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Sample records for transcription reactivation steps

  1. Mitotic bookmarking: maintaining post-mitotic reprogramming of transcription reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodhi, Niraj; Ji, Yingbiao; Tulin, Alexei

    2016-03-01

    Restoring chromatin structure with high fidelity after mitosis is critical for cell survival. Transcriptional reactivation of genes is the first step toward establishing identity of the daughter cell. During mitosis, chromatin bookmarking factors associated with specific chromatin regions ensure the restoration of the original gene expression pattern in daughter cells. Recent findings have provided new insights into the mechanisms, regulation, and biological significance of gene bookmarking in eukaryotes. In this review, we discuss how epigenetic factors, such as Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1, establish epigenetic memory in mitotic chromatin.

  2. Student Transcript-Enhanced Placement Study (STEPS). Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Terrence

    2013-01-01

    Prior research suggests that using high school transcripts may improve English and math placement accuracy at colleges. Between 2012 and 2013, the Research and Planning Group for California Community Colleges (RP Group) conducted the Student Transcript Enhanced Placement Study (STEPS) in partnership with the California Community Colleges…

  3. Two Step Synthesis of a Non-symmetric Acetylcholinesterase Reactivator

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    Vit Koleckar

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The newly developed and very promising acetylcholinesterase reactivator (E-1- (2-hydroxyiminomethylpyridinium-4-(4-hydroxyiminomethylpyridinium-but-2-ene dibromide was prepared using two different pathways via a two-step synthesis involving the appropriate (E-1-(4-bromobut-2-enyl-2- or 4-hydroxyiminomethyl-pyridinium bromides. Afterwards, purities and yields of the desired product prepared by both routes were compared. Finally, its potency to reactivate several nerve agent-inhibited acetylcholinesterases was tested.

  4. Mitotic transcription and waves of gene reactivation during mitotic exit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palozola, Katherine C; Donahue, Greg; Liu, Hong; Grant, Gregory R; Becker, Justin S; Cote, Allison; Yu, Hongtao; Raj, Arjun; Zaret, Kenneth S

    2017-10-06

    Although the genome is generally thought to be transcriptionally silent during mitosis, technical limitations have prevented sensitive mapping of transcription during mitosis and mitotic exit. Thus, the means by which the interphase expression pattern is transduced to daughter cells have been unclear. We used 5-ethynyluridine to pulse-label transcripts during mitosis and mitotic exit and found that many genes exhibit transcription during mitosis, as confirmed with fluorescein isothiocyanate-uridine 5'-triphosphate labeling, RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization, and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The first round of transcription immediately after mitosis primarily activates genes involved in the growth and rebuilding of daughter cells, rather than cell type-specific functions. We propose that the cell's transcription pattern is largely retained at a low level through mitosis, whereas the amplitude of transcription observed in interphase is reestablished during mitotic exit. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  5. Reactivation of Latent HIV-1 Expression by Engineered TALE Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdigão, Pedro; Gaj, Thomas; Santa-Marta, Mariana; Barbas, Carlos F; Goncalves, Joao

    2016-01-01

    The presence of replication-competent HIV-1 -which resides mainly in resting CD4+ T cells--is a major hurdle to its eradication. While pharmacological approaches have been useful for inducing the expression of this latent population of virus, they have been unable to purge HIV-1 from all its reservoirs. Additionally, many of these strategies have been associated with adverse effects, underscoring the need for alternative approaches capable of reactivating viral expression. Here we show that engineered transcriptional modulators based on customizable transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins can induce gene expression from the HIV-1 long terminal repeat promoter, and that combinations of TALE transcription factors can synergistically reactivate latent viral expression in cell line models of HIV-1 latency. We further show that complementing TALE transcription factors with Vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, enhances HIV-1 expression in latency models. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that TALE transcription factors are a potentially effective alternative to current pharmacological routes for reactivating latent virus and that combining synthetic transcriptional activators with histone deacetylase inhibitors could lead to the development of improved therapies for latent HIV-1 infection.

  6. Reactivation of Latent HIV-1 Expression by Engineered TALE Transcription Factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Perdigão

    Full Text Available The presence of replication-competent HIV-1 -which resides mainly in resting CD4+ T cells--is a major hurdle to its eradication. While pharmacological approaches have been useful for inducing the expression of this latent population of virus, they have been unable to purge HIV-1 from all its reservoirs. Additionally, many of these strategies have been associated with adverse effects, underscoring the need for alternative approaches capable of reactivating viral expression. Here we show that engineered transcriptional modulators based on customizable transcription activator-like effector (TALE proteins can induce gene expression from the HIV-1 long terminal repeat promoter, and that combinations of TALE transcription factors can synergistically reactivate latent viral expression in cell line models of HIV-1 latency. We further show that complementing TALE transcription factors with Vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, enhances HIV-1 expression in latency models. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that TALE transcription factors are a potentially effective alternative to current pharmacological routes for reactivating latent virus and that combining synthetic transcriptional activators with histone deacetylase inhibitors could lead to the development of improved therapies for latent HIV-1 infection.

  7. Development of augmentation mechanism for large reactivity step in CFBR-II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Cenming; Zhang Yi; Rong Ru; Hu Qian

    2008-01-01

    Linear motor, as the implementation mechanism for augmentation of large reactivity step in the CFBR-II reactor, is used to step increase the reactivity during the pulse burst. The whole system includes linear motor, Driving amplifier, Siemens PLC, ACE shock Absorber, and etc. The augmentation mechanism driven by linear motor can effectively overcome the disadvantages of pneumatic drive, and is featured by small volume, light weight, high speed movement, and high driving accuracy, and at the meantime, the linear motor can operate according to the preset rate curve. (authors)

  8. Non-sequential and multi-step splicing of the dystrophin transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzoli, Isabella; Pulyakhina, Irina; Verwey, Nisha E; Ariyurek, Yavuz; Laros, Jeroen F J; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke

    2016-01-01

    The dystrophin protein encoding DMD gene is the longest human gene. The 2.2 Mb long human dystrophin transcript takes 16 hours to be transcribed and is co-transcriptionally spliced. It contains long introns (24 over 10kb long, 5 over 100kb long) and the heterogeneity in intron size makes it an ideal transcript to study different aspects of the human splicing process. Splicing is a complex process and much is unknown regarding the splicing of long introns in human genes. Here, we used ultra-deep transcript sequencing to characterize splicing of the dystrophin transcripts in 3 different human skeletal muscle cell lines, and explored the order of intron removal and multi-step splicing. Coverage and read pair analyses showed that around 40% of the introns were not always removed sequentially. Additionally, for the first time, we report that non-consecutive intron removal resulted in 3 or more joined exons which are flanked by unspliced introns and we defined these joined exons as an exon block. Lastly, computational and experimental data revealed that, for the majority of dystrophin introns, multistep splicing events are used to splice out a single intron. Overall, our data show for the first time in a human transcript, that multi-step intron removal is a general feature of mRNA splicing.

  9. Effect of the selective adsorption on the reactive scattering process of molecular beams from stepped surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, N.

    1977-01-01

    An indicative proposal which may explain the diffusion of incident atomic beams scattered by a crystal surface is made in terms of the selective adsorption mechanism. In this sense, the stepped metallic surfaces present characteristics which enhance the displacements and the lifetimes of the beams on the surface. This may be important for increasing the exchange reactive scattering of molecules from crystal surfaces

  10. Step aerobic combined with resistance training improves cutaneous microvascular reactivity in overweight women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suksom, D; Phanpheng, Y; Soogarun, S; Sapwarobol, S

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of combined aerobic and resistance exercise training on body weight and cutaneous microvascular reactivity in overweight individuals. A total of 41 overweight women aged 30-45 years (BMI 25-29.9 kg/m²) were randomized into sedentary time control (CON; N.=15), traditional aerobic dance (AD; N.=11), and step aerobic dance combined with upper-body resistance training (SAR; N.=15) groups. Exercise programs were 50 minutes/session, 3 times/week for 12 weeks. Maximal oxygen consumption and 1-RM strength of lower body increased (Pocclusive reactive hyperemia was positively and significantly correlated with adiponectin level (r=0.23). The present findings suggest that simultaneously performed step aerobic dance and resistance training exerts more favorable effects on weight loss and improving cutaneous microvascular reactivity in overweight women.

  11. Restarting Lytic Gene Transcription at the Onset of Herpes Simplex Virus Reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliffe, Anna R; Wilson, Angus C

    2017-01-15

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) establishes a latent reservoir in neurons of human peripheral nerves. In this quiescent state, the viral genome persists as a circular, histone-associated episome, and transcription of viral lytic cycle genes is largely suppressed through epigenetic processes. Periodically, latent virus undergoes reactivation whereby lytic genes are activated and viral replication occurs. In this Gem, we review recent evidence that mechanisms governing the initial transcription of lytic genes are distinct from those of de novo infection and directly link reactivation to neuronal stress response pathways. We also discuss evidence that lytic cycle gene expression can be uncoupled from the full reactivation program, arguing for a less sharply bimodal definition of latency. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  12. Gene bookmarking accelerates the kinetics of post-mitotic transcriptional re-activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Rui; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Fu, Yu; Lazar, Zsolt; Spector, David L

    2011-10-09

    Although transmission of the gene expression program from mother to daughter cells has been suggested to be mediated by gene bookmarking, the precise mechanism by which bookmarking mediates post-mitotic transcriptional re-activation has been unclear. Here, we used a real-time gene expression system to quantitatively demonstrate that transcriptional activation of the same genetic locus occurs with a significantly more rapid kinetics in post-mitotic cells versus interphase cells. RNA polymerase II large subunit (Pol II) and bromodomain protein 4 (BRD4) were recruited to the locus in a different sequential order on interphase initiation versus post-mitotic re-activation resulting from the recognition by BRD4 of increased levels of histone H4 Lys 5 acetylation (H4K5ac) on the previously activated locus. BRD4 accelerated the dynamics of messenger RNA synthesis by de-compacting chromatin and hence facilitating transcriptional re-activation. Using a real-time quantitative approach, we identified differences in the kinetics of transcriptional activation between interphase and post-mitotic cells that are mediated by a chromatin-based epigenetic mechanism.

  13. Fabrication of conductive copper patterns using reactive inkjet printing followed by two-step electroless plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Jin-Ju; Lin, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Yan; Sowade, Enrico; Baumann, Reinhard R.; Feng, Zhe-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Copper patterns were fabricated by reactive inkjet printing and two-step electroless plating. • Cu particles produced via reactive inkjet printing act as catalyst for copper electroless plating. • High conductivity can be obtained without many printing passes and high temperature sintering. • This approach can largely avoid nozzle-clogging problems. • This approach presents a potential way in the flexible printed electronics with simple process. - Abstract: A simple and low-cost process for fabricating conductive copper patterns on flexible polyimide substrates was demonstrated. Copper catalyst patterns were first produced on polyimide substrates using reactive inkjet printing of Cu (II)-bearing ink and reducing ink, and then the conductive copper patterns were generated after a two-step electroless plating procedure. The copper layers were characterized by optical microscope, SEM, XRD and EDS. Homogeneously distributed copper nanoclusters were found in the catalyst patterns. A thin copper layer with uniform particle size was formed after first-step electroless plating, and a thick copper layer of about 14.3 μm with closely packed structure and fine crystallinity was produced after second-step electroless plating. This resulting copper layer had good solderability, reliable adhesion strength and a low resistivity of 5.68 μΩ cm without any sintering process.

  14. Transcriptional and physiological changes during Mycobacterium tuberculosis reactivation from non-replicating persistence

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    Peicheng Du

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis can persist for years in the hostile environment of the host in a non-replicating or slowly replicating state. While active disease predominantly results from reactivation of a latent infection, the molecular mechanisms of M. tuberculosis reactivation are still poorly understood. We characterized the physiology and global transcriptomic profiles of M. tuberculosis during reactivation from hypoxia-induced non-replicating persistence. We found that M. tuberculosis reactivation upon reaeration was associated with a lag phase, in which the recovery of cellular physiological and metabolic functions preceded the resumption of cell replication. Enrichment analysis of the transcriptomic dynamics revealed changes to many metabolic pathways and transcription regulons/subnetworks that orchestrated the metabolic and physiological transformation in preparation for cell division. In particular, we found that M. tuberculosis reaeration lag phase is associated with down-regulation of persistence-associated regulons/subnetworks, including DosR, MprA, SigH, SigE and ClgR, as well as metabolic pathways including those involved in the uptake of lipids and their catabolism. More importantly, we identified a number of up-regulated transcription regulons and metabolic pathways, including those involved in metal transport and remobilization, second messenger-mediated responses, DNA repair and recombination, and synthesis of major cell wall components. We also found that inactivation of the major alternative sigma factors SigE or SigH disrupted exit from persistence, underscoring the importance of the global transcriptional reprogramming during M. tuberculosis reactivation. Our observations suggest that M. tuberculosis lag phase is associated with a global gene expression reprogramming that defines the initiation of a reactivation process.

  15. CD8 T cells control cytomegalovirus latency by epitope-specific sensing of transcriptional reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Christian O; Holtappels, Rafaela; Tervo, Hanna-Mari; Böhm, Verena; Däubner, Torsten; Oehrlein-Karpi, Silke A; Kühnapfel, Birgit; Renzaho, Angélique; Strand, Dennis; Podlech, Jürgen; Reddehase, Matthias J; Grzimek, Natascha K A

    2006-11-01

    During murine cytomegalovirus (mCMV) latency in the lungs, most of the viral genomes are transcriptionally silent at the major immediate-early locus, but rare and stochastic episodes of desilencing lead to the expression of IE1 transcripts. This low-frequency but perpetual expression is accompanied by an activation of lung-resident effector-memory CD8 T cells specific for the antigenic peptide 168-YPHFMPTNL-176, which is derived from the IE1 protein. These molecular and immunological findings were combined in the "silencing/desilencing and immune sensing hypothesis" of cytomegalovirus latency and reactivation. This hypothesis proposes that IE1 gene expression proceeds to cell surface presentation of the IE1 peptide by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecule L(d) and that its recognition by CD8 T cells terminates virus reactivation. Here we provide experimental evidence in support of this hypothesis. We generated mutant virus mCMV-IE1-L176A, in which the antigenic IE1 peptide is functionally deleted by a point mutation of the C-terminal MHC class I anchor residue Leu into Ala. Two revertant viruses, mCMV-IE1-A176L and the wobble nucleotide-marked mCMV-IE1-A176L*, in which Leu is restored by back-mutation of Ala codon GCA into Leu codons CTA and CTT, respectively, were constructed. Pulmonary latency of the mutant virus was found to be associated with an increased prevalence of IE1 transcription and with events of IE3 transactivator splicing. In conclusion, IE1-specific CD8 T cells recognize and terminate virus reactivation in vivo at the first opportunity in the reactivated gene expression program. The perpetual gene expression and antigen presentation might represent the driving molecular force in CMV-associated immunosenescence.

  16. Oct-1 acts as a transcriptional repressor on the C-reactive protein promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voleti, Bhavya; Hammond, David J.; Thirumalai, Avinash; Agrawal, Alok

    2012-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), a plasma protein of the innate immune system, is produced by hepatocytes. A critical regulatory region (−42 to −57) on the CRP promoter contains binding site for the IL-6-activated transcription factor C/EBPβ. The IL-1β-activated transcription factor NF-κB binds to a κB site located nearby (−63 to −74). The κB site overlaps an octamer motif (−59 to −66) which is the binding site for the constitutively active transcription factor Oct-1. Oct-1 is known to function both as a transcriptional repressor and as an activator depending upon the promoter context. Also, Oct-1 can regulate gene expression either by binding directly to the promoter or by interacting with other transcription factors bound to the promoter. The aim of this study was to investigate the functions of Oct-1 in regulating CRP expression. In luciferase transactivation assays, overexpressed Oct-1 inhibited (IL-6+IL-1β)-induced CRP expression in Hep3B cells. Deletion of the Oct-1 site from the promoter drastically reduced the cytokine response because the κB site was altered as a consequence of deleting the Oct-1 site. Surprisingly, overexpressed Oct-1 inhibited the residual (IL-6+IL-1β)-induced CRP expression through the promoter lacking the Oct-1 site. Similarly, deletion of the Oct-1 site reduced the induction of CRP expression in response to overexpressed C/EBPβ, and overexpressed Oct-1 inhibited C/EBPβ-induced CRP expression through the promoter lacking the Oct-1 site. We conclude that Oct-1 acts as a transcriptional repressor of CRP expression and it does so by occupying its cognate site on the promoter and also via other transcription factors by an as yet undefined mechanism. PMID:22750226

  17. Curaxin CBL0100 Blocks HIV-1 Replication and Reactivation through Inhibition of Viral Transcriptional Elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean, Maxime J; Hayashi, Tsuyoshi; Huang, Huachao; Brennan, Justin; Simpson, Sydney; Purmal, Andrei; Gurova, Katerina; Keefer, Michael C; Kobie, James J; Santoso, Netty G; Zhu, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Despite combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), predominantly caused by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), remains incurable. The barrier to a cure lies in the virus' ability to establish a latent infection in HIV/AIDS patients. Unsurprisingly, efforts for a sterilizing cure have focused on the "shock and kill" strategy using latency-reversing agents (LRAs) to complement cART in order to eliminate these latent reservoirs. However, this method faces numerous challenges. Recently, the "block and lock" strategy has been proposed. It aims to reinforce a deep state of latency and prevent sporadic reactivation ("blip") of HIV-1 using latency-promoting agents (LPAs) for a functional cure. Our studies of curaxin 100 (CBL0100), a small-molecule targeting the facilitates chromatin transcription (FACT) complex, show that it blocks both HIV-1 replication and reactivation in in vitro and ex vivo models of HIV-1. Mechanistic investigation elucidated that CBL0100 preferentially targets HIV-1 transcriptional elongation and decreases the occupancy of RNA Polymerase II (Pol II) and FACT at the HIV-1 promoter region. In conclusion, CBL0100 is a newly identified inhibitor of HIV-1 transcription that can be used as an LPA in the "block and lock" cure strategy.

  18. Curaxin CBL0100 Blocks HIV-1 Replication and Reactivation through Inhibition of Viral Transcriptional Elongation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime J. Jean

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite combination antiretroviral therapy (cART, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, predominantly caused by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1, remains incurable. The barrier to a cure lies in the virus' ability to establish a latent infection in HIV/AIDS patients. Unsurprisingly, efforts for a sterilizing cure have focused on the “shock and kill” strategy using latency-reversing agents (LRAs to complement cART in order to eliminate these latent reservoirs. However, this method faces numerous challenges. Recently, the “block and lock” strategy has been proposed. It aims to reinforce a deep state of latency and prevent sporadic reactivation (“blip” of HIV-1 using latency-promoting agents (LPAs for a functional cure. Our studies of curaxin 100 (CBL0100, a small-molecule targeting the facilitates chromatin transcription (FACT complex, show that it blocks both HIV-1 replication and reactivation in in vitro and ex vivo models of HIV-1. Mechanistic investigation elucidated that CBL0100 preferentially targets HIV-1 transcriptional elongation and decreases the occupancy of RNA Polymerase II (Pol II and FACT at the HIV-1 promoter region. In conclusion, CBL0100 is a newly identified inhibitor of HIV-1 transcription that can be used as an LPA in the “block and lock” cure strategy.

  19. One-step low temperature reactive consolidation of high purity nanocrystalline Mg{sub 2}Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shaoping, E-mail: chenshaoping@tyut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Zhang, Xia [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Fan, Wenhao, E-mail: fanwenhao1979@163.com [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Yi, Tanghong [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Quach, Dat V. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Bux, Sabah [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Meng, Qingsen [Key Laboratory of Interface Science and Engineering in Advanced Materials, Ministry of Education, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); College of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Kauzlarich, Susan M. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Munir, Zuhair A. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Bulk nanocrystalline Mg{sub 2}Si were fabricated by one-step reactive sintering. • Use of MgH{sub 2} instead of Mg prevented the formation of MgO. • Presence of the pores contributed to decreasing the thermal conductivity. • Samples with 1 at.% Bi had a maximum ZT of 0.6 at 775. - Abstract: Bulk nanocrystalline Mg{sub 2}Si thermoelectric materials were synthesized and consolidated in a one-step process through a solid-state reaction between magnesium hydride and silicon, using the spark plasma sintering (SPS) method. The hydrogen produced in the process alleviates the problem of the oxidation of Mg. The samples were reactively sintered at temperatures in the range 723–823 K and under a uniaxial pressure in the range of 71–164 MPa in 5 min. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis showed the products to be pure Mg{sub 2}Si. The grain size of the consolidated samples was less than 500 nm, as determined by transmission electron spectroscopy (TEM). Residual nano-pores were observed by scanning electron microscopy at grain boundaries; their presence is believed to be the consequence of hydrogen evolution during the reactive sintering. The effect of synthesis temperature and pressure on crystallite size, density, and transport properties was determined. The results showed that use of MgH{sub 2} instead of Mg in the one-step method prevents the formation of MgO. The addition of 1 at.% Bi as a dopant improved the power factor significantly. Samples with 1 at.% Bi had a ZT of 0.6 at 775 K.

  20. Human Galectin-9 Is a Potent Mediator of HIV Transcription and Reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Mohsen, Mohamed; Chavez, Leonard; Tandon, Ravi; Chew, Glen M; Deng, Xutao; Danesh, Ali; Keating, Sheila; Lanteri, Marion; Samuels, Michael L; Hoh, Rebecca; Sacha, Jonah B; Norris, Philip J; Niki, Toshiro; Shikuma, Cecilia M; Hirashima, Mitsuomi; Deeks, Steven G; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C; Pillai, Satish K

    2016-06-01

    Identifying host immune determinants governing HIV transcription, latency and infectivity in vivo is critical to developing an HIV cure. Based on our recent finding that the host factor p21 regulates HIV transcription during antiretroviral therapy (ART), and published data demonstrating that the human carbohydrate-binding immunomodulatory protein galectin-9 regulates p21, we hypothesized that galectin-9 modulates HIV transcription. We report that the administration of a recombinant, stable form of galectin-9 (rGal-9) potently reverses HIV latency in vitro in the J-Lat HIV latency model. Furthermore, rGal-9 reverses HIV latency ex vivo in primary CD4+ T cells from HIV-infected, ART-suppressed individuals (p = 0.002), more potently than vorinostat (p = 0.02). rGal-9 co-administration with the latency reversal agent "JQ1", a bromodomain inhibitor, exhibits synergistic activity (pHIV latency. Beyond latent viral reactivation, rGal-9 induces robust expression of the host antiviral deaminase APOBEC3G in vitro and ex vivo (FDRHIV reservoir will be replenished when latency is reversed therapeutically. Lastly, endogenous levels of soluble galectin-9 in the plasma of 72 HIV-infected ART-suppressed individuals were associated with levels of HIV RNA in CD4+ T cells (pHIV antibodies (pHIV transcription and viral production in vivo during therapy. Our data suggest that galectin-9 and the host glycosylation machinery should be explored as foundations for novel HIV cure strategies.

  1. Single-Cell RNA-Seq Reveals Transcriptional Heterogeneity in Latent and Reactivated HIV-Infected Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golumbeanu, Monica; Cristinelli, Sara; Rato, Sylvie; Munoz, Miguel; Cavassini, Matthias; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Ciuffi, Angela

    2018-04-24

    Despite effective treatment, HIV can persist in latent reservoirs, which represent a major obstacle toward HIV eradication. Targeting and reactivating latent cells is challenging due to the heterogeneous nature of HIV-infected cells. Here, we used a primary model of HIV latency and single-cell RNA sequencing to characterize transcriptional heterogeneity during HIV latency and reactivation. Our analysis identified transcriptional programs leading to successful reactivation of HIV expression. Copyright © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Decreased reactivation of a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) latency associated transcript (LAT) mutant using the in vivo mouse UV-B model of induced reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    BenMohamed, Lbachir; Osorio, Nelson; Srivastava, Ruchi; Khan, Arif A.; Simpson, Jennifer L.; Wechsler, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Blinding ocular herpetic disease in humans is due to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) reactivations from latency, rather than to primary acute infection. The cellular and molecular mechanisms that control the HSV-1 latency-reactivation cycle remain to be fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to determine if reactivation of the HSV-1 latency associated transcript (LAT) deletion mutant (dLAT2903) was impaired in this model, as it is in the rabbit model of induced and spontaneous reactivation and in the explant TG induced reactivation model in mice. The eyes of mice latently infected with wild type HSV-1 strain McKrae (LAT(+) virus) or dLAT2903 (LAT(−) virus) were irradiated with UV-B and reactivation was determined. We found that compared to LAT(−) virus, LAT(+) virus reactivated at a higher rate as determined by shedding of virus in tears on days 3 to 7 after UV-B treatment. Thus, the UV-B induced reactivation model of HSV-1 appears to be a useful small animal model for studying the mechanisms involved in how LAT enhances the HSV-1 reactivation phenotype. The utility of the model for investigating the immune evasion mechanisms regulating the HSV-1 latency/reactivation cycle and for testing the protective efficacy of candidate therapeutic vaccines and drugs are discussed. PMID:26002839

  3. One-step reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification for the detection of Maize chlorotic mottle virus in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ling; Jiao, Zhiyuan; Liu, Dongmei; Liu, Xingliang; Xia, Zihao; Deng, Congliang; Zhou, Tao; Fan, Zaifeng

    2017-02-01

    Maize chlorotic mottle virus (MCMV) is spreading in many regions worldwide, causing maize lethal necrosis when co-infected with a potyvirid. In this study, one-step reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay was developed to detect MCMV in maize. A set of four specific primers was designed based on the conserved coat protein gene sequences of MCMV. The RT-LAMP could be completed within 60min under isothermal condition at 63°C. The sensitivity test showed that the RT-LAMP was about 10-fold more sensitive than RT-PCR and no cross-reactivity was detected with other viral pathogens infecting maize in China. Moreover, the results of RT-LAMP could be visually inspected by SYBR Green I staining in a closed-tube, facilitating high-throughput application of MCMV detection. This method was further verified by testing field-collected samples. These results suggested that the developed MCMV RT-LAMP technique is a rapid, efficient and sensitive method which could be used as a routine screen for MCMV infection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Human Galectin-9 Is a Potent Mediator of HIV Transcription and Reactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Abdel-Mohsen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Identifying host immune determinants governing HIV transcription, latency and infectivity in vivo is critical to developing an HIV cure. Based on our recent finding that the host factor p21 regulates HIV transcription during antiretroviral therapy (ART, and published data demonstrating that the human carbohydrate-binding immunomodulatory protein galectin-9 regulates p21, we hypothesized that galectin-9 modulates HIV transcription. We report that the administration of a recombinant, stable form of galectin-9 (rGal-9 potently reverses HIV latency in vitro in the J-Lat HIV latency model. Furthermore, rGal-9 reverses HIV latency ex vivo in primary CD4+ T cells from HIV-infected, ART-suppressed individuals (p = 0.002, more potently than vorinostat (p = 0.02. rGal-9 co-administration with the latency reversal agent "JQ1", a bromodomain inhibitor, exhibits synergistic activity (p<0.05. rGal-9 signals through N-linked oligosaccharides and O-linked hexasaccharides on the T cell surface, modulating the gene expression levels of key transcription initiation, promoter proximal-pausing, and chromatin remodeling factors that regulate HIV latency. Beyond latent viral reactivation, rGal-9 induces robust expression of the host antiviral deaminase APOBEC3G in vitro and ex vivo (FDR<0.006 and significantly reduces infectivity of progeny virus, decreasing the probability that the HIV reservoir will be replenished when latency is reversed therapeutically. Lastly, endogenous levels of soluble galectin-9 in the plasma of 72 HIV-infected ART-suppressed individuals were associated with levels of HIV RNA in CD4+ T cells (p<0.02 and with the quantity and binding avidity of circulating anti-HIV antibodies (p<0.009, suggesting a role of galectin-9 in regulating HIV transcription and viral production in vivo during therapy. Our data suggest that galectin-9 and the host glycosylation machinery should be explored as foundations for novel HIV cure strategies.

  5. Multiple steps in the regulation of transcription-factor level and activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calkhoven, CF; Ab, G

    1996-01-01

    This review focuses on the regulation of transcription factors, many of which are DNA-binding proteins that recognize cis-regulatory elements of target genes and are the most direct regulators of gene transcription. Transcription factors serve as integration centres of the different

  6. Specific reactivation of latent HIV-1 with designer zinc-finger transcription factors targeting the HIV-1 5'-LTR promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P; Qu, X; Wang, X; Zhu, X; Zeng, H; Chen, H; Zhu, H

    2014-05-01

    HIV-1 latency remains the primary obstacle to the eradication of this virus. The current latency-reversing agents cannot effectively and specifically eliminate latent HIV-1 reservoirs. Therefore, better approaches are urgently needed. In this study, we describe a novel strategy to reactivate latent HIV-1 using zinc-finger transcription factors composed of designer zinc-finger proteins and the transcriptional activation domain VP64. For the first time, we demonstrate that ZF-VP64 with HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter-specific affinity could significantly reactivate HIV-1 expression from latently infected cells without altering cell proliferation or cell cycle progression. We also provide evidence that the reactivation of HIV-1 by ZF-VP64 occurs through specific binding to the 5'-LTR promoter. Our results demonstrate the potential of this novel approach for anti-HIV-1 latency therapy.

  7. Stability of gas atomized reactive powders through multiple step in-situ passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Iver E.; Steinmetz, Andrew D.; Byrd, David J.

    2017-05-16

    A method for gas atomization of oxygen-reactive reactive metals and alloys wherein the atomized particles are exposed as they solidify and cool in a very short time to multiple gaseous reactive agents for the in-situ formation of a protective reaction film on the atomized particles. The present invention is especially useful for making highly pyrophoric reactive metal or alloy atomized powders, such as atomized magnesium and magnesium alloy powders. The gaseous reactive species (agents) are introduced into the atomization spray chamber at locations downstream of a gas atomizing nozzle as determined by the desired powder or particle temperature for the reactions and the desired thickness of the reaction film.

  8. Leishmania donovani activates nuclear transcription factor-κB in macrophages through reactive oxygen intermediates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Km Singh, Vandana; Balaraman, Sridevi; Tewary, Poonam; Madhubala, Rentala

    2004-01-01

    Interaction of Leishmania donovani with macrophages antagonizes host defense mechanisms by interfering with a cascade of cell signaling processes in the macrophages. An early intracellular signaling event that follows receptor engagement is the activation of transcription factor NF-κB. It has been reported earlier that NF-κB-dependent signaling pathway regulates proinflammatory cytokine release. We therefore investigated the effect of L. donovani infectivity on this nuclear transcription factor in macrophage cell line J774A.1. Both L. donovani and its surface molecule lipophosphoglycan (LPG) resulted in a dose- and time-dependent activation of NF-κB-DNA binding activity in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. We also report the involvement of IκB-α and IκB-β in the persistent activation of NF-κB by L. donovani. We demonstrate that the NF-κB activation was independent of viability of the parasite. Electrophoretic mobility supershift assay indicated that the NF-κB complex consists of p65 and c-rel subunits. The interaction of parasite with the macrophages and not the cellular uptake was important for NF-κB activation. Both p38 and ERK mitogen activated protein kinase (MAP) activation appears to be necessary for NF-κB activation by LPG. Preincubation of cells with antioxidants resulted in inhibition of L. donovani induced NF-κB activation, thereby suggesting a potential role of reactive oxygen species in L. donovani induced intracellular signaling. The present data indicate that antioxidants could play an important role in working out various therapeutic modalities to control leishmaniasis

  9. Step out of the groove : Epigenetic gene control systems and engineered transcription factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschure, Pernette J.; Visser, Astrid E.; Rots, Marianne G.; Hall, JC; Dunlap, JC; Friedmann, T; VanHeyningen,

    2006-01-01

    At the linear DNA level, gene activity is believed to be driven by binding of transcription factors, which subsequently recruit the RNA polymerase to the gene promoter region. However, it has become clear that transcriptional activation involves large complexes of many different proteins, which not

  10. Step out of the groove : epigenetic gene control systems and engineered transcription factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschure, P.J.; Visser, A.E.; Rots, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    At the linear DNA level, gene activity is believed to be driven by binding of transcription factors, which subsequently recruit the RNA polymerase to the gene promoter region. However, it has become clear that transcriptional activation involves large complexes of many different proteins, which not

  11. Increased Back-Bonding Explains Step-Edge Reactivity and Particle Size Effect for CO Activation on Ru Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foppa, Lucas; Copéret, Christophe; Comas-Vives, Aleix

    2016-12-28

    Carbon monoxide is a ubiquitous molecule, a key feedstock and intermediate in chemical processes. Its adsorption and activation, typically carried out on metallic nanoparticles (NPs), are strongly dependent on the particle size. In particular, small NPs, which in principle contain more corner and step-edge atoms, are surprisingly less reactive than larger ones. Hereby, first-principles calculations on explicit Ru NP models (1-2 nm) show that both small and large NPs can present step-edge sites (e.g., B 5 and B 6 sites). However, such sites display strong particle-size-dependent reactivity because of very subtle differences in local chemical bonding. State-of-the-art crystal orbital Hamilton population analysis allows a detailed molecular orbital picture of adsorbed CO on step-edges, which can be classified as flat (η 1 coordination) and concave (η 2 coordination) sites. Our analysis shows that the CO π-metal d π hybrid band responsible for the electron back-donation is better represented by an oxygen lone pair on flat sites, whereas it is delocalized on both C and O atoms on concave sites, increasing the back-bonding on these sites compared to flat step-edges or low-index surface sites. The bonding analysis also rationalizes why CO cleavage is easier on step-edge sites of large NPs compared to small ones irrespective of the site geometry. The lower reactivity of small NPs is due to the smaller extent of the Ru-O interaction in the η 2 adsorption mode, which destabilizes the η 2 transition-state structure for CO direct cleavage. Our findings provide a molecular understanding of the reactivity of CO on NPs, which is consistent with the observed particle size effect.

  12. Efficient biotinylation and single-step purification of tagged transcription factors in mammalian cells and transgenic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boer, Ernie; Rodriguez, Patrick; Bonte, Edgar; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Katsantoni, Eleni; Heck, Albert; Grosveld, Frank; Strouboulis, John

    2003-06-01

    Proteomic approaches require simple and efficient protein purification methodologies that are amenable to high throughput. Biotinylation is an attractive approach for protein complex purification due to the very high affinity of avidin/streptavidin for biotinylated templates. Here, we describe an approach for the single-step purification of transcription factor complex(es) based on specific in vivo biotinylation. We expressed the bacterial BirA biotin ligase in mammalian cells and demonstrated very efficient biotinylation of a hematopoietic transcription factor bearing a small (23-aa) artificial peptide tag. Biotinylation of the tagged transcription factor altered neither the factor's protein interactions or DNA binding properties in vivo nor its subnuclear distribution. Using this approach, we isolated the biotin-tagged transcription factor and at least one other known interacting protein from crude nuclear extracts by direct binding to streptavidin beads. Finally, this method works efficiently in transgenic mice, thus raising the prospect of using biotinylation tagging in protein complex purification directly from animal tissues. Therefore, BirA-mediated biotinylation of tagged proteins provides the basis for the single-step purification of proteins from mammalian cells.

  13. UV-enhanced reactivation of minute-virus-of-mice: stimulation of a late step in the viral life cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rommelaere, J.; Vos, J.-M.; Cornelis, J.J.

    1981-01-01

    UV-enhanced reactivation of minute-virus-of-mice (MVM), an autonomous parvovirus, was studied in parasynchronous mouse A9 cells. The survival of UV-irradiated MVM is increased in cells which have been UV-irradiated prior to infection. UV-enhanced reactivation can be explained neither by facilitated plaque detection on UV-treated indicator cells, nor by altered kinetics of virus production by UV-irradiated cells. No effect of the multiplicity of infection on virus survival was detected in unirradiated or irradiated cells. The magnitude of UV-enhanced reactivation is a direct exponential function of the UV dose administered to the virus while virus survival is inversely proportional to the UV dosage. The expression of UV-enhanced reactivation can be activated in cells arrested in G 0 , it requires de novo protein synthesis and it is maximal when cells are irradiated 30 h before the onset of viral DNA replication. Early phases of the viral cycle, such as adsorption to cellular receptors, migration to the nucleus and uncoating were not affected by cell irradiation and are unlikely targets of the UV-enhanced reactivation function(s). These results, together with the single-strandedness of the viral genome, strongly suggest that the step stimulated in UV-irradiated cells functions concomitant with, or subsequent to, viral DNA replication. (author)

  14. A hyperactive transcriptional state marks genome reactivation at the mitosis–G1 transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiung, Chris C.-S.; Bartman, Caroline R.; Huang, Peng; Ginart, Paul; Stonestrom, Aaron J.; Keller, Cheryl A.; Face, Carolyne; Jahn, Kristen S.; Evans, Perry; Sankaranarayanan, Laavanya; Giardine, Belinda; Hardison, Ross C.; Raj, Arjun; Blobel, Gerd A.

    2016-01-01

    During mitosis, RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and many transcription factors dissociate from chromatin, and transcription ceases globally. Transcription is known to restart in bulk by telophase, but whether de novo transcription at the mitosis–G1 transition is in any way distinct from later in interphase remains unknown. We tracked Pol II occupancy genome-wide in mammalian cells progressing from mitosis through late G1. Unexpectedly, during the earliest rounds of transcription at the mitosis–G1 transition, ∼50% of active genes and distal enhancers exhibit a spike in transcription, exceeding levels observed later in G1 phase. Enhancer–promoter chromatin contacts are depleted during mitosis and restored rapidly upon G1 entry but do not spike. Of the chromatin-associated features examined, histone H3 Lys27 acetylation levels at individual loci in mitosis best predict the mitosis–G1 transcriptional spike. Single-molecule RNA imaging supports that the mitosis–G1 transcriptional spike can constitute the maximum transcriptional activity per DNA copy throughout the cell division cycle. The transcriptional spike occurs heterogeneously and propagates to cell-to-cell differences in mature mRNA expression. Our results raise the possibility that passage through the mitosis–G1 transition might predispose cells to diverge in gene expression states. PMID:27340175

  15. A hyperactive transcriptional state marks genome reactivation at the mitosis-G1 transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiung, Chris C-S; Bartman, Caroline R; Huang, Peng; Ginart, Paul; Stonestrom, Aaron J; Keller, Cheryl A; Face, Carolyne; Jahn, Kristen S; Evans, Perry; Sankaranarayanan, Laavanya; Giardine, Belinda; Hardison, Ross C; Raj, Arjun; Blobel, Gerd A

    2016-06-15

    During mitosis, RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and many transcription factors dissociate from chromatin, and transcription ceases globally. Transcription is known to restart in bulk by telophase, but whether de novo transcription at the mitosis-G1 transition is in any way distinct from later in interphase remains unknown. We tracked Pol II occupancy genome-wide in mammalian cells progressing from mitosis through late G1. Unexpectedly, during the earliest rounds of transcription at the mitosis-G1 transition, ∼50% of active genes and distal enhancers exhibit a spike in transcription, exceeding levels observed later in G1 phase. Enhancer-promoter chromatin contacts are depleted during mitosis and restored rapidly upon G1 entry but do not spike. Of the chromatin-associated features examined, histone H3 Lys27 acetylation levels at individual loci in mitosis best predict the mitosis-G1 transcriptional spike. Single-molecule RNA imaging supports that the mitosis-G1 transcriptional spike can constitute the maximum transcriptional activity per DNA copy throughout the cell division cycle. The transcriptional spike occurs heterogeneously and propagates to cell-to-cell differences in mature mRNA expression. Our results raise the possibility that passage through the mitosis-G1 transition might predispose cells to diverge in gene expression states. © 2016 Hsiung et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  16. Rapid detection and quantification of Ebola Zaire virus by one-step real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Young-Tae; Ticer, Anysha; Carrion, Ricardo; Patterson, Jean L

    2017-04-01

    Given that Ebola virus causes severe hemorrhagic fever in humans with mortality rates as high as 90%, rapid and accurate detection of this virus is essential both for controlling infection and preventing further transmission. Here, a one-step qRT-PCR assay for rapid and quantitative detection of an Ebola Zaire strain using GP, VP24 or VP40 genes as a target is introduced. Routine assay conditions for hydrolysis probe detection were established from the manufacturer's protocol used in the assays. The analytical specificity and sensitivity of each assay was evaluated using in vitro synthesized viral RNA transcripts. The assays were highly specific for the RNA transcripts, no cross-reactivity being observed among them. The limits of detection of the assays ranged from 10 2 to 10 3 copies per reaction. The assays were also evaluated using viral RNAs extracted from cell culture-propagated viruses (Ebola Zaire, Sudan and Reston strains), confirming that they are gene- and strain-specific. The RT-PCR assays detected viral RNAs in blood samples from virus-infected animal, suggesting that they can be also a useful method for identifying Ebola virus in clinical samples. © 2017 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  17. Reactive stepping behaviour in response to forward loss of balance predicts future falls in community-dwelling older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carty, Christopher P; Cronin, Neil J; Nicholson, Deanne; Lichtwark, Glen A; Mills, Peter M; Kerr, Graham; Cresswell, Andrew G; Barrett, Rod S

    2015-01-01

    a fall occurs when an individual experiences a loss of balance from which they are unable to recover. Assessment of balance recovery ability in older adults may therefore help to identify individuals at risk of falls. The purpose of this 12-month prospective study was to assess whether the ability to recover from a forward loss of balance with a single step across a range of lean magnitudes was predictive of falls. two hundred and one community-dwelling older adults, aged 65-90 years, underwent baseline testing of sensori-motor function and balance recovery ability followed by 12-month prospective falls evaluation. Balance recovery ability was defined by whether participants required either single or multiple steps to recover from forward loss of balance from three lean magnitudes, as well as the maximum lean magnitude participants could recover from with a single step. forty-four (22%) participants experienced one or more falls during the follow-up period. Maximal recoverable lean magnitude and use of multiple steps to recover at the 15% body weight (BW) and 25%BW lean magnitudes significantly predicted a future fall (odds ratios 1.08-1.26). The Physiological Profile Assessment, an established tool that assesses variety of sensori-motor aspects of falls risk, was also predictive of falls (Odds ratios 1.22 and 1.27, respectively), whereas age, sex, postural sway and timed up and go were not predictive. reactive stepping behaviour in response to forward loss of balance and physiological profile assessment are independent predictors of a future fall in community-dwelling older adults. Exercise interventions designed to improve reactive stepping behaviour may protect against future falls. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Geriatrics Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. A Tripartite Amplification Loop Involving the Transcription Factor WRKY75, Salicylic Acid, and Reactive Oxygen Species Accelerates Leaf Senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Pengru; Li, Zhonghai; Huang, Peixin; Li, Bosheng; Fang, Shuang; Chu, Jinfang; Guo, Hongwei

    2017-11-01

    Leaf senescence is a highly coordinated, complicated process involving the integration of numerous internal and environmental signals. Salicylic acid (SA) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are two well-defined inducers of leaf senescence whose contents progressively and interdependently increase during leaf senescence via an unknown mechanism. Here, we characterized the transcription factor WRKY75 as a positive regulator of leaf senescence in Arabidopsis thaliana. Knockdown or knockout of WRKY75 delayed age-dependent leaf senescence, while overexpression of WRKY75 accelerated this process. WRKY75 transcription is induced by age, SA, H 2 O 2 , and multiple plant hormones. Meanwhile, WRKY75 promotes SA production by inducing the transcription of SA INDUCTION-DEFICIENT2 ( SID2 ) and suppresses H 2 O 2 scavenging, partly by repressing the transcription of CATALASE2 ( CAT2 ). Genetic analysis revealed that the mutation of SID2 or an increase in catalase activity rescued the precocious leaf senescence phenotype evoked by WRKY75 overexpression. Based on these results, we propose a tripartite amplification loop model in which WRKY75, SA, and ROS undergo a gradual but self-sustained rise driven by three interlinking positive feedback loops. This tripartite amplification loop provides a molecular framework connecting upstream signals, such as age and plant hormones, to the downstream regulatory network executed by SA- and H 2 O 2 -responsive transcription factors during leaf senescence. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  19. Selective control of primer usage in multiplex one-step reverse transcription PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Natasha

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiplex RT-PCR is a valuable technique used for pathogen identification, disease detection and relative quantification of gene expression. The simplification of this protocol into a one-step procedure saves time and reagents. However, intensive PCR optimization is often required to overcome competing undesired PCR primer extension during the RT step. Results Herein, we report multiplex one-step RT-PCR experiments in which the PCR primers contain thermolabile phosphotriester modification groups. The presence of these groups minimizes PCR primer extension during the RT step and allows for control of PCR primer extension until the more stringent, elevated temperatures of PCR are reached. Results reveal that the use of primers whose extension can be controlled in a temperature-mediated way provides improved one-step RT-PCR specificity in both singleplex and multiplex reaction formats. Conclusions The need for an accurate and sensitive technique to quantify mRNA expression levels makes the described modified primer technology a promising tool for use in multiplex one-step RT-PCR. A more accurate representation of the abundances in initial template sample is feasible with modified primers, as artifacts of biased PCR are reduced because of greater improvements in reaction specificity.

  20. Statistical modeling of tear strength for one step fixation process of reactive printing and easy care finishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asim, F.; Mahmood, M.

    2017-01-01

    Statistical modeling imparts significant role in predicting the impact of potential factors affecting the one step fixation process of reactive printing and easy care finishing. Investigation of significant factors on tear strength of cotton fabric for single step fixation of reactive printing and easy care finishing has been carried out in this research work using experimental design technique. The potential design factors were; concentration of reactive dye, concentration of crease resistant, fixation method and fixation temperature. The experiments were designed using DoE (Design of Experiment) and analyzed through software Design Expert. The detailed analysis of significant factors and interactions including ANOVA (Analysis of Variance), residuals, model accuracy and statistical model for tear strength has been presented. The interaction and contour plots of vital factors has been examined. It has been found from the statistical analysis that each factor has an interaction with other factor. Most of the investigated factors showed curvature effect on other factor. After critical examination of significant plots, quadratic model of tear strength with significant terms and their interaction at alpha = 0.05 has been developed. The calculated correlation coefficient, R2 of the developed model is 0.9056. The high values of correlation coefficient inferred that developed equation of tear strength will precisely predict the tear strength over the range of values. (author)

  1. The structure and reactivity of adsorbates on stepped Rh and Pt surfaces investigated by LEED, HREELS, TPD, XPS and STM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batteas, J.D. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Materials Science Div.

    1995-06-01

    Defects on surfaces such as steps play an important role in surface chemistry. In order to obtain an understanding of the influence of steps in surface chemical reactions, the structure and reactivity of small molecules (O{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2}S, and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) on atomically stepped surfaces of RH and Pt have been investigated. The detailed structures of CO and oxygen bonded to the Rh(110) surface were determined. The CO molecules bond near the short bridge sites with the CO molecular axis tilted approximately 24{degree} from the surface normal. Oxygen atoms are bound asymmetrically in the 3-fold fcc hollow-sites to the (111) facets of the steps. The interactions of CO and oxygen on the Rh(311) surface were examined. The reaction of CO with the ordered phases of O shows two distinct reaction channels, a low temperature reaction limited channel (200 K) and a high temperature diffusion limited channel (350 K). Models of the reaction geometry and dynamics are proposed. The thermal decomposition of ethylene was examined on the Rh(311) surface. The stable decomposition species (C{sub 2}H, CH and C{sub 2}) are formed near 300 K, approximately 100 K lower on the stepped Rh(311) than on the flatter Rh(111) surface. The formation of these species at lower temperatures is attributed to the stepped nature of the surface. Finally, in situ STM was used to examine surface structural changes of a stepped Pt(111) crystal under coadsorption of sulfur and CO. This is the first direct evidence for a new mechanism by which a surface covered with an unreactive, strongly chemisorbed overlayer can form new sites, for bonding and reactions to occur, by massive surface restructuring at the step edges. This new surface phenomenon answers some of the puzzles of metal surface catalysis and its implications are described. 278 refs.

  2. Drosophila JAK/STAT pathway reveals distinct initiation and reinforcement steps in early transcription of Sxl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Frank W; Erickson, James W

    2007-04-03

    X-linked signal elements (XSEs) communicate the dose of X chromosomes to the regulatory-switch gene Sex-lethal (Sxl) during Drosophila sex determination. Unequal XSE expression in precellular XX and XY nuclei ensures that only XX embryos will activate the establishment promoter, SxlPe, to produce a pulse of the RNA-binding protein, SXL [1]. Once XSE protein concentrations have been assessed, SxlPe is inactivated and the maintenance promoter, SxlPm, is turned on in both sexes; however, only in females is SXL present to direct the SxlPm-derived transcripts to be spliced into functional mRNA [2, 3]. Thereafter, Sxl is maintained in the on state by positive autoregulatory RNA splicing [2]. Once set in the stable on (female) or off (male) state, Sxl controls somatic sexual development through control of downstream effectors of sexual differentiation and dosage compensation [1, 4]. Most XSEs encode transcription factors that bind SxlPe, but the XSE unpaired (upd) encodes a secreted ligand for the JAK/STAT pathway [5-7]. We show that although STAT directly regulates SxlPe, it is dispensable for promoter activation. Instead, JAK/STAT is needed to maintain high-level SxlPe expression in order to ensure Sxl autoregulation in XX embryos. Thus, upd is a unique XSE that augments, rather than defines, the initial sex-determination signal.

  3. Multi-Step Deep Reactive Ion Etching Fabrication Process for Silicon-Based Terahertz Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung-Kubiak, Cecile (Inventor); Reck, Theodore (Inventor); Chattopadhyay, Goutam (Inventor); Perez, Jose Vicente Siles (Inventor); Lin, Robert H. (Inventor); Mehdi, Imran (Inventor); Lee, Choonsup (Inventor); Cooper, Ken B. (Inventor); Peralta, Alejandro (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A multi-step silicon etching process has been developed to fabricate silicon-based terahertz (THz) waveguide components. This technique provides precise dimensional control across multiple etch depths with batch processing capabilities. Nonlinear and passive components such as mixers and multipliers waveguides, hybrids, OMTs and twists have been fabricated and integrated into a small silicon package. This fabrication technique enables a wafer-stacking architecture to provide ultra-compact multi-pixel receiver front-ends in the THz range.

  4. The Next Step in Understanding Impaired Reactive Balance Control in People With Stroke: The Role of Defective Early Automatic Postural Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kam, D. de; Roelofs, J.M.B.; Bruijnes, A.; Geurts, A.C.; Weerdesteyn, V.G.M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Postural muscle responses are often impaired after stroke. We aimed to identify the contribution of deficits in very early postural responses to poorer reactive balance capacity, with a particular focus on reactive stepping as a key strategy for avoiding falls. METHODS: A

  5. Palladium-Catalyzed Direct C-H Arylations of Dioxythiophenes Bearing Reactive Functional Groups: A Step-Economical Approach for Functional π-Conjugated Oligoarenes

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Ching-Yuan

    2015-06-25

    A Pd-catalyzed and single-step C-H arylation of dioxythiophene derivates bearing unprotected reactive functional groups (-OH, -COOH, -N3) in a phosphine-free manner has been developed. Various dioxythiopene-based oligoarenes with extended π-conjugation are obtained with good yields (up to 90%). These oligoarenes display suitable optical properties (absorption and emission maxima, quantum yields) and contain reactive functional groups suitable for further conjugations with bioactive molecules. This new methodology is step economical (fewer synthetic steps), environmental friendly (no toxic metal-containing side-poducts) and the oligoarenes synthesized are potentially applicable for bio-labeling, bioimaging, and biosensing.

  6. Palladium-catalyzed direct C-H arylations of dioxythiophenes bearing reactive functional groups: a step-economical approach for functional π-conjugated oligoarenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ching-Yuan; Chong, Hui; Lin, Hsing-An; Yamashita, Yoshiro; Zhang, Bin; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Hashizume, Daizuke; Yu, Hsiao-Hua

    2015-08-21

    A Pd-catalyzed single-step C-H arylation of dioxythiophene derivatives bearing unprotected reactive functional groups (-OH, -COOH, -N3) in a phosphine-free manner has been developed. Various dioxythiopene-based oligoarenes with extended π-conjugation are obtained with good yields (up to 90%). These oligoarenes display suitable optical properties (absorption and emission maxima, quantum yields) and contain reactive functional groups suitable for further conjugations with bioactive molecules. This new methodology is step economical (fewer synthetic steps) and environmentally friendly (no toxic metal-containing by-products) and the oligoarenes synthesized are potentially applicable for bio-labeling, bioimaging, and biosensing.

  7. A diagnostic one-step real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction method for accurate detection of influenza virus type A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Mohammad Amin; Ziyaeyan, Mazyar; Alborzi, Abdolvahab

    2016-12-01

    Influenza A is known as a public health concern worldwide. In this study, a novel one-step real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rtRT-PCR) assay was designed and optimized for the detection of influenza A viruses. The primers and probe were designed based on the analysis of 90 matrix nucleotide sequence data of influenza type A subtypes from the GenBank database of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). The influenza virus A/Tehran/5652/2010 (H1N1 pdm09) was used as a reference. The rtRT-PCR assay was optimized, compared with that of the World Health Organization (WHO), and its analytical sensitivity, specificity and reproducibility were evaluated. In total, 64 nasopharyngeal swabs from patients with influenza-like illness (ILI) and 41 samples without ILI symptoms were tested for the virus, using conventional cell culture, direct immunofluorescence antibody (DFA) methods, and one-step rtRT-PCR with the designed primer set and probe and the WHO's. The optimized assay results were similar to the WHO's. The optimized assay results were similar to WHO's, with non-significant differences for 10-10 3 copies of viral RNA/reaction ( p > 0.05). It detected 10 copies of viral RNA/reaction with high reproducibility and no cross reactivity with other respiratory viruses. A specific cytopathic effect was observed in 6/64 (9.37%) of the ILI group using conventional culture and DFA staining methods; however, it was not seen in non-ILI. Also, the results of our assay and the WHO's were similar to those of viral isolation and DFA staining. Given the high specificity, sensitivity and reproducibility of this novel assay, it can serve as a reliable diagnostic tool for the detection of influenza A viruses in clinical specimens and lab experiments.

  8. Simultaneous Detection of Four Foodborne Viruses in Food Samples Using a One-Step Multiplex Reverse Transcription PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shin-Young; Kim, Mi-Ju; Kim, Hyun-Joong; Jeong, KwangCheol Casey; Kim, Hae-Yeong

    2018-02-28

    A one-step multiplex reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) method comprising six primer sets (for the detection of norovirus GI and GII, hepatitis A virus, rotavirus, and astrovirus) was developed to simultaneously detect four kinds of pathogenic viruses. The size of the PCR products for norovirus GI and GII, hepatitis A virus (VP3/VP1 and P2A regions), rotavirus, and astrovirus were 330, 164, 244, 198, 629, and 449 bp, respectively. The RT-PCR with the six primer sets showed specificity for the pathogenic viruses. The detection limit of the developed multiplex RT-PCR, as evaluated using serially diluted viral RNAs, was comparable to that of one-step single RT-PCR. Moreover, this multiplex RT-PCR was evaluated using food samples such as water, oysters, lettuce, and vegetable product. These food samples were artificially spiked with the four kinds of viruses in diverse combinations, and the spiked viruses in all food samples were detected successfully.

  9. Development of a modularized two-step (M2S) chromosome integration technique for integration of multiple transcription units inSaccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siwei; Ding, Wentao; Zhang, Xueli; Jiang, Huifeng; Bi, Changhao

    2016-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has already been used for heterologous production of fuel chemicals and valuable natural products. The establishment of complicated heterologous biosynthetic pathways in S. cerevisiae became the research focus of Synthetic Biology and Metabolic Engineering. Thus, simple and efficient genomic integration techniques of large number of transcription units are demanded urgently. An efficient DNA assembly and chromosomal integration method was created by combining homologous recombination (HR) in S. cerevisiae and Golden Gate DNA assembly method, designated as modularized two-step (M2S) technique. Two major assembly steps are performed consecutively to integrate multiple transcription units simultaneously. In Step 1, Modularized scaffold containing a head-to-head promoter module and a pair of terminators was assembled with two genes. Thus, two transcription units were assembled with Golden Gate method into one scaffold in one reaction. In Step 2, the two transcription units were mixed with modules of selective markers and integration sites and transformed into S. cerevisiae for assembly and integration. In both steps, universal primers were designed for identification of correct clones. Establishment of a functional β-carotene biosynthetic pathway in S. cerevisiae within 5 days demonstrated high efficiency of this method, and a 10-transcriptional-unit pathway integration illustrated the capacity of this method. Modular design of transcription units and integration elements simplified assembly and integration procedure, and eliminated frequent designing and synthesis of DNA fragments in previous methods. Also, by assembling most parts in Step 1 in vitro, the number of DNA cassettes for homologous integration in Step 2 was significantly reduced. Thus, high assembly efficiency, high integration capacity, and low error rate were achieved.

  10. Curcumin and synthetic analogs induce reactive oxygen species and decreases specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors by targeting microRNAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandhy, Shruti U; Kim, KyoungHyun; Larsen, Lesley; Rosengren, Rhonda J; Safe, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Curcumin inhibits growth of several cancer cell lines, and studies in this laboratory in bladder and pancreatic cancer cells show that curcumin downregulates specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 and pro-oncogenic Sp-regulated genes. In this study, we investigated the anticancer activity of curcumin and several synthetic cyclohexanone and piperidine analogs in colon cancer cells. The effects of curcumin and synthetic analogs on colon cancer cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined using standardized assays. The changes in Sp proteins and Sp-regulated gene products were analysed by western blots, and real time PCR was used to determine microRNA-27a (miR-27a), miR-20a, miR-17-5p and ZBTB10 and ZBTB4 mRNA expression. The IC 50 (half-maximal) values for growth inhibition (24 hr) of colon cancer cells by curcumin and synthetic cyclohexanone and piperidine analogs of curcumin varied from 10 μM for curcumin to 0.7 μM for the most active synthetic piperidine analog RL197, which was used along with curcumin as model agents in this study. Curcumin and RL197 inhibited RKO and SW480 colon cancer cell growth and induced apoptosis, and this was accompanied by downregulation of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 and Sp-regulated genes including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), hepatocyte growth factor receptor (c-MET), survivin, bcl-2, cyclin D1 and NFκB (p65 and p50). Curcumin and RL197 also induced reactive oxygen species (ROS), and cotreatment with the antioxidant glutathione significantly attenuated curcumin- and RL197-induced growth inhibition and downregulation of Sp1, Sp3, Sp4 and Sp-regulated genes. The mechanism of curcumin-/RL197-induced repression of Sp transcription factors was ROS-dependent and due to induction of the Sp repressors ZBTB10 and ZBTB4 and downregulation of microRNAs (miR)-27a, miR-20a and miR-17-5p that regulate these repressors. These results identify a new and highly potent

  11. A rapid one-step kinetics-based immunoassay procedure for the highly-sensitive detection of C-reactive protein

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Sandeep Kumar Vashist, Gregor Czilwik, Thomas van Oordt, Felix von Stetten, Roland Zengerle, E. Marion Schneider & John H.T. Luong ### Abstract A rapid one-step kinetics-based sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent (ELISA) procedure has been developed for highly-sensitive detection of C-reactive protein (CRP) in less than 30 min. With minimal process steps, the procedure is highly simplified and cost-effective. The analysis only involves sequentially the formation of a sandwic...

  12. Microchip capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence combined with one-step duplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction for the rapid detection of Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16 in throat swab specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Ruan; Chengjun, Sun; Heng, Chen; Chen, Zhou; Yuanqian, Li; Yongxin, Li

    2015-07-01

    Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16 are the main pathogens causing hand-foot-mouth disease. In this paper, microchip capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence combined with one-step duplex reverse transcript-polymerase chain reaction has been developed for the detection of Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16 in throat swab specimens. The specific reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction amplicons labeled with SYBR Orange were separated by microchip capillary electrophoresis and detected by laser induced fluorescence detector within 7 min. The intraday and interday relative standard deviation of migration time for DNA Marker was in the range of 1.36-2.94 and 2.78-3.96%, respectively. The detection limits were as low as 2.06 × 10(3) copies/mL for Enterovirus 71 and 5 × 10(3) copies/mL for Coxsackievirus A16. No cross-reactivity was observed with rotavirus, astrovirus, norovirus, and adenovirus, which showed good specificity of the method. This assay was validated using 100 throat swab specimens that were detected by real-time reverse-transcript polymerase chain reaction in parallel and the two methods produced the same results. This study provided a rapid, sensitive and specific method for the detection of Enterovirus 71 and Coxsackievirus A16, which make a contribution to significant time and cost saving for the identification and treatment of patients. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. High REDOX RESPONSIVE TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR1 Levels Result in Accumulation of Reactive Oxygen Species in Arabidopsis thaliana Shoots and Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Mitsuhiro; Johnson, Joy Michal; Hieno, Ayaka; Tokizawa, Mutsutomo; Nomoto, Mika; Tada, Yasuomi; Godfrey, Rinesh; Obokata, Junichi; Sherameti, Irena; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu Y; Böhmer, Frank-D; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2015-08-01

    Redox Responsive Transcription Factor1 (RRTF1) in Arabidopsis is rapidly and transiently upregulated by H2O2, as well as biotic- and abiotic-induced redox signals. RRTF1 is highly conserved in angiosperms, but its physiological role remains elusive. Here we show that inactivation of RRTF1 restricts and overexpression promotes reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation in response to stress. Transgenic lines overexpressing RRTF1 are impaired in root and shoot development, light sensitive, and susceptible to Alternaria brassicae infection. These symptoms are diminished by the beneficial root endophyte Piriformospora indica, which reduces ROS accumulation locally in roots and systemically in shoots, and by antioxidants and ROS inhibitors that scavenge ROS. More than 800 genes were detected in mature leaves and seedlings of transgenic lines overexpressing RRTF1; ∼ 40% of them have stress-, redox-, ROS-regulated-, ROS-scavenging-, defense-, cell death- and senescence-related functions. Bioinformatic analyses and in vitro DNA binding assays demonstrate that RRTF1 binds to GCC-box-like sequences in the promoter of RRTF1-responsive genes. Upregulation of RRTF1 by stress stimuli and H2O2 requires WRKY18/40/60. RRTF1 is co-regulated with the phylogenetically related RAP2.6, which contains a GCC-box-like sequence in its promoter, but transgenic lines overexpressing RAP2.6 do not accumulate higher ROS levels. RRTF1 also stimulates systemic ROS accumulation in distal non-stressed leaves. We conclude that the elevated levels of the highly conserved RRTF1 induce ROS accumulation in response to ROS and ROS-producing abiotic and biotic stress signals. Copyright © 2015 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Minimizing Freshwater Consumption in the Wash-Off Step in Textile Reactive Dyeing by Catalytic Ozonation with Carbon Aerogel Hosted Bimetallic Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enling Hu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In textile reactive dyeing, dyed fabrics have to be rinsed in the wash-off step several times to improve colorfastness. Thus, the multiple rinsing processes drastically increase the freshwater consumption and meanwhile generate massive waste rinsing effluents. This paper addresses an innovative alternative to recycle the waste effluents to minimize freshwater consumption in the wash-off step. Accordingly, catalytic ozonation with a highly effective catalyst has been applied to remedy the waste rinsing effluents for recycling. The carbon aerogel (CA hosted bimetallic hybrid material (Ag–Fe2O3@CA was fabricated and used as the catalyst in the degradation of residual dyes in the waste rinsing effluents by ozonation treatments. The results indicate the participation of Ag–Fe2O3@CA had strikingly enhanced the removal percentage of chemical oxidation demand by 30%. In addition, it has been validated that waste effluents had been successfully reclaimed after catalytic ozonation with Ag–Fe2O3@CA. They could be additionally reused to reduce freshwater consumption in the wash-off step, but without sacrificing the color quality of corresponding fabrics in terms of color difference and colorfastness. This study may be the first to report the feasibility of catalytic ozonation in minimization of freshwater consumption in the wash-off step in textile reactive dyeing.

  15. One-step reverse transcription loop mediated isothermal amplification assay for detection of Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    A reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay for the detection of Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV) was developed. In this method, a set of four primers was designed based on the conserved regions in the coat protein gene of ACLSV, and was synthesized for the ...

  16. Heat Shock Protein 90 Facilitates Latent HIV Reactivation through Maintaining the Function of Positive Transcriptional Elongation Factor b (p-TEFb) under Proteasome Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiao-Yan; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Chun-Yan; Lin, Jian; Zeng, Xiao-Yun; Ren, Ru-Xia; Wang, Keng; Xun, Tian-Rong; Shai, Yechiel; Liu, Shu-Wen

    2016-12-09

    The persistence of HIV in resting memory CD4 + T cells at a latent state is considered as the major barrier on the path to achieve a cure for HIV. Proteasome inhibitors (PIs) were previously reported as latency reversing agents (LRAs) but the mechanism underlying this function is yet unclear. Here we demonstrate that PIs reactivate latent HIV ex vivo without global T cell activation, and may facilitate host innate immune responses. Mechanistically, latent HIV reactivation induced by PIs is mediated by heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) via the recruitment of the heat shock protein (HSP) 90-positive transcriptional elongation factor b (p-TEFb) complex. Specifically, HSP90 downstream HSF1 gives positive feedback to the reactivation process through binding to cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) and preventing it from undergoing degradation by the proteasome. Overall, these findings suggest proteasome inhibitors as potential latency reversing agents. In addition, HSF1/HSP90 involved in HIV transcription elongation, may serve as therapeutic targets in HIV eradication. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Heat Shock Protein 90 Facilitates Latent HIV Reactivation through Maintaining the Function of Positive Transcriptional Elongation Factor b (p-TEFb) under Proteasome Inhibition*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiao-Yan; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Chun-Yan; Lin, Jian; Zeng, Xiao-Yun; Ren, Ru-Xia; Wang, Keng; Xun, Tian-Rong; Shai, Yechiel; Liu, Shu-Wen

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of HIV in resting memory CD4+ T cells at a latent state is considered as the major barrier on the path to achieve a cure for HIV. Proteasome inhibitors (PIs) were previously reported as latency reversing agents (LRAs) but the mechanism underlying this function is yet unclear. Here we demonstrate that PIs reactivate latent HIV ex vivo without global T cell activation, and may facilitate host innate immune responses. Mechanistically, latent HIV reactivation induced by PIs is mediated by heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) via the recruitment of the heat shock protein (HSP) 90-positive transcriptional elongation factor b (p-TEFb) complex. Specifically, HSP90 downstream HSF1 gives positive feedback to the reactivation process through binding to cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) and preventing it from undergoing degradation by the proteasome. Overall, these findings suggest proteasome inhibitors as potential latency reversing agents. In addition, HSF1/HSP90 involved in HIV transcription elongation, may serve as therapeutic targets in HIV eradication. PMID:27799305

  18. Relationships between fear of falling, balance confidence, and control of balance, gait, and reactive stepping in individuals with sub-acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinkel-Ivy, Alison; Inness, Elizabeth L; Mansfield, Avril

    2016-01-01

    Fear of falling is common in individuals with stroke; however, the associations between fear of falling, balance confidence, and the control of balance and gait are not well understood for this population. This study aimed to determine whether, at the time of admission to in-patient rehabilitation, specific features of balance and gait differed between individuals with stroke who did and did not report fear of falling, and whether these features were related to balance confidence. Individuals with stroke entering in-patient rehabilitation were asked if they were afraid of falling, and completed the Activities-Specific Balance Confidence Scale. Participants performed quiet standing, gait, and reactive stepping tasks, and specific measures were extracted for each (quiet standing: centre of pressure amplitude, between-limb synchronization, and Romberg quotients; gait: walking velocity, double support time, and variability measures; reactive stepping: number of steps, frequency of grasp reactions, and frequency of assists). No significant differences were identified between individuals with and without fear of falling. Balance confidence was negatively related to centre of pressure amplitude, double support time, and step time variability, and positively related to walking velocity. Low balance confidence was related to poor quiet standing balance control and cautious behavior when walking in individuals with sub-acute stroke. While the causal relationship between balance confidence and the control of balance and gait is unclear from the current work, these findings suggest there may be a role for interventions to increase balance confidence among individuals with stroke, in order to improve functional mobility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Proneural Transcription Factors Regulate Different Steps of Cortical Neuron Migration through Rnd-Mediated Inhibition of RhoA Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacary, Emilie; Heng, Julian; Azzarelli, Roberta; Riou, Philippe; Castro, Diogo; Lebel-Potter, Mélanie; Parras, Carlos; Bell, Donald M.; Ridley, Anne J.; Parsons, Maddy; Guillemot, François

    2011-01-01

    Summary Little is known of the intracellular machinery that controls the motility of newborn neurons. We have previously shown that the proneural protein Neurog2 promotes the migration of nascent cortical neurons by inducing the expression of the atypical Rho GTPase Rnd2. Here, we show that another proneural factor, Ascl1, promotes neuronal migration in the cortex through direct regulation of a second Rnd family member, Rnd3. Both Rnd2 and Rnd3 promote neuronal migration by inhibiting RhoA signaling, but they control distinct steps of the migratory process, multipolar to bipolar transition in the intermediate zone and locomotion in the cortical plate, respectively. Interestingly, these divergent functions directly result from the distinct subcellular distributions of the two Rnd proteins. Because Rnd proteins also regulate progenitor divisions and neurite outgrowth, we propose that proneural factors, through spatiotemporal regulation of Rnd proteins, integrate the process of neuronal migration with other events in the neurogenic program. PMID:21435554

  20. Detection of Live Salmonella enterica in Fresh-cut Vegetables by a TaqMan-Based One-Step Reverse Transcription Real-Time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yingjie; Xiong, Guotong; Bai, Mengyang; Ge, Ying; Wu, Zufang

    2018-02-28

    Fresh-cut produce is at greater risk of Salmonella contamination. Detection and early warning systems play an important role in reducing the dissemination of contaminated products. One-step Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-qPCR) targeting Salmonella tmRNA with or without a 6-h enrichment was evaluated for the detection of Salmonella in fresh-cut vegetables after 6-h storage. LOD of one-step RT-qPCR was 1.0 CFU ml -1 (about 100 copies tmRNA ml -1 ) by assessed 10-fold serially diluted RNA from 10 6 CFU ml -1 bacteria culture. Then one-step RT-qPCR assay was applied to detect viable Salmonella cells in 14 fresh-cut vegetables after 6-h storage. Without enrichment, this assay could detect 10 CFU g -1 for fresh-cut lettuce, cilantro, spinach, cabbage, Chinese cabbage and bell pepper, and 10 2 CFU g -1 for other vegetables. With a 6-h enrichment, this assay could detect 10 CFU g -1 for all fresh-cut vegetables used in this study. Moreover, this assay was able to discriminate viable cells from dead cells. This rapid detection assay may provide potential processing control and early warning method in fresh-cut vegetable processing to strengthen food safety assurance. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Canola (Brassica napus L.) NAC103 transcription factor gene is a novel player inducing reactive oxygen species accumulation and cell death in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Fangfang; Wang, Boya; Wu, Feifei; Yan, Jingli; Li, Liang; Wang, Chen; Wang, Yiqiao; Yang, Bo; Jiang, Yuan-Qing

    2014-11-07

    NAC transcription factors are plant-specific and play important roles in many processes including plant development, response to biotic and abiotic stresses and hormone signaling. So far, only a few NAC genes have been identified to mediate cell death. In this study, we identified a novel NAC gene from canola (Brassica napus L.), BnaNAC103 which induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation and cell death in Nicotianabenthamiana leaves. We found that BnaNAC103 responded to multiple signalings, including cold, salicylic acid (SA) and a fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. BnaNAC103 is located in the nucleus. Expression of full-length BnaNAC103, but not either the N-terminal NAC domain or C-terminal regulatory domain, was identified to induce hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death when expressed in N. benthamiana. The cell death triggered by BnaNAC103 is preceded by accumulation of ROS, with diaminobenzidine (DAB) staining supporting this. Moreover, quantification of ion leakage and malondialdehyde (MDA) of leaf discs indicates significant cell membrane breakage and lipid peroxidation induced by BnaNAC103 expression. Taken together, our work has identified a novel NAC transcription factor gene modulating ROS level and cell death in plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Selenitetriglicerydes affect CYP1A1 and QR activity by involvement of reactive oxygen species and Nrf2 transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchocki, Piotr; Misiewicz-Krzemińska, Irena; Skupińska, Katarzyna; Niedźwiecka, Katarzyna; Lubelska, Katarzyna; Fijałek, Zbigniew; Kasprzycka-Guttman, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Selenitetriglycerides are a group of compounds that contain selenium (Se) (IV). In this paper, we present the results of examinations of three structurally-related selenitetriglicerydes that contain various Se concentrations: 2%, 5% and 7% Selol. The present study concentrates on the effect of Selol on phase 1 and 2 enzyme activity and the implications of free radicals and the nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-antioxidant response element (ARE) pathway in the activity of this compound. The cytotoxic and cytostatic activities of the three kinds of Selol were evaluated; however, the cytotoxic effect was observed only for 7% Selol. Our results show that 2% Selol acts as a monofunctional inducer of phase 2 enzyme activity, and the induction is mediated by the Nrf2 transcription factor. Selol 7% acts in an opposite manner and induces phase 1 with simultaneous inhibition of phase 2 enzyme activity. The differential effect can be associated with the increase in Se content, leading to a change in the structure of the compound.

  3. Optimization of one-step real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays for norovirus detection and molecular epidemiology of noroviruses in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neesanant, Pimmnapar; Sirinarumitr, Theerapol; Chantakru, Siriruk; Boonyaprakob, Ukadaj; Chuwongkomon, Kaittawee; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn; Sethabutr, Orntipa; Abente, Eugenio J; Supawat, Krongkaew; Mason, Carl J

    2013-12-01

    Noroviruses (NoVs) are an important human pathogen associated with acute viral gastroenteritis worldwide. NoVs display a significant amount of genetic heterogeneity, making it difficult to develop comprehensive detection assays. In this study, primer sets and probes were designed for a TaqMan(®)-based real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for norovirus detection purposes. The assay was optimized and utilized as a multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay for genogroup I (GI) detection, and a singleplex real-time RT-PCR assay for genogroup II (GII) detection. The assays showed high specificity for NoV detection and no cross-reactivity was observed between GI and GII. The detection limit of the assay was as low as 10 and 50 RNA copies per reaction for GI and GII, respectively. The optimized protocol was employed to assess the presence of NoV strains in clinical samples collected throughout Thailand during December 2005 to November 2006. The percentage of NoV infections among children with acute gastroenteritis (case) was 23.8% (119/500) and for children without acute gastroenteritis (control) it was 6.8% (30/441). The frequency of NoV infections varied geographically, with the highest frequency observed in the central region and the lowest frequency in the northern region (P>0.0001). Of the 149 positive case and control specimens, GII was found to be the predominant genogroup (98.6%). Partial capsid sequences were successfully obtained from 67 NoV-positive specimens and a phylogenetic analysis was performed to genotype the viral strains. GII.4 was the most common genotype detected. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Visible-light photocatalytic decolorization of reactive brilliant red X-3B on Cu{sub 2}O/crosslinked-chitosan nanocomposites prepared via one step process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Chunhua [College of Resource and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Chemical Materials and Devices of Ministry of Education, College of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Jianghan University, Wuhan 430056 (China); Xiao, Ling, E-mail: xiaoling9119@yahoo.cn [College of Resource and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Liu, Li; Zhu, Huayue [College of Resource and Environmental Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Chen, Chunhua; Gao, Lin [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Chemical Materials and Devices of Ministry of Education, College of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Jianghan University, Wuhan 430056 (China)

    2013-04-15

    Cu{sub 2}O/crosslinked-chitosan nanocomposites (Cu{sub 2}O/CS NCs) were in situ prepared via a simple one-step liquid phase precipitation–reduction process and characterized by XRD, FT-IR, SEM, TEM, BET, XPS and UV–vis/DRS. The characterization results showed that Cu{sub 2}O/CS NCs were almost similar spherical or ellipsoidal and the surface was rough and porous because Cu{sub 2}O particle was wrapped in chitosan. The chitosan layer was especially favorable for improving the adsorption ability of dye and molecular oxygen and restraining the recombination of electrons–holes pair. The visible-light photocatalytic decolorization behavior on Cu{sub 2}O/CS NCs was evaluated using reactive brilliant red X-3B (X-3B) as a model pollutant. The influences of various experimental factors on X-3B decolorization were investigated. It was found that the photocatalytic decolorization process on Cu{sub 2}O/CS NCs followed apparent pseudo-first-order kinetics model. The dye X-3B could be decolorized more efficiently in acidic media than in alkaline media. Cu{sub 2}O/CS NCs exhibited enhanced visible-light photocatalytic activity compared with other photocatalysts reported before under similar experimental conditions.

  5. Activity of the upstream TATA-less promoter of the p21(Waf1/Cip1) gene depends on transcription factor IIA (TFIIA) in addition to TFIIA-reactive TBP-like protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hidefumi; Maeda, Ryo; Nakadai, Tomoyoshi; Tamura, Taka-aki

    2014-07-01

    TATA-binding protein-like protein (TLP) binds to transcription factor IIA (TFIIA) with high affinity, although the significance of this binding is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of TFIIA in transcriptional regulation of the p21(Waf1/Cip1) (p21) gene. It has been shown that TLP is indispensable for p53-activated transcription from an upstream TATA-less promoter of the p21 gene. We found that mutant TLPs having decreased TFIIA-binding ability exhibited weakened transcriptional activation function for the upstream promoter. Activity of the upstream promoter was enhanced considerably by an increased amount of TFIIA in a p53-dependent manner, whereas activity of the TATA-containing downstream promoter was enhanced only slightly. TFIIA potentiated the upstream promoter additively with TLP. Although TFIIA is recruited to both promoters, activity of the upstream promoter was much more dependent on TFIIA. Recruitment of TFIIA and TLP to the upstream promoter was augmented in etoposide-treated cells, in which the amount of TFIIA-TLP complex is increased, and TFIIA-reactive TLP was required for the recruitment of both factors. It was confirmed that etoposide-stimulated transcription depends on TLP. We also found that TFIIA-reactive TLP acts to decrease cell growth rate, which can be explained by interaction of the p21 promoter with the transcription factors that we examined. The results of the present study suggest that the upstream TATA-less promoter of p21 needs TFIIA and TFIIA-reactive TLP for p53-dependent transcriptional enhancement. © 2014 The Authors.FEBS Journal published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  6. Kresoxim-methyl primes Medicago truncatula plants against abiotic stress factors via altered reactive oxygen and nitrogen species signalling leading to downstream transcriptional and metabolic readjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippou, Panagiota; Antoniou, Chrystalla; Obata, Toshihiro; Van Der Kelen, Katrien; Harokopos, Vaggelis; Kanetis, Loukas; Aidinis, Vassilis; Van Breusegem, Frank; Fernie, Alisdair R; Fotopoulos, Vasileios

    2016-03-01

    Biotic and abiotic stresses, such as fungal infection and drought, cause major yield losses in modern agriculture. Kresoxim-methyl (KM) belongs to the strobilurins, one of the most important classes of agricultural fungicides displaying a direct effect on several plant physiological and developmental processes. However, the impact of KM treatment on salt and drought stress tolerance is unknown. In this study we demonstrate that KM pre-treatment of Medicago truncatula plants results in increased protection to drought and salt stress. Foliar application with KM prior to stress imposition resulted in improvement of physiological parameters compared with stressed-only plants. This protective effect was further supported by increased proline biosynthesis, modified reactive oxygen and nitrogen species signalling, and attenuation of cellular damage. In addition, comprehensive transcriptome analysis identified a number of transcripts that are differentially accumulating in drought- and salinity-stressed plants (646 and 57, respectively) after KM pre-treatment compared with stressed plants with no KM pre-treatment. Metabolomic analysis suggests that the priming role of KM in drought- and to a lesser extent in salinity-stressed plants can be attributed to the regulation of key metabolites (including sugars and amino acids) resulting in protection against abiotic stress factors. Overall, the present study highlights the potential use of this commonly used fungicide as a priming agent against key abiotic stress conditions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  7. Increased neurovirulence and reactivation of the herpes simplex virus type 1 latency associated transcript (LAT) negative mutant dLAT2903 with a disrupted LAT miR-H2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xianzhi; Brown, Don; Osorio, Nelson; Hsiang, Chinhui; BenMohamed, Lbachir; Wechsler, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    At least six microRNAs (miRNAs) appear to be encoded by the latency associated transcript (LAT) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). The gene for ICP0, an important immediate early (IE) viral protein, is antisense to, and overlaps with, the region of LAT from which miRNA H2 (miR-H2) is derived. We recently reported that a mutant (McK-ΔH2) disrupted for miR-H2 on the wild type HSV-1 strain McKrae genomic background has increased ICP0 expression, increased neurovirulence, and slightly more rapid reactivation. We report here that HSV-1 mutants deleted for the LAT promoter nonetheless make significant amounts of miR-H2 during lytic tissue culture infection, presumably via readthrough transcription from an upstream promoter. To determine if miR-H2 might also play a role in the HSV-1 latency-reactivation cycle of a LAT negative mutant, we constructed dLAT-ΔH2, in which miR-H2 is disrupted in dLAT2903 without altering the predicted amino acid sequence of the overlapping ICP0 open reading frame. Similar to McK-ΔH2, dLAT-ΔH2 expressed more ICP0, was more neurovirulent, and had increased reactivation in the mouse TG explant induced reactivation model of HSV-1 compared to its parental virus. Interestingly, although the increased reactivation of McK-ΔH2 compared to its parental wt virus was subtle and only detected at very early times after explant TG induced reactivation, the increased reactivation of dLAT-ΔH2 compared to its dLAT2903 parental virus appeared more robust and was significantly increased even at late times after induction. These results confirm that miR-H2 plays a role in modulating the HSV-1 reactivation phenotype. PMID:26069184

  8. Interferon Potentiates Toll-Like Receptor-Induced Prostaglandin D2 Production through Positive Feedback Regulation between Signal Transducer and Activators of Transcription 1 and Reactive Oxygen Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Yun Kim

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Prostaglandin D2 (PGD2 is a potent lipid mediator that controls inflammation, and its dysregulation has been implicated in diverse inflammatory disorders. Despite significant progress made in understanding the role of PGD2 as a key regulator of immune responses, the molecular mechanism underlying PGD2 production remains unclear, particularly upon challenge with different and multiple inflammatory stimuli. Interferons (IFNs potentiate macrophage activation and act in concert with exogenous inflammatory mediators such as toll-like receptor (TLR ligands to amplify inflammatory responses. A recent study found that IFN-γ enhanced lipopolysaccharide-induced PGD2 production, indicating a role of IFNs in PGD2 regulation. Here, we demonstrate that TLR-induced PGD2 production by macrophages was significantly potentiated by signaling common to IFN-β and IFN-γ in a signal transducer and activators of transcription (STAT1-dependent mechanism. Such potentiation by IFNs was also observed for PGE2 production, despite the differential regulation of PGD synthase and PGE synthase isoforms mediating PGD2 and PGE2 production under inflammatory conditions. Mechanistic analysis revealed that the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS was remarkably potentiated by IFNs and required for PGD2 production, but was nullified by STAT1 deficiency. Conversely, the regulation of STAT1 level and activity by IFNs was largely dependent on ROS levels. Using a model of zymosan-induced peritonitis, the relevance of this finding in vivo was supported by marked inhibition of PGD2 and ROS produced in peritoneal exudate cells by STAT1 deficiency. Collectively, our findings suggest that IFNs, although not activating on their own, are potent amplifiers of TLR-induced PGD2 production via positive-feedback regulation between STAT1 and ROS.

  9. Sulfonation pathway inhibitors block reactivation of latent HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murry, Jeffrey P; Godoy, Joseph; Mukim, Amey; Swann, Justine; Bruce, James W; Ahlquist, Paul; Bosque, Alberto; Planelles, Vicente; Spina, Celsa A; Young, John A T

    2014-12-01

    Long-lived pools of latently infected cells are a significant barrier to the development of a cure for HIV-1 infection. A better understanding of the mechanisms of reactivation from latency is needed to facilitate the development of novel therapies that address this problem. Here we show that chemical inhibitors of the sulfonation pathway prevent virus reactivation, both in latently infected J-Lat and U1 cell lines and in a primary human CD4+ T cell model of latency. In each of these models, sulfonation inhibitors decreased transcription initiation from the HIV-1 promoter. These inhibitors block transcription initiation at a step that lies downstream of nucleosome remodeling and affects RNA polymerase II recruitment to the viral promoter. These results suggest that the sulfonation pathway acts by a novel mechanism to regulate efficient virus transcription initiation during reactivation from latency, and further that augmentation of this pathway could be therapeutically useful. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Effects of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 RNAi on content of reactive oxygen species and DNA damage in glioma cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Ling; Li Fengsheng; Dong Bo; Liu Lihui; Liu Qingjie; Chen Xiaohua; Mao Bingzhi

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) RNAi on the content of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the DNA damage in glioma cells. Methods: Glioma cells of the line U251 cells were cultured and transfected with STAT3 RNAi plasmid (pSilencer2.1-STAT3, STAT3 group) and pSilencer2.1-GFP (GFP control group) respectively. Part of the U251 cells were irradiated with γ-rays of 60 Co as positive control group of smear phenomenon. The levels of ROS and malondialdehyde (MDA) in the cells were detected 24, 48, and 72 h later by flow cytometry and fluorescence chamoluminescence analyzer, respectively. The DNA damage in the transfected U251 cells was examined by using single cell gel electrophoresis assay, and the cell cycle distribution was examined using FACS PI staining 12, 24, and 36 h later. Results: At 24 h after the transfection, the ROS level of the siSTAT3-transfected cells was 8.91 times that of the control group (F=89.296, P<0.05), and returned to the normal level 48 h later. There were not significant differences in the MDA level of the cells 24, 48, and 72 h later between the siSTAT3 group and siGFP group. Compared with the 8 Gy irradiation positive group with obvious smear phenomenon, smear phenomenon was shown in part of the cells in the siSTAT3 group 6 h later, became less 12 h later, and disappeared completely 24 h later. Compared with the control group,lag of S stage rate was 17.22% and the lag of G 2 /M stage rate was 6.4% 12 h later in the siSTAT-transfected group,and the G 0 /G 1 stage lag rate was 18.44% 24 h later, and the lag of S stage rate was 17.99% 36 h later. Conclusions: Inhibition of STAT3 results in the change of oxido reduction status in glioma cells, as well as damage and reparation of DNA. (authors)

  11. Stepping Up: Improving Progression in English and Math from High School to College. Student Transcript-Enhanced Placement Study. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Terrence; Karandjeff, Kelley

    2014-01-01

    How do we determine if incoming students are ready for college-level work? California's community college system is currently working to address this complex question in a more nuanced, comprehensive, and equitable way. This research brief offers insights that can inform these efforts resulting from the Student Transcript-Enhanced Placement Study…

  12. Visual Detection of Potato leafroll virus by One-step Reverse Transcription Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification of DNA with Hydroxynaphthol Blue Dye

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmadi, S.; Almasi, A.M.; Fatehi, F.; Struik, P.C.; Moradi, A.

    2013-01-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay is a novel technique for amplifying DNA under constant temperature, with high specificity, sensitivity, rapidity and efficiency. We applied reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) to visually detect Potato leafroll

  13. Reactivity of NH4H2PO4 toward LaCl3 in LiCl-KCl melt flux. Step by step formation of monazite-like LaPO4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudry, Damien; Rakhmatullin, Aydar; Bessada, Catherine; Bardez, Isabelle; Bart, Florence; Jobic, Stéphane; Deniard, Philippe

    2009-08-03

    The synthesis of lanthanum phosphates in molten LiCl-KCL eutectic was chosen to address the preliminary treatment of chlorinated wastes containing fission products that are already present in a Li/Cl eutectic. The obtained monazite compound shows interesting properties to be considered as a good candidate to trap lanthanum for a long-time. The synthesis route based on LaCl(3) reaction with NH(4)H(2)PO(4) in a stoichiometric amount is a key point to obtain monazite as a pure phase. Hence, the salt composition is not modified during the synthesis reaction. The chemical reactivity of ammonium dihydrogenphosphate (NH(4)H(2)PO(4), hereafter abbreviated ADP) toward lanthanum chloride (LaCl(3)) in molten LiCl-KCl eutectic is probed by NMR spectroscopy to follow the formation of LaPO(4). Formally, a direct transformation of the two aforementioned precursors into LaPO(4), NH(4)Cl and HCl can be discarded on the basis of the low thermal stability of ADP. To shed some light on the formation of LaPO(4), in situ and ex situ NMR experiments were carried out on LiCl-KCl/LaCl(3)/ADP, as well as LiCl-KCl/ADP, KCl/ADP, and LiCl/ADP mixtures. First, the reactivity of the precursors in contact with the eutectic was studied from room temperature to 600 degrees C by means of (31)P, (35)Cl, and (139)La high temperature NMR. Second, ex situ room temperature magic angle spinning (MAS) and RadioFrequency driven recoupling (RFDR) (31)P solid-state NMR experiments were carried out on solid samples prepared in different conditions (i.e., temperature and atmosphere) and quenched at room temperature to identify frozen intermediate species in their metastable state. On the basis of this approach, we propose a model for the LaPO(4) formation based on a multistep mechanism which highlights the strong reactivity of ADP toward the alkaline salts but without final change in the composition of the solvent.

  14. Two-step mechanism for modifier of transcription 1 (Mot1) enzyme-catalyzed displacement of TATA-binding protein (TBP) from DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyle-Heyrman, Georgette; Viswanathan, Ramya; Widom, Jonathan; Auble, David T

    2012-03-16

    The TATA box binding protein (TBP) is a central component of the transcription preinitiation complex, and its occupancy at a promoter is correlated with transcription levels. The TBP-promoter DNA complex contains sharply bent DNA and its interaction lifetime is limited by the ATP-dependent TBP displacement activity of the Snf2/Swi2 ATPase Mot1. Several mechanisms for Mot1 action have been proposed, but how it catalyzes TBP removal from DNA is unknown. To better understand the Mot1 mechanism, native gel electrophoresis and FRET were used to determine how Mot1 affects the trajectory of DNA in the TBP-DNA complex. Strikingly, in the absence of ATP, Mot1 acts to unbend DNA, whereas TBP remains closely associated with the DNA in a stable Mot1-TBP-DNA ternary complex. Interestingly, and in contrast to full-length Mot1, the isolated Mot1 ATPase domain binds DNA, and its affinity for DNA is nucleotide-dependent, suggesting parallels between the Mot1 mechanism and DNA translocation-based mechanisms of chromatin remodeling enzymes. Based on these findings, a model is presented for Mot1 that links a DNA conformational change with ATP-induced DNA translocation.

  15. Ultraviolet-B-induced responses in Arabidopsis thaliana: role of salicylic acid and reactive oxygen species in the regulation of transcripts encoding photosynthetic and acidic pathogenesis-related proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surplus, S.L.; Jordan, B.R.; Murphy, A.M.; Carr, J.P.; Thomas, B.; Mackerness, S.A.H.

    1998-01-01

    Supplementary UV-B was shown to lead to a decrease in transcripts encoding the photosynthetic genes Lhcb and psbA and a concomitant increase in transcripts encoding three acid-type pathogenesis-related proteins, PR-1, PR-2 and PR-5, in Arabidopsis thaliana. UV-B radiation has been reported to lead to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we report that ROS are required for UV-B-induced down-regulation of the photosynthetic genes and up-regulation of PR genes, as the addition of antioxidants before UV-B treatment resulted in a marked reduction in the effect of UV-B on both sets of genes. Rises in ROS are frequently accompanied by increases in salicylic acid (SA) accumulation. UV-B treatment of transgenic NahG Arabidopsis plants, which are unable to accumulate SA, showed that the increase in PR transcripts, but not the decrease in photosynthetic transcripts, was dependent on the increase in SA. In addition, a 3 d exposure to UV-B radiation resulted in a 7-fold increase in SA levels. Oxidant treatment of NahG plants indicated that ROS could not up-regulate PR genes in the absence of SA accumulation; however, the down-regulation of photosynthetic transcripts was unchanged from that in wild-type plants. The results indicate that the effects of UV-B on the two sets of genes are mediated through two distinct signal tranduction pathways. One pathway is ROS-dependent but SA-independent and mediates the down-regulation of photosynthetic genes. The other is SA- and ROS-dependent and mediates the up-regulation of the acidic-type PR genes

  16. Reduced step edges on rutile TiO (110) as competing defects to oxygen vacancies on the terraces and reactive sites for ethanol dissociation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, U.; Hansen, Jonas Ørbæk; Salazar, Estephania Lira

    2012-01-01

    microscopy studies, we here present experimental evidence for the existence of O vacancies along the ⟨11̅ 1⟩R step edges (OS vac.’s) on rutile TiO2(110). Both the distribution of bridging O vacancies on the terraces and temperature-programed reaction experiments of ethanol-covered TiO2(110) point......The rutile TiO2(110) surface is the most studied surface of titania and considered as a prototype of transition metal oxide surfaces. Reactions on flat TiO2(110)-(1×1) surfaces are well studied, but the processes occurring on the step edges have barely been considered. Based on scanning tunneling...

  17. Alpha beta but not gamma delta T cell clones in synovial fluids of patients with reactive arthritis show active transcription of tumour necrosis factor alpha and interferon gamma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rihl, M.; Gu, J.; Baeten, D.; Märker-Hermann, E.; Goodall, J. C.; Gaston, J. S. H.; Kuipers, J. G.; Zeidler, H.; Yu, D. T. Y.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the cytokine expression profile of three CD8+, three CD4+, and three gammadelta+ T cell clones all derived from the synovial fluids of three patients with reactive arthritis (ReA). METHODS: Complementary DNA based microarrays containing the specific sequence of 56 cytokine

  18. PVDF-HFP/silica-SH nanocomposite synthesis for PEMFC membranes through simultaneous one-step sol–gel reaction and reactive extrusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seck, S.; Magana, S.; Prébé, A.; Niepceron, F.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, synthesis of thiol-functionalized silica/PVDF-HFP [poly(vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene)] nanocomposite materials was carried out by reactive extrusion through in situ sol–gel reactions of an alkoxysilane inorganic precursor solution composed of polydimethoxysiloxane (PDMOS) and mercaptopropyltriethoxysilane (MPTES). Successful introduction of the functional MPTES and structural PDMOS alkoxysilanes, and subsequent condensation reactions in the PVDF-HFP, were obtained through pre-hydrolysis reactions of the precursors. 29 Si-Nuclear magnetic resonance was used to assess the hydrolysis level of the inorganic precursor solution and condensation state in the resulting PVDF-HFP/functionalized silica nanocomposites, while the morphology was observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The hydrolysis-condensation reactions resulting in the inorganic phase were optimized by setting an appropriate R 0 molar ratio (H 2 O/alkoxy function), R 1 molar ratio (MPTES/PDMOS) and pH of the solution. Increasing the R 0 ratio barely affected the hydrolysis kinetics. However, a higher R 1 ratio led to a decrease in the inorganic precursors condensation state and consequently to an increase in the reaction time in the extruder to reach the subsequent condensation state. Hence the morphology of the obtained nanocomposites was finer for the highest R 1 ratio and in agreement with the evolution of the solubility parameters. Promising ionic exchange capacity (IEC) and conductivity values were obtained for these innovative nanocomposite materials thanks to a controlled oxidation reaction of the thiol groups into sulfonic acid functions. This original approach demonstrated the possibility of incorporating in situ functionalized silica into a molten fluorinated polymer matrix in a unique reactive extrusion procedure. - Highlights: • Thiol-functionalized silica/PVDF-HFP nanocomposite synthesis by sol–gel and extrusion. • Promising IEC (0.7 meq g −1 ) and

  19. HIV-1 reverse transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei-Shau; Hughes, Stephen H

    2012-10-01

    Reverse transcription and integration are the defining features of the Retroviridae; the common name "retrovirus" derives from the fact that these viruses use a virally encoded enzyme, reverse transcriptase (RT), to convert their RNA genomes into DNA. Reverse transcription is an essential step in retroviral replication. This article presents an overview of reverse transcription, briefly describes the structure and function of RT, provides an introduction to some of the cellular and viral factors that can affect reverse transcription, and discusses fidelity and recombination, two processes in which reverse transcription plays an important role. In keeping with the theme of the collection, the emphasis is on HIV-1 and HIV-1 RT.

  20. PVDF-HFP/silica-SH nanocomposite synthesis for PEMFC membranes through simultaneous one-step sol–gel reaction and reactive extrusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seck, S. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, UMR CNRS 5223 Ingénierie des Matériaux Polymères, IMP@Lyon1, Bât PolyTech, 15 Boulevard Latarjet, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Université de Lyon, INSA, UMR CNRS 5223 Ingénierie des Matériaux Polymères IMP@INSA, Batîment Jules Verne, 17 avenue Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Magana, S. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, UMR CNRS 5223 Ingénierie des Matériaux Polymères, IMP@Lyon1, Bât PolyTech, 15 Boulevard Latarjet, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Prébé, A.; Niepceron, F. [Université de Lyon, Université Lyon 1, UMR CNRS 5223 Ingénierie des Matériaux Polymères, IMP@Lyon1, Bât PolyTech, 15 Boulevard Latarjet, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Université de Lyon, INSA, UMR CNRS 5223 Ingénierie des Matériaux Polymères IMP@INSA, Batîment Jules Verne, 17 avenue Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); and others

    2015-08-01

    In this study, synthesis of thiol-functionalized silica/PVDF-HFP [poly(vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene)] nanocomposite materials was carried out by reactive extrusion through in situ sol–gel reactions of an alkoxysilane inorganic precursor solution composed of polydimethoxysiloxane (PDMOS) and mercaptopropyltriethoxysilane (MPTES). Successful introduction of the functional MPTES and structural PDMOS alkoxysilanes, and subsequent condensation reactions in the PVDF-HFP, were obtained through pre-hydrolysis reactions of the precursors. {sup 29}Si-Nuclear magnetic resonance was used to assess the hydrolysis level of the inorganic precursor solution and condensation state in the resulting PVDF-HFP/functionalized silica nanocomposites, while the morphology was observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The hydrolysis-condensation reactions resulting in the inorganic phase were optimized by setting an appropriate R{sub 0} molar ratio (H{sub 2}O/alkoxy function), R{sub 1} molar ratio (MPTES/PDMOS) and pH of the solution. Increasing the R{sub 0} ratio barely affected the hydrolysis kinetics. However, a higher R{sub 1} ratio led to a decrease in the inorganic precursors condensation state and consequently to an increase in the reaction time in the extruder to reach the subsequent condensation state. Hence the morphology of the obtained nanocomposites was finer for the highest R{sub 1} ratio and in agreement with the evolution of the solubility parameters. Promising ionic exchange capacity (IEC) and conductivity values were obtained for these innovative nanocomposite materials thanks to a controlled oxidation reaction of the thiol groups into sulfonic acid functions. This original approach demonstrated the possibility of incorporating in situ functionalized silica into a molten fluorinated polymer matrix in a unique reactive extrusion procedure. - Highlights: • Thiol-functionalized silica/PVDF-HFP nanocomposite synthesis by sol–gel and extrusion.

  1. HIV-1 Reverse Transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Wei-Shau; Hughes, Stephen H.

    2012-01-01

    Reverse transcription and integration are the defining features of the Retroviridae; the common name “retrovirus” derives from the fact that these viruses use a virally encoded enzyme, reverse transcriptase (RT), to convert their RNA genomes into DNA. Reverse transcription is an essential step in retroviral replication. This article presents an overview of reverse transcription, briefly describes the structure and function of RT, provides an introduction to some of the cellular and viral fact...

  2. Detection of bovine central nervous system tissues in rendered animal by-products by one-step real-time reverse transcription PCR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrievskaia, Olga; Tangorra, Erin

    2014-12-01

    Contamination of rendered animal byproducts with central nervous system tissues (CNST) from animals with bovine spongiform encephalopathy is considered one of the vehicles of disease transmission. Removal from the animal feed chain of CNST originated from cattle of a specified age category, species-labeling of rendered meat products, and testing of rendered products for bovine CNST are tasks associated with the epidemiological control of bovine spongiform encephalopathy. A single-step TaqMan real-time reverse transcriptase (RRT) PCR assay was developed and evaluated for specific detection of bovine glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) mRNA, a biomarker of bovine CNST, in rendered animal by-products. An internal amplification control, mammalian b -actin mRNA, was coamplified in the duplex RRT-PCR assay to monitor amplification efficiency, normalize amplification signals, and avoid false-negative results. The functionality of the GFAP mRNA RRT-PCR was assessed through analysis of laboratory-generated binary mixtures of bovine central nervous system (CNS) and muscle tissues treated under various thermal settings imitating industrial conditions. The assay was able to detect as low as 0.05 % (wt/wt) bovine brain tissue in binary mixtures heat treated at 110 to 130°C for 20 to 60 min. Further evaluation of the GFAP mRNA RRT-PCR assay involved samples of industrial rendered products of various species origin and composition obtained from commercial sources and rendering plants. Low amounts of bovine GFAP mRNA were detected in several bovine-rendered products, which was in agreement with declared species composition. An accurate estimation of CNS tissue content in industrial-rendered products was complicated due to a wide range of temperature and time settings in rendering protocols. Nevertheless, the GFAP mRNA RRT-PCR assay may be considered for bovine CNS tissue detection in rendered products in combination with other available tools (for example, animal age

  3. Heat Shock Factor 1 Mediates Latent HIV Reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiao-Yan; Zhao, Wei; Zeng, Xiao-Yun; Lin, Jian; Li, Min-Min; Shen, Xin-Tian; Liu, Shu-Wen

    2016-05-18

    HSF1, a conserved heat shock factor, has emerged as a key regulator of mammalian transcription in response to cellular metabolic status and stress. To our knowledge, it is not known whether HSF1 regulates viral transcription, particularly HIV-1 and its latent form. Here we reveal that HSF1 extensively participates in HIV transcription and is critical for HIV latent reactivation. Mode of action studies demonstrated that HSF1 binds to the HIV 5'-LTR to reactivate viral transcription and recruits a family of closely related multi-subunit complexes, including p300 and p-TEFb. And HSF1 recruits p300 for self-acetylation is also a committed step. The knockout of HSF1 impaired HIV transcription, whereas the conditional over-expression of HSF1 improved that. These findings demonstrate that HSF1 positively regulates the transcription of latent HIV, suggesting that it might be an important target for different therapeutic strategies aimed at a cure for HIV/AIDS.

  4. Broadly reactive pan-paramyxovirus reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis for the detection of Canine distemper virus in a case of canine meningoencephalitis of unknown etiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatzberg, Scott J.; Li, Qiang; Porter, Brian F.; Barber, Renee M.; Claiborne, Mary Kate; Levine, Jonathan M.; Levine, Gwendolyn J.; Israel, Sarah K.; Young, Benjamin D.; Kiupel, Matti; Greene, Craig; Ruone, Susan; Anderson, Larry; Tong, Suxiang

    2016-01-01

    Despite the immunologic protection associated with routine vaccination protocols, Canine distemper virus (CDV) remains an important pathogen of dogs. Antemortem diagnosis of systemic CDV infection may be made by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and/or immunohistochemical testing for CDV antigen; central nervous system infection often requires postmortem confirmation via histopathology and immunohistochemistry. An 8-month-old intact male French Bulldog previously vaccinated for CDV presented with multifocal neurologic signs. Based on clinical and postmortem findings, the dog’s disease was categorized as a meningoencephalitis of unknown etiology. Broadly reactive, pan-paramyxovirus RT-PCR using consensus-degenerate hybrid oligonucleotide primers, combined with sequence analysis, identified CDV amplicons in the dog’s brain. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of CDV antigens, and a specific CDV RT-PCR based on the phosphoprotein gene identified a wild-type versus vaccinal virus strain. This case illustrates the utility of broadly reactive PCR and sequence analysis for the identification of pathogens in diseases with unknown etiology. PMID:19901287

  5. The thioredoxin MoTrx2 protein mediates reactive oxygen species (ROS) balance and controls pathogenicity as a target of the transcription factor MoAP1 in Magnaporthe oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingzhen; Yin, Ziyi; Tang, Wei; Cai, Xingjia; Gao, Chuyun; Zhang, Haifeng; Zheng, Xiaobo; Wang, Ping; Zhang, Zhengguang

    2017-12-01

    We have shown previously that the transcription factor MoAP1 governs the oxidative response and is important for pathogenicity in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. To explore the underlying mechanism, we have identified thioredoxin MoTrx2 as a target of MoAP1 in M. oryzae. Thioredoxins are highly conserved 12-kDa oxidoreductase enzymes containing a dithiol-disulfide active site, and function as antioxidants against free radicals, such as reactive oxygen species (ROS). In yeast and fungi, thioredoxins are important for oxidative stress tolerance and growth. To study the functions of MoTrx2, we generated ΔMotrx2 mutants that exhibit various defects, including sulfite assimilation, asexual and sexual differentiation, infectious hyphal growth and pathogenicity. We found that ΔMotrx2 mutants possess a defect in the scavenging of ROS during host cell invasion and in the active suppression of the rice defence response. We also found that ΔMotrx2 mutants display higher intracellular ROS levels during conidial germination, but lower peroxidase and laccase activities, which contribute to the attenuation in virulence. Given that the function of MoTrx2 overlaps that of MoAP1 in the stress response and pathogenicity, our findings further indicate that MoTrx2 is a key thioredoxin protein whose function is subjected to transcriptional regulation by MoAP1 in M. oryzae. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  6. The extract of Ginkgo biloba EGb 761 reactivates a juvenile profile in the skeletal muscle of sarcopenic rats by transcriptional reprogramming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Bidon

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia is a major public health problem in industrialized nations, placing an increasing burden on public healthcare systems because the loss of skeletal muscle mass and strength that characterizes this affection increases the dependence and the risk of injury caused by sudden falls in elderly people. Albeit exercise and caloric restriction improve sarcopenia-associated decline of the muscular performances, a more suitable and focused pharmacological treatment is still lacking.In order to evaluate such a possible treatment, we investigated the effects of EGb 761, a Ginkgo biloba extract used in chronic age-dependent neurological disorders, on the function of the soleus muscle in aged rats. EGb 761 induced a gain in muscular mass that was associated with an improvement of the muscular performances as assessed by biochemical and electrophysiological tests. DNA microarray analysis shows that these modifications are accompanied by the transcriptional reprogramming of genes related to myogenesis through the TGFbeta signaling pathway and to energy production via fatty acids and glucose oxidation. EGb 761 restored a more juvenile gene expression pattern by regenerating the aged muscle and reversing the age-related metabolic shift from lipids to glucose utilization.Thus, EGb 761 may represent a novel treatment for sarcopenia both more manageable and less cumbersome than exercise and caloric restriction.

  7. Next Step for STEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Claire [CTSI; Bremner, Brenda [CTSI

    2013-08-09

    The Siletz Tribal Energy Program (STEP), housed in the Tribe’s Planning Department, will hire a data entry coordinator to collect, enter, analyze and store all the current and future energy efficiency and renewable energy data pertaining to administrative structures the tribe owns and operates and for homes in which tribal members live. The proposed data entry coordinator will conduct an energy options analysis in collaboration with the rest of the Siletz Tribal Energy Program and Planning Department staff. An energy options analysis will result in a thorough understanding of tribal energy resources and consumption, if energy efficiency and conservation measures being implemented are having the desired effect, analysis of tribal energy loads (current and future energy consumption), and evaluation of local and commercial energy supply options. A literature search will also be conducted. In order to educate additional tribal members about renewable energy, we will send four tribal members to be trained to install and maintain solar panels, solar hot water heaters, wind turbines and/or micro-hydro.

  8. Reactive oxygen species and transcript analysis upon excess light treatment in wild-type Arabidopsis thaliana vs a photosensitive mutant lacking zeaxanthin and lutein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roncaglia Enrica

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS are unavoidable by-products of oxygenic photosynthesis, causing progressive oxidative damage and ultimately cell death. Despite their destructive activity they are also signalling molecules, priming the acclimatory response to stress stimuli. Results To investigate this role further, we exposed wild type Arabidopsis thaliana plants and the double mutant npq1lut2 to excess light. The mutant does not produce the xanthophylls lutein and zeaxanthin, whose key roles include ROS scavenging and prevention of ROS synthesis. Biochemical analysis revealed that singlet oxygen (1O2 accumulated to higher levels in the mutant while other ROS were unaffected, allowing to define the transcriptomic signature of the acclimatory response mediated by 1O2 which is enhanced by the lack of these xanthophylls species. The group of genes differentially regulated in npq1lut2 is enriched in sequences encoding chloroplast proteins involved in cell protection against the damaging effect of ROS. Among the early fine-tuned components, are proteins involved in tetrapyrrole biosynthesis, chlorophyll catabolism, protein import, folding and turnover, synthesis and membrane insertion of photosynthetic subunits. Up to now, the flu mutant was the only biological system adopted to define the regulation of gene expression by 1O2. In this work, we propose the use of mutants accumulating 1O2 by mechanisms different from those activated in flu to better identify ROS signalling. Conclusions We propose that the lack of zeaxanthin and lutein leads to 1O2 accumulation and this represents a signalling pathway in the early stages of stress acclimation, beside the response to ADP/ATP ratio and to the redox state of both plastoquinone pool. Chloroplasts respond to 1O2 accumulation by undergoing a significant change in composition and function towards a fast acclimatory response. The physiological implications of this signalling specificity are

  9. GFAP and vimentin deficiency alters gene expression in astrocytes and microglia in wild-type mice and changes the transcriptional response of reactive glia in mouse model for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamphuis, Willem; Kooijman, Lieneke; Orre, Marie; Stassen, Oscar; Pekny, Milos; Hol, Elly M

    2015-06-01

    Reactive astrocytes with an increased expression of intermediate filament (IF) proteins Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) and Vimentin (VIM) surround amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The functional consequences of this upregulation are unclear. To identify molecular pathways coupled to IF regulation in reactive astrocytes, and to study the interaction with microglia, we examined WT and APPswe/PS1dE9 (AD) mice lacking either GFAP, or both VIM and GFAP, and determined the transcriptome of cortical astrocytes and microglia from 15- to 18-month-old mice. Genes involved in lysosomal degradation (including several cathepsins) and in inflammatory response (including Cxcl5, Tlr6, Tnf, Il1b) exhibited a higher AD-induced increase when GFAP, or VIM and GFAP, were absent. The expression of Aqp4 and Gja1 displayed the same pattern. The downregulation of neuronal support genes in astrocytes from AD mice was absent in GFAP/VIM null mice. In contrast, the absence of IFs did not affect the transcriptional alterations induced by AD in microglia, nor was the cortical plaque load altered. Visualizing astrocyte morphology in GFAP-eGFP mice showed no clear structural differences in GFAP/VIM null mice, but did show diminished interaction of astrocyte processes with plaques. Microglial proliferation increased similarly in all AD groups. In conclusion, absence of GFAP, or both GFAP and VIM, alters AD-induced changes in gene expression profile of astrocytes, showing a compensation of the decrease of neuronal support genes and a trend for a slightly higher inflammatory expression profile. However, this has no consequences for the development of plaque load, microglial proliferation, or microglial activation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Deciphering Transcriptional Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valen, Eivind

    RNA); and ii) translation, in which the mRNA is translated into a protein. This thesis focus on the ¿rst of these steps, transcription, and speci¿cally the initiation of this. Simpli¿ed, initiation is preceded by the binding of several proteins, known as transcription factors (TFs), to DNA. This takes place...... published providing an unbiased overview of the transcription start site (TSS) usage in a tissue. We have paired this method with high-throughput sequencing technology to produce a library of unprecedented depth (DeepCAGE) for the mouse hippocampus. We investigated this in detail and focused particularly...... control spanning the range from completely muted to cranked up to maximum. The volume, in this case, is the production rate of proteins. This production is the result of a two step procedure: i) transcription, in which a small part of DNA from the genome (a gene) is transcribed into an RNA molecule (an m...

  11. Initiation of HIV Reverse Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland Marquet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Reverse transcription of retroviral genomes into double stranded DNA is a key event for viral replication. The very first stage of HIV reverse transcription, the initiation step, involves viral and cellular partners that are selectively packaged into the viral particle, leading to an RNA/protein complex with very specific structural and functional features, some of which being, in the case of HIV-1, linked to particular isolates. Recent understanding of the tight spatio-temporal regulation of reverse transcription and its importance for viral infectivity further points toward reverse transcription and potentially its initiation step as an important drug target.

  12. Transcriptional control of t lymphocyte differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J.T. Staal (Frank); F. Weerkamp (Floor); A.W. Langerak (Anton); R.W. Hendriks (Rudi); H.C. Clevers (Hans)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractInitiation of gene transcription by transcription factors (TFs) is an important regulatory step in many developmental processes. The differentiation of T cell progenitors in the thymus is tightly controlled by signaling molecules, ultimately activating

  13. Heat Shock Factor 1 Mediates Latent HIV Reactivation

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao-Yan Pan; Wei Zhao; Xiao-Yun Zeng; Jian Lin; Min-Min Li; Xin-Tian Shen; Shu-Wen Liu

    2016-01-01

    HSF1, a conserved heat shock factor, has emerged as a key regulator of mammalian transcription in response to cellular metabolic status and stress. To our knowledge, it is not known whether HSF1 regulates viral transcription, particularly HIV-1 and its latent form. Here we reveal that HSF1 extensively participates in HIV transcription and is critical for HIV latent reactivation. Mode of action studies demonstrated that HSF1 binds to the HIV 5?-LTR to reactivate viral transcription and recruit...

  14. Weigle Reactivation in Acinetobacter Calcoaceticus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berenstein, Dvora

    1982-01-01

    phage and host survivals of about 5 times 10-6 and 1 times 10-1, respectively. Intracellular development of W-reactivated P78 was followed by one-step growth experiments. Conditions which allowed maximal W-reactivation also extended the period of phage production and yielded a somewhat reduced burst......Weigle (W)-reactivation was demonstrated in Acinetobacter calcoaceticus for the UV-irra-diated lysogenic phage P78. The reactivation factor (survival of irradiated phage on irradiated bacteria/ survival on unirradiated bacteria) reached a maximum value of 20. This was obtained at UV-doses giving...

  15. Weigle reactivation in Acinetobacter calcoaceticus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berenstein, D.

    1982-01-01

    Weigle (W)-reactivation was demonstrated in Acinetobacter calcoaceticus for the UV-irradiated lysogenic phage P78. The reactivation factor (survival of irradiated phage on irradiated bacteria/survival on unirradiated bacteria) reached a maximum value of 20. This was obtained at UV-doses giving phage and host survivals of about 5 x 10 -6 and 1 x 10 -1 , respectively. Intracellular development of W-reactivated P78 was followed by one-step growth experiments. Conditions which allowed maximal W-reactivation also extended the period of phage production and yielded a somewhat reduced burst size. (author)

  16. Transcription Through Chromatin - Dynamic Organization of Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Remodeling of chromatin confers it the ability for dynamic change. Remodeling is essential for transcriptional regulation, the first step of gene expression. Chromatin Structure and Gene Expression. Transcription is the first step of gene expression in which RNA synthesis occurs from the DNA (gene) template in a series of.

  17. Transcription Through Chromatin - Dynamic Organization of Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this article, we discuss the dynamic organization of eukaryotic genes into chromatin. Remodeling of chromatin confers it the ability for dynamic change. Remodeling is essential for transcriptional regulation, the first step of gene expression. Chromatin Structure and Gene Expression. Transcription is the first step of gene ...

  18. The "putative" role of transcription factors from HlWRKY family in the regulation of the final steps of prenylflavonid and bitter acids biosynthesis in hop (Humulus lupulus L.)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matoušek, Jaroslav; Kocábek, Tomáš; Patzak, J.; Bříza, Jindřich; Siglová, Kristýna; Mishra, Ajay Kumar; Duraisamy, Ganesh Selvaraj; Týcová, Anna; Ono, E.; Krofta, K.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 92, č. 3 (2016), s. 263-277 ISSN 0167-4412 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-03037S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Lupulin biosynthesis * Transcription factors * 5' RNA degradome * Plant promoter activation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.356, year: 2016

  19. GFAP and vimentin deficiency alters gene expression in astrocytes and microglia in wild-type mice and changes the transcriptional response of reactive glia in mouse model for Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, W.; Kooijman, L.; Orre, M.; Stassen, O.; Pekny, M.; Hol, E.M.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive astrocytes with an increased expression of intermediate filament (IF) proteins Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) and Vimentin (VIM) surround amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The functional consequences of this upregulation are unclear. To identify molecular pathways coupled

  20. GFAP and vimentin deficiency alters gene expression in astrocytes and microglia in wild-type mice and changes the transcriptional response of reactive glia in mouse model for Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, W.; Kooijman, Lieneke; Orre, Marie; Stassen, Oscar; Pekny, Milos; Hol, Elly M

    Reactive astrocytes with an increased expression of intermediate filament (IF) proteins Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) and Vimentin (VIM) surround amyloid plaques in Alzheimer's disease (AD). The functional consequences of this upregulation are unclear. To identify molecular pathways coupled

  1. Reactive Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eren Erken

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactive arthritis is an acute, sterile, non-suppurative and inflammatory arthropaty which has occured as a result of an infectious processes, mostly after gastrointestinal and genitourinary tract infections. Reiter syndrome is a frequent type of reactive arthritis. Both reactive arthritis and Reiter syndrome belong to the group of seronegative spondyloarthropathies, associated with HLA-B27 positivity and characterized by ongoing inflammation after an infectious episode. The classical triad of Reiter syndrome is defined as arthritis, conjuctivitis and urethritis and is seen only in one third of patients with Reiter syndrome. Recently, seronegative asymmetric arthritis and typical extraarticular involvement are thought to be adequate for the diagnosis. However, there is no established criteria for the diagnosis of reactive arthritis and the number of randomized and controlled studies about the therapy is not enough. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(3.000: 283-299

  2. Reactive Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüdiger Ehlers

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The distinction between safety and liveness properties is a fundamental classification with immediate implications on the feasibility and complexity of various monitoring, model checking, and synthesis problems. In this paper, we revisit the notion of safety for reactive systems, i.e., for systems whose behavior is characterized by the interplay of uncontrolled environment inputs and controlled system outputs. We show that reactive safety is a strictly larger class of properties than standard safety. We provide algorithms for checking if a property, given as a temporal formula or as a word or tree automaton, is a reactive safety property and for translating such properties into safety automata. Based on this construction, the standard verification and synthesis algorithms for safety properties immediately extend to the larger class of reactive safety.

  3. Reactive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aceto, Luca; Ingolfsdottir, Anna; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    A reactive system comprises networks of computing components, achieving their goals through interaction among themselves and their environment. Thus even relatively small systems may exhibit unexpectedly complex behaviours. As moreover reactive systems are often used in safety critical systems......, the need for mathematically based formal methodology is increasingly important. There are many books that look at particular methodologies for such systems. This book offers a more balanced introduction for graduate students and describes the various approaches, their strengths and weaknesses, and when...

  4. Initiation of HIV Reverse Transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Isel, Catherine; Ehresmann, Chantal; Marquet, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Reverse transcription of retroviral genomes into double stranded DNA is a key event for viral replication. The very first stage of HIV reverse transcription, the initiation step, involves viral and cellular partners that are selectively packaged into the viral particle, leading to an RNA/protein complex with very specific structural and functional features, some of which being, in the case of HIV-1, linked to particular isolates. Recent understanding of the tight spatio-temporal regulation of...

  5. The Journey of a Transcription Factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pireyre, Marie

    in their regulation at multiple steps of their activation. Plant signaling in connection with transcription factor regulation is an exciting field, allowing research on multiple regulatory mechanisms. This thesis shed light on the importance of integrating all steps of transcription factor activation in a regulatory......Plants have developed astonishing networks regulating their metabolism to adapt to their environment. The complexity of these networks is illustrated by the expansion of families of regulators such as transcription factors in the plant kingdom. Transcription factors specifically impact...... MYBs to activate transcription of GLS biosynthetic genes. A lot is known about transcriptional regulation of these nine GLS regulators. This thesis aimed at identifying regulatory mechanisms at the protein level, allowing rapid and specific regulation of transcription factors using GLS as a model...

  6. Reactive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aceto, Luca; Ingolfsdottir, Anna; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand

    A reactive system comprises networks of computing components, achieving their goals through interaction among themselves and their environment. Thus even relatively small systems may exhibit unexpectedly complex behaviours. As moreover reactive systems are often used in safety critical systems...... they are best used. Milner's CCS and its operational semantics are introduced, together with the notions of behavioural equivalences based on bisimulation techniques and with recursive extensions of Hennessy-Milner logic. In the second part of the book, the presented theories are extended to take timing issues...

  7. Genome reactivation after the silence in mitosis: recapitulating mechanisms of development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaret, Kenneth S

    2014-04-28

    Transcription is silenced during mitosis and reactivated at mitotic exit. The dynamics and identities of "bookmarking" transcription factors and chromatin marks that mediate reactivation often recapitulate those observed during cell identity establishment in development. Thus, features of postmitotic gene reactivation can provide insights into mechanisms of developmental cell fate establishment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dynamics of HIV latency and reactivation in a primary CD4+ T cell model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejman Mohammadi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available HIV latency is a major obstacle to curing infection. Current strategies to eradicate HIV aim at increasing transcription of the latent provirus. In the present study we observed that latently infected CD4+ T cells from HIV-infected individuals failed to produce viral particles upon ex vivo exposure to SAHA (vorinostat, despite effective inhibition of histone deacetylases. To identify steps that were not susceptible to the action of SAHA or other latency reverting agents, we used a primary CD4+ T cell model, joint host and viral RNA sequencing, and a viral-encoded reporter. This model served to investigate the characteristics of latently infected cells, the dynamics of HIV latency, and the process of reactivation induced by various stimuli. During latency, we observed persistence of viral transcripts but only limited viral translation. Similarly, the reactivating agents SAHA and disulfiram successfully increased viral transcription, but failed to effectively enhance viral translation, mirroring the ex vivo data. This study highlights the importance of post-transcriptional blocks as one mechanism leading to HIV latency that needs to be relieved in order to purge the viral reservoir.

  9. Mitotic Transcriptional Activation: Clearance of Actively Engaged Pol II via Transcriptional Elongation Control in Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kaiwei; Woodfin, Ashley R; Slaughter, Brian D; Unruh, Jay R; Box, Andrew C; Rickels, Ryan A; Gao, Xin; Haug, Jeffrey S; Jaspersen, Sue L; Shilatifard, Ali

    2015-11-05

    Although it is established that some general transcription factors are inactivated at mitosis, many details of mitotic transcription inhibition (MTI) and its underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We have identified mitotic transcriptional activation (MTA) as a key regulatory step to control transcription in mitosis for genes with transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerase II (Pol II) to activate and transcribe until the end of the gene to clear Pol II from mitotic chromatin, followed by global impairment of transcription reinitiation through MTI. Global nascent RNA sequencing and RNA fluorescence in situ hybridization demonstrate the existence of transcriptionally engaged Pol II in early mitosis. Both genetic and chemical inhibition of P-TEFb in mitosis lead to delays in the progression of cell division. Together, our study reveals a mechanism for MTA and MTI whereby transcriptionally engaged Pol II can progress into productive elongation and finish transcription to allow proper cellular division. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Application of stepping motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-10-01

    This book is divided into three parts, which is about practical using of stepping motor. The first part has six chapters. The contents of the first part are about stepping motor, classification of stepping motor, basic theory og stepping motor, characteristic and basic words, types and characteristic of stepping motor in hybrid type and basic control of stepping motor. The second part deals with application of stepping motor with hardware of stepping motor control, stepping motor control by microcomputer and software of stepping motor control. The last part mentions choice of stepping motor system, examples of stepping motor, measurement of stepping motor and practical cases of application of stepping motor.

  11. Evaluation of virus isolation, one-step real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assay, and two rapid influenza diagnostic tests for detecting canine Influenza A virus H3N8 shedding in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecoraro, Heidi L; Spindel, Miranda E; Bennett, Susi; Lunn, Katharine F; Landolt, Gabriele A

    2013-05-01

    Sustained transmission of canine Influenza A virus (CIV) H3N8 among U.S. dogs underscores the threat influenza continues to pose to canine health. Because rapid and accurate detection of infection is critical to the diagnosis and control of CIV, the 2 main objectives of the current study were to estimate and compare the sensitivities of CIV testing methods on canine swab samples and to evaluate the performance of Flu Detect™ (Synbiotics Corp., Kansas City, MO) for detecting CIV nasal shedding in high-risk shelter dogs. To address the first objective, nasal and pharyngeal swab samples were collected from 124 shelter and household dogs seen by Colorado State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital clinicians for canine infectious respiratory disease between April 2006 and March 2007 and tested for CIV shedding using virus isolation, the rapid influenza diagnostic test Directigen Flu A+B™ (BD Diagnostic Systems, Sparks, MD), and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). For the second objective, 1,372 dogs with unknown respiratory health status were sampled from 6 U.S. shelters from December 2009 to November 2010. Samples were tested for presence of CIV using real-time RT-PCR and Flu Detect. Using a stochastic latent class modeling approach, the median sensitivities of virus isolation, rapid influenza diagnostic test, and real-time RT-PCR were 72%, 65%, and 95%, respectively. The Flu Detect test performed poorly for detecting CIV nasal shedding compared to real-time RT-PCR. In conclusion, the real-time RT-PCR has the highest sensitivity for detecting virus nasal shedding and can be used as a rapid diagnostic test for CIV.

  12. Specificity in ROS Signaling and Transcript Signatures

    OpenAIRE

    Vaahtera, Lauri; Brosché, Mikael; Wrzaczek, Michael; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Reactive oxygen species (ROS), important signaling molecules in plants, are involved in developmental control and stress adaptation. ROS production can trigger broad transcriptional changes; however, it is not clear how specificity in transcriptional regulation is achieved. Recent Advances: A large collection of public transcriptome data from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana is available for analysis. These data can be used for the analysis of biological processes that are a...

  13. Inactivation of the FoxO3a transcription factor is associated with the production of reactive oxygen species during protein kinase CK2 downregulation-mediated senescence in human colon cancer and breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seong-Yeol; Bae, Young-Seuk, E-mail: ysbae@knu.ac.kr

    2016-09-09

    We previously showed that protein kinase CK2 downregulation mediates senescence through the reactive oxygen species (ROS)–p53–p21{sup Cip1/WAF1} pathway in various human cells. In the present study, we investigated whether the FoxO3a transcription factor is associated with ROS production during CK2 downregulation-induced senescence in human colon cancer HCT116 and breast cancer MCF-7 cells. FoxO3a overexpression suppressed ROS production and p53 stabilization induced by a CK2α knockdown. CK2α downregulation induced nuclear export of FoxO3a through stimulation of AKT-mediated phosphorylation of FoxO3a and decreased transcription of its target genes (Cu/ZnSOD, MnSOD, and catalase). In contrast, CK2α overexpression inhibited AKT-mediated FoxO3a phosphorylation. This resulted in nuclear accumulation of FoxO3a, and elevated expression of its target genes. Therefore, these data indicate for the first time that CK2 downregulation stimulates ROS generation by inhibiting FoxO3a during premature senescence in human colon and breast cancer cells. - Highlights: • FoxO3a overexpression inhibited ROS production mediated by CK2α knockdown. • CK2α downregulation induced nuclear export of FoxO3a via AKT activation. • CK2α downregulation reduced transcription of FoxO3a target genes including SOD. • CK2α upregulation elevated nuclear import and target gene expression of FoxO3a. • This study indicates that CK2 can modulate the intracellular ROS level via FoxO3a.

  14. X-ray Crystal Structures Elucidate the Nucleotidyl Transfer Reaction of Transcript Initiation Using Two Nucleotides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Gleghorn; E Davydova; R Basu; L Rothman-Denes; K Murakami

    2011-12-31

    We have determined the X-ray crystal structures of the pre- and postcatalytic forms of the initiation complex of bacteriophage N4 RNA polymerase that provide the complete set of atomic images depicting the process of transcript initiation by a single-subunit RNA polymerase. As observed during T7 RNA polymerase transcript elongation, substrate loading for the initiation process also drives a conformational change of the O helix, but only the correct base pairing between the +2 substrate and DNA base is able to complete the O-helix conformational transition. Substrate binding also facilitates catalytic metal binding that leads to alignment of the reactive groups of substrates for the nucleotidyl transfer reaction. Although all nucleic acid polymerases use two divalent metals for catalysis, they differ in the requirements and the timing of binding of each metal. In the case of bacteriophage RNA polymerase, we propose that catalytic metal binding is the last step before the nucleotidyl transfer reaction.

  15. Efficient reactive Brownian dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donev, Aleksandar; Yang, Chiao-Yu; Kim, Changho

    2018-01-01

    We develop a Split Reactive Brownian Dynamics (SRBD) algorithm for particle simulations of reaction-diffusion systems based on the Doi or volume reactivity model, in which pairs of particles react with a specified Poisson rate if they are closer than a chosen reactive distance. In our Doi model, we ensure that the microscopic reaction rules for various association and dissociation reactions are consistent with detailed balance (time reversibility) at thermodynamic equilibrium. The SRBD algorithm uses Strang splitting in time to separate reaction and diffusion and solves both the diffusion-only and reaction-only subproblems exactly, even at high packing densities. To efficiently process reactions without uncontrolled approximations, SRBD employs an event-driven algorithm that processes reactions in a time-ordered sequence over the duration of the time step. A grid of cells with size larger than all of the reactive distances is used to schedule and process the reactions, but unlike traditional grid-based methods such as reaction-diffusion master equation algorithms, the results of SRBD are statistically independent of the size of the grid used to accelerate the processing of reactions. We use the SRBD algorithm to compute the effective macroscopic reaction rate for both reaction-limited and diffusion-limited irreversible association in three dimensions and compare to existing theoretical predictions at low and moderate densities. We also study long-time tails in the time correlation functions for reversible association at thermodynamic equilibrium and compare to recent theoretical predictions. Finally, we compare different particle and continuum methods on a model exhibiting a Turing-like instability and pattern formation. Our studies reinforce the common finding that microscopic mechanisms and correlations matter for diffusion-limited systems, making continuum and even mesoscopic modeling of such systems difficult or impossible. We also find that for models in which

  16. Specificity and robustness in transcription control networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Anirvan M; Djordjevic, Marko; Shraiman, Boris I

    2002-02-19

    Recognition by transcription factors of the regulatory DNA elements upstream of genes is the fundamental step in controlling gene expression. How does the necessity to provide stability with respect to mutation constrain the organization of transcription control networks? We examine the mutation load of a transcription factor interacting with a set of n regulatory response elements as a function of the factor/DNA binding specificity and conclude on theoretical grounds that the optimal specificity decreases with n. The predicted correlation between variability of binding sites (for a given transcription factor) and their number is supported by the genomic data for Escherichia coli. The analysis of E. coli genomic data was carried out using an algorithm suggested by the biophysical model of transcription factor/DNA binding. Complete results of the search for candidate transcription factor binding sites are available at http://www.physics.rockefeller.edu/~boris/public/search_ecoli.

  17. Nascent RNA sequencing reveals distinct features in plant transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Hetzel, Jonathan; Duttke, Sascha H.; Benner, Christopher; Chory, Joanne

    2016-01-01

    Transcription is a fundamental and dynamic step in the regulation of gene expression, but the characteristics of plant transcription are poorly understood. We adapted the global nuclear run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) and 5′GRO-seq methods for plants and provide a plant version of the next-generation sequencing software HOMER (homer.ucsd.edu/homer/plants) to facilitate data analysis. Mapping nascent transcripts in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings enabled identification of known and novel transcript...

  18. Relationship between Measures of HIV Reactivation and Decline of the Latent Reservoir under Latency-Reversing Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petravic, Janka; Rasmussen, Thomas A; Lewin, Sharon R; Kent, Stephen J; Davenport, Miles P

    2017-05-01

    Antiretroviral-free HIV remission requires substantial reduction of the number of latently infected cells and enhanced immune control of viremia. Latency-reversing agents (LRAs) aim to eliminate latently infected cells by increasing the rate of reactivation of HIV transcription, which exposes these cells to killing by the immune system. As LRAs are explored in clinical trials, it becomes increasingly important to assess the effect of an increased HIV reactivation rate on the decline of latently infected cells and to estimate LRA efficacy in increasing virus reactivation. However, whether the extent of HIV reactivation is a good predictor of the rate of decline of the number of latently infected cells is dependent on a number of factors. Our modeling shows that the mechanisms of maintenance and clearance of the reservoir, the life span of cells with reactivated HIV, and other factors may significantly impact the relationship between measures of HIV reactivation and the decline in the number of latently infected cells. The usual measures of HIV reactivation are the increase in cell-associated HIV RNA (CA RNA) and/or plasma HIV RNA soon after administration. We analyze two recent studies where CA RNA was used to estimate the impact of two novel LRAs, panobinostat and romidepsin. Both drugs increased the CA RNA level 3- to 4-fold in clinical trials. However, cells with panobinostat-reactivated HIV appeared long-lived (half-life > 1 month), suggesting that the HIV reactivation rate increased by approximately 8%. With romidepsin, the life span of cells that reactivated HIV was short (2 days), suggesting that the HIV reactivation rate may have doubled under treatment. IMPORTANCE Long-lived latently infected cells that persist on antiretroviral treatment (ART) are thought to be the source of viral rebound soon after ART interruption. The elimination of latently infected cells is an important step in achieving antiretroviral-free HIV remission. Latency-reversing agents

  19. What Is Reactive Arthritis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Initiative Breadcrumb Home Health Topics English Español Reactive Arthritis Basics In-Depth Download Download EPUB Download PDF What is it? Points To Remember About Reactive Arthritis Reactive arthritis is pain or swelling in a ...

  20. The way to collisions, step by step

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    While the LHC sectors cool down and reach the cryogenic operating temperature, spirits are warming up as we all eagerly await the first collisions. No reason to hurry, though. Making particles collide involves the complex manoeuvring of thousands of delicate components. The experts will make it happen using a step-by-step approach.

  1. Step-Growth Polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stille, J. K.

    1981-01-01

    Following a comparison of chain-growth and step-growth polymerization, focuses on the latter process by describing requirements for high molecular weight, step-growth polymerization kinetics, synthesis and molecular weight distribution of some linear step-growth polymers, and three-dimensional network step-growth polymers. (JN)

  2. Stepping motor controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourret, Steven C.; Swansen, James E.

    1984-01-01

    A stepping motor is microprocessingly controlled by digital circuitry which monitors the output of a shaft encoder adjustably secured to the stepping motor and generates a subsequent stepping pulse only after the preceding step has occurred and a fixed delay has expired. The fixed delay is variable on a real-time basis to provide for smooth and controlled deceleration.

  3. An autonomous organic reaction search engine for chemical reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragone, Vincenza; Sans, Victor; Henson, Alon B.; Granda, Jaroslaw M.; Cronin, Leroy

    2017-06-01

    The exploration of chemical space for new reactivity, reactions and molecules is limited by the need for separate work-up-separation steps searching for molecules rather than reactivity. Herein we present a system that can autonomously evaluate chemical reactivity within a network of 64 possible reaction combinations and aims for new reactivity, rather than a predefined set of targets. The robotic system combines chemical handling, in-line spectroscopy and real-time feedback and analysis with an algorithm that is able to distinguish and select the most reactive pathways, generating a reaction selection index (RSI) without need for separate work-up or purification steps. This allows the automatic navigation of a chemical network, leading to previously unreported molecules while needing only to do a fraction of the total possible reactions without any prior knowledge of the chemistry. We show the RSI correlates with reactivity and is able to search chemical space using the most reactive pathways.

  4. An autonomous organic reaction search engine for chemical reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragone, Vincenza; Sans, Victor; Henson, Alon B; Granda, Jaroslaw M; Cronin, Leroy

    2017-06-09

    The exploration of chemical space for new reactivity, reactions and molecules is limited by the need for separate work-up-separation steps searching for molecules rather than reactivity. Herein we present a system that can autonomously evaluate chemical reactivity within a network of 64 possible reaction combinations and aims for new reactivity, rather than a predefined set of targets. The robotic system combines chemical handling, in-line spectroscopy and real-time feedback and analysis with an algorithm that is able to distinguish and select the most reactive pathways, generating a reaction selection index (RSI) without need for separate work-up or purification steps. This allows the automatic navigation of a chemical network, leading to previously unreported molecules while needing only to do a fraction of the total possible reactions without any prior knowledge of the chemistry. We show the RSI correlates with reactivity and is able to search chemical space using the most reactive pathways.

  5. Microsoft Office professional 2010 step by step

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Joyce; Frye, Curtis

    2011-01-01

    Teach yourself exactly what you need to know about using Office Professional 2010-one step at a time! With STEP BY STEP, you build and practice new skills hands-on, at your own pace. Covering Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, Outlook, Excel, Access, Publisher, and OneNote, this book will help you learn the core features and capabilities needed to: Create attractive documents, publications, and spreadsheetsManage your e-mail, calendar, meetings, and communicationsPut your business data to workDevelop and deliver great presentationsOrganize your ideas and notes in one placeConnect, share, and accom

  6. Hamming generalized corrector for reactivity calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suescun-Diaz, Daniel; Ibarguen-Gonzalez, Maria C.; Figueroa-Jimenez, Jorge H. [Pontificia Universidad Javeriana Cali, Cali (Colombia). Dept. de Ciencias Naturales y Matematicas

    2014-06-15

    This work presents the Hamming method generalized corrector for numerically resolving the differential equation of delayed neutron precursor concentration from the point kinetics equations for reactivity calculation, without using the nuclear power history or the Laplace transform. A study was carried out of several correctors with their respective modifiers with different time step calculations, to offer stability and greater precision. Better results are obtained for some correctors than with other existing methods. Reactivity can be calculated with precision of the order h{sup 5}, where h is the time step. (orig.)

  7. Hamming generalized corrector for reactivity calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suescun-Diaz, Daniel; Ibarguen-Gonzalez, Maria C.; Figueroa-Jimenez, Jorge H.

    2014-01-01

    This work presents the Hamming method generalized corrector for numerically resolving the differential equation of delayed neutron precursor concentration from the point kinetics equations for reactivity calculation, without using the nuclear power history or the Laplace transform. A study was carried out of several correctors with their respective modifiers with different time step calculations, to offer stability and greater precision. Better results are obtained for some correctors than with other existing methods. Reactivity can be calculated with precision of the order h 5 , where h is the time step. (orig.)

  8. On Computational Small Steps and Big Steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Jacob

    rules in the small-step semantics cause the refocusing step of the syntactic correspondence to be inapplicable. Second, we propose two solutions to overcome this in-applicability: backtracking and rule generalization. Third, we show how these solutions affect the other transformations of the two......We study the relationship between small-step semantics, big-step semantics and abstract machines, for programming languages that employ an outermost reduction strategy, i.e., languages where reductions near the root of the abstract syntax tree are performed before reductions near the leaves....... In particular, we investigate how Biernacka and Danvy’s syntactic correspondence and Reynolds’s functional correspondence can be applied to interderive semantic specifications for such languages. The main contribution of this dissertation is three-fold: First, we identify that backward overlapping reduction...

  9. HIV-1 reverse transcription initiation: a potential target for novel antivirals?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbink, Truus E. M.; Berkhout, Ben

    2008-01-01

    Reverse transcription is an essential step in the retroviral life cycle, as it converts the genomic RNA into DNA. In this review, we describe recent developments concerning the initiation step of this complex, multi-step reaction. During initiation of reverse transcription, a cellular tRNA primer is

  10. Compensatory stepping responses in individuals with stroke: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhani, Bimal; Mansfield, Avril; Inness, Elizabeth L; McIlroy, William E

    2011-05-01

    Impaired postural control and a high incidence of falls are commonly observed following stroke. Compensatory stepping responses are critical to reactive balance control. We hypothesize that, following a stroke, individuals with unilateral limb dyscontrol will be faced with the unique challenge of controlling such rapid stepping reactions that may eventually be linked to the high rate of falling. The objectives of this exploratory pilot study were to investigate compensatory stepping in individuals poststroke with regard to: (1) choice of initial stepping limb (paretic or non-paretic); (2) step characteristics; and (3) differences in step characteristics when the initial step is taken with the paretic vs. the non-paretic limb. Four subjects following stroke (38-165 days post) and 11 healthy young adults were recruited. Anterior and posterior perturbations were delivered by using a weight drop system. Force plates recorded centre-of-pressure excursion prior to the onset of stepping and step timing. Of the four subjects, three only attempted to step with their non-paretic limb and one stepped with either limb. Time to foot-off was generally slow, whereas step onset time and swing time were comparable to healthy controls. Two of the four subjects executed multistep responses in every trial, and attempts to force stepping with the paretic limb were unsuccessful in three of the four subjects. Despite high clinical balance scores, these individuals with stroke demonstrated impaired compensatory stepping responses, suggesting that current clinical evaluations might not accurately reflect reactive balance control in this population.

  11. Reactive Collision Avoidance Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharf, Daniel; Acikmese, Behcet; Ploen, Scott; Hadaegh, Fred

    2010-01-01

    The reactive collision avoidance (RCA) algorithm allows a spacecraft to find a fuel-optimal trajectory for avoiding an arbitrary number of colliding spacecraft in real time while accounting for acceleration limits. In addition to spacecraft, the technology can be used for vehicles that can accelerate in any direction, such as helicopters and submersibles. In contrast to existing, passive algorithms that simultaneously design trajectories for a cluster of vehicles working to achieve a common goal, RCA is implemented onboard spacecraft only when an imminent collision is detected, and then plans a collision avoidance maneuver for only that host vehicle, thus preventing a collision in an off-nominal situation for which passive algorithms cannot. An example scenario for such a situation might be when a spacecraft in the cluster is approaching another one, but enters safe mode and begins to drift. Functionally, the RCA detects colliding spacecraft, plans an evasion trajectory by solving the Evasion Trajectory Problem (ETP), and then recovers after the collision is avoided. A direct optimization approach was used to develop the algorithm so it can run in real time. In this innovation, a parameterized class of avoidance trajectories is specified, and then the optimal trajectory is found by searching over the parameters. The class of trajectories is selected as bang-off-bang as motivated by optimal control theory. That is, an avoiding spacecraft first applies full acceleration in a constant direction, then coasts, and finally applies full acceleration to stop. The parameter optimization problem can be solved offline and stored as a look-up table of values. Using a look-up table allows the algorithm to run in real time. Given a colliding spacecraft, the properties of the collision geometry serve as indices of the look-up table that gives the optimal trajectory. For multiple colliding spacecraft, the set of trajectories that avoid all spacecraft is rapidly searched on

  12. Bromodomain and extraterminal inhibitors block the Epstein-Barr virus lytic cycle at two distinct steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Kristin M; Moquin, Stephanie A; He, Amanda; Fernandez, Samantha G; Somberg, Jessica J; Liu, Stephanie M; Martinez, Delsy M; Miranda, Jj L

    2017-08-11

    Lytic infection by the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) poses numerous health risks, such as infectious mononucleosis and lymphoproliferative disorder. Proteins in the bromodomain and extraterminal (BET) family regulate multiple stages of viral life cycles and provide promising intervention targets. Synthetic small molecules can bind to the bromodomains and disrupt function by preventing recognition of acetylated lysine substrates. We demonstrate that JQ1 and other BET inhibitors block two different steps in the sequential cascade of the EBV lytic cycle. BET inhibitors prevent expression of the viral immediate-early protein BZLF1. JQ1 alters transcription of genes controlled by the host protein BACH1, and BACH1 knockdown reduces BZLF1 expression. BET proteins also localize to the lytic origin of replication (OriLyt) genetic elements, and BET inhibitors prevent viral late gene expression. There JQ1 reduces BRD4 recruitment during reactivation to preclude replication initiation. This represents a rarely observed dual mode of action for drugs.

  13. Reactive Kripke semantics

    CERN Document Server

    Gabbay, Dov M

    2013-01-01

    This text offers an extension to the traditional Kripke semantics for non-classical logics by adding the notion of reactivity. Reactive Kripke models change their accessibility relation as we progress in the evaluation process of formulas in the model. This feature makes the reactive Kripke semantics strictly stronger and more applicable than the traditional one. Here we investigate the properties and axiomatisations of this new and most effective semantics, and we offer a wide landscape of applications of the idea of reactivity. Applied topics include reactive automata, reactive grammars, rea

  14. Structural basis of RNA polymerase II backtracking, arrest and reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Alan C M; Cramer, Patrick

    2011-03-10

    During gene transcription, RNA polymerase (Pol) II moves forwards along DNA and synthesizes messenger RNA. However, at certain DNA sequences, Pol II moves backwards, and such backtracking can arrest transcription. Arrested Pol II is reactivated by transcription factor IIS (TFIIS), which induces RNA cleavage that is required for cell viability. Pol II arrest and reactivation are involved in transcription through nucleosomes and in promoter-proximal gene regulation. Here we present X-ray structures at 3.3 Å resolution of an arrested Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pol II complex with DNA and RNA, and of a reactivation intermediate that additionally contains TFIIS. In the arrested complex, eight nucleotides of backtracked RNA bind a conserved 'backtrack site' in the Pol II pore and funnel, trapping the active centre trigger loop and inhibiting mRNA elongation. In the reactivation intermediate, TFIIS locks the trigger loop away from backtracked RNA, displaces RNA from the backtrack site, and complements the polymerase active site with a basic and two acidic residues that may catalyse proton transfers during RNA cleavage. The active site is demarcated from the backtrack site by a 'gating tyrosine' residue that probably delimits backtracking. These results establish the structural basis of Pol II backtracking, arrest and reactivation, and provide a framework for analysing gene regulation during transcription elongation.

  15. Step by Step Microsoft Office Visio 2003

    CERN Document Server

    Lemke, Judy

    2004-01-01

    Experience learning made easy-and quickly teach yourself how to use Visio 2003, the Microsoft Office business and technical diagramming program. With STEP BY STEP, you can take just the lessons you need, or work from cover to cover. Either way, you drive the instruction-building and practicing the skills you need, just when you need them! Produce computer network diagrams, organization charts, floor plans, and moreUse templates to create new diagrams and drawings quicklyAdd text, color, and 1-D and 2-D shapesInsert graphics and pictures, such as company logosConnect shapes to create a basic f

  16. Meteorin is upregulated in reactive astrocytes and functions as a negative feedback effector in reactive gliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hye Shin; Lee, Soon-Hee; Cha, Jong-Ho; Seo, Ji Hae; Ahn, Bum Ju; Kim, Kyu-Won

    2015-08-01

    Reactive gliosis is a glial response to a wide range of central nervous system insults, which results in cellular and molecular changes to resting glial cells. Despite its fundamental effect on neuropathologies, the identification and characterization of the molecular mechanisms underlying this process remain to be fully elucidated. The aim of the present study was to analyze the expression profile and functions of the astrocytic neurotrophic factor, meteorin, in the progression of reactive gliosis. A mouse model of photothrombotic ischemia, and a primary astrocyte culture were used in the present study. Reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting and immunofluorescence staining were performed to examine the expression levels of meteorin and reactive gliosis markers. Increased expression levels of meteorin were observed in reactive astrocytes in a photothrombotic ischemia mouse model, as well as in cultured astrocytes, which were stimulated by transforming growth factor-β1. Exogenous treatment of the astrocytes with meteorin did not induce janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 signaling, however, silencing the expression of meteorin in the astrocytes resulted in an upregulation of reactive astrocyte markers, including glial fibrillary acidic protein and S100β, indicating that endogenous meteorin is required for the maintenance of astrocytic homeostasis. These results suggested a novel role for meteorin as a negative feedback effector in reactive gliosis.

  17. Reactive perforating collagenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Mukesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactive perforating collagenosis is a rare cutaneous disorder of unknown etiology. We hereby describe a case of acquired reactive perforating collagenosis in a patient of diabetes and chronic renal failure.

  18. Reactivity on the Web

    OpenAIRE

    Bailey, James; Bry, François; Eckert, Michael; Patrânjan, Paula Lavinia

    2005-01-01

    Reactivity, the ability to detect simple and composite events and respond in a timely manner, is an essential requirement in many present-day information systems. With the emergence of new, dynamic Web applications, reactivity on the Web is receiving increasing attention. Reactive Web-based systems need to detect and react not only to simple events but also to complex, real-life situations. This paper introduces XChange, a language for programming reactive behaviour on the Web,...

  19. Diabetes PSA (:30) Step By Step

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-24

    First steps to preventing diabetes. For Hispanic and Latino American audiences.  Created: 10/24/2009 by National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), a joint program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.   Date Released: 10/24/2009.

  20. Diabetes PSA (:60) Step By Step

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-10-24

    First steps to preventing diabetes. For Hispanic and Latino American audiences.  Created: 10/24/2009 by National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), a joint program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.   Date Released: 10/24/2009.

  1. Comparison of Transcription Factor Binding Site Models

    KAUST Repository

    Bhuyan, Sharifulislam

    2012-05-01

    Modeling of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) and TFBS prediction on genomic sequences are important steps to elucidate transcription regulatory mechanism. Dependency of transcription regulation on a great number of factors such as chemical specificity, molecular structure, genomic and epigenetic characteristics, long distance interaction, makes this a challenging problem. Different experimental procedures generate evidence that DNA-binding domains of transcription factors show considerable DNA sequence specificity. Probabilistic modeling of TFBSs has been moderately successful in identifying patterns from a family of sequences. In this study, we compare performances of different probabilistic models and try to estimate their efficacy over experimental TFBSs data. We build a pipeline to calculate sensitivity and specificity from aligned TFBS sequences for several probabilistic models, such as Markov chains, hidden Markov models, Bayesian networks. Our work, containing relevant statistics and evaluation for the models, can help researchers to choose the most appropriate model for the problem at hand.

  2. HIV-1 transcription and latency: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lint, Carine; Bouchat, Sophie; Marcello, Alessandro

    2013-06-26

    Combination antiretroviral therapy, despite being potent and life-prolonging, is not curative and does not eradicate HIV-1 infection since interruption of treatment inevitably results in a rapid rebound of viremia. Reactivation of latently infected cells harboring transcriptionally silent but replication-competent proviruses is a potential source of persistent residual viremia in cART-treated patients. Although multiple reservoirs may exist, the persistence of resting CD4+ T cells carrying a latent infection represents a major barrier to eradication. In this review, we will discuss the latest reports on the molecular mechanisms that may regulate HIV-1 latency at the transcriptional level, including transcriptional interference, the role of cellular factors, chromatin organization and epigenetic modifications, the viral Tat trans-activator and its cellular cofactors. Since latency mechanisms may also operate at the post-transcriptional level, we will consider inhibition of nuclear RNA export and inhibition of translation by microRNAs as potential barriers to HIV-1 gene expression. Finally, we will review the therapeutic approaches and clinical studies aimed at achieving either a sterilizing cure or a functional cure of HIV-1 infection, with a special emphasis on the most recent pharmacological strategies to reactivate the latent viruses and decrease the pool of viral reservoirs.

  3. HIV-1 transcription and latency: an update

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Combination antiretroviral therapy, despite being potent and life-prolonging, is not curative and does not eradicate HIV-1 infection since interruption of treatment inevitably results in a rapid rebound of viremia. Reactivation of latently infected cells harboring transcriptionally silent but replication-competent proviruses is a potential source of persistent residual viremia in cART-treated patients. Although multiple reservoirs may exist, the persistence of resting CD4+ T cells carrying a latent infection represents a major barrier to eradication. In this review, we will discuss the latest reports on the molecular mechanisms that may regulate HIV-1 latency at the transcriptional level, including transcriptional interference, the role of cellular factors, chromatin organization and epigenetic modifications, the viral Tat trans-activator and its cellular cofactors. Since latency mechanisms may also operate at the post-transcriptional level, we will consider inhibition of nuclear RNA export and inhibition of translation by microRNAs as potential barriers to HIV-1 gene expression. Finally, we will review the therapeutic approaches and clinical studies aimed at achieving either a sterilizing cure or a functional cure of HIV-1 infection, with a special emphasis on the most recent pharmacological strategies to reactivate the latent viruses and decrease the pool of viral reservoirs. PMID:23803414

  4. Biophysical models of transcription in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubey, Sandeep

    Cells constantly face environmental challenges and deal with them by changing their gene expression patterns. They make decisions regarding which genes to express and which genes not to express based on intra-cellular and environmental cues. These decisions are often made by regulating the process of transcription. While the identities of the different molecules that take part in regulating transcription have been determined for a number of different genes, their dynamics inside the cell are still poorly understood. One key feature of these regulatory dynamics is that the numbers of the bio-molecules involved is typically small, resulting in large temporal fluctuations in transcriptional outputs (mRNA and protein). In this thesis I show that measurements of the cell-to-cell variability of the distribution of transcribing RNA polymerases along a gene provide a previously unexplored method for deciphering the mechanism of its transcription in vivo. First, I propose a simple kinetic model of transcription initiation and elongation from which I calculate transcribing RNA polymerase copy-number fluctuations. I test my theory against published data obtained for yeast genes and propose a novel mechanism of transcription. Rather than transcription being initiated through a single rate-limiting step, as was previously proposed, my single-cell analysis reveals the presence of at least two rate limiting steps. Second, I compute the distribution of inter-polymerase distance distribution along a gene and propose a method for analyzing inter-polymerase distance distributions acquired in experiments. By applying this method to images of polymerases transcribing ribosomal genes in E.coli I show that one model of regulation of these genes is consistent with inter-polymerase distance data while a number of other models are not. The analytical framework described in this thesis can be used to extract quantitative information about the dynamics of transcription from single

  5. Microsoft Office Word 2007 step by step

    CERN Document Server

    Cox, Joyce

    2007-01-01

    Experience learning made easy-and quickly teach yourself how to create impressive documents with Word 2007. With Step By Step, you set the pace-building and practicing the skills you need, just when you need them!Apply styles and themes to your document for a polished lookAdd graphics and text effects-and see a live previewOrganize information with new SmartArt diagrams and chartsInsert references, footnotes, indexes, a table of contentsSend documents for review and manage revisionsTurn your ideas into blogs, Web pages, and moreYour all-in-one learning experience includes:Files for building sk

  6. Mechanisms of transcriptional repression by histone lysine methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hublitz, Philip; Albert, Mareike; Peters, Antoine H F M

    2009-01-01

    During development, covalent modification of both, histones and DNA contribute to the specification and maintenance of cell identity. Repressive modifications are thought to stabilize cell type specific gene expression patterns, reducing the likelihood of reactivation of lineage-unrelated genes......, transcription factor binding and the antagonizing activities of distinct epigenetic regulators such as histone methyltransferases (HMTs) and histone demethylases (HDMs). Subsequently, we compare chromatin signatures associated with different types of transcriptional outcomes from stable repression to highly...

  7. RNA polymerase II transcriptional fidelity control and its functional interplay with DNA modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Wang, Wei; Chong, Jenny; Shin, Ji Hyun; Xu, Jun; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Accurate genetic information transfer is essential for life. As a key enzyme involved in the first step of gene expression, RNA polymerase II (Pol II) must maintain high transcriptional fidelity while it reads along DNA template and synthesizes RNA transcript in a stepwise manner during transcription elongation. DNA lesions or modifications may lead to significant changes in transcriptional fidelity or transcription elongation dynamics. In this review, we will summarize recent progress toward understanding the molecular basis of RNA Pol II transcriptional fidelity control and impacts of DNA lesions and modifications on Pol II transcription elongation.

  8. Reactive Programming in Java

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Reactive Programming in gaining a lot of excitement. Many libraries, tools, and frameworks are beginning to make use of reactive libraries. Besides, applications dealing with big data or high frequency data can benefit from this programming paradigm. Come to this presentation to learn about what reactive programming is, what kind of problems it solves, how it solves them. We will take an example oriented approach to learning the programming model and the abstraction.

  9. BN600 reactivity definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheltyshev, V.; Ivanov, A.

    2000-01-01

    Since 1980, the fast BN600 reactor with sodium coolant has been operated at Beloyarsk Nuclear Power Plant. The periodic monitoring of the reactivity modifications should be implemented in compliance with the standards and regulations applied in nuclear power engineering. The reactivity measurements are carried out in order to confirm the basic neutronic features of a BN600 reactor. The reactivity measurements are aimed to justify that nuclear safety is provided in course of the in-reactor installation of the experimental core components. Two reactivity meters are to be used on BN600 operation: 1. Digital on-line reactivity calculated under stationary reactor operation on power (approximation of the point-wise kinetics is applied). 2. Second reactivity meter used to define the reactor control rod operating components efficiency under reactor startup and take account of the changing efficiency of the sensor, however, this is more time-consumptive than the on-line reactivity meter. The application of two reactivity meters allows for the monitoring of the reactor reactivity under every operating mode. (authors)

  10. Computational Abstraction Steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Lone Leth; Thomsen, Bent; Nørmark, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    and class instantiations. Our teaching experience shows that many novice programmers find it difficult to write programs with abstractions that materialise to concrete objects later in the development process. The contribution of this paper is the idea of initiating a programming process by creating......In this paper we discuss computational abstraction steps as a way to create class abstractions from concrete objects, and from examples. Computational abstraction steps are regarded as symmetric counterparts to computational concretisation steps, which are well-known in terms of function calls...

  11. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L.; Swanson, Magdalena I.; Bolotin, Eugene; Ticoll, Amy; Cheung, Warren A.; Zhang, Xiao Yu Cindy; Dickman, Christopher T. D.; Fulton, Debra L.; Lim, Jonathan S.; Schnabl, Jake M.; Ramos, Oscar H. P.; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; de Leeuw, Charles N.; Simpson, Elizabeth M.; Ryffel, Gerhart U.; Lam, Eric W.-F.; Kist, Ralf; Wilson, Miranda S. C.; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Brosens, Jan J.; Beccari, Leonardo L.; Bovolenta, Paola; Benayoun, Bérénice A.; Monteiro, Lara J.; Schwenen, Helma D. C.; Grontved, Lars; Wederell, Elizabeth; Mandrup, Susanne; Veitia, Reiner A.; Chakravarthy, Harini; Hoodless, Pamela A.; Mancarelli, M. Michela; Torbett, Bruce E.; Banham, Alison H.; Reddy, Sekhar P.; Cullum, Rebecca L.; Liedtke, Michaela; Tschan, Mario P.; Vaz, Michelle; Rizzino, Angie; Zannini, Mariastella; Frietze, Seth; Farnham, Peggy J.; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Brown, Philip J.; Laperrière, David; Leprince, Dominique; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Prince, Kelly L.; Putker, Marrit; del Peso, Luis; Camenisch, Gieri; Wenger, Roland H.; Mikula, Michal; Rozendaal, Marieke; Mader, Sylvie; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Rhodes, Simon J.; van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Olechnowicz, Sam W. Z.; Breslin, Mary B.; Lan, Michael S.; Nanan, Kyster K.; Wegner, Michael; Hou, Juan; Mullen, Rachel D.; Colvin, Stephanie C.; Noy, Peter John; Webb, Carol F.; Witek, Matthew E.; Ferrell, Scott; Daniel, Juliet M.; Park, Jason; Waldman, Scott A.; Peet, Daniel J.; Taggart, Michael; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Karrich, Julien J.; Blom, Bianca; Vesuna, Farhad; O'Geen, Henriette; Sun, Yunfu; Gronostajski, Richard M.; Woodcroft, Mark W.; Hough, Margaret R.; Chen, Edwin; Europe-Finner, G. Nicholas; Karolczak-Bayatti, Magdalena; Bailey, Jarrod; Hankinson, Oliver; Raman, Venu; Lebrun, David P.; Biswal, Shyam; Harvey, Christopher J.; Debruyne, Jason P.; Hogenesch, John B.; Hevner, Robert F.; Héligon, Christophe; Luo, Xin M.; Blank, Marissa Cathleen; Millen, Kathleen Joyce; Sharlin, David S.; Forrest, Douglas; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zhao, Chunyan; Mishima, Yuriko; Sinha, Satrajit; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Sladek, Frances M.; Bradley, Philip H.; Wasserman, Wyeth W.

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review

  12. The transcriptional landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The application of new and less biased methods to study the transcriptional output from genomes, such as tiling arrays and deep sequencing, has revealed that most of the genome is transcribed and that there is substantial overlap of transcripts derived from the two strands of DNA. In protein codi...

  13. Calculation of reactivity without Lagrange interpolation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suescun D, D.; Figueroa J, J. H.; Rodriguez R, K. C.; Villada P, J. P.

    2015-09-01

    A new method to solve numerically the inverse equation of punctual kinetics without using Lagrange interpolating polynomial is formulated; this method uses a polynomial approximation with N points based on a process of recurrence for simulating different forms of nuclear power. The results show a reliable accuracy. Furthermore, the method proposed here is suitable for real-time measurements of reactivity, with step sizes of calculations greater that Δt = 0.3 s; due to its precision can be used to implement a digital meter of reactivity in real time. (Author)

  14. Mechanical Properties of Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevier, Stuart A.; Levine, Herbert

    2017-06-01

    The mechanical properties of transcription have recently been shown to play a central role in gene expression. However, a full physical characterization of this central biological process is lacking. In this Letter, we introduce a simple description of the basic physical elements of transcription where RNA elongation, RNA polymerase rotation, and DNA supercoiling are coupled. The resulting framework describes the relative amount of RNA polymerase rotation and DNA supercoiling that occurs during RNA elongation. Asymptotic behavior is derived and can be used to experimentally extract unknown mechanical parameters of transcription. Mechanical limits to transcription are incorporated through the addition of a DNA supercoiling-dependent RNA polymerase velocity. This addition can lead to transcriptional stalling and resulting implications for gene expression, chromatin structure and genome organization are discussed.

  15. Focal cryotherapy: step by step technique description.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo, Cristina; Srougi, Victor; da Costa, José Batista; Baghdad, Mohammed; Velilla, Guillermo; Nunes-Silva, Igor; Bergerat, Sebastien; Garcia-Barreras, Silvia; Rozet, François; Ingels, Alexandre; Galiano, Marc; Sanchez-Salas, Rafael; Barret, Eric; Cathelineau, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Focal cryotherapy emerged as an efficient option to treat favorable and localized prostate cancer (PCa). The purpose of this video is to describe the procedure step by step. We present the case of a 68 year-old man with localized PCa in the anterior aspect of the prostate. The procedure is performed under general anesthesia, with the patient in lithotomy position. Briefly, the equipament utilized includes the cryotherapy console coupled with an ultrasound system, argon and helium gas bottles, cryoprobes, temperature probes and an urethral warming catheter. The procedure starts with a real-time trans-rectal prostate ultrasound, which is used to outline the prostate, the urethra and the rectal wall. The cryoprobes are pretested and placed in to the prostate through the perineum, following a grid template, along with the temperature sensors under ultrasound guidance. A cystoscopy confirms the right positioning of the needles and the urethral warming catheter is installed. Thereafter, the freeze sequence with argon gas is started, achieving extremely low temperatures (-40ºC) to induce tumor cell lysis. Sequentially, the thawing cycle is performed using helium gas. This process is repeated one time. Results among several series showed a biochemical disease-free survival between 71-93% at 9-70 month- follow-up, incontinence rates between 0-3.6% and erectile dysfunction between 0-42% (1-5). Focal cryotherapy is a feasible procedure to treat anterior PCa that may offer minimal morbidity, allowing good cancer control and better functional outcomes when compared to whole-gland treatment. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  16. Focal cryotherapy: step by step technique description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Redondo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction and objective: Focal cryotherapy emerged as an efficient option to treat favorable and localized prostate cancer (PCa. The purpose of this video is to describe the procedure step by step. Materials and methods: We present the case of a 68 year-old man with localized PCa in the anterior aspect of the prostate. Results: The procedure is performed under general anesthesia, with the patient in lithotomy position. Briefly, the equipment utilized includes the cryotherapy console coupled with an ultrasound system, argon and helium gas bottles, cryoprobes, temperature probes and an urethral warming catheter. The procedure starts with a real-time trans-rectal prostate ultrasound, which is used to outline the prostate, the urethra and the rectal wall. The cryoprobes are pretested and placed in to the prostate through the perineum, following a grid template, along with the temperature sensors under ultrasound guidance. A cystoscopy confirms the right positioning of the needles and the urethral warming catheter is installed. Thereafter, the freeze sequence with argon gas is started, achieving extremely low temperatures (-40°C to induce tumor cell lysis. Sequentially, the thawing cycle is performed using helium gas. This process is repeated one time. Results among several series showed a biochemical disease-free survival between 71-93% at 9-70 month- follow-up, incontinence rates between 0-3.6% and erectile dysfunction between 0-42% (1–5. Conclusions: Focal cryotherapy is a feasible procedure to treat anterior PCa that may offer minimal morbidity, allowing good cancer control and better functional outcomes when compared to whole-gland treatment.

  17. Epstein-Barr virus latency type and spontaneous reactivation predict lytic induction levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, An T; Fernandez, Samantha G; Somberg, Jessica J; Keck, Kristin M; Miranda, Jj L

    2016-05-20

    The human Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) evades the immune system by entering a transcriptionally latent phase in B cells. EBV in tumor cells expresses distinct patterns of genes referred to as latency types. Viruses in tumor cells also display varying levels of lytic transcription resulting from spontaneous reactivation out of latency. We measured this dynamic range of lytic transcription with RNA deep sequencing and observed no correlation with EBV latency types among genetically different viruses, but type I cell lines reveal more spontaneous reactivation than isogenic type III cultures. We further determined that latency type and spontaneous reactivation levels predict the relative amount of induced reactivation generated by cytotoxic chemotherapy drugs. Our work has potential implications for personalizing medicine against EBV-transformed malignancies. Identifying latency type or measuring spontaneous reactivation may provide predictive power in treatment contexts where viral production should be either avoided or coerced. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Steps on rutile TiO2(110): Active sites for water and methanol dissociation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez, Umberto; Vilhelmsen, Lasse; Kristoffersen, Henrik Høgh

    2011-01-01

    for each step edge, more stable, reconstructed structures were found for the step edge, while the bulk truncated structures were recovered for the step edge.We demonstrate how oxygen vacancies along these defects have lower formation energies than on flat terraces and how water and methanol...... molecules adsorb dissociatively on reduced step edges. Our findings are in agreement with earlier experimental results and indicate an important contribution from step edges to the reactivity of the TiO2(110) surface....

  19. Gene transcription and electromagnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    Our overall aim is to obtain sufficient information to allow us to ultimately determine whether ELF EM field exposure is an initiating factor in neoplastic transformation and/or if exposure can mimic characteristics of the second-step counterpart in neoplastic disease. This aim is based on our previous findings that levels of some transcripts are increased in cells exposed to EM fields. While the research is basic in nature, the ramifications have bearing on the general safety of exposure to EM fields in industrial and everyday life. A large array of diverse biological effects are reported to occur as the result of exposure to elf EM fields, suggesting that the cell response to EM fields is at a basic level, presumably initiated by molecular and/or biophysical events at the cell membrane. The hypothesized route is a signal transduction pathway involving membrane calcium fluxes. Information flow resulting from signal transduction can mediate the induction of regulatory factors in the cell, and directly affect how transcription is regulated.

  20. Heterogeneity of reactive astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark A; Ao, Yan; Sofroniew, Michael V

    2014-04-17

    Astrocytes respond to injury and disease in the central nervous system (CNS) with a process referred to as reactive astrogliosis. Recent progress demonstrates that reactive astrogliosis is not a simple all-or-none phenomenon, but is a finely gradated continuum of changes that range from reversible alterations in gene expression and cell hypertrophy, to scar formation with permanent tissue rearrangement. There is now compelling evidence that reactive astrocytes exhibit a substantial potential for heterogeneity at multiple levels, including gene expression, cell morphology, topography (distance from lesions), CNS regions, local (among neighboring cells), cell signaling and cell function. Structural and functional changes are regulated in reactive astrocytes by many different potential signaling events that occur in a context dependent manner. It is noteworthy that different stimuli of astrocyte reactivity can lead to similar degrees of GFAP upregulation while causing substantially different changes in transcriptome profiles and cell function. Thus, it is not possible to equate simple and uniform measures such as cell hypertrophy and upregulation of GFAP expression with a single, uniform concept of astrocyte reactivity. Instead, it is necessary to recognize the considerable potential for heterogeneity and determine the functional implications of astrocyte reactivity in a context specific manner as regulated by specific signaling events. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Reactive Power Compensation Method Considering Minimum Effective Reactive Power Reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Yiyu; Zhang, Kai; Pu, Zhang; Li, Xuenan; Zuo, Xianghong; Zhen, Jiao; Sudan, Teng

    2017-05-01

    According to the calculation model of minimum generator reactive power reserve of power system voltage stability under the premise of the guarantee, the reactive power management system with reactive power compensation combined generator, the formation of a multi-objective optimization problem, propose a reactive power reserve is considered the minimum generator reactive power compensation optimization method. This method through the improvement of the objective function and constraint conditions, when the system load growth, relying solely on reactive power generation system can not meet the requirement of safe operation, increase the reactive power reserve to solve the problem of minimum generator reactive power compensation in the case of load node.

  2. Reactive Leidenfrost droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raufaste, C.; Bouret, Y.; Celestini, F.

    2016-05-01

    We experimentally investigate the reactivity of Leidenfrost droplets with their supporting substrates. Several organic liquids are put into contact with a copper substrate heated above their Leidenfrost temperature. As the liquid evaporates, the gaseous flow cleans the superficial copper oxide formed at the substrate surface and the reaction maintains a native copper spot below the evaporating droplet. The copper spot can reach several times the droplet size for the most reactive organic compounds. This study shows an interesting coupling between the physics of the Leidenfrost effect and the mechanics of reactive flows. Different applications are proposed such as drop motion tracking and vapor flow monitoring.

  3. Learning SQL in Steps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Garner

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Learning SQL is a common problem for many Computer Science (CS students, the steps involved are quite different to those mastered when learning procedural or object-oriented programming languages. The introduction of commercial products that include shortcuts into the learning environment can initially appear to benefit the student, however, transferring these skills to a textual environment can be difficult for many students. Computer Science students are required to build textual SQL queries because the demands of complex queries can quickly out grow the capabilities of graphical query builders available in many software packages. SQL in Steps (SiS is a graphical user interface centred around the textual translation of a query; this combination of a GUI and a clear representation of its textual meaning has the potential to improve the way in which users gain an understanding of SQL. SiS allows for an incremental and evolutionary development of queries by enabling students to build queries step by step until their goal is reached. A planned evaluation of SiS hopes to quantify the extent to which the introduction of such a user interface into the learning environment can improve the students' understanding of the language.

  4. Queen Mary Two Step

    OpenAIRE

    Melin, Mats H.

    2007-01-01

    n/a Dance devised by Mats Melin in October 2007 whilst teaching Ceilidh dancing on board the cruise ship Queen Mary 2 crossing the Atlantic from Southampton to New York and back with the Ian Muir Sound from Prestwick. The segment of music featured is from Ian Muir Scottish Dance Band's recording of an Eva Three step.

  5. Stepping in the river

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Kearney

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available 'Stepping in the River' is about the cultural misunderstandings and small betrayals that arise when First World tourists visit Third World countries. It is also about the enduring love that people in these countries can inspire, imperfect though that love may be.

  6. Step-Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babah Daouda, Falylath; Ingenbleek, P.T.M.; Trijp, van H.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    With upcoming middle classes in Africa, micro-entrepreneurs witness new opportunities that can potentially lift them out of poverty. Exploiting these opportunities requires entrepreneurs to make a ‘step-change’ away from the bottom of the pyramid to middle-class markets. This process hosts

  7. Reactive sputter deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Mahieu, Stijn

    2008-01-01

    In this valuable work, all aspects of the reactive magnetron sputtering process, from the discharge up to the resulting thin film growth, are described in detail, allowing the reader to understand the complete process. Hence, this book gives necessary information for those who want to start with reactive magnetron sputtering, understand and investigate the technique, control their sputtering process and tune their existing process, obtaining the desired thin films.

  8. Antisense transcription-dependent chromatin signature modulates sense transcript dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Thomas; Howe, Françoise S; Murray, Struan C; Wouters, Meredith; Lorenz, Philipp; Seward, Emily; Rata, Scott; Angel, Andrew; Mellor, Jane

    2018-02-12

    Antisense transcription is widespread in genomes. Despite large differences in gene size and architecture, we find that yeast and human genes share a unique, antisense transcription-associated chromatin signature. We asked whether this signature is related to a biological function for antisense transcription. Using quantitative RNA-FISH, we observed changes in sense transcript distributions in nuclei and cytoplasm as antisense transcript levels were altered. To determine the mechanistic differences underlying these distributions, we developed a mathematical framework describing transcription from initiation to transcript degradation. At GAL1 , high levels of antisense transcription alter sense transcription dynamics, reducing rates of transcript production and processing, while increasing transcript stability. This relationship with transcript stability is also observed as a genome-wide association. Establishing the antisense transcription-associated chromatin signature through disruption of the Set3C histone deacetylase activity is sufficient to similarly change these rates even in the absence of antisense transcription. Thus, antisense transcription alters sense transcription dynamics in a chromatin-dependent manner. © 2018 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  9. Combined in vitro transcription and reverse transcription to amplify and label complex synthetic oligonucleotide probe libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgha, Yusuf; Beliveau, Brian; Semrau, Kassandra; Schwartz, Donald; Wu, Chao-ting; Gulari, Erdogan; Rouillard, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays allow the production of complex custom oligonucleotide libraries for nucleic acid detection–based applications such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We have developed a PCR-free method to make single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) fluorescent probes through an intermediate RNA library. A double-stranded oligonucleotide library is amplified by transcription to create an RNA library. Next, dye- or hapten-conjugate primers are used to reverse transcribe the RNA to produce a dye-labeled cDNA library. Finally the RNA is hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions to obtain the single-stranded fluorescent probes library. Starting from unique oligonucleotide library constructs, we present two methods to produce single-stranded probe libraries. The two methods differ in the type of reverse transcription (RT) primer, the incorporation of fluorescent dye, and the purification of fluorescent probes. The first method employs dye-labeled reverse transcription primers to produce multiple differentially single-labeled probe subsets from one microarray library. The fluorescent probes are purified from excess primers by oligonucleotide-bead capture. The second method uses an RNA:DNA chimeric primer and amino-modified nucleotides to produce amino-allyl probes. The excess primers and RNA are hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions, followed by probe purification and labeling with amino-reactive dyes. The fluorescent probes created by the combination of transcription and reverse transcription can be used for FISH and to detect any RNA and DNA targets via hybridization. PMID:26054766

  10. Combined in vitro transcription and reverse transcription to amplify and label complex synthetic oligonucleotide probe libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgha, Yusuf; Beliveau, Brian; Semrau, Kassandra; Schwartz, Donald; Wu, Chao-Ting; Gulari, Erdogan; Rouillard, Jean-Marie

    2015-06-01

    Oligonucleotide microarrays allow the production of complex custom oligonucleotide libraries for nucleic acid detection-based applications such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). We have developed a PCR-free method to make single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) fluorescent probes through an intermediate RNA library. A double-stranded oligonucleotide library is amplified by transcription to create an RNA library. Next, dye- or hapten-conjugate primers are used to reverse transcribe the RNA to produce a dye-labeled cDNA library. Finally the RNA is hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions to obtain the single-stranded fluorescent probes library. Starting from unique oligonucleotide library constructs, we present two methods to produce single-stranded probe libraries. The two methods differ in the type of reverse transcription (RT) primer, the incorporation of fluorescent dye, and the purification of fluorescent probes. The first method employs dye-labeled reverse transcription primers to produce multiple differentially single-labeled probe subsets from one microarray library. The fluorescent probes are purified from excess primers by oligonucleotide-bead capture. The second method uses an RNA:DNA chimeric primer and amino-modified nucleotides to produce amino-allyl probes. The excess primers and RNA are hydrolyzed under alkaline conditions, followed by probe purification and labeling with amino-reactive dyes. The fluorescent probes created by the combination of transcription and reverse transcription can be used for FISH and to detect any RNA and DNA targets via hybridization.

  11. Linear step drive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haniger, L.; Elger, R.; Kocandrle, L.; Zdebor, J.

    1986-01-01

    A linear step drive is described developed in Czechoslovak-Soviet cooperation and intended for driving WWER-1000 control rods. The functional principle is explained of the motor and the mechanical and electrical parts of the drive, power control, and the indicator of position are described. The motor has latches situated in the reactor at a distance of 3 m from magnetic armatures, it has a low structural height above the reactor cover, which suggests its suitability for seismic localities. Its magnetic circuits use counterpoles; the mechanical shocks at the completion of each step are damped using special design features. The position indicator is of a special design and evaluates motor position within ±1% of total travel. A drive diagram and the flow chart of both the control electronics and the position indicator are presented. (author) 4 figs

  12. Stepping Stone Mobility.

    OpenAIRE

    Jovanovic, B.; Nyarko, Y.

    1996-01-01

    People at the top of an occupational ladder earn more partly because they have spent time on lower rungs, where they have learned something. But what precisely do they learn? There are two contrasting views: First, the Bandit model assumes that people are different, that experience reveals their characteristics, and that consequently an occupational switch can result. Second, in our Stepping Stone model, experience raises a worker's productivity on a given task and the acquired skill can in p...

  13. Learning SQL in Steps

    OpenAIRE

    Philip Garner; John Mariani

    2015-01-01

    Learning SQL is a common problem for many Computer Science (CS) students, the steps involved are quite different to those mastered when learning procedural or object-oriented programming languages. The introduction of commercial products that include shortcuts into the learning environment can initially appear to benefit the student, however, transferring these skills to a textual environment can be difficult for many students. Computer Science students are required to build textual SQL queri...

  14. Three steps ahead

    OpenAIRE

    Heller, Yuval

    2012-01-01

    We study a variant of the repeated Prisoner's Dilemma with uncertain horizon, in which each player chooses his foresight ability: that is, the timing in which he is informed about the realized length of the interaction. In addition, each player has an independent probability to observe the opponent's foresight ability. We show that if this probability is not too close to zero or one, then the game admits an evolutionarily stable strategy, in which agents who look one step ahead and agents who...

  15. Reactive modification of polyesters and their blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chen

    2004-12-01

    the desired rheological and structural characteristics of the final products for potential applications such as low density extrusion foaming or compatibilization of immiscible polymer blends. Important modification conditions through coagents are identified and reaction mechanisms are proposed. A high MW saturated polyester, PET, can also be rheologically modified in extruders through low MW multifunctional anhydride and epoxy compounds by chain extension/branching. Several such modifiers were successfully screened in terms of their reactivity towards PET under controlled reactive extrusion conditions. A dianhydride with medium reactivity was then successfully used in a one-step reactive modification/extrusion foaming process to produce low density foams. A similar process was successfully used to produce small cell size foams from a four component system containing PET, PP and lesser amounts of a low molecular weight multifunctional epoxy compound and an acid functionalized polyolefin, the latter acting as compatibilizers.

  16. Reactive Power Compensator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sharkawi, M.A.; Venkata, S.S.; Chen, M.; Andexler, G.; Huang, T.

    1992-07-28

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation. 26 figs.

  17. Reactive power compensator

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.; Chen, Mingliang; Andexler, George; Huang, Tony

    1992-01-01

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation.

  18. Reactive power compensator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A. (Renton, WA); Venkata, Subrahmanyam S. (Woodinville, WA); Chen, Mingliang (Kirkland, WA); Andexler, George (Everett, WA); Huang, Tony (Seattle, WA)

    1992-01-01

    A system and method for determining and providing reactive power compensation for an inductive load. A reactive power compensator (50,50') monitors the voltage and current flowing through each of three distribution lines (52a, 52b, 52c), which are supplying three-phase power to one or more inductive loads. Using signals indicative of the current on each of these lines when the voltage waveform on the line crosses zero, the reactive power compensator determines a reactive power compensator capacitance that must be connected to the lines to maintain a desired VAR level, power factor, or line voltage. Alternatively, an operator can manually select a specific capacitance for connection to each line, or the capacitance can be selected based on a time schedule. The reactive power compensator produces control signals, which are coupled through optical fibers (102/106) to a switch driver (110, 110') to select specific compensation capacitors (112) for connections to each line. The switch driver develops triggering signals that are supplied to a plurality of series-connected solid state switches (350), which control charge current in one direction in respect to ground for each compensation capacitor. During each cycle, current flows from ground to charge the capacitors as the voltage on the line begins to go negative from its positive peak value. The triggering signals are applied to gate the solid state switches into a conducting state when the potential on the lines and on the capacitors reaches a negative peak value, thereby minimizing both the potential difference and across the charge current through the switches when they begin to conduct. Any harmonic distortion on the potential and current carried by the lines is filtered out from the current and potential signals used by the reactive power compensator so that it does not affect the determination of the required reactive compensation.

  19. Compensation of Reactive Power of Isolated Wind-Diesel Hybrid Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P.; Bhatti, T. S.; Ramakrishna, K. S. S.

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents the automatic reactive power control of an isolated wind-diesel hybrid power system with a synchronous generator (SG) for a diesel genset and an induction generator (IG) with wind energy conversion systems (WECS) to generate electricity. To reduce the gap between reactive power generation and demand, a variable source of reactive power is used such as static synchronous compensator (STATCOM). The mathematical model of the system based on reactive power flow equations is developed. Three examples of the wind-diesel hybrid power systems are considered with different wind power generation capacities to study the effect of the wind power generation on the system performance. The study is based on small signal analysis by considering IEEE type-1 excitation system for the SG. The paper also shows the transient performance of the hybrid systems for 1 % step increase in reactive power load and 1 % step increase in reactive power load plus 1 % step increase in input wind power.

  20. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I

    2012-01-01

    mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written......ABSTRACT: Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130...... and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe....

  1. The transcription factor encyclopedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I; Bolotin, Eugene; Ticoll, Amy; Cheung, Warren A; Zhang, Xiao Yu Cindy; Dickman, Christopher T D; Fulton, Debra L; Lim, Jonathan S; Schnabl, Jake M; Ramos, Oscar H P; Vasseur-Cognet, Mireille; de Leeuw, Charles N; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Ryffel, Gerhart U; Lam, Eric W-F; Kist, Ralf; Wilson, Miranda S C; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Brosens, Jan J; Beccari, Leonardo L; Bovolenta, Paola; Benayoun, Bérénice A; Monteiro, Lara J; Schwenen, Helma D C; Grontved, Lars; Wederell, Elizabeth; Mandrup, Susanne; Veitia, Reiner A; Chakravarthy, Harini; Hoodless, Pamela A; Mancarelli, M Michela; Torbett, Bruce E; Banham, Alison H; Reddy, Sekhar P; Cullum, Rebecca L; Liedtke, Michaela; Tschan, Mario P; Vaz, Michelle; Rizzino, Angie; Zannini, Mariastella; Frietze, Seth; Farnham, Peggy J; Eijkelenboom, Astrid; Brown, Philip J; Laperrière, David; Leprince, Dominique; de Cristofaro, Tiziana; Prince, Kelly L; Putker, Marrit; del Peso, Luis; Camenisch, Gieri; Wenger, Roland H; Mikula, Michal; Rozendaal, Marieke; Mader, Sylvie; Ostrowski, Jerzy; Rhodes, Simon J; Van Rechem, Capucine; Boulay, Gaylor; Olechnowicz, Sam W Z; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S; Nanan, Kyster K; Wegner, Michael; Hou, Juan; Mullen, Rachel D; Colvin, Stephanie C; Noy, Peter John; Webb, Carol F; Witek, Matthew E; Ferrell, Scott; Daniel, Juliet M; Park, Jason; Waldman, Scott A; Peet, Daniel J; Taggart, Michael; Jayaraman, Padma-Sheela; Karrich, Julien J; Blom, Bianca; Vesuna, Farhad; O'Geen, Henriette; Sun, Yunfu; Gronostajski, Richard M; Woodcroft, Mark W; Hough, Margaret R; Chen, Edwin; Europe-Finner, G Nicholas; Karolczak-Bayatti, Magdalena; Bailey, Jarrod; Hankinson, Oliver; Raman, Venu; LeBrun, David P; Biswal, Shyam; Harvey, Christopher J; DeBruyne, Jason P; Hogenesch, John B; Hevner, Robert F; Héligon, Christophe; Luo, Xin M; Blank, Marissa Cathleen; Millen, Kathleen Joyce; Sharlin, David S; Forrest, Douglas; Dahlman-Wright, Karin; Zhao, Chunyan; Mishima, Yuriko; Sinha, Satrajit; Chakrabarti, Rumela; Portales-Casamar, Elodie; Sladek, Frances M; Bradley, Philip H; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2012-01-01

    Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130 mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written and vetted by experts in the field. TFe is available at http://www.cisreg.ca/tfe.

  2. Digital reactivity meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copie, M.; Valantic, B.

    1978-01-01

    Digital reactivity meters (DRM) are mostly used as measuring instruments, e.g. for calibration of control rods, and there are only a few cases of their incorporation into the control systems of the reactors. To move in this direction there is more development work needed. First of all, fast algorithms are needed for inverse kinetics equations to relieve the computer for more important tasks of reactor model solving in real time. The next problem, currently under investigation, is the incorporation of the reactor thermal-hydraulic model into the DRM so that it can be used in the power range. Such an extension of DHM allows presentation not only of the instantaneous reactivity of the system, but also the inserted reactivity can be estimated from the temperature reactivity feed-backs. One of the applications of this concept is the anomalous digital reactivity monitor (ADRN) as part of the reactor protection system. As a solution of the first problem, a fast algorithm for solving the inverse kinetics equations has been implemented in the off-line program RODCAL on CDC 1700 computer and tested for its accuracy by performing different control rod calibrations on the reactor TRIGA

  3. A Transcription and Translation Protocol for Sensitive Cross-Cultural Team Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Lauren; Birkhead, Ana Sanchez; Fernandez, Cecilia; Egger, Marlene J

    2017-10-01

    Assurance of transcript accuracy and quality in interview-based qualitative research is foundational for data accuracy and study validity. Based on our experience in a cross-cultural ethnographic study of women's pelvic organ prolapse, we provide practical guidance to set up step-by-step interview transcription and translation protocols for team-based research on sensitive topics. Beginning with team decisions about level of detail in transcription, completeness, and accuracy, we operationalize the process of securing vendors to deliver the required quality of transcription and translation. We also share rubrics for assessing transcript quality and the team protocol for managing transcripts (assuring consistency of format, insertion of metadata, anonymization, and file labeling conventions) and procuring an acceptable initial translation of Spanish-language interviews. Accurate, complete, and systematically constructed transcripts in both source and target languages respond to the call for more transparency and reproducibility of scientific methods.

  4. SYSTEMATIZATION OF THE BASIC STEPS OF THE STEP-AEROBICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darinka Korovljev

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Following the development of the powerful sport industry, in front of us appeared a lot of new opportunities for creating of the new programmes of exercising with certain requisites. One of such programmes is certainly step-aerobics. Step-aerobics can be defined as a type of aerobics consisting of the basic aerobic steps (basic steps applied in exercising on stepper (step bench, with a possibility to regulate its height. Step-aerobics itself can be divided into several groups, depending on the following: type of music, working methods and adopted knowledge of the attendants. In this work, the systematization of the basic steps in step-aerobics was made on the basis of the following criteria: steps origin, number of leg motions in stepping and relating the body support at the end of the step. Systematization of the basic steps of the step-aerobics is quite significant for making a concrete review of the existing basic steps, thus making creation of the step-aerobics lesson easier

  5. Stepping Stones through Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Lyle

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Indo-European mythology is known only through written records but it needs to be understood in terms of the preliterate oral-cultural context in which it was rooted. It is proposed that this world was conceptually organized through a memory-capsule consisting of the current generation and the three before it, and that there was a system of alternate generations with each generation taking a step into the future under the leadership of a white or red king.

  6. Machine Dictation and Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Evelyn; And Others

    This instructional package contains both an instructor's manual and a student's manual for a course in machine dictation and transcription. The instructor's manual contains an overview with tips on teaching the course, letters for dictation, and a key to the letters. The student's manual contains an overview of the course and of the skills needed…

  7. Automatic Music Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapuri, Anssi; Virtanen, Tuomas

    Written musical notation describes music in a symbolic form that is suitable for performing a piece using the available musical instruments. Traditionally, musical notation indicates the pitch, target instrument, timing, and duration of each sound to be played. The aim of music transcription either by humans or by a machine is to infer these musical parameters, given only the acoustic recording of a performance.

  8. Bayesian Music Transcription

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cemgil, A.T.

    2004-01-01

    Music transcription refers to extraction of a human readable and interpretable description from a recording of a music performance. The final goal is to implement a program that can automatically infer a musical notation that lists the pitch levels of notes and corresponding score positions in any

  9. Structural studies of bacterial transcriptional regulatory proteins by multidimensional heteronuclear NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkman, Brian Finley [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to elucidate detailed structural information for peptide and protein molecules. A small peptide was designed and synthesized, and its three-dimensional structure was calculated using distance information derived from two-dimensional NMR measurements. The peptide was used to induce antibodies in mice, and the cross-reactivity of the antibodies with a related protein was analyzed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Two proteins which are involved in regulation of transcription in bacteria were also studied. The ferric uptake regulation (Fur) protein is a metal-dependent repressor which controls iron uptake in bacteria. Two- and three-dimensional NMR techniques, coupled with uniform and selective isotope labeling allowed the nearly complete assignment of the resonances of the metal-binding domain of the Fur protein. NTRC is a transcriptional enhancer binding protein whose N-terminal domain is a "receiver domain" in the family of "two-component" regulatory systems. Phosphorylation of the N-terminal domain of NTRC activates the initiation of transcription of aeries encoding proteins involved in nitrogen regulation. Three- and four-dimensional NMR spectroscopy methods have been used to complete the resonance assignments and determine the solution structure of the N-terminal receiver domain of the NTRC protein. Comparison of the solution structure of the NTRC receiver domain with the crystal structures of the homologous protein CheY reveals a very similar fold, with the only significant difference being the position of helix 4 relative to the rest of the protein. The determination of the structure of the NTRC receiver domain is the first step toward understanding a mechanism of signal transduction which is common to many bacterial regulatory systems.

  10. SPAR-H Step-by-Step Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. J. Galyean; A. M. Whaley; D. L. Kelly; R. L. Boring

    2011-05-01

    This guide provides step-by-step guidance on the use of the SPAR-H method for quantifying Human Failure Events (HFEs). This guide is intended to be used with the worksheets provided in: 'The SPAR-H Human Reliability Analysis Method,' NUREG/CR-6883, dated August 2005. Each step in the process of producing a Human Error Probability (HEP) is discussed. These steps are: Step-1, Categorizing the HFE as Diagnosis and/or Action; Step-2, Rate the Performance Shaping Factors; Step-3, Calculate PSF-Modified HEP; Step-4, Accounting for Dependence, and; Step-5, Minimum Value Cutoff. The discussions on dependence are extensive and include an appendix that describes insights obtained from the psychology literature.

  11. Reactive Turing machines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C.M. Baeten (Jos); S.P. Luttik (Bas); P.J.A. van Tilburg

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWe propose reactive Turing machines (RTMs), extending classical Turing machines with a process-theoretical notion of interaction, and use it to define a notion of executable transition system. We show that every computable transition system with a bounded branching degree is simulated

  12. Clojure reactive programming

    CERN Document Server

    Borges, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    If you are a Clojure developer who is interested in using Reactive Programming to build asynchronous and concurrent applications, this book is for you. Knowledge of Clojure and Leiningen is required. Basic understanding of ClojureScript will be helpful for the web chapters, although it is not strictly necessary.

  13. Chemical Reactivity Test (CRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaka, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-13

    The Chemical Reactivity Test (CRT) is used to determine the thermal stability of High Explosives (HEs) and chemical compatibility between (HEs) and alien materials. The CRT is one of the small-scale safety tests performed on HE at the High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF).

  14. Spring 5 & reactive streams

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Clozel, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Spring is a framework widely used by the world-wide Java community, and it is also extensively used at CERN. The accelerator control system is constituted of 10 million lines of Java code, spread across more than 1000 projects (jars) developed by 160 software engineers. Around half of this (all server-side Java code) is based on the Spring framework. Warning: the speakers will assume that people attending the seminar are familiar with Java and Spring’s basic concepts. Spring 5.0 and Spring Boot 2.0 updates (45 min) This talk will cover the big ticket items in the 5.0 release of Spring (including Kotlin support, @Nullable and JDK9) and provide an update on Spring Boot 2.0, which is scheduled for the end of the year. Reactive Spring (1h) Spring Framework 5.0 has been released - and it now supports reactive applications in the Spring ecosystem. During this presentation, we'll talk about the reactive foundations of Spring Framework with the Reactor project and the reactive streams specification. We'll al...

  15. A Universal Reactive Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henrik Reif; Mørk, Simon; Sørensen, Morten U.

    1997-01-01

    Turing showed the existence of a model universal for the set of Turing machines in the sense that given an encoding of any Turing machine asinput the universal Turing machine simulates it. We introduce the concept of universality for reactive systems and construct a CCS processuniversal...

  16. The iodine reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The iodine is an important element because it has long life isotopes (such as iodine 129) and a great mobility in natural media. Iodine presents a complex chemistry because of its volatility and its strong redox reactivity. The S.E.C.R. works to better understand the reactivity of this element in different natural, industrial or biological environments. It plays a part in thermochemical sites as a possible way of hydrogen formation. This seminar gives some aspects relative to the chemical reactivity of iodine, since its thermochemistry in the I/S cycles to produce hydrogen to its reactivity in the natural medium and its potential radiological impact. This document includes 4 presentations transparencies) dealing with: the 129 I cycle rejected in the low radioactive gaseous and liquid effluents of the La Hague reprocessing plant (C. Frechou); a bibliographic review of iodine retention in soils (F. Bazer-Bachi); the hydrogen production and the iodine/sulfur thermochemical cycle (role of iodine in the process); and the direct characterization by electro-spray ionization mass spectroscopy of iodine fixation by fulvic acids (P. Reiller, B. Amekraz, C. Moulin, V. Moulin)

  17. Reactive power compensating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Timothy J. (Redondo Beach, CA); El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A. (Renton, WA); Venkata, Subrahmanyam S. (Seattle, WA)

    1987-01-01

    The reactive power of an induction machine is compensated by providing fixed capacitors on each phase line for the minimum compensation required, sensing the current on one line at the time its voltage crosses zero to determine the actual compensation required for each phase, and selecting switched capacitors on each line to provide the balance of the compensation required.

  18. Reactive Power Compensating System.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Timothy J.; El-Sharkawi, Mohamed A.; Venkata, Subrahmanyam S.

    1985-01-04

    The circuit was designed for the specific application of wind-driven induction generators. It has great potential for application in any situation where a varying reactive power load is present, such as with induction motors or generators, or for transmission network compensation.

  19. Hippocampus discovery First steps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliasz Engelhardt

    Full Text Available The first steps of the discovery, and the main discoverers, of the hippocampus are outlined. Arantius was the first to describe a structure he named "hippocampus" or "white silkworm". Despite numerous controversies and alternate designations, the term hippocampus has prevailed until this day as the most widely used term. Duvernoy provided an illustration of the hippocampus and surrounding structures, considered the first by most authors, which appeared more than one and a half century after Arantius' description. Some authors have identified other drawings and texts which they claim predate Duvernoy's depiction, in studies by Vesalius, Varolio, Willis, and Eustachio, albeit unconvincingly. Considering the definition of the hippocampal formation as comprising the hippocampus proper, dentate gyrus and subiculum, Arantius and Duvernoy apparently described the gross anatomy of this complex. The pioneering studies of Arantius and Duvernoy revealed a relatively small hidden formation that would become one of the most valued brain structures.

  20. CpG methylation controls reactivation of HIV from latency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Blazkova

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation of retroviral promoters and enhancers localized in the provirus 5' long terminal repeat (LTR is considered to be a mechanism of transcriptional suppression that allows retroviruses to evade host immune responses and antiretroviral drugs. However, the role of DNA methylation in the control of HIV-1 latency has never been unambiguously demonstrated, in contrast to the apparent importance of transcriptional interference and chromatin structure, and has never been studied in HIV-1-infected patients. Here, we show in an in vitro model of reactivable latency and in a latent reservoir of HIV-1-infected patients that CpG methylation of the HIV-1 5' LTR is an additional epigenetic restriction mechanism, which controls resistance of latent HIV-1 to reactivation signals and thus determines the stability of the HIV-1 latency. CpG methylation acts as a late event during establishment of HIV-1 latency and is not required for the initial provirus silencing. Indeed, the latent reservoir of some aviremic patients contained high proportions of the non-methylated 5' LTR. The latency controlled solely by transcriptional interference and by chromatin-dependent mechanisms in the absence of significant promoter DNA methylation tends to be leaky and easily reactivable. In the latent reservoir of HIV-1-infected individuals without detectable plasma viremia, we found HIV-1 promoters and enhancers to be hypermethylated and resistant to reactivation, as opposed to the hypomethylated 5' LTR in viremic patients. However, even dense methylation of the HIV-1 5'LTR did not confer complete resistance to reactivation of latent HIV-1 with some histone deacetylase inhibitors, protein kinase C agonists, TNF-alpha, and their combinations with 5-aza-2deoxycytidine: the densely methylated HIV-1 promoter was most efficiently reactivated in virtual absence of T cell activation by suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid. Tight but incomplete control of HIV-1 latency by Cp

  1. Astronomical sketching a step-by-step introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Handy, Richard; Perez, Jeremy; Rix, Erika; Robbins, Sol

    2007-01-01

    This book presents the amateur with fine examples of astronomical sketches and step-by-step tutorials in each medium, from pencil to computer graphics programs. This unique book can teach almost anyone to create beautiful sketches of celestial objects.

  2. DeepBound: accurate identification of transcript boundaries via deep convolutional neural fields

    KAUST Repository

    Shao, Mingfu

    2017-04-20

    Motivation: Reconstructing the full- length expressed transcripts (a. k. a. the transcript assembly problem) from the short sequencing reads produced by RNA-seq protocol plays a central role in identifying novel genes and transcripts as well as in studying gene expressions and gene functions. A crucial step in transcript assembly is to accurately determine the splicing junctions and boundaries of the expressed transcripts from the reads alignment. In contrast to the splicing junctions that can be efficiently detected from spliced reads, the problem of identifying boundaries remains open and challenging, due to the fact that the signal related to boundaries is noisy and weak.

  3. DNA Topoisomerases in Transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødgaard, Morten Terpager

    2015-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most of the ex......This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most...... topoisomerase-DNA cleavage complex. The second study is an investigation of how topoisomerases influence gene regulation by keeping the genome in an optimal topological state....

  4. Eukaryotic transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staby, Lasse; O'Shea, Charlotte; Willemoës, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Gene-specific transcription factors (TFs) are key regulatory components of signaling pathways, controlling, for example, cell growth, development, and stress responses. Their biological functions are determined by their molecular structures, as exemplified by their structured DNA-binding domains...... them to participate in large interactomes, how they use only a few hydrophobic residues, short sequence motifs, prestructured motifs, and coupled folding and binding for their interactions with co-activators, and how their accessibility to post-translational modification affects their interactions...

  5. Spanish dialects: phonetic transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno Bilbao, M. Asunción; Mariño Acebal, José Bernardo

    1998-01-01

    It is well known that canonical Spanish, the dialectal variant `central' of Spain, so called Castilian, can be transcribed by rules. This paper deals with the automatic grapheme to phoneme transcription rules in several Spanish dialects from Latin America. Spanish is a language spoken by more than 300 million people, has an important geographical dispersion compared among other languages and has been historically influenced by many native languages. In this paper authors expand the Castilian ...

  6. Chaetocin reactivates the lytic replication of Epstein-Barr virus from latency via reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shilun; Yin, Juan; Zhong, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress, regarded as a negative effect of free radicals in vivo, takes place when organisms suffer from harmful stimuli. Some viruses can induce the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in infected cells, which may be closely related with their pathogenicity. In this report, chaetocin, a fungal metabolite reported to have antimicrobial and cytostatic activity, was studied for its effect on the activation of latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in B95-8 cells. We found that chaetocin remarkably up-regulated EBV lytic transcription and DNA replication at a low concentration (50 nmol L -1 ). The activation of latent EBV was accompanied by an increased cellular ROS level. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), an ROS inhibitor, suppressed chaetocin-induced EBV activation. Chaetocin had little effect on histone H3K9 methylation, while NAC also significantly reduced H3K9 methylation. These results suggested that chaetocin reactivates latent EBV primarily via ROS pathways.

  7. Impact of the redox-cycling herbicide diquat on transcript expression and antioxidant enzymatic activities of the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouetard, Anthony, E-mail: anthony.bouetard@rennes.inra.fr [INRA, UMR INRA-Agrocampus Ouest ESE 0985, Equipe Ecotoxicologie et Qualite des Milieux Aquatiques, 65 rue de Saint-Brieuc, 35042 Rennes cedex (France); Besnard, Anne-Laure; Vassaux, Daniele; Lagadic, Laurent; Coutellec, Marie-Agnes [INRA, UMR INRA-Agrocampus Ouest ESE 0985, Equipe Ecotoxicologie et Qualite des Milieux Aquatiques, 65 rue de Saint-Brieuc, 35042 Rennes cedex (France)

    2013-01-15

    significantly (or non-significantly for cat) after 5 h of exposure, and went back to control levels afterwards, suggesting the onset of an early response to oxidative stress associated to the unbalance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in hepatocytes. Although increases obtained for Gred and SOD activities were globally consistent with their respective transcript expressions, up-regulation of transcription was not always correlated with increase of enzymatic activity, indicating that diquat might affect steps downstream of transcription. However, constitutive levels of enzymatic activities were at least maintained. In conclusion, diquat was shown to affect expression of the whole set of studied transcripts, reflecting their suitability as markers of early response to oxidative stress in L. stagnalis.

  8. One-step microlithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlen, Franz-Josef; Sankaranarayanan, Srikanth; Kar, Aravinda

    1997-09-01

    Subject of this investigation is a one-step rapid machining process to create miniaturized 3D parts, using the original sample material. An experimental setup where metal powder is fed to the laser beam-material interaction region has been built. The powder is melted and forms planar, 2D geometries as the substrate is moved under the laser beam in XY- direction. After completing the geometry in the plane, the substrate is displaced in Z-direction, and a new layer of material is placed on top of the just completed deposit. By continuous repetition of this process, 3D parts wee created. In particular, the impact of the focal spot size of the high power laser beam on the smallest achievable structures was investigated. At a translation speed of 51 mm/s a minimum material thickness of 590 micrometers was achieved. Also, it was shown that a small Z-displacement has a negligible influence on the continuity of the material deposition over this power range. A high power CO2 laser was used as energy source, the material powder under investigation was stainless steel SS304L. Helium was used as shield gas at a flow rate of 15 1/min. The incident CO2 laser beam power was varied between 300 W and 400 W, with the laser beam intensity distribute in a donut mode. The laser beam was focused to a focal diameter of 600 (Mu) m.

  9. Reactive Air Aluminization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jung-Pyung; Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2011-10-28

    Ferritic stainless steels and other alloys are of great interest to SOFC developers for applications such as interconnects, cell frames, and balance of plant components. While these alloys offer significant advantages (e.g., low material and manufacturing cost, high thermal conductivity, and high temperature oxidation resistance), there are challenges which can hinder their utilization in SOFC systems; these challenges include Cr volatility and reactivity with glass seals. To overcome these challenges, protective coatings and surface treatments for the alloys are under development. In particular, aluminization of alloy surfaces offers the potential for mitigating both evaporation of Cr from the alloy surface and reaction of alloy constituents with glass seals. Commercial aluminization processes are available to SOFC developers, but they tend to be costly due to their use of exotic raw materials and/or processing conditions. As an alternative, PNNL has developed Reactive Air Aluminization (RAA), which offers a low-cost, simpler alternative to conventional aluminization methods.

  10. SPAR-H Step-by-Step Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    April M. Whaley; Dana L. Kelly; Ronald L. Boring; William J. Galyean

    2012-06-01

    Step-by-step guidance was developed recently at Idaho National Laboratory for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the use of the Standardized Plant Analysis Risk-Human Reliability Analysis (SPAR-H) method for quantifying Human Failure Events (HFEs). This work was done to address SPAR-H user needs, specifically requests for additional guidance on the proper application of various aspects of the methodology. This paper overviews the steps of the SPAR-H analysis process and highlights some of the most important insights gained during the development of the step-by-step directions. This supplemental guidance for analysts is applicable when plant-specific information is available, and goes beyond the general guidance provided in existing SPAR-H documentation. The steps highlighted in this paper are: Step-1, Categorizing the HFE as Diagnosis and/or Action; Step-2, Rate the Performance Shaping Factors; Step-3, Calculate PSF-Modified HEP; Step-4, Accounting for Dependence, and; Step-5, Minimum Value Cutoff.

  11. What makes ecological systems reactive?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Robin E

    2010-06-01

    Although perturbations from a stable equilibrium must ultimately vanish, they can grow initially, and the maximum initial growth rate is called reactivity. Reactivity thus identifies systems that may undergo transient population surges or drops in response to perturbations; however, we lack biological and mathematical intuition about what makes a system reactive. This paper presents upper and lower bounds on reactivity for an arbitrary linearized model, explores their strictness, and discusses their biological implications. I find that less stable systems (i.e. systems with long transients) have a smaller possible range of reactivities for which no perturbations grow. Systems with more species have a higher capacity to be reactive, assuming species interactions do not weaken too rapidly as the number of species increases. Finally, I find that in discrete time, reactivity is determined largely by mean interaction strength and neither discrete nor continuous time reactivity are sensitive to food web topology. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Modern Reactive Power Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubraeva, L.; Timofeev, S.

    2018-02-01

    The paper reviews main stages of development of reactive power generators, describes the 1-st and 2-nd generation of synchronous condensers with conventional cooling systems and a new generation – superconductive synchronous condensers. Asynchronous non- salient pole condensers expand the class of rotating compensating devices. Comparison of dynamic performance of conventional synchronous condensers, cryogenic condensers and SVC is presented. The variant of a model 5 MVA HTSC synchronous condenser intended for wind power plants is described.

  13. Genomic Analysis of Reactive Astrogliosis

    OpenAIRE

    Zamanian, JL; Xu, L; Foo, LC; Nouri, N; Zhou, L; Giffard, RG; Barres, BA

    2012-01-01

    Reactive astrogliosis is characterized by a profound change in astrocyte phenotype in response to all CNS injuries and diseases. To better understand the reactive astrocyte state, we used Affymetrix GeneChip arrays to profile gene expression in populations of reactive astrocytes isolated at various time points after induction using two mouse injury models, ischemic stroke and neuroinflammation. We find reactive gliosis consists of a rapid, but quickly attenuated induction of gene expression a...

  14. Steps towards silicon optoelectronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starovoytov, A

    1999-07-01

    This thesis addresses the issue of a potential future microelectronics technology, namely the possibility of utilising the optical properties of nanocrystalline silicon for optoelectronic circuits. The subject is subdivided into three chapters. Chapter 1 is an introduction. It formulates the oncoming problem for microelectronic development, explains the basics of Integrated Optoelectronics, introduces porous silicon as a new light-emitting material and gives a brief review of other competing light-emitting material systems currently under investigation. Examples of existing porous silicon devices are given. Chapter 2 reviews the basic physics relevant to the subject of this thesis and in-forms on the present situation in this field of research, including both experimental and theoretical knowledge gained up-to-date. The chapter provides the necessary background for correct interpretation of the results reported in Chapter 3 and for a realistic decision on the direction for future work. Chapter 3 describes my own experimental and computational results within the framework of the subject, obtained at De Montfort University. These include: one-step preparation of laterally structured porous silicon with photoluminescence and microscopy characterisation, Raman spectroscopy of porous silicon, a polarisation study of the photoluminescence from porous silicon, computer simulations of the conductivity of two-component media and of laser focused atomic deposition for nanostructure fabrication. Thus, this thesis makes a dual contribution to the chosen field: it summarises the present knowledge on the possibility of utilising optical properties of nanocrystalline silicon in silicon-based electronics, and it reports new results within the framework of the subject. The main conclusion is that due to its promising optoelectronic properties nanocrystalline silicon remains a prospective competitor for the cheapest and fastest microelectronics of the next century. (author)

  15. A Cellular Factor for Regulation of Transcriptional Elongation by HIV TAT

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhou, Qiang

    1998-01-01

    Control of transcriptional elongation has been recognized as an important step in gene regulation, but mechanisms regulating the efficiency of elongation by RNA polymerase II have not been extensively studied...

  16. Negative elongation factor NELF controls transcription of immediate early genes in a stimulus-specific manner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Toshitsugu; Piuz, Isabelle; Schlegel, Werner

    2009-01-01

    The transcription rate of immediate early genes (IEGs) is controlled directly by transcription elongation factors at the transcription elongation step. Negative elongation factor (NELF) and 5,6-dichloro-1-β-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB) sensitivity-inducing factor (DSIF) stall RNA polymerase II (pol II) soon after transcription initiation. Upon induction of IEG transcription, DSIF is converted into an accelerator for pol II elongation. To address whether and how NELF as well as DSIF controls overall IEG transcription, its expression was reduced using stable RNA interference in GH4C1 cells. NELF knock-down reduced thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH)-induced transcription of the IEGs c-fos, MKP-1, and junB. In contrast, epidermal growth factor (EGF)-induced transcription of these IEGs was unaltered or even slightly increased by NELF knock-down. Thus, stable knock-down of NELF affects IEG transcription stimulation-specifically. Conversely, DSIF knock-down reduced both TRH- and EGF-induced transcription of the three IEGs. Interestingly, TRH-induced activation of the MAP kinase pathway, a pathway essential for transcription of the three IEGs, was down-regulated by NELF knock-down. Thus, stable knock-down of NELF, by modulating intracellular signaling pathways, caused stimulation-specific loss of IEG transcription. These observations indicate that NELF controls overall IEG transcription via multiple mechanisms both directly and indirectly

  17. Getting up to speed with transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonkers, Iris; Lis, John T.

    Recent advances in sequencing techniques that measure nascent transcripts and that reveal the positioning of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) have shown that the pausing of Pol II in promoter-proximal regions and its release to initiate a phase of productive elongation are key steps in transcription

  18. Reactivation of latent HIV by histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakawa, Kotaro; Chavez, Leonard; Hakre, Shweta; Calvanese, Vincenzo; Verdin, Eric

    2013-06-01

    Latent HIV persists in CD4(+) T cells in infected patients under antiretroviral therapy (ART). Latency is associated with transcriptional silencing of the integrated provirus and driven, at least in part, by histone deacetylases (HDACs), a family of chromatin-associated proteins that regulate histone acetylation and the accessibility of DNA to transcription factors. Remarkably, inhibition of HDACs is sufficient to reactivate a fraction of latent HIV in a variety of experimental systems. This basic observation led to the shock and kill idea that forcing the transcriptional activation of HIV might lead to virus expression, to virus- or host-induced cell death of the reactivated cells, and to the eradication of the pool of latently infected cells. Such intervention might possibly lead to a cure for HIV-infected patients. Here, we review the basic biology of HDACs and their inhibitors, the role of HDACs in HIV latency, and recent efforts to use HDAC inhibitors to reactivate latent HIV in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Programming Reactive Extensions and LINQ

    CERN Document Server

    Liberty, Jesse

    2011-01-01

    Pro Reactive Extensions and LINQ is a deep dive into the next important technology for .NET developers: Reactive Extensions. This in-depth tutorial goes beyond what is available anywhere else to teach how to write WPF, Silverlight, and Windows Phone applications using the Reactive Extensions (Rx) to handle events and asynchronous method calls. Reactive programming allows you to turn those aspects of your code that are currently imperative into something much more event-driven and flexible. For this reason, it's sometimes referred to as LINQ for Events. Reactive programming hinges on the concep

  20. FOXO3a inhibits TNF-α- and IL-1β-induced astrocyte proliferation: implication for reactive astrogliosis

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Min; Huang, Yunlong; Tian, Changhai; Zhao, Yong; Zheng, Jialin

    2011-01-01

    Reactive astrogliosis is one of the pathological hallmarks of neurodegenerative diseases. Inflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-1β, have been shown to mediate the reactive astrogliosis in neurodegenerative diseases; however, the molecular mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the role of transcription factor FOXO3a on astrocyte proliferation, one primary aspect of severe reactive astrogliosis. Our results confirmed that TNF-α and IL-1β increased astrocyte proliferat...

  1. Protein oxidation mediated by heme-induced active site conversion specific for heme-regulated transcription factor, iron response regulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitatsuji, Chihiro; Izumi, Kozue; Nambu, Shusuke; Kurogochi, Masaki; Uchida, Takeshi; Nishimura, Shin-ichiro; Iwai, Kazuhiro; O'Brian, Mark R; Ikeda-Saito, Masao; Ishimori, Koichiro

    2016-01-05

    The Bradyrhizobium japonicum transcriptional regulator Irr (iron response regulator) is a key regulator of the iron homeostasis, which is degraded in response to heme binding via a mechanism that involves oxidative modification of the protein. Here, we show that heme-bound Irr activates O2 to form highly reactive oxygen species (ROS) with the "active site conversion" from heme iron to non-heme iron to degrade itself. In the presence of heme and reductant, the ROS scavenging experiments show that Irr generates H2O2 from O2 as found for other hemoproteins, but H2O2 is less effective in oxidizing the peptide, and further activation of H2O2 is suggested. Interestingly, we find a time-dependent decrease of the intensity of the Soret band and appearance of the characteristic EPR signal at g = 4.3 during the oxidation, showing the heme degradation and the successive formation of a non-heme iron site. Together with the mutational studies, we here propose a novel "two-step self-oxidative modification" mechanism, during which O2 is activated to form H2O2 at the heme regulatory motif (HRM) site and the generated H2O2 is further converted into more reactive species such as ·OH at the non-heme iron site in the His-cluster region formed by the active site conversion.

  2. Repetitive Elements in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Transcriptional Regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Malvessi Cattani

    Full Text Available Transcriptional regulation, a multiple-step process, is still poorly understood in the important pig pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. Basic motifs like promoters and terminators have already been described, but no other cis-regulatory elements have been found. DNA repeat sequences have been shown to be an interesting potential source of cis-regulatory elements. In this work, a genome-wide search for tandem and palindromic repetitive elements was performed in the intergenic regions of all coding sequences from M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448. Computational analysis demonstrated the presence of 144 tandem repeats and 1,171 palindromic elements. The DNA repeat sequences were distributed within the 5' upstream regions of 86% of transcriptional units of M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448. Comparative analysis between distinct repetitive sequences found in related mycoplasma genomes demonstrated different percentages of conservation among pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains. qPCR assays revealed differential expression among genes showing variable numbers of repetitive elements. In addition, repeats found in 206 genes already described to be differentially regulated under different culture conditions of M. hyopneumoniae strain 232 showed almost 80% conservation in relation to M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448 repeats. Altogether, these findings suggest a potential regulatory role of tandem and palindromic DNA repeats in the M. hyopneumoniae transcriptional profile.

  3. Repetitive Elements in Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae Transcriptional Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattani, Amanda Malvessi; Siqueira, Franciele Maboni; Guedes, Rafael Lucas Muniz; Schrank, Irene Silveira

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional regulation, a multiple-step process, is still poorly understood in the important pig pathogen Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae. Basic motifs like promoters and terminators have already been described, but no other cis-regulatory elements have been found. DNA repeat sequences have been shown to be an interesting potential source of cis-regulatory elements. In this work, a genome-wide search for tandem and palindromic repetitive elements was performed in the intergenic regions of all coding sequences from M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448. Computational analysis demonstrated the presence of 144 tandem repeats and 1,171 palindromic elements. The DNA repeat sequences were distributed within the 5' upstream regions of 86% of transcriptional units of M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448. Comparative analysis between distinct repetitive sequences found in related mycoplasma genomes demonstrated different percentages of conservation among pathogenic and nonpathogenic strains. qPCR assays revealed differential expression among genes showing variable numbers of repetitive elements. In addition, repeats found in 206 genes already described to be differentially regulated under different culture conditions of M. hyopneumoniae strain 232 showed almost 80% conservation in relation to M. hyopneumoniae strain 7448 repeats. Altogether, these findings suggest a potential regulatory role of tandem and palindromic DNA repeats in the M. hyopneumoniae transcriptional profile.

  4. Reactive Material Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-31

    disadvantage of this process is that it needs to incorporate a step for efficiently evaporating the solvent at mild temperature before the heat-curing...ascertain the risks in- volved in processing large quantities of the aluminum-epoxy mixture. Curing of the epoxy is an exo- thermic reaction. The current

  5. HTSC-Josephson step contacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, K.

    1994-03-01

    In this work the properties of josephson step contacts are investigated. After a short introduction into Josephson step contacts the structure, properties and the Josphson contacts of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-x high-T c superconductors is presented. The fabrication of HTSC step contacts and the microstructure is discussed. The electric properties of these contacts are measured together with the Josephson emission and the magnetic field dependence. The temperature dependence of the stationary transport properties is given. (WL)

  6. Genomic Analysis of Reactive Astrogliosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanian, JL; Xu, L; Foo, LC; Nouri, N; Zhou, L; Giffard, RG; Barres, BA

    2012-01-01

    Reactive astrogliosis is characterized by a profound change in astrocyte phenotype in response to all CNS injuries and diseases. To better understand the reactive astrocyte state, we used Affymetrix GeneChip arrays to profile gene expression in populations of reactive astrocytes isolated at various time points after induction using two mouse injury models, ischemic stroke and neuroinflammation. We find reactive gliosis consists of a rapid, but quickly attenuated induction of gene expression after insult and identify two induced genes, Lcn2 and Serpina3n, as strong markers of reactive astrocytes. Strikingly, reactive astrocyte phenotype strongly depended on the type of inducing injury. Although there is a core set of genes that is up-regulated in reactive astrocytes from both injury models, at least 50% of the altered gene expression is specific to a given injury type. Reactive astrocytes in ischemia exhibited a molecular phenotype that suggests that they may be beneficial or protective, whereas reactive astrocytes induced by LPS exhibited a phenotype that suggests that they may be detrimental. These findings demonstrate that, despite well established commonalities, astrocyte reactive gliosis is a highly heterogeneous state in which astrocyte activities are altered to respond to the specific injury. This raises the question of how many subtypes of reactive astrocytes exist. Our findings provide transcriptome databases for two subtypes of reactive astrocytes that will be highly useful in generating new and testable hypotheses of their function, as well as for providing new markers to detect different types of reactive astrocytes in human neurological diseases. PMID:22553043

  7. Transcriptional Regulation in Haematopoiesis:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Felicia K B

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are responsible for the formation of all of the distinct mature cell types found in the blood. HSCs can – as the only cells of the haematopoietic system – regenerate all of the blood cells when transplanted into a irradiated host, because they are endowed...... of distinct lineage affiliated genes in the otherwise highly purified HSCs. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the use of our model as a tool for isolating superior HSCs, and show that low-level expression of mature lineage markers is inherent in the highly purified stem cell compartment. In the second...... in transplantation studies. Consistent with this, transcriptome profiling revealed very low expression of cell cycle genes in these reporter-dim HSCs. Sequencing of >1200 single HSCs confirmed that the main source of transcriptional heterogeneity was the cell cycle. It also revealed a low-level expression...

  8. Normal aging induces A1-like astrocyte reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Laura E; Liddelow, Shane A; Chakraborty, Chandrani; Münch, Alexandra E; Heiman, Myriam; Barres, Ben A

    2018-02-20

    The decline of cognitive function occurs with aging, but the mechanisms responsible are unknown. Astrocytes instruct the formation, maturation, and elimination of synapses, and impairment of these functions has been implicated in many diseases. These findings raise the question of whether astrocyte dysfunction could contribute to cognitive decline in aging. We used the Bac-Trap method to perform RNA sequencing of astrocytes from different brain regions across the lifespan of the mouse. We found that astrocytes have region-specific transcriptional identities that change with age in a region-dependent manner. We validated our findings using fluorescence in situ hybridization and quantitative PCR. Detailed analysis of the differentially expressed genes in aging revealed that aged astrocytes take on a reactive phenotype of neuroinflammatory A1-like reactive astrocytes. Hippocampal and striatal astrocytes up-regulated a greater number of reactive astrocyte genes compared with cortical astrocytes. Moreover, aged brains formed many more A1 reactive astrocytes in response to the neuroinflammation inducer lipopolysaccharide. We found that the aging-induced up-regulation of reactive astrocyte genes was significantly reduced in mice lacking the microglial-secreted cytokines (IL-1α, TNF, and C1q) known to induce A1 reactive astrocyte formation, indicating that microglia promote astrocyte activation in aging. Since A1 reactive astrocytes lose the ability to carry out their normal functions, produce complement components, and release a toxic factor which kills neurons and oligodendrocytes, the aging-induced up-regulation of reactive genes by astrocytes could contribute to the cognitive decline in vulnerable brain regions in normal aging and contribute to the greater vulnerability of the aged brain to injury. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  9. Euglena Transcript Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWatters, David C; Russell, Anthony G

    2017-01-01

    RNA transcript processing is an important stage in the gene expression pathway of all organisms and is subject to various mechanisms of control that influence the final levels of gene products. RNA processing involves events such as nuclease-mediated cleavage, removal of intervening sequences referred to as introns and modifications to RNA structure (nucleoside modification and editing). In Euglena, RNA transcript processing was initially examined in chloroplasts because of historical interest in the secondary endosymbiotic origin of this organelle in this organism. More recent efforts to examine mitochondrial genome structure and RNA maturation have been stimulated by the discovery of unusual processing pathways in other Euglenozoans such as kinetoplastids and diplonemids. Eukaryotes containing large genomes are now known to typically contain large collections of introns and regulatory RNAs involved in RNA processing events, and Euglena gracilis in particular has a relatively large genome for a protist. Studies examining the structure of nuclear genes and the mechanisms involved in nuclear RNA processing have revealed that indeed Euglena contains large numbers of introns in the limited set of genes so far examined and also possesses large numbers of specific classes of regulatory and processing RNAs, such as small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs). Most interestingly, these studies have also revealed that Euglena possesses novel processing pathways generating highly fragmented cytosolic ribosomal RNAs and subunits and non-conventional intron classes removed by unknown splicing mechanisms. This unexpected diversity in RNA processing pathways emphasizes the importance of identifying the components involved in these processing mechanisms and their evolutionary emergence in Euglena species.

  10. Grief: Difficult Times, Simple Steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszak, Emily Lane

    This guide presents techniques to assist others in coping with the loss of a loved one. Using the language of 9 layperson, the book contains more than 100 tips for caregivers or loved ones. A simple step is presented on each page, followed by reasons and instructions for each step. Chapters include: "What to Say"; "Helpful Things to Do"; "Dealing…

  11. Reactivity parameters for safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, D.J.

    1985-01-01

    The reactor core model in the most commonly used computer programs for safety analysis is a point kinetics model. The core average fission rate is calculated knowing the reactivity, neutron generation time and delayed-neutron parameters. The reactivity is a time dependent function taking account of the effect of changes in water density and temperature, fuel temperature, control rod position and soluble boron concentration. In this presentation some of the alternative ways of representing this reactivity function are reviewed

  12. Massive florid reactive periostitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nance, K.V.; Renner, J.B.; Brashear, H.R.; Siegal, G.P.; North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill, NC

    1990-01-01

    Florid reactive periostitis is a rare, benign process usually occurring in the small, tubular bones of the hands and feet. Typically the lesion occurs in an adolescent or young adult and presents as a small area of pain and erythema over the affected bone. Although the histologic features may suggest malignancy, there is usually little radiographic evidence to support such a diagnosis. In the following report an unusual example of this entity is described whose large size and relentless local progression led to initial diagnostic uncertainty and eventual aggressive management. This case suggests that a wide spectrum of radiologic and morphologic changes may be seen in this entity and that a seemingly unrelated genetic disease may alter the typical clinical course. (orig.)

  13. Pembrolizumab reactivates pulmonary granulomatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majdi Al-dliw

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcoid like reaction is a well-known entity that occurs as a consequence to several malignancies or their therapies. Immunotherapy has gained a lot of interest in the past few years and has recently gained approval as first line therapy in multiple advanced stage malignancies. Pneumonitis has been described as complication of such therapy. Granulomatous inflammation has been only rarely reported subsequent to immunotherapy. We describe a case of granulomatous inflammation reactivation affecting the lungs in a patient previously exposed to Pembrolizumab and have evidence of a distant granulomatous infection. We discuss potential mechanisms of the inflammation and assert the importance of immunosuppression in controlling the dis-inhibited immune system.

  14. Positive void reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, D.J.

    1992-09-01

    This report is a review of some of the important aspects of the analysis of large loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). One important aspect is the calculation of positive void reactivity. To study this subject the lattice physics codes used for void worth calculations and the coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic codes used for the transient analysis are reviewed. Also reviewed are the measurements used to help validate the codes. The application of these codes to large LOCAs is studied with attention focused on the uncertainty factor for the void worth used to bias the results. Another aspect of the subject dealt with in the report is the acceptance criteria that are applied. This includes the criterion for peak fuel enthalpy and the question of whether prompt criticality should also be a criterion. To study the former, fuel behavior measurements and calculations are reviewed. (Author) (49 refs., 2 figs., tab.)

  15. Reactive Search and Intelligent Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Battiti, Roberto; Mascia, Franco

    2008-01-01

    Reactive Search integrates sub-symbolic machine learning techniques into search heuristics for solving complex optimization problems. By automatically adjusting the working parameters, a reactive search self-tunes and adapts, effectively learning by doing until a solution is found. Intelligent Optimization, a superset of Reactive Search, concerns online and off-line schemes based on the use of memory, adaptation, incremental development of models, experimental algorithms applied to optimization, intelligent tuning and design of heuristics. Reactive Search and Intelligent Optimization is an exc

  16. Identification of a Transcription Factor That Regulates Host Cell Exit and Virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalitha Srinivasan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb with host cell death signaling pathways is characterized by an initial anti-apoptotic phase followed by a pro-necrotic phase to allow for host cell exit of the bacteria. The bacterial modulators regulating necrosis induction are poorly understood. Here we describe the identification of a transcriptional repressor, Rv3167c responsible for regulating the escape of Mtb from the phagosome. Increased cytosolic localization of MtbΔRv3167c was accompanied by elevated levels of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and reduced activation of the protein kinase Akt, and these events were critical for the induction of host cell necrosis and macroautophagy. The increase in necrosis led to an increase in bacterial virulence as reflected in higher bacterial burden and reduced survival of mice infected with MtbΔRv3167c. The regulon of Rv3167c thus contains the bacterial mediators involved in escape from the phagosome and host cell necrosis induction, both of which are crucial steps in the intracellular lifecycle and virulence of Mtb.

  17. Regulating RNA polymerase pausing and transcription elongation in embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Irene M; Waterfall, Joshua J; Core, Leighton J; Munroe, Robert J; Schimenti, John; Lis, John T

    2011-04-01

    Transitions between pluripotent stem cells and differentiated cells are executed by key transcription regulators. Comparative measurements of RNA polymerase distribution over the genome's primary transcription units in different cell states can identify the genes and steps in the transcription cycle that are regulated during such transitions. To identify the complete transcriptional profiles of RNA polymerases with high sensitivity and resolution, as well as the critical regulated steps upon which regulatory factors act, we used genome-wide nuclear run-on (GRO-seq) to map the density and orientation of transcriptionally engaged RNA polymerases in mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). In both cell types, progression of a promoter-proximal, paused RNA polymerase II (Pol II) into productive elongation is a rate-limiting step in transcription of ∼40% of mRNA-encoding genes. Importantly, quantitative comparisons between cell types reveal that transcription is controlled frequently at paused Pol II's entry into elongation. Furthermore, "bivalent" ESC genes (exhibiting both active and repressive histone modifications) bound by Polycomb group complexes PRC1 (Polycomb-repressive complex 1) and PRC2 show dramatically reduced levels of paused Pol II at promoters relative to an average gene. In contrast, bivalent promoters bound by only PRC2 allow Pol II pausing, but it is confined to extremely 5' proximal regions. Altogether, these findings identify rate-limiting targets for transcription regulation during cell differentiation.

  18. Reactivity of bromoselenophenes in palladium-catalyzed direct arylations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aymen Skhiri

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The reactivity of 2-bromo- and 2,5-dibromoselenophenes in Pd-catalyzed direct heteroarylation was investigated. From 2-bromoselenophene, only the most reactive heteroarenes could be employed to prepare 2-heteroarylated selenophenes; whereas, 2,5-dibromoselenophene generally gave 2,5-di(heteroarylated selenophenes in high yields using both thiazole and thiophene derivatives. Moreover, sequential catalytic C2 heteroarylation, bromination, catalytic C5 arylation reactions allowed the synthesis of unsymmetrical 2,5-di(heteroarylated selenophene derivatives in three steps from selenophene.

  19. Microprocessor controller for stepping motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strait, B.G.; Thuot, M.E.

    1977-01-01

    A new concept for digital computer control of multiple stepping motors which operate in a severe electromagnetic pulse environment is presented. The motors position mirrors in the beam-alignment system of a 100-kJ CO 2 laser. An asynchronous communications channel of a computer is used to send coded messages, containing the motor address and stepping-command information, to the stepping-motor controller in a bit serial format over a fiber-optics communications link. The addressed controller responds by transmitting to the computer its address and other motor information, thus confirming the received message. Each controller is capable of controlling three stepping motors. The controller contains the fiber-optics interface, a microprocessor, and the stepping-motor driven circuits. The microprocessor program, which resides in an EPROM, decodes the received messages, transmits responses, performs the stepping-motor sequence logic, maintains motor-position information, and monitors the motor's reference switch. For multiple stepping-motor application, the controllers are connected in a daisy chain providing control of many motors from one asynchronous communications channel of the computer

  20. Mitotic bookmarking by transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadauke, Stephan; Blobel, Gerd A

    2013-04-02

    Mitosis is accompanied by dramatic changes in chromatin organization and nuclear architecture. Transcription halts globally and most sequence-specific transcription factors and co-factors are ejected from mitotic chromatin. How then does the cell maintain its transcriptional identity throughout the cell division cycle? It has become clear that not all traces of active transcription and gene repression are erased within mitotic chromatin. Many histone modifications are stable or only partially diminished throughout mitosis. In addition, some sequence-specific DNA binding factors have emerged that remain bound to select sites within mitotic chromatin, raising the possibility that they function to transmit regulatory information through the transcriptionally silent mitotic phase, a concept that has been termed "mitotic bookmarking." Here we review recent approaches to studying potential bookmarking factors with regards to their mitotic partitioning, and summarize emerging ideas concerning the in vivo functions of mitotically bound nuclear factors.

  1. The elusive role of mitotic bookmarking in transcriptional regulation: Insights from Sox2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deluz, Cédric; Strebinger, Daniel; Friman, Elias T; Suter, David M

    2017-04-03

    The ability of some transcription factors to remain bound to specific genes on condensed mitotic chromosomes has been suggested to play a role in their rapid transcriptional reactivation upon mitotic exit. We have recently shown that SOX2 and OCT4 remain associated to mitotic chromosomes, and that depletion of SOX2 at the mitosis-G1 (M-G1) transition impairs its ability to maintain pluripotency and drive neuroectodermal commitment. Here we report on the role of SOX2 at the M-G1 transition in regulating transcriptional activity of embryonic stem cells. Using single cell time-lapse analysis of reporter constructs for STAT3 and SOX2/OCT4 activity, we show that SOX2/OCT4 do not lead to more rapid transcriptional reactivation in G1 than STAT3, a transcription factor that is excluded from mitotic chromosomes. We also report that only few endogenous target genes show decreased pre-mRNA levels after mitotic exit or in other cell cycle phases in the absence of SOX2 at the M-G1 transition. This suggests that bookmarked SOX2 target genes are not differently regulated than non-bookmarked target genes, and we discuss an alternative hypothesis on how mitotic bookmarking by SOX2 and other sequence-specific transcription factors could be involved in transcriptional regulation.

  2. The estimation of oxime efficiency is affected by the experimental design of phosphylated acetylcholinesterase reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maček Hrvat, Nikolina; Zorbaz, Tamara; Šinko, Goran; Kovarik, Zrinka

    2017-11-24

    Reactivation of acetylcholinesterase (AChE), an essential enzyme in neurotransmission, is a key point in the treatment of acute poisoning by nerve agents and pesticides, which structurally belong to organophosphorus compounds (OP). Due to the high diversity of substituents on the phosphorous atom, there is a variety of OP-AChE conjugates deriving from AChE inhibition, and therefore not only is there no universal reactivator efficient enough for the most toxic OPs, but for some nerve agents there is still a lack of any reactivator at all. The endeavor of many chemists to find more efficient reactivators resulted in thousands of newly-designed and synthesized oximes-potential reactivators of AChE. For an evaluation of the oximés reactivation efficiency, many research groups employ a simple spectrophotometric Ellman method. Since parameters that describe reactivator efficiency are often incomparable among laboratories, we tried to emphasize the critical steps in the determination of reactivation parameters as well as in the experimental design of a reactivation assay. We highlighted the important points in evaluation of reactivation kinetic parameters with an aim to achieve better agreement and comparability between the results obtained by different laboratories and overall, a more efficient evaluation of in vitro reactivation potency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Environmental enrichment increases transcriptional and epigenetic differentiation between mouse dorsal and ventral dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tie-Yuan; Keown, Christopher L; Wen, Xianglan; Li, Junhao; Vousden, Dulcie A; Anacker, Christoph; Bhattacharyya, Urvashi; Ryan, Richard; Diorio, Josie; O'Toole, Nicholas; Lerch, Jason P; Mukamel, Eran A; Meaney, Michael J

    2018-01-19

    Early life experience influences stress reactivity and mental health through effects on cognitive-emotional functions that are, in part, linked to gene expression in the dorsal and ventral hippocampus. The hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) is a major site for experience-dependent plasticity associated with sustained transcriptional alterations, potentially mediated by epigenetic modifications. Here, we report comprehensive DNA methylome, hydroxymethylome and transcriptome data sets from mouse dorsal and ventral DG. We find genome-wide transcriptional and methylation differences between dorsal and ventral DG, including at key developmental transcriptional factors. Peripubertal environmental enrichment increases hippocampal volume and enhances dorsal DG-specific differences in gene expression. Enrichment also enhances dorsal-ventral differences in DNA methylation, including at binding sites of the transcription factor NeuroD1, a regulator of adult neurogenesis. These results indicate a dorsal-ventral asymmetry in transcription and methylation that parallels well-known functional and anatomical differences, and that may be enhanced by environmental enrichment.

  4. Reactive Functionalized Multilayer Polymers in Coextrusion Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamnawar, Khalid; Maazouz, Abderrahim

    2007-04-01

    Coextrusion technologies are commonly used to produce multilayered composite sheets or films with a large range of applications. The contrast of rheological properties between layers can lead to interfacial instabilities during flow. Important theoretical and experimental advances have been made during the last decades on the stability of compatible and incompatible polymers using a mechanical approach. The present study deals with the influence of this affinity on interfacial instabilities for functionalized incompatible polymers between the neighboring layers. Polyamide (PA6)/Polyethylene-grafted (GMA) or pure PE were studied with different viscosity and elasticity ratios. We have experimentally confirmed, in this case, that the weak disturbance can be predicted by considering an interphase of non-zero thickness (corresponding to interdiffusion/reaction zone) instead of a purely geometrical interface between the two reactive layers. As a first step, rheological behavior of multilayer coextruded cast films was investigated to probe: (i) the competition between polymer/polymer interdiffusion and the interfacial reaction and (ii) the influence of the interphase. The contribution of this one effect has been studied along with the increase of the number of layers. The results show that the variation in dynamic modulus of the multilayer system reflects both diffusion and chemical reaction. Finally, and in order to quantify the contribution of the effect of the interface/interphase with a specific interfacial area, an expression was developed to take into account the interphase triggered between the neighboring layers and allowed us to estimate its thickness at a specific welding time and shear rate. As the second step, we formulate an experimental strategy to optimize the process by listing the different parameters controlling the stability of the reactive multilayer flows. The plastic films of two, three and five layers were coextruded in symmetrical and asymmetrical

  5. A Tariff for Reactive Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kueck, John D [ORNL; Kirby, Brendan J [ORNL; Li, Fangxing [ORNL; Tufon, Christopher [Pacific Gas and Electric Company; Isemonger, Alan [California Independent System Operator

    2008-07-01

    Two kinds of power are required to operate an electric power system: real power, measured in watts, and reactive power, measured in volt-amperes reactive or VARs. Reactive power supply is one of a class of power system reliability services collectively known as ancillary services, and is essential for the reliable operation of the bulk power system. Reactive power flows when current leads or lags behind voltage. Typically, the current in a distribution system lags behind voltage because of inductive loads such as motors. Reactive power flow wastes energy and capacity and causes voltage droop. To correct lagging power flow, leading reactive power (current leading voltage) is supplied to bring the current into phase with voltage. When the current is in phase with voltage, there is a reduction in system losses, an increase in system capacity, and a rise in voltage. Reactive power can be supplied from either static or dynamic VAR sources. Static sources are typically transmission and distribution equipment, such as capacitors at substations, and their cost has historically been included in the revenue requirement of the transmission operator (TO), and recovered through cost-of-service rates. By contrast, dynamic sources are typically generators capable of producing variable levels of reactive power by automatically controlling the generator to regulate voltage. Transmission system devices such as synchronous condensers can also provide dynamic reactive power. A class of solid state devices (called flexible AC transmission system devices or FACTs) can provide dynamic reactive power. One specific device has the unfortunate name of static VAR compensator (SVC), where 'static' refers to the solid state nature of the device (it does not include rotating equipment) and not to the production of static reactive power. Dynamic sources at the distribution level, while more costly would be very useful in helping to regulate local voltage. Local voltage regulation would

  6. Step 1: Learn about Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... JavaScript on. Feature: Type 2 Diabetes Step 1: Learn About Diabetes Past Issues / Fall 2014 Table of ... fewer problems with your eyesight, feet, and gums. Learn how caring for your diabetes helps you feel ...

  7. Step sites in syngas catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostrup-Nielsen, J.; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2006-01-01

    Step sites play an important role in many catalytic reactions. This paper reviews recent results on metal catalysts for syngas reactions with emphasis on steam reforming. Modern characterization techniques (STEM, HREM...) and theoretical calculations (DFT) has allowed a more quantitative...

  8. NextSTEP-2 Habitation

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Through the public-private partnerships enabled by the Next Space Technologies for Exploration Partnerships - 2 (NextSTEP-2) Broad Agency Announcement, NASA has...

  9. 7 Steps to Aging Well

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issue Past Issues Special Section 7 Steps to Aging Well Past Issues / Winter 2007 Table of Contents ... Exercise: A Guide from the National Institute on Aging is a publication from NIA that has strength, ...

  10. 21 CFR 12.98 - Official transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., participants, and counsel have 30 days from the time the transcript becomes available to propose corrections in the transcript of oral testimony. Corrections are permitted only for transcription errors. The... a verbatim stenographic transcript of oral testimony and for necessary copies of the transcript. (b...

  11. Reactivation with productivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Carlos Hernando

    2002-01-01

    A market to five years that it will move near $63.000 millions, starting from the production of 254.000 reserves that Ecopetrol requires for its maintenance and operation, it was projected with base in the offer study and it demands that they carried out the universities Javeriana and Industrial of Santander for the Colombian Company of Petroleum around the metal mechanic sector. In accordance with the figures of the report, Ecopetrol, like one of the state entities selected by the national government to design pilot programs, guided to reactivate the Colombian industry; it is projecting a good perspective for the Colombian economy and the invigoration of the national productive sector. In practical terms, the report points out that Ecopetrol, in its different operative centers, will require in next five years the quantity of had restored before mentioned in the lines of mechanical stamps, centrifugal bombs, inter chambers of heat, compressors and valves of security; pieces that are elaborated by international makers in 99%. To produce them nationally would represent to the company an economy of 52% of the total value of the purchases in next five years and a reduction of time of delivery of 17 weeks to one week

  12. SIRT1 regulates HIV transcription via Tat deacetylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Pagans

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus (HIV Tat protein is acetylated by the transcriptional coactivator p300, a necessary step in Tat-mediated transactivation. We report here that Tat is deacetylated by human sirtuin 1 (SIRT1, a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent class III protein deacetylase in vitro and in vivo. Tat and SIRT1 coimmunoprecipitate and synergistically activate the HIV promoter. Conversely, knockdown of SIRT1 via small interfering RNAs or treatment with a novel small molecule inhibitor of the SIRT1 deacetylase activity inhibit Tat-mediated transactivation of the HIV long terminal repeat. Tat transactivation is defective in SIRT1-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts and can be rescued by expression of SIRT1. These results support a model in which cycles of Tat acetylation and deacetylation regulate HIV transcription. SIRT1 recycles Tat to its unacetylated form and acts as a transcriptional coactivator during Tat transactivation.

  13. Transcriptional regulation of c-fos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prywes, R.; Fisch, T.M.; Roeder, R.G.

    1988-01-01

    Expression of the c-fos proto-oncogene is induced rapidly and transiently by serum and other mitogenic agents. This rapid induction is therefore likely to involve posttranslational modifications and provides an excellent model for an early nuclear target of the signal transduction process, growth factors that bind to tyrosine kinase receptors. The authors have sought to understand the mechanism of transcriptional induction by each of these agents. The first step in this process was to identify the sequence elements in the c-fos gene responsible for induction by each of these agents. A specific element, termed serum response element (SRE), has been identified by transfection experiments of c-fos promoter constructs. To study regulation via SRE, a nuclear factor that binds to the SRE, termed serum response factor (SRF), has been identified with the gel mobility shift assay

  14. Automatic Phonetic Transcription for Danish Speech Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkedal, Andreas Søeborg

    for English and now extended to cover 50 languages. Due to the nature of open source software, the quality of language support depends greatly on who encoded them. The Danish version was created by a Danish native speaker and contains more than 8,600 spelling-to-phoneme rules and more than 11,000 rules...... for particular words and word classes in addition. In comparison, English has 5,852 spelling-tophoneme rules and 4,133 additional rules and 8,278 rules and 3,829 additional rules. Phonix applies deep morphological analysis as a preprocessing step. Should the analysis fail, several fallback strategies...... to acquire and expensive to create. For languages with productive compounding or agglutinative languages like German and Finnish, respectively, phonetic dictionaries are also hard to maintain. For this reason, automatic phonetic transcription tools have been produced for many languages. The quality...

  15. Molecular mechanisms for the destabilization and restabilization of reactivated spatial memory in the Morris water maze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Ryang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Memory retrieval is not a passive process. Recent studies have shown that reactivated memory is destabilized and then restabilized through gene expression-dependent reconsolidation. Molecular studies on the regulation of memory stability after retrieval have focused almost exclusively on fear memory, especially on the restabilization process of the reactivated fear memory. We previously showed that, similarly with fear memories, reactivated spatial memory undergoes reconsolidation in the Morris water maze. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms by which reactivated spatial memory is destabilized and restabilized remain poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism that regulates the stability of the reactivated spatial memory. Results We first showed that pharmacological inactivation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor (NMDAR in the hippocampus or genetic inhibition of cAMP-responsible element binding protein (CREB-mediated transcription disrupted reactivated spatial memory. Finally, we showed that pharmacological inhibition of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1 and L-type voltage gated calcium channels (LVGCCs in the hippocampus blocked the disruption of the reactivated spatial memory by the inhibition of protein synthesis. Conclusions Our findings indicated that the reactivated spatial memory is destabilized through the activation of CB1 and LVGCCs and then restabilized through the activation of NMDAR- and CREB-mediated transcription. We also suggest that the reactivated spatial memory undergoes destabilization and restabilization in the hippocampus, through similar molecular processes as those for reactivated contextual fear memories, which require CB1 and LVGCCs for destabilization and NMDAR and CREB for restabilization.

  16. X chromosome reactivation initiates in nascent primordial germ cells in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michihiko Sugimoto

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available During primordial germ cell (PGC development, epigenetic reprogramming events represented by X chromosome reactivation and erasure of genomic imprinting are known to occur. Although precise timing is not given, X reactivation is thought to take place over a short period of time just before initiation of meiosis. Here, we show that the cessation of Xist expression commences in nascent PGCs, and re-expression of some X-linked genes begins in newly formed PGCs. The X reactivation process was not complete in E14.5 PGCs, indicating that X reactivation in developing PGCs occurs over a prolonged period. These results set the reactivation timing much earlier than previously thought and suggest that X reactivation may involve slow passive steps.

  17. Processivity and coupling in messenger RNA transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Aitken

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of messenger RNA processing is now being uncovered by experimental techniques that are capable of detecting individual copies of mRNA in cells, and by quantitative real-time observations that reveal the kinetics. This processing is commonly modelled by permitting mRNA to be transcribed only when the promoter is in the on state. In this simple on/off model, the many processes involved in active transcription are represented by a single reaction. These processes include elongation, which has a minimum time for completion and processing that is not captured in the model.In this paper, we explore the impact on the mRNA distribution of representing the elongation process in more detail. Consideration of the mechanisms of elongation leads to two alternative models of the coupling between the elongating polymerase and the state of the promoter: Processivity allows polymerases to complete elongation irrespective of the promoter state, whereas coupling requires the promoter to be active to produce a full-length transcript. We demonstrate that these alternatives have a significant impact on the predicted distributions. Models are simulated by the Gillespie algorithm, and the third and fourth moments of the resulting distribution are computed in order to characterise the length of the tail, and sharpness of the peak. By this methodology, we show that the moments provide a concise summary of the distribution, showing statistically-significant differences across much of the feasible parameter range.We conclude that processivity is not fully consistent with the on/off model unless the probability of successfully completing elongation is low--as has been observed. The results also suggest that some form of coupling between the promoter and a rate-limiting step in transcription may explain the cell's inability to maintain high mRNA levels at low noise--a prediction of the on/off model that has no supporting evidence.

  18. Microsoft Office SharePoint Designer 2007 Step by Step

    CERN Document Server

    Coventry, Penelope

    2008-01-01

    The smart way to learn Office SharePoint Designer 2007-one step at a time! Work at your own pace through the easy numbered steps, practice files on CD, helpful hints, and troubleshooting tips to master the fundamentals of building customized SharePoint sites and applications. You'll learn how to work with Windows® SharePoint Services 3.0 and Office SharePoint Server 2007 to create Web pages complete with Cascading Style Sheets, Lists, Libraries, and customized Web parts. Then, make your site really work for you by adding data sources, including databases, XML data and Web services, and RSS fe

  19. Information marketing business entrepreneur's step-by-step startup guide

    CERN Document Server

    magazine, Entrepreneur

    2012-01-01

    A six-figure income from information? Yes! It sounds easy because it is. You've got information that millions of others are looking for and now you can learn how to package, price and sell it.The experts at Entrepreneur take you step by step, jumpstarting your thinking about your area of expertise and showing you how to convert it into a high-demand information product. Following the example set by today's most successful information marketers, you learn the ins and outs of running your own information marketing business using proven strategies and effective marketing techniques.

  20. Microsoft Windows Sharepoint Services 3.0 Step by Step

    CERN Document Server

    Londer, Olga; Bleeker, Todd; Coventry, Penelope

    2007-01-01

    Experience learning made easy-and quickly teach yourself how to use Windows SharePoint Services to enable effective team collaboration. With Step By Step, you set the pace-building and practicing the skills you need, just when you need them! Build your own SharePoint site with easy-to-use templatesCreate lists and libraries to store informationAdd discussion boards, wikis, and blogsSet up Document and Meeting Workspaces for easy collaborationShare calendars, contacts, and data from Microsoft Office programsCustomize your pages with Web Parts Your all-in-one learning experience includes: Fi

  1. A step-by-step methodology for enterprise interoperability projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmeta, Ricardo; Pazos, Verónica

    2015-05-01

    Enterprise interoperability is one of the key factors for enhancing enterprise competitiveness. Achieving enterprise interoperability is an extremely complex process which involves different technological, human and organisational elements. In this paper we present a framework to help enterprise interoperability. The framework has been developed taking into account the three domains of interoperability: Enterprise Modelling, Architecture and Platform and Ontologies. The main novelty of the framework in comparison to existing ones is that it includes a step-by-step methodology that explains how to carry out an enterprise interoperability project taking into account different interoperability views, like business, process, human resources, technology, knowledge and semantics.

  2. Microsoft® Office Access™ 2007 Step by Step

    CERN Document Server

    Lambert, Steve; Lambert, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Experience learning made easy-and quickly teach yourself how to build database solutions with Access 2007. With Step By Step, you set the pace-building and practicing the skills you need, just when you need them! Build databases from scratch or from templatesExchange data with other databases and Office documentsCreate forms to simplify data entryUse filters and queries to find and analyze informationDesign rich reports that help make your data meaningfulHelp prevent data corruption and unauthorized access Your all-in-one learning experience includes: Files for building skills and practic

  3. Chromosomal contact permits transcription between coregulated genes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fanucchi, Stephanie

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Transcription of coregulated genes occurs in the context of long-range chromosomal contacts that form multigene complexes. Such contacts and transcription are lost in knockout studies of transcription factors and structural chromatin proteins...

  4. Early reverse transcription is essential for productive foamy virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamborlini, Alessia; Renault, Noémie; Saïb, Ali; Delelis, Olivier

    2010-06-11

    Although viral RNA constitutes the majority of nucleic acids packaged in virions, a late occurring step of reverse transcription leads to the presence of infectious viral cDNA in foamy virus particles. This peculiarity distinguishes them from the rest of the retroviral family. To evaluate the respective contribution of these viral nucleic acids in the replication of foamy viruses, their fate was studied by real-time PCR and RT-PCR early after infection, in the presence or in the absence of AZT. We found that an early reverse transcription step, which occurs during the first hours post-entry, is absolutely required for productive infection. Remarkably, sensitivity to AZT can be counteracted by increasing the multiplicity of infection (moi). We also show that 2-LTR circular viral DNA, which appears as soon as four hours post-infection, is transcriptionally competent. Taken together, our data demonstrate that an early reverse transcription process, which takes place soon after viral entry, is indispensable for infectivity of FVs at low moi, when the amount of DNA-containing particles is not sufficient to lead to a productive infection. This study demonstrates a key role of the packaged viral RNA in the foamy virus infection, suggesting that the replication of this virus can be achieved by involving either viral DNA or RNA genome, depending on the condition of infection.

  5. Hydrogen peroxide sensing, signaling and regulation of transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Susana Marinho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The regulatory mechanisms by which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 modulates the activity of transcription factors in bacteria (OxyR and PerR, lower eukaryotes (Yap1, Maf1, Hsf1 and Msn2/4 and mammalian cells (AP-1, NRF2, CREB, HSF1, HIF-1, TP53, NF-κB, NOTCH, SP1 and SCREB-1 are reviewed. The complexity of regulatory networks increases throughout the phylogenetic tree, reaching a high level of complexity in mammalians. Multiple H2O2 sensors and pathways are triggered converging in the regulation of transcription factors at several levels: (1 synthesis of the transcription factor by upregulating transcription or increasing both mRNA stability and translation; (ii stability of the transcription factor by decreasing its association with the ubiquitin E3 ligase complex or by inhibiting this complex; (iii cytoplasm–nuclear traffic by exposing/masking nuclear localization signals, or by releasing the transcription factor from partners or from membrane anchors; and (iv DNA binding and nuclear transactivation by modulating transcription factor affinity towards DNA, co-activators or repressors, and by targeting specific regions of chromatin to activate individual genes. We also discuss how H2O2 biological specificity results from diverse thiol protein sensors, with different reactivity of their sulfhydryl groups towards H2O2, being activated by different concentrations and times of exposure to H2O2. The specific regulation of local H2O2 concentrations is also crucial and results from H2O2 localized production and removal controlled by signals. Finally, we formulate equations to extract from typical experiments quantitative data concerning H2O2 reactivity with sensor molecules. Rate constants of 140 M−1 s−1 and ≥1.3 × 103 M−1 s−1 were estimated, respectively, for the reaction of H2O2 with KEAP1 and with an unknown target that mediates NRF2 protein synthesis. In conclusion, the multitude of H2O2 targets and mechanisms provides an opportunity for

  6. Transcriptional control of megakaryocyte development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, A N

    2007-10-15

    Megakaryocytes are highly specialized cells that arise from a bipotent megakaryocytic-erythroid progenitor (MEP). This developmental leap requires coordinated activation of megakaryocyte-specific genes, radical changes in cell cycle properties, and active prevention of erythroid differentiation. These programs result from upregulation of megakaryocyte-selective transcription factors, downregulation of erythroid-selective transcription factors and ongoing mediation of common erythro-megakaryocytic transcription factors. Unlike most developmental programs, no single lineage-unique family of master regulators exerts executive control over the megakaryocytic plan. Rather, an assemblage of non-unique factors and signals converge to determine lineage and differentiation. In human megakaryopoiesis, hereditary disorders of platelet production have confirmed contributions from three distinct transcription factor families. Murine models have extended this repertoire to include multiple additional factors. At a mechanistic level, the means by which these non-unique factors collaborate in the establishment of a perfectly unique cell type remains a central question.

  7. Transcriptional Silencing of Retroviral Vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M.; Pedersen, F.S.

    1996-01-01

    Although retroviral vector systems have been found to efficiently transduce a variety of cell types in vitro, the use of vectors based on murine leukemia virus in preclinical models of somatic gene therapy has led to the identification of transcriptional silencing in vivo as an important problem....... Extinction of long-term vector expression has been observed after implantation of transduced hematopoietic cells as well as fibroblasts, myoblasts and hepatocytes. Here we review the influence of vector structure, integration site and cell type on transcriptional silencing. While down-regulation of proviral...... transcription is known from a number of cellular and animal models, major insight has been gained from studies in the germ line and embryonal cells of the mouse. Key elements for the transfer and expression of retroviral vectors, such as the viral transcriptional enhancer and the binding site for the t...

  8. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, George M.; Mali, Prashant G.; Esvelt, Kevin M.

    2016-02-23

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including introducing into the cell a first foreign nucleic acid encoding one or more RNAs complementary to DNA, wherein the DNA includes the target nucleic acid, introducing into the cell a second foreign nucleic acid encoding a nuclease-null Cas9 protein that binds to the DNA and is guided by the one or more RNAs, introducing into the cell a third foreign nucleic acid encoding a transcriptional regulator protein or domain, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein, and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain are expressed, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain co-localize to the DNA and wherein the transcriptional regulator protein or domain regulates expression of the target nucleic acid.

  9. Phosphorylation of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Twist in development and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Gongda; Hemmings, Brian A

    2012-02-01

    The transcription factor Twist plays vital roles during embryonic development through regulating/controlling cell migration. However, postnatally, in normal physiological settings, Twist is either not expressed or inactivated. Increasing evidence shows a strong correlation between Twist reactivation and both cancer progression and malignancy, where the transcriptional activities of Twist support cancer cells to disseminate from primary tumours and subsequently establish a secondary tumour growth in distant organs. However, it is largely unclear how this signalling programme is reactivated or what signalling pathways regulate its activity. The present review discusses recent advances in Twist regulation and activity, with a focus on phosphorylation-dependent Twist activity, potential upstream kinases and the contribution of these factors in transducing biological signals from upstream signalling complexes. The recent advances in these areas have shed new light on how phosphorylation-dependent regulation of the Twist proteins promotes or suppresses Twist activity, leading to differential regulation of Twist transcriptional targets and thereby influencing cell fate.

  10. Present art of reactivity determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Yoshihiko; Nakano, Masafumi; Matsuura, Shojiro

    1977-01-01

    Experimental techniques for reactivity determination of a reactor have been one of the long standing subjects in reactor physics. Recently, such a requirement was proposed by the reactor designers and operators that the values of reactivity should be measured more accurately. This is because importance is emphasized for the role of reactivity to the performance of reactor safety, economics and operability. Motivated by the requirement, some remarkable progresses are being made for the improvement of the experimental techniques. Then, the present review summarizes the research activities on this subject, identifies several reactor physics problems to be overcome, and makes mention of the future targets. (auth.)

  11. FIRST STEP towards ICF commercialization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saylor, W.W.; Pendergrass, J.H.; Dudziak, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    Production of tritium for weapons and fusion R and D programs and successful development of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) technologies are important national goals. A conceptual design for an ICF facility to meet these goals is presented. FIRST STEP (Fusion, Inertial, Reduced-Requirements Systems Test for Special Nuclear Material, Tritium, and Energy Production) is a concept for a plant to produce SNM, tritium, and energy while serving as a test bed for ICF technology development. A credible conceptual design for an ICF SNM and tritium production facility that competes favorably with fission technology on the bases of cost, production quality, and safety was sought. FIRST STEP is also designed to be an engineering test facility that integrates systems required for an ICF power plant and that is intermediate in scale between proof-of-principle experiment and commercial power plant. FIRST STEP driver and pellet performance requirements are moderate and represent reasonable intermediate goals in an R and D plan for ICF commercialization. Repetition rate requirements for FIRST STEP are similar to those of commercial size plants and FIRST STEP can be used to integrate systems under realistic ICF conditions

  12. Development of numerical methods for reactive transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouillard, N.

    2006-12-01

    When a radioactive waste is stored in deep geological disposals, it is expected that the waste package will be damaged under water action (concrete leaching, iron corrosion). Then, to understand these damaging processes, chemical reactions and solutes transport are modelled. Numerical simulations of reactive transport can be done sequentially by the coupling of several codes. This is the case of the software platform ALLIANCES which is developed jointly with CEA, ANDRA and EDF. Stiff reactions like precipitation-dissolution are crucial for the radioactive waste storage applications, but standard sequential iterative approaches like Picard's fail in solving rapidly reactive transport simulations with such stiff reactions. In the first part of this work, we focus on a simplified precipitation and dissolution process: a system made up with one solid species and two aqueous species moving by diffusion is studied mathematically. It is assumed that a precipitation dissolution reaction occurs in between them, and it is modelled by a discontinuous kinetics law of unknown sign. By using monotonicity properties, the convergence of a finite volume scheme on admissible mesh is proved. Existence of a weak solution is obtained as a by-product of the convergence of the scheme. The second part is dedicated to coupling algorithms which improve Picard's method and can be easily used in an existing coupling code. By extending previous works, we propose a general and adaptable framework to solve nonlinear systems. Indeed by selecting special options, we can either recover well known methods, like nonlinear conjugate gradient methods, or design specific method. This algorithm has two main steps, a preconditioning one and an acceleration one. This algorithm is tested on several examples, some of them being rather academical and others being more realistic. We test it on the 'three species model'' example. Other reactive transport simulations use an external chemical code CHESS. For a

  13. Development of Stepping Endurance Test Plan on CRDM of a Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, DongHyun; Kim, Hyeonil; Park, Suki [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Various types of the irradiation targets can be loaded and unloaded during power operation, according to the purpose of research reactor utilization. And their reactivity worth varies as well. The insertion rate of reactivity is dependent to reactivity worth of targets, travel length during loading or unloading and transfer device speed. Due to the reactivity transition during loading and unloading, neutron power is changed and reaches an action point of the reactor regulating system. Based on the measured neutron rate of change, reactor power control system controls the power with its own algorithm. It generates the signals and transmits these to the CRDM for motor driving. Stepping motors on the CRDM move the control rods with step signals. The process repeats until power is stabilized. Accordingly, the stepping behaviours of CRDM should be modelled upon an understanding of the control process and reactor responses. Methodology for a stepping endurance test plan on the CRDM of a research reactor is developed since CRDM endurance is very important for reactor controller and should be ensured for a certain period of time throughout the life of a research reactor. Therefore, it is expected to provide a reasonable stepping test plan. In the future, the simulation will be performed with specific design values.

  14. Marketing dental implants: a step-by-step approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, D P

    1995-03-01

    Introducing dental implants into a practice requires planning and commitment. Part of the planning process is learning new clinical skills, but another essential component is developing a marketing approach. The author offers a seven-step plan for adding dental implants to your repertoire.

  15. Publishing Ethical Research: A Step-by-Step Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wester, Kelly L.

    2011-01-01

    To publish ethical research, one must conduct research responsibly, making ethical choices from the inception of the research idea and throughout the research process. Conducting and publishing ethical research is important because of the impact the results will have on the counseling profession. Steps to consider are discussed.

  16. Myelin-specific T cells induce interleukin-1beta expression in lesion-reactive microglial-like cells in zones of axonal degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grebing, Manuela; Nielsen, Helle H; Fenger, Christina D

    2016-01-01

    -reactive microglia. To gain mechanistic insight, we used RNA microarray analysis to compare the transcript profile in hippocampi from perforant pathway axonal-lesioned mice with and without adoptively transferred myelin-specific T cells 2 days postlesion, when microglia are clearly lesion reactive. Pathway analysis...

  17. National Capital Planning Commission Meeting Transcripts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Capital Planning Commission — Transcripts of the monthly (with the exception of August) National Capital Planning Commission meeting transcripts are provided for research to confirm actions taken...

  18. Intergenic and repeat transcription in human, chimpanzee and macaque brains measured by RNA-Seq.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augix Guohua Xu

    Full Text Available Transcription is the first step connecting genetic information with an organism's phenotype. While expression of annotated genes in the human brain has been characterized extensively, our knowledge about the scope and the conservation of transcripts located outside of the known genes' boundaries is limited. Here, we use high-throughput transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq to characterize the total non-ribosomal transcriptome of human, chimpanzee, and rhesus macaque brain. In all species, only 20-28% of non-ribosomal transcripts correspond to annotated exons and 20-23% to introns. By contrast, transcripts originating within intronic and intergenic repetitive sequences constitute 40-48% of the total brain transcriptome. Notably, some repeat families show elevated transcription. In non-repetitive intergenic regions, we identify and characterize 1,093 distinct regions highly expressed in the human brain. These regions are conserved at the RNA expression level across primates studied and at the DNA sequence level across mammals. A large proportion of these transcripts (20% represents 3'UTR extensions of known genes and may play roles in alternative microRNA-directed regulation. Finally, we show that while transcriptome divergence between species increases with evolutionary time, intergenic transcripts show more expression differences among species and exons show less. Our results show that many yet uncharacterized evolutionary conserved transcripts exist in the human brain. Some of these transcripts may play roles in transcriptional regulation and contribute to evolution of human-specific phenotypic traits.

  19. Ocular herpes simplex virus: how are latency, reactivation, recurrent disease and therapy interrelated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Dujaili, Lena J; Clerkin, Patrick P; Clement, Christian; McFerrin, Harris E; Bhattacharjee, Partha S; Varnell, Emily D; Kaufman, Herbert E; Hill, James M

    2012-01-01

    Most humans are infected with herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 in early childhood and remain latently infected throughout life. While most individuals have mild or no symptoms, some will develop destructive HSV keratitis. Ocular infection with HSV-1 and its associated sequelae account for the majority of corneal blindness in industrialized nations. Neuronal latency in the peripheral ganglia is established when transcription of the viral genome is repressed (silenced) except for the latency-associated transcripts and microRNAs. The functions of latency-associated transcripts have been investigated since 1987. Roles have been suggested relating to reactivation, establishment of latency, neuronal protection, antiapoptosis, apoptosis, virulence and asymptomatic shedding. Here, we review HSV-1 latent infections, reactivation, recurrent disease and antiviral therapies for the ocular HSV diseases. PMID:21861620

  20. Step by step male to female transsexual surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Rodrigo Uliano Moser; Abreu, Fernando Jahn da Silva; da Silva, Gabriel M V; Dos Santos, João Vitor Quadra Vieira; Batezini, Nelson Sivonei da Silva; Silva, Brasil; Rosito, Tiago Elias

    2018-01-01

    After the diagnosis of transsexualism is confirmed therapy commences with psychotherapeutic preparation for the conversion, and after conversion, long-term patient rehabilitation is maintained for at least two years. The indication for surgery is chronic discomfort caused by discord with the patient's natural gender, intense dislike of developing secondary sex characteristics and the onset of puberty. The surgical conversion of transsexuals is the main step in the complex care of these problematic patients (1). This surgery was first described by Benjamin H, using a flap of inverted penile skin (2) and is considered the gold standard since then. Male-to-female transsexual surgical techniques are well defined and give good cosmetic and functional results. Sex reassignment surgery promotes the improvement of psychological aspects and social relationships as shown in the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment applied in the patients submitted to this procedure (3). Techniques include the creation of a normal appearing female introitus, a vaginoplasty allowing sexual intercourse and the capability of clitoral orgasm (4). Various methods for neovaginoplasty have been described and can be classified into five categories, i.e. pedicled intestinal transplants, penile skin grafts, penile skin flaps, non-genital skin flaps and non-genital skin grafts (5). In our Hospital, we use penile and scrotal skin flaps. Until now, 174 procedures have been performed by our team using this technique with high rates of satisfaction (3). We present a step-by-step male to female transsexual surgery. Surgical gender reassignment of male transsexuals resulted in replicas of female genitalia which enabled coitus with orgasm (1). With this video we show step by step that a surgery using penile skin flaps is able to be performed with good cosmetic results. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  1. Needed Computations Shortcutting Needed Steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antoy, Sergio; Johannsen, Jacob; Libby, Steven

    We define a compilation scheme for a constructor-based strongly-sequential graph rewriting system which shortcuts some needed steps. The result of this compilation is another constructor-based graph rewriting system that is normalizing for the original system when using an innermost strategy. We...... then modify the resulting rewrite sytem in a way that avoids totally or partially the construction of the contracta of some needed steps of a computation. The resulting rewrite system can be easily implemented by eager functions in a variety of programming languages. When computing normal forms in this way...

  2. Mannuronic Acids : Reactivity and Selectivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Codee, Jeroen D. C.; Walvoort, Marthe T. C.; de Jong, Ana-Rae; Lodder, Gerrit; Overkleeft, Herman S.; van der Marel, Gijsbert A.

    2011-01-01

    This review describes our recent studies toward the reactivity and selectivity of mannopyranosyl uronic acid donors, which have been found to be very powerful donors for the construction of beta-mannosidic linkages.

  3. Insights into mRNP biogenesis provided by new genetic interactions among export and transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estruch, Francisco; Hodge, Christine; Gómez-Navarro, Natalia; Peiró-Chova, Lorena; Heath, Catherine V; Cole, Charles N

    2012-09-10

    The various steps of mRNP biogenesis (transcription, processing and export) are interconnected. It has been shown that the transcription machinery plays a pivotal role in mRNP assembly, since several mRNA export factors are recruited during transcription and physically interact with components of the transcription machinery. Although the shuttling DEAD-box protein Dbp5p is concentrated on the cytoplasmic fibrils of the NPC, previous studies demonstrated that it interacts physically and genetically with factors involved in transcription initiation. We investigated the effect of mutations affecting various components of the transcription initiation apparatus on the phenotypes of mRNA export mutant strains. Our results show that growth and mRNA export defects of dbp5 and mex67 mutant strains can be suppressed by mutation of specific transcription initiation components, but suppression was not observed for mutants acting in the very first steps of the pre-initiation complex (PIC) formation. Our results indicate that mere reduction in the amount of mRNP produced is not sufficient to suppress the defects caused by a defective mRNA export factor. Suppression occurs only with mutants affecting events within a narrow window of the mRNP biogenesis process. We propose that reducing the speed with which transcription converts from initiation and promoter clearance to elongation may have a positive effect on mRNP formation by permitting more effective recruitment of partially-functional mRNP proteins to the nascent mRNP.

  4. Reactivation of latent HIV-1 by new semi-synthetic ingenol esters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandeló José, Diego; Bartholomeeusen, Koen; Delveccio da Cunha, Rodrigo; Abreu, Celina Monteiro; Glinski, Jan; Barbizan Ferreira da Costa, Thais; Bacchi Rabay, Ana Flávia Mello; Pianowski Filho, Luiz Francisco; Dudycz, Lech W.; Ranga, Udaykumar; Peterlin, Boris Matija; Pianowski, Luiz Francisco; Tanuri, Amilcar; Aguiar, Renato Santana

    2014-01-01

    The ability of HIV to establish long-lived latent infection is mainly due to transcriptional silencing of viral genome in resting memory T lymphocytes. Here, we show that new semi-synthetic ingenol esters reactivate latent HIV reservoirs. Amongst the tested compounds, 3-caproyl-ingenol (ING B) was more potent in reactivating latent HIV than known activators such as SAHA, ingenol 3,20-dibenzoate, TNF-α, PMA and HMBA. ING B activated PKC isoforms followed by NF-κB nuclear translocation. As virus reactivation is dependent on intact NF-κB binding sites in the LTR promoter region ING B, we have shown that. ING B was able to reactivate virus transcription in primary HIV-infected resting cells up to 12 fold and up to 25 fold in combination with SAHA. Additionally, ING B promoted up-regulation of P-TEFb subunits CDK9/Cyclin T1. The role of ING B on promoting both transcription initiation and elongation makes this compound a strong candidate for an anti-HIV latency drug combined with suppressive HAART. - Highlights: • 3-caproyl-ingenol (ING B) reactivates latent HIV better than SAHA, ingenol 3,20-dibenzoate, TNF-α, PMA and HMBA. • ING B promotes PKC activation and NF-kB translocation to the nucleus. • ING B activates virus transcription of B and non-B subtypes of HIV-1. • ING B activates HIV transcription in infected primary resting CD4+ T cells. • ING B induces higher levels of P-TEFb components in human primary cells

  5. Reactivation of latent HIV-1 by new semi-synthetic ingenol esters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandeló José, Diego [Departamento de Genética, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-902 (Brazil); Bartholomeeusen, Koen [Department of Medicine, Microbiology and Immunology, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143-0703 (United States); Delveccio da Cunha, Rodrigo; Abreu, Celina Monteiro [Departamento de Genética, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-902 (Brazil); Glinski, Jan [PlantaAnalytica LLC, Danbury, CT 06810 (United States); Barbizan Ferreira da Costa, Thais; Bacchi Rabay, Ana Flávia Mello; Pianowski Filho, Luiz Francisco [Kyolab Laboratories, Valinhos, São Paulo 13273-105 (Brazil); Dudycz, Lech W. [Lex Company Research Laboratories, Shirley 01464, MA (United States); Ranga, Udaykumar [Molecular Biology and Genetics Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bengaluru 560064 (India); Peterlin, Boris Matija [Department of Medicine, Microbiology and Immunology, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143-0703 (United States); Pianowski, Luiz Francisco [Kyolab Laboratories, Valinhos, São Paulo 13273-105 (Brazil); Tanuri, Amilcar [Departamento de Genética, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-902 (Brazil); Aguiar, Renato Santana, E-mail: santana@biologia.ufrj.br [Departamento de Genética, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro 21941-902 (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    The ability of HIV to establish long-lived latent infection is mainly due to transcriptional silencing of viral genome in resting memory T lymphocytes. Here, we show that new semi-synthetic ingenol esters reactivate latent HIV reservoirs. Amongst the tested compounds, 3-caproyl-ingenol (ING B) was more potent in reactivating latent HIV than known activators such as SAHA, ingenol 3,20-dibenzoate, TNF-α, PMA and HMBA. ING B activated PKC isoforms followed by NF-κB nuclear translocation. As virus reactivation is dependent on intact NF-κB binding sites in the LTR promoter region ING B, we have shown that. ING B was able to reactivate virus transcription in primary HIV-infected resting cells up to 12 fold and up to 25 fold in combination with SAHA. Additionally, ING B promoted up-regulation of P-TEFb subunits CDK9/Cyclin T1. The role of ING B on promoting both transcription initiation and elongation makes this compound a strong candidate for an anti-HIV latency drug combined with suppressive HAART. - Highlights: • 3-caproyl-ingenol (ING B) reactivates latent HIV better than SAHA, ingenol 3,20-dibenzoate, TNF-α, PMA and HMBA. • ING B promotes PKC activation and NF-kB translocation to the nucleus. • ING B activates virus transcription of B and non-B subtypes of HIV-1. • ING B activates HIV transcription in infected primary resting CD4+ T cells. • ING B induces higher levels of P-TEFb components in human primary cells.

  6. Transcriptional regulators of Na, K-ATPase subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqin eLi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Na,K-ATPase classically serves as an ion pump creating an electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane that is essential for transepithelial transport, nutrient uptake and membrane potential. In addition, Na,K-ATPase also functions as a receptor, a signal transducer and a cell adhesion molecule. With such diverse roles, it is understandable that the Na,K-ATPase subunits, the catalytic alpha-subunit, the beta-subunit and the FXYD proteins, are controlled extensively during development and to accommodate physiological needs. The spatial and temporal expression of Na,K-ATPase is partially regulated at the transcriptional level. Numerous transcription factors, hormones, growth factors, lipids and extracellular stimuli modulate the transcription of the Na,K-ATPase subunits. Moreover, epigenetic mechanisms also contribute to the regulation of Na,K-ATPase expression. With the ever growing knowledge about diseases associated with the malfunction of Na,K-ATPase, this review aims at summarizing the best-characterized transcription regulators that modulate Na,K-ATPase subunit levels. As abnormal expression of Na,K-ATPase subunits have been observed in many carcinoma, we will also discuss transcription factors that are associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a crucial step in the progression of many tumors to malignant disease.

  7. Fuel Temperature Coefficient of Reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loewe, W.E.

    2001-07-31

    A method for measuring the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity in a heterogeneous nuclear reactor is presented. The method, which is used during normal operation, requires that calibrated control rods be oscillated in a special way at a high reactor power level. The value of the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity is found from the measured flux responses to these oscillations. Application of the method in a Savannah River reactor charged with natural uranium is discussed.

  8. [Hyper-reactive malarial splenomegaly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maazoun, F; Deschamps, O; Barros-Kogel, E; Ngwem, E; Fauchet, N; Buffet, P; Froissart, A

    2015-11-01

    Hyper-reactive malarial splenomegaly is a rare and severe form of chronic malaria. This condition is a common cause of splenomegaly in endemic areas. The pathophysiology of hyper-reactive malarial splenomegaly involves an intense immune reaction (predominantly B cell-driven) to repeated/chronic infections with Plasmodium sp. The diagnosis may be difficult, due to a poorly specific clinical presentation (splenomegaly, fatigue, cytopenias), a long delay between residence in a malaria-endemic area and onset of symptoms, and a frequent absence of parasites on conventional thin and thick blood smears. A strongly contributive laboratory parameter is the presence of high levels of total immunoglobulin M. When the diagnostic of hyper-reactive malarial splenomegaly is considered, search for anti-Plasmodium antibodies and Plasmodium nucleic acids (genus and species) by PCR is useful. Diagnosis of hyper-reactive malarial splenomegaly relies on the simultaneous presence of epidemiological, clinical, biological and follow-up findings. Regression of both splenomegaly and hypersplenism following antimalarial therapy allows the differential diagnosis with splenic lymphoma, a common complication of hyper-reactive malarial splenomegaly. Although rare in Western countries, hyper-reactive malarial splenomegaly deserves increased medical awareness to reduce the incidence of incorrect diagnosis, to prevent progression to splenic lymphoma and to avoid splenectomy. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. AIREKMOD-RR, Reactivity Transients in Nuclear Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baggoura, B.; Mazrou, H.

    2001-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: AIREMOD-RR is a point kinetics code which can simulate fast transients in nuclear research reactor cores. It can also be used for theoretical reactor dynamics studies. It is used for research reactor kinetic analysis and provides a point neutron kinetic capability. The thermal hydraulic behavior is governed by a one-dimensional heat balance equation. The calculations are restricted to a single equivalent unit cell which consists of fuel, clad and coolant. 2 - Method of solution: For transient reactor kinetic calculations a modified Runge Kutta numerical method is used. The external reactivity insertion, specified as a function of time, is converted in dollar ($) unit. The neutron density, energy release and feedback variables are given at each time step. The two types of reactivity feedback considered are: Doppler effect and moderator effect. A new expression for the reactivity dependence on the feedback variables has been introduced in the present version of the code. The feedback reactivities are fitted in power series expression. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The number of delayed neutron groups and the total number of equations are limited only by computer storage capabilities. - Coolant is always in liquid phase. - Void reactivity feedback is not considered

  10. Friction of atomically stepped surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikken, R.J.; Thijsse, B.J.; Nicola, L.

    2017-01-01

    The friction behavior of atomically stepped metal surfaces under contact loading is studied using molecular dynamics simulations. While real rough metal surfaces involve roughness at multiple length scales, the focus of this paper is on understanding friction of the smallest scale of roughness:

  11. Step sites in syngas catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostrup-Nielsen, J.; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2006-01-01

    Step sites play an important role in many catalytic reactions. This paper reviews recent results on metal catalysts for syngas reactions with emphasis on steam reforming. Modern characterization techniques (STEM, HREM...) and theoretical calculations (DFT) has allowed a more quantitative explanat...

  12. Optic nerve astrocyte reactivity protects function in experimental glaucoma and other nerve injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Daniel; Moore, Sara; Jakobs, Tatjana C

    2017-05-01

    Reactive remodeling of optic nerve head astrocytes is consistently observed in glaucoma and other optic nerve injuries. However, it is unknown whether this reactivity is beneficial or harmful for visual function. In this study, we used the Cre recombinase (Cre)- loxP system under regulation of the mouse glial fibrillary acidic protein promoter to knock out the transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) from astrocytes and test the effect this has on reactive remodeling, ganglion cell survival, and visual function after experimental glaucoma and nerve crush. After injury, STAT3 knockout mice displayed attenuated astrocyte hypertrophy and reactive remodeling; astrocytes largely maintained their honeycomb organization and glial tubes. These changes were associated with increased loss of ganglion cells and visual function over a 30-day period. Thus, reactive astrocytes play a protective role, preserving visual function. STAT3 signaling is an important mediator of various aspects of the reactive phenotype within optic nerve astrocytes. © 2017 Sun et al.

  13. Notch1-STAT3-ETBR signaling axis controls reactive astrocyte proliferation after brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeComte, Matthew D; Shimada, Issei S; Sherwin, Casey; Spees, Jeffrey L

    2015-07-14

    Defining the signaling network that controls reactive astrogliosis may provide novel treatment targets for patients with diverse CNS injuries and pathologies. We report that the radial glial cell antigen RC2 identifies the majority of proliferating glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive (GFAP(+)) reactive astrocytes after stroke. These cells highly expressed endothelin receptor type B (ETB(R)) and Jagged1, a Notch1 receptor ligand. To study signaling in adult reactive astrocytes, we developed a model based on reactive astrocyte-derived neural stem cells isolated from GFAP-CreER-Notch1 conditional knockout (cKO) mice. By loss- and gain-of-function studies and promoter activity assays, we found that Jagged1/Notch1 signaling increased ETB(R) expression indirectly by raising the level of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), a previously unidentified EDNRB transcriptional activator. Similar to inducible transgenic GFAP-CreER-Notch1-cKO mice, GFAP-CreER-ETB(R)-cKO mice exhibited a defect in reactive astrocyte proliferation after cerebral ischemia. Our results indicate that the Notch1-STAT3-ETB(R) axis connects a signaling network that promotes reactive astrocyte proliferation after brain injury.

  14. Dissecting a complex neurosurgical illustration: step-by-step development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Ian

    2011-12-01

    Modern computer graphics software has enabled the medical illustrator to render very complex anatomy by composing many different layers of drawings simultaneously. This and the author's capacity to take an "editorial" approach to compress several chronological events into a single, comprehensive two-dimensional illustration are analyzed in a step-by-step process. Through a series of images, the article provides a visual synopsis of the development of an illustration for an extensive clinical case: total sacrectomy performed through an all-posterior approach. Originally given as a slide presentation at the American Association of Neurological Surgeons Theodore Kurze Lecture in April 2011, the article provides some detailed notes on the techniques the author used to develop a comprehensive neurosurgical illustration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Step into the Groove: Engineered Transcription Factors as Modulators of Gene Expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Astrid E.; Verschure, Pernette J.; Gommans, Willemijn M.; Haisma, Hidde J.; Rots, Marianne G.; Hall, JC; Dunlap, JC; Friedmann, T; VanHeyningen,

    2006-01-01

    Increasing knowledge about the influence of dysregulated gene expression in causing numerous diseases opens up new possibilities for the development of innovative therapeutics. In this chapter, we first describe different mechanisms of misregulated gene expression resulting in various

  16. Step into the groove : engineered transcription factors as modulators of gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, A.E.; Verschure, P.J.; Gommans, W.M.; Haisma, H.J.; Rots, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    Increasing knowledge about the influence of dysregulated gene expression in causing numerous diseases opens up new possibilities for the development of innovative therapeutics. In this chapter, we first describe different mechanisms of misregulated gene expression resulting in various

  17. Reactive sites influence in PMMA oligomers reactivity: a DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, C. V.; Vásquez, S. R.; Flores, N.; García, L.; Rico, J. L.

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we present a theoretical study of methyl methacrylate (MMA) living anionic polymerization. The study was addressed to understanding two important experimental observations made for Michael Szwarc in 1956. The unexpected effect of reactive sites concentration in the propagation rate, and the self-killer behavior of MMA (deactivating of living anionic polymerization). The theoretical calculations were performed by density functional theory (DFT) to obtain the frontier molecular orbitals values. These values were used to calculate and analyze the chemical interaction descriptors in DFT-Koopmans’ theorem. As a result, it was observed that the longest chain-length species (related with low concentration of reactive sites) exhibit the highest reactivity (behavior associated with the increase of the propagation rate). The improvement in this reactivity was attributed to the crosslinking produced in the polymethyl methacrylate chains. Meanwhile, the self-killer behavior was associated with the intermolecular forces present in the reactive sites. This behavior was associated to an obstruction in solvation, since the active sites remained active through all propagation species. The theoretical results were in good agreement with the Szwarc experiments.

  18. Euphorbia Kansui Reactivates Latent HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Daniele C; Fujinaga, Koh; Peterlin, B Matija

    2016-01-01

    While highly active anti-retroviral therapy has greatly improved the lives of HIV infected individuals, these treatments are unable to eradicate the virus. Current approaches to reactivate the virus have been limited by toxicity, lack of an orally available therapy, and limited responses in primary CD4+ T cells and in clinical trials. The PKC agonist ingenol, purified from Euphorbia plants, is a potent T cell activator and reactivates latent HIV. Euphorbia kansui itself has been used for centuries in traditional Chinese medicine to treat ascites, fluid retention, and cancer. We demonstrate that an extract of this plant, Euphorbia kansui, is capable of recapitulating T cell activation induced by the purified ingenol. Indeed, Euphorbia kansui induced expression of the early T cell activation marker CD69 and P-TEFb in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, Euphorbia kansui reactivated latent HIV in a CD4+ T cell model of latency and in HIV+ HAART suppressed PBMC. When combined with the other latency reversing agents, the effective dose of Euphorbia kansui required to reactive HIV was reduced 10-fold and resulted in synergistic reactivation of latent HIV. We conclude that Euphorbia Euphorbia kansui reactivates latent HIV and activates CD4+ T cells. When used in combination with a latency reversing agent, the effective dose of Euphorbia kansui is reduced; which suggests its application as a combination strategy to reactivate latent HIV while limiting the toxicity due to global T cell activation. As a natural product, which has been used in traditional medicine for thousands of years, Euphorbia kansui is attractive as a potential treatment strategy, particularly in resource poor countries with limited treatment options. Further clinical testing will be required to determine its safety with current anti-retroviral therapies.

  19. Euphorbia Kansui Reactivates Latent HIV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele C Cary

    Full Text Available While highly active anti-retroviral therapy has greatly improved the lives of HIV infected individuals, these treatments are unable to eradicate the virus. Current approaches to reactivate the virus have been limited by toxicity, lack of an orally available therapy, and limited responses in primary CD4+ T cells and in clinical trials. The PKC agonist ingenol, purified from Euphorbia plants, is a potent T cell activator and reactivates latent HIV. Euphorbia kansui itself has been used for centuries in traditional Chinese medicine to treat ascites, fluid retention, and cancer. We demonstrate that an extract of this plant, Euphorbia kansui, is capable of recapitulating T cell activation induced by the purified ingenol. Indeed, Euphorbia kansui induced expression of the early T cell activation marker CD69 and P-TEFb in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, Euphorbia kansui reactivated latent HIV in a CD4+ T cell model of latency and in HIV+ HAART suppressed PBMC. When combined with the other latency reversing agents, the effective dose of Euphorbia kansui required to reactive HIV was reduced 10-fold and resulted in synergistic reactivation of latent HIV. We conclude that Euphorbia Euphorbia kansui reactivates latent HIV and activates CD4+ T cells. When used in combination with a latency reversing agent, the effective dose of Euphorbia kansui is reduced; which suggests its application as a combination strategy to reactivate latent HIV while limiting the toxicity due to global T cell activation. As a natural product, which has been used in traditional medicine for thousands of years, Euphorbia kansui is attractive as a potential treatment strategy, particularly in resource poor countries with limited treatment options. Further clinical testing will be required to determine its safety with current anti-retroviral therapies.

  20. 16 CFR 1502.36 - Official transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the time the transcript becomes available to propose corrections in the transcript of oral testimony. Corrections are permitted only for transcription errors. The presiding officer shall promptly order justified... presiding officer will arrange for a verbatim stenographic transcript of oral testimony and for necessary...

  1. A comparison of herpes simplex virus type 1 and varicella-zoster virus latency and reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Peter G. E.; Rovnak, Joel; Badani, Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1; human herpesvirus 1) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV; human herpesvirus 3) are human neurotropic alphaherpesviruses that cause lifelong infections in ganglia. Following primary infection and establishment of latency, HSV-1 reactivation typically results in herpes labialis (cold sores), but can occur frequently elsewhere on the body at the site of primary infection (e.g. whitlow), particularly at the genitals. Rarely, HSV-1 reactivation can cause encephalitis; however, a third of the cases of HSV-1 encephalitis are associated with HSV-1 primary infection. Primary VZV infection causes varicella (chickenpox) following which latent virus may reactivate decades later to produce herpes zoster (shingles), as well as an increasingly recognized number of subacute, acute and chronic neurological conditions. Following primary infection, both viruses establish a latent infection in neuronal cells in human peripheral ganglia. However, the detailed mechanisms of viral latency and reactivation have yet to be unravelled. In both cases latent viral DNA exists in an ‘end-less’ state where the ends of the virus genome are joined to form structures consistent with unit length episomes and concatemers, from which viral gene transcription is restricted. In latently infected ganglia, the most abundantly detected HSV-1 RNAs are the spliced products originating from the primary latency associated transcript (LAT). This primary LAT is an 8.3 kb unstable transcript from which two stable (1.5 and 2.0 kb) introns are spliced. Transcripts mapping to 12 VZV genes have been detected in human ganglia removed at autopsy; however, it is difficult to ascribe these as transcripts present during latent infection as early-stage virus reactivation may have transpired in the post-mortem time period in the ganglia. Nonetheless, low-level transcription of VZV ORF63 has been repeatedly detected in multiple ganglia removed as close to death as possible. There is

  2. Contribution of cell culture, RNA extraction, and reverse transcription to the measurement error in quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction-based gene expression quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combes, Jean-Damien; Grelier, Gaël; Laversanne, Matthieu; Voirin, Nicolas; Chabaud, Sylvie; Ecochard, René; Lasset, Christine; Moyret-Lalle, Caroline

    2009-10-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) instruments are known to be reliable. However, many authors have underlined the poor reliability of the procedures that precede the measurement of gene expression--cell culture, RNA extraction, and reverse transcription. Here we quantified the measurement errors due to each step and estimated the correction that would accrue from replicating any of those steps. We measured the relative expression of the APC-11 gene (the catalytic anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome subunit suspected to be involved in breast cancer) with step replication in 18 breast cancer cell lines. The final qPCR step was found to be reproducible (standard deviation [SD]=0.26). In comparison with the between-cell-line variability (SD=1.7), the variability due to the previous steps (cell culture, RNA extraction, and reverse transcription) was on the same order of magnitude (SD=1.2-2.0). Misclassification rates were used to assess the impact of replicating each manual procedure. The misclassification rates improved with replication of cell culture, RNA extraction, and reverse transcription (90.0, 60.9, and 61.1% decreases, respectively). The results point out a high error level in the quantification of gene expression, and these errors may stem from all steps of the procedure. The best correction would accrue from replicating cell culture.

  3. A guide to integrating transcriptional regulatory and metabolic networks using PROM (probabilistic regulation of metabolism).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonidis, Evangelos; Chandrasekaran, Sriram; Price, Nathan D

    2013-01-01

    The integration of transcriptional regulatory and metabolic networks is a crucial step in the process of predicting metabolic behaviors that emerge from either genetic or environmental changes. Here, we present a guide to PROM (probabilistic regulation of metabolism), an automated method for the construction and simulation of integrated metabolic and transcriptional regulatory networks that enables large-scale phenotypic predictions for a wide range of model organisms.

  4. Transcription of potato spindle tuber viroid by RNA polymerase II starts predominantly at two specific sites

    OpenAIRE

    Fels, Andreas; Hu, Kanghong; Riesner, Detlev

    2001-01-01

    Pospiviroidae, with their main representative potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd), are replicated via a rolling circle mechanism by the host-encoded DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II (pol II). In the first step, the (+)-strand circular viroid is transcribed into a (–)-strand oligomer intermediate. As yet it is not known whether transcription is initiated by promotors at specific start sites or is distributed non-specifically over the whole circle. An in vitro transcription extract was prepared ...

  5. A PCA3 gene-based transcriptional amplification system targeting primary prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Neveu, Bertrand; Jain, Pallavi; T?tu, Bernard; Wu, Lily; Fradet, Yves; Pouliot, Fr?d?ric

    2015-01-01

    Targeting specifically primary prostate cancer (PCa) cells for immune therapy, gene therapy or molecular imaging is of high importance. The PCA3 long non-coding RNA is a unique PCa biomarker and oncogene that has been widely studied. This gene has been mainly exploited as an accurate diagnostic urine biomarker for PCa detection. In this study, the PCA3 promoter was introduced into a new transcriptional amplification system named the 3-Step Transcriptional Amplification System (PCA3-3STA) and ...

  6. Determination of thermal reactivity coefficients for the first fuel loading of MO34

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lueley, J.; Vrban, B.; Farkas, G.; Hascik, J.; Hinca, R.; Petriska, M.; Slugen, V.

    2012-01-01

    The article introduces determination of thermal reactivity coefficients, especially summarized (isothermal) and moderator (density) reactivity coefficients between 200 grad C and 260 grad C with 2 grad C step, - in compliance with the assignment - for the first fuel loading into the RC of NP Mochovce units using 2 nd generation fuel during the start-up using calculation code MCNP5 1.60. (authors)

  7. Enhanced reactivity of dinuclear Copper(I) acetylides in dipolar cycloadditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlquist, Mårten Sten Gösta; Fokin, V.V.

    2007-01-01

    Dinuclear alkynyl copper(I) complexes exhibit superior reactivity toward organic azides compared to their monomeric analogues. DFT studies indicate that the second copper center facilitates the formation of the cupracycle in the rate-determining step and stabilizes the metallacycle intermediate...... itself. These findings support the experimentally determined rate law and shed light on the origin of high reactivity of the in situ generated copper acetylides....

  8. Transcriptional networks of TCP transcription factors in Arabidopsis development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danisman, S.D.

    2011-01-01

    Leaves are a plant’s main organs of photosynthesis and hence the development of this organ is under strict control. The different phases of leaf development are under the control of both endogenous and exogenous influences. In this work we were interested in a particular class of transcription

  9. Substation Reactive Power Regulation Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junfeng; Zhang, Chunwang; Ma, Daqing

    2018-01-01

    With the increasing requirements on the power supply quality and reliability of distribution network, voltage and reactive power regulation of substations has become one of the indispensable ways to ensure voltage quality and reactive power balance and to improve the economy and reliability of distribution network. Therefore, it is a general concern of the current power workers and operators that what kind of flexible and effective control method should be used to adjust the on-load tap-changer (OLTC) transformer and shunt compensation capacitor in a substation to achieve reactive power balance in situ, improve voltage pass rate, increase power factor and reduce active power loss. In this paper, based on the traditional nine-zone diagram and combining with the characteristics of substation, a fuzzy variable-center nine-zone diagram control method is proposed and used to make a comprehensive regulation of substation voltage and reactive power. Through the calculation and simulation of the example, this method is proved to have satisfactorily reconciled the contradiction between reactive power and voltage in real-time control and achieved the basic goal of real-time control of the substation, providing a reference value to the practical application of the substation real-time control method.

  10. Bortezomib Induced Hepatitis B Reactivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salwa Hussain

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It has recently been reported that hepatitis B (HBV reactivation often occurs after the use of rituximab and stem cell transplantation in patients with lymphoma who are hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg negative. However, clinical data on HBV reactivation in multiple myeloma (MM is limited to only a few reported cases. Bortezomib and lenalidomide have remarkable activity in MM with manageable toxicity profiles, but reactivation of viral infections may emerge as a problem. We present a case of MM that developed HBV reactivation after bortezomib and lenalidomide therapy. Case Report. A 73-year-old female with a history of marginal cell lymphoma was monitored without requiring therapy. In 2009, she developed MM, presenting as a plasmacytoma requiring vertebral decompression and focal radiation. While receiving radiation she developed renal failure and was started on bortezomib and liposomal doxorubicin. After a transient response to 5 cycles, treatment was switched to lenalidomide. Preceding therapy initiation, her serology indicated resolved infection. Serial monitoring for HBV displayed seroconversion one month after change in therapy. Conclusion. Bortezomib associated late HBV reactivation appears to be a unique event that requires further confirmation and brings to discussion whether hepatitis B core positive individuals would benefit from monitoring of HBV activation while on therapy.

  11. Biodecolorization and biodegradation of Reactive Blue by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-06-18

    Jun 18, 2007 ... Aspergillus sp. effectively decolorized Reactive Blue and other structurally different synthetic dyes. Agitation was found to be an important ... Few chemically different dyes such as Reactive Black (75%), Reactive Yellow (70%),. Reactive Red (33%) and ..... Degradation of azo dyes by the lignin degrading ...

  12. Chromatin and Transcription in Yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rando, Oliver J.; Winston, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms by which chromatin structure controls eukaryotic transcription has been an intense area of investigation for the past 25 years. Many of the key discoveries that created the foundation for this field came from studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, including the discovery of the role of chromatin in transcriptional silencing, as well as the discovery of chromatin-remodeling factors and histone modification activities. Since that time, studies in yeast have continued to contribute in leading ways. This review article summarizes the large body of yeast studies in this field. PMID:22345607

  13. Ultraviolet irradiation of herpes simplex virus (type 1): delayed transcription and comparative sensitivities of virus functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eglin, R.P.; Gugerli, P.; Wildy, P.

    1980-01-01

    The delay in the replication of herpes simplex virus surviving u.v. irradiation occurs after the uncoating of virus, as judged by sensitivity to DNase. It occurs before translation, judged by the kinetics of appearance of various virus-specific proteins, and before transcription, judged by the detection of virus-specific RNA by in situ hybridization. Since the delays in both transcription and translation are reversed by photoreactivation, the simplest hypothesis is that pyrimidine dimers directly obstruct transcription; unless these are broken by photoreactivating enzymes, there will be transcriptional delay until reactivating processes have repaired the lesion. The u.v. sensitivities of the abilities to induce various enzymes (thymidine kinase, DNase and DNA polymerase) were only about four times less than that of infectivity. The ability to induce the three enzymes was three times less sensitive than that of the structural antigen (Band II). (U.K.)

  14. Senescence, Stress, and Reactive Oxygen Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Jajic

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS is one of the earliest responses of plant cells to various biotic and abiotic stresses. ROS are capable of inducing cellular damage by oxidation of proteins, inactivation of enzymes, alterations in the gene expression, and decomposition of biomembranes. On the other hand, they also have a signaling role and changes in production of ROS can act as signals that change the transcription of genes that favor the acclimation of plants to abiotic stresses. Among the ROS, it is believed that H2O2 causes the largest changes in the levels of gene expression in plants. A wide range of plant responses has been found to be triggered by H2O2 such as acclimation to drought, photooxidative stress, and induction of senescence. Our knowledge on signaling roles of singlet oxygen (1O2 has been limited by its short lifetime, but recent experiments with a flu mutant demonstrated that singlet oxygen does not act primarily as a toxin but rather as a signal that activates several stress-response pathways. In this review we summarize the latest progress on the signaling roles of ROS during senescence and abiotic stresses and we give a short overview of the methods that can be used for their assessment.

  15. Senescence, Stress, and Reactive Oxygen Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jajic, Ivan; Sarna, Tadeusz; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the earliest responses of plant cells to various biotic and abiotic stresses. ROS are capable of inducing cellular damage by oxidation of proteins, inactivation of enzymes, alterations in the gene expression, and decomposition of biomembranes. On the other hand, they also have a signaling role and changes in production of ROS can act as signals that change the transcription of genes that favor the acclimation of plants to abiotic stresses. Among the ROS, it is believed that H2O2 causes the largest changes in the levels of gene expression in plants. A wide range of plant responses has been found to be triggered by H2O2 such as acclimation to drought, photooxidative stress, and induction of senescence. Our knowledge on signaling roles of singlet oxygen (1O2) has been limited by its short lifetime, but recent experiments with a flu mutant demonstrated that singlet oxygen does not act primarily as a toxin but rather as a signal that activates several stress-response pathways. In this review we summarize the latest progress on the signaling roles of ROS during senescence and abiotic stresses and we give a short overview of the methods that can be used for their assessment. PMID:27135335

  16. eRNAs promote transcription by establishing chromatin accessibility at defined genomic loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mousavi, Kambiz; Zare, Hossein; Dell'orso, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    Transcription factors and DNA regulatory binding motifs are fundamental components of the gene regulatory network. Here, by using genome-wide binding profiling, we show extensive occupancy of transcription factors of myogenesis (MyoD and Myogenin) at extragenic enhancer regions coinciding with RNA...... synthesis (i.e., eRNA). In particular, multiple regions were transcribed to eRNA within the regulatory region of MYOD1, including previously characterized distal regulatory regions (DRR) and core enhancer (CE). While (CE)RNA enhanced RNA polymerase II (Pol II) occupancy and transcription at MYOD1, (DRR)RNA...... acted to activate the downstream myogenic genes. The deployment of transcriptional machinery to appropriate loci is contingent on chromatin accessibility, a rate-limiting step preceding Pol II assembly. By nuclease sensitivity assay, we found that eRNAs regulate genomic access of the transcriptional...

  17. Blogging business step-by-step startup guide

    CERN Document Server

    magazine, Entrepreneur

    2014-01-01

    This kit includes: Essential industry and business-specific startup steps with worksheets, calculators, checklists and more. Entrepreneur Editors' Start Your Own Business, a guide to starting any business and surviving the first three years. Downloadable, customizable business letters, sales letters, and other sample documents. Entrepreneur's Small Business Legal Toolkit. Blogs are still one of the internet's fastest-growing phenomena–and one of the best and easiest ways to make money online. Packed with the latest blog tools, tricks, and up-and-coming trends, this fully revised edition teache

  18. Reverse transcriptase-coupled quantitative real time PCR analysis of cell-free transcription on the chromatin-assembled p21 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Hyeon; Magan, Natisha

    2011-01-01

    Cell-free eukaryotic transcription assays have contributed tremendously to the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms that govern transcription at eukaryotic promoters. Currently, the conventional G-less cassette transcription assay is one of the simplest and fastest methods for measuring transcription in vitro. This method requires several components, including the radioisotope labelling of RNA product during the transcription reaction followed by visualization of transcripts using autoradiography. To further simplify and expedite the conventional G-less cassette transcription assay, we have developed a method to incorporate a reverse transcriptase-coupled quantitative real time PCR (RT-qPCR). By using DNA template depletion steps that include DNA template immobilization, Trizol extraction and DNase I treatment, we have successfully enriched p21 promoter-driven transcripts over DNA templates. The quantification results of RNA transcripts using the RT-qPCR assay were comparable to the results of the conventional G-less cassette transcription assay both in naked DNA and chromatin-assembled templates. We first report a proof-of-concept demonstration that incorporating RT-qPCR in cell-free transcription assays can be a simpler and faster alternative method to the conventional radioisotope-mediated transcription assays. This method will be useful for developing high throughput in vitro transcription assays and provide quantitative data for RNA transcripts generated in a defined cell-free transcription reaction.

  19. ChIP-Seq Data Analysis to Define Transcriptional Regulatory Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavesi, Giulio

    The first step in the definition of transcriptional regulatory networks is to establish correct relationships between transcription factors (TFs) and their target genes, together with the effect of their regulatory activity (activator or repressor). Fundamental advances in this direction have been made possible by the introduction of experimental techniques such as Chromatin Immunoprecipitation, which, coupled with next-generation sequencing technologies (ChIP-Seq), permit the genome-wide identification of TF binding sites. This chapter provides a survey on how data of this kind are to be processed and integrated with expression and other types of data to infer transcriptional regulatory rules and codes.

  20. Real-Time Reactive Power Distribution in Microgrids by Dynamic Programing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levron, Yoash; Beck, Yuval; Katzir, Liran

    2017-01-01

    In this paper a new real-time optimization method for reactive power distribution in microgrids is proposed. The method enables location of a globally optimal distribution of reactive power under normal operating conditions. The method exploits the typical compact structure of microgrids to obtain...... as radial ones. The optimization problem is formulated with the cluster reactive powers as free variables, and the solution space is spanned by the cluster reactive power outputs. The optimal solution is then constructed by efficiently scanning the entire solution space, by scanning every possible...... combination of reactive powers, by means of dynamic programming. Since every single step involves a one-dimensional problem, the complexity of the solution is only linear with the number of clusters, and as a result, a globally optimal solution may be obtained in real time. The paper includes the results...

  1. Reactivation of latent HIV-1 by new semi-synthetic ingenol esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandeló José, Diego; Bartholomeeusen, Koen; da Cunha, Rodrigo Delvecchio; Abreu, Celina Monteiro; Glinski, Jan; da Costa, Thais Barbizan Ferreira; Bacchi Rabay, Ana Flávia Mello; Pianowski Filho, Luiz Francisco; Dudycz, Lech W; Ranga, Udaykumar; Peterlin, Boris Matija; Pianowski, Luiz Francisco; Tanuri, Amilcar; Aguiar, Renato Santana

    2014-08-01

    The ability of HIV to establish long-lived latent infection is mainly due to transcriptional silencing of viral genome in resting memory T lymphocytes. Here, we show that new semi-synthetic ingenol esters reactivate latent HIV reservoirs. Amongst the tested compounds, 3-caproyl-ingenol (ING B) was more potent in reactivating latent HIV than known activators such as SAHA, ingenol 3,20-dibenzoate, TNF-α, PMA and HMBA. ING B activated PKC isoforms followed by NF-κB nuclear translocation. As virus reactivation is dependent on intact NF-κB binding sites in the LTR promoter region ING B, we have shown that. ING B was able to reactivate virus transcription in primary HIV-infected resting cells up to 12 fold and up to 25 fold in combination with SAHA. Additionally, ING B promoted up-regulation of P-TEFb subunits CDK9/Cyclin T1. The role of ING B on promoting both transcription initiation and elongation makes this compound a strong candidate for an anti-HIV latency drug combined with suppressive HAART. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Treatment of dyeing wastewater including reactive dyes (Reactive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fungal growth was not observed at pH 2. Maximum fungal decolourisation ocurred at pH 3 for anionic reactive dyes (RR, RBB, RB) and pH 6 for cationic MB dye. The fungal dye bioremoval was associated with the surface charge of the fungus due to electrostatic interactions. Growing R. arrhizus strain decolourised 100% of ...

  3. Memory reactivation improves visual perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amar-Halpert, Rotem; Laor-Maayany, Rony; Nemni, Shlomi; Rosenblatt, Jonathan D; Censor, Nitzan

    2017-10-01

    Human perception thresholds can improve through learning. Here we report findings challenging the fundamental 'practice makes perfect' basis of procedural learning theory, showing that brief reactivations of encoded visual memories are sufficient to improve perceptual discrimination thresholds. Learning was comparable to standard practice-induced learning and was not due to short training per se, nor to an epiphenomenon of primed retrieval enhancement. The results demonstrate that basic perceptual functions can be substantially improved by memory reactivation, supporting a new account of perceptual learning dynamics.

  4. The complex STATes of astrocyte reactivity: How are they controlled by the JAK-STAT3 pathway?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyzériat, Kelly; Abjean, Laurene; Carrillo-de Sauvage, María-Angeles; Ben Haim, Lucile; Escartin, Carole

    2016-08-25

    Astrocytes play multiple important roles in brain physiology. In pathological conditions, they become reactive, which is characterized by morphological changes and upregulation of intermediate filament proteins. Besides these descriptive hallmarks, astrocyte reactivity involves significant transcriptional and functional changes that are far from being fully understood. Most importantly, astrocyte reactivity seems to encompass multiple states, each having a specific influence on surrounding cells and disease progression. These diverse functional states of reactivity must be regulated by subtle signaling networks. Many signaling cascades have been associated with astrocyte reactivity, but among them, the JAK-STAT3 pathway is emerging as a central regulator. In this review, we aim (i) to show that the JAK-STAT3 pathway plays a key role in the control of astrocyte reactivity, (ii) to illustrate that STAT3 is a pleiotropic molecule operating multiple functions in reactive astrocytes, and (iii) to suggest that each specific functional state of reactivity is governed by complex molecular interactions within astrocytes, which converge on STAT3. More research is needed to precisely identify the signaling networks controlling the diverse states of astrocyte reactivity. Only then, we will be able to precisely delineate the therapeutic potential of reactive astrocytes in each neurological disease context. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Acta Clinica Croatica: progress of a journal step by step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramljak, Gordana

    2014-03-01

    The journal Acta Clinica Croatica (ACC) was founded in 1962 under the title Anali Bolnice Dr. M. Stojanović. In 1995, the title of the journal was changed into its present form and ever since all papers have been published in English. In 2000, the electronic (online) edition of the ACC was released in addition to the print version. The paper presents development of the journal from 1962 to 2012 based on the analysis of the following SCOPUS citation index parameters: type and number of documents published in the journal; number of citations; and number of domestic and foreign authors. The studied period was analyzed in three time segments: the period from 1995 to 1999, the period from 2000 to 2006 and the period from 2007 to 2012. The same parameters were analyzed in the Web of Science/SCI-Expanded bibliographic and citation index for the 2007-2012 period. The increasing number of documents, authors (both domestic and foreign) and citations demonstrates gradual rise in the quality, visibility and impact of the journal. The fifty years of experience show that a goal, at first very distant and almost unachievable, may be reached by progressing step by step.

  6. Structural insights into transcription complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berger, I.; Blanco, A.G.; Boelens, R.; Cavarelli, J.; Coll, M.; Folkers, G.E.; Nie, Y.; Pogenberg, V.; Schultz, P.; Wilmanns, M.; Moras, D.; Poterszman, A.

    2011-01-01

    Control of transcription allows the regulation of cell activity in response to external stimuli and research in the field has greatly benefited from efforts in structural biology. In this review, based on specific examples from the European SPINE2-COMPLEXES initiative, we illustrate the impact of

  7. The post-transcriptional operon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tenenbaum, Scott A.; Christiansen, Jan; Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    model (PTO) is used to describe data from an assortment of methods (e.g. RIP-Chip, CLIP-Chip, miRNA profiling, ribosome profiling) that globally address the functionality of mRNA. Several examples of post-transcriptional operons have been documented in the literature and demonstrate the usefulness...

  8. NAC transcription factors in senescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Podzimska-Sroka, Dagmara; O'Shea, Charlotte; Gregersen, Per L.

    2015-01-01

    Within the last decade, NAC transcription factors have been shown to play essential roles in senescence, which is the focus of this review. Transcriptome analyses associate approximately one third of Arabidopsis NAC genes and many crop NAC genes with senescence, thereby implicating NAC genes as i...

  9. Transcription factor-based biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Jeffrey A; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-10-08

    The present invention provides for a system comprising a BmoR transcription factor, a .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase, and a pBMO promoter operatively linked to a reporter gene, wherein the pBMO promoter is capable of expression of the reporter gene with an activated form of the BmoR and the .sigma..sup.54-RNA polymerase.

  10. HDG1 transcription factor targets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horstman, A.; Boutilier, K.A.; Sanchez Perez, Gabino

    2015-01-01

    The AIL transcription factor BABY BOOM (BBM) is required together with the related PLETHORA proteins for embryo and root meristem development and its expression is sufficient to confer pluripotency and totipotency to somatic tissues. We show that BBM and other AIL proteins interact with multiple

  11. NEUROD1 Instructs Neuronal Conversion in Non-Reactive Astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brulet, Rebecca; Matsuda, Taito; Zhang, Ling; Miranda, Carlos; Giacca, Mauro; Kaspar, Brian K; Nakashima, Kinichi; Hsieh, Jenny

    2017-06-06

    Currently, all methods for converting non-neuronal cells into neurons involve injury to the brain; however, whether neuronal transdifferentiation can occur long after the period of insult remains largely unknown. Here, we use the transcription factor NEUROD1, previously shown to convert reactive glial cells to neurons in the cortex, to determine whether astrocyte-to-neuron transdifferentiation can occur under physiological conditions. We utilized adeno-associated virus 9 (AAV9), which crosses the blood-brain barrier without injury, to deliver NEUROD1 to astrocytes through an intravascular route. Interestingly, we found that a small, but significant number of non-reactive astrocytes converted to neurons in the striatum, but not the cortex. Moreover, astrocytes cultured to minimize their proliferative potential also exhibited limited neuronal transdifferentiation with NEUROD1 expression. Our results show that a single transcription factor can induce astrocyte-to-neuron conversion under physiological conditions, potentially facilitating future clinical approaches long after the acute injury phase. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Rapid detection of duck hepatitis A virus genotype C using reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuanfeng; Chen, Zongyan; Meng, Chunchun; Liu, Guangqing

    2014-02-01

    A one-step reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay was used and optimized to develop a rapid and sensitive detection system for duck hepatitis A virus genotype C (DHAV-C) RNA. A set of four specific primers was designed against highly conserved sequences located within the 3D gene from DHAV (strain GX1201). Under optimal reaction conditions, the sensitivity of DHAV-C-specific RT-LAMP was 100-fold higher than that of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), with a detection limit of 0.3pg (6.59×10(4) copies) per reaction. No cross-reactivity was observed from the samples of other duck viruses, which is in good accordance with RT-PCR. Furthermore, a positive reaction can be visually inspected by observing turbidity or color change after the addition of SYBR green I dye. The DHAV-C-specific RT-LAMP assay was applied to the samples and compared with RT-PCR. The positive-sample ratios were 26.7% (12 of 45) by RT-LAMP and 20% (9 of 45) by RT-PCR. Therefore, the newly developed RT-LAMP assay is a rapid, specific, sensitive, and cost-effective method of DHAV-C detection. This assay has potential applications in both clinical diagnosis and field surveillance of DHAV-C infection. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. 5-Azacytidine mediated reactivation of silenced transgenes in potato (Solanum tuberosum) at the whole plant level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyč, Dimitrij; Nocarová, Eva; Sikorová, Lenka; Fischer, Lukáš

    2017-08-01

    Transient 5-azacytidine treatment of leaf explants from potato plants with transcriptionally silenced transgenes allows de novo regeneration of plants with restored transgene expression at the whole plant level. Transgenes introduced into plant genomes frequently become silenced either at the transcriptional or the posttranscriptional level. Transcriptional silencing is usually associated with DNA methylation in the promoter region. Treatments with inhibitors of maintenance DNA methylation were previously shown to allow reactivation of transcriptionally silenced transgenes in single cells or tissues, but not at the whole plant level. Here we analyzed the effect of DNA methylation inhibitor 5-azacytidine (AzaC) on the expression of two silenced reporter genes encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) and neomycin phosphotransferase (NPTII) in potato plants. Whereas no obvious reactivation was observed in AzaC-treated stem cuttings, transient treatment of leaf segments with 10 μM AzaC and subsequent de novo regeneration of shoots on the selective medium with kanamycin resulted in the production of whole plants with clearly reactivated expression of previously silenced transgenes. Reactivation of nptII expression was accompanied by a decrease in cytosine methylation in the promoter region of the gene. Using the plants with reactivated GFP expression, we found that re-silencing of this transgene can be accidentally triggered by de novo regeneration. Thus, testing the incidence of transgene silencing during de novo regeneration could be a suitable procedure for negative selection of transgenic lines (insertion events) which have an inclination to be silenced. Based on our analysis of non-specific inhibitory effects of AzaC on growth of potato shoots in vitro, we estimated that AzaC half-life in the culture media is approximately 2 days.

  14. A conserved role for human Nup98 in altering chromatin structure and promoting epigenetic transcriptional memory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William H Light

    Full Text Available The interaction of nuclear pore proteins (Nups with active genes can promote their transcription. In yeast, some inducible genes interact with the nuclear pore complex both when active and for several generations after being repressed, a phenomenon called epigenetic transcriptional memory. This interaction promotes future reactivation and requires Nup100, a homologue of human Nup98. A similar phenomenon occurs in human cells; for at least four generations after treatment with interferon gamma (IFN-γ, many IFN-γ-inducible genes are induced more rapidly and more strongly than in cells that have not previously been exposed to IFN-γ. In both yeast and human cells, the recently expressed promoters of genes with memory exhibit persistent dimethylation of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4me2 and physically interact with Nups and a poised form of RNA polymerase II. However, in human cells, unlike yeast, these interactions occur in the nucleoplasm. In human cells transiently depleted of Nup98 or yeast cells lacking Nup100, transcriptional memory is lost; RNA polymerase II does not remain associated with promoters, H3K4me2 is lost, and the rate of transcriptional reactivation is reduced. These results suggest that Nup100/Nup98 binding to recently expressed promoters plays a conserved role in promoting epigenetic transcriptional memory.

  15. A conserved role for human Nup98 in altering chromatin structure and promoting epigenetic transcriptional memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, William H; Freaney, Jonathan; Sood, Varun; Thompson, Abbey; D'Urso, Agustina; Horvath, Curt M; Brickner, Jason H

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of nuclear pore proteins (Nups) with active genes can promote their transcription. In yeast, some inducible genes interact with the nuclear pore complex both when active and for several generations after being repressed, a phenomenon called epigenetic transcriptional memory. This interaction promotes future reactivation and requires Nup100, a homologue of human Nup98. A similar phenomenon occurs in human cells; for at least four generations after treatment with interferon gamma (IFN-γ), many IFN-γ-inducible genes are induced more rapidly and more strongly than in cells that have not previously been exposed to IFN-γ. In both yeast and human cells, the recently expressed promoters of genes with memory exhibit persistent dimethylation of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4me2) and physically interact with Nups and a poised form of RNA polymerase II. However, in human cells, unlike yeast, these interactions occur in the nucleoplasm. In human cells transiently depleted of Nup98 or yeast cells lacking Nup100, transcriptional memory is lost; RNA polymerase II does not remain associated with promoters, H3K4me2 is lost, and the rate of transcriptional reactivation is reduced. These results suggest that Nup100/Nup98 binding to recently expressed promoters plays a conserved role in promoting epigenetic transcriptional memory.

  16. DYRK1A Controls HIV-1 Replication at a Transcriptional Level in an NFAT Dependent Manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thijs Booiman

    Full Text Available Transcription of the HIV-1 provirus is regulated by both viral and host proteins and is very important in the context of viral latency. In latently infected cells, viral gene expression is inhibited as a result of the sequestration of host transcription factors and epigenetic modifications.In our present study we analyzed the effect of host factor dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A on HIV-1 replication. We show that DYRK1A controls HIV-1 replication by regulating provirus transcription. Downregulation or inhibition of DYRK1A increased LTR-driven transcription and viral replication in cell lines and primary PBMC. Furthermore, inhibition of DYRK1A resulted in reactivation of latent HIV-1 provirus to a similar extent as two commonly used broad-spectrum HDAC inhibitors. We observed that DYRK1A regulates HIV-1 transcription via the Nuclear Factor of Activated T-cells (NFAT by promoting its translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Therefore, inhibition of DYRK1A results in increased nuclear levels of NFAT and increased NFAT binding to the viral LTR and thus increasing viral transcription.Our data indicate that host factor DYRK1A plays a role in the regulation of viral transcription and latency. Therefore, DYRK1A might be an attractive candidate for therapeutic strategies targeting the viral reservoir.

  17. Water and salinity stress in grapevines: early and late changes in transcript and metabolite profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Grant R; Ergül, Ali; Grimplet, Jerome; Tillett, Richard L; Tattersall, Elizabeth A R; Bohlman, Marlene C; Vincent, Delphine; Sonderegger, Justin; Evans, Jason; Osborne, Craig; Quilici, David; Schlauch, Karen A; Schooley, David A; Cushman, John C

    2007-04-01

    Grapes are grown in semiarid environments, where drought and salinity are common problems. Microarray transcript profiling, quantitative reverse transcription-PCR, and metabolite profiling were used to define genes and metabolic pathways in Vitis vinifera cv. Cabernet Sauvignon with shared and divergent responses to a gradually applied and long-term (16 days) water-deficit stress and equivalent salinity stress. In this first-of-a-kind study, distinct differences between water deficit and salinity were revealed. Water deficit caused more rapid and greater inhibition of shoot growth than did salinity at equivalent stem water potentials. One of the earliest responses to water deficit was an increase in the transcript abundance of RuBisCo activase (day 4), but this increase occurred much later in salt-stressed plants (day 12). As water deficit progressed, a greater number of affected transcripts were involved in metabolism, transport, and the biogenesis of cellular components than did salinity. Salinity affected a higher percentage of transcripts involved in transcription, protein synthesis, and protein fate than did water deficit. Metabolite profiling revealed that there were higher concentrations of glucose, malate, and proline in water-deficit-treated plants as compared to salinized plants. The metabolite differences were linked to differences in transcript abundance of many genes involved in energy metabolism and nitrogen assimilation, particularly photosynthesis, gluconeogenesis, and photorespiration. Water-deficit-treated plants appear to have a higher demand than salinized plants to adjust osmotically, detoxify free radicals (reactive oxygen species), and cope with photoinhibition.

  18. The Tat Inhibitor Didehydro-Cortistatin A Prevents HIV-1 Reactivation from Latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousseau, Guillaume; Kessing, Cari F; Fromentin, Rémi; Trautmann, Lydie; Chomont, Nicolas; Valente, Susana T

    2015-07-07

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) inhibits HIV-1 replication, but the virus persists in latently infected resting memory CD4(+) T cells susceptible to viral reactivation. The virus-encoded early gene product Tat activates transcription of the viral genome and promotes exponential viral production. Here we show that the Tat inhibitor didehydro-cortistatin A (dCA), unlike other antiretrovirals, reduces residual levels of viral transcription in several models of HIV latency, breaks the Tat-mediated transcriptional feedback loop, and establishes a nearly permanent state of latency, which greatly diminishes the capacity for virus reactivation. Importantly, treatment with dCA induces inactivation of viral transcription even after its removal, suggesting that the HIV promoter is epigenetically repressed. Critically, dCA inhibits viral reactivation upon CD3/CD28 or prostratin stimulation of latently infected CD4(+) T cells from HIV-infected subjects receiving suppressive ART. Our results suggest that inclusion of a Tat inhibitor in current ART regimens may contribute to a functional HIV-1 cure by reducing low-level viremia and preventing viral reactivation from latent reservoirs. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces HIV-1 replication to very low levels, but the virus persists in latently infected memory CD4(+) T cells, representing a long-lasting source of resurgent virus upon ART interruption. Based on the mode of action of didehydro-cortistatin A (dCA), a Tat-dependent transcription inhibitor, our work highlights an alternative approach to current HIV-1 eradication strategies to decrease the latent reservoir. In our model, dCA blocks the Tat feedback loop initiated after low-level basal reactivation, blocking transcriptional elongation and hence viral production from latently infected cells. Therefore, dCA combined with ART would be aimed at delaying or halting ongoing viral replication, reactivation, and replenishment of the latent viral reservoir. Thus, the latent pool of

  19. Steps in Researching the Music in Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole

    2007-01-01

    The chapter introduces a generic flowchart + step-by-step guide for microanalysis of music (compositions and improvisations) in music therapy.......The chapter introduces a generic flowchart + step-by-step guide for microanalysis of music (compositions and improvisations) in music therapy....

  20. Hydraulic Design of Stepped Spillways Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepped chutes and spillways are commonly used for routing discharges during flood events. In addition, stepped chutes are used for overtopping protection of earthen embankments. Stepped spillways provide significant energy dissipation due to its stepped feature; as a result, the stilling basin as...

  1. Three-Step priming in lexical decision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chwilla, D.J.; Kolk, H.H.J.

    2002-01-01

    In two experiments, we investigated mediated two-step priming (e.g., from lion to stripes via tiger) and three-step priming (e.g., from mane to stripes via lion and tiger). Experiment 1 showed robust two-step priming in the double lexical decision task. In Experiment 2, we tested for three-step

  2. Treating water-reactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lussiez, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Some compounds and elements, such as lithium hydride, magnesium, sodium, and calcium react violently with water to generate much heat and produce hydrogen. The hydrogen can ignite or even form an explosive mixture with air. Other metals may react rapidly only if they are finely divided. Some of the waste produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory includes these metals that are contaminated with radioactivity. By far the greatest volume of water-reactive waste is lithium hydride contaminated with depleted uranium. Reactivity of the water-reactive wastes is neutralized with an atmosphere of humid nitrogen, which prevents the formation of an explosive mixture of hydrogen and air. When we adjust the temperature of the nitrogen and the humidifier, the nitrogen can be more or less humid, and the rate of reaction can be adjusted and controlled. Los Alamos has investigated the rates of reaction of lithium hydride as a function of the temperature and humidity, and, as anticipated, they in with in temperature and humidity. Los Alamos will investigate other variables. For example, the nitrogen flow will be optimized to conserve nitrogen and yet keep the reaction rates high. Reaction rates will be determined for various forms of lithium waste, from small chips to powder. Bench work will lead to the design of a skid-mounted process for treating wastes. Other water-reactive wastes will also be investigated

  3. PREPARATION AND REACTIVITY STUDIES OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    Each of the reactive groups might form cross- linking networks under thermal curing reaction with curing agents to bring about high cross- linking density. So, it was considered worthwhile to study the synthesis, characterization and curing reaction of the maleimidophenyl glycidylether epoxy compounds with different amines.

  4. Hydroxyl radical reactivity with diethylhydroxylamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorse, R.A. Jr.; Lii, R.R.; Saunders, B.B.

    1977-01-01

    Diethylhydroxylamine (DEHA) reacts with gas-phase hydroxyl radicals on every third collision, whereas the corresponding reaction in aqueous solution is considerably slower. The high gas-phase reactivity explains the predicted inhibitory effect of DEHA in atmospheric smog processes. Results from the studies in the aqueous phase are helpful in predicting the mechanism of the reaction of DEHA with hydroxyl radicals

  5. Separability of local reactivity descriptors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    which are ratios of electrophilic to nucleophilic FF and vice-versa respectively, have been identified as more reliable criteria for intra-molecular reactivity.16. More recently, Parr and co-workers have defined a new concept of global philicity21 from which Chatta- raj and co-workers have defined local philicity indices,22 which ...

  6. Adaptation of Candida albicans to Reactive Sulfur Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebaro, Yasmin; Lorenz, Michael; Fa, Alice; Zheng, Rui; Gustin, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen that is highly resistant to different oxidative stresses. How reactive sulfur species (RSS) such as sulfite regulate gene expression and the role of the transcription factor Zcf2 and the sulfite exporter Ssu1 in such responses are not known. Here, we show that C. albicans specifically adapts to sulfite stress and that Zcf2 is required for that response as well as induction of genes predicted to remove sulfite from cells and to increase the intracellular amount of a subset of nitrogen metabolites. Analysis of mutants in the sulfate assimilation pathway show that sulfite conversion to sulfide accounts for part of sulfite toxicity and that Zcf2-dependent expression of the SSU1 sulfite exporter is induced by both sulfite and sulfide. Mutations in the SSU1 promoter that selectively inhibit induction by the reactive nitrogen species (RNS) nitrite, a previously reported activator of SSU1 , support a model for C. albicans in which Cta4-dependent RNS induction and Zcf2-dependent RSS induction are mediated by parallel pathways, different from S. cerevisiae in which the transcription factor Fzf1 mediates responses to both RNS and RSS. Lastly, we found that endogenous sulfite production leads to an increase in resistance to exogenously added sulfite. These results demonstrate that C. albicans has a unique response to sulfite that differs from the general oxidative stress response, and that adaptation to internal and external sulfite is largely mediated by one transcription factor and one effector gene. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  7. Transcription recovery after DNA damage requires chromatin priming by the H3.3 histone chaperone HIRA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Salomé; Polo, Sophie E; Almouzni, Geneviève

    2013-09-26

    Understanding how to recover fully functional and transcriptionally active chromatin when its integrity has been challenged by genotoxic stress is a critical issue. Here, by investigating how chromatin dynamics regulate transcriptional activity in response to DNA damage in human cells, we identify a pathway involving the histone chaperone histone regulator A (HIRA) to promote transcription restart after UVC damage. Our mechanistic studies reveal that HIRA accumulates at sites of UVC irradiation upon detection of DNA damage prior to repair and deposits newly synthesized H3.3 histones. This local action of HIRA depends on ubiquitylation events associated with damage recognition. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the early and transient function of HIRA in response to DNA damage primes chromatin for later reactivation of transcription. We propose that HIRA-dependent histone deposition serves as a chromatin bookmarking system to facilitate transcription recovery after genotoxic stress. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of the interface in high tenacity viscose / polyamide-6 composites prepared using reactive injection

    OpenAIRE

    Revol , Baptiste Paul

    2017-01-01

    Polyamide-6 / glass fibers composites were studied in order to replace glass fibers with high tenacity viscose as a reinforcement, using a reactive injection process. The first step was the physico-chemical characterization of fibers and matrix using different techniques such as: DSC, TGA, mechanical testing, FTIR, NMR and contact angle measurements. In order to improve the interface between high tenacity viscose and polyamide-6, the viscose fibers were functionalized using a two step method....

  9. Release of proteins from intact chloroplasts induced by reactive oxygen species during biotic and abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Kwang-Chul; Verma, Dheeraj; Jin, Shuangxia; Singh, Nameirakpam D; Daniell, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Plastids sustain life on this planet by providing food, feed, essential biomolecules and oxygen. Such diverse metabolic and biosynthetic functions require efficient communication between plastids and the nucleus. However, specific factors, especially large molecules, released from plastids that regulate nuclear genes have not yet been fully elucidated. When tobacco and lettuce transplastomic plants expressing GFP within chloroplasts, were challenged with Erwinia carotovora (biotic stress) or paraquat (abiotic stress), GFP was released into the cytoplasm. During this process GFP moves gradually towards the envelope, creating a central red zone of chlorophyll fluorescence. GFP was then gradually released from intact chloroplasts into the cytoplasm with an intact vacuole and no other visible cellular damage. Different stages of GFP release were observed inside the same cell with a few chloroplasts completely releasing GFP with detection of only red chlorophyll fluorescence or with no reduction in GFP fluorescence or transitional steps between these two phases. Time lapse imaging by confocal microscopy clearly identified sequence of these events. Intactness of chloroplasts during this process was evident from chlorophyll fluorescence emanated from thylakoid membranes and in vivo Chla fluorescence measurements (maximum quantum yield of photosystem II) made before or after infection with pathogens to evaluate their photosynthetic competence. Hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion serve as signal molecules for generation of reactive oxygen species and Tiron, scavenger of superoxide anion, blocked release of GFP from chloroplasts. Significant increase in ion leakage in the presence of paraquat and light suggests changes in the chloroplast envelope to facilitate protein release. Release of GFP-RC101 (an antimicrobial peptide), which was triggered by Erwinia infection, ceased after conferring protection, further confirming this export phenomenon. These results suggest a

  10. Release of proteins from intact chloroplasts induced by reactive oxygen species during biotic and abiotic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Chul Kwon

    Full Text Available Plastids sustain life on this planet by providing food, feed, essential biomolecules and oxygen. Such diverse metabolic and biosynthetic functions require efficient communication between plastids and the nucleus. However, specific factors, especially large molecules, released from plastids that regulate nuclear genes have not yet been fully elucidated. When tobacco and lettuce transplastomic plants expressing GFP within chloroplasts, were challenged with Erwinia carotovora (biotic stress or paraquat (abiotic stress, GFP was released into the cytoplasm. During this process GFP moves gradually towards the envelope, creating a central red zone of chlorophyll fluorescence. GFP was then gradually released from intact chloroplasts into the cytoplasm with an intact vacuole and no other visible cellular damage. Different stages of GFP release were observed inside the same cell with a few chloroplasts completely releasing GFP with detection of only red chlorophyll fluorescence or with no reduction in GFP fluorescence or transitional steps between these two phases. Time lapse imaging by confocal microscopy clearly identified sequence of these events. Intactness of chloroplasts during this process was evident from chlorophyll fluorescence emanated from thylakoid membranes and in vivo Chla fluorescence measurements (maximum quantum yield of photosystem II made before or after infection with pathogens to evaluate their photosynthetic competence. Hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion serve as signal molecules for generation of reactive oxygen species and Tiron, scavenger of superoxide anion, blocked release of GFP from chloroplasts. Significant increase in ion leakage in the presence of paraquat and light suggests changes in the chloroplast envelope to facilitate protein release. Release of GFP-RC101 (an antimicrobial peptide, which was triggered by Erwinia infection, ceased after conferring protection, further confirming this export phenomenon. These

  11. Release of Proteins from Intact Chloroplasts Induced by Reactive Oxygen Species during Biotic and Abiotic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nameirakpam D.; Daniell, Henry

    2013-01-01

    Plastids sustain life on this planet by providing food, feed, essential biomolecules and oxygen. Such diverse metabolic and biosynthetic functions require efficient communication between plastids and the nucleus. However, specific factors, especially large molecules, released from plastids that regulate nuclear genes have not yet been fully elucidated. When tobacco and lettuce transplastomic plants expressing GFP within chloroplasts, were challenged with Erwinia carotovora (biotic stress) or paraquat (abiotic stress), GFP was released into the cytoplasm. During this process GFP moves gradually towards the envelope, creating a central red zone of chlorophyll fluorescence. GFP was then gradually released from intact chloroplasts into the cytoplasm with an intact vacuole and no other visible cellular damage. Different stages of GFP release were observed inside the same cell with a few chloroplasts completely releasing GFP with detection of only red chlorophyll fluorescence or with no reduction in GFP fluorescence or transitional steps between these two phases. Time lapse imaging by confocal microscopy clearly identified sequence of these events. Intactness of chloroplasts during this process was evident from chlorophyll fluorescence emanated from thylakoid membranes and in vivo Chla fluorescence measurements (maximum quantum yield of photosystem II) made before or after infection with pathogens to evaluate their photosynthetic competence. Hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion serve as signal molecules for generation of reactive oxygen species and Tiron, scavenger of superoxide anion, blocked release of GFP from chloroplasts. Significant increase in ion leakage in the presence of paraquat and light suggests changes in the chloroplast envelope to facilitate protein release. Release of GFP-RC101 (an antimicrobial peptide), which was triggered by Erwinia infection, ceased after conferring protection, further confirming this export phenomenon. These results suggest a

  12. Abnormal Ergosterol Biosynthesis Activates Transcriptional Responses to Antifungal Azoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chengcheng; Zhou, Mi; Wang, Wenzhao; Sun, Xianyun; Yarden, Oded; Li, Shaojie

    2018-01-01

    Fungi transcriptionally upregulate expression of azole efflux pumps and ergosterol biosynthesis pathway genes when exposed to antifungal agents that target ergosterol biosynthesis. To date, these transcriptional responses have been shown to be dependent on the presence of the azoles and/or depletion of ergosterol. Using an inducible promoter to regulate Neurospora crassa erg11 , which encodes the major azole target, sterol 14α-demethylase, we were able to demonstrate that the CDR4 azole efflux pump can be transcriptionally activated by ergosterol biosynthesis inhibition even in the absence of azoles. By analyzing ergosterol deficient mutants, we demonstrate that the transcriptional responses by cdr4 and, unexpectedly, genes encoding ergosterol biosynthesis enzymes ( erg genes) that are responsive to azoles, are not dependent on ergosterol depletion. Nonetheless, deletion of erg2 , which encodes C-8 sterol isomerase, also induced expression of cdr4 . Deletion of erg2 also induced the expression of erg24 , the gene encoding C-14 sterol reductase, but not other tested erg genes which were responsive to erg11 inactivation. This indicates that inhibition of specific steps of ergosterol biosynthesis can result in different transcriptional responses, which is further supported by our results obtained using different ergosterol biosynthesis inhibitors. Together with the sterol profiles, these results suggest that the transcriptional responses by cdr4 and erg genes are associated with accumulation of specific sterol intermediate(s). This was further supported by the fact that when the erg2 mutant was treated with ketoconazole, upstream inhibition overrode the effects by downstream inhibition on ergosterol biosynthesis pathway. Even though cdr4 expression is associated with the accumulation of sterol intermediates, intra- and extracellular sterol analysis by HPLC-MS indicated that the transcriptional induction of cdr4 did not result in efflux of the accumulated intermediate

  13. Alternative staffing services. Contract transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessier, C

    1992-03-01

    Contract medical transcription services can be of great assistance in meeting the demands for transcription, without jeopardizing patient, physician, or institutional confidentiality. You simply must require the contract service to provide at least the same degree of protection and preservation of confidentiality that you should require inhouse. To achieve this you must make these requirements explicit, comprehensive, comprehensible, believable, and enforceable. Discuss the requirements with prospective contractors. Review them at least annually with existing contractors and when contracts are due for renewal. Be sure to specify the consequence of breaching confidentiality, and if there are breaches, enforce the terms of the contract. Consult your institution's legal counsel both in developing the contract and in enforcing its provisions. Take into consideration your department's and institution's policies, AHIMA's statement on confidentiality, as well as local, state, and federal laws. Above all, never lose sight of the patient. Ultimately, it is not patient information that you are obligated to protect. It is the patient.

  14. Transcription factor-mediated cell-to-cell signalling in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiao; Kumar, Dhinesh; Chen, Huan; Wu, Shuwei; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2014-04-01

    Plant cells utilize mobile transcription factors to transmit intercellular signals when they perceive environmental stimuli or initiate developmental programmes. Studies on these novel cell-to-cell signals have accumulated multiple pieces of evidence showing that non-cell-autonomous transcription factors play pivotal roles in most processes related to the formation and development of plant organs. Recent studies have explored the evolution of mobile transcription factors and proposed mechanisms for their trafficking through plasmodesmata, where a selective system exists to facilitate this process. Mobile transcription factors contribute to the diversity of the intercellular signalling network, which is also established by peptides, hormones, and RNAs. Crosstalk between mobile transcription factors and other intercellular molecules leads to the development of complex biological signalling networks in plants. The regulation of plasmodesmata appears to have been another major step in controlling the intercellular trafficking of transcription factors based on studies of many plasmodesmal components. Furthermore, diverse omics approaches are being successfully applied to explore a large number of candidate transcription factors as mobile signals in plants. Here, we review these fascinating discoveries to integrate current knowledge of non-cell-autonomous transcription factors.

  15. Structural and reactivity models for copper oxygenases: cooperative effects and novel reactivities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Plana, Joan; Garcia-Bosch, Isaac; Company, Anna; Costas, Miquel

    2015-08-18

    Dioxygen is widely used in nature as oxidant. Nature itself has served as inspiration to use O2 in chemical synthesis. However, the use of dioxygen as an oxidant is not straightforward. Its triplet ground-state electronic structure makes it unreactive toward most organic substrates. In natural systems, metalloenzymes activate O2 by reducing it to more reactive peroxide (O2(2-)) or superoxide (O2(-)) forms. Over the years, the development of model systems containing transition metals has become a convenient tool for unravelling O2-activation mechanistic aspects and reproducing the oxidative activity of enzymes. Several copper-based systems have been developed within this area. Tyrosinase is a copper-based O2-activating enzyme, whose structure and reactivity have been widely studied, and that serves as a paradigm for O2 activation at a dimetal site. It contains a dicopper center in its active site, and it catalyzes the regioselective ortho-hydroxylation of phenols to catechols and further oxidation to quinones. This represents an important step in melanin biosynthesis and it is mediated by a dicopper(II) side-on peroxo intermediate species. In the present accounts, our research in the field of copper models for oxygen activation is collected. We have developed m-xylyl linked dicopper systems that mimick structural and reactivity aspects of tyrosinase. Synergistic cooperation of the two copper(I) centers results in O2 binding and formation of bis(μ-oxo)dicopper(III) cores. These in turn bind and ortho-hydroxylate phenolates via an electrophilic attack of the oxo ligand over the arene. Interestingly the bis(μ-oxo)dicopper(III) cores can also engage in ortho-hydroxylation-defluorination of deprotonated 2-fluorophenols, substrates that are well-known enzyme inhibitors. Analysis of Cu2O2 species with different binding modes show that only the bis(μ-oxo)dicopper(III) cores can mediate the reaction. Finally, the use of unsymmetric systems for oxygen activation is a field

  16. The structure of stepped surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algra, A.J.

    1981-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of Low Energy Ion Scattering (LEIS) as far as multiple scattering effects are concerned, is discussed. The ion fractions of lithium, sodium and potassium scattered from a copper (100) surface have been measured as a function of several experimental parameters. The ratio of the intensities of the single and double scattering peaks observed in ion scattering spectroscopy has been determined and ion scattering spectroscopy applied in the multiple scattering mode is used to determine the structure of a stepped Cu(410) surface. The average relaxation of the (100) terraces of this surface appears to be very small. The adsorption of oxygen on this surface has been studied with LEIS and it is indicated that oxygen absorbs dissociatively. (C.F.)

  17. Moral transhumanism: the next step.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennison, Michael N

    2012-08-01

    Although transhumanism offers hope for the transcendence of human biological limitations, it generates many intrinsic and consequential ethical concerns. The latter include issues such as the exacerbation of social inequalities and the exponentially increasing technological capacity to cause harm. To mitigate these risks, many thinkers have initiated investigations into the possibility of moral enhancement that could limit the power disparities facilitated by biotechnological enhancement. The arguments often focus on whether moral enhancement is morally permissible, or even obligatory, and remain largely in the realm of the hypothetical. This paper proposes that psilocybin may represent a viable, practical option for moral enhancement and that its further research in the context of moral psychology could comprise the next step in the development of moral transhumanism.

  18. Steps towards an evolutionary physics

    CERN Document Server

    Tiezzi, E

    2006-01-01

    If thermodynamics is to physics as logic is to philosophy, recent theoretical advancements lend new coherence to the marvel and dynamism of life on Earth. Enzo Tiezzi's "Steps Towards an Evolutionary Physics" is a primer and guide, to those who would to stand on the shoulders of giants to attain this view: Heisenberg, Planck, Bateson, Varela, and Prigogine as well as notable contemporary scientists. The adventure of such a free and enquiring spirit thrives not so much on answers as on new questions. The book offers a new gestalt on the uncertainty principle and concept of probability. A wide range of examples, enigmas, and paradoxes lead one's imagination on an exquisite dance. Among the applications are: songs and shapes of nature, oscillatory reactions, orientors, goal functions and configurations of processes, and "dissipative structures and the city". Ecodynamics is a new science, which proposes a cross-fertilization between Charles Darwin and Ilya Prigogine. As an enigma in thermodynamics, Entropy forms ...

  19. Astrocyte reactivity and reactive astrogliosis: costs and benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekny, Milos; Pekna, Marcela

    2014-10-01

    Astrocytes are the most abundant cells in the central nervous system (CNS) that provide nutrients, recycle neurotransmitters, as well as fulfill a wide range of other homeostasis maintaining functions. During the past two decades, astrocytes emerged also as increasingly important regulators of neuronal functions including the generation of new nerve cells and structural as well as functional synapse remodeling. Reactive gliosis or reactive astrogliosis is a term coined for the morphological and functional changes seen in astroglial cells/astrocytes responding to CNS injury and other neurological diseases. Whereas this defensive reaction of astrocytes is conceivably aimed at handling the acute stress, limiting tissue damage, and restoring homeostasis, it may also inhibit adaptive neural plasticity mechanisms underlying recovery of function. Understanding the multifaceted roles of astrocytes in the healthy and diseased CNS will undoubtedly contribute to the development of treatment strategies that will, in a context-dependent manner and at appropriate time points, modulate reactive astrogliosis to promote brain repair and reduce the neurological impairment. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Preimages for Step-Reduced SHA-2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aoki, Kazumaro; Guo, Jian; Matusiewicz, Krystian

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present preimage attacks on up to 43-step SHA-256 (around 67% of the total 64 steps) and 46-step SHA-512 (around 57.5% of the total 80 steps), which significantly increases the number of attacked steps compared to the best previously published preimage attack working for 24 steps....... The time complexities are 2^251.9, 2^509 for finding pseudo-preimages and 2^254.9, 2^511.5 compression function operations for full preimages. The memory requirements are modest, around 2^6 words for 43-step SHA-256 and 46-step SHA-512. The pseudo-preimage attack also applies to 43-step SHA-224 and SHA-384...

  1. Production of the 2400 kb Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene transcript; transcription time and cotranscriptional splicing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennyson, C.N.; Worton, R.G. [Univ. of Toronto and the Hospital for Sick Children, Ontario (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    The largest known gene in any organism is the human DMD gene which has 79 exons that span 2400 kb. The extreme nature of the DMD gene raises questions concerning the time required for transcription and whether splicing begins before transcription is complete. DMD gene transcription is induced as cultured human myoblasts differentiate to form multinucleated myotubes, providing a system for studying the kinetics of transcription and splicing. Using quantitative RT-PCR, transcript accumulation was monitored from four different regions within the gene following induction of expression. By comparing the accumulation of transcripts from the 5{prime} and 3{prime} ends of the gene we have shown that approximately 12 hours are required to transcribe 1770 kb of the gene, extrapolating to a time of 16 hours for the transcription unit expressed in muscle. Comparison of accumulation profiles for spliced and total transcript demonstrated that transcripts are spliced at the 5{prime} end before transcription is complete, providing strong evidence for cotranscriptional splicing of DMD gene transcripts. Finally, the rate of transcript accumulation was reduced at the 3{prime} end of the gene relative to the 5{prime} end, perhaps due to premature termination of transcription complexes as they traverse this enormous transcription unit. The lag between transcription initiation and the appearance of complete transcripts could be important in limiting transcript production in dividing cells and to the timing of mRNA appearance in differentiating muscle.

  2. Designed transcription activator-like effector proteins efficiently induced the expression of latent HIV-1 in latently infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohui; Wang, Pengfei; Fu, Zheng; Ji, Haiyan; Qu, Xiying; Zeng, Hanxian; Zhu, Xiaoli; Deng, Junxiao; Lu, Panpan; Zha, Shijun; Song, Zhishuo; Zhu, Huanzhang

    2015-01-01

    HIV latency is the foremost barrier to clearing HIV infection from patients. Reactivation of latent HIV-1 represents a promising strategy to deplete these viral reservoirs. Here, we report a novel approach to reactivate latent HIV-1 provirus using artificially designed transcription activator-like effector (TALE) fusion proteins containing a DNA-binding domain specifically targeting the HIV-1 promoter and the herpes simplex virus-based transcriptional activator VP64 domain. We engineered four TALE genes (TALE1-4) encoding TALE proteins, each specifically targeting different 20-bp DNA sequences within the HIV-1 promoter, and we constructed four TALE-VP64 expression vectors corresponding to TALE1-4. We found that TALE1-VP64 effectively reactivated HIV-1 gene expression in latently infected C11 and A10.6 cells. We further confirmed that TALE1-VP64 reactivated latent HIV-1 via specific binding to the HIV-LTR promoter. Moreover, we also found that TALE1-VP64 did not affect cell proliferation or cell cycle distribution. Taken together, our data demonstrated that TALE1-VP64 can specifically and effectively reactivate latent HIV-1 transcription, suggesting that this strategy may provide a novel approach for anti-HIV-1 latency therapy in the future.

  3. Transcriptional Profiling of Egg Allergy and Relationship to Disease Phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Kosoy

    Full Text Available Egg allergy is one of the most common food allergies of childhood. There is a lack of information on the immunologic basis of egg allergy beyond the role of IgE.To use transcriptional profiling as a novel approach to uncover immunologic processes associated with different phenotypes of egg allergy.Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were obtained from egg-allergic children who were defined as reactive (BER or tolerant (BET to baked egg, and from food allergic controls (AC who were egg non-allergic. PBMCs were stimulated with egg white protein. Gene transcription was measured by microarray after 24 h, and cytokine secretion by multiplex assay after 5 days.The transcriptional response of PBMCs to egg protein differed between BER and BET versus AC subjects. Compared to the AC group, the BER group displayed increased expression of genes associated with allergic inflammation as well as corresponding increased secretion of IL-5, IL-9 and TNF-α. A similar pattern was observed for the BET group. Further similarities in gene expression patterns between BER and BET groups, as well as some important differences, were revealed using a novel Immune Annotation resource developed for this project. This approach identified several novel processes not previously associated with egg allergy, including positive associations with TLR4-stimulated myeloid cells and activated NK cells, and negative associations with an induced Treg signature. Further pathway analysis of differentially expressed genes comparing BER to BET subjects showed significant enrichment of IFN-α and IFN-γ response genes, as well as genes associated with virally-infected DCs.Transcriptional profiling identified several novel pathways and processes that differed when comparing the response to egg allergen in BET, BER, and AC groups. We conclude that this approach is a useful hypothesis-generating mechanism to identify novel immune processes associated with allergy and tolerance to forms

  4. A Search of Reactivated Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Quan-Zhi

    2017-05-01

    Dormant or near-dormant short-period comets can unexpectedly regain the ability to eject dust. In many known cases, the resurrection is short-lived and lasts less than one orbit. However, it is possible that some resurrected comets can remain active in later perihelion passages. We search the archival images of various facilities to look for these “reactivated” comets. We identify two candidates, 297P/Beshore and 332P/Ikeya-Murakami, both of which were found to be inactive or weakly active in the previous orbit before their discovery. We derive a reactivation rate of ˜ 0.007 {{comet}}-1 {{orbit}}-1, which implies that typical short-period comets only become temporarily dormant a few times or less. Smaller comets are prone to rotational instability and may undergo temporary dormancy more frequently. Next generation high-cadence surveys may find more reactivation events of these comets.

  5. Melioidosis: reactivation during radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jegasothy, B.V.; Goslen, J.B.; Salvatore, M.A.

    1980-05-01

    Melioidosis is caused by Pseudomonas pseudomallei, a gram-negative, motile bacillus which is a naturally occurring soil saprophyte. The organism is endemic in Southeast Asia, the Philippines, Australia, and parts of Central and South America. Most human disease occurs from infection acquired in these countries. Infection with P pseudomallei may produce no apparent clinical disease. Acute pneumonitis or septicemia may result from inhalation of the organism, and inoculation into sites of trauma may cause localized skin abscesses, or the disease may remain latent and be reactivated months or years later by trauma, burns, or pneumococcal pneumonia, diabetic ketoacidosis, influenza, or bronchogenic carcinoma. The last is probably the commonest form of melioidosis seen in the United States. We present the first case of reactivation of melioidosis after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the lung, again emphasizing the need to consider melioidosis in a septic patient with a history of travel, especially to Southeast Asia.

  6. Melioidosis: reactivation during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jegasothy, B.V.; Goslen, J.B.; Salvatore, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    Melioidosis is caused by Pseudomonas pseudomallei, a gram-negative, motile bacillus which is a naturally occurring soil saprophyte. The organism is endemic in Southeast Asia, the Philippines, Australia, and parts of Central and South America. Most human disease occurs from infection acquired in these countries. Infection with P pseudomallei may produce no apparent clinical disease. Acute pneumonitis or septicemia may result from inhalation of the organism, and inoculation into sites of trauma may cause localized skin abscesses, or the disease may remain latent and be reactivated months or years later by trauma, burns, or pneumococcal pneumonia, diabetic ketoacidosis, influenza, or bronchogenic carcinoma. The last is probably the commonest form of melioidosis seen in the United States. We present the first case of reactivation of melioidosis after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the lung, again emphasizing the need to consider melioidosis in a septic patient with a history of travel, especially to Southeast Asia

  7. Critical flux determination by flux-stepping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Søren; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2010-01-01

    In membrane filtration related scientific literature, often step-by-step determined critical fluxes are reported. Using a dynamic microfiltration device, it is shown that critical fluxes determined from two different flux-stepping methods are dependent upon operational parameters such as step......, such values are more or less useless in itself as critical flux predictors, and constant flux verification experiments have to be conducted to check if the determined critical fluxes call predict sustainable flux regimes. However, it is shown that using the step-by-step predicted critical fluxes as start...

  8. Engine combustion control via fuel reactivity stratification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Rolf Deneys; Hanson, Reed M; Splitter, Derek A; Kokjohn, Sage L

    2013-12-31

    A compression ignition engine uses two or more fuel charges having two or more reactivities to control the timing and duration of combustion. In a preferred implementation, a lower-reactivity fuel charge is injected or otherwise introduced into the combustion chamber, preferably sufficiently early that it becomes at least substantially homogeneously dispersed within the chamber before a subsequent injection is made. One or more subsequent injections of higher-reactivity fuel charges are then made, and these preferably distribute the higher-reactivity matter within the lower-reactivity chamber space such that combustion begins in the higher-reactivity regions, and with the lower-reactivity regions following thereafter. By appropriately choose the reactivities of the charges, their relative amounts, and their timing, combustion can be tailored to achieve optimal power output (and thus fuel efficiency), at controlled temperatures (and thus controlled NOx), and with controlled equivalence ratios (and thus controlled soot).

  9. Sea sand for reactive barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia R, G.; Ordonez R, E.; Ordonez R, En.

    2002-01-01

    Some phosphates have the property to suck in radioactive metals in solution, what it is taken in advance to make reactive barriers which are placed in the nuclear waste repositories. In an effort for contributing to the study of this type of materials, it has been obtained the zirconium silicate (ZrSiO 4 ) and the alpha zirconium hydrogen phosphate (Zr(HPO 4 ) 2H 2 O) starting from sea sand in an easy and economic way. (Author)

  10. Reactive polymer fused deposition manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunc, Vlastimil; Rios, Orlando; Love, Lonnie J.; Duty, Chad E.; Johs, Alexander

    2017-05-16

    Methods and compositions for additive manufacturing that include reactive or thermosetting polymers, such as urethanes and epoxies. The polymers are melted, partially cross-linked prior to the depositing, deposited to form a component object, solidified, and fully cross-linked. These polymers form networks of chemical bonds that span the deposited layers. Application of a directional electromagnetic field can be applied to aromatic polymers after deposition to align the polymers for improved bonding between the deposited layers.

  11. Aerobic glycolysis tunes YAP/TAZ transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzo, Elena; Santinon, Giulia; Pocaterra, Arianna; Aragona, Mariaceleste; Bresolin, Silvia; Forcato, Mattia; Grifoni, Daniela; Pession, Annalisa; Zanconato, Francesca; Guzzo, Giulia; Bicciato, Silvio; Dupont, Sirio

    2015-05-12

    Increased glucose metabolism and reprogramming toward aerobic glycolysis are a hallmark of cancer cells, meeting their metabolic needs for sustained cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming is usually considered as a downstream consequence of tumor development and oncogene activation; growing evidence indicates, however, that metabolism on its turn can support oncogenic signaling to foster tumor malignancy. Here, we explored how glucose metabolism regulates gene transcription and found an unexpected link with YAP/TAZ, key transcription factors regulating organ growth, tumor cell proliferation and aggressiveness. When cells actively incorporate glucose and route it through glycolysis, YAP/TAZ are fully active; when glucose metabolism is blocked, or glycolysis is reduced, YAP/TAZ transcriptional activity is decreased. Accordingly, glycolysis is required to sustain YAP/TAZ pro-tumorigenic functions, and YAP/TAZ are required for the full deployment of glucose growth-promoting activity. Mechanistically we found that phosphofructokinase (PFK1), the enzyme regulating the first committed step of glycolysis, binds the YAP/TAZ transcriptional cofactors TEADs and promotes their functional and biochemical cooperation with YAP/TAZ. Strikingly, this regulation is conserved in Drosophila, where phosphofructokinase is required for tissue overgrowth promoted by Yki, the fly homologue of YAP. Moreover, gene expression regulated by glucose metabolism in breast cancer cells is strongly associated in a large dataset of primary human mammary tumors with YAP/TAZ activation and with the progression toward more advanced and malignant stages. These findings suggest that aerobic glycolysis endows cancer cells with particular metabolic properties and at the same time sustains transcription factors with potent pro-tumorigenic activities such as YAP/TAZ. © 2015 The Authors.

  12. Reactive sclerosis of the pedicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sun Wha; Lim, Jae Hoon

    1991-01-01

    The vertebral pedicles of the neural arch represent the 'eyes' through which normal variants, anomalies and acquired pathologic conditions can be detected on lumbar spine radiographs. Close scrutiny of the size, shape, density and margins of the pedicles may permit the radiologist to suggest a wide variety of disease. Radiologic attention is almost always directed at determining of sclerosis or lysis of the pedicle. Numerous conditions causing sclerosis of the pedicle have been reported and among them osteoidosteoma and osteoblastoma are well known tumors. However the real significance of reactive sclerosis of the pedicle related to the unstable neural arch such as contralateral spondyloysis have drawn little attention in the literature. The purpose of this report is to analyze the nature of arch deficiency which is the primary lesion related to the sclerotic pedicle, and emphasizes the significance of radiologic features of reactive pedicular sclerosis for clinical practice. Cautious observation of both sclerotic lesion and the contralateral neural arch is essential in radiologic evaluation of the scleortic pedicle and the presence of a contraslateral pars defect in the same vertebral segment suggests reactive sclerosis of the pedicle

  13. Reactive sclerosis of the pedicle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sun Wha; Lim, Jae Hoon [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1991-01-15

    The vertebral pedicles of the neural arch represent the 'eyes' through which normal variants, anomalies and acquired pathologic conditions can be detected on lumbar spine radiographs. Close scrutiny of the size, shape, density and margins of the pedicles may permit the radiologist to suggest a wide variety of disease. Radiologic attention is almost always directed at determining of sclerosis or lysis of the pedicle. Numerous conditions causing sclerosis of the pedicle have been reported and among them osteoidosteoma and osteoblastoma are well known tumors. However the real significance of reactive sclerosis of the pedicle related to the unstable neural arch such as contralateral spondyloysis have drawn little attention in the literature. The purpose of this report is to analyze the nature of arch deficiency which is the primary lesion related to the sclerotic pedicle, and emphasizes the significance of radiologic features of reactive pedicular sclerosis for clinical practice. Cautious observation of both sclerotic lesion and the contralateral neural arch is essential in radiologic evaluation of the scleortic pedicle and the presence of a contraslateral pars defect in the same vertebral segment suggests reactive sclerosis of the pedicle.

  14. Controlling material reactivity using architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Kyle

    2017-06-01

    The reactivity of thermites can be tailored through selection of several parameters, and can range from very slow burns to rapid deflagrations. 3D printing is a rapidly emerging field, and offers the potential to build architected parts. Here we sought to explore whether controlling such features could be a suitable path forward for gaining additional control of the reactivity. This talk discusses several new methods for preparing thermite samples with controlled architectures using 3D printing. Additionally, we demonstrate that the architecture can play a role in the reactivity of an object. Our results suggest that architecture can be used to tailor the convective and/or advective energy transport during a deflagration, thus enhancing or retarding the reaction. The results are promising in that they give researchers an additional way of controlling the energy release rate without defaulting to the conventional approach of changing the formulation. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-708525. In collaboration with: Cheng Zhu, Eric Duoss, Matt Durban, Alex Gash, Alexandra Golobic, Michael Grapes, David Kolesky, Joshua Kuntz, Jennifer Lewis, Christopher Spadaccini; LAWRENCE LIVERMORE NATIONAL LAB.

  15. The transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor-2 (MEF2) in cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oort, R.J. van

    2007-01-01

    The heart responds to stress signals by hypertrophic growth, which is the first step towards heart failure (HF). The genetic pattern underlying HF remains largely elusive. Although the transcription factor Myocyte Enhancer Factor-2 (MEF2) is known to be a common endpoint for several hypertrophic

  16. Molecular Basis of Transcription-Coupled Pre-mRNA Capping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Rucobo, Fuensanta W.; Kohler, Rebecca; van de Waterbeemd, Michiel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/412537761; Heck, Albert J R|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/105189332; Hemann, Matthias; Herzog, Franz; Stark, Holger; Cramer, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Capping is the first step in pre-mRNA processing, and the resulting 5'-RNA cap is required for mRNA splicing, export, translation, and stability. Capping is functionally coupled to transcription by RNA polymerase (Pol) II, but the coupling mechanism remains unclear. We show that efficient binding of

  17. In vivo live imaging of RNA polymerase II transcription factories in primary cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Ghamari (Alireza); M.P.C. van de Corput (Mariëtte); S. Thongjuea (Supat); W.A. van Cappellen (Gert); W.F.J. van IJcken (Wilfred); J.A.J. van Haren (Jeffrey); E. Soler (Eric); D. Eick (Dirk); B. Lenhard (Boris); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractTranscription steps are marked by different modifications of the C-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Phosphorylation of Ser5 and Ser7 by cyclin-dependent kinase 7 (CDK7) as part of TFIIH marks initiation, whereas phosphorylation of Ser2 by CDK9 marks elongation. These

  18. Step styles of pedestrians at different densities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiayue; Weng, Wenguo; Boltes, Maik; Zhang, Jun; Tordeux, Antoine; Ziemer, Verena

    2018-02-01

    Stepping locomotion is the basis of human movement. The investigation of stepping locomotion and its affecting factors is necessary for a more realistic knowledge of human movement, which is usually referred to as walking with equal step lengths for the right and left leg. To study pedestrians’ stepping locomotion, a set of single-file movement experiments involving 39 participants of the same age walking on a highly curved oval course is conducted. The microscopic characteristics of the pedestrians including 1D Voronoi density, speed, and step length are calculated based on a projected coordinate. The influence of the projection lines with different radii on the measurement of these quantities is investigated. The step lengths from the straight and curved parts are compared using the Kolmogorov–Smirnov test. During the experiments, six different step styles are observed and the proportions of different step styles change with the density. At low density, the main step style is the stable-large step style and the step lengths of one pedestrian are almost constant. At high density, some pedestrians adjust and decrease their step lengths. Some pedestrians take relatively smaller and larger steps alternately to adapt to limited space.

  19. High-throughput Characterization of HIV-1 Reservoir Reactivation Using a Single-Cell-in-Droplet PCR Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert W. Yucha

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Reactivation of latent viral reservoirs is on the forefront of HIV-1 eradication research. However, it is unknown if latency reversing agents (LRAs increase the level of viral transcription from cells producing HIV RNA or harboring transcriptionally-inactive (latent infection. We therefore developed a microfluidic single-cell-in-droplet (scdPCR assay to directly measure the number of CD4+ T cells that produce unspliced (usRNA and multiply spliced (msRNA following ex vivo latency reversal with either an histone deacetylase inhibitor (romidepsin or T cell receptor (TCR stimulation. Detection of HIV-1 transcriptional activity can also be performed on hundreds of thousands of CD4+ T-cells in a single experiment. The scdPCR method was then applied to CD4+ T cells obtained from HIV-1-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. Overall, our results suggest that effects of LRAs on HIV-1 reactivation may be heterogeneous—increasing transcription from active cells in some cases and increasing the number of transcriptionally active cells in others. Genomic DNA and human mRNA isolated from HIV-1 reactivated cells could also be detected and quantified from individual cells. As a result, our assay has the potential to provide needed insight into various reservoir eradication strategies.

  20. High-throughput Characterization of HIV-1 Reservoir Reactivation Using a Single-Cell-in-Droplet PCR Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yucha, Robert W; Hobbs, Kristen S; Hanhauser, Emily; Hogan, Louise E; Nieves, Wildaliz; Ozen, Mehmet O; Inci, Fatih; York, Vanessa; Gibson, Erica A; Thanh, Cassandra; Shafiee, Hadi; El Assal, Rami; Kiselinova, Maja; Robles, Yvonne P; Bae, Helen; Leadabrand, Kaitlyn S; Wang, ShuQi; Deeks, Steven G; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Demirci, Utkan; Henrich, Timothy J

    2017-06-01

    Reactivation of latent viral reservoirs is on the forefront of HIV-1 eradication research. However, it is unknown if latency reversing agents (LRAs) increase the level of viral transcription from cells producing HIV RNA or harboring transcriptionally-inactive (latent) infection. We therefore developed a microfluidic single-cell-in-droplet (scd)PCR assay to directly measure the number of CD4 + T cells that produce unspliced (us)RNA and multiply spliced (ms)RNA following ex vivo latency reversal with either an histone deacetylase inhibitor (romidepsin) or T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation. Detection of HIV-1 transcriptional activity can also be performed on hundreds of thousands of CD4+ T-cells in a single experiment. The scdPCR method was then applied to CD4 + T cells obtained from HIV-1-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy. Overall, our results suggest that effects of LRAs on HIV-1 reactivation may be heterogeneous-increasing transcription from active cells in some cases and increasing the number of transcriptionally active cells in others. Genomic DNA and human mRNA isolated from HIV-1 reactivated cells could also be detected and quantified from individual cells. As a result, our assay has the potential to provide needed insight into various reservoir eradication strategies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Insights into the reactivation of cobalamin-dependent methionine synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koutmos, Markos; Datta, Supratim; Pattridge, Katherine A.; Smith, Janet L.; Matthews, Rowena G.; (Michigan)

    2009-12-10

    Cobalamin-dependent methionine synthase (MetH) is a modular protein that catalyzes the transfer of a methyl group from methyltetrahydrofolate to homocysteine to produce methionine and tetrahydrofolate. The cobalamin cofactor, which serves as both acceptor and donor of the methyl group, is oxidized once every {approx}2,000 catalytic cycles and must be reactivated by the uptake of an electron from reduced flavodoxin and a methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (AdoMet). Previous structures of a C-terminal fragment of MetH (MetH{sup CT}) revealed a reactivation conformation that juxtaposes the cobalamin- and AdoMet-binding domains. Here we describe 2 structures of a disulfide stabilized MetH{sup CT} ({sub s-s}MetH{sup CT}) that offer further insight into the reactivation of MetH. The structure of {sub s-s}MetH{sup CT} with cob(II)alamin and S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine represents the enzyme in the reactivation step preceding electron transfer from flavodoxin. The structure supports earlier suggestions that the enzyme acts to lower the reduction potential of the Co(II)/Co(I) couple by elongating the bond between the cobalt and its upper axial water ligand, effectively making the cobalt 4-coordinate, and illuminates the role of Tyr-1139 in the stabilization of this 4-coordinate state. The structure of {sub s-s}MetH{sub CT} with aquocobalamin may represent a transient state at the end of reactivation as the newly remethylated 5-coordinate methylcobalamin returns to the 6-coordinate state, triggering the rearrangement to a catalytic conformation.

  2. Photocatalytic oxidation of a reactive azo dye and evaluation of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the photocatalytic oxidation of a reactive azo dye and determine the improvement in the biodegradability when photocatalytic oxidation was used as a pretreatment step prior to biological treatment. The results obtained from the experiments adding H2O2/TiO2 show that the ...

  3. Measuring Physical Activity with Pedometers in Older Adults with Intellectual Disability : Reactivity and Number of Days

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilgenkamp, Thessa; Van Wijck, Ruud; Evenhuis, Heleen

    The minimum number of days of pedometer monitoring needed to estimate valid average weekly step counts and reactivity was investigated for older adults with intellectual disability. Participants (N = 268) with borderline to severe intellectual disability ages 50 years and older were instructed to

  4. Improvement of COD and TOC reactive dyes in textile wastewater by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to investigate the removal of reactive dyes, Samofix Red V-RBL and Samofix Green V-G from wastewater using a two step Al (III) coagulation/activated carbon adsorption method. The effects of pH and coagulant dosage as well as the effects of contact time and a powdered activated carbon dosage ...

  5. Diagnostic properties of C-reactive protein for detecting pneumonia in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, M.J.; Broekhuizen, B.D.L.; Minnaard, M.C.; Balemans, W.A.; Hopstaken, R.M.; de Jong, P.A.; Verheij, Th.J.M.

    BACKGROUND: The diagnostic value of C-reactive protein (CRP) level for pneumonia in children is unknown. As a first step in the assessment of the value of CRP, a diagnostic study was performed in children at an emergency department (ED). METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, data were

  6. Periodic arrays of deep nanopores made in silicon with reactive ion etching and deep UV lithography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woldering, L.A.; Tjerkstra, R.W.; Jansen, Henricus V.; Setija, Irwan D.; Vos, Willem L.

    2008-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of periodic arrays of deep nanopores with high aspect ratios in crystalline silicon. The radii and pitches of the pores were defined in a chromium mask by means of deep UV scan and step technology. The pores were etched with a reactive ion etching process with SF6,

  7. Multi-step direct reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koning, A.J.

    1992-07-01

    In recent years a variety of statistical theories has been developed concerning multistep direct (MSD) nuclear reactions. In addition, dominant in applications is a whole class of semiclassical models that may be subsumed under the heading of 'generalized exciton models'; these are basically MSD-type extensions on top of compound-like concepts. In this report the relation between their underlying statistical MSD-postulates are highlighted. A command framework is sketched that enables to generate the various MSD theories through assigning statistical properties to different parts of the nuclear Hamiltonian. Then it is shown that distinct forms of nuclear randomness are embodied in the mentioned theories. All these theories appear to be very similar at a qualitative level. In order to explain the high energy-tails and forward-peaked angular distribution typical for particles emitted in MSD reactions, it is imagined that the incident continuum particle stepwise looses its energy and direction in a sequence of collisions, thereby creating new particle-hole pairs in the target system. At each step emission may take place. The statistical aspect comes in because many continuum states are involved in the process. These are supposed to display chaotic behavior, the associated randomness assumption giving rise to important simplifications in the expression for MSD emission cross sections. This picture suggests that mentioned MSD models can be interpreted as a variant of essentially one and the same theory. 113 refs.; 25 figs.; 9 tabs

  8. Steps to Advanced CANDU 600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Yongshick; Brooks, G. L.

    1988-01-01

    The CANDU nuclear power system was developed from merging of AECL heavy water reactor technology with Ontario Hydro electrical power station expertise. The original four units of Ontario Hydro's Pickering Generating Station are the first full-scale commercial application of the CANDU system. AECL and Ontario Hydro then moved to the next evolutionary step, a more advanced larger scale design for four units at the Bruce Generating Station. CANDU 600 followed as a single unit nuclear electric power station design derived from an amalgam of features of the multiple unit Pickering and Bruce designs. The design of the CANDU 600 nuclear steam supply system is based on the Pickering design with improvements derived from the Bruce design. For example, most CANDU 600 auxiliary systems are based on Bruce systems, whereas the fuel handling system is based on the Pickering system. Four CANDU 600 units are in operation, and five are under construction in Romania. For the additional four units at Pickering Generating Station 'B', Ontario Hydro selected a replica of the Pickering 'A' design with limited design changes to maintain a high level of standardization across all eight units. Ontario Hydro applied a similar policy for the additional four units at Bruce Generating Station 'B'. For the four unit Darlington station, Ontario Hydro selected a design based on Bruce with improvements derived from operating experience, the CANDU 600 design and development programs

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis reactivates latent HIV-1 in T cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Erica C; Novis, Camille L; Martins, Laura J; Macedo, Amanda B; Kimball, Kadyn E; Bosque, Alberto; Planelles, Vicente; Barrows, Louis R

    2017-01-01

    Following proviral integration into the host cell genome and establishment of a latent state, the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can reenter a productive life cycle in response to various stimuli. HIV-1 reactivation occurs when transcription factors, such as nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), and activator protein -1 (AP-1), bind cognate sites within the long terminal repeat (LTR) region of the HIV-1 provirus to promote transcription. Interestingly, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) can reactivate latent HIV-1 through activation of the transcription factor NF-κB. Some PRRs are expressed on central memory CD4+ T cells (TCM), which in HIV-1 patients constitute the main reservoir of latent HIV-1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), interacts with PRRs through membrane components. However, the ability of Mtb to reactivate latent HIV-1 has not been extensively studied. Here we show that phosphatidylinositol mannoside 6 (PIM6), a component of the Mtb membrane, in addition to whole bacteria in co-culture, can reactivate HIV-1 in a primary TCM cell model of latency. Using a JLAT model of HIV-1 latency, we found this interaction to be mediated through Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR-2). Thus, we describe a mechanism by which Mtb can exacerbate HIV-1 infection. We hypothesize that chronic Mtb infection can drive HIV-1 reactivation. The phenomenon described here could explain, in part, the poor prognosis that characterizes HIV-1/Mtb co-infection.

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis reactivates latent HIV-1 in T cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica C Larson

    Full Text Available Following proviral integration into the host cell genome and establishment of a latent state, the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 can reenter a productive life cycle in response to various stimuli. HIV-1 reactivation occurs when transcription factors, such as nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB, nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT, and activator protein -1 (AP-1, bind cognate sites within the long terminal repeat (LTR region of the HIV-1 provirus to promote transcription. Interestingly, pattern recognition receptors (PRRs that recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs can reactivate latent HIV-1 through activation of the transcription factor NF-κB. Some PRRs are expressed on central memory CD4+ T cells (TCM, which in HIV-1 patients constitute the main reservoir of latent HIV-1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB, interacts with PRRs through membrane components. However, the ability of Mtb to reactivate latent HIV-1 has not been extensively studied. Here we show that phosphatidylinositol mannoside 6 (PIM6, a component of the Mtb membrane, in addition to whole bacteria in co-culture, can reactivate HIV-1 in a primary TCM cell model of latency. Using a JLAT model of HIV-1 latency, we found this interaction to be mediated through Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR-2. Thus, we describe a mechanism by which Mtb can exacerbate HIV-1 infection. We hypothesize that chronic Mtb infection can drive HIV-1 reactivation. The phenomenon described here could explain, in part, the poor prognosis that characterizes HIV-1/Mtb co-infection.

  11. Reactivation of latent HIV-1 provirus via targeting protein phosphatase-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Mudit; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Ammosova, Tatyana; Kumari, Namita; Smith, Kahli; Breuer, Denitra; Ilatovskiy, Andrey V; Kont, Yasemin Saygideğer; Ivanov, Andrey; Üren, Aykut; Kovalskyy, Dmytro; Petukhov, Michael; Kashanchi, Fatah; Nekhai, Sergei

    2015-07-16

    HIV-1 escapes antiretroviral drugs by integrating into the host DNA and forming a latent transcriptionally silent HIV-1 provirus. This provirus presents the major hurdle in HIV-1 eradication and cure. Transcriptional activation, which is prerequisite for reactivation and the eradication of latent proviruses, is impaired in latently infected T cells due to the lack of host transcription factors, primarily NF-κB and P-TEFb (CDK9/cyclin T1). We and others previously showed that protein phosphatase-1 (PP1) regulates HIV-1 transcription by modulating CDK9 phosphorylation. Recently we have developed a panel of small molecular compounds targeting a non-catalytic site of PP1. Here we generated a new class of sulfonamide-containing compounds that activated HIV-1 in acute and latently infected cells. Among the tested molecules, a small molecule activator of PP1 (SMAPP1) induced both HIV-1 replication and reactivation of latent HIV-1 in chronically infected cultured and primary cells. In vitro, SMAPP1 interacted with PP1 and increased PP1 activity toward a recombinant substrate. Treatment with SMAPP1 increased phosphorylation of CDK9's Ser90 and Thr186 residues, but not Ser175. Proteomic analysis showed upregulation of P-TEFb and PP1 related proteins, including PP1 regulatory subunit Sds22 in SMAPP1-treated T cells. Docking analysis identified a PP1 binding site for SMAPP1 located within the C-terminal binding pocket of PP1. We identified a novel class of PP1-targeting compounds that reactivate latent HIV-1 provirus by targeting PP1, increasing CDK9 phosphorylation and enhancing HIV transcription. This compound represents a novel candidate for anti-HIV-1 therapeutics aiming at eradication of latent HIV-1 reservoirs.

  12. Step-Wise Migration : Evidence from Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pardede, Elda; McCann, Philip; Venhorst, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to study multiple internal migration trajectories in Indonesia, with special attention to step-wise migration. Step-wise migration involves moves with smaller steps from village to nearby small town, to larger town, and then to big cities rather than a direct move from

  13. The Complexity of One-Step Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngu, Bing

    2014-01-01

    An analysis of one-step equations from a cognitive load theory perspective uncovers variation within one-step equations. The complexity of one-step equations arises from the element interactivity across the operational and relational lines. The higher the number of operational and relational lines, the greater the complexity of the equations.…

  14. Ten steps to successful software process improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandt, R. K.

    2003-01-01

    This paper identifies ten steps for managing change that address organizational and cultural issues. Four of these steps are critical, that if not done, will almost guarantee failure. This ten-step program emphasizes the alignment of business goals, change process goals, and the work performed by the employees of an organization.

  15. Ten Steps to Making Evaluation Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridharan, Sanjeev; Nakaima, April

    2011-01-01

    This paper proposes ten steps to make evaluations matter. The ten steps are a combination of the usual recommended practice such as developing program theory and implementing rigorous evaluation designs with a stronger focus on more unconventional steps including developing learning frameworks, exploring pathways of evaluation influence, and…

  16. Traffic safety and step-by-step driving licence for young people

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tønning, Charlotte; Agerholm, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Young novice car drivers are much more accident-prone than other drivers - up to 10 times that of their parents' generation. A central solution to improve the traffic safety for this group is implementation of a step-by-step driving licence. A number of countries have introduced a step...... presents a review of safety effects from step-by-step driving licence schemes. Most of the investigated schemes consist of a step-by-step driving licence with Step 1) various tests and education, Step 2) a period where driving is only allowed together with an experienced driver and Step 3) driving without...... companion is allowed but with various restrictions and, in some cases, additional driving education and tests. In general, a step-by-step driving licence improves traffic safety even though the young people are permitted to drive a car earlier on. The effects from driving with an experienced driver vary...

  17. Reactivity calculation using the Euler–Maclaurin formula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suescún-Díaz, Daniel; Rodríguez-Sarasty, Jesús A.; Figueroa-Jiménez, Jorge H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Euler–Maclaurin formula has high precision and low computational cost. ► This method can be implemented in reactivity meters with time step of up to 0.1 s. ► This approach has not limitation of the nuclear power form. - Abstract: We develop an approximation method based on the Euler–Maclaurin formula for numerically solving the integral of the inverse point kinetic equation for nuclear reactor power. Due to its greater precision, this method requires fewer history points than other methods based on the nuclear power history. The approximation is validated with different forms of the nuclear power and with different time step calculations. Results suggest that this method, though easier to implement, has a better precision and lower computational costs than other methods that require the nuclear power history

  18. BET bromodomain inhibition as a novel strategy for reactivation of HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Camellia; Archin, Nancie; Michaels, Daniel; Belkina, Anna C; Denis, Gerald V; Bradner, James; Sebastiani, Paola; Margolis, David M; Montano, Monty

    2012-12-01

    The persistence of latent HIV-1 remains a major challenge in therapeutic efforts to eradicate infection. We report the capacity for HIV reactivation by a selective small molecule inhibitor of BET family bromodomains, JQ1, a promising therapeutic agent with antioncogenic properties. JQ1 reactivated HIV transcription in models of latent T cell infection and latent monocyte infection. We also tested the effect of exposure to JQ1 to allow recovery of replication-competent HIV from pools of resting CD4(+) T cells isolated from HIV-infected, ART-treated patients. In one of three patients, JQ1 allowed recovery of virus at a frequency above unstimulated conditions. JQ1 potently suppressed T cell proliferation with minimal cytotoxic effect. Transcriptional profiling of T cells with JQ1 showed potent down-regulation of T cell activation genes, including CD3, CD28, and CXCR4, similar to HDAC inhibitors, but JQ1 also showed potent up-regulation of chromatin modification genes, including SIRT1, HDAC6, and multiple lysine demethylases (KDMs). Thus, JQ1 reactivates HIV-1 while suppressing T cell activation genes and up-regulating histone modification genes predicted to favor increased Tat activity. Thus, JQ1 may be useful in studies of potentially novel mechanisms for transcriptional control as well as in translational efforts to identify therapeutic molecules to achieve viral eradication.

  19. A Tutorial on Reliability Testing in AAC Language Sample Transcription and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Thomas; Hill, Katya

    2015-06-01

    Establishing reliability is an essential step in language sample transcription and analysis. This tutorial provides an illustration of replicable procedures for reliability testing during transcription and analysis of language samples generated by people who use augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) systems. Statistical measures used for testing agreement between raters coding categorical data are summarized. Detailed procedures for reliability testing in AAC language sample transcription and analysis are provided, beginning with the collection of raw language sample data. Procedures include guidelines for (a) establishing inter-judge agreement during the transcription process, and (b) using Cohen's kappa to establish inter-rater reliability during deeper analysis of transcribed utterances. All procedures are demonstrated in a case example using language samples from children who use AAC.

  20. Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus Hijacks RNA Polymerase II To Create a Viral Transcriptional Factory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Christopher Phillip; Lyu, Yuanzhi; Chuang, Frank; Nakano, Kazushi; Izumiya, Chie; Jin, Di; Campbell, Mel; Izumiya, Yoshihiro

    2017-06-01

    Locally concentrated nuclear factors ensure efficient binding to DNA templates, facilitating RNA polymerase II recruitment and frequent reutilization of stable preinitiation complexes. We have uncovered a mechanism for effective viral transcription by focal assembly of RNA polymerase II around Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) genomes in the host cell nucleus. Using immunofluorescence labeling of latent nuclear antigen (LANA) protein, together with fluorescence in situ RNA hybridization (RNA-FISH) of the intron region of immediate early transcripts, we visualized active transcription of viral genomes in naturally infected cells. At the single-cell level, we found that not all episomes were uniformly transcribed following reactivation stimuli. However, those episomes that were being transcribed would spontaneously aggregate to form transcriptional "factories," which recruited a significant fraction of cellular RNA polymerase II. Focal assembly of "viral transcriptional factories" decreased the pool of cellular RNA polymerase II available for cellular gene transcription, which consequently impaired cellular gene expression globally, with the exception of selected ones. The viral transcriptional factories localized with replicating viral genomic DNAs. The observed colocalization of viral transcriptional factories with replicating viral genomic DNA suggests that KSHV assembles an "all-in-one" factory for both gene transcription and DNA replication. We propose that the assembly of RNA polymerase II around viral episomes in the nucleus may be a previously unexplored aspect of KSHV gene regulation by confiscation of a limited supply of RNA polymerase II in infected cells. IMPORTANCE B cells infected with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) harbor multiple copies of the KSHV genome in the form of episomes. Three-dimensional imaging of viral gene expression in the nucleus allows us to study interactions and changes in the physical distribution of

  1. Procyanidin trimer C1 derived from Theobroma cacao reactivates latent human immunodeficiency virus type 1 provirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Takanori; Barnor, Jacob; Huu, Tung Nguyen; Morinaga, Osamu; Hamano, Akiko; Ndzinu, Jerry; Frimpong, Angela; Minta-Asare, Keren; Amoa-Bosompem, Mildred; Brandful, James; Odoom, John; Bonney, Joseph; Tuffour, Isaac; Owusu, Baffour-Awuah; Ofosuhene, Mark; Atchoglo, Philip; Sakyiamah, Maxwell; Adegle, Richard; Appiah-Opong, Regina; Ampofo, William; Koram, Kwadwo; Nyarko, Alexander; Okine, Laud; Edoh, Dominic; Appiah, Alfred; Uto, Takuhiro; Yoshinaka, Yoshiyuki; Uota, Shin; Shoyama, Yukihiro; Yamaoka, Shoji

    2015-04-03

    Despite remarkable advances in combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection remains incurable due to the incomplete elimination of the replication-competent virus, which persists in latent reservoirs. Strategies for targeting HIV reservoirs for eradication that involves reactivation of latent proviruses while protecting uninfected cells by cART are urgently needed for cure of HIV infection. We screened medicinal plant extracts for compounds that could reactivate the latent HIV-1 provirus and identified a procyanidin trimer C1 derived from Theobroma cacao as a potent activator of the provirus in human T cells latently infected with HIV-1. This reactivation largely depends on the NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways because either overexpression of a super-repressor form of IκBα or pretreatment with a MEK inhibitor U0126 diminished provirus reactivation by C1. A pan-PKC inhibitor significantly blocked the phorbol ester-induced but not the C1-induced HIV-1 reactivation. Although C1-induced viral gene expression persisted for as long as 48 h post-stimulation, NF-κB-dependent transcription peaked at 12 h post-stimulation and then quickly declined, suggesting Tat-mediated self-sustainment of HIV-1 expression. These results suggest that procyanidin C1 trimer is a potential compound for reactivation of latent HIV-1 reservoirs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Redox-sensitive transcription factor Nrf2 regulates vascular smooth muscle cell migration and neointimal hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashino, Takashi; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yoshida, Takemi; Numazawa, Satoshi

    2013-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species are important mediators for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signaling in vascular smooth muscle cells, whereas excess reactive oxygen species-induced oxidative stress contributes to the development and progression of vascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Activation of the redox-sensitive transcription factor, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), is pivotal in cellular defense against oxidative stress by transcriptional upregulation of antioxidant proteins. This study aimed to elucidate the role of Nrf2 in PDGF-mediated vascular smooth muscle cell migration and neointimal hyperplasia. PDGF promoted nuclear translocation of Nrf2, followed by the induction of target genes, including NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase-1, heme oxygenase-1, and thioredoxin-1. Nrf2 depletion by small interfering RNA enhanced PDGF-promoted Rac1 activation and reactive oxygen species production and persistently phosphorylated downstream extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2. Nrf2 depletion enhanced vascular smooth muscle cell migration in response to PDGF and wound scratch. In vivo, Nrf2-deficient mice showed enhanced neointimal hyperplasia in a wire injury model. These findings suggest that the Nrf2 system is important for PDGF-stimulated vascular smooth muscle cell migration by regulating reactive oxygen species elimination, which may contribute to neointimal hyperplasia after vascular injury. Our findings provide insight into the Nrf2 system as a novel therapeutic target for vascular remodeling and atherosclerosis.

  3. 48 CFR 52.214-25 - Step Two of Two-Step Sealed Bidding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Step Two of Two-Step... Clauses 52.214-25 Step Two of Two-Step Sealed Bidding. As prescribed in 14.201-6(t), insert the following provision: Step Two of Two-Step Sealed Bidding (APR 1985) (a) This invitation for bids is issued to initiate...

  4. Reactivation of fetal hemoglobin in thalassemia and sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Eridani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Considerable attention has been recently devoted to mechanisms involved in the perinatal hemoglobin switch, as it was long ago established that the survival of fetal hemoglobin (HbF production in significant amount can reduce the severity of the clinical course in severe disorders like β-thalassemia and sickle cell disease (SCD. For instance, when β-thalassemia is associated with hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH the disease takes a mild course, labeled as thalassemia intermedia. The same clinical amelioration occurs for the association between HPFH and SCD. As for the mechanism of this effect, some information has been obtained from the study of natural mutations at the human β-globin locus in patients with increased HbF, like the Corfu thalassemia mutations. Important evidence came from the discovery that drugs capable of improving the clinical picture of SCD, like decitabine ad hydroxycarbamide, are acting through the reactivation, to some extent, of HbF synthesis. The study of the mechanism of action of these compounds was followed by the identification of some genetic determinants, which promote this event. In particular, among a few genetic factors involved in this process, the most relevant appears the BCL11A gene, which is now credited to be able to silence γ-globin genes in the perinatal period by interaction with several erythroid-specific transcription factors and is actually considered as a barrier to HbF reactivation by known HbF inducing agents. Epigenetics is also a player in the process, mainly through DNA demethylation. This is certified by the recent demonstration that hypomethylating agents such as 5-azacytidine and decitabine, the first compounds used for HbF induction by pharmacology, act as irreversible inhibitors of demethyltransferase enzymes. Great interest has also been raised by the finding that several micro-RNAs, which act as negative regulators of gene expression, have been implicated in the

  5. Eukaryotic elongation factor 1 complex subunits are critical HIV-1 reverse transcription cofactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Kylie; Wei, Ting; Li, Dongsheng; Qin, Fangyun; Warrilow, David; Lin, Min-Hsuan; Sivakumaran, Haran; Apolloni, Ann; Abbott, Catherine M; Jones, Alun; Anderson, Jenny L; Harrich, David

    2012-06-12

    Cellular proteins have been implicated as important for HIV-1 reverse transcription, but whether any are reverse transcription complex (RTC) cofactors or affect reverse transcription indirectly is unclear. Here we used protein fractionation combined with an endogenous reverse transcription assay to identify cellular proteins that stimulated late steps of reverse transcription in vitro. We identified 25 cellular proteins in an active protein fraction, and here we show that the eEF1A and eEF1G subunits of eukaryotic elongation factor 1 (eEF1) are important components of the HIV-1 RTC. eEF1A and eEF1G were identified in fractionated human T-cell lysates as reverse transcription cofactors, as their removal ablated the ability of active protein fractions to stimulate late reverse transcription in vitro. We observed that the p51 subunit of reverse transcriptase and integrase, two subunits of the RTC, coimmunoprecipitated with eEF1A and eEF1G. Moreover eEF1A and eEF1G associated with purified RTCs and colocalized with reverse transcriptase following infection of cells. Reverse transcription in cells was sharply down-regulated when eEF1A or eEF1G levels were reduced by siRNA treatment as a result of reduced levels of RTCs in treated cells. The combined evidence indicates that these eEF1 subunits are critical RTC stability cofactors required for efficient completion of reverse transcription. The identification of eEF1 subunits as unique RTC components provides a basis for further investigations of reverse transcription and trafficking of the RTC to the nucleus.

  6. Tissue-specific mitotic bookmarking by hematopoietic transcription factor GATA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadauke, Stephan; Udugama, Maheshi I; Pawlicki, Jan M; Achtman, Jordan C; Jain, Deepti P; Cheng, Yong; Hardison, Ross C; Blobel, Gerd A

    2012-08-17

    Tissue-specific transcription patterns are preserved throughout cell divisions to maintain lineage fidelity. We investigated whether transcription factor GATA1 plays a role in transmitting hematopoietic gene expression programs through mitosis when transcription is transiently silenced. Live-cell imaging revealed that a fraction of GATA1 is retained focally within mitotic chromatin. ChIP-seq of highly purified mitotic cells uncovered that key hematopoietic regulatory genes are occupied by GATA1 in mitosis. The GATA1 coregulators FOG1 and TAL1 dissociate from mitotic chromatin, suggesting that GATA1 functions as platform for their postmitotic recruitment. Mitotic GATA1 target genes tend to reactivate more rapidly upon entry into G1 than genes from which GATA1 dissociates. Mitosis-specific destruction of GATA1 delays reactivation selectively of genes that retain GATA1 during mitosis. These studies suggest a requirement of mitotic "bookmarking" by GATA1 for the faithful propagation of cell-type-specific transcription programs through cell division. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of Forkhead Transcription Factors in Diabetes-Induced Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaskar Ponugoti

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disorder, characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from insulin deficiency and/or insulin resistance. Recent evidence suggests that high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS and subsequent oxidative stress are key contributors in the development of diabetic complications. The FOXO family of forkhead transcription factors including FOXO1, FOXO3, FOXO4, and FOXO6 play important roles in the regulation of many cellular and biological processes and are critical regulators of cellular oxidative stress response pathways. FOXO1 transcription factors can affect a number of different tissues including liver, retina, bone, and cell types ranging from hepatocytes to microvascular endothelial cells and pericytes to osteoblasts. They are induced by oxidative stress and contribute to ROS-induced cell damage and apoptosis. In this paper, we discuss the role of FOXO transcription factors in mediating oxidative stress-induced cellular response.

  8. Self-propagating reactive Al/Ni nanocomposites for bonding applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Matthias P.; Roshanghias, Ali; Tortschanoff, Andreas

    2017-12-01

    Highly reactive integrated material systems have recently gained attention, as they promise a feasible tool for heterogeneous integration of micro electromechanical systems. As integrated energy sources they can be used to join heterogeneous materials without applying too much thermal stress to the whole device. An alternative approach is proposed, comprising a single layer of a reactive nanocomposite made of intermixed metal nanoparticles, instead of multilayer systems. In this study the development of the reactive nanocomposite from choice of materials through processing steps, handling and application methods are described. Eventually the results of the experiments upon the reactivity of the nanocomposites and the feasibility for bonding applications are presented. Analysis of the composites was performed by phase-analysis using x-ray diffraction and reaction propagation analysis by high-speed imaging. Composition of products was found to vary with initial particle sizes. Beside of other phases, the dominant phase was intermetallic NiAl.

  9. Nuclear Factor E2-Related Factor-2 Negatively Regulates NLRP3 Inflammasome Activity by Inhibiting Reactive Oxygen Species-Induced NLRP3 Priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiuting; Zhang, Xin; Ding, Yang; Zhou, Wei; Tao, Lei; Lu, Ping; Wang, Yajing; Hu, Rong

    2017-01-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome is a multiprotein complex that protects hosts against a variety of pathogens. However, the molecular mechanisms of modulating NLRP3 inflammasome activation, especially at the priming step, are still poorly understood. This study was designed to elucidate the negative regulation of nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) on the activation of NLRP3 inflammasome. We reported that Nrf2 activation inhibited NLRP3 expression, caspase-1 cleavage, and subsequent IL-1β generation. Compared with normal cells, Nrf2-deficient cells showed upregulated cleaved caspase-1, which were attributed to the increased transcription of NLRP3 caused by excess reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, priming of the NLRP3 inflammasome was sensitive to the exogenous ROS levels induced by H 2 O 2 or rotenone. Combined with adenosine triphosphate, rotenone triggered higher activity of the NLRP3 inflammasome compared with lipopolysaccharide, suggesting that ROS promoted the priming step. In addition, Nrf2-induced NQO1 was involved in the inhibition of the NLRP3 inflammasome. In an in vivo alum-induced peritonitis mouse model, Nrf2 activation suppressed typical IL-1 signaling-dependent inflammation, whereas Nrf2 -/- mice exhibited a significant increase in the recruitment of immune cell and the generation of IL-1β compared with wild-type mice. We elucidated the effects and possible mechanisms of Nrf2 activation-induced NQO1 expression on NLRP3 inflammasome inactivation and established a novel regulatory role of the Nrf2 pathway in ROS-induced NLRP3 priming. We demonstrated Nrf2 negatively regulating NLRP3 inflammasome activity by inhibiting the priming step and suggested that Nrf2 could be a potential target for some uncontrolled inflammasome activation-associated diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 28-43.

  10. Reactivity to sorbitan sesquioleate affects reactivity to fragrance mix I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geier, Johannes; Schnuch, Axel; Lessmann, Holger; Uter, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    Fragrance mix I (FM I) and its single constituents contain 5% and 1% sorbitan sesquioleate (SSO), respectively. SSO is a rare sensitizer and a potential irritant. To determine whether the outcome of the FM I breakdown test is affected by positive patch test reactivity to SSO. A retrospective analysis of data from the Information Network of Departments of Dermatology, 1998-2013, was performed. The full FM I breakdown test including SSO was tested in 2952 patients. Of these, 154 (5.2%) had a positive patch test reaction to SSO 20% pet. and 2709 (91.8%) had a negative patch test reaction. Positive reactions to one or more of the single fragrances contained in the mix were significantly more common (82.5% versus 57.3%) in SSO-positive patients, who also had more multiple reactions than FM I-positive patients with negative SSO reactions (61.5% versus 21.3% patients with reactions to two or more fragrances). Our results indicate that reactivity to SSO markedly affects the outcome of patch testing with FM I and its single constituents. SSO must be an obligatory part of the full FM I breakdown test, and should ideally be included in the baseline series. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Methane dissociation on the steps and terraces of Pt(211) resolved by quantum state and impact site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Helen; Guo, Han; Gutiérrez-González, Ana; Menzel, Jan Paul; Jackson, Bret; Beck, Rainer D.

    2018-01-01

    Methane dissociation on the step and terrace sites of a Pt(211) single crystal was studied by reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) at a surface temperature of 120 K. The C—H stretch RAIRS signal of the chemisorbed methyl product species was used to distinguish between adsorption on step and terrace sites allowing methyl uptake to be monitored as a function of incident kinetic energy for both sites. Our results indicate a direct dissociation mechanism on both sites with higher reactivity on steps than on terraces consistent with a difference in an activation barrier height of at least 30 kJ/mol. State-specific preparation of incident CH4 with one quantum of antisymmetric (ν3) stretch vibration further increases the CH4 reactivity enabling comparison between translational and vibrational activation on both steps and terraces. The reaction is modeled with first principles quantum theory that accurately describes dissociative chemisorption at different sites on the surface.

  12. Insights into mRNP biogenesis provided by new genetic interactions among export and transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estruch Francisco

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The various steps of mRNP biogenesis (transcription, processing and export are interconnected. It has been shown that the transcription machinery plays a pivotal role in mRNP assembly, since several mRNA export factors are recruited during transcription and physically interact with components of the transcription machinery. Although the shuttling DEAD-box protein Dbp5p is concentrated on the cytoplasmic fibrils of the NPC, previous studies demonstrated that it interacts physically and genetically with factors involved in transcription initiation. Results We investigated the effect of mutations affecting various components of the transcription initiation apparatus on the phenotypes of mRNA export mutant strains. Our results show that growth and mRNA export defects of dbp5 and mex67 mutant strains can be suppressed by mutation of specific transcription initiation components, but suppression was not observed for mutants acting in the very first steps of the pre-initiation complex (PIC formation. Conclusions Our results indicate that mere reduction in the amount of mRNP produced is not sufficient to suppress the defects caused by a defective mRNA export factor. Suppression occurs only with mutants affecting events within a narrow window of the mRNP biogenesis process. We propose that reducing the speed with which transcription converts from initiation and promoter clearance to elongation may have a positive effect on mRNP formation by permitting more effective recruitment of partially-functional mRNP proteins to the nascent mRNP.

  13. Solar array stepping to minimize array excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Mahabaleshwar K. P. (Inventor); Liu, Tung Y. (Inventor); Plescia, Carl T. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Mechanical oscillations of a mechanism containing a stepper motor, such as a solar-array powered spacecraft, are reduced and minimized by the execution of step movements in pairs of steps, the period between steps being equal to one-half of the period of torsional oscillation of the mechanism. Each pair of steps is repeated at needed intervals to maintain desired continuous movement of the portion of elements to be moved, such as the solar array of a spacecraft. In order to account for uncertainty as well as slow change in the period of torsional oscillation, a command unit may be provided for varying the interval between steps in a pair.

  14. Notch1–STAT3–ETBR signaling axis controls reactive astrocyte proliferation after brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeComte, Matthew D.; Shimada, Issei S.; Sherwin, Casey; Spees, Jeffrey L.

    2015-01-01

    Defining the signaling network that controls reactive astrogliosis may provide novel treatment targets for patients with diverse CNS injuries and pathologies. We report that the radial glial cell antigen RC2 identifies the majority of proliferating glial fibrillary acidic protein-positive (GFAP+) reactive astrocytes after stroke. These cells highly expressed endothelin receptor type B (ETBR) and Jagged1, a Notch1 receptor ligand. To study signaling in adult reactive astrocytes, we developed a model based on reactive astrocyte-derived neural stem cells isolated from GFAP-CreER-Notch1 conditional knockout (cKO) mice. By loss- and gain-of-function studies and promoter activity assays, we found that Jagged1/Notch1 signaling increased ETBR expression indirectly by raising the level of phosphorylated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), a previously unidentified EDNRB transcriptional activator. Similar to inducible transgenic GFAP-CreER-Notch1-cKO mice, GFAP-CreER-ETBR-cKO mice exhibited a defect in reactive astrocyte proliferation after cerebral ischemia. Our results indicate that the Notch1–STAT3–ETBR axis connects a signaling network that promotes reactive astrocyte proliferation after brain injury. PMID:26124113

  15. Evolution of Chloroplast Transcript Processing in Plasmodium and Its Chromerid Algal Relatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorrell, Richard G.; Drew, James; Nisbet, R. Ellen R.; Howe, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    It is well understood that apicomplexan parasites, such as the malaria pathogen Plasmodium, are descended from free-living algae, and maintain a vestigial chloroplast that has secondarily lost all genes of photosynthetic function. Recently, two fully photosynthetic relatives of parasitic apicomplexans have been identified, the ‘chromerid’ algae Chromera velia and Vitrella brassicaformis, which retain photosynthesis genes within their chloroplasts. Elucidating the processes governing gene expression in chromerid chloroplasts might provide valuable insights into the origins of parasitism in the apicomplexans. We have characterised chloroplast transcript processing pathways in C. velia, V. brassicaformis and P. falciparum with a focus on the addition of an unusual, 3′ poly(U) tail. We demonstrate that poly(U) tails in chromerids are preferentially added to transcripts that encode proteins that are directly involved in photosynthetic electron transfer, over transcripts for proteins that are not involved in photosynthesis. To our knowledge, this represents the first chloroplast transcript processing pathway to be associated with a particular functional category of genes. In contrast, Plasmodium chloroplast transcripts are not polyuridylylated. We additionally present evidence that poly(U) tail addition in chromerids is involved in the alternative processing of polycistronic precursors covering multiple photosynthesis genes, and appears to be associated with high levels of transcript abundance. We propose that changes to the chloroplast transcript processing machinery were an important step in the loss of photosynthesis in ancestors of parasitic apicomplexans. PMID:24453981

  16. Trends in reactivity of oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftelund, Anja

    , and I) and OH on a wide range of rutile oxide surfaces. Furthermore, Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) relations are found for the adsorption of a large number of molecules (including Cl, Br and I) on transition metal oxides. In these relations the activation energies scale linearly with the dissociative...... chemisorption energies. It turns out that the BEP relation for rutile oxides is almost coinciding with the dissociation line, i.e. no barrier exists for the reactive surfaces. The heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of hydrogen halides (HCl, HBr, and HI) is investigated. A micro-kinetic model is solved...

  17. Menstrual cycle and skin reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agner, T; Damm, P; Skouby, S O

    1991-01-01

    The hypothesis was tested that a cyclic variation exists in skin reactivity to irritant stimuli. Twenty-nine healthy women with regular menstrual cycles were challenged with sodium lauryl sulfate as an irritant patch test at day 1 and at days 9 through 11 of the menstrual cycle. The skin response...... in the menstrual cycle as evaluated by visual scoring (p less than 0.05) as well as by measurement of transepidermal water loss (p less than 0.05) and edema formation (p less than 0.005)....

  18. Framework for reactive mass transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Mønster; Johannesson, Björn; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2014-01-01

    Reactive transport modeling is applicable for a range of porous materials. Here the modeling framework is focused on cement-based materials, where ion diffusion and migration are described by the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equation system. A two phase vapor/liquid flow model, with a sorption hysteresis...... description is coupled to the system. The mass transport is solved by using the finite element method where the chemical equilibrium is solved explicitly by an operator splitting method. The IPHREEQC library is used as chemical equilibrium solver. The equation system, solved by IPHREEQC, is explained...

  19. Temperature dependence of the step free energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zandvliet, H. J. W.; Gurlu, O.; Poelsema, Bene

    2001-01-01

    We have derived an expression for the step free energy that includes the usual thermally induced step meandering term and a vibrational entropy term related to the step edge atoms. The latter term results from the reduced local coordination of the step atoms with respect to the terrace atoms and was introduced recently by Frenken and Stoltze as well as by Bonzel and Emundts. Additionally, we have added third and fourth terms that deal with the vibrational entropy contribution of the thermally generated step and kink atoms. At elevated temperatures the two latter vibrational entropy terms are of the same order of magnitude. Incorporation of these vibrational entropy terms results in a faster decrease of the step free energy with increasing temperature than anticipated previously. This enhanced temperature dependence of the step free energy results in a lower thermal roughening temperature of the facet

  20. Next Steps Forward in Understanding Martian Surface and Subsurface Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Brandi L.

    2017-09-01

    The presence of oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and perchlorate (ClO4-), which have been detected on Mars, has significant implications for chemistry and astrobiology. These oxidants can increase the reactivity of the Martian soil, accelerate the decomposition of organic molecules, and depress the freezing point of water. The study by Crandall et al. "Can Perchlorates be Transformed to Hydrogen Peroxide Products by Cosmic Rays on the Martian Surface" reveals a new formation mechanism by which hydrogen peroxide and other potential oxidants can be generated via irradiation of perchlorate by cosmic rays. This study represents an important next step in developing a full understanding of Martian surface and subsurface chemistry, particularly with respect to degradation of organic molecules and potential biosignatures.

  1. Metabolic and Transcriptional Reprogramming in Developing Soybean (Glycine max Embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Grene

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Soybean (Glycine max seeds are an important source of seed storage compounds, including protein, oil, and sugar used for food, feed, chemical, and biofuel production. We assessed detailed temporal transcriptional and metabolic changes in developing soybean embryos to gain a systems biology view of developmental and metabolic changes and to identify potential targets for metabolic engineering. Two major developmental and metabolic transitions were captured enabling identification of potential metabolic engineering targets specific to seed filling and to desiccation. The first transition involved a switch between different types of metabolism in dividing and elongating cells. The second transition involved the onset of maturation and desiccation tolerance during seed filling and a switch from photoheterotrophic to heterotrophic metabolism. Clustering analyses of metabolite and transcript data revealed clusters of functionally related metabolites and transcripts active in these different developmental and metabolic programs. The gene clusters provide a resource to generate predictions about the associations and interactions of unknown regulators with their targets based on “guilt-by-association” relationships. The inferred regulators also represent potential targets for future metabolic engineering of relevant pathways and steps in central carbon and nitrogen metabolism in soybean embryos and drought and desiccation tolerance in plants.

  2. A Method for Determining Reactivity-Time Function of Safety Rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milovanovic, S.; Pesic, M.

    1994-01-01

    For accidental analysis of HERBE fast-thermal core, an accurate reactivity-time function for reactor safety rods is necessary. The HERBE core was designed with four safety rods: two of them are the actual safety rods, and the other two are additional safety rods which include holds during motion. The reactivity-time function is determined in two steps: (1) safety rods reactivity-position function is measured using inverse method; (2) rod drop position-time function is measured using a new method. In previously proposed method, it was determined by measurement of rod drop times and assuming constant acceleration during any particular interval of a rod motion. The complex dependence of the reactivity-time function for the HERBE safety rods during reactor shutdown is determined by combining both previously obtained reactivity worth data and measurements of safety rods trajectory. Integral reactivity-time function of the safety rods, including rods interference reactivity effects, is shown. In this new method an improvement for accurate safety rod position measurement, compared to previously proposed method, is obtained. At the same time, the assumption of the constant acceleration of the safety rods in the motion intervals is validated

  3. Kcne4 Deletion Sex-Dependently Alters Vascular Reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abbott, Geoffrey W; Jepps, Thomas A

    2016-01-01

    ) subunits. We investigated the effects of targeted germline Kcne4 deletion on mesenteric artery reactivity in adult male and female mice. Kcne4 deletion increased mesenteric artery contractility in response to α-adrenoceptor agonist methoxamine, and decreased responses to Kv7.2-7.5 channel activator ML213......, in male but not female mice. In contrast, Kcne4 deletion markedly decreased vasorelaxation in response to isoprenaline in both male and female mice. Kcne4 expression was 2-fold lower in the female versus the male mouse mesenteric artery, and Kcne4 deletion elicited only moderate changes of other Kcne...... transcripts, with no striking sex-specific differences. However, Kv7.4 protein expression in females was twice that in males, and was reduced in both sexes by Kcne4 deletion. Our findings confirm a crucial role for KCNE4 in regulation of Kv7 channel activity to modulate vascular tone, and provide the first...

  4. Reactivity of metal catalysts in glucose-fructose conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loerbroks, Claudia; van Rijn, Jeaphianne; Ruby, Marc-Philipp; Tong, Qiong; Schüth, Ferdi; Thiel, Walter

    2014-09-15

    A joint experimental and computational study on the glucose-fructose conversion in water is reported. The reactivity of different metal catalysts (CrCl3, AlCl3, CuCl2, FeCl3, and MgCl2) was analyzed. Experimentally, CrCl3 and AlCl3 achieved the best glucose conversion rates, CuCl2 and FeCl3 were only mediocre catalysts, and MgCl2 was inactive. To explain these differences in reactivity, DFT calculations were performed for various metal complexes. The computed mechanism consists of two proton transfers and a hydrogen-atom transfer; the latter was the rate-determining step for all catalysts. The computational results were consistent with the experimental findings and rationalized the observed differences in the behavior of the metal catalysts. To be an efficient catalyst, a metal complex should satisfy the following criteria: moderate Brønsted and Lewis acidity (pKa = 4-6), coordination with either water or weaker σ donors, energetically low-lying unoccupied orbitals, compact transition-state structures, and the ability for complexation of glucose. Thus, the reactivity of the metal catalysts in water is governed by many factors, not just the Lewis acidity. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Influence of the void fraction in the linear reactivity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo, J.A.; Ramirez, J.R.; Alonso, G.

    2003-01-01

    The linear reactivity model allows the multicycle analysis in pressurized water reactors in a simple and quick way. In the case of the Boiling water reactors the void fraction it varies axially from 0% of voids in the inferior part of the fuel assemblies until approximately 70% of voids to the exit of the same ones. Due to this it is very important the determination of the average void fraction during different stages of the reactor operation to predict the burnt one appropriately of the same ones to inclination of the pattern of linear reactivity. In this work a pursuit is made of the profile of power for different steps of burnt of a typical operation cycle of a Boiling water reactor. Starting from these profiles it builds an algorithm that allows to determine the voids profile and this way to obtain the average value of the same one. The results are compared against those reported by the CM-PRESTO code that uses another method to carry out this calculation. Finally, the range in which is the average value of the void fraction during a typical cycle is determined and an estimate of the impact that it would have the use of this value in the prediction of the reactivity produced by the fuel assemblies is made. (Author)

  6. Reverse engineering transcriptional gene networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belcastro, Vincenzo; di Bernardo, Diego

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is a step-by-step guide on how to infer gene networks from gene expression profiles. The definition of a gene network is given in Subheading 1, where the different types of networks are discussed. The chapter then guides the readers through a data-gathering process in order to build a compendium of gene expression profiles from a public repository. Gene expression profiles are then discretized and a statistical relationship between genes, called mutual information (MI), is computed. Gene pairs with insignificant MI scores are then discarded by applying one of the described pruning steps. The retained relationships are then used to build up a Boolean adjacency matrix used as input for a clustering algorithm to divide the network into modules (or communities). The gene network can then be used as a hypothesis generator for discovering gene function and analyzing gene signatures. Some case studies are presented, and an online web-tool called Netview is described.

  7. Fluoropolymer and aluminum piezoelectric reactives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janesheski, Robert S.; Groven, Lori J.; Son, Steven

    2012-03-01

    The ability to sensitize a nanoaluminum/piezoelectric polymer composite has been studied using two fluoropolymer systems (THV220A and FC-2175). Reactive composite samples of the nanoaluminum/polymer were made into thin sheets and their ability to store energy and exhibit piezoelectric properties was measured. Also, initial drop weight impact tests were performed on the samples and results showed the piezoelectric energetic composites failed to ignite at a given impact energy unless sensitized. When a DC voltage was applied to the sample, the materials ignited at the same impact energy where previous ignition failed. Results indicate that the reactive composites may have been sensitized by storing the applied charge. The application of a DC voltage may also have an effect on the piezoelectric properties of the energetic composites similar to the way poling techniques work. Further work is planned to investigate what parameters are inducing the sensitization of the material. A better understanding could lead to applications where switching or tuning the sensitization of an energetic material is beneficial.

  8. Reactive chemicals and process hazards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surianarayanan, M.

    2016-01-01

    Exothermic chemical reactions are often accompanied by significant heat release, and therefore, need a thorough investigation before they are taken to a plant scale. Sudden thermal energy releases from exothermic decompositions and runaway reactions have contributed to serious fire and explosions in several chemical process plants. Similarly, thermal runaway had also occurred in storage and transportation of reactive chemicals. The secondary events of thermal runaway reactions can be rupture of process vessel, toxic spills and release of explosive vapor clouds or combination of these also. The explosion hazards are governed by the system thermodynamics and kinetics of the thermal process. Theoretical prediction of limiting temperature is difficult due to process complexities. Further, the kinetic data obtained through classical techniques, at conditions far away from runaway situation, is often not valid for assessing the runaway behavior of exothermic processes. The main focus of this lecture is to discuss the causes and several contributing factors for thermal runaway and instability and present analyses of the methodologies of the new instrumental techniques for assessing the thermal hazards of reactive chemicals during processing, storage and transportation. (author)

  9. Quantum Entanglement and Chemical Reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Espíritu, M; Esquivel, R O; López-Rosa, S; Dehesa, J S

    2015-11-10

    The water molecule and a hydrogenic abstraction reaction are used to explore in detail some quantum entanglement features of chemical interest. We illustrate that the energetic and quantum-information approaches are necessary for a full understanding of both the geometry of the quantum probability density of molecular systems and the evolution of a chemical reaction. The energy and entanglement hypersurfaces and contour maps of these two models show different phenomena. The energy ones reveal the well-known stable geometry of the models, whereas the entanglement ones grasp the chemical capability to transform from one state system to a new one. In the water molecule the chemical reactivity is witnessed through quantum entanglement as a local minimum indicating the bond cleavage in the dissociation process of the molecule. Finally, quantum entanglement is also useful as a chemical reactivity descriptor by detecting the transition state along the intrinsic reaction path in the hypersurface of the hydrogenic abstraction reaction corresponding to a maximally entangled state.

  10. Reactive Astrocytes in Brain Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Wasilewski

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain metastasis, the secondary growth of malignant cells within the central nervous system (CNS, exceeds the incidence of primary brain tumors (i.e., gliomas by tenfold and are seemingly on the rise owing to the emergence of novel targeted therapies that are more effective in controlling extracranial disease relatively to intracranial lesions. Despite the fact that metastasis to the brain poses a unmet clinical problem, with afflicted patients carrying significant morbidity and a fatal prognosis, our knowledge as to how metastatic cells manage to adapt to the tissue environment of the CNS remains limited. Answering this question could pave the way for novel and more specific therapeutic modalities in brain metastasis by targeting the specific makeup of the brain metastatic niche. In regard to this, astrocytes have emerged as the major host cell type that cancer cells encounter and interact with during brain metastasis formation. Similarly to other CNS disorders, astrocytes become reactive and respond to the presence of cancer cells by changing their phenotype and significantly influencing the outcome of disseminated cancer cells within the CNS. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on the contribution of reactive astrocytes in brain metastasis by focusing on the signaling pathways and types of interactions that play a crucial part in the communication with cancer cells and how these could be translated into innovative therapies.

  11. Analysis of microRNA transcription and post-transcriptional processing by Dicer in the context of CHO cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackl, Matthias; Jadhav, Vaibhav; Klanert, Gerald; Karbiener, Michael; Scheideler, Marcel; Grillari, Johannes; Borth, Nicole

    2014-01-01

    CHO cells are the mammalian cell line of choice for recombinant production of therapeutic proteins. However, their low rate of proliferation limits obtainable space-time yields due to inefficient biomass accumulation. We set out to correlate microRNA transcription to cell-specific growth-rate by microarray analysis of 5 CHO suspension cell lines with low to high specific growth rates. Global microRNA expression analysis and Pearson correlation studies showed that mature microRNA transcript levels are predominately up-regulated in a state of fast proliferation (46 positively correlated, 17 negatively correlated). To further validate this observation, the expression of three genes that are central to microRNA biogenesis (Dicer, Drosha and Dgcr8) was analyzed. The expression of Dicer, which mediates the final step in microRNA maturation, was found to be strongly correlated to growth rate. Accordingly, knockdown of Dicer impaired cell growth by reducing growth-correlating microRNA transcripts. Moderate ectopic overexpression of Dicer positively affected cell growth, while strong overexpression impaired growth, presumably due to the concomitant increase of microRNAs that inhibit cell growth. Our data therefore suggest that Dicer dependent microRNAs regulate CHO cell proliferation and that Dicer could serve as a potential surrogate marker for cellular proliferation. PMID:24486028

  12. Growth of Ceria Nano-Islands on a Stepped Au(788 Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng Ma

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The growth morphology and structure of ceria nano-islands on a stepped Au(788 surface has been investigated by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED. Within the concept of physical vapor deposition, different kinetic routes have been employed to design ceria-Au inverse model catalysts with different ceria nanoparticle shapes and arrangements. A two-dimensional superlattice of ceria nano-islands with a relatively narrow size distribution (5 ± 2 nm2 has been generated on the Au(788 surface by the postoxidation method. This reflects the periodic anisotropy of the template surface and has been ascribed to the pinning of ceria clusters and thus nucleation on the fcc domains of the herringbone reconstruction on the Au terraces. In contrast, the reactive evaporation method yields ceria islands elongated in [01-1] direction, i.e., parallel to the step edges, with high aspect ratios (~6. Diffusion along the Au step edges of ceria clusters and their limited step crossing in conjunction with a growth front perpendicular to the step edges is tentatively proposed to control the ceria growth under reactive evaporation conditions. Both deposition recipes generate two-dimensional islands of CeO2(111-type O–Ce–O single and double trilayer structures for submonolayer coverages.

  13. Integrated Design and Control of Reactive and Non-Reactive Distillation Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansouri, Seyed Soheil; Sales-Cruz, Mauricio; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted

    reactive distillation processes. The element concept (Pérez Cisneros et al., 1997) is used to translate a ternary system of compounds (A + B ↔ C) to a binary system of element (WA and WB). In the case of multicomponent reactive distillation processes the equivalent element concept is used to translate...... a multicomponent (multi-element) system (Jantharasuk et al., 2011) of compounds (A + B ↔ C + D(inert)) to a binary system of key elements (elements WHK and WLK). For an energy-efficient design, non-reactive driving force (for binary non-reactive distillation), reactive driving force (for ternary compound reactive...... that apply to a binary non-reactive compound system are valid also for a binary-element or a binary-key-element system. Therefore, it is advantageous to employ the element based method for multicomponent reaction-separation systems. The operation of the non-reactive distillation column, ternary reactive...

  14. Multi-step inhibition explains HIV-1 protease inhibitor pharmacodynamics and resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabi, S. Alireza; Laird, Gregory M.; Durand, Christine M.; Laskey, Sarah; Shan, Liang; Bailey, Justin R.; Chioma, Stanley; Moore, Richard D.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) are among the most effective antiretroviral drugs. They are characterized by highly cooperative dose-response curves that are not explained by current pharmacodynamic theory. An unresolved problem affecting the clinical use of PIs is that patients who fail PI-containing regimens often have virus that lacks protease mutations, in apparent violation of fundamental evolutionary theory. Here, we show that these unresolved issues can be explained through analysis of the effects of PIs on distinct steps in the viral life cycle. We found that PIs do not affect virion release from infected cells but block entry, reverse transcription, and post–reverse transcription steps. The overall dose-response curves could be reconstructed by combining the curves for each step using the Bliss independence principle, showing that independent inhibition of multiple distinct steps in the life cycle generates the highly cooperative dose-response curves that make these drugs uniquely effective. Approximately half of the inhibitory potential of PIs is manifest at the entry step, likely reflecting interactions between the uncleaved Gag and the cytoplasmic tail (CT) of the Env protein. Sequence changes in the CT alone, which are ignored in current clinical tests for PI resistance, conferred PI resistance, providing an explanation for PI failure without resistance. PMID:23979165

  15. Transcription factors: Time to deliver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulasov, Alexey V; Rosenkranz, Andrey A; Sobolev, Alexander S

    2018-01-10

    Transcription factors (TFs) are at the center of the broad regulatory network orchestrating gene expression programs that elicit different biological responses. For a long time, TFs have been considered as potent drug targets due to their implications in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases. At the same time, TFs, located at convergence points of cellular regulatory pathways, are powerful tools providing opportunities both for cell type change and for managing the state of cells. This task formulation requires the TF modulation problem to come to the fore. We review several ways to manage TF activity (small molecules, transfection, nanocarriers, protein-based approaches), analyzing their limitations and the possibilities to overcome them. Delivery of TFs could revolutionize the biomedical field. Whether this forecast comes true will depend on the ability to develop convenient technologies for targeted delivery of TFs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Transcriptional regulation by cyclic AMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montminy, M

    1997-01-01

    A number of hormones and growth factors have been shown to stimulate target cells via second messenger pathways that in turn regulate the phosphorylation of specific nuclear factors. The second messenger cyclic AMP, for example, regulates a striking number of physiologic processes, including intermediary metabolism, cellular proliferation, and neuronal signaling, by altering basic patterns of gene expression. Our understanding of cyclic AMP signaling in the nucleus has expanded considerably over the past decade, owing in large part to the characterization of cyclic AMP-responsive promoter elements, transcription factors that bind them, and signal-dependent coactivators that mediate target gene induction. More importantly, these studies have revealed new insights into biological problems as diverse as biological clocks and long-term memory. The purpose of this review is to describe the components of the cyclic AMP response unit and to analyze how these components cooperate to induce target gene expression in response to hormonal stimulation.

  17. Transcript profiling of a novel plant meristem, the monocot cambium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinkgraf, Matthew; Gerttula, Suzanne; Groover, Andrew

    2017-06-01

    While monocots lack the ability to produce a vascular cambium or woody growth, some monocot lineages evolved a novel lateral meristem, the monocot cambium, which supports secondary radial growth of stems. In contrast to the vascular cambium found in woody angiosperm and gymnosperm species, the monocot cambium produces secondary vascular bundles, which have an amphivasal organization of tracheids encircling a central strand of phloem. Currently there is no information concerning the molecular genetic basis of the development or evolution of the monocot cambium. Here we report high-quality transcriptomes for monocot cambium and early derivative tissues in two monocot genera, Yucca and Cordyline. Monocot cambium transcript profiles were compared to those of vascular cambia and secondary xylem tissues of two forest tree species, Populus trichocarpa and Eucalyptus grandis. Monocot cambium transcript levels showed that there are extensive overlaps between the regulation of monocot cambia and vascular cambia. Candidate regulatory genes that vary between the monocot and vascular cambia were also identified, and included members of the KANADI and CLE families involved in polarity and cell-cell signaling, respectively. We suggest that the monocot cambium may have evolved in part through reactivation of genetic mechanisms involved in vascular cambium regulation. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  18. The Value of Step-by-Step Risk Assessment for Unmanned Aircraft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    La Cour-Harbo, Anders

    2018-01-01

    The new European legislation expected in 2018 or 2019 will introduce a step-by-step process for conducting risk assessments for unmanned aircraft flight operations. This is a relatively simple approach to a very complex challenge. This work compares this step-by-step process to high fidelity risk...

  19. The JAK/STAT3 pathway is a common inducer of astrocyte reactivity in Alzheimer's and Huntington's diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Haim, Lucile; Ceyzériat, Kelly; Carrillo-de Sauvage, Maria Angeles; Aubry, Fabien; Auregan, Gwennaëlle; Guillermier, Martine; Ruiz, Marta; Petit, Fanny; Houitte, Diane; Faivre, Emilie; Vandesquille, Matthias; Aron-Badin, Romina; Dhenain, Marc; Déglon, Nicole; Hantraye, Philippe; Brouillet, Emmanuel; Bonvento, Gilles; Escartin, Carole

    2015-02-11

    Astrocyte reactivity is a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases (ND), but its effects on disease outcomes remain highly debated. Elucidation of the signaling cascades inducing reactivity in astrocytes during ND would help characterize the function of these cells and identify novel molecular targets to modulate disease progression. The Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (JAK/STAT3) pathway is associated with reactive astrocytes in models of acute injury, but it is unknown whether this pathway is directly responsible for astrocyte reactivity in progressive pathological conditions such as ND. In this study, we examined whether the JAK/STAT3 pathway promotes astrocyte reactivity in several animal models of ND. The JAK/STAT3 pathway was activated in reactive astrocytes in two transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease and in a mouse and a nonhuman primate lentiviral vector-based model of Huntington's disease (HD). To determine whether this cascade was instrumental for astrocyte reactivity, we used a lentiviral vector that specifically targets astrocytes in vivo to overexpress the endogenous inhibitor of the JAK/STAT3 pathway [suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3)]. SOCS3 significantly inhibited this pathway in astrocytes, prevented astrocyte reactivity, and decreased microglial activation in models of both diseases. Inhibition of the JAK/STAT3 pathway within reactive astrocytes also increased the number of huntingtin aggregates, a neuropathological hallmark of HD, but did not influence neuronal death. Our data demonstrate that the JAK/STAT3 pathway is a common mediator of astrocyte reactivity that is highly conserved between disease states, species, and brain regions. This universal signaling cascade represents a potent target to study the role of reactive astrocytes in ND. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/352817-13$15.00/0.

  20. Olive phenolic compounds: metabolic and transcriptional profiling during fruit development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alagna Fiammetta

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Olive (Olea europaea L. fruits contain numerous secondary metabolites, primarily phenolics, terpenes and sterols, some of which are particularly interesting for their nutraceutical properties. This study will attempt to provide further insight into the profile of olive phenolic compounds during fruit development and to identify the major genetic determinants of phenolic metabolism. Results The concentration of the major phenolic compounds, such as oleuropein, demethyloleuropein, 3–4 DHPEA-EDA, ligstroside, tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol, verbascoside and lignans, were measured in the developing fruits of 12 olive cultivars. The content of these compounds varied significantly among the cultivars and decreased during fruit development and maturation, with some compounds showing specificity for certain cultivars. Thirty-five olive transcripts homologous to genes involved in the pathways of the main secondary metabolites were identified from the massive sequencing data of the olive fruit transcriptome or from cDNA-AFLP analysis. Their mRNA levels were determined using RT-qPCR analysis on fruits of high- and low-phenolic varieties (Coratina and Dolce d’Andria, respectively during three different fruit developmental stages. A strong correlation was observed between phenolic compound concentrations and transcripts putatively involved in their biosynthesis, suggesting a transcriptional regulation of the corresponding pathways. OeDXS, OeGES, OeGE10H and OeADH, encoding putative 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-P synthase, geraniol synthase, geraniol 10-hydroxylase and arogenate dehydrogenase, respectively, were almost exclusively present at 45 days after flowering (DAF, suggesting that these compounds might play a key role in regulating secoiridoid accumulation during fruit development. Conclusions Metabolic and transcriptional profiling led to the identification of some major players putatively involved in biosynthesis of secondary compounds in the

  1. Interrogating transcriptional regulatory sequences in Tol2-mediated Xenopus transgenics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela G Loots

    Full Text Available Identifying gene regulatory elements and their target genes in vertebrates remains a significant challenge. It is now recognized that transcriptional regulatory sequences are critical in orchestrating dynamic controls of tissue-specific gene expression during vertebrate development and in adult tissues, and that these elements can be positioned at great distances in relation to the promoters of the genes they control. While significant progress has been made in mapping DNA binding regions by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation and next generation sequencing, functional validation remains a limiting step in improving our ability to correlate in silico predictions with biological function. We recently developed a computational method that synergistically combines genome-wide gene-expression profiling, vertebrate genome comparisons, and transcription factor binding-site analysis to predict tissue-specific enhancers in the human genome. We applied this method to 270 genes highly expressed in skeletal muscle and predicted 190 putative cis-regulatory modules. Furthermore, we optimized Tol2 transgenic constructs in Xenopus laevis to interrogate 20 of these elements for their ability to function as skeletal muscle-specific transcriptional enhancers during embryonic development. We found 45% of these elements expressed only in the fast muscle fibers that are oriented in highly organized chevrons in the Xenopus laevis tadpole. Transcription factor binding site analysis identified >2 Mef2/MyoD sites within ~200 bp regions in 6 of the validated enhancers, and systematic mutagenesis of these sites revealed that they are critical for the enhancer function. The data described herein introduces a new reporter system suitable for interrogating tissue-specific cis-regulatory elements which allows monitoring of enhancer activity in real time, throughout early stages of embryonic development, in Xenopus.

  2. Olive phenolic compounds: metabolic and transcriptional profiling during fruit development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Olive (Olea europaea L.) fruits contain numerous secondary metabolites, primarily phenolics, terpenes and sterols, some of which are particularly interesting for their nutraceutical properties. This study will attempt to provide further insight into the profile of olive phenolic compounds during fruit development and to identify the major genetic determinants of phenolic metabolism. Results The concentration of the major phenolic compounds, such as oleuropein, demethyloleuropein, 3–4 DHPEA-EDA, ligstroside, tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol, verbascoside and lignans, were measured in the developing fruits of 12 olive cultivars. The content of these compounds varied significantly among the cultivars and decreased during fruit development and maturation, with some compounds showing specificity for certain cultivars. Thirty-five olive transcripts homologous to genes involved in the pathways of the main secondary metabolites were identified from the massive sequencing data of the olive fruit transcriptome or from cDNA-AFLP analysis. Their mRNA levels were determined using RT-qPCR analysis on fruits of high- and low-phenolic varieties (Coratina and Dolce d’Andria, respectively) during three different fruit developmental stages. A strong correlation was observed between phenolic compound concentrations and transcripts putatively involved in their biosynthesis, suggesting a transcriptional regulation of the corresponding pathways. OeDXS, OeGES, OeGE10H and OeADH, encoding putative 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-P synthase, geraniol synthase, geraniol 10-hydroxylase and arogenate dehydrogenase, respectively, were almost exclusively present at 45 days after flowering (DAF), suggesting that these compounds might play a key role in regulating secoiridoid accumulation during fruit development. Conclusions Metabolic and transcriptional profiling led to the identification of some major players putatively involved in biosynthesis of secondary compounds in the olive tree. Our data

  3. Reactive Balance in Individuals With Chronic Stroke: Biomechanical Factors Related to Perturbation-Induced Backward Falling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salot, Pooja; Patel, Prakruti; Bhatt, Tanvi

    2016-03-01

    An effective compensatory stepping response is the first line of defense for preventing a fall during sudden large external perturbations. The biomechanical factors that contribute to heightened fall risk in survivors of stroke, however, are not clearly understood. It is known that impending sensorimotor and balance deficits poststroke predispose these individuals to a risk of fall during sudden external perturbations. The purpose of this study was to examine the mechanism of fall risk in survivors of chronic stroke when exposed to sudden, slip-like forward perturbations in stance. This was a cross-sectional study. Fourteen individuals with stroke, 14 age-matched controls (AC group), and 14 young controls (YC group) were exposed to large-magnitude forward stance perturbations. Postural stability was computed as center of mass (COM) position (XCOM/BOS) and velocity (ẊCOM/BOS) relative to the base of support (BOS) at first step lift-off (LO) and touch-down (TD) and at second step TD. Limb support was quantified as vertical hip descent (Zhip) from baseline after perturbation onset. All participants showed a backward balance loss, with 71% of the stroke group experiencing a fall compared with no falls in the control groups (AC and YC groups). At first step LO, no between-group differences in XCOM/BOS and ẊCOM/BOS were noted. At first step TD, however, the stroke group had a significantly posterior XCOM/BOS and backward ẊCOM/BOS compared with the control groups. At second step TD, individuals with stroke were still more unstable (more posterior XCOM/BOS and backward ẊCOM/BOS) compared with the AC group. Individuals with stroke also showed greater peak Zhip compared with the control groups. Furthermore, the stroke group took a larger number of steps with shorter step length and delayed step initiation compared with the control groups. Although the study highlights the reactive balance deficits increasing fall risk in survivors of stroke compared with healthy

  4. Transcription of Byzantine Chant - Problems, Possibilities, Formats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troelsgård, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Discusses the problems and possibilities for transsription of Byzantine chant on the basis of medieval musical manuscripts. A relatively 'neutral' style of transcription is suggested for musicological purposes....

  5. Transcriptional networks and chromatin remodeling controlling adipogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Ronni; Mandrup, Susanne

    2012-01-01

    Adipocyte differentiation is tightly controlled by a transcriptional cascade, which directs the extensive reprogramming of gene expression required to convert fibroblast-like precursor cells into mature lipid-laden adipocytes. Recent global analyses of transcription factor binding and chromatin...... remodeling have revealed 'snapshots' of this cascade and the chromatin landscape at specific time-points of differentiation. These studies demonstrate that multiple adipogenic transcription factors co-occupy hotspots characterized by an open chromatin structure and specific epigenetic modifications....... Such transcription factor hotspots are likely to represent key signaling nodes which integrate multiple adipogenic signals at specific chromatin sites, thereby facilitating coordinated action on gene expression....

  6. NAC transcription factor JUNGBRUNNEN1 enhances drought tolerance in tomato

    KAUST Repository

    Thirumalaikumar, Venkatesh P.

    2017-06-22

    Water deficit (drought stress) massively restricts plant growth and the yield of crops; reducing the deleterious effects of drought is therefore of high agricultural relevance. Drought triggers diverse cellular processes including the inhibition of photosynthesis, the accumulation of cell-damaging reactive oxygen species, and gene expression reprogramming, besides others. Transcription factors (TF) are central regulators of transcriptional reprogramming and expression of many TF genes is affected by drought, including members of the NAC family. Here, we identify the NAC factor JUNGBRUNNEN1 (JUB1) as a regulator of drought tolerance in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Expression of tomato JUB1 (SlJUB1) is enhanced by various abiotic stresses, including drought. Inhibiting SlJUB1 by virus-induced gene silencing drastically lowers drought tolerance concomitant with an increase in ion leakage, an elevation of hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) levels, and a decrease of the expression of various drought-responsive genes. In contrast, overexpression of AtJUB1 from Arabidopsis thaliana increases drought tolerance in tomato, alongside with a higher relative leaf water content during drought and reduced H2 O2 levels. AtJUB1 was previously shown to stimulate expression of DREB2A, a TF involved in drought responses, and of the DELLA genes GAI and RGL1. We show here that SlJUB1 similarly controls the expression of the tomato orthologs SlDREB1, SlDREB2, and SlDELLA. Furthermore, AtJUB1 directly binds to the promoters of SlDREB1, SlDREB2 and SlDELLA in tomato. Our study highlights JUB1 as a transcriptional regulator of drought tolerance and suggests considerable conservation of the abiotic stress-related gene regulatory networks controlled by this NAC factor between Arabidopsis and tomato. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Multi-step contrast sensitivity gauge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Enrico C; Thompson, Kyle R; Moore, David G; Heister, Jack D; Poland, Richard W; Ellegood, John P; Hodges, George K; Prindville, James E

    2014-10-14

    An X-ray contrast sensitivity gauge is described herein. The contrast sensitivity gauge comprises a plurality of steps of varying thicknesses. Each step in the gauge includes a plurality of recesses of differing depths, wherein the depths are a function of the thickness of their respective step. An X-ray image of the gauge is analyzed to determine a contrast-to-noise ratio of a detector employed to generate the image.

  8. The micro-step motor controller

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Kwang Pyo; Lee, Chang Hee; Moon, Myung Kook; Choi, Bung Hun; Choi, Young Hyun; Cheon, Jong Gu

    2004-11-01

    The developed micro-step motor controller can handle 4 axes stepping motor drivers simultaneously and provide high power bipolar driving mechanism with constant current mode. It can be easily controlled by manual key functions and the motor driving status is displayed by the front panel VFD. Due to the development of several kinds of communication and driving protocol, PC can operate even several micro-step motor controllers at once by multi-drop connection

  9. Role of the σ54 Activator Interacting Domain in Bacterial Transcription Initiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegel, Alexander R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Wemmer, David E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-10-11

    Bacterial sigma factors are subunits of RNA polymerase that direct the holoenzyme to specific sets of promoters in the genome and are a central element of regulating transcription. Most polymerase holoenzymes open the promoter and initiate transcription rapidly after binding. However, polymerase containing the members of the σ54 family must be acted on by a transcriptional activator before DNA opening and initiation occur. A key domain in these transcriptional activators forms a hexameric AAA + ATPase that acts through conformational changes brought on by ATP hydrolysis. Contacts between the transcriptional activator and σ54 are primarily made through an N-terminal σ54 activator interacting domain (AID). To better understand this mechanism of bacterial transcription initiation, we characterized the σ54 AID by NMR spectroscopy and other biophysical methods and show that it is an intrinsically disordered domain in σ54 alone. In this paper, we identified a minimal construct of the Aquifex aeolicus σ54 AID that consists of two predicted helices and retains native-like binding affinity for the transcriptional activator NtrC1. Using the NtrC1 ATPase domain, bound with the non-hydrolyzable ATP analog ADP-beryllium fluoride, we studied the NtrC1–σ54 AID complex using NMR spectroscopy. We show that the σ54 AID becomes structured after associating with the core loops of the transcriptional activators in their ATP state and that the primary site of the interaction is the first predicted helix. Finally, understanding this complex, formed as the first step toward initiation, will help unravel the mechanism of σ54 bacterial transcription initiation.

  10. Interferon-Stimulated Genes Are Transcriptionally Repressed by PR in Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Katherine R; Goodman, Merit L; Singhal, Hari; Hall, Jade A; Li, Tianbao; Holloran, Sean M; Trinca, Gloria M; Gibson, Katelin A; Jin, Victor X; Greene, Geoffrey L; Hagan, Christy R

    2017-10-01

    The progesterone receptor (PR) regulates transcriptional programs that drive proliferation, survival, and stem cell phenotypes. Although the role of native progesterone in the development of breast cancer remains controversial, PR clearly alters the transcriptome in breast tumors. This study identifies a class of genes, Interferon (IFN)-stimulated genes (ISGs), potently downregulated by ligand-activated PR which have not been previously shown to be regulated by PR. Progestin-dependent transcriptional repression of ISGs was observed in breast cancer cell line models and human breast tumors. Ligand-independent regulation of ISGs was also observed, as basal transcript levels were markedly higher in cells with PR knockdown. PR repressed ISG transcription in response to IFN treatment, the canonical mechanism through which these genes are activated. Liganded PR is robustly recruited to enhancer regions of ISGs, and ISG transcriptional repression is dependent upon PR's ability to bind DNA. In response to PR activation, key regulatory transcription factors that are required for IFN-activated ISG transcription, STAT2 and IRF9, exhibit impaired recruitment to ISG promoter regions, correlating with PR/ligand-dependent ISG transcriptional repression. IFN activation is a critical early step in nascent tumor recognition and destruction through immunosurveillance. As the large majority of breast tumors are PR positive at the time of diagnosis, PR-dependent downregulation of IFN signaling may be a mechanism through which early PR-positive breast tumors evade the immune system and develop into clinically relevant tumors. Implications: This study highlights a novel transcriptional mechanism through which PR drives breast cancer development and potentially evades the immune system. Mol Cancer Res; 15(10); 1331-40. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Calcific Uremic Arteriolopathy: Pathophysiology, Reactive Oxygen Species and Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt M. Sowers

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcific uremic arteriolopathy (CUA/calciphylaxis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease requiring renal replacement. Once thought to be rare, it is being increasingly recognized and reported on a global scale. The uremic milieu predisposes to multiple metabolic toxicities including increased levels of reactive oxygen species and inflammation. Increased oxidative stress and inflammation promote this arteriolopathy by adversely affecting endothelial function resulting in a prothrombotic milieu and significant remodeling effects on vascular smooth muscle cells. These arteriolar pathological effects include intimal hyperplasia, inflammation, endovascular fibrosis and vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis and differentiation into bone forming osteoblast-like cells resulting in medial calcification. Systemic factors promoting this vascular condition include elevated calcium, parathyroid hormone and hyperphosphatemia with consequent increases in the calcium × phosphate product. The uremic milieu contributes to a marked increased in upstream reactive oxygen species—oxidative stress and subsequent downstream increased inflammation, in part, via activation of the nuclear transcription factor NFκB and associated downstream cytokine pathways. Consitutive anti-calcification proteins such as Fetuin-A and matrix GLA proteins and their signaling pathways may be decreased, which further contributes to medial vascular calcification. The resulting clinical entity is painful, debilitating and contributes to the excess morbidity and mortality associated with chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease. These same histopathologic conditions also occur in patients without uremia and therefore, the term calcific obliterative arteriolopathy could be utilized in these conditions.

  12. Extension of the Dermal Sensitisation Threshold (DST) approach to incorporate chemicals classified as reactive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safford, Robert J; Api, Anne Marie; Roberts, David W; Lalko, Jon F

    2015-08-01

    The evaluation of chemicals for their skin sensitising potential is an essential step in ensuring the safety of ingredients in consumer products. Similar to the Threshold of Toxicological Concern, the Dermal Sensitisation Threshold (DST) has been demonstrated to provide effective risk assessments for skin sensitisation in cases where human exposure is low. The DST was originally developed based on a Local Lymph Node Assay (LLNA) dataset and applied to chemicals that were not considered to be directly reactive to skin proteins, and unlikely to initiate the first mechanistic steps leading to the induction of sensitisation. Here we have extended the DST concept to protein reactive chemicals. A probabilistic assessment of the original DST dataset was conducted and a threshold of 64 μg/cm(2) was derived. In our accompanying publication, a set of structural chemistry based rules was developed to proactively identify highly reactive and potentially highly potent materials which should be excluded from the DST approach. The DST and rule set were benchmarked against a test set of chemicals with LLNA/human data. It is concluded that by combining the reactive DST with knowledge of chemistry a threshold can be established below which there is no appreciable risk of sensitisation for protein-reactive chemicals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Oxime-induced reactivation of sarin-inhibited AChE: a theoretical mechanisms study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Gu, Jiande; Leszczynski, Jerzy; Feliks, Mikolaj; Sokalski, W Andrzej

    2007-03-08

    Oximes (especially oximate anions) are used as potential reactivators of OP-inhibited AChE due to their unique alpha-effect nucleophilic reactivity. In the present study, by applying the DFT approach at the B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level and the Møller-Plesset perturbation theory at the MP2/6-311G(d,p) level, the formoximate-induced reactivation patterns of the sarin-AChE adduct and the corresponding reaction mechanism have been investigated. The potential energy surface along the pathway of the reactivation reaction of sarin-inhibited AChE by oxime reveals that the reaction can occur quickly due to the relatively low energy barriers. A two-step process is a major pathway proposed for the studied reactivation reaction. Through the nucleophilic attack, the oximate first binds to the sarin-AChE adduct to form a relatively stable phosphorus complex. The regeneration of the serine takes place subsequently through an elimination step, which is expected to be competitive with the nucleophilic attacking process. The polarizable continuum model (PCM) has been applied to evaluate the solvate effects on the pathway. It is concluded that the reaction energy barriers are also low enough for the reaction to easily occur in solvent. The results derived from both the gas-phase model and the aqueous solvation model suggest that the studied oximate anion is an efficient antidote reagent for sarin-inhibited AChE.

  14. DksA-dependent transcriptional regulation in Salmonella experiencing nitrosative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew A Crawford

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Redox-based signaling is fundamental to the capacity of bacteria to sense, and respond to, nitrosative and oxidative stress encountered in natural and host environments. The conserved RNA polymerase regulatory protein DksA is a thiol-based sensor of reactive nitrogen and oxygen species. DksA-dependent transcriptional control promotes antinitrosative and antioxidative defenses that contribute to Salmonella pathogenesis. The specific adaptive changes mediated by DksA in response to reactive species, however, have not been elucidated. Herein, we characterize DksA-dependent changes in gene expression in Salmonella enterica experiencing nitrosative stress. Genome-wide expression analysis of wild-type and delta-dksA Salmonella exposed to the nitric oxide (•NO donor DETA NONOate demonstrated •NO- and DksA-dependent regulatory control of 427 target genes. Transcriptional changes centered primarily on genes encoding aspects of cellular metabolism. Several antioxidants and oxidoreductases important in redox buffering, •NO detoxification, and damage repair were also observed to be up-regulated in an •NO- and DksA-dependent manner. Compared to wild-type bacteria, •NO-treated delta-dksA Salmonella exhibited a de-repression of genes encoding components of iron homeostasis and failed to activate sulfur assimilation and cysteine biosynthetic operons. As cysteine is integral to efficient antinitrosative and antioxidative defense and repair programs, we further examined the redox-responsive transcriptional control of cysteine biosynthesis by DksA. These investigations revealed that the activation of genes comprising cysteine biosynthesis also occurs in response to hydrogen peroxide, is dependent upon the redox-sensing zinc finger domain of DksA, and requires the transcriptional regulator CysB. Our observations demonstrate that DksA mediates global adaptation to nitrosative stress in Salmonella and provide unique insight into a novel regulatory mechanism

  15. Stat3 inhibition attenuates mechanical allodynia through transcriptional regulation of chemokine expression in spinal astrocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3 is known to induce cell proliferation and inflammation by regulating gene transcription. Recent studies showed that Stat3 modulates nociceptive transmission by reducing spinal astrocyte proliferation. However, it is unclear whether Stat3 also contributes to the modulation of nociceptive transmission by regulating inflammatory response in spinal astrocytes. This study aimed at investigating the role of Stat3 on neuroinflammation during development of pain in rats after intrathecal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS. METHODS: Stat3 specific siRNA oligo and synthetic selective inhibitor (Stattic were applied to block the activity of Stat3 in primary astrocytes or rat spinal cord, respectively. LPS was used to induce the expression of proinflammatory genes in all studies. Immunofluorescence staining of cells and slices of spinal cord was performed to monitor Stat3 activation. The impact of Stat3 inhibition on proinflammatory genes expression was determined by cytokine antibody array, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Mechanical allodynia, as determined by the threshold pressure that could induce hind paw withdrawal after application of standardized von Frey filaments, was used to detect the effects of Stat3 inhibition after pain development with intrathecal LPS injection. RESULTS: Intrathecal injection of LPS activated Stat3 in reactive spinal astrocytes. Blockade of Stat3 activity attenuated mechanical allodynia significantly and was correlated with a lower number of reactive astrocytes in the spinal dorsal horn. In vitro study demonstrated that Stat3 modulated inflammatory response in primary astrocytes by transcriptional regulation of chemokine expression including Cx3cl1, Cxcl5, Cxcl10 and Ccl20. Similarly, inhibition of Stat3 reversed the expression of these chemokines in the spinal dorsal horn. CONCLUSIONS: Stat3 acted as a

  16. Evaluation of the TRCRtest NV-W for norovirus detection in stools by the Transcription-Reverse Transcription Concerted method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medici, Maria Cristina; Tummolo, Fabio; Albonetti, Valeria; Pinardi, Federica; Ferraglia, Francesca; Chezzi, Carlo; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; De Conto, Flora; Calderaro, Adriana

    2013-11-01

    A novel molecular assay, TRCRtest NV-W, based on a transcription-reverse transcription concerted reaction (TRC) for isothermal amplification and real-time detection of norovirus in stools was assessed and compared with an RT-nPCR. Archived stools positive for either different types or variants of norovirus genogroups I and II or other enteric viruses were used to assess the sensitivity and specificity of the novel assay. The TRC assay was 100% specific since it detected all the noroviruses tested and it did not display cross reactivity with other enteric viruses. When screening a collection of 387 stools with the TRC and RT-nPCR assays, the TRC displayed concordance, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of 96.6%, 81%, 99.7%, 98.1%, and 96.3%, respectively, after retesting the negative specimens. Additional PCRs and/or sequencing, used to understand inconsistent results between TRC and RT-nPCR, confirmed all positive results and did not reveal nucleotide variations in the TRC probe and primers binding sites. The TRC assay may be a rapid and ease of use tool for the detection of noroviruses in clinical virology laboratories even in the face of rapidly evolving noroviruses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Reactive Distillation for Esterification of Bio-based Organic Acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, Nathan; Miller, Dennis J.; Asthana, Navinchandra S.; Kolah, Aspi K.; Vu, Dung; Lira, Carl T.

    2008-09-23

    The following is the final report of the three year research program to convert organic acids to their ethyl esters using reactive distillation. This report details the complete technical activities of research completed at Michigan State University for the period of October 1, 2003 to September 30, 2006, covering both reactive distillation research and development and the underlying thermodynamic and kinetic data required for successful and rigorous design of reactive distillation esterification processes. Specifically, this project has led to the development of economical, technically viable processes for ethyl lactate, triethyl citrate and diethyl succinate production, and on a larger scale has added to the overall body of knowledge on applying fermentation based organic acids as platform chemicals in the emerging biorefinery. Organic acid esters constitute an attractive class of biorenewable chemicals that are made from corn or other renewable biomass carbohydrate feedstocks and replace analogous petroleum-based compounds, thus lessening U.S. dependence on foreign petroleum and enhancing overall biorefinery viability through production of value-added chemicals in parallel with biofuels production. Further, many of these ester products are candidates for fuel (particularly biodiesel) components, and thus will serve dual roles as both industrial chemicals and fuel enhancers in the emerging bioeconomy. The technical report from MSU is organized around the ethyl esters of four important biorenewables-based acids: lactic acid, citric acid, succinic acid, and propionic acid. Literature background on esterification and reactive distillation has been provided in Section One. Work on lactic acid is covered in Sections Two through Five, citric acid esterification in Sections Six and Seven, succinic acid in Section Eight, and propionic acid in Section Nine. Section Ten covers modeling of ester and organic acid vapor pressure properties using the SPEAD (Step Potential

  18. Smart Steps to Sustainability 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart Steps to Sustainability provides small business owners and managers with practical advice and tools to implementsustainable and environmentally-preferable business practices that go beyond compliance.

  19. Core restraint contributions to radial expansion reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    Bowing of core assemblies caused by thermal gradients, swelling gradients, and irradiation creep can cause significant changes in reactivity of an LMFBR during startup, overpower and loss-of-flow without scram transients. This paper summarizes calculations of bowing reactivity effects for both a small homogeneous and a small heterogeneous core design. It includes two core restraint concepts for each core design and concentrates on reactivity changes in the critical power-to-flow range of 1.0 to 2.0

  20. Development of Prototype Reactive Armor Tile

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-13

    Final Technical Status Report For DOTC 10-01-INIT-017 Development of Prototype Reactive Armor Tile Reporting Period: 13 May 2015 Ordnance...Final 3. DATES COVERED 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Final Report: Development of Prototype Reactive Armor Tile 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER OTA # W15QKN-09-9...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Prototyping efforts performed for Development of Prototype Reactive Armor Tile 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF

  1. Reactive power compensation a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Hofmann, Wolfgang; Just, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    The comprehensive resource on reactive power compensation, presenting the design, application and operation of reactive power equipment and installations The area of reactive power compensation is gaining increasing importance worldwide. If suitably designed, it is capable of improving voltage quality significantly, meaning that losses in equipment and power systems are reduced, the permissible loading of equipment can be increased, and the over-all stability of system operation improved. Ultimately, energy use and CO2 emisson are reduced. This unique guide discusses the

  2. A Reactive Transport Model for Marcellus Shale Weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Heidari, P.; Jin, L.; Williams, J.; Brantley, S.

    2017-12-01

    Shale formations account for 25% of the land surface globally. One of the most productive shale-gas formations is the Marcellus, a black shale that is rich in organic matter and pyrite. As a first step toward understanding how Marcellus shale interacts with water, we developed a reactive transport model to simulate shale weathering under ambient temperature and pressure conditions, constrained by soil chemistry and water data. The simulation was carried out for 10,000 years, assuming bedrock weathering and soil genesis began right after the last glacial maximum. Results indicate weathering was initiated by pyrite dissolution for the first 1,000 years, leading to low pH and enhanced dissolution of chlorite and precipitation of iron hydroxides. After pyrite depletion, chlorite dissolved slowly, primarily facilitated by the presence of CO2 and organic acids, forming vermiculite as a secondary mineral. A sensitivity analysis indicated that the most important controls on weathering include the presence of reactive gases (CO2 and O2), specific surface area, and flow velocity of infiltrating meteoric water. The soil chemistry and mineralogy data could not be reproduced without including the reactive gases. For example, pyrite remained in the soil even after 10,000 years if O2 was not continuously present in the soil column; likewise, chlorite remained abundant and porosity remained small with the presence of soil CO2. The field observations were only simulated successfully when the specific surface areas of the reactive minerals were 1-3 orders of magnitude smaller than surface area values measured for powdered minerals, reflecting the lack of accessibility of fluids to mineral surfaces and potential surface coating. An increase in the water infiltration rate enhanced weathering by removing dissolution products and maintaining far-from-equilibrium conditions. We conclude that availability of reactive surface area and transport of H2O and gases are the most important

  3. One-step Maskless Fabrication and Optical Characterization of Silicon Surfaces with Antireflective Properties and a White Color Appearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Ling; Feidenhans'l, Nikolaj Agentoft; Telecka, Agnieszka

    2016-01-01

    We report a simple one-step maskless fabrication of inverted pyramids on silicon wafers by reactive ion etching. The fabricated surface structures exhibit excellent anti-reflective properties: The total reflectance of the nano inverted pyramids fabricated by our method can be as low as 12% without...

  4. Reactive species and pulmonary edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iles, Karen E; Song, Weifeng; Miller, David W; Dickinson, Dale A; Matalon, Sadis

    2009-10-01

    Pulmonary edema occurs when fluid flux into the lung interstitium exceeds its removal, resulting in hypoxemia and even death. Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema (NPE) generally results when microvascular and alveolar permeability to plasma proteins increase, one possible etiology being oxidant injury. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) can modify or damage ion channels, such as epithelial sodium channels, which alters fluid balance. Experimental systems in which either RONS are increased or protective antioxidant mechanisms are decreased result in alterations of epithelial sodium channel activity and support the hypothesis that RONS are important in NPE. Both basic and clinical studies are needed to critically define the RONS-NPE connection and the capacity of antioxidant therapy (either alone or as a supplement to β-agonists) to improve patient outcome.

  5. Self-reactive T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becker, Jürgen C; thor Straten, Per; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2014-01-01

    -proteins expressed in regulatory immune cells have been reported, especially in patients with cancer. The seemingly lack of tolerance toward such proteins is interesting, as it suggests a regulatory function of self-reactive T (srT) cells, which may be important for the fine tuning of the immune system....... In particular, surprising has been the description of cytotoxic srT cells that are able to eliminate normal regulatory immune cells. Such srT cells may be important as effector cells that suppress regulatory suppressor cells. The current knowledge of the nature and function of srT cells is still limited. Still......, the therapeutic targeting of srT cells offers a novel approach to harness immune-regulatory networks in cancer....

  6. Technology development of membrane filtration for reactive dye removal from textile industries effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mitra Gholami

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Effluents from textile industries contain different types of dyes. One of these dyes used in textile industries is Reactive dye. Because of high molecular weight and complex chemical structures, they show low levels of biodegradability. Hence, the direct disposal of these effluents to municipal wastewater treatment, produce problems in biological treatment processes. The aim of this research is to study the efficacy of membrane filtration process for reactive dye removal from textile industries effluents. Materials and Methods: In the first step, reactive dye biodegradability was studied through Zahen-Wellens method (ISO9888 1999. In the second step, four types of reactive dyes in 80, 100, 250, 500 and 1000 mg/L concentrations passed through spiral wound membrane modules of nanofilter (NFwith a molecular weight cut off (MWCOof 300 and 600 dalton(Da and reverse osmosis(RO of 50 Da in different temperatures and pressures. In each step, permeate flux, rejection coefficient and ADMI (American Dye Manufacturer Institute value were determined. Results: Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD and rejection coefficient (R% for reactive dye was 25 and 12. 5 reactively. For NF 300, NF600 and RO, COD and R% were obtained (33%, 36%, (33%, 29% and (45%, 99. 6% respectively. The optimum operating condition of 30-35 oC temperature and 4 bar pressure for NF300 & 600Da and 7bar for RO were obtained. Conclusion: according to obtained results, concentration haven any effect on membrane performance. Results also clearly showed higher removal efficiency for the membrane treatment than for biodegradability studies.

  7. Reactive broadcasting protocol for video on demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Jehan-Francois; Carter, Steven W.; Long, Darrell D. E.

    1999-12-01

    We propose a reactive broadcasting protocol that addresses the problem of distributing moderately popular videos in a more efficient fashion. Like all efficient broadcasting protocols, reactive broadcasting assumes that the customer set-top box has enough local storage to store at least one half of each video being watched. Unlike other broadcasting protocols, reactive broadcasting only broadcasts the later portions of each video. the initial segment of each video is distributed on demand using a stream tapping protocol. Our simulations show that reactive broadcasting outperforms both conventional broadcasting protocols and pure stream tapping for a wide range of video request rates.

  8. Digital reactivity meter for NPP Krsko

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glumac, B.; Vidmar, M.; Ravnik, M.

    1984-01-01

    Digital or analog reactivity meter is needed in order to perform the necessary low power physics tests after core reload in a nuclear power plant. Nuclear power plant Krsko ordered the construction of such digital reactivity meter on the basis of 'mikro-m' modular computer system that has been developed by IJS. Input signal sampling model as well as realtime reactivity calculation on the basis of the reactor inverse kinetic equation have also been developed by IJS. This digital reactivity meter has already been used to perform the start-up tests in NPP Krsko following first reload in fall of 1983. (author)

  9. Secure provision of reactive power ancillary services in competitive electricity markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Samahy, Ismael

    The research work presented in this thesis discusses various complex issues associated with reactive power management and pricing in the context of new operating paradigms in deregulated power systems, proposing appropriate policy solutions. An integrated two-level framework for reactive power management is set forth, which is both suitable for a competitive market and ensures a secure and reliable operation of the associated power system. The framework is generic in nature and can be adopted for any electricity market structure. The proposed hierarchical reactive power market structure comprises two stages: procurement of reactive power resources on a seasonal basis, and real-time reactive power dispatch. The main objective of the proposed framework is to provide appropriate reactive power support from service providers at least cost, while ensuring a secure operation of the power system. The proposed procurement procedure is based on a two-step optimization model. First, the marginal benefits of reactive power supply from each provider, with respect to system security, are obtained by solving a loadability-maximization problem subject to transmission security constraints imposed by voltage and thermal limits. Second, the selected set of generators is determined by solving an optimal power flow (OPF)-based auction. This auction maximizes a societal advantage function comprising generators' offers and their corresponding marginal benefits with respect to system security, and considering all transmission system constraints. The proposed procedure yields the selected set of generators and zonal price components, which would form the basis for seasonal contracts between the system operator and the selected reactive power service providers. The main objective of the proposed reactive power dispatch model is to minimize the total payment burden on the Independent System Operator (ISO), which is associated with reactive power dispatch. The real power generation is

  10. Genome-wide data-mining of candidate human splice translational efficiency polymorphisms (STEPs and an online database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Raistrick

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Variation in pre-mRNA splicing is common and in some cases caused by genetic variants in intronic splicing motifs. Recent studies into the insulin gene (INS discovered a polymorphism in a 5' non-coding intron that influences the likelihood of intron retention in the final mRNA, extending the 5' untranslated region and maintaining protein quality. Retention was also associated with increased insulin levels, suggesting that such variants--splice translational efficiency polymorphisms (STEPs--may relate to disease phenotypes through differential protein expression. We set out to explore the prevalence of STEPs in the human genome and validate this new category of protein quantitative trait loci (pQTL using publicly available data.Gene transcript and variant data were collected and mined for candidate STEPs in motif regions. Sequences from transcripts containing potential STEPs were analysed for evidence of splice site recognition and an effect in expressed sequence tags (ESTs. 16 publicly released genome-wide association data sets of common diseases were searched for association to candidate polymorphisms with HapMap frequency data. Our study found 3324 candidate STEPs lying in motif sequences of 5' non-coding introns and further mining revealed 170 with transcript evidence of intron retention. 21 potential STEPs had EST evidence of intron retention or exon extension, as well as population frequency data for comparison.Results suggest that the insulin STEP was not a unique example and that many STEPs may occur genome-wide with potentially causal effects in complex disease. An online database of STEPs is freely accessible at http://dbstep.genes.org.uk/.

  11. Sintering uranium oxide using a preheating step

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, N.J.; Nivas, Y.; Packard, D.R.

    1977-01-01

    Compacted pellets of uranium oxide or uranium oxide with one or more additives are heated in a kiln in a process having a preheating step, a sintering step, a reduction step, and a cooling step in a controlled atmosphere. The process is practiced to give a range of temperature and atmosphere conditions for obtaining optimum fluoride removal from the compacted pellets along with optimum sintering in a single process. The preheating step of this process is conducted in a temperature range of about 600 0 to about 900 0 C and the pellets are held for at least twenty min, and preferably about 60 min, in an atmosphere having a composition in the range of about 10 to about 75 vol % hydrogen with the balance being carbon dioxide. The sintering step is conducted at a temperature in the range of about 900 0 C to 1500 0 C in the presence of an atmosphere having a composition in the range of about 0.5 to about 90 vol % hydrogen with the balance being carbon dioxide. The reduction step reduces the oxygen to metal ratio of the pellets to a range of about 1.98 to 2.10:1 and this is accomplished by gradually cooling the pellets for about 30 to about 120 min from the temperature of the sintering step to about 1100 0 C in an atmosphere of about 10 to 90 vol % hydrogen with the balance being carbon dioxide. Thereafter the pellets are cooled to about 100 0 C under a protective atmosphere, and in one preferred practice the same atmosphere used in the reduction step is used in the cooling step. The preheating, sintering and reduction steps may also be conducted with their respective atmospheres having an initial additional component of water vapor and the water vapor can comprise up to about 20 vol %

  12. From antidunes to step-pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recking, Alain; Leduc, Pauline

    2014-05-01

    Step-pools are bed morphologies that are typical in high-gradient streams , recognizable by a staircase-like longitudinal profile resulting from accumulation of cobbles and boulders that are transverse to the channel and alternating with pools containing finer sediments. Within the last two decades step-pools have been the subject of increased efforts to characterize their nature; however their origin is still in debate. Researchers have very soon suspected step-pools to be the residual form of antidunes produced during flooding, but this hypothesis was continuously contested. Other theories has been proposed, considering, that step-pool profile develops a maximum flow resistance, or that pools geometry is controlled by the energy of a falling jet, or that steps form by boulders accumulation in a channel-spanning manner. All these theories gave very satisfying results when compared with experimental data, but does it mean that the antidune theory should we abandoned? We performed new flume experiments on steep slopes to investigate the antidune origin for step-pools. Our experiments showed that step-pools can have several origins, depending on the flow conditions and sediment mixture used. In some circumstances antidunes were well observed but did not produce stable step-pools morphology. In many occasions, step-pools obtained in the flume were isolated step-pools, with no real apparent periodicity. Only a few flow and sediment conditions allowed us to reproduce trains of antidunes which stabilized at the flow recession to produce stable periodical step-pools. These conditions are presented and discussed.

  13. Calculation of reactivity without Lagrange interpolation; Calculo de la reactividad sin interpolacion de Lagrange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suescun D, D.; Figueroa J, J. H. [Pontificia Universidad Javeriana Cali, Departamento de Ciencias Naturales y Matematicas, Calle 18 No. 118-250, Cali, Valle del Cauca (Colombia); Rodriguez R, K. C.; Villada P, J. P., E-mail: dsuescun@javerianacali.edu.co [Universidad del Valle, Departamento de Fisica, Calle 13 No. 100-00, Cali, Valle del Cauca (Colombia)

    2015-09-15

    A new method to solve numerically the inverse equation of punctual kinetics without using Lagrange interpolating polynomial is formulated; this method uses a polynomial approximation with N points based on a process of recurrence for simulating different forms of nuclear power. The results show a reliable accuracy. Furthermore, the method proposed here is suitable for real-time measurements of reactivity, with step sizes of calculations greater that Δt = 0.3 s; due to its precision can be used to implement a digital meter of reactivity in real time. (Author)

  14. Method for reactivating catalysts and a method for recycling supercritical fluids used to reactivate the catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginosar, Daniel M.; Thompson, David N.; Anderson, Raymond P.

    2008-08-05

    A method of reactivating a catalyst, such as a solid catalyst or a liquid catalyst. The method comprises providing a catalyst that is at least partially deactivated by fouling agents. The catalyst is contacted with a fluid reactivating agent that is at or above a critical point of the fluid reactivating agent and is of sufficient density to dissolve impurities. The fluid reactivating agent reacts with at least one fouling agent, releasing the at least one fouling agent from the catalyst. The at least one fouling agent becomes dissolved in the fluid reactivating agent and is subsequently separated or removed from the fluid reactivating agent so that the fluid reactivating agent may be reused. A system for reactivating a catalyst is also disclosed.

  15. Regulation of transcription in hyperthermophilic archaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, A.B.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the research presented here was to insight in the mechanisms by which transcription in hyperthermophilic archaea is regulated. To accomplish this, we have aimed (I) to identify transcriptional regulatory proteins from hyperthermophilic archaea, (II) to characterize these

  16. 40 CFR 179.94 - Transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of particular oral testimony first becomes available to propose corrections in the transcript of that testimony. Corrections are permitted only for transcription errors. The presiding officer shall promptly... have all oral testimony stenographically reported or recorded and transcribed, with evidence that is...

  17. Overlapping transcription structure of human cytomegalovirus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-01-21

    Jan 21, 2013 ... Transcription of human cytomegalovirus UL/b′ region has been studied extensively for some genes. In this study, transcripts of the UL140 and UL141, two of the UL/b′ genes, were identified in late RNAs of three HCMV isolates using Northern blot hybridization, cDNA library screening and RACE-PCR.

  18. NAC transcription factors: structurally distinct, functionally diverse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Addie Nina; Ernst, Heidi A; Leggio, Leila Lo

    2005-01-01

    level and localization, and to the first indications of NAC participation in transcription factor networks. The recent determination of the DNA and protein binding NAC domain structure offers insight into the molecular functions of the protein family. Research into NAC transcription factors has...

  19. Overlapping transcription structure of human cytomegalovirus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Transcription of human cytomegalovirus UL/b′ region has been studied extensively for some genes. In this study, transcripts of the UL140 and UL141, two of the UL/b′ genes, were identified in late RNAs of three HCMV isolates using Northern blot hybridization, cDNA library screening and RACE-PCR. At least three ...

  20. Phonon scattering in graphene over substrate steps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sevincli, Haldun; Brandbyge, Mads

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the effect on phonon transport of substrate-induced bends in graphene. We consider bending induced by an abrupt kink in the substrate, and provide results for different step-heights and substrate interaction strengths. We find that individual substrate steps reduce thermal conductance...

  1. Connections between transcription, mRNP assembly and quality control in S. cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Torben Heick

    Processing of mRNA and proper formation of messenger ribonucleoprotein particles (mRNPs) require co-transcriptional loading of proteins onto nascent transcripts, which is critically dependent on the function of the THO/TREX complex, as well as on proper mRNA 3’-end formation.To better determine t...... the role(s) of the THO complex, we have searched for mutant alleles that exhibit a genetic interaction with a strain carrying a deletion of the THO complex component MFT1. Our results suggest that the THO complex is functionally connected to the 3’end formation/mRNA export step. High...... to the new 3’-end. Mutations in several genes involved in mRNA export and in mRNP assembly lead to retention of mRNPs in transcription site-foci and to partial degradation of the mRNA by the nuclear exosome. Here, we demonstrate a prominent role of the rate of transcription in the constitution of an export......-competent mRNP. We show that a transcription-defective allele of the Rad3p helicase, a component of the TFIIH transcription initiation factor, suppress several export-related phenotypes linked to mutation of Rna14p and members of the THO complex. Biochemical and genetic data indicate that mutation of Rad3p...

  2. Specific Reactivation of Latent HIV-1 by dCas9-SunTag-VP64-mediated Guide RNA Targeting the HIV-1 Promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Haiyan; Jiang, Zhengtao; Lu, Panpan; Ma, Li; Li, Chuan; Pan, Hanyu; Fu, Zheng; Qu, Xiying; Wang, Pengfei; Deng, Junxiao; Yang, Xinyi; Wang, Jianhua; Zhu, Huanzhang

    2016-03-01

    HIV-1 escapes antiretroviral agents by integrating into the host DNA and forming a latent transcriptionally silent HIV-1 provirus. Transcriptional activation is prerequisite for reactivation and the eradication of latent HIV-1 proviruses. dCas9-SunTag-VP64 transcriptional system has been reported that it can robustly activate the expression of an endogenous gene using a single guide RNA (sgRNA). Here, we systematically investigated the potential of dCas9-SunTag-VP64 with the designed sgRNAs for reactivating latent HIV-1. We found dCas9-SunTag-VP64 with sgRNA 4 or sgRNA 5 targeted from -164 to -146 or -124 to -106 bp upstream of the transcription start sites of HIV-1 could induce high expression of luciferase reporter gene after screening of sgRNAs targeting different regions of the HIV-1 promoter. Further, we confirmed that dCas9-SunTag-VP64 with sgRNA 4 or sgRNA 5 can effectively reactivate latent HIV-1 transcription in several latently infected human T-cell lines. Moreover, we confirmed that the reactivation of latent HIV-1 by dCas9-SunTag-VP64 with the designed sgRNA occurred through specific binding to the HIV-1 LTR promoter without genotoxicity and global T-cell activation. Taken together, our data demonstrated dCas9-SunTag-VP64 system can effectively and specifically reactivate latent HIV-1 transcription, suggesting that this strategy could offer a novel approach to anti-HIV-1 latency.

  3. Intranasal Oxytocin Administration Dampens Amygdala Reactivity towards Emotional Faces in Male and Female PTSD Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Saskia Bj; van Zuiden, Mirjam; Nawijn, Laura; Frijling, Jessie L; Veltman, Dick J; Olff, Miranda

    2016-05-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a disabling psychiatric disorder. As a substantial part of PTSD patients responds poorly to currently available psychotherapies, pharmacological interventions boosting treatment response are needed. Because of its anxiolytic and pro-social properties, the neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) has been proposed as promising strategy for treatment augmentation in PTSD. As a first step to investigate the therapeutic potential of OT in PTSD, we conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over functional MRI study examining OT administration effects (40 IU) on amygdala reactivity toward emotional faces in unmedicated male and female police officers with (n=37, 21 males) and without (n=40, 20 males) PTSD. Trauma-exposed controls were matched to PTSD patients based on age, sex, years of service and educational level. Under placebo, the expected valence-dependent amygdala reactivity (ie, greater activity toward fearful-angry faces compared with happy-neutral faces) was absent in PTSD patients. OT administration dampened amygdala reactivity toward all emotional faces in male and female PTSD patients, but enhanced amygdala reactivity in healthy male and female trauma-exposed controls, independent of sex and stimulus valence. In PTSD patients, greater anxiety prior to scanning and amygdala reactivity during the placebo session were associated with greater reduction of amygdala reactivity after OT administration. Taken together, our results indicate presumably beneficial neurobiological effects of OT administration in male and female PTSD patients. Future studies should investigate OT administration in clinical settings to fully appreciate its therapeutic potential.

  4. Reactivity transient calculatios in research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, R.S. dos

    1986-01-01

    A digital program for reactivity transient analysis in research reactor and cylindrical geometry was showed quite efficient when compared with methods and programs of the literature, as much in the solution of the neutron kinetics equation as in the thermohydraulic. An improvement in the representation of the feedback reactivity adopted on the program reduced markedly the computation time, with some accuracy. (Author) [pt

  5. Reactivity monitoring during reactor-reloading operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumann, N.P.; Ahlfeld, C.F.; Ridgely, G.C.

    1983-01-01

    At the Savannah River Plant (SRP) reloading operations during shutdown present special considerations in reactivity monitoring and control. Large reactivity changes may occur during reloading operations because of the heterogeneous nature of some core designs. This paper describes an improved monitoring system

  6. Reactivity of commercially available monoclonal antibodies to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the present study two-parameter flow cytometry was used to screen existing commercially available mAbs to human leukocyte antigens and major histocompatibility molecules (MHC) for their reactivity with camel leukocytes. The comparison of patterns of reactivity obtained after labelling human and camel leukocytes ...

  7. Reactive arthritis associated with Mycoplasma genitalium urethritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrisment, D; Machelart, I; Wirth, G; Lazaro, E; Greib, C; Pellegrin, J-L; Bébéar, C; Peuchant, O

    2013-11-01

    Mycoplasma genitalium is an important cause of sexually transmitted infections that is gaining recognition and is an independent cause of acute and chronic nongonococcal urethritis in men. M. genitalium has been implicated as a possible causative factor in reactive arthritis. We report a case of reactive arthritis complicating M. genitalium urethritis in an HLA-B27-positive patient. © 2013.

  8. Imidazolide monolayers for versatile reactive microcontact printing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hsu, S.H.; Reinhoudt, David; Huskens, Jurriaan; Velders, Aldrik

    2008-01-01

    Imidazolide monolayers prepared from the reaction of amino SAMs with N,N-carbonyldiimidazole (CDI) are used as a versatile platform for surface patterning with amino-, carboxyl- and alcohol-containing compounds through reactive microcontact printing (µCP). To demonstrate the surface reactivity of

  9. Evolution and Reactivity in the Semantic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alferes, José Júlio; Eckert, Michael; May, Wolfgang

    Evolution and reactivity in the Semantic Web address the vision and concrete need for an active Web, where data sources evolve autonomously and perceive and react to events. In 2004, when the Rewerse project started, regarding work on Evolution and Reactivity in the Semantic Web there wasn’t much more than a vision of such an active Web.

  10. Psychophysiology of proactive and reactive relational aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray-Close, Dianna; Holterman, Leigh Ann; Breslend, Nicole L; Sullivan, Alexandra

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated the joint effects of parasympathetic and sympathetic nervous system reactivity to social and non-social stressors on proactive (i.e., goal-directed, unemotional) and reactive (i.e., emotional, impulsive) functions of relational aggression. Two hundred and forty-seven (M age =18.77years) participants completed a series of stressor tasks while their sympathetic arousal (i.e., skin conductance) and parasympathetic arousal (i.e., respiratory sinus arrhythmia) were assessed. Participants also provided self-reports of their aggressive behavior. In the standardized social stressor only, physiological reactivity was related to aggression, such that respiratory sinus arrhythmia augmentation predicted proactive relational aggression whereas heightened skin conductance reactivity predicted reactive relational aggression. Finally, in the context of low skin conductance reactivity, respiratory sinus arrhythmia augmentation was related to heightened proactive and reactive aggression, whereas respiratory sinus arrhythmia withdrawal was protective. Results suggest that the benefits hypothesized to accompany respiratory sinus arrhythmia withdrawal may only occur among individuals with low "fight or flight" stress responses. Findings extend research on the physiological indicators of aggression to relational aggression, and highlight the importance of assessing functions of aggression, as well as physiological reactivity to multiple stressors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. REACT: A simple framework for reactive systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holenderski, L.

    2008-01-01

    Many software/hardware systems developed in Philips Research, especially those that serve as demonstrators for research ideas or product proposals developed in the Lifestyle sector, are so-called reactive systems. A reactive system consists of sensors, actuators and a control module. Sensors and

  12. Second Reactivation of Neurocysticercosis: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Young Sup; Hwang, Hee Young; Choi, Hye Young; Kim, Jee Eun; Kim, Hyung Sik [Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    This report describes the first case involving a second reactivation of neurocysticercosis. There was peripheral enhancement and surrounding edema at multiple calcified lesions in both cerebral hemispheres on the brain MRI. One must be aware of the possibility of reactivation of neurocysticercosis to make the correct diagnosis

  13. Immune reactivity of candidate reference materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Aalbers, Marja; Fötisch, Kay; de Heer, Pleuni; Notten, Silla; Vieths, Stefan; van Ree, Ronald

    2006-01-01

    Immune reactivity is a key issue in the evaluation of the quality of recombinant allergens as potential reference materials. Within the frame of the CREATE project, the immune reactivity of the natural and recombinant versions of the major allergens of birch pollen (Bet v 1), grass pollen (Phl p 1

  14. The reactive extrusion of thermoplastic polyurethane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, Vincent Wilhelmus Andreas

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to increase the understanding of the reactive extrusion of thermoplastic polyurethane. Overall, several issues were identified: • Using a relative simple extrusion model, the reactive extrusion process can be described. This model can be used to further investigate

  15. Frustrated Lewis pairs: Design and reactivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 127; Issue 2. Frustrated Lewis pairs: Design and reactivity. Sanjoy Mukherjee Pakkirisamy Thilagar. Volume 127 Issue 2 ... main group as well as transition metal chemistry. The design strategies adopted for FLP systems and their unique reactivity are discussed here.

  16. Transcriptional activation of nuclear-related factor 2 by FK506 in Jurkat T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Y W; Jeong, Y M; Chung, M W; Choi, S K; Choi, S J N; Chung, S Y

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the effect of FK506 in transcriptional activation of nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like2 (Nrf2) in human Jurkat T cells. FK506 treatment increased the generation of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species in Jurkat cells in a dose-dependent manner. Generation of nitric oxide was also increased after treatment with FK506 in Jurkat cells. Peak levels of endothelial nitricoxide synthase expression occurred at 24 hours and then decreased after 48 hours. We found that a marked dissociation of Nrf 2 from Kelch-like ECH-associated protein-1 and subsequently Nrf 2 nuclear translocation occurred in Jurkat cells treated with FK506 during 48 hours. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis data revealed that the FK506 treatment increased expression of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in Jurkat cells in a dose-dependent manner. HO-1 expression was induced after 6 hours of treatment of FK506 to Jurkat cells, peaked at 24 hours, and then decreased after 48 hours. These results suggest that FK506 induces Nrf 2-driven transcriptional activation of the antioxidant response element by activating HO-1 and free radicals such as reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. A NAC Transcription Factor Represses Putrescine Biosynthesis and Affects Drought Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Fu, Bing; Sun, Peipei; Xiao, Chang; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2016-11-01

    Arginine decarboxylase (ADC)-mediated putrescine biosynthesis plays an important role in plant stress responses, but the transcriptional regulation of ADC in response to abiotic stress is not well understood. We isolated a NAM, ATAF1/2, and CUC (NAC) domain-containing transcription factor, PtrNAC72, from trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata) by yeast one-hybrid screening. PtrNAC72, localized to the nucleus, binds specifically to the promoter of PtADC and acts as a transcriptional repressor. PtrNAC72 expression was induced by cold, drought, and abscisic acid. ADC messenger RNA abundance and putrescine levels were decreased in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana nudicaulis) plants overexpressing PtrNAC72 but increased, compared with the wild type, in an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transfer DNA insertion mutant, nac72 While transgenic tobacco lines overexpressing PtrNAC72 were more sensitive to drought, plants of the Arabidopsis nac72 mutant exhibited enhanced drought tolerance, consistent with the accumulation of reactive oxygen species in the tested genotypes. In addition, exogenous application of putrescine to the overexpression lines restored drought tolerance, while treatment with d-arginine, an ADC inhibitor, compromised the drought tolerance of nac72 Taken together, these results demonstrate that PtrNAC72 is a repressor of putrescine biosynthesis and may negatively regulate the drought stress response, at least in part, via the modulation of putrescine-associated reactive oxygen species homeostasis. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  18. A NAC Transcription Factor Represses Putrescine Biosynthesis and Affects Drought Tolerance1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Fu, Bing; Sun, Peipei; Xiao, Chang; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Arginine decarboxylase (ADC)-mediated putrescine biosynthesis plays an important role in plant stress responses, but the transcriptional regulation of ADC in response to abiotic stress is not well understood. We isolated a NAM, ATAF1/2, and CUC (NAC) domain-containing transcription factor, PtrNAC72, from trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata) by yeast one-hybrid screening. PtrNAC72, localized to the nucleus, binds specifically to the promoter of PtADC and acts as a transcriptional repressor. PtrNAC72 expression was induced by cold, drought, and abscisic acid. ADC messenger RNA abundance and putrescine levels were decreased in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana nudicaulis) plants overexpressing PtrNAC72 but increased, compared with the wild type, in an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transfer DNA insertion mutant, nac72. While transgenic tobacco lines overexpressing PtrNAC72 were more sensitive to drought, plants of the Arabidopsis nac72 mutant exhibited enhanced drought tolerance, consistent with the accumulation of reactive oxygen species in the tested genotypes. In addition, exogenous application of putrescine to the overexpression lines restored drought tolerance, while treatment with d-arginine, an ADC inhibitor, compromised the drought tolerance of nac72. Taken together, these results demonstrate that PtrNAC72 is a repressor of putrescine biosynthesis and may negatively regulate the drought stress response, at least in part, via the modulation of putrescine-associated reactive oxygen species homeostasis. PMID:27663409

  19. Transcription-dependent degradation controls the stability of the SREBP family of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundqvist, Anders; Ericsson, Johan

    2003-11-25

    Cholesterol metabolism is tightly controlled by members of the sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) family of transcription factors. Here we demonstrate that the ubiquitination and degradation of SREBPs depend on their transcriptional activity. Mutations in the transactivation or DNA-binding domains of SREBPs inhibit their transcriptional activity and stabilize the proteins. The transcriptional activity and degradation of these mutants are restored when fused to heterologous transactivation or DNA-binding domains. When SREBP1a was fused to the DBD of Gal4, the ubiquitination and degradation of the fusion protein depended on coexpression of a promoter-reporter gene containing Gal4-binding sites. In addition, disruption of the interaction between WT SREBP and endogenous p300/CBP resulted in inhibition of SREBP-dependent transcription and stabilization of SREBP. Chemical inhibitors of transcription reduced the degradation of transcriptionally active SREBP1a, whereas they had no effect on the stability of transcriptionally inactive mutants, demonstrating that transcriptional activation plays an important role in the degradation of SREBPs. Thus, transcription-dependent degradation of SREBP constitutes a feedback mechanism to regulate the expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism and may represent a general mechanism to regulate the duration of transcriptional responses.

  20. Reactive oxygen species in periodontitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parveen Dahiya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent epidemiological studies reveal that more than two-third of the world′s population suffers from one of the chronic forms of periodontal disease. The primary etiological agent of this inflammatory disease is a polymicrobial complex, predominantly Gram negative anaerobic or facultative bacteria within the sub-gingival biofilm. These bacterial species initiate the production of various cytokines such as interleukin-8 and TNF-α, further causing an increase in number and activity of polymorphonucleocytes (PMN along with these cytokines, PMNs also produce reactive oxygen species (ROS superoxide via the respiratory burst mechanism as the part of the defence response to infection. ROS just like the interleukins have deleterious effects on tissue cells when produced in excess. To counter the harmful effects of ROS, human body has its own defence mechanisms to eliminate them as soon as they are formed. The aim of this review is to focus on the role of different free radicals, ROS, and antioxidants in the pathophysiology of periodontal tissue destruction.