and 179,853 gene contigs was developed by assembly of 72.7 million reads using Trinity. Using this transcriptome reference and a query of flowering pathway genes of herbaceous plants, we identified potential flowering pathway genes/transcripts of blueberry. Transcriptome analysis of flowering pathway genes was then conducted on leaf tissue samples of transgenic blueberry cv. Aurora ('VcFT-Aurora', which overexpresses a blueberry FLOWERING LOCUS T-like gene (VcFT. Sixty-one blueberry transcripts of 40 genes showed high similarities to 33 known flowering-related genes of herbaceous plants, of which 17 down-regulated and 16 up-regulated genes were identified in 'VcFT-Aurora'. All down-regulated genes encoded transcription factors/enzymes upstream in the signaling pathway containing VcFT. A blueberry CONSTANS-LIKE 5-like (VcCOL5 gene was down-regulated and associated with five other differentially expressed (DE genes in the photoperiod-mediated flowering pathway. Three down-regulated genes, i.e., a MADS-AFFECTING FLOWERING 2-like gene (VcMAF2, a MADS-AFFECTING FLOWERING 5-like gene (VcMAF5, and a VERNALIZATION1-like gene (VcVRN1, may function as integrators in place of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC in the vernalization pathway. Because no CONSTAN1-like or FLOWERING LOCUS C-like genes were found in blueberry, VcCOL5 and VcMAF2/VcMAF5 or VRN1 might be the major integrator(s in the photoperiod- and vernalization-mediated flowering pathway, respectively. The major down-stream genes of VcFT, i.e., SUPPRESSOR of Overexpression of Constans 1-like (VcSOC1, LEAFY-like (VcLFY, APETALA1-like (VcAP1, CAULIFLOWER 1-like (VcCAL1, and FRUITFULL-like (VcFUL genes were present and showed high similarity to their orthologues in herbaceous plants. Moreover, overexpression of VcFT promoted expression of all of

  4. Transcript Profile of Flowering Regulatory Genes in VcFT-Overexpressing Blueberry Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walworth, Aaron E; Chai, Benli; Song, Guo-Qing

    2016-01-01

    In order to identify genetic components in flowering pathways of highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.), a transcriptome reference composed of 254,396 transcripts and 179,853 gene contigs was developed by assembly of 72.7 million reads using Trinity. Using this transcriptome reference and a query of flowering pathway genes of herbaceous plants, we identified potential flowering pathway genes/transcripts of blueberry. Transcriptome analysis of flowering pathway genes was then conducted on leaf tissue samples of transgenic blueberry cv. Aurora ('VcFT-Aurora'), which overexpresses a blueberry FLOWERING LOCUS T-like gene (VcFT). Sixty-one blueberry transcripts of 40 genes showed high similarities to 33 known flowering-related genes of herbaceous plants, of which 17 down-regulated and 16 up-regulated genes were identified in 'VcFT-Aurora'. All down-regulated genes encoded transcription factors/enzymes upstream in the signaling pathway containing VcFT. A blueberry CONSTANS-LIKE 5-like (VcCOL5) gene was down-regulated and associated with five other differentially expressed (DE) genes in the photoperiod-mediated flowering pathway. Three down-regulated genes, i.e., a MADS-AFFECTING FLOWERING 2-like gene (VcMAF2), a MADS-AFFECTING FLOWERING 5-like gene (VcMAF5), and a VERNALIZATION1-like gene (VcVRN1), may function as integrators in place of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) in the vernalization pathway. Because no CONSTAN1-like or FLOWERING LOCUS C-like genes were found in blueberry, VcCOL5 and VcMAF2/VcMAF5 or VRN1 might be the major integrator(s) in the photoperiod- and vernalization-mediated flowering pathway, respectively. The major down-stream genes of VcFT, i.e., SUPPRESSOR of Overexpression of Constans 1-like (VcSOC1), LEAFY-like (VcLFY), APETALA1-like (VcAP1), CAULIFLOWER 1-like (VcCAL1), and FRUITFULL-like (VcFUL) genes were present and showed high similarity to their orthologues in herbaceous plants. Moreover, overexpression of VcFT promoted expression of all of these

  5. Transcriptional analysis of the jamaicamide gene cluster from the marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula and identification of possible regulatory proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorrestein Pieter C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The marine cyanobacterium Lyngbya majuscula is a prolific producer of bioactive secondary metabolites. Although biosynthetic gene clusters encoding several of these compounds have been identified, little is known about how these clusters of genes are transcribed or regulated, and techniques targeting genetic manipulation in Lyngbya strains have not yet been developed. We conducted transcriptional analyses of the jamaicamide gene cluster from a Jamaican strain of Lyngbya majuscula, and isolated proteins that could be involved in jamaicamide regulation. Results An unusually long untranslated leader region of approximately 840 bp is located between the jamaicamide transcription start site (TSS and gene cluster start codon. All of the intergenic regions between the pathway ORFs were transcribed into RNA in RT-PCR experiments; however, a promoter prediction program indicated the possible presence of promoters in multiple intergenic regions. Because the functionality of these promoters could not be verified in vivo, we used a reporter gene assay in E. coli to show that several of these intergenic regions, as well as the primary promoter preceding the TSS, are capable of driving β-galactosidase production. A protein pulldown assay was also used to isolate proteins that may regulate the jamaicamide pathway. Pulldown experiments using the intergenic region upstream of jamA as a DNA probe isolated two proteins that were identified by LC-MS/MS. By BLAST analysis, one of these had close sequence identity to a regulatory protein in another cyanobacterial species. Protein comparisons suggest a possible correlation between secondary metabolism regulation and light dependent complementary chromatic adaptation. Electromobility shift assays were used to evaluate binding of the recombinant proteins to the jamaicamide promoter region. Conclusion Insights into natural product regulation in cyanobacteria are of significant value to drug discovery

  6. Mathematical model of a telomerase transcriptional regulatory network developed by cell-based screening: analysis of inhibitor effects and telomerase expression mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan E Bilsland

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells depend on transcription of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT. Many transcription factors affect TERT, though regulation occurs in context of a broader network. Network effects on telomerase regulation have not been investigated, though deeper understanding of TERT transcription requires a systems view. However, control over individual interactions in complex networks is not easily achievable. Mathematical modelling provides an attractive approach for analysis of complex systems and some models may prove useful in systems pharmacology approaches to drug discovery. In this report, we used transfection screening to test interactions among 14 TERT regulatory transcription factors and their respective promoters in ovarian cancer cells. The results were used to generate a network model of TERT transcription and to implement a dynamic Boolean model whose steady states were analysed. Modelled effects of signal transduction inhibitors successfully predicted TERT repression by Src-family inhibitor SU6656 and lack of repression by ERK inhibitor FR180204, results confirmed by RT-QPCR analysis of endogenous TERT expression in treated cells. Modelled effects of GSK3 inhibitor 6-bromoindirubin-3'-oxime (BIO predicted unstable TERT repression dependent on noise and expression of JUN, corresponding with observations from a previous study. MYC expression is critical in TERT activation in the model, consistent with its well known function in endogenous TERT regulation. Loss of MYC caused complete TERT suppression in our model, substantially rescued only by co-suppression of AR. Interestingly expression was easily rescued under modelled Ets-factor gain of function, as occurs in TERT promoter mutation. RNAi targeting AR, JUN, MXD1, SP3, or TP53, showed that AR suppression does rescue endogenous TERT expression following MYC knockdown in these cells and SP3 or TP53 siRNA also cause partial recovery. The model therefore successfully predicted several

  7. Boolean modelling reveals new regulatory connections between transcription factors orchestrating the development of the ventral spinal cord.

    KAUST Repository

    Lovrics, Anna

    2014-11-14

    We have assembled a network of cell-fate determining transcription factors that play a key role in the specification of the ventral neuronal subtypes of the spinal cord on the basis of published transcriptional interactions. Asynchronous Boolean modelling of the network was used to compare simulation results with reported experimental observations. Such comparison highlighted the need to include additional regulatory connections in order to obtain the fixed point attractors of the model associated with the five known progenitor cell types located in the ventral spinal cord. The revised gene regulatory network reproduced previously observed cell state switches between progenitor cells observed in knock-out animal models or in experiments where the transcription factors were overexpressed. Furthermore the network predicted the inhibition of Irx3 by Nkx2.2 and this prediction was tested experimentally. Our results provide evidence for the existence of an as yet undescribed inhibitory connection which could potentially have significance beyond the ventral spinal cord. The work presented in this paper demonstrates the strength of Boolean modelling for identifying gene regulatory networks.

  8. Thermodynamical transcription of density functional theory with minimum Fisher information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Á.

    2018-03-01

    Ghosh, Berkowitz and Parr designed a thermodynamical transcription of the ground-state density functional theory and introduced a local temperature that varies from point to point. The theory, however, is not unique because the kinetic energy density is not uniquely defined. Here we derive the expression of the phase-space Fisher information in the GBP theory taking the inverse temperature as the Fisher parameter. It is proved that this Fisher information takes its minimum for the case of constant temperature. This result is consistent with the recently proven theorem that the phase-space Shannon information entropy attains its maximum at constant temperature.

  9. Transcription Factor Foxo1 Is a Negative Regulator of NK Cell Maturation and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Youcai; Kerdiles, Yann; Chu, Jianhong; Yuan, Shunzong; Wang, Youwei; Chen, Xilin; Mao, Hsiaoyin; Zhang, Lingling; Zhang, Jianying; Hughes, Tiffany; Deng, Yafei; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Fangjie; Zou, Xianghong; Liu, Chang-Gong; Freud, Aharon G.; Li, Xiaohui; Caligiuri, Michael A; Vivier, Eric; Yu, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Little is known about the role of negative regulators in controlling natural killer (NK) cell development and effector functions. Foxo1 is a multifunctional transcription factor of the forkhead family. Using a mouse model of conditional deletion in NK cells, we found that Foxo1 negatively controlled NK cell differentiation and function. Immature NK cells expressed abundant Foxo1 and little Tbx21 relative to mature NK cells, but these two transcription factors reversed their expression as NK cells proceeded through development. Foxo1 promoted NK cell homing to lymph nodes through upregulating CD62L expression, and impaired late-stage maturation and effector functions by repressing Tbx21 expression. Loss of Foxo1 rescued the defect in late-stage NK cell maturation in heterozygous Tbx21+/− mice. Collectively, our data reveal a regulatory pathway by which the negative regulator Foxo1 and the positive regulator Tbx21 play opposing roles in controlling NK cell development and effector functions. PMID:25769609

  10. Groucho corepressor functions as a cofactor for the Knirps short-range transcriptional repressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payankaulam, Sandhya; Arnosti, David N

    2009-10-13

    Despite the pervasive roles for repressors in transcriptional control, the range of action of these proteins on cis regulatory elements remains poorly understood. Knirps has essential roles in patterning the Drosophila embryo by means of short-range repression, an activity that is essential for proper regulation of complex transcriptional control elements. Short-range repressors function in a local fashion to interfere with the activity of activators or basal promoters within approximately 100 bp. In contrast, long-range repressors such as Hairy act over distances >1 kb. The functional distinction between these two classes of repressors has been suggested to stem from the differential recruitment of the CtBP corepressor to short-range repressors and Groucho to long-range repressors. Contrary to this differential recruitment model, we report that Groucho is a functional part of the Knirps short-range repression complex. The corepressor interaction is mediated via an eh-1 like motif present in the N terminus and a conserved region present in the central portion of Knirps. We also show that this interaction is important for the CtBP-independent repression activity of Knirps and is required for regulation of even-skipped. Our study uncovers a previously uncharacterized interaction between proteins previously thought to function in distinct repression pathways, and indicates that the Groucho corepressor can be differentially harnessed to execute short- and long-range repression.

  11. Ciliary dyslexia candidate genes DYX1C1 and DCDC2 are regulated by Regulatory Factor X (RFX) transcription factors through X-box promoter motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammimies, Kristiina; Bieder, Andrea; Lauter, Gilbert; Sugiaman-Trapman, Debora; Torchet, Rachel; Hokkanen, Marie-Estelle; Burghoorn, Jan; Castrén, Eero; Kere, Juha; Tapia-Páez, Isabel; Swoboda, Peter

    2016-10-01

    DYX1C1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319 are three of the most replicated dyslexia candidate genes (DCGs). Recently, these DCGs were implicated in functions at the cilium. Here, we investigate the regulation of these DCGs by Regulatory Factor X transcription factors (RFX TFs), a gene family known for transcriptionally regulating ciliary genes. We identify conserved X-box motifs in the promoter regions of DYX1C1, DCDC2, and KIAA0319 and demonstrate their functionality, as well as the ability to recruit RFX TFs using reporter gene and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Furthermore, we uncover a complex regulation pattern between RFX1, RFX2, and RFX3 and their significant effect on modifying the endogenous expression of DYX1C1 and DCDC2 in a human retinal pigmented epithelial cell line immortalized with hTERT (hTERT-RPE1). In addition, induction of ciliogenesis increases the expression of RFX TFs and DCGs. At the protein level, we show that endogenous DYX1C1 localizes to the base of the cilium, whereas DCDC2 localizes along the entire axoneme of the cilium, thereby validating earlier localization studies using overexpression models. Our results corroborate the emerging role of DCGs in ciliary function and characterize functional noncoding elements, X-box promoter motifs, in DCG promoter regions, which thus can be targeted for mutation screening in dyslexia and ciliopathies associated with these genes.-Tammimies, K., Bieder, A., Lauter, G., Sugiaman-Trapman, D., Torchet, R., Hokkanen, M.-E., Burghoorn, J., Castrén, E., Kere, J., Tapia-Páez, I., Swoboda, P. Ciliary dyslexia candidate genes DYX1C1 and DCDC2 are regulated by Regulatory Factor (RF) X transcription factors through X-box promoter motifs. © The Author(s).

  12. Muscle and neural isoforms of agrin increase utrophin expression in cultured myotubes via a transcriptional regulatory mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramolini, A O; Burton, E A; Tinsley, J M; Ferns, M J; Cartaud, A; Cartaud, J; Davies, K E; Lunde, J A; Jasmin, B J

    1998-01-09

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a prevalent X-linked neuromuscular disease for which there is currently no cure. Recently, it was demonstrated in a transgenic mouse model that utrophin could functionally compensate for the lack of dystrophin and alleviate the muscle pathology (Tinsley, J. M., Potter, A. C., Phelps, S. R., Fisher, R., Trickett, J. I., and Davies, K. E. (1996) Nature 384, 349-353). In this context, it thus becomes essential to determine the cellular and molecular mechanisms presiding over utrophin expression in attempts to overexpress the endogenous gene product throughout skeletal muscle fibers. In a recent study, we showed that the nerve exerts a profound influence on utrophin gene expression and postulated that nerve-derived trophic factors mediate the local transcriptional activation of the utrophin gene within nuclei located in the postsynaptic sarcoplasm (Gramolini, A. O., Dennis, C. L., Tinsley, J. M., Robertson, G. S., Davies, K. E, Cartaud, J., and Jasmin, B. J. (1997) J. Biol. Chem. 272, 8117-8120). In the present study, we have therefore focused on the effect of agrin on utrophin expression in cultured C2 myotubes. In response to Torpedo-, muscle-, or nerve-derived agrin, we observed a significant 2-fold increase in utrophin mRNAs. By contrast, CGRP treatment failed to affect expression of utrophin transcripts. Western blotting experiments also revealed that the increase in utrophin mRNAs was accompanied by an increase in the levels of utrophin. To determine whether these changes were caused by parallel increases in the transcriptional activity of the utrophin gene, we transfected muscle cells with a 1. 3-kilobase pair utrophin promoter-reporter (nlsLacZ) gene construct and treated them with agrin for 24-48 h. Under these conditions, both muscle- and nerve-derived agrin increased the activity of beta-galactosidase, indicating that agrin treatment led, directly or indirectly, to the transcriptional activation of the utrophin gene

  13. Identification of functional elements and regulatory circuits by Drosophila modENCODE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Sushmita; Ernst, Jason; Kharchenko, Peter V.; Kheradpour, Pouya; Negre, Nicolas; Eaton, Matthew L.; Landolin, Jane M.; Bristow, Christopher A.; Ma, Lijia; Lin, Michael F.; Washietl, Stefan; Arshinoff, Bradley I.; Ay, Ferhat; Meyer, Patrick E.; Robine, Nicolas; Washington, Nicole L.; Stefano, Luisa Di; Berezikov, Eugene; Brown, Christopher D.; Candeias, Rogerio; Carlson, Joseph W.; Carr, Adrian; Jungreis, Irwin; Marbach, Daniel; Sealfon, Rachel; Tolstorukov, Michael Y.; Will, Sebastian; Alekseyenko, Artyom A.; Artieri, Carlo; Booth, Benjamin W.; Brooks, Angela N.; Dai, Qi; Davis, Carrie A.; Duff, Michael O.; Feng, Xin; Gorchakov, Andrey A.; Gu, Tingting; Henikoff, Jorja G.; Kapranov, Philipp; Li, Renhua; MacAlpine, Heather K.; Malone, John; Minoda, Aki; Nordman, Jared; Okamura, Katsutomo; Perry, Marc; Powell, Sara K.; Riddle, Nicole C.; Sakai, Akiko; Samsonova, Anastasia; Sandler, Jeremy E.; Schwartz, Yuri B.; Sher, Noa; Spokony, Rebecca; Sturgill, David; van Baren, Marijke; Wan, Kenneth H.; Yang, Li; Yu, Charles; Feingold, Elise; Good, Peter; Guyer, Mark; Lowdon, Rebecca; Ahmad, Kami; Andrews, Justen; Berger, Bonnie; Brenner, Steven E.; Brent, Michael R.; Cherbas, Lucy; Elgin, Sarah C. R.; Gingeras, Thomas R.; Grossman, Robert; Hoskins, Roger A.; Kaufman, Thomas C.; Kent, William; Kuroda, Mitzi I.; Orr-Weaver, Terry; Perrimon, Norbert; Pirrotta, Vincenzo; Posakony, James W.; Ren, Bing; Russell, Steven; Cherbas, Peter; Graveley, Brenton R.; Lewis, Suzanna; Micklem, Gos; Oliver, Brian; Park, Peter J.; Celniker, Susan E.; Henikoff, Steven; Karpen, Gary H.; Lai, Eric C.; MacAlpine, David M.; Stein, Lincoln D.; White, Kevin P.; Kellis, Manolis

    2010-12-22

    To gain insight into how genomic information is translated into cellular and developmental programs, the Drosophila model organism Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (modENCODE) project is comprehensively mapping transcripts, histone modifications, chromosomal proteins, transcription factors, replication proteins and intermediates, and nucleosome properties across a developmental time course and in multiple cell lines. We have generated more than 700 data sets and discovered protein-coding, noncoding, RNA regulatory, replication, and chromatin elements, more than tripling the annotated portion of the Drosophila genome. Correlated activity patterns of these elements reveal a functional regulatory network, which predicts putative new functions for genes, reveals stage- and tissue-specific regulators, and enables gene-expression prediction. Our results provide a foundation for directed experimental and computational studies in Drosophila and related species and also a model for systematic data integration toward comprehensive genomic and functional annotation. Several years after the complete genetic sequencing of many species, it is still unclear how to translate genomic information into a functional map of cellular and developmental programs. The Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) (1) and model organism ENCODE (modENCODE) (2) projects use diverse genomic assays to comprehensively annotate the Homo sapiens (human), Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly), and Caenorhabditis elegans (worm) genomes, through systematic generation and computational integration of functional genomic data sets. Previous genomic studies in flies have made seminal contributions to our understanding of basic biological mechanisms and genome functions, facilitated by genetic, experimental, computational, and manual annotation of the euchromatic and heterochromatic genome (3), small genome size, short life cycle, and a deep knowledge of development, gene function, and chromosome biology. The functions

  14. PvTFDB: a Phaseolus vulgaris transcription factors database for expediting functional genomics in legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhawna; Bonthala, V S; Gajula, Mnv Prasad

    2016-01-01

    The common bean [Phaseolus vulgaris (L.)] is one of the essential proteinaceous vegetables grown in developing countries. However, its production is challenged by low yields caused by numerous biotic and abiotic stress conditions. Regulatory transcription factors (TFs) symbolize a key component of the genome and are the most significant targets for producing stress tolerant crop and hence functional genomic studies of these TFs are important. Therefore, here we have constructed a web-accessible TFs database for P. vulgaris, called PvTFDB, which contains 2370 putative TF gene models in 49 TF families. This database provides a comprehensive information for each of the identified TF that includes sequence data, functional annotation, SSRs with their primer sets, protein physical properties, chromosomal location, phylogeny, tissue-specific gene expression data, orthologues, cis-regulatory elements and gene ontology (GO) assignment. Altogether, this information would be used in expediting the functional genomic studies of a specific TF(s) of interest. The objectives of this database are to understand functional genomics study of common bean TFs and recognize the regulatory mechanisms underlying various stress responses to ease breeding strategy for variety production through a couple of search interfaces including gene ID, functional annotation and browsing interfaces including by family and by chromosome. This database will also serve as a promising central repository for researchers as well as breeders who are working towards crop improvement of legume crops. In addition, this database provide the user unrestricted public access and the user can download entire data present in the database freely.Database URL: http://www.multiomics.in/PvTFDB/. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  15. PKC-theta in regulatory and effector T-cell functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedran eBrezar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the major goals in immunology research is to understand the regulatory mechanisms that underpin the rapid switch on/off of robust and efficient effector (Teff or regulatory (Tregs T-cell responses. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of such responses is critical for the development of effective therapies. T-cell activation involves the engagement of T-cell receptor and co-stimulatory signals, but the subsequent recruitment of serine/threonine-specific protein Kinase C-theta (PKC-θ to the immunological synapse is instrumental for the formation of signalling complexes, that ultimately lead to a transcriptional network in T cells. Recent studies demonstrated that major differences between Teffs and Tregs occurred at the immunological synapse where its formation induces altered signalling pathways in Tregs. These pathways are characterized by reduced recruitment of PKC-θ, suggesting that PKC-θ inhibits Tregs suppressive function in a negative feedback loop. As the balance of Teffs and Tregs has been shown to be central in several diseases, it was not surprising that some studies revealed that PKC-θ plays a major role in the regulation of this balance.This review will examine recent knowledge on the role of PKC-θ in T-cell transcriptional responses and how this protein can impact on the function of both Tregs and Teffs.

  16. Comparative Bioinformatics Analysis of Transcription Factor Genes Indicates Conservation of Key Regulatory Domains among Babesia bovis, Babesia microti, and Theileria equi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba F Alzan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Apicomplexa tick-borne hemoparasites, including Babesia bovis, Babesia microti, and Theileria equi are responsible for bovine and human babesiosis and equine theileriosis, respectively. These parasites of vast medical, epidemiological, and economic impact have complex life cycles in their vertebrate and tick hosts. Large gaps in knowledge concerning the mechanisms used by these parasites for gene regulation remain. Regulatory genes coding for DNA binding proteins such as members of the Api-AP2, HMG, and Myb families are known to play crucial roles as transcription factors. Although the repertoire of Api-AP2 has been defined and a HMG gene was previously identified in the B. bovis genome, these regulatory genes have not been described in detail in B. microti and T. equi. In this study, comparative bioinformatics was used to: (i identify and map genes encoding for these transcription factors among three parasites' genomes; (ii identify a previously unreported HMG gene in B. microti; (iii define a repertoire of eight conserved Myb genes; and (iv identify AP2 correlates among B. bovis and the better-studied Plasmodium parasites. Searching the available transcriptome of B. bovis defined patterns of transcription of these three gene families in B. bovis erythrocyte stage parasites. Sequence comparisons show conservation of functional domains and general architecture in the AP2, Myb, and HMG proteins, which may be significant for the regulation of common critical parasite life cycle transitions in B. bovis, B. microti, and T. equi. A detailed understanding of the role of gene families encoding DNA binding proteins will provide new tools for unraveling regulatory mechanisms involved in B. bovis, B. microti, and T. equi life cycles and environmental adaptive responses and potentially contributes to the development of novel convergent strategies for improved control of babesiosis and equine piroplasmosis.

  17. The p53 regulatory gene MDM2 is a direct transcriptional target of MYCN in neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slack, Andrew; Chen, Zaowen; Tonelli, Roberto; Pule, Martin; Hunt, Lisa; Pession, Andrea; Shohet, Jason M

    2005-01-18

    The MYCN oncogene is the major negative prognostic marker in neuroblastoma with important roles in both the pathogenesis and clinical behavior of this aggressive malignancy. MYC oncogenes activate both proliferative and apoptotic cellular pathways and, accordingly, inhibition of p53-mediated apoptosis is a prerequisite for MYC-driven tumorigenesis. To identify novel transcriptional targets mediating the MYCN-dependent phenotype, we screened a MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma cell line by using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) cloning. We identified the essential p53 inhibitor and protooncogene MDM2 as a putative target. MDM2 has multiple p53-independent functions modulating cell cycle and transcriptional events. Standard ChIP with MYCN antibodies established the binding of MYCN to a consensus E-box within the human MDM2 promoter. Oligonucleotide pull-down assays further established the capacity of MYCN to bind to this promoter region, confirming the ChIP results. Luciferase reporter assays confirmed the E-box-specific, MYCN-dependent regulation of the MDM2 promoter in MYCN-inducible neuroblastoma cell lines. Real-time quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis demonstrated a rapid increase in endogenous MDM2 mRNA and MDM2 protein upon induction of MYCN. Targeted inhibition of MYCN in a MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma cell line resulted in decreased MDM2 expression levels with concomitant stabilization of p53 and induction of apoptosis. Our finding that MYCN directly modulates baseline MDM2 levels suggests a mechanism contributing to the pathogenesis of neuroblastoma and other MYC-driven malignancies through inhibition of MYC-stimulated apoptosis.

  18. A hairpin within YAP mRNA 3′UTR functions in regulation at post-transcription level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Yuen; Wang, Yuan; Feng, Jinyan; Feng, Guoxing; Zheng, Minying; Yang, Zhe; Xiao, Zelin; Lu, Zhanping; Ye, Lihong; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    The central dogma of gene expression is that DNA is transcribed into messenger RNAs, which in turn serve as the template for protein synthesis. Recently, it has been reported that mRNAs display regulatory roles that rely on their ability to compete for microRNA binding, independent of their protein-coding function. However, the regulatory mechanism of mRNAs remains poorly understood. Here, we report that a hairpin within YAP mRNA 3′untranslated region (3′UTR) functions in regulation at post-transcription level through generating endogenous siRNAs (esiRNAs). Bioinformatics analysis for secondary structure showed that YAP mRNA displayed a hairpin structure (termed standard hairpin, S-hairpin) within its 3′UTR. Surprisingly, we observed that the overexpression of S-hairpin derived from YAP 3′UTR (YAP-sh) increased the luciferase reporter activities of transcriptional factor NF-κB and AP-1 in 293T cells. Moreover, we identified that a fragment from YAP-sh, an esiRNA, was able to target mRNA 3′UTR of NF2 (a member of Hippo-signaling pathway) and YAP mRNA 3′UTR itself in hepatoma cells. Thus, we conclude that the YAP-sh within YAP mRNA 3′UTR may serve as a novel regulatory element, which functions in regulation at post-transcription level. Our finding provides new insights into the mechanism of mRNAs in regulatory function. - Highlights: • An S-hairpin within YAP mRNA 3′UTR possesses regulatory function. • YAP-sh acts as a regulatory element for YAP at post-transcription level. • YAP-sh-3p20, an esiRNA derived from YAP-sh, targets mRNAs of YAP and NF2. • YAP-sh-3p20 depresses the proliferation of HepG2 cells in vitro

  19. A hairpin within YAP mRNA 3′UTR functions in regulation at post-transcription level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Yuen; Wang, Yuan; Feng, Jinyan; Feng, Guoxing; Zheng, Minying; Yang, Zhe; Xiao, Zelin; Lu, Zhanping [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, Department of Cancer Research, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Ye, Lihong [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, Department of Biochemistry, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Zhang, Xiaodong, E-mail: zhangxd@nankai.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, Department of Cancer Research, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2015-04-03

    The central dogma of gene expression is that DNA is transcribed into messenger RNAs, which in turn serve as the template for protein synthesis. Recently, it has been reported that mRNAs display regulatory roles that rely on their ability to compete for microRNA binding, independent of their protein-coding function. However, the regulatory mechanism of mRNAs remains poorly understood. Here, we report that a hairpin within YAP mRNA 3′untranslated region (3′UTR) functions in regulation at post-transcription level through generating endogenous siRNAs (esiRNAs). Bioinformatics analysis for secondary structure showed that YAP mRNA displayed a hairpin structure (termed standard hairpin, S-hairpin) within its 3′UTR. Surprisingly, we observed that the overexpression of S-hairpin derived from YAP 3′UTR (YAP-sh) increased the luciferase reporter activities of transcriptional factor NF-κB and AP-1 in 293T cells. Moreover, we identified that a fragment from YAP-sh, an esiRNA, was able to target mRNA 3′UTR of NF2 (a member of Hippo-signaling pathway) and YAP mRNA 3′UTR itself in hepatoma cells. Thus, we conclude that the YAP-sh within YAP mRNA 3′UTR may serve as a novel regulatory element, which functions in regulation at post-transcription level. Our finding provides new insights into the mechanism of mRNAs in regulatory function. - Highlights: • An S-hairpin within YAP mRNA 3′UTR possesses regulatory function. • YAP-sh acts as a regulatory element for YAP at post-transcription level. • YAP-sh-3p20, an esiRNA derived from YAP-sh, targets mRNAs of YAP and NF2. • YAP-sh-3p20 depresses the proliferation of HepG2 cells in vitro.

  20. Exploration of G-quadruplex function in c-Myb gene and its transcriptional regulation by topotecan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangyuan; Zhou, Jiang; Xu, Ming; Yuan, Gu

    2018-02-01

    Our bioinformatics research shows that there are four G-rich sequences (S1-S4) in the upstream region of the transcription start site of c-Myb gene, and we have proved that these sequences have the ability to form G-quadruplex structures. This work mainly focuses on G-quadruplex function, recognition and transcription regulation in c-Myb gene, revealing a novel regulatory element in c-Myb proximal promoter region, and its transcription regulation by G-quadruplex binder. The research has identified that the enhancer effect in c-Myb transcription was primarily affected by the G-quadruplex formed by S1 sequence, and the up-regulation effect may due to the removal of repressive progress of MZF-1 by stabilizing G-quadruplex. Attentions were being paid to the development of G-quadruplex binders for selective recognition, and topotecan was found to have high binding affinity in vitro and could effectively affect the c-Myb transcription activities in cells. The regulation of G-quadruplex with binders in transcriptional, translational levels by Q-RT-PCR and western blot was in expectation of providing a strategy for gene expression modulation. In conclusion, our study revealed a G-quadruplex structure in c-Myb proximal promoter region, which was of great importance in the regulation of c-Myb function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. EWS and FUS bind a subset of transcribed genes encoding proteins enriched in RNA regulatory functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Yonglun; Friis, Jenny Blechingberg; Fernandes, Ana Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Background FUS (TLS) and EWS (EWSR1) belong to the FET-protein family of RNA and DNA binding proteins. FUS and EWS are structurally and functionally related and participate in transcriptional regulation and RNA processing. FUS and EWS are identified in translocation generated cancer fusion proteins...... and involved in the human neurological diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and fronto-temporal lobar degeneration. Results To determine the gene regulatory functions of FUS and EWS at the level of chromatin, we have performed chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next generation sequencing (Ch......IP-seq). Our results show that FUS and EWS bind to a subset of actively transcribed genes, that binding often is downstream the poly(A)-signal, and that binding overlaps with RNA polymerase II. Functional examinations of selected target genes identified that FUS and EWS can regulate gene expression...

  2. Large-scale turnover of functional transcription factor bindingsites in Drosophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, Alan M.; Pollard, Daniel A.; Nix, David A.; Iyer, VenkyN.; Li, Xiao-Yong; Biggin, Mark D.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2006-07-14

    The gain and loss of functional transcription-factor bindingsites has been proposed as a major source of evolutionary change incis-regulatory DNA and gene expression. We have developed an evolutionarymodel to study binding site turnover that uses multiple sequencealignments to assess the evolutionary constraint on individual bindingsites, and to map gain and loss events along a phylogenetic tree. Weapply this model to study the evolutionary dynamics of binding sites ofthe Drosophila melanogaster transcription factor Zeste, using genome-widein vivo (ChIP-chip) binding data to identify functional Zeste bindingsites, and the genome sequences of D. melanogaster, D. simulans, D.erecta and D. yakuba to study their evolution. We estimate that more than5 percent of functional Zeste binding sites in D. melanogaster weregained along the D. melanogaster lineage or lost along one of the otherlineages. We find that Zeste bound regions have a reduced rate of bindingsite loss and an increased rate of binding site gain relative to flankingsequences. Finally, we show that binding site gains and losses areasymmetrically distributed with respect to D. melanogaster, consistentwith lineage-specific acquisition and loss of Zeste-responsive regulatoryelements.

  3. Identifying functional transcription factor binding sites in yeast by considering their positional preference in the promoters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Jou Lai

    Full Text Available Transcription factor binding site (TFBS identification plays an important role in deciphering gene regulatory codes. With comprehensive knowledge of TFBSs, one can understand molecular mechanisms of gene regulation. In the recent decades, various computational approaches have been proposed to predict TFBSs in the genome. The TFBS dataset of a TF generated by each algorithm is a ranked list of predicted TFBSs of that TF, where top ranked TFBSs are statistically significant ones. However, whether these statistically significant TFBSs are functional (i.e. biologically relevant is still unknown. Here we develop a post-processor, called the functional propensity calculator (FPC, to assign a functional propensity to each TFBS in the existing computationally predicted TFBS datasets. It is known that functional TFBSs reveal strong positional preference towards the transcriptional start site (TSS. This motivates us to take TFBS position relative to the TSS as the key idea in building our FPC. Based on our calculated functional propensities, the TFBSs of a TF in the original TFBS dataset could be reordered, where top ranked TFBSs are now the ones with high functional propensities. To validate the biological significance of our results, we perform three published statistical tests to assess the enrichment of Gene Ontology (GO terms, the enrichment of physical protein-protein interactions, and the tendency of being co-expressed. The top ranked TFBSs in our reordered TFBS dataset outperform the top ranked TFBSs in the original TFBS dataset, justifying the effectiveness of our post-processor in extracting functional TFBSs from the original TFBS dataset. More importantly, assigning functional propensities to putative TFBSs enables biologists to easily identify which TFBSs in the promoter of interest are likely to be biologically relevant and are good candidates to do further detailed experimental investigation. The FPC is implemented as a web tool at http://santiago.ee.ncku.edu.tw/FPC/.

  4. Transcriptional regulatory networks downstream of TAL1/SCL in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Palomero, Teresa; Odom, Duncan T.; O'Neil, Jennifer; Ferrando, Adolfo A.; Margolin, Adam; Neuberg, Donna S.; Winter, Stuart S.; Larson, Richard S.; Li, Wei; Liu, X. Shirley; Young, Richard A.; Look, A. Thomas

    2006-01-01

    Aberrant expression of 1 or more transcription factor oncogenes is a critical component of the molecular pathogenesis of human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL); however, oncogenic transcriptional programs downstream of T-ALL oncogenes are mostly unknown. TAL1/SCL is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor oncogene aberrantly expressed in 60% of human T-ALLs. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) on chip to identify 71 direct transcriptional targets of TAL1/SCL. ...

  5. Global transcription profiling reveals differential responses to chronic nitrogen stress and putative nitrogen regulatory components in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Tong

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A large quantity of nitrogen (N fertilizer is used for crop production to achieve high yields at a significant economic and environmental cost. Efforts have been directed to understanding the molecular basis of plant responses to N and identifying N-responsive genes in order to manipulate their expression, thus enabling plants to use N more efficiently. No studies have yet delineated these responses at the transcriptional level when plants are grown under chronic N stress and the understanding of regulatory elements involved in N response is very limited. Results To further our understanding of the response of plants to varying N levels, a growth system was developed where N was the growth-limiting factor. An Arabidopsis whole genome microarray was used to evaluate global gene expression under different N conditions. Differentially expressed genes under mild or severe chronic N stress were identified. Mild N stress triggered only a small set of genes significantly different at the transcriptional level, which are largely involved in various stress responses. Plant responses were much more pronounced under severe N stress, involving a large number of genes in many different biological processes. Differentially expressed genes were also identified in response to short- and long-term N availability increases. Putative N regulatory elements were determined along with several previously known motifs involved in the responses to N and carbon availability as well as plant stress. Conclusion Differentially expressed genes identified provide additional insights into the coordination of the complex N responses of plants and the components of the N response mechanism. Putative N regulatory elements were identified to reveal possible new components of the regulatory network for plant N responses. A better understanding of the complex regulatory network for plant N responses will help lead to strategies to improve N use efficiency.

  6. Seed maturation associated transcriptional programs and regulatory networks underlying genotypic difference in seed dormancy and size/weight in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, Yuji; Gao, Feng; Jordan, Mark C; Ayele, Belay T

    2017-09-16

    Maturation forms one of the critical seed developmental phases and it is characterized mainly by programmed cell death, dormancy and desiccation, however, the transcriptional programs and regulatory networks underlying acquisition of dormancy and deposition of storage reserves during the maturation phase of seed development are poorly understood in wheat. The present study performed comparative spatiotemporal transcriptomic analysis of seed maturation in two wheat genotypes with contrasting seed weight/size and dormancy phenotype. The embryo and endosperm tissues of maturing seeds appeared to exhibit genotype-specific temporal shifts in gene expression profile that might contribute to the seed phenotypic variations. Functional annotations of gene clusters suggest that the two tissues exhibit distinct but genotypically overlapping molecular functions. Motif enrichment predicts genotypically distinct abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellin (GA) regulated transcriptional networks contribute to the contrasting seed weight/size and dormancy phenotypes between the two genotypes. While other ABA responsive element (ABRE) motifs are enriched in both genotypes, the prevalence of G-box-like motif specifically in tissues of the dormant genotype suggests distinct ABA mediated transcriptional mechanisms control the establishment of dormancy during seed maturation. In agreement with this, the bZIP transcription factors that co-express with ABRE enriched embryonic genes differ with genotype. The enrichment of SITEIIATCYTC motif specifically in embryo clusters of maturing seeds irrespective of genotype predicts a tissue specific role for the respective TCP transcription factors with no or minimal contribution to the variations in seed dormancy. The results of this study advance our understanding of the seed maturation associated molecular mechanisms underlying variation in dormancy and weight/size in wheat seeds, which is a critical step towards the designing of molecular strategies

  7. Transcription elongation factor GreA has functional chaperone activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kun; Jiang, Tianyi; Yu, Bo; Wang, Limin; Gao, Chao; Ma, Cuiqing; Xu, Ping; Ma, Yanhe

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial GreA is an indispensable factor in the RNA polymerase elongation complex. It plays multiple roles in transcriptional elongation, and may be implicated in resistance to various stresses. In this study, we show that Escherichia coli GreA inhibits aggregation of several substrate proteins under heat shock condition. GreA can also effectively promote the refolding of denatured proteins. These facts reveal that GreA has chaperone activity. Distinct from many molecular chaperones, GreA does not form stable complexes with unfolded substrates. GreA overexpression confers the host cells with enhanced resistance to heat shock and oxidative stress. Moreover, GreA expression in the greA/greB double mutant could suppress the temperature-sensitive phenotype, and dramatically alleviate the in vivo protein aggregation. The results suggest that bacterial GreA may act as chaperone in vivo. These results suggest that GreA, in addition to its function as a transcription factor, is involved in protection of cellular proteins against aggregation.

  8. Genome-Wide Mapping of Collier In Vivo Binding Sites Highlights Its Hierarchical Position in Different Transcription Regulatory Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilde de Taffin

    Full Text Available Collier, the single Drosophila COE (Collier/EBF/Olf-1 transcription factor, is required in several developmental processes, including head patterning and specification of muscle and neuron identity during embryogenesis. To identify direct Collier (Col targets in different cell types, we used ChIP-seq to map Col binding sites throughout the genome, at mid-embryogenesis. In vivo Col binding peaks were associated to 415 potential direct target genes. Gene Ontology analysis revealed a strong enrichment in proteins with DNA binding and/or transcription-regulatory properties. Characterization of a selection of candidates, using transgenic CRM-reporter assays, identified direct Col targets in dorso-lateral somatic muscles and specific neuron types in the central nervous system. These data brought new evidence that Col direct control of the expression of the transcription regulators apterous and eyes-absent (eya is critical to specifying neuronal identities. They also showed that cross-regulation between col and eya in muscle progenitor cells is required for specification of muscle identity, revealing a new parallel between the myogenic regulatory networks operating in Drosophila and vertebrates. Col regulation of eya, both in specific muscle and neuronal lineages, may illustrate one mechanism behind the evolutionary diversification of Col biological roles.

  9. Chromatin reader L(3)mbt requires the Myb-MuvB/DREAM transcriptional regulatory complex for chromosomal recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Daniel P; Georlette, Daphne; Antoszewski, Lisa; Botchan, Michael R

    2014-10-07

    Lethal malignant brain tumors (lmbt) result from the loss of the conserved transcriptional repressor l(3)mbt, in Drosophila melanogaster. Similar mutations in the human homolog L3MBTL1 correlate with some cancers. The protein's C-terminal MBT repeats bind mono and dimethylated histones in vitro, which could influence recruitment of L3MBTL1 to its target sites. The L(3)mbt chromatin targeting mechanism, however, is controversial and several studies suggest insufficiency or a minor role for histone methylation in determining the site specificity for recruitment. We report that L(3)mbt colocalizes with core members of the Myb-MuvB/DREAM (MMB/DREAM) transcriptional regulatory complex genome-wide, and that L(3)mbt-mediated repression requires this complex in salivary glands and larval brains. Loss of l(3)mbt or of MMB components through mutation cause similar spurious expression of genes, including the transposon regulatory gene piwi, in terminally differentiated cells. The DNA-binding MMB core component Mip120 (Lin54) is required for L(3)mbt recruitment to chromosomes, whereas Mip130 (Lin9) (an MMB core protein) and E2f2 (an MMB transcriptional repressor) are not, but are essential for repression. Cytolocalization experiments suggest the presence of site-specific differential composition of MMB in polytene chromosomes where some loci were bound by a Myb-containing or alternatively, an E2f2 and L(3)mbt form of the complex.

  10. Evaluation of T Regulatory Lymphocytes Transcription Factors in HTLV-1-Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP) Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezeldasht, Sanaz Ahmadi; Sadeghian, Hamed; Azarpazhooh, Mahmoud Reza; Shamsian, Seyyed Ali Akbar; Rafatpanah, Houshang; Mahmoodi, Mahmood; Rezaee, Seyyed Abdolrahim

    2017-08-01

    HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) is an aggressive neurological disease. The CD4 + CD25 + T cell population plays pivotal roles in the maintenance of immunological tolerance and prevention of such autoimmune diseases. In the current study, proviral load (PVL), factor forkhead box p3 (Foxp3), and glucocorticoid-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor-related protein (GITR) gene expression and regulatory T cells (Tregs) counts of 21 HAM/TSP patients and 16 HTLV-1 healthy carriers (ACs) were measured using real-time PCR, TaqMan method, and flow cytometry. The demographic, history of disease, and severity of myelopathy were assessed by a checklist and the Osame motor disability score (OMDS). The mean OMDS for HAM/TSP was 4.82 ± 2.37 which had no significant correlation with Treg count or the expression of Foxp3, GITR, and PVL. The CD4 + CD25 + cell counts had no significant differences between HAM/TSP and ACs. Findings revealed a higher PVL in HAM/TSPs (313.36 copies/10 4 ) compared to ACs (144.93 copies/10 4 , p = 0.035). The Foxp3 and GITR mRNA levels were lower in HAM/TSP patients (11.78 and 13.80, respectively) than those in healthy carriers (18.44 and 21.00, p = 0.041 and 0.03, respectively). There was a significant correlation between Treg frequency and Foxp3 gene expression (R = 0.67, p = 0.006) and GITR and Foxp3 (R = 0.84, p = 0.042) in HAM/TSP patients. Furthermore, the transcription factors have strong correlations with CD4 + CD25 + T cell frequencies. These findings suggest that HTLV-1 infection can modify the expression of main functional transcription factors, FOXP3 and GITR, which may lead to immune response deterioration of Tregs and consequently HAM/TSP manifestation.

  11. Structure, function and networks of transcription factors involved in abiotic stress responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemose, Søren; O'Shea, Charlotte; Jensen, Michael Krogh

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are master regulators of abiotic stress responses in plants. This review focuses on TFs from seven major TF families, known to play functional roles in response to abiotic stresses, including drought, high salinity, high osmolarity, temperature extremes...... and the phytohormone ABA. Although ectopic expression of several TFs has improved abiotic stress tolerance in plants, fine-tuning of TF expression and protein levels remains a challenge to avoid crop yield loss. To further our understanding of TFs in abiotic stress responses, emerging gene regulatory networks based...... disorder (ID), referring to their lack of fixed tertiary structures. ID is now an emerging topic in plant science. Furthermore, the importance of the ubiquitin-proteasome protein degradation systems and modification by sumoylation is also apparent from the interactomes. Therefore; TF interaction partners...

  12. Role of architecture in the function and specificity of two Notch-regulated transcriptional enhancer modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng; Posakony, James W

    2012-07-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, cis-regulatory modules that are activated by the Notch cell-cell signaling pathway all contain two types of transcription factor binding sites: those for the pathway's transducing factor Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)] and those for one or more tissue- or cell type-specific factors called "local activators." The use of different "Su(H) plus local activator" motif combinations, or codes, is critical to ensure that only the correct subset of the broadly utilized Notch pathway's target genes are activated in each developmental context. However, much less is known about the role of enhancer "architecture"--the number, order, spacing, and orientation of its component transcription factor binding motifs--in determining the module's specificity. Here we investigate the relationship between architecture and function for two Notch-regulated enhancers with spatially distinct activities, each of which includes five high-affinity Su(H) sites. We find that the first, which is active specifically in the socket cells of external sensory organs, is largely resistant to perturbations of its architecture. By contrast, the second enhancer, active in the "non-SOP" cells of the proneural clusters from which neural precursors arise, is sensitive to even simple rearrangements of its transcription factor binding sites, responding with both loss of normal specificity and striking ectopic activity. Thus, diverse cryptic specificities can be inherent in an enhancer's particular combination of transcription factor binding motifs. We propose that for certain types of enhancer, architecture plays an essential role in determining specificity, not only by permitting factor-factor synergies necessary to generate the desired activity, but also by preventing other activator synergies that would otherwise lead to unwanted specificities.

  13. Mapping Mammalian Cell-type-specific Transcriptional Regulatory Networks Using KD-CAGE and ChIP-seq Data in the TC-YIK Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizio, Marina; Ishizu, Yuri; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Hasegawa, Akira; Kubosaki, Atsutaka; Severin, Jessica; Kawaji, Hideya; Nakamura, Yukio; Suzuki, Harukazu; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R R

    2015-01-01

    Mammals are composed of hundreds of different cell types with specialized functions. Each of these cellular phenotypes are controlled by different combinations of transcription factors. Using a human non islet cell insulinoma cell line (TC-YIK) which expresses insulin and the majority of known pancreatic beta cell specific genes as an example, we describe a general approach to identify key cell-type-specific transcription factors (TFs) and their direct and indirect targets. By ranking all human TFs by their level of enriched expression in TC-YIK relative to a broad collection of samples (FANTOM5), we confirmed known key regulators of pancreatic function and development. Systematic siRNA mediated perturbation of these TFs followed by qRT-PCR revealed their interconnections with NEUROD1 at the top of the regulation hierarchy and its depletion drastically reducing insulin levels. For 15 of the TF knock-downs (KD), we then used Cap Analysis of Gene Expression (CAGE) to identify thousands of their targets genome-wide (KD-CAGE). The data confirm NEUROD1 as a key positive regulator in the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN), and ISL1, and PROX1 as antagonists. As a complimentary approach we used ChIP-seq on four of these factors to identify NEUROD1, LMX1A, PAX6, and RFX6 binding sites in the human genome. Examining the overlap between genes perturbed in the KD-CAGE experiments and genes with a ChIP-seq peak within 50 kb of their promoter, we identified direct transcriptional targets of these TFs. Integration of KD-CAGE and ChIP-seq data shows that both NEUROD1 and LMX1A work as the main transcriptional activators. In the core TRN (i.e., TF-TF only), NEUROD1 directly transcriptionally activates the pancreatic TFs HSF4, INSM1, MLXIPL, MYT1, NKX6-3, ONECUT2, PAX4, PROX1, RFX6, ST18, DACH1, and SHOX2, while LMX1A directly transcriptionally activates DACH1, SHOX2, PAX6, and PDX1. Analysis of these complementary datasets suggests the need for caution in interpreting Ch

  14. Functional analysis of a dominant negative mutation of interferon regulatory factor 5.

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    Long Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interferon regulatory factor (IRF family members have been implicated as critical transcription factors that function in immune response, hematopoietic differentiation and cell growth regulation. Activation of IRF-5 results in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNFalpha, IL6 and IL12p40, as well as type I interferons. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we identify a G202C (position relative to translation start codon missense-mutation transcript of IRF-5 in transformed B and T cell lines, which were either infected or non-infected by viruses, and peripheral blood from ATL or CLL patients. The mutated transcript encodes a novel protein in which the sixty-eighth amino acid, Alanine, is substituted by Proline (IRF-5P68 in the DNA binding domain of IRF-5. IRF-5P68 phenotype results in a complete loss of its DNA-binding activity and functions as a dominant negative molecule through interacting with wild type IRF-5. Co-expression of IRF-5P68 inhibits MyD88-mediated IRF-5 transactivation. Moreover, Toll-like receptor (TLR-dependent IL6 and IL12P40 production induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS, R837 or CpG ODN 1826 was reduced in IRF-5 (P68 expressing cells as compared to the control cells. CONCLUSION: IRF-5P68 acts as a dominant negative regulator that interferes with IRF-5-mediated production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The functional characterization of the novel IRF-5 mutant in transformed B and T cell lines and in ATL and CLL patients may lead to a better understanding of the role of these transcriptional regulators in hematopoietic malignancies.

  15. The regulatory network of B-cell differentiation: a focused view of early B-cell factor 1 function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boller, Sören; Grosschedl, Rudolf

    2014-09-01

    During the last decades, many studies have investigated the transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of lineage decision in the hematopoietic system. These efforts led to a model in which extrinsic signals and intrinsic cues establish a permissive chromatin context upon which a regulatory network of transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers act to guide the differentiation of hematopoietic lineages. These networks include lineage-specific factors that further modify the epigenetic landscape and promote the generation of specific cell types. The process of B lymphopoiesis requires a set of transcription factors, including Ikaros, PU.1, E2A, and FoxO1 to 'prime' cis-regulatory regions for subsequent activation by the B-lineage-specific transcription factors EBF1 and Pax-5. The expression of EBF1 is initiated by the combined action of E2A and FoxO1, and it is further enhanced and maintained by several positive feedback loops that include Pax-5 and IL-7 signaling. EBF1 acts in concert with Ikaros, PU.1, Runx1, E2A, FoxO1, and Pax-5 to establish the B cell-specific transcription profile. EBF1 and Pax-5 also collaborate to repress alternative cell fates and lock cells into the B-lineage fate. In addition to the functions of EBF1 in establishing and maintaining B-cell identity, EBF1 is required to coordinate differentiation with cell proliferation and survival. © 2014 The Authors. Immunological Reviews Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Transcription factor retention on mitotic chromosomes: regulatory mechanisms and impact on cell fate decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raccaud, Mahé; Suter, David M

    2017-09-01

    During mitosis, gene transcription stops, and the bulk of DNA-binding proteins are excluded from condensed chromosomes. While most gene-specific transcription factors are largely evicted from mitotic chromosomes, a subset remains bound to specific and non-specific DNA sites. Here, we review the current knowledge on the mechanisms leading to the retention of a subset of transcription factors on mitotic chromosomes and discuss the implications in gene expression regulation and their potential as an epigenetic mechanism controlling stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  17. Identification of putative regulatory motifs in the upstream regions of co-expressed functional groups of genes in Plasmodium falciparum

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    Joshi NV

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Regulation of gene expression in Plasmodium falciparum (Pf remains poorly understood. While over half the genes are estimated to be regulated at the transcriptional level, few regulatory motifs and transcription regulators have been found. Results The study seeks to identify putative regulatory motifs in the upstream regions of 13 functional groups of genes expressed in the intraerythrocytic developmental cycle of Pf. Three motif-discovery programs were used for the purpose, and motifs were searched for only on the gene coding strand. Four motifs – the 'G-rich', the 'C-rich', the 'TGTG' and the 'CACA' motifs – were identified, and zero to all four of these occur in the 13 sets of upstream regions. The 'CACA motif' was absent in functional groups expressed during the ring to early trophozoite transition. For functional groups expressed in each transition, the motifs tended to be similar. Upstream motifs in some functional groups showed 'positional conservation' by occurring at similar positions relative to the translational start site (TLS; this increases their significance as regulatory motifs. In the ribonucleotide synthesis, mitochondrial, proteasome and organellar translation machinery genes, G-rich, C-rich, CACA and TGTG motifs, respectively, occur with striking positional conservation. In the organellar translation machinery group, G-rich motifs occur close to the TLS. The same motifs were sometimes identified for multiple functional groups; differences in location and abundance of the motifs appear to ensure different modes of action. Conclusion The identification of positionally conserved over-represented upstream motifs throws light on putative regulatory elements for transcription in Pf.

  18. A Direct Regulatory Interaction between Chaperonin TRiC and Stress-Responsive Transcription Factor HSF1

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    Daniel W. Neef

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Heat shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1 is an evolutionarily conserved transcription factor that protects cells from protein-misfolding-induced stress and apoptosis. The mechanisms by which cytosolic protein misfolding leads to HSF1 activation have not been elucidated. Here, we demonstrate that HSF1 is directly regulated by TRiC/CCT, a central ATP-dependent chaperonin complex that folds cytosolic proteins. A small-molecule activator of HSF1, HSF1A, protects cells from stress-induced apoptosis, binds TRiC subunits in vivo and in vitro, and inhibits TRiC activity without perturbation of ATP hydrolysis. Genetic inactivation or depletion of the TRiC complex results in human HSF1 activation, and HSF1A inhibits the direct interaction between purified TRiC and HSF1 in vitro. These results demonstrate a direct regulatory interaction between the cytosolic chaperone machine and a critical transcription factor that protects cells from proteotoxicity, providing a mechanistic basis for signaling perturbations in protein folding to a stress-protective transcription factor.

  19. ThDof1.4 and ThZFP1 constitute a transcriptional regulatory cascade involved in salt or osmotic stress in Tamarix hispida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Dandan; Wang, Lina; Zhang, Yiming; Zhao, Huimin; Wang, Yucheng

    2017-07-01

    Identification of the upstream regulators of a gene is important to characterize the transcriptional pathway and the function of the gene. Previously, we found that a zinc finger protein (ThZFP1) is involved in abiotic stress tolerance of Tamarix hispida. In the present study, we further investigated the transcriptional pathway of ThZFP1. Dof motifs are abundant in the ThZFP1 promoter; therefore, we used them to screen for transcriptional regulators of ThZFP1. A Dof protein, ThDof1.4, binds to the Dof motif specifically, and was hypothesized as the upstream regulator of ThZFP1. Further study showed that overexpression of ThDof1.4 in T. hispida activated the expression of GUS controlled by the ThZFP1 promoter. In T. hispida, transient overexpression of ThDof1.4 increased the transcripts of ThZFP1; conversely, transient RNAi-silencing of ThDof1.4 reduced the expression of ThZFP1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation indicated that ThDof1.4 binds to the ThZFP1 promoter. Additionally, ThDof1.4 and ThZFP1 share similar expression patterns in response to salt or drought stress. Furthermore, like ThZFP1, ThDof1.4 could increase the proline level and enhance ROS scavenging capability to improve salt and osmotic stress tolerance. Together, these results suggested that ThDof1.4 and ThZFP1 form a transcriptional regulatory cascade involved in abiotic stress resistance in T. hispida.

  20. Modification of the FoxP3 transcription factor principally affects inducible T regulatory cells in a model of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

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    Johan Verhagen

    Full Text Available T regulatory (Treg cells expressing the transcription factor FoxP3 play a key role in protection against autoimmune disease. GFP-FoxP3 reporter mice have been used widely to study the induction, function and stability of both thymically- and peripherally-induced Treg cells. The N-terminal modification of FoxP3, however, affects its interaction with transcriptional co-factors; this can alter Treg cell development and function in certain self-antigen specific animal models. Interestingly, Treg cell function can be negatively or positively affected, depending on the nature of the model. In this study, we focused on the effect of the GFP-FoxP3 reporter on Treg cell development and function in the Tg4 mouse model. In this model, T cells express a transgenic T cell receptor (TCR specific for the Myelin Basic Protein (MBP peptide Ac1-9, making the animals susceptible to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, a disease akin to multiple sclerosis in humans. Unlike diabetes-susceptible mice, Tg4 FoxP3(gfp mice did not develop spontaneous autoimmune disease and did not demonstrate augmented susceptibility to induced disease. Concurrently, thymic generation of natural Treg cells was not negatively affected. The induction of FoxP3 expression in naive peripheral T cells was, however, significantly impaired as a result of the transgene. This study shows that the requirements for the interaction of FoxP3 with co-factors, which governs its regulatory ability, differ not only between natural and inducible Treg cells but also between animal models of diseases such as diabetes and EAE.

  1. [P53-mediated Regulatory Mechanism of Ran Transcription in Multiple Myeloma Cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lei; Gu, Zhen-Yang; Gao, Chun-Ji

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the role of p53 on ran transcription in myeloma cells. Using real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR, the ran transcription level was measured in 8 human myeloma cell lines such as OPM-2, RPMI-8226, U-266, KAS6/1, ANML-6, H-929, MM1.S and MOLP-8. The ran transcription level and P53 expression were detected by Q-PCR in MM1.S treated with Nutlin-3a for 24, 48 and 72 hours, respectively. The Western blot was used to detect the expression levels of ran and P53 proteins, and ran expression level after transfection of MM1.S cells using different concentration of plasmids which express the P53 luciferase reporter. H-929 and MM1.S cells showed the highest ran transcription level among the above-mentioned 8 cell lines (P<0.05). After treatment with Nutlin-3a, ran transcription level in MM1.S cells decreased (P<0.05), (r=-1.00, P=0.04) and P53 expression increased (r=1.00, P=0.06) in time-dependence manner. The detection by p53 luciferase reporter showed that the ran transcription decreased and the plasmid increased to 25 ng (P<0.05). This study demonstrated that ran is a target gene regulated by P53 in myeloma cells for the first time.

  2. Temporal clustering of gene expression links the metabolic transcription factor HNF4α to the ER stress-dependent gene regulatory network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M Arensdorf

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The unfolded protein response (UPR responds to disruption of endoplasmic reticulum (ER function by initiating signaling cascades that ultimately culminate in extensive transcriptional regulation. Classically, this regulation includes genes encoding ER chaperones, ER-associated degradation factors, and others involved in secretory protein folding and processing, and is carried out by the transcriptional activators that are produced as a consequence of UPR activation. However, up to half of the mRNAs regulated by ER stress are downregulated rather than upregulated, and the mechanisms linking ER stress and UPR activation to mRNA suppression are poorly understood. To begin to address this issue, we used a bottom-up approach to study the metabolic gene regulatory network controlled by the UPR in the liver, because ER in the liver stress leads to lipid accumulation, and fatty liver disease is the most common liver disease in the western world. qRT-PCR profiling of mouse liver mRNAs during ER stress revealed that suppression of the transcriptional regulators C/EBPα, PPARα, and PGC-1α preceded lipid accumulation, and was then followed by suppression of mRNAs encoding key enzymes involved in fatty acid oxidation and lipoprotein biogenesis and transport. Mice lacking the ER stress sensor ATF6α, which experience persistent ER stress and profound lipid accumulation during challenge, were then used as the basis for a functional genomics approach that allowed genes to be grouped into distinct expression profiles. This clustering predicted that ER stress would suppress the activity of the metabolic transcriptional regulator HNF4α--a finding subsequently confirmed by chromatin immunopreciptation at the Cebpa and Pgc1a promoters. Our results establish a framework for hepatic gene regulation during ER stress and suggest that HNF4α occupies the apex of that framework. They also provide a unique resource for the community to further explore the temporal

  3. The muscle regulatory transcription factor MyoD participates with p53 to directly increase the expression of the pro-apoptotic Bcl2 family member PUMA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harford, Terri J; Kliment, Greg; Shukla, Girish C; Weyman, Crystal M

    2017-12-01

    The muscle regulatory transcription factor MyoD is a master regulator of skeletal myoblast differentiation. We have previously reported that MyoD is also necessary for the elevated expression of the pro-apoptotic Bcl2 family member PUMA, and the ensuing apoptosis, that occurs in a subset of myoblasts induced to differentiate. Herein, we report the identification of a functional MyoD binding site within the extended PUMA promoter. In silico analysis of the murine PUMA extended promoter revealed three potential MyoD binding sites within 2 kb of the transcription start site. Expression from a luciferase reporter construct containing this 2 kb fragment was enhanced by activation of MyoD in both myoblasts and fibroblasts and diminished by silencing of MyoD in myoblasts. Experiments utilizing truncated versions of this promoter region revealed that the potential binding site at position - 857 was necessary for expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis confirmed binding of MyoD to the DNA region encompassing position - 857. The increase in MyoD binding to the PUMA promoter as a consequence of culture in differentiation media (DM) was comparable to the increase in MyoD binding at the myogenin promoter and was diminished in myoblasts silenced for MyoD expression. Finally, ChIP analysis using an antibody specific for the transcription factor p53 demonstrated that, in myoblasts silenced for MyoD expression, p53 binding to the PUMA promoter was diminished in response to culture in DM. These data indicate that MyoD plays a direct role in regulating PUMA expression and reveal functional consequences of MyoD expression on p53 mediated transcription of PUMA.

  4. The AFL subfamily of B3 transcription factors: evolution and function in angiosperm seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonero, Pilar; Iglesias-Fernández, Raquel; Vicente-Carbajosa, Jesús

    2017-02-01

    Seed development follows zygotic embryogenesis; during the maturation phase reserves accumulate and desiccation tolerance is acquired. This is tightly regulated at the transcriptional level and the AFL (ABI3/FUS3/LEC2) subfamily of B3 transcription factors (TFs) play a central role. They alter hormone biosynthesis, mainly in regards to abscisic acid and gibberellins, and also regulate the expression of other TFs and/or modulate their downstream activity via protein-protein interactions. This review deals with the origin of AFL TFs, which can be traced back to non-vascular plants such as Physcomitrella patens and achieves foremost expansion in the angiosperms. In green algae, like the unicellular Chlamydomonas reinhardtii or the pluricellular Klebsormidium flaccidum, a single B3 gene and four B3 paralogous genes are annotated, respectively. However, none of them present with the structural features of the AFL subfamily, with the exception of the B3 DNA-binding domain. Phylogenetic analysis groups the AFL TFs into four Major Clusters of Ortologous Genes (MCOGs). The origin and function of these genes is discussed in view of their expression patterns and in the context of major regulatory interactions in seeds of monocotyledonous and dicotyledonous species. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. A Regulatory Circuit Composed of a Transcription Factor, IscR, and a Regulatory RNA, RyhB, Controls Fe-S Cluster Delivery

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    Pierre Mandin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fe-S clusters are cofactors conserved through all domains of life. Once assembled by dedicated ISC and/or SUF scaffolds, Fe-S clusters are conveyed to their apo-targets via A-type carrier proteins (ATCs. Escherichia coli possesses four such ATCs. ErpA is the only ATC essential under aerobiosis. Recent studies reported a possible regulation of the erpA mRNA by the small RNA (sRNA RyhB, which controls the expression of many genes under iron starvation. Surprisingly, erpA has not been identified in recent transcriptomic analysis of the iron starvation response, thus bringing into question the actual physiological significance of the putative regulation of erpA by RyhB. Using an sRNA library, we show that among 26 sRNAs, only RyhB represses the expression of an erpA-lacZ translational fusion. We further demonstrate that this repression occurs during iron starvation. Using mutational analysis, we show that RyhB base pairs to the erpA mRNA, inducing its disappearance. In addition, IscR, the master regulator of Fe-S homeostasis, represses expression of erpA at the transcriptional level when iron is abundant, but depleting iron from the medium alleviates this repression. The conjunction of transcriptional derepression by IscR and posttranscriptional repression by RyhB under Fe-limiting conditions is best described as an incoherent regulatory circuit. This double regulation allows full expression of erpA at iron concentrations for which Fe-S biogenesis switches from the ISC to the SUF system. We further provide evidence that this regulatory circuit coordinates ATC usage to iron availability.

  6. The Arabidopsis Transcription Factor NAC016 Promotes Drought Stress Responses by Repressing AREB1 Transcription through a Trifurcate Feed-Forward Regulatory Loop Involving NAP[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuraba, Yasuhito; Kim, Ye-Sol; Han, Su-Hyun; Lee, Byoung-Doo; Paek, Nam-Chon

    2015-01-01

    Drought and other abiotic stresses negatively affect plant growth and development and thus reduce productivity. The plant-specific NAM/ATAF1/2/CUC2 (NAC) transcription factors have important roles in abiotic stress-responsive signaling. Here, we show that Arabidopsis thaliana NAC016 is involved in drought stress responses; nac016 mutants have high drought tolerance, and NAC016-overexpressing (NAC016-OX) plants have low drought tolerance. Using genome-wide gene expression microarray analysis and MEME motif searches, we identified the NAC016-specific binding motif (NAC16BM), GATTGGAT[AT]CA, in the promoters of genes downregulated in nac016-1 mutants. The NAC16BM sequence does not contain the core NAC binding motif CACG (or its reverse complement CGTG). NAC016 directly binds to the NAC16BM in the promoter of ABSCISIC ACID-RESPONSIVE ELEMENT BINDING PROTEIN1 (AREB1), which encodes a central transcription factor in the stress-responsive abscisic acid signaling pathway and represses AREB1 transcription. We found that knockout mutants of the NAC016 target gene NAC-LIKE, ACTIVATED BY AP3/PI (NAP) also exhibited strong drought tolerance; moreover, NAP binds to the AREB1 promoter and suppresses AREB1 transcription. Taking these results together, we propose that a trifurcate feed-forward pathway involving NAC016, NAP, and AREB1 functions in the drought stress response, in addition to affecting leaf senescence in Arabidopsis. PMID:26059204

  7. Comparative study of discretization methods of microarray data for inferring transcriptional regulatory networks

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    Ji Wei

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray data discretization is a basic preprocess for many algorithms of gene regulatory network inference. Some common discretization methods in informatics are used to discretize microarray data. Selection of the discretization method is often arbitrary and no systematic comparison of different discretization has been conducted, in the context of gene regulatory network inference from time series gene expression data. Results In this study, we propose a new discretization method "bikmeans", and compare its performance with four other widely-used discretization methods using different datasets, modeling algorithms and number of intervals. Sensitivities, specificities and total accuracies were calculated and statistical analysis was carried out. Bikmeans method always gave high total accuracies. Conclusions Our results indicate that proper discretization methods can consistently improve gene regulatory network inference independent of network modeling algorithms and datasets. Our new method, bikmeans, resulted in significant better total accuracies than other methods.

  8. Functional alignment of regulatory networks: a study of temperate phages.

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    Ala Trusina

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between the design and functionality of molecular networks is now a key issue in biology. Comparison of regulatory networks performing similar tasks can provide insights into how network architecture is constrained by the functions it directs. Here, we discuss methods of network comparison based on network architecture and signaling logic. Introducing local and global signaling scores for the difference between two networks, we quantify similarities between evolutionarily closely and distantly related bacteriophages. Despite the large evolutionary separation between phage lambda and 186, their networks are found to be similar when difference is measured in terms of global signaling. We finally discuss how network alignment can be used to pinpoint protein similarities viewed from the network perspective.

  9. Likelihood for transcriptions in a genetic regulatory system under asymmetric stable Lévy noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Cheng, Xiujun; Duan, Jinqiao; Kurths, Jürgen; Li, Xiaofan

    2018-01-01

    This work is devoted to investigating the evolution of concentration in a genetic regulation system, when the synthesis reaction rate is under additive and multiplicative asymmetric stable Lévy fluctuations. By focusing on the impact of skewness (i.e., non-symmetry) in the probability distributions of noise, we find that via examining the mean first exit time (MFET) and the first escape probability (FEP), the asymmetric fluctuations, interacting with nonlinearity in the system, lead to peculiar likelihood for transcription. This includes, in the additive noise case, realizing higher likelihood of transcription for larger positive skewness (i.e., asymmetry) index β, causing a stochastic bifurcation at the non-Gaussianity index value α = 1 (i.e., it is a separating point or line for the likelihood for transcription), and achieving a turning point at the threshold value β≈-0.5 (i.e., beyond which the likelihood for transcription suddenly reversed for α values). The stochastic bifurcation and turning point phenomena do not occur in the symmetric noise case (β = 0). While in the multiplicative noise case, non-Gaussianity index value α = 1 is a separating point or line for both the MFET and the FEP. We also investigate the noise enhanced stability phenomenon. Additionally, we are able to specify the regions in the whole parameter space for the asymmetric noise, in which we attain desired likelihood for transcription. We have conducted a series of numerical experiments in "regulating" the likelihood of gene transcription by tuning asymmetric stable Lévy noise indexes. This work offers insights for possible ways of achieving gene regulation in experimental research.

  10. Functional characterization of MADS box transcription factors in Petunia hybrida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrario, S.I.T.

    2004-01-01

    Transcription factors play a central role in the regulation and integration of several developmental pathways in all organisms. MADS box proteins are, among transcription factors, key players in the regulation of flower induction, flower architecture and vegetative development and have been isolated

  11. Interleukin-2 and STAT5 in regulatory T cell development and function

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmud, Shawn A.; Manlove, Luke S.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Interleukin-2 and its downstream target STAT5 have effects on many aspects of immune function. This has been perhaps best documented in regulatory T cells. In this review we summarize the initial findings supporting a role for IL2 and STAT5 in regulatory T cell development and outline more recent studies describing how this critical signaling pathway entrains regulatory T cell differentiation and affects regulatory T cell function.

  12. Comparative analysis of regulatory elements between Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae by genome-wide transcription start site profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghyuk Kim

    Full Text Available Genome-wide transcription start site (TSS profiles of the enterobacteria Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae were experimentally determined through modified 5' RACE followed by deep sequencing of intact primary mRNA. This identified 3,746 and 3,143 TSSs for E. coli and K. pneumoniae, respectively. Experimentally determined TSSs were then used to define promoter regions and 5' UTRs upstream of coding genes. Comparative analysis of these regulatory elements revealed the use of multiple TSSs, identical sequence motifs of promoter and Shine-Dalgarno sequence, reflecting conserved gene expression apparatuses between the two species. In both species, over 70% of primary transcripts were expressed from operons having orthologous genes during exponential growth. However, expressed orthologous genes in E. coli and K. pneumoniae showed a strikingly different organization of upstream regulatory regions with only 20% identical promoters with TSSs in both species. Over 40% of promoters had TSSs identified in only one species, despite conserved promoter sequences existing in the other species. 662 conserved promoters having TSSs in both species resulted in the same number of comparable 5' UTR pairs, and that regulatory element was found to be the most variant region in sequence among promoter, 5' UTR, and ORF. In K. pneumoniae, 48 sRNAs were predicted and 36 of them were expressed during exponential growth. Among them, 34 orthologous sRNAs between two species were analyzed in depth, and the analysis showed that many sRNAs of K. pneumoniae, including pleiotropic sRNAs such as rprA, arcZ, and sgrS, may work in the same way as in E. coli. These results reveal a new dimension of comparative genomics such that a comparison of two genomes needs to be comprehensive over all levels of genome organization.

  13. Interleukin 35 Rescues Regulatory B Cell Function, but the Effect Is Dysregulated in Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaoxuan; Qin, Chengyong

    2017-05-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a long-time inflammatory condition arising from aberrant immune activation in the colon and the rectum. Interleukin (IL)-35 plays critical roles in autoimmune disorders. In this study, we explored the pathways of IL-35 in affecting UC. First, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from UC patients were obtained. Pretreating PBMCs with IL-35 resulted in significantly elevated IL-10 production from whole PBMCs as well as B cells, whereas pretreating PBMCs with IL-12 or IL-27 did not demonstrate a similar effect. IL-35 suppressed the proliferation of CD4 + CD25 - conventional T cells, CD4 + CD25 + regulatory T (Treg) cells, and CD8 + T cells, but did not inhibit the proliferation of B cells. IL-35-mediated IL-10 secretion in B cells did not require the presence of Treg cells. After treatment with IL-35, B cells from UC patients presented significantly enhanced regulatory function, characterized by inhibiting cell proliferation and interferon (IFN)-γ, IL-17, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α secretion from autologous CD4 + CD25 - T cells and CD8 + T cells, which was dependent on IL-10 signaling. However, IL-35-treatment did not demonstrate an effect on regulating IL-5 and IL-13 responses. These discoveries identified a Th1, Th17, and CD8 + T cell-targeting role of IL-35 in UC patients. Next, we examined the IL-35 expression in the intestinal mucosal in UC patients. Data showed that both noninflamed and inflamed tissues from UC patients presented significantly lower IL-35 secretion compared to healthy control tissues, which was associated with suppressed p35 transcription. UC patients with higher IL-35 also presented higher IL-10 secretion in gut mucosa. Together, our study identified that IL-35 could mediate anti-inflammatory function through promoting regulatory B cell functions, but this effect was suppressed in UC patients.

  14. CONREAL: conserved regulatory elements anchored alignment algorithm for identification of transcription factor binding sites by phylogenetic footprinting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berezikov, E.; Guryev, V.; Plasterk, R.; Cuppen, E.

    2004-01-01

    Prediction of transcription-factor target sites in promoters remains difficult due to the short length and degeneracy of the target sequences. Although the use of orthologous sequences and phylogenetic footprinting approaches may help in the recognition of conserved and potentially functional

  15. Transcriptional and Translational Regulatory Responses to Iron Limitation in the Globally Distributed Marine Bacterium Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel P.; Kitner, Joshua B.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Clauss, Therese R.; Lipton, Mary S.; Schwalbach, Michael S.; Steindler, Laura; Nicora, Carrie D.; Smith, Richard D.; Giovannoni, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Iron is recognized as an important micronutrient that limits microbial plankton productivity over vast regions of the oceans. We investigated the gene expression responses of Candidatus Pelagibacter ubique cultures to iron limitation in natural seawater media supplemented with a siderophore to chelate iron. Microarray data indicated transcription of the periplasmic iron binding protein sfuC increased by 16-fold, and iron transporter subunits, iron-sulfur center assembly genes, and the putative ferroxidase rubrerythrin transcripts increased to a lesser extent. Quantitative peptide mass spectrometry revealed that sfuC protein abundance increased 27-fold, despite an average decrease of 59% across the global proteome. Thus, we propose sfuC as a marker gene for indicating iron limitation in marine metatranscriptomic and metaproteomic ecological surveys. The marked proteome reduction was not directly correlated to changes in the transcriptome, implicating post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms as modulators of protein expression. Two RNA-binding proteins, CspE and CspL, correlated well with iron availability, suggesting that they may contribute to the observed differences between the transcriptome and proteome. We propose a model in which the RNA-binding activity of CspE and CspL selectively enables protein synthesis of the iron acquisition protein SfuC during transient growth-limiting episodes of iron scarcity. PMID:20463970

  16. Differential roles of epigenetic changes and Foxp3 expression in regulatory T cell-specific transcriptional regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, Hiromasa; Ohkura, Naganari; Vandenbon, Alexis; Itoh, Masayoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Standley, Daron M.; Date, Hiroshi; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Forrest, Alistair R.R.; Kawaji, Hideya; Rehli, Michael; Baillie, J. Kenneth; de Hoon, Michiel J.L.; Haberle, Vanja; Lassmann, Timo; Kulakovskiy, Ivan V.; Lizio, Marina; Itoh, Masayoshi; Andersson, Robin; Mungall, Christopher J.; Meehan, Terrence F.; Schmeier, Sebastian; Bertin, Nicolas; Jørgensen, Mette; Dimont, Emmanuel; Arner, Erik; Schmidl, Christian; Schaefer, Ulf; Medvedeva, Yulia A.; Plessy, Charles; Vitezic, Morana; Severin, Jessica; Semple, Colin A.; Ishizu, Yuri; Francescatto, Margherita; Alam, Intikhab; Albanese, Davide; Altschuler, Gabriel M.; Archer, John A.C.; Arner, Peter; Babina, Magda; Baker, Sarah; Balwierz, Piotr J.; Beckhouse, Anthony G.; Pradhan-Bhatt, Swati; Blake, Judith A.; Blumenthal, Antje; Bodega, Beatrice; Bonetti, Alessandro; Briggs, James; Brombacher, Frank; Burroughs, A. Maxwell; Califano, Andrea; Cannistraci, Carlo V.; Carbajo, Daniel; Chen, Yun; Chierici, Marco; Ciani, Yari; Clevers, Hans C.; Dalla, Emiliano; Davis, Carrie A.; Deplancke, Bart; Detmar, Michael; Diehl, Alexander D.; Dohi, Taeko; Drabløs, Finn; Edge, Albert S.B.; Edinger, Matthias; Ekwall, Karl; Endoh, Mitsuhiro; Enomoto, Hideki; Fagiolini, Michela; Fairbairn, Lynsey; Fang, Hai; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.; Favorov, Alexander V.; Fisher, Malcolm E.; Frith, Martin C.; Fujita, Rie; Fukuda, Shiro; Furlanello, Cesare; Furuno, Masaaki; Furusawa, Jun-ichi; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B.; Gibson, Andrew; Gingeras, Thomas; Goldowitz, Daniel; Gough, Julian; Guhl, Sven; Guler, Reto; Gustincich, Stefano; Ha, Thomas J.; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Hara, Mitsuko; Harbers, Matthias; Harshbarger, Jayson; Hasegawa, Akira; Hasegawa, Yuki; Hashimoto, Takehiro; Herlyn, Meenhard; Hitchens, Kelly J.; Sui, Shannan J. Ho; Hofmann, Oliver M.; Hoof, Ilka; Hori, Fumi; Huminiecki, Lukasz; Iida, Kei; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Jankovic, Boris R.; Jia, Hui; Joshi, Anagha; Jurman, Giuseppe; Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Kai, Chieko; Kaida, Kaoru; Kaiho, Ai; Kajiyama, Kazuhiro; Kanamori-Katayama, Mutsumi; Kasianov, Artem S.; Kasukawa, Takeya; Katayama, Shintaro; Kato, Sachi; Kawaguchi, Shuji; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yuki I.; Kawashima, Tsugumi; Kempfle, Judith S.; Kenna, Tony J.; Kere, Juha; Khachigian, Levon M.; Kitamura, Toshio; Klinken, S. Peter; Knox, Alan J.; Kojima, Miki; Kojima, Soichi; Kondo, Naoto; Koseki, Haruhiko; Koyasu, Shigeo; Krampitz, Sarah; Kubosaki, Atsutaka; Kwon, Andrew T.; Laros, Jeroen F.J.; Lee, Weonju; Lennartsson, Andreas; Li, Kang; Lilje, Berit; Lipovich, Leonard; Mackay-sim, Alan; Manabe, Ri-ichiroh; Mar, Jessica C.; Marchand, Benoit; Mathelier, Anthony; Mejhert, Niklas; Meynert, Alison; Mizuno, Yosuke; Morais, David A. de Lima; Morikawa, Hiromasa; Morimoto, Mitsuru; Moro, Kazuyo; Motakis, Efthymios; Motohashi, Hozumi; Mummery, Christine L.; Murata, Mitsuyoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Nakachi, Yutaka; Nakahara, Fumio; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Yukio; Nakazato, Kenichi; van Nimwegen, Erik; Ninomiya, Noriko; Nishiyori, Hiromi; Noma, Shohei; Nozaki, Tadasuke; Ogishima, Soichi; Ohkura, Naganari; Ohmiya, Hiroko; Ohno, Hiroshi; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Okazaki, Yasushi; Orlando, Valerio; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A.; Pain, Arnab; Passier, Robert; Patrikakis, Margaret; Persson, Helena; Piazza, Silvano; Prendergast, James G.D.; Rackham, Owen J.L.; Ramilowski, Jordan A.; Rashid, Mamoon; Ravasi, Timothy; Rizzu, Patrizia; Roncador, Marco; Roy, Sugata; Rye, Morten B.; Saijyo, Eri; Sajantila, Antti; Saka, Akiko; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Sakai, Mizuho; Sato, Hiroki; Satoh, Hironori; Savvi, Suzana; Saxena, Alka; Schneider, Claudio; Schultes, Erik A.; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula G.; Schwegmann, Anita; Sengstag, Thierry; Sheng, Guojun; Shimoji, Hisashi; Shimoni, Yishai; Shin, Jay W.; Simon, Christophe; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Takaaki; Suzuki, Masanori; Swoboda, Rolf K.; 't Hoen, Peter A.C.; Tagami, Michihira; Takahashi, Naoko; Takai, Jun; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tatsukawa, Hideki; Tatum, Zuotian; Thompson, Mark; Toyoda, Hiroo; Toyoda, Tetsuro; Valen, Eivind; van de Wetering, Marc; van den Berg, Linda M.; Verardo, Roberto; Vijayan, Dipti; Vorontsov, Ilya E.; Wasserman, Wyeth W.; Watanabe, Shoko; Wells, Christine A.; Winteringham, Louise N.; Wolvetang, Ernst; Wood, Emily J.; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yoneda, Misako; Yonekura, Yohei; Yoshida, Shigehiro; Zabierowski, Suzan E.; Zhang, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring regulatory T (Treg) cells, which specifically express the transcription factor forkhead box P3 (Foxp3), are engaged in the maintenance of immunological self-tolerance and homeostasis. By transcriptional start site cluster analysis, we assessed here how genome-wide patterns of DNA methylation or Foxp3 binding sites were associated with Treg-specific gene expression. We found that Treg-specific DNA hypomethylated regions were closely associated with Treg up-regulated transcriptional start site clusters, whereas Foxp3 binding regions had no significant correlation with either up- or down-regulated clusters in nonactivated Treg cells. However, in activated Treg cells, Foxp3 binding regions showed a strong correlation with down-regulated clusters. In accordance with these findings, the above two features of activation-dependent gene regulation in Treg cells tend to occur at different locations in the genome. The results collectively indicate that Treg-specific DNA hypomethylation is instrumental in gene up-regulation in steady state Treg cells, whereas Foxp3 down-regulates the expression of its target genes in activated Treg cells. Thus, the two events seem to play distinct but complementary roles in Treg-specific gene expression. PMID:24706905

  17. The BAF complex interacts with Pax6 in adult neural progenitors to establish a neurogenic cross-regulatory transcriptional network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninkovic, Jovica; Steiner-Mezzadri, Andrea; Jawerka, Melanie; Akinci, Umut; Masserdotti, Giacomo; Petricca, Stefania; Fischer, Judith; von Holst, Alexander; Beckers, Johanes; Lie, Chichung D; Petrik, David; Miller, Erik; Tang, Jiong; Wu, Jiang; Lefebvre, Veronique; Demmers, Jeroen; Eisch, Amelia; Metzger, Daniel; Crabtree, Gerald; Irmler, Martin; Poot, Raymond; Götz, Magdalena

    2013-10-03

    Numerous transcriptional regulators of neurogenesis have been identified in the developing and adult brain, but how neurogenic fate is programmed at the epigenetic level remains poorly defined. Here, we report that the transcription factor Pax6 directly interacts with the Brg1-containing BAF complex in adult neural progenitors. Deletion of either Brg1 or Pax6 in the subependymal zone (SEZ) causes the progeny of adult neural stem cells to convert to the ependymal lineage within the SEZ while migrating neuroblasts convert to different glial lineages en route to or in the olfactory bulb (OB). Genome-wide analyses reveal that the majority of genes downregulated in the Brg1 null SEZ and OB contain Pax6 binding sites and are also downregulated in Pax6 null SEZ and OB. Downstream of the Pax6-BAF complex, we find that Sox11, Nfib, and Pou3f4 form a transcriptional cross-regulatory network that drives neurogenesis and can convert postnatal glia into neurons. Taken together, elements of our work identify a tripartite effector network activated by Pax6-BAF that programs neuronal fate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Autophagy and the hematopoietic niche: a regulatory role for the Forkhead-box transcription factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomez Puerto, MC

    2016-01-01

    Two main components of the hematopoietic niche are hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). FOXO transcription factors play a fundamental role in the maintenance of these cells through the regulation of cell cycle and oxidative stress. Other gene expression programs

  19. Mitochondrial biogenesis in brown adipose tissue is associated with differential expression of transcription regulatory factors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Villena, J. A.; Carmona, M. C.; Rodriguez de la Concepción, M.; Rossmeisl, Martin; Vinas, O.; Mampel, T.; Iglesias, R.; Giralt, M.; Villarroya, F.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 11 (2002), s. 1934-1944 ISSN 1420-682X Grant - others:Ministerio de Ciencia y Tecnología (ES) PM98.0188 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : brown adipose tissue * mitochondria * transcription factors Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.259, year: 2002

  20. A central regulatory system largely controls transcriptional activation and repression responses to phosphate starvation in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regla Bustos

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Plants respond to different stresses by inducing or repressing transcription of partially overlapping sets of genes. In Arabidopsis, the PHR1 transcription factor (TF has an important role in the control of phosphate (Pi starvation stress responses. Using transcriptomic analysis of Pi starvation in phr1, and phr1 phr1-like (phl1 mutants and in wild type plants, we show that PHR1 in conjunction with PHL1 controls most transcriptional activation and repression responses to phosphate starvation, regardless of the Pi starvation specificity of these responses. Induced genes are enriched in PHR1 binding sequences (P1BS in their promoters, whereas repressed genes do not show such enrichment, suggesting that PHR1(-like control of transcriptional repression responses is indirect. In agreement with this, transcriptomic analysis of a transgenic plant expressing PHR1 fused to the hormone ligand domain of the glucocorticoid receptor showed that PHR1 direct targets (i.e., displaying altered expression after GR:PHR1 activation by dexamethasone in the presence of cycloheximide corresponded largely to Pi starvation-induced genes that are highly enriched in P1BS. A minimal promoter containing a multimerised P1BS recapitulates Pi starvation-specific responsiveness. Likewise, mutation of P1BS in the promoter of two Pi starvation-responsive genes impaired their responsiveness to Pi starvation, but not to other stress types. Phylogenetic footprinting confirmed the importance of P1BS and PHR1 in Pi starvation responsiveness and indicated that P1BS acts in concert with other cis motifs. All together, our data show that PHR1 and PHL1 are partially redundant TF acting as central integrators of Pi starvation responses, both specific and generic. In addition, they indicate that transcriptional repression responses are an integral part of adaptive responses to stress.

  1. A review of NRC regulatory processes and functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    A reexamination by the ACRS of the Regulatory Process has been made. Objectives were to provide in a single source, ACRS' understanding of the Regulatory Process and to point out perceived weaknesses and to make appropriate recommendations for change

  2. A lncRNA-H19 transcript from secondary hair follicle of Liaoning cashmere goat: Identification, regulatory network and expression regulated potentially by its promoter methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yu B; Wang, Ze Y; Yin, Rong H; Jiao, Qian; Zhao, Su J; Cong, Yu Y; Xue, Hui L; Guo, Dan; Wang, Shi Q; Zhu, Yan X; Bai, Wen L

    2018-01-30

    The H19 transcript (imprinted maternally expressed transcript) is well-known as long noncoding RNA (lncRNA), and it is thought to be associated with the inductive capacity of dermal papilla cells for hair-follicle reconstruction. In this study, we isolated and characterized a lncRNA-H19 transcript from the secondary hair follicle of Liaoning cashmere goat. Also, we investigated its transcriptional pattern and methylation status of H19 gene in secondary hair follicle of this breed during different stages of hair follicle cycle. Nucleotide composition analysis indicated that guanine (G) and cytosine (C) are the dominant nucleotides in the lncRNA-H19 transcript of Liaoning cashmere goat with the highest frequency distribution (11.25%) of GG nucleotide pair. The regulatory network showed that lncRNA-H19 transcript appears to have remarkably diverse regulatory relationships with its related miRNAs and the potential target genes. In secondary hair follicle, the relative expression of lncRNA-H19 transcript at the anagen phase is significantly higher than that at both telogen and catagen phases suggesting that lncRNA-H19 transcript might play essential roles in the formation and growth of cashmere fiber of goat. Methylation analysis indicated that the methylation of the promoter region of H19 gene most likely participates in its transcriptional suppression in secondary hair follicle of Liaoning cashmere goat. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Evolution of Transcriptional Regulatory Networks in Pseudomonas aeruginosa During Long Time Growth in Human Hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Eva Kammer

    are subjected to forces that allow the bacteria to break genomic constraints, remodel existing regulatory networks, and colonise new environments. While experimental evolution studies have documented that global regulators of gene expression are indeed targets for adaptive mutations, it is less clear to which...... extent these observations relate to natural microbial populations. The focus of this thesis has been to study how regulatory networks evolve in natural systems. By using a particular infectious disease scenario (human associated persistent airway infections caused by the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... in global regulator genes facilitate the generation of novel phenotypes which again facilitate the shift in life-style of the bacterium from an environmental opportunistic pathogen to a human airway specific pathogen. These findings are not only applicable to P. aeruginosa specific studies, but suggest that...

  4. A DNA-binding-site landscape and regulatory network analysis for NAC transcription factors in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindemose, Søren; Jensen, Michael Krogh; de Velde, Jan Van

    2014-01-01

    Target gene identification for transcription factors is a prerequisite for the systems wide understanding of organismal behaviour. NAM-ATAF1/2-CUC2 (NAC) transcription factors are amongst the largest transcription factor families in plants, yet limited data exist from unbiased approaches to resolve...... the DNA-binding preferences of individual members. Here, we present a TF-target gene identification workflow based on the integration of novel protein binding microarray data with gene expression and multi-species promoter sequence conservation to identify the DNA-binding specificities and the gene...... of complementary functional genomics filters, makes it possible to translate, for each TF, protein binding microarray data into a set of high-quality target genes. With this approach, we confirm NAC target genes reported from independent in vivo analyses. We emphasize that candidate target gene sets together...

  5. The Drosophila melanogaster DmCK2beta transcription unit encodes for functionally non-redundant protein isoforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauch, Eike; Wecklein, Heike; Stark, Felix; Jauch, Mandy; Raabe, Thomas

    2006-06-07

    Genes encoding for the two evolutionary highly conserved subunits of a heterotetrameric protein kinase CK2 holoenzyme are present in all examined eukaryotic genomes. Depending on the organism, multiple transcription units encoding for a catalytically active CK2alpha subunit and/or a regulatory CK2beta subunit may exist. The phosphotransferase activity of members of the protein kinase CK2alpha family is thought to be independent of second messengers but is modulated by interaction with CK2beta-like proteins. In the genome of Drosophila melanogaster, one gene encoding for a CK2alpha subunit and three genes encoding for CK2beta-like proteins are present. The X-linked DmCK2beta transcription unit encodes for several CK2beta protein isoforms due to alternative splicing of its primary transcript. We addressed the question whether CK2beta-like proteins are redundant in function. Our in vivo experiments show that variations of the very C-terminal tail of CK2beta isoforms encoded by the X-linked DmCK2beta transcription unit influence their functional properties. In addition, we find that CK2beta-like proteins encoded by the autosomal D. melanogaster genes CK2betates and CK2beta' cannot fully substitute for a loss of CK2beta isoforms encoded by DmCK2beta.

  6. Role of transcription regulatory sequence in regulation of gene expression and replication of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengbao; Meng, Han; Gao, Yujin; Gao, Hui; Guo, Kangkang; Almazan, Fernando; Sola, Isabel; Enjuanes, Luis; Zhang, Yanming; Abrahamyan, Levon

    2017-08-10

    In order to gain insight into the role of the transcription regulatory sequences (TRSs) in the regulation of gene expression and replication of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene, under the control of the different structural gene TRSs, was inserted between the N gene and 3'-UTR of the PRRSV genome and EGFP expression was analyzed for each TRS. TRSs of all the studied structural genes of PRRSV positively modulated EGFP expression at different levels. Among the TRSs analyzed, those of GP2, GP5, M, and N genes highly enhanced EGFP expression without altering replication of PRRSV. These data indicated that structural gene TRSs could be an extremely useful tool for foreign gene expression using PRRSV as a vector.

  7. Post-Transcriptional Regulation by the Csr Global Regulatory System in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Kazushi; 鈴木, 一史

    2007-01-01

    In many species of bacteria, the Csr (carbon storage regulator) global regulatory system coordinates the expression of various genes. In Escherichia coli, the central component of this system, CsrA, is a RNA-binding protein. The CsrA is a homodimer and binds to leader segments of target mRNAs, affecting their translation and stability. CsrA activity is regulated by two small non-coding RNAs, CsrB and CsrC. These RNAs contain multiple CsrA-binding sequences and act by sequestering CsrA. In thi...

  8. TRFBA: an algorithm to integrate genome-scale metabolic and transcriptional regulatory networks with incorporation of expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motamedian, Ehsan; Mohammadi, Maryam; Shojaosadati, Seyed Abbas; Heydari, Mona

    2017-04-01

    Integration of different biological networks and data-types has been a major challenge in systems biology. The present study introduces the transcriptional regulated flux balance analysis (TRFBA) algorithm that integrates transcriptional regulatory and metabolic models using a set of expression data for various perturbations. TRFBA considers the expression levels of genes as a new continuous variable and introduces two new linear constraints. The first constraint limits the rate of reaction(s) supported by a metabolic gene using a constant parameter (C) that converts the expression levels to the upper bounds of the reactions. Considering the concept of constraint-based modeling, the second set of constraints correlates the expression level of each target gene with that of its regulating genes. A set of constraints and binary variables was also added to prevent the second set of constraints from overlapping. TRFBA was implemented on Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae models to estimate growth rates under various environmental and genetic perturbations. The error sensitivity to the algorithm parameter was evaluated to find the best value of C. The results indicate a significant improvement in the quantitative prediction of growth in comparison with previously presented algorithms. The robustness of the algorithm to change in the expression data and the regulatory network was tested to evaluate the effect of noisy and incomplete data. Furthermore, the use of added constraints for perturbations without their gene expression profile demonstrates that these constraints can be applied to improve the growth prediction of FBA. TRFBA is implemented in Matlab software and requires COBRA toolbox. Source code is freely available at http://sbme.modares.ac.ir . : motamedian@modares.ac.ir. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  9. Expression Pattern of Myogenic Regulatory Transcription Factor mRNAs in the Embryo and Adult Labeo rohita (Hamilton, 1822

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archya Sengupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the regulation of skeletal muscle development is important to meet the increasing demand of Indian major carp Labeo rohita. Myogenic regulatory factors (MRFs along with myocyte specific enhancer factor 2 (MEF2 play the pivotal role in the determination and differentiation of skeletal muscle. The majority of skeletal muscle genes require both MRFs and MEF2 family members to activate their transcription. In this study, the expression pattern of MyoD, myf-5, myogenin, and MEF2A was observed from 6 h after fertilization to 12 months of age using semiquantitative RT-PCR as well as real-time PCR method. MyoD and myf-5 mRNAs were expressed at high level at the early embryonic stages. Myogenin and MEF2A were expressed after MyoD and myf-5 and remained active up to adult stage. Expression of MyoD was lower than that of Myf-5 after the 5th month. Partial sequencing of MyoD, myf-5, and MEF2A was done to draw phylogeny. In phylogenetic study, Labeo MyoD, MEF2A and myf-5 were found to be closely related to those of common carp. The present investigation suggests that the four transcription factors play pivotal role in the regulation of muscle growth of Labeo rohita in an overlapping and interconnected way.

  10. Different papillomaviruses have different repertoires of transcription factor binding sites: convergence and divergence in the upstream regulatory region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso Ángel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Papillomaviruses (PVs infect stratified squamous epithelia in warm-blooded vertebrates and have undergone a complex evolutionary process. The control of the expression of the early ORFs in PVs depends on the binding of cellular and viral transcription factors to the upstream regulatory region (URR of the virus. It is believed that there is a core of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS common to all PVs, with additional individual differences, although most of the available information focuses only on a handful of viruses. Results We have studied the URR of sixty-one PVs, covering twenty different hosts. We have predicted the TFBS present in the URR and analysed these results by principal component analysis and genetic algorithms. The number and nature of TFBS in the URR might be much broader than thus far described, and different PVs have different repertoires of TFBS. Conclusion There are common fingerprints in the URR in PVs that infect primates, although the ancestors of these viruses diverged a long time ago. Additionally, there are obvious differences between the URR of alpha and beta PVs, despite these PVs infect similar histological cell types in the same host, i.e. human. A thorough analysis of the TFBS in the URR might provide crucial information about the differential biology of cancer-associated PVs.

  11. A novel test for selection on cis-regulatory elements reveals positive and negative selection acting on mammalian transcriptional enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Justin D; McManus, Kimberly F; Fraser, Hunter B

    2013-11-01

    Measuring natural selection on genomic elements involved in the cis-regulation of gene expression--such as transcriptional enhancers and promoters--is critical for understanding the evolution of genomes, yet it remains a major challenge. Many studies have attempted to detect positive or negative selection in these noncoding elements by searching for those with the fastest or slowest rates of evolution, but this can be problematic. Here, we introduce a new approach to this issue, and demonstrate its utility on three mammalian transcriptional enhancers. Using results from saturation mutagenesis studies of these enhancers, we classified all possible point mutations as upregulating, downregulating, or silent, and determined which of these mutations have occurred on each branch of a phylogeny. Applying a framework analogous to Ka/Ks in protein-coding genes, we measured the strength of selection on upregulating and downregulating mutations, in specific branches as well as entire phylogenies. We discovered distinct modes of selection acting on different enhancers: although all three have experienced negative selection against downregulating mutations, the selection pressures on upregulating mutations vary. In one case, we detected positive selection for upregulation, whereas the other two had no detectable selection on upregulating mutations. Our methodology is applicable to the growing number of saturation mutagenesis data sets, and provides a detailed picture of the mode and strength of natural selection acting on cis-regulatory elements.

  12. Transcriptional regulatory network triggered by oxidative signals configures the early response mechanisms of japonica rice to chilling stress

    KAUST Repository

    Yun, Kil-Young

    2010-01-25

    Background: The transcriptional regulatory network involved in low temperature response leading to acclimation has been established in Arabidopsis. In japonica rice, which can only withstand transient exposure to milder cold stress (10C), an oxidative-mediated network has been proposed to play a key role in configuring early responses and short-term defenses. The components, hierarchical organization and physiological consequences of this network were further dissected by a systems-level approach.Results: Regulatory clusters responding directly to oxidative signals were prominent during the initial 6 to 12 hours at 10C. Early events mirrored a typical oxidative response based on striking similarities of the transcriptome to disease, elicitor and wounding induced processes. Targets of oxidative-mediated mechanisms are likely regulated by several classes of bZIP factors acting on as1/ocs/TGA-like element enriched clusters, ERF factors acting on GCC-box/JAre-like element enriched clusters and R2R3-MYB factors acting on MYB2-like element enriched clusters.Temporal induction of several H2O2-induced bZIP, ERF and MYB genes coincided with the transient H2O2spikes within the initial 6 to 12 hours. Oxidative-independent responses involve DREB/CBF, RAP2 and RAV1 factors acting on DRE/CRT/rav1-like enriched clusters and bZIP factors acting on ABRE-like enriched clusters. Oxidative-mediated clusters were activated earlier than ABA-mediated clusters.Conclusion: Genome-wide, physiological and whole-plant level analyses established a holistic view of chilling stress response mechanism of japonica rice. Early response regulatory network triggered by oxidative signals is critical for prolonged survival under sub-optimal temperature. Integration of stress and developmental responses leads to modulated growth and vigor maintenance contributing to a delay of plastic injuries. 2010 Yun et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  13. The Plant-Specific Dof Transcription Factors Family: New Players Involved in Vascular System Development and Functioning in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Hir, Rozenn; Bellini, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    In higher plants phloem and xylem are responsible for long-distance transport of water, nutrients, and signals that act systemically at short or long-distance to coordinate developmental processes. The formation of the plant vascular system is a complex process that integrates signaling events and gene regulation at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Thanks to transcriptomic and proteomic analysis we start to better understand the mechanisms underlying the formation and the functioning of the vascular system. The role of the DNA-binding with one finger (Dof TFs), a group of plant-specific transcription factors, recently emerged as part of the transcriptional regulatory networks acting on the formation and functioning of the vascular tissues. More than half of the members of this TF family are expressed in the vascular system. In addition some of them have been proposed to be mobile proteins, suggesting a possible role in the control of short- or long-distance signaling as well. This review summarizes the current knowledge on Dof TFs family in Arabidopsis with a special focus on their role in vascular development and functioning. PMID:23755058

  14. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 in health and neurodegenerative disease: from structural insights to post-transcriptional regulatory roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekenstein, Uriya; Soreq, Hermona

    2013-09-01

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) are a family of conserved nuclear proteins that associate with nascent RNA polymerase II transcripts to yield hnRNP particles, playing key roles in mRNA metabolism, DNA-related functions and microRNA biogenesis. HnRNPs accompany transcripts from stages of transcriptional regulation through splicing and post-transcriptional regulation, and are believed to affect the majority of expressed genes in mammals. Most hnRNP mRNA transcripts undergo alternative splicing and post-translational modifications, to yield a remarkable diversity of proteins with numerous functional elements that work in concert in their multiple functions. Therefore, mis-regulation of hnRNPs leads to different maladies. Here, we focus on the role of one of the best-known members of this protein family, hnRNP A1 in RNA metabolism, and address recent works that note its multileveled involvement in several neurodegenerative disorders. Initially discovered as a DNA binding protein, hnRNP A1 includes two RNA recognition motifs, and post-translational modifications of these and other regions in this multifunctional protein alter both its nuclear pore shuttling properties and its RNA interactions and affect transcription, mRNA splicing and microRNA biogenesis. HnRNP A1 plays several key roles in neuronal functioning and its depletion, either due to debilitated cholinergic neurotransmission or under autoimmune reactions causes drastic changes in RNA metabolism. Consequently, hnRNP A1 decline contributes to the severity of symptoms in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), fronto-temporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), multiple sclerosis (MS), hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP) and HTLV-I associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). At the translational level, these properties of hnRNP A1 led to massive research efforts aimed at developing RNA

  15. WRKY transcription factor superfamily: Structure, origin and functions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    WRKY transcription factors regulate the expression of pathogen-induced, senescence-induced, abscisic acid (ABA)-induced, gibberellic acid (GA)-induced and salcylic acid (SA)-induced genes and play an important role in the regulation of plant growth and development as well as in their response to many kinds of biotic ...

  16. Positive- and negative-acting regulatory elements contribute to the tissue-specific expression of INNER NO OUTER, a YABBY-type transcription factor gene in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Marissa K

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The INNER NO OUTER (INO gene, which encodes a YABBY-type transcription factor, specifies and promotes the growth of the outer integument of the ovule in Arabidopsis. INO expression is limited to the abaxial cell layer of the developing outer integument of the ovule and is regulated by multiple regions of the INO promoter, including POS9, a positive element that when present in quadruplicate can produce low-level expression in the normal INO pattern. Results Significant redundancy in activity between different regions of the INO promoter is demonstrated. For specific regulatory elements, multimerization or the addition of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S general enhancer was able to activate expression of reporter gene constructs that were otherwise incapable of expression on their own. A new promoter element, POS6, is defined and is shown to include sufficient positive regulatory information to reproduce the endogenous pattern of expression in ovules, but other promoter regions are necessary to fully suppress expression outside of ovules. The full-length INO promoter, but not any of the INO promoter deletions tested, is able to act as an enhancer-blocking insulator to prevent the ectopic activation of expression by the 35S enhancer. Sequence conservation between the promoter regions of Arabidopsis thaliana, Brassica oleracea and Brassica rapa aligns closely with the functional definition of the POS6 and POS9 regions, and with a defined INO minimal promoter. The B. oleracea INO promoter is sufficient to promote a similar pattern and level of reporter gene expression in Arabidopsis to that observed for the Arabidopsis promoter. Conclusions At least two independent regions of the INO promoter contain sufficient regulatory information to direct the specific pattern but not the level of INO gene expression. These regulatory regions act in a partially redundant manner to promote the expression in a specific pattern in the ovule and

  17. Bladder inflammatory transcriptome in response to tachykinins: Neurokinin 1 receptor-dependent genes and transcription regulatory elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saban, Ricardo; Simpson, Cindy; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth; Memet, Sylvie; Dozmorov, Igor; Saban, Marcia R

    2007-01-01

    Background Tachykinins (TK), such as substance P, and their neurokinin receptors which are ubiquitously expressed in the human urinary tract, represent an endogenous system regulating bladder inflammatory, immune responses, and visceral hypersensitivity. Increasing evidence correlates alterations in the TK system with urinary tract diseases such as neurogenic bladders, outflow obstruction, idiopathic detrusor instability, and interstitial cystitis. However, despite promising effects in animal models, there seems to be no published clinical study showing that NK-receptor antagonists are an effective treatment of pain in general or urinary tract disorders, such as detrusor overactivity. In order to search for therapeutic targets that could block the tachykinin system, we set forth to determine the regulatory network downstream of NK1 receptor activation. First, NK1R-dependent transcripts were determined and used to query known databases for their respective transcription regulatory elements (TREs). Methods An expression analysis was performed using urinary bladders isolated from sensitized wild type (WT) and NK1R-/- mice that were stimulated with saline, LPS, or antigen to provoke inflammation. Based on cDNA array results, NK1R-dependent genes were selected. PAINT software was used to query TRANSFAC database and to retrieve upstream TREs that were confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Results The regulatory network of TREs driving NK1R-dependent genes presented cRel in a central position driving 22% of all genes, followed by AP-1, NF-kappaB, v-Myb, CRE-BP1/c-Jun, USF, Pax-6, Efr-1, Egr-3, and AREB6. A comparison between NK1R-dependent and NK1R-independent genes revealed Nkx-2.5 as a unique discriminator. In the presence of NK1R, Nkx2-5 _01 was significantly correlated with 36 transcripts which included several candidates for mediating bladder development (FGF) and inflammation (PAR-3, IL-1R, IL-6, α-NGF, TSP2). In the absence of NK1R, the matrix Nkx2

  18. Bladder inflammatory transcriptome in response to tachykinins: Neurokinin 1 receptor-dependent genes and transcription regulatory elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dozmorov Igor

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tachykinins (TK, such as substance P, and their neurokinin receptors which are ubiquitously expressed in the human urinary tract, represent an endogenous system regulating bladder inflammatory, immune responses, and visceral hypersensitivity. Increasing evidence correlates alterations in the TK system with urinary tract diseases such as neurogenic bladders, outflow obstruction, idiopathic detrusor instability, and interstitial cystitis. However, despite promising effects in animal models, there seems to be no published clinical study showing that NK-receptor antagonists are an effective treatment of pain in general or urinary tract disorders, such as detrusor overactivity. In order to search for therapeutic targets that could block the tachykinin system, we set forth to determine the regulatory network downstream of NK1 receptor activation. First, NK1R-dependent transcripts were determined and used to query known databases for their respective transcription regulatory elements (TREs. Methods An expression analysis was performed using urinary bladders isolated from sensitized wild type (WT and NK1R-/- mice that were stimulated with saline, LPS, or antigen to provoke inflammation. Based on cDNA array results, NK1R-dependent genes were selected. PAINT software was used to query TRANSFAC database and to retrieve upstream TREs that were confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Results The regulatory network of TREs driving NK1R-dependent genes presented cRel in a central position driving 22% of all genes, followed by AP-1, NF-kappaB, v-Myb, CRE-BP1/c-Jun, USF, Pax-6, Efr-1, Egr-3, and AREB6. A comparison between NK1R-dependent and NK1R-independent genes revealed Nkx-2.5 as a unique discriminator. In the presence of NK1R, Nkx2-5 _01 was significantly correlated with 36 transcripts which included several candidates for mediating bladder development (FGF and inflammation (PAR-3, IL-1R, IL-6, α-NGF, TSP2. In the absence of

  19. Distinguishing the Transcription Regulation Patterns in Promoters of Human Genes with Different Function or Evolutionary Age

    KAUST Repository

    Alam, Tanvir

    2012-07-01

    Distinguishing transcription regulatory patterns of different gene groups is a common problem in various bioinformatics studies. In this work we developed a methodology to deal with such a problem based on machine learning techniques. We applied our method to two biologically important problems related to detecting a difference in transcription regulation of: a/ protein-coding and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in human, as well as b/ a difference between primate-specific and non-primate-specific long non-coding RNAs. Our method is capable to classify RNAs using various regulatory features of genes that transcribe into these RNAs, such as nucleotide frequencies, transcription factor binding sites, de novo sequence motifs, CpG islands, repetitive elements, histone modification marks, and others. Ten-fold cross-validation tests suggest that our model can distinguish protein-coding and non-coding RNAs with accuracy above 80%. Twenty-fold cross-validation tests suggest that our model can distinguish primate-specific from non-primate-specific promoters of lncRNAs with accuracy above 80%. Consequently, we can hypothesize that transcription of the groups of genes mentioned above are regulated by different mechanisms. Feature selection techniques allowed us to reduce the number of features significantly while keeping the accuracy around 80%. Consequently, we can conclude that selected features play significant role in transcription regulation of coding and non-coding genes, as well as primate-specific and non-primate-specific lncRNA genes.

  20. Evolutionary dynamics of DNA-binding sites and direct target genes of a floral master regulatory transcription factor [ChIP-Seq

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muiño, J.M.; Bruijn, de S.A.; Vingron, Martin; Angenent, G.C.; Kaufmann, K.

    2015-01-01

    Plant development is controlled by transcription factors (TFs) which form complex gene-regulatory networks. Genome-wide TF DNA-binding studies revealed that these TFs have several thousands of binding sites in the Arabidopsis genome, and may regulate the expression of many genes directly. Given the

  1. Decoding genome-wide GadEWX-transcriptional regulatory networks reveals multifaceted cellular responses to acid stress in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; O'Brien, Edward J.

    2015-01-01

    The regulators GadE, GadW and GadX (which we refer to as GadEWX) play a critical role in the transcriptional regulation of the glutamate-dependent acid resistance (GDAR) system in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. However, the genome-wide regulatory role of GadEWX is still unknown. Here we comprehens...

  2. Trichostatin A Promotes the Generation and Suppressive Functions of Regulatory T Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Doñas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T cells are a specific subset of lymphocytes that suppress immune responses and play a crucial role in the maintenance of self-tolerance. They can be generated in the thymus as well as in the periphery through differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells. The forkhead box P3 transcription factor (Foxp3 is a crucial molecule regulating the generation and function of Tregs. Here we show that the foxp3 gene promoter becomes hyperacetylated in in vitro differentiated Tregs compared to naïve CD4+ T cells. We also show that the histone deacetylase inhibitor TSA stimulated the in vitro differentiation of naïve CD4+ T cells into Tregs and that this induction was accompanied by a global increase in histone H3 acetylation. Importantly, we also demonstrated that Tregs generated in the presence of TSA have phenotypical and functional differences from the Tregs generated in the absence of TSA. Thus, TSA-generated Tregs showed increased suppressive activities, which could potentially be explained by a mechanism involving the ectonucleotidases CD39 and CD73. Our data show that TSA could potentially be used to enhance the differentiation and suppressive function of CD4+Foxp3+ Treg cells.

  3. OCTAMER-BINDING TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS: GENOMICS AND FUNCTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Feng-Qi

    2013-01-01

    The Octamer-binding proteins (Oct) are a group of highly conserved transcription factors that specifically bind to the octamer motif (ATGCAAAT) and closely related sequences that are found in promoters and enhancers of a wide variety of both ubiquitously expressed and cell type-specific genes. Oct factors belong to the larger family of POU domain factors that are characterized by the presence of a highly conserved bipartite DNA binding domain, consisting of an amino-terminal specific subdomai...

  4. The Cellular Bromodomain Protein Brd4 has Multiple Functions in E2-Mediated Papillomavirus Transcription Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M. Helfer

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The cellular bromodomain protein Brd4 functions in multiple processes of the papillomavirus life cycle, including viral replication, genome maintenance, and gene transcription through its interaction with the viral protein, E2. However, the mechanisms by which E2 and Brd4 activate viral transcription are still not completely understood. In this study, we show that recruitment of positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb, a functional interaction partner of Brd4 in transcription activation, is important for E2’s transcription activation activity. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP analyses demonstrate that P-TEFb is recruited to the actual papillomavirus episomes. We also show that E2’s interaction with cellular chromatin through Brd4 correlates with its papillomavirus transcription activation function since JQ1(+, a bromodomain inhibitor that efficiently dissociates E2-Brd4 complexes from chromatin, potently reduces papillomavirus transcription. Our study identifies a specific function of Brd4 in papillomavirus gene transcription and highlights the potential use of bromodomain inhibitors as a method to disrupt the human papillomavirus (HPV life cycle.

  5. Functional analysis of Dof transcription factors controlling heading date and PPDK gene expression in rice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Yu

    2015-01-01

    Chapter 1 presents a general introduction to the factors involved in crop domestication and the specific role of transcription factors in this process. Chapter 2 describes the functional analysis of a Dof-type transcription factor, named OsDof24, from rice.chapter 3 describes the role of OsDof25 in

  6. Insights into structural and functional diversity of Dof (DNA binding with one finger) transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S; Malviya, N; Kushwaha, H; Nasim, J; Bisht, N C; Singh, V K; Yadav, D

    2015-03-01

    The structural, functional and in-silico studies of Dof transcription factor attempted so far reveals immense opportunity to analyze the plant genomes in terms of number of Dof genes and discuss in light of the evolution. The multiple functions of Dof genes needs to explored for crop improvement. Transcription factors play a very vital role in gene regulation at transcriptional level and are being extensively studied across phylas. In recent years, sequencing of plant genomes has led to genome-wide identification and characterizations of diverse types of plant-specific transcription factor gene family providing key insights into their structural and functional diversity. The DNA binding with one finger (Dof), a class belonging to C2H2-type zinc finger family proteins, is a plant-specific transcription factor having multiple roles such as seed maturation and germination, phytohormone and light-mediated regulation and plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Dof proteins are present across plant lineage, from green algae to higher angiosperm, and represent a unique class of transcription factor having bifunctional binding activities, with both DNA and proteins, to regulate the complex transcriptional machinery in plant cells. The structural and functional diversity of the Dof transcription factor family along with the bioinformatics analysis highlighting the phylogeny of Dof families is reviewed in light of its importance in plant biotechnology for crop improvement.

  7. Genomewide Analysis of Clp1 Function in Transcription in Budding Yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Husini, Nadra; Sharifi, Ali; Mousavi, Seyed Ahmad; Chitsaz, Hamidreza; Ansari, Athar

    2017-01-01

    In budding yeast, the 3? end processing of mRNA and the coupled termination of transcription by RNAPII requires the CF IA complex. We have earlier demonstrated a role for the Clp1 subunit of this complex in termination and promoter-associated transcription of CHA1. To assess the generality of the observed function of Clp1 in transcription, we tested the effect of Clp1 on transcription on a genomewide scale using the Global Run-On-Seq (GRO-Seq) approach. GRO-Seq analysis showed the polymerase ...

  8. The life cycle of the steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein: from transcription through proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granot, Zvi; Silverman, Eran; Friedlander, Ruth; Melamed-Book, Naomi; Eimerl, Sarah; Timberg, Rina; Hales, Karen H; Hales, Dale B; Stocco, Douglas M; Orly, Joseph

    2002-11-01

    The Steroidogenic Acute Regulatory (StAR) protein is a mitochondrial protein required for the transport of cholesterol substrate to the P450scc enzyme located in the inner mitochondrial membranes of steroid producing cells. This study suggests that the acute regulation of the rodent StAR gene in the ovary is mediated by two factors, C/EBPbeta and GATA-4. Once translated, the StAR precursor protein is either imported into the mitochondria, or it is rapidly degraded in the cytosol. We predicted that in order to perpetuate StAR activity cycles, imported StAR should turn over rapidly to avoid a potentially harmful accumulation of the protein in sub-mitochondrial compartments. Pulse-chase experiments in metabolically labeled cells showed that: (a) the turnover rate of mature mitochondrial StAR protein (30 kDa) is much faster (t(1/2) = 4-5 h) than that of other mitochondrial proteins; (b) dissipation of the inner membrane potential (-delta psi) by carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (mCCCP) accelerates the mitochondrial degradation of StAR; (c) unexpectedly, the mitochondrial degradation of StAR is inhibited by MG132 and lactacystin, but not by epoxomicin. Furthermore, StAR degradation becomes inhibitor-resistant two hours after import. Therefore, these studies suggest a bi-phasic route of StAR turnover in the mitochondria. Shortly after import, StAR is degraded by inhibitor-sensitive protease(s) (phase I), whereas at later times, StAR turnover proceeds to completion through an MG132-resistant proteolytic activity (phase II). Collectively, this study defines StAR as a unique protein that can authentically be used to probe multiple proteolytic activities in mammalian mitochondria.

  9. Brain in situ hybridization maps as a source for reverse-engineering transcriptional regulatory networks: Alzheimer's disease insights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acquaah-Mensah, George K.; Taylor, Ronald C.

    2016-07-01

    Microarray data have been a valuable resource for identifying transcriptional regulatory relationships among genes. As an example, brain region-specific transcriptional regulatory events have the potential of providing etiological insights into Alzheimer Disease (AD). However, there is often a paucity of suitable brain-region specific expression data obtained via microarrays or other high throughput means. The Allen Brain Atlas in situ hybridization (ISH) data sets (Jones et al., 2009) represent a potentially valuable alternative source of high-throughput brain region-specific gene expression data for such purposes. In this study, Allen BrainAtlasmouse ISH data in the hippocampal fields were extracted, focusing on 508 genes relevant to neurodegeneration. Transcriptional regulatory networkswere learned using three high-performing network inference algorithms. Only 17% of regulatory edges from a network reverse-engineered based on brain region-specific ISH data were also found in a network constructed upon gene expression correlations inmousewhole brain microarrays, thus showing the specificity of gene expression within brain sub-regions. Furthermore, the ISH data-based networks were used to identify instructive transcriptional regulatory relationships. Ncor2, Sp3 and Usf2 form a unique three-party regulatory motif, potentially affecting memory formation pathways. Nfe2l1, Egr1 and Usf2 emerge among regulators of genes involved in AD (e.g. Dhcr24, Aplp2, Tia1, Pdrx1, Vdac1, andSyn2). Further, Nfe2l1, Egr1 and Usf2 are sensitive to dietary factors and could be among links between dietary influences and genes in the AD etiology. Thus, this approach of harnessing brain region-specific ISH data represents a rare opportunity for gleaning unique etiological insights for diseases such as AD.

  10. Untangling the transcription regulatory network of the bacitracin synthase operon in Bacillus licheniformis DW2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Wang, Qin; Qiu, Yimin; Nomura, Christopher T; Li, Junhui; Chen, Shouwen

    The bacitracin synthetase gene cluster in Bacillus licheniformis DW2 is composed of the bacABC operon encoding a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase and bacT encoding a thioesterase. Although the bacitracin gene cluster has been well studied, little is known about how this gene cluster is regulated. This study provides insight into how the transcription factors Spo0A and AbrB regulate bacitracin biosynthesis. Deletion of spo0A resulted in drastically reduced expression of bacA and bacT, and subsequently bacitracin production. On the other hand, the expression of bacA and bacT increased significantly in B. licheniformis DW2ΔabrB and DW2Δ0AΔabrB compared to the wild-type strain DW2. The bacitracin yields on cell numbers (U/CFU) in DW2ΔabrB and DW2Δ0A/pHY300-0A-sad67 were 17.5% and 14.9% higher than that of the wild-type strain. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) further confirmed that AbrB could directly bind to the promoter regions of bacA and bacT. These results indicate that AbrB acts as a repressor of bacitracin biosynthesis by inhibiting bacA and bacT expression, while Spo0A indirectly promotes bacitracin biosynthesis by repressing abrB expression. Copyright © 2017 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. PRMT1 mediated methylation of TAF15 is required for its positive gene regulatory function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jobert, Laure; Argentini, Manuela [Institut de Genetique et de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), CNRS UMR 7104, INSERM U 596, Universite Louis Pasteur de Strasbourg, BP 10142 - 67404 Illkirch Cedex, CU de Strasbourg (France); Tora, Laszlo, E-mail: laszlo@igbmc.u-strasbg.fr [Institut de Genetique et de Biologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire (IGBMC), CNRS UMR 7104, INSERM U 596, Universite Louis Pasteur de Strasbourg, BP 10142 - 67404 Illkirch Cedex, CU de Strasbourg (France)

    2009-04-15

    TAF15 (formerly TAF{sub II}68) is a nuclear RNA-binding protein that is associated with a distinct population of TFIID and RNA polymerase II complexes. TAF15 harbours an N-terminal activation domain, an RNA recognition motif (RRM) and many Arg-Gly-Gly (RGG) repeats at its C-terminal end. The N-terminus of TAF15 serves as an essential transforming domain in the fusion oncoprotein created by chromosomal translocation in certain human chondrosarcomas. Post-transcriptional modifications (PTMs) of proteins are known to regulate their activity, however, nothing is known on how PTMs affect TAF15 function. Here we demonstrate that endogenous human TAF15 is methylated in vivo at its numerous RGG repeats. Furthermore, we identify protein arginine N-methyltransferase 1 (PRMT1) as a TAF15 interactor and the major PRMT responsible for its methylation. In addition, the RGG repeat-containing C-terminus of TAF15 is responsible for the shuttling between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and the methylation of RGG repeats affects the subcellular localization of TAF15. The methylation of TAF15 by PRMT1 is required for the ability of TAF15 to positively regulate the expression of the studied endogenous TAF15-target genes. Our findings demonstrate that arginine methylation of TAF15 by PRMT1 is a crucial event determining its proper localization and gene regulatory function.

  12. Revealing genome-scale transcriptional regulatory landscape of OmpR highlights its expanded regulatory roles under osmotic stress in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seo, Sang Woo; Gao, Ye; Kim, Donghyuk

    2017-01-01

    A transcription factor (TF), OmpR, plays a critical role in transcriptional regulation of the osmotic stress response in bacteria. Here, we reveal a genome-scale OmpR regulon in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. Integrative data analysis reveals that a total of 37 genes in 24 transcription units (TUs...

  13. Screening of the transcriptional regulatory regions of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2 in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartley Judith

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF has neurotrophic activity which is mediated by its main agonist receptor, VEGFR2. Dysregulation of VEGF causes motor neurone degeneration in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, and expression of VEGFR2 is reduced in motor neurones and spinal cord of patients with ALS. Methods We have screened the promoter region and 4 exonic regions of functional significance of the VEGFR2 gene in a UK population of patients with ALS, for mutations and polymorphisms that may affect expression or function of this VEGF receptor. Results No mutations were identified in the VEGFR2 gene. We found no association between polymorphisms in the regulatory regions of the VEGFR2 gene and ALS. Conclusion Mechanisms other than genetic variation may downregulate expression or function of the VEGFR2 receptor in patients with ALS.

  14. Distinctive Regulatory T Cells and Altered Cytokine Profile Locally in the Airways of Young Smokers with Normal Lung Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostadkarampour, Mahyar; Müller, Malin; Öckinger, Johan; Kullberg, Susanna; Lindén, Anders; Eklund, Anders; Grunewald, Johan; Wahlström, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Smoking influences the immune system in different ways and, hypothetically, effects on pulmonary effector and regulatory T cells emerge as potentially detrimental. Therefore, we characterized the frequencies and characteristics of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets in the blood and lungs of young tobacco smokers. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and peripheral blood were obtained from healthy moderate smokers (n = 18; 2-24 pack-years) and never-smokers (n = 15), all with normal lung function. Cells were stimulated ex vivo and key intracellular cytokines (IFNγ, IL-17, IL-10 and TNFα) and transcription factors (Foxp3, T-bet and Helios) were analyzed using flow cytometry. Our results indicate that smoking is associated with a decline in lung IL-17+ CD4+ T cells, increased IFNγ+ CD8+ T cells and these alterations relate to the history of daily cigarette consumption. There is an increased fraction of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells being Helios- in the lungs of smokers. Cytokine production is mainly confined to the Helios- T cells, both in regulatory and effector subsets. Moreover, we detected a decline of Helios+Foxp3- postulated regulatory CD8+ T cells in smokers. These alterations in the immune system are likely to increase risk for infection and may have implications for autoimmune processes initiated in the lungs among tobacco smokers.

  15. Phylogeny, Functional Annotation, and Protein Interaction Network Analyses of the Xenopus tropicalis Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuyi Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The previous survey identified 70 basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH proteins, but it was proved to be incomplete, and the functional information and regulatory networks of frog bHLH transcription factors were not fully known. Therefore, we conducted an updated genome-wide survey in the Xenopus tropicalis genome project databases and identified 105 bHLH sequences. Among the retrieved 105 sequences, phylogenetic analyses revealed that 103 bHLH proteins belonged to 43 families or subfamilies with 46, 26, 11, 3, 15, and 4 members in the corresponding supergroups. Next, gene ontology (GO enrichment analyses showed 65 significant GO annotations of biological processes and molecular functions and KEGG pathways counted in frequency. To explore the functional pathways, regulatory gene networks, and/or related gene groups coding for Xenopus tropicalis bHLH proteins, the identified bHLH genes were put into the databases KOBAS and STRING to get the signaling information of pathways and protein interaction networks according to available public databases and known protein interactions. From the genome annotation and pathway analysis using KOBAS, we identified 16 pathways in the Xenopus tropicalis genome. From the STRING interaction analysis, 68 hub proteins were identified, and many hub proteins created a tight network or a functional module within the protein families.

  16. The stress-regulatory transcription factors Msn2 and Msn4 regulate fatty acid oxidation in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajvanshi, Praveen Kumar; Arya, Madhuri; Rajasekharan, Ram

    2017-11-10

    The transcription factors Msn2 and Msn4 (multicopy suppressor of SNF1 mutation proteins 2 and 4) bind the stress-response element in gene promoters in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae However, the roles of Msn2/4 in primary metabolic pathways such as fatty acid β-oxidation are unclear. Here, in silico analysis revealed that the promoters of most genes involved in the biogenesis, function, and regulation of the peroxisome contain Msn2/4-binding sites. We also found that transcript levels of MSN2/MSN4 are increased in glucose-depletion conditions and that during growth in nonpreferred carbon sources, Msn2 is constantly localized to the nucleus in wild-type cells. Of note, the double mutant msn2 Δ msn4 Δ exhibited a severe growth defect when grown with oleic acid as the sole carbon source and had reduced transcript levels of major β-oxidation genes. ChIP indicated that Msn2 has increased occupancy on the promoters of β-oxidation genes in glucose-depleted conditions, and in vivo reporter gene analysis indicated reduced expression of these genes in msn2 Δ msn4 Δ cells. Moreover, mobility shift assays revealed that Msn4 binds β-oxidation gene promoters. Immunofluorescence microscopy with anti-peroxisome membrane protein antibodies disclosed that the msn2 Δ msn4 Δ strain had fewer peroxisomes than the wild type, and lipid analysis indicated that the msn2 Δ msn4 Δ strain had increased triacylglycerol and steryl ester levels. Collectively, our data suggest that Msn2/Msn4 transcription factors activate expression of the genes involved in fatty acid oxidation. Because glucose sensing, signaling, and fatty acid β-oxidation pathways are evolutionarily conserved throughout eukaryotes, the msn2 Δ msn4 Δ strain could therefore be a good model system for further study of these critical processes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Divergence of regulatory networks governed by the orthologous transcription factors FLC and PEP1 in Brassicaceae species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos, Julieta L; Tilmes, Vicky; Madrigal, Pedro; Severing, Edouard; Richter, René; Rijkenberg, Colin W M; Krajewski, Paweł; Coupland, George

    2017-12-19

    Genome-wide landscapes of transcription factor (TF) binding sites (BSs) diverge during evolution, conferring species-specific transcriptional patterns. The rate of divergence varies in different metazoan lineages but has not been widely studied in plants. We identified the BSs and assessed the effects on transcription of FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) and PERPETUAL FLOWERING 1 (PEP1), two orthologous MADS-box TFs that repress flowering and confer vernalization requirement in the Brassicaceae species Arabidopsis thaliana and Arabis alpina , respectively. We found that only 14% of their BSs were conserved in both species and that these contained a CArG-box that is recognized by MADS-box TFs. The CArG-box consensus at conserved BSs was extended compared with the core motif. By contrast, species-specific BSs usually lacked the CArG-box in the other species. Flowering-time genes were highly overrepresented among conserved targets, and their CArG-boxes were widely conserved among Brassicaceae species. Cold-regulated (COR) genes were also overrepresented among targets, but the cognate BSs and the identity of the regulated genes were usually different in each species. In cold, COR gene transcript levels were increased in flc and pep1-1 mutants compared with WT, and this correlated with reduced growth in pep1-1 Therefore, FLC orthologs regulate a set of conserved target genes mainly involved in reproductive development and were later independently recruited to modulate stress responses in different Brassicaceae lineages. Analysis of TF BSs in these lineages thus distinguishes widely conserved targets representing the core function of the TF from those that were recruited later in evolution. Copyright © 2017 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  18. Regulatory and functional interactions of plant growth regulators and plant glutathione S-transferases (GSTs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moons, Ann

    2005-01-01

    Plant glutathioneS-transferases (GSTs) are a heterogeneous superfamily of multifunctional proteins, grouped into six classes. The tau (GSTU) and phi (GSTF) class GSTs are the most represented ones and are plant-specific, whereas the smaller theta (GSTT) and zeta (GSTZ) classes are also found in animals. The lambda GSTs (GSTL) and the dehydroascorbate reductases (DHARs) are more distantly related. Plant GSTs perform a variety of pivotal catalytic and non-enzymatic functions in normal plant development and plant stress responses, roles that are only emerging. Catalytic functions include glutathione (GSH)-conjugation in the metabolic detoxification of herbicides and natural products. GSTs can also catalyze GSH-dependent peroxidase reactions that scavenge toxic organic hydroperoxides and protect from oxidative damage. GSTs can furthermore catalyze GSH-dependent isomerizations in endogenous metabolism, exhibit GSH-dependent thioltransferase safeguarding protein function from oxidative damage and DHAR activity functioning in redox homeostasis. Plant GSTs can also function as ligandins or binding proteins for phytohormones (i.e., auxins and cytokinins) or anthocyanins, thereby facilitating their distribution and transport. Finally, GSTs are also indirectly involved in the regulation of apoptosis and possibly also in stress signaling. Plant GST genes exhibit a diversity of expression patterns during biotic and abiotic stresses. Stress-induced plant growth regulators (i.e., jasmonic acid [JA], salicylic acid [SA], ethylene [ETH], and nitric oxide [NO] differentially activate GST gene expression. It is becoming increasingly evident that unique combinations of multiple, often interactive signaling pathways from various phytohormones and reactive oxygen species or antioxidants render the distinct transcriptional activation patterns of individual GSTs during stress. Underestimated post-transcriptional regulations of individual GSTs are becoming increasingly evident and roles

  19. Functional interrelationship between TFII-I and E2F transcription factors at specific cell cycle gene loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yong; Nar, Rukiye; Fan, Alex X; Aryan, Mahmoud; Hossain, Mir A; Gurumurthy, Aishwarya; Wassel, Paul C; Tang, Ming; Lu, Jianrong; Strouboulis, John; Bungert, Jörg

    2018-01-01

    Transcription factor TFII-I is a multifunctional protein implicated in the regulation of cell cycle and stress-response genes. Previous studies have shown that a subset of TFII-I associated genomic sites contained DNA-binding motifs for E2F family transcription factors. We analyzed the co-association of TFII-I and E2Fs in more detail using bioinformatics, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and co-immunoprecipitation experiments. The data show that TFII-I interacts with E2F transcription factors. Furthermore, TFII-I, E2F4, and E2F6 interact with DNA-regulatory elements of several genes implicated in the regulation of the cell cycle, including DNMT1, HDAC1, CDKN1C, and CDC27. Inhibition of TFII-I expression led to a decrease in gene expression and in the association of E2F4 and E2F6 with these gene loci in human erythroleukemia K562 cells. Finally, TFII-I deficiency reduced the proliferation of K562 cells and increased the sensitivity toward doxorubicin toxicity. The results uncover novel interactions between TFII-I and E2Fs and suggest that TFII-I mediates E2F function at specific cell cycle genes. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Iron Starvation Conditions Upregulate Ehrlichia ruminantium Type IV Secretion System, tr1 Transcription Factor and map1 Genes Family through the Master Regulatory Protein ErxR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Moumène

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ehrlichia ruminantium is an obligatory intracellular bacterium that causes heartwater, a fatal disease in ruminants. Due to its intracellular nature, E. ruminantium requires a set of specific virulence factors, such as the type IV secretion system (T4SS, and outer membrane proteins (Map proteins in order to avoid and subvert the host's immune response. Several studies have been conducted to understand the regulation of the T4SS or outer membrane proteins, in Ehrlichia, but no integrated approach has been used to understand the regulation of Ehrlichia pathogenicity determinants in response to environmental cues. Iron is known to be a key nutrient for bacterial growth both in the environment and within hosts. In this study, we experimentally demonstrated the regulation of virB, map1, and tr1 genes by the newly identified master regulator ErxR (for Ehrlichia ruminantium expression regulator. We also analyzed the effect of iron depletion on the expression of erxR gene, tr1 transcription factor, T4SS and map1 genes clusters in E. ruminantium. We show that exposure of E. ruminantium to iron starvation induces erxR and subsequently tr1, virB, and map1 genes. Our results reveal tight co-regulation of T4SS and map1 genes via the ErxR regulatory protein at the transcriptional level, and, for the first time link map genes to the virulence function sensu stricto, thereby advancing our understanding of Ehrlichia's infection process. These results suggest that Ehrlichia is able to sense changes in iron concentrations in the environment and to regulate the expression of virulence factors accordingly.

  1. Restriction of IL-22-producing T cell responses and differential regulation of regulatory T cell compartments by zinc finger transcription factor Ikaros.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Jennifer J; Schjerven, Hilde; Li, Shiyang; Lee, Aileen; Qiu, Ju; Chen, Zong-Ming E; Smale, Stephen T; Zhou, Liang

    2014-10-15

    Proper immune responses are needed to control pathogen infection at mucosal surfaces. IL-22-producing CD4(+) T cells play an important role in controlling bacterial infection in the gut; however, transcriptional regulation of these cells remains elusive. In this study, we show that mice with targeted deletion of the fourth DNA-binding zinc finger of the transcription factor Ikaros had increased IL-22-producing, but not IL-17-producing, CD4(+) T cells in the gut. Adoptive transfer of CD4(+) T cells from these Ikaros-mutant mice conferred enhanced mucosal immunity against Citrobacter rodentium infection. Despite an intact in vivo thymic-derived regulatory T cell (Treg) compartment in these Ikaros-mutant mice, TGF-β, a cytokine well known for induction of Tregs, failed to induce Foxp3 expression in Ikaros-mutant CD4(+) T cells in vitro and, instead, promoted IL-22. Aberrant upregulation of IL-21 in CD4(+) T cells expressing mutant Ikaros was responsible, at least in part, for the enhanced IL-22 expression in a Stat3-dependent manner. Genetic analysis using compound mutations further demonstrated that the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, but not RORγt, was required for aberrant IL-22 expression by Ikaros-mutant CD4(+) T cells, whereas forced expression of Foxp3 was sufficient to inhibit this aberrant cytokine production. Together, our data identified new functions for Ikaros in maintaining mucosal immune homeostasis by restricting IL-22 production by CD4(+) T cells. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  2. Everyday risk taking as a function of regulatory focus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamstra, Melvyn R. W.; Bolderdijk, Jan Willem; Veldstra, Janet L.

    Uncertainty is an inherent aspect of everyday life. However, faced with uncertainty, some individuals take risks more eagerly than others. Regulatory focus theory may explain such differences because risky behavior may arise naturally from the eagerness of promotion focused individuals, while safe

  3. Expression and purification of functional, recombinant Trypanosoma cruzi complement regulatory protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beucher, Margaret; Meira, Wendell S F; Zegarra, Vasthy; Galvão, Lúcia M C; Chiari, Egler; Norris, Karen A

    2003-01-01

    The complement regulatory protein (CRP) of Trypanosoma cruzi is a developmentally regulated glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored membrane protein that protects the parasite from complement-mediated killing, and is an important virulence determinant of the microorganism. CRP binds human complement components C3b and C4b to restrict activation of the complement cascade. Here, we report production of functional, recombinant T. cruzi CRP in mammalian cells and a one-step purification of the recombinant protein. Exchange of the crp DNA sequence encoding the carboxy-terminal GPI signal sequence with the corresponding sequence of decay accelerating factor (DAF) was necessary for recognition, cleavage, and addition of GPI in mammalian cells. CRP production was assessed in two mammalian cell lines with crp-daf gene expression driven by three different transcription control regions: Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat, cytomegalovirus (CMV) immediate early gene, and chicken beta-actin promoter/CMV enhancer. We present evidence that CRP produced in transfected Chinese hamster Ovary (CHO) cells was functional and protected the cells from complement-mediated lysis. To facilitate purification of the recombinant protein, a hexahistidyl tag was incorporated at 3(') end of the cDNA upstream of the GPI anchor addition sequence. An additional histidine fusion construct was made that allowed for secretion and recovery of recombinant protein from culture supernatant fluid. Both membrane and secreted forms of the protein were purified in one step by nickel nitrilotriacetic acid. The production and purification of functionally active CRP in a non-infectious expression system will allow for structure and function studies aimed at identifying the active site(s) of this protein.

  4. SREBP-2, a second basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper protein that stimulates transcription by binding to a sterol regulatory element.

    OpenAIRE

    Hua, X; Yokoyama, C; Wu, J; Briggs, M R; Brown, M S; Goldstein, J L; Wang, X

    1993-01-01

    We report the cDNA cloning of SREBP-2, the second member of a family of basic-helix-loop-helix-leucine zipper (bHLH-Zip) transcription factors that recognize sterol regulatory element 1 (SRE-1). SRE-1, a conditional enhancer in the promoters for the low density lipoprotein receptor and 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A synthase genes, increases transcription in the absence of sterols and is inactivated when sterols accumulate. Human SREBP-2 contains 1141 amino acids and is 47% identical t...

  5. FARE-CAFE: a database of functional and regulatory elements of cancer-associated fusion events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korla, Praveen Kumar; Cheng, Jack; Huang, Chien-Hung; Tsai, Jeffrey J. P.; Liu, Yu-Hsuan; Kurubanjerdjit, Nilubon; Hsieh, Wen-Tsong; Chen, Huey-Yi; Ng, Ka-Lok

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal translocation (CT) is of enormous clinical interest because this disorder is associated with various major solid tumors and leukemia. A tumor-specific fusion gene event may occur when a translocation joins two separate genes. Currently, various CT databases provide information about fusion genes and their genomic elements. However, no database of the roles of fusion genes, in terms of essential functional and regulatory elements in oncogenesis, is available. FARE-CAFE is a unique combination of CTs, fusion proteins, protein domains, domain–domain interactions, protein–protein interactions, transcription factors and microRNAs, with subsequent experimental information, which cannot be found in any other CT database. Genomic DNA information including, for example, manually collected exact locations of the first and second break points, sequences and karyotypes of fusion genes are included. FARE-CAFE will substantially facilitate the cancer biologist’s mission of elucidating the pathogenesis of various types of cancer. This database will ultimately help to develop ‘novel’ therapeutic approaches. Database URL: http://ppi.bioinfo.asia.edu.tw/FARE-CAFE PMID:26384373

  6. A Novel Sucrose-Regulatory MADS-Box Transcription Factor GmNMHC5 Promotes Root Development and Nodulation in Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Han, Xiangdong; Zhan, Ge; Zhao, Zhenfang; Feng, Yongjun; Wu, Cunxiang

    2015-08-31

    The MADS-box protein family includes many transcription factors that have a conserved DNA-binding MADS-box domain. The proteins in this family were originally recognized to play prominent roles in floral development. Recent findings, especially with regard to the regulatory roles of the AGL17 subfamily in root development, have greatly broadened their known functions. In this study, a gene from soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.), GmNMHC5, was cloned from the Zigongdongdou cultivar and identified as a member of the AGL17 subfamily. Real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR analysis showed that GmNMHC5 was expressed at much higher levels in roots and nodules than in other organs. The activation of expression was first examined in leaves and roots, followed by shoot apexes. GmNMHC5 expression levels rose sharply when the plants were treated under short-day conditions (SD) and started to pod, whereas low levels were maintained in non-podding plants under long-day conditions (LD). Furthermore, overexpression of GmNMHC5 in transgenic soybean significantly promoted lateral root development and nodule building. Moreover, GmNMHC5 is upregulated by exogenous sucrose. These results indicate that GmNMHC5 can sense the sucrose signal and plays significant roles in lateral root development and nodule building.

  7. A Novel Sucrose-Regulatory MADS-Box Transcription Factor GmNMHC5 Promotes Root Development and Nodulation in Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The MADS-box protein family includes many transcription factors that have a conserved DNA-binding MADS-box domain. The proteins in this family were originally recognized to play prominent roles in floral development. Recent findings, especially with regard to the regulatory roles of the AGL17 subfamily in root development, have greatly broadened their known functions. In this study, a gene from soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr., GmNMHC5, was cloned from the Zigongdongdou cultivar and identified as a member of the AGL17 subfamily. Real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR analysis showed that GmNMHC5 was expressed at much higher levels in roots and nodules than in other organs. The activation of expression was first examined in leaves and roots, followed by shoot apexes. GmNMHC5 expression levels rose sharply when the plants were treated under short-day conditions (SD and started to pod, whereas low levels were maintained in non-podding plants under long-day conditions (LD. Furthermore, overexpression of GmNMHC5 in transgenic soybean significantly promoted lateral root development and nodule building. Moreover, GmNMHC5 is upregulated by exogenous sucrose. These results indicate that GmNMHC5 can sense the sucrose signal and plays significant roles in lateral root development and nodule building.

  8. Airway function, inflammation and regulatory T cell function in subjects in asthma remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, Louis-Philippe; Turcott, Hélène; Plante, Sophie; Chakir, Jamila

    2012-01-01

    Factors associated with asthma remission need to be determined, particularly when remission occurs in adulthood. To evaluate airway responsiveness and inflammation in adult patients in asthma remission compared with adults with mild, persistent symptomatic asthma. Adenosine monophosphate and methacholine responsiveness were evaluated in 26 patients in complete remission of asthma, 16 patients in symptomatic remission of asthma, 29 mild asthmatic patients and 15 healthy controls. Blood sampling and induced sputum were also obtained to measure inflammatory parameters. Perception of breathlessness at 20% fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 s was similar among groups. In subjects with symptomatic remission of asthma, responsiveness to adenosine monophosphate and methacholine was intermediate between mild asthma and complete asthma remission, with the latter group similar to controls. Asthma remission was associated with a shorter duration of disease. Blood immunoglobulin E levels were significantly increased in the asthma group, and blood eosinophils were significantly elevated in the complete asthma remission, symptomatic remission and asthma groups compared with controls. The suppressive function of regulatory T cells was lower in asthma and remission groups compared with controls. A continuum of asthma remission was observed, with patients in complete asthma remission presenting features similar to controls, while patients in symptomatic asthma remission appeared to be in an intermediate state between complete asthma remission and symptomatic asthma. Remission was associated with a shorter disease duration. Despite remission of asthma, a decreased suppressor function of regulatory T cells was observed, which may predispose patients to future recurrence of the disease.

  9. Genetic variation in metallothionein and metal-regulatory transcription factor 1 in relation to urinary cadmium, copper, and zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, Scott V.; Barrick, Brian; Christopher, Emily P.; Shafer, Martin M.; Makar, Karen W.; Song, Xiaoling; Lampe, Johanna W.; Vilchis, Hugo; Ulery, April; Newcomb, Polly A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Metallothionein (MT) proteins play critical roles in the physiological handling of both essential (Cu and Zn) and toxic (Cd) metals. MT expression is regulated by metal-regulatory transcription factor 1 (MTF1). Hence, genetic variation in the MT gene family and MTF1 might influence excretion of these metals. Methods: 321 women were recruited in Seattle, WA and Las Cruces, NM and provided demographic information, urine samples for measurement of metal concentrations by mass spectrometry and creatinine, and blood or saliva for extraction of DNA. Forty-one single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MTF1 gene region and the region of chromosome 16 encoding the MT gene family were selected for genotyping in addition to an ancestry informative marker panel. Linear regression was used to estimate the association of SNPs with urinary Cd, Cu, and Zn, adjusted for age, urinary creatinine, smoking history, study site, and ancestry. Results: Minor alleles of rs28366003 and rs10636 near the MT2A gene were associated with lower urinary Cd, Cu, and Zn. Minor alleles of rs8044719 and rs1599823, near MT1A and MT1B, were associated with lower urinary Cd and Zn, respectively. Minor alleles of rs4653329 in MTF1 were associated with lower urinary Cd. Conclusions: These results suggest that genetic variation in the MT gene region and MTF1 influences urinary Cd, Cu, and Zn excretion. - Highlights: • Genetic variation in metallothionein (MT) genes was assessed in two diverse populations. • Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in MT genes were associated with mean urinary Cd, Cu and Zn. • Genetic variation may influence biomarkers of exposure, and associations of exposure with health.

  10. Comparative transcriptional profiling of 3 murine models of SLE nephritis reveals both unique and shared regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramalingam Bethunaickan

    Full Text Available To define shared and unique features of SLE nephritis in mouse models of proliferative and glomerulosclerotic renal disease.Perfused kidneys from NZB/W F1, NZW/BXSB and NZM2410 mice were harvested before and after nephritis onset. Affymetrix based gene expression profiles of kidney RNA were analyzed using Genomatix Pathway Systems and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software. Gene expression patterns were confirmed using real-time PCR.955, 1168 and 755 genes were regulated in the kidneys of nephritic NZB/W F1, NZM2410 and NZW/BXSB mice respectively. 263 genes were regulated concordantly in all three strains reflecting immune cell infiltration, endothelial cell activation, complement activation, cytokine signaling, tissue remodeling and hypoxia. STAT3 was the top associated transcription factor, having a binding site in the gene promoter of 60/263 regulated genes. The two strains with proliferative nephritis shared a macrophage/DC infiltration and activation signature. NZB/W and NZM2410 mice shared a mitochondrial dysfunction signature. Dominant T cell and plasma cell signatures in NZB/W mice reflected lymphoid aggregates; this was the only strain with regulatory T cell infiltrates. NZW/BXSB mice manifested tubular regeneration and NZM2410 mice had the most metabolic stress and manifested loss of nephrin, indicating podocyte loss.These findings identify shared inflammatory mechanisms of SLE nephritis that can be therapeutically targeted. Nevertheless, the heterogeneity of effector mechanisms suggests that individualized therapy might need to be based on biopsy findings. Some common mechanisms are shared with non-immune-mediated renal diseases, suggesting that strategies to prevent tissue hypoxia and remodeling may be useful in SLE nephritis.

  11. Construction and analysis of the transcription factor-microRNA co-regulatory network response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis: a view from the blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yan; Duan, Zipeng; Xu, Feng; Zhang, Jiayuan; Shulgina, Marina V; Li, Fan

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis ( Mtb ) infection has been regional outbreak, recently. The traditional focus on the patterns of "reductionism" which was associated with single molecular changes has been unable to meet the demand of early diagnosis and clinical application when current tuberculosis infection happened. In this study, we employed a systems biology approach to collect large microarray data sets including mRNAs and microRNAs (miRNAs) to identify the differentially expressed mRNAs and miRNAs in the whole blood of TB patients. The aim was to identify key genes associated with the immune response in the pathogenic process of tuberculosis by analyzing the co-regulatory network that was consisted of transcription factors and miRNAs as well as their target genes. The network along with their co-regulatory genes was analyzed utilizing Transcriptional Regulatory Element Database (TRED) and Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID). We got 21 (19 up-regulated and 2 down-regulated) differentially expressed genes that were co-regulated by transcription factors and miRNAs. KEGG pathway enrichment analysis showed that the 21 differentially expressed genes were predominantly involved in Tuberculosis signaling pathway, which may play a major role in tuberculosis biological process. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to verify the over expression of co-regulatory genes ( FCGR1A and CEBPB ). The genetic expression was correlated with clinicopathological characteristics in TB patients and inferences drawn. Our results suggest the TF-miRNA gene co-regulatory network may help us further understand the molecular mechanism of immune response to tuberculosis and provide us a new angle of future biomarker and therapeutic targets.

  12. Prediction of regulatory elements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandelin, Albin

    2008-01-01

    Finding the regulatory mechanisms responsible for gene expression remains one of the most important challenges for biomedical research. A major focus in cellular biology is to find functional transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) responsible for the regulation of a downstream gene. As wet-lab...

  13. GenomeRunner web server: regulatory similarity and differences define the functional impact of SNP sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozmorov, Mikhail G; Cara, Lukas R; Giles, Cory B; Wren, Jonathan D

    2016-08-01

    The growing amount of regulatory data from the ENCODE, Roadmap Epigenomics and other consortia provides a wealth of opportunities to investigate the functional impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Yet, given the large number of regulatory datasets, researchers are posed with a challenge of how to efficiently utilize them to interpret the functional impact of SNP sets. We developed the GenomeRunner web server to automate systematic statistical analysis of SNP sets within a regulatory context. Besides defining the functional impact of SNP sets, GenomeRunner implements novel regulatory similarity/differential analyses, and cell type-specific regulatory enrichment analysis. Validated against literature- and disease ontology-based approaches, analysis of 39 disease/trait-associated SNP sets demonstrated that the functional impact of SNP sets corresponds to known disease relationships. We identified a group of autoimmune diseases with SNPs distinctly enriched in the enhancers of T helper cell subpopulations, and demonstrated relevant cell type-specificity of the functional impact of other SNP sets. In summary, we show how systematic analysis of genomic data within a regulatory context can help interpreting the functional impact of SNP sets. GenomeRunner web server is freely available at http://www.integrativegenomics.org/ mikhail.dozmorov@gmail.com Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Genomewide Analysis of Clp1 Function in Transcription in Budding Yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Husini, Nadra; Sharifi, Ali; Mousavi, Seyed Ahmad; Chitsaz, Hamidreza; Ansari, Athar

    2017-07-31

    In budding yeast, the 3' end processing of mRNA and the coupled termination of transcription by RNAPII requires the CF IA complex. We have earlier demonstrated a role for the Clp1 subunit of this complex in termination and promoter-associated transcription of CHA1. To assess the generality of the observed function of Clp1 in transcription, we tested the effect of Clp1 on transcription on a genomewide scale using the Global Run-On-Seq (GRO-Seq) approach. GRO-Seq analysis showed the polymerase reading through the termination signal in the downstream region of highly transcribed genes in a temperature-sensitive mutant of Clp1 at elevated temperature. No such terminator readthrough was observed in the mutant at the permissive temperature. The poly(A)-independent termination of transcription of snoRNAs, however, remained unaffected in the absence of Clp1 activity. These results strongly suggest a role for Clp1 in poly(A)-coupled termination of transcription. Furthermore, the density of antisense transcribing polymerase upstream of the promoter region exhibited an increase in the absence of Clp1 activity, thus implicating Clp1 in promoter directionality. The overall conclusion of these results is that Clp1 plays a general role in poly(A)-coupled termination of RNAPII transcription and in enhancing promoter directionality in budding yeast.

  15. Amphipathic small molecules mimic the binding mode and function of endogenous transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhrlage, Sara J; Bates, Caleb A; Rowe, Steven P; Minter, Aaron R; Brennan, Brian B; Majmudar, Chinmay Y; Wemmer, David E; Al-Hashimi, Hashim; Mapp, Anna K

    2009-05-15

    Small molecules that reconstitute the binding mode(s) of a protein and in doing so elicit a programmed functional response offer considerable advantages in the control of complex biological processes. The development challenges of such molecules are significant, however. Many protein-protein interactions require multiple points of contact over relatively large surface areas. More significantly, several binding modes can be superimposed upon a single sequence within a protein, and a true small molecule replacement must be preprogrammed for such multimodal binding. This is the case for the transcriptional activation domain or TAD of transcriptional activators as these motifs utilize a poorly characterized multipartner binding profile in order to stimulate gene expression. Here we describe a unique class of small molecules that exhibit both function and a binding profile analogous to natural transcriptional activation domains. Of particular note, the small molecules are the first reported to bind to the KIX domain within the CREB binding protein (CBP) at a site that is utilized by natural activators. Further, a comparison of functional and nonfunctional small molecules indicates that an interaction with CBP is a key contributor to transcriptional activity. Taken together, the evidence suggests that the small molecule TADs mimic both the function and mechanism of their natural counterparts and thus present a framework for the broader development of small molecule transcriptional switches.

  16. Disrupting SUMOylation enhances transcriptional function and ameliorates polyglutamine androgen receptor–mediated disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Jason P.; Reddy, Satya L.; Yu, Zhigang; Giorgetti, Elisa; Montie, Heather L.; Mukherjee, Sarmistha; Higgins, Jake; McEachin, Richard C.; Robins, Diane M.; Merry, Diane E.; Iñiguez-Lluhí, Jorge A.; Lieberman, Andrew P.

    2015-01-01

    Expansion of the polyglutamine (polyQ) tract within the androgen receptor (AR) causes neuromuscular degeneration in individuals with spinobulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA). PolyQ AR has diminished transcriptional function and exhibits ligand-dependent proteotoxicity, features that have both been implicated in SBMA; however, the extent to which altered AR transcriptional function contributes to pathogenesis remains controversial. Here, we sought to dissociate effects of diminished AR function from polyQ-mediated proteotoxicity by enhancing the transcriptional activity of polyQ AR. To accomplish this, we bypassed the inhibitory effect of AR SUMOylation (where SUMO indicates small ubiquitin-like modifier) by mutating conserved lysines in the polyQ AR that are sites of SUMOylation. We determined that replacement of these residues by arginine enhances polyQ AR activity as a hormone-dependent transcriptional regulator. In a murine model, disruption of polyQ AR SUMOylation rescued exercise endurance and type I muscle fiber atrophy; it also prolonged survival. These changes occurred without overt alterations in polyQ AR expression or aggregation, revealing the favorable trophic support exerted by the ligand-activated receptor. Our findings demonstrate beneficial effects of enhancing the transcriptional function of the ligand-activated polyQ AR and indicate that the SUMOylation pathway may be a potential target for therapeutic intervention in SBMA. PMID:25607844

  17. Site-Specific Incorporation of Functional Components into RNA by an Unnatural Base Pair Transcription System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rie Kawai

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Toward the expansion of the genetic alphabet, an unnatural base pair between 7-(2-thienylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (Ds and pyrrole-2-carbaldehyde (Pa functions as a third base pair in replication and transcription, and provides a useful tool for the site-specific, enzymatic incorporation of functional components into nucleic acids. We have synthesized several modified-Pa substrates, such as alkylamino-, biotin-, TAMRA-, FAM-, and digoxigenin-linked PaTPs, and examined their transcription by T7 RNA polymerase using Ds-containing DNA templates with various sequences. The Pa substrates modified with relatively small functional groups, such as alkylamino and biotin, were efficiently incorporated into RNA transcripts at the internal positions, except for those less than 10 bases from the 3′-terminus. We found that the efficient incorporation into a position close to the 3′-terminus of a transcript depended on the natural base contexts neighboring the unnatural base, and that pyrimidine-Ds-pyrimidine sequences in templates were generally favorable, relative to purine-Ds-purine sequences. The unnatural base pair transcription system provides a method for the site-specific functionalization of large RNA molecules.

  18. TEAD transcription factors mediate the function of TAZ in cell growth and epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Heng; Liu, Chen-Ying; Zha, Zheng-Yu; Zhao, Bin; Yao, Jun; Zhao, Shimin; Xiong, Yue; Lei, Qun-Ying; Guan, Kun-Liang

    2009-05-15

    The TAZ transcription co-activator has been shown to promote cell proliferation and to induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Recently we have demonstrated that TAZ is phosphorylated and inhibited by the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, which is altered in human cancer. The mechanism of TAZ-mediated transcription is unclear. We demonstrate here that TEAD is a key downstream transcription factor mediating the function of TAZ. Disruption of TEAD-TAZ binding or silencing of TEAD expression blocked the function of TAZ to promote cell proliferation and to induce epithelial-mesenchymal transition, demonstrating TEAD as a key downstream effector of TAZ. We also identified CTGF, a gene that regulates cell adhesion, proliferation, and migration, as a direct target of TAZ and TEAD. Our study establishes a functional partnership between TAZ and TEAD under negative regulation by the Hippo signaling pathway.

  19. Advanced Inverter Functions to Support High Levels of Distributed Solar: Policy and Regulatory Considerations (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-11-01

    This paper explains how advanced inverter functions (sometimes called 'smart inverters') contribute to the integration of high levels of solar PV generation onto the electrical grid and covers the contributions of advanced functions to maintaining grid stability. Policy and regulatory considerations associated with the deployment of advanced inverter functions are also introduced.

  20. Functional Conservation of the Glide/Gcm Regulatory Network Controlling Glia, Hemocyte, and Tendon Cell Differentiation in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattenoz, Pierre B; Popkova, Anna; Southall, Tony D; Aiello, Giuseppe; Brand, Andrea H; Giangrande, Angela

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screens allow us to understand how transcription factors trigger developmental processes, including cell specification. A major challenge is identification of their binding sites because feedback loops and homeostatic interactions may mask the direct impact of those factors in transcriptome analyses. Moreover, this approach dissects the downstream signaling cascades and facilitates identification of conserved transcriptional programs. Here we show the results and the validation of a DNA adenine methyltransferase identification (DamID) genome-wide screen that identifies the direct targets of Glide/Gcm, a potent transcription factor that controls glia, hemocyte, and tendon cell differentiation in Drosophila. The screen identifies many genes that had not been previously associated with Glide/Gcm and highlights three major signaling pathways interacting with Glide/Gcm: Notch, Hedgehog, and JAK/STAT, which all involve feedback loops. Furthermore, the screen identifies effector molecules that are necessary for cell-cell interactions during late developmental processes and/or in ontogeny. Typically, immunoglobulin (Ig) domain-containing proteins control cell adhesion and axonal navigation. This shows that early and transiently expressed fate determinants not only control other transcription factors that, in turn, implement a specific developmental program but also directly affect late developmental events and cell function. Finally, while the mammalian genome contains two orthologous Gcm genes, their function has been demonstrated in vertebrate-specific tissues, placenta, and parathyroid glands, begging questions on the evolutionary conservation of the Gcm cascade in higher organisms. Here we provide the first evidence for the conservation of Gcm direct targets in humans. In sum, this work uncovers novel aspects of cell specification and sets the basis for further understanding of the role of conserved Gcm gene regulatory cascades. Copyright © 2016

  1. Functional Conservation of the Glide/Gcm Regulatory Network Controlling Glia, Hemocyte, and Tendon Cell Differentiation in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattenoz, Pierre B.; Popkova, Anna; Southall, Tony D.; Aiello, Giuseppe; Brand, Andrea H.; Giangrande, Angela

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput screens allow us to understand how transcription factors trigger developmental processes, including cell specification. A major challenge is identification of their binding sites because feedback loops and homeostatic interactions may mask the direct impact of those factors in transcriptome analyses. Moreover, this approach dissects the downstream signaling cascades and facilitates identification of conserved transcriptional programs. Here we show the results and the validation of a DNA adenine methyltransferase identification (DamID) genome-wide screen that identifies the direct targets of Glide/Gcm, a potent transcription factor that controls glia, hemocyte, and tendon cell differentiation in Drosophila. The screen identifies many genes that had not been previously associated with Glide/Gcm and highlights three major signaling pathways interacting with Glide/Gcm: Notch, Hedgehog, and JAK/STAT, which all involve feedback loops. Furthermore, the screen identifies effector molecules that are necessary for cell-cell interactions during late developmental processes and/or in ontogeny. Typically, immunoglobulin (Ig) domain–containing proteins control cell adhesion and axonal navigation. This shows that early and transiently expressed fate determinants not only control other transcription factors that, in turn, implement a specific developmental program but also directly affect late developmental events and cell function. Finally, while the mammalian genome contains two orthologous Gcm genes, their function has been demonstrated in vertebrate-specific tissues, placenta, and parathyroid glands, begging questions on the evolutionary conservation of the Gcm cascade in higher organisms. Here we provide the first evidence for the conservation of Gcm direct targets in humans. In sum, this work uncovers novel aspects of cell specification and sets the basis for further understanding of the role of conserved Gcm gene regulatory cascades. PMID:26567182

  2. Vimentin-ERK Signaling Uncouples Slug Gene Regulatory Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virtakoivu, Reetta; Mai, Anja; Mattila, Elina; De Franceschi, Nicola; Imanishi, Susumu Y; Corthals, Garry; Kaukonen, Riina; Saari, Markku; Cheng, Fang; Torvaldson, Elin; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Mannermaa, Arto; Muharram, Ghaffar; Gilles, Christine; Eriksson, John; Soini, Ylermi; Lorens, James B; Ivaska, Johanna

    2015-06-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in cells is a developmental process adopted during tumorigenesis that promotes metastatic capacity. In this study, we advance understanding of EMT control in cancer cells with the description of a novel vimentin-ERK axis that regulates the transcriptional activity of Slug (SNAI2). Vimentin, ERK, and Slug exhibited overlapping subcellular localization in clinical specimens of triple-negative breast carcinoma. RNAi-mediated ablation of these gene products inhibited cancer cell migration and cell invasion through a laminin-rich matrix. Biochemical analyses demonstrated direct interaction of vimentin and ERK, which promoted ERK activation and enhanced vimentin transcription. Consistent with its role as an intermediate filament, vimentin acted as a scaffold to recruit Slug to ERK and promote Slug phosphorylation at serine-87. Site-directed mutagenesis established a requirement for ERK-mediated Slug phosphorylation in EMT initiation. Together, these findings identified a pivotal step in controlling the ability of Slug to organize hallmarks of EMT. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Genome-wide analysis of the Dof transcription factor gene family reveals soybean-specific duplicable and functional characteristics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Guo

    Full Text Available The Dof domain protein family is a classic plant-specific zinc-finger transcription factor family involved in a variety of biological processes. There is great diversity in the number of Dof genes in different plants. However, there are only very limited reports on the characterization of Dof transcription factors in soybean (Glycine max. In the present study, 78 putative Dof genes were identified from the whole-genome sequence of soybean. The predicted GmDof genes were non-randomly distributed within and across 19 out of 20 chromosomes and 97.4% (38 pairs were preferentially retained duplicate paralogous genes located in duplicated regions of the genome. Soybean-specific segmental duplications contributed significantly to the expansion of the soybean Dof gene family. These Dof proteins were phylogenetically clustered into nine distinct subgroups among which the gene structure and motif compositions were considerably conserved. Comparative phylogenetic analysis of these Dof proteins revealed four major groups, similar to those reported for Arabidopsis and rice. Most of the GmDofs showed specific expression patterns based on RNA-seq data analyses. The expression patterns of some duplicate genes were partially redundant while others showed functional diversity, suggesting the occurrence of sub-functionalization during subsequent evolution. Comprehensive expression profile analysis also provided insights into the soybean-specific functional divergence among members of the Dof gene family. Cis-regulatory element analysis of these GmDof genes suggested diverse functions associated with different processes. Taken together, our results provide useful information for the functional characterization of soybean Dof genes by combining phylogenetic analysis with global gene-expression profiling.

  4. Genome-wide analysis of the Dof transcription factor gene family reveals soybean-specific duplicable and functional characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yong; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2013-01-01

    The Dof domain protein family is a classic plant-specific zinc-finger transcription factor family involved in a variety of biological processes. There is great diversity in the number of Dof genes in different plants. However, there are only very limited reports on the characterization of Dof transcription factors in soybean (Glycine max). In the present study, 78 putative Dof genes were identified from the whole-genome sequence of soybean. The predicted GmDof genes were non-randomly distributed within and across 19 out of 20 chromosomes and 97.4% (38 pairs) were preferentially retained duplicate paralogous genes located in duplicated regions of the genome. Soybean-specific segmental duplications contributed significantly to the expansion of the soybean Dof gene family. These Dof proteins were phylogenetically clustered into nine distinct subgroups among which the gene structure and motif compositions were considerably conserved. Comparative phylogenetic analysis of these Dof proteins revealed four major groups, similar to those reported for Arabidopsis and rice. Most of the GmDofs showed specific expression patterns based on RNA-seq data analyses. The expression patterns of some duplicate genes were partially redundant while others showed functional diversity, suggesting the occurrence of sub-functionalization during subsequent evolution. Comprehensive expression profile analysis also provided insights into the soybean-specific functional divergence among members of the Dof gene family. Cis-regulatory element analysis of these GmDof genes suggested diverse functions associated with different processes. Taken together, our results provide useful information for the functional characterization of soybean Dof genes by combining phylogenetic analysis with global gene-expression profiling.

  5. Pak2 is essential for the function of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells through maintaining a suppressive Treg phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hagan, Kyle L; Miller, Stephen D; Phee, Hyewon

    2017-12-06

    Foxp3, a key transcription factor that drives lineage differentiation of regulatory T cells (Tregs), was thought to imprint a unique and irreversible genetic signature within Tregs. Recent evidence, however, suggests that loss or attenuation of Foxp3 expression can cause Tregs to de-differentiate into effector T cells capable of producing proinflammatory cytokines. Herein, we report that the signaling kinase, p21-activated kinase 2 (Pak2), is essential for maintaining Treg stability and suppressive function. Loss of Pak2, specifically in Tregs, resulted in reduced expression of multiple Treg functional molecules, including Foxp3, CD25, Nrp-1 and CTLA-4, coupled with a loss of Treg suppressive function in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, Pak2-deficient Tregs gained expression of Th2-associated cytokines and the transcription factor, Gata3, becoming Th2-like cells, explaining their inability to regulate immune responses. Collectively, these findings suggest Pak2 as an important signaling molecule for guarding against aberrant immune responses through regulating the stability of Foxp3 + Tregs and maintaining a suppressive Treg phenotype.

  6. Menin and RNF20 recruitment is associated with dynamic histone modifications that regulate signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1-activated transcription of the interferon regulatory factor 1 gene (IRF1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buro Lauren J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT activation of gene expression is both rapid and transient, and when properly executed it affects growth, differentiation, homeostasis and the immune response, but when dysregulated it contributes to human disease. Transcriptional activation is regulated by alterations to the chromatin template. However, the role of histone modification at gene loci that are activated for transcription in response to STAT signaling is poorly defined. Results Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we profiled several histone modifications during STAT1 activation of the interferon regulatory factor 1 gene (IRF1. Methylated lysine histone proteins H3K4me2, H3K4me3, H3K79me3, H3K36me3 and monoubiquitinated histone ubH2B are dynamic and correlate with interferon (IFNγ induction of STAT1 activity. Chemical inhibition of H3K4 methylation downregulates IRF1 transcription and decreases RNA polymerase II (Pol II occupancy at the IRF1 promoter. MEN1, a component of a complex proteins associated with Set1 (COMPASS-like complex and the hBRE1 component, RNF20, are localized to IRF1 in the uninduced state and are further recruited when IRF1 is activated. RNAi-mediated depletion of RNF20 lowers both ubH2B and H3K4me3, but surprisingly, upregulates IFNγ induced IRF1 transcription. The dynamics of phosphorylation in the C-terminal domain (CTD of Pol II are disrupted during gene activation as well. Conclusions H2B monoubiquitination promotes H3K4 methylation, but the E3 ubiquitin ligase, RNF20, is repressive of inducible transcription at the IRF1 gene locus, suggesting that ubH2B can, directly or indirectly, affect Pol II CTD phosphorylation cycling to exert control on ongoing transcription.

  7. Characterization of the regulatory domains of the human skn-1a/Epoc-1/Oct-11 POU transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildesheim, J; Foster, R A; Chamberlin, M E; Vogel, J C

    1999-09-10

    The Skn-1a POU transcription factor is primarily expressed in keratinocytes of murine embryonic and adult epidermis. Although some POU factors expressed in a tissue-specific manner are important for normal differentiation, the biological function of Skn-1a remains unknown. Previous in vitro studies indicate that Skn-1a has the ability to transactivate markers of keratinocyte differentiation. In this study, we have characterized Skn-1a's transactivation domain(s) and engineered a dominant negative protein that lacked this transactivation domain. Deletional analysis of the human homologue of Skn-1a with three target promoters revealed the presence of two functional domains: a primary C-terminal transactivation domain and a combined N-terminal inhibitory domain and transactivation domain. Skn-1a lacking the C-terminal region completely lost transactivation ability, irrespective of the promoter tested, and was able to block transactivation by normal Skn-1a in competition assays. Compared with full-length, Skn-1a lacking the N-terminal region demonstrated either increased transactivation (bovine cytokeratin 6 promoter), comparable transactivation (human papillomavirus type 1a long control region), or loss of transactivation (human papillomavirus type 18 long control region). The identification of a primary C-terminal transactivation domain enabled us to generate a dominant negative Skn-1a factor, which will be useful in the quest for a better understanding of this keratinocyte-specific gene regulator.

  8. Disabled-2 is a FOXP3 target gene required for regulatory T cell function

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, N; Nguyen, H; Friedline, RH; Malhotra, N; Brehm, M; Koyonagi, M; Bix, M; Cooper, JA; Chambers, CA; Kang, J

    2009-01-01

    FOXP3 expressing regulatory T cells are vital for maintaining peripheral T cell tolerance and homeostasis. The mechanisms by which FOXP3 target genes orchestrate context-dependent Treg cell function are largely unknown. Here we show that in mouse peripheral lymphocytes, the Drosophila Disabled-2 (Dab2) homolog, a gene that is involved in enhancing TGFβ responses, is exclusively expressed in FOXP3+ regulatory T cells. Dab2 is a direct target of FOXP3 and regulatory T cells lacking DAB2 are fun...

  9. Mutant p53 is a transcriptional co-factor that binds to G-rich regulatory regions of active genes and generates transcriptional plasticity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Quante, T.; Otto, B.; Brázdová, Marie; Kejnovská, Iva; Deppert, W.; Tolstonog, G.V.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 17 (2012), s. 3290-3303 ISSN 1538-4101 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/10/2370 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : mutant p53 * transcription * G-quadruplex Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.243, year: 2012

  10. Tcf7l2/Tcf4 Transcriptional Repressor Function Requires HDAC Activity in the Developing Vertebrate CNS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    Full Text Available The generation of functionally distinct neuronal subtypes within the vertebrate central nervous system (CNS requires the precise regulation of progenitor gene expression in specific neuronal territories during early embryogenesis. Accumulating evidence has implicated histone deacetylase (HDAC proteins in cell specification, proliferation, and differentiation in diverse embryonic and adult tissues. However, although HDAC proteins have shown to be expressed in the developing vertebrate neural tube, their specific role in CNS neural progenitor fate specification remains unclear. Prior work from our lab showed that the Tcf7l2/Tcf4 transcription factor plays a key role in ventral progenitor lineage segregation by differential repression of two key specification factors, Nkx2.2 and Olig2. In this study, we found that administration of HDAC inhibitors (Valproic Acid (VPA, Trichostatin-A (TSA, or sodium butyrate in chick embryos in ovo disrupted normal progenitor gene segregation in the developing neural tube, indicating that HDAC activity is required for this process. Further, using functional and pharmacological approaches in vivo, we found that HDAC activity is required for the differential repression of Nkx2.2 and Olig2 by Tcf7l2/Tcf4. Finally, using dominant-negative functional assays, we provide evidence that Tcf7l2/Tcf4 repression also requires Gro/TLE/Grg co-repressor factors. Together, our data support a model where the transcriptional repressor activity of Tcf7l2/Tcf4 involves functional interactions with both HDAC and Gro/TLE/Grg co-factors at specific target gene regulatory elements in the developing neural tube, and that this activity is required for the proper segregation of the Nkx2.2 (p3 and Olig2 (pMN expressing cells from a common progenitor pool.

  11. ChIP-seq analysis of genomic binding regions of five major transcription factors highlights a central role for ZIC2 in the mouse epiblast stem cell gene regulatory network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Kazunari; Oki, Shinya; Iida, Hideaki; Andrabi, Munazah; Yamaguchi, Katsushi

    2017-01-01

    To obtain insight into the transcription factor (TF)-dependent regulation of epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs), we performed ChIP-seq analysis of the genomic binding regions of five major TFs. Analysis of in vivo biotinylated ZIC2, OTX2, SOX2, POU5F1 and POU3F1 binding in EpiSCs identified several new features. (1) Megabase-scale genomic domains rich in ZIC2 peaks and genes alternate with those rich in POU3F1 but sparse in genes, reflecting the clustering of regulatory regions that act at short and long-range, which involve binding of ZIC2 and POU3F1, respectively. (2) The enhancers bound by ZIC2 and OTX2 prominently regulate TF genes in EpiSCs. (3) The binding sites for SOX2 and POU5F1 in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and EpiSCs are divergent, reflecting the shift in the major acting TFs from SOX2/POU5F1 in ESCs to OTX2/ZIC2 in EpiSCs. (4) This shift in the major acting TFs appears to be primed by binding of ZIC2 in ESCs at relevant genomic positions that later function as enhancers following the disengagement of SOX2/POU5F1 from major regulatory functions and subsequent binding by OTX2. These new insights into EpiSC gene regulatory networks gained from this study are highly relevant to early stage embryogenesis. PMID:28455373

  12. TFpredict and SABINE: sequence-based prediction of structural and functional characteristics of transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Eichner

    Full Text Available One of the key mechanisms of transcriptional control are the specific connections between transcription factors (TF and cis-regulatory elements in gene promoters. The elucidation of these specific protein-DNA interactions is crucial to gain insights into the complex regulatory mechanisms and networks underlying the adaptation of organisms to dynamically changing environmental conditions. As experimental techniques for determining TF binding sites are expensive and mostly performed for selected TFs only, accurate computational approaches are needed to analyze transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes on a genome-wide level. We implemented a four-step classification workflow which for a given protein sequence (1 discriminates TFs from other proteins, (2 determines the structural superclass of TFs, (3 identifies the DNA-binding domains of TFs and (4 predicts their cis-acting DNA motif. While existing tools were extended and adapted for performing the latter two prediction steps, the first two steps are based on a novel numeric sequence representation which allows for combining existing knowledge from a BLAST scan with robust machine learning-based classification. By evaluation on a set of experimentally confirmed TFs and non-TFs, we demonstrate that our new protein sequence representation facilitates more reliable identification and structural classification of TFs than previously proposed sequence-derived features. The algorithms underlying our proposed methodology are implemented in the two complementary tools TFpredict and SABINE. The online and stand-alone versions of TFpredict and SABINE are freely available to academics at http://www.cogsys.cs.uni-tuebingen.de/software/TFpredict/ and http://www.cogsys.cs.uni-tuebingen.de/software/SABINE/.

  13. Cutting edge: Dab2 is a FOXP3 target gene required for regulatory T cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Nitya; Nguyen, Hai; Friedline, Randall H; Malhotra, Nidhi; Brehm, Michael; Koyanagi, Madoka; Bix, Mark; Cooper, Jonathan A; Chambers, Cynthia A; Kang, Joonsoo

    2009-10-01

    FOXP3-expressing regulatory T (Treg) cells are vital for maintaining peripheral T cell tolerance and homeostasis. The mechanisms by which FOXP3 target genes orchestrate context-dependent Treg cell function are largely unknown. In this study we show that in mouse peripheral lymphocytes the Drosophila Disabled-2 (Dab2) homolog, a gene that is involved in enhancing TGFbeta responses, is exclusively expressed in FOXP3+ regulatory T cells. Dab2 is a direct target of FOXP3, and regulatory T cells lacking DAB2 are functionally impaired in vitro and in vivo. However, not all aspects of Treg cell function are perturbed, and DAB2 appears to be dispensable for Treg cell function in maintaining naive T cell homeostasis.

  14. Disabled-2 is a FOXP3 target gene required for regulatory T cell function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, N; Nguyen, H; Friedline, RH; Malhotra, N; Brehm, M; Koyonagi, M; Bix, M; Cooper, JA; Chambers, CA; Kang, J

    2010-01-01

    FOXP3 expressing regulatory T cells are vital for maintaining peripheral T cell tolerance and homeostasis. The mechanisms by which FOXP3 target genes orchestrate context-dependent Treg cell function are largely unknown. Here we show that in mouse peripheral lymphocytes, the Drosophila Disabled-2 (Dab2) homolog, a gene that is involved in enhancing TGFβ responses, is exclusively expressed in FOXP3+ regulatory T cells. Dab2 is a direct target of FOXP3 and regulatory T cells lacking DAB2 are functionally impaired in vitro and in vivo. However, not all aspects of Treg cell function are perturbed and DAB2 appears dispensable for Treg cell function in maintaining naïve T cell homeostasis. PMID:19767570

  15. Alternative Splicing of FOXP3 Controls Regulatory T Cell Effector Functions and Is Associated with Human Atherosclerotic Plaque Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Anne-Laure; Seitz, Christina; Liu, Sang; Kouznetsov, Nikolai V; Gertow, Karl; Westerberg, Lisa S; Paulsson-Berne, Gabrielle; Hansson, Göran K; Andersson, John

    2018-04-04

    Rationale: Regulatory T (Treg) cells suppress immune responses and have been shown to attenuate atherosclerosis. The Treg cell lineage specification factor FOXP3 is essential for Treg cells' ability to uphold immunological tolerance. In humans, FOXP3 exists in several different isoforms, however, their specific role is poorly understood. Objective: To define the regulation and functions of the two major FOXP3 isoforms, FOXP3fl and FOXP3Δ2, as well as to establish whether their expression is associated with ischemic atherosclerotic disease. Methods and Results: Human primary T-cells were transduced with lentiviruses encoding distinct FOXP3 isoforms. The phenotype and function of these cells were analyzed by flow cytometry, in vitro suppression assays and RNA-sequencing. We also assessed the effect of activation on Treg cells isolated from healthy volunteers. Treg cell activation resulted in increased FOXP3 expression that predominantly was made up of FOXP3Δ2. FOXP3Δ2 induced specific transcription of GARP, which functions by tethering the immunosuppressive cytokine TGF-β to the cell membrane of activated Treg cells. RT-PCR was used to determine the impact of alternative splicing of FOXP3 in relation with atherosclerotic plaque stability in a cohort of over 150 patients that underwent carotid endarterectomy. Plaque instability was associated with a lower FOXP3Δ2 transcript usage, when comparing plaques from patients without symptoms and patients with occurrence of recent (<1 month) vascular symptoms including minor stoke, transient ischemic attack or amaurosis fugax. No difference was detected in total levels of FOXP3 mRNA between these two groups. Conclusions: These results suggest that activated Treg cells suppress the atherosclerotic disease process and that FOXP3Δ2 controls a transcriptional program that acts protectively in human atherosclerotic plaques.

  16. A nanobody modulates the p53 transcriptional program without perturbing its functional architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethuyne, Jonas; De Gieter, Steven; Zwaenepoel, Olivier; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Durinck, Kaat; Verhelle, Adriaan; Hassanzadeh-Ghassabeh, Gholamreza; Speleman, Frank; Loris, Remy; Gettemans, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The p53 transcription factor plays an important role in genome integrity. To perform this task, p53 regulates the transcription of genes promoting various cellular outcomes including cell cycle arrest, apoptosis or senescence. The precise regulation of this activity remains elusive as numerous mechanisms, e.g. posttranslational modifications of p53 and (non-)covalent p53 binding partners, influence the p53 transcriptional program. We developed a novel, non-invasive tool to manipulate endogenous p53. Nanobodies (Nb), raised against the DNA-binding domain of p53, allow us to distinctively target both wild type and mutant p53 with great specificity. Nb3 preferentially binds ‘structural’ mutant p53, i.e. R175H and R282W, while a second but distinct nanobody, Nb139, binds both mutant and wild type p53. The co-crystal structure of the p53 DNA-binding domain in complex with Nb139 (1.9 Å resolution) reveals that Nb139 binds opposite the DNA-binding surface. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Nb139 does not disturb the functional architecture of the p53 DNA-binding domain using conformation-specific p53 antibody immunoprecipitations, glutaraldehyde crosslinking assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Functionally, the binding of Nb139 to p53 allows us to perturb the transactivation of p53 target genes. We propose that reduced recruitment of transcriptional co-activators or modulation of selected post-transcriptional modifications account for these observations. PMID:25324313

  17. Transcriptional Co-repressor Function of the Hippo Pathway Transducers YAP and TAZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minchul Kim

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available YAP (yes-associated protein and TAZ are oncogenic transcriptional co-activators downstream of the Hippo tumor-suppressor pathway. However, whether YAP and/or TAZ (YAP/TAZ engage in transcriptional co-repression remains relatively unexplored. Here, we directly demonstrated that YAP/TAZ represses numerous target genes, including tumor-suppressor genes such as DDIT4 (DNA-damage-inducible transcript 4 and Trail (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand. Mechanistically, the repressor function of YAP/TAZ requires TEAD (TEA domain transcription factors. A YAP/TAZ-TEAD complex recruits the NuRD complex to deacetylate histones and alters nucleosome occupancy at target genes. Functionally, repression of DDIT4 and Trail by YAP/TAZ is required for mTORC1 (mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 activation and cell survival, respectively. Our demonstration of the transcriptional co-repressor activity of YAP/TAZ opens a new avenue for understanding the Hippo signaling pathway.

  18. Regulatory mechanisms for 3'-end alternative splicing and polyadenylation of the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein, GFAP, transcript

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blechingberg, Jenny; Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2007-01-01

    The glial fibrillary acidic protein, GFAP, forms the intermediate cytoskeleton in cells of the glial lineage. Besides the common GFAP alpha transcript, the GFAP epsilon and GFAP kappa transcripts are generated by alternative mRNA 3'-end processing. Here we use a GFAP minigene to characterize...

  19. Functional analysis of jasmonate-responsive transcription factors in Arabidopsis thaliana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zarei, Adel

    2007-01-01

    The aim of the studies described in this thesis was the functional analysis of JA-responsive transcription factors in Arabidopsis with an emphasis on the interaction with the promoters of their target genes. In short, the following new results were obtained. The promoter of the PDF1.2 gene contains

  20. Functional roles of enhancer RNAs for oestrogen-dependent transcriptional activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenbo; Notani, Dimple; Ma, Qi; Tanasa, Bogdan; Nunez, Esperanza; Chen, Aaron Yun; Merkurjev, Daria; Zhang, Jie; Ohgi, Kenneth; Song, Xiaoyuan; Oh, Soohwan; Kim, Hong-Sook; Glass, Christopher K; Rosenfeld, Michael G

    2013-06-27

    The functional importance of gene enhancers in regulated gene expression is well established. In addition to widespread transcription of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in mammalian cells, bidirectional ncRNAs are transcribed on enhancers, and are thus referred to as enhancer RNAs (eRNAs). However, it has remained unclear whether these eRNAs are functional or merely a reflection of enhancer activation. Here we report that in human breast cancer cells 17β-oestradiol (E2)-bound oestrogen receptor α (ER-α) causes a global increase in eRNA transcription on enhancers adjacent to E2-upregulated coding genes. These induced eRNAs, as functional transcripts, seem to exert important roles for the observed ligand-dependent induction of target coding genes, increasing the strength of specific enhancer-promoter looping initiated by ER-α binding. Cohesin, present on many ER-α-regulated enhancers even before ligand treatment, apparently contributes to E2-dependent gene activation, at least in part by stabilizing E2/ER-α/eRNA-induced enhancer-promoter looping. Our data indicate that eRNAs are likely to have important functions in many regulated programs of gene transcription.

  1. [The function of transcription factor P63 and its signaling pathway during limb development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei; Tian, Wen

    2014-08-01

    The development of human limb is controlled by several transcription factors and signaling pathways, which are organized in precise time- and space-restricted manners. Recent studies showed that P63 and its signaling pathway play important roles in this process. Transcription factor P63, one member of the P53 family, is characterized by a similar amino acid domain, plays a crucial role in the development of limb and ectoderm differentiation, especially with its DNA binding domain, and sterile alpha motif domains. Mutated P63 gene may produce abnormal transcription factor P63 which can affect the signaling pathway. Furthermore, defective signaling protein in structure and/or quantity is synthesized though the pathway. Eventually, members of the signaling protein family are involved in the regulation of differentiation and development of stem cell, which causes deformity of limbs. In brief, three signaling pathways are related to the digit formation along three axes, including SHH-ZPA, FGFs-AER and Lmx1B-Wnt7a-En1. Each contains numerous signaling molecules which are integrated in self-regulatory modules that assure the acquisition or the correct digit complements. These finding has brought new clues for deciphering the etiology of congenital limb malformation and may provide alternatives for both prevention and treatment.

  2. Analysis of functional redundancies within the Arabidopsis TCP transcription factor family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danisman, Selahattin; van Dijk, Aalt D J; Bimbo, Andrea; van der Wal, Froukje; Hennig, Lars; de Folter, Stefan; Angenent, Gerco C; Immink, Richard G H

    2013-12-01

    Analyses of the functions of TEOSINTE-LIKE1, CYCLOIDEA, and PROLIFERATING CELL FACTOR1 (TCP) transcription factors have been hampered by functional redundancy between its individual members. In general, putative functionally redundant genes are predicted based on sequence similarity and confirmed by genetic analysis. In the TCP family, however, identification is impeded by relatively low overall sequence similarity. In a search for functionally redundant TCP pairs that control Arabidopsis leaf development, this work performed an integrative bioinformatics analysis, combining protein sequence similarities, gene expression data, and results of pair-wise protein-protein interaction studies for the 24 members of the Arabidopsis TCP transcription factor family. For this, the work completed any lacking gene expression and protein-protein interaction data experimentally and then performed a comprehensive prediction of potential functional redundant TCP pairs. Subsequently, redundant functions could be confirmed for selected predicted TCP pairs by genetic and molecular analyses. It is demonstrated that the previously uncharacterized class I TCP19 gene plays a role in the control of leaf senescence in a redundant fashion with TCP20. Altogether, this work shows the power of combining classical genetic and molecular approaches with bioinformatics predictions to unravel functional redundancies in the TCP transcription factor family.

  3. Genome-wide Reconstruction of OxyR and SoxRS Transcriptional Regulatory Networks under Oxidative Stress in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seo, Sang Woo; Kim, Donghyuk; Szubin, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Three transcription factors (TFs), OxyR, SoxR, and SoxS, play a critical role in transcriptional regulation of the defense system for oxidative stress in bacteria. However, their full genome-wide regulatory potential is unknown. Here, we perform a genome-scale reconstruction of the OxyR, SoxR, an...

  4. The transcription factor c-Maf controls touch receptor development and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wende, Hagen; Lechner, Stefan G; Cheret, Cyril; Bourane, Steeve; Kolanczyk, Maria E; Pattyn, Alexandre; Reuter, Katja; Munier, Francis L; Carroll, Patrick; Lewin, Gary R; Birchmeier, Carmen

    2012-03-16

    The sense of touch relies on detection of mechanical stimuli by specialized mechanosensory neurons. The scarcity of molecular data has made it difficult to analyze development of mechanoreceptors and to define the basis of their diversity and function. We show that the transcription factor c-Maf/c-MAF is crucial for mechanosensory function in mice and humans. The development and function of several rapidly adapting mechanoreceptor types are disrupted in c-Maf mutant mice. In particular, Pacinian corpuscles, a type of mechanoreceptor specialized to detect high-frequency vibrations, are severely atrophied. In line with this, sensitivity to high-frequency vibration is reduced in humans carrying a dominant mutation in the c-MAF gene. Thus, our work identifies a key transcription factor specifying development and function of mechanoreceptors and their end organs.

  5. An Expanded Role for the RFX Transcription Factor DAF-19, with Dual Functions in Ciliated and Nonciliated Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Stasio, Elizabeth A; Mueller, Katherine P; Bauer, Rosemary J; Hurlburt, Alexander J; Bice, Sophie A; Scholtz, Sophie L; Phirke, Prasad; Sugiaman-Trapman, Debora; Stinson, Loraina A; Olson, Haili B; Vogel, Savannah L; Ek-Vazquez, Zabdiel; Esemen, Yagmur; Korzynski, Jessica; Wolfe, Kelsey; Arbuckle, Bonnie N; Zhang, He; Lombard-Knapp, Gaelen; Piasecki, Brian P; Swoboda, Peter

    2018-03-01

    Regulatory Factor X (RFX) transcription factors (TFs) are best known for activating genes required for ciliogenesis in both vertebrates and invertebrates. In humans, eight RFX TFs have a variety of tissue-specific functions, while in the worm Caenorhabditis elegans , the sole RFX gene, daf-19 , encodes a set of nested isoforms. Null alleles of daf-19 confer pleiotropic effects including altered development with a dauer constitutive phenotype, complete absence of cilia and ciliary proteins, and defects in synaptic protein maintenance. We sought to identify RFX/ daf-19 target genes associated with neuronal functions other than ciliogenesis using comparative transcriptome analyses at different life stages of the worm. Subsequent characterization of gene expression patterns revealed one set of genes activated in the presence of DAF-19 in ciliated sensory neurons, whose activation requires the daf-19c isoform, also required for ciliogenesis. A second set of genes is downregulated in the presence of DAF-19, primarily in nonsensory neurons. The human orthologs of some of these neuronal genes are associated with human diseases. We report the novel finding that daf-19a is directly or indirectly responsible for downregulation of these neuronal genes in C. elegans by characterizing a new mutation affecting the daf-19a isoform ( tm5562 ) and not associated with ciliogenesis, but which confers synaptic and behavioral defects. Thus, we have identified a new regulatory role for RFX TFs in the nervous system. The new daf-19 candidate target genes we have identified by transcriptomics will serve to uncover the molecular underpinnings of the pleiotropic effects that daf-19 exerts on nervous system function. Copyright © 2018 by the Genetics Society of America.

  6. A regulatory network modeled from wild-type gene expression data guides functional predictions in Caenorhabditis elegans development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stigler Brandilyn

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complex gene regulatory networks underlie many cellular and developmental processes. While a variety of experimental approaches can be used to discover how genes interact, few biological systems have been systematically evaluated to the extent required for an experimental definition of the underlying network. Therefore, the development of computational methods that can use limited experimental data to define and model a gene regulatory network would provide a useful tool to evaluate many important but incompletely understood biological processes. Such methods can assist in extracting all relevant information from data that are available, identify unexpected regulatory relationships and prioritize future experiments. Results To facilitate the analysis of gene regulatory networks, we have developed a computational modeling pipeline method that complements traditional evaluation of experimental data. For a proof-of-concept example, we have focused on the gene regulatory network in the nematode C. elegans that mediates the developmental choice between mesodermal (muscle and ectodermal (skin cell fates in the embryonic C lineage. We have used gene expression data to build two models: a knowledge-driven model based on gene expression changes following gene perturbation experiments, and a data-driven mathematical model derived from time-course gene expression data recovered from wild-type animals. We show that both models can identify a rich set of network gene interactions. Importantly, the mathematical model built only from wild-type data can predict interactions demonstrated by the perturbation experiments better than chance, and better than an existing knowledge-driven model built from the same data set. The mathematical model also provides new biological insight, including a dissection of zygotic from maternal functions of a key transcriptional regulator, PAL-1, and identification of non-redundant activities of the T-box genes

  7. Exonic remnants of whole-genome duplication reveal cis-regulatory function of coding exons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xianjun; Navratilova, Pavla; Fredman, David; Drivenes, Øyvind; Becker, Thomas S; Lenhard, Boris

    2010-03-01

    Using a comparative genomics approach to reconstruct the fate of genomic regulatory blocks (GRBs) and identify exonic remnants that have survived the disappearance of their host genes after whole-genome duplication (WGD) in teleosts, we discover a set of 38 candidate cis-regulatory coding exons (RCEs) with predicted target genes. These elements demonstrate evolutionary separation of overlapping protein-coding and regulatory information after WGD in teleosts. We present evidence that the corresponding mammalian exons are still under both coding and non-coding selection pressure, are more conserved than other protein coding exons in the host gene and several control sets, and share key characteristics with highly conserved non-coding elements in the same regions. Their dual function is corroborated by existing experimental data. Additionally, we show examples of human exon remnants stemming from the vertebrate 2R WGD. Our findings suggest that long-range cis-regulatory inputs for developmental genes are not limited to non-coding regions, but can also overlap the coding sequence of unrelated genes. Thus, exonic regulatory elements in GRBs might be functionally equivalent to those in non-coding regions, calling for a re-evaluation of the sequence space in which to look for long-range regulatory elements and experimentally test their activity.

  8. Functional characterization of poplar wood-associated NAC domain transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ruiqin; Lee, Chanhui; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2010-02-01

    Wood is the most abundant biomass produced by land plants. Dissection of the molecular mechanisms underlying the transcriptional regulation of wood formation is a fundamental issue in plant biology and has important implications in tree biotechnology. Although a number of transcription factors in tree species have been shown to be associated with wood formation and some of them are implicated in lignin biosynthesis, none of them have been demonstrated to be key regulators of the biosynthesis of all three major components of wood. In this report, we have identified a group of NAC domain transcription factors, PtrWNDs, that are preferentially expressed in developing wood of poplar (Populus trichocarpa). Expression of PtrWNDs in the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) snd1 nst1 double mutant effectively complemented the secondary wall defects in fibers, indicating that PtrWNDs are capable of activating the entire secondary wall biosynthetic program. Overexpression of PtrWND2B and PtrWND6B in Arabidopsis induced the expression of secondary wall-associated transcription factors and secondary wall biosynthetic genes and, concomitantly, the ectopic deposition of cellulose, xylan, and lignin. Furthermore, PtrWND2B and PtrWND6B were able to activate the promoter activities of a number of poplar wood-associated transcription factors and wood biosynthetic genes. Together, these results demonstrate that PtrWNDs are functional orthologs of SND1 and suggest that PtrWNDs together with their downstream transcription factors form a transcriptional network involved in the regulation of wood formation in poplar.

  9. ELT-2 Is the Predominant Transcription Factor Controlling Differentiation and Function of the C. elegans Intestine, from Embryo to Adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhee, James D.; Fukushige, Tetsunari; Krause, Michael W.; Minnema, Stephanie E.; Goszczynski, Barbara; Gaudet, Jeb; Kohara, Yuji; Bossinger, Olaf; Zhao, Yongjun; Khattra, Jaswinder; Hirst, Martin; Jones, Steven J.M.; Marra, Marco A.; Ruzanov, Peter; Warner, Adam; Zapf, Richard; Moerman, Donald G.; Kalb, John M.

    2009-01-01

    Starting with SAGE-libraries prepared from C. elegans FAC-sorted embryonic intestine cells (8E-16E cell stage), from total embryos and from purified oocytes, and taking advantage of the NextDB in situ hybridization data base, we define sets of genes highly expressed from the zygotic genome, and expressed either exclusively or preferentially in the embryonic intestine or in the intestine of newly hatched larvae; we had previously defined a similarly expressed set of genes from the adult intestine. We show that an extended TGATAA-like sequence is essentially the only candidate for a cis-acting regulatory motif common to intestine genes expressed at all stages. This sequence is a strong ELT-2 binding site and matches the sequence of GATA-like sites found to be important for the expression of every intestinal gene so far analyzed experimentally. We show that the majority of these three sets of highly expressed intestinal-specific/intestinal-enriched genes respond strongly to ectopic expression of ELT-2 within the embryo. By flow-sorting elt-2(null) larvae from elt-2(+) larvae and then preparing Solexa/Illumina-SAGE libraries, we show that the majority of these genes also respond strongly to loss-of-function of ELT-2. To test the consequences of loss of other transcription factors identified in the embryonic intestine, we develop a strain of worms that is RNAi-sensitive only in the intestine; however, we are unable (with one possible exception) to identify any other transcription factor whose intestinal loss-of-function causes a phenotype of comparable severity to the phenotype caused by loss of ELT-2. Overall, our results support a model in which ELT-2 is the predominant transcription factor in the post-specification C. elegans intestine and participates directly in the transcriptional regulation of the majority (> 80%) of intestinal genes. We present evidence that ELT-2 plays a central role in most aspects of C. elegans intestinal physiology: establishing the

  10. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission organization charts and functional statements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-19

    This document is the organizational chart for the US NRC. It contains organizational structure and functional statements for the following: (1) the Commission, (2) committees and boards, (3) staff offices, (4) office of the Inspector General, (5) executive director for operations, (6) program offices, and (7) regional offices.

  11. Quantitative effect and regulatory function of cyclic adenosine 5 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhsudhan

    (d) These results suggest that the physiological function of cAMP is to maintain homeostatic energy levels. In carbon-limited cultures, growth is limited by the supply of energy; the cAMP levels therefore increase to enhance energy accumulation by activating the catabolic promoters and inhibiting the anabolic promoters.

  12. Testing for Cognitive Function in Animals in a Regulatory Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Superior cognitive functions have allowed the human species to dominate a world of incredible biological diversity. Threats to these essential capacities cannot be ignored, and a strategy is needed to evaluate the hazard posed by exposure to chemical and other agents. Because peo...

  13. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission organization charts and functional statements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This document is the organizational chart for the US NRC. It contains organizational structure and functional statements for the following: (1) the Commission, (2) committees and boards, (3) staff offices, (4) office of the Inspector General, (5) executive director for operations, (6) program offices, and (7) regional offices

  14. Expanded roles of leucine-responsive regulatory protein in transcription regulation of the Escherichia coli genome: Genomic SELEX screening of the regulation targets

    OpenAIRE

    Shimada, Tomohiro; Saito, Natsumi; Maeda, Michihisa; Tanaka, Kan; Ishihama, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) is a transcriptional regulator for the genes involved in transport, biosynthesis and catabolism of amino acids in Escherichia coli. In order to identify the whole set of genes under the direct control of Lrp, we performed Genomic SELEX screening and identified a total of 314 Lrp-binding sites on the E. coli genome. As a result, the regulation target of Lrp was predicted to expand from the hitherto identified genes for amino acid metabolism to a set ...

  15. Structure and function of the mycobacterial transcription initiation complex with the essential regulator RbpA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubin, Elizabeth A.; Fay, Allison; Xu, Catherine; Bean, James M.; Saecker, Ruth M.; Glickman, Michael S.; Darst, Seth A.; Campbell, Elizabeth A. (Rockefeller); (SKI)

    2017-01-09

    RbpA and CarD are essential transcription regulators in mycobacteria. Mechanistic analyses of promoter open complex (RPo) formation establish that RbpA and CarD cooperatively stimulate formation of an intermediate (RP2) leading to RPo; formation of RP2 is likely a bottleneck step at the majority of mycobacterial promoters. Once RPo forms, CarD also disfavors its isomerization back to RP2. We determined a 2.76 Å-resolution crystal structure of a mycobacterial transcription initiation complex (TIC) with RbpA as well as a CarD/RbpA/TIC model. Both CarD and RbpA bind near the upstream edge of the -10 element where they likely facilitate DNA bending and impede transcription bubble collapse. In vivo studies demonstrate the essential role of RbpA, show the effects of RbpA truncations on transcription and cell physiology, and indicate additional functions for RbpA not evident in vitro. This work provides a framework to understand the control of mycobacterial transcription by RbpA and CarD.

  16. Structure of noncoding RNA is a determinant of function of RNA binding proteins in transcriptional regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyoshi Takanori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The majority of the noncoding regions of mammalian genomes have been found to be transcribed to generate noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs, resulting in intense interest in their biological roles. During the past decade, numerous ncRNAs and aptamers have been identified as regulators of transcription. 6S RNA, first described as a ncRNA in E. coli, mimics an open promoter structure, which has a large bulge with two hairpin/stalk structures that regulate transcription through interactions with RNA polymerase. B2 RNA, which has stem-loops and unstructured single-stranded regions, represses transcription of mRNA in response to various stresses, including heat shock in mouse cells. The interaction of TLS (translocated in liposarcoma with CBP/p300 was induced by ncRNAs that bind to TLS, and this in turn results in inhibition of CBP/p300 histone acetyltransferase (HAT activity in human cells. Transcription regulator EWS (Ewing's sarcoma, which is highly related to TLS, and TLS specifically bind to G-quadruplex structures in vitro. The carboxy terminus containing the Arg-Gly-Gly (RGG repeat domains in these proteins are necessary for cis-repression of transcription activation and HAT activity by the N-terminal glutamine-rich domain. Especially, the RGG domain in the carboxy terminus of EWS is important for the G-quadruplex specific binding. Together, these data suggest that functions of EWS and TLS are modulated by specific structures of ncRNAs.

  17. Structure and function of the mycobacterial transcription initiation complex with the essential regulator RbpA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubin, Elizabeth A; Fay, Allison; Xu, Catherine; Bean, James M; Saecker, Ruth M; Glickman, Michael S; Darst, Seth A; Campbell, Elizabeth A

    2017-01-09

    RbpA and CarD are essential transcription regulators in mycobacteria. Mechanistic analyses of promoter open complex (RPo) formation establish that RbpA and CarD cooperatively stimulate formation of an intermediate (RP2) leading to RPo; formation of RP2 is likely a bottleneck step at the majority of mycobacterial promoters. Once RPo forms, CarD also disfavors its isomerization back to RP2. We determined a 2.76 Å-resolution crystal structure of a mycobacterial transcription initiation complex (TIC) with RbpA as well as a CarD/RbpA/TIC model. Both CarD and RbpA bind near the upstream edge of the -10 element where they likely facilitate DNA bending and impede transcription bubble collapse. In vivo studies demonstrate the essential role of RbpA, show the effects of RbpA truncations on transcription and cell physiology, and indicate additional functions for RbpA not evident in vitro. This work provides a framework to understand the control of mycobacterial transcription by RbpA and CarD.

  18. DMPD: The role of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family in dendritic celldevelopment and function. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17702640 The role of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family in dendritic cel...b 2007 Aug 16. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show The role of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family ...e interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family in dendritic celldevelopment and function. Authors Gabriele L, O

  19. Does the PI3K pathway promote or antagonize regulatory T cell development and function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soond, Dalya R.; Slack, Elizabeth C. M.; Garden, Oliver A.; Patton, Daniel T.; Okkenhaug, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) prevent autoimmunity and inflammation by suppressing the activation of other T cells and antigen presenting cells. The role of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling in Treg is controversial. Some studies suggest that inhibition of the PI3K pathway is essential for the development of Tregs whereas other studies have shown reduced Treg numbers and function when PI3K activity is suppressed. Here we attempt to reconcile the different studies that have explored PI3K and the downstream effectors Akt, Foxo, and mTOR in regulatory T cell development and function and discuss the implications for health and therapeutic intervention. PMID:22912633

  20. Eukaryotic transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staby, Lasse; O'Shea, Charlotte; Willemoës, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Gene-specific transcription factors (TFs) are key regulatory components of signaling pathways, controlling, for example, cell growth, development, and stress responses. Their biological functions are determined by their molecular structures, as exemplified by their structured DNA-binding domains...... them to participate in large interactomes, how they use only a few hydrophobic residues, short sequence motifs, prestructured motifs, and coupled folding and binding for their interactions with co-activators, and how their accessibility to post-translational modification affects their interactions...

  1. Reprogramming transcription by distinct classes of enhancers functionally defined by eRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Garcia-Bassets, Ivan; Benner, Chris; Li, Wenbo; Su, Xue; Zhou, Yiming; Qiu, Jinsong; Liu, Wen; Kaikkonen, Minna U; Ohgi, Kenneth A; Glass, Christopher K; Rosenfeld, Michael G; Fu, Xiang-Dong

    2011-05-15

    Mammalian genomes are populated with thousands of transcriptional enhancers that orchestrate cell-type-specific gene expression programs, but how those enhancers are exploited to institute alternative, signal-dependent transcriptional responses remains poorly understood. Here we present evidence that cell-lineage-specific factors, such as FoxA1, can simultaneously facilitate and restrict key regulated transcription factors, exemplified by the androgen receptor (AR), to act on structurally and functionally distinct classes of enhancer. Consequently, FoxA1 downregulation, an unfavourable prognostic sign in certain advanced prostate tumours, triggers dramatic reprogramming of the hormonal response by causing a massive switch in AR binding to a distinct cohort of pre-established enhancers. These enhancers are functional, as evidenced by the production of enhancer-templated non-coding RNA (eRNA) based on global nuclear run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) analysis, with a unique class apparently requiring no nucleosome remodelling to induce specific enhancer-promoter looping and gene activation. GRO-seq data also suggest that liganded AR induces both transcription initiation and elongation. Together, these findings reveal a large repository of active enhancers that can be dynamically tuned to elicit alternative gene expression programs, which may underlie many sequential gene expression events in development, cell differentiation and disease progression.

  2. Gateway-compatible inducible vector set for the functional analysis of transcription factors in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhaolai; Sun, Xudong; Xu, Huini

    2018-05-01

    The inducible vectors pER8-Gateway-3Flag and pER8-Gateway-3Flag-SRDX have been subjected to considerable research in terms of the function of transcription factors (TFs) via transcription activity and repression, respectively. Approximately 1500 TFs have been identified in Arabidopsis thaliana genome. To identify their functions, loss-of-function and gain-of-function mutants were generated to analyze the phenotype. However, many loss-of-function mutants did not show any evident phenotype because of the functional redundancy within the TF family. The constitutive misexpression of some TFs may result in lethality or sterility. To overcome these problems, we produced a Gateway-compatible inducible binary vector system that facilitates fast and reliable DNA cloning and biological function identification. The vector can be used for the inducible expression of protein fusions to a polypeptide protein tag named 3xFLAG tag. This vector system can also be used to generate an inducible transcription inhibition of protein fusion to an Ethylene-Responsive Factor-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif. The EAR motif makes it possible to get rid of redundancy within a TF family, thereby facilitating studies on loss of function. With these Gateway vectors, conventional subcloning technology that depends on restriction digestion and ligation is avoided. Thus, these Gateway vectors should be useful not only for the rapid analysis of the functions of redundant plant TFs, but also for the manipulation of TF overexpression, resulting in plant lethality or sterility, via an inducible promoter.

  3. Specificity and robustness in transcription control networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Anirvan M; Djordjevic, Marko; Shraiman, Boris I

    2002-02-19

    Recognition by transcription factors of the regulatory DNA elements upstream of genes is the fundamental step in controlling gene expression. How does the necessity to provide stability with respect to mutation constrain the organization of transcription control networks? We examine the mutation load of a transcription factor interacting with a set of n regulatory response elements as a function of the factor/DNA binding specificity and conclude on theoretical grounds that the optimal specificity decreases with n. The predicted correlation between variability of binding sites (for a given transcription factor) and their number is supported by the genomic data for Escherichia coli. The analysis of E. coli genomic data was carried out using an algorithm suggested by the biophysical model of transcription factor/DNA binding. Complete results of the search for candidate transcription factor binding sites are available at http://www.physics.rockefeller.edu/~boris/public/search_ecoli.

  4. Mitotic bookmarking by transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadauke, Stephan; Blobel, Gerd A

    2013-04-02

    Mitosis is accompanied by dramatic changes in chromatin organization and nuclear architecture. Transcription halts globally and most sequence-specific transcription factors and co-factors are ejected from mitotic chromatin. How then does the cell maintain its transcriptional identity throughout the cell division cycle? It has become clear that not all traces of active transcription and gene repression are erased within mitotic chromatin. Many histone modifications are stable or only partially diminished throughout mitosis. In addition, some sequence-specific DNA binding factors have emerged that remain bound to select sites within mitotic chromatin, raising the possibility that they function to transmit regulatory information through the transcriptionally silent mitotic phase, a concept that has been termed "mitotic bookmarking." Here we review recent approaches to studying potential bookmarking factors with regards to their mitotic partitioning, and summarize emerging ideas concerning the in vivo functions of mitotically bound nuclear factors.

  5. Promiscuity of enhancer, coding and non-coding transcription functions in ultraconserved elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanges Remo

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ultraconserved elements (UCEs are highly constrained elements of mammalian genomes, whose functional role has not been completely elucidated yet. Previous studies have shown that some of them act as enhancers in mouse, while some others are expressed in both normal and cancer-derived human tissues. Only one UCE element so far was shown to present these two functions concomitantly, as had been observed in other isolated instances of single, non ultraconserved enhancer elements. Results We used a custom microarray to assess the levels of UCE transcription during mouse development and integrated these data with published microarray and next-generation sequencing datasets as well as with newly produced PCR validation experiments. We show that a large fraction of non-exonic UCEs is transcribed across all developmental stages examined from only one DNA strand. Although the nature of these transcripts remains a mistery, our meta-analysis of RNA-Seq datasets indicates that they are unlikely to be short RNAs and that some of them might encode nuclear transcripts. In the majority of cases this function overlaps with the already established enhancer function of these elements during mouse development. Utilizing several next-generation sequencing datasets, we were further able to show that the level of expression observed in non-exonic UCEs is significantly higher than in random regions of the genome and that this is also seen in other regions which act as enhancers. Conclusion Our data shows that the concurrent presence of enhancer and transcript function in non-exonic UCE elements is more widespread than previously shown. Moreover through our own experiments as well as the use of next-generation sequencing datasets, we were able to show that the RNAs encoded by non-exonic UCEs are likely to be long RNAs transcribed from only one DNA strand.

  6. Co-regulation of Iron Metabolism and Virulence Associated Functions by Iron and XibR, a Novel Iron Binding Transcription Factor, in the Plant Pathogen Xanthomonas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Sheo Shankar; Patnana, Pradeep Kumar; Lomada, Santosh Kumar; Tomar, Archana; Chatterjee, Subhadeep

    2016-01-01

    Abilities of bacterial pathogens to adapt to the iron limitation present in hosts is critical to their virulence. Bacterial pathogens have evolved diverse strategies to coordinately regulate iron metabolism and virulence associated functions to maintain iron homeostasis in response to changing iron availability in the environment. In many bacteria the ferric uptake regulator (Fur) functions as transcription factor that utilize ferrous form of iron as cofactor to regulate transcription of iron metabolism and many cellular functions. However, mechanisms of fine-tuning and coordinated regulation of virulence associated function beyond iron and Fur-Fe2+ remain undefined. In this study, we show that a novel transcriptional regulator XibR (named X anthomonas iron binding regulator) of the NtrC family, is required for fine-tuning and co-coordinately regulating the expression of several iron regulated genes and virulence associated functions in phytopathogen Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (Xcc). Genome wide expression analysis of iron-starvation stimulon and XibR regulon, GUS assays, genetic and functional studies of xibR mutant revealed that XibR positively regulates functions involved in iron storage and uptake, chemotaxis, motility and negatively regulates siderophore production, in response to iron. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by quantitative real-time PCR indicated that iron promoted binding of the XibR to the upstream regulatory sequence of operon’s involved in chemotaxis and motility. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed that purified XibR bound ferric form of iron. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed that iron positively affected the binding of XibR to the upstream regulatory sequences of the target virulence genes, an effect that was reversed by ferric iron chelator deferoxamine. Taken together, these data revealed that how XibR coordinately regulates virulence associated and iron metabolism functions in Xanthomonads in

  7. SIRT1-Regulated Abnormal Acetylation of FOXP3 Induces Regulatory T-Cell Function Defect in Hashimoto's Thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Lun, Yu; Jiang, Han; Liu, Xun; Duan, Zhiquan; Xin, Shijie; Zhang, Jian

    2018-02-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) is an autoimmune thyroid disease characterized by low expression of transcription factor Forkhead Box P3 (FOXP3) and functional deficiency of a cluster of differentiation regulatory T cells (Tregs). This study aimed to investigate the mechanism of Treg dysfunction in HT. The number of CD4 + CD25 + FOXP3 + T cells was determined by flow cytometry. Expression of FOXP3 and Sirtuin type 1 (SIRT1) was evaluated by Western blot analysis. Acetylation of FOXP3 was analyzed by immunoprecipitation and Western blot analysis. The suppressive function of Treg was analyzed by the 5,6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) assay. The percentage of CD4 + CD25 + FOXP3 + T cells, expression of FOXP3, and FOXP3 acetylation level in the HT group were significantly lower than in the control groups. Conversely, SIRT1 expression was significantly higher in the HT group than in the other two groups. After Ex-527 treatment, the CD4 + CD25 + FOXP3 + T cells percentage, FOXP3 expression, and FOXP3 acetylation level in the HT group were significantly increased. HT Tregs exhibited less suppressive activity, but Ex-527 treatment significantly increased their suppressive activity. The findings demonstrate that the reduced FOXP3 expression level and Treg function defect in HT patients are regulated by SIRT1-mediated abnormal FOXP3 acetylation. Ex-527 may upregulate the FOXP3 acetylation level and subsequently increase the number and suppressive function of Treg cells.

  8. Sequence and functional characterization of MIRNA164 promoters from Brassica shows copy number dependent regulatory diversification among homeologs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Aditi; Anand, Saurabh; Singh, Neer K; Das, Sandip

    2018-03-12

    The impact of polyploidy on functional diversification of cis-regulatory elements is poorly understood. This is primarily on account of lack of well-defined structure of cis-elements and a universal regulatory code. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on characterization of sequence and functional diversification of paralogous and homeologous promoter elements associated with MIR164 from Brassica. The availability of whole genome sequence allowed us to identify and isolate a total of 42 homologous copies of MIR164 from diploid species-Brassica rapa (A-genome), Brassica nigra (B-genome), Brassica oleracea (C-genome), and allopolyploids-Brassica juncea (AB-genome), Brassica carinata (BC-genome) and Brassica napus (AC-genome). Additionally, we retrieved homologous sequences based on comparative genomics from Arabidopsis lyrata, Capsella rubella, and Thellungiella halophila, spanning ca. 45 million years of evolutionary history of Brassicaceae. Sequence comparison across Brassicaceae revealed lineage-, karyotype, species-, and sub-genome specific changes providing a snapshot of evolutionary dynamics of miRNA promoters in polyploids. Tree topology of cis-elements associated with MIR164 was found to re-capitulate the species and family evolutionary history. Phylogenetic shadowing identified transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) conserved across Brassicaceae, of which, some are already known as regulators of MIR164 expression. Some of the TFBS were found to be distributed in a sub-genome specific (e.g., SOX specific to promoter of MIR164c from MF2 sub-genome), lineage-specific (YABBY binding motif, specific to C. rubella in MIR164b), or species-specific (e.g., VOZ in A. thaliana MIR164a) manner which might contribute towards genetic and adaptive variation. Reporter activity driven by promoters associated with MIR164 paralogs and homeologs was majorly in agreement with known role of miR164 in leaf shaping, regulation of lateral root development and

  9. Post-transcriptional regulation on a global scale: form and function of Csr/Rsm systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeo, Tony; Vakulskas, Christopher A; Babitzke, Paul

    2013-02-01

    Originally described as a repressor of gene expression in the stationary phase of growth, CsrA (RsmA) regulates primary and secondary metabolic pathways, biofilm formation, motility, virulence circuitry of pathogens, quorum sensing and stress response systems by binding to conserved sequences in its target mRNAs and altering their translation and/or turnover. While the binding of CsrA to RNA is understood at an atomic level, new mechanisms of gene activation and repression by this protein are still emerging. In the γ-proteobacteria, small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) use molecular mimicry to sequester multiple CsrA dimers away from mRNA. In contrast, the FliW protein of Bacillus subtilis inhibits CsrA activity by binding to this protein, thereby establishing a checkpoint in flagellum morphogenesis. Turnover of CsrB and CsrC sRNAs in Escherichia coli requires a specificity protein of the GGDEF-EAL domain superfamily, CsrD, in addition to the housekeeping nucleases RNase E and PNPase. The Csr system of E. coli contains extensive autoregulatory circuitry, which governs the expression and activity of CsrA. Interaction of the Csr system with transcriptional regulatory networks results in a variety of complex response patterns. This minireview will highlight basic principles and new insights into the workings of these complex eubacterial regulatory systems. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Comprehensive meta-analysis of Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (STAT genomic binding patterns discerns cell-specific cis-regulatory modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Keunsoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytokine-activated transcription factors from the STAT (Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription family control common and context-specific genetic programs. It is not clear to what extent cell-specific features determine the binding capacity of seven STAT members and to what degree they share genetic targets. Molecular insight into the biology of STATs was gained from a meta-analysis of 29 available ChIP-seq data sets covering genome-wide occupancy of STATs 1, 3, 4, 5A, 5B and 6 in several cell types. Results We determined that the genomic binding capacity of STATs is primarily defined by the cell type and to a lesser extent by individual family members. For example, the overlap of shared binding sites between STATs 3 and 5 in T cells is greater than that between STAT5 in T cells and non-T cells. Even for the top 1,000 highly enriched STAT binding sites, ~15% of STAT5 binding sites in mouse female liver are shared by other STATs in different cell types while in T cells ~90% of STAT5 binding sites are co-occupied by STAT3, STAT4 and STAT6. In addition, we identified 116 cis-regulatory modules (CRM, which are recognized by all STAT members across cell types defining a common JAK-STAT signature. Lastly, in liver STAT5 binding significantly coincides with binding of the cell-specific transcription factors HNF4A, FOXA1 and FOXA2 and is associated with cell-type specific gene transcription. Conclusions Our results suggest that genomic binding of STATs is primarily determined by the cell type and further specificity is achieved in part by juxtaposed binding of cell-specific transcription factors.

  11. UVB induces a genome-wide acting negative regulatory mechanism that operates at the level of transcription initiation in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyenis, Akos; Umlauf, David; Ujfaludi, Zsuzsanna; Boros, Imre; Ye, Tao; Tora, Làszlò

    2014-07-01

    Faithful transcription of DNA is constantly threatened by different endogenous and environmental genotoxic effects. Transcription coupled repair (TCR) has been described to stop transcription and quickly remove DNA lesions from the transcribed strand of active genes, permitting rapid resumption of blocked transcription. This repair mechanism has been well characterized in the past using individual target genes. Moreover, numerous efforts investigated the fate of blocked RNA polymerase II (Pol II) during DNA repair mechanisms and suggested that stopped Pol II complexes can either backtrack, be removed and degraded or bypass the lesions to allow TCR. We investigated the effect of a non-lethal dose of UVB on global DNA-bound Pol II distribution in human cells. We found that the used UVB dose did not induce Pol II degradation however surprisingly at about 93% of the promoters of all expressed genes Pol II occupancy was seriously reduced 2-4 hours following UVB irradiation. The presence of Pol II at these cleared promoters was restored 5-6 hours after irradiation, indicating that the negative regulation is very dynamic. We also identified a small set of genes (including several p53 regulated genes), where the UVB-induced Pol II clearing did not operate. Interestingly, at promoters, where Pol II promoter clearance occurs, TFIIH, but not TBP, follows the behavior of Pol II, suggesting that at these genes upon UVB treatment TFIIH is sequestered for DNA repair by the TCR machinery. In agreement, in cells where the TCR factor, the Cockayne Syndrome B protein, was depleted UVB did not induce Pol II and TFIIH clearance at promoters. Thus, our study reveals a UVB induced negative regulatory mechanism that targets Pol II transcription initiation on the large majority of transcribed gene promoters, and a small subset of genes, where Pol II escapes this negative regulation.

  12. UVB induces a genome-wide acting negative regulatory mechanism that operates at the level of transcription initiation in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akos Gyenis

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Faithful transcription of DNA is constantly threatened by different endogenous and environmental genotoxic effects. Transcription coupled repair (TCR has been described to stop transcription and quickly remove DNA lesions from the transcribed strand of active genes, permitting rapid resumption of blocked transcription. This repair mechanism has been well characterized in the past using individual target genes. Moreover, numerous efforts investigated the fate of blocked RNA polymerase II (Pol II during DNA repair mechanisms and suggested that stopped Pol II complexes can either backtrack, be removed and degraded or bypass the lesions to allow TCR. We investigated the effect of a non-lethal dose of UVB on global DNA-bound Pol II distribution in human cells. We found that the used UVB dose did not induce Pol II degradation however surprisingly at about 93% of the promoters of all expressed genes Pol II occupancy was seriously reduced 2-4 hours following UVB irradiation. The presence of Pol II at these cleared promoters was restored 5-6 hours after irradiation, indicating that the negative regulation is very dynamic. We also identified a small set of genes (including several p53 regulated genes, where the UVB-induced Pol II clearing did not operate. Interestingly, at promoters, where Pol II promoter clearance occurs, TFIIH, but not TBP, follows the behavior of Pol II, suggesting that at these genes upon UVB treatment TFIIH is sequestered for DNA repair by the TCR machinery. In agreement, in cells where the TCR factor, the Cockayne Syndrome B protein, was depleted UVB did not induce Pol II and TFIIH clearance at promoters. Thus, our study reveals a UVB induced negative regulatory mechanism that targets Pol II transcription initiation on the large majority of transcribed gene promoters, and a small subset of genes, where Pol II escapes this negative regulation.

  13. The pioneer factor OCT4 requires the chromatin remodeller BRG1 to support gene regulatory element function in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Hamish W; Klose, Robert J

    2017-03-13

    Pioneer transcription factors recognise and bind their target sequences in inaccessible chromatin to establish new transcriptional networks throughout development and cellular reprogramming. During this process, pioneer factors establish an accessible chromatin state to facilitate additional transcription factor binding, yet it remains unclear how different pioneer factors achieve this. Here, we discover that the pluripotency-associated pioneer factor OCT4 binds chromatin to shape accessibility, transcription factor co-binding, and regulatory element function in mouse embryonic stem cells. Chromatin accessibility at OCT4-bound sites requires the chromatin remodeller BRG1, which is recruited to these sites by OCT4 to support additional transcription factor binding and expression of the pluripotency-associated transcriptome. Furthermore, the requirement for BRG1 in shaping OCT4 binding reflects how these target sites are used during cellular reprogramming and early mouse development. Together this reveals a distinct requirement for a chromatin remodeller in promoting the activity of the pioneer factor OCT4 and regulating the pluripotency network.

  14. Computational identification of developmental enhancers:conservation and function of transcription factor binding-site clustersin drosophila melanogaster and drosophila psedoobscura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, Benjamin P.; Pfeiffer, Barret D.; Laverty, Todd R.; Salzberg, Steven L.; Rubin, Gerald M.; Eisen, Michael B.; Celniker, SusanE.

    2004-08-06

    The identification of sequences that control transcription in metazoans is a major goal of genome analysis. In a previous study, we demonstrated that searching for clusters of predicted transcription factor binding sites could discover active regulatory sequences, and identified 37 regions of the Drosophila melanogaster genome with high densities of predicted binding sites for five transcription factors involved in anterior-posterior embryonic patterning. Nine of these clusters overlapped known enhancers. Here, we report the results of in vivo functional analysis of 27 remaining clusters. We generated transgenic flies carrying each cluster attached to a basal promoter and reporter gene, and assayed embryos for reporter gene expression. Six clusters are enhancers of adjacent genes: giant, fushi tarazu, odd-skipped, nubbin, squeeze and pdm2; three drive expression in patterns unrelated to those of neighboring genes; the remaining 18 do not appear to have enhancer activity. We used the Drosophila pseudoobscura genome to compare patterns of evolution in and around the 15 positive and 18 false-positive predictions. Although conservation of primary sequence cannot distinguish true from false positives, conservation of binding-site clustering accurately discriminates functional binding-site clusters from those with no function. We incorporated conservation of binding-site clustering into a new genome-wide enhancer screen, and predict several hundred new regulatory sequences, including 85 adjacent to genes with embryonic patterns. Measuring conservation of sequence features closely linked to function--such as binding-site clustering--makes better use of comparative sequence data than commonly used methods that examine only sequence identity.

  15. Transcriptional regulatory program in wild-type and retinoblastoma gene-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts during adipocyte differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hakim-Weber, Robab; Krogsdam, Anne-M; Jørgensen, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Although many molecular regulators of adipogenesis have been identified a comprehensive catalogue of components is still missing. Recent studies showed that the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) was expressed in the cell cycle and late cellular differentiation phase during adipogenesis. To investigate...... this dual role of pRb in the early and late stages of adipogenesis we used microarrays to perform a comprehensive systems-level analysis of the common transcriptional program of the classic 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cell line, wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), and retinoblastoma gene-deficient MEFs...... of experimental data and computational analyses pinpointed a feedback-loop between Pparg and Foxo1.To analyze the effects of the retinoblastoma protein at the transcriptional level we chose a perturbated system (Rb-/- MEFs) for comparison to the transcriptional program of wild-type MEFs. Gene ontology analysis...

  16. Enhancing Student Academic and Health Functioning: A Self-Regulatory Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Barry J.

    1996-01-01

    Traces a program of research on students' self-regulation of their academic and health functioning from initial operational definitions to training and intervention studies. This body of evidence has shown that students' use of self-regulatory processes, such as learning strategies, goal setting, self-monitoring, and self-efficacy beliefs, predict…

  17. Sex Chromosome-wide Transcriptional Suppression and Compensatory Cis-Regulatory Evolution Mediate Gene Expression in the Drosophila Male Germline.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily L Landeen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of heteromorphic sex chromosomes has repeatedly resulted in the evolution of sex chromosome-specific forms of regulation, including sex chromosome dosage compensation in the soma and meiotic sex chromosome inactivation in the germline. In the male germline of Drosophila melanogaster, a novel but poorly understood form of sex chromosome-specific transcriptional regulation occurs that is distinct from canonical sex chromosome dosage compensation or meiotic inactivation. Previous work shows that expression of reporter genes driven by testis-specific promoters is considerably lower-approximately 3-fold or more-for transgenes inserted into X chromosome versus autosome locations. Here we characterize this transcriptional suppression of X-linked genes in the male germline and its evolutionary consequences. Using transgenes and transpositions, we show that most endogenous X-linked genes, not just testis-specific ones, are transcriptionally suppressed several-fold specifically in the Drosophila male germline. In wild-type testes, this sex chromosome-wide transcriptional suppression is generally undetectable, being effectively compensated by the gene-by-gene evolutionary recruitment of strong promoters on the X chromosome. We identify and experimentally validate a promoter element sequence motif that is enriched upstream of the transcription start sites of hundreds of testis-expressed genes; evolutionarily conserved across species; associated with strong gene expression levels in testes; and overrepresented on the X chromosome. These findings show that the expression of X-linked genes in the Drosophila testes reflects a balance between chromosome-wide epigenetic transcriptional suppression and long-term compensatory adaptation by sex-linked genes. Our results have broad implications for the evolution of gene expression in the Drosophila male germline and for genome evolution.

  18. Specific interactions between transcription factors and the promoter-regulatory region of the human cytomegalovirus major immediate-early gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghazal, P.; Lubon, H.; Hennighausen, L.

    1988-01-01

    Repeat sequence motifs as well as unique sequences between nucleotides -150 and -22 of the human cytomegalovirus immediate-early 1 gene interact in vitro with nuclear proteins. The authors show that a transcriptional element between nucleotides -91 and -65 stimulated promoter activity in vivo and in vitro by binding specific cellular transcription factors. Finally, a common sequence motif, (T)TGG/AC, present in 15 of the determined binding sites suggests a particular class of nuclear factors associated with the immediate-early 1 gene

  19. Functional dissection of regulatory models using gene expression data of deletion mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin'e Li

    Full Text Available Genome-wide gene expression profiles accumulate at an alarming rate, how to integrate these expression profiles generated by different laboratories to reverse engineer the cellular regulatory network has been a major challenge. To automatically infer gene regulatory pathways from genome-wide mRNA expression profiles before and after genetic perturbations, we introduced a new Bayesian network algorithm: Deletion Mutant Bayesian Network (DM_BN. We applied DM_BN to the expression profiles of 544 yeast single or double deletion mutants of transcription factors, chromatin remodeling machinery components, protein kinases and phosphatases in S. cerevisiae. The network inferred by this method identified causal regulatory and non-causal concurrent interactions among these regulators (genetically perturbed genes that are strongly supported by the experimental evidence, and generated many new testable hypotheses. Compared to networks reconstructed by routine similarity measures or by alternative Bayesian network algorithms, the network inferred by DM_BN excels in both precision and recall. To facilitate its application in other systems, we packaged the algorithm into a user-friendly analysis tool that can be downloaded at http://www.picb.ac.cn/hanlab/DM_BN.html.

  20. Functional Characterization of a Novel Pro-Apoptotic Transcriptional Regulatory Protein in Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    artificial E-box promoter ( pEMS ) [7]. The result shown in Figure 4, suggest that PAPX suppresses myc activity as determined by pEMS . Moreover, PAPX- induced...from brain tissues and cell lines from cervical, liver, prostate, brain and breast indicates that PAPX is also down-regulated in these carcinoma also...cell lines Primary brain tumors 1 234 5 6 789 1011 -- PAPX _ _ _ _-GAPDH Breast 12 Proposed Model of PAPX in regulating Myc activity Given that PAPX is

  1. SVD identifies transcript length distribution functions from DNA microarray data and reveals evolutionary forces globally affecting GBM metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas M Bertagnolli

    Full Text Available To search for evolutionary forces that might act upon transcript length, we use the singular value decomposition (SVD to identify the length distribution functions of sets and subsets of human and yeast transcripts from profiles of mRNA abundance levels across gel electrophoresis migration distances that were previously measured by DNA microarrays. We show that the SVD identifies the transcript length distribution functions as "asymmetric generalized coherent states" from the DNA microarray data and with no a-priori assumptions. Comparing subsets of human and yeast transcripts of the same gene ontology annotations, we find that in both disparate eukaryotes, transcripts involved in protein synthesis or mitochondrial metabolism are significantly shorter than typical, and in particular, significantly shorter than those involved in glucose metabolism. Comparing the subsets of human transcripts that are overexpressed in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM or normal brain tissue samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas, we find that GBM maintains normal brain overexpression of significantly short transcripts, enriched in transcripts that are involved in protein synthesis or mitochondrial metabolism, but suppresses normal overexpression of significantly longer transcripts, enriched in transcripts that are involved in glucose metabolism and brain activity. These global relations among transcript length, cellular metabolism and tumor development suggest a previously unrecognized physical mode for tumor and normal cells to differentially regulate metabolism in a transcript length-dependent manner. The identified distribution functions support a previous hypothesis from mathematical modeling of evolutionary forces that act upon transcript length in the manner of the restoring force of the harmonic oscillator.

  2. A pilot study comparing T-regulatory cell function among healthy children in different areas of Gansu, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Panhong; Chang, Xiaoru; Ye, Zhonghui; Yao, Yueli; Nguyen, Patton Khuu; Hammond, Sally Katharine; Wang, Junling; Liu, Sa

    2017-10-01

    Immune system is critical to protecting human health from toxic substances. Our previously published research had found an important link between polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in ambient air and changes at the DNA level in immune cells that led to impaired function of regulatory T (Treg) cells in children living in California, USA. But molecular and cellular pathways of these changes remain unclear. The present study aims to explore whether exposure to PAHs leads to changes in Treg cells functions of children living in Gansu, China, where ambient air pollution levels are much higher than those in California, and to explore potential mechanisms of PAH-induced immunological dysfunctions. Air pollutions in Lanzhou and Lintao, Gansu Province, were measured from December 2015 to June 2016. Healthy children were recruited from both cities and enrolled in this pilot study. Demographic information was collected by questionnaires. Blood samples were collected. Peripheral blood Treg cells were analyzed for Treg cells percentage by flow cytometry. Gene expression of forkhead box transcription factor 3 (Foxp3), transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and interleukin 35 (IL35) were examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results indicated PAH concentration (as sum of 16 PAHs) in Lintao was over two times higher than that was in Lanzhou (707 vs. 326 ng/m 3 ), whereas PM 2.5 concentration was comparable in two cities (55.3 in Lintao vs. 65.7 μg/m 3 in Lanzhou). Notably, we observed lower gene expressions for Foxp3 (P < 0.05), IL35 (P < 0.05), and TGF-β, in children living in Lintao, suggesting an impairment of Treg cells function potentially associated with higher PAH exposure in Lintao. However, no significant difference was observed in Treg cells % among CD4 + T cells between Lanzhou and Lintao groups.

  3. Genome-wide Reconstruction of OxyR and SoxRS Transcriptional Regulatory Networks under Oxidative Stress in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Woo Seo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Three transcription factors (TFs, OxyR, SoxR, and SoxS, play a critical role in transcriptional regulation of the defense system for oxidative stress in bacteria. However, their full genome-wide regulatory potential is unknown. Here, we perform a genome-scale reconstruction of the OxyR, SoxR, and SoxS regulons in Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655. Integrative data analysis reveals that a total of 68 genes in 51 transcription units (TUs belong to these regulons. Among them, 48 genes showed more than 2-fold changes in expression level under single-TF-knockout conditions. This reconstruction expands the genome-wide roles of these factors to include direct activation of genes related to amino acid biosynthesis (methionine and aromatic amino acids, cell wall synthesis (lipid A biosynthesis and peptidoglycan growth, and divalent metal ion transport (Mn2+, Zn2+, and Mg2+. Investigating the co-regulation of these genes with other stress-response TFs reveals that they are independently regulated by stress-specific TFs.

  4. Single nucleotide polymorphisms with cis-regulatory effects on long non-coding transcripts in human primary monocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Carlsson Almlöf

    Full Text Available We applied genome-wide allele-specific expression analysis of monocytes from 188 samples. Monocytes were purified from white blood cells of healthy blood donors to detect cis-acting genetic variation that regulates the expression of long non-coding RNAs. We analysed 8929 regions harboring genes for potential long non-coding RNA that were retrieved from data from the ENCODE project. Of these regions, 60% were annotated as intergenic, which implies that they do not overlap with protein-coding genes. Focusing on the intergenic regions, and using stringent analysis of the allele-specific expression data, we detected robust cis-regulatory SNPs in 258 out of 489 informative intergenic regions included in the analysis. The cis-regulatory SNPs that were significantly associated with allele-specific expression of long non-coding RNAs were enriched to enhancer regions marked for active or bivalent, poised chromatin by histone modifications. Out of the lncRNA regions regulated by cis-acting regulatory SNPs, 20% (n = 52 were co-regulated with the closest protein coding gene. We compared the identified cis-regulatory SNPs with those in the catalog of SNPs identified by genome-wide association studies of human diseases and traits. This comparison identified 32 SNPs in loci from genome-wide association studies that displayed a strong association signal with allele-specific expression of non-coding RNAs in monocytes, with p-values ranging from 6.7×10(-7 to 9.5×10(-89. The identified cis-regulatory SNPs are associated with diseases of the immune system, like multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis.

  5. Developmentally Regulated Recruitment of Transcription Factors and Chromatin Modification Activities to Chicken Lysozyme cis-Regulatory Elements In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefevre, Pascal; Melnik, Svitlana; Wilson, Nicola; Riggs, Arthur D.; Bonifer, Constanze

    2003-01-01

    Expression of the chicken lysozyme gene is upregulated during macrophage differentiation and reaches its highest level in bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated macrophages. This is accompanied by complex alterations in chromatin structure. We have previously shown that chromatin fine-structure alterations precede the onset of gene expression in macrophage precursor cells and mark the lysozyme chromatin domain for expression later in development. To further examine this phenomenon and to investigate the basis for the differentiation-dependent alterations of lysozyme chromatin, we studied the recruitment of transcription factors to the lysozyme locus in vivo at different stages of myeloid differentiation. Factor recruitment occurred in several steps. First, early-acting transcription factors such as NF1 and Fli-1 bound to a subset of enhancer elements and recruited CREB-binding protein. LPS stimulation led to an additional recruitment of C/EBPβ and a significant change in enhancer and promoter structure. Transcription factor recruitment was accompanied by specific changes in histone modification within the lysozyme chromatin domain. Interestingly, we present evidence for a transient interaction of transcription factors with lysozyme chromatin in lysozyme-nonexpressing macrophage precursors, which was accompanied by a partial demethylation of CpG sites. This indicates that a partially accessible chromatin structure of lineage-specific genes is a hallmark of hematopoietic progenitor cells. PMID:12773578

  6. Histone/protein deacetylase inhibitor therapy for enhancement of Foxp3+ T-regulatory cell function post-transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L; Beier, U H; Akimova, T; Dahiya, S; Han, R; Samanta, A; Levine, M H; Hancock, W W

    2018-03-30

    T-regulatory (Treg) cells are like other cells present throughout the body in being subject to biochemical modifications in response to extracellular signals. An important component of these responses involves changes in post-translational modifications (PTMs) of histones and many non-histone proteins, including phosphorylation/dephosphorylation, ubiquitination/deubiquitination and acetylation/deacetylation. Foxp3, the key transcription factor of Tregs, is constantly being rapidly turned over, and a number of these PTMs determine its level of expression and activity. Of interest in the transplant setting, modulation of the acetylation or deacetylation of key lysine residues in Foxp3 can promote the stability and function, leading to increased Treg production and increased Treg suppressive activity. This mini-review focuses on recent data concerning the roles that histone/protein deacetylases (HDACs) play in control of Treg function, and how small molecule HDAC inhibitors can be used to promote Treg-dependent allograft survival in experimental models. These data are discussed in the light of increasing interest in the identification and clinical evaluation of isoform-selective HDAC inhibitors, and their potential application as tools to modulate Foxp3+ Treg cell numbers and function in transplant recipients. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. AtMYB61, an R2R3-MYB transcription factor, functions as a pleiotropic regulator via a small gene network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Julia M; Dubos, Christian; Prouse, Michael B; Wilkins, Olivia; Hong, Henry; Poole, Mervin; Kang, Kyu-Young; Li, Eryang; Douglas, Carl J; Western, Tamara L; Mansfield, Shawn D; Campbell, Malcolm M

    2012-09-01

    Throughout their lifetimes, plants must coordinate the regulation of various facets of growth and development. Previous evidence has suggested that the Arabidopsis thaliana R2R3-MYB, AtMYB61, might function as a coordinate regulator of multiple aspects of plant resource allocation. Using a combination of cell biology, transcriptome analysis and biochemistry, in conjunction with gain-of-function and loss-of-function genetics, the role of AtMYB61 in conditioning resource allocation throughout the plant life cycle was explored. In keeping with its role as a regulator of resource allocation, AtMYB61 is expressed in sink tissues, notably xylem, roots and developing seeds. Loss of AtMYB61 function decreases xylem formation, induces qualitative changes in xylem cell structure and decreases lateral root formation; in contrast, gain of AtMYB61 function has the opposite effect on these traits. AtMYB61 coordinates a small network of downstream target genes, which contain a motif in their upstream regulatory regions that is bound by AtMYB61, and AtMYB61 activates transcription from this same motif. Loss-of-function analysis supports the hypothesis that AtMYB61 targets play roles in shaping subsets of AtMYB61-related phenotypes. Taken together, these findings suggest that AtMYB61 links the transcriptional control of multiple aspects of plant resource allocation. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  8. Mast cells down-regulate CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cell suppressor function via histamine H1 receptor interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forward, Nicholas A; Furlong, Suzanne J; Yang, Yongjun; Lin, Tong-Jun; Hoskin, David W

    2009-09-01

    Mast cells promote both innate and acquired immune responses, but little is known about the effect of mast cells on T regulatory (T(reg)) cell function. In this study, we show for the first time that the capacity of murine CD4(+)CD25(+) T(reg) cells to suppress in vitro proliferation by CD4(+)CD25(-) T responder (T(resp)) cells in response to anti-CD3/anti-CD28 mAb-coated beads was reduced in the presence of syngeneic bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMC) activated by FcepsilonR cross-linking. Activated BMMC culture supernatants or exogenous histamine also inhibited T(reg) cell suppressor function while the histamine H1 receptor-specific antagonist loratadine, but not the H2 receptor-specific antagonist famotidine, restored T(reg) cell suppressor function in the presence of activated BMMC or activated BMMC culture supernatants. Moreover, treatment of T(reg) cells with loratadine, but not famotidine, rescued T(reg) cell suppressor function in the presence of exogenous histamine. In addition, the H1 receptor-specific agonist 2-pyridylethylamine dihydrochloride inhibited T(reg) cell suppressor function to an extent that was comparable to histamine, whereas the H2 receptor-specific agonist amthamine dihydrobromide was without effect. Both T(reg) cells and T(resp) cells expressed H1 receptors. Exposure to histamine caused T(reg) cells to express lower levels of CD25 and the T(reg) cell-specific transcription factor Foxp3. Taken together, these data indicate that BMMC-elaborated histamine inhibited T(reg) cell suppressor function by signaling through the H1 receptor. We suggest that histamine released as a result of mast cell activation by microbial products might cause a transient decrease in T(reg) cell suppressor function, thereby enhancing the development of protective immunity.

  9. Collaborating functions of BLM and DNA topoisomerase I in regulating human rDNA transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grierson, Patrick M.; Acharya, Samir; Groden, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) is an inherited disorder caused by loss of function of the recQ-like BLM helicase. It is characterized clinically by severe growth retardation and cancer predisposition. BLM localizes to PML nuclear bodies and to the nucleolus; its deficiency results in increased intra- and inter-chromosomal recombination, including hyper-recombination of rDNA repeats. Our previous work has shown that BLM facilitates RNA polymerase I-mediated rRNA transcription in the nucleolus (Grierson et al., 2012 [18]). This study uses protein co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro transcription/translation (IVTT) to identify a direct interaction of DNA topoisomerase I with the C-terminus of BLM in the nucleolus. In vitro helicase assays demonstrate that DNA topoisomerase I stimulates BLM helicase activity on a nucleolar-relevant RNA:DNA hybrid, but has an insignificant effect on BLM helicase activity on a control DNA:DNA duplex substrate. Reciprocally, BLM enhances the DNA relaxation activity of DNA topoisomerase I on supercoiled DNA substrates. Our study suggests that BLM and DNA topoisomerase I function coordinately to modulate RNA:DNA hybrid formation as well as relaxation of DNA supercoils in the context of nucleolar transcription

  10. Functional analysis of a potential regulatory K+-binding site in the Na+, K+-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schack, Vivien Rodacker; Vilsen, Bente

    The Na+, K+-ATPase functions by actively transporting 3 Na+ ions out of and 2 K+ ions into the cell, thereby creating ion gradients crucial for many physiological processes. Recently, a combined structural and functional study of the closely related Ca2+-ATPase indicated the presence...... of a regulatory K+-binding site in the P-domain of the enzyme, identifying E732 as being of particular importance (Sorensen, Clausen et al. 2004). In addition, P709 is thought to play a significant role in the structural organization of this site. Both E732 and P709 are highly conserved among P-type ATPases (E732...... is present as either glutamic acid or aspartic acid), which supports their importance and additionally raises the question whether this site may play a general role among P-type ATPases. In Na+, K+-ATPase, K+ functions directly as a substrate for membrane binding sites, however, an additional regulatory...

  11. Palmitoylation of TEAD Transcription Factors Is Required for Their Stability and Function in Hippo Pathway Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, Cameron L; Gierke, Sarah; Schnier, Paul D; Murray, Jeremy; Sandoval, Wendy N; Sagolla, Meredith; Dey, Anwesha; Hannoush, Rami N; Fairbrother, Wayne J; Cunningham, Christian N

    2016-01-05

    The Hippo signaling pathway is responsible for regulating the function of TEAD family transcription factors in metazoans. TEADs, with their co-activators YAP/TAZ, are critical for controlling cell differentiation and organ size through their transcriptional activation of genes involved in cell growth and proliferation. Dysregulation of the Hippo pathway has been implicated in multiple forms of cancer. Here, we identify a novel form of regulation of TEAD family proteins. We show that human TEADs are palmitoylated at a universally conserved cysteine, and report the crystal structures of the human TEAD2 and TEAD3 YAP-binding domains in their palmitoylated forms. These structures show a palmitate bound within a highly conserved hydrophobic cavity at each protein's core. Our findings also demonstrate that this modification is required for proper TEAD folding and stability, indicating a potential new avenue for pharmacologically regulating the Hippo pathway through the modulation of TEAD palmitoylation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase inhibits dsRNA-induced type I interferon transcription by decreasing interferon regulatory factor 3/7 in protein levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Dang; Fang, Liurong; Luo, Rui; Ye, Rui; Fang, Ying; Xie, Lilan; Chen, Huanchun [Division of Animal Infectious Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); Xiao, Shaobo, E-mail: shaoboxiao@yahoo.com [Division of Animal Infectious Diseases, State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2010-08-13

    Research highlights: {yields} FMDV L{sup pro} inhibits poly(I:C)-induced IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} mRNA expression. {yields} L{sup pro} inhibits MDA5-mediated activation of the IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter. {yields} L{sup pro} significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes. {yields} L{sup pro} inhibits IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter activation by decreasing IRF-3/7 in protein levels. {yields} The ability to process eIF-4G of L{sup pro} is not necessary to inhibit IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} activation. -- Abstract: The leader proteinase (L{sup pro}) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) has been identified as an interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) antagonist that disrupts the integrity of transcription factor nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). In this study, we showed that the reduction of double stranded RNA (dsRNA)-induced IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} expression caused by L{sup pro} was also associated with a decrease of interferon regulatory factor 3/7 (IRF-3/7) in protein levels, two critical transcription factors for activation of IFN-{alpha}/{beta}. Furthermore, overexpression of L{sup pro} significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes including 2',5'-OAS, ISG54, IP-10, and RANTES. Screening L{sup pro} mutants indicated that the ability to process eIF-4G of L{sup pro} is not required for suppressing dsRNA-induced activation of the IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter and decreasing IRF-3/7 expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that, in addition to disrupting NF-{kappa}B, L{sup pro} also decreases IRF-3/7 expression to suppress dsRNA-induced type I IFN production, suggesting multiple strategies used by FMDV to counteract the immune response to viral infection.

  13. Foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase inhibits dsRNA-induced type I interferon transcription by decreasing interferon regulatory factor 3/7 in protein levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Dang; Fang, Liurong; Luo, Rui; Ye, Rui; Fang, Ying; Xie, Lilan; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → FMDV L pro inhibits poly(I:C)-induced IFN-α1/β mRNA expression. → L pro inhibits MDA5-mediated activation of the IFN-α1/β promoter. → L pro significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes. → L pro inhibits IFN-α1/β promoter activation by decreasing IRF-3/7 in protein levels. → The ability to process eIF-4G of L pro is not necessary to inhibit IFN-α1/β activation. -- Abstract: The leader proteinase (L pro ) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) has been identified as an interferon-β (IFN-β) antagonist that disrupts the integrity of transcription factor nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). In this study, we showed that the reduction of double stranded RNA (dsRNA)-induced IFN-α1/β expression caused by L pro was also associated with a decrease of interferon regulatory factor 3/7 (IRF-3/7) in protein levels, two critical transcription factors for activation of IFN-α/β. Furthermore, overexpression of L pro significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes including 2',5'-OAS, ISG54, IP-10, and RANTES. Screening L pro mutants indicated that the ability to process eIF-4G of L pro is not required for suppressing dsRNA-induced activation of the IFN-α1/β promoter and decreasing IRF-3/7 expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that, in addition to disrupting NF-κB, L pro also decreases IRF-3/7 expression to suppress dsRNA-induced type I IFN production, suggesting multiple strategies used by FMDV to counteract the immune response to viral infection.

  14. ICE1 of Pyrus ussuriensis functions in cold tolerance by enhancing PuDREBa transcriptional levels through interacting with PuHHP1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaosan; Li, Kongqing; Jin, Cong; Zhang, Shaoling

    2015-12-01

    ICE1 transcription factor plays an important role in plant cold stress via regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes. In this study, a PuICE1 gene isolated from Pyrus ussuriensis was characterized for its function in cold tolerance. The expression levels of the PuICE1 were induced by cold, dehydration and salt, with the greatest induction under cold conditions. PuICE1 was localized in the nucleus and could bind specifically to the MYC element in the PuDREBa promoter. The PuICE1 fused to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain to have transcriptional activation activity. Ectopic expression of the PuICE1 in tomato conferred enhanced tolerance to cold stress at cold temperatures, less electrolyte leakage, less MDA content, higher chlorophyll content, higher survival rate, higher proline content, higher activities of enzymes. In additon, steady-state mRNA levels of six stress-responsive genes coding for either functional or regulatory genes were induced to higher levels in the transgenic lines by cold stress. Yeast two-hybrid, transient assay, split luciferase complementation and BiFC assays all revealed that PuHHP1 protein can physically interact with PuICE1. Taken together, these results demonstrated that PuICE1 plays a positive role in cold tolerance, which may be due to enhancement of PuDREBa transcriptional levels through interacting with the PuHHP1.

  15. Training and the personnel accreditation of regulatory functions in the Argentine Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menossi, C.A.; Fraire, E.O.; Segado, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    Teaching and the training are indispensable for the development of the human resources in all disciplines and occupations of the man in the world scale. About the applications of the radionuclides in the nuclear industry, in Argentina, during the last years, the efforts have been intensified. The necessity of improving the capacity of answer in radiation protection and nuclear safety demands an focus integrated in the teaching and the training. The radiological protection and the nuclear safety presents elements of the applied physics, the chemistry, the biology, the nuclear technology and other specialized subjects. However, in relation with the development of the human resources, specially those that belong to regulatory bodies and perform inspection functions, have important differences, necessities and specific problems. Some differences and problems emerge of the wide diversity and reach of the radiological and nuclear applications. Nowadays, in the world, the applications of the radiation and radioactive sources are being diversified in the medicine (diagnosis, radiotherapy, nuclear medicine, the industry, the agricultures, and the investigation and teaching), that involve a permanent knowledge and actualization of the personnel of the regulatory bodies. For that exposed this work describe training program for the personnel with regulatory functions (inspectors) of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority in the Argentine Republic. Also, this document includes the description of the basic formation and specialized in each case and it reach. (author)

  16. In vitro transcription and translation inhibition via DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conde, J; Baptista, P V [Centro de Investigacao em Genetica Molecular Humana (CIGMH), Departamento de Ciencias da Vida, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); De la Fuente, J M, E-mail: pmvb@fct.unl.pt [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragon, Universidad de Zaragoza, Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2010-12-17

    The use of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has been gaining momentum as vectors for gene silencing strategies, combining the AuNPs' ease of functionalization with DNA and/or siRNA, high loading capacity and fast uptake by target cells. Here, we used AuNP functionalized with thiolated oligonucleotides to specifically inhibit transcription in vitro, demonstrating the synergetic effect between AuNPs and a specific antisense sequence that blocks the T7 promoter region. Also, AuNPs efficiently protect the antisense oligonucleotide against nuclease degradation, which can thus retain its inhibitory potential. In addition, we demonstrate that AuNPs functionalized with a thiolated oligonucleotide complementary to the ribosome binding site and the start codon, effectively shut down in vitro translation. Together, these two approaches can provide for a simple yet robust experimental set up to test for efficient gene silencing of AuNP-DNA conjugates. What is more, these results show that appropriate functionalization of AuNPs can be used as a dual targeting approach to an enhanced control of gene expression-inhibition of both transcription and translation.

  17. Simple sequence repeats showing 'length preference' have regulatory functions in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Jaya; Athar, Fathima; Rani, Tirupaati Swaroopa; Mishra, Rakesh Kumar

    2017-09-10

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs), simple tandem repeats (STRs) or microsatellites are short tandem repeats of 1-6 nucleotide motifs. They are twice as abundant as the protein coding DNA in the human genome and yet little is known about their functional relevance. Analysis of genomes across various taxa show that despite the instability associated with longer stretches of repeats, few SSRs with specific longer repeat lengths are enriched in the genomes indicating a positive selection. This conserved feature of length dependent enrichment hints at not only sequence but also length dependent functionality for SSRs. In the present study, we selected 23 SSRs of the human genome that show specific repeat length dependent enrichment and analysed their cis-regulatory potential using promoter modulation, boundary and barrier assays. We find that the 23 SSR sequences, which are mostly intergenic and intronic, possess distinct cis-regulatory potential. They modulate minimal promoter activity in transient luciferase assays and are capable of functioning as enhancer-blockers and barrier elements. The results of our functional assays propose cis-gene regulatory roles for these specific length enriched SSRs and opens avenues for further investigations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterization of flounder ( Paralichthys olivaceus) FoxD5 and its function in regulating myogenic regulatory factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xungang; Zhang, Yuqing; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Peijun; Xu, Yongli

    2012-03-01

    As one member of winged helix domain transcription factors, FoxD5 was reported to be a trunk organizer. Recent study showed that zebrafish foxd5 is expressed in the somites. To further understand the function of FoxD5 in fish muscle development, the FoxD5 gene was isolated from flounder. Its expression pattern was analyzed by in situ hybridization, while its function in regulating myogenic regulatory factor, MyoD, was analyzed by ectopic expression. It showed that flounder FoxD5 was firstly expressed in the tailbud, adaxial cells, and neural plate of the head. In flounder embryo, FoxD5 is expressed not only in forebrain but also in somite cells that will form muscle in the future. When flounder FoxD5 was over-expressed in zebrafish by microinjection, the expression of zebrafish MyoD in the somites was reduced, suggesting that FoxD5 is involved in myogenesis by regulating the expression of MyoD.

  19. The Maize TFome--development of a transcription factor open reading frame collection for functional genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdo, Brett; Gray, John; Goetting-Minesky, Mary P; Wittler, Bettina; Hunt, Matthew; Li, Tai; Velliquette, David; Thomas, Julie; Gentzel, Irene; dos Santos Brito, Michael; Mejía-Guerra, Maria Katherine; Connolly, Layne N; Qaisi, Dalya; Li, Wei; Casas, Maria I; Doseff, Andrea I; Grotewold, Erich

    2014-10-01

    Establishing the architecture of the gene regulatory networks (GRNs) responsible for controlling the transcription of all genes in an organism is a natural development that follows elucidation of the genome sequence. Reconstruction of the GRN requires the availability of a series of molecular tools and resources that so far have been limited to a few model organisms. One such resource consists of collections of transcription factor (TF) open reading frames (ORFs) cloned into vectors that facilitate easy expression in plants or microorganisms. In this study, we describe the development of a publicly available maize TF ORF collection (TFome) of 2034 clones corresponding to 2017 unique gene models in recombination-ready vectors that make possible the facile mobilization of the TF sequences into a number of different expression vectors. The collection also includes several hundred co-regulators (CoREGs), which we classified into well-defined families, and for which we propose here a standard nomenclature, as we have previously done for TFs. We describe the strategies employed to overcome the limitations associated with cloning ORFs from a genome that remains incompletely annotated, with a partial full-length cDNA set available, and with many TF/CoREG genes lacking experimental support. In many instances this required the combination of genome-wide expression data with gene synthesis approaches. The strategies developed will be valuable for developing similar resources for other agriculturally important plants. Information on all the clones generated is available through the GRASSIUS knowledgebase (http://grassius.org/). © 2014 The Authors The Plant Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. The Maize TFome – development of a transcription factor open reading frame collection for functional genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdo, Brett; Gray, John; Goetting-Minesky, Mary P; Wittler, Bettina; Hunt, Matthew; Li, Tai; Velliquette, David; Thomas, Julie; Gentzel, Irene; Brito, Michael dos Santos; Mejía-Guerra, Maria Katherine; Connolly, Layne N; Qaisi, Dalya; Li, Wei; Casas, Maria I; Doseff, Andrea I; Grotewold, Erich

    2014-01-01

    Establishing the architecture of the gene regulatory networks (GRNs) responsible for controlling the transcription of all genes in an organism is a natural development that follows elucidation of the genome sequence. Reconstruction of the GRN requires the availability of a series of molecular tools and resources that so far have been limited to a few model organisms. One such resource consists of collections of transcription factor (TF) open reading frames (ORFs) cloned into vectors that facilitate easy expression in plants or microorganisms. In this study, we describe the development of a publicly available maize TF ORF collection (TFome) of 2034 clones corresponding to 2017 unique gene models in recombination-ready vectors that make possible the facile mobilization of the TF sequences into a number of different expression vectors. The collection also includes several hundred co-regulators (CoREGs), which we classified into well-defined families, and for which we propose here a standard nomenclature, as we have previously done for TFs. We describe the strategies employed to overcome the limitations associated with cloning ORFs from a genome that remains incompletely annotated, with a partial full-length cDNA set available, and with many TF/CoREG genes lacking experimental support. In many instances this required the combination of genome-wide expression data with gene synthesis approaches. The strategies developed will be valuable for developing similar resources for other agriculturally important plants. Information on all the clones generated is available through the GRASSIUS knowledgebase (http://grassius.org/). PMID:25053252

  1. Characterization of a CREB Gain-of-Function Mutant with Constitutive Transcriptional Activity In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Keyong; Asahara, Hiroshi; Jhala, Ulupi S.; Wagner, Brandee L.; Montminy, Marc

    2000-01-01

    The cyclic AMP (cAMP)-responsive factor CREB promotes cellular gene expression, following its phosphorylation at Ser133, via recruitment of the coactivator paralogs CREB-binding protein (CBP) and p300. CBP and p300, in turn, appear to mediate target gene induction via their association with RNA polymerase II complexes and via intrinsic histone acetyltransferase activities that mobilize promoter-bound nucleosomes. In addition to cAMP, a wide variety of stimuli, including hypoxia, UV irradiation, and growth factor addition, induce Ser133 phosphorylation with stoichiometry and kinetics comparable to those induced by cAMP. Yet a number of these signals are incapable of promoting target gene activation via CREB phosphorylation per se, suggesting the presence of additional regulatory events either at the level of CREB-CBP complex formation or in the subsequent recruitment of the transcriptional apparatus. Here we characterize a Tyr134Phe CREB mutant that behaves as a constitutive activator in vivo. Like protein kinase A (PKA)-stimulated wild-type CREB, the Tyr134Phe polypeptide was found to stimulate target gene expression via the Ser133-dependent recruitment of CBP and p300. Biochemical studies reveal that mutation of Tyr134 to Phe lowers the Km for PKA phosphorylation and thereby induces high levels of constitutive Ser133 phosphorylation in vivo. Consistent with its constitutive activity, Tyr134Phe CREB strongly promoted differentiation of PC12 cells in concert with suboptimal doses of nerve growth factor. Taken together, these results demonstrate that Ser133 phosphorylation is sufficient for cellular gene activation and that additional signal-dependent modifications of CBP or p300 are not required for recruitment of the transcriptional apparatus to the promoter. PMID:10825195

  2. REGULATORY POLICY AND OPTIMIZATION OF INVESTMENT RESOURCE ALLOCATION IN THE MODEL OF FUNCTIONING OF RECREATION INDUSTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Shevchenko

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The research objective is the rationale of the theoretical and methodical approach concerning the improvement of regulatory policy as well as the process of distribution of financial investments using the model of the functioning of a recreational sector of the national economy. The methodology of the study includes the use of optimal control theory for the model formation of the functioning of the recreational industry as well as determining the behaviour of regulatory authorities and capabilities to optimize the allocation of investment resources in the recreational sector of the national economy. Results. The issue of equilibration of regulatory policy in the recreational sector of the national economy is actualized, including the question of targeted distribution of state and external financial investments. Also, it is proved that regulatory policy should establish the frameworks that on the one hand, do not allow public authorities to exercise extra influence on the economy of recreation, on the other hand, to keep the behaviour of the recreational business entities within the limits of normal socio-economic activity – on the basis of analysis of the continuum “recreation – work” by means of modified Brennan-Buchanan model. It is revealed that even with the condition of the tax reduction, the situation when the population resting less and works more than in the background of a developed economy is observed. However, according to the optimistic forecast, eventually on condition when the economy is emerging from the shade, we will obtain an official mode of the work in which, while maintaining taxes on proposed more advantageous for the population level, ultimately the ratio leisure and work will be established which is corresponding to the principles of sustainable development. Practical value. On the basis of methodical principles of the theory of optimal control, the model of the functioning of the recreational industry under the

  3. Functional identification in Lactobacillus reuteri of a PocR-like transcription factor regulating glycerol utilization and vitamin B12 synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saulnier Delphine MA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lactobacillus reuteri harbors the genes responsible for glycerol utilization and vitamin B12 synthesis within a genetic island phylogenetically related to gamma-Proteobacteria. Within this island, resides a gene (lreu_1750 that based on its genomic context has been suggested to encode the regulatory protein PocR and presumably control the expression of the neighboring loci. However, this functional assignment is not fully supported by sequence homology, and hitherto, completely lacks experimental confirmation. Results In this contribution, we have overexpressed and inactivated the gene encoding the putative PocR in L. reuteri. The comparison of these strains provided metabolic and transcriptional evidence that this regulatory protein controls the expression of the operons encoding glycerol utilization and vitamin B12 synthesis. Conclusions We provide clear experimental evidence for assigning Lreu_1750 as PocR in Lactobacillus reuteri. Our genome-wide transcriptional analysis further identifies the loci contained in the PocR regulon. The findings reported here could be used to improve the production-yield of vitamin B12, 1,3-propanediol and reuterin, all industrially relevant compounds.

  4. Hippo Component TAZ Functions as a Co-repressor and Negatively Regulates ΔNp63 Transcription through TEA Domain (TEAD) Transcription Factor*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia-Sama, Ivette; Zhao, Yulei; Lai, Dulcie; Janse van Rensburg, Helena J.; Hao, Yawei; Yang, Xiaolong

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional co-activator with a PDZ binding domain (TAZ) is a WW domain-containing transcriptional co-activator and a core component of an emerging Hippo signaling pathway that regulates organ size, tumorigenesis, metastasis, and drug resistance. TAZ regulates these biological functions by up-regulating downstream cellular genes through transactivation of transcription factors such as TEAD and TTF1. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying TAZ-induced tumorigenesis, we have recently performed a gene expression profile analysis by overexpressing TAZ in mammary cells. In addition to the TAZ-up-regulated genes that were confirmed in our previous studies, we identified a large number of cellular genes that were down-regulated by TAZ. In this study, we have confirmed these down-regulated genes (including cytokines, chemokines, and p53 gene family members) as bona fide downstream transcriptional targets of TAZ. By using human breast and lung epithelial cells, we have further characterized ΔNp63, a p53 gene family member, and shown that TAZ suppresses ΔNp63 mRNA, protein expression, and promoter activity through interaction with the transcription factor TEAD. We also show that TEAD can inhibit ΔNp63 promoter activity and that TAZ can directly interact with ΔNp63 promoter-containing TEAD binding sites. Finally, we provide functional evidence that down-regulation of ΔNp63 by TAZ may play a role in regulating cell migration. Altogether, this study provides novel evidence that the Hippo component TAZ can function as a co-repressor and regulate biological functions by negatively regulating downstream cellular genes. PMID:25995450

  5. Hippo Component TAZ Functions as a Co-repressor and Negatively Regulates ΔNp63 Transcription through TEA Domain (TEAD) Transcription Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia-Sama, Ivette; Zhao, Yulei; Lai, Dulcie; Janse van Rensburg, Helena J; Hao, Yawei; Yang, Xiaolong

    2015-07-03

    Transcriptional co-activator with a PDZ binding domain (TAZ) is a WW domain-containing transcriptional co-activator and a core component of an emerging Hippo signaling pathway that regulates organ size, tumorigenesis, metastasis, and drug resistance. TAZ regulates these biological functions by up-regulating downstream cellular genes through transactivation of transcription factors such as TEAD and TTF1. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying TAZ-induced tumorigenesis, we have recently performed a gene expression profile analysis by overexpressing TAZ in mammary cells. In addition to the TAZ-up-regulated genes that were confirmed in our previous studies, we identified a large number of cellular genes that were down-regulated by TAZ. In this study, we have confirmed these down-regulated genes (including cytokines, chemokines, and p53 gene family members) as bona fide downstream transcriptional targets of TAZ. By using human breast and lung epithelial cells, we have further characterized ΔNp63, a p53 gene family member, and shown that TAZ suppresses ΔNp63 mRNA, protein expression, and promoter activity through interaction with the transcription factor TEAD. We also show that TEAD can inhibit ΔNp63 promoter activity and that TAZ can directly interact with ΔNp63 promoter-containing TEAD binding sites. Finally, we provide functional evidence that down-regulation of ΔNp63 by TAZ may play a role in regulating cell migration. Altogether, this study provides novel evidence that the Hippo component TAZ can function as a co-repressor and regulate biological functions by negatively regulating downstream cellular genes. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. SIRT6-mediated transcriptional suppression of Txnip is critical for pancreatic beta cell function and survival in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Kunhua; Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Zhao; Nipper, Michael; Zhu, Zhenxin; Leighton, Jake; Xu, Kexin; Musi, Nicolas; Wang, Pei

    2018-04-01

    Better understanding of how genetic and epigenetic components control beta cell differentiation and function is key to the discovery of novel therapeutic approaches to prevent beta cell dysfunction and failure in the progression of type 2 diabetes. Our goal was to elucidate the role of histone deacetylase sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) in beta cell development and homeostasis. Sirt6 endocrine progenitor cell conditional knockout and beta cell-specific knockout mice were generated using the Cre-loxP system. Mice were assayed for islet morphology, glucose tolerance, glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and susceptibility to streptozotocin. Transcriptional regulatory functions of SIRT6 in primary islets were evaluated by RNA-Seq analysis. Reverse transcription-quantitative (RT-q)PCR and immunoblot were used to verify and investigate the gene expression changes. Chromatin occupancies of SIRT6, H3K9Ac, H3K56Ac and active RNA polymerase II were evaluated by chromatin immunoprecipitation. Deletion of Sirt6 in pancreatic endocrine progenitor cells did not affect endocrine morphology, beta cell mass or insulin production but did result in glucose intolerance and defective glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in mice. Conditional deletion of Sirt6 in adult beta cells reproduced the insulin secretion defect. Loss of Sirt6 resulted in aberrant upregulation of thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) in beta cells. SIRT6 deficiency led to increased acetylation of histone H3 lysine residue at 9 (H3K9Ac), acetylation of histone H3 lysine residue at 56 (H3K56Ac) and active RNA polymerase II at the promoter region of Txnip. SIRT6-deficient beta cells exhibited a time-dependent increase in H3K9Ac, H3K56Ac and TXNIP levels. Finally, beta cell-specific SIRT6-deficient mice showed increased sensitivity to streptozotocin. Our results reveal that SIRT6 suppresses Txnip expression in beta cells via deacetylation of histone H3 and plays a critical role in maintaining beta cell function and viability

  7. A functional genomics strategy reveals clockwork orange as a transcriptional regulator in the Drosophila circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Akira; Ukai-Tadenuma, Maki; Yamada, Rikuhiro G; Houl, Jerry; Uno, Kenichiro D; Kasukawa, Takeya; Dauwalder, Brigitte; Itoh, Taichi Q; Takahashi, Kuniaki; Ueda, Ryu; Hardin, Paul E; Tanimura, Teiichi; Ueda, Hiroki R

    2007-07-01

    The Drosophila circadian clock consists of integrated autoregulatory feedback loops, making the clock difficult to elucidate without comprehensively identifying the network components in vivo. Previous studies have adopted genome-wide screening for clock-controlled genes using high-density oligonucleotide arrays that identified hundreds of clock-controlled genes. In an attempt to identify the core clock genes among these candidates, we applied genome-wide functional screening using an RNA interference (RNAi) system in vivo. Here we report the identification of novel clock gene candidates including clockwork orange (cwo), a transcriptional repressor belonging to the basic helix-loop-helix ORANGE family. cwo is rhythmically expressed and directly regulated by CLK-CYC through canonical E-box sequences. A genome-wide search for its target genes using the Drosophila genome tiling array revealed that cwo forms its own negative feedback loop and directly suppresses the expression of other clock genes through the E-box sequence. Furthermore, this negative transcriptional feedback loop contributes to sustaining a high-amplitude circadian oscillation in vivo. Based on these results, we propose that the competition between cyclic CLK-CYC activity and the adjustable threshold imposed by CWO keeps E-box-mediated transcription within the controllable range of its activity, thereby rendering a Drosophila circadian clock capable of generating high-amplitude oscillation.

  8. Norepinephrine mediates the transcriptional effects of heterotypic chronic stress on colonic motor function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Barun K.; Shi, Xuan-Zheng; Sarna, Sushil K.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic stress precipitates or exacerbates the symptoms of functional bowel disorders, including motility dysfunction. The cellular mechanisms of these effects are not understood. We tested the hypothesis that heterotypic chronic stress (HeCS) elevates the release of norepinephrine from the adrenal medulla, which enhances transcription of the gene-regulating expression of Cav1.2 (L-type) channels in colonic circular smooth muscle cells, resulting in enhanced colonic motor function. The experiments were performed in rats using a 9-day heterotypic chronic stress (HeCS) protocol. We found that HeCS, but not acute stress, time dependently enhances the contractile response to ACh in colonic circular smooth muscle strips and in single dissociated smooth muscle cells, the plasma levels of norepinephrine and the mRNA and protein expressions of the α1C subunit of Cav1.2 channels. These effects result in faster colonic transit and increase in defecation rate. The effects of HeCS are blocked by adrenalectomy but not by depletion of norepinephrine in sympathetic neurons. The inhibition of receptors for glucocortocoids, corticotropin-releasing hormone or nicotine also does not block the effects of heterotypic chronic stress. Norepinephrine acts on α- and β3-adrenergic receptors to induce the transcription of α1C subunit. We conclude that HeCS alters colonic motor function by elevating the plasma levels of norepinephrine. Colonic motor dysfunction is associated with enhanced gene transcription of Cav1.2 channels in circular smooth muscle cells. These findings suggest the potential cellular mechanisms by which heterotypic chronic stress may exacerbate motility dysfunction in patients with irritable bowel syndrome. PMID:19359422

  9. A screen for hydroxymethylcytosine and formylcytosine binding proteins suggests functions in transcription and chromatin regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iurlaro, Mario; Ficz, Gabriella; Oxley, David; Raiber, Eun-Ang; Bachman, Martin; Booth, Michael J; Andrews, Simon; Balasubramanian, Shankar; Reik, Wolf

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation (5mC) plays important roles in epigenetic regulation of genome function. Recently, TET hydroxylases have been found to oxidise 5mC to hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), formylcytosine (5fC) and carboxylcytosine (5caC) in DNA. These derivatives have a role in demethylation of DNA but in addition may have epigenetic signaling functions in their own right. A recent study identified proteins which showed preferential binding to 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and its oxidised forms, where readers for 5mC and 5hmC showed little overlap, and proteins bound to further oxidation forms were enriched for repair proteins and transcription regulators. We extend this study by using promoter sequences as baits and compare protein binding patterns to unmodified or modified cytosine using DNA from mouse embryonic stem cell extracts. We compared protein enrichments from two DNA probes with different CpG composition and show that, whereas some of the enriched proteins show specificity to cytosine modifications, others are selective for both modification and target sequences. Only a few proteins were identified with a preference for 5hmC (such as RPL26, PRP8 and the DNA mismatch repair protein MHS6), but proteins with a strong preference for 5fC were more numerous, including transcriptional regulators (FOXK1, FOXK2, FOXP1, FOXP4 and FOXI3), DNA repair factors (TDG and MPG) and chromatin regulators (EHMT1, L3MBTL2 and all components of the NuRD complex). Our screen has identified novel proteins that bind to 5fC in genomic sequences with different CpG composition and suggests they regulate transcription and chromatin, hence opening up functional investigations of 5fC readers.

  10. Expression, function, and regulation of the embryonic transcription factor TBX1 in parathyroid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdelli, Chiara; Avagliano, Laura; Guarnieri, Vito; Cetani, Filomena; Ferrero, Stefano; Vicentini, Leonardo; Beretta, Edoardo; Scillitani, Alfredo; Creo, Pasquale; Bulfamante, Gaetano Pietro; Vaira, Valentina; Corbetta, Sabrina

    2017-12-01

    Transcription factors active in embryonic parathyroid cells can be maintained in adult parathyroids and be involved in tumorigenesis. TBX1, the candidate gene of 22q11.2-DiGeorge syndrome, which includes congenital hypoparathyroidism, is involved in parathyroid embryogenesis. The study aimed to investigate expression, function, and regulation of the parathyroid embryonic transcription factor TBX1 in human parathyroid adult normal and tumor tissues. TBX1 transcripts were detected in normal parathyroids and were deregulated in parathyroid tumors. Using immunohistochemistry, TBX1 protein was detected, mainly at the nuclear level, in a consistent proportion of cells in normal adult parathyroids, whereas TBX1 immunoreactivity was absent in fetal parathyroids. TBX1-expressing cells were markedly reduced in about a half of adenomas (PAds) and two-thirds of carcinomas and the proportion of TBX1-expressing cells negatively correlated with the serum albumin-corrected calcium levels in the analyzed tumors. Moreover, a subset of TBX1-expressing tumor cells coexpressed PTH. TBX1 silencing in HEK293 cells, expressing endogenous TBX1, increased the proportion of cells in the G0/G1 phase of cell cycle; concomitantly, CDKN1A/p21 and CDKN2A/p16 transcripts increased and ID1 mRNA levels decreased. TBX1 silencing exerted similar effects in PAd-derived cells, suggesting cell cycle arrest. Moreover, in PAd-derived cells GCM2 and PTH mRNA levels were unaffected by TBX1 deficiency, whereas it was associated with reduction of WNT5A, an antagonist of canonical WNT/β-catenin pathway. WNT/β-catenin activation by lithium chloride inhibited TBX1 expression levels both in HEK293 and PAd-derived cells. In conclusion, TBX1 is expressed in adult parathyroid cells and deregulated in parathyroid tumors, where TBX1 deficiency may potentially contribute to the low proliferative nature of parathyroid tumors.

  11. Physical and functional interactions between hematopoietic cell-specific ETS transcription factors and homeodomain proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Takeshi; Sakurai, Takuya; Nanashima, Naoki; Kihara-Negishi, Fumiko; Suzuki, Mitsuhiro; Fan, Yang; Akita, Miki; Oikawa, Tsuneyuki; Tsuchida, Shigeki

    2009-03-01

    To examine the possibility that ETS family transcription factors, PU.1, SPI-B, ELF-1, ERG-3, ETS-1 and TEL, and homeodomain proteins, HOXA10, HOXC13, MEIS1 and PBX1B, function cooperatively, we investigated their interactions. In luciferase assays, HOXA10 and HOXC13 augmented the activity of PU.1 and SPI-B while diminishing that of ELF-1 and ERG-3. MEIS1 diminished the activity of ETS-1. No clear effects were observed for other combinations. Immunoprecipitation assays showed protein-protein interactions among the combinations exhibiting functional interactions. A mutation of HOXC13, which abolished binding to ELF-1, also abolished the diminishing effect on ELF-1. The results suggest functional interaction through physical interactions.

  12. Thermosensing coordinates a cis-regulatory module for transcriptional activation of the intracellular virulence system in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Nancy; Osborne, Suzanne; Bustamante, Víctor H; Tomljenovic, Ana M; Puente, José L; Coombes, Brian K

    2007-11-23

    The expression of bacterial virulence genes is tightly controlled by the convergence of multiple extracellular signals. As a zoonotic pathogen, virulence gene regulation in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium must be responsive to multiple cues from the general environment as well as from multiple niches within animal and human hosts. Previous work has identified combined magnesium and phosphate limitation as an environmental cue that activates genes required for intracellular virulence. One unanswered question is how virulence genes that are expressed within the host are inhibited in non-host environments that satisfy the phosphate and magnesium limitation cues. We report here that thermosensing is the major mechanism controlling incongruous activation of the intracellular virulence phenotype. Bacteria grown at 30 degrees C or lower were unable to activate the intracellular type III secretion system even under strong inducing signals such as synthetic medium, contact with macrophages, and exposure to the murine gut. Thermoregulation was fully recapitulated in a Salmonella bongori strain engineered to contain the intracellular virulence genes of S. enterica sv. Typhimurium, suggesting that orthologous thermoregulators were available. Accordingly, virulence gene repression at the nonpermissive temperature required Hha and H-NS, two nucleoid-like proteins involved in virulence gene control. The use of combined environmental cues to control transcriptional "logic gates" allows for transcriptional selectivity of virulence genes that would otherwise be superfluous if activated in the non-host environment. Thus, thermosensing by Salmonella provides integrated control of host niche-specific virulence factors.

  13. The transcriptional regulatory network in the drought response and its crosstalk in abiotic stress responses including drought, cold and heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo eNakashima

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Drought negatively impacts plant growth and the productivity of crops around the world. Understanding the molecular mechanisms in the drought response is important for improvement of drought tolerance using molecular techniques. In plants, abscisic acid (ABA is accumulated under osmotic stress conditions caused by drought, and has a key role in stress responses and tolerance. Comprehensive molecular analyses have shown that ABA regulates the expression of many genes under osmotic stress conditions, and the ABA-responsive element (ABRE is the major cis-element for ABA-responsive gene expression. Transcription factors (TFs are master regulators of gene expression. ABRE-binding protein (AREB and ABRE-binding factor (ABF TFs control gene expression in an ABA-dependent manner. SNF1-related protein kinases 2, group A 2C-type protein phosphatases, and ABA receptors were shown to control the ABA signaling pathway. ABA-independent signaling pathways such as dehydration-responsive element-binding protein (DREB TFs and NAC TFs are also involved in stress responses including drought, heat and cold. Recent studies have suggested that there are interactions between the major ABA signaling pathway and other signaling factors in stress responses. The important roles of these transcription factors in crosstalk among abiotic stress responses will be discussed. Control of ABA or stress signaling factor expression can improve tolerance to environmental stresses. Recent studies using crops have shown that stress-specific overexpression of TFs improves drought tolerance and grain yield compared with controls in the field.

  14. Coevolution within and between regulatory loci can preserve promoter function despite evolutionary rate acceleration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Barrière

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Phenotypes that appear to be conserved could be maintained not only by strong purifying selection on the underlying genetic systems, but also by stabilizing selection acting via compensatory mutations with balanced effects. Such coevolution has been invoked to explain experimental results, but has rarely been the focus of study. Conserved expression driven by the unc-47 promoters of Caenorhabditis elegans and C. briggsae persists despite divergence within a cis-regulatory element and between this element and the trans-regulatory environment. Compensatory changes in cis and trans are revealed when these promoters are used to drive expression in the other species. Functional changes in the C. briggsae promoter, which has experienced accelerated sequence evolution, did not lead to alteration of gene expression in its endogenous environment. Coevolution among promoter elements suggests that complex epistatic interactions within cis-regulatory elements may facilitate their divergence. Our results offer a detailed picture of regulatory evolution in which subtle, lineage-specific, and compensatory modifications of interacting cis and trans regulators together maintain conserved gene expression patterns.

  15. Conserved regulatory mechanism controls the development of cells with rooting functions in land plants

    OpenAIRE

    Tam, Thomas Ho Yuen; Catarino, Bruno; Dolan, Liam

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the discovery of an ancient genetic mechanism that was used to build rooting systems when plants colonized the relatively dry continental surfaces >470 million years ago. We demonstrate that a group of basic helix–loop–helix transcription factors—the LOTUS JAPONICUS ROOTHAIRLESS1-LIKE proteins—is part of a conserved auxin-regulated gene network that controls the development of tip-growing cells with rooting functions among extant land plants. This result suggests that this...

  16. Expanded roles of leucine-responsive regulatory protein in transcription regulation of the Escherichia coli genome: Genomic SELEX screening of the regulation targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Tomohiro; Saito, Natsumi; Maeda, Michihisa; Tanaka, Kan; Ishihama, Akira

    2015-07-01

    Leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp) is a transcriptional regulator for the genes involved in transport, biosynthesis and catabolism of amino acids in Escherichia coli . In order to identify the whole set of genes under the direct control of Lrp, we performed Genomic SELEX screening and identified a total of 314 Lrp-binding sites on the E. coli genome. As a result, the regulation target of Lrp was predicted to expand from the hitherto identified genes for amino acid metabolism to a set of novel target genes for utilization of amino acids for protein synthesis, including tRNAs, aminoacyl-tRNA synthases and rRNAs. Northern blot analysis indicated alteration of mRNA levels for at least some novel targets, including the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes. Phenotype MicroArray of the lrp mutant indicated significant alteration in utilization of amino acids and peptides, whilst metabolome analysis showed variations in the concentration of amino acids in the lrp mutant. From these two datasets we realized a reverse correlation between amino acid levels and cell growth rate: fast-growing cells contain low-level amino acids, whilst a high level of amino acids exists in slow-growing cells. Taken together, we propose that Lrp is a global regulator of transcription of a large number of the genes involved in not only amino acid transport and metabolism, but also amino acid utilization.

  17. Regulatory Snapshots: integrative mining of regulatory modules from expression time series and regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana P Gonçalves

    Full Text Available Explaining regulatory mechanisms is crucial to understand complex cellular responses leading to system perturbations. Some strategies reverse engineer regulatory interactions from experimental data, while others identify functional regulatory units (modules under the assumption that biological systems yield a modular organization. Most modular studies focus on network structure and static properties, ignoring that gene regulation is largely driven by stimulus-response behavior. Expression time series are key to gain insight into dynamics, but have been insufficiently explored by current methods, which often (1 apply generic algorithms unsuited for expression analysis over time, due to inability to maintain the chronology of events or incorporate time dependency; (2 ignore local patterns, abundant in most interesting cases of transcriptional activity; (3 neglect physical binding or lack automatic association of regulators, focusing mainly on expression patterns; or (4 limit the discovery to a predefined number of modules. We propose Regulatory Snapshots, an integrative mining approach to identify regulatory modules over time by combining transcriptional control with response, while overcoming the above challenges. Temporal biclustering is first used to reveal transcriptional modules composed of genes showing coherent expression profiles over time. Personalized ranking is then applied to prioritize prominent regulators targeting the modules at each time point using a network of documented regulatory associations and the expression data. Custom graphics are finally depicted to expose the regulatory activity in a module at consecutive time points (snapshots. Regulatory Snapshots successfully unraveled modules underlying yeast response to heat shock and human epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, based on regulations documented in the YEASTRACT and JASPAR databases, respectively, and available expression data. Regulatory players involved in

  18. RNA polymerase II transcriptional fidelity control and its functional interplay with DNA modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Wang, Wei; Chong, Jenny; Shin, Ji Hyun; Xu, Jun; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Accurate genetic information transfer is essential for life. As a key enzyme involved in the first step of gene expression, RNA polymerase II (Pol II) must maintain high transcriptional fidelity while it reads along DNA template and synthesizes RNA transcript in a stepwise manner during transcription elongation. DNA lesions or modifications may lead to significant changes in transcriptional fidelity or transcription elongation dynamics. In this review, we will summarize recent progress toward understanding the molecular basis of RNA Pol II transcriptional fidelity control and impacts of DNA lesions and modifications on Pol II transcription elongation.

  19. Functional Domains of the RhlR Transcriptional Regulator of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Janet R.; Patel, Hetal; Montminy, Timothy; Wagner, Victoria E.; Iglewski, Barbara H.

    2003-01-01

    The RhlR transcriptional regulator of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, along with its cognate autoinducer, N-butyryl homoserine lactone (C4-HSL), regulates gene expression in response to cell density. With an Escherichia coli LexA-based protein interaction system, we demonstrated that RhlR multimerized and that the degree of multimerization was dependent on the C4-HSL concentration. Studies with an E. coli lasB::lacZ lysogen demonstrated that RhlR multimerization was necessary for it to function as a transcriptional activator. Deletion analysis of RhlR indicated that the N-terminal domain of the protein is necessary for C4-HSL binding. Single amino acid substitutions in the C-terminal domain of RhlR generated mutant RhlR proteins that had the ability to bind C4-HSL and multimerize but were unable to activate lasB expression, demonstrating that the C-terminal domain is important for target gene activation. Single amino acid substitutions in both the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of RhlR demonstrated that both domains possess residues involved in multimerization. RhlR with a C-terminal deletion and an RhlR site-specific mutant form that possessed multimerization but not transcriptional activation capabilities were able to inhibit the ability of wild-type RhlR to activate rhlA expression in P. aeruginosa. We conclude that C4-HSL binding is necessary for RhlR multimerization and that RhlR functions as a multimer in P. aeruginosa. PMID:14645272

  20. Transcriptional regulation of renal dopamine D1 receptor function during oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banday, Anees A; Lokhandwala, Mustafa F

    2015-05-01

    There exists a strong link between oxidative stress, renal dopaminergic system, and hypertension. It is reported that reactive oxygen species attenuate renal proximal tubular dopamine receptor (D1R) function, which disrupts sodium regulation and leads to hypertension. However, the mechanisms for renal D1R dysfunction are not clear. We investigated the role of redox-sensitive transcription factors AP1 and SP3 in transcriptional suppression of D1R gene and subsequent D1R signaling. Human kidney proximal tubular cells were treated with a pro-oxidant l-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) with and without an antioxidant tempol. In human kidney cells, BSO caused oxidative stress and reduced D1R mRNA and membrane receptor expression. Incubation of human kidney cells with SKF38393, a D1R agonist, caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of Na/K-ATPase. However, SKF38393 failed to inhibit Na/K-ATPase in BSO-treated cells. BSO increased AP1 and SP3 nuclear expression. Transfection with AP1- or SP3-specific siRNA abolished BSO-induced D1R downregulation. Treatment of rats with BSO for 4 weeks increased oxidative stress and SP3-AP1 expression and reduced D1R numbers in renal proximal tubules. These rats exhibited high blood pressure, and SKF38393 failed to inhibit proximal tubular Na/K-ATPase activity. Control rats were kept on tap water. Tempol per se had no effect on D1R expression or other signaling molecules but prevented BSO-induced oxidative stress, SP3-AP1 upregulation, and D1R dysfunction in both human kidney cells and rats. These data show that oxidative stress via AP1-SP3 activation suppresses D1R transcription and function. Tempol mitigates oxidative stress, blocks AP1-SP3 activation, and prevents D1R dysfunction and hypertension. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Functional domains of the RhlR transcriptional regulator of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Janet R; Patel, Hetal; Montminy, Timothy; Wagner, Victoria E; Iglewski, Barbara H

    2003-12-01

    The RhlR transcriptional regulator of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, along with its cognate autoinducer, N-butyryl homoserine lactone (C(4)-HSL), regulates gene expression in response to cell density. With an Escherichia coli LexA-based protein interaction system, we demonstrated that RhlR multimerized and that the degree of multimerization was dependent on the C(4)-HSL concentration. Studies with an E. coli lasB::lacZ lysogen demonstrated that RhlR multimerization was necessary for it to function as a transcriptional activator. Deletion analysis of RhlR indicated that the N-terminal domain of the protein is necessary for C(4)-HSL binding. Single amino acid substitutions in the C-terminal domain of RhlR generated mutant RhlR proteins that had the ability to bind C(4)-HSL and multimerize but were unable to activate lasB expression, demonstrating that the C-terminal domain is important for target gene activation. Single amino acid substitutions in both the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of RhlR demonstrated that both domains possess residues involved in multimerization. RhlR with a C-terminal deletion and an RhlR site-specific mutant form that possessed multimerization but not transcriptional activation capabilities were able to inhibit the ability of wild-type RhlR to activate rhlA expression in P. aeruginosa. We conclude that C(4)-HSL binding is necessary for RhlR multimerization and that RhlR functions as a multimer in P. aeruginosa.

  2. Exploring associations between self-regulatory mechanisms and neuropsychological functioning and driver behaviour after brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rike, Per-Ola; Johansen, Hans J; Ulleberg, Pål; Lundqvist, Anna; Schanke, Anne-Kristine

    2018-04-01

    The objective of this prospective one-year follow-up study was to explore the associations between self-regulatory mechanisms and neuropsychological tests as well as baseline and follow-up ratings of driver behaviour. The participants were a cohort of subjects with stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI) who were found fit to drive after a multi-disciplinary driver assessment (baseline). Baseline measures included neuropsychological tests and ratings of self-regulatory mechanisms, i.e., executive functions (Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Adult Version; BRIEF-A) and impulsive personality traits (UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale). The participants rated pre-injury driving behaviour on the Driver Behaviour Qestionnaire (DBQ) retrospectively at baseline and after one year of post-injury driving (follow-up). Better performance on neuropsychological tests was significantly associated with more post-injury DBQ Violations. The BRIEF-A main indexes were significantly associated with baseline and follow-up ratings of DBQ Mistakes and follow-up DBQ Inattention. UPPS (lack of) Perseverance was significantly associated with baseline DBQ Inattention, whereas UPPS Urgency was significantly associated with baseline DBQ Inexperience and post-injury DBQ Mistakes. There were no significant changes in DBQ ratings from baseline (pre-injury) to follow-up (post-injury). It was concluded that neuropsychological functioning and self-regulatory mechanisms are related to driver behaviour. Some aspects of driver behaviour do not necessarily change after brain injury, reflecting the influence of premorbid driving behaviour or impaired awareness of deficits on post-injury driving behaviour. Further evidence is required to predict the role of self-regulatory mechanisms on driver behaviour and crashes or near misses.

  3. Multiple regulatory roles of the mouse transmembrane adaptor protein NTAL in gene transcription and mast cell physiology.

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    Iva Polakovicova

    Full Text Available Non-T cell activation linker (NTAL; also called LAB or LAT2 is a transmembrane adaptor protein that is expressed in a subset of hematopoietic cells, including mast cells. There are conflicting reports on the role of NTAL in the high affinity immunoglobulin E receptor (FcεRI signaling. Studies carried out on mast cells derived from mice with NTAL knock out (KO and wild type mice suggested that NTAL is a negative regulator of FcεRI signaling, while experiments with RNAi-mediated NTAL knockdown (KD in human mast cells and rat basophilic leukemia cells suggested its positive regulatory role. To determine whether different methodologies of NTAL ablation (KO vs KD have different physiological consequences, we compared under well defined conditions FcεRI-mediated signaling events in mouse bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs with NTAL KO or KD. BMMCs with both NTAL KO and KD exhibited enhanced degranulation, calcium mobilization, chemotaxis, tyrosine phosphorylation of LAT and ERK, and depolymerization of filamentous actin. These data provide clear evidence that NTAL is a negative regulator of FcεRI activation events in murine BMMCs, independently of possible compensatory developmental alterations. To gain further insight into the role of NTAL in mast cells, we examined the transcriptome profiles of resting and antigen-activated NTAL KO, NTAL KD, and corresponding control BMMCs. Through this analysis we identified several genes that were differentially regulated in nonactivated and antigen-activated NTAL-deficient cells, when compared to the corresponding control cells. Some of the genes seem to be involved in regulation of cholesterol-dependent events in antigen-mediated chemotaxis. The combined data indicate multiple regulatory roles of NTAL in gene expression and mast cell physiology.

  4. Regulatory function of a novel population of mouse autoantigen-specific Foxp3 regulatory T cells depends on IFN-gamma, NO, and contact with target cells.

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    Cyndi Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Both naturally arising Foxp3(+ and antigen-induced Foxp3(- regulatory T cells (Treg play a critical role in regulating immune responses, as well as in preventing autoimmune diseases and graft rejection. It is known that antigen-specific Treg are more potent than polyclonal Treg in suppressing pathogenic immune responses that cause autoimmunity and inflammation. However, difficulty in identifying and isolating a sufficient number of antigen-specific Treg has limited their use in research to elucidate the mechanisms underlying their regulatory function and their potential role in therapy. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a novel class II MHC tetramer, we have isolated a population of CD4(+ Foxp3(- T cells specific for the autoantigen glutamic acid decarboxylase p286-300 peptide (NR286 T cells from diabetes-resistant non-obese resistant (NOR mice. These Foxp3(- NR286 T cells functioned as Treg that were able to suppress target T cell proliferation in vitro and inhibit type 1 diabetes in animals. Unexpected results from mechanistic studies in vitro showed that their regulatory function was dependent on not only IFN-gamma and nitric oxide, but also on cell contact with target cells. In addition, separating NR286 Treg from target T cells in transwell assays abolished both production of NO and suppression of target T cells, regardless of whether IFN-gamma was produced in cell cultures. Therefore, production of NO, not IFN-gamma, was cell contact dependent, suggesting that NO may function downstream of IFN-gamma in mediating regulatory function of NR286 Treg. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These studies identified a unique population of autoantigen-specific Foxp3(- Treg that can exert their regulatory function dependent on not only IFN-gamma and NO but also cell contact with target cells.

  5. Functional and genomic analyses of FOXP3-transduced Jurkat-T cells as regulatory T (Treg)-like cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Joon-Young; Kim, Han-Jong; Hurt, Elaine M.; Chen, Xin; Howard, O.M. Zack; Farrar, William L.

    2007-01-01

    FOXP3, a forkhead transcription factor is essential for the development and function of CD4 + CD25 + regulatory T cells (Tregs). In contrast to conversion of murine naive T cells to Tregs by transduction of Foxp3, it is controversial whether ectopic expression of FOXP3 in human CD4 + T cells is sufficient for acquisition of suppressive activity. Here, we show that retroviral transduction of FOXP3 induces a Treg phenotype in human leukemic CD4 + Jurkat-T cells, evidenced by increased expression of Treg-associated cell surface markers as well as inhibition of cytokine production. Furthermore, FOXP3-transduced Jurkat-T cells suppress the proliferation of human CD4 + CD25 - T cells. Additionally, DNA microarray analysis identifies Treg-related genes regulated by FOXP3. Our study demonstrates that enforced expression of FOXP3 confers Treg-like properties on Jurkat-T cells, which can be a convenient and efficient Treg-like cell model for further study to identify Treg cell surface markers and target genes regulated by FOXP3

  6. Relating genes to function: identifying enriched transcription factors using the ENCODE ChIP-Seq significance tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Raymond K; Chen, Bin; Butte, Atul J

    2013-08-01

    Biological analysis has shifted from identifying genes and transcripts to mapping these genes and transcripts to biological functions. The ENCODE Project has generated hundreds of ChIP-Seq experiments spanning multiple transcription factors and cell lines for public use, but tools for a biomedical scientist to analyze these data are either non-existent or tailored to narrow biological questions. We present the ENCODE ChIP-Seq Significance Tool, a flexible web application leveraging public ENCODE data to identify enriched transcription factors in a gene or transcript list for comparative analyses. The ENCODE ChIP-Seq Significance Tool is written in JavaScript on the client side and has been tested on Google Chrome, Apple Safari and Mozilla Firefox browsers. Server-side scripts are written in PHP and leverage R and a MySQL database. The tool is available at http://encodeqt.stanford.edu. abutte@stanford.edu Supplementary material is available at Bioinformatics online.

  7. Cloning and functional characterisation of avian transcription factor E2A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Kerstin B

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During B lymphocyte development the E2A gene is a critical regulator of cell proliferation and differentiation. With regards to the immunoglobulin genes the E2A proteins contribute to the regulation of gene rearrangement, expression and class switch recombination. We are now using the chicken cell line DT40 as a model system to further analyse the function of E2A. Results Here we report the cloning and functional analysis of the transcription factor E2A from chicken. Using RACE PCR on the chicken lymphoma cell line DT40 we have isolated full-length clones for the two E2A splice variants E12 and E47. Sequence conservation between the human and chicken proteins is extensive: the basic-helix-loop-helix DNA binding domain of human and chicken E47 and E12 are 93% and 92% identical, respectively. In addition high levels of conservation are seen in activation domain I, the potential NLS and the ubiquitin ligase interaction domain. E2A is expressed in a variety of tissues in chicken, with higher levels of expression in organs rich in immune cells. We demonstrate that chicken E12 and E47 proteins are strong transcriptional activators whose function depends on the presence of activation domain I. As in mammals, the dominant negative proteins Id1 and Id3 can inhibit the function of chicken E47. Conclusions The potential for homologous recombination in DT40 allows the genetic dissection of biochemical pathways in somatic cells. With the cloning of avian E2A and the recent description of an in vitro somatic hypermutation assay in this cell line, it should now be possible to dissect the potential role of E2A in the regulation of somatic hypermutation and gene conversion.

  8. Transcriptional analysis of the mammalian heart with special reference to its endocrine function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Bold Adolfo J

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pharmacological and gene ablation studies have demonstrated the crucial role of the endocrine function of the heart as mediated by the polypeptide hormones ANF and BNP in the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis. The importance of these studies lies on the fact that hypertension and chronic congestive heart failure are clinical entities that may be regarded as states of relative deficiency of ANF and BNP. These hormones are produced by the atrial muscle cells (cardiocytes, which display a dual secretory/muscle phenotype. In contrast, ventricular cardiocytes display mainly a muscle phenotype. Comparatively little information is available regarding the genetic background for this important phenotypic difference with particular reference to the endocrine function of the heart. We postulated that comparison of gene expression profiles between atrial and ventricular muscles would help identify gene transcripts that underlie the phenotypic differences associated with the endocrine function of the heart. Results Comparison of gene expression profiles in the rat heart revealed a total of 1415 differentially expressed genes between the atria and ventricles based on a 1.8 fold cut-off. The identification of numerous chamber specific transcripts, such as ANF for the atria and Irx4 for the ventricles among several others, support the soundness of the GeneChip data and demonstrates that the differences in gene expression profiles observed between the atrial and ventricular tissues were not spurious in nature. Pathway analysis revealed unique expression profiles in the atria for G protein signaling that included Gαo1, Gγ2 and Gγ3, AGS1, RGS2, and RGS6 and the related K+ channels GIRK1 and GIRK4. Transcripts involved in vesicle trafficking, hormone secretion as well as mechanosensors (e.g. the potassium channel TREK-1 were identified in relationship to the synthesis, storage and secretion of hormones. Conclusion The data developed

  9. Human mitochondrial transcription factor A functions in both nuclei and mitochondria and regulates cancer cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Bin; Izumi, Hiroto; Yasuniwa, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Masaki; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Fujimoto, Naohiro; Matsumoto, Tetsuro; Wu, Bin; Tanimoto, Akihide; Sasaguri, Yasuyuki; Kohno, Kimitoshi

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) localizes in nuclei and binds tightly to the nuclear chromatin. → mtTFA contains two putative nuclear localization signals (NLS) in the HMG-boxes. → Overexpression of mtTFA enhances the growth of cancer cells, whereas downregulation of mtTFA inhibits their growth by regulating mtTFA target genes, such as baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 5 (BIRC5; also known as survivin). → Knockdown of mtTFA expression induces p21-dependent G1 cell cycle arrest. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) is one of the high mobility group protein family and is required for both transcription from and maintenance of mitochondrial genomes. However, the roles of mtTFA have not been extensively studied in cancer cells. Here, we firstly reported the nuclear localization of mtTFA. The proportion of nuclear-localized mtTFA varied among different cancer cells. Some mtTFA binds tightly to the nuclear chromatin. DNA microarray and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that mtTFA can regulate the expression of nuclear genes. Overexpression of mtTFA enhanced the growth of cancer cell lines, whereas downregulation of mtTFA inhibited their growth by regulating mtTFA target genes, such as baculoviral IAP repeat-containing 5 (BIRC5; also known as survivin). Knockdown of mtTFA expression induced p21-dependent G1 cell cycle arrest. These results imply that mtTFA functions in both nuclei and mitochondria to promote cell growth.

  10. Co-transcriptional production of RNA–DNA hybrids for simultaneous release of multiple split functionalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonin, Kirill A.; Desai, Ravi; Viard, Mathias; Kireeva, Maria L.; Bindewald, Eckart; Case, Christopher L.; Maciag, Anna E.; Kasprzak, Wojciech K.; Kim, Taejin; Sappe, Alison; Stepler, Marissa; KewalRamani, Vineet N.; Kashlev, Mikhail; Blumenthal, Robert; Shapiro, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    Control over the simultaneous delivery of different functionalities and their synchronized intracellular activation can greatly benefit the fields of RNA and DNA biomedical nanotechnologies and allow for the production of nanoparticles and various switching devices with controllable functions. We present a system of multiple split functionalities embedded in the cognate pairs of RNA–DNA hybrids which are programmed to recognize each other, re-associate and form a DNA duplex while also releasing the split RNA fragments which upon association regain their original functions. Simultaneous activation of three different functionalities (RNAi, Förster resonance energy transfer and RNA aptamer) confirmed by multiple in vitro and cell culture experiments prove the concept. To automate the design process, a novel computational tool that differentiates between the thermodynamic stabilities of RNA–RNA, RNA–DNA and DNA–DNA duplexes was developed. Moreover, here we demonstrate that besides being easily produced by annealing synthetic RNAs and DNAs, the individual hybrids carrying longer RNAs can be produced by RNA polymerase II-dependent transcription of single-stranded DNA templates. PMID:24194608

  11. Validation of skeletal muscle cis-regulatory module predictions reveals nucleotide composition bias in functional enhancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T Kwon

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We performed a genome-wide scan for muscle-specific cis-regulatory modules (CRMs using three computational prediction programs. Based on the predictions, 339 candidate CRMs were tested in cell culture with NIH3T3 fibroblasts and C2C12 myoblasts for capacity to direct selective reporter gene expression to differentiated C2C12 myotubes. A subset of 19 CRMs validated as functional in the assay. The rate of predictive success reveals striking limitations of computational regulatory sequence analysis methods for CRM discovery. Motif-based methods performed no better than predictions based only on sequence conservation. Analysis of the properties of the functional sequences relative to inactive sequences identifies nucleotide sequence composition can be an important characteristic to incorporate in future methods for improved predictive specificity. Muscle-related TFBSs predicted within the functional sequences display greater sequence conservation than non-TFBS flanking regions. Comparison with recent MyoD and histone modification ChIP-Seq data supports the validity of the functional regions.

  12. Regulation of WRKY46 transcription factor function by mitogen-activated protein kinases in Arabidopsis thaliana.

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    Arsheed Hussain Sheikh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available AbstractMitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades are central signalling pathways activated in plants after sensing internal developmental and external stress cues. Knowledge about the downstream substrate proteins of MAPKs is still limited in plants. We screened Arabidopsis WRKY transcription factors as potential targets downstream of MAPKs, and concentrated on characterizing WRKY46 as a substrate of the MAPK, MPK3. Mass spectrometry revealed in vitro phosphorylation of WRKY46 at amino acid position S168 by MPK3. However, mutagenesis studies showed that a second phosphosite, S250, can also be phosphorylated. Elicitation with pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs, such as the bacterial flagellin-derived flg22 peptide led to in vivo destabilization of WRKY46 in Arabidopsis protoplasts. Mutation of either phosphorylation site reduced the PAMP-induced degradation of WRKY46. Furthermore, the protein for the double phosphosite mutant is expressed at higher levels compared to wild-type proteins or single phosphosite mutants. In line with its nuclear localization and predicted function as a transcriptional activator, overexpression of WRKY46 in protoplasts raised basal plant defence as reflected by the increase in promoter activity of the PAMP-responsive gene, NHL10, in a MAPK-dependent manner. Thus, MAPK-mediated regulation of WRKY46 is a mechanism to control plant defence.

  13. Two Arabidopsis orthologs of the transcriptional coactivator ADA2 have distinct biological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hark, Amy T; Vlachonasios, Konstantinos E; Pavangadkar, Kanchan A; Rao, Sumana; Gordon, Hillary; Adamakis, Ioannis-Dimosthenis; Kaldis, Athanasios; Thomashow, Michael F; Triezenberg, Steven J

    2009-02-01

    Histone acetylation is an example of covalent modification of chromatin structure that has the potential to regulate gene expression. Gcn5 is a prototypical histone acetyltransferase that associates with the transcriptional coactivator Ada2. In Arabidopsis, two genes encode proteins that resemble yeast ADA2 and share approximately 45% amino acid sequence identity. We previously reported that plants harboring a T-DNA insertion in the ADA2b gene display a dwarf phenotype with developmental defects in several organs. Here we describe T-DNA insertion alleles in the ADA2a gene, which result in no dramatic growth or developmental phenotype. Both ADA2a and ADA2b are expressed in a variety of plant tissues; moreover, expression of ADA2a from a constitutive promoter fails to complement the ada2b-1 mutant phenotype, consistent with the hypothesis that the two proteins have distinct biochemical roles. To further probe the cellular roles of ADA2a and ADA2b, we studied the response of the transcriptional coactivator mutants to abiotic stress. Although ada2b seedlings display hypersensitivity to salt and abscisic acid and altered responses to low temperature stress, the responses of ada2a seedlings to abiotic stress generally parallel those of wildtype plants. Intriguingly, ada2a;ada2b double mutant plants display an intermediate, gcn5-like phenotype, suggesting that ADA2a and ADA2b each work independently with GCN5 to affect genome function in Arabidopsis.

  14. Transcript levels of several epigenome regulatory genes in bovine somatic donor cells are not correlated with their cloning efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenli; Sadeghieh, Sanaz; Abruzzese, Ronald; Uppada, Subhadra; Meredith, Justin; Ohlrichs, Charletta; Broek, Diane; Polejaeva, Irina

    2009-09-01

    Among many factors that potentially affect somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryo development is the donor cell itself. Cloning potentials of somatic donor cells vary greatly, possibly because the cells have different capacities to be reprogrammed by ooplasma. It is therefore intriguing to identify factors that regulate the reprogrammability of somatic donor cells. Gene expression analysis is a widely used tool to investigate underlying mechanisms of various phenotypes. In this study, we conducted a retrospective analysis investigating whether donor cell lines with distinct cloning efficiencies express different levels of genes involved in epigenetic reprogramming including histone deacetylase-1 (HDAC1), -2 (HDAC2); DNA methyltransferase-1 (DNMT1), -3a (DNMT3a),-3b (DNMT3b), and the bovine homolog of yeast sucrose nonfermenting-2 (SNF2L), a SWI/SNF family of ATPases. Cell samples from 12 bovine donor cell lines were collected at the time of nuclear transfer experiments and expression levels of the genes were measured using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Our results show that there are no significant differences in expression levels of these genes between donor cell lines of high and low cloning efficiency defined as live calving rates, although inverse correlations are observed between in vitro embryo developmental rates and expression levels of HDAC2 and SNF2L. We also show that selection of stable reference genes is important for relative quantification, and different batches of cells can have different gene expression patterns. In summary, we demonstrate that expression levels of these epigenome regulatory genes in bovine donor cells are not correlated with cloning potential. The experimental design and data analysis method reported here can be applied to study any genes expressed in donor cells.

  15. Quantitative and functional analysis of CD69+T regulatory lymphocytes in patients with periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitales-Noyola, Marlen; Martínez-Martínez, Rita; Loyola-Rodríguez, Juan P; Baranda, Lourdes; Niño-Moreno, Perla; González-Amaro, Roberto

    2017-08-01

    Periodontal disease is chronic inflammatory process that affects the attachment structures of the teeth and constitutes a significant cause of tooth loss in adults. Although different bacteria play an important role in the triggering of this condition, the progression and severity of the disease are strongly affected by the host immune response, which is under the control of different immune regulatory mechanisms, including T regulatory (Treg) cells. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency and function of CD69 + Treg lymphocytes in patients with chronic periodontal disease. Peripheral blood samples (n = 33) and gingival tissue (n = 9) were obtained from patients with chronic periodontal disease. Blood samples from 25 healthy individuals were also studied. Levels of CD69 + Treg lymphocytes in peripheral blood and gingival tissue were determined by six-color multiparametric flow cytometry, immunofluorescence, and immunohistochemistry. The immune regulatory function of CD69 + Treg cells was tested by an in vitro assay of inhibition of lymphocyte activation. Percentages of CD69 + Treg cells were significantly higher in the peripheral blood from patients with active periodontal disease compared to healthy controls, and these percentages inversely correlated with the periodontal attachment loss. Increased numbers of these Treg cells were detected in the gingival tissue from active PD patients compared to their peripheral blood. However, the suppressive function of CD69 + Treg cells was significantly diminished in patients with periodontal disease compared to healthy controls. Our data suggest that CD69 + Treg cells seem to be another important piece in the complex immunopathogenesis of periodontal disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Interaction between E-protein and Oct transcription factors in the function of the catfish IGH enhancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikima, Jun-ichi; Lennard Richard, Mara L.; Wilson, Melanie R.; Miller, Norman W.; Warr, Gregory W.

    2008-01-01

    Transcriptional control of the immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) locus in the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, is incompletely understood. It is however known that 2 variant octamer motifs and a μE5 motif in the core region of the enhancer (Eμ3′) are important in driving transcription, and it has been suggested that interaction between transcription factors (Oct factors and E-proteins) bound to these sites contributes to enhancer function. In this study the functional relationships between the μE5 motif, the proximal octamer motif, and the factors that bind them have been examined. The results of mutational analysis of these motifs showed that their interaction is important to driving transcription from the enhancer. Furthermore, the catfish Oct transcription factors were capable of a physical interaction with the catfish E-proteins. These results support a role for interaction between transcription factors bound to the octamer and μE5 motifs in the function of the Eμ3′ enhancer. PMID:18511119

  17. The ras1 function of Schizosaccharomyces pombe mediates pheromone-induced transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O; Davey, William John; Egel, R

    1992-01-01

    transcription of mat1-Pm in response to M factor. Furthermore, an activated ras1val17 mutant exhibits a stronger induction of the mat1-Pm transcript. However, transcription still depends on nitrogen deprivation as well as on the presence of pheromone, showing that activation of the Ras1 protein alone does...

  18. Chronic exposure of HIT cells to high glucose concentrations paradoxically decreases insulin gene transcription and alters binding of insulin gene regulatory protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, L K; Redmon, J B; Towle, H C; Robertson, R P

    1993-07-01

    Chronically culturing HIT-T15 cells in media containing high glucose concentrations leads to decreased insulin mRNA levels, insulin content, and insulin secretion. These changes can be prevented by culturing the cells in media containing lower glucose levels (Robertson, R. P., H.-J. Zhang, K. L. Pyzdrowski, and T. F. Walseth. 1992. J. Clin. Invest. 90:320-325). The mechanism of this seemingly paradoxical phenomenon was examined by transiently transfecting HIT cells with a chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) reporter gene controlled by the 5'-regulatory domain of the human insulin gene (INSCAT). Early passages of HIT cells readily expressed INSCAT, whereas late passages of cells chronically cultured in 11.1 mM glucose expressed only 28.7 +/- 2.3% (mean +/- SEM) of the CAT activity expressed in early passages. In contrast, late passages of HIT cells chronically cultured in 0.8 mM glucose retained the ability to express the INSCAT reporter gene to 69.6 +/- 10.0% of the CAT activity observed in early passages. The decrease in INSCAT expression in late passages of cells serially cultured in 11.1 mM glucose was associated with the inability to form a specific nuclear protein-DNA complex with the CT motifs of the human insulin promoter. Formation of this specific protein-DNA complex was preserved in late passages of HIT cells when serially cultured in 0.8 mM glucose. Mutations of the CT motifs caused markedly diminished CAT activity in all passages examined. These data indicate that chronic exposure of the beta cell to high glucose concentrations can paradoxically decrease insulin gene transcription, in part, by altering the ability of a regulatory protein (GSTF) to interact with the insulin gene promoter. This provides a potential mechanism for glucotoxic effects on the beta cell at the level of the insulin gene.

  19. Single and combinatorial chromatin coupling events underlies the function of transcript factor krüppel-like factor 11 in the regulation of gene networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Krüppel-like factors (KLFs) are a group of master regulators of gene expression conserved from flies to human. However, scant information is available on either the mechanisms or functional impact of the coupling of KLF proteins to chromatin remodeling machines, a deterministic step in transcriptional regulation. Results and discussion In the current study, we use genome-wide analyses of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP-on-Chip) and Affymetrix-based expression profiling to gain insight into how KLF11, a human transcription factor involved in tumor suppression and metabolic diseases, works by coupling to three co-factor groups: the Sin3-histone deacetylase system, WD40-domain containing proteins, and the HP1-histone methyltransferase system. Our results reveal that KLF11 regulates distinct gene networks involved in metabolism and growth by using single or combinatorial coupling events. Conclusion This study, the first of its type for any KLF protein, reveals that interactions with multiple chromatin systems are required for the full gene regulatory function of these proteins. PMID:24885560

  20. TLE3 Is a Dual-Function Transcriptional Coregulator of Adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Claudio J; Waki, Hironori; Godio, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    PPARγ and Wnt signaling are central positive and negative regulators of adipogenesis, respectively. Here we identify the groucho family member TLE3 as a transcriptional integrator of the PPARγ and Wnt pathways. TLE3 is a direct target of PPARγ that participates in a feed-forward loop during...... adipocyte differentiation. TLE3 enhances PPARγ activity and functions synergistically with PPARγ on its target promoters to stimulate adipogenesis. At the same time, induction of TLE3 during differentiation provides a mechanism for termination of Wnt signaling. TLE3 antagonizes TCF4 activation by β......-catenin in preadipocytes, thereby inhibiting Wnt target gene expression and reversing β-catenin-dependent repression of adipocyte gene expression. Transgenic expression of TLE3 in adipose tissue in vivo mimics the effects of PPARγ agonist and ameliorates high-fat-diet-induced insulin resistance. Our data suggest that TLE3...

  1. Thymus cell population exerting a regulatory function in the immune response of mice of polyvinyl pyrrolidone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotter, V.; Trainin, N.

    1974-01-01

    An increased response to PVP was observed after adult mouse thymectomy and was partially reversed either by thymus implantation or by a single injection of thymic cells. In addition, an injection of thymic cells was found to reduce the response to PVP in normal recipients. An enhanced response to PVP was measured in B mice compared to that of normals. In such mice reduction of the response to PVP was observed when repeated doses of thymus cells were administered. Lower doses of HC resistant thymus cells strongly inhibited the response to PVP. The cells involved in the thymus regulatory function appear to be radiosensitive, since it was shown that radiation by itself resulted in an increased response to PVP. This inhibitory function of the thymus seems to disappear relatively early in progression of life, as seen by an increased response to PVP in elder mice. These results indicate that a T cell population exerts a regulatory function in the immunological response to PVP that was previously considered to be thymus independent

  2. Transcription start site profiling uncovers divergent transcription and enhancer-associated RNAs in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meers, Michael P; Adelman, Karen; Duronio, Robert J; Strahl, Brian D; McKay, Daniel J; Matera, A Gregory

    2018-02-21

    High-resolution transcription start site (TSS) mapping in D. melanogaster embryos and cell lines has revealed a rich and detailed landscape of both cis- and trans-regulatory elements and factors. However, TSS profiling has not been investigated in an orthogonal in vivo setting. Here, we present a comprehensive dataset that links TSS dynamics with nucleosome occupancy and gene expression in the wandering third instar larva, a developmental stage characterized by large-scale shifts in transcriptional programs in preparation for metamorphosis. The data recapitulate major regulatory classes of TSSs, based on peak width, promoter-proximal polymerase pausing, and cis-regulatory element density. We confirm the paucity of divergent transcription units in D. melanogaster, but also identify notable exceptions. Furthermore, we identify thousands of novel initiation events occurring at unannotated TSSs that can be classified into functional categories by their local density of histone modifications. Interestingly, a sub-class of these unannotated TSSs overlaps with functionally validated enhancer elements, consistent with a regulatory role for "enhancer RNAs" (eRNAs) in defining developmental transcription programs. High-depth TSS mapping is a powerful strategy for identifying and characterizing low-abundance and/or low-stability RNAs. Global analysis of transcription initiation patterns in a developing organism reveals a vast number of novel initiation events that identify potential eRNAs as well as other non-coding transcripts critical for animal development.

  3. Polymorphisms in signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and lung function in asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarus Ross

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Identifying genetic determinants for lung function is important in providing insight into the pathophysiology of asthma. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 is a transcription factor latent in the cytoplasm; the gene (STAT3 is activated by a wide range of cytokines, and may play a role in lung development and asthma pathogenesis. Methods We genotyped six single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the STAT3 gene in a cohort of 401 Caucasian adult asthmatics. The associations between each SNP and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1, as a percent of predicted, at the baseline exam were tested using multiple linear regression models. Longitudinal analyses involving repeated measures of FEV1 were conducted with mixed linear models. Haplotype analyses were conducted using imputed haplotypes. We completed a second association study by genotyping the same six polymorphisms in a cohort of 652 Caucasian children with asthma. Results We found that three polymorphisms were significantly associated with baseline FEV1: homozygotes for the minor alleles of each polymorphism had lower FEV1 than homozygotes for the major alleles. Moreover, these associations persisted when we performed an analysis on repeated measures of FEV1 over 8 weeks. A haplotypic analysis based on the six polymorphisms indicated that two haplotypes were associated with baseline FEV1. Among the childhood asthmatics, one polymorphism was associated with both baseline FEV1 and the repeated measures of FEV1 over 4 years. Conclusion Our results indicate that genetic variants in STAT3, independent of asthma treatment, are determinants of FEV1 in both adults and children with asthma, and suggest that STAT3 may participate in inflammatory pathways that have an impact on level of lung function.

  4. EBNA2 Drives Formation of New Chromosome Binding Sites and Target Genes for B-Cell Master Regulatory Transcription Factors RBP-jκ and EBF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fang; Chen, Horng-Shen; Kossenkov, Andrew V; DeWispeleare, Karen; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Lieberman, Paul M

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) transforms resting B-lymphocytes into proliferating lymphoblasts to establish latent infections that can give rise to malignancies. We show here that EBV-encoded transcriptional regulator EBNA2 drives the cooperative and combinatorial genome-wide binding of two master regulators of B-cell fate, namely EBF1 and RBP-jκ. Previous studies suggest that these B-cell factors are statically bound to target gene promoters. In contrast, we found that EBNA2 induces the formation of new binding for both RBP-jκ and EBF1, many of which are in close physical proximity in the cellular and viral genome. These newly induced binding sites co-occupied by EBNA2-EBF1-RBP-jκ correlate strongly with transcriptional activation of linked genes that are important for B-lymphoblast function. Conditional expression or repression of EBNA2 leads to a rapid alteration in RBP-jκ and EBF1 binding. Biochemical and shRNA depletion studies provide evidence for cooperative assembly at co-occupied sites. These findings reveal that EBNA2 facilitate combinatorial interactions to induce new patterns of transcription factor occupancy and gene programming necessary to drive B-lymphoblast growth and survival.

  5. EBNA2 Drives Formation of New Chromosome Binding Sites and Target Genes for B-Cell Master Regulatory Transcription Factors RBP-jκ and EBF1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV transforms resting B-lymphocytes into proliferating lymphoblasts to establish latent infections that can give rise to malignancies. We show here that EBV-encoded transcriptional regulator EBNA2 drives the cooperative and combinatorial genome-wide binding of two master regulators of B-cell fate, namely EBF1 and RBP-jκ. Previous studies suggest that these B-cell factors are statically bound to target gene promoters. In contrast, we found that EBNA2 induces the formation of new binding for both RBP-jκ and EBF1, many of which are in close physical proximity in the cellular and viral genome. These newly induced binding sites co-occupied by EBNA2-EBF1-RBP-jκ correlate strongly with transcriptional activation of linked genes that are important for B-lymphoblast function. Conditional expression or repression of EBNA2 leads to a rapid alteration in RBP-jκ and EBF1 binding. Biochemical and shRNA depletion studies provide evidence for cooperative assembly at co-occupied sites. These findings reveal that EBNA2 facilitate combinatorial interactions to induce new patterns of transcription factor occupancy and gene programming necessary to drive B-lymphoblast growth and survival.

  6. The transcription factor Ste12 mediates the regulatory role of the Tmk1 MAP kinase in mycoparasitism and vegetative hyphal fusion in the filamentous fungus Trichoderma atroviride.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Gruber

    Full Text Available Mycoparasitic species of the fungal genus Trichoderma are potent antagonists able to combat plant pathogenic fungi by direct parasitism. An essential step in this mycoparasitic fungus-fungus interaction is the detection of the fungal host followed by activation of molecular weapons in the mycoparasite by host-derived signals. The Trichoderma atroviride MAP kinase Tmk1, a homolog of yeast Fus3/Kss1, plays an essential role in regulating the mycoparasitic host attack, aerial hyphae formation and conidiation. However, the transcription factors acting downstream of Tmk1 are hitherto unknown. Here we analyzed the functions of the T. atroviride Ste12 transcription factor whose orthologue in yeast is targeted by the Fus3 and Kss1 MAP kinases. Deletion of the ste12 gene in T. atroviride not only resulted in reduced mycoparasitic overgrowth and lysis of host fungi but also led to loss of hyphal avoidance in the colony periphery and a severe reduction in conidial anastomosis tube formation and vegetative hyphal fusion events. The transcription of several orthologues of Neurospora crassa hyphal fusion genes was reduced upon ste12 deletion; however, the Δste12 mutant showed enhanced expression of mycoparasitism-relevant chitinolytic and proteolytic enzymes and of the cell wall integrity MAP kinase Tmk2. Based on the comparative analyses of Δste12 and Δtmk1 mutants, an essential role of the Ste12 transcriptional regulator in mediating outcomes of the Tmk1 MAPK pathway such as regulation of the mycoparasitic activity, hyphal fusion and carbon source-dependent vegetative growth is suggested. Aerial hyphae formation and conidiation, in contrast, were found to be independent of Ste12.

  7. [Cloning and function identification of gene 'admA' and up-stream regulatory sequence related to antagonistic activity of Enterobacter cloacae B8].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun-Li; Li, De-Bao; Yu, Xu-Ping

    2012-04-01

    To reveal the antagonistic mechanism of B8 strain to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, transposon tagging method and chromosome walking were deployed to clone antagonistic related fragments around Tn5 insertion site in the mutant strain B8B. The function of up-stream regulatory sequence of gene 'admA' involved in the antagonistic activity was further identified by gene knocking out technique. An antagonistic related left fragment of Tn5 insertion site, 2 608 bp in length, was obtained by tagging with Kan resistance gene of Tn5. A 2 354 bp right fragment of Tn5 insertion site was amplified with 2 rounds of chromosome walking. The length of the B contig around the Tn5 insertion site was 4 611 bp, containing 7 open reading frames (ORFs). Bioinformatic analysis revealed that these ORFs corresponded to the partial coding regions of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, two LysR family transcriptional regulators, hypothetical protein VSWAT3-20465 of Vibrionales and admA, admB, and partial sequence of admC gene of Pantoea agglomerans biosynthetic gene cluster, respectively. Tn5 was inserted in the up-stream of 200 bp or 894 bp of the sequence corresponding to anrP ORF or admA gene on B8B, respectively. The B-1 and B-2 mutants that lost antagonistic activity were selected by homeologuous recombination technology in association with knocking out plasmid pMB-BG. These results suggested that the transcription and expression of anrP gene might be disrupted as a result of the knocking out of up-stream regulatory sequence by Tn5 in B8B strain, further causing biosythesis regulation of the antagonistic related gene cluster. Thus, the antagonistic related genes in B8 strain is a gene family similar as andrimid biosynthetic gene cluster, and the upstream regulatory region appears to be critical for the antibiotics biosynthesis.

  8. CRISPR-Cas9 epigenome editing enables high-throughput screening for functional regulatory elements in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klann, Tyler S; Black, Joshua B; Chellappan, Malathi; Safi, Alexias; Song, Lingyun; Hilton, Isaac B; Crawford, Gregory E; Reddy, Timothy E; Gersbach, Charles A

    2017-06-01

    Large genome-mapping consortia and thousands of genome-wide association studies have identified non-protein-coding elements in the genome as having a central role in various biological processes. However, decoding the functions of the millions of putative regulatory elements discovered in these studies remains challenging. CRISPR-Cas9-based epigenome editing technologies have enabled precise perturbation of the activity of specific regulatory elements. Here we describe CRISPR-Cas9-based epigenomic regulatory element screening (CERES) for improved high-throughput screening of regulatory element activity in the native genomic context. Using dCas9 KRAB repressor and dCas9 p300 activator constructs and lentiviral single guide RNA libraries to target DNase I hypersensitive sites surrounding a gene of interest, we carried out both loss- and gain-of-function screens to identify regulatory elements for the β-globin and HER2 loci in human cells. CERES readily identified known and previously unidentified regulatory elements, some of which were dependent on cell type or direction of perturbation. This technology allows the high-throughput functional annotation of putative regulatory elements in their native chromosomal context.

  9. Allocation of distinct organ fates from a precursor field requires a shift in expression and function of gene regulatory networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sneha Palliyil

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A common occurrence in metazoan development is the rise of multiple tissues/organs from a single uniform precursor field. One example is the anterior forebrain of vertebrates, which produces the eyes, hypothalamus, diencephalon, and telencephalon. Another instance is the Drosophila wing disc, which generates the adult wing blade, the hinge, and the thorax. Gene regulatory networks (GRNs that are comprised of signaling pathways and batteries of transcription factors parcel the undifferentiated field into discrete territories. This simple model is challenged by two observations. First, many GRN members that are thought to control the fate of one organ are actually expressed throughout the entire precursor field at earlier points in development. Second, each GRN can simultaneously promote one of the possible fates choices while repressing the other alternatives. It is therefore unclear how GRNs function to allocate tissue fates if their members are uniformly expressed and competing with each other within the same populations of cells. We address this paradigm by studying fate specification in the Drosophila eye-antennal disc. The disc, which begins its development as a homogeneous precursor field, produces a number of adult structures including the compound eyes, the ocelli, the antennae, the maxillary palps, and the surrounding head epidermis. Several selector genes that control the fates of the eye and antenna, respectively, are first expressed throughout the entire eye-antennal disc. We show that during early stages, these genes are tasked with promoting the growth of the entire field. Upon segregation to distinct territories within the disc, each GRN continues to promote growth while taking on the additional roles of promoting distinct primary fates and repressing alternate fates. The timing of both expression pattern restriction and expansion of functional duties is an elemental requirement for allocating fates within a single field.

  10. Global functional analysis of nucleophosmin in Taxol response, cancer, chromatin regulation, and ribosomal DNA transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstralh, Daniel T.; Conti, Brian J.; Moore, Chris B.; Brickey, W. June; Taxman, Debra J.; Ting, Jenny P.-Y.

    2007-01-01

    Analysis of lung cancer response to chemotherapeutic agents showed the accumulation of a Taxol-induced protein that reacted with an anti-phospho-MEK1/2 antibody. Mass spectroscopy identified the protein as nucleophosmin/B23 (NPM), a multifunctional protein with diverse roles: ribosome biosynthesis, p53 regulation, nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling, and centrosome duplication. Our work demonstrates that following cellular exposure to mitosis-arresting agents, NPM is phosphorylated and its chromatographic property is altered, suggesting changes in function during mitosis. To determine the functional relevance of NPM, its expression in tumor cells was reduced by siRNA. Cells with reduced NPM were treated with Taxol followed by microarray profiling accompanied by gene/protein pathway analyses. These studies demonstrate several expected and unexpected consequences of NPM depletion. The predominant downstream effectors of NPM are genes involved in cell proliferation, cancer, and the cell cycle. In congruence with its role in cancer, NPM is over-expressed in primary malignant lung cancer tissues. We also demonstrate a role for NPM in the expression of genes encoding SET (TAF1β) and the histone methylase SET8. Additionally, we show that NPM is required for a previously unobserved G2/M upregulation of TAF1A, which encodes the rDNA transcription factor TAF I 48. These results demonstrate multi-faceted functions of NPM that can affect cancer cells

  11. The Populus ARBORKNOX1 homeodomain transcription factor regulates woody growth through binding to evolutionarily conserved target genes of diverse function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lijun; Zinkgraf, Matthew; Petzold, H Earl; Beers, Eric P; Filkov, Vladimir; Groover, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The class I KNOX homeodomain transcription factor ARBORKNOX1 (ARK1) is a key regulator of vascular cambium maintenance and cell differentiation in Populus. Currently, basic information is lacking concerning the distribution, functional characteristics, and evolution of ARK1 binding in the Populus genome. Here, we used chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) technology to identify ARK1 binding loci genome-wide in Populus. Computational analyses evaluated the distribution of ARK1 binding loci, the function of genes associated with bound loci, the effect of ARK1 binding on transcript levels, and evolutionary conservation of ARK1 binding loci. ARK1 binds to thousands of loci which are highly enriched proximal to the transcriptional start sites of genes of diverse functions. ARK1 target genes are significantly enriched in paralogs derived from the whole-genome salicoid duplication event. Both ARK1 and a maize (Zea mays) homolog, KNOTTED1, preferentially target evolutionarily conserved genes. However, only a small portion of ARK1 target genes are significantly differentially expressed in an ARK1 over-expression mutant. This study describes the functional characteristics and evolution of DNA binding by a transcription factor in an undomesticated tree, revealing complexities similar to those shown for transcription factors in model animal species. No claim to original US Government works. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  12. Deep sequencing of RNA from immune cell-derived vesicles uncovers the selective incorporation of small non-coding RNA biotypes with potential regulatory functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolte-'t Hoen, Esther N M; Buermans, Henk P J; Waasdorp, Maaike; Stoorvogel, Willem; Wauben, Marca H M; 't Hoen, Peter A C

    2012-10-01

    Cells release RNA-carrying vesicles and membrane-free RNA/protein complexes into the extracellular milieu. Horizontal vesicle-mediated transfer of such shuttle RNA between cells allows dissemination of genetically encoded messages, which may modify the function of target cells. Other studies used array analysis to establish the presence of microRNAs and mRNA in cell-derived vesicles from many sources. Here, we used an unbiased approach by deep sequencing of small RNA released by immune cells. We found a large variety of small non-coding RNA species representing pervasive transcripts or RNA cleavage products overlapping with protein coding regions, repeat sequences or structural RNAs. Many of these RNAs were enriched relative to cellular RNA, indicating that cells destine specific RNAs for extracellular release. Among the most abundant small RNAs in shuttle RNA were sequences derived from vault RNA, Y-RNA and specific tRNAs. Many of the highly abundant small non-coding transcripts in shuttle RNA are evolutionary well-conserved and have previously been associated to gene regulatory functions. These findings allude to a wider range of biological effects that could be mediated by shuttle RNA than previously expected. Moreover, the data present leads for unraveling how cells modify the function of other cells via transfer of specific non-coding RNA species.

  13. CRNET: An efficient sampling approach to infer functional regulatory networks by integrating large-scale ChIP-seq and time-course RNA-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Gu, Jinghua; Wang, Xiao; Jung, Jin-Gyoung; Wang, Tian-Li; Hilakivi-Clarke, Leena; Clarke, Robert; Xuan, Jianhua

    2017-12-21

    NGS techniques have been widely applied in genetic and epigenetic studies. Multiple ChIP-seq and RNA-seq profiles can now be jointly used to infer functional regulatory networks (FRNs). However, existing methods suffer from either oversimplified assumption on transcription factor (TF) regulation or slow convergence of sampling for FRN inference from large-scale ChIP-seq and time-course RNA-seq data. We developed an efficient Bayesian integration method (CRNET) for FRN inference using a two-stage Gibbs sampler to estimate iteratively hidden TF activities and the posterior probabilities of binding events. A novel statistic measure that jointly considers regulation strength and regression error enables the sampling process of CRNET to converge quickly, thus making CRNET very efficient for large-scale FRN inference. Experiments on synthetic and benchmark data showed a significantly improved performance of CRNET when compared with existing methods. CRNET was applied to breast cancer data to identify FRNs functional at promoter or enhancer regions in breast cancer MCF-7 cells. Transcription factor MYC is predicted as a key functional factor in both promoter and enhancer FRNs. We experimentally validated the regulation effects of MYC on CRNET-predicted target genes using appropriate RNAi approaches in MCF-7 cells. R scripts of CRNET are available at http://www.cbil.ece.vt.edu/software.htm. xuan@vt.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  14. mRNA Transcript Diversity Creates New Opportunities for Pharmacological Intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Barrie, Elizabeth S.; Smith, Ryan M.; Sanford, Jonathan C.; Sadee, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Most protein coding genes generate multiple RNA transcripts through alternative splicing, variable 3′ and 5′UTRs, and RNA editing. Although drug design typically targets the main transcript, alternative transcripts can have profound physiological effects, encoding proteins with distinct functions or regulatory properties. Formation of these alternative transcripts is tissue-selective and context-dependent, creating opportunities for more effective and targeted therapies with reduced adverse e...

  15. Phylogenetic conservation of the regulatory and functional properties of the Vav oncoprotein family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couceiro, Jose R.; Martin-Bermudo, Maria D.; Bustelo, Xose R.

    2005-01-01

    Vav proteins are phosphorylation-dependent GDP/GTP exchange factors for Rho/Rac GTPases. Despite intense characterization of mammalian Vav proteins both biochemically and genetically, there is little information regarding the conservation of their biological properties in lower organisms. To approach this issue, we have performed a characterization of the regulatory, catalytic, and functional properties of the single Vav family member of Drosophila melanogaster. These analyses have shown that the intramolecular mechanisms controlling the enzyme activity of mammalian Vav proteins are already present in Drosophila, suggesting that such properties have been set up before the divergence between protostomes and deuterostomes during evolution. We also show that Drosophila and mammalian Vav proteins have similar catalytic specificities. As a consequence, Drosophila Vav can trigger oncogenic transformation, morphological change, and enhanced cell motility in mammalian cells. Gain-of-function studies using transgenic flies support the implication of this protein in cytoskeletal-dependent processes such as embryonic dorsal closure, myoblast fusion, tracheal development, and the migration/guidance of different cell types. These results highlight the important roles of Vav proteins in the signal transduction pathways regulating cytoskeletal dynamics. Moreover, they indicate that the foundations for the regulatory and enzymatic activities of this protein family have been set up very early during evolution

  16. Profiling of conserved non-coding elements upstream of SHOX and functional characterisation of the SHOX cis-regulatory landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdin, Hannah; Fernández-Miñán, Ana; Benito-Sanz, Sara; Janssens, Sandra; Callewaert, Bert; De Waele, Kathleen; De Schepper, Jean; François, Inge; Menten, Björn; Heath, Karen E; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis; De Baere, Elfride

    2015-12-03

    Genetic defects such as copy number variations (CNVs) in non-coding regions containing conserved non-coding elements (CNEs) outside the transcription unit of their target gene, can underlie genetic disease. An example of this is the short stature homeobox (SHOX) gene, regulated by seven CNEs located downstream and upstream of SHOX, with proven enhancer capacity in chicken limbs. CNVs of the downstream CNEs have been reported in many idiopathic short stature (ISS) cases, however, only recently have a few CNVs of the upstream enhancers been identified. Here, we set out to provide insight into: (i) the cis-regulatory role of these upstream CNEs in human cells, (ii) the prevalence of upstream CNVs in ISS, and (iii) the chromatin architecture of the SHOX cis-regulatory landscape in chicken and human cells. Firstly, luciferase assays in human U2OS cells, and 4C-seq both in chicken limb buds and human U2OS cells, demonstrated cis-regulatory enhancer capacities of the upstream CNEs. Secondly, CNVs of these upstream CNEs were found in three of 501 ISS patients. Finally, our 4C-seq interaction map of the SHOX region reveals a cis-regulatory domain spanning more than 1 Mb and harbouring putative new cis-regulatory elements.

  17. Functional Characterization of Tea (Camellia sinensis MYB4a Transcription Factor Using an Integrative Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingzhuo Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Green tea (Camellia sinensis, Cs abundantly produces a diverse array of phenylpropanoid compounds benefiting human health. To date, the regulation of the phenylpropanoid biosynthesis in tea remains to be investigated. Here, we report a cDNA isolated from leaf tissues, which encodes a R2R3-MYB transcription factor. Amino acid sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis indicate that it is a member of the MYB4-subgroup and named as CsMYB4a. Transcriptional and metabolic analyses show that the expression profile of CsMYB4a is negatively correlated to the accumulation of six flavan-3-ols and other phenolic acids. GFP fusion analysis shows CsMYB4a’s localization in the nucleus. Promoters of five tea phenylpropanoid pathway genes are isolated and characterized to contain four types of AC-elements, which are targets of MYB4 members. Interaction of CsMYB4a and five promoters shows that CsMYB4a decreases all five promoters’ activity. To further characterize its function, CsMYB4a is overexpressed in tobacco plants. The resulting transgenic plants show dwarf, shrinking and yellowish leaf, and early senescence phenotypes. A further genome-wide transcriptomic analysis reveals that the expression levels of 20 tobacco genes involved in the shikimate and the phenylpropanoid pathways are significantly downregulated in transgenic tobacco plants. UPLC-MS and HPLC based metabolic profiling reveals significant reduction of total lignin content, rutin, chlorogenic acid, and phenylalanine in CsMYB4a transgenic tobacco plants. Promoter sequence analysis of the 20 tobacco genes characterizes four types of AC-elements. Further CsMYB4a-AC element and CsMYB4a-promoter interaction analyses indicate that the negative regulation of CsMYB4a on the shikimate and phenylpropanoid pathways in tobacco is via reducing promoter activity. Taken together, all data indicate that CsMYB4a negatively regulates the phenylpropanoid and shikimate pathways.Highlight: A tea (Camellia

  18. Methylation of the tumor suppressor protein, BRCA1, influences its transcriptional cofactor function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Guendel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Approximately half of hereditary breast cancers have mutations in either BRCA1 or BRCA2. BRCA1 is a multifaceted tumor suppressor protein that has implications in processes such as cell cycle, transcription, DNA damage response and chromatin remodeling. This multifunctional nature of BRCA1 is achieved by exerting its many effects through modulation of transcription. Many cellular events are dictated by covalent modification of proteins, an important mechanism in regulating protein and genome function; of which protein methylation is an important posttranslational modification with activating or repressive effects. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we demonstrate for the first time that BRCA1 is methylated both in breast cancer cell lines and breast cancer tumor samples at arginine and lysine residues through immunoprecipitation and western blot analysis. Arginine methylation by PRMT1 was observed in vitro and the region of BRCA1 504-802 shown to be highly methylated. PRMT1 was detected in complex with BRCA1 504-802 through in vitro binding assays and co-immunoprecipitated with BRCA1. Inhibition of methylation resulted in decreased BRCA1 methylation and alteration of BRCA1 binding to promoters in vivo as shown through chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Knockdown of PRMT1 also resulted in increased BRCA1 binding to particular promoters in vivo. Finally, following methylation inhibition, Sp1 was found to preferentially associate with hypo-methylated BRCA1 and STAT1 was found to preferentially associate with hyper-methylated BRCA1. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that methylation may influence either the ability of BRCA1 to bind to specific promoters or protein-protein interactions which alters the recruitment of BRCA1 to these promoters. Thus, given the importance of BRCA1 to genomic stability, methylation of BRCA1 may ultimately affect the tumor suppressor ability of BRCA1.

  19. Comparative analysis of the ATRX promoter and 5' regulatory region reveals conserved regulatory elements which are linked to roles in neurodevelopment, alpha-globin regulation and testicular function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argentaro Anthony

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ATRX is a tightly-regulated multifunctional protein with crucial roles in mammalian development. Mutations in the ATRX gene cause ATR-X syndrome, an X-linked recessive developmental disorder resulting in severe mental retardation and mild alpha-thalassemia with facial, skeletal and genital abnormalities. Although ubiquitously expressed the clinical features of the syndrome indicate that ATRX is not likely to be a global regulator of gene expression but involved in regulating specific target genes. The regulation of ATRX expression is not well understood and this is reflected by the current lack of identified upstream regulators. The availability of genomic data from a range of species and the very highly conserved 5' regulatory regions of the ATRX gene has allowed us to investigate putative transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs in evolutionarily conserved regions of the mammalian ATRX promoter. Results We identified 12 highly conserved TFBSs of key gene regulators involved in biologically relevant processes such as neural and testis development and alpha-globin regulation. Conclusions Our results reveal potentially important regulatory elements in the ATRX gene which may lead to the identification of upstream regulators of ATRX and aid in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms that underlie ATR-X syndrome.

  20. Mitochondrial functions modulate neuroendocrine, metabolic, inflammatory, and transcriptional responses to acute psychological stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, Martin; McManus, Meagan J.; Gray, Jason D.; Nasca, Carla; Moffat, Cynthia; Kopinski, Piotr K.; Seifert, Erin L.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Wallace, Douglas C.

    2015-01-01

    The experience of psychological stress triggers neuroendocrine, inflammatory, metabolic, and transcriptional perturbations that ultimately predispose to disease. However, the subcellular determinants of this integrated, multisystemic stress response have not been defined. Central to stress adaptation is cellular energetics, involving mitochondrial energy production and oxidative stress. We therefore hypothesized that abnormal mitochondrial functions would differentially modulate the organism’s multisystemic response to psychological stress. By mutating or deleting mitochondrial genes encoded in the mtDNA [NADH dehydrogenase 6 (ND6) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI)] or nuclear DNA [adenine nucleotide translocator 1 (ANT1) and nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase (NNT)], we selectively impaired mitochondrial respiratory chain function, energy exchange, and mitochondrial redox balance in mice. The resulting impact on physiological reactivity and recovery from restraint stress were then characterized. We show that mitochondrial dysfunctions altered the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis, sympathetic adrenal–medullary activation and catecholamine levels, the inflammatory cytokine IL-6, circulating metabolites, and hippocampal gene expression responses to stress. Each mitochondrial defect generated a distinct whole-body stress-response signature. These results demonstrate the role of mitochondrial energetics and redox balance as modulators of key pathophysiological perturbations previously linked to disease. This work establishes mitochondria as stress-response modulators, with implications for understanding the mechanisms of stress pathophysiology and mitochondrial diseases. PMID:26627253

  1. Transcriptional programming and functional interactions within the Phytophthora sojae RXLR effector repertoire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qunqing; Han, Changzhi; Ferreira, Adriana O; Yu, Xiaoli; Ye, Wenwu; Tripathy, Sucheta; Kale, Shiv D; Gu, Biao; Sheng, Yuting; Sui, Yangyang; Wang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Zhengguang; Cheng, Baoping; Dong, Suomeng; Shan, Weixing; Zheng, Xiaobo; Dou, Daolong; Tyler, Brett M; Wang, Yuanchao

    2011-06-01

    The genome of the soybean pathogen Phytophthora sojae contains nearly 400 genes encoding candidate effector proteins carrying the host cell entry motif RXLR-dEER. Here, we report a broad survey of the transcription, variation, and functions of a large sample of the P. sojae candidate effectors. Forty-five (12%) effector genes showed high levels of polymorphism among P. sojae isolates and significant evidence for positive selection. Of 169 effectors tested, most could suppress programmed cell death triggered by BAX, effectors, and/or the PAMP INF1, while several triggered cell death themselves. Among the most strongly expressed effectors, one immediate-early class was highly expressed even prior to infection and was further induced 2- to 10-fold following infection. A second early class, including several that triggered cell death, was weakly expressed prior to infection but induced 20- to 120-fold during the first 12 h of infection. The most strongly expressed immediate-early effectors could suppress the cell death triggered by several early effectors, and most early effectors could suppress INF1-triggered cell death, suggesting the two classes of effectors may target different functional branches of the defense response. In support of this hypothesis, misexpression of key immediate-early and early effectors severely reduced the virulence of P. sojae transformants.

  2. Enhancer RNAs: the new molecules of transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Fan; Shiekhattar, Ramin

    2014-04-01

    In the past few years, technological advances in nucleotide sequencing have culminated in a greater understanding of the complexity of the human transcriptome. Notably, the discovery that distal regulatory elements known as enhancers are transcribed and such enhancer-derived transcripts (eRNAs) serve a critical function in transcriptional activation has added a new dimension to transcriptional regulation. Here we review recent insights into the tissue-specific and temporal-specific gene regulation brought about by the discovery of eRNAs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. De novo sequencing and assembly of Centella asiatica leaf transcriptome for mapping of structural, functional and regulatory genes with special reference to secondary metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangwan, Rajender S; Tripathi, Sandhya; Singh, Jyoti; Narnoliya, Lokesh K; Sangwan, Neelam S

    2013-08-01

    Centella asiatica (L.) Urban is an important medicinal plant and has been used since ancient times in traditional systems of medicine. C. asiatica mainly contains ursane skeleton based triterpenoid sapogenins and saponins predominantly in its leaves. This investigation employed Illumina next generation sequencing (NGS) strategy on a pool of three cDNAs from expanding leaf of C. asiatica and developed an assembled transcriptome sequence resource of the plant. The short transcript reads (STRs) generated and assembled into contigs and singletons, representing majority of the genes expressed in C. asiatica, were termed as 'tentative unique transcripts' (TUTs). The TUT dataset was analyzed with the objectives of (i) development of a transcriptome assembly of C. asiatica, and (ii) classification/characterization of the genes into categories like structural, functional, regulatory etc. based on their function. Overall, 68.49% of the 46,171,131 reads generated in the NGS process could be assembled into a total of 79,041 contigs. Gene ontology and functional annotation of sequences resulted into the identification of genes related to different sets of cellular functions including identification of genes related to primary and secondary metabolism. The wet lab validation of seventeen assembled gene sequences identified to be involved in secondary metabolic pathways and control of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was established by semi-quantitative and real time PCR (qRT-PCR). The validation also included sequencing/size matching of a set of semi-quantitative PCR amplicons with their in silico assembled contig/gene. This confirmed the appropriateness of assembling the reads and contigs. Thus, the present study constitutes the largest report to date on C. asiatica transcriptome based gene resource that may contribute substantially to the understanding of the basal biological functions and biochemical pathways of secondary metabolites as well as the transcriptional regulatory

  4. Preaxial polydactyly/triphalangeal thumb is associated with changed transcription factor-binding affinity in a family with a novel point mutation in the long-range cis-regulatory element ZRS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farooq, Muhammad; Troelsen, Jesper T; Boyd, Mette

    2010-01-01

    A cis-regulatory sequence also known as zone of polarizing activity (ZPA) regulatory sequence (ZRS) located in intron 5 of LMBR1 is essential for expression of sonic hedgehog (SHH) in the developing posterior limb bud mesenchyme. Even though many point mutations causing preaxial duplication defects...... demonstrated a marked difference between wild-type and the mutant probe, which uniquely bound one or several transcription factors extracted from Caco-2 cells. This finding supports a model in which ectopic anterior SHH expression in the developing limb results from abnormal binding of one or more...

  5. Comparative Analysis of mRNA Isoform Expression in Cardiac Hypertrophy and Development Reveals Multiple Post-Transcriptional Regulatory Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Yeon; Li, Wencheng; Zheng, Dinghai; Zhai, Peiyong; Zhao, Yun; Matsuda, Takahisa; Vatner, Stephen F.; Sadoshima, Junichi; Tian, Bin

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is enlargement of the heart in response to physiological or pathological stimuli, chiefly involving growth of myocytes in size rather than in number. Previous studies have shown that the expression pattern of a group of genes in hypertrophied heart induced by pressure overload resembles that at the embryonic stage of heart development, a phenomenon known as activation of the “fetal gene program”. Here, using a genome-wide approach we systematically defined genes and pathways regulated in short- and long-term cardiac hypertrophy conditions using mice with transverse aortic constriction (TAC), and compared them with those regulated at different stages of embryonic and postnatal development. In addition, exon-level analysis revealed widespread mRNA isoform changes during cardiac hypertrophy resulting from alternative usage of terminal or internal exons, some of which are also developmentally regulated and may be attributable to decreased expression of Fox-1 protein in cardiac hypertrophy. Genes with functions in certain pathways, such as cell adhesion and cell morphology, are more likely to be regulated by alternative splicing. Moreover, we found 3′UTRs of mRNAs were generally shortened through alternative cleavage and polyadenylation in hypertrophy, and microRNA target genes were generally de-repressed, suggesting coordinated mechanisms to increase mRNA stability and protein production during hypertrophy. Taken together, our results comprehensively delineated gene and mRNA isoform regulation events in cardiac hypertrophy and revealed their relations to those in development, and suggested that modulation of mRNA isoform expression plays an importance role in heart remodeling under pressure overload. PMID:21799842

  6. Isolation and functional characterization of a transcription factor VpNAC1 from Chinese wild Vitis pseudoreticulata.