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Sample records for transactivator protein ul69

  1. Proteomic analysis of the herpes simplex virus 1 virion protein 16 transactivator protein in infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Hyung; Knipe, David M

    2015-06-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 virion protein 16 (VP16) tegument protein forms a transactivation complex with the cellular proteins host cell factor 1 (HCF-1) and octamer-binding transcription factor 1 (Oct-1) upon entry into the host cell. VP16 has also been shown to interact with a number of virion tegument proteins and viral glycoprotein H to promote viral assembly, but no comprehensive study of the VP16 proteome has been performed at early times postinfection. We therefore performed a proteomic analysis of VP16-interacting proteins at 3 h postinfection. We confirmed the interaction of VP16 with HCF-1 and a large number of cellular Mediator complex proteins, but most surprisingly, we found that the major viral protein associating with VP16 is the infected cell protein 4 (ICP4) immediate-early (IE) transactivator protein. These results raise the potential for a new function for VP16 in associating with the IE ICP4 and playing a role in transactivation of early and late gene expression, in addition to its well-documented function in transactivation of IE gene expression. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Properties of virion transactivator proteins encoded by primate cytomegaloviruses

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    Barry Peter A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a betaherpesvirus that causes severe disease in situations where the immune system is immature or compromised. HCMV immediate early (IE gene expression is stimulated by the virion phosphoprotein pp71, encoded by open reading frame (ORF UL82, and this transactivation activity is important for the efficient initiation of viral replication. It is currently recognized that pp71 acts to overcome cellular intrinsic defences that otherwise block viral IE gene expression, and that interactions of pp71 with the cell proteins Daxx and ATRX are important for this function. A further property of pp71 is the ability to enable prolonged gene expression from quiescent herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 genomes. Non-human primate cytomegaloviruses encode homologs of pp71, but there is currently no published information that addresses their effects on gene expression and modes of action. Results The UL82 homolog encoded by simian cytomegalovirus (SCMV, strain Colburn, was identified and cloned. This ORF, named S82, was cloned into an HSV-1 vector, as were those from baboon, rhesus monkey and chimpanzee cytomegaloviruses. The use of an HSV-1 vector enabled expression of the UL82 homologs in a range of cell types, and permitted investigation of their abilities to direct prolonged gene expression from quiescent genomes. The results show that all UL82 homologs activate gene expression, and that neither host cell type nor promoter target sequence has major effects on these activities. Surprisingly, the UL82 proteins specified by non-human primate cytomegaloviruses, unlike pp71, did not direct long term expression from quiescent HSV-1 genomes. In addition, significant differences were observed in the intranuclear localization of the UL82 homologs, and in their effects on Daxx. Strikingly, S82 mediated the release of Daxx from nuclear domain 10 substructures much more rapidly than pp71 or the other proteins tested. All

  3. I-mfa domain proteins specifically interact with HTLV-1 Tax and repress its transactivating functions

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    Kusano, Shuichi, E-mail: skusano@m2.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Division of Persistent and Oncogenic Viruses, Center for Chronic Viral Diseases, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Yoshimitsu, Makoto; Hachiman, Miho [Division of Hematology and Immunology, Center for Chronic Viral Diseases, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Ikeda, Masanori [Division of Persistent and Oncogenic Viruses, Center for Chronic Viral Diseases, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    The I-mfa domain proteins HIC (also known as MDFIC) and I-mfa (also known as MDFI) are candidate tumor suppressor genes that are involved in cellular and viral transcriptional regulation. Here, we show that HIC and I-mfa directly interact with human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) Tax protein in vitro. In addition, HIC and I-mfa repress Tax-dependent transactivation of an HTLV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) reporter construct in COS-1, Jurkat and high-Tax-producing HTLV-1-infected T cells. HIC also interacts with Tax through its I-mfa domain in vivo and represses Tax-dependent transactivation of HTLV-1 LTR and NF-κB reporter constructs in an interaction-dependent manner. Furthermore, we show that HIC decreases the nuclear distribution and stimulates the proteasomal degradation of Tax. These data reveal that HIC specifically interacts with HTLV-1 Tax and negatively regulates Tax transactivational activity by altering its subcellular distribution and stability. - Highlights: • I-mfa domain proteins, HIC and I-mfa, specifically interact with HTLV-1 Tax. • HIC and I-mfa repress the Tax-dependent transactivation of HTLV-1 LTR. • HIC represses the Tax-dependent transactivation of NF-κΒ. • HIC decreases the nuclear distribution of Tax. • HIC stimulates the proteasomal degradation of Tax.

  4. Inhibition of E2F-1 transactivation by direct binding of the retinoblastoma protein

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    Helin, K; Harlow, E; Fattaey, A

    1993-01-01

    to transcription factor E2F has provided a model for the mechanism of pRB-mediated growth regulation. Since adenovirus E1A proteins dissociate the pRB-E2F complexes and stimulate E2F-dependent transcription, it has been suggested that pRB inhibits E2F transactivation. Although some evidence for this hypothesis has...... been provided, it has not been possible to determine the mechanism of pRB-mediated inhibition of E2F transactivation. In this study, we constructed mutants of E2F-1 that do not bind to pRB yet retain the ability to transactivate the adenovirus E2 promoter through E2F DNA-binding sites. We demonstrated...

  5. BS69 : A novel adenovirus E1A-associated protein that inhibits E1A transactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hateboer, G.; Gennissen, A.M.C.; Ramos, Y.F.M.; Kerkhoven, R.; Sonntag-Buck, V.; Stunnenberg, H.G.; Bernards, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The adenovirus ElA gene products are nuclear phosphoproteins that can transactivate the other adenovirus early genes as well as several cellular genes, and can transform primary rodent cells in culture. Transformation and transactivation by ElA proteins is most likely to be mediated through

  6. Cell-Surface Receptors Transactivation Mediated by G Protein-Coupled Receptors

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    Cattaneo, Fabio; Guerra, Germano; Parisi, Melania; De Marinis, Marta; Tafuri, Domenico; Cinelli, Mariapia; Ammendola, Rosario

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are seven transmembrane-spanning proteins belonging to a large family of cell-surface receptors involved in many intracellular signaling cascades. Despite GPCRs lack intrinsic tyrosine kinase activity, tyrosine phosphorylation of a tyrosine kinase receptor (RTK) occurs in response to binding of specific agonists of several such receptors, triggering intracellular mitogenic cascades. This suggests that the notion that GPCRs are associated with the regulation of post-mitotic cell functions is no longer believable. Crosstalk between GPCR and RTK may occur by different molecular mechanism such as the activation of metalloproteases, which can induce the metalloprotease-dependent release of RTK ligands, or in a ligand-independent manner involving membrane associated non-receptor tyrosine kinases, such as c-Src. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are also implicated as signaling intermediates in RTKs transactivation. Intracellular concentration of ROS increases transiently in cells stimulated with GPCR agonists and their deliberated and regulated generation is mainly catalyzed by enzymes that belong to nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase family. Oxidation and/or reduction of cysteine sulfhydryl groups of phosphatases tightly controls the activity of RTKs and ROS-mediated inhibition of cellular phosphatases results in an equilibrium shift from the non-phosphorylated to the phosphorylated state of RTKs. Many GPCR agonists activate phospholipase C, which catalyze the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bis-phosphate to produce inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate and diacylglicerol. The consequent mobilization of Ca2+ from endoplasmic reticulum leads to the activation of protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms. PKCα mediates feedback inhibition of RTK transactivation during GPCR stimulation. Recent data have expanded the coverage of transactivation to include Serine/Threonine kinase receptors and Toll-like receptors. Herein, we

  7. Identification of Essential Genetic Baculoviral Elements for Recombinant Protein Expression by Transactivation in Sf21 Insect Cells.

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    Maren Bleckmann

    Full Text Available The Baculovirus Expression Vector System (BEVS is widely used to produce high amounts of recombinant proteins. Nevertheless, generating recombinant baculovirus in high quality is rather time-consuming and labor-intensive. Alternatively, virus-free expression in insect cells did not achieve similar expression levels for most proteins so far. The transactivation method is a promising approach for protein expression in Sf21 cells. It combines advantages of BEVS and plasmid-based expression by activating strong virus-dependent promoters on a transfected plasmid by baculoviral coinfection. Here, we identified expression elements required for transactivation. Therefore, we designed several vectors comprising different viral promoters or promoter combinations and tested them for eGFP expression using the automated BioLector microcultivation system. Remarkably, only the combination of the very late promoter p10 together with the homologous region 5 (hr5 could boost expression during transactivation. Other elements, like p10 alone or the late viral promoter polH, did not respond to transactivation. A new combination of hr5 and p10 with the strongest immediate early OpMNPV viral promoter OpIE2 improved the yield of eGFP by ~25% in comparison to the previous applied hr5-IE1-p10 expression cassette. Furthermore, we observed a strong influence of the transcription termination sequence and vector backbone on the level of expression. Finally, the expression levels for transactivation, BEVS and solely plasmid-based expression were compared for the marker protein eGFP, underlining the potential of transactivation for fast recombinant protein expression in Sf21 cells. In conclusion, essential elements for transactivation could be identified. The optimal elements were applied to generate an improved vector applicable in virus-free plasmid-based expression, transactivation and BEVS.

  8. Identification of Essential Genetic Baculoviral Elements for Recombinant Protein Expression by Transactivation in Sf21 Insect Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fang-Fang; Yen, Zen-Zen; Lindemann, Nils; Meyer, Steffen; Spehr, Johannes; van den Heuvel, Joop

    2016-01-01

    The Baculovirus Expression Vector System (BEVS) is widely used to produce high amounts of recombinant proteins. Nevertheless, generating recombinant baculovirus in high quality is rather time-consuming and labor-intensive. Alternatively, virus-free expression in insect cells did not achieve similar expression levels for most proteins so far. The transactivation method is a promising approach for protein expression in Sf21 cells. It combines advantages of BEVS and plasmid-based expression by activating strong virus-dependent promoters on a transfected plasmid by baculoviral coinfection. Here, we identified expression elements required for transactivation. Therefore, we designed several vectors comprising different viral promoters or promoter combinations and tested them for eGFP expression using the automated BioLector microcultivation system. Remarkably, only the combination of the very late promoter p10 together with the homologous region 5 (hr5) could boost expression during transactivation. Other elements, like p10 alone or the late viral promoter polH, did not respond to transactivation. A new combination of hr5 and p10 with the strongest immediate early OpMNPV viral promoter OpIE2 improved the yield of eGFP by ~25% in comparison to the previous applied hr5-IE1-p10 expression cassette. Furthermore, we observed a strong influence of the transcription termination sequence and vector backbone on the level of expression. Finally, the expression levels for transactivation, BEVS and solely plasmid-based expression were compared for the marker protein eGFP, underlining the potential of transactivation for fast recombinant protein expression in Sf21 cells. In conclusion, essential elements for transactivation could be identified. The optimal elements were applied to generate an improved vector applicable in virus-free plasmid-based expression, transactivation and BEVS. PMID:26934632

  9. Phosphorylation of bovine leukemia virus Tax protein is required for in vitro transformation but not for transactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willems, L; Grimonpont, C; Kerkhofs, P; Capiau, C; Gheysen, D; Conrath, K; Roussef, R; Mamoun, R; Portetelle, D; Burny, A; Adam, E; Lefèbvre, L; Twizere, J C; Heremans, H; Kettmann, R

    1998-04-30

    The Tax proteins of the oncovirinae viruses are phosphorylated transcriptional activators that exhibit oncogenic potential. The role of phosphorylation in their functional activities remains unknown. As a model for the Human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I), Bovine Leukemia Virus (BLV) permits the characterization of viral replication and leukemogenesis in vivo. Here, we show that the BLV Tax protein is phosphorylated on serine residues 106 and 293 both in insect and in mammalian cells. These sites can also be efficiently phosphorylated by the cdc2 and MAP kinases in vitro. Mutation of these residues does not affect the capacity of the Tax protein to function as a transactivator. Indeed, the Tax proteins mutated at one or both serines increase LTR-directed viral transcription at levels similar to those obtained with wild-type Tax in cell culture. Moreover, inhibition of Tax phosphorylation by W7, a calmodulin antagonist, does not alter its transactivation activity. Thus, phosphorylation on serines 106 and 293 is not required for transactivation by Tax. However, simultaneous substitution of both serines into alanine residues destroys the capacity of Tax to cooperate with the Ha-ras oncogene to transform primary rat embryo fibroblasts and induce tumors in nude mice. When the serines were replaced with aspartic acid residues, the oncogenic potential of Tax was maintained indicating that the negative charge rather than the phosphate group itself was required for Tax oncogenicity. Finally, to assess the role of the serine residues in vivo, recombinant viruses which express the Tax mutants were constructed and injected into sheep. It appeared that the mutated proviruses replicate at levels similar to the wild-type virus in vivo. We conclude that Tax phosphorylation is dispensable for transactivation and viral replication in vivo but is required for its oncogenic potential in vitro.

  10. Frontotemporal dementia with trans-activation response DNA-binding protein 43 presenting with catatonic syndrome.

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    Watanabe, Ryohei; Kawakami, Ito; Onaya, Mitsumoto; Higashi, Shinji; Arai, Nobutaka; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Hasegawa, Masato; Arai, Tetsuaki

    2017-11-07

    Catatonia is a clinical syndrome characterized by symptoms such as immobility, mutism, stupor, stereotypy, echophenomena, catalepsy, automatic obedience, posturing, negativism, gegenhalten and ambitendency. This syndrome occurs mostly in mood disorder and schizophrenic patients, and is related to neuronal dysfunction involving the frontal lobe. Some cases of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) with catatonia have been reported, but these cases were not examined by autopsy. Here, we report on a FTD case which showed catatonia after the first episode of brief psychotic disorder. At the age of 58, the patient had a sudden onset of disorganized behavior and meaningless speech. Psychotropic drugs were effective for catatonic symptoms. However, after remission apathy, hyperorality, socially inappropriate behavior, hoarding, and an instinctive grasp reaction appeared and persisted. Brain MRI showed significant atrophy of the bilateral fronto-temporal lobes. A neuropathological examination revealed extensive trans-activation response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) positive neurocytoplasmic inclusions and dystrophic neurites in the brain, including the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, and brainstem. Pathological diagnosis was frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with TDP-43 (FTLD-TDP) type C, which was also confirmed by the band pattern of C-terminal fragments of TDP-43 on western blotting of sarkosyl-insoluble fractions extracted from the frozen brain. Dysfunction of the thalamus, globus pallidus, supplementary motor area, amygdala and cingulate cortex have been said to be related to the catatonic syndrome. In this case, these areas were affected, showing abnormal TDP-43-positive structures. Further studies are expected to confirm further clinical - pathological correlations to FTLD. © 2017 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  11. Genus beta human papillomavirus E6 proteins vary in their effects on the transactivation of p53 target genes.

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    White, Elizabeth A; Walther, Johanna; Javanbakht, Hassan; Howley, Peter M

    2014-08-01

    The genus beta human papillomaviruses (beta HPVs) cause cutaneous lesions and are thought to be involved in the initiation of some nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs), particularly in patients with the genetic disorder epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV). We have previously reported that at least two of the genus beta HPV E6 proteins bind to and/or increase the steady-state levels of p53 in squamous epithelial cells. This is in contrast to a well-characterized ability of the E6 proteins of cancer-associated HPVs of genus alpha HPV, which inactivate p53 by targeting its ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. In this study, we have investigated the ability of genus beta E6 proteins from eight different HPV types to block the transactivation of p53 target genes following DNA damage. We find that the E6 proteins from diverse beta HPV species and types vary in their capacity to block the induction of MDM2, p21, and proapoptotic genes after genotoxic stress. We conclude that some genus beta HPV E6 proteins inhibit at least some p53 target genes, although perhaps not by the same mechanism or to the same degree as the high-risk genus alpha HPV E6 proteins. This study addresses the ability of various human papillomavirus E6 proteins to block the activation of p53-responsive cellular genes following DNA damage in human keratinocytes, the normal host cell for HPVs. The E6 proteins encoded by the high-risk, cancer-associated HPV types of genus alpha HPV have a well-established activity to target p53 degradation and thereby inhibit the response to DNA damage. In this study, we have investigated the ability of genus beta HPV E6 proteins from eight different HPV types to block the ability of p53 to transactivate downstream genes following DNA damage. We find that some, but not all, genus beta HPV E6 proteins can block the transactivation of some p53 target genes. This differential response to DNA damage furthers the understanding of cutaneous HPV biology and may help to explain the

  12. Protein kinase A-dependent transactivation by the E2A-Pbx1 fusion protein.

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    Ogo, A; Waterman, M R; Kamps, M P; Kagawa, N

    1995-10-27

    The chimeric gene E2A-PBX1 is formed by the t(1;19) chromosomal translocation exclusively associated with pediatric pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (pre-B ALL). The resultant fusion protein from this chimeric gene contains the DNA-binding homeodomain of Pbx1. The first and only functional Pbx1 binding site has been localized in bovine CYP17 to a sequence (CRS1) that participates in cAMP-dependent transcription of this gene encoding the steroid hydroxylase, 17 alpha-hydroxylase cytochrome P450. Because Pbx1 is not expressed in pre-B cells, it may be possible that the E2a-Pbx1 fusion protein expressed in pre-B cells having this translocation will activate, in response to cAMP, transcription of genes not normally expressed in these cells leading to arrest of differentiation at the pre-B cell stage. We have now shown that reporter genes comprising CRS1 are activated transcriptionally by protein kinase A (PKA) in the pre-B cell line 697, which endogenously expresses the fusion protein, and that overexpression of E2A-Pbx1 in additional cell lines enhances transcription of reporter genes in a PKA-dependent fashion. Thus, it seems plausible that arrest in the pre-B stage leading to pre-B ALL includes cAMP-dependent activation of E2A-Pbx1.

  13. The viral transactivator HBx protein exhibits a high potential for regulation via phosphorylation through an evolutionarily conserved mechanism

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    Hernández Sergio

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV encodes an oncogenic factor, HBx, which is a multifunctional protein that can induce dysfunctional regulation of signaling pathways, transcription, and cell cycle progression, among other processes, through interactions with target host factors. The subcellular localization of HBx is both cytoplasmic and nuclear. This dynamic distribution of HBx could be essential to the multiple roles of the protein at different stages during HBV infection. Transactivational functions of HBx may be exerted both in the nucleus, via interaction with host DNA-binding proteins, and in the cytoplasm, via signaling pathways. Although there have been many studies describing different pathways altered by HBx, and its innumerable binding partners, the molecular mechanism that regulates its different roles has been difficult to elucidate. Methods In the current study, we took a bioinformatics approach to investigate whether the viral protein HBx might be regulated via phosphorylation by an evolutionarily conserved mechanism. Results We found that the phylogenetically conserved residues Ser25 and Ser41 (both within the negative regulatory domain, and Thr81 (in the transactivation domain are predicted to be phosphorylated. By molecular 3D modeling of HBx, we further show these residues are all predicted to be exposed on the surface of the protein, making them easily accesible to these types of modifications. Furthermore, we have also identified Yin Yang sites that might have the potential to be phosphorylated and O-β-GlcNAc interplay at the same residues. Conclusions Thus, we propose that the different roles of HBx displayed in different subcellular locations might be regulated by an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of posttranslational modification, via phosphorylation.

  14. Full trans-activation mediated by the immediate-early protein of equine herpesvirus 1 requires a consensus TATA box, but not its cognate binding sequence.

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    Kim, Seong K; Shakya, Akhalesh K; O'Callaghan, Dennis J

    2016-01-04

    The immediate-early protein (IEP) of equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) has extensive homology to the IEP of alphaherpesviruses and possesses domains essential for trans-activation, including an acidic trans-activation domain (TAD) and binding domains for DNA, TFIIB, and TBP. Our data showed that the IEP directly interacted with transcription factor TFIIA, which is known to stabilize the binding of TBP and TFIID to the TATA box of core promoters. When the TATA box of the EICP0 promoter was mutated to a nonfunctional TATA box, IEP-mediated trans-activation was reduced from 22-fold to 7-fold. The IEP trans-activated the viral promoters in a TATA motif-dependent manner. Our previous data showed that the IEP is able to repress its own promoter when the IEP-binding sequence (IEBS) is located within 26-bp from the TATA box. When the IEBS was located at 100 bp upstream of the TATA box, IEP-mediated trans-activation was very similar to that of the minimal IE(nt -89 to +73) promoter lacking the IEBS. As the distance from the IEBS to the TATA box decreased, IEP-mediated trans-activation progressively decreased, indicating that the IEBS located within 100 bp from the TATA box sequence functions as a distance-dependent repressive element. These results indicated that IEP-mediated full trans-activation requires a consensus TATA box of core promoters, but not its binding to the cognate sequence (IEBS). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Transactivation of the proenkephalin gene promoter by the Tax sub 1 protein of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I

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    Joshi, J.B. (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States)); Dave, H.P.G. (National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1992-02-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I), an etiologic agent for adult T-cell leukemia, is strongly associated with certain neurological diseases. The HTLV-I genome encodes a protein, Tax{sub 1}, that transactivates viral gene transcription. CD4-positive T helper lymphocytes express the proenkephalin gene, and enkephalins have been implicated as neuroimmunomodulators. The authors have investigated the effect of Tax{sub 1} on the proenkephalin gene promoter in C6 rat glioma cells and demonstrated its transactivation. Analysis using 5{prime} deletion mutants of the promoter region showed that sequences upstream of base pair - 190 are necessary for maximal transactivation. Forskolin, a cAMP modulator, synergistically increased Tax{sub 1}-mediated transactivation of the proenkephalin promoter. Neither Tax{sub 1} transactivation alone nor Tax{sub 1}/cAMP synergism exclusively involved cAMP-responsive elements. Endogenous proenkephalin gene expression increased in Tax{sub 1}-expressing C6 cells. Since HTLV-I infects lymphocytes, which express proenkephalin mRNA, Tax{sub 1} transregulation of proenkephalin expression may provide bidirectional communication between the nervous and immune systems in HTLV-I-related diseases.

  16. Interaction of c-Myc with the pRb-related protein p107 results in inhibition of c-Myc-mediated transactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijersbergen, R.L.; Hijmans, E.M.; Zhu, L.; Bernards, R.A.

    1994-01-01

    The product of the c-myc proto-oncogene, c-Myc, is a sequence-specific DNA binding protein with an Nterminal transactivation domain and a C-terminal DNA binding domain. Several lines of evidence indicate that c-Myc activity is essential for normal cell cycle progression. Since the abundance of

  17. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Transactivation Is Required for Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Activation by Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors in HaCaT Keratinocytes

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    Wymke Ockenga

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Non-neuronal acetylcholine plays a substantial role in the human skin by influencing adhesion, migration, proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes. These processes are regulated by the Mitogen-Activated Protein (MAP kinase cascade. Here we show that in HaCaT keratinocytes all five muscarinic receptor subtypes are expressed, but M1 and M3 are the subtypes involved in mitogenic signaling. Stimulation with the cholinergic agonist carbachol leads to activation of the MAP kinase extracellular signal regulated kinase, together with the protein kinase Akt. The activation is fully dependent on the transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, which even appears to be the sole pathway for the muscarinic receptors to facilitate MAP kinase activation in HaCaT cells. The transactivation pathway involves a triple-membrane-passing process, based on activation of matrix metalloproteases, and extracellular ligand release; whereas phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, Src family kinases or protein kinase C do not appear to be involved in MAP kinase activation. Furthermore, phosphorylation, ubiquitination and endocytosis of the EGF receptor after cholinergic transactivation are different from that induced by a direct stimulation with EGF, suggesting that ligands other than EGF itself mediate the cholinergic transactivation.

  18. Cav1.3 channel α1D protein is overexpressed and modulates androgen receptor transactivation in prostate cancers.

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    Chen, Ruibao; Zeng, Xing; Zhang, Ruitao; Huang, Jiaoti; Kuang, Xiangxing; Yang, Jun; Liu, Jihong; Tawfik, Ossama; Thrasher, James Brantley; Li, Benyi

    2014-07-01

    Widespread use of L-type calcium channel blockers for treating hypertension has led to multiple epidemiologic studies to assess the risk of prostate cancer incidence. These studies revealed a reverse correlation between the likelihood of prostate cancer risk and the use of L-type calcium channel blockers among men without family history but the mechanism was not clear. In this study, we examined the expression profiles of multiple L-type calcium channel genes in prostate cancers and determined their functional roles in androgen receptor (AR) transactivation and cell growth. By reanalyzing the ONCOMINE database, we found that L-type calcium channel CACNA1D gene expression levels in cancer tissues were significantly higher than noncancer tissues in 14 of 15 published complementary deoxyribonucleic acid microarray data sets, of which 9 data sets showed an increase of 2- to 17-folds. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and immunostaining experiments revealed that CACNA1D gene and its coding protein α1D were highly expressed in prostate cancers, especially in castration-resistant diseases, compared with benign prostate tissues. Consistent with the notion of CACNA1D as an ERG-regulated gene, CACNA1D gene expression levels were significantly higher in prostate cancers with TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion compared with the cases without this gene fusion. Blocking L-type channel's function or knocking down CACNA1D gene expression significantly suppressed androgen-stimulated Ca(2+) influx, AR transactivation, and cell growth in prostate cancer cells. Taken together, these data suggest that CACNA1D gene overexpression is associated with prostate cancer progression and might play an important role in Ca(2+) influx, AR activation, and cell growth in prostate cancer cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Temperature inducible β-sheet structure in the transactivation domains of retroviral regulatory proteins of the Rev family

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    Thumb, Werner; Graf, Christine; Parslow, Tristram; Schneider, Rainer; Auer, Manfred

    1999-11-01

    The interaction of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) regulatory protein Rev with cellular cofactors is crucial for the viral life cycle. The HIV-1 Rev transactivation domain is functionally interchangeable with analog regions of Rev proteins of other retroviruses suggesting common folding patterns. In order to obtain experimental evidence for similar structural features mediating protein-protein contacts we investigated activation domain peptides from HIV-1, HIV-2, VISNA virus, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) by CD spectroscopy, secondary structure prediction and sequence analysis. Although different in polarity and hydrophobicity, all peptides showed a similar behavior with respect to solution conformation, concentration dependence and variations in ionic strength and pH. Temperature studies revealed an unusual induction of β-structure with rising temperatures in all activation domain peptides. The high stability of β-structure in this region was demonstrated in three different peptides of the activation domain of HIV-1 Rev in solutions containing 40% hexafluoropropanol, a reagent usually known to induce α-helix into amino acid sequences. Sequence alignments revealed similarities between the polar effector domains from FIV and EIAV and the leucine rich (hydrophobic) effector domains found in HIV-1, HIV-2 and VISNA. Studies on activation domain peptides of two dominant negative HIV-1 Rev mutants, M10 and M32, pointed towards different reasons for the biological behavior. Whereas the peptide containing the M10 mutation (L 78E 79→D 78L 79) showed wild-type structure, the M32 mutant peptide (L 78L 81L 83→A 78A 81A 83) revealed a different protein fold to be the reason for the disturbed binding to cellular cofactors. From our data, we conclude, that the activation domain of Rev proteins from different viral origins adopt a similar fold and that a β-structural element is involved in binding to a

  20. GPCR responses in vascular smooth muscle can occur predominantly through dual transactivation of kinase receptors and not classical Gαq protein signalling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Peter J

    2013-05-30

    GPCR signalling is well known to proceed through several linear pathways involving activation of G proteins and their downstream signalling pathways such as activation of phospholipase C. In addition, GPCRs signal via transactivation of Protein Tyrosine Kinase receptors such as that for Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) and Platelet-Derived Growth Factor (PDGF) where GPCR agonists mediate increase levels of phosphorylated Erk (pErk) the immediate downstream product of the activation of EGF receptor. It has recently been shown that this paradigm can be extended to include the GPCR transactivation of a Protein Serine/Threonine Kinase receptor, specifically the Transforming Growth Factor β Type I receptor (also known as Alk V) (TβRI) in which case GPCR activation leads to the formation of carboxy terminal polyphosphorylated Smad2 (phosphoSmad2) being the immediate downstream product of the activation of TβRI. Growth factor and hormone regulation of proteoglycan synthesis in vascular smooth muscle cells represent one component of an in vitro model of atherosclerosis because modified proteoglycans show enhanced binding to lipoproteins as the initiating step in atherosclerosis. In the example of proteoglycan synthesis stimulated by GPCR agonists such as thrombin and endothelin-1, the transactivation pathways for the EGF receptor and TβRI are both active and together account for essentially all of the response to the GPCRs. In contrast, signalling downstream of GPCRs such as increased inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate (IP3) and intracellular calcium do not have any effect on GPCR stimulated proteoglycan synthesis. These data lead to the conclusion that dual transactivation pathways for protein tyrosine and serine/threonine kinase receptors may play a far greater role in GPCR signalling than currently recognised. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Human TFDP3, a novel DP protein, inhibits DNA binding and transactivation by E2F

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qiao, Huan; Di Stefano, Luisa; Tian, Chan

    2006-01-01

    The two known DP proteins, TFDP1 and -2, bind E2Fs to form heterodimers essential for high affinity DNA binding and efficient transcriptional activation/repression. Here we report the identification of a new member of the DP family, human TFDP3. Despite the high degree of sequence similarity, TFD...

  2. The E3 ubiquitin ligase WWP2 facilitates RUNX2 protein transactivation in a mono-ubiquitination manner during osteogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; He, Xinyu; Hua, Yue; Li, Qian; Wang, Jiyong; Gan, Xiaoqing

    2017-07-07

    Poly-ubiquitination-mediated RUNX2 degradation is an important cause of age- and inflammation-related bone loss. NEDD4 family E3 ubiquitin protein ligases are thought to be the major regulators of RUNX2 poly-ubiquitination. However, we observed a mono-ubiquitination of RUNX2 that was catalyzed by WWP2, a member of the NEDD4 family of E3 ubiquitin ligases. WWP2 has been reported to catalyze the mono-ubiquitination of Goosecoid in chondrocytes, facilitating craniofacial skeleton development. In this study, we found that osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells promoted WWP2 expression and nuclear accumulation. Knockdown of Wwp2 in mesenchymal stem cells and osteoblasts led to significant deficiencies of osteogenesis, including decreased mineral deposition and down-regulation of osteogenic marker genes. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed the interaction of WWP2 with RUNX2 in vitro and in vivo Mono-ubiquitination by WWP2 leads to RUNX2 transactivation, as evidenced by the wild type of WWP2, but not its ubiquitin ligase-dead mutant, augmenting RUNX2-reponsive reporter activity. Moreover, deletion of WWP2-dependent mono-ubiquitination resulted in striking defects of RUNX2 osteoblastic activity. In addition, ectopic expression of the constitutively active type 1A bone morphogenetic protein receptor enhanced WWP2-dependent RUNX2 ubiquitination and transactivation, demonstrating a regulatory role of bone morphogenetic protein signaling in the WWP2-RUNX2 axis. Taken together, our results provide evidence that WWP2 serves as a positive regulator of osteogenesis by augmenting RUNX2 transactivation in a non-proteolytic mono-ubiquitination manner. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Transactivator protein: An alternative for delivery of recombinant proteins for safer reprogramming of induced Pluripotent Stem Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Fazlina; Ahmad, Raja Norazireen Raja; Farzaneh, Farzin

    2017-05-02

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) are somatic cells reprogrammed to pluripotency by forced expression of pluripotency factors. These cells are shown to have the same pluripotent potential as embryonic stem cells (ESC) and considered as an alternative to the much controversial usage of ESC which involved human embryos. However, the traditional method in reprogramming cells into iPSC using genome-integrating retro- or lenti- viruses remains an obstacle for its application in clinical setting. Although numerous studies have been conducted for a safer DNA-based reprogramming, reprogramming of iPSC by genetic modifications may raise the possibility of malignant transformation and has been a major limitation for its usage in clinical applications. Therefore, there is a need for an alternative method to reprogram the cells without the use of gene editing and a much safer way to deliver transcription factors to induce pluripotency on target cells. Using protein transduction approach, a number of studies have demonstrated the generation of human iPSCs from human fibroblasts and mouse embryonic fibroblasts by direct delivery of reprogramming proteins. In this review, the definition and mechanism of HIV-TAT protein (a type of protein transduction domain) in delivering recombinant proteins, including the potential of protein-based delivery to induce iPSC were further discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Vaccinia Virus Protein C6 Inhibits Type I IFN Signalling in the Nucleus and Binds to the Transactivation Domain of STAT2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer H Stuart

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The type I interferon (IFN response is a crucial innate immune signalling pathway required for defense against viral infection. Accordingly, the great majority of mammalian viruses possess means to inhibit this important host immune response. Here we show that vaccinia virus (VACV strain Western Reserve protein C6, is a dual function protein that inhibits the cellular response to type I IFNs in addition to its published function as an inhibitor of IRF-3 activation, thereby restricting type I IFN production from infected cells. Ectopic expression of C6 inhibits the induction of interferon stimulated genes (ISGs in response to IFNα treatment at both the mRNA and protein level. C6 inhibits the IFNα-induced Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT signalling pathway at a late stage, downstream of STAT1 and STAT2 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation and binding of the interferon stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3 complex to the interferon stimulated response element (ISRE. Mechanistically, C6 associates with the transactivation domain of STAT2 and this might explain how C6 inhibits the type I IFN signalling very late in the pathway. During virus infection C6 reduces ISRE-dependent gene expression despite the presence of the viral protein phosphatase VH1 that dephosphorylates STAT1 and STAT2. The ability of a cytoplasmic replicating virus to dampen the immune response within the nucleus, and the ability of viral immunomodulators such as C6 to inhibit multiple stages of the innate immune response by distinct mechanisms, emphasizes the intricacies of host-pathogen interactions and viral immune evasion.

  5. The activation of G protein-coupled estrogen receptor induces relaxation via cAMP as well as potentiates contraction via EGFR transactivation in porcine coronary arteries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Yu

    Full Text Available Estrogen exerts protective effects against cardiovascular diseases in premenopausal women, but is associated with an increased risk of both coronary heart disease and stroke in older postmenopausal women. Studies have shown that activation of the G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER can cause either relaxation or contraction of arteries. It is highly likely that these dual actions of GPER may contribute to the seemingly paradoxical effects of estrogen in regulating coronary artery function. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that activation of GPER enhances agonist-stimulated porcine coronary artery contraction via epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR transactivation and its downstream extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK1/2 pathway. Isometric tension studies and western blot were performed to determine the effect of GPER activation on coronary artery contraction. Our findings demonstrated that G-1 caused concentration-dependent relaxation of ET-1-induced contraction, while pretreatment of arterial rings with G-1 significantly enhanced ET-1-induced contraction. GPER antagonist, G-36, significantly inhibited both the G-1-induced relaxation effect and G-1-enhanced ET-1 contraction. Gallein, a Gβγ inhibitor, significantly increased G-1-induced relaxation, yet inhibited G-1-enhanced ET-1-mediated contraction. Similarly, inhibition of EGFR with AG1478 or inhibition of Src with phosphatase 2 further increased G-1-induced relaxation responses in coronary arteries, but decreased G-1-enhanced ET-1-induced contraction. Western blot experiments in porcine coronary artery smooth muscle cells (PCASMC showed that G-1 increased tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR, which was inhibited by AG-1478. Furthermore, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays showed that the level of heparin-binding EGF (HB-EGF released by ET-1 treatment increased two-fold; whereas pre-incubation with G-1 further increased ET-1-induced HB-EGF release to four

  6. Conformational control of the binding of the transactivation domain of the MLL protein and c-Myb to the KIX domain of CREB.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Nihal Korkmaz

    Full Text Available The KIX domain of CBP is a transcriptional coactivator. Concomitant binding to the activation domain of proto-oncogene protein c-Myb and the transactivation domain of the trithorax group protein mixed lineage leukemia (MLL transcription factor lead to the biologically active ternary MLL∶KIX∶c-Myb complex which plays a role in Pol II-mediated transcription. The binding of the activation domain of MLL to KIX enhances c-Myb binding. Here we carried out molecular dynamics (MD simulations for the MLL∶KIX∶c-Myb ternary complex, its binary components and KIX with the goal of providing a mechanistic explanation for the experimental observations. The dynamic behavior revealed that the MLL binding site is allosterically coupled to the c-Myb binding site. MLL binding redistributes the conformational ensemble of KIX, leading to higher populations of states which favor c-Myb binding. The key element in the allosteric communication pathways is the KIX loop, which acts as a control mechanism to enhance subsequent binding events. We tested this conclusion by in silico mutations of loop residues in the KIX∶MLL complex and by comparing wild type and mutant dynamics through MD simulations. The loop assumed MLL binding conformation similar to that observed in the KIX∶c-Myb state which disfavors the allosteric network. The coupling with c-Myb binding site faded, abolishing the positive cooperativity observed in the presence of MLL. Our major conclusion is that by eliciting a loop-mediated allosteric switch between the different states following the binding events, transcriptional activation can be regulated. The KIX system presents an example how nature makes use of conformational control in higher level regulation of transcriptional activity and thus cellular events.

  7. Nuclear localization and transactivating capacities of the papillary renal cell carcinoma-associated TFE3 and PRCC (fusion) proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weterman, M. A. J.; van Groningen, J. J.; Jansen, A.; van Kessel, A. G.

    2000-01-01

    The papillary renal cell carcinoma-associated t(X;1)(p11;q21) leads to fusion of the transcription factor TFE3 gene on the X-chromosome to a novel gene, PRCC, on chromosome 1. As a result, two putative fusion proteins are formed: PRCCTFE3, which contains all known domains for DNA binding,

  8. HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein switches the pathway of transactivation response element RNA/DNA annealing from loop-loop "kissing" to "zipper".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, My-Nuong; Barany, George; Rouzina, Ioulia; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2009-02-27

    The chaperone activity of HIV-1 (human immunodeficiency virus type 1) nucleocapsid protein (NC) facilitates multiple nucleic acid rearrangements that are critical for reverse transcription of the single-stranded RNA genome into double-stranded DNA. Annealing of the transactivation response element (TAR) RNA hairpin to a complementary TAR DNA hairpin is an essential step in the minus-strand transfer step of reverse transcription. Previously, we used truncated 27-nt mini-TAR RNA and DNA constructs to investigate this annealing reaction pathway in the presence and in the absence of HIV-1 NC. In this work, full-length 59-nt TAR RNA and TAR DNA constructs were used to systematically study TAR hairpin annealing kinetics. In the absence of NC, full-length TAR hairpin annealing is approximately 10-fold slower than mini-TAR annealing. Similar to mini-TAR annealing, the reaction pathway for TAR in the absence of NC involves the fast formation of an unstable "kissing" loop intermediate, followed by a slower conversion to an extended duplex. NC facilitates the annealing of TAR by approximately 10(5)-fold by stabilizing the bimolecular intermediate ( approximately 10(4)-fold) and promoting the subsequent exchange reaction ( approximately 10-fold). In contrast to the mini-TAR annealing pathway, wherein NC-mediated annealing can initiate through both loop-loop kissing and a distinct "zipper" pathway involving nucleation at the 3'-/5'-terminal ends, full-length TAR hairpin annealing switches predominantly to the zipper pathway in the presence of saturated NC.

  9. The equine herpesvirus-1 IR3 gene that lies antisense to the sole immediate-early (IE) gene is trans-activated by the IE protein, and is poorly expressed to a protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Byung Chul; Breitenbach, Jonathan E.; Kim, Seong K.; O'Callaghan, Dennis J.

    2007-01-01

    The unique IR3 gene of equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) is expressed as a late 1.0-kb transcript. Previous studies confirmed the IR3 transcription initiation site and tentatively identified other cis-acting elements specific to IR3 such as a TATA box, a 443 base pair 5'untranslated region (UTR), a 285 base pair open reading frame (ORF), and a poly adenylation (A) signal [Holden, V.R., Harty, R.N., Yalamanchili, R.R., O'Callaghan, D.J., 1992. The IR3 gene of equine herpesvirus type 1: a unique gene regulated by sequences within the intron of the immediate-early gene. DNA Seq. 3, 143-152]. Transient transfection assays revealed that the IR3 promoter is strongly trans-activated by the IE protein (IEP) and that coexpression of the IEP with the early EICP0 and IR4 regulatory proteins results in maximal trans-activation of the IR3 promoter. Gel shift assays revealed that the IEP directly binds to the IR3 promoter region. Western blot analysis showed that the IR3 protein produced in E. coli was detected by antibodies to IR3 synthetic peptides; however, the IR3 protein was not detected in EHV-1 infected cell extracts by these same anti-IR3 antibodies, even though the IR3 transcript was detected by northern blot. These findings suggest that the IR3 may not be expressed to a protein. Expression of an IR3/GFP fusion gene was not observed, but expression of a GFP/IR3 fusion gene was detected by fluorescent microscopy. In further attempts to detect the IR3/GFP fusion protein using anti-GFP antibody, western blot analysis showed that the IR3/GFP fusion protein was not detected in vivo. Interestingly, a truncated form of the GFP/IR3 protein was synthesized from the GFP/IR3 fusion gene. However, GFP/IR3 and IR3/GFP fusion proteins of the predicted sizes were synthesized by in vitro coupled transcription and translation of the fusion genes, suggesting poor expression of the IR3 protein in vivo. The possible role of the IR3 transcript in EHV-1 infection is discussed

  10. Role of adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP) and acyl-coA binding protein (ACBP) in PPAR-mediated transactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helledie, Torben; Jørgensen, Claus; Antonius, Marianne

    2002-01-01

    lipid binding protein (ALBP), the keratinocyte lipid binding protein (KLBP) and the acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) exhibit a prominent nuclear localization in differentiating 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Similarly, ectopic expression of these proteins in CV-1 cells resulted in a primarily nuclear localization...... appears to sequester or increase the turn-over of the agonist. Similarly, our results are in keeping with a model in which ACBP increase the metabolism of these ligands....

  11. Adenovirus E4 open reading frame 4-induced dephosphorylation inhibits E1A activation of the E2 promoter and E2F-1-mediated transactivation independently of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mannervik, M; Fan, S; Ström, A C

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the cell cycle-regulated E2F transcription factor is subjected to both positive and negative control by phosphorylation. Here we show that in transient transfection experiments, adenovirus E1A activation of the viral E2 promoter is abrogated by coexpression...... of the viral E4 open reading frame 4 (E4-ORF4) protein. This effect does not to require the retinoblastoma protein that previously has been shown to regulate E2F activity. The inhibitory activity of E4-ORF4 appears to be specific because E4-ORF4 had little effect on, for example, E4-ORF6/7 transactivation...... of the E2 promoter. We further show that the repressive effect of E4-ORF4 on E2 transcription works mainly through the E2F DNA-binding sites in the E2 promoter. In agreement with this, we find that E4-ORF4 inhibits E2F-1/DP-1-mediated transactivation. We also show that E4-ORF4 inhibits E2 mRNA expression...

  12. NLRC5: a newly discovered MHC class I transactivator (CITA)

    OpenAIRE

    Meissner, Torsten B.; Li, Amy; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2011-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II are crucial for the function of the human adaptive immune system. An NLR protein, CIITA (MHC class II transactivator), is a master regulator of MHC class II gene expression as well as of some of the genes involved in MHC class II antigen presentation. It has recently been discovered that another member of the NLR protein family, NLRC5, transcriptionally activates MHC class I genes, and thus acts as “CITA” (MHC class I transactivator)...

  13. SAR of PXR transactivation in benzimidazole-based IGF-1R kinase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Kurt; Wittman, Mark D; Saulnier, Mark G; Velaparthi, Upender; Sang, Xiaopeng; Frennesson, David B; Struzynski, Charles; Seitz, Steven P; He, Liqi; Carboni, Joan M; Li, Aixin; Greer, Ann F; Gottardis, Marco; Attar, Ricardo M; Yang, Zheng; Balimane, Praveen; Discenza, Lorell N; Lee, Francis Y; Sinz, Michael; Kim, Sean; Vyas, Dolatrai

    2010-03-01

    The SAR of PXR transactivation by 3-(benzimidazol-2-yl)-pyridine-2-one based ATP competitive inhibitors of Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 Receptor kinase (IGF-1R) is discussed. Compounds without PXR transactivation, with in vivo antitumor activity, reduced protein binding and improved oral exposure are presented. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Nitric oxide and KLF4 protein epigenetically modify class II transactivator to repress major histocompatibility complex II expression during Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorpade, Devram Sampat; Holla, Sahana; Sinha, Akhauri Yash; Alagesan, Senthil Kumar; Balaji, Kithiganahalli Narayanaswamy

    2013-07-12

    Pathogenic mycobacteria employ several immune evasion strategies such as inhibition of class II transactivator (CIITA) and MHC-II expression, to survive and persist in host macrophages. However, precise roles for specific signaling components executing down-regulation of CIITA/MHC-II have not been adequately addressed. Here, we demonstrate that Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-mediated TLR2 signaling-induced iNOS/NO expression is obligatory for the suppression of IFN-γ-induced CIITA/MHC-II functions. Significantly, NOTCH/PKC/MAPK-triggered signaling cross-talk was found critical for iNOS/NO production. NO responsive recruitment of a bifunctional transcription factor, KLF4, to the promoter of CIITA during M. bovis BCG infection of macrophages was essential to orchestrate the epigenetic modifications mediated by histone methyltransferase EZH2 or miR-150 and thus calibrate CIITA/MHC-II expression. NO-dependent KLF4 regulated the processing and presentation of ovalbumin by infected macrophages to reactive T cells. Altogether, our study delineates a novel role for iNOS/NO/KLF4 in dictating the mycobacterial capacity to inhibit CIITA/MHC-II-mediated antigen presentation by infected macrophages and thereby elude immune surveillance.

  15. Adenovirus E4 open reading frame 4-induced dephosphorylation inhibits E1A activation of the E2 promoter and E2F-1-mediated transactivation independently of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mannervik, M; Fan, S; Ström, A C

    1999-01-01

    of the viral E4 open reading frame 4 (E4-ORF4) protein. This effect does not to require the retinoblastoma protein that previously has been shown to regulate E2F activity. The inhibitory activity of E4-ORF4 appears to be specific because E4-ORF4 had little effect on, for example, E4-ORF6/7 transactivation......Previous studies have shown that the cell cycle-regulated E2F transcription factor is subjected to both positive and negative control by phosphorylation. Here we show that in transient transfection experiments, adenovirus E1A activation of the viral E2 promoter is abrogated by coexpression...... during virus growth. E4-ORF4 has previously been shown to bind to and activate the cellular protein phosphatase 2A. The inhibitory effect of E4-ORF4 was relieved by okadaic acid, which inhibits protein phosphatase 2A activity, suggesting that E4-ORF4 represses E2 transcription by inducing transcription...

  16. Quantitative Analysis of NF-κB Transactivation Specificity Using a Yeast-Based Functional Assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasundhara Sharma

    Full Text Available The NF-κB transcription factor family plays a central role in innate immunity and inflammation processes and is frequently dysregulated in cancer. We developed an NF-κB functional assay in yeast to investigate the following issues: transactivation specificity of NF-κB proteins acting as homodimers or heterodimers; correlation between transactivation capacity and in vitro DNA binding measurements; impact of co-expressed interacting proteins or of small molecule inhibitors on NF-κB-dependent transactivation. Full-length p65 and p50 cDNAs were cloned into centromeric expression vectors under inducible GAL1 promoter in order to vary their expression levels. Since p50 lacks a transactivation domain (TAD, a chimeric construct containing the TAD derived from p65 was also generated (p50TAD to address its binding and transactivation potential. The p50TAD and p65 had distinct transactivation specificities towards seventeen different κB response elements (κB-REs where single nucleotide changes could greatly impact transactivation. For four κB-REs, results in yeast were predictive of transactivation potential measured in the human MCF7 cell lines treated with the NF-κB activator TNFα. Transactivation results in yeast correlated only partially with in vitro measured DNA binding affinities, suggesting that features other than strength of interaction with naked DNA affect transactivation, although factors such as chromatin context are kept constant in our isogenic yeast assay. The small molecules BAY11-7082 and ethyl-pyruvate as well as expressed IkBα protein acted as NF-κB inhibitors in yeast, more strongly towards p65. Thus, the yeast-based system can recapitulate NF-κB features found in human cells, thereby providing opportunities to address various NF-κB functions, interactions and chemical modulators.

  17. Development of a dual luciferase activity and fluorescamine protein assay adapted to a 384 micro-well plate format: Reducing variability in human luciferase transactivation cell lines aimed at endocrine active substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Jennifer C; Tillitt, Donald E

    2018-03-01

    There is a need to adapt cell bioassays to 384-well and 1536-well formats instead of the traditional 96-well format as high-throughput screening (HTS) demands increase. However, the sensitivity and performance of the bioassay must be re-verified in these higher micro-well plates, and verification of cell health must also be HT (high-throughput). We have adapted two commonly used human breast luciferase transactivation cell bioassays, the recently re-named estrogen agonist/antagonist screening VM7Luc4E2 cell bioassay (previously designated BG1Luc4E2) and the androgen/glucocorticoid screening MDA-kb2 cell bioassay, to 384-well formats for HTS of endocrine-active substances (EASs). This cost-saving adaptation includes a fast, accurate, and easy measurement of protein amount in each well via the fluorescamine assay with which to normalize luciferase activity of cell lysates without requiring any transfer of the cell lysates. Here we demonstrate that by accounting for protein amount in the cell lysates, antagonistic agents can easily be distinguished from cytotoxic agents in the MDA-kb2 and VM7Luc4E2 cell bioassays. Additionally, we demonstrate via the fluorescamine assay improved interpretation of luciferase activity in wells along the edge of the plate (the so-called "edge effect"), thereby increasing usable wells to the entire plate, not just interior wells. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Development of a dual luciferase activity and fluorescamine protein assay adapted to a 384 micro-well plate format: Reducing variability in human luciferase transactivation cell lines aimed at endocrine active substances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Jennifer; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2018-01-01

    There is a need to adapt cell bioassays to 384-well and 1536-well formats instead of the traditional 96-well format as high-throughput screening (HTS) demands increase. However, the sensitivity and performance of the bioassay must be re-verified in these higher micro-well plates, and verification of cell health must also be HT (high-throughput). We have adapted two commonly used human breast luciferase transactivation cell bioassays, the recently re-named estrogen agonist/antagonist screening VM7Luc4E2 cell bioassay (previously designated BG1Luc4E2) and the androgen/glucocorticoid screening MDA-kb2 cell bioassay, to 384-well formats for HTS of endocrine-active substances (EASs). This cost-saving adaptation includes a fast, accurate, and easy measurement of protein amount in each well via the fluorescamine assay with which to normalize luciferase activity of cell lysates without requiring any transfer of the cell lysates. Here we demonstrate that by accounting for protein amount in the cell lysates, antagonistic agents can easily be distinguished from cytotoxic agents in the MDA-kb2 and VM7Luc4E2 cell bioassays. Additionally, we demonstrate via the fluorescamine assay improved interpretation of luciferase activity in wells along the edge of the plate (the so-called “edge effect”), thereby increasing usable wells to the entire plate, not just interior wells.

  19. Lipid-binding proteins modulate ligand-dependent trans-activation by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and localize to the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helledie, T; Antonius, M; Sorensen, R V

    2000-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are activated by a variety of fatty acids, eicosanoids, and hypolipidemic and insulin-sensitizing drugs. Many of these compounds bind avidly to members of a family of small lipid-binding proteins, the fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs). Fatty a...

  20. Lipid-binding proteins modulate ligand-dependent trans-activation by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors and localize to the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helledie, T; Antonius, M; Sorensen, R V

    2000-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are activated by a variety of fatty acids, eicosanoids, and hypolipidemic and insulin-sensitizing drugs. Many of these compounds bind avidly to members of a family of small lipid-binding proteins, the fatty acid-binding proteins (FABPs). Fatty...

  1. A lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-derived soluble protein, p40, stimulates ligand release from intestinal epithelial cells to transactivate epidermal growth factor receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protein p40, a Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG)-derived soluble protein, ameliorates intestinal injury and colitis, reduces apoptosis and preserves barrier function by activation of EGF receptor (EGFR) in intestinal epithelial cells. The aim of this study was to determine the mechanisms by which p40...

  2. Identification of transactivation-responsive DNA-binding protein 43 (TARDBP43; TDP-43) as a novel factor for TNF-α expression upon lipopolysaccharide stimulation in human monocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, H; Hattori, T; Maeda, H; Takashiba, S; Takigawa, M; Kido, J; Nagata, T

    2015-08-01

    Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a major cytokine implicated in various inflammatory diseases. The nature of the nuclear factors associated with human TNF-α gene regulation is not well elucidated. We previously identified a novel region located from -550 to -487 in human TNF-α promoter that did not contain the reported binding sites for nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) but showed lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced transcriptional activity. The purpose of this study is to identify novel factors that bind to the promoter region and regulate TNF-α expression. To identify DNA-binding proteins that bound to the target region of TNF-α promoter, a cDNA library from LPS-stimulated human monocytic cell line THP-1 was screened using a yeast one-hybrid system. Cellular localizations of the DNA-binding protein in the cells were examined by subcellular immunocytochemistry. Nuclear amounts of the protein in LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells were identified by western blot analysis. Expression of mRNA of the protein in the cells was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays were performed to confirm the DNA-binding profile. Overexpression of the protein and knockdown of the gene were also performed to investigate the role for TNF-α expression. Several candidates were identified from the cDNA library and transactivation-responsive DNA-binding protein 43 (TARDBP43; TDP-43) was focused on. Western blot analysis revealed that nuclear TDP-43 protein was increased in the LPS-stimulated THP-1 cells. Expression of TDP-43 mRNA was already enhanced before TNF-α induction by LPS. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay analysis showed that nuclear extracts obtained by overexpressing FLAG-tagged TDP-43 bound to the -550 to -487 TNF-α promoter fragments. Overexpression of TDP-43 in THP-1 cells resulted in an increase of TNF-α expression. Knockdown of TDP-43 in THP-1 cells downregulated TNF-α expression. We identified TDP-43 as one of the novel

  3. Trans-activation of the JC virus late promoter by the tat protein of type 1 human immunodeficiency virus in glial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Hiroomi; Lashgari, M.; Amini, S.; Khalili, K.; Rappaport, J.; Wong-Staal, F.

    1990-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system caused by the JC virus (JCV), a human papovavirus. PML is a relatively rare disease seen predominantly in immunocompromised individuals and is a frequent complication observed in AIDS patients. The significantly higher incidence of PML in AIDS patients than in other immunosuppressive disorders has suggested that the presence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in the brain may directly or indirectly contribute to the pathogenesis of this disease. In the present study the authors have examined the expression of the JCV genome in both glial and non-glial cells in the presence of HIV-1 regulatory proteins. They find that the HIV-1-encoded trans-regulatory protein tat increases the basal activity of the JCV late promoter, JCV L , in glial cells. They conclude that the presence of the HIV-1-encoded tat protein may positively affect the JCV lytic cycle in glial cells by stimulating JCV gene expression. The results suggest a mechanism for the relatively high incidence of PML in AIDS patients than in other immunosuppressive disorders. Furthermore, the findings indicate that the HIV-1 regulatory protein tat may stimulate other viral and perhaps cellular promoters, in addition to its own

  4. Identification of a dimerization domain in the C-terminal segment of the IE110 transactivator protein from herpes simplex virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciufo, D M; Mullen, M A; Hayward, G S

    1994-05-01

    The 775-amino-acid IE110 (or ICP0) phosphoprotein of herpes simplex virus (HSV) functions as an accessory transcription factor during the lytic cycle and plays a critical role in reactivation from latent infection. By immunofluorescence analysis, IE110 localizes in a novel pattern consisting of several dozen spherical punctate granules in the nuclei of DNA-transfected cells. We constructed a hybrid version of IE110 that contained an epitope-tagged domain from the N terminus of the HSV IE175 protein and lacked the IE110 N-terminal domain that confers punctate characteristics. This hybrid IE175(N)/IE110(C) protein gave an irregular nuclear diffuse pattern on its own but was redistributed very efficiently into spherical punctate granules after cotransfection with the wild-type HSV-1 IE110 protein. Similar colocalization interactions occurred with internally deleted forms of IE110 that lacked the zinc finger region or large segments from the center of the protein, including both cytoplasmic and elongated punctate forms, but C-terminal truncated versions of IE110 did not interact. In all such interactions, the punctate phenotype was dominant. Evidence that C-terminal segments of IE110 could also form stable mixed-subunit oligomers in vitro was obtained by coimmunoprecipitation of in vitro-translated IE110 polypeptides with different-size hemagglutinin epitope-tagged forms of the protein. This occurred only when the two forms were cotranslated, not when they were simply mixed together. An in vitro-synthesized IE110 C-terminal polypeptide also gave immunoprecipitable homodimers and heterodimers when two different-size forms were cross-linked with glutaraldehyde and reacted specifically with a bacterial glutathione S-transferase/IE110 C-terminal protein in far-Western blotting experiments. The use of various N-terminal and C-terminal truncated forms of IE110 in the in vivo assays revealed that the outer boundaries of the interaction domain mapped between codons 617 and 711

  5. Synthesis of a gene for the HIV transactivator protein TAT by a novel single stranded approach involving in vivo gap repair.

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, S E; Johnson, I D; Braddock, M; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M; Edwards, R M

    1988-01-01

    The synthesis of a gene for the HIV TAT protein is described using a novel approach that capitalises on the ability to synthesise oligonucleotides of greater than 100 bp in length. It involves the synthesis of large oligomers covering one strand of the desired gene in its entirety and the use of small complementary bridging and adapter oligonucleotides to direct the assembly and cloning of the large oligomers. After ligation to the cloning vector the partially single stranded intermediate is ...

  6. EGFR transactivation: mechanisms, pathophysiology and potential therapies in cardiovascular system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Steven J.; Kawai, Tatsuo; Elliott, Katherine J.; O’Brien, Shannon; Thomas, Walter; Harris, Raymond C.; Eguchi, Satoru

    2017-01-01

    Accumulating studies suggest that the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation is associated with the physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system, and inhibition of EGFR activity is emerging as a potential therapeutic strategy to treat diseases, including hypertension, cardiac hypertrophy, renal fibrosis and abdominal aortic aneurysm. The capacity of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) agonists, such as angiotensin II (AngII), to promote EGFR signaling is well described – a process termed EGFR “transactivation” – yet delineating the molecular processes and functional relevance of this crosstalk has been challenging. Moreover, these critical findings are dispersed among many different fields. The aim of our review is to highlight the recent advancement of the signaling cascades and downstream consequences of EGFR transactivation within the cardiovascular renal system in vitro and in vivo. We will also focus on linking EGFR transactivation to animal models of the disease as well as the potential therapeutic applications. PMID:26566153

  7. Cardiac GPCR-Mediated EGFR Transactivation: Impact and Therapeutic Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grisanti, Laurel A; Guo, Shuchi; Tilley, Douglas G

    2017-07-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) remain primary therapeutic targets for numerous cardiovascular disorders, including heart failure (HF), because of their influence on cardiac remodeling in response to elevated neurohormone signaling. GPCR blockers have proven to be beneficial in the treatment of HF by reducing chronic G protein activation and cardiac remodeling, thereby extending the lifespan of patients with HF. Unfortunately, this effect does not persist indefinitely, thus next-generation therapeutics aim to selectively block harmful GPCR-mediated pathways while simultaneously promoting beneficial signaling. Transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been shown to be mediated by an expanding repertoire of GPCRs in the heart, and promotes cardiomyocyte survival, thus may offer a new avenue of HF therapeutics. However, GPCR-dependent EGFR transactivation has also been shown to regulate cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis by different GPCRs and through distinct molecular mechanisms. Here, we discuss the mechanisms and impact of GPCR-mediated EGFR transactivation in the heart, focusing on angiotensin II, urotensin II, and β-adrenergic receptor systems, and highlight areas of research that will help us to determine whether this pathway can be engaged as future therapeutic strategy.

  8. The highest affinity DNA element bound by Pbx complexes in t(1;19) leukemic cells fails to mediate cooperative DNA-binding or cooperative transactivation by E2a-Pbx1 and class I Hox proteins - evidence for selective targetting of E2a-Pbx1 to a subset of Pbx-recognition elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoepfler, P S; Kamps, M P

    1997-05-29

    Oncoprotein E2a-Pbx1 contains the N-terminal transactivation domains of E2a and the majority of the homeodomain protein, Pbx1. Using recombinant proteins, both Pbx1 and E2a-Pbx1 heterodimerize with Hox proteins on bipartite elements, Pbx1 binding a 5' TGAT core and Class I Hox proteins binding adjacent 3' TAAT, TTAT, or TGAT cores. In contrast to these in vitro results, nuclear extracts from E2a-Pbx1-transformed cells assemble an abundant Pbx-containing complex on TGATTGAT that excludes E2a-Pbx1, suggesting that an uncharacterized in vivo partner discriminates between E2a-Pbx1 and Pbx proteins, distinguishing it from Hox proteins. Here, we describe the DNA-binding properties of this complex, and identify TGATTGAC (PCE; Pbx Consensus Element) as its optimal recognition motif. In vitro, the PCE fails to bind heterodimers of Class I Hox proteins plus either Pbx1 or E2a-Pbx1. Likewise, in vivo, the PCE fails to mediate cooperative transactivation by E2a-Pbx1 plus Class I Hox proteins. Thus, the PCE binds a Pbx dimer partner that behaves unlike Class I Hox proteins. Competition analysis indicates that the Pbx-containing complex that binds the PCE also binds the TGATTGAT Pbx-Hox element and binds promoter elements required for tissue-specific expression of a number of cellular genes. Thus, different Pbx partners dictate targetting of Pbx heterodimers to related DNA motifs that differ in the sequence of their 3' half-sites, and E2a-Pbx1 heterodimerizes with only a subset of Pbx partners, restricting its potential DNA targets.

  9. Apolipoprotein E isoform dependently affects Tat-mediated HIV-1 LTR transactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nabab; Datta, Gaurav; Geiger, Jonathan D; Chen, Xuesong

    2018-03-20

    Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) is the major carrier protein that mediates the transport and delivery of cholesterol and other lipids in the brain. Three isoforms of ApoE (ApoE2, ApoE3, ApoE4) exist in humans, and their relative expression levels impact HIV-1 infection, HIV-1/AIDS disease progression, and cognitive decline associated with HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorder. Because HIV-1 Tat, a viral protein essential for HIV-1 replication, can bind to low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) that controls ApoE uptake in the brain, we determined the extent to which different isoforms of ApoE affected Tat-mediated HIV-1 LTR transactivation. Using U87MG glioblastoma cells expressing LTR-driven luciferase, we determined the extent to which LRP1 as well as ApoE2, ApoE3, and ApoE4 affected Tat-mediated HIV-1 LTR transactivation. A specific LRP1 antagonist and siRNA knockdown of LRP1 both restricted significantly Tat-mediated LTR transactivation. Of the three ApoEs, ApoE4 was the least potent and effective at preventing HIV-1 Tat internalization and at decreasing Tat-mediated HIV-1 LTR transactivation. Further, Tat-mediated LTR transactivation was attenuated by an ApoE mimetic peptide, and ApoE4-induced restriction of Tat-mediated LTR transactivation was potentiated by an ApoE4 structure modulator that changes ApoE4 into an ApoE3-like phenotype. These findings help explain observed differential effects of ApoEs on HIV-1 infectivity and the prevalence of HAND in people living with HIV-1 infection and suggest that ApoE mimetic peptides and ApoE4 structure modulator might be used as a therapeutic strategy against HIV-1 infection and associated neurocognitive disorders.

  10. Hepatitis B virus DNA integration and transactivation of cellular genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is etiologically related to human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Most HCCs contain integrated HBV DNA in hepatocyte, suggesting that the integration may be involved in carcinogenesis. Available data on the integrants from human hepatocellular carcinomas seem to represent primary integrants as well as the products of secondary rearrangements. By means of structural analyses of the possible primary integrants, it has been observed that the replication intermediates of the viral genome are the preferred substrates for integration. The integrated HBV DNA and the target cellular DNA are invariably associated with deletions, possibly reflecting the substrate for, and the mechanism of, the integration reaction. The host DNA sequences as well as the target site of integration in chromosomes are selected randomly suggesting that HBV DNA integration should bring about random mutagenic effects. Analysis of the samples recovered from hepatocellular carcinomas show that the integrated HBV DNA can mediate secondary rearrangements of chromosomes, such as translocations, inversions, deletions and (possibly amplifications. The integration of HBV DNA into the host genome occurs at early steps of clonal tumor expansion. The integration has been shown in a number of cases to affect a variety of cancer-related genes and to exert insertional mutagenesis. However, in contrast to the woodchuck model, in which specific HBV-DNA integration is detectable in most cases, insertional activation or inactivation of cellular genes appears to be a rare event in man. The discovery of transactivating functions exerted by HBx and truncated HBs(urface proteins supports the notion that these could be relevant to hepatocarcinogenesis as these transactivator sequences have been found in a large number of HCC tumors or hepatoma-derived cell lines. The HBx

  11. Molecular basis for gene-specific transactivation by nuclear receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mads Aagaard; Siersbæk, Rasmus; Mandrup, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear receptors (NRs) are key transcriptional regulators of metazoan physiology and metabolism. Different NRs bind to similar or even identical core response elements; however, they regulate transcription in a highly receptor- and gene-specific manner. These differences in gene activation can m...... on the recent advances in the molecular mechanisms responsible for receptor- and gene-specific transcriptional activation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Translating nuclear receptors from health to disease....... most likely be accounted for by mechanisms involving receptor-specific interactions with DNA as well as receptor-specific interactions with protein complexes binding to adjacent and distant DNA sequences. Here, we review key molecular aspects of transactivation by NRs with special emphasis...

  12. Diametrically opposed effects of hypoxia and oxidative stress on two viral transactivators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiyar Ashok

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many pathogens exist in multiple physiological niches within the host. Differences between aerobic and anaerobic conditions are known to alter the expression of bacterial virulence factors, typically through the conditional activity of transactivators that modulate their expression. More recently, changes in physiological niches have been shown to affect the expression of viral genes. For many viruses, differences in oxygen tension between hypoxia and normoxia alter gene expression or function. Oxygen tension also affects many mammalian transactivators including AP-1, NFkB, and p53 by affecting the reduced state of critical cysteines in these proteins. We have recently determined that an essential cys-x-x-cys motif in the EBNA1 transactivator of Epstein-Barr virus is redox-regulated, such that transactivation is favoured under reducing conditions. The crucial Tat transactivator of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV has an essential cysteine-rich region, and is also regulated by redox. Contrary to EBNA1, it is reported that Tat's activity is increased by oxidative stress. Here we have compared the effects of hypoxia, oxidative stress, and cellular redox modulators on EBNA1 and Tat. Results Our results indicate that unlike EBNA1, Tat is less active during hypoxia. Agents that generate hydroxyl and superoxide radicals reduce EBNA1's activity but increase transactivation by Tat. The cellular redox modulator, APE1/Ref-1, increases EBNA1's activity, without any effect on Tat. Conversely, thioredoxin reductase 1 (TRR1 reduces Tat's function without any effect on EBNA1. Conclusions We conclude that oxygen partial pressure and oxidative stress affects the functions of EBNA1 and Tat in a dramatically opposed fashion. Tat is more active during oxidative stress, whereas EBNA1's activity is compromised under these conditions. The two proteins respond to differing cellular redox modulators, suggesting that the oxidized cysteine adduct is a

  13. Phosphorylation of Src by phosphoinositide 3-kinase regulates beta-adrenergic receptor-mediated EGFR transactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Lewis J; Alexander, Kevin M; Mohan, Maradumane L; Bowman, Amber L; Mangmool, Supachoke; Xiao, Kunhong; Naga Prasad, Sathyamangla V; Rockman, Howard A

    2016-10-01

    β2-Adrenergic receptors (β2AR) transactivate epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) through formation of a β2AR-EGFR complex that requires activation of Src to mediate signaling. Here, we show that both lipid and protein kinase activities of the bifunctional phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) enzyme are required for β2AR-stimulated EGFR transactivation. Mechanistically, the generation of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-tris-phosphate (PIP3) by the lipid kinase function stabilizes β2AR-EGFR complexes while the protein kinase activity of PI3K regulates Src activation by direct phosphorylation. The protein kinase activity of PI3K phosphorylates serine residue 70 on Src to enhance its activity and induce EGFR transactivation following βAR stimulation. This newly identified function for PI3K, whereby Src is a substrate for the protein kinase activity of PI3K, is of importance since Src plays a key role in pathological and physiological signaling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The nucleotide-binding domain of NLRC5 is critical for nuclear import and transactivation activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meissner, Torsten B. [Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Li, Amy; Liu, Yuen-Joyce [Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Gagnon, Etienne [Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Institut de Recherche en Immunologie et Cancerologie, Departement de Microbiologie et Immunologie, Universite de Montreal, Montreal, Canada H3T1J4 (Canada); Kobayashi, Koichi S., E-mail: Koichi_Kobayashi@dfci.harvard.edu [Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunobiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NLRC5 requires an intact NLS for its function as MHC class I transactivator. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear presence of NLRC5 is required for MHC class I induction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nucleotide-binding controls nuclear import and transactivation activity of NLRC5. -- Abstract: Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II are crucial for the function of the human adaptive immune system. A member of the NLR (nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat) protein family, NLRC5, has recently been identified as a transcriptional regulator of MHC class I and related genes. While a 'master regulator' of MHC class II genes, CIITA, has long been known, NLRC5 specifically associates with and transactivates the proximal promoters of MHC class I genes. In this study, we analyzed the molecular requirements of NLRC5 nuclear import and transactivation activity. We show that NLRC5-mediated MHC class I gene induction requires an intact nuclear localization signal and nuclear distribution of NLRC5. In addition, we find that the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of NLRC5 is critical not only for nuclear translocation but also for the transactivation of MHC class I genes. Changing the cellular localization of NLRC5 is likely to immediately impact MHC class I expression as well as MHC class I-mediated antigen presentation. NLRC5 may thus provide a promising target for the modulation of MHC class I antigen presentation, especially in the setting of transplant medicine.

  15. Non-transactivational, dual pathways for LPA-induced Erk1/2 activation in primary cultures of brown pre-adipocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmstroem, Therese E.; Mattsson, Charlotte L.; Wang, Yanling; Iakovleva, Irina; Petrovic, Natasa [Department of Physiology, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Nedergaard, Jan, E-mail: jan@metabol.su.se [Department of Physiology, The Wenner-Gren Institute, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-10-01

    In many cell types, G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-induced Erk1/2 MAP kinase activation is mediated via receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) transactivation, in particular via the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), acting via GPCRs, is a mitogen and MAP kinase activator in many systems, and LPA can regulate adipocyte proliferation. The mechanism by which LPA activates the Erk1/2 MAP kinase is generally accepted to be via EGF receptor transactivation. In primary cultures of brown pre-adipocytes, EGF can induce Erk1/2 activation, which is obligatory and determinant for EGF-induced proliferation of these cells. Therefore, we have here examined whether LPA, via EGF transactivation, can activate Erk1/2 in brown pre-adipocytes. We found that LPA could induce Erk1/2 activation. However, the LPA-induced Erk1/2 activation was independent of transactivation of EGF receptors (or PDGF receptors) in these cells (whereas in transformed HIB-1B brown adipocytes, the LPA-induced Erk1/2 activation indeed proceeded via EGF receptor transactivation). In the brown pre-adipocytes, LPA instead induced Erk1/2 activation via two distinct non-transactivational pathways, one G{sub i}-protein dependent, involving PKC and Src activation, the other, a PTX-insensitive pathway, involving PI3K (but not Akt) activation. Earlier studies showing LPA-induced Erk1/2 activation being fully dependent on RTK transactivation have all been performed in cell lines and transfected cells. The present study implies that in non-transformed systems, RTK transactivation may not be involved in the mediation of GPCR-induced Erk1/2 MAP kinase activation.

  16. Screening of the target genes trans-activated by HLA-HA8 in hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi WANG

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To clone and identify the target genes trans-activated by human minor histocompatibility antigen HLA-HA8 in hepatocytes with suppression subtractive hybridization(SSH and bioinfomatics technique.Methods mRNA was isolated from HepG2 cells transfected by pcDNA3.1(--HLA-HA8 and pcDNA3.1(- empty vector,and then used to synthesize the double-stranded cDNA(marked as Tester and Driver,respectively by reverse transcription.After being digested with restriction enzyme Rsa I,the tester cDNA was divided into two parts and ligated to the specific adaptor 1 and adaptor 2,respectively,and then hybridized with driver cDNA twice and underwent PCR twice.The production was subcloned into pEGM-Teasy plasmid vectors to set up the subtractive library.The library was then amplified by transfection into E.coli strain DH5α.The cDNA was sequenced and analyzed in GenBank with Blast search after PCR amplification.Results The subtractive library of genes trans-activated by HLA-HA8 was constructed successfully.The amplified library contained 101 positive clones.Colony PCR showed that all these clones contained 200-1000bp inserts.Twenty eight clones were selected randomly to analyze the sequences.The result of homologous analysis showed that altogether 16 coding sequences were gotten,of which 4 sequences were with unknown function.Conclusions The obtained sequences trans-activated by HLA-HA8 may code different proteins and play important roles in cell growth and metabolism,energy synthesis and metabolism,material transport and signal transduction.This finding will bring some new clues for the studies not only on the biological functions of HLA-HA8,but also on the HBV infection mechanism.

  17. A central role for CK1 in catalysing phosphorylation of the P53 transactivation domain at serine 20 after HHV-6B viral infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maclaine, NJ; Øster, Bodil; Bundgaard, Bettina

    2008-01-01

    The tumour suppressor protein p53 is activated by distinct cellular stresses including radiation, hypoxia, type-I interferon, and DNA/RNA virus infection. The transactivation domain of p53 contains a phosphorylation site at serine 20 (Ser20) whose modification stabilises the binding of the transc...

  18. Hypo- and hypermorphic FOXC1 mutations in dominant glaucoma: transactivation and phenotypic variability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Medina-Trillo

    Full Text Available Dominant glaucoma, a heterogeneous, infrequent and irreversible optic neuropathy, is often associated with elevated intraocular pressure and early-onset. The role of FOXC1 in this type of glaucoma was investigated in twelve Spanish probands via nucleotide variation screening of its proximal promoter and unique exon. Functional evaluations of the identified variants included analyses of the transcriptional activity, protein stability, DNA binding ability and subcellular localization. Four different mutations that were identified in four probands (33.3% were associated with remarkable phenotypic variability and were functionally classified as either hypermorphic (p.Y47X, p.Q106X and p.G447_G448insDG or hypomorphic (p.I126S alleles. To the best of our knowledge, three of the variants are novel (p.Y47X, p.I126S and p.G447_G448insDG and, in addition, hypermorphic FOXC1 mutations are reported herein for the first time. The presence of an intact N-terminal activation domain in the truncated proteins p.Y47X and p.Q106X may underlie their associated transactivation hyperactivity by a gain-of-function mechanism involving dysregulated protein-protein interactions. Similarly, altered molecular interactions may also lead to increased p.G447_G448insDG activity. In contrast, the partial loss-of-function associated with p.I126S was due to impaired protein stability, DNA binding, protein phosphorylation and subcellular distribution. These results support that moderate and variable FOXC1 transactivation changes are associated with moderate goniodysgenesis, dominant glaucoma and remarkable phenotypic variability.

  19. Hypo- and Hypermorphic FOXC1 Mutations in Dominant Glaucoma: Transactivation and Phenotypic Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Trillo, Cristina; Sánchez-Sánchez, Francisco; Aroca-Aguilar, José-Daniel; Ferre-Fernández, Jesús-José; Morales, Laura; Méndez-Hernández, Carmen-Dora; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; Ayuso, Carmen; García-Feijoo, Julián; Escribano, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Dominant glaucoma, a heterogeneous, infrequent and irreversible optic neuropathy, is often associated with elevated intraocular pressure and early-onset. The role of FOXC1 in this type of glaucoma was investigated in twelve Spanish probands via nucleotide variation screening of its proximal promoter and unique exon. Functional evaluations of the identified variants included analyses of the transcriptional activity, protein stability, DNA binding ability and subcellular localization. Four different mutations that were identified in four probands (33.3%) were associated with remarkable phenotypic variability and were functionally classified as either hypermorphic (p.Y47X, p.Q106X and p.G447_G448insDG) or hypomorphic (p.I126S) alleles. To the best of our knowledge, three of the variants are novel (p.Y47X, p.I126S and p.G447_G448insDG) and, in addition, hypermorphic FOXC1 mutations are reported herein for the first time. The presence of an intact N-terminal activation domain in the truncated proteins p.Y47X and p.Q106X may underlie their associated transactivation hyperactivity by a gain-of-function mechanism involving dysregulated protein-protein interactions. Similarly, altered molecular interactions may also lead to increased p.G447_G448insDG activity. In contrast, the partial loss-of-function associated with p.I126S was due to impaired protein stability, DNA binding, protein phosphorylation and subcellular distribution. These results support that moderate and variable FOXC1 transactivation changes are associated with moderate goniodysgenesis, dominant glaucoma and remarkable phenotypic variability. PMID:25786029

  20. The MHC-II transactivator CIITA inhibits Tat function and HIV-1 replication in human myeloid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forlani, Greta; Turrini, Filippo; Ghezzi, Silvia; Tedeschi, Alessandra; Poli, Guido; Accolla, Roberto S; Tosi, Giovanna

    2016-04-18

    We previously demonstrated that the HLA class II transactivator CIITA inhibits HIV-1 replication in T cells by competing with the viral transactivator Tat for the binding to Cyclin T1 subunit of the P-TEFb complex. Here, we analyzed the anti-viral function of CIITA in myeloid cells, another relevant HIV-1 target cell type. We sinvestigated clones of the U937 promonocytic cell line, either permissive (Plus) or non-permissive (Minus) to HIV-1 replication. This different phenotype has been associated with the expression of TRIM22 in U937 Minus but not in Plus cells. U937 Plus cells stably expressing CIITA were generated and HLA-II positive clones were selected by cell sorting and cloning. HLA and CIITA proteins were analyzed by cytofluorometry and western blotting, respectively. HLA-II DR and CIITA mRNAs were quantified by qRT-PCR. Tat-dependent transactivation was assessed by performing the HIV-1 LTR luciferase gene reporter assay. Cells were infected with HIV-1 and viral replication was evaluated by measuring the RT activity in culture supernatants. CIITA was expressed only in HLA-II-positive U937 Minus cells, and this was strictly correlated with inhibition of Tat-dependent HIV-1 LTR transactivation in Minus but not in Plus cells. Overexpression of CIITA in Plus cells restored the suppression of Tat transactivation, confirming the inhibitory role of CIITA. Importantly, HIV-1 replication was significantly reduced in Plus-CIITA cells with respect to Plus parental cells. This effect was independent of TRIM22 as CIITA did not induce TRIM22 expression in Plus-CIITA cells. U937 Plus and Minus cells represent an interesting model to study the role of CIITA in HIV-1 restriction in the monocytic/macrophage cell lineage. The differential expression of CIITA in CIITA-negative Plus and CIITA-positive Minus cells correlated with their capacity to support or not HIV-1 replication, respectively. In Minus cells CIITA targeted the viral transactivator Tat to inhibit HIV-1

  1. Clusterin is a critical downstream mediator of stress-induced YB-1 transactivation in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiota, Masaki; Zoubeidi, Amina; Kumano, Masafumi; Beraldi, Eliana; Naito, Seiji; Nelson, Colleen C; Sorensen, Poul H B; Gleave, Martin E

    2011-12-01

    Clusterin is a stress-activated, cytoprotective chaperone that confers broad-spectrum treatment resistance in cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating CLU transcription following anticancer treatment stress remain incompletely defined. We report that Y-box binding protein-1 (YB-1) directly binds to CLU promoter regions to transcriptionally regulate clusterin expression. In response to endoplasmic reticulum stress inducers, including paclitaxel, YB-1 is translocated to the nucleus to transactivate clusterin. Furthermore, higher levels of activated YB-1 and clusterin are seen in taxane-resistant, compared with parental, prostate cancer cells. Knockdown of either YB-1 or clusterin sensitized prostate cancer cells to paclitaxel, whereas their overexpression increased resistance to taxane. Clusterin overexpression rescued cells from increased paclitaxel-induced apoptosis following YB-1 knockdown; in contrast, however, YB-1 overexpression did not rescue cells from increased paclitaxel-induced apoptosis following clusterin knockdown. Collectively, these data indicate that YB-1 transactivation of clusterin in response to stress is a critical mediator of paclitaxel resistance in prostate cancer.

  2. miR-16 targets transcriptional corepressor SMRT and modulates NF-kappaB-regulated transactivation of interleukin-8 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhou

    Full Text Available The signaling pathways associated with the Toll-like receptors (TLRs and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB are essential to pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine expression, as well as initiating innate epithelial immune responses. The TLR/NF-κB signaling pathways must be stringently controlled through an intricate network of positive and negative regulatory elements. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are non-coding small RNAs that regulate the stability and/or translation of protein-coding mRNAs. Herein we report that miR-16 promotes NF-κB-regulated transactivation of the IL-8 gene by suppression of the silencing mediator for retinoid and thyroid hormone receptor (SMRT. LPS stimulation activated miR-16 gene transcription in human monocytes (U937 and biliary epithelial cells (H69 through MAPK-dependent mechanisms. Transfection of cells with the miR-16 precursor promoted LPS-induced production of IL-8, IL-6, and IL-1α, without a significant effect on their RNA stability. Instead, an increase in NF-κB-regulated transactivation of the IL-8 gene was confirmed in cells following transfection of miR-16 precursor. Importantly, miR-16 targeted the 3'-untranslated region of SMRT and caused translational suppression of SMRT. LPS decreased SMRT expression via upregulation of miR-16. Moreover, functional manipulation of SMRT altered NF-κB-regulated transactivation of LPS-induced IL-8 expression. These data suggest that miR-16 targets SMRT and modulates NF-κB-regulated transactivation of the IL-8 gene.

  3. Enhanced human somatic cell reprogramming efficiency by fusion of the MYC transactivation domain and OCT4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs holds great promise for regenerative medicine. However the iPSC induction efficiency is still very low and with lengthy reprogramming process. We utilized the highly potent transactivation domain (TAD of MYC protein to engineer the human OCT4 fusion proteins. Applying the MYC-TAD-OCT4 fusion proteins in mouse iPSC generation leads to shorter reprogramming dynamics, with earlier activation of pluripotent markers in reprogrammed cells than wild type OCT4 (wt-OCT4. Dramatic enhancement of iPSC colony induction efficiency and shortened reprogramming dynamics were observed when these MYC-TAD-OCT4 fusion proteins were used to reprogram primary human cells. The OCT4 fusion proteins induced human iPSCs are pluripotent. We further show that the MYC Box I (MBI is dispensable while both MBII and the linking region between MBI/II are essential for the enhanced reprogramming activity of MYC-TAD-OCT4 fusion protein. Consistent with an enhanced transcription activity, the engineered OCT4 significantly stimulated the expression of genes specifically targeted by OCT4-alone, OCT4/SOX2, and OCT4/SOX2/KLF4 during human iPSC induction, compared with the wt-OCT4. The MYC-TAD-OCT4 fusion proteins we generated will be valuable tools for studying the reprogramming mechanisms and for efficient iPSC generation for humans as well as for other species.

  4. Trans-activation function of a 3' truncated X gene-cell fusion product from integrated hepatitis B virus DNA in chronic hepatitis tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Shinako; Koike, Katsuro

    1990-01-01

    To investigate the expression and transactivation function of the X gene in integrated hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA from chronic hepatitis tissues, a series of transfectants containing cloned integrated HBV DNAs was made and analyzed for X mRNA expression and trans-activation activity by using a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assay. Most of the integrated HBV DNAs expressed X mRNA and encoded a product with trans-activation activity in spite of the loss of the 3' end region of the X gene due to integration. From cDNA cloning and sequence analysis of X mRNA transcribed from native or integrated HBV DNA, the X protein was found to be translated from the X open reading frame without splicing. For integrated HBV DNA, transcription was extended to a cellular flanking DNA and an X gene-cell fusion transcript was terminated by using a cellular poly(A) signal. The amino acid sequence deduced from an X-cell fusion transcript indicated truncation of the carboxyl-terminal five amino acids, but the upstream region of seven amino acids conserved among hepadnaviruses was retained in the integrated HBV DNA, suggesting that this conserved region is essential for the transactivation function of the X protein. These findings support the following explanation for hepatocarcinogenesis by HBV DNA integration: the expression of a cellular oncogene(s) is transactivated at the time of chronic infection by the increasing amounts of the integrated HBV gene product(s), such as the X-cell fusion product

  5. The nuclear cofactor RAC3/AIB1/SRC-3 enhances Nrf2 signaling by interacting with transactivation domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J-H; Yu, S; Chen, J D; Kong, A N

    2013-01-24

    Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, NM 006164, 605 AA) is essential for the antioxidant responsive element (ARE)-mediated expression of a group of detoxifying antioxidant genes that detoxify carcinogens and protect against oxidative stress. Several proteins have been identified as Nrf2-interacting molecules. In this study, we found that the overexpression of receptor-associated coactivator 3 (RAC3)/AIB-1/steroid receptor coactivator-3, a nuclear coregulator and oncogene frequently amplified in human breast cancers, induced heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) through Nrf2 transactivation in HeLa cells. Next, we determined the interaction between RAC3 and Nrf2 proteins using a co-immunoprecipitation assay and fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis. The results showed that RAC3 bound directly to the Nrf2 protein in the nucleus. Subsequently, we identified the interacting domains of Nrf2 and RAC3 using a glutathione S-transferase pull-down assay. The results showed that both the N-terminal RAC3-pasB and C-terminal RAC3-R3B3 domains were tightly bound to the Neh4 and Neh5 transactivation domains. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that RAC3 bound tightly to the ARE enhancer region of the HO-1 promoter via Nrf2 binding. These data suggest that Nrf2 activation is modulated and directly controlled through interactions with the RAC3 protein in HeLa cells.

  6. Transactivation activity and nucleocytoplasmic transport of β-catenin are independently regulated by its C-terminal end.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturana, J L; Niechi, I; Silva, E; Huerta, H; Cataldo, R; Härtel, S; Barros, L F; Galindo, M; Tapia, J C

    2015-11-15

    The key protein in the canonical Wnt pathway is β-catenin, which is phosphorylated both in absence and presence of Wnt signals by different kinases. Upon activation in the cytoplasm, β-catenin can enter into the nucleus to transactivate target gene expression, many of which are cancer-related genes. The mechanism governing β-catenin's nucleocytoplasmic transport has been recently unvealed, although phosphorylation at its C-terminal end and its functional consequences are not completely understood. Serine 646 of β-catenin is a putative CK2 phosphorylation site and lies in a region which has been proposed to be important for its nucleocytoplasmic transport and transactivation activity. This residue was mutated to aspartic acid mimicking CK2-phosphorylation and its effects on β-catenin activity as well as localization were explored. β-Catenin S6464D did not show significant differences in both transcriptional activity and nuclear localization compared to the wild-type form, but displayed a characteristic granular nuclear pattern. Three-dimensional models of nuclei were constructed which showed differences in number and volume of granules, being those from β-catenin S646D more and smaller than the wild-type form. FRAP microscopy was used to compare nuclear export of both proteins which showed a slightly higher but not significant retention of β-catenin S646D. Altogether, these results show that C-terminal phosphorylation of β-catenin seems to be related with its nucleocytoplasmic transport but not transactivation activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. AML1/ETO trans-activates c-KIT expression through the long range interaction between promoter and intronic enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ying; Wang, Genjie; Hu, Qingzhu; Xiao, Xichun; Chen, Shuxia

    2018-04-01

    The AML1/ETO onco-fusion protein is crucial for the genesis of t(8;21) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is well documented as a transcriptional repressor through dominant-negative effect. However, little is known about the transactivation mechanism of AML1/ETO. Through large cohort of patient's expression level data analysis and a series of experimental validation, we report here that AML1/ETO transactivates c-KIT expression through directly binding to and mediating the long-range interaction between the promoter and intronic enhancer regions of c-KIT. Gene expression analyses verify that c-KIT expression is significantly high in t(8;21) AML. Further ChIP-seq analysis and motif scanning identify two regulatory regions located in the promoter and intronic enhancer region of c-KIT, respectively. Both regions are enriched by co-factors of AML1/ETO, such as AML1, CEBPe, c-Jun, and c-Fos. Further luciferase reporter assays show that AML1/ETO trans-activates c-KIT promoter activity through directly recognizing the AML1 motif and the co-existence of co-factors. The induction of c-KIT promoter activity is reinforced with the existence of intronic enhancer region. Furthermore, ChIP-3C-qPCR assays verify that AML1/ETO mediates the formation of DNA-looping between the c-KIT promoter and intronic enhancer region through the long-range interaction. Collectively, our data uncover a novel transcriptional activity mechanism of AML1/ETO and enrich our knowledge of the onco-fusion protein mediated transcription regulation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Transactivation Domain of Human c-Myc Is Essential to Alleviate Poly(Q)-Mediated Neurotoxicity in Drosophila Disease Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Kritika; Sarkar, Surajit

    2017-05-01

    Polyglutamine (poly(Q)) disorders, such as Huntington's disease (HD) and spinocerebellar ataxias, represent a group of neurological disorders which arise due to an atypically expanded poly(Q) tract in the coding region of the affected gene. Pathogenesis of these disorders inside the cells begins with the assembly of these mutant proteins in the form of insoluble inclusion bodies (IBs), which progressively sequester several vital cellular transcription factors and other essential proteins, and finally leads to neuronal dysfunction and apoptosis. We have shown earlier that targeted upregulation of Drosophila myc (dmyc) dominantly suppresses the poly(Q) toxicity in Drosophila. The present study examines the ability of the human c-myc proto-oncogene and also identifies the specific c-Myc isoform which drives the mitigation of poly(Q)-mediated neurotoxicity, so that it could be further substantiated as a potential drug target. We report for the first time that similar to dmyc, tissue-specific induced expression of human c-myc also suppresses poly(Q)-mediated neurotoxicity by an analogous mechanism. Among the three isoforms of c-Myc, the rescue potential was maximally manifested by the full-length c-Myc2 protein, followed by c-Myc1, but not by c-MycS which lacks the transactivation domain. Our study suggests that strategies focussing on the transactivation domain of c-Myc could be a very useful approach to design novel drug molecules against poly(Q) disorders.

  9. Conditional reverse tet-transactivator mouse strains for the efficient induction of TRE-regulated transgenes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Lukas E; Nasr, Zeina; Saborowski, Michael; Ebbesen, Saya H; Manchado, Eusebio; Tasdemir, Nilgun; Lee, Teresa; Pelletier, Jerry; Lowe, Scott W

    2014-01-01

    Tetracycline or doxycycline (dox)-regulated control of genetic elements allows inducible, reversible and tissue specific regulation of gene expression in mice. This approach provides a means to investigate protein function in specific cell lineages and at defined periods of development and disease. Efficient and stable regulation of cDNAs or non-coding elements (e.g. shRNAs) downstream of the tetracycline-regulated element (TRE) requires the robust expression of a tet-transactivator protein, commonly the reverse tet-transactivator, rtTA. Most rtTA strains rely on tissue specific promoters that often do not provide sufficient rtTA levels for optimal inducible expression. Here we describe the generation of two mouse strains that enable Cre-dependent, robust expression of rtTA3, providing tissue-restricted and consistent induction of TRE-controlled transgenes. We show that these transgenic strains can be effectively combined with established mouse models of disease, including both Cre/LoxP-based approaches and non Cre-dependent disease models. The integration of these new tools with established mouse models promises the development of more flexible genetic systems to uncover the mechanisms of development and disease pathogenesis.

  10. Conditional reverse tet-transactivator mouse strains for the efficient induction of TRE-regulated transgenes in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas E Dow

    Full Text Available Tetracycline or doxycycline (dox-regulated control of genetic elements allows inducible, reversible and tissue specific regulation of gene expression in mice. This approach provides a means to investigate protein function in specific cell lineages and at defined periods of development and disease. Efficient and stable regulation of cDNAs or non-coding elements (e.g. shRNAs downstream of the tetracycline-regulated element (TRE requires the robust expression of a tet-transactivator protein, commonly the reverse tet-transactivator, rtTA. Most rtTA strains rely on tissue specific promoters that often do not provide sufficient rtTA levels for optimal inducible expression. Here we describe the generation of two mouse strains that enable Cre-dependent, robust expression of rtTA3, providing tissue-restricted and consistent induction of TRE-controlled transgenes. We show that these transgenic strains can be effectively combined with established mouse models of disease, including both Cre/LoxP-based approaches and non Cre-dependent disease models. The integration of these new tools with established mouse models promises the development of more flexible genetic systems to uncover the mechanisms of development and disease pathogenesis.

  11. Flock House virus subgenomic RNA3 is replicated and its replication correlates with transactivation of RNA2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckerle, Lance D.; Albarino, Cesar G.; Ball, L. Andrew.

    2003-01-01

    The nodavirus Flock House virus has a bipartite genome composed of RNAs 1 and 2, which encode the catalytic component of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and the capsid protein precursor, respectively. In addition to catalyzing replication of the viral genome, the RdRp also transcribes from RNA1 a subgenomic RNA3, which is both required for and suppressed by RNA2 replication. Here, we show that in the absence of RNA1 replication, FHV RdRp replicated positive-sense RNA3 transcripts fully and copied negative-sense RNA3 transcripts into positive strands. The two nonstructural proteins encoded by RNA3 were dispensable for replication, but sequences in the 3'-terminal 58 nucleotides were required. RNA3 variants that failed to replicate also failed to transactivate RNA2. These results imply that RNA3 is naturally produced both by transcription from RNA1 and by subsequent RNA1-independent replication and that RNA3 replication may be necessary for transactivation of RNA2

  12. Contribution to the investigation of the p53 in vivo and in vitro trans-activation activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meiller, A.

    2004-03-01

    Among the body's defence mechanisms, the programmed cellular death or apoptosis is an important safeguard way which allows the body to get rid of the injured cells before they acquire steady genetic modifications leading to an anarchistic multiplication. As p53 tumor suppressor gene plays a predominant role within this process, this research report first presents the p53 protein, its structure, its activities as a transcription factor, its modifications and the implications on its functional activities, its biological activities, and describes the p53 intracellular rate regulation and the use of this protein in radiology, particularly in 'in vivo' investigations on irradiated mice. It also presents the p53 family. Then, the author reports experimental investigations on possible other genes which could be trans-activated by p53. A gene is identified as a new target gene. She also demonstrates a new p53 activation path induced by another member of the p53 family, the p73 alpha protein

  13. Cholinergic Transactivation of the EGFR in HaCaT Keratinocytes Stimulates a Flotillin-1 Dependent MAPK-Mediated Transcriptional Response

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    Sina Kühne

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine and its receptors regulate numerous cellular processes in keratinocytes and other non-neuronal cells. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors are capable of transactivating the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR and, downstream thereof, the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascade, which in turn regulates transcription of genes involved in cell proliferation and migration. We here show that cholinergic stimulation of human HaCaT keratinocytes results in increased transcription of matrix metalloproteinase MMP-3 as well as several ligands of the epidermal growth factor family. Since both metalloproteinases and the said ligands are involved in the transactivation of the EGFR, this transcriptional upregulation may provide a positive feed-forward loop for EGFR/MAPK activation. We here also show that the cholinergic EGFR and MAPK activation and the upregulation of MMP-3 and EGF-like ligands are dependent on the expression of flotillin-1 which we have previously shown to be a regulator of MAPK signaling.

  14. Epstein-Barr virus immediate-early gene product trans-activates gene expression from the human immunodeficiency virus long terminal repeat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenney, S.; Kamine, J.; Markovitz, D.; Fenrick, R.; Pagano, J.

    1988-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients are frequently coinfected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). In this report, the authors demonstrate that an EBV immediate-early gene product, BamHI MLF1, stimulates expression of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene linked to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) promoter. The HIV promoter sequences necessary for trans-activation by EBV do not include the tat-responsive sequences. In addition, in contrast to the other herpesvirus trans-activators previously studied, the EBV BamHI MLF1 gene product appears to function in part by a posttranscriptional mechanism, since it increases pHIV-CAT protein activity more than it increases HIV-CAT mRNA. This ability of an EBV gene product to activate HIV gene expression may have biologic consequences in persons coinfected with both viruses

  15. Interactions of chromatin context, binding site sequence content, and sequence evolution in stress-induced p53 occupancy and transactivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Su

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular stresses activate the tumor suppressor p53 protein leading to selective binding to DNA response elements (REs and gene transactivation from a large pool of potential p53 REs (p53REs. To elucidate how p53RE sequences and local chromatin context interact to affect p53 binding and gene transactivation, we mapped genome-wide binding localizations of p53 and H3K4me3 in untreated and doxorubicin (DXR-treated human lymphoblastoid cells. We examined the relationships among p53 occupancy, gene expression, H3K4me3, chromatin accessibility (DNase 1 hypersensitivity, DHS, ENCODE chromatin states, p53RE sequence, and evolutionary conservation. We observed that the inducible expression of p53-regulated genes was associated with the steady-state chromatin status of the cell. Most highly inducible p53-regulated genes were suppressed at baseline and marked by repressive histone modifications or displayed CTCF binding. Comparison of p53RE sequences residing in different chromatin contexts demonstrated that weaker p53REs resided in open promoters, while stronger p53REs were located within enhancers and repressed chromatin. p53 occupancy was strongly correlated with similarity of the target DNA sequences to the p53RE consensus, but surprisingly, inversely correlated with pre-existing nucleosome accessibility (DHS and evolutionary conservation at the p53RE. Occupancy by p53 of REs that overlapped transposable element (TE repeats was significantly higher (p<10-7 and correlated with stronger p53RE sequences (p<10-110 relative to nonTE-associated p53REs, particularly for MLT1H, LTR10B, and Mer61 TEs. However, binding at these elements was generally not associated with transactivation of adjacent genes. Occupied p53REs located in L2-like TEs were unique in displaying highly negative PhyloP scores (predicted fast-evolving and being associated with altered H3K4me3 and DHS levels. These results underscore the systematic interaction between chromatin status and p53

  16. p53 transactivation and the impact of mutations, cofactors and small molecules using a simplified yeast-based screening system.

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    Virginia Andreotti

    Full Text Available The p53 tumor suppressor, which is altered in most cancers, is a sequence-specific transcription factor that is able to modulate the expression of many target genes and influence a variety of cellular pathways. Inactivation of the p53 pathway in cancer frequently occurs through the expression of mutant p53 protein. In tumors that retain wild type p53, the pathway can be altered by upstream modulators, particularly the p53 negative regulators MDM2 and MDM4.Given the many factors that might influence p53 function, including expression levels, mutations, cofactor proteins and small molecules, we expanded our previously described yeast-based system to provide the opportunity for efficient investigation of their individual and combined impacts in a miniaturized format. The system integrates i variable expression of p53 proteins under the finely tunable GAL1,10 promoter, ii single copy, chromosomally located p53-responsive and control luminescence reporters, iii enhanced chemical uptake using modified ABC-transporters, iv small-volume formats for treatment and dual-luciferase assays, and v opportunities to co-express p53 with other cofactor proteins. This robust system can distinguish different levels of expression of WT and mutant p53 as well as interactions with MDM2 or 53BP1.We found that the small molecules Nutlin and RITA could both relieve the MDM2-dependent inhibition of WT p53 transactivation function, while only RITA could impact p53/53BP1 functional interactions. PRIMA-1 was ineffective in modifying the transactivation capacity of WT p53 and missense p53 mutations. This dual-luciferase assay can, therefore, provide a high-throughput assessment tool for investigating a matrix of factors that can influence the p53 network, including the effectiveness of newly developed small molecules, on WT and tumor-associated p53 mutants as well as interacting proteins.

  17. Differential transactivation by orphan nuclear receptor NOR1 and its fusion gene product EWS/NOR1: possible involvement of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase I, PARP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkura, Naganari; Nagamura, Yuko; Tsukada, Toshihiko

    2008-10-15

    In extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma, a chromosomal translocation creates a gene fusion between EWS and an orphan nuclear receptor, NOR1. The resulting fusion protein EWS/NOR1 has been believed to lead to malignant transformation by functioning as a transactivator for NOR1-target genes. By comparing the gene expression profiles of NOR1- and EWS/NOR1-overexpressing cells, we found that they largely shared up-regulated genes, but no significant correlation was observed with respect to the transactivation levels of each gene. In addition, the proteins associated with NOR1 and EWS/NOR1 were mostly the same in these cells. The results suggest that these proteins differentially transactivate overlapping target genes through a similar transcriptional machinery. To clarify the mechanisms underlying the transcriptional divergence between NOR1 and EWS/NOR1, we searched for alternatively associated proteins, and identified poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase I (PARP-1) as an NOR1-specific binding protein. Consistent with its binding properties, PARP-1 acted as a transcriptional repressor of NOR1, but not EWS/NOR1, in a luciferase reporter assay employing PARP-1(-/-) fibroblasts. Interestingly, suppressive activity of PARP-1 was observed in a DNA response element-specific manner, and in a subtype-specific manner toward the NR4A family (Nur77, Nurr1, and NOR1), suggesting that PARP-1 plays a role in the diversity of transcriptional regulation mediated by the NR4A family in normal cells. Altogether, our findings suggest that NOR1 and EWS/NOR1 regulate overlapping target genes differently by utilizing associated proteins, including PARP-1; and that EWS/NOR1 may acquire oncogenic activities by avoiding (or gaining) transcription factor-specific modulation by the associated proteins. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Resveratrol prevents angiotensin II-induced hypertrophy of vascular smooth muscle cells through the transactivation of growth factor receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Ekhtear; Anand-Srivastava, Madhu B

    2017-08-01

    We previously showed that augmented levels of endogenous angiotensin II (AngII) contribute to vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) hypertrophy through the transactivation of growth factor receptors in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Resveratrol (RV), a polyphenolic component of red wine, has also been shown to attenuate AngII-evoked VSMC hypertrophy; however, the molecular mechanism mediating this response is obscure. The present study was therefore undertaken to examine whether RV could prevent AngII-induced VSMC hypertrophy through the transactivation of growth factor receptor and associated signaling pathways. AngII treatment of VSMC enhanced the protein synthesis that was attenuated towards control levels by RV pretreatment as well as by the inhibitors of NADPH oxidase, c-Src, and growth factor receptors. Furthermore, RV pretreatment also inhibited enhanced levels of superoxide anion, NADPH oxidase activity, increased expression of NADPH oxidase subunits, and phosphorylation of c-Src, EGF-R, PDGE-R, ERK1/2, and AKT1/2. In conclusion, these results indicate that RV attenuates AngII-induced VSMC hypertrophy through the inhibition of enhanced oxidative stress and activation of c-Src, growth factor receptors, and MAPK/AKT signaling. We suggest that RV could be used as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of vascular complications associated with hypertension and hypertrophy.

  19. Cyclin D1 represses p300 transactivation through a cyclin-dependent kinase-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Maofu; Wang, Chenguang; Rao, Mahadev; Wu, Xiaofang; Bouras, Toula; Zhang, Xueping; Li, Zhiping; Jiao, Xuanmao; Yang, Jianguo; Li, Anping; Perkins, Neil D; Thimmapaya, Bayar; Kung, Andrew L; Munoz, Alberto; Giordano, Antonio; Lisanti, Michael P; Pestell, Richard G

    2005-08-19

    Cyclin D1 encodes a regulatory subunit, which with its cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)-binding partner forms a holoenzyme that phosphorylates and inactivates the retinoblastoma protein. In addition to its Cdk binding-dependent functions, cyclin D1 regulates cellular differentiation in part by modifying several transcription factors and nuclear receptors. The molecular mechanism through which cyclin D1 regulates the function of transcription factors involved in cellular differentiation remains to be clarified. The histone acetyltransferase protein p300 is a co-integrator required for regulation of multiple transcription factors. Here we show that cyclin D1 physically interacts with p300 and represses p300 transactivation. We demonstrated further that the interaction of the two proteins occurs at the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-responsive element of the lipoprotein lipase promoter in the context of the local chromatin structure. We have mapped the domains in p300 and cyclin D1 involved in this interaction. The bromo domain and cysteine- and histidine-rich domains of p300 were required for repression by cyclin D1. Cyclin D1 repression of p300 was independent of the Cdk- and retinoblastoma protein-binding domains of cyclin D1. Cyclin D1 inhibits histone acetyltransferase activity of p300 in vitro. Microarray analysis identified a signature of genes repressed by cyclin D1 and induced by p300 that promotes cellular differentiation and induces cell cycle arrest. Together, our results suggest that cyclin D1 plays an important role in cellular proliferation and differentiation through regulation of p300.

  20. AKT increases VEGF expression in tumor cells by transactivating the proximal VEGF promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pore, N.; Bernhard, E.J.; Shu, H.-K.; Li, B.; O'Rourke, D.M.; Maity, A.; Haas-Kogan, D.

    2003-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is overexpressed in many cancers including glioblastomas and may contribute to their growth. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) amplification and loss of PTEN, commonly found in glioblastomas leading to increase phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) activity and VEGF expression. In the current study we show that AKT, which is downstream of PI3K, regulates VEGF expression. U87MG human glioblastoma cells lack wildtype PTEN and express high levels of phosphorylated AKT. Over expression of AKT either by stable expression in immortalized human astrocytes or by transduction with adenovirus containing activated myristoylated AKT in SF188 glioblastoma cells increases VEGF expression. Moreover the elevation of angiogenesis by constitutively expressed AKT is further confirmed by in vivo matrigel plug assay in nude mice. The upregulation of VEGF by AKT is mediated through a region in the proximal promoter located between -88 and -70 (+1 is transcription start site). In transient transfection activity of a luciferase reporter containing the -88/+54 region of the VEGF promoter is increased by cotransfection with myristoylated AKT and downregulated by a dominant negative AKT expression vector. Mutation of the putative Sp1 binding sites located in the -88/-70 region we show that AKT acts through Sp1 to transactivate the VEGF promoter. Cotransfection of the VEGF promoter reporter with both Sp1 and myristoylated AKT expression vectors increases promoter activity to a greater extent than either Sp1 or Akt by itself. In vivo phosphate labeling of proteins reveals that AKT leads to increased Sp1 phosphorylation. Gel shift assays using a radio labeled probe corresponding to nucleotides -88 through -66 in the promoter show increased binding with nuclear extracts from cells transduced with adenovirus expressing myristoylated AKT. In conclusion, our results suggest that loss of PTEN leads to increased VEGF expression by increasing AKT

  1. Transcription factor Nrf1 is topologically repartitioned across membranes to enable target gene transactivation through its acidic glucose-responsive domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiguo; Ren, Yonggang; Li, Shaojun; Hayes, John D

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-bound Nrf1 transcription factor regulates critical homeostatic and developmental genes. The conserved N-terminal homology box 1 (NHB1) sequence in Nrf1 targets the cap'n'collar (CNC) basic basic-region leucine zipper (bZIP) factor to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but it is unknown how its activity is controlled topologically within membranes. Herein, we report a hitherto unknown mechanism by which the transactivation activity of Nrf1 is controlled through its membrane-topology. Thus after Nrf1 is anchored within ER membranes, its acidic transactivation domains (TADs), including the Asn/Ser/Thr-rich (NST) glycodomain situated between acidic domain 1 (AD1) and AD2, are transiently translocated into the lumen of the ER, where NST is glycosylated in the presence of glucose to yield an inactive 120-kDa Nrf1 glycoprotein. Subsequently, portions of the TADs partially repartition across membranes into the cyto/nucleoplasmic compartments, whereupon an active 95-kDa form of Nrf1 accumulates, a process that is more obvious in glucose-deprived cells and may involve deglycosylation. The repartitioning of Nrf1 out of membranes is monitored within this protein by its acidic-hydrophobic amphipathic glucose-responsive domains, particularly the Neh5L subdomain within AD1. Therefore, the membrane-topological organization of Nrf1 dictates its post-translational modifications (i.e. glycosylation, the putative deglycosylation and selective proteolysis), which together control its ability to transactivate target genes.

  2. Transactivation of EGFR by LPS induces COX-2 expression in enterocytes.

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    Steven J McElroy

    Full Text Available Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC is the leading cause of gastrointestinal morbidity and mortality in preterm infants. NEC is characterized by an exaggerated inflammatory response to bacterial flora leading to bowel necrosis. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS mediates inflammation through TLR4 activation and is a key molecule in the pathogenesis of NEC. However, LPS also induces cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, which promotes intestinal barrier restitution through stimulation of intestinal cell survival, proliferation, and migration. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR activation prevents experimental NEC and may play a critical role in LPS-stimulated COX-2 production. We hypothesized that EGFR is required for LPS induction of COX-2 expression. Our data show that inhibiting EGFR kinase activity blocks LPS-induced COX-2 expression in small intestinal epithelial cells. LPS induction of COX-2 requires Src-family kinase signaling while LPS transactivation of EGFR requires matrix metalloprotease (MMP activity. EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors block LPS stimulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK, suggesting an important role of the MAPK/ERK pathway in EGFR-mediated COX-2 expression. LPS stimulates proliferation of IEC-6 cells, but this stimulation is inhibited with either the EGFR kinase inhibitor AG1478, or the selective COX-2 inhibitor Celecoxib. Taken together, these data show that EGFR plays an important role in LPS-induction of COX-2 expression in enterocytes, which may be one mechanism for EGF in inhibition of NEC.

  3. Crystal Structure of the CLOCK Transactivation Domain Exon19 in Complex with a Repressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Zhiqiang; Su, Lijing; Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V.; Zhang, Hong (UTSMC)

    2017-08-01

    In the canonical clock model, CLOCK:BMAL1-mediated transcriptional activation is feedback regulated by its repressors CRY and PER and, in association with other coregulators, ultimately generates oscillatory gene expression patterns. How CLOCK:BMAL1 interacts with coregulator(s) is not well understood. Here we report the crystal structures of the mouse CLOCK transactivating domain Exon19 in complex with CIPC, a potent circadian repressor that functions independently of CRY and PER. The Exon19:CIPC complex adopts a three-helical coiled-coil bundle conformation containing two Exon19 helices and one CIPC. Unique to Exon19:CIPC, three highly conserved polar residues, Asn341 of CIPC and Gln544 of the two Exon19 helices, are located at the mid-section of the coiled-coil bundle interior and form hydrogen bonds with each other. Combining results from protein database search, sequence analysis, and mutagenesis studies, we discovered for the first time that CLOCK Exon19:CIPC interaction is a conserved transcription regulatory mechanism among mammals, fish, flies, and other invertebrates.

  4. Noncanonical DNA motifs as transactivation targets by wild type and mutant p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer J Jordan

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Sequence-specific binding by the human p53 master regulator is critical to its tumor suppressor activity in response to environmental stresses. p53 binds as a tetramer to two decameric half-sites separated by 0-13 nucleotides (nt, originally defined by the consensus RRRCWWGYYY (n = 0-13 RRRCWWGYYY. To better understand the role of sequence, organization, and level of p53 on transactivation at target response elements (REs by wild type (WT and mutant p53, we deconstructed the functional p53 canonical consensus sequence using budding yeast and human cell systems. Contrary to early reports on binding in vitro, small increases in distance between decamer half-sites greatly reduces p53 transactivation, as demonstrated for the natural TIGER RE. This was confirmed with human cell extracts using a newly developed, semi-in vitro microsphere binding assay. These results contrast with the synergistic increase in transactivation from a pair of weak, full-site REs in the MDM2 promoter that are separated by an evolutionary conserved 17 bp spacer. Surprisingly, there can be substantial transactivation at noncanonical (1/2-(a single decamer and (3/4-sites, some of which were originally classified as biologically relevant canonical consensus sequences including PIDD and Apaf-1. p53 family members p63 and p73 yielded similar results. Efficient transactivation from noncanonical elements requires tetrameric p53, and the presence of the carboxy terminal, non-specific DNA binding domain enhanced transactivation from noncanonical sequences. Our findings demonstrate that RE sequence, organization, and level of p53 can strongly impact p53-mediated transactivation, thereby changing the view of what constitutes a functional p53 target. Importantly, inclusion of (1/2- and (3/4-site REs greatly expands the p53 master regulatory network.

  5. Expression of the HTLV-I tax transactivator in yeast: correlation between phenotypic alterations and tax function in higher eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, R A; Tomchak, L; Ruben, S M; Rosen, C A

    1990-11-01

    The transcriptional activator protein (Tax) from human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 was expressed in yeast using several different promoters in several strains: In all instances, expression of Tax resulted in very strong aggregation of the yeast cells. This phenotype appears to be identical by all criteria tested to the flocculation phenotype of the dominant mutation flo 1. Of most significance, mutations in Tax that affect transactivation of the IL-2R alpha regulatory sequences, but retain their ability to activate the viral long terminal repeat also fail to yield the aggregation phenotype. Based on these findings, expression of Tax in yeast may prove to be a simple primordial system for examining the regulatory mechanisms and cellular functions involved in regulation of gene expression.

  6. In brown adipocytes, adrenergically induced β1-/β3-(Gs)-, α2-(Gi)- and α1-(Gq)-signalling to Erk1/2 activation is not mediated via EGF receptor transactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yanling; Fälting, Johanna M.; Mattsson, Charlotte L.; Holmström, Therése E.; Nedergaard, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue is unusual in that the neurotransmitter norepinephrine influences cell destiny in ways generally associated with effects of classical growth factors: regulation of cell proliferation, of apoptosis, and progression of differentiation. The norepinephrine effects are mediated through G-protein-coupled receptors; further mediation of such stimulation to e.g. Erk1/2 activation is in cell biology in general accepted to occur through transactivation of the EGF receptor (by external or internal pathways). We have examined here the significance of such transactivation in brown adipocytes. Stimulation of mature brown adipocytes with cirazoline (α 1 -adrenoceptor coupled via G q ), clonidine (α 2 via G i ) or CL316243 (β 3 via G s ) or via β 1 -receptors significantly activated Erk1/2. Pretreatment with the EGF receptor kinase inhibitor AG1478 had, remarkably, no significant effect on Erk1/2 activation induced by any of these adrenergic agonists (although it fully abolished EGF-induced Erk1/2 activation), demonstrating absence of EGF receptor-mediated transactivation. Results with brown preadipocytes (cells in more proliferative states) were not qualitatively different. Joint stimulation of all adrenoceptors with norepinephrine did not result in synergism on Erk1/2 activation. AG1478 action on EGF-stimulated Erk1/2 phosphorylation showed a sharp concentration–response relationship (IC 50 0.3 µM); a minor apparent effect of AG1478 on norepinephrine-stimulated Erk1/2 phosphorylation showed nonspecific kinetics, implying caution in interpretation of partial effects of AG1478 as reported in other systems. Transactivation of the EGF receptor is clearly not a universal prerequisite for coupling of G-protein coupled receptors to Erk1/2 signalling cascades. - Highlights: • In brown adipocytes, norepinephrine regulates proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation. • EGF receptor transactivation is supposed to mediate GPCR-induced Erk1/2 activation. •

  7. Fkbp52 Regulates Androgen Receptor Transactivation Activity and Male Urethra Morphogenesis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hanying; Yong, Weidong; Hinds, Terry D.; Yang, Zuocheng; Zhou, Yuhong; Sanchez, Edwin R.; Shou, Weinian

    2010-01-01

    Hypospadias is a common birth defect in humans, yet its etiology and pattern of onset are largely unknown. Recent studies have shown that male mice with targeted ablation of FK506-binding protein-52 (Fkbp52) develop hypospadias, most likely due to actions of Fkbp52 as a molecular co-chaperone of the androgen receptor (AR). Here, we further dissect the developmental and molecular mechanisms that underlie hypospadias in Fkbp52-deficient mice. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a defect in the elevation of prepucial swelling that led to the onset of the ventral penile cleft. Interestingly, expression of Fkbp52 was highest in the ventral aspect of the developing penis that undergoes fusion of the urethral epithelium. Although in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analyses suggested that Fkbp52 mutants had a normal urethral epithelium signaling center and epithelial differentiation, a reduced apoptotic cell index at ventral epithelial cells at the site of fusion and a defect of genital mesenchymal cell migration were observed. Supplementation of gestating females with excess testosterone partially rescued the hypospadic phenotype in Fkbp52 mutant males, showing that loss of Fkbp52 desensitizes AR to hormonal activation. Direct measurement of AR activity was performed in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells treated with dihydrotestosterone or synthetic agonist R1881. Reduced AR activity at genes controlling sexual dimorphism and cell growth was found in Fkbp52-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. However, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed normal occupancy of AR at gene promoters, suggesting that Fkbp52 exerts downstream effects on the transactivation function of AR. Taken together, our data show Fkbp52 to be an important molecular regulator in the androgen-mediated pathway of urethra morphogenesis. PMID:20605780

  8. Fkbp52 regulates androgen receptor transactivation activity and male urethra morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hanying; Yong, Weidong; Hinds, Terry D; Yang, Zuocheng; Zhou, Yuhong; Sanchez, Edwin R; Shou, Weinian

    2010-09-03

    Hypospadias is a common birth defect in humans, yet its etiology and pattern of onset are largely unknown. Recent studies have shown that male mice with targeted ablation of FK506-binding protein-52 (Fkbp52) develop hypospadias, most likely due to actions of Fkbp52 as a molecular co-chaperone of the androgen receptor (AR). Here, we further dissect the developmental and molecular mechanisms that underlie hypospadias in Fkbp52-deficient mice. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a defect in the elevation of prepucial swelling that led to the onset of the ventral penile cleft. Interestingly, expression of Fkbp52 was highest in the ventral aspect of the developing penis that undergoes fusion of the urethral epithelium. Although in situ hybridization and immunohistochemical analyses suggested that Fkbp52 mutants had a normal urethral epithelium signaling center and epithelial differentiation, a reduced apoptotic cell index at ventral epithelial cells at the site of fusion and a defect of genital mesenchymal cell migration were observed. Supplementation of gestating females with excess testosterone partially rescued the hypospadic phenotype in Fkbp52 mutant males, showing that loss of Fkbp52 desensitizes AR to hormonal activation. Direct measurement of AR activity was performed in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells treated with dihydrotestosterone or synthetic agonist R1881. Reduced AR activity at genes controlling sexual dimorphism and cell growth was found in Fkbp52-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. However, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis revealed normal occupancy of AR at gene promoters, suggesting that Fkbp52 exerts downstream effects on the transactivation function of AR. Taken together, our data show Fkbp52 to be an important molecular regulator in the androgen-mediated pathway of urethra morphogenesis.

  9. FOXM1 regulates glycolysis in hepatocellular carcinoma by transactivating glucose transporter 1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Runze; Pu, Meng; Li, Yu; Wang, Desheng

    2017-04-01

    The Forkhead box M1 (FOXM1) transcription factor plays crucial roles in the initiation and progression of various malignancies, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the mechanism by which FOXM1 regulates cancer metabolism remains unclear. In the present study, overexpression and RNA interference (RNAi) approaches were used to investigate the role of FOXM1 in the regulation of glycolysis in vitro. Luciferase reporter assays were used to explore the transcriptional regulation of the glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1) promoter by FOXM1. Then, immunohistochemical staining was used to examine the expression of FOXM1 and GLUT1 in 100 paired HCC and adjacent non-cancerous liver tissues. Chi-square test and logistic regression analysis were performed to evaluate the association between FOXM1 and GLUT1 expression with clinicopathological characteristics. Our data showed that FOXM1 promoted glycolysis in the HCC cells. FOXM1 knockdown significantly reduced the expression of GLUT1 among key glycolysis-related molecules in the different HCC cell lines. Glucose uptake and lactate production assay showed that FOXM1 positively regulated glycolysis based on GLUT1 expression. Moreover, FOXM1 overexpression increased and knockdown decreased GLUT1 expression. Luciferase reporter assays showed that the -206 to -199 bp region of the GLUT1 promoter is important for FOXM1 to enhance GLUT1 promoter activity. The results of the IHC analysis showed that the protein expression of FOXM1 and GLUT1 was closely related to the tumor histological grade and TNM stage. In addition, GLUT1 expression was also related to microvascular invasion. In conclusion, overexpression of FOXM1 and GLUT1 may play critical roles in HCC. FOXM1 promotes HCC glycolysis by transactivating GLUT1 expression.

  10. Trans-activation of an artificial dTam3 transposable element in transgenic tobacco plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haring, Michel A.; Teeuwen-de Vroomen, Marianne J.; Nijkamp, H. John J.; Hille, Jacques

    1991-01-01

    In Antirrhinum majus only autonomous Tam3 transposons have been characterized. We investigated whether an artificial dTam3 element, with a deletion in the presumptive transposase coding region, can be trans-activated in tobacco by an activator Tam3 element, which was immobilized by the deletion of

  11. Newly developed quantitative transactivation system shows difference in activation by Vitis CBF transcription factors on DRE/CRT elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassuth, Annette; Siddiqua, Mahbuba; Xiao, Huogen; Moody, Michelle A; Carlow, Chevonne E

    2014-01-01

    Agroinfiltration-based transactivation systems can determine if a protein functions as a transcription factor, and via which promoter element. However, this activation is not always a yes or no proposition. Normalization for variation in plasmid delivery into plant cells, sample collection and protein extraction is desired to allow for a quantitative comparison between transcription factors or promoter elements. We developed new effector and reporter plasmids which carry additional reporter genes, as well as a procedure to assay all three reporter enzymes from a single extract. The applicability of these plasmids was demonstrated with the analysis of CBF transcription factors and their target promoter sequence, DRE/CRT. Changes in the core DRE/CRT sequence abolished activation by Vitis CBF1 or Vitis CBF4, whereas changes in the surrounding sequence lowered activation by Vitis CBF1 but much less so for Vitis CBF4. The system also detected a reduction in activation due to one amino acid change in Vitis CBF1. The newly developed effector and reporter plasmids improve the ability to quantitatively compare the activation on two different promoter elements by the same transcription factor, or between two different transcription factors on the same promoter element. The quantitative difference in activation by VrCBF1 and VrCBF4 on various DRE/CRT elements support the hypothesis that these transcription factors have unique roles in the cold acclimation process.

  12. APOBEC3G inhibits HIV-1 RNA elongation by inactivating the viral trans-activation response element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowarski, Roni; Prabhu, Ponnandy; Kenig, Edan; Smith, Yoav; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Kotler, Moshe

    2014-07-29

    Deamination of cytidine residues in viral DNA is a major mechanism by which APOBEC3G (A3G) inhibits vif-deficient human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. dC-to-dU transition following RNase-H activity leads to viral cDNA degradation, production of non-functional proteins, formation of undesired stop codons and decreased viral protein synthesis. Here, we demonstrate that A3G provides an additional layer of defense against HIV-1 infection dependent on inhibition of proviral transcription. HIV-1 transcription elongation is regulated by the trans-activation response (TAR) element, a short stem-loop RNA structure required for elongation factors binding. Vif-deficient HIV-1-infected cells accumulate short viral transcripts and produce lower amounts of full-length HIV-1 transcripts due to A3G deamination of the TAR apical loop cytidine, highlighting the requirement for TAR loop integrity in HIV-1 transcription. We further show that free single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) termini are not essential for A3G activity and a gap of CCC motif blocked with juxtaposed DNA or RNA on either or 3'+5' ends is sufficient for A3G deamination. These results identify A3G as an efficient mutator and that deamination of (-)SSDNA results in an early block of HIV-1 transcription. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. SUV39H1 interacts with HTLV-1 Tax and abrogates Tax transactivation of HTLV-1 LTR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Yuetsu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tax is the oncoprotein of HTLV-1 which deregulates signal transduction pathways, transcription of genes and cell cycle regulation of host cells. Transacting function of Tax is mainly mediated by its protein-protein interactions with host cellular factors. As to Tax-mediated regulation of gene expression of HTLV-1 and cellular genes, Tax was shown to regulate histone acetylation through its physical interaction with histone acetylases and deacetylases. However, functional interaction of Tax with histone methyltransferases (HMTase has not been studied. Here we examined the ability of Tax to interact with a histone methyltransferase SUV39H1 that methylates histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9 and represses transcription of genes, and studied the functional effects of the interaction on HTLV-1 gene expression. Results Tax was shown to interact with SUV39H1 in vitro, and the interaction is largely dependent on the C-terminal half of SUV39H1 containing the SET domain. Tax does not affect the methyltransferase activity of SUV39H1 but tethers SUV39H1 to a Tax containing complex in the nuclei. In reporter gene assays, co-expression of SUV39H1 represses Tax transactivation of HTLV-1 LTR promoter activity, which was dependent on the methyltransferase activity of SUV39H1. Furthermore, SUV39H1 expression is induced along with Tax in JPX9 cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP analysis shows localization of SUV39H1 on the LTR after Tax induction, but not in the absence of Tax induction, in JPX9 transformants retaining HTLV-1-Luc plasmid. Immunoblotting shows higher levels of SUV39H1 expression in HTLV-1 transformed and latently infected cell lines. Conclusion Our study revealed for the first time the interaction between Tax and SUV39H1 and apparent tethering of SUV39H1 by Tax to the HTLV-1 LTR. It is speculated that Tax-mediated tethering of SUV39H1 to the LTR and induction of the repressive histone modification on the chromatin through H3 K9

  14. SUV39H1 interacts with HTLV-1 Tax and abrogates Tax transactivation of HTLV-1 LTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamoi, Koju; Yamamoto, Keiyu; Misawa, Aya; Miyake, Ariko; Ishida, Takaomi; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Mochizuki, Manabu; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2006-01-13

    Tax is the oncoprotein of HTLV-1 which deregulates signal transduction pathways, transcription of genes and cell cycle regulation of host cells. Transacting function of Tax is mainly mediated by its protein-protein interactions with host cellular factors. As to Tax-mediated regulation of gene expression of HTLV-1 and cellular genes, Tax was shown to regulate histone acetylation through its physical interaction with histone acetylases and deacetylases. However, functional interaction of Tax with histone methyltransferases (HMTase) has not been studied. Here we examined the ability of Tax to interact with a histone methyltransferase SUV39H1 that methylates histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) and represses transcription of genes, and studied the functional effects of the interaction on HTLV-1 gene expression. Tax was shown to interact with SUV39H1 in vitro, and the interaction is largely dependent on the C-terminal half of SUV39H1 containing the SET domain. Tax does not affect the methyltransferase activity of SUV39H1 but tethers SUV39H1 to a Tax containing complex in the nuclei. In reporter gene assays, co-expression of SUV39H1 represses Tax transactivation of HTLV-1 LTR promoter activity, which was dependent on the methyltransferase activity of SUV39H1. Furthermore, SUV39H1 expression is induced along with Tax in JPX9 cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis shows localization of SUV39H1 on the LTR after Tax induction, but not in the absence of Tax induction, in JPX9 transformants retaining HTLV-1-Luc plasmid. Immunoblotting shows higher levels of SUV39H1 expression in HTLV-1 transformed and latently infected cell lines. Our study revealed for the first time the interaction between Tax and SUV39H1 and apparent tethering of SUV39H1 by Tax to the HTLV-1 LTR. It is speculated that Tax-mediated tethering of SUV39H1 to the LTR and induction of the repressive histone modification on the chromatin through H3 K9 methylation may be the basis for the dose

  15. Promoter trans-activation of protooncogenes c-fos and c-myc, but not c-Ha-ras, by products of adenovirus early region 1A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sassone-Corsi, P.; Borrelli, E.

    1987-01-01

    The E1A (early region 1A) oncogene products of adenovirus type 2 trans-activate the other early viral transcription units, as well as some cellular promoters. Using a short-term cotransfection assay in murine NIH 3T3 fibroblasts, we show that c-fos and c-myc promoter activities are stimulated by the E1A proteins, whereas c-Ha-ras transcription is not affected. The product of E1A 13S mRNA is responsible for the trans-activation, whereas the 12S mRNA product has no effect. Analysis of the c-fos promoter sequences required for the E1A stimulation shows that responsive sequences are located between positions -402 and -240 upstream of the transcription initiation site. This same region also contains the c-fos serum-responsive element. Furthermore, transcription of the endogenous c-fos gene in HeLa cells is increased after E1A transfection

  16. An improved reprogrammable mouse model harbouring the reverse tetracycline-controlled transcriptional transactivator 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Alaei

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Reprogrammable mouse models engineered to conditionally express Oct-4, Klf-4, Sox-2 and c-Myc (OKSM have been instrumental in dissecting molecular events underpinning the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells. However, until now these models have been reported in the context of the m2 reverse tetracycline-controlled transactivator, which results in low reprogramming efficiency and consequently limits the number of reprogramming intermediates that can be isolated for downstream profiling. Here, we describe an improved OKSM mouse model in the context of the reverse tetracycline-controlled transactivator 3 with enhanced reprogramming efficiency (>9-fold and increased numbers of reprogramming intermediate cells albeit with similar kinetics, which we believe will facilitate mechanistic studies of the reprogramming process.

  17. NLRC5/MHC class I transactivator is a target for immune evasion in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshihama, Sayuri; Roszik, Jason; Downs, Isaac; Meissner, Torsten B.; Vijayan, Saptha; Chapuy, Bjoern; Sidiq, Tabasum; Shipp, Margaret A.; Lizee, Gregory A.; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2016-01-01

    Tumor antigen presentation to CD8+ T cells by MHC class I molecules is crucial for immune responses against cancers, whereas the loss of MHC class I is a common immune evasion strategy used by cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms leading to MHC class I deficiency have remained poorly defined. We demonstrate here that MHC class I transactivator (CITA)/NOD-like receptor (NLR) family, caspase recruitment (CARD) domain containing 5 (NLRC5) is a major target for cancer immune evasion. Reduce...

  18. Mutations that abrogate transactivational activity of the feline leukemia virus long terminal repeat do not affect virus replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abujamra, Ana L.; Faller, Douglas V.; Ghosh, Sajal K.

    2003-01-01

    The U3 region of the LTR of oncogenic Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV) and feline leukemia viruses (FeLV) have been previously reported to activate expression of specific cellular genes in trans, such as MHC class I, collagenase IV, and MCP-1, in an integration-independent manner. It has been suggested that transactivation of these specific cellular genes by leukemia virus U3-LTR may contribute to the multistage process of leukemogenesis. The U3-LTR region, necessary for gene transactivational activity, also contains multiple transcription factor-binding sites that are essential for normal virus replication. To dissect the promoter activity and the gene transactivational activity of the U3-LTR, we conducted mutational analysis of the U3-LTR region of FeLV-A molecular clone 61E. We identified minimal nucleotide substitution mutants on the U3 LTR that did not disturb transcription factor-binding sites but abrogated its ability to transactivate the collagenase gene promoter. To determine if these mutations actually have altered any uncharacterized important transcription factor-binding site, we introduced these U3-LTR mutations into the full-length infectious molecular clone 61E. We demonstrate that the mutant virus was replication competent but could not transactivate cellular gene expression. These results thus suggest that the gene transactivational activity is a distinct property of the LTR and possibly not related to its promoter activity. The cellular gene transactivational activity-deficient mutant FeLV generated in this study may also serve as a valuable reagent for testing the biological significance of LTR-mediated cellular gene activation in the tumorigenesis caused by leukemia viruses

  19. A structural explanation of the effects of dissociated glucocorticoids on glucocorticoid receptor transactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dezitter, Xavier; Fagart, Jérôme; Taront, Solenne; Fay, Michel; Masselot, Bernadette; Hétuin, Dominique; Formstecher, Pierre; Rafestin-Oblin, Marie-Edith; Idziorek, Thierry

    2014-02-01

    There is a therapeutic need for glucocorticoid receptor (GR) ligands that distinguish between the transrepression and transactivation activity of the GR, the later thought to be responsible for side effects. These ligands are known as "dissociated glucocorticoids" (dGCs). The first published dGCs, RU24782 (9α-fluoro-11β-hydroxy-16α-methylpregna-21-thiomethyl-1,4-diene-3,20-dione) and RU24858 (9α-fluoro-11β-hydroxy-16α-methylpregna-21-cyanide-1,4-diene-3,20-dione), do not have the 17α-hydroxyl group that characterizes dexamethasone (Dex; 9α-fluoro-11β,17α,21-trihydroxy-16α-methylpregna-1,4-diene-3,20-dione), and they differ from one another by having C21-thiomethyl and C21-cyanide moieties, respectively. Our aim was therefore to establish the structural basis of their activity. Both RU24782 and RU24858 induced a transactivation activity highly dependent on the GR expression level but always lower than dexamethasone. They also display less ability than dexamethasone to trigger steroid receptor coactivator 1 (SRC-1) recruitment and histone H3 acetylation. Docking studies, validated by mutagenesis experiments, revealed that dGCs are not anchored by Gln642, in contrast to Dex, which is hydrogen bonded to this residue via its 17α-hydroxyl group. This contact is essential for SRC-1 recruitment and subsequent dexamethasone-induced GR transactivation, but not transrepression. The ability of dGCs to make contacts with Ile747, for both RU24858 and RU24782 and with Asn564 for RU24858 are not strong enough to maintain GR in a conformation able to efficiently recruit SRC-1, unless SRC-1 is overexpressed. Overall, our findings provide some structural guidelines for the synthesis of potential new dissociated glucocorticoids with a better therapeutic ratio.

  20. Inhibition of E2F-1 transactivation by direct binding of the retinoblastoma protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, K; Harlow, E; Fattaey, A

    1993-01-01

    Loss of a functional retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene product, pRB, is a key step in the development of many human tumors. pRB is a negative regulator of cell proliferation and appears to participate in control of entry into the S phase of the cell cycle. The recent demonstration that pRB binds...

  1. Exploiting the Novel Repressed Transactivator Assay to Identify Protein Peptide Inhibitors of the Myc Oncoprotein

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Penn, Linda Z

    2005-01-01

    Fundamental research clearly shows that the product of the c-myc oncogene is often expressed at elevated levels in a large number of breast cancers and is associated with poor prognosis, high-risk disease...

  2. Exploiting the Novel Repressed Transactivator Assay to Identify Protein Peptide Inhibitors of the Myc Oncoprotein

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Penn, Linda

    2003-01-01

    Fundamental research clearly shows that the product of the c-myc oncogene is often expressed at elevated levels in a large number of breast cancers and is associated with poor prognosis, high-risk disease...

  3. Co-factors necessary for PPAR mediated transactivation of endogenous target genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; Nielsen, Ronni; Stunnenberg, Henk

    of endogenous target gene in different cell types are elusive. To mutually compare the ability of the PPAR subtypes to activate endogenous target genes in a given cell, PPARa, PPARb/d and PPARg2 were HA tagged and rapidly, equally and synchronously expressed using adenoviral delivery. Within a few hours after...... subtype specific activation of target genes. Accumulating evidence suggests that transcriptional co-factors can function as master regulators for nuclear receptors and impose promoter selectivity. To study co-factor necessity for PPAR mediated transactivation of endogenous target genes, specific co...

  4. In brown adipocytes, adrenergically induced β{sub 1}-/β{sub 3}-(G{sub s})-, α{sub 2}-(G{sub i})- and α{sub 1}-(G{sub q})-signalling to Erk1/2 activation is not mediated via EGF receptor transactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yanling; Fälting, Johanna M.; Mattsson, Charlotte L.; Holmström, Therése E.; Nedergaard, Jan, E-mail: jan@metabol.su.se

    2013-10-15

    Brown adipose tissue is unusual in that the neurotransmitter norepinephrine influences cell destiny in ways generally associated with effects of classical growth factors: regulation of cell proliferation, of apoptosis, and progression of differentiation. The norepinephrine effects are mediated through G-protein-coupled receptors; further mediation of such stimulation to e.g. Erk1/2 activation is in cell biology in general accepted to occur through transactivation of the EGF receptor (by external or internal pathways). We have examined here the significance of such transactivation in brown adipocytes. Stimulation of mature brown adipocytes with cirazoline (α{sub 1}-adrenoceptor coupled via G{sub q}), clonidine (α{sub 2} via G{sub i}) or CL316243 (β{sub 3} via G{sub s}) or via β{sub 1}-receptors significantly activated Erk1/2. Pretreatment with the EGF receptor kinase inhibitor AG1478 had, remarkably, no significant effect on Erk1/2 activation induced by any of these adrenergic agonists (although it fully abolished EGF-induced Erk1/2 activation), demonstrating absence of EGF receptor-mediated transactivation. Results with brown preadipocytes (cells in more proliferative states) were not qualitatively different. Joint stimulation of all adrenoceptors with norepinephrine did not result in synergism on Erk1/2 activation. AG1478 action on EGF-stimulated Erk1/2 phosphorylation showed a sharp concentration–response relationship (IC{sub 50} 0.3 µM); a minor apparent effect of AG1478 on norepinephrine-stimulated Erk1/2 phosphorylation showed nonspecific kinetics, implying caution in interpretation of partial effects of AG1478 as reported in other systems. Transactivation of the EGF receptor is clearly not a universal prerequisite for coupling of G-protein coupled receptors to Erk1/2 signalling cascades. - Highlights: • In brown adipocytes, norepinephrine regulates proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation. • EGF receptor transactivation is supposed to mediate GPCR

  5. DNA binding domains and nuclear localization signal of LEDGF: contribution of two helix-turn-helix (HTH)-like domains and a stretch of 58 amino acids of the N-terminal to the trans-activation potential of LEDGF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dhirendra P; Kubo, E; Takamura, Y; Shinohara, T; Kumar, A; Chylack, Leo T; Fatma, N

    2006-01-20

    Lens epithelium derived growth factor (LEDGF), a nuclear protein, plays a role in regulating the transcription of stress-associated genes such as heat shock proteins by binding to consensus core DNA sequences nAGGn or nGAAn or their repeats, and in doing so helps to provide cyto-protection. However, additional information is required to identify the specific structural features of LEDGF involved in gene transcription. Here we have investigated the functional domains activating and repressing DNA-binding modules, by using a DNA binding assay and trans-activation experiments performed by analyzing proteins prepared from deletion constructs. The results disclosed the DNA-binding domain of N-terminal LEDGF mapped between amino acid residues 5 and 62, a 58 amino acid residue stretch PWWP domain which binds to stress response elements (STRE; A/TGGGGA/T). C-terminal LEDGF contains activation domains, an extensive loop-region (aa 418-530) with two helix-turn-helix (HTH)-like domains, and binds to a heat shock element (HSE; nGAAn). A trans-activation assay using Hsp27 promoter revealed that both HTH domains contribute in a cooperative manner to the trans-activation potential of LEDGF. Interestingly, removal of N-terminal LEDGF (aa 1-187) significantly enhances the gene activation potential of C-terminal LEDGF (aa 199-530); thus the N-terminal domain (aa 5-62), exhibits auto-transcriptional repression activity. It appears that this domain is involved in stabilizing the LEDGF-DNA binding complex. Collectively, our results demonstrate that LEDGF contains three DNA-binding domains, which regulate gene expression depending on cellular microenvironment and thus modify the physiology of cells to maintain cellular homeostasis.

  6. NLRC5/MHC class I transactivator is a target for immune evasion in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihama, Sayuri; Roszik, Jason; Downs, Isaac; Meissner, Torsten B; Vijayan, Saptha; Chapuy, Bjoern; Sidiq, Tabasum; Shipp, Margaret A; Lizee, Gregory A; Kobayashi, Koichi S

    2016-05-24

    Cancer cells develop under immune surveillance, thus necessitating immune escape for successful growth. Loss of MHC class I expression provides a key immune evasion strategy in many cancers, although the molecular mechanisms remain elusive. MHC class I transactivator (CITA), known as "NLRC5" [NOD-like receptor (NLR) family, caspase recruitment (CARD) domain containing 5], has recently been identified as a critical transcriptional coactivator of MHC class I gene expression. Here we show that the MHC class I transactivation pathway mediated by CITA/NLRC5 constitutes a target for cancer immune evasion. In all the 21 tumor types we examined, NLRC5 expression was highly correlated with the expression of MHC class I, with cytotoxic T-cell markers, and with genes in the MHC class I antigen-presentation pathway, including LMP2/LMP7, TAP1, and β2-microglobulin. Epigenetic and genetic alterations in cancers, including promoter methylation, copy number loss, and somatic mutations, were most prevalent in NLRC5 among all MHC class I-related genes and were associated with the impaired expression of components of the MHC class I pathway. Strikingly, NLRC5 expression was significantly associated with the activation of CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells and patient survival in multiple cancer types. Thus, NLRC5 constitutes a novel prognostic biomarker and potential therapeutic target of cancers.

  7. NLRC5/MHC class I transactivator is a target for immune evasion in cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihama, Sayuri; Roszik, Jason; Downs, Isaac; Meissner, Torsten B.; Vijayan, Saptha; Chapuy, Bjoern; Sidiq, Tabasum; Shipp, Margaret A.; Lizee, Gregory A.; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells develop under immune surveillance, thus necessitating immune escape for successful growth. Loss of MHC class I expression provides a key immune evasion strategy in many cancers, although the molecular mechanisms remain elusive. MHC class I transactivator (CITA), known as “NLRC5” [NOD-like receptor (NLR) family, caspase recruitment (CARD) domain containing 5], has recently been identified as a critical transcriptional coactivator of MHC class I gene expression. Here we show that the MHC class I transactivation pathway mediated by CITA/NLRC5 constitutes a target for cancer immune evasion. In all the 21 tumor types we examined, NLRC5 expression was highly correlated with the expression of MHC class I, with cytotoxic T-cell markers, and with genes in the MHC class I antigen-presentation pathway, including LMP2/LMP7, TAP1, and β2-microglobulin. Epigenetic and genetic alterations in cancers, including promoter methylation, copy number loss, and somatic mutations, were most prevalent in NLRC5 among all MHC class I-related genes and were associated with the impaired expression of components of the MHC class I pathway. Strikingly, NLRC5 expression was significantly associated with the activation of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells and patient survival in multiple cancer types. Thus, NLRC5 constitutes a novel prognostic biomarker and potential therapeutic target of cancers. PMID:27162338

  8. A transgenic mouse line for collecting ribosome-bound mRNA using the tetracycline transactivator system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurel eDrane

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Acquiring the gene expression profiles of specific neuronal cell-types is important for understanding their molecular identities. Genome-wide gene expression profiles of genetically defined cell-types can be acquired by collecting and sequencing mRNA that is bound to epitope-tagged ribosomes (TRAP; Translating Ribosome Affinity Purification. Here, we introduce a transgenic mouse model that combines the TRAP technique with the tetracycline transactivator (tTA system by expressing EGFP-tagged ribosomal protein L10a (EGFP-L10a under control of the tetracycline response element (tetO-TRAP. This allows both spatial control of EGFP-L10a expression through cell-type specific tTA expression, as well as temporal regulation by inhibiting transgene expression through the administration of doxycycline. We show that crossing tetO-TRAP mice with transgenic mice expressing tTA under the Camk2a promoter (Camk2a-tTA results in offspring with cell-type specific expression of EGFP-L10a in CA1 pyramidal neurons and medium spiny neurons in the striatum. Co-immunoprecipitation confirmed that EGFP-L10a integrates into a functional ribosomal complex. In addition, collection of ribosome-bound mRNA from the hippocampus yielded the expected enrichment of genes expressed in CA1 pyramidal neurons, as well as a depletion of genes expressed in other hippocampal cell-types. Finally, we show that crossing tetO-TRAP mice with transgenic Fos-tTA mice enables the expression of EGFP-L10a in CA1 pyramidal neurons that are activated during a fear conditioning trial. The tetO-TRAP mouse can be combined with other tTA mouse lines to enable gene expression profiling of a variety of different cell-types.

  9. Transactivation of bad by vorinostat-induced acetylated p53 enhances doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity in cervical cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sook-Jeong; Hwang, Sung-Ook; Noh, Eun Joo; Kim, Dong-Uk; Nam, Miyoung; Kim, Jong Hyeok; Nam, Joo Hyun; Hoe, Kwang-Lae

    2014-02-14

    Vorinostat (VOR) has been reported to enhance the cytotoxic effects of doxorubicin (DOX) with fewer side effects because of the lower DOX dosage in breast cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the novel mechanism underlying the synergistic cytotoxic effects of VOR and DOX co-treatment in cervical cancer cells HeLa, CaSki and SiHa cells. Co-treatment with VOR and DOX at marginal doses led to the induction of apoptosis through caspase-3 activation, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage and DNA micronuclei. Notably, the synergistic growth inhibition induced by the co-treatment was attributed to the upregulation of the pro-apoptotic protein Bad, as the silencing of Bad expression using small interfering RNA (siRNA) abolished the phenomenon. As siRNA against p53 did not result in an increase in acetylated p53 and the consequent upregulation of Bad, the observed Bad upregulation was mediated by acetylated p53. Moreover, a chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed that the co-treatment of HeLa cells with VOR and DOX increased the recruitment of acetylated p53 to the bad promoter, with consequent bad transactivation. Conversely, C33A cervical cancer cells containing mutant p53 co-treated with VOR and DOX did not exhibit Bad upregulation, acetylated p53 induction or consequent synergistic growth inhibition. Together, the synergistic growth inhibition of cervical cancer cell lines induced by co-treatment with VOR and DOX can be attributed to the upregulation of Bad, which is induced by acetylated p53. These results show for the first time that the acetylation of p53, rather than histones, is a mechanism for the synergistic growth inhibition induced by VOR and DOX co-treatments.

  10. The glucocorticoid RU24858 does not distinguish between transrepression and transactivation in primary human eosinophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xianzhi

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucocorticoids are used to treat chronic inflammatory diseases such as asthma. Induction of eosinophil apoptosis is considered to be one of the main mechanisms behind the anti-asthmatic effect of glucocorticoids. Glucocorticoid binding to its receptor (GR can have a dual effect on gene transcription. Activated GR can activate transcription (transactivation, or by interacting with other transcription factors such as NF-κB suppress transcription (transrepression. RU24858 has been reported to transrepress but to have little or no transactivation capability in other cell types. The dissociated properties of RU24858 have not been previously studied in non-malignant human cells. As the eosinophils have a very short lifetime and many of the modern molecular biological methods cannot be used, a "dissociated steroid" would be a valuable tool to evaluate the mechanism of action of glucocorticoids in human eosinophils. The aim of this study was to elucidate the ability of RU24858 to activate and repress gene expression in human eosinophils in order to see whether it is a dissociated steroid in human eosinophils. Methods Human peripheral blood eosinophils were isolated under sterile conditions and cultured in the presence and/or absence RU24858. For comparison, dexamethasone and mometasone were used. We measured chemokine receptor-4 (CXCR4 and Annexin 1 expression by flow cytometry and cytokine production by ELISA. Apoptosis was measured by DNA fragmentation and confirmed by morphological analysis. Results RU24858 (1 μM increased CXCR4 and Annexin 1 expression on eosinophils to a similar extent as mometasone (1 μM and dexamethasone (1 μM. Like dexamethasone and mometasone, RU24858 did suppress IL-8 and MCP-1 production in eosinophils. RU24858 also increased spontaneous eosinophil apoptosis to a similar degree as dexamethasone and mometasone, but unlike dexamethasone and mometasone it did not reverse IL-5- or GM

  11. Use of cryopreserved transiently transfected cells in high-throughput pregnane X receptor transactivation assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhengrong; Puglisi, Jaime; Connors, David; Stewart, Jeremy; Herbst, John; Marino, Anthony; Sinz, Michael; O'Connell, Jonathan; Banks, Martyn; Dickinson, Kenneth; Cacace, Angela

    2007-03-01

    Cryopreserved, transiently transfected HepG2 cells were compared to freshly transfected HepG2 cells for use in a pregnane X receptor (PXR) transactivation assay. Assay performance was similar for both cell preparations; however, cryopreserved cells demonstrated less interassay variation. Validation with drugs of different PXR activation potencies and efficacies demonstrated an excellent correlation (r(2) > 0.95) between cryopreserved and fresh cells. Cryopreservation did not change the effect of known CYP3A4 inducers that have poor cell permeability, indicating that cryopreservation had little effect on membrane permeability. In addition, cryopreserved HepG2 cells did not exhibit enhanced susceptibility to cytotoxic compounds compared to transiently transfected control cells. The use of cryopreserved cells enables this assay to run with enhanced efficiency.

  12. Effects of nuclear receptor transactivation on steroid hormone synthesis and gene expression in porcine Leydig cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Matthew A; Squires, E James

    2013-01-01

    Male pigs are routinely castrated at a young age to prevent the formation of androstenone, a 16-androstene testicular steroid that is a major component of boar taint. The practice of castration has been increasingly viewed as unfavorable, due to both economic considerations and animal welfare concerns. Other means of controlling boar taint, including reducing the synthesis of androstenone in the testes, would eliminate the need for castration. In this study, we determined the effects of transactivation of three nuclear receptors, the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR), pregnane X receptor (PXR), and farnesoid X receptor (FXR), on gene expression and steroid hormone metabolism in primary porcine Leydig cells. Primary cells were isolated from mature boars, and transcript expression levels were assayed using real-time PCR. The transcripts of interest included porcine orthologs of common phase I and phase II metabolic enzymes, enzymes involved in steroidogenesis, and transcripts previously shown to be differentially expressed in boars with high androstenone and boar taint levels. Transactivation of CAR, PXR, or FXR increased the expression of several genes involved in steroidogenesis, including cytochrome B5A (CYB5A) and cytochrome B5 reductase 1 (CYB5R1), as well as hydroxysteroid (17-beta) dehydrogenase 4 (HSD17B4) and retinol dehydrogenase 12 (RDH12). Treatment with (6-(4-chlorophenyl)imidazo[2,1-b][1,3]thiazole-5-carbaldehyde-O-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)oxime (CITCO), a CAR agonist, or rifampicin (RIF), a PXR agonist, resulted in significantly (pnuclear receptors may lead to increased levels of 16-androstene steroids, likely by altering the activity of CYP17A1 through CYB5A and CYB5R1 to the andien-β synthase reaction and away from the 17α-hydroxylase and C17, 20 lyase reactions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Functional analysis of Burkitt's lymphoma mutant c-Myc proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith-Sørensen, B.; Hijmans, E.M.; Bernards, R.A.

    1996-01-01

    The c-myc gene encodes a sequence-specific DNA binding protein that activates transcription of cellular genes. Transcription activation by Myc proteins is regulated by phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues within the transactivation domain and by complex formation with the

  14. The C-terminal domain of the nuclear factor I-B2 isoform is glycosylated and transactivates the WAP gene in the JEG-3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sudit S.; Rosen, Jeffrey M.

    2007-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor I (NFI) has been shown previously both in vivo and in vitro to be involved in the cooperative regulation of whey acidic protein (WAP) gene transcription along with the glucocorticoid receptor and STAT5. In addition, one of the specific NFI isoforms, NFI-B2, was demonstrated in transient co-transfection experiments in JEG cells, which lack endogenous NFI, to be preferentially involved in the cooperative regulation of WAP gene expression. A comparison of the DNA-binding specificities of the different NFI isoforms only partially explained their differential ability to activate the WAP gene transcription. Here, we analyzed the transactivation regions of two NFI isoforms by making chimeric proteins between the NFI-A and B isoforms. Though, their DNA-binding specificities were not altered as compared to the corresponding wild-type transcription factors, the C-terminal region of the NFI-B isoform was shown to preferentially activate WAP gene transcription in cooperation with GR and STAT5 in transient co-transfection assays in JEG-3 cells. Furthermore, determination of serine and threonine-specific glycosylation (O-linked N-acetylglucosamine) of the C-terminus of the NFI-B isoform suggested that the secondary modification by O-GlcNAc might play a role in the cooperative regulation of WAP gene transcription by NFI-B2 and STAT5

  15. TGFβ induces proHB-EGF shedding and EGFR transactivation through ADAM activation in gastric cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebi, Masahide; Kataoka, Hiromi; Shimura, Takaya; Kubota, Eiji; Hirata, Yoshikazu; Mizushima, Takashi; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Mamoru; Mabuchi, Motoshi; Tsukamoto, Hironobu; Tanida, Satoshi; Kamiya, Takeshi; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Joh, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → TGFβ induces EGFR transactivation through proHB-EGF shedding by activated ADAM members in gastric cancer cells. → TGFβ induces nuclear translocation of HB-EGF-CTF cleaved by ADAM members. → TGFβ enhances cell growth by EGFR transactivation and HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation and ADAM inhibitors block these effects. → Silencing of ADAM17 also blocks EGFR transactivation, HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation and cancer cell growth by TGFβ. → ADAM17 may play a crucial role in this TGFβ-HB-EGF signal transduction. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ) is known to potently inhibit cell growth. Loss of responsiveness to TGFβ inhibition on cell growth is a hallmark of many types of cancer, yet its mechanism is not fully understood. Membrane-anchored heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (proHB-EGF) ectodomain is cleaved by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) members and is implicated in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation. Recently, nuclear translocation of the C-terminal fragment (CTF) of pro-HB-EGF was found to induce cell growth. We investigated the association between TGFβ and HB-EGF signal transduction via ADAM activation. Materials and methods: The CCK-8 assay in two gastric cancer cell lines was used to determine the effect for cell growth by TGFβ. The effect of two ADAM inhibitors was also evaluated. Induction of EGFR phosphorylation by TGFβ was analyzed and the effect of the ADAM inhibitors was also examined. Nuclear translocation of HB-EGF-CTF by shedding through ADAM activated by TGFβ was also analyzed. EGFR transactivation, HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation, and cell growth were examined under the condition of ADAM17 knockdown. Result: TGFβ-induced EGFR phosphorylation of which ADAM inhibitors were able to inhibit. TGFβ induced shedding of proHB-EGF allowing HB-EGF-CTF to translocate to the nucleus. ADAM inhibitors blocked this nuclear translocation. TGF

  16. TGF{beta} induces proHB-EGF shedding and EGFR transactivation through ADAM activation in gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebi, Masahide [Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Kataoka, Hiromi, E-mail: hkataoka@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Shimura, Takaya; Kubota, Eiji; Hirata, Yoshikazu; Mizushima, Takashi; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Mamoru; Mabuchi, Motoshi; Tsukamoto, Hironobu; Tanida, Satoshi; Kamiya, Takeshi [Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Higashiyama, Shigeki [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Ehime (Japan); Joh, Takashi [Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan)

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} TGF{beta} induces EGFR transactivation through proHB-EGF shedding by activated ADAM members in gastric cancer cells. {yields} TGF{beta} induces nuclear translocation of HB-EGF-CTF cleaved by ADAM members. {yields} TGF{beta} enhances cell growth by EGFR transactivation and HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation and ADAM inhibitors block these effects. {yields} Silencing of ADAM17 also blocks EGFR transactivation, HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation and cancer cell growth by TGF{beta}. {yields} ADAM17 may play a crucial role in this TGF{beta}-HB-EGF signal transduction. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF{beta}) is known to potently inhibit cell growth. Loss of responsiveness to TGF{beta} inhibition on cell growth is a hallmark of many types of cancer, yet its mechanism is not fully understood. Membrane-anchored heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (proHB-EGF) ectodomain is cleaved by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) members and is implicated in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation. Recently, nuclear translocation of the C-terminal fragment (CTF) of pro-HB-EGF was found to induce cell growth. We investigated the association between TGF{beta} and HB-EGF signal transduction via ADAM activation. Materials and methods: The CCK-8 assay in two gastric cancer cell lines was used to determine the effect for cell growth by TGF{beta}. The effect of two ADAM inhibitors was also evaluated. Induction of EGFR phosphorylation by TGF{beta} was analyzed and the effect of the ADAM inhibitors was also examined. Nuclear translocation of HB-EGF-CTF by shedding through ADAM activated by TGF{beta} was also analyzed. EGFR transactivation, HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation, and cell growth were examined under the condition of ADAM17 knockdown. Result: TGF{beta}-induced EGFR phosphorylation of which ADAM inhibitors were able to inhibit. TGF{beta} induced shedding of proHB-EGF allowing HB-EGF-CTF to

  17. Whole-genome cartography of p53 response elements ranked on transactivation potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebaldi, Toma; Zaccara, Sara; Alessandrini, Federica; Bisio, Alessandra; Ciribilli, Yari; Inga, Alberto

    2015-06-17

    Many recent studies using ChIP-seq approaches cross-referenced to trascriptome data and also to potentially unbiased in vitro DNA binding selection experiments are detailing with increasing precision the p53-directed gene regulatory network that, nevertheless, is still expanding. However, most experiments have been conducted in established cell lines subjected to specific p53-inducing stimuli, both factors potentially biasing the results. We developed p53retriever, a pattern search algorithm that maps p53 response elements (REs) and ranks them according to predicted transactivation potentials in five classes. Besides canonical, full site REs, we developed specific pattern searches for non-canonical half sites and 3/4 sites and show that they can mediate p53-dependent responsiveness of associated coding sequences. Using ENCODE data, we also mapped p53 REs in about 44,000 distant enhancers and identified a 16-fold enrichment for high activity REs within those sites in the comparison with genomic regions near transcriptional start sites (TSS). Predictions from our pattern search were cross-referenced to ChIP-seq, ChIP-exo, expression, and various literature data sources. Based on the mapping of predicted functional REs near TSS, we examined expression changes of thirteen genes as a function of different p53-inducing conditions, providing further evidence for PDE2A, GAS6, E2F7, APOBEC3H, KCTD1, TRIM32, DICER, HRAS, KITLG and TGFA p53-dependent regulation, while MAP2K3, DNAJA1 and potentially YAP1 were identified as new direct p53 target genes. We provide a comprehensive annotation of canonical and non-canonical p53 REs in the human genome, ranked on predicted transactivation potential. We also establish or corroborate direct p53 transcriptional control of thirteen genes. The entire list of identified and functionally classified p53 REs near all UCSC-annotated genes and within ENCODE mapped enhancer elements is provided. Our approach is distinct from, and complementary

  18. Slug suppression induces apoptosis via Puma transactivation in rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes treated with hydrogen peroxide

    OpenAIRE

    Cha, Hoon-Suk; Bae, Eun-Kyung; Ahn, Joong Kyong; Lee, Jaejoon; Ahn, Kwang-Sung; Koh, Eun-Mi

    2010-01-01

    Inadequate apoptosis contributes to synovial hyperplasia in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Recent study shows that low expression of Puma might be partially responsible for the decreased apoptosis of fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS). Slug, a highly conserved zinc finger transcriptional repressor, is known to antagonize apoptosis of hematopoietic progenitor cells by repressing Puma transactivation. In this study, we examined the expression and function of Slug in RA FLS. Slug mRNA expression was...

  19. Immediate-early gene region of human cytomegalovirus trans-activates the promoter of human immunodeficiency virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, M.G.; Kenney, S.C.; Kamine, J.; Pagano, J.S.; Huang, E.S.

    1987-12-01

    Almost all homosexual patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are also actively infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The authors have hypothesized that an interaction between HCMV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the agent that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, may exist at a molecular level and contribute to the manifestations of HIV infection. In this report, they demonstrate that the immediate-early gene region of HCMV, in particular immediate-early region 2, trans-activates the expression of the bacterial gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase that is fused to the HIV long terminal repeat and carried by plasmid pHIV-CAT. The HCMV immediate-early trans-activator increases the level of mRNA from the plamid pHIV-CAT. The sequences of HIV that are responsive to trans-activation by the HDMV immediate-early region are distinct from HIV sequences that are required for response to the HIV tat. The stimulation of HIV gene expression by HDMV gene functions could enhance the consequences of HIV infection in persons with previous or concurrent HCMV infection.

  20. Immediate-early gene region of human cytomegalovirus trans-activates the promoter of human immunodeficiency virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, M.G.; Kenney, S.C.; Kamine, J.; Pagano, J.S.; Huang, E.S.

    1987-01-01

    Almost all homosexual patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are also actively infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The authors have hypothesized that an interaction between HCMV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the agent that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, may exist at a molecular level and contribute to the manifestations of HIV infection. In this report, they demonstrate that the immediate-early gene region of HCMV, in particular immediate-early region 2, trans-activates the expression of the bacterial gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase that is fused to the HIV long terminal repeat and carried by plasmid pHIV-CAT. The HCMV immediate-early trans-activator increases the level of mRNA from the plamid pHIV-CAT. The sequences of HIV that are responsive to trans-activation by the HDMV immediate-early region are distinct from HIV sequences that are required for response to the HIV tat. The stimulation of HIV gene expression by HDMV gene functions could enhance the consequences of HIV infection in persons with previous or concurrent HCMV infection

  1. BFV activates the NF-κB pathway through its transactivator (BTas) to enhance viral transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jian; Tan Juan; Zhang Xihui; Guo Hongyan; Zhang Qicheng; Guo Tingting; Geng Yunqi; Qiao Wentao

    2010-01-01

    Multiple families of viruses have evolved sophisticated strategies to regulate nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling, which plays a pivotal role in diverse cellular events, including virus-host interactions. In this study, we report that bovine foamy virus (BFV) is able to activate the NF-κB pathway through the action of its transactivator, BTas. Both cellular IKKβ and IκBα also participate in this activation. In addition, we demonstrate that BTas induces the processing of p100, which implies that BTas can activate NF-κB through a noncanonical pathway as well. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis shows that BTas interacts with IKK catalytic subunits (IKKα and IKKβ), which may be responsible for regulation of IKK kinase activity and persistent NF-κB activation. Furthermore, our results indicate that the level of BTas-mediated LTR transcription correlates with the activity of cellular NF-κB. Together, this study suggests that BFV activates the NF-κB pathway through BTas to enhance viral transcription.

  2. Brain-targeted delivery of trans-activating transcriptor-conjugated magnetic PLGA/lipid nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangru Wen

    Full Text Available Magnetic poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA/lipid nanoparticles (MPLs were fabricated from PLGA, L-α-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE, 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-amino (polyethylene glycol (DSPE-PEG-NH2, and magnetic nanoparticles (NPs, and then conjugated to trans-activating transcriptor (TAT peptide. The TAT-MPLs were designed to target the brain by magnetic guidance and TAT conjugation. The drugs hesperidin (HES, naringin (NAR, and glutathione (GSH were encapsulated in MPLs with drug loading capacity (>10% and drug encapsulation efficiency (>90%. The therapeutic efficacy of the drug-loaded TAT-MPLs in bEnd.3 cells was compared with that of drug-loaded MPLs. The cells accumulated higher levels of TAT-MPLs than MPLs. In addition, the accumulation of QD-loaded fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-labeled TAT-MPLs in bEnd.3 cells was dose and time dependent. Our results show that TAT-conjugated MPLs may function as an effective drug delivery system that crosses the blood brain barrier to the brain.

  3. Stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α/CXCL12) stimulates ovarian cancer cell growth through the EGF receptor transactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porcile, Carola; Bajetto, Adriana; Barbieri, Federica; Barbero, Simone; Bonavia, Rudy; Biglieri, Marianna; Pirani, Paolo; Florio, Tullio; Schettini, Gennaro

    2005-01-01

    Ovarian cancer (OC) is the leading cause of death in gynecologic diseases in which there is evidence for a complex chemokine network. Chemokines are a family of proteins that play an important role in tumor progression influencing cell proliferation, angiogenic/angiostatic processes, cell migration and metastasis, and, finally, regulating the immune cells recruitment into the tumor mass. We previously demonstrated that astrocytes and glioblastoma cells express both the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and its ligand stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), and that SDF-1α treatment induced cell proliferation, supporting the hypothesis that chemokines may play an important role in tumor cells' growth in vitro. In the present study, we report that CXCR4 and SDF-1 are expressed in OC cell lines. We demonstrate that SDF-1α induces a dose-dependent proliferation in OC cells, by the specific interaction with CXCR4 and a biphasic activation of ERK1/2 and Akt kinases. Our results further indicate that CXCR4 activation induces EGF receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation that in turn was linked to the downstream intracellular kinases activation, ERK1/2 and Akt. In addition, we provide evidence for cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase (c-Src) involvement in the SDF-1/CXCR4-EGFR transactivation. These results suggest a possible important 'cross-talk' between SDF-1/CXCR4 and EGFR intracellular pathways that may link signals of cell proliferation in ovarian cancer

  4. Analysis of p53 Transactivation Domain Mutants Reveals Acad11 as a Metabolic Target Important for p53 Pro-Survival Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dadi Jiang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The p53 tumor suppressor plays a key role in maintaining cellular integrity. In response to diverse stress signals, p53 can trigger apoptosis to eliminate damaged cells or cell-cycle arrest to enable cells to cope with stress and survive. However, the transcriptional networks underlying p53 pro-survival function are incompletely understood. Here, we show that in oncogenic-Ras-expressing cells, p53 promotes oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS and cell survival upon glucose starvation. Analysis of p53 transcriptional activation domain mutants reveals that these responses depend on p53 transactivation function. Using gene expression profiling and ChIP-seq analysis, we identify several p53-inducible fatty acid metabolism-related genes. One such gene, Acad11, encoding a protein involved in fatty acid oxidation, is required for efficient OXPHOS and cell survival upon glucose starvation. This study provides new mechanistic insight into the pro-survival function of p53 and suggests that targeting this pathway may provide a strategy for therapeutic intervention based on metabolic perturbation.

  5. Re-purposing of histological tissue sections for corroborative western blot analysis of hypothalamic metabolic neuropeptide expression following delineation of transactivated structures by Fos immuno-mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alenazi, Fahaad S H; Ibrahim, Baher A; Briski, Karen P

    2015-04-01

    Fos immunocytochemistry is a valuable anatomical mapping tool for distinguishing cells within complex tissues that undergo genomic activation, but it is seldom paired with corroborative molecular analytical techniques. Due to preparatory requirements that include protein cross-linking for specimen sectioning, histological tissue sections are regarded as unsuitable for those methods. Our studies show that pharmacological activation of the hindbrain energy sensor AMPK by AICAR elicits estradiol (E)-dependent patterns of Fos immunolabeling of hypothalamic metabolic loci. Here, Western blotting was applied to hypothalamic tissue removed from histological sections of E- versus oil (O)-implanted ovariectomized (OVX) female rat brain to measure levels of metabolic transmitters associated with Fos-positive structures. In both E and O rats, AICAR treatment elicited alterations in pro-opiomelanocortin, neuropeptide Y, SF-1, and orexin-A neuropeptide expression that coincided with patterns of Fos labeling of structures containing neurons that synthesize these neurotransmitters, e.g. arcuate and ventromedial nuclei and lateral hypothalamic area. O, but not E animals also exhibited parallel augmentation of tissue corticotropin-releasing hormone neuropeptide levels and paraventricular nucleus Fos staining. Data demonstrate the utility of immunoblot analysis as a follow-through technique to capitalize on Fos mapping of transactivation sites in the brain. Findings that induction of Fos immunoreactivity coincides with adjustments in hypothalamic metabolic neuropeptide expression affirms that this functional indicator reflects changes in neurotransmission in pathways governing metabolic outflow. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Vitamin D3 transactivates the zinc and manganese transporter SLC30A10 via the Vitamin D receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claro da Silva, Tatiana; Hiller, Christian; Gai, Zhibo; Kullak-Ublick, Gerd A

    2016-10-01

    competition EMSA revealed binding of select sequences, namely, nt -1623/-1588 and nt -1758/-1723 relative to the transcription start site, to VDR-containing nuclear extracts. In conclusion, we have shown that vitamin D3 transactivates the SLC30A10 gene in a VDR-dependent manner, resulting in increased ZnT10 protein expression. Because SLC30A10 is highly expressed in the small intestine, it is possible that the control of zinc and manganese systemic levels is regulated by vitamin D3 in the intestine. Zinc, manganese and vitamin D are important for bone metabolism and brain health. Future examination of a possible role for supplementation or chelation of zinc and manganese, alongside vitamin D3 administration, will further our understanding of its potential benefit in the treatment of specific illnesses, such as osteoporosis and Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. DNA alkylating agents alleviate silencing of class II transactivator gene expression in L1210 lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Shawn P; Holtz, Renae; Lewandowski, Nicole; Tomasi, Thomas B; Fuji, Hiroshi

    2002-09-15

    MHC class II (Ia) Ag expression is inversely correlated with tumorigenicity and directly correlated with immunogenicity in clones of the mouse L1210 lymphoma (1 ). Understanding the mechanisms by which class II Ag expression is regulated in L1210 lymphoma may facilitate the development of immunotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of some types of lymphoma and leukemia. This study demonstrates that the variation in MHC class II Ag expression among clones of L1210 lymphoma is due to differences in the expression of the class II transactivator (CIITA). Analysis of stable hybrids suggests that CIITA expression is repressed by a dominant mechanism in class II-negative L1210 clones. DNA-alkylating agents such as ethyl methanesulfonate and the chemotherapeutic drug melphalan activate CIITA and class II expression in class II negative L1210 cells, and this effect appears to be restricted to transformed cell lines derived from the early stages of B cell ontogeny. Transient transfection assays demonstrated that the CIITA type III promoter is active in class II(-) L1210 cells, despite the fact that the endogenous gene is not expressed, which suggests that these cells have all of the transacting factors necessary for CIITA transcription. An inverse correlation between methylation of the CIITA transcriptional regulatory region and CIITA expression was observed among L1210 clones. Furthermore, 5-azacytidine treatment activated CIITA expression in class II-negative L1210 cells. Collectively, our results suggest that 1) CIITA gene expression is repressed in class II(-) L1210 cells by methylation of the CIITA upstream regulatory region, and 2) treatment with DNA-alkylating agents overcomes methylation-based silencing of the CIITA gene in L1210 cells.

  8. Characterization of the novel progestin gestodene by receptor binding studies and transactivation assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrmann, U; Slater, E P; Fritzemeier, K H

    1995-01-01

    Gestodene is a novel progestin used in oral contraceptives with an increased separation of progestogenic versus androgenic activity and a distinct antimineralocorticoid activity. This specific pharmacological profile of gestodene is defined by its pattern of binding affinities to a variety of steroid hormone receptors. In the present study the affinity of gestodene to the progesterone receptor (PR), the androgen receptor (AR), the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the estrogen receptor (ER) was re-evaluated by steroid binding assays and compared to those obtained for 3-keto-desogestrel and progesterone. The two synthetic progestins displayed identical high affinity to rabbit PR and similar marked binding to rat AR and GR, while progesterone showed high affinity to PR but only low binding to AR and GR. Furthermore, 3-keto-desogestrel exhibited almost no binding to MR, whereas gestodene, similar to progesterone, showed marked affinity to this receptor. In addition to receptor binding studies, transactivation assays were carried out to investigate the effects of gestodene on AR-, GR- and MR-mediated induction of transcription. In contrast to progesterone, which showed antiandrogenic activity, gestodene and 3-keto-desogestrel both exhibited androgenic activity. Furthermore, all three progestins exhibited weak GR-mediated antagonistic activity. In contrast to progesterone, which showed almost no glucocorticoid activity, gestodene and 3-keto-desogestrel showed weak glucocorticoid action. In addition, gestodene inhibited the aldosterone-induced reporter gene transcription, similar to progesterone, whereas unlike progesterone, gestodene did not induce reporter gene transcription. 3-Keto-desogestrel showed neither antimineralocorticoid nor mineralocorticoid action.

  9. A trans-activator function is generated by integration of hepatitis B virus preS/S sequences in human hepatocellular carcinoma DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caselmann, W.H.; Meyer, M.; Kekule, A.S.; Lauer, U.; Hofschneider, P.H.; Koshy, R.

    1990-01-01

    The X gene of wild-type hepatitis B virus or integrated DNA has recently been shown to stimulate transcription of a variety of enhancers and promoters. To further delineate the viral sequences responsible for trans-activation in hepatomas, the authors cloned the single hepatitis B virus insert from human hepatocellular carcinoma DNA M1. The plasmid pM1 contains 2004 base of hepatitis B virus DNA subtype adr, including truncated preS/S sequences and the enhancer element. The X promoter and 422 nucleotides of the X coding region are present. The entire preC/C gene is deleted. In transient cotransfection assays using Chang liver cells (CCL 13), pM1 DNA exerts a 6- to 10-fold trans-activating effect on the expression of the pSV2CAT reporter plasmid. The transactivation occurs by stimulation of transcription and is dependent on the simian virus 40 enhancer in the reporter plasmid. Deletion analysis of pM1 subclones reveals that the transactivator is encoded by preS/S and not by X sequences. A frameshift mutation within the preS2 open reading frame shows that this portion is indispensable for the trans-activating function. Initiation of transcription has been mapped to the S1 promoter. A comparable trans-activating effect is also observed with cloned wild-type hepatitis B virus sequences similarly truncated. These results show that a transcriptional trans-activator function not present in the intact gene is generated by 3' truncation of integrated hepatitis B virus DNA preS/S sequences

  10. The MHC-II transactivator CIITA, a restriction factor against oncogenic HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 retroviruses: similarities and differences in the inhibition of Tax-1 and Tax-2 viral transactivators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forlani, Greta; Abdallah, Rawan; Accolla, Roberto S.; Tosi, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    The activation of CD4+ T helper cells is strictly dependent on the presentation of antigenic peptides by MHC class II (MHC-II) molecules. MHC-II expression is primarily regulated at the transcriptional level by the AIR-1 gene product CIITA (class II transactivator). Thus, CIITA plays a pivotal role in the triggering of the adaptive immune response against pathogens. Besides this well known function, we recently found that CIITA acts as an endogenous restriction factor against HTLV-1 (human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1) and HTLV-2 oncogenic retroviruses by targeting their viral transactivators Tax-1 and Tax-2, respectively. Here we review our findings on CIITA-mediated inhibition of viral replication and discuss similarities and differences in the molecular mechanisms by which CIITA specifically counteracts the function of Tax-1 and Tax-2 molecules. The dual function of CIITA as a key regulator of adaptive and intrinsic immunity represents a rather unique example of adaptation of host-derived factors against pathogen infections during evolution. PMID:23986750

  11. Transactivation of ErbB receptors by leptin in the cardiovascular system: mechanisms, consequences and target for therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bełtowski, Jerzy; Jazmroz-Wiśniewska, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Many experimental and clinical studies have demonstrated that elevated leptin concentration in patients with obesity/metabolic syndrome contributes to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disorders including arterial hypertension, atherosclerosis, restenosis after coronary angioplasty and myocardial hypertrophy. Receptor tyrosine kinases belonging to the ErbB family, especially ErbB1 (epidermal growth factor receptor) and ErbB2 are abundantly expressed in the blood vessels and the heart. EGFR is activated not only by its multiple peptide ligands but also by many other factors including angiotensin II, endothelin-1, norepinephrine, thrombin and prorenin; the phenomenon referred to as "transactivation". Augmented EGFR signaling contributes to abnormalities of vascular tone and renal sodium handling as well as vascular remodeling and myocardial hypertrophy through various intracellular mechanisms, in particular extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K). Recent experimental studies indicate that chronically elevated leptin transactivates the EGFR through the mechanisms requiring reactive oxygen species and cytosolic tyrosine kinase, c-Src. In addition, hyperleptinemia increases ErbB2 activity in the arterial wall. Stimulation of EGFR and ErbB2 downstream signaling pathways such as ERK and PI3K in the vascular wall and the kidney may contribute to the increase in vascular tone, enhanced tubular sodium reabsorption as well as vascular and renal lesions in hyperleptinemic obese subjects.

  12. High-level gene expression in Aedes albopictus cells using a baculovirus Hr3 enhancer and IE1 transactivator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gray Christine E

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aedes aegypti is the key vector of both the Yellow Fever and Dengue Fever viruses throughout many parts of the world. Low and variable transgene expression levels due to position effect and position effect variegation are problematic to efforts to create transgenic laboratory strains refractory to these viruses. Transformation efficiencies are also less than optimal, likely due to failure to detect expression from all integrated transgenes and potentially due to limited expression of the transposase required for transgene integration. Results Expression plasmids utilizing three heterologous promoters and three heterologous enhancers, in all possible combinations, were tested. The Hr3/IE1 enhancer-transactivator in combination with each of the constitutive heterologous promoters tested increased reporter gene expression significantly in transiently transfected Aedes albopictus C7-10 cells. Conclusions The addition of the Hr3 enhancer to expression cassettes and concomitant expression of the IE1 transactivator gene product is a potential method for increasing the level of transgene expression in insect systems. This mechanism could also potentially be used to increase the level of transiently-expressed transposase in order to increase the number of integration events in transposon-mediated transformation experiments.

  13. High-level gene expression in Aedes albopictus cells using a baculovirus Hr3 enhancer and IE1 transactivator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Christine E; Coates, Craig J

    2004-07-13

    Aedes aegypti is the key vector of both the Yellow Fever and Dengue Fever viruses throughout many parts of the world. Low and variable transgene expression levels due to position effect and position effect variegation are problematic to efforts to create transgenic laboratory strains refractory to these viruses. Transformation efficiencies are also less than optimal, likely due to failure to detect expression from all integrated transgenes and potentially due to limited expression of the transposase required for transgene integration. Expression plasmids utilizing three heterologous promoters and three heterologous enhancers, in all possible combinations, were tested. The Hr3/IE1 enhancer-transactivator in combination with each of the constitutive heterologous promoters tested increased reporter gene expression significantly in transiently transfected Aedes albopictus C7-10 cells. The addition of the Hr3 enhancer to expression cassettes and concomitant expression of the IE1 transactivator gene product is a potential method for increasing the level of transgene expression in insect systems. This mechanism could also potentially be used to increase the level of transiently-expressed transposase in order to increase the number of integration events in transposon-mediated transformation experiments.

  14. MB0 and MBI Are Independent and Distinct Transactivation Domains in MYC that Are Essential for Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qin; West-Osterfield, Kimberly; Spears, Erick; Li, Zhaoliang; Panaccione, Alexander; Hann, Stephen R

    2017-05-06

    MYC is a transcription factor that is essential for cellular proliferation and development. Deregulation or overexpression of MYC occurs in a variety of human cancers. Ectopic expression of MYC causes hyperproliferation and transformation of cells in culture and tumorigenesis in several transgenic mouse models. Deregulation of MYC can also induce apoptosis through activation of p53 and/or ARF tumor suppressors as a safeguard to prevent tumorigenesis. MYC binds to thousands of genomic sites and regulates hundreds of target genes in a context-dependent fashion to mediate these diverse biological roles. The N-terminal region of MYC contains several conserved domains or MYC Boxes (MB), which influence the different MYC transcriptional and biological activities to varying degrees. However, the specific domains that mediate the ability of MYC to activate transcription remain ill defined. In this report, we have identified a new conserved transactivation domain (TAD), MB0, which is essential for MYC transactivation and target gene induction. We demonstrate that MB0 and MBI represent two distinct and independent TADs within the N-terminal 62 amino acids of MYC. In addition, both MB0 and MBI are essential for MYC transformation of primary fibroblasts in cooperation with activated RAS, while MB0 is necessary for efficient MYC-induced p53-independent apoptosis.

  15. Efficient iPS cell production with the MyoD transactivation domain in serum-free culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Hirai

    Full Text Available A major difficulty of producing induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs has been the low efficiency of reprogramming differentiated cells into pluripotent cells. We previously showed that 5% of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs were reprogrammed into iPSCs when they were transduced with a fusion gene composed of Oct4 and the transactivation domain of MyoD (called M(3O, along with Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc (SKM. In addition, M(3O facilitated chromatin remodeling of pluripotency genes in the majority of transduced MEFs, including cells that did not become iPSCs. These observations suggested the possibility that more than 5% of cells had acquired the ability to become iPSCs given more favorable culture conditions. Here, we raised the efficiency of making mouse iPSCs with M(3O-SKM to 26% by culturing transduced cells at low density in serum-free culture medium. In contrast, the efficiency increased from 0.1% to only 2% with the combination of wild-type Oct4 and SKM (OSKM under the same culture condition. For human iPSCs, M(3O-SKM achieved 7% efficiency under a similar serum-free culture condition, in comparison to 1% efficiency with OSKM. This study highlights the power of combining the transactivation domain of MyoD with a favorable culture environment.

  16. Notch3 Maintains Luminal Phenotype and Suppresses Tumorigenesis and Metastasis of Breast Cancer via Trans-Activating Estrogen Receptor-α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Xiao-Wei; Liang, Yuan-Ke; Lin, Hao-Yu; Wei, Xiao-Long; Zhang, Yong-Qu; Bai, Jing-Wen; Chen, Chun-Fa; Chen, Min; Du, Cai-Wen; Li, Yao-Chen; Tian, Jie; Man, Kwan; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2017-01-01

    The luminal A phenotype is the most common breast cancer subtype and is characterized by estrogen receptor α expression (ERα). Identification of the key regulator that governs the luminal phenotype of breast cancer will clarify the pathogenic mechanism and provide novel therapeutic strategies for this subtype of cancer. ERα signaling pathway sustains the epithelial phenotype and inhibits the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of breast cancer. In this study, we demonstrate that Notch3 positively associates with ERα in both breast cancer cell lines and human breast cancer tissues. We found that overexpression of Notch3 intra-cellular domain, a Notch3 active form (N3ICD), in ERα negative breast cancer cells re-activated ERα, while knock-down of Notch3 reduced ERα transcript and proteins, with alteration of down-stream genes, suggesting its ability to regulate ERα. Mechanistically, our results show that Notch3 specifically binds to the CSL binding element of the ERα promoter and activates ERα expression. Moreover, Notch3 suppressed EMT, while suppression of Notch3 promoted EMT in cellular assay. Overexpressing N3ICD in triple-negative breast cancer suppressed tumorigenesis and metastasis in vivo . Conversely, depletion of Notch3 in luminal breast cancer promoted metastasis in vivo . Furthermore, Notch3 transcripts were significantly associated with prolonged relapse-free survival in breast cancer, in particular in ERα positive breast cancer patients. Our observations demonstrate that Notch3 governs the luminal phenotype via trans-activating ERα expression in breast cancer. These findings delineate the role of a Notch3/ERα axis in maintaining the luminal phenotype and inhibiting tumorigenesis and metastasis in breast cancer, providing a novel strategy to re-sensitize ERα negative or low-expressing breast cancers to hormone therapy.

  17. Inhibitory effects of omega-3 fatty acids on injury-induced epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation contribute to delayed wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turk, Harmony F; Monk, Jennifer M; Fan, Yang-Yi; Callaway, Evelyn S; Weeks, Brad; Chapkin, Robert S

    2013-05-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mediated signaling is required for optimal intestinal wound healing. Since n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), specifically docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), alter EGFR signaling and suppress downstream activation of key signaling pathways, we hypothesized that DHA would be detrimental to the process of intestinal wound healing. Using a mouse immortalized colonocyte model, DHA uniquely reduced EGFR ligand-induced receptor activation, whereas DHA and its metabolic precursor eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) reduced wound-induced EGFR transactivation compared with control (no fatty acid or linoleic acid). Under wounding conditions, the suppression of EGFR activation was associated with a reduction in downstream activation of cytoskeletal remodeling proteins (PLCγ1, Rac1, and Cdc42). Subsequently, DHA and EPA reduced cell migration in response to wounding. Mice were fed a corn oil-, DHA-, or EPA-enriched diet prior to intestinal wounding (2.5% dextran sodium sulfate for 5 days followed by termination after 0, 3, or 6 days of recovery). Mortality was increased in EPA-fed mice and colonic histological injury scores were increased in EPA- and DHA-fed mice compared with corn oil-fed (control) mice. Although kinetics of colonic EGFR activation and downstream signaling (PLCγ1, Rac1, and Cdc42) were delayed by both n-3 PUFA, colonic repair was increased in EPA- relative to DHA-fed mice. These results indicate that, during the early response to intestinal wounding, DHA and EPA uniquely delay the activation of key wound-healing processes in the colon. This effect is mediated, at least in part, via suppression of EGFR-mediated signaling and downstream cytoskeletal remodeling.

  18. Inhibition of both HIV-1 reverse transcription and gene expression by a cyclic peptide that binds the Tat-transactivating response element (TAR RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Lalonde

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The RNA response element TAR plays a critical role in HIV replication by providing a binding site for the recruitment of the viral transactivator protein Tat. Using a structure-guided approach, we have developed a series of conformationally-constrained cyclic peptides that act as structural mimics of the Tat RNA binding region and block Tat-TAR interactions at nanomolar concentrations in vitro. Here we show that these compounds block Tat-dependent transcription in cell-free systems and in cell-based reporter assays. The compounds are also cell permeable, have low toxicity, and inhibit replication of diverse HIV-1 strains, including both CXCR4-tropic and CCR5-tropic primary HIV-1 isolates of the divergent subtypes A, B, C, D and CRF01_AE. In human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, the cyclic peptidomimetic L50 exhibited an IC(50 ∼250 nM. Surprisingly, inhibition of LTR-driven HIV-1 transcription could not account for the full antiviral activity. Timed drug-addition experiments revealed that L-50 has a bi-phasic inhibition curve with the first phase occurring after HIV-1 entry into the host cell and during the initiation of HIV-1 reverse transcription. The second phase coincides with inhibition of HIV-1 transcription. Reconstituted reverse transcription assays confirm that HIV-1 (- strand strong stop DNA synthesis is blocked by L50-TAR RNA interactions in-vitro. These findings are consistent with genetic evidence that TAR plays critical roles both during reverse transcription and during HIV gene expression. Our results suggest that antiviral drugs targeting TAR RNA might be highly effective due to a dual inhibitory mechanism.

  19. Inhibition of both HIV-1 reverse transcription and gene expression by a cyclic peptide that binds the Tat-transactivating response element (TAR) RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalonde, Matthew S; Lobritz, Michael A; Ratcliff, Annette; Chamanian, Mastooreh; Athanassiou, Zafiria; Tyagi, Mudit; Wong, Julian; Robinson, John A; Karn, Jonathan; Varani, Gabriele; Arts, Eric J

    2011-05-01

    The RNA response element TAR plays a critical role in HIV replication by providing a binding site for the recruitment of the viral transactivator protein Tat. Using a structure-guided approach, we have developed a series of conformationally-constrained cyclic peptides that act as structural mimics of the Tat RNA binding region and block Tat-TAR interactions at nanomolar concentrations in vitro. Here we show that these compounds block Tat-dependent transcription in cell-free systems and in cell-based reporter assays. The compounds are also cell permeable, have low toxicity, and inhibit replication of diverse HIV-1 strains, including both CXCR4-tropic and CCR5-tropic primary HIV-1 isolates of the divergent subtypes A, B, C, D and CRF01_AE. In human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, the cyclic peptidomimetic L50 exhibited an IC(50) ∼250 nM. Surprisingly, inhibition of LTR-driven HIV-1 transcription could not account for the full antiviral activity. Timed drug-addition experiments revealed that L-50 has a bi-phasic inhibition curve with the first phase occurring after HIV-1 entry into the host cell and during the initiation of HIV-1 reverse transcription. The second phase coincides with inhibition of HIV-1 transcription. Reconstituted reverse transcription assays confirm that HIV-1 (-) strand strong stop DNA synthesis is blocked by L50-TAR RNA interactions in-vitro. These findings are consistent with genetic evidence that TAR plays critical roles both during reverse transcription and during HIV gene expression. Our results suggest that antiviral drugs targeting TAR RNA might be highly effective due to a dual inhibitory mechanism.

  20. The Inhibition of Stat5 by a Peptide Aptamer Ligand Specific for the DNA Binding Domain Prevents Target Gene Transactivation and the Growth of Breast and Prostate Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Axel; Borghouts, Corina; Brendel, Christian; Moriggl, Richard; Delis, Natalia; Brill, Boris; Vafaizadeh, Vida; Groner, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    The signal transducer and activator of transcription Stat5 is transiently activated by growth factor and cytokine signals in normal cells, but its persistent activation has been observed in a wide range of human tumors. Aberrant Stat5 activity was initially observed in leukemias, but subsequently also found in carcinomas. We investigated the importance of Stat5 in human tumor cell lines. shRNA mediated downregulation of Stat5 revealed the dependence of prostate and breast cancer cells on the expression of this transcription factor. We extended these inhibition studies and derived a peptide aptamer (PA) ligand, which directly interacts with the DNA-binding domain of Stat5 in a yeast-two-hybrid screen. The Stat5 specific PA sequence is embedded in a thioredoxin (hTRX) scaffold protein. The resulting recombinant protein S5-DBD-PA was expressed in bacteria, purified and introduced into tumor cells by protein transduction. Alternatively, S5-DBD-PA was expressed in the tumor cells after infection with a S5-DBD-PA encoding gene transfer vector. Both strategies impaired the DNA-binding ability of Stat5, suppressed Stat5 dependent transactivation and caused its intracellular degradation. Our experiments describe a peptide based inhibitor of Stat5 protein activity which can serve as a lead for the development of a clinically useful compound for cancer treatment. PMID:24276378

  1. The Inhibition of Stat5 by a Peptide Aptamer Ligand Specific for the DNA Binding Domain Prevents Target Gene Transactivation and the Growth of Breast and Prostate Tumor Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Vafaizadeh

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The signal transducer and activator of transcription Stat5 is transiently activated by growth factor and cytokine signals in normal cells, but its persistent activation has been observed in a wide range of human tumors. Aberrant Stat5 activity was initially observed in leukemias, but subsequently also found in carcinomas. We investigated the importance of Stat5 in human tumor cell lines. shRNA mediated downregulation of Stat5 revealed the dependence of prostate and breast cancer cells on the expression of this transcription factor. We extended these inhibition studies and derived a peptide aptamer (PA ligand, which directly interacts with the DNA-binding domain of Stat5 in a yeast-two-hybrid screen. The Stat5 specific PA sequence is embedded in a thioredoxin (hTRX scaffold protein. The resulting recombinant protein S5-DBD-PA was expressed in bacteria, purified and introduced into tumor cells by protein transduction. Alternatively, S5-DBD-PA was expressed in the tumor cells after infection with a S5-DBD-PA encoding gene transfer vector. Both strategies impaired the DNA-binding ability of Stat5, suppressed Stat5 dependent transactivation and caused its intracellular degradation. Our experiments describe a peptide based inhibitor of Stat5 protein activity which can serve as a lead for the development of a clinically useful compound for cancer treatment.

  2. The structure formed by inverted repeats in p53 response elements determines the transactivation activity of p53 protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brázda, Václav; Čechová, Jana; Battistin, M.; Coufal, Jan; Jagelská, Eva; Raimondi, I.; Inga, A.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 483, č. 1 (2017), s. 516-521 ISSN 0006-291X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-21855S Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : tumor-suppressor p53 * cruciform structures * dna-conformation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 2.466, year: 2016

  3. Exploiting the Novel Repressed Transactivator Assay to Identify Protein Interactors and Peptide Inhibitors of the Myc Oncoprotein

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Penn, Linda

    2002-01-01

    Fundamental research clearly shows that the product of the c-myc oncogene is often expressed at elevated levels in a large number of breast cancers and is associated with poor prognosis, high-risk disease...

  4. Macrophage Transactivation for Chemokine Production Identified as a Negative Regulator of Granulomatous Inflammation Using Agent-Based Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Moyo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cellular activation in trans by interferons, cytokines, and chemokines is a commonly recognized mechanism to amplify immune effector function and limit pathogen spread. However, an optimal host response also requires that collateral damage associated with inflammation is limited. This may be particularly so in the case of granulomatous inflammation, where an excessive number and/or excessively florid granulomas can have significant pathological consequences. Here, we have combined transcriptomics, agent-based modeling, and in vivo experimental approaches to study constraints on hepatic granuloma formation in a murine model of experimental leishmaniasis. We demonstrate that chemokine production by non-infected Kupffer cells in the Leishmania donovani-infected liver promotes competition with infected KCs for available iNKT cells, ultimately inhibiting the extent of granulomatous inflammation. We propose trans-activation for chemokine production as a novel broadly applicable mechanism that may operate early in infection to limit excessive focal inflammation.

  5. Slug suppression induces apoptosis via Puma transactivation in rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes treated with hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hoon-Suk; Bae, Eun-Kyung; Ahn, Joong Kyong; Lee, Jaejoon; Ahn, Kwang-Sung; Koh, Eun-Mi

    2010-06-30

    Inadequate apoptosis contributes to synovial hyperplasia in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Recent study shows that low expression of Puma might be partially responsible for the decreased apoptosis of fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS). Slug, a highly conserved zinc finger transcriptional repressor, is known to antagonize apoptosis of hematopoietic progenitor cells by repressing Puma transactivation. In this study, we examined the expression and function of Slug in RA FLS. Slug mRNA expression was measured in the synovial tissue (ST) and FLS obtained from RA and osteoarthritis patients. Slug and Puma mRNA expression in FLS by apoptotic stimuli were measured by real-time PCR analysis. FLS were transfected with control siRNA or Slug siRNA. Apoptosis was quantified by trypan blue exclusion, DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 assay. RA ST expressed higher level of Slug mRNA compared with osteoarthritis ST. Slug was significantly induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) but not by exogenous p53 in RA FLS. Puma induction by H2O2 stimulation was significantly higher in Slug siRNA-transfected FLS compared with control siRNA-transfected FLS. After H2O2 stimulation, viable cell number was significantly lower in Slug siRNA-transfected FLS compared with control siRNA-transfected FLS. Apoptosis enhancing effect of Slug siRNA was further confirmed by ELISA that detects cytoplasmic histone-associated DNA fragments and caspase-3 assay. These data demonstrate that Slug is overexpressed in RA ST and that suppression of Slug gene facilitates apoptosis of FLS by increasing Puma transactivation. Slug may therefore represent a potential therapeutic target in RA.

  6. Integrin-mediated transactivation of P2X7R via hemichannel-dependent ATP release stimulates astrocyte migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Alvaro; Lagos-Cabré, Raúl; Kong, Milene; Cárdenas, Areli; Burgos-Bravo, Francesca; Schneider, Pascal; Quest, Andrew F G; Leyton, Lisette

    2016-09-01

    Our previous reports indicate that ligand-induced αVβ3 integrin and Syndecan-4 engagement increases focal adhesion formation and migration of astrocytes. Additionally, ligated integrins trigger ATP release through unknown mechanisms, activating P2X7 receptors (P2X7R), and the uptake of Ca(2+) to promote cell adhesion. However, whether the activation of P2X7R and ATP release are required for astrocyte migration and whether αVβ3 integrin and Syndecan-4 receptors communicate with P2X7R via ATP remains unknown. Here, cells were stimulated with Thy-1, a reported αVβ3 integrin and Syndecan-4 ligand. Results obtained indicate that ATP was released by Thy-1 upon integrin engagement and required the participation of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K), phospholipase-C gamma (PLCγ) and inositol trisphosphate (IP3) receptors (IP3R). IP3R activation leads to increased intracellular Ca(2+), hemichannel (Connexin-43 and Pannexin-1) opening, and ATP release. Moreover, silencing of the P2X7R or addition of hemichannel blockers precluded Thy-1-induced astrocyte migration. Finally, Thy-1 lacking the integrin-binding site did not stimulate ATP release, whereas Thy-1 mutated in the Syndecan-4-binding domain increased ATP release, albeit to a lesser extent and with delayed kinetics compared to wild-type Thy-1. Thus, hemichannels activated downstream of an αVβ3 integrin-PI3K-PLCγ-IP3R pathway are responsible for Thy-1-induced, hemichannel-mediated and Syndecan-4-modulated ATP release that transactivates P2X7Rs to induce Ca(2+) entry. These findings uncover a hitherto unrecognized role for hemichannels in the regulation of astrocyte migration via P2X7R transactivation induced by integrin-mediated ATP release. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The adenovirus E1A binding protein BS69 is a corepressor of transcription through recruitment of N-CoR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Masselink, H.; Bernards, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    BS69 was first identified as a protein that interacts directly with the transactivation domain (conserved region 3) of the 289R adenovirus type 5 E1A protein. We show here that BS69 is a potent repressor of transcription. BS69 mediates repression, at least in part, through interaction with the

  8. Nuclear receptor corepressor-dependent repression of peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor delta-mediated transactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsdam, Anne-M; Nielsen, Curt A F; Neve, Søren

    2002-01-01

    delta-RXR alpha heterodimer bound to an acyl-CoA oxidase (ACO)-type peroxisome-proliferator response element recruited a glutathione S-transferase-NCoR fusion protein in a ligand-independent manner. Contrasting with most other nuclear receptors, PPAR delta was found to interact equally well......The nuclear receptor corepressor (NCoR) was isolated as a peroxisome-proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) delta interacting protein using the yeast two-hybrid system. NCoR interacted strongly with the ligand-binding domain of PPAR delta, whereas interactions with the ligand-binding domains...

  9. Antidepressant drugs transactivate TrkB neurotrophin receptors in the adult rodent brain independently of BDNF and monoamine transporter blockade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomi Rantamäki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antidepressant drugs (ADs have been shown to activate BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor receptor TrkB in the rodent brain but the mechanism underlying this phenomenon remains unclear. ADs act as monoamine reuptake inhibitors and after prolonged treatments regulate brain bdnf mRNA levels indicating that monoamine-BDNF signaling regulate AD-induced TrkB activation in vivo. However, recent findings demonstrate that Trk receptors can be transactivated independently of their neurotrophin ligands. METHODOLOGY: In this study we examined the role of BDNF, TrkB kinase activity and monoamine reuptake in the AD-induced TrkB activation in vivo and in vitro by employing several transgenic mouse models, cultured neurons and TrkB-expressing cell lines. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a chemical-genetic TrkB(F616A mutant and TrkB overexpressing mice, we demonstrate that ADs specifically activate both the maturely and immaturely glycosylated forms of TrkB receptors in the brain in a TrkB kinase dependent manner. However, the tricyclic AD imipramine readily induced the phosphorylation of TrkB receptors in conditional bdnf⁻/⁻ knock-out mice (132.4±8.5% of control; P = 0.01, indicating that BDNF is not required for the TrkB activation. Moreover, using serotonin transporter (SERT deficient mice and chemical lesions of monoaminergic neurons we show that neither a functional SERT nor monoamines are required for the TrkB phosphorylation response induced by the serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors fluoxetine or citalopram, or norepinephrine selective reuptake inhibitor reboxetine. However, neither ADs nor monoamine transmitters activated TrkB in cultured neurons or cell lines expressing TrkB receptors, arguing that ADs do not directly bind to TrkB. CONCLUSIONS: The present findings suggest that ADs transactivate brain TrkB receptors independently of BDNF and monoamine reuptake blockade and emphasize the need of an intact tissue context for the

  10. p27KIP1 blocks cyclin E-dependent transactivation of cyclin A gene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zerfass-Thome, K; Schulze, A; Zwerschke, W

    1997-01-01

    Cyclin E is necessary and rate limiting for the passage of mammalian cells through the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Control of cell cycle progression by cyclin E involves cdk2 kinase, which requires cyclin E for catalytic activity. Expression of cyclin E/cdk2 leads to an activation of cyclin A gene...... expression, as monitored by reporter gene constructs derived from the human cyclin A promoter. Promoter activation by cyclin E/cdk2 requires an E2F binding site in the cyclin A promoter. We show here that cyclin E/cdk2 kinase can directly bind to E2F/p107 complexes formed on the cyclin A promoter-derived E2F...... binding site, and this association is controlled by p27KIP1, most likely through direct protein-protein interaction. These observation suggest that cyclin E/cdk2 associates with E2F/p107 complexes in late G1 phase, once p27KIP1 has decreased below a critical threshold level. Since a kinase-negative mutant...

  11. Oncogenic N-Ras Stimulates SRF-Mediated Transactivation via H3 Acetylation at Lysine 9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Ju Yi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Signal transduction pathways regulate the gene expression by altering chromatin dynamics in response to mitogens. Ras proteins are key regulators linking extracellular stimuli to a diverse range of biological responses associated with gene regulation. In mammals, the three ras genes encode four Ras protein isoforms: H-Ras, K-Ras4A, K-Ras4B, and N-Ras. Although emerging evidence suggests that Ras isoforms differentially regulate gene expressions and are functionally nonredundant, the mechanisms underlying Ras specificity and Ras signaling effects on gene expression remain unclear. Here, we show that oncogenic N-Ras acts as the most potent regulator of SRF-, NF-κB-, and AP-1-dependent transcription. N-Ras-RGL2 axis is a distinct signaling pathway for SRF target gene expression such as Egr1 and JunB, as RGL2 Ras binding domain (RBD significantly impaired oncogenic N-Ras-induced SRE activation. By monitoring the effect of Ras isoforms upon the change of global histone modifications in oncogenic Ras-overexpressed cells, we discovered that oncogenic N-Ras elevates H3K9ac/H3K23ac levels globally in the chromatin context. Importantly, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays revealed that H3K9ac is significantly enriched at the promoter and coding regions of Egr1 and JunB. Collectively, our findings define an undocumented role of N-Ras in modulating of H3 acetylation and in gene regulation.

  12. The Contribution of Transactivation Subdomains 1 and 2 to p53-Induced Gene Expression Is Heterogeneous But Not Subdomain-Specific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer M. Smith

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Two adjacent regions within the transactivation domain of p53 are sufficient to support sequence-specific transactivation when fused to a heterologous DNA binding domain. It has been hypothesized that these two subdomains of p53 may contribute to the expression of distinct p53-responsive genes. Here we have used oligonucleotide microarrays to identify transcripts induced by variants of p53 with point mutations within subdomains 1, 2, or 1 and 2 (QS1, QS2, QS1/QS2, respectively. The expression of 254 transcripts was increased in response to wild-type p53 expression but most of these transcripts were poorly induced by these variants of p53. Strikingly, a number of known p53regulated transcripts including TNFRSF10B, BAX, BTG2, POLH were increased to wild-type levels by p53QS1 and p53QS2 but not p53QS1/QS2, indicating that either sub domain 1 or 2 is sufficient for p53-dependent expression of a small subset of p53-responsive genes. Unexpectedly, there was no evidence for p53QS1- or p53QS2-specific gene expression. Taken together, we found heterogeneity in the requirement for transactivation subdomains 1 and 2 of p53 without any subdomain-specific contribution to p53-induced gene expression.

  13. E1A-dependent trans-activation of the human MYC promoter is mediated by the E2F factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiebert, S.W.; Lipp, M.; Nevins, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    E2F is a cellular transcription factor that binds to two sites in the adenovirus E2 promoter. Previous experiments have implicated E2F in the E1A-dependent transactivation of the E2 gene since levels of active E2F increase markedly during adenovirus infection in parallel with the increase in E2 transcription, and an E2F binding site can confer E1A inducibility to a heterologous promoter. Here the authors show that E2F binds to two sequence elements within the P2 promoter of the human MYC gene which are within a region that is critical for promoter activity. The MYC promoter can be trans-activated in an E1A-dependent manner and site-directed mutagenesis demonstrates that these E2F elements are essential for trans-activation. Finally, they also find that adenovirus infection of quiescent cells results in a stimulation of the endogenous MYC gene. They conclude that the activation of the E2F factor, which is likely responsible for the activation of viral E2 transcription, is also responsible for the E1A-dependent induction of MYC transcription

  14. Structural characterization of a noncovalent complex between ubiquitin and the transactivation domain of the erythroid-specific factor EKLF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiola, Luca; Lussier-Price, Mathieu; Gagnon, David; Lafrance-Vanasse, Julien; Mascle, Xavier; Arseneault, Genevieve; Legault, Pascale; Archambault, Jacques; Omichinski, James G

    2013-11-05

    Like other acidic transactivation domains (TAD), the minimal TAD from the erythroid-specific transcription factor EKLF (EKLFTAD) has been shown to contribute both to its transcriptional activity as well as to its ubiquitin(UBI)-mediated degradation. In this article, we examine the activation-degradation role of the acidic TAD of EKLF and demonstrate that the first 40 residues (EKLFTAD1) within this region form a noncovalent interaction with UBI. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structural studies of an EKLFTAD1-UBI complex show that EKLFTAD1 adopts a 14-residue α helix that forms the recognition interface with UBI in a similar manner as the UBI-interacting helix of Rabex5. We also identify a similar interaction between UBI and the activation-degradation region of SREBP1a, but not with the activation-degradation regions of p53, GAL4, and VP16. These results suggest that select activation-degradation regions like the ones found in EKLF and SREBP1a function in part through their ability to form noncovalent interactions with UBI. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Nanotherapeutics Using an HIV-1 Poly A and Transactivator of the HIV-1 LTR-(TAR- Specific siRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supriya D. Mahajan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 replication can be efficiently inhibited by intracellular expression of an siRNA targeting the viral RNA. We used a well-validated siRNA (si510 which targets the poly A/TAR (transactivator of the HIV-1 LTR site and suppresses viral replication. Nanotechnology holds much potential for impact in the field of HIV-1 therapeutics, and nanoparticles such as quantum rods (QRs can be easily functionalized to incorporate siRNA forming stable nanoplexes that can be used for gene silencing. We evaluated the efficacy of the QR-si510 HIV-1 siRNA nanoplex in suppressing viral replication in the HIV-1-infected monocytic cell line THP-1 by measuring p24 antigen levels and gene expression levels of HIV-1 LTR. Our results suggest that the QR-si510 HIV-1 siRNA nanoplex is not only effective in delivering siRNA, but also in suppressing HIV-1 viral replication for a longer time period. HIV-1 nanotherapeutics can thus enhance systemic bioavailability and offer multifunctionality.

  16. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester downregulates phospholipase D1 via direct binding and inhibition of NFκB transactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Mi Hee; Kang, Dong Woo [Department of Molecular Biology, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Yunjin [College of Pharmacy, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kang-Yell [Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Min, Do Sik, E-mail: minds@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Biology, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •We found CAFÉ, a natural product that suppresses expression and activity of PLD1. •CAPE decreased PLD1 expression by inhibiting NFκB transactivation. •CAPE rapidly inhibited PLD activity via its binding to a Cys837 of PLD1. •PLD1 downregulation by CAPE inhibited invasion and proliferation of glioma cells. -- Abstract: Upregulation of phospholipase D (PLD) is functionally linked with oncogenic signals and tumorigenesis. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is an active compound of propolis extract that exhibits anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and antineoplastic properties. In this study, we demonstrated that CAPE suppressed the expression of PLD1 at the transcriptional level via inhibition of binding of NFκB to PLD1 promoter. Moreover, CAPE, but not its analogs, bound to a Cys837 residue of PLD1 and inhibited enzymatic activity of PLD. CAPE also decreased activation of matrix metalloproteinases-2 induced by phosphatidic acid, a product of PLD activity. Ultimately, CAPE-induced downregulation of PLD1 suppressed invasion and proliferation of glioma cells. Taken together, the results of this study indicate that CAPE might contribute to anti-neoplastic effect by targeting PLD1.

  17. Polymorphism in MHC class II transactivator gene is not associated with susceptibility to colorectal cancer in Swedish patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumtaz, Melad; Löfgren, Sture; Hugander, Anders; Dimberg, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Reduced expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II) genes in colorectal cancer (CRC) has been reported. MHC-II transactivator (CIITA), encoded by the MHC2TA gene, is considered to be the master regulator for MHC-II gene expression. A functional single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) -168A-->G in the promoter region of the MHC2TA gene is suggested to have an influence on different autoimmune diseases. Our study was performed to evaluate the association between the -168A-->G MHC2TA gene variant in patients with CRC versus a control group. Using the TaqMan system, this SNP was screened in 248 CRC patients and 256 controls. No significant difference in genotype distribution or in allelic frequencies was found between the two groups, nor any association with clinical characteristics. The results of this study suggest that -168A-->G polymorphism of the MHC2TA gene is not associated with susceptibility to CRC.

  18. Overexpression of ERβ is sufficient to inhibit hypoxia-inducible factor-1 transactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Choa; Lee, YoungJoo, E-mail: yjlee@sejong.ac.kr

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • We examined the effect of ERβ specific ligand on HIF-1 inhibition. • DPN down-regulates the ARNT protein levels in PC3 cells. • DPN did not show additional effect in ERβ transfected MCF-7 cells. • Our study shows that unliganded ERβ is sufficient to inhibit HIF-1 in systems of overexpression. - Abstract: Estrogen receptor (ER) β is predicted to play an important role in the prevention of breast cancer development and progression. We have previously shown that ERβ suppresses hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1-mediated transcription through aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) degradation via ubiquitination processes. In this study, we attempted to examine the effect of ERβ specific ligand on HIF-1 inhibition in ERβ positive PC3 cells and ERβ transfected MCF-7 cells. ERβ specific agonist diarylpropionitrile (DPN) stimulated estrogen response element (ERE)-luciferase activity in a similar fashion to estradiol in PC3 cells. We observed that DPN down-regulates the ARNT protein levels leading to an attenuation of hypoxia-induced hypoxia response element (HRE)-driven luciferase reporter gene activation in PC3 cells. Treatment of DPN reduced vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and co-treatment with ERβ specific antagonist PHTPP abrogated the effect in PC3 cells. We then examined the effect of DPN in ERβ transfected MCF-7 cells. HIF-1 transcriptional activity repression by ERβ was not further reduced by DPN, as examined by HRE-driven luciferase assays. Expression of ERβ significantly decreased VEGF secretion and ARNT expression under hypoxic conditions. However, DPN did not additionally affect this suppression in MCF-7 cells transfected with ERβ. This result shows that unliganded ERβ is sufficient to inhibit HIF-1 in systems of overexpression.

  19. Pax6 represses androgen receptor-mediated transactivation by inhibiting recruitment of the coactivator SPBP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julianne Elvenes

    Full Text Available The androgen receptor (AR has a central role in development and maintenance of the male reproductive system and in the etiology of prostate cancer. The transcription factor Pax6 has recently been reported to act as a repressor of AR and to be hypermethylated in prostate cancer cells. SPBP is a transcriptional regulator that previously has been shown to enhance the activity of Pax6. In this study we have identified SPBP to act as a transcriptional coactivator of AR. We also show that Pax6 inhibits SPBP-mediated enhancement of AR activity on the AR target gene probasin promoter, a repression that was partly reversed by increased expression of SPBP. Enhanced expression of Pax6 reduced the amount of SPBP associated with the probasin promoter when assayed by ChIP in HeLa cells. We mapped the interaction between both AR and SPBP, and AR and Pax6 to the DNA-binding domains of the involved proteins. Further binding studies revealed that Pax6 and SPBP compete for binding to AR. These results suggest that Pax6 represses AR activity by displacing and/or inhibiting recruitment of coactivators to AR target promoters. Understanding the mechanism for inhibition of AR coactivators can give rise to molecular targeted drugs for treatment of prostate cancer.

  20. A gene-specific role for the Ssu72 RNAPII CTD phosphatase in HIV-1 Tat transactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yupeng; Zhang, Lirong; Estarás, Conchi; Choi, Seung H; Moreno, Luis; Karn, Jonathan; Moresco, James J; Yates, John R; Jones, Katherine A

    2014-10-15

    HIV-1 Tat stimulates transcription elongation by recruiting the P-TEFb (positive transcription elongation factor-b) (CycT1:CDK9) C-terminal domain (CTD) kinase to the HIV-1 promoter. Here we show that Tat transactivation also requires the Ssu72 CTD Ser5P (S5P)-specific phosphatase, which mediates transcription termination and intragenic looping at eukaryotic genes. Importantly, HIV-1 Tat interacts directly with Ssu72 and strongly stimulates its CTD phosphatase activity. We found that Ssu72 is essential for Tat:P-TEFb-mediated phosphorylation of the S5P-CTD in vitro. Interestingly, Ssu72 also stimulates nascent HIV-1 transcription in a phosphatase-dependent manner in vivo. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments reveal that Ssu72, like P-TEFb and AFF4, is recruited by Tat to the integrated HIV-1 proviral promoter in TNF-α signaling 2D10 T cells and leaves the elongation complex prior to the termination site. ChIP-seq (ChIP combined with deep sequencing) and GRO-seq (genome-wide nuclear run-on [GRO] combined with deep sequencing) analysis further reveals that Ssu72 predominantly colocalizes with S5P-RNAPII (RNA polymerase II) at promoters in human embryonic stem cells, with a minor peak in the terminator region. A few genes, like NANOG, also have high Ssu72 at the terminator. Ssu72 is not required for transcription at most cellular genes but has a modest effect on cotranscriptional termination. We conclude that Tat alters the cellular function of Ssu72 to stimulate viral gene expression and facilitate the early S5P-S2P transition at the integrated HIV-1 promoter. © 2014 Chen et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  1. Role of adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP) and acyl-coA binding protein (ACBP) in PPAR-mediated transactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helledie, Torben; Jørgensen, Claus; Antonius, Marianne

    2002-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear hormone receptors that are activated by a number of fatty acids and fatty acid derivatives. By contrast, we have recently shown that acyl-CoA esters display PPAR antagonistic properties in vitro. We have also shown that the adipocyte...

  2. ERK1 phosphorylates Nanog to regulate protein stability and stem cell self-renewal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Hyun Kim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Nanog regulates human and mouse embryonic stem (ES cell self-renewal activity. Activation of ERKs signaling negatively regulates ES cell self-renewal and induces differentiation, but the mechanisms are not understood. We found that ERK1 binds and phosphorylates Nanog. Activation of MEK/ERKs signaling and phosphorylation of Nanog inhibit Nanog transactivation, inducing ES cell differentiation. Conversely, suppression of MEK/ERKs signaling enhances Nanog transactivation to inhibit ES cell differentiation. We observed that phosphorylation of Nanog by ERK1 decreases Nanog stability through ubiquitination-mediated protein degradation. Further, we found that this phosphorylation induces binding of FBXW8 with Nanog to reduce Nanog protein stability. Overall, our results demonstrated that ERKs-mediated Nanog phosphorylation plays an important role in self-renewal of ES cells through FBXW8-mediated Nanog protein stability.

  3. Role of PU.1 in MHC class II expression through transcriptional regulation of class II transactivator pI in dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Nao; Yokoyama, Hokuto; Yashiro, Takuya; Nakano, Nobuhiro; Nishiyama, Makoto; Kanada, Shunsuke; Fukai, Tatsuo; Hara, Mutsuko; Ikeda, Shigaku; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko; Nishiyama, Chiharu

    2012-03-01

    PU.1 is a hematopoietic cell-specific transcription factor belonging to the Ets family. We hypothesized that PU.1 is involved in MHC class II expression in dendritic cells (DCs). The role of PU.1 in MHC class II expression in DCs was analyzed. Transcriptional regulation of the DC-specific pI promoter of the class II transactivator (CIITA) gene and subsequent MHC class II expression was investigated by using PU.1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) and reporter, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and electrophoretic mobility shift assays. PU.1 siRNA introduction suppressed MHC class II expression, allogeneic and syngeneic T-cell activation activities of bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) with reduction of CIITA mRNA driven by the DC-specific promoter pI, and MHC class II mRNA. The chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed constitutive binding of PU.1 to the pI region in BMDCs, whereas acetylation of histone H3 on pI was suppressed by LPS stimulation in parallel with shutdown of CIITA transcription. PU.1 transactivated the pI promoter through cis-elements at -47/-44 and -30/-27 in a reporter assay and to which PU.1 directly bound in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Acetylation of histones H3 and H4 on pI was reduced in PU.1 siRNA-introduced BMDCs. Knockdown of interferon regulatory factor 4 or 8, which is a heterodimer partner of PU.1, by siRNA did not affect pI-driven CIITA transcription or MHC class II expression. PU.1 basally transactivates the CIITA pI promoter in DCs by functioning as a monomeric transcription factor and by affecting histone modification, resulting in the subsequent expression and function of MHC class II. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. SOX9 governs differentiation stage-specific gene expression in growth plate chondrocytes via direct concomitant transactivation and repression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Y L Leung

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage and endochondral bone development require SOX9 activity to regulate chondrogenesis, chondrocyte proliferation, and transition to a non-mitotic hypertrophic state. The restricted and reciprocal expression of the collagen X gene, Col10a1, in hypertrophic chondrocytes and Sox9 in immature chondrocytes epitomise the precise spatiotemporal control of gene expression as chondrocytes progress through phases of differentiation, but how this is achieved is not clear. Here, we have identified a regulatory element upstream of Col10a1 that enhances its expression in hypertrophic chondrocytes in vivo. In immature chondrocytes, where Col10a1 is not expressed, SOX9 interacts with a conserved sequence within this element that is analogous to that within the intronic enhancer of the collagen II gene Col2a1, the known transactivation target of SOX9. By analysing a series of Col10a1 reporter genes in transgenic mice, we show that the SOX9 binding consensus in this element is required to repress expression of the transgene in non-hypertrophic chondrocytes. Forced ectopic Sox9 expression in hypertrophic chondrocytes in vitro and in mice resulted in down-regulation of Col10a1. Mutation of a binding consensus motif for GLI transcription factors, which are the effectors of Indian hedgehog signaling, close to the SOX9 site in the Col10a1 regulatory element, also derepressed transgene expression in non-hypertrophic chondrocytes. GLI2 and GLI3 bound to the Col10a1 regulatory element but not to the enhancer of Col2a1. In addition to Col10a1, paired SOX9-GLI binding motifs are present in the conserved non-coding regions of several genes that are preferentially expressed in hypertrophic chondrocytes and the occurrence of pairing is unlikely to be by chance. We propose a regulatory paradigm whereby direct concomitant positive and negative transcriptional control by SOX9 ensures differentiation phase-specific gene expression in chondrocytes. Discrimination between

  5. Transactivation of the TIEG1 confers growth inhibition of transforming growth factor-β-susceptible hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lei; Lai, Yiu-Kay; Zhang, Jin-Fang; Chan, Chu-Yan; Lu, Gang; Lin, Marie CM; He, Ming-Liang; Li, Ji-Cheng; Kung, Hsiang-Fu

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β-inducible early gene 1 (TIEG1) in TGF-β-induced growth inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. METHODS: Human hepatocyte and HCC cell lines with varied susceptibilities to TGF-β1 were tested by methylthiazoletetrazolium (MTT) assay. The expression changes of Smad2, Smad3, Smad4, Smad7, TIEG1 and TIEG2 gene following treatment with TGF-β1 in a TGF-β-sensitive hepatocyte cell line (MIHA), a TGF-β-sensitive hepatoma cell line (Hep3B) and two TGF-β-insensitive hepatoma cell lines (HepG2 and Bel7404) were examined. SiRNA targeting TIEG1 was transfected into Hep3B cells and the sensitivity of cells to TGF-β1 was examined. Overexpression of TIEG1 was induced by lentiviral-mediated transduction in TGF-β1-resistant hepatoma cell lines (Bel7404 and HepG2). MTT assay and 4’,6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole staining were used to identify cell viability and apoptosis, respectively. The expression level of stathmin was measured by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western-blotting analysis, and stathmin promoter activity by TIEG1 was monitored by a luciferase reporter gene system. RESULTS: TIEG1 was significantly upregulated by TGF-β1 in the TGF-β1-sensitive HCC cell line, Hep3B, but not in the resistant cell lines. The suppression of TIEG1 by siRNAs decreased the sensitivity of Hep3B cells to TGF-β1, whereas the overexpression of TIEG1 mediated growth inhibition and apoptosis in TGF-β1-resistant HCC cell lines, which resembled those of TGF-β1-sensitive HCC cells treated with TGF-β1. Our data further suggested that stathmin was a direct target of TIEG1, as stathmin was significantly downregulated by TIEG1 overexpression, and stathmin promoter activity was inhibited by TIEG1 in a dose-dependent manner. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that transactivation of TIEG1 conferred growth inhibition of TGF-β-susceptible human HCC cells. PMID:22563190

  6. Ac-mediated trans-activation of the Ds element in rice (Oryza sativa L.) cells as revealed by GUS assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, R; Takumi, S; Mori, N; Nakamura, C

    1999-01-01

    A method using particle bombardment and beta-glucuronidase (GUS) assay was applied to rice callus for detecting the excision of the maize Ds element trans-activated by the Ac transposase source. Excision of Ds biolistically introduced into rice callus resulted in the restoration of the interrupted gus gene expression, allowing visual detection of trans-activation two days after bombardment. Only the transgenic callus lines expressing the Ac transposase gene and the wild-type callus co-transformed with Ac and Ds revealed GUS activity. Frequency of excision, estimated based on the relative GUS activity, ranged from 0.3% to 2.2%. Callus lines showing different levels of Ac transcripts revealed varying excision frequencies. At the later stages of callus growth after selection for the Ac/Ds transformed lines, excision events were detected by GUS assay and confirmed by PCR and sequence analyses of the excision sites in individual colonies. GUS activity was also demonstrated in the primary regenerants from the Ac/Ds-transformed callus colonies. The method described in this study may be used as an approach for rapid detection of excision events and assessment of various factors limiting Ac/Ds activity in rice cells.

  7. The Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Transactivator CIITA Inhibits the Persistent Activation of NF-κB by the Human T Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Tax-1 Oncoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forlani, Greta; Abdallah, Rawan; Accolla, Roberto S; Tosi, Giovanna

    2016-01-20

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax-1, a key protein in HTLV-1-induced T cell transformation, deregulates diverse cell signaling pathways. Among them, the NF-κB pathway is constitutively activated by Tax-1, which binds to NF-κB proteins and activates the IκB kinase (IKK). Upon phosphorylation-dependent IκB degradation, NF-κB migrates into the nucleus, mediating Tax-1-stimulated gene expression. We show that the transcriptional regulator of major histocompatibility complex class II genes CIITA (class II transactivator), endogenously or ectopically expressed in different cells, inhibits the activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway by Tax-1 and map the region that mediates this effect. CIITA affects the subcellular localization of Tax-1, which is mostly retained in the cytoplasm, and this correlates with impaired migration of RelA into the nucleus. Cytoplasmic and nuclear mutant forms of CIITA reveal that CIITA exploits different strategies to suppress Tax-1-mediated NF-κB activation in both subcellular compartments. CIITA interacts with Tax-1 without preventing Tax-1 binding to both IKKγ and RelA. Nevertheless, CIITA affects Tax-1-induced IKK activity, causing retention of the inactive p50/RelA/IκB complex in the cytoplasm. Nuclear CIITA associates with Tax-1/RelA in nuclear bodies, blocking Tax-1-dependent activation of NF-κB-responsive genes. Thus, CIITA inhibits cytoplasmic and nuclear steps of Tax-1-mediated NF-κB activation. These results, together with our previous finding that CIITA acts as a restriction factor inhibiting Tax-1-promoted HTLV-1 gene expression and replication, indicate that CIITA is a versatile molecule that might also counteract Tax-1 transforming activity. Unveiling the molecular basis of CIITA-mediated inhibition of Tax-1 functions may be important in defining new strategies to control HTLV-1 spreading and oncogenic potential. HTLV-1 is the causative agent of human adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATLL). The viral

  8. CysLT1 receptor-induced human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation requires ROS generation, EGF receptor transactivation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capra Valérie

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cysteine-containing leukotrienes (cysteinyl-LTs are pivotal inflammatory mediators that play important roles in the pathophysiology of asthma, allergic rhinitis, and other inflammatory conditions. In particular, cysteinyl-LTs exert a variety of effects with relevance to the aetiology of asthma such as smooth muscle contraction, eosinophil recruitment, increased microvascular permeability, enhanced mucus secretion and decreased mucus transport and, finally, airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC proliferation. We used human ASMC (HASMC to identify the signal transduction pathway(s of the leukotriene D4 (LTD4-induced DNA synthesis. Methods Proliferation of primary HASMC was measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation. Phosphorylation of EGF receptor (EGF-R and ERK1/2 was assessed with a polyclonal anti-EGF-R or anti-phosphoERKl/2 monoclonal antibody. A Ras pull-down assay kit was used to evaluate Ras activation. The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS was estimated by measuring dichlorodihydrofluorescein (DCF oxidation. Results We demonstrate that in HASMC LTD4-stimulated thymidine incorporation and potentiation of EGF-induced mitogenic signaling mostly depends upon EGF-R transactivation through the stimulation of CysLT1-R. Accordingly, we found that LTD4 stimulation was able to trigger the increase of Ras-GTP and, in turn, to activate ERK1/2. We show here that EGF-R transactivation was sensitive to pertussis toxin (PTX and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K inhibitors and that it occurred independently from Src activity, despite the observation of a strong impairment of LTD4-induced DNA synthesis following Src inhibition. More interestingly, CysLT1-R stimulation increased the production of ROS and N-acetylcysteine (NAC abolished LTD4-induced EGF-R phosphorylation and thymidine incorporation. Conclusion Collectively, our data demonstrate that in HASMC LTD4 stimulation of a Gi/o coupled CysLT1-R triggers the transactivation of the EGF

  9. Virus-Like Particles Derived from HIV-1 for Delivery of Nuclear Proteins: Improvement of Production and Activity by Protein Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Marc-André; Lytvyn, Viktoria; Deforet, Francis; Gilbert, Rénald; Gaillet, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) derived from retroviruses and lentiviruses can be used to deliver recombinant proteins without the fear of causing insertional mutagenesis to the host cell genome. In this study we evaluate the potential of an inducible lentiviral vector packaging cell line for VLP production. The Gag gene from HIV-1 was fused to a gene encoding a selected protein and it was transfected into the packaging cells. Three proteins served as model: the green fluorescent protein and two transcription factors-the cumate transactivator (cTA) of the inducible CR5 promoter and the human Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4). The sizes of the VLPs were 120-150 nm in diameter and they were resistant to freeze/thaw cycles. Protein delivery by the VLPs reached up to 100% efficacy in human cells and was well tolerated. Gag-cTA triggered up to 1100-fold gene activation of the reporter gene in comparison to the negative control. Protein engineering was required to detect Gag-KLF4 activity. Thus, insertion of the VP16 transactivation domain increased the activity of the VLPs by eightfold. An additional 2.4-fold enhancement was obtained by inserting nuclear export signal. In conclusion, our platform produced VLPs capable of efficient protein transfer, and it was shown that protein engineering can be used to improve the activity of the delivered proteins as well as VLP production.

  10. NF-kappaB p65-dependent transactivation of miRNA genes following Cryptosporidium parvum infection stimulates epithelial cell immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhou

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidium parvum is a protozoan parasite that infects the gastrointestinal epithelium and causes diarrheal disease worldwide. Innate epithelial immune responses are key mediators of the host's defense to C. parvum. MicroRNAs (miRNAs regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level and are involved in regulation of both innate and adaptive immune responses. Using an in vitro model of human cryptosporidiosis, we analyzed C. parvum-induced miRNA expression in biliary epithelial cells (i.e., cholangiocytes. Our results demonstrated differential alterations in the mature miRNA expression profile in cholangiocytes following C. parvum infection or lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Database analysis of C. parvum-upregulated miRNAs revealed potential NF-kappaB binding sites in the promoter elements of a subset of miRNA genes. We demonstrated that mir-125b-1, mir-21, mir-30b, and mir-23b-27b-24-1 cluster genes were transactivated through promoter binding of the NF-kappaB p65 subunit following C. parvum infection. In contrast, C. parvum transactivated mir-30c and mir-16 genes in cholangiocytes in a p65-independent manner. Importantly, functional inhibition of selected p65-dependent miRNAs in cholangiocytes increased C. parvum burden. Thus, we have identified a panel of miRNAs regulated through promoter binding of the NF-kappaB p65 subunit in human cholangiocytes in response to C. parvum infection, a process that may be relevant to the regulation of epithelial anti-microbial defense in general.

  11. Heterodimerization of the transcription factors E2F-1 and DP-1 leads to cooperative trans-activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, K; Wu, C L; Fattaey, A R

    1993-01-01

    the hypophosphorylated form of the retinoblastoma protein (pRB). The other protein, murine DP-1, was purified from an E2F DNA-affinity column, and it was subsequently shown to bind the consensus E2F DNA-binding site. To study a possible interaction between E2F-1 and DP-1, we have now isolated a cDNA for the human...

  12. Identification of a dimerization domain in the C-terminal segment of the IE110 transactivator protein from herpes simplex virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Ciufo, D M; Mullen, M A; Hayward, G S

    1994-01-01

    The 775-amino-acid IE110 (or ICP0) phosphoprotein of herpes simplex virus (HSV) functions as an accessory transcription factor during the lytic cycle and plays a critical role in reactivation from latent infection. By immunofluorescence analysis, IE110 localizes in a novel pattern consisting of several dozen spherical punctate granules in the nuclei of DNA-transfected cells. We constructed a hybrid version of IE110 that contained an epitope-tagged domain from the N terminus of the HSV IE175 p...

  13. Multimodular biosensors reveal a novel platform for activation of G proteins by growth factor receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Midde, Krishna K; Aznar, Nicolas; Laederich, Melanie B; Ma, Gary S; Kunkel, Maya T; Newton, Alexandra C; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2015-03-03

    Environmental cues are transmitted to the interior of the cell via a complex network of signaling hubs. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and trimeric G proteins are two such major signaling hubs in eukaryotes. Conventionally, canonical signal transduction via trimeric G proteins is thought to be triggered exclusively by G protein-coupled receptors. Here we used molecular engineering to develop modular fluorescent biosensors that exploit the remarkable specificity of bimolecular recognition, i.e., of both G proteins and RTKs, and reveal the workings of a novel platform for activation of G proteins by RTKs in single living cells. Comprised of the unique modular makeup of guanidine exchange factor Gα-interacting vesicle-associated protein (GIV)/girdin, a guanidine exchange factor that links G proteins to a variety of RTKs, these biosensors provide direct evidence that RTK-GIV-Gαi ternary complexes are formed in living cells and that Gαi is transactivated within minutes after growth factor stimulation at the plasma membrane. Thus, GIV-derived biosensors provide a versatile strategy for visualizing, monitoring, and manipulating the dynamic association of Gαi with RTKs for noncanonical transactivation of G proteins in cells and illuminate a fundamental signaling event regulated by GIV during diverse cellular processes and pathophysiologic states.

  14. Nickel(II) Complex of Polyhydroxybenzaldehyde N4-Thiosemicarbazone Exhibits Anti-Inflammatory Activity by Inhibiting NF-κB Transactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Sheng Wei; Looi, Chung Yeng; Hassandarvish, Pouya; Phan, Alicia Yi Ling; Wong, Won Fen; Wang, Hao; Paterson, Ian C.; Ea, Chee Kwee; Mustafa, Mohd Rais; Maah, Mohd Jamil

    2014-01-01

    Background The biological properties of thiosemicarbazone have been widely reported. The incorporation of some transition metals such as Fe, Ni and Cu to thiosemicarbazone complexes is known to enhance its biological effects. In this study, we incorporated nickel(II) ions into thiosemicarbazone with N4-substitution groups H3L (H; H3L1, CH3; H3L2, C6H5; H3L3 and C2H5; H3L4) and examined its potential anti-inflammatory activity. Methodology/Principal Findings Four ligands (1–4) and their respective nickel-containing complexes (5–8) were synthesized and characterized. The compounds synthesized were tested for their effects on NF-κB nuclear translocation, pro-inflammatory cytokines secretion and NF-κB transactivation activity. The active compound was further evaluated on its ability to suppress carrageenan-induced acute inflammation in vivo. A potential binding target of the active compound was also predicted by molecular docking analysis. Conclusions/Significance Among all synthesized compounds tested, we found that complex [Ni(H2L1)(PPh3)]Cl (5) (complex 5), potently inhibited IκBα degradation and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation in LPS-stimulated RAW264.7 cells as well as TNFα-stimulated HeLa S3 cells. In addition, complex 5 significantly down-regulated LPS- or TNFα-induced transcription of NF-κB target genes, including genes that encode the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα, IFNβ and IL6. Luciferase reporter assays confirmed that complex 5 inhibited the transactivation activity of NF-κB. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory effect of complex 5 was also supported by its suppressive effect on carrageenan-induced paw edema formation in wild type C57BL/6 mice. Interestingly, molecular docking study showed that complex 5 potentially interact with the active site of IKKβ. Taken together, we suggest complex 5 as a novel NF-κB inhibitor with potent anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:24977407

  15. Roles of PU.1 in monocyte- and mast cell-specific gene regulation: PU.1 transactivates CIITA pIV in cooperation with IFN-gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tomonobu; Nishiyama, Chiharu; Nakano, Nobuhiro; Nishiyama, Makoto; Usui, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Kanada, Shunsuke; Fukuyama, Kanako; Akiba, Hisaya; Tokura, Tomoko; Hara, Mutsuko; Tsuboi, Ryoji; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko

    2009-07-01

    Over-expression of PU.1, a myeloid- and lymphoid-specific transcription factor belonging to the Ets family, induces monocyte-specific gene expression in mast cells. However, the effects of PU.1 on each target gene and the involvement of cytokine signaling in PU.1-mediated gene expression are largely unknown. In the present study, PU.1 was over-expressed in two different types of bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells (BMMCs): BMMCs cultured with IL-3 plus stem cell factor (SCF) and BMMCs cultured with pokeweed mitogen-stimulated spleen-conditioned medium (PWM-SCM). PU.1 over-expression induced expression of MHC class II, CD11b, CD11c and F4/80 on PWM-SCM-cultured BMMCs, whereas IL-3/SCF-cultured BMMCs expressed CD11b and F4/80, but not MHC class II or CD11c. When IFN-gamma was added to the IL-3/SCF-based medium, PU.1 transfectant acquired MHC class II expression, which was abolished by antibody neutralization or in Ifngr(-/-) BMMCs, through the induction of expression of the MHC class II transactivator, CIITA. Real-time PCR detected CIITA mRNA driven by the fourth promoter, pIV, and chromatin immunoprecipitation indicated direct binding of PU.1 to pIV in PU.1-over-expressing BMMCs. PU.1-over-expressing cells showed a marked increase in IL-6 production in response to LPS stimulation in both IL-3/SCF and PWM-SCM cultures. These results suggest that PU.1 overproduction alone is sufficient for both expression of CD11b and F4/80 and for amplification of LPS-induced IL-6 production. However, IFN-gamma stimulation is essential for PU.1-mediated transactivation of CIITA pIV. Reduced expression of mast cell-related molecules and transcription factors GATA-1/2 and up-regulation of C/EBPalpha in PU.1 transfectants indicate that enforced PU.1 suppresses mast cell-specific gene expression through these transcription factors.

  16. Shutdown of HIV-1 Transcription in T Cells by Nullbasic, a Mutant Tat Protein

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Hongping; Li, Dongsheng; Sivakumaran, Haran; Lor, Mary; Rustanti, Lina; Cloonan, Nicole; Wani, Shivangi; Harrich, David

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nullbasic is a derivative of the HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (Tat) protein that strongly inhibits HIV-1 replication in lymphocytes. Here we show that lentiviral vectors that constitutively express a Nullbasic-ZsGreen1 (NB-ZSG1) fusion protein by the eEF1? promoter led to robust long-term inhibition of HIV-1 replication in Jurkat cells. Although Jurkat-NB-ZSG1 cells were infected by HIV-1, no virus production could be detected and addition of phorbol ester 12-myristate 13-ac...

  17. The class II transactivator (CIITA) is regulated by post-translational modification cross-talk between ERK1/2 phosphorylation, mono-ubiquitination and Lys63 ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Julie E; Shanderson, Ronald L; Boyd, Nathaniel H; Cacan, Ercan; Greer, Susanna F

    2015-06-19

    The class II transactivator (CIITA) is known as the master regulator for the major histocompatibility class II (MHC II) molecules. CIITA is dynamically regulated through a series of intricate post-translational modifications (PTMs). CIITA's role is to initiate transcription of MHC II genes, which are responsible for presenting extracellular antigen to CD4(+) T-cells. In the present study, we identified extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 as the kinase responsible for phosphorylating the regulatory site, Ser(280), which leads to increased levels of mono-ubiquitination and an overall increase in MHC II activity. Further, we identify that CIITA is also modified by Lys(63)-linked ubiquitination. Lys(63) ubiquitinated CIITA is concentrated in the cytoplasm and following activation of ERK1/2, CIITA phosphorylation occurs and Lys=ubiquitinated CIITA translocates to the nucleus. CIITA ubiquitination and phosphorylation perfectly demonstrates how CIITA location and activity is regulated through PTM cross-talk. Identifying CIITA PTMs and understanding how they mediate CIITA regulation is necessary due to the critical role CIITA has in the initiation of the adaptive immune response. © 2015 Authors.

  18. Interferon Regulatory Factor 1 Transactivates Expression of Human DNA Polymerase η in Response to Carcinogen N-Methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Hongyan; Zhu, Huifang; Lou, Meng; Fan, Yanfeng; Liu, Hong; Shen, Jing; Li, Zhongjie; Lv, Xue; Shan, Jianzhen; Zhu, Lijun; Chin, Y. Eugene; Shao, Jimin

    2012-01-01

    DNA polymerase η (Polη) implements translesion DNA synthesis but has low fidelity in replication. We have previously shown that Polη plays an important role in the genesis of nontargeted mutations at undamaged DNA sites in cells exposed to the carcinogen N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Here, we report that MNNG-induced Polη expression in an interferon regulatory factor 1 (IRF1)-dependent manner in human cells. Mutagenesis analysis showed that four critical residues (Arg-82, Cys-83, Asn-86, and Ser-87) located in the IRF family conserved DNA binding domain-helix α3 were involved in DNA binding and POLH transactivation by IRF1. Furthermore, Polη up-regulation induced by IRF1 was responsible for the increase of mutation frequency in a SupF shuttle plasmid replicated in the MNNG-exposed cells. Interestingly, IRF1 was acetylated by the histone acetyltransferase CBP in these cells. Lys → Arg substitution revealed that Lys-78 of helix α3 was the major acetylation site, and the IRF1-K78R mutation partially inhibited DNA binding and its transcriptional activity. Thus, we propose that IRF1 activation is responsible for MNNG-induced Polη up-regulation, which contributes to mutagenesis and ultimately carcinogenesis in cells. PMID:22367195

  19. Chromatin fine structure profiles for a developmentally regulated gene: reorganization of the lysozyme locus before trans-activator binding and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontaraki, J; Chen, H H; Riggs, A; Bonifer, C

    2000-08-15

    The chicken lysozyme locus is activated in a stepwise fashion during myeloid differentiation. We have used this locus as a model to study at high resolution changes in chromatin structure both in chicken cell lines representing various stages of macrophage differentiation and in primary cells from transgenic mice. In this study we have addressed the question of whether chromatin rearrangements can be detected in myeloid precursor cells at a stage well before overt transcription of the lysozyme gene begins. In addition to restriction enzyme accessibility assays and DMS footprinting, we have applied new, very sensitive techniques to assay for chromatin changes. Particularly informative was UV photofootprinting, using terminal transferase-dependent PCR and nonradioactive detection. We find that the basic chromatin structure in lysozyme nonexpressing hematopoietic precursor cells is highly similar to the pattern found in fully differentiated lysozyme-expressing cells. In addition, we find that only in nonexpressing cells are dimethylsulfate footprints and UV photofootprints affected by trichostatin, an inhibitor of histone deacetylation. These results are interpreted to mean that most chromatin pattern formation is complete before the binding of end-stage trans-activators, supporting the notion that heritable chromatin structure is central to the stable epigenetic programs that guide development.

  20. Chromatin fine structure profiles for a developmentally regulated gene: reorganization of the lysozyme locus before trans-activator binding and gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontaraki, Joanna; Chen, Hsiu-Hua; Riggs, Arthur; Bonifer, Constanze

    2000-01-01

    The chicken lysozyme locus is activated in a stepwise fashion during myeloid differentiation. We have used this locus as a model to study at high resolution changes in chromatin structure both in chicken cell lines representing various stages of macrophage differentiation and in primary cells from transgenic mice. In this study we have addressed the question of whether chromatin rearrangements can be detected in myeloid precursor cells at a stage well before overt transcription of the lysozyme gene begins. In addition to restriction enzyme accessibility assays and DMS footprinting, we have applied new, very sensitive techniques to assay for chromatin changes. Particularly informative was UV photofootprinting, using terminal transferase-dependent PCR and nonradioactive detection. We find that the basic chromatin structure in lysozyme nonexpressing hematopoietic precursor cells is highly similar to the pattern found in fully differentiated lysozyme-expressing cells. In addition, we find that only in nonexpressing cells are dimethylsulfate footprints and UV photofootprints affected by trichostatin, an inhibitor of histone deacetylation. These results are interpreted to mean that most chromatin pattern formation is complete before the binding of end-stage trans-activators, supporting the notion that heritable chromatin structure is central to the stable epigenetic programs that guide development. PMID:10950873

  1. Development of a Fish Cell Biosensor System for Genotoxicity Detection Based on DNA Damage-Induced Trans-Activation of p21 Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huarong Guo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available p21CIP1/WAF1 is a p53-target gene in response to cellular DNA damage. Here we report the development of a fish cell biosensor system for high throughput genotoxicity detection of new drugs, by stably integrating two reporter plasmids of pGL3-p21-luc (human p21 promoter linked to firefly luciferase and pRL-CMV-luc (CMV promoter linked to Renilla luciferase into marine flatfish flounder gill (FG cells, referred to as p21FGLuc. Initial validation of this genotoxicity biosensor system showed that p21FGLuc cells had a wild-type p53 signaling pathway and responded positively to the challenge of both directly acting genotoxic agents (bleomycin and mitomycin C and indirectly acting genotoxic agents (cyclophosphamide with metabolic activation, but negatively to cyclophosphamide without metabolic activation and the non-genotoxic agents ethanol and D-mannitol, thus confirming a high specificity and sensitivity, fast and stable response to genotoxic agents for this easily maintained fish cell biosensor system. This system was especially useful in the genotoxicity detection of Di(2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP, a rodent carcinogen, but negatively reported in most non-mammalian in vitro mutation assays, by providing a strong indication of genotoxicity for DEHP. A limitation for this biosensor system was that it might give false positive results in response to sodium butyrate and any other agents, which can trans-activate the p21 gene in a p53-independent manner.

  2. DMA, a bisbenzimidazole, offers radioprotection by promoting NFκB transactivation through NIK/IKK in human glioma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navrinder Kaur

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ionizing radiation (IR exposure often occurs for human beings through occupational, medical, environmental, accidental and/or other sources. Thus, the role of radioprotector is essential to overcome the complex series of overlapping responses to radiation induced DNA damage. METHODS AND RESULTS: Treatment of human glioma U87 cells with DMA (5- {4-methylpiperazin-1-yl}-2-[2'-(3, 4-dimethoxyphenyl-5'-benzimidazolyl] in the presence or absence of radiation uncovered differential regulation of an array of genes and proteins using microarray and 2D PAGE techniques. Pathway construction followed by relative quantitation of gene expression of the identified proteins and their interacting partners led to the identification of MAP3K14 (NFκB inducing kinase, NIK as the candidate gene affected in response to DMA. Subsequently, over expression and knock down of NIK suggested that DMA affects NFκB inducing kinase mediated phosphorylation of IKKα and IKKβ both alone and in the presence of ionizing radiation (IR. The TNF-α induced NFκB dependent luciferase reporter assay demonstrated 1.65, 2.26 and 3.62 fold increase in NFκB activation at 10, 25 and 50 µM DMA concentrations respectively, compared to control cells. This activation was further increased by 5.8 fold in drug + radiation (50 µM +8.5 Gy treated cells in comparison to control. We observed 51% radioprotection in control siRNA transfected cells that attenuated to 15% in siRNA NIK treated U87 cells, irradiated in presence of DMA at 24 h. CONCLUSIONS: Our studies show that NIK/IKK mediated NFκB activation is more intensified in cells over expressing NIK and treated with DMA, alone or in combination with ionizing radiation, indicating that DMA promotes NIK mediated NFκB signaling. This subsequently leads to the radioprotective effect exhibited by DMA.

  3. CREB Binding Protein Interacts with Nucleoporin-Specific FG Repeats That Activate Transcription and Mediate NUP98-HOXA9 Oncogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Lawryn H.; Brindle, Paul K.; Schnabel, Catherine A.; Pritchard, Colin E. J.; Cleary, Michael L.; van Deursen, Jan M. A.

    1999-01-01

    Genes encoding the Phe-Gly (FG) repeat-containing nucleoporins NUP98 and CAN/NUP214 are at the breakpoints of several chromosomal translocations associated with human acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but their role in oncogenesis is unclear. Here we demonstrate that the NUP98-HOXA9 fusion gene encodes two nuclear oncoproteins with either 19 or 37 NUP98 FG repeats fused to the DNA binding and PBX heterodimerization domains of the transcription factor HOXA9. Both NUP98-HOXA9 chimeras transformed NIH 3T3 fibroblasts, and this transformation required the HOXA9 domains for DNA binding and PBX interaction. Surprisingly, the FG repeats acted as very potent transactivators of gene transcription. This NUP98-derived activity is essential for transformation and can be replaced by the bona fide transactivation domain of VP16. Interestingly, FG repeat-containing segments derived from the nucleoporins NUP153 and CAN/NUP214 functioned similarly to those from NUP98. We further demonstrate that transactivation by FG repeat-rich segments of NUP98 correlates with their ability to interact functionally and physically with the transcriptional coactivators CREB binding protein (CBP) and p300. This finding shows, for the first time, that a translocation-generated fusion protein appears to recruit CBP/p300 as an important step of its oncogenic mechanism. Together, our results suggest that NUP98-HOXA9 chimeras are aberrant transcription factors that deregulate HOX-responsive genes through the transcriptional activation properties of nucleoporin-specific FG repeats that recruit CBP/p300. Indeed, FG repeat-mediated transactivation may be a shared pathogenic function of nucleoporins implicated human AML. PMID:9858599

  4. Dienogest is a selective progesterone receptor agonist in transactivation analysis with potent oral endometrial activity due to its efficient pharmacokinetic profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasagawa, Shinichi; Shimizu, Yutaka; Kami, Hideaki; Takeuchi, Takashi; Mita, Shizuka; Imada, Kazunori; Kato, Shigeaki; Mizuguchi, Kiyoshi

    2008-02-01

    Dienogest was introduced as an oral progestin. Yet its strong oral potency on endometrial activity is not clearly explained. To circumvent this situation, steroid hormone receptor profiling using transactivation assay and endometrial activity test in rabbits were carried out with determination of plasma drug concentration. Agonistic/antagonistic activity on human progesterone receptor (PR), androgen receptor (AR), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha), or estrogen receptor beta (ERbeta) were determined. Dienogest activate PR (EC50=3.4 or 10.5 nmol/l) with antagonistic activity on AR (EC50=420.6 or 775.0 nmol/l) but not agonistic nor antagonistic action on GR, MR (3000 nmol/l). Dienogest activate neither ERalpha nor ERbeta (3000 nmol/l). Progesterone activated PR with antagonistic activity on AR and on MR. Dydrogesterone showed a similar profile to progesterone. Norethisterone activated PR, AR, and ERalpha. Medroxyprogesterone acetate activated PR, AR, and GR. Danazol activated PR and AR. Collectively, dienogest has a good specificity to PR compared with the other drugs. By oral treatment, dienogest showed the strongest endometrial activity (ED50=0.0042 mg/kg) in McPhail test among other progestins (ED50 values for MPA, DYG, NES were 0.074, 1.9, >0.05 mg/kg, respectively). Dienogest showed higher plasma concentrations than those of the other progestins with higher doses. The estimated plasma concentration of dienogest at ED50 (3.66 nmol/l) was close to its EC50 value to activate PR. Thus, the stronger oral activity of dienogest could be explained simply by its in vitro potency on PR and its oral pharmacokinetic profile.

  5. Alpha1a-Adrenoceptor Genetic Variant Triggers Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Hyperproliferation and Agonist Induced Hypertrophy via EGFR Transactivation Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Gradinaru

    Full Text Available α1a Adrenergic receptors (α1aARs are the predominant AR subtype in human vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs. α1aARs in resistance vessels are crucial in the control of blood pressure, yet the impact of naturally occurring human α1aAR genetic variants in cardiovascular disorders remains poorly understood. To this end, we present novel findings demonstrating that 3D cultures of vascular SMCs expressing human α1aAR-247R (247R genetic variant demonstrate significantly increased SMC contractility compared with cells expressing the α1aAR-WT (WT receptor. Stable expression of 247R genetic variant also triggers MMP/EGFR-transactivation dependent serum- and agonist-independent (constitutive hyperproliferation and agonist-dependent hypertrophy of SMCs. Agonist stimulation reduces contractility Using pathway-specific inhibitors we determined that the observed hyperproliferation of 247R-expressing cells is triggered via β-arrestin1/Src/MMP-2/EGFR/ERK-dependent mechanism. MMP-2-specific siRNA inhibited 247R-triggered hyperproliferation indicating MMP-2 involvement in 247R-triggered hyperproliferation in SMCs. β-arrestin1-specific shRNA also inhibited 247R-triggered hyperproliferation but did not affect hypertrophy in 247R-expressing SMCs, indicating that agonist-dependent hypertrophy is independent of β-arrestin1. Our data reveal that in different cardiovascular cells the same human receptor genetic variant can activate alternative modulators of the same signaling pathway. Thus, our findings in SMCs demonstrate that depending on the type of cells expressing the same receptor (or receptor variant, different target-specific inhibitors could be used to modulate aberrant hyperproliferative or hypertrophic pathways in order to restore normal phenotype.

  6. Niacin activates the PI3K/Akt cascade via PKC- and EGFR-transactivation-dependent pathways through hydroxyl-carboxylic acid receptor 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huawang Sun

    Full Text Available Niacin has been demonstrated to activate a PI3K/Akt signaling cascade to prevent brain damage after stroke and UV-induced skin damage; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms for HCA2-induced Akt activation remain to be elucidated. Using CHO-K1 cells stably expressing HCA2 and A431 cells, a human epidermoid cell line with high levels of endogenous expression of functional HCA2 receptors, we first demonstrated that niacin induced a robust Akt phosphorylation at both Thr308 and Ser473 in a time-dependent fashion, with a maximal activation at 5 min and a subsequent reduction to baseline by 30 min through HCA2, and that the activation was significantly blocked by pertussis toxin. The HCA2-mediated activation of Akt was also significantly inhibited by the PKC inhibitors GF109203x and Go6983 in both cell lines, by the PDGFR-selective inhibitor tyrphostin A9 in CHO-HCA2 cells and by the MMP inhibitor GM6001 and EGFR-specific inhibitor AG1478 in A431 cells. These results suggest that the PKC pathway and PDGFR/EGFR transactivation pathway play important roles in HCA2-mediated Akt activation. Further investigation indicated that PI3K and the Gβγ subunit were likely to play an essential role in HCA2-induced Akt activation. Moreover, Immunobloting analyses using an antibody that recognizes p70S6K1 phosphorylated at Thr389 showed that niacin evoked p70S6K1 activation via the PI3K/Akt pathway. The results of our study provide new insight into the signaling pathways involved in HCA2 activation.

  7. Autoimmunity and inflammation are independent of class II transactivator type PIV-dependent class II major histocompatibility complex expression in peripheral tissues during collagen-induced arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldburger, Jean-Marc; Palmer, Gaby; Seemayer, Christian; Lamacchia, Celine; Finckh, Axel; Christofilopoulos, Panayiotis; Baeten, Dominique; Reith, Walter; Gabay, Cem

    2011-11-01

    To determine the regulation of class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) expression in fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) in order to investigate their role as nonprofessional antigen-presenting cells in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Expression of class II MHC, class II MHC transactivator (CIITA), and Ciita isoforms PI, PIII, and PIV was examined by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, and flow cytometry in human synovial tissues, arthritic mouse joints, and human and murine FLS. CIA was induced in mice in which isoform PIV of Ciita was knocked out (PIV(-/-) ), in PIV(-/-) mice transgenic for CIITA in the thymus (K14 CIITA), and in their control littermates. HLA-DRA, total CIITA, and CIITA PIII messenger RNA levels were significantly increased in synovial tissue samples from patients with rheumatoid arthritis compared with the levels in tissue from patients with osteoarthritis. Human FLS expressed surface class II MHC via CIITA PIII and PIV, while class II MHC expression in murine FLS was entirely mediated by PIV. Mice with a targeted deletion of CIITA PIV lack CD4+ T cells and were protected against CIA. The expression of CIITA was restored in the thymus of PIV(-/-) K14 CIITA-transgenic mice, which had a normal CD4+ T cell repertoire and normal surface levels of class II MHC on professional antigen-presenting cells, but did not induce class II MHC on FLS. Synovial inflammation and immune responses against type II collagen were similar in PIV(-/-) K14 CIITA-transgenic mice and control mice with CIA, but bone erosion was significantly reduced in the absence of PIV. Overexpression of class II MHC is tightly correlated with CIITA expression in arthritic synovium and in FLS. Selective targeting of Ciita PIV in peripheral tissues abrogates class II MHC expression by murine FLS but does not protect against inflammation and autoimmune responses in CIA. Copyright © 2011 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  8. Reprogramming cells with synthetic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoxiao; Malik, Vikas; Jauch, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of one cell type into another cell type by forcibly expressing specific cocktails of transcription factors (TFs) has demonstrated that cell fates are not fixed and that cellular differentiation can be a two-way street with many intersections. These experiments also illustrated the sweeping potential of TFs to "read" genetically hardwired regulatory information even in cells where they are not normally expressed and to access and open up tightly packed chromatin to execute gene expression programs. Cellular reprogramming enables the modeling of diseases in a dish, to test the efficacy and toxicity of drugs in patient-derived cells and ultimately, could enable cell-based therapies to cure degenerative diseases. Yet, producing terminally differentiated cells that fully resemble their in vivocounterparts in sufficient quantities is still an unmet clinical need. While efforts are being made to reprogram cells nongenetically by using drug-like molecules, defined TF cocktails still dominate reprogramming protocols. Therefore, the optimization of TFs by protein engineering has emerged as a strategy to enhance reprogramming to produce functional, stable and safe cells for regenerative biomedicine. Engineering approaches focused on Oct4, MyoD, Sox17, Nanog and Mef2c and range from chimeric TFs with added transactivation domains, designer transcription activator-like effectors to activate endogenous TFs to reprogramming TFs with rationally engineered DNA recognition principles. Possibly, applying the complete toolkit of protein design to cellular reprogramming can help to remove the hurdles that, thus far, impeded the clinical use of cells derived from reprogramming technologies.

  9. The Tax oncogene enhances ELL incorporation into p300 and P-TEFb containing protein complexes to activate transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fufa, Temesgen D; Byun, Jung S; Wakano, Clay; Fernandez, Alfonso G; Pise-Masison, Cynthia A; Gardner, Kevin

    2015-09-11

    The eleven-nineteen lysine-rich leukemia protein (ELL) is a key regulator of RNA polymerase II mediated transcription. ELL facilitates RNA polymerase II transcription pause site entry and release by dynamically interacting with p300 and the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). In this study, we investigated the role of ELL during the HTLV-1 Tax oncogene induced transactivation. We show that ectopic expression of Tax enhances ELL incorporation into p300 and P-TEFb containing transcriptional complexes and the subsequent recruitment of these complexes to target genes in vivo. Depletion of ELL abrogates Tax induced transactivation of the immediate early genes Fos, Egr2 and NF-kB, suggesting that ELL is an essential cellular cofactor of the Tax oncogene. Thus, our study identifies a novel mechanism of ELL-dependent transactivation of immediate early genes by Tax and provides the rational for further defining the genome-wide targets of Tax and ELL. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Roles of phosphorylation and helix propensity in the binding of the KIX domain of CREB-binding protein by constitutive (c-Myb) and inducible (CREB) activators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zor, Tsaffrir; Mayr, Bernhard M; Dyson, H Jane; Montminy, Marc R; Wright, Peter E

    2002-11-01

    cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP) is a general transcriptional co-activator that mediates interactions between transcription factors and the basal transcription machinery. To obtain insights into the mechanism by which the KIX domain of CBP can recognize the transactivation domains of many different transcription factors, we have used NMR and biochemical analyses to study the interactions of KIX with the transactivation domain from the constitutive activator c-Myb and with the kinase-inducible transactivation domain (KID) from CREB. NMR chemical shift mapping shows that both activation domains bind to the same surface of KIX. In the unbound state, both the phosphorylated KID and c-Myb activation domains are only partly structured, and binding to KIX is coupled with folding to form an amphipathic helix. Helix-destabilizing mutations significantly impair binding, whereas mutations that increase the intrinsic secondary structure content of the free phosphorylated KID peptide have only a small influence on binding affinity. Low affinity but specific binding of unphosphorylated KID to KIX was measured by ITC and was also observed in Western blot assays and by a fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiment in living cells. The large increase in the affinity for phosphorylated KID is due to favorable intermolecular interactions involving the phosphate moiety. After induction by phosphorylation, CREB is able to compete effectively with other transcriptional activators for binding to CBP.

  11. Transcriptional activation of NAD+-dependent protein deacetylase SIRT1 by nuclear receptor TLX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwahara, Naotoshi; Hisahara, Shin; Hayashi, Takashi; Horio, Yoshiyuki

    2009-01-01

    An orphan nuclear receptor TLX is a transcriptional repressor that promotes the proliferation and self-renewal of neural precursor cells (NPCs). SIRT1, an NAD + -dependent protein deacetylase, is highly expressed in the NPCs and participates in neurogenesis. Here, we found that TLX colocalized with SIRT1 and knockdown of TLX by small interfering RNAs decreased SIRT1 levels in NPCs. TLX increased the SIRT1 expression by binding to the newly identified TLX-activating element in the SIRT1 gene promoter in HEK293 cells. Thus, TLX is an inducer of SIRT1 and may contribute to neurogenesis both as a transactivator and as a repressor.

  12. Hepatitis B virus X protein stimulates the Hedgehog-Gli activation through protein stabilization and nuclear localization of Gli1 in liver cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye Young; Cho, Hyun Kook; Hong, Sung Pyo; Cheong, Jaehun

    2011-10-28

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver diseases, which frequently results in hepatits, cirrhosis, fibrosis, and ultimately hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Recent studies have shown the activation of Hedgehog signaling in HCC. Here, we provide evidences that HBV induces Gli-directed gene transactivation. HBx increases the protein stability of Gli proteins, which are key transcription factors of the Hedgehog signaling pathway, and nucleus translocation of Gli1 through direct protein interaction of HBx and Gli1. This functional synergism of Gli1 protein by HBx increases the Hedgehog activation-directed gene expression. Taken together, these results suggest that HBV infection might induce hepatocellular carcinoma by modulating post-translational activation of the hedgehog signaling components. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. An approach towards genetically engineered cell fate mapping in maize using the Lc gene as a visible marker: transactivation capacity of Lc vectors in differentiated maize cells and microinjection of Lc vectors into somatic embryos and shoot apical meristems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusardi, M C; Neuhaus-Url, G; Potrykus, I; Neuhaus, G

    1994-04-01

    To establish a system for genetically engineered cell fate mapping, different vectors carrying the Lc gene, a member of the R gene family, were delivered into embryonic and meristematic cells of maize by the microinjection technique. Vectors in which the Lc cDNA is driven either by a constitutive promoter (CaMV 35S), with or without the Adh1 intron 1 of maize, or a tissue-specific promoter (phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, PEPC) as well as self-replicating wheat dwarf virus (WDV) vectors carrying a Lc-expression-cassette, have been tested. The ability of these vectors to transactivate was evaluated in mesophyll-derived protoplasts of the maize genotype appropriate for these microinjection experiments. The expression product of the introduced Lc gene can substitute for mutated R and B loci, resulting in anthocyanin production. Analogous results were obtained by microinjection into organized tissues, where transactivation of anthocyanin biosynthesis resulted in pigmented sectors in somatic embryos (B79) and in the leaves of plants regenerated from the cultivated shoot apical meristems (K55, r-g, b). The tissue-specific appearance of pigmented sectors in leaves, using the mesophyll-specific PEPC promoter suggests the possibility of using this approach for layer-specific cell fate studies. The presence of the introduced plasmids in leaves showing red sectors 20-30 days after injection was proven by PCR analysis.

  14. Regulation of the pancreatic duodenal homeobox-1 protein by DNA-dependent protein kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrun, Patricia; Montminy, Marc R; Van Obberghen, Emmanuel

    2005-11-18

    The transcription factor PDX-1 plays a crucial role during pancreatic development and in the function of insulin-producing beta cells. Disruption of the pdx-1 gene in these cells induces overt diabetes in mice, and this gene is modified in several type 2 diabetic families. It is thus crucial to determine the molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of PDX-1 expression and/or activation. We identified new proteins associated with PDX-1 by mass spectrometry. These proteins, Ku70 and Ku80, are regulatory subunits of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). We determined that the interaction between PDX-1 and Ku70 or Ku80 is dependent on the homeodomain of PDX-1. Most interestingly, we demonstrated in vitro that the DNA-PK phosphorylates PDX-1 on threonine 11. Although this residue is located in the transactivation domain, this phosphorylation does not seem to be implicated in the transcriptional activation of PDX-1. However, in response to radiation, which activates DNA-PK, a second form of the PDX-1 protein appears rapidly. This form is phosphorylated on threonine and seems to drive PDX-1 degradation by the proteosome. In correlation with this degradation, we observed a subsequent reduction in the activation of the insulin promoter and a decrease in PDX-1-mediated gene expression, i.e. glut2 and glucokinase. Our study demonstrates that radiation, through the activation of DNA-PK, may regulate PDX-1 protein expression.

  15. Protein Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Text Size: A A A Listen En Español Protein Foods Foods high in protein such as fish, ... for the vegetarian proteins, whether they have carbohydrate. Protein Choices Plant-Based Proteins Plant-based protein foods ...

  16. Endothelin B Receptors on Primary Chicken Müller Cells and the Human MIO-M1 Müller Cell Line Activate ERK Signaling via Transactivation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Harun-Or-Rashid

    Full Text Available Injury to the eye or retina triggers Müller cells, the major glia cell of the retina, to dedifferentiate and proliferate. In some species they attain retinal progenitor properties and have the capacity to generate new neurons. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR system and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK signaling are key regulators of these processes in Müller cells. The extracellular signals that modulate and control these processes are not fully understood. In this work we studied whether endothelin receptor signaling can activate EGFR and ERK signaling in Müller cells. Endothelin expression is robustly upregulated at retinal injury and endothelin receptors have been shown to transactivate EGFRs in other cell types. We analyzed the endothelin signaling system in chicken retina and cultured primary chicken Müller cells as well as the human Müller cell line MIO-M1. The Müller cells were stimulated with receptor agonists and treated with specific blockers to key enzymes in the signaling pathway or with siRNAs. We focused on endothelin receptor mediated transactivation of EGFRs by using western blot analysis, quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR and immunocytochemistry. The results showed that chicken Müller cells and the human Müller cell line MIO-M1 express endothelin receptor B. Stimulation by the endothelin receptor B agonist IRL1620 triggered phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and autophosphorylation of (Y1173 EGFR. The effects could be blocked by Src-kinase inhibitors (PP1, PP2, EGFR-inhibitor (AG1478, EGFR-siRNA and by inhibitors to extracellular matrix metalloproteinases (GM6001, consistent with a Src-kinase mediated endothelin receptor response that engage ligand-dependent and ligand-independent EGFR activation. Our data suggest a mechanism for how injury-induced endothelins, produced in the retina, may modulate the Müller cell responses by Src-mediated transactivation of EGFRs. The data give support to a view in

  17. Modulation of thyroid hormone receptor transactivation by the early region 1A (E1A-like inhibitor of differentiation 1 (EID1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Vargas

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional activation (TA mediated by the effect of thyroid hormones on target genes requires co-activator proteins such as the early region 1A (E1A associated 300 kDa binding protein (p300 and the cAMP response element binding protein (CREB binding protein (CBP, known as the p300/CBP complex, which acetylate histones 3 and 4 to allow transcriptional machinery access to the target gene promoter. Little is known on the role of p300 in thyroid hormone receptor (TR mediated TA but the E1A-like inhibitor of differentiation 1 (EID1, an inhibitor of p300 histone acetyltransferase (HAT, is a functional homolog of E1A and may inhibit myogenic differentiation factor D (MyoD transcriptional activity and reduces muscle cell differentiation. We evaluated the influence of EID1 on TR-mediated transcriptional activity using transfection and mammalian two-hybrid studies to show that EID1 may partially reduces TA activity of the TR receptor, probably due to p300 blockage since EID1 mutants cannot reduce TR-mediated TA. The EID1 does not affect the function of p160 co-activator proteins (160 kDa proteins of steroid receptor co-activators and is functionally independent of co-repressor proteins or TR binding. Summarizing, EID1 reduces TR-mediated transcriptional activity by blocking p300 and may play an important role in thyroid receptor activity in muscle and other tissues.

  18. Reprogramming cells with synthetic proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxiao Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Conversion of one cell type into another cell type by forcibly expressing specific cocktails of transcription factors (TFs has demonstrated that cell fates are not fixed and that cellular differentiation can be a two-way street with many intersections. These experiments also illustrated the sweeping potential of TFs to "read" genetically hardwired regulatory information even in cells where they are not normally expressed and to access and open up tightly packed chromatin to execute gene expression programs. Cellular reprogramming enables the modeling of diseases in a dish, to test the efficacy and toxicity of drugs in patient-derived cells and ultimately, could enable cell-based therapies to cure degenerative diseases. Yet, producing terminally differentiated cells that fully resemble their in vivocounterparts in sufficient quantities is still an unmet clinical need. While efforts are being made to reprogram cells nongenetically by using drug-like molecules, defined TF cocktails still dominate reprogramming protocols. Therefore, the optimization of TFs by protein engineering has emerged as a strategy to enhance reprogramming to produce functional, stable and safe cells for regenerative biomedicine. Engineering approaches focused on Oct4, MyoD, Sox17, Nanog and Mef2c and range from chimeric TFs with added transactivation domains, designer transcription activator-like effectors to activate endogenous TFs to reprogramming TFs with rationally engineered DNA recognition principles. Possibly, applying the complete toolkit of protein design to cellular reprogramming can help to remove the hurdles that, thus far, impeded the clinical use of cells derived from reprogramming technologies.

  19. Reprogramming cells with synthetic proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoxiao; Malik, Vikas; Jauch, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Conversion of one cell type into another cell type by forcibly expressing specific cocktails of transcription factors (TFs) has demonstrated that cell fates are not fixed and that cellular differentiation can be a two-way street with many intersections. These experiments also illustrated the sweeping potential of TFs to “read” genetically hardwired regulatory information even in cells where they are not normally expressed and to access and open up tightly packed chromatin to execute gene expression programs. Cellular reprogramming enables the modeling of diseases in a dish, to test the efficacy and toxicity of drugs in patient-derived cells and ultimately, could enable cell-based therapies to cure degenerative diseases. Yet, producing terminally differentiated cells that fully resemble their in vivo counterparts in sufficient quantities is still an unmet clinical need. While efforts are being made to reprogram cells nongenetically by using drug-like molecules, defined TF cocktails still dominate reprogramming protocols. Therefore, the optimization of TFs by protein engineering has emerged as a strategy to enhance reprogramming to produce functional, stable and safe cells for regenerative biomedicine. Engineering approaches focused on Oct4, MyoD, Sox17, Nanog and Mef2c and range from chimeric TFs with added transactivation domains, designer transcription activator-like effectors to activate endogenous TFs to reprogramming TFs with rationally engineered DNA recognition principles. Possibly, applying the complete toolkit of protein design to cellular reprogramming can help to remove the hurdles that, thus far, impeded the clinical use of cells derived from reprogramming technologies. PMID:25652623

  20. Improved intracellular delivery of glucocerebrosidase mediated by the HIV-1 TAT protein transduction domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyun Oh; Luu, Nga; Kaneski, Christine R.; Schiffmann, Raphael; Brady, Roscoe O.; Murray, Gary J.

    2005-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) for Gaucher disease designed to target glucocerebrosidase (GC) to macrophages via mannose-specific endocytosis is very effective in reversing hepatosplenomegaly, and normalizing hematologic parameters but is less effective in improving bone and lung involvement and ineffective in brain. Recombinant GCs containing an in-frame fusion to the HIV-1 trans-activator protein transduction domain (TAT) were expressed in eukaryotic cells in order to obtain active, normally glycosylated GC fusion proteins for enzyme uptake studies. Despite the absence of mannose-specific endocytic receptors on the plasma membranes of various fibroblasts, the recombinant GCs with C-terminal TAT fusions were readily internalized by these cells. Immunofluorescent confocal microscopy demonstrated the recombinant TAT-fusion proteins with a mixed endosomal and lysosomal localization. Thus, TAT-modified GCs represent a novel strategy for a new generation of therapeutic enzymes for ERT for Gaucher disease

  1. Protein-protein interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byron, Olwyn; Vestergaard, Bente

    2015-01-01

    Responsive formation of protein:protein interaction (PPI) upon diverse stimuli is a fundament of cellular function. As a consequence, PPIs are complex, adaptive entities, and exist in structurally heterogeneous interplays defined by the energetic states of the free and complexed protomers......, are reported. The aim is to depict how the elucidation of the interplay of structures requires the interplay of methods....

  2. Fluorescent protein marker lines in maize: generation and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qingyu; Luo, Anding; Zadrozny, Tara; Sylvester, Anne; Jackson, Dave

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FP) have significantly impacted the way that we study plants in the past two decades. In the post-genomics era, these FP tools are in higher demand by plant scientists for studying the dynamics of protein localization, function, and interactions, and to translate sequence information to biological knowledge that can benefit humans. Although FP tools have been widely used in the model plant Arabidopsis, few FP resources have been developed for maize, one of the most important food crops worldwide, and an ideal species for genetic and developmental biology research. In an effort to provide the maize and cereals research communities with a comprehensive set of FP resources for different purposes of study, we generated more than 100 stable transformed maize FP marker lines, which mark most compartments in maize cells with different FPs. Additionally, we are generating driver and reporter lines, based on the principle of the pOp-LhG4 transactivation system, allowing specific expression or mis-expression of any gene of interest to precisely study protein functions. These marker lines can be used not only for static protein localization studies, but will be useful for studying protein dynamics and interactions using kinetic microscopy methods, such as fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET).

  3. The hTAF II 68-TEC fusion protein functions as a strong transcriptional activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sol; Lee, Hye Jin; Jun, Hee Jung; Kim, Jungho

    2008-06-01

    Human extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (EMC) is caused by a chromosomal translocation that involves TEC (translocated in extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma), and either EWS (Ewing's sarcoma) or hTAF(II)68 (human TATA-binding protein-associated factor II 68), which generates EWS-TEC or hTAF(II)68-TEC fusion proteins, respectively. Although there has been a great deal of progress in characterizing EWS-TEC, there is relatively little known about the biological function of hTAF(II)68-TEC. We have examined the functional consequences of the fusion of the amino terminal domain (NTD) of hTAF(II)68 to TEC in EMC. The chimeric gene encodes a nuclear protein that binds DNA with the same sequence specificity as parental TEC. Nuclear localization of hTAF(II)68-TEC was dependent on the DNA binding domain, and we identified a cluster of basic amino acids in the DNA binding domain, KRRR, that specifically mediate the nuclear localization of hTAF(II)68-TEC. The transactivation activity of hTAF(II)68-TEC was higher than TEC towards a known target promoter that contained several TEC binding sites. Finally, deletion analysis of hTAF(II)68-TEC indicated that the hTAF(II)68 NTD, and the AF1 and AF2 domains of hTAF(II)68-TEC are necessary for full transactivation potential. These results suggest that the oncogenic effect of the t(9;17) translocation may be due to the hTAF(II)68-TEC chimeric protein and that fusion of the hTAF(II)68 NTD to the TEC protein produces a gain of function chimeric product. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. The ubiquitin ligase Cullin5SOCS2 regulates NDR1/STK38 stability and NF-κB transactivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paul, Indranil; Batth, Tanveer S; Iglesias-Gato, Diego

    2017-01-01

    SOCS2 is a pleiotropic E3 ligase. Its deficiency is associated with gigantism and organismal lethality upon inflammatory challenge. However, mechanistic understanding of SOCS2 function is dismal due to our unawareness of its protein substrates. We performed a mass spectrometry based proteomic pro...

  5. Focal Adhesion Kinase (FAK) Binds RET Kinase via Its FERM Domain, Priming a Direct and Reciprocal RET-FAK Transactivation Mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plaza-Menacho, Ivan; Morandi, Andrea; Mologni, Luca; Boender, Piet; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Magee, Anthony I.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Knowles, Phillip; McDonald, Neil Q.; Isacke, Clare M.

    2011-01-01

    Whether RET is able to directly phosphorylate and activate downstream targets independently of the binding of proteins that contain Src homology 2 or phosphotyrosine binding domains and whether mechanisms in trans by cytoplasmic kinases can modulate RET function and signaling remain largely

  6. A ribosomal protein L23-nucleophosmin circuit coordinates Miz1 function with cell growth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wanzel, Michael; Russ, Annika C; Kleine-Kohlbrecher, Daniela

    2008-01-01

    The Myc-associated zinc-finger protein, Miz1, is a negative regulator of cell proliferation and induces expression of the cell-cycle inhibitors p15(Ink4b) and p21(Cip1). Here we identify the ribosomal protein L23 as a negative regulator of Miz1-dependent transactivation. L23 exerts this function...... by retaining nucleophosmin, an essential co-activator of Miz1 required for Miz1-induced cell-cycle arrest, in the nucleolus. Mutant forms of nucleophosmin found in acute myeloid leukaemia fail to co-activate Miz1 and re-localize it to the cytosol. As L23 is encoded by a direct target gene of Myc......, this regulatory circuit may provide a feedback mechanism that links translation of Myc target genes and cell growth to Miz1-dependent cell-cycle arrest....

  7. Regulation of hepatitis C virus replication by nuclear translocation of nonstructural 5A protein and transcriptional activation of host genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Muhammad Ahmad; Imache, Mohamed R; Higgs, Martin R; Carmouse, Sophie; Pawlotsky, Jean-Michel; Lerat, Hervé

    2013-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 5A (NS5A) is involved in regulating viral replication through its direct interaction with the HCV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. NS5A also alters infected cell metabolism through complex interactions with numerous host cell proteins. NS5A has furthermore been suggested to act as a transcriptional activator, although the impact on viral replication is unclear. To study this, HCV NS5A variants were amplified from hepatic tissue from an HCV-infected patient, and their abilities to activate gene transcription were analyzed in a single-hybrid yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) model. Different variants isolated from the same patient displayed different transactivational activities. When these variants were inserted into the HCV subgenomic replicon system, they demonstrated various levels of RNA replication, which correlated with their transactivational activities. We showed that the C-terminal fragment of NS5A was localized to the nucleus and that a functional NS5A nuclear localization signal and cellular caspase activity were required for this process. Furthermore, nuclear localization of NS5A was necessary for viral replication. Finally, we demonstrate that nuclear NS5A binds to host cell promoters of several genes previously identified as important for efficient HCV RNA replication, inducing their transcription. Taken together, these results demonstrate a new mechanism by which HCV modulates its cellular environment, thereby enhancing viral replication.

  8. Fibronectin-induced VEGF receptor and calcium channel transactivation stimulate GLUT-1 synthesis and trafficking through PPARγ and TC10 in mouse embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Han Na; Han, Ho Jae

    2013-05-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) mediates interactions between integrin and growth factor receptor (GFR) or ion channel. Although this crosstalk promotes integration of the downstream signal pathways and then regulates cellular function, the effect of ECM on glucose transporter (GLUT) in stem cells has not been elucidated. Therefore, we examined the effect of fibronectin on GLUT-1 expression, trafficking, and its related signal pathways in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Fibronectin increased 2-deoxyglucose (DG) uptake and GLUT-1 protein expression that were blocked by transcription or translation inhibitors. Integrin α5β1-bound fibronectin increased 2-DG uptake through cluster formation with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) 2, and then activated Ras and PI3K/Akt. In another pathway, integrin α5β1 displayed structural and functional interactions with calcium channels, and stimulated 2-DG uptake through calcium influx and PKC activation. Akt and PKC-induced PPARγ phosphorylation enhanced the decreased expression of PPARγ protein, and subsequently increased GLUT-1 protein synthesis and 2-DG uptake. Fibronectin stimulated TC10 activity and cytoskeleton (F-actin) rearrangement, followed by GLUT-1 trafficking. In conclusion, integrin-bound fibronectin stimulates GLUT-1 synthesis through VEGFR2/Ras/PI3K/Akt and calcium channel/Ca(2+)/PKC, which are merged at PPARγ and GLUT-1 trafficking through TC10 and F-actin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. HMGB1 and HMGB2 cell-specifically down-regulate the p53-and p73-dependent sequence-specific transactivation from the human Bax gene promoter

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štros, Michal; Ozaki, T.; Bačíková, Alena; Kageyama, H.; Nakagawara, A.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 277, č. 9 (2002), s. 7157-7164 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7004902; GA AV ČR IAA5004105; GA ČR GA301/99/0691; GA ČR GA301/02/0952 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5004920 Keywords : tumor-suppressor P53 * DNA-bending proteins * mammalian-cells Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 6.696, year: 2002

  10. Estrogen receptor transcription and transactivation: Estrogen receptor alpha and estrogen receptor beta - regulation by selective estrogen receptor modulators and importance in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S Katzenellenbogen, Benita; A Katzenellenbogen, John

    2000-01-01

    Estrogens display intriguing tissue-selective action that is of great biomedical importance in the development of optimal therapeutics for the prevention and treatment of breast cancer, for menopausal hormone replacement, and for fertility regulation. Certain compounds that act through the estrogen receptor (ER), now referred to as selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs), can demonstrate remarkable differences in activity in the various estrogen target tissues, functioning as agonists in some tissues but as antagonists in others. Recent advances elucidating the tripartite nature of the biochemical and molecular actions of estrogens provide a good basis for understanding these tissue-selective actions. As discussed in this thematic review, the development of optimal SERMs should now be viewed in the context of two estrogen receptor subtypes, ERα and ERβ, that have differing affinities and responsiveness to various SERMs, and differing tissue distribution and effectiveness at various gene regulatory sites. Cellular, biochemical, and structural approaches have also shown that the nature of the ligand affects the conformation assumed by the ER-ligand complex, thereby regulating its state of phosphorylation and the recruitment of different coregulator proteins. Growth factors and protein kinases that control the phosphorylation state of the complex also regulate the bioactivity of the ER. These interactions and changes determine the magnitude of the transcriptional response and the potency of different SERMs. As these critical components are becoming increasingly well defined, they provide a sound basis for the development of novel SERMs with optimal profiles of tissue selectivity as medical therapeutic agents

  11. Isolation of the mouse (MFH-1) and human (FKHL14) mesenchyme fork head-1 genes reveals conservation of their gene and protein structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Naoyuki; Iida, Kiyoshi; Yang, Xiao-Li [Akita Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    The very recently found evolutionarily conserved DNA-binding domain of 100 amino acids, termed the fork head domain, emerged from a sequence comparison of the rat hepatocyte transcription factor HNF-3{alpha} and the homeotic gene fork head of Drosophila. We previously isolated a new member of this family, the mesenchyme fork head-1 (MFH-1) gene, which is expressed in developing mesenchyme. Here we describe the isolation of the mouse (MFH-1) and human (FKHL14) chromosomal MFH-1 genes and the determination of the gene and protein structures of MFH-1. We found that the MFH-1 gene has no introns and that the identity of the amino acid sequences of mouse and human MFH-1 proteins is 94%. We also investigated the transcriptional activity of the mouse and human MFH-1 proteins and found that both proteins act as positive transactivators. 31 refs., 3 figs.

  12. PTEN mutation cooperates with EGFR activation in human glioblastoma cells to increase VEGF mRNA levels by transactivating an element in the proximal promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maity, A.; Pore, N.; Haas-Kogan, D.A.; O'Rourke, D.M.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Glioblastomas often express high levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), even under normoxic conditions. Genetic alterations that commonly occur in these tumors, including PTEN mutations and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) overexpression, may contribute to this increased VEGF expression. Our previous work showed that, compared to parental U87MG human glioblastoma cells, VEGF mRNA levels are decreased in U87/T691, a derivative line in which EGFR signaling is inhibited by introduction of a truncated p185Neu protein (Cancer Research 60: 5879-5886, 2000). In that study, we also showed that the effect of EGFR activation on VEGF was mediated at the level of transcription via a PI3K dependent pathway. The purpose of the current study was to assess the role of PTEN, a negative regulator of PI3K, and its interaction with EGFR activation in regulating VEGF expression. Materials and Methods: Protein lysates were obtained from U87MG and U87/T691 cells for use in Western blotting for phosphorylated Akt. U87MG and U87/T691 cells were infected with adenovirus expressing either wildtype PTEN or phosphatase dead PTEN, then RNA was harvested for Northern blotting for VEGF. Nuclear extracts were also obtained from these cells for use in gel shift assays. Luciferase assays were performed with lysates of U87MG cells transfected with luciferase reporter constructs containing fragments of the VEGF promoter. Results: The level of phosphorylated Akt, a marker for PI3K activation, was lower in U87/T691 cells compared to U87MG cells, an expected result because of inhibition of the EGFR in the former. Treatment of U87/T691 cells with the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 further decreased the level of phosphorylated Akt and VEGF mRNA. Therefore, in spite of EGFR inhibition, U87/T691 cells contain residual PI3K activity that regulates VEGF expression. To determine whether the PTEN status of these cells influences VEGF mRNA levels, wildtype PTEN was introduced into U87MG and

  13. Interfacial Protein-Protein Associations

    OpenAIRE

    Langdon, Blake B.; Kastantin, Mark; Walder, Robert; Schwartz, Daniel K.

    2013-01-01

    While traditional models of protein adsorption focus primarily on direct protein-surface interactions, recent findings suggest that protein-protein interactions may play a central role. Using high-throughput intermolecular resonance energy transfer (RET) tracking, we directly observed dynamic, protein-protein associations of bovine serum albumin on poly(ethylene glycol) modified surfaces. The associations were heterogeneous and reversible, and associating molecules resided on the surface for ...

  14. Non-enzymatic action of RRM1 protein upregulates PTEN leading to inhibition of colorectal cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Hongyan; Lou, Meng; Chen, Yuexia; Liu, Xiyong; Chen, Naiming; Shan, Jianzhen; Ling, Zhiqiang; Shen, Jing; Zhu, Lijun; Yen, Yun; Zheng, Shu; Shao, Jimin

    2015-06-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase large subunit M1 (RRM1) forms a holoenzyme with small subunits to provide deoxyribonucleotides for DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. Here, we reported a non-RR role of the catalytic subunit protein RRM1 and related pathway in inhibiting colorectal cancer (CRC) metastasis. Ectopic overexpression of the wild-type RRM1, and importantly, its Y738F mutant that lacks RR enzymatic activity, prevented the migration and invasion of CRC cells by promoting phosphatase and tensin homolog on chromosome 10 (PTEN) transactivation. Furthermore, overexpression of the wild-type and RR-inactive mutant RRM1 similarly reduced the phosphorylation of Akt and increased the E-cadherin expression in CRC cells, which were blocked by PTEN knockdown attenuation. Examination of clinical CRC specimens demonstrated that both RRM1 protein expression and RR activity were elevated in most cancer tissues compared to the paired normal tissues. However, while RR activity did not change significantly in different cancer stages, the RRM1 protein level was significantly increased at stages T1-3 but decreased at stage T4, in parallel with the PTEN expression level and negatively correlated with invasion and liver metastasis. Thus, we propose that RRM1 protein can inhibit CRC invasion and metastasis at the advanced stage by regulating PTEN transactivation and its downstream pathways in addition to forming an RR holoenzyme for supporting cancer proliferation. Understanding of the seemingly contrary dual roles of RRM1 protein may further help to explain the complex mechanisms by which this key enzyme and its components are involved in cancer development.

  15. CITED2 silencing sensitizes cancer cells to cisplatin by inhibiting p53 trans-activation and chromatin relaxation on the ERCC1 DNA repair gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Chin; Chang, Pu-Yuan; Chao, Chuck C.-K.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we show that silencing of CITED2 using small-hairpin RNA (shCITED2) induced DNA damage and reduction of ERCC1 gene expression in HEK293, HeLa and H1299 cells, even in the absence of cisplatin. In contrast, ectopic expression of ERCC1 significantly reduced intrinsic and induced DNA damage levels, and rescued the effects of CITED2 silencing on cell viability. The effects of CITED2 silencing on DNA repair and cell death were associated with p53 activity. Furthermore, CITED2 silencing caused severe elimination of the p300 protein and markers of relaxed chromatin (acetylated H3 and H4, i.e. H3K9Ac and H3K14Ac) in HEK293 cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further revealed that DNA damage induced binding of p53 along with H3K9Ac or H3K14Ac at the ERCC1 promoter, an effect which was almost entirely abrogated by silencing of CITED2 or p300. Moreover, lentivirus-based CITED2 silencing sensitized HeLa cell line-derived tumor xenografts to cisplatin in immune-deficient mice. These results demonstrate that CITED2/p300 can be recruited by p53 at the promoter of the repair gene ERCC1 in response to cisplatin-induced DNA damage. The CITED2/p300/p53/ERCC1 pathway is thus involved in the cell response to cisplatin and represents a potential target for cancer therapy. PMID:26384430

  16. Human herpesvirus 6B U19 protein is a PML-regulated transcriptional activator that localizes to nuclear foci in a PML-independent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod-Olsen, Emil; Ross-Hansen, Katrine; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm

    2008-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) contains an IE-B domain spanning open reading frames U16/17-U19, based on homology with human cytomegalovirus. Here, the protein product, U19, of the HHV-6B U19 gene is identified as a 47 kDa transcriptional activator. HHV-6B infection or overexpression of U19...... transactivated the RANTES promoter. Mutational analysis of the promoter indicated that transactivation was not critically dependent on the promoter sites CRE, NF-kappaB, ISRE or NF-IL6. ND10 are nuclear substructures that are involved in several cellular regulatory pathways, including those controlling gene...... structure, U19 also localized to the centre of ND10. Knockdown of PML by small interfering RNA did not prevent U19 localization to ND10-like foci, but instead led to a fourfold increase in U19-induced transcription from the RANTES promoter. Generation of four truncated U19 proteins indicated that the N...

  17. A physiological role of AMP-activated protein kinase in phenobarbital-mediated constitutive androstane receptor activation and CYP2B induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shindo, Sawako; Numazawa, Satoshi; Yoshida, Takemi

    2007-02-01

    CAR (constitutive androstane receptor) is a nuclear receptor that regulates the transcription of target genes, including CYP (cytochrome P450) 2B and 3A. The transactivation by CAR is regulated by its subcellular localization; however, the mechanism that governs nuclear translocation has yet to be clarified. It has been reported recently that AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase) is involved in phenobarbital-mediated CYP2B induction in a particular culture system. We therefore investigated in vivo whether AMPK is involved in the activation of CAR-dependent gene expression. Immunoblot analysis using an antibody which recognizes Thr-172-phosphorylated AMPKalpha1/2 revealed phenobarbital-induced AMPK activation in rat and mouse livers as well. Phenobarbital, however, failed to increase the liver phospho-AMPK level of tumour-bearing rats in which CAR nuclear translocation had been impaired. In in vivo reporter gene assays employing PBREM (phenobarbital-responsive enhancer module) from CYP2B1, an AMPK inhibitor 8-bromo-AMP abolished phenobarbital-induced transactivation. In addition, Cyp2b10 gene expression was attenuated by 8-bromo-AMP. Forced expression of a dominant-negative mutant and the wild-type of AMPKalpha2 in the mouse liver suppressed and further enhanced phenobarbital-induced PBREM-reporter activity respectively. Moreover, the AMPK activator AICAR (5-amino-4-imidazolecarboxamide riboside) induced PBREM transactivation and an accumulation of CAR in the nuclear fraction of the mouse liver. However, AICAR and metformin, another AMPK activator, failed to induce hepatic CYP2B in mice and rats. These observations suggest that AMPK is at least partly involved in phenobarbital-originated signalling, but the kinase activation by itself is not sufficient for CYP2B induction in vivo.

  18. Transcriptional activation of the mouse obese (ob) gene by CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hwang, C S; Mandrup, S; MacDougald, O A

    1996-01-01

    /EBP alpha expression vector into 3T3-L1 cells with a series of 5' truncated ob gene promoter constructs activated reporter gene expression with all constructs containing the proximal C/EBP binding site (nucleotides -55 to -47). Mutation of this site blocked transactivation by C/EBP alpha. Taken together......Like other adipocyte genes that are transcriptionally activated by CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha (C/EBP alpha) during preadipocyte differentiation, expression of the mouse obese (ob) gene is immediately preceded by the expression of C/EBP alpha. While the 5' flanking region of the mouse ob...... gene contains several consensus C/EBP binding sites, only one of these sites appears to be functional. DNase I cleavage inhibition patterns (footprinting) of the ob gene promoter revealed that recombinant C/EBP alpha, as well as a nuclear factor present in fully differentiated 3T3-L1 adipocytes...

  19. The proteosome inhibitor MG132 attenuates Retinoic Acid Receptor trans-activation and enhances trans-repression of Nuclear Factor κB. Potential relevance to chemo-preventive interventions with retinoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosier Randy N

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB is a pro-malignant transcription factor with reciprocal effects on pro-metastatic and anti-metastatic gene expression. Interestingly, NFκB blockade results in the reciprocal induction of retinoic acid receptors (RARs. Given the established property of RARs as negative regulators of malignant progression, we postulated that reciprocal interactions between NFκB and RARs constitute a signaling module in metastatic gene expression and malignant progression. Using Line 1 tumor cells as a model for signal regulation of metastatic gene expression, we investigated the reciprocal interactions between NFκB and RARs in response to the pan-RAR agonist, all-trans retinoic acid (at-RA and the pan-RAR antagonist, AGN193109. Results At-RA [0.1–1 μM] dose-dependently activated RAR and coordinately trans-repressed NFκB, while AGN193109 [1–10 μM] dose-dependently antagonized the effects of at-RA. At-RA and AGN193109 reciprocally regulate pro-metastatic matrix metalloprotease 9 (MMP 9 and its endogenous inhibitor, the tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease 1 (TIMP 1, in a manner consistent with the putative roles of NFκB and RAR in malignant progression. Activation of RAR concurs with its ubiquitination and proteosomal degradation. Accordingly, the proteosome inhibitor, MG132 [5 μM], blocked RAR degradation, quelled RAR trans-activation and enhanced RAR trans-repression of NFκB. Conclusion We conclude that reciprocal interactions between NFκB and RARs constitute a signaling module in metastatic gene expression and malignant progression and propose that the dissociative effect of proteosome inhibitors could be harnessed towards enhancing the anticancer activity of retinoids.

  20. 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (TiPARP, ARTD14) is a mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase and repressor of aryl hydrocarbon receptor transactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPherson, Laura; Tamblyn, Laura; Rajendra, Sharanya; Bralha, Fernando; McPherson, J Peter; Matthews, Jason

    2013-02-01

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-inducible poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (TiPARP/ARTD14) is a member of the PARP family and is regulated by the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR); however, little is known about TiPARP function. In this study, we examined the catalytic function of TiPARP and determined its role in AHR transactivation. We observed that TiPARP exhibited auto-mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and ribosylated core histones. RNAi-mediated knockdown of TiPARP in T-47D breast cancer and HuH-7 hepatoma cells increased TCDD-dependent cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and CYP1B1 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels and recruitment of AHR to both genes. Overexpression of TiPARP reduced AHR-dependent increases in CYP1A1-reporter gene activity, which was restored by overexpression of AHR, but not aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator. Deletion and mutagenesis studies showed that TiPARP-mediated inhibition of AHR required the zinc-finger and catalytic domains. TiPARP and AHR co-localized in the nucleus, directly interacted and both were recruited to CYP1A1 in response to TCDD. Overexpression of Tiparp enhanced, whereas RNAi-mediated knockdown of TiPARP reduced TCDD-dependent AHR proteolytic degradation. TCDD-dependent induction of AHR target genes was enhanced in Tiparp(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts compared with wildtype controls. Our findings show that TiPARP is a mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase and a transcriptional repressor of AHR, revealing a novel negative feedback loop in AHR signalling.

  1. Proteins engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    At the - Departement d'Ingenierie et d'etudes de proteines (Deip) of the CEA more than seventy researchers are working hard to understand the function of proteins. For that they use the molecular labelling technique (F.M.)

  2. Total protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003483.htm Total protein To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes ...

  3. WW domain-binding protein 2: an adaptor protein closely linked to the development of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuai; Wang, Han; Huang, Yu-Fan; Li, Ming-Li; Cheng, Jiang-Hong; Hu, Peng; Lu, Chuan-Hui; Zhang, Ya; Liu, Na; Tzeng, Chi-Meng; Zhang, Zhi-Ming

    2017-07-19

    The WW domain is composed of 38 to 40 semi-conserved amino acids shared with structural, regulatory, and signaling proteins. WW domain-binding protein 2 (WBP2), as a binding partner of WW domain protein, interacts with several WW-domain-containing proteins, such as Yes kinase-associated protein (Yap), paired box gene 8 (Pax8), WW-domain-containing transcription regulator protein 1 (TAZ), and WW-domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) through its PPxY motifs within C-terminal region, and further triggers the downstream signaling pathway in vitro and in vivo. Studies have confirmed that phosphorylated form of WBP2 can move into nuclei and activate the transcription of estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR), whose expression were the indicators of breast cancer development, indicating that WBP2 may participate in the progression of breast cancer. Both overexpression of WBP2 and activation of tyrosine phosphorylation upregulate the signal cascades in the cross-regulation of the Wnt and ER signaling pathways in breast cancer. Following the binding of WBP2 to the WW domain region of TAZ which can accelerate migration, invasion and is required for the transformed phenotypes of breast cancer cells, the transformation of epithelial to mesenchymal of MCF10A is activated, suggesting that WBP2 is a key player in regulating cell migration. When WBP2 binds with WWOX, a tumor suppressor, ER transactivation and tumor growth can be suppressed. Thus, WBP2 may serve as a molecular on/off switch that controls the crosstalk between E2, WWOX, Wnt, TAZ, and other oncogenic signaling pathways. This review interprets the relationship between WBP2 and breast cancer, and provides comprehensive views about the function of WBP2 in the regulation of the pathogenesis of breast cancer and endocrine therapy in breast cancer treatment.

  4. Identification of compounds with anti-human cytomegalovirus activity that inhibit production of IE2 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beelontally, Rooksarr; Wilkie, Gavin S; Lau, Betty; Goodmaker, Charles J; Ho, Catherine M K; Swanson, Chad M; Deng, Xianming; Wang, Jinhua; Gray, Nathanael S; Davison, Andrew J; Strang, Blair L

    2017-02-01

    Using a high throughput screening methodology we surveyed a collection of largely uncharacterized validated or suspected kinase inhibitors for anti-human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) activity. From this screen we identified three structurally related 5-aminopyrazine compounds (XMD7-1, -2 and -27) that inhibited HCMV replication in virus yield reduction assays at low micromolar concentrations. Kinase selectivity assays indicated that each compound was a kinase inhibitor capable of inhibiting a range of cellular protein kinases. Western blotting and RNA sequencing demonstrated that treatment of infected cells with XMD7 compounds resulted in a defect in the production of the major HCMV transcriptional transactivator IE2 proteins (IE2-86, IE2-60 and IE2-40) and an overall reduction in transcription from the viral genome. However, production of certain viral proteins was not compromised by treatment with XMD7 compounds. Thus, these novel anti-HCMV compounds likely inhibited transcription from the viral genome and suppressed production of a subset of viral proteins by inhibiting IE2 protein production. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Transcriptional activation capacity of the novel PLAG family of zinc finger proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kas, K; Voz, M L; Hensen, K; Meyen, E; Van de Ven, W J

    1998-09-04

    We have isolated and characterized two novel cDNAs encoding C2H2 zinc finger proteins showing high sequence homology to PLAG1, a protein ectopically activated by promoter swapping or promoter substitution in pleomorphic adenomas with chromosomal abnormalities at chromosome 8q12. PLAG1 and the two new PLAG1 family members (PLAGL1 and PLAGL2) constitute a novel subfamily of zinc finger proteins that recognize DNA and/or RNA. To examine the potential of the three human proteins to modulate transcription, we constructed several PLAG/GAL4 DNA binding domain fusion proteins and measured their ability to activate transcription of a reporter gene construct in different mammalian cell lines and in yeast. Although the carboxyl-terminal part of PLAGL1 shows strong overall transcriptional activity in mesenchymal (COS-1) and epithelial cells (293), both PLAG1 and PLAGL2 transactivate in mesenchymal cells only if depleted from a repressing region. This effect is less profound in epithelial cells. These data suggest that the activation in pleomorphic adenomas of PLAG1 most likely results in uncontrolled activation of downstream target genes.

  6. Therapeutic effects of cell-permeant peptides that activate G proteins downstream of growth factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Gary S; Aznar, Nicolas; Kalogriopoulos, Nicholas; Midde, Krishna K; Lopez-Sanchez, Inmaculada; Sato, Emi; Dunkel, Ying; Gallo, Richard L; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2015-05-19

    In eukaryotes, receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and trimeric G proteins are two major signaling hubs. Signal transduction via trimeric G proteins has long been believed to be triggered exclusively by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). This paradigm has recently been challenged by several studies on a multimodular signal transducer, Gα-Interacting Vesicle associated protein (GIV/Girdin). We recently demonstrated that GIV's C terminus (CT) serves as a platform for dynamic association of ligand-activated RTKs with Gαi, and for noncanonical transactivation of G proteins. However, exogenous manipulation of this platform has remained beyond reach. Here we developed cell-permeable GIV-CT peptides by fusing a TAT-peptide transduction domain (TAT-PTD) to the minimal modular elements of GIV that are necessary and sufficient for activation of Gi downstream of RTKs, and used them to engineer signaling networks and alter cell behavior. In the presence of an intact GEF motif, TAT-GIV-CT peptides enhanced diverse processes in which GIV's GEF function has previously been implicated, e.g., 2D cell migration after scratch-wounding, invasion of cancer cells, and finally, myofibroblast activation and collagen production. Furthermore, topical application of TAT-GIV-CT peptides enhanced the complex, multireceptor-driven process of wound repair in mice in a GEF-dependent manner. Thus, TAT-GIV peptides provide a novel and versatile tool to manipulate Gαi activation downstream of growth factors in a diverse array of pathophysiologic conditions.

  7. Expression and Functional Analyses of the Plastid Lipid-Associated Protein CHRC Suggest Its Role in Chromoplastogenesis and Stress1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner-Dagan, Yael; Ovadis, Marianna; Shklarman, Elena; Elad, Yigal; Rav David, Dalia; Vainstein, Alexander

    2006-01-01

    Chromoplastogenesis during flower development and fruit ripening involves the dramatic overaccumulation of carotenoids sequestered into structures containing lipids and proteins called plastid lipid-associated proteins (PAPs). CHRC, a cucumber (Cucumis sativus) PAP, has been suggested to be transcriptionally activated in carotenoid-accumulating flowers by gibberellin (GA). Mybys, a MYB-like trans-activator identified here, may represent a chromoplastogenesis-related factor: Its expression is flower specific and parallels that of ChrC during flower development; moreover, as revealed by stable ectopic and transient-expression assays, it specifically trans-activates ChrC promoter in flowers accumulating carotenoids and flavonoids. A detailed dissection of ChrC promoter revealed a GA-responsive element, gacCTCcaa, the mutation of which abolished ChrC activation by GA. This cis-element is different from the GARE motif and is involved in ChrC activation probably via negative regulation, similar to other GA-responsive systems. The GA responsiveness and MYBYS floral activation of the ChrC promoter do not overlap with respect to cis-elements. To study the functionality of CHRC, which is activated in vegetative tissues similar to other PAPs by various biotic and abiotic stresses, we employed a tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plant system and generated RNAi-transgenic lines with suppressed LeCHRC. Transgenic flowers accumulated approximately 30% less carotenoids per unit protein than controls, indicating an interrelationship between PAPs and flower-specific carotenoid accumulation in chromoplasts. Moreover, the transgenic LeCHRC-suppressed plants were significantly more susceptible to Botrytis cinerea infection, suggesting CHRC's involvement in plant protection under stress conditions and supporting the general, evolutionarily preserved role of PAPs. PMID:16815957

  8. Protein Extractability

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results showed that protein extractability was dependent on pH, type of salt, salt concentrations and extraction time. Salts extracted more proteins from the moringa seed flour than water. Maximum extraction of protein was. 85.06% and 84.72% with 0.5 M CaCl and 0.75 M NaCl respectively. On varying the pH, maximum ...

  9. Glutamine rich and basic region/leucine zipper (bZIP) domains stabilize cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) binding to chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Bernhard M; Guzman, Ernesto; Montminy, Marc

    2005-04-15

    We have examined the dynamics of cAMP-response element-binding protein (CREB) binding to chromatin in live cells using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP). CREB was found to bind to target sites with a residence time of 100 s, and exposure to a cAMP agonist had no effect on these kinetics. In addition to the basic region/leucine zipper (bZIP) domain, a glutamine-rich trans-activation domain in CREB called Q2 also appeared to be critical for promoter occupancy. Indeed, mutations in Q2 that reduced residence time by FRAP assay disrupted target gene activation via CREB in cells exposed to a cAMP agonist. Notably, insertion of the glutamine-rich B trans-activation domain of SP1 into a mutant CREB polypeptide lacking Q2 stabilized CREB occupancy and rescued target gene activation. These results suggest a novel mechanism by which the family of glutamine-rich activators promotes cellular gene expression.

  10. Protein politics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijver, Marike

    2005-01-01

    This study is part of the program of the interdisciplinary research group Profetas (protein foods, environment, technology and society). Profetas consists of technological, environmental and socio-economic research projects on protein food systems which result in the development of scenarios and

  11. Whey Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fraction de Lactosérum, Fraction de Petit-Lait, Goat Milk Whey, Goat Whey, Isolat de Protéine de Lactosérum, Isolat de Protéine de Petit-Lait, Lactosérum de Lait de Chèvre, MBP, Milk Protein, Milk Protein Isolate, Mineral Whey Concentrate, Proteínas ...

  12. Protein adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles R. Frihart; Linda F. Lorenz

    2018-01-01

    Nature uses a wide variety of chemicals for providing adhesion internally (e.g., cell to cell) and externally (e.g., mussels to ships and piers). This adhesive bonding is chemically and mechanically complex, involving a variety of proteins, carbohydrates, and other compounds.Consequently,the effect of protein structures on adhesive properties is only partially...

  13. Tau protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Jette Lautrup Battistini; Kristensen, Kim; Bahl, Jmc

    2011-01-01

    Background: Tau protein has been proposed as biomarker of axonal damage leading to irreversible neurological impairment in MS. CSF concentrations may be useful when determining risk of progression from ON to MS. Objective: To investigate the association between tau protein concentration and 14......-3-3 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with monosymptomatic optic neuritis (ON) versus patients with monosymptomatic onset who progressed to multiple sclerosis (MS). To evaluate results against data found in a complete literature review. Methods: A total of 66 patients with MS and/or ON from...... the Department of Neurology of Glostrup Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark, were included. CSF samples were analysed for tau protein and 14-3-3 protein, and clinical and paraclinical information was obtained from medical records. Results: The study shows a significantly increased concentration of tau...

  14. Mechanisms of HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein Inhibition by Lysyl-Peptidyl-Anthraquinone Conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosic, Alice; Sinigaglia, Laura; Cappellini, Marta; Carli, Ilaria; Parolin, Cristina; Zagotto, Giuseppe; Sabatino, Giuseppina; Rovero, Paolo; Fabris, Dan; Gatto, Barbara

    2016-01-20

    The Nucleocapsid protein NCp7 (NC) is a nucleic acid chaperone responsible for essential steps of the HIV-1 life cycle and an attractive candidate for drug development. NC destabilizes nucleic acid structures and promotes the formation of annealed substrates for HIV-1 reverse transcription elongation. Short helical nucleic acid segments bordered by bulges and loops, such as the Trans-Activation Response element (TAR) of HIV-1 and its complementary sequence (cTAR), are nucleation elements for helix destabilization by NC and also preferred recognition sites for threading intercalators. Inspired by these observations, we have recently demonstrated that 2,6-disubstituted peptidyl-anthraquinone-conjugates inhibit the chaperone activities of recombinant NC in vitro, and that inhibition correlates with the stabilization of TAR and cTAR stem-loop structures. We describe here enhanced NC inhibitory activity by novel conjugates that exhibit longer peptidyl chains ending with a conserved N-terminal lysine. Their efficient inhibition of TAR/cTAR annealing mediated by NC originates from the combination of at least three different mechanisms, namely, their stabilizing effects on nucleic acids dynamics by threading intercalation, their ability to target TAR RNA substrate leading to a direct competition with the protein for the same binding sites on TAR, and, finally, their effective binding to the NC protein. Our results suggest that these molecules may represent the stepping-stone for the future development of NC-inhibitors capable of targeting the protein itself and its recognition site in RNA.

  15. The laminA/NF-Y protein complex reveals an unknown transcriptional mechanism on cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicchillitti, Lucia; Manni, Isabella; Mancone, Carmine; Regazzo, Giulia; Spagnuolo, Manuela; Alonzi, Tonino; Carlomosti, Fabrizio; Dell'Anna, Maria Lucia; Dell'Omo, Giulia; Picardo, Mauro; Ciana, Paolo; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Tripodi, Marco; Magenta, Alessandra; Rizzo, Maria Giulia; Gurtner, Aymone; Piaggio, Giulia

    2017-01-10

    Lamin A is a component of the nuclear matrix that also controls proliferation by largely unknown mechanisms. NF-Y is a ubiquitous protein involved in cell proliferation composed of three subunits (-YA -YB -YC) all required for the DNA binding and transactivation activity. To get clues on new NF-Y partner(s) we performed a mass spectrometry screening of proteins that co-precipitate with the regulatory subunit of the complex, NF-YA. By this screening we identified lamin A as a novel putative NF-Y interactor. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments and confocal analysis confirmed the interaction between the two endogenous proteins. Interestingly, this association occurs on euchromatin regions, too. ChIP experiments demonstrate lamin A enrichment in several promoter regions of cell cycle related genes in a NF-Y dependent manner. Gain and loss of function experiments reveal that lamin A counteracts NF-Y transcriptional activity. Taking advantage of a recently generated transgenic reporter mouse, called MITO-Luc, in which an NF-Y-dependent promoter controls luciferase expression, we demonstrate that lamin A counteracts NF-Y transcriptional activity not only in culture cells but also in living animals. Altogether, our data demonstrate the occurrence of lamin A/NF-Y interaction and suggest a possible role of this protein complex in regulation of NF-Y function in cell proliferation.

  16. Protein-Protein Interaction Databases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szklarczyk, Damian; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2015-01-01

    of research are explored. Here we present an overview of the most widely used protein-protein interaction databases and the methods they employ to gather, combine, and predict interactions. We also point out the trade-off between comprehensiveness and accuracy and the main pitfall scientists have to be aware...

  17. Protein deamidation

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Noah E.

    2002-01-01

    A completely automatic computerized technique for the quantitative estimation of the deamidation rates of any protein for which the three-dimensional structure is known has been developed. Calculations of the specific deamidation rates of 170,014 asparaginyl residues in 13,335 proteins have been carried out. The calculated values have good quantitative reliability when compared with experimental measurements. These rates demonstrate that deamidation may be a biologically ...

  18. Effects of antiandrogenic progestins, chlormadinone and cyproterone acetate, and the estrogen 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), and their mixtures: Transactivation with human and rainbowfish hormone receptors and transcriptional effects in zebrafish (Danio rerio) eleuthero-embryos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegenthaler, Patricia Franziska [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland (FHNW), School of Life Sciences, Gründenstrasse 40, CH-4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Bain, Peter [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Land and Water Flagship, PMB2, Glen Osmond, 5064 South Australia (Australia); Riva, Francesco [IRCCS – Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche “Mario Negri”, Environmental Biomarkers Unit, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Via La Masa 19, I-20156 Milan (Italy); Fent, Karl, E-mail: karl.fent@fhnw.ch [University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland (FHNW), School of Life Sciences, Gründenstrasse 40, CH-4132 Muttenz (Switzerland); Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zürich), Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollution Dynamics, Department of Environmental System Sciences, CH-8092 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Agonistic and antagonistic activity of CMA and CPA were assessed in vitro. • CMA and CPA showed different interaction with human and fish receptors. • No progestogenic but antiandrogenic and antiglucocorticoid activity occurred in fish. • CMA and CPA showed transcriptional changes in zebrafish embryos. • Binary mixtures of the progestins with EE2 were assessed in vitro and in vivo. - Abstract: Synthetic progestins act as endocrine disrupters in fish but their risk to the environment is not sufficiently known. Here, we focused on an unexplored antiandrogenic progestin, chlormadinone acetate (CMA), and the antiandrogenic progestin cyproterone acetate (CPA). The aim was to evaluate whether their in vitro interaction with human and rainbowfish (Melanotaenia fluviatilis) sex hormone receptors is similar. Furthermore, we investigated their activity in zebrafish (Danio rerio) eleuthero-embryos. First, we studied agonistic and antagonistic activities of CMA, CPA, and 17α-ethinylestradiol (EE2), in recombinant yeast expressing either the human progesterone (PGR), androgen (AR), or estrogen receptor. The same compounds were also investigated in vitro in a stable transfection cell system expressing rainbowfish nuclear steroid receptors. For human receptors, both progestins exhibited progestogenic, androgenic and antiestrogenic activity with no antiandrogenic or estrogenic activity. In contrast, interactions with rainbowfish receptors showed no progestogenic, but antiandrogenic, antiglucocorticoid, and some antiestrogenic activity. Thus, interaction with and transactivation of human and rainbowfish PGR and AR were distinctly different. Second, we analyzed transcriptional alterations in zebrafish eleuthero‐embryos at 96 and 144 h post fertilization after exposure to CPA, CMA, EE2, and binary mixtures of CMA and CPA with EE2, mimicking the use in oral contraceptives. CMA led to slight down-regulation of the ar transcript, while CPA down-regulated ar

  19. Nucleolar protein trafficking in response to HIV-1 Tat: rewiring the nucleolus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Ali Jarboui

    Full Text Available The trans-activator Tat protein is a viral regulatory protein essential for HIV-1 replication. Tat trafficks to the nucleoplasm and the nucleolus. The nucleolus, a highly dynamic and structured membrane-less sub-nuclear compartment, is the site of rRNA and ribosome biogenesis and is involved in numerous cellular functions including transcriptional regulation, cell cycle control and viral infection. Importantly, transient nucleolar trafficking of both Tat and HIV-1 viral transcripts are critical in HIV-1 replication, however, the role(s of the nucleolus in HIV-1 replication remains unclear. To better understand how the interaction of Tat with the nucleolar machinery contributes to HIV-1 pathogenesis, we investigated the quantitative changes in the composition of the nucleolar proteome of Jurkat T-cells stably expressing HIV-1 Tat fused to a TAP tag. Using an organellar proteomic approach based on mass spectrometry, coupled with Stable Isotope Labelling in Cell culture (SILAC, we quantified 520 proteins, including 49 proteins showing significant changes in abundance in Jurkat T-cell nucleolus upon Tat expression. Numerous proteins exhibiting a fold change were well characterised Tat interactors and/or known to be critical for HIV-1 replication. This suggests that the spatial control and subcellular compartimentaliation of these cellular cofactors by Tat provide an additional layer of control for regulating cellular machinery involved in HIV-1 pathogenesis. Pathway analysis and network reconstruction revealed that Tat expression specifically resulted in the nucleolar enrichment of proteins collectively participating in ribosomal biogenesis, protein homeostasis, metabolic pathways including glycolytic, pentose phosphate, nucleotides and amino acids biosynthetic pathways, stress response, T-cell signaling pathways and genome integrity. We present here the first differential profiling of the nucleolar proteome of T-cells expressing HIV-1 Tat. We

  20. Identification of a nuclear export signal in the KSHV latent protein LANA2 mediating its export from the nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz-Fontela, C.; Collado, M.; Rodriguez, E.; Garcia, M.A.; Alvarez-Barrientos, A.; Arroyo, J.; Nombela, C.; Rivas, C.

    2005-01-01

    LANA2 is a latent protein detected in Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-infected B cells that inhibits p53-dependent transcriptional transactivation and apoptosis and PKR-dependent apoptosis, suggesting an important role in the transforming activity of the virus. It has been reported that LANA2 localizes into the nucleus of both KSHV-infected B cells and transiently transfected HeLa cells. In this study, we show that LANA2 is a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein that requires a Rev-type nuclear export signal located in the C-terminus to direct the protein to the cytoplasm, through an association with the export receptor CRM1. In addition, a functional protein kinase B (PKB)/Akt phosphorylation motif partially overlapping with the nuclear export signal was identified. Nuclear exclusion of LANA2 was negatively regulated by the phosphorylation of threonine 564 by Akt. The ability of LANA2 to shuttle between nucleus and cytoplasm has implications for the function of this viral protein

  1. Probing the functional impact of sequence variation on p53-DNA interactions using a novel microsphere assay for protein-DNA binding with human cell extracts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A Noureddine

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The p53 tumor suppressor regulates its target genes through sequence-specific binding to DNA response elements (REs. Although numerous p53 REs are established, the thousands more identified by bioinformatics are not easily subjected to comparative functional evaluation. To examine the relationship between RE sequence variation -- including polymorphisms -- and p53 binding, we have developed a multiplex format microsphere assay of protein-DNA binding (MAPD for p53 in nuclear extracts. Using MAPD we measured sequence-specific p53 binding of doxorubicin-activated or transiently expressed p53 to REs from established p53 target genes and p53 consensus REs. To assess the sensitivity and scalability of the assay, we tested 16 variants of the p21 target sequence and a 62-multiplex set of single nucleotide (nt variants of the p53 consensus sequence and found many changes in p53 binding that are not captured by current computational binding models. A group of eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs was examined and binding profiles closely matched transactivation capability tested in luciferase constructs. The in vitro binding characteristics of p53 in nuclear extracts recapitulated the cellular in vivo transactivation capabilities for eight well-established human REs measured by luciferase assay. Using a set of 26 bona fide REs, we observed distinct binding patterns characteristic of transiently expressed wild type and mutant p53s. This microsphere assay system utilizes biologically meaningful cell extracts in a multiplexed, quantitative, in vitro format that provides a powerful experimental tool for elucidating the functional impact of sequence polymorphism and protein variation on protein/DNA binding in transcriptional networks.

  2. Protein Crystallizability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smialowski, Pawel; Wong, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Obtaining diffracting quality crystals remains a major challenge in protein structure research. We summarize and compare methods for selecting the best protein targets for crystallization, construct optimization and crystallization condition design. Target selection methods are divided into algorithms predicting the chance of successful progression through all stages of structural determination (from cloning to solving the structure) and those focusing only on the crystallization step. We tried to highlight pros and cons of different approaches examining the following aspects: data size, redundancy and representativeness, overfitting during model construction, and results evaluation. In summary, although in recent years progress was made and several sequence properties were reported to be relevant for crystallization, the successful prediction of protein crystallization behavior and selection of corresponding crystallization conditions continue to challenge structural researchers.

  3. Structures of inactive retinoblastoma protein reveal multiple mechanisms for cell cycle control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, Jason R.; Hura, Greg L.; Rubin, Seth M. (UCSC); (LBNL)

    2012-07-18

    Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) phosphorylation of the Retinoblastoma protein (Rb) drives cell proliferation through inhibition of Rb complexes with E2F transcription factors and other regulatory proteins. We present the first structures of phosphorylated Rb that reveal the mechanism of its inactivation. S608 phosphorylation orders a flexible 'pocket' domain loop such that it mimics and directly blocks E2F transactivation domain (E2F{sup TD}) binding. T373 phosphorylation induces a global conformational change that associates the pocket and N-terminal domains (RbN). This first multidomain Rb structure demonstrates a novel role for RbN in allosterically inhibiting the E2F{sup TD}-pocket association and protein binding to the pocket 'LxCxE' site. Together, these structures detail the regulatory mechanism for a canonical growth-repressive complex and provide a novel example of how multisite Cdk phosphorylation induces diverse structural changes to influence cell cycle signaling.

  4. Presence of a functional but dispensable Nuclear Export Signal in the HTLV-2 Tax protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiemer Lars

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 and type 2 are related human retroviruses. HTLV-1 is the etiological agent of the Adult T-cell Leukemia/Lymphoma and of the Tropical Spastic Paraparesis/HTLV-1 Associated Myelopathy, whereas, HTLV-2 infection has not been formally associated with any T-cell malignancy. HTLV-1 and 2 genomes encode, respectively, the Tax1 and Tax2 proteins whose role is to transactivate the viral promoter. HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 Tax sequences display 28% divergence at the amino acid level. Tax1 is a shuttling protein that possesses both a non canonical nuclear import (NLS and a nuclear export (NES signal. We have recently demonstrated that Tax1 and Tax2 display different subcellular localization and that residues 90–100 are critical for this process. We investigate in the present report, whether Tax2 also possesses a functional NES. Results We first used a NES prediction method to determine whether the Tax2 protein might contain a NES and the results do suggest the presence of a NES sequence in Tax2. Using Green Fluorescent Protein-NES (GFP-NES fusion proteins, we demonstrate that the Tax2 sequence encompasses a functional NES (NES2. As shown by microscope imaging, NES2 is able to mediate translocation of GFP from the nucleus, without the context of a full length Tax protein. Furthermore, point mutations or leptomycin B treatment abrogate NES2 function. However, within the context of full length Tax2, similar point mutations in the NES2 leucine rich stretch do not modify Tax2 localization. Finally, we also show that Tax1 NES function is dependent upon the positioning of the nuclear export signal "vis-à-vis" GFP. Conclusion HTLV-2 Tax NES is functional but dispensable for the protein localization in vitro.

  5. Protein nanoparticles for therapeutic protein delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera Estrada, L P; Champion, J A

    2015-06-01

    Therapeutic proteins can face substantial challenges to their activity, requiring protein modification or use of a delivery vehicle. Nanoparticles can significantly enhance delivery of encapsulated cargo, but traditional small molecule carriers have some limitations in their use for protein delivery. Nanoparticles made from protein have been proposed as alternative carriers and have benefits specific to therapeutic protein delivery. This review describes protein nanoparticles made by self-assembly, including protein cages, protein polymers, and charged or amphipathic peptides, and by desolvation. It presents particle fabrication and delivery characterization for a variety of therapeutic and model proteins, as well as comparison of the features of different protein nanoparticles.

  6. Interaction of the regulatory subunit of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase with PATZ1 (ZNF278)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Weng-Lang; Ravatn, Roald; Kudoh, Kazuya; Alabanza, Leah; Chin, Khew-Voon

    2010-01-01

    The effects of cAMP in cell are predominantly mediated by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), which is composed of two genetically distinct subunits, catalytic (C) and regulatory (R), forming a tetrameric holoenzyme R 2 C 2 . The only known function for the R subunit is that of inhibiting the activity of the C subunit kinase. It has been shown that overexpression of RIα, but not the C subunit kinase, is associated with neoplastic transformation. In addition, it has also been demonstrated that mutation in the RIα, but not the C subunit is associated with increased resistance to the DNA-damaging anticancer drug cisplatin, thus suggesting that the RIα subunit of PKA may have functions independent of the kinase. We show here that the RIα subunit interacts with a BTB/POZ domain zinc-finger transcription factor, PATZ1 (ZNF278), and co-expression with RIα results in its sequestration in the cytoplasm. The cytoplasmic/nuclear translocation is inducible by cAMP. C-terminus deletion abolishes PATZ1 interaction with RIα and results in its localization in the nucleus. PATZ1 transactivates the cMyc promoter and the presence of cAMP and co-expression with RIα modulates its transactivation. Moreover, PATZ1 is aberrantly expressed in cancer. Taken together, our results showed a potentially novel mechanism of cAMP signaling mediated through the interaction of RIα with PATZ1 that is independent of the kinase activity of PKA, and the aberrant expression of PATZ1 in cancer point to its role in cell growth regulation.

  7. Recombinant protein production technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recombinant protein production is an important technology for antibody production, biochemical activity study, and structural determination during the post-genomic era. Limiting factors in recombinant protein production include low-level protein expression, protein precipitation, and loss of protein...

  8. Structure of the retinoblastoma protein bound to adenovirus E1A reveals the molecular basis for viral oncoprotein inactivation of a tumor suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2007-11-01

    The adenovirus (Ad) E1A (Ad-E1A) oncoprotein mediates cell transformation, in part, by displacing E2F transcription factors from the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) tumor suppressor. In this study we determined the crystal structure of the pRb pocket domain in complex with conserved region 1 (CR1) of Ad5-E1A. The structure and accompanying biochemical studies reveal that E1A-CR1 binds at the interface of the A and B cyclin folds of the pRb pocket domain, and that both E1A-CR1 and the E2F transactivation domain use similar conserved nonpolar residues to engage overlapping sites on pRb, implicating a novel molecular mechanism for pRb inactivation by a viral oncoprotein.

  9. Structure of the retinoblastoma protein bound to adenovirus E1A reveals the molecular basis for viral oncoprotein inactivation of a tumor suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xin; Marmorstein, Ronen (UPENN)

    2008-04-02

    The adenovirus (Ad) E1A (Ad-E1A) oncoprotein mediates cell transformation, in part, by displacing E2F transcription factors from the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) tumor suppressor. In this study we determined the crystal structure of the pRb pocket domain in complex with conserved region 1 (CR1) of Ad5-E1A. The structure and accompanying biochemical studies reveal that E1A-CR1 binds at the interface of the A and B cyclin folds of the pRb pocket domain, and that both E1A-CR1 and the E2F transactivation domain use similar conserved nonpolar residues to engage overlapping sites on pRb, implicating a novel molecular mechanism for pRb inactivation by a viral oncoprotein.

  10. Cloning, Expression and Purification of the Recombinant HIV-1 Tat-Nef Fusion Protein in Prokaryotic Expression System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh Kadkhodayan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Nef is one of the HIV-1 critical proteins, because it is essential for viral replication and AIDS disease progression and induction of immune response against it can partially inhibit viral infection. Moreover, a domain of the HIV-1 Trans-Activator of Transcription (Tat, 48-60 aa could act as a cell penetrating peptide (CPP. In current study, cloning and expression of Tat-Nef fusion protein was performed in E. coli for the first time. The protein expression was confirmed by western blot analysis and was purified using reverse staining method. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, primarily, cloning of Tat-Nef fusion gene was done in pGEX6p2 expression vector. Then, the expression of Tat-Nef recombinat protein in E.coli BL21 (DE3 strain was performed by using IPTG inducer. The protein expression was confirmed by SDS-PAGE and western blotting using anti-Nef monoclonal antibody. Then, the recombinant fusion protein was purified from gel using reverse staining method. Results: The results of PCR analysis and enzyme digestion showed a clear band of ~ 726 bp in agarose gel indicating the correct Tat-Nef fusion cloning in pGEX6p2 prokaryotic expression vector. In addition, a 54 kDa band of Tat-Nef on SDS-PAGE revealed Tat-Nef protein expression that western blot analysis using anti-Nef monoclonal antibody confirmed it. Conclusion: The purified Tat-Nef recombinant fusion protein will be used as an antigen for protein vaccine design against HIV infection.

  11. Splice variants of the forkhead box protein AFX exhibit dominant negative activity and inhibit AFXalpha-mediated tumor cell apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Jig Lee

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Loss-of-function in the apoptosis-inducing genes is known to facilitate tumorigenesis. AFX (FOXO4, a member of forkhead transcription factors functions as a tumor suppressor and has 2 isoforms, AFXalpha (505 a.a. and AFXzeta (450 a.a.. In human cancer cells, we identified an N-terminally deleted form of AFXalpha (alpha198-505, translated from a downstream start and 2 short N-terminal AFX proteins (90, and 101 a.a. produced by aberrant splicing.We investigated the expression and role of these AFX variants. Cell transduction study revealed that short N-terminal AFX proteins were not stable. Though alpha(198-505 protein expression was detected in the cytoplasm and nucleus, alpha(198-505 expressing cells did not show a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling mediated by PI3 kinase signaling. Whereas, we observed this shuttling in cells expressing either AFXalpha or AFXzeta protein. AFXzeta and alpha(198-505 lost the ability to transactivate BCL6 or suppress cyclin D2 gene expression. These variants did not induce cancer cell death whereas AFXalpha resulted in apoptosis. We found that AFXzeta and alpha(198-505 suppress the AFXalpha stimulation of BCL6 promoter in a dose dependent manner, indicating dominant negative activity. These variants also inhibited AFXalpha induction of apoptosis.Loss of function by aberrant splicing and the dominant negative activity of AFX variants may provide a mechanism for enhanced survival of neoplastic cells.

  12. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein delta activates insulin-like growth factor-I gene transcription in osteoblasts. Identification of a novel cyclic AMP signaling pathway in bone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umayahara, Y.; Ji, C.; Centrella, M.; Rotwein, P.; McCarthy, T. L.

    1997-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) plays a key role in skeletal growth by stimulating bone cell replication and differentiation. We previously showed that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and other cAMP-activating agents enhanced IGF-I gene transcription in cultured primary rat osteoblasts through promoter 1, the major IGF-I promoter, and identified a short segment of the promoter, termed HS3D, that was essential for hormonal regulation of IGF-I gene expression. We now demonstrate that CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) delta is a major component of a PGE2-stimulated DNA-protein complex involving HS3D and find that C/EBPdelta transactivates IGF-I promoter 1 through this site. Competition gel shift studies first indicated that a core C/EBP half-site (GCAAT) was required for binding of a labeled HS3D oligomer to osteoblast nuclear proteins. Southwestern blotting and UV-cross-linking studies showed that the HS3D probe recognized a approximately 35-kDa nuclear protein, and antibody supershift assays indicated that C/EBPdelta comprised most of the PGE2-activated gel-shifted complex. C/EBPdelta was detected by Western immunoblotting in osteoblast nuclear extracts after treatment of cells with PGE2. An HS3D oligonucleotide competed effectively with a high affinity C/EBP site from the rat albumin gene for binding to osteoblast nuclear proteins. Co-transfection of osteoblast cell cultures with a C/EBPdelta expression plasmid enhanced basal and PGE2-activated IGF-I promoter 1-luciferase activity but did not stimulate a reporter gene lacking an HS3D site. By contrast, an expression plasmid for the related protein, C/EBPbeta, did not alter basal IGF-I gene activity but did increase the response to PGE2. In osteoblasts and in COS-7 cells, C/EBPdelta, but not C/EBPbeta, transactivated a reporter gene containing four tandem copies of HS3D fused to a minimal promoter; neither transcription factor stimulated a gene with four copies of an HS3D mutant that was unable to bind osteoblast

  13. Aquaporin Protein-Protein Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Virginia Roche

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aquaporins are tetrameric membrane-bound channels that facilitate transport of water and other small solutes across cell membranes. In eukaryotes, they are frequently regulated by gating or trafficking, allowing for the cell to control membrane permeability in a specific manner. Protein–protein interactions play crucial roles in both regulatory processes and also mediate alternative functions such as cell adhesion. In this review, we summarize recent knowledge about aquaporin protein–protein interactions; dividing the interactions into three types: (1 interactions between aquaporin tetramers; (2 interactions between aquaporin monomers within a tetramer (hetero-tetramerization; and (3 transient interactions with regulatory proteins. We particularly focus on the structural aspects of the interactions, discussing the small differences within a conserved overall fold that allow for aquaporins to be differentially regulated in an organism-, tissue- and trigger-specific manner. A deep knowledge about these differences is needed to fully understand aquaporin function and regulation in many physiological processes, and may enable design of compounds targeting specific aquaporins for treatment of human disease.

  14. Inhibitory PAS domain protein is a negative regulator of hypoxia-inducible gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Yuichi; Cao, Renhai; Svensson, Kristian; Bertilsson, Göran; Asman, Mikael; Tanaka, Hirotoshi; Cao, Yihai; Berkenstam, Anders; Poellinger, Lorenz

    2001-11-01

    Alteration of gene expression is a crucial component of adaptive responses to hypoxia. These responses are mediated by hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs). Here we describe an inhibitory PAS (Per/Arnt/Sim) domain protein, IPAS, which is a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH)/PAS protein structurally related to HIFs. IPAS contains no endogenous transactivation function but demonstrates dominant negative regulation of HIF-mediated control of gene expression. Ectopic expression of IPAS in hepatoma cells selectively impairs induction of genes involved in adaptation to a hypoxic environment, notably the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) gene, and results in retarded tumour growth and tumour vascular density in vivo. In mice, IPAS was predominantly expressed in Purkinje cells of the cerebellum and in corneal epithelium of the eye. Expression of IPAS in the cornea correlates with low levels of expression of the VEGF gene under hypoxic conditions. Application of an IPAS antisense oligonucleotide to the mouse cornea induced angiogenesis under normal oxygen conditions, and demonstrated hypoxia-dependent induction of VEGF gene expression in hypoxic corneal cells. These results indicate a previously unknown mechanism for negative regulation of angiogenesis and maintenance of an avascular phenotype.

  15. Inhibition of cell proliferation by p107, a relative of the retinoblastoma protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, L; van den Heuvel, S; Helin, K; Fattaey, A; Ewen, M; Livingston, D; Dyson, N; Harlow, E

    1993-07-01

    The cellular protein p107 shares many structural and biochemical features with the retinoblastoma gene product, pRB. We have isolated a full-length cDNA for human p107 and have used this clone to study the function of p107. We show that, like pRB, p107 is a potent inhibitor of E2F-mediated trans-activation, and overexpression of p107 can inhibit proliferation in certain cell types, arresting sensitive cells in G1. Several experiments, however, showed that growth inhibition by pRB and p107 did not occur through the same mechanism. First, in the cervical carcinoma cell line C33A, p107 was able to block cell proliferation, whereas pRB could not, even though both proteins were potent inhibitors of E2F-mediated transcription in this cell line. Second, growth arrest by pRB and p107 was rescued differentially by various cell cycle regulators. Third, some mutants of p107 that cannot associate with adenovirus E1A were still able to inhibit cell proliferation, whereas analogous mutants in pRB are known to be unable to block cell growth. Together, these results suggest a biological role of p107 that is related, but not identical, to that of pRB.

  16. Retinoblastoma protein directly interacts with and activates the transcription factor NF-IL6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, P L; Riley, D J; Chen-Kiang, S; Lee, W H

    1996-01-09

    The biological function of the retinoblastoma protein (RB) in the cell division cycle has been extensively documented, but its apparent role in differentiation remains largely unexplored. To investigate how RB is involved in differentiation, the U937 large-cell lymphoma line was induced to differentiate along a monocyte/macrophage lineage. During differentiation RB was found to interact directly through its simian virus 40 large tumor antigen (T antigen)-binding domain with NF-IL6, a member of the CAAT/enhancer-binding protein (C/EBP) family of transcription factors. NF-IL6 utilizes two distinct regions to bind to the hypophosphorylated form of RB in vitro and in cells. Wild-type but not mutant RB enhanced both binding activity of NF-IL6 to its cognate DNA sequences in vitro and promoter transactivation by NF-IL6 in cells. These findings indicate a novel biochemical function of RB: it activates, by an apparent chaperone-like activity, specific transcription factors important for differentiation. This contrasts with its sequestration and inactivation of other transcription factors, such as E2F-1, which promote progression of the cell cycle. Such disparate mechanisms may help to explain the dual role of RB in cell differentiation and the cell division cycle.

  17. Intrinsic nucleic acid dynamics modulates HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein binding to its targets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Bazzi

    Full Text Available HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC is involved in the rearrangement of nucleic acids occurring in key steps of reverse transcription. The protein, through its two zinc fingers, interacts preferentially with unpaired guanines in single-stranded sequences. In mini-cTAR stem-loop, which corresponds to the top half of the cDNA copy of the transactivation response element of the HIV-1 genome, NC was found to exhibit a clear preference for the TGG sequence at the bottom of mini-cTAR stem. To further understand how this site was selected among several potential binding sites containing unpaired guanines, we probed the intrinsic dynamics of mini-cTAR using (13C relaxation measurements. Results of spin relaxation time measurements have been analyzed using the model-free formalism and completed by dispersion relaxation measurements. Our data indicate that the preferentially recognized guanine in the lower part of the stem is exempt of conformational exchange and highly mobile. In contrast, the unrecognized unpaired guanines of mini-cTAR are involved in conformational exchange, probably related to transient base-pairs. These findings support the notion that NC preferentially recognizes unpaired guanines exhibiting a high degree of mobility. The ability of NC to discriminate between close sequences through their dynamic properties contributes to understanding how NC recognizes specific sites within the HIV genome.

  18. Intrinsic Nucleic Acid Dynamics Modulates HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Protein Binding to Its Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzi, Ali; Zargarian, Loussiné; Chaminade, Françoise; De Rocquigny, Hugues; René, Brigitte; Mély, Yves; Fossé, Philippe; Mauffret, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein (NC) is involved in the rearrangement of nucleic acids occurring in key steps of reverse transcription. The protein, through its two zinc fingers, interacts preferentially with unpaired guanines in single-stranded sequences. In mini-cTAR stem-loop, which corresponds to the top half of the cDNA copy of the transactivation response element of the HIV-1 genome, NC was found to exhibit a clear preference for the TGG sequence at the bottom of mini-cTAR stem. To further understand how this site was selected among several potential binding sites containing unpaired guanines, we probed the intrinsic dynamics of mini-cTAR using 13C relaxation measurements. Results of spin relaxation time measurements have been analyzed using the model-free formalism and completed by dispersion relaxation measurements. Our data indicate that the preferentially recognized guanine in the lower part of the stem is exempt of conformational exchange and highly mobile. In contrast, the unrecognized unpaired guanines of mini-cTAR are involved in conformational exchange, probably related to transient base-pairs. These findings support the notion that NC preferentially recognizes unpaired guanines exhibiting a high degree of mobility. The ability of NC to discriminate between close sequences through their dynamic properties contributes to understanding how NC recognizes specific sites within the HIV genome. PMID:22745685

  19. Characterization of an Opa interacting protein 5 involved in lung and esophageal carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koinuma, Junkichi; Akiyama, Hirohiko; Fujita, Masahiro; Hosokawa, Masao; Tsuchiya, Eiju; Kondo, Satoshi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Daigo, Yataro

    2012-03-01

    To identify potential molecular targets for diagnosis, treatment and/or prevention of lung and esophageal carcinomas, we screened for genes that were overexpressed in tumors through gene expression analyses of 120 lung cancers and 19 esophageal squamous-cell carcinomas using a cDNA microarray consisting of 27,648 cDNA or expressed sequence tags. In this process, we identified a gene, Opa interacting protein 5 (OIP5), to be highly transactivated in the majority of lung and esophageal cancers. Immunohistochemical staining using 336 archived non-small cell lung cancers and 305 esophageal squamous-cell carcinomas specimens demonstrated that OIP5 expression was significantly associated with poor prognosis of lung and esophageal cancer patients (P = 0.0053 and 0.0168, respectively), and multivariate analysis confirmed its independent prognostic value for non-small cell lung cancers (P = 0.0112). Suppression of OIP5 expression with siRNA effectively suppressed the growth of cancer cells, whereas the exogenous expression of OIP5 enhanced the growth of cancer cells. In addition, OIP5 protein is likely to be stabilized through its interaction with Raf1. OIP5 is a promising target for developing new prognostic biomarkers and anti-cancer drugs. © 2011 Japanese Cancer Association.

  20. Protein immobilization strategies for protein biochips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusmini, F.; Rusmini, Federica; Zhong, Zhiyuan; Feijen, Jan

    2007-01-01

    In the past few years, protein biochips have emerged as promising proteomic and diagnostic tools for obtaining information about protein functions and interactions. Important technological innovations have been made. However, considerable development is still required, especially regarding protein

  1. Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1-infected cells secrete exosomes that contain Tax protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Elizabeth; Narayanan, Aarthi; Van Duyne, Rachel; Shabbeer-Meyering, Shabana; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Das, Ravi; Afonso, Philippe V; Sampey, Gavin C; Chung, Myung; Popratiloff, Anastas; Shrestha, Bindesh; Sehgal, Mohit; Jain, Pooja; Vertes, Akos; Mahieux, Renaud; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2014-08-08

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. The HTLV-1 transactivator protein Tax controls many critical cellular pathways, including host cell DNA damage response mechanisms, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. Extracellular vesicles called exosomes play critical roles during pathogenic viral infections as delivery vehicles for host and viral components, including proteins, mRNA, and microRNA. We hypothesized that exosomes derived from HTLV-1-infected cells contain unique host and viral proteins that may contribute to HTLV-1-induced pathogenesis. We found exosomes derived from infected cells to contain Tax protein and proinflammatory mediators as well as viral mRNA transcripts, including Tax, HBZ, and Env. Furthermore, we observed that exosomes released from HTLV-1-infected Tax-expressing cells contributed to enhanced survival of exosome-recipient cells when treated with Fas antibody. This survival was cFLIP-dependent, with Tax showing induction of NF-κB in exosome-recipient cells. Finally, IL-2-dependent CTLL-2 cells that received Tax-containing exosomes were protected from apoptosis through activation of AKT. Similar experiments with primary cultures showed protection and survival of peripheral blood mononuclear cells even in the absence of phytohemagglutinin/IL-2. Surviving cells contained more phosphorylated Rb, consistent with the role of Tax in regulation of the cell cycle. Collectively, these results suggest that exosomes may play an important role in extracellular delivery of functional HTLV-1 proteins and mRNA to recipient cells. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Human T-lymphotropic Virus Type 1-infected Cells Secrete Exosomes That Contain Tax Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Elizabeth; Narayanan, Aarthi; Van Duyne, Rachel; Shabbeer-Meyering, Shabana; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Das, Ravi; Afonso, Philippe V.; Sampey, Gavin C.; Chung, Myung; Popratiloff, Anastas; Shrestha, Bindesh; Sehgal, Mohit; Jain, Pooja; Vertes, Akos; Mahieux, Renaud; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2014-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. The HTLV-1 transactivator protein Tax controls many critical cellular pathways, including host cell DNA damage response mechanisms, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. Extracellular vesicles called exosomes play critical roles during pathogenic viral infections as delivery vehicles for host and viral components, including proteins, mRNA, and microRNA. We hypothesized that exosomes derived from HTLV-1-infected cells contain unique host and viral proteins that may contribute to HTLV-1-induced pathogenesis. We found exosomes derived from infected cells to contain Tax protein and proinflammatory mediators as well as viral mRNA transcripts, including Tax, HBZ, and Env. Furthermore, we observed that exosomes released from HTLV-1-infected Tax-expressing cells contributed to enhanced survival of exosome-recipient cells when treated with Fas antibody. This survival was cFLIP-dependent, with Tax showing induction of NF-κB in exosome-recipient cells. Finally, IL-2-dependent CTLL-2 cells that received Tax-containing exosomes were protected from apoptosis through activation of AKT. Similar experiments with primary cultures showed protection and survival of peripheral blood mononuclear cells even in the absence of phytohemagglutinin/IL-2. Surviving cells contained more phosphorylated Rb, consistent with the role of Tax in regulation of the cell cycle. Collectively, these results suggest that exosomes may play an important role in extracellular delivery of functional HTLV-1 proteins and mRNA to recipient cells. PMID:24939845

  3. A NAC domain protein family contributing to the regulation of wood formation in poplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, Misato; Nishikubo, Nobuyuki; Xu, Bo; Yamaguchi, Masatoshi; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Goué, Nadia; Shi, Fusun; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Demura, Taku

    2011-08-01

    Wood harvested from trees is one of the most widely utilized natural materials on our planet. Recent environmental issues have prompted an increase in the demand for wood, especially as a cost-effective and renewable resource for industry and energy, so it is important to understand the process of wood formation. In the present study, we focused on poplar (Populus trichocarpa) NAC domain protein genes which are homologous to well-known Arabidopsis transcription factors regulating the differentiation of xylem vessels and fiber cells. From phylogenetic analysis, we isolated 16 poplar NAC domain protein genes, and named them PtVNS (VND-, NST/SND- and SMB-related proteins) genes. Expression analysis revealed that 12 PtVNS (also called PtrWND) genes including both VND and NST groups were expressed in developing xylem tissue and phloem fiber, whereas in primary xylem vessels, only PtVNS/PtrWND genes of the VND group were expressed. By using the post-translational induction system of Arabidopsis VND7, a master regulator of xylem vessel element differentiation, many poplar genes functioning in xylem vessel differentiation downstream from NAC domain protein genes were identified. Transient expression assays showed the variation in PtVNS/PtrWND transactivation activity toward downstream genes, even between duplicate gene pairs. Furthermore, overexpression of PtVNS/PtrWND genes induced ectopic secondary wall thickening in poplar leaves as well as in Arabidopsis seedlings with different levels of induction efficiency according to the gene. These results suggest that wood formation in poplar is regulated by cooperative functions of the NAC domain proteins. © 2011 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Atypical protein kinase C mediates activation of NF-E2-related factor 2 in response to oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numazawa, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Makie; Yoshida, Aya; Tanaka, Sachiko; Yoshida, Takemi

    2003-08-01

    Transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) regulates the induction of antioxidative proteins, including heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1). Nrf2 is sequestered in the cytoplasm by Keap1 under unstimulated conditions but translocates into the nucleus and transactivates the antioxidant responsive element (ARE) upon exposure to oxidative insults. It has recently been demonstrated that in vitro phosphorylation of Nrf2 on Ser40 by protein kinase C (PKC) facilitates the dissociation of Nrf2 from the Keap1 complex (Huang HC, Nguyen T, and Pickett CB. J Biol Chem 277: 42769-42774, 2002). The present study was designed to examine whether PKC is involved in oxidative stress-mediated nuclear translocation of Nrf2 in vivo and, if so, which PKC isoforms are involved. Induction of HO-1 gene expression by phorone, a glutathione depletor, and 4-hydroxy-2,3-nonenal (4-HNE), an end product of lipid peroxidation, was suppressed by a specific PKC inhibitor, Ro-31-8220, at concentrations that inhibit all isoforms in WI-38 cells. The induction of HO-1 was not affected by prolonged exposure of the cells to 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13 acetate (TPA), suggesting that TPA-insensitive atypical PKC (aPKC) isoforms are involved. An immunocomplex kinase assay revealed that phorone and 4-HNE increased aPKCiota activity. In COS-7 cells, 4-HNE induced nuclear translocation of the Nrf2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion protein, but not the Nrf2(S40A)-GFP mutant. In the absence of oxidative insults, the Nrf2(S40E)-GFP mutant was distributed in the nucleus. The Nrf2-GFP accumulation in the nucleus was induced by coexpression of aPKCiota, but not by a kinase inactive mutant aPKCiota(K274W). The activity of an ARE-driven reporter was increased by coexpression of aPKCiota, and this effect was eliminated by Ro-31-8220 in HepG2 cells. The reporter activity induced by 4-HNE was inhibited by coexpression of aPKCiota(K274W). These results suggest that phosphorylation of Nrf2 Ser40 by aPKC(s) is involved in

  5. Genome Editing for Cancer Therapy: Delivery of Cas9 Protein/sgRNA Plasmid via a Gold Nanocluster/Lipid Core-Shell Nanocarrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Zhang, Lingmin; Xie, Yangzhouyun; Wang, Nuoxin; Tang, Rongbing; Zheng, Wenfu; Jiang, Xingyu

    2017-11-01

    The type II bacterial clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein) system (CRISPR-Cas9) is a powerful toolbox for gene-editing, however, the nonviral delivery of CRISPR-Cas9 to cells or tissues remains a key challenge. This paper reports a strategy to deliver Cas9 protein and single guide RNA (sgRNA) plasmid by a nanocarrier with a core of gold nanoclusters (GNs) and a shell of lipids. By modifying the GNs with HIV-1-transactivator of transcription peptide, the cargo (Cas9/sgRNA) can be delivered into cell nuclei. This strategy is utilized to treat melanoma by designing sgRNA targeting Polo-like kinase-1 ( Plk1 ) of the tumor. The nanoparticle (polyethylene glycol-lipid/GNs/Cas9 protein/sgPlk1 plasmid, LGCP) leads to >70% down-regulation of Plk1 protein expression of A375 cells in vitro. Moreover, the LGCP suppresses melanoma progress by 75% on mice. Thus, this strategy can deliver protein-nucleic acid hybrid agents for gene therapy.

  6. Cloning, expression, and characterization of the TATA-binding protein (TBP) promoter binding factor, a transcription activator of the Acanthamoeba TBP gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, W; Bateman, E

    1995-12-01

    TATA-binding protein (TBP) gene promoter binding factor (TPBF) is a transactivator which binds to the TBP promoter element (TPE) sequence of the Acanthamoeba TBP gene promoter and stimulates transcription in vitro. We have isolated a cDNA clone encoding TPBF. TPBF is a polypeptide of 327 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 37 kDa. The predicted amino acid sequence of TPBF shows no significant homology to other proteins. TPBF has two potential coiled-coil regions, a basic region, a proline-rich region, a histidine-rich N terminus, and a nuclear targeting sequence. The recombinant protein has an apparent molecular mass of 50 kDa, identical with that of TPBF purified from Acanthamoeba. Recombinant TPBF is able to bind DNA and activate transcription with the same specificity as natural Acanthamoeba TPBF, demonstrating the authenticity of the clone. Mobility shift assays of co-translated TPBF polypeptides and chemical cross-linking demonstrate that TPBF is tetrameric in solution and when bound to DNA. Analyses of TPBF mutants show that Coiled-coil II is essential for DNA binding, but Coiled-coil I and the basic region are also involved. TPBF is thus a novel DNA-binding protein with functional similarity to the tumor suppressor protein p53.

  7. Ultraviolet B (UVB) induction of the c-fos promoter is mediated by phospho-cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) binding to CRE and c-fos activator protein 1 site (FAP1) cis elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Melissa; Bowden, G Tim

    2002-06-26

    The ultraviolet B (UVB) portion (280-320 nm) of the ultraviolet spectrum has been shown to contribute to the development of non-melanoma skin cancer in humans. Research in the human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT, revealed that UVB irradiation caused the upregulation of the transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1). The AP-1 complex formed in UVB-irradiated HaCaT cells is specifically composed of c-fos and Jun D. c-Fos expression was induced in a manner that correlated with the UVB-induced activation of AP-1. To investigate how c-fos expression is regulated by UVB irradiation, the role of each of four cis elements within the c-fos promoter was evaluated. Clustered point mutations at the sis inducible element (SIE), serum response element (SRE), c-fos AP-1 site (FAP1), or cyclic AMP response elements (CRE) significantly inhibited UVB induction of the c-fos promoter. This indicated that all four cis elements are required for maximum promoter activity. The CRE and FAP1 elements were the two most active cis elements that mediate the UVB transactivation of c-fos. Homodimers of phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) were induced by UVB irradiation to bind to each of these elements. Therefore, CREB may function as an important regulatory protein in the UVB-induced expression of c-fos.

  8. Heterodimerization of Hox proteins with Pbx1 and oncoprotein E2a-Pbx1 generates unique DNA-binding specifities at nucleotides predicted to contact the N-terminal arm of the Hox homeodomain--demonstration of Hox-dependent targeting of E2a-Pbx1 in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Q; Kamps, M P

    1997-01-09

    Hox proteins control genetic programs that orchestrate development, and a large subset of Hox proteins can bind DNA elements as heterodimers with the Pbx family of homeodomain proteins. A transcriptionally activated version of Pbx1, E2a-Pbx1, is an oncoprotein in human pre-B cell leukemia that strongly suppresses differentiation and retains its ability to heterodimerize with Hox proteins. Because monomeric Hox proteins bind very similar DNA motifs, it is unclear how they activate diverse developmental programs. Here we demonstrate that heterodimers containing different Hox proteins and a common Pbx1 or E2a-Pbx1 partner bind different DNA motifs. Structural models suggest that the specificity of the Hox protein is altered by a conformation change involving residues in the N-terminal arm of the Hox homeodomain. Mutational analysis also supported the hypothesis that unique sequences in the N-terminal arm of the Hox homeodomain are at least partially responsible for mediating this specificity. In vivo, Hox proteins directed E2a-Pbx1-mediated transactivation with moderate specificity to cognate Hox-Pbx motifs. Thus, the development specificity of individual Hox proteins may be mediated, in part, by differential targeting of cellular genes by Pbx1-Hox complexes. Likewise, through its function as a common heterodimer partner, oncoprotein E2a-Pbx1 may be able to interfere with multiple programs of development that are induced by the sequential or simultaneous expression of Hox proteins during hematopoiesis.

  9. Learning about Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Learning About Proteins KidsHealth / For Kids / Learning About Proteins What's in ... from the foods you eat. Different Kinds of Protein Protein from animal sources, such as meat and ...

  10. Protein Kinase CK2 Expression Predicts Relapse Survival in ERα Dependent Breast Cancer, and Modulates ERα Expression in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlon D. Williams

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The heterotetrameric protein kinase CK2 has been associated with oncogenic transformation, and our previous studies have shown that it may affect estrogenic signaling. Here, we investigate the role of the protein kinase CK2 in regulating ERα (estrogen receptor α signaling in breast cancer. We determined the correlation of CK2α expression with relapse free breast cancer patient survival utilizing Kaplan Meier Plotter (kmplot.com/analysis/ to mine breast cancer microarrays repositories. Patients were stratified according to ERα status, histological grade, and hormonal therapy. Luciferase reporter assays and flow cytometry were implemented to determine the impact of CK2 inhibition on ERE-mediated gene expression and expression of ERα protein. CK2α expression is associated with shorter relapse free survival among ERα (+ patients with grade 1 or 2 tumors, as well as among those patients receiving hormonal therapy. Biochemical inhibition of CK2 activity results in increased ER-transactivation as well as increased expression among ERα (+ and ERα (− breast cancer cell lines. These findings suggest that CK2 may contribute to estrogen-independent cell proliferation and breast tumor progression, and may potentially serve as a biomarker and pharmacological target in breast cancer.

  11. PTIP associated protein 1, PA1, is an independent prognostic factor for lymphnode negative breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Takeshita

    Full Text Available Pax transactivation domain interacting protein (PTIP associated protein 1, PA1, was a newly found protein participating in the modulation of transactivity of nuclear receptor super family members such as estrogen receptor (ER, androgen receptor (AR and glucocorticoid receptor (GR. Breast cancer is one of the most life threatening diseases for women and has tight association with estrogen and ER. This study was performed to understand the function of PA1 in breast cancer. The expression of PA1 had been evaluated in a total of 344 primary invasive breast cancer samples and examined the relationship with clinical output, relapse free survival (RFS, breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS. PA1 expression was observed in both nucleus and cytoplasm, however, appeared mainly in nuclear. PA1 nuclear expression was correlated with postmenopausal (P = 0.0097, smaller tumor size (P = 0.0025, negative Ki67 (P = 0.02, positive AR (P = 0.049 and positive ERβ (P = 0.0020. Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated PA1 nuclear positive cases seemed to have a longer survival than negative ones for RFS (P = 0.023 but not for BCSS (P = 0.23. In the Cox hazards model, PA1 nuclear protein expression proved to be a significant prognostic univariate parameter for RFS (P = 0.03, but not for BCSS (P = 0.20. In addition, for those patients without lymphnode metastasis PA1 was found to be an independent prognostic factor for RFS (P = 0.025, which was verified by univariate and multivariate analyses. These investigations suggested PA1 expression could be a potential prognostic indicator for RFS in breast cancer.

  12. Transient degradation of NF-κB proteins in macrophages after interaction with mast cell granules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Ito

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The exposure of the macrophage cell line, J774 to mast cell granules (MCG led to the form ation of altered nuclear transcription factor proteins (NFκBx, which had faster electrophoretic mobility than the p50 homodimer of NF-κB, but retained comparable DNA binding capacity. Antibodies to N-terminal peptides of p50, p52, p65 or c-Rel supershifted only a fraction of NF-κBx. Western blot analyses revealed that nuclear p65 and c-Rel were progressively degraded after exposure to MCG, whereas nuclear p50 appeared to be unaffected. In contrast, cytoplasmic p50, p65, c-Rel as well as IkBα remained intact after MCG treatment, although p52 was clearly degraded. In comparison to J774 cells, incubation of m ouse peritoneal macrophages with MCG resulted in more extensive alterations to NF-κB proteins. The alterations in NF-κB proteins did not affect the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS or TNF-α mRNA in J774 cells. These data indicate that exposure of J774 cells to MCG leads to generation of altered nuclear p52, p65 and c-Rel, which retain intact N-terminal peptides, specific oligonucleotide binding and transactivating activity. On the other hand, in peritoneal macrophages, MCG induce more extensive modifications to NF-κB proteins with associated inhibition of iNOS or TNF-α mRNA expression.

  13. Fusion-protein-assisted protein crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobe, Bostjan; Ve, Thomas; Williams, Simon J

    2015-07-01

    Fusion proteins can be used directly in protein crystallization to assist crystallization in at least two different ways. In one approach, the `heterologous fusion-protein approach', the fusion partner can provide additional surface area to promote crystal contact formation. In another approach, the `fusion of interacting proteins approach', protein assemblies can be stabilized by covalently linking the interacting partners. The linker connecting the proteins plays different roles in the two applications: in the first approach a rigid linker is required to reduce conformational heterogeneity; in the second, conversely, a flexible linker is required that allows the native interaction between the fused proteins. The two approaches can also be combined. The recent applications of fusion-protein technology in protein crystallization from the work of our own and other laboratories are briefly reviewed.

  14. Inhibitory effect on activator protein-1, nuclear factor-kappaB, and cell transformation by extracts of strawberries (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiow Y; Feng, Rentian; Lu, Yongju; Bowman, Linda; Ding, Min

    2005-05-18

    The inhibitory effects of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa Duch.) antioxidant enzymes on tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) or ultraviolet-B (UVB) induced activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) were studied. The inhibitory effects of strawberry extracts on the proliferation and transformation of human and mouse cancer cells were also evaluated. Strawberries had high activities of glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, guaiacol peroxidase, ascorbate peroxidase, and glutathione reductase. Strawberry extracts inhibited the proliferation of human lung epithelial cancer cell line A549 and decreased TPA-induced neoplastic transformation of JB6 P+ mouse epidermal cells. Pretreatment of JB6 P+ mouse epidermal cells with strawberry extract resulted in the inhibition of both UVB- and TPA-induced AP-1 and NF-kappaB transactivation. Furthermore, strawberry extract also blocked TPA-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) and UVB-induced phosphorylation of ERKs and JNK kinase in JB6 P+ mouse epidermal cell culture. These results suggest that the ability of strawberries to block UVB- and TPA-induced AP-1 and NF-kappaB activation may be due to their antioxidant properties and their ability to reduce oxidative stress. The oxidative events that regulate AP-1 and NF-kappaB transactivation can be important molecular targets for cancer prevention. The strawberries may be highly effective as a chemopreventive agent that acts by targeting the down-regulation of AP-1 and NF-kappaB activities, blocking MAPK signaling, and suppressing cancer cell proliferation and transformation.

  15. Membrane bending by protein-protein crowding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak, Jeanne C; Schmid, Eva M; Ryan, Christopher J; Ann, Hyoung Sook; Sasaki, Darryl Y; Sherman, Michael B; Geissler, Phillip L; Fletcher, Daniel A; Hayden, Carl C

    2012-09-01

    Curved membranes are an essential feature of dynamic cellular structures, including endocytic pits, filopodia protrusions and most organelles. It has been proposed that specialized proteins induce curvature by binding to membranes through two primary mechanisms: membrane scaffolding by curved proteins or complexes; and insertion of wedge-like amphipathic helices into the membrane. Recent computational studies have raised questions about the efficiency of the helix-insertion mechanism, predicting that proteins must cover nearly 100% of the membrane surface to generate high curvature, an improbable physiological situation. Thus, at present, we lack a sufficient physical explanation of how protein attachment bends membranes efficiently. On the basis of studies of epsin1 and AP180, proteins involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis, we propose a third general mechanism for bending fluid cellular membranes: protein-protein crowding. By correlating membrane tubulation with measurements of protein densities on membrane surfaces, we demonstrate that lateral pressure generated by collisions between bound proteins drives bending. Whether proteins attach by inserting a helix or by binding lipid heads with an engineered tag, protein coverage above ~20% is sufficient to bend membranes. Consistent with this crowding mechanism, we find that even proteins unrelated to membrane curvature, such as green fluorescent protein (GFP), can bend membranes when sufficiently concentrated. These findings demonstrate a highly efficient mechanism by which the crowded protein environment on the surface of cellular membranes can contribute to membrane shape change.

  16. EDITORIAL: Precision proteins Precision proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-06-01

    Since the birth of modern day medicine, during the times of Hippocrates in ancient Greece, the profession has developed from the rudimentary classification of disease into a rigorous science with an inspiring capability to treat and cure. Scientific methodology has distilled clinical diagnostic tools from the early arts of prognosis, which used to rely as much on revelation and prophecy, as intuition and judgement [1]. Over the past decade, research into the interactions between proteins and nanosystems has provided some ingenious and apt techniques for delving into the intricacies of anatomical systems. In vivo biosensing has emerged as a vibrant field of research, as much of medical diagnosis relies on the detection of substances or an imbalance in the chemicals in the body. The inherent properties of nanoscale structures, such as cantilevers, make them well suited to biosensing applications that demand the detection of molecules at very low concentrations. Measurable deflections in cantilevers functionalised with antibodies provide quantitative indicators of the presence of specific antigens when the two react. Such developments have roused mounting interest in the interactions of proteins with nanostructures, such as carbon nanotubes [3], which have demonstrated great potential as generic biomarkers. Plasmonic properties are also being exploited in sensing applications, such as the molecular sentinel recently devised by researchers in the US. The device uses the plasmonic properties of a silver nanoparticle linked to a Raman labelled hairpin DNA probe to signal changes in the probe geometry resulting from interactions with substances in the environment. Success stories so far include the detection of two specific genes associated with breast cancer [4]. A greater understanding of how RNA interference regulates gene expression has highlighted the potential of using this natural process as another agent for combating disease in personalized medicine. However, the

  17. Hepatic overexpression of idol increases circulating protein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 in mice and hamsters via dual mechanisms: sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 and low-density lipoprotein receptor-dependent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Makoto; Terao, Yoshio; Ayaori, Makoto; Uto-Kondo, Harumi; Iizuka, Maki; Yogo, Makiko; Hagisawa, Kosuke; Takiguchi, Shunichi; Yakushiji, Emi; Nakaya, Kazuhiro; Ogura, Masatsune; Komatsu, Tomohiro; Ikewaki, Katsunori

    2014-06-01

    Low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) is degraded by inducible degrader of LDLR (Idol) and protein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9), thereby regulating circulating LDL levels. However, it remains unclear whether, and if so how, these LDLR degraders affect each other. We therefore investigated effects of liver-specific expression of Idol on LDL/PCSK9 metabolism in mice and hamsters. Injection of adenoviral vector expressing Idol (Ad-Idol) induced a liver-specific reduction in LDLR expression which, in turn, increased very-low-density lipoprotein/LDL cholesterol levels in wild-type mice because of delayed LDL catabolism. Interestingly, hepatic Idol overexpression markedly increased plasma PCSK9 levels. In LDLR-deficient mice, plasma PCSK9 levels were already elevated at baseline and unchanged by Idol overexpression, which was comparable with the observation for Ad-Idol-injected wild-type mice, indicating that Idol-induced PCSK9 elevation depended on LDLR. In wild-type mice, but not in LDLR-deficient mice, Ad-Idol enhanced hepatic PCSK9 expression, with activation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 and subsequently increased expression of its target genes. Supporting in vivo findings, Idol transactivated PCSK9/LDLR in sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2/LDLR-dependent manners in vitro. Furthermore, an in vivo kinetic study using (125)I-labeled PCSK9 revealed delayed clearance of circulating PCSK9, which could be another mechanism. Finally, to extend these findings into cholesteryl ester transfer protein-expressing animals, we repeated the above in vivo experiments in hamsters and obtained similar results. A vicious cycle in LDLR degradation might be generated by PCSK9 induced by hepatic Idol overexpression via dual mechanisms: sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2/LDLR. Furthermore, these effects would be independent of cholesteryl ester transfer protein expression. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Efficient expression of a soluble lipid transfer protein (LTP) of Platanus orientalis using short peptide tags and structural comparison with the natural form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salari, Farhad; Vahedi, Fatemeh; Chamani, Jamshidkhan; Varasteh, Abdolreza; Ketabdar, Hanieh; Sankian, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Successful recombinant allergen-based immunotherapy has drawn a great deal of attention to use recombinant allergens for new therapeutic and/or diagnostic strategies. The Escherichia coli expression system is frequently used to produce recombinant allergens; however, protein expression in E. coli often results in inclusion bodies. Here, we focused on the expression of two recombinant soluble forms of Pla or 3 using solubility-enhancing peptide tags, human immune deficiency virus type 1 transactivator of transcription core domain and poly-arginine-lysine: rTAT-Pla or 3 and rPoly-Arg-Lys-Pla or 3. Structural characteristics and IgE reactivity of purified recombinant proteins were compared with natural Pla or 3 (nPla or 3) isolated from Platanus orientalis using circular dichroism spectra, fluorescence spectroscopy, and immunoblotting. Likewise, intrinsic viscosity and Stokes radius of the natural and recombinant Pla or 3 allergens were determined to analyze structural compactness in aqueous media. The results indicate high-level solubility and efficient expression of the fusion proteins (rTAT-Pla or 3 and rPoly-Arg-Lys-Pla or 3) compared with the wild-type recombinant. Furthermore, the similar structural characteristics and IgE-binding activities of the fusion proteins to nPla or 3 provide a promising tool for allergy diagnosis and treatment. © 2014 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Human I-mfa domain proteins specifically interact with KSHV LANA and affect its regulation of Wnt signaling-dependent transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusano, Shuichi, E-mail: skusano@m2.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Division of Persistent and Oncogenic Viruses, Center for Chronic Viral Diseases, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Eizuru, Yoshito [Division of Persistent and Oncogenic Viruses, Center for Chronic Viral Diseases, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)

    2010-06-04

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV)-encoded latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) protein has been reported to interact with glycogen synthase kinase 3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}) and to negatively regulate its activity, leading to stimulation of GSK-3{beta}-dependent {beta}-catenin degradation. We show here that the I-mfa domain proteins, HIC (human I-mfa domain-containing protein) and I-mfa (inhibitor of MyoD family a), interacted in vivo with LANA through their C-terminal I-mfa domains. This interaction affected the intracellular localization of HIC, inhibited the LANA-dependent transactivation of a {beta}-catenin-regulated reporter construct, and decreased the level of the LANA.GSK-3{beta} complex. These data reveal for the first time that I-mfa domain proteins interact with LANA and negatively regulate LANA-mediated activation of Wnt signaling-dependent transcription by inhibiting the formation of the LANA.GSK-3{beta} complex.

  20. Protein docking prediction using predicted protein-protein interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Bin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many important cellular processes are carried out by protein complexes. To provide physical pictures of interacting proteins, many computational protein-protein prediction methods have been developed in the past. However, it is still difficult to identify the correct docking complex structure within top ranks among alternative conformations. Results We present a novel protein docking algorithm that utilizes imperfect protein-protein binding interface prediction for guiding protein docking. Since the accuracy of protein binding site prediction varies depending on cases, the challenge is to develop a method which does not deteriorate but improves docking results by using a binding site prediction which may not be 100% accurate. The algorithm, named PI-LZerD (using Predicted Interface with Local 3D Zernike descriptor-based Docking algorithm, is based on a pair wise protein docking prediction algorithm, LZerD, which we have developed earlier. PI-LZerD starts from performing docking prediction using the provided protein-protein binding interface prediction as constraints, which is followed by the second round of docking with updated docking interface information to further improve docking conformation. Benchmark results on bound and unbound cases show that PI-LZerD consistently improves the docking prediction accuracy as compared with docking without using binding site prediction or using the binding site prediction as post-filtering. Conclusion We have developed PI-LZerD, a pairwise docking algorithm, which uses imperfect protein-protein binding interface prediction to improve docking accuracy. PI-LZerD consistently showed better prediction accuracy over alternative methods in the series of benchmark experiments including docking using actual docking interface site predictions as well as unbound docking cases.

  1. Bisphenol A at a low concentration boosts mouse spermatogonial cell proliferation by inducing the G protein-coupled receptor 30 expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Zhi-Guo [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Huang, Wei [Department of Chemical Biology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Peking University Health Science Center, Beijing 100091 (China); Liu, Yu-Xiang [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Zhu, Ben-Zhan, E-mail: bzhu@rcees.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Linus Pauling Institute, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is one of the most prevalent chemicals in daily-use materials, therefore, human exposure to BPA is ubiquitous. We found that low concentrations of BPA stimulate the spermatogonial GC-1 cells proliferation by G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR30)-mediated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-extracellular regulated kinase (ERK)-c-Fos pathway. However, through the same pathway GPR30 expression has been shown to be induced by EGF, an EGFR ligand. Thus, we want to know if low concentrations of BPA are able to induce the GPR30 expression and the possible mechanism(s) in GC-1 cells. By transient transfection with expression plasmids, 10{sup −9} M BPA significantly transactivates the Gpr30-5′-flanking region through activating the GPR30, cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG), estrogen receptor-α (ER-α), and EFGR-ERK pathways. Furthermore, an activator protein-1 (AP-1) site located within this region is found to be responsible for the transactivation of BPA. Expectedly, through the same pathways, BPA significantly induces the gene and protein expression of GPR30. c-Fos is further observed to be strongly recruited to the AP-1 site in a chromatin immunoprecipitation assay and its dysfunction on the AP-1 site markedly suppresses the expression of GPR30, p-ERK1/2, p-Ser118-ER-α and cell proliferation by BPA. Our results demonstrate that a low-concentration BPA induces GPR30 expression through the GPR30-EFGR-ERK-c-Fos, ER-α, and PKG pathways, presumably boosting the cells proliferation via a regulatory loop. The present study provides a novel insight into the potential role of GPR30 in the initiation and progression of male germ cell cancer induced by environmentally relevant BPA. - Highlights: ► Low concentrations of BPA activate the PKG and GPR30-EFGR-ERK-ER-α pathways. ► Low concentrations of BPA activate the AP-1 site of Gpr30-5′-flanking region. ► Low concentrations of BPA induce the expression of GPR30 gene and protein. ► Low

  2. Shotgun protein sequencing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faulon, Jean-Loup Michel; Heffelfinger, Grant S.

    2009-06-01

    A novel experimental and computational technique based on multiple enzymatic digestion of a protein or protein mixture that reconstructs protein sequences from sequences of overlapping peptides is described in this SAND report. This approach, analogous to shotgun sequencing of DNA, is to be used to sequence alternative spliced proteins, to identify post-translational modifications, and to sequence genetically engineered proteins.

  3. Ectopic expression of a basic helix-loop-helix gene transactivates parallel pathways of proanthocyanidin biosynthesis. structure, expression analysis, and genetic control of leucoanthocyanidin 4-reductase and anthocyanidin reductase genes in Lotus corniculatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolocci, Francesco; Robbins, Mark P; Madeo, Laura; Arcioni, Sergio; Martens, Stefan; Damiani, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) are plant secondary metabolites and are composed primarily of catechin and epicatechin units in higher plant species. Due to the ability of PAs to bind reversibly with plant proteins to improve digestion and reduce bloat, engineering this pathway in leaves is a major goal for forage breeders. Here, we report the cloning and expression analysis of anthocyanidin reductase (ANR) and leucoanthocyanidin 4-reductase (LAR), two genes encoding enzymes committed to epicatechin and catechin biosynthesis, respectively, in Lotus corniculatus. We show the presence of two LAR gene families (LAR1 and LAR2) and that the steady-state levels of ANR and LAR1 genes correlate with the levels of PAs in leaves of wild-type and transgenic plants. Interestingly, ANR and LAR1, but not LAR2, genes produced active proteins following heterologous expression in Escherichia coli and are affected by the same basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that promotes PA accumulation in cells of palisade and spongy mesophyll. This study provides direct evidence that the same subclass of transcription factors can mediate the expression of the structural genes of both branches of PA biosynthesis.

  4. Our interests in protein-protein interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    protein interactions. Evolution of P-P partnerships. Evolution of P-P structures. Evolutionary dynamics of P-P interactions. Dynamics of P-P interaction network. Host-pathogen interactions. CryoEM mapping of gigantic protein assemblies.

  5. Inhibition of cell proliferation by p107, a relative of the retinoblastoma protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, L; van den Heuvel, S; Helin, K

    1993-01-01

    The cellular protein p107 shares many structural and biochemical features with the retinoblastoma gene product, pRB. We have isolated a full-length cDNA for human p107 and have used this clone to study the function of p107. We show that, like pRB, p107 is a potent inhibitor of E2F-mediated trans......-activation, and overexpression of p107 can inhibit proliferation in certain cell types, arresting sensitive cells in G1. Several experiments, however, showed that growth inhibition by pRB and p107 did not occur through the same mechanism. First, in the cervical carcinoma cell line C33A, p107 was able to block cell proliferation...... to inhibit cell proliferation, whereas analogous mutants in pRB are known to be unable to block cell growth. Together, these results suggest a biological role of p107 that is related, but not identical, to that of pRB....

  6. G Protein-Coupled Estrogen Receptor-Selective Ligands Modulate Endometrial Tumor Growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whitney K. Petrie

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial carcinoma is the most common cancer of the female reproductive tract. GPER/GPR30 is a 7-transmembrane spanning G protein-coupled receptor that has been identified as the third estrogen receptor, in addition to ERα and ERβ. High GPER expression is predictive of poor survival in endometrial and ovarian cancer, but despite this, the estrogen-mediated signaling pathways and specific estrogen receptors involved in endometrial cancer remain unclear. Here, employing ERα-negative Hec50 endometrial cancer cells, we demonstrate that GPER mediates estrogen-stimulated activation of ERK and PI3K via matrix metalloproteinase activation and subsequent transactivation of the EGFR and that ER-targeted therapeutic agents (4-hydroxytamoxifen, ICI182,780/fulvestrant, and Raloxifene, the phytoestrogen genistein, and the “ERα-selective” agonist propylpyrazole triol also function as GPER agonists. Furthermore, xenograft tumors of Hec50 cells yield enhanced growth with G-1 and estrogen, the latter being inhibited by GPER-selective pharmacologic antagonism with G36. These results have important implications with respect to the use of putatively ER-selective ligands and particularly for the widespread long-term use of “ER-targeted” therapeutics. Moreover, our findings shed light on the potential mechanisms of SERM/SERD side effects reported in many clinical studies. Finally, our results provide the first demonstration that pharmacological inhibition of GPER activity in vivo prevents estrogen-mediated tumor growth.

  7. Genome-wide binding map of the HIV-1 Tat protein to the human genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Marban

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 Trans-Activator of Transcription (Tat protein binds to multiple host cellular factors and greatly enhances the level of transcription of the HIV genome. While Tat's control of viral transcription is well-studied, much less is known about the interaction of Tat with the human genome. Here, we report the genome-wide binding map of Tat to the human genome in Jurkat T cells using chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with next-generation sequencing. Surprisingly, we found that ~53% of the Tat target regions are within DNA repeat elements, greater than half of which are Alu sequences. The remaining target regions are located in introns and distal intergenic regions; only ~7% of Tat-bound regions are near transcription start sites (TSS at gene promoters. Interestingly, Tat binds to promoters of genes that, in Jurkat cells, are bound by the ETS1 transcription factor, the CBP histone acetyltransferase and/or are enriched for histone H3 lysine 4 tri-methylation (H3K4me3 and H3K27me3. Tat binding is associated with genes enriched with functions in T cell biology and immune response. Our data reveal that Tat's interaction with the host genome is more extensive than previously thought, with potentially important implications for the viral life cycle.

  8. Evolution of protein-protein interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Evolution of protein-protein interactions · Our interests in protein-protein interactions · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Slide 5 · Slide 6 · Slide 7 · Slide 8 · Slide 9 · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Slide 14 · Slide 15 · Slide 16 · Slide 17 · Slide 18 · Slide 19 · Slide 20.

  9. Ontological visualization of protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill David P

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular processes require the interaction of many proteins across several cellular compartments. Determining the collective network of such interactions is an important aspect of understanding the role and regulation of individual proteins. The Gene Ontology (GO is used by model organism databases and other bioinformatics resources to provide functional annotation of proteins. The annotation process provides a mechanism to document the binding of one protein with another. We have constructed protein interaction networks for mouse proteins utilizing the information encoded in the GO annotations. The work reported here presents a methodology for integrating and visualizing information on protein-protein interactions. Results GO annotation at Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI captures 1318 curated, documented interactions. These include 129 binary interactions and 125 interaction involving three or more gene products. Three networks involve over 30 partners, the largest involving 109 proteins. Several tools are available at MGI to visualize and analyze these data. Conclusions Curators at the MGI database annotate protein-protein interaction data from experimental reports from the literature. Integration of these data with the other types of data curated at MGI places protein binding data into the larger context of mouse biology and facilitates the generation of new biological hypotheses based on physical interactions among gene products.

  10. 24-hour urine protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urine protein - 24 hour; Chronic kidney disease - urine protein; Kidney failure - urine protein ... Heart failure High blood pressure during pregnancy ( preeclampsia ) Kidney disease caused by diabetes, high blood pressure, autoimmune disorders, ...

  11. Protein-losing enteropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007338.htm Protein-losing enteropathy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Protein-losing enteropathy is an abnormal loss of protein ...

  12. Protein in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - protein ... Protein foods are broken down into parts called amino acids during digestion. The human body needs a ... to eat animal products to get all the protein you need in your diet. Amino acids are ...

  13. Oligomeric protein structure networks: insights into protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brinda KV

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein association is essential for a variety of cellular processes and hence a large number of investigations are being carried out to understand the principles of protein-protein interactions. In this study, oligomeric protein structures are viewed from a network perspective to obtain new insights into protein association. Structure graphs of proteins have been constructed from a non-redundant set of protein oligomer crystal structures by considering amino acid residues as nodes and the edges are based on the strength of the non-covalent interactions between the residues. The analysis of such networks has been carried out in terms of amino acid clusters and hubs (highly connected residues with special emphasis to protein interfaces. Results A variety of interactions such as hydrogen bond, salt bridges, aromatic and hydrophobic interactions, which occur at the interfaces are identified in a consolidated manner as amino acid clusters at the interface, from this study. Moreover, the characterization of the highly connected hub-forming residues at the interfaces and their comparison with the hubs from the non-interface regions and the non-hubs in the interface regions show that there is a predominance of charged interactions at the interfaces. Further, strong and weak interfaces are identified on the basis of the interaction strength between amino acid residues and the sizes of the interface clusters, which also show that many protein interfaces are stronger than their monomeric protein cores. The interface strengths evaluated based on the interface clusters and hubs also correlate well with experimentally determined dissociation constants for known complexes. Finally, the interface hubs identified using the present method correlate very well with experimentally determined hotspots in the interfaces of protein complexes obtained from the Alanine Scanning Energetics database (ASEdb. A few predictions of interface hot

  14. HTLV-1 Tax protein recruitment into IKKε and TBK1 kinase complexes enhances IFN-I expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diani, Erica; Avesani, Francesca; Bergamo, Elisa; Cremonese, Giorgia; Bertazzoni, Umberto; Romanelli, Maria Grazia

    2015-02-01

    The Tax protein expressed by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) plays a pivotal role in the deregulation of cellular pathways involved in the immune response, inflammation, cell survival, and cancer. Many of these effects derive from Tax multiple interactions with host factors, including the subunits of the IKK-complex that are required for NF-κB activation. IKKɛ and TBK1 are two IKK-related kinases that allow the phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factors that trigger IFN type I gene expression. We observed that IKKɛ and TBK1 recruit Tax into cellular immunocomplexes. We also found that TRAF3, which regulates cell receptor signaling effectors, forms complexes with Tax. Transactivation analyses revealed that expression of Tax, in presence of IKKɛ and TBK1, enhances IFN-β promoter activity, whereas the activation of NF-κB promoter is not modified. We propose that Tax may be recruited into the TBK1/IKKɛ complexes as a scaffolding-adaptor protein that enhances IFN-I gene expression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Genome-wide targeting of the epigenetic regulatory protein CTCF to gene promoters by the transcription factor TFII-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña-Hernández, Rodrigo; Marques, Maud; Hilmi, Khalid; Zhao, Teijun; Saad, Amine; Alaoui-Jamali, Moulay A; del Rincon, Sonia V; Ashworth, Todd; Roy, Ananda L; Emerson, Beverly M; Witcher, Michael

    2015-02-17

    CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) is a key regulator of nuclear chromatin structure and gene regulation. The impact of CTCF on transcriptional output is highly varied, ranging from repression to transcriptional pausing and transactivation. The multifunctional nature of CTCF may be directed solely through remodeling chromatin architecture. However, another hypothesis is that the multifunctional nature of CTCF is mediated, in part, through differential association with protein partners having unique functions. Consistent with this hypothesis, our mass spectrometry analyses of CTCF interacting partners reveal a previously undefined association with the transcription factor general transcription factor II-I (TFII-I). Biochemical fractionation of CTCF indicates that a distinct CTCF complex incorporating TFII-I is assembled on DNA. Unexpectedly, we found that the interaction between CTCF and TFII-I is essential for directing CTCF to the promoter proximal regulatory regions of target genes across the genome, particularly at genes involved in metabolism. At genes coregulated by CTCF and TFII-I, we find knockdown of TFII-I results in diminished CTCF binding, lack of cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) recruitment, and an attenuation of RNA polymerase II phosphorylation at serine 5. Phenotypically, knockdown of TFII-I alters the cellular response to metabolic stress. Our data indicate that TFII-I directs CTCF binding to target genes, and in turn the two proteins cooperate to recruit CDK8 and enhance transcription initiation.

  16. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear protein EBNA3C directly induces expression of AID and somatic mutations in B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalchschmidt, Jens S; Bashford-Rogers, Rachael; Paschos, Kostas; Gillman, Adam C T; Styles, Christine T; Kellam, Paul; Allday, Martin J

    2016-05-30

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the enzyme responsible for induction of sequence variation in immunoglobulins (Igs) during the process of somatic hypermutation (SHM) and also Ig class switching, can have a potent mutator phenotype in the development of lymphoma. Using various Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) recombinants, we provide definitive evidence that the viral nuclear protein EBNA3C is essential in EBV-infected primary B cells for the induction of AID mRNA and protein. Using lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) established with EBV recombinants conditional for EBNA3C function, this was confirmed, and it was shown that transactivation of the AID gene (AICDA) is associated with EBNA3C binding to highly conserved regulatory elements located proximal to and upstream of the AICDA transcription start site. EBNA3C binding initiated epigenetic changes to chromatin at specific sites across the AICDA locus. Deep sequencing of cDNA corresponding to the IgH V-D-J region from the conditional LCL was used to formally show that SHM is activated by functional EBNA3C and induction of AID. These data, showing the direct targeting and induction of functional AID by EBNA3C, suggest a novel role for EBV in the etiology of B cell cancers, including endemic Burkitt lymphoma. © 2016 Kalchschmidt et al.

  17. Protein-x of hepatitis B virus in interaction with CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα - an in silico analysis approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamadkhani Ashraf

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Even though many functions of protein-x from the Hepatitis B virus (HBV have been revealed, the nature of protein-x is yet unknown. This protein is well-known for its transactivation activity through interaction with several cellular transcription factors, it is also known as an oncogene. In this work, we have presented computational approaches to design a model to show the structure of protein-x and its respective binding sites associated with the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα. C/EBPα belongs to the bZip family of transcription factors, which activates transcription of several genes through its binding sites in liver and fat cells. The C/EBPα has been shown to bind and modulate enhancer I and the enhancer II/core promoter of HBV. In this study using the bioinformatics tools we tried to present a reliable model for the protein-x interaction with C/EBPα. Results The amino acid sequence of protein-x was extracted from UniProt [UniProt:Q80IU5] and the x-ray crystal structure of the partial CCAAT-enhancer α [PDB:1NWQ] was retrieved from the Protein Data Bank (PDB. Similarity search for protein-x was carried out by psi-blast and bl2seq using NCBI [GenBank: BAC65106.1] and Local Meta-Threading-Server (LOMETS was used as a threading server for determining the maximum tertiary structure similarities. Advanced MODELLER was implemented to design a comparative model, however, due to the lack of a suitable template, Quark was used for ab initio tertiary structure prediction. The PDB-blast search indicated a maximum of 23% sequence identity and 33% similarity with crystal structure of the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus leader protease Nsp1α [PDB:3IFU]. This meant that protein-x does not have a suitable template to predict its tertiary structure using comparative modeling tools, therefore we used QUARK as an ab initio 3D prediction approach. Docking results from the ab initio tertiary structure of

  18. Orphan Nuclear Receptor Small Heterodimer Partner Negatively Regulates Growth Hormone-mediated Induction of Hepatic Gluconeogenesis through Inhibition of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 5 (STAT5) Transactivation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Deuk; Li, Tiangang; Ahn, Seung-Won; Kim, Don-Kyu; Lee, Ji-Min; Hwang, Seung-Lark; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Lee, Chul-Ho; Lee, In-Kyu; Chiang, John Y. L.; Choi, Hueng-Sik

    2012-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) is a key metabolic regulator mediating glucose and lipid metabolism. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a member of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase superfamily and regulates cell cycle progression. The orphan nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner (SHP: NR0B2) plays a pivotal role in regulating metabolic processes. Here, we studied the role of ATM on GH-dependent regulation of hepatic gluconeogenesis in the liver. GH induced phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose 6-phosphatase gene expression in primary hepatocytes. GH treatment and adenovirus-mediated STAT5 overexpression in hepatocytes increased glucose production, which was blocked by a JAK2 inhibitor, AG490, dominant negative STAT5, and STAT5 knockdown. We identified a STAT5 binding site on the PEPCK gene promoter using reporter assays and point mutation analysis. Up-regulation of SHP by metformin-mediated activation of the ATM-AMP-activated protein kinase pathway led to inhibition of GH-mediated induction of hepatic gluconeogenesis, which was abolished by an ATM inhibitor, KU-55933. Immunoprecipitation studies showed that SHP physically interacted with STAT5 and inhibited STAT5 recruitment on the PEPCK gene promoter. GH-induced hepatic gluconeogenesis was decreased by either metformin or Ad-SHP, whereas the inhibition by metformin was abolished by SHP knockdown. Finally, the increase of hepatic gluconeogenesis following GH treatment was significantly higher in the liver of SHP null mice compared with that of wild-type mice. Overall, our results suggest that the ATM-AMP-activated protein kinase-SHP network, as a novel mechanism for regulating hepatic glucose homeostasis via a GH-dependent pathway, may be a potential therapeutic target for insulin resistance. PMID:22977252

  19. NCYM, a Cis-antisense gene of MYCN, encodes a de novo evolved protein that inhibits GSK3β resulting in the stabilization of MYCN in human neuroblastomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Suenaga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The rearrangement of pre-existing genes has long been thought of as the major mode of new gene generation. Recently, de novo gene birth from non-genic DNA was found to be an alternative mechanism to generate novel protein-coding genes. However, its functional role in human disease remains largely unknown. Here we show that NCYM, a cis-antisense gene of the MYCN oncogene, initially thought to be a large non-coding RNA, encodes a de novo evolved protein regulating the pathogenesis of human cancers, particularly neuroblastoma. The NCYM gene is evolutionally conserved only in the taxonomic group containing humans and chimpanzees. In primary human neuroblastomas, NCYM is 100% co-amplified and co-expressed with MYCN, and NCYM mRNA expression is associated with poor clinical outcome. MYCN directly transactivates both NCYM and MYCN mRNA, whereas NCYM stabilizes MYCN protein by inhibiting the activity of GSK3β, a kinase that promotes MYCN degradation. In contrast to MYCN transgenic mice, neuroblastomas in MYCN/NCYM double transgenic mice were frequently accompanied by distant metastases, behavior reminiscent of human neuroblastomas with MYCN amplification. The NCYM protein also interacts with GSK3β, thereby stabilizing the MYCN protein in the tumors of the MYCN/NCYM double transgenic mice. Thus, these results suggest that GSK3β inhibition by NCYM stabilizes the MYCN protein both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, the survival of MYCN transgenic mice bearing neuroblastoma was improved by treatment with NVP-BEZ235, a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor shown to destabilize MYCN via GSK3β activation. In contrast, tumors caused in MYCN/NCYM double transgenic mice showed chemo-resistance to the drug. Collectively, our results show that NCYM is the first de novo evolved protein known to act as an oncopromoting factor in human cancer, and suggest that de novo evolved proteins may functionally characterize human disease.

  20. Protein surface shielding agents in protein crystallization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hašek, J.

    2011-01-01

    The crystallization process can be controlled by protein surface shielding agents blocking undesirable competitive adhesion modes during non-equilibrium processes of deposition of protein molecules on the surface of growing crystalline blocks. The hypothesis is based on a number of experimental proofs from diffraction experiments and also retrieved from the Protein Data Bank. The molecules adhering temporarily on the surface of protein molecules change the propensity of protein molecules to deposit on the crystal surface in a definite position and orientation. The concepts of competitive adhesion modes and protein surface shielding agents acting on the surface of molecules in a non-equilibrium process of protein crystallization provide a useful platform for the control of crystallization. The desirable goal, i.e. a transient preference of a single dominating adhesion mode between protein molecules during crystallization, leads to uniform deposition of proteins in a crystal. This condition is the most important factor for diffraction quality and thus also for the accuracy of protein structure determination. The presented hypothesis is a generalization of the experimentally well proven behaviour of hydrophilic polymers on the surface of protein molecules of other compounds

  1. Foxp3-dependent transformation of human primary CD4+ T lymphocytes by the retroviral protein tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Huan; Cheng, Hua

    2015-10-23

    The retroviral Tax proteins of human T cell leukemia virus type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1 and -2) are highly homologous viral transactivators. Both viral proteins can immortalize human primary CD4+ memory T cells, but when expressed alone they rarely transform T cells. In the present study, we found that the Tax proteins displayed a differential ability to immortalize human CD4+Foxp3+ T cells with characteristic expression of CTLA-4 and GITR. Because epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) was reportedly expressed and activated in a subset of CD4+Foxp3+ T cells, we introduced an activated EGFR into Tax-immortalized CD4+Foxp3+ T cells. We observed that these modified cells were grown independently of exogenous IL-2, correlating with a T cell transformation phenotype. In Tax-immortalized CD4+Foxp3- T cells, ectopic expression of Foxp3 was a prerequisite for Tax transformation of T cells. Accordingly, treatment of the transformed T cells with erlotinib, a selective inhibitor of EGFR, induced degradation of EGFR in lysosome, consequently causing T cell growth inhibition. Further, we identified autophagy as a crucial cellular survival pathway for the transformed T cells. Silencing key autophagy molecules including Beclin1, Atg5 and PI3 kinase class III (PI3KC3) resulted in drastic impairment of T cell growth. Our data, therefore, unveiled a previously unidentified role of Foxp3 in T cell transformation, providing a molecular basis for HTLV-1 transformation of CD4+Foxp3+ T cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Serine / threonine protein phosphatase 5 (PP5 participates in the regulation of glucocorticoid receptor nucleocytoplasmic shuttling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bueno Manuel

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In most cells glucocorticoid receptors (GR reside predominately in the cytoplasm. Upon hormone binding, the GR translocates into the nucleus, where the hormone-activated GR-complex regulates the transcription of GR-responsive genes. Serine/threonine protein phosphatase type 5 (PP5 associates with the GR-heat-shock protein-90 complex, and the suppression of PP5 expression with ISIS 15534 stimulates the activity of GR-responsive reporter plasmids, without affecting the binding of hormone to the GR. Results To further characterize the mechanism by which PP5 affects GR-induced gene expression, we employed immunofluorescence microscopy to track the movement of a GR-green fluorescent fusion protein (GR-GFP that retained hormone binding, nuclear translocation activity and specific DNA binding activity, but is incapable of transactivation. In the absence of glucocorticoids, GR-GFP localized mainly in the cytoplasm. Treatment with dexamethasone results in the efficient translocation of GR-GFPs into the nucleus. The nuclear accumulation of GR-GFP, without the addition of glucocorticoids, was also observed when the expression of PP5 was suppressed by treatment with ISIS 15534. In contrast, ISIS 15534 treatment had no apparent effect on calcium induced nuclear translocation of NFAT-GFP. Conclusion These studies suggest that PP5 participates in the regulation of glucocorticoid receptor nucleocytoplasmic shuttling, and that the GR-induced transcriptional activity observed when the expression of PP5 is suppressed by treatment with ISIS 15534 results from the nuclear accumulation of GR in a form that is capable of binding DNA yet still requires agonist to elicit maximal transcriptional activation.

  3. Nickel decreases cellular iron level and converts cytosolic aconitase to iron-regulatory protein 1 in A549 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Haobin; Davidson, Todd; Singleton, Steven; Garrick, Michael D.; Costa, Max

    2005-01-01

    Nickel (Ni) compounds are well-established carcinogens and are known to initiate a hypoxic response in cells via the stabilization and transactivation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). This change may be the consequence of nickel's interference with the function of several Fe(II)-dependent enzymes. In this study, the effects of soluble nickel exposure on cellular iron homeostasis were investigated. Nickel treatment decreased both mitochondrial and cytosolic aconitase (c-aconitase) activity in A549 cells. Cytosolic aconitase was converted to iron-regulatory protein 1, a form critical for the regulation of cellular iron homeostasis. The increased activity of iron-regulatory protein 1 after nickel exposure stabilized and increased transferrin receptor (Tfr) mRNA and antagonized the iron-induced ferritin light chain protein synthesis. The decrease of aconitase activity after nickel treatment reflected neither direct interference with aconitase function nor obstruction of [4Fe-4S] cluster reconstitution by nickel. Exposure of A549 cells to soluble nickel decreased total cellular iron by about 40%, a decrease that likely caused the observed decrease in aconitase activity and the increase of iron-regulatory protein 1 activity. Iron treatment reversed the effect of nickel on cytosolic aconitase and iron-regulatory protein 1. To assess the mechanism for the observed effects, human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells over expressing divalent metal transporter-1 (DMT1) were compared to A549 cells expressing only endogenous transporters for inhibition of iron uptake by nickel. The inhibition data suggest that nickel can enter via DMT1 and compete with iron for entry into the cell. This disturbance of cellular iron homeostasis by nickel may have a great impact on the ability of the cell to regulate a variety of cell functions, as well as create a state of hypoxia in cells under normal oxygen tension. These effects may be very important in how nickel exerts phenotypic

  4. The Nrf1 CNC-bZIP protein is regulated by the proteasome and activated by hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepelev, Nikolai L; Bennitz, Joshua D; Huang, Ting; McBride, Skye; Willmore, William G

    2011-01-01

    Nrf1 (nuclear factor-erythroid 2 p45 subunit-related factor 1) is a transcription factor mediating cellular responses to xenobiotic and pro-oxidant stress. Nrf1 regulates the transcription of many stress-related genes through the electrophile response elements (EpREs) located in their promoter regions. Despite its potential importance in human health, the mechanisms controlling Nrf1 have not been addressed fully. We found that proteasomal inhibitors MG-132 and clasto-lactacystin-β-lactone stabilized the protein expression of full-length Nrf1 in both COS7 and WFF2002 cells. Concomitantly, proteasomal inhibition decreased the expression of a smaller, N-terminal Nrf1 fragment, with an approximate molecular weight of 23 kDa. The EpRE-luciferase reporter assays revealed that proteasomal inhibition markedly inhibited the Nrf1 transactivational activity. These results support earlier hypotheses that the 26 S proteasome processes Nrf1 into its active form by removing its inhibitory N-terminal domain anchoring Nrf1 to the endoplasmic reticulum. Immunoprecipitation demonstrated that Nrf1 is ubiquitinated and that proteasomal inhibition increased the degree of Nrf1 ubiquitination. Furthermore, Nrf1 protein had a half-life of approximately 5 hours in COS7 cells. In contrast, hypoxia (1% O(2)) significantly increased the luciferase reporter activity of exogenous Nrf1 protein, while decreasing the protein expression of p65, a shorter form of Nrf1, known to act as a repressor of EpRE-controlled gene expression. Finally, the protein phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid activated Nrf1 reporter activity, while the latter was repressed by the PKC inhibitor staurosporine. Collectively, our data suggests that Nrf1 is controlled by several post-translational mechanisms, including ubiquitination, proteolytic processing and proteasomal-mediated degradation as well as by its phosphorylation status. © 2011 Chepelev et al.

  5. Nanotechnologies in protein microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krizkova, Sona; Heger, Zbynek; Zalewska, Marta; Moulick, Amitava; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Protein microarray technology became an important research tool for study and detection of proteins, protein-protein interactions and a number of other applications. The utilization of nanoparticle-based materials and nanotechnology-based techniques for immobilization allows us not only to extend the surface for biomolecule immobilization resulting in enhanced substrate binding properties, decreased background signals and enhanced reporter systems for more sensitive assays. Generally in contemporarily developed microarray systems, multiple nanotechnology-based techniques are combined. In this review, applications of nanoparticles and nanotechnologies in creating protein microarrays, proteins immobilization and detection are summarized. We anticipate that advanced nanotechnologies can be exploited to expand promising fields of proteins identification, monitoring of protein-protein or drug-protein interactions, or proteins structures.

  6. Protein sequence comparison and protein evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, W.R. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Biochemistry

    1995-12-31

    This tutorial was one of eight tutorials selected to be presented at the Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology which was held in the United Kingdom from July 16 to 19, 1995. This tutorial examines how the information conserved during the evolution of a protein molecule can be used to infer reliably homology, and thus a shared proteinfold and possibly a shared active site or function. The authors start by reviewing a geological/evolutionary time scale. Next they look at the evolution of several protein families. During the tutorial, these families will be used to demonstrate that homologous protein ancestry can be inferred with confidence. They also examine different modes of protein evolution and consider some hypotheses that have been presented to explain the very earliest events in protein evolution. The next part of the tutorial will examine the technical aspects of protein sequence comparison. Both optimal and heuristic algorithms and their associated parameters that are used to characterize protein sequence similarities are discussed. Perhaps more importantly, they survey the statistics of local similarity scores, and how these statistics can both be used to improve the selectivity of a search and to evaluate the significance of a match. They them examine distantly related members of three protein families, the serine proteases, the glutathione transferases, and the G-protein-coupled receptors (GCRs). Finally, the discuss how sequence similarity can be used to examine internal repeated or mosaic structures in proteins.

  7. Prognostic significance of catalase expression and its regulatory effects on hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) in HBV-related advanced hepatocellular carcinomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Mi-Young; Cheong, Jae Youn; Lim, Wonchung; Jo, Sujin; Lee, Youngsoo; Wang, Hee-Jung; Han, Kyou-Hoon; Cho, Hyeseong

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) plays a role in liver cancer development. We previously showed that ROS increased HBx levels and here, we investigated the role of antioxidants in the regulation of HBx expression and their clinical relevance. We found that overexpression of catalase induced a significant loss in HBx levels. The cysteine null mutant of HBx (Cys−) showed a dramatic reduction in its protein stability. In clonogenic proliferation assays, Huh7-X cells produced a significant number of colonies whereas Huh7-Cys− cells failed to generate them. The Cys at position 69 of HBx was crucial to maintain its protein stability and transactivation function in response to ROS. Among 50 HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) specimens, 72% of HCCs showed lower catalase levels than those of surrounding non-tumor tissues. In advanced stage IV, catalase levels in non-tumor tissues were increased whereas those in tumors were further reduced. Accordingly, patients with a high T/N ratio for catalase showed significantly longer survival than those with a low T/N ratio. Together, catalase expression in HCC patients can be clinically useful for prediction of patient survival, and restoration of catalase expression in HCCs could be an important strategy for intervention in HBV-induced liver diseases. PMID:25361011

  8. Prognostic significance of catalase expression and its regulatory effects on hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) in HBV-related advanced hepatocellular carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Mi-Young; Cheong, Jae Youn; Lim, Wonchung; Jo, Sujin; Lee, Youngsoo; Wang, Hee-Jung; Han, Kyou-Hoon; Cho, Hyeseong

    2014-12-15

    Hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) plays a role in liver cancer development. We previously showed that ROS increased HBx levels and here, we investigated the role of antioxidants in the regulation of HBx expression and their clinical relevance. We found that overexpression of catalase induced a significant loss in HBx levels. The cysteine null mutant of HBx (Cys-) showed a dramatic reduction in its protein stability. In clonogenic proliferation assays, Huh7-X cells produced a significant number of colonies whereas Huh7-Cys- cells failed to generate them. The Cys at position 69 of HBx was crucial to maintain its protein stability and transactivation function in response to ROS. Among 50 HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) specimens, 72% of HCCs showed lower catalase levels than those of surrounding non-tumor tissues. In advanced stage IV, catalase levels in non-tumor tissues were increased whereas those in tumors were further reduced. Accordingly, patients with a high T/N ratio for catalase showed significantly longer survival than those with a low T/N ratio. Together, catalase expression in HCC patients can be clinically useful for prediction of patient survival, and restoration of catalase expression in HCCs could be an important strategy for intervention in HBV-induced liver diseases.

  9. Repurposing the clinically approved calcium antagonist manidipine dihydrochloride as a new early inhibitor of human cytomegalovirus targeting the Immediate-Early 2 (IE2) protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercorelli, Beatrice; Luganini, Anna; Celegato, Marta; Palù, Giorgio; Gribaudo, Giorgio; Loregian, Arianna

    2018-02-01

    Currently, there are no therapeutic alternatives to DNA polymerase inhibitors to treat human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections, a major threat for immunocompromised patients and pregnant women. Here, we explored the potential to repurpose manidipine dihydrochloride (MND), a calcium antagonist clinically approved to treat hypertension, as a new anti-HCMV agent. MND emerged in a previous drug repurposing screen to find early inhibitors of HCMV replication, and now we confirm that it inhibits in the low micromolar range the replication of different HCMV strains, including clinical isolates and viruses resistant to approved DNA polymerase inhibitors. The antiviral activity of MND is specific for HCMV over different both DNA and RNA viruses. Further experiments in HCMV-infected cells testing the effects of MND on viral DNA synthesis and viral proteins expression revealed that it halts the progression of the virus cycle prior to viral DNA replication and E genes expression, but after IE proteins expression. According to these results, we observed that the overall antiviral activity of MND involves a specific interference with the transactivating functions of the viral Immediate-Early 2 (IE-2) protein, an essential viral transcription factor required for the progression of HCMV replication. Given that the inhibitory concentration against HCMV is in the range of clinically relevant concentrations of MND in humans, and the mechanism of action differs from that of the other available therapeutics, this already approved drug is an attractive candidate for repurposing in alternative anti-HCMV therapeutic protocols. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Protein digestion in ruminants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    digestibility, or the contribution of endogenous protein to the indigestible feed .... endogenous protein fractions. Alternatively, Stern & Satter (1984) suggested a method whereby the increased protein outflow to the small intestine, resulting from the incremental addition of ..... definition of the various protein fractions. Finally ...

  11. The Protein Model Portal

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Konstantin; Kiefer, Florian; Kopp, J?rgen; Battey, James N. D.; Podvinec, Michael; Westbrook, John D.; Berman, Helen M.; Bordoli, Lorenza; Schwede, Torsten

    2008-01-01

    Structural Genomics has been successful in determining the structures of many unique proteins in a high throughput manner. Still, the number of known protein sequences is much larger than the number of experimentally solved protein structures. Homology (or comparative) modeling methods make use of experimental protein structures to build models for evolutionary related proteins. Thereby, experimental structure determination efforts and homology modeling complement each other in the exploratio...

  12. Photoswitchable cyan fluorescent protein for protein tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudakov, Dmitriy M; Verkhusha, Vladislav V; Staroverov, Dmitry B; Souslova, Ekaterina A; Lukyanov, Sergey; Lukyanov, Konstantin A

    2004-11-01

    In recent years diverse photolabeling techniques using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-like proteins have been reported, including photoactivatable PA-GFP, photoactivatable protein Kaede, the DsRed 'greening' technique and kindling fluorescent proteins. So far, only PA-GFP, which is monomeric and gives 100-fold fluorescence contrast, could be applied for protein tracking. Here we describe a dual-color monomeric protein, photoswitchable cyan fluorescent protein (PS-CFP). PS-CFP is capable of efficient photoconversion from cyan to green, changing both its excitation and emission spectra in response to 405-nm light irradiation. Complete photoactivation of PS-CFP results in a 1,500-fold increase in the green-to-cyan fluorescence ratio, making it the highest-contrast monomeric photoactivatable fluorescent protein described to date. We used PS-CFP as a photoswitchable tag to study trafficking of human dopamine transporter in living cells. At moderate excitation intensities, PS-CFP can be used as a pH-stable cyan label for protein tagging and fluorescence resonance energy transfer applications.

  13. Protein- protein interaction detection system using fluorescent protein microdomains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2010-02-23

    The invention provides a protein labeling and interaction detection system based on engineered fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins that require fused interacting polypeptides to drive the association of the fragments, and further are soluble and stable, and do not change the solubility of polypeptides to which they are fused. In one embodiment, a test protein X is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 10, amino acids 198-214), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. A second test protein Y is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 11, amino acids 215-230), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. When X and Y interact, they bring the GFP strands into proximity, and are detected by complementation with a third GFP fragment consisting of GFP amino acids 1-198 (strands 1-9). When GFP strands 10 and 11 are held together by interaction of protein X and Y, they spontaneous association with GFP strands 1-9, resulting in structural complementation, folding, and concomitant GFP fluorescence.

  14. Comparing side chain packing in soluble proteins, protein-protein interfaces, and transmembrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaines, J C; Acebes, S; Virrueta, A; Butler, M; Regan, L; O'Hern, C S

    2018-05-01

    We compare side chain prediction and packing of core and non-core regions of soluble proteins, protein-protein interfaces, and transmembrane proteins. We first identified or created comparable databases of high-resolution crystal structures of these 3 protein classes. We show that the solvent-inaccessible cores of the 3 classes of proteins are equally densely packed. As a result, the side chains of core residues at protein-protein interfaces and in the membrane-exposed regions of transmembrane proteins can be predicted by the hard-sphere plus stereochemical constraint model with the same high prediction accuracies (>90%) as core residues in soluble proteins. We also find that for all 3 classes of proteins, as one moves away from the solvent-inaccessible core, the packing fraction decreases as the solvent accessibility increases. However, the side chain predictability remains high (80% within 30°) up to a relative solvent accessibility, rSASA≲0.3, for all 3 protein classes. Our results show that ≈40% of the interface regions in protein complexes are "core", that is, densely packed with side chain conformations that can be accurately predicted using the hard-sphere model. We propose packing fraction as a metric that can be used to distinguish real protein-protein interactions from designed, non-binding, decoys. Our results also show that cores of membrane proteins are the same as cores of soluble proteins. Thus, the computational methods we are developing for the analysis of the effect of hydrophobic core mutations in soluble proteins will be equally applicable to analyses of mutations in membrane proteins. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Development of a high-throughput method for the systematic identification of human proteins nuclear translocation potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawai Jun

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Important clues to the function of novel and uncharacterized proteins can be obtained by identifying their ability to translocate in the nucleus. In addition, a comprehensive definition of the nuclear proteome undoubtedly represents a key step toward a better understanding of the biology of this organelle. Although several high-throughput experimental methods have been developed to explore the sub-cellular localization of proteins, these methods tend to focus on the predominant localizations of gene products and may fail to provide a complete catalog of proteins that are able to transiently locate into the nucleus. Results We have developed a method for examining the nuclear localization potential of human gene products at the proteome scale by adapting a mammalian two-hybrid system we have previously developed. Our system is composed of three constructs co-transfected into a mammalian cell line. First, it contains a PCR construct encoding a fusion protein composed of a tested protein, the PDZ-protein TIP-1, and the transactivation domain of TNNC2 (referred to as ACT construct. Second, our system contains a PCR construct encoding a fusion protein composed of the DNA binding domain of GAL4 and the PDZ binding domain of rhotekin (referred to as the BIND construct. Third, a GAL4-responsive luciferase reporter is used to detect the reconstitution of a transcriptionally active BIND-ACT complex through the interaction of TIP-1 and rhotekin, which indicates the ability of the tested protein to translocate into the nucleus. We validated our method in a small-scale feasibility study by comparing it to green fluorescent protein (GFP fusion-based sub-cellular localization assays, sequence-based computational prediction of protein sub-cellular localization, and current sub-cellular localization data available from the literature for 22 gene products. Conclusion Our reporter-based system can rapidly screen gene products for their ability

  16. IGSF9 Family Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maria; Walmod, Peter Schledermann

    2013-01-01

    The Drosophila protein Turtle and the vertebrate proteins immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF), member 9 (IGSF9/Dasm1) and IGSF9B are members of an evolutionarily ancient protein family. A bioinformatics analysis of the protein family revealed that invertebrates contain only a single IGSF9 family gene......, whereas vertebrates contain two to four genes. In cnidarians, the gene appears to encode a secreted protein, but transmembrane isoforms of the protein have also evolved, and in many species, alternative splicing facilitates the expression of both transmembrane and secreted isoforms. In most species......, the longest isoforms of the proteins have the same general organization as the neural cell adhesion molecule family of cell adhesion molecule proteins, and like this family of proteins, IGSF9 family members are expressed in the nervous system. A review of the literature revealed that Drosophila Turtle...

  17. Efficient Multiple Genome Modifications Induced by the crRNAs, tracrRNA and Cas9 Protein Complex in Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohga, Rie; Ota, Satoshi; Kawahara, Atsuo

    2015-01-01

    The type II clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) associated with Cas9 endonuclease (CRISPR/Cas9) has become a powerful genetic tool for understanding the function of a gene of interest. In zebrafish, the injection of Cas9 mRNA and guide-RNA (gRNA), which are prepared using an in vitro transcription system, efficiently induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at the targeted genomic locus. Because gRNA was originally constructed by fusing two short RNAs CRISPR RNA (crRNA) and trans-activating crRNA (tracrRNA), we examined the effect of synthetic crRNAs and tracrRNA with Cas9 mRNA or Cas9 protein on the genome editing activity. We previously reported that the disruption of tyrosinase (tyr) by tyr-gRNA/Cas9 mRNA causes a retinal pigment defect, whereas the disruption of spns2 by spns2-gRNA1/Cas9 mRNA leads to a cardiac progenitor migration defect in zebrafish. Here, we found that the injection of spns2-crRNA1, tyr-crRNA and tracrRNA with Cas9 mRNA or Cas9 protein simultaneously caused a migration defect in cardiac progenitors and a pigment defect in retinal epithelial cells. A time course analysis demonstrated that the injection of crRNAs and tracrRNA with Cas9 protein rapidly induced genome modifications compared with the injection of crRNAs and tracrRNA with Cas9 mRNA. We further show that the crRNA-tracrRNA-Cas9 protein complex is functional for the visualization of endogenous gene expression; therefore, this is a very powerful, ready-to-use system in zebrafish. PMID:26010089

  18. Ciliary neurotrophic factor infused intracerebroventricularly shows reduced catabolic effects when linked to the TAT protein transduction domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, André S; Rezende, Alexandre C S; Grigoletto, Jessica; Rogério, Fabio; Velloso, Lício A; Skaper, Stephen D; Negro, Alessandro; Langone, Francesco

    2009-09-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) regulates the differentiation and survival of a wide spectrum of developing and adult neurons, including motor neuron loss after injury. We recently described a cell-penetrant recombinant human CNTF (rhCNTF) molecule, formed by fusion with the human immunodeficiency virus-1 transactivator of transcription (TAT) protein transduction domain (TAT-CNTF) that, upon subcutaneous administration, retains full neurotrophic activity without cytokine-like side-effects. Although the CNTF receptor is present in hypothalamic nuclei, which are involved in the control of energy, rhCNTF but not TAT-CNTF stimulates signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 phosphorylation in the rat hypothalamus after subcutaneous administration. This could be due limited TAT-CNTF distribution in the hypothalamus and/or altered intracellular signaling by the fusion protein. To explore these possibilities, we examined the effect of intracerebroventricular administration of TAT-CNTF in male adult rats. TAT-CNTF-induced weight loss, although the effect was smaller than that seen with either rhCNTF or leptin (which exerts CNTF-like effects via its receptor). In contrast to rhCNTF and leptin, TAT-CNTF neither induced morphological changes in adipose tissues nor increased uncoupling protein 1 expression in brown adipose tissue, a characteristic feature of rhCNTF and leptin. Acute intracerebroventricular administration of TAT-CNTF induced a less robust phosphorylation of signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 in the hypothalamus, compared with rhCNTF. The data show that fusion of a protein transduction domain may change rhCNTF CNS distribution, while further strengthening the utility of cell-penetrating peptide technology to neurotrophic factor biology beyond the neuroscience field.

  19. Efficient Multiple Genome Modifications Induced by the crRNAs, tracrRNA and Cas9 Protein Complex in Zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirohito Kotani

    Full Text Available The type II clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR associated with Cas9 endonuclease (CRISPR/Cas9 has become a powerful genetic tool for understanding the function of a gene of interest. In zebrafish, the injection of Cas9 mRNA and guide-RNA (gRNA, which are prepared using an in vitro transcription system, efficiently induce DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs at the targeted genomic locus. Because gRNA was originally constructed by fusing two short RNAs CRISPR RNA (crRNA and trans-activating crRNA (tracrRNA, we examined the effect of synthetic crRNAs and tracrRNA with Cas9 mRNA or Cas9 protein on the genome editing activity. We previously reported that the disruption of tyrosinase (tyr by tyr-gRNA/Cas9 mRNA causes a retinal pigment defect, whereas the disruption of spns2 by spns2-gRNA1/Cas9 mRNA leads to a cardiac progenitor migration defect in zebrafish. Here, we found that the injection of spns2-crRNA1, tyr-crRNA and tracrRNA with Cas9 mRNA or Cas9 protein simultaneously caused a migration defect in cardiac progenitors and a pigment defect in retinal epithelial cells. A time course analysis demonstrated that the injection of crRNAs and tracrRNA with Cas9 protein rapidly induced genome modifications compared with the injection of crRNAs and tracrRNA with Cas9 mRNA. We further show that the crRNA-tracrRNA-Cas9 protein complex is functional for the visualization of endogenous gene expression; therefore, this is a very powerful, ready-to-use system in zebrafish.

  20. Prediction of Protein-Protein Interactions Related to Protein Complexes Based on Protein Interaction Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for predicting protein-protein interactions based on detected protein complexes is proposed to repair deficient interactions derived from high-throughput biological experiments. Protein complexes are pruned and decomposed into small parts based on the adaptive k-cores method to predict protein-protein interactions associated with the complexes. The proposed method is adaptive to protein complexes with different structure, number, and size of nodes in a protein-protein interaction network. Based on different complex sets detected by various algorithms, we can obtain different prediction sets of protein-protein interactions. The reliability of the predicted interaction sets is proved by using estimations with statistical tests and direct confirmation of the biological data. In comparison with the approaches which predict the interactions based on the cliques, the overlap of the predictions is small. Similarly, the overlaps among the predicted sets of interactions derived from various complex sets are also small. Thus, every predicted set of interactions may complement and improve the quality of the original network data. Meanwhile, the predictions from the proposed method replenish protein-protein interactions associated with protein complexes using only the network topology.

  1. Personalizing Protein Nourishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    DALLAS, DAVID C.; SANCTUARY, MEGAN R.; QU, YUNYAO; KHAJAVI, SHABNAM HAGHIGHAT; VAN ZANDT, ALEXANDRIA E.; DYANDRA, MELISSA; FRESE, STEVEN A.; BARILE, DANIELA; GERMAN, J. BRUCE

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are not equally digestible—their proteolytic susceptibility varies by their source and processing method. Incomplete digestion increases colonic microbial protein fermentation (putrefaction), which produces toxic metabolites that can induce inflammation in vitro and have been associated with inflammation in vivo. Individual humans differ in protein digestive capacity based on phenotypes, particularly disease states. To avoid putrefaction-induced intestinal inflammation, protein sources and processing methods must be tailored to the consumer’s digestive capacity. This review explores how food processing techniques alter protein digestibility and examines how physiological conditions alter digestive capacity. Possible solutions to improving digestive function or matching low digestive capacity with more digestible protein sources are explored. Beyond the ileal digestibility measurements of protein digestibility, less invasive, quicker and cheaper techniques for monitoring the extent of protein digestion and fermentation are needed to personalize protein nourishment. Biomarkers of protein digestive capacity and efficiency can be identified with the toolsets of peptidomics, metabolomics, microbial sequencing and multiplexed protein analysis of fecal and urine samples. By monitoring individual protein digestive function, the protein component of diets can be tailored via protein source and processing selection to match individual needs to minimize colonic putrefaction and, thus, optimize gut health. PMID:26713355

  2. Oct-1 acts as a transcriptional repressor on the C-reactive protein promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voleti, Bhavya; Hammond, David J.; Thirumalai, Avinash; Agrawal, Alok

    2012-01-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP), a plasma protein of the innate immune system, is produced by hepatocytes. A critical regulatory region (−42 to −57) on the CRP promoter contains binding site for the IL-6-activated transcription factor C/EBPβ. The IL-1β-activated transcription factor NF-κB binds to a κB site located nearby (−63 to −74). The κB site overlaps an octamer motif (−59 to −66) which is the binding site for the constitutively active transcription factor Oct-1. Oct-1 is known to function both as a transcriptional repressor and as an activator depending upon the promoter context. Also, Oct-1 can regulate gene expression either by binding directly to the promoter or by interacting with other transcription factors bound to the promoter. The aim of this study was to investigate the functions of Oct-1 in regulating CRP expression. In luciferase transactivation assays, overexpressed Oct-1 inhibited (IL-6+IL-1β)-induced CRP expression in Hep3B cells. Deletion of the Oct-1 site from the promoter drastically reduced the cytokine response because the κB site was altered as a consequence of deleting the Oct-1 site. Surprisingly, overexpressed Oct-1 inhibited the residual (IL-6+IL-1β)-induced CRP expression through the promoter lacking the Oct-1 site. Similarly, deletion of the Oct-1 site reduced the induction of CRP expression in response to overexpressed C/EBPβ, and overexpressed Oct-1 inhibited C/EBPβ-induced CRP expression through the promoter lacking the Oct-1 site. We conclude that Oct-1 acts as a transcriptional repressor of CRP expression and it does so by occupying its cognate site on the promoter and also via other transcription factors by an as yet undefined mechanism. PMID:22750226

  3. Protein Kinase C Inhibitors as Modulators of Vascular Function and Their Application in Vascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raouf A. Khalil

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Blood pressure (BP is regulated by multiple neuronal, hormonal, renal and vascular control mechanisms. Changes in signaling mechanisms in the endothelium, vascular smooth muscle (VSM and extracellular matrix cause alterations in vascular tone and blood vessel remodeling and may lead to persistent increases in vascular resistance and hypertension (HTN. In VSM, activation of surface receptors by vasoconstrictor stimuli causes an increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i, which forms a complex with calmodulin, activates myosin light chain (MLC kinase and leads to MLC phosphorylation, actin-myosin interaction and VSM contraction. Vasoconstrictor agonists could also increase the production of diacylglycerol which activates protein kinase C (PKC. PKC is a family of Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent isozymes that have different distributions in various blood vessels, and undergo translocation from the cytosol to the plasma membrane, cytoskeleton or the nucleus during cell activation. In VSM, PKC translocation to the cell surface may trigger a cascade of biochemical events leading to activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and MAPK kinase (MEK, a pathway that ultimately increases the myofilament force sensitivity to [Ca2+]i, and enhances actin-myosin interaction and VSM contraction. PKC translocation to the nucleus may induce transactivation of various genes and promote VSM growth and proliferation. PKC could also affect endothelium-derived relaxing and contracting factors as well as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs in the extracellular matrix further affecting vascular reactivity and remodeling. In addition to vasoactive factors, reactive oxygen species, inflammatory cytokines and other metabolic factors could affect PKC activity. Increased PKC expression and activity have been observed in vascular disease and in certain forms of experimental and human HTN. Targeting of vascular PKC using PKC inhibitors may function in

  4. Bisphenol A differentially activates protein kinase C isoforms in murine placental tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Wenjuan; Huang, Hui; Wang, Yanfei; Wong, Tsz Yan; Wang, C.C.; Leung, Lai K.

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol A is utilized to make polycarbonate plastics and is an environmental pollutant. Recent research has indicated that it is an endocrine disruptor and may interfere with reproductive processes. Our lab has previously shown that bisphenol A could regulate corticotrophin releasing hormone and aromatase in cultured placental cells. In the present study, the effect of bisphenol A on these two genes in the placenta was investigated in mice. Pregnant ICR mice were gavaged with bisphenol A at 2, 20 and 200 mg/kg body weight/day from E13 to E16 and were euthanized at E17. Compared to the control mice, increased plasma estrogen and corticotrophin releasing hormone were observed in bisphenol A-treated mice. Messenger RNA quantification indicated that placental crh but not cyp19 was induced in mice treated with bisphenol A. Tracking the related signaling pathway, we found that protein kinase C ζ/λ and δ were activated in the placentas of bisphenol A-treated mice. As the gene promoter of crh contains CRE and the half site of ERE, either phospho-PKC or estrogen could stimulate the gene transactivation. These results indicate that bisphenol A might increase plasma concentrations of estradiol, testosterone, corticotrophin releasing hormone and placental phospho-PKC ζ/λ and δ in mice. Ultimately, the incidence of premature birth in these mice could increase. - Highlights: • The pollutant bisphenol A differentially activated PKC isoforms in the placenta. • CRE-binding activity in the nuclear protein of placenta was increased. • Bisphenol A induces CRH mRNA expression in mice

  5. Bisphenol A differentially activates protein kinase C isoforms in murine placental tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Wenjuan; Huang, Hui; Wang, Yanfei [Biochemistry Programme, School of Life Sciences, Faculty of Science, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. (Hong Kong); Wong, Tsz Yan [Food and Nutritional Sciences Programme, School of Life Sciences, Faculty of Science, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. (Hong Kong); Wang, C.C. [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. (Hong Kong); Leung, Lai K., E-mail: laikleung@cuhk.edu.hk [Biochemistry Programme, School of Life Sciences, Faculty of Science, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. (Hong Kong); Food and Nutritional Sciences Programme, School of Life Sciences, Faculty of Science, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, N.T. (Hong Kong)

    2013-06-01

    Bisphenol A is utilized to make polycarbonate plastics and is an environmental pollutant. Recent research has indicated that it is an endocrine disruptor and may interfere with reproductive processes. Our lab has previously shown that bisphenol A could regulate corticotrophin releasing hormone and aromatase in cultured placental cells. In the present study, the effect of bisphenol A on these two genes in the placenta was investigated in mice. Pregnant ICR mice were gavaged with bisphenol A at 2, 20 and 200 mg/kg body weight/day from E13 to E16 and were euthanized at E17. Compared to the control mice, increased plasma estrogen and corticotrophin releasing hormone were observed in bisphenol A-treated mice. Messenger RNA quantification indicated that placental crh but not cyp19 was induced in mice treated with bisphenol A. Tracking the related signaling pathway, we found that protein kinase C ζ/λ and δ were activated in the placentas of bisphenol A-treated mice. As the gene promoter of crh contains CRE and the half site of ERE, either phospho-PKC or estrogen could stimulate the gene transactivation. These results indicate that bisphenol A might increase plasma concentrations of estradiol, testosterone, corticotrophin releasing hormone and placental phospho-PKC ζ/λ and δ in mice. Ultimately, the incidence of premature birth in these mice could increase. - Highlights: • The pollutant bisphenol A differentially activated PKC isoforms in the placenta. • CRE-binding activity in the nuclear protein of placenta was increased. • Bisphenol A induces CRH mRNA expression in mice.

  6. Shutdown of HIV-1 Transcription in T Cells by Nullbasic, a Mutant Tat Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongping Jin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nullbasic is a derivative of the HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (Tat protein that strongly inhibits HIV-1 replication in lymphocytes. Here we show that lentiviral vectors that constitutively express a Nullbasic-ZsGreen1 (NB-ZSG1 fusion protein by the eEF1α promoter led to robust long-term inhibition of HIV-1 replication in Jurkat cells. Although Jurkat-NB-ZSG1 cells were infected by HIV-1, no virus production could be detected and addition of phorbol ester 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA and JQ1 had no effect, while suberanilohydroxamic acid (SAHA modestly stimulated virus production but at levels 300-fold lower than those seen in HIV-1-infected Jurkat-ZSG1 cells. Virus replication was not recovered by coculture of HIV-1-infected Jurkat-NB-ZSG1 cells with uninfected Jurkat cells. Latently infected Jurkat latent 6.3 and ACH2 cells treated with latency-reversing agents produced measurable viral capsid (CA, but little or none was made when they expressed NB-ZSG1. When Jurkat cells chronically infected with HIV-1 were transduced with lentiviral virus-like particles conveying NB-ZSG1, a >3-log reduction in CA production was observed. Addition of PMA increased virus CA production but at levels 500-fold lower than those seen in nontransduced Jurkat cells. Transcriptome sequencing analysis confirmed that HIV-1 mRNA was strongly inhibited by NB-ZSG1 but indicated that full-length viral mRNA was made. Analysis of HIV-1-infected Jurkat cells expressing NB-ZSG1 by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that recruitment of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII and histone 3 lysine 9 acetylation were inhibited. The reduction of HIV-1 promoter-associated RNAPII and epigenetic changes in viral nucleosomes indicate that Nullbasic can inhibit HIV-1 replication by enforcing viral silencing in cells.

  7. The early UL31 gene of equine herpesvirus 1 encodes a single-stranded DNA-binding protein that has a nuclear localization signal sequence at the C-terminus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seongman; Chul Ahn, Byung; O' Callaghan, Dennis J. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Center for Molecular and Tumor Virology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA 71130-3932 (United States); Kim, Seong Kee, E-mail: skim1@lsuhsc.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Center for Molecular and Tumor Virology, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Shreveport, LA 71130-3932 (United States)

    2012-10-25

    The amino acid sequence of the UL31 protein (UL31P) of equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) has homology to that of the ICP8 of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Here we show that the UL31 gene is synergistically trans-activated by the IEP and the UL5P (EICP27). Detection of the UL31 RNA transcript and the UL31P in EHV-1-infected cells at 6 h post-infection (hpi) as well as metabolic inhibition assays indicated that UL31 is an early gene. The UL31P preferentially bound to single-stranded DNA over double-stranded DNA in gel shift assays. Subcellular localization of the green fluorescent protein (GFP)-UL31 fusion proteins revealed that the C-terminal 32 amino acid residues of the UL31P are responsible for the nuclear localization. These findings may contribute to defining the role of the UL31P single-stranded DNA-binding protein in EHV-1 DNA replication.

  8. The early UL31 gene of equine herpesvirus 1 encodes a single-stranded DNA-binding protein that has a nuclear localization signal sequence at the C-terminus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seongman; Chul Ahn, Byung; O’Callaghan, Dennis J.; Kim, Seong Kee

    2012-01-01

    The amino acid sequence of the UL31 protein (UL31P) of equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) has homology to that of the ICP8 of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Here we show that the UL31 gene is synergistically trans-activated by the IEP and the UL5P (EICP27). Detection of the UL31 RNA transcript and the UL31P in EHV-1-infected cells at 6 h post-infection (hpi) as well as metabolic inhibition assays indicated that UL31 is an early gene. The UL31P preferentially bound to single-stranded DNA over double-stranded DNA in gel shift assays. Subcellular localization of the green fluorescent protein (GFP)–UL31 fusion proteins revealed that the C-terminal 32 amino acid residues of the UL31P are responsible for the nuclear localization. These findings may contribute to defining the role of the UL31P single-stranded DNA-binding protein in EHV-1 DNA replication.

  9. Polymer Directed Protein Assemblies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick van Rijn

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation and protein self-assembly is an important occurrence in natural systems, and is in some form or other dictated by biopolymers. Very obvious influences of biopolymers on protein assemblies are, e.g., virus particles. Viruses are a multi-protein assembly of which the morphology is dictated by poly-nucleotides namely RNA or DNA. This “biopolymer” directs the proteins and imposes limitations on the structure like the length or diameter of the particle. Not only do these bionanoparticles use polymer-directed self-assembly, also processes like amyloid formation are in a way a result of directed protein assembly by partial unfolded/misfolded biopolymers namely, polypeptides. The combination of proteins and synthetic polymers, inspired by the natural processes, are therefore regarded as a highly promising area of research. Directed protein assembly is versatile with respect to the possible interactions which brings together the protein and polymer, e.g., electrostatic, v.d. Waals forces or covalent conjugation, and possible combinations are numerous due to the large amounts of different polymers and proteins available. The protein-polymer interacting behavior and overall morphology is envisioned to aid in clarifying protein-protein interactions and are thought to entail some interesting new functions and properties which will ultimately lead to novel bio-hybrid materials.

  10. X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) regulation of cyclin D1 protein expression and cancer cell anchorage-independent growth via its E3 ligase-mediated protein phosphatase 2A/c-Jun axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zipeng; Zhang, Ruowen; Li, Jingxia; Huang, Haishan; Zhang, Dongyun; Zhang, Jingjie; Gao, Jimin; Chen, Jingyuan; Huang, Chuanshu

    2013-07-12

    The X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) is a well known potent inhibitor of apoptosis; however, it is also involved in other cancer cell biological behavior. In the current study, we discovered that XIAP and its E3 ligase played a crucial role in regulation of cyclin D1 expression in cancer cells. We found that deficiency of XIAP expression resulted in a marked reduction in cyclin D1 expression. Consistently, cell cycle transition and anchorage-independent cell growth were also attenuated in XIAP-deficient cancer cells compared with those of the parental wild-type cells. Subsequent studies demonstrated that E3 ligase activity within the RING domain of XIAP is crucial for its ability to regulate cyclin D1 transcription, cell cycle transition, and anchorage-independent cell growth by up-regulating transactivation of c-Jun/AP-1. Moreover, we found that E3 ligase within RING domain was required for XIAP inhibition of phosphatase PP2A activity by up-regulation of PP2A phosphorylation at Tyr-307 in its catalytic subunit. Such PP2A phosphorylation and inactivation resulted in phosphorylation and activation of its downstream target c-Jun in turn leading to cyclin D1 expression. Collectively, our studies uncovered a novel function of E3 ligase activity of XIAP in the up-regulation of cyclin D1 expression, providing significant insight into the understanding of the biomedical significance of overexpressed XIAP in cancer development, further offering a new molecular basis for utilizing XIAP E3 ligase as a cancer therapeutic target.

  11. Protein Data Bank (PDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Protein Data Bank (PDB) archive is the single worldwide repository of information about the 3D structures of large biological molecules, including proteins and...

  12. Protein electrophoresis - urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003589.htm Urine protein electrophoresis test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The urine protein electrophoresis (UPEP) test is used to estimate how much ...

  13. Protein electrophoresis - serum

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003540.htm Protein electrophoresis - serum To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. This lab test measures the types of protein in the fluid (serum) part of a blood ...

  14. CSF total protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    CSF total protein is a test to determine the amount of protein in your spinal fluid, also called cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). ... The normal protein range varies from lab to lab, but is typically about 15 to 60 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) ...

  15. Analysis of a bovine herpesvirus 1 protein encoded by an alternatively spliced latency related (LR) RNA that is abundantly expressed in latently infected neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinani, Devis; Liu, Yilin; Jones, Clinton

    2014-09-01

    The bovine herpes virus 1 (BoHV-1) encoded latency-related RNA (LR-RNA) is abundantly expressed in latently infected sensory neurons. A LR mutant virus with three stop codons at the amino-terminus of ORF2 does not reactivate from latency or replicate efficiently in certain tissues. ORF2 inhibits apoptosis, interacts with Notch1 or Notch3, and interferes with Notch mediated signaling. Alternative splicing of LR-RNA in trigeminal ganglia yields transcripts that have the potential to encode a protein containing most of ORF2 sequences and parts of other coding sequences located within the LR gene. In this study, we determined that an ORF2 protein fused with reading frame B (15d ORF) was more stable in transfected cells. ORF2 and the 15d ORF stimulated neurite formation in mouse neuroblastoma cells, interfered with Notch3 mediated trans-activation, and had similar DNA binding properties. Increased stability of the 15d ORF is predicted to enhance the establishment of latency. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Functional interplay between the transcription factors USF1 and PDX-1 and protein kinase CK2 in pancreatic β-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spohrer, Sarah; Groß, Rebecca; Nalbach, Lisa; Schwind, Lisa; Stumpf, Heike; Menger, Michael D; Ampofo, Emmanuel; Montenarh, Mathias; Götz, Claudia

    2017-11-27

    Glucose homeostasis is regulated by insulin, which is produced in the β-cells of the pancreas. The synthesis of insulin is controlled by several transcription factors including PDX-1, USF1 and USF2. Both, PDX-1 and USF1 were identified as substrates for protein kinase CK2. Here, we have analysed the interplay of PDX-1, USF1 and CK2 in the regulation of PDX-1 gene transcription. We found that the PDX-1 promoter is dose-dependently transactivated by PDX-1 and transrepressed by USF1. With increasing glucose concentrations the transrepression of the PDX-1 promoter by USF1 is successively abrogated. PDX-1 binding to its own promoter was not influenced by glucose, whereas USF1 binding to the PDX-1 promoter was reduced. The same effect was observed after inhibition of the protein kinase activity by three different inhibitors or by using a phospho-mutant of USF1. Moreover, phosphorylation of USF1 by CK2 seems to strengthen the interaction between USF1 and PDX-1. Thus, CK2 is a negative regulator of the USF1-dependent PDX-1 transcription. Moreover, upon inhibition of CK2 in primary islets, insulin expression as well as insulin secretion were enhanced without affecting the viability of the cells. Therefore, inhibition of CK2 activity may be a promising approach to stimulate insulin production in pancreatic β-cells.

  17. Zinc finger protein 521 antagonizes early B-cell factor 1 and modulates the B-lymphoid differentiation of primary hematopoietic progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mega, Tiziana; Lupia, Michela; Amodio, Nicola; Horton, Sarah J; Mesuraca, Maria; Pelaggi, Daniela; Agosti, Valter; Grieco, Michele; Chiarella, Emanuela; Spina, Raffaella; Moore, Malcolm A S; Schuringa, Jan Jacob; Bond, Heather M; Morrone, Giovanni

    2011-07-01

    Zinc finger protein 521 (EHZF/ZNF521) is a multi-functional transcription co-factor containing 30 zinc fingers and an amino-terminal motif that binds to the nucleosome remodelling and histone deacetylase (NuRD) complex. ZNF521 is believed to be a relevant player in the regulation of the homeostasis of the hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell compartment, however the underlying molecular mechanisms are still largely unknown. Here, we show that this protein plays an important role in the control of B-cell development by inhibiting the activity of early B-cell factor-1 (EBF1), a master factor in B-lineage specification. In particular, our data demonstrate that: (1) ZNF521 binds to EBF1 via its carboxyl-terminal portion and this interaction is required for EBF1 inhibition; (2) NuRD complex recruitment by ZNF521 is not essential for the inhibition of transactivation of EBF1-dependent promoters; (3) ZNF521 represses EBF1 target genes in a human B-lymphoid molecular context; and (4) RNAi-mediated silencing of ZNF521/Zfp521 in primary human and murine hematopoietic progenitors strongly enhances the generation of B-lymphocytes in vitro. Taken together, our data indicate that ZNF521 can antagonize B-cell development and lend support to the notion that it may contribute to conserve the multipotency of primitive lympho-myeloid progenitors by preventing or delaying their EBF1-driven commitment toward the B-cell lineage.

  18. Chemical synthesis of human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein: autonomous protein domains for induction of cellular DNA synthesis and for trans activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawls, J A; Pusztai, R; Green, M

    1990-12-01

    The human papillomavirus type 16 E7 protein belongs to a family of nuclear oncoproteins that share amino acid sequences and functional homology. To localize biochemical activities associated with E7, we chemically synthesized the full-length 98-amino-acid polypeptide and several deletion mutant peptides. We show that the E7 polypeptide is biologically active and possesses at least two functional domains; the first induces cellular DNA synthesis in quiescent rodent cells, and the second trans activates the adenovirus E1A-inducible early E2 promoter and binds zinc. Further, each domain is autonomous and can function on separate peptides. DNA synthesis induction activity maps within the N-terminal portion of the molecule, which contains sequences related to adenovirus E1A conserved domains 1 and 2 required for cell transformation and binding of the retinoblastoma gene product. trans-Activation and Zn-binding activities map within the C-terminal portion of the molecule, a region which contains Cys-X-X-Cys motifs. trans Activation does not require protein synthesis, implying a mechanism that involves interaction with a preexisting cellular factor(s). E7 trans activates the adenovirus E2 promoter but not other E1A-inducible viral promoters, suggesting the possibility that E7 trans activation involves interaction, directly or indirectly, with cellular transcription factor E2F.

  19. Protein sequence databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apweiler, Rolf; Bairoch, Amos; Wu, Cathy H

    2004-02-01

    A variety of protein sequence databases exist, ranging from simple sequence repositories, which store data with little or no manual intervention in the creation of the records, to expertly curated universal databases that cover all species and in which the original sequence data are enhanced by the manual addition of further information in each sequence record. As the focus of researchers moves from the genome to the proteins encoded by it, these databases will play an even more important role as central comprehensive resources of protein information. Several the leading protein sequence databases are discussed here, with special emphasis on the databases now provided by the Universal Protein Knowledgebase (UniProt) consortium.

  20. Protein hydration and dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Kataoka, Mikio

    2015-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering can measure the protein thermal fluctuations under the physiological aqueous environment, especially it is powerful to observe the low-energy protein dynamics in THz region, which are revealed theoretically to be coupled with solvations. Neutron enables the selective observation of protein and hydration water by deuteration. The complementary analysis with molecular dynamics simulation is also effective for the study of protein hydration. Some examples of the application toward the understanding of molecular basis of protein functions will be introduced. (author)

  1. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, Andrew M [Santa Fe, NM; Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Kiss, Csaba [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  2. Targeting proteins for degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrader, Erin K; Harstad, Kristine G; Matouschek, Andreas

    2009-11-01

    Protein degradation plays a central role in many cellular functions. Misfolded and damaged proteins are removed from the cell to avoid toxicity. The concentrations of regulatory proteins are adjusted by degradation at the appropriate time. Both foreign and native proteins are digested into small peptides as part of the adaptive immune response. In eukaryotic cells, an ATP-dependent protease called the proteasome is responsible for much of this proteolysis. Proteins are targeted for proteasomal degradation by a two-part degron, which consists of a proteasome binding signal and a degradation initiation site. Here we describe how both components contribute to the specificity of degradation.

  3. Protein supplementation with aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Juergen M; Diekmann, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    To highlight the recent evicence for optimal protein intake and protein supplementation in older adults. A special focus has been placed on the effects on muscle protein synthesis, strength and overall performance in this population. Although for older adults, some additional evidence on the benefits of a higher protein intake than 0.8 g/kg body weight per day has been provided, the results of studies focusing on the timing of protein intake over the day have been contradictory. Supplementation with so-called 'fast' proteins, which are also rich in leucine, for example whey protein, proved superior with regard to muscle protein synthesis. First studies in frail older persons showed increased strength after supplementation with milk protein, whereas the combination with physical exercise increased muscle mass without additional benefit for strength or functionality. Recent evidence suggests positive effects of protein supplementation on muscle protein synthesis, muscle mass and muscle strength. However, as most studies included only small numbers of participants for short treatment periods, larger studies with longer duration are necessary to support the clinical relevance of these observations.

  4. Racemic protein crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Todd O; Kent, Stephen B H

    2012-01-01

    Although natural proteins are chiral and are all of one "handedness," their mirror image forms can be prepared by chemical synthesis. This opens up new opportunities for protein crystallography. A racemic mixture of the enantiomeric forms of a protein molecule can crystallize in ways that natural proteins cannot. Recent experimental data support a theoretical prediction that this should make racemic protein mixtures highly amenable to crystallization. Crystals obtained from racemic mixtures also offer advantages in structure determination strategies. The relevance of these potential advantages is heightened by advances in synthetic methods, which are extending the size limit for proteins that can be prepared by chemical synthesis. Recent ideas and results in the area of racemic protein crystallography are reviewed.

  5. Intracellular protein breakdown. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohley, P.; Kirschke, H.; Langner, J.; Wiederanders, B.; Ansorge, S.

    1976-01-01

    Double-labelled proteins from rat liver cytosol ( 14 C in long-lived, 3 H in short-lived proteins after in-vivo-labelling) are used as substrates for unlabelled proteinases in vitro. Differences in the degradation rates of short-lived and long-lived proteins in vitro by different proteinases and after addition of different effectors allow conclusions concerning their importance for the in-vivo-turnover of substrate proteins. The main activity (>90%) of soluble lysosomal proteinases at pH 6.1 and pH 6.9 is caused by thiolproteinases, which degrade preferentially short-lived cytosol proteins. These proteinases are inhibited by leupeptin. Autolysis of double-labelled cell fractions shows a remarkably faster breakdown of short-lived substrate proteins only in the soluble part of lysosomes. Microsomal fractions degrade in vitro preferentially long-lived substrate proteins. (author)

  6. Protein solubility modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agena, S. M.; Pusey, M. L.; Bogle, I. D.

    1999-01-01

    A thermodynamic framework (UNIQUAC model with temperature dependent parameters) is applied to model the salt-induced protein crystallization equilibrium, i.e., protein solubility. The framework introduces a term for the solubility product describing protein transfer between the liquid and solid phase and a term for the solution behavior describing deviation from ideal solution. Protein solubility is modeled as a function of salt concentration and temperature for a four-component system consisting of a protein, pseudo solvent (water and buffer), cation, and anion (salt). Two different systems, lysozyme with sodium chloride and concanavalin A with ammonium sulfate, are investigated. Comparison of the modeled and experimental protein solubility data results in an average root mean square deviation of 5.8%, demonstrating that the model closely follows the experimental behavior. Model calculations and model parameters are reviewed to examine the model and protein crystallization process. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  7. [Overexpression of the nucleolar protein SURF-6 in mouse fibroblasts NIH/3T3 leads to stabilisation of intragenic transcribed spacers of the pre-rRNA].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzikov, M A; Veĭko, N N; Zharskaia, O O; Magoulas, Kh B; Zatsepina, O V

    2010-01-01

    SURF-6 is an evolutionary conserved nucleolar protein that is required for maintenance of cell viability, but its functional significance in mammals still remains illusive. In the present work we examined effects of SURF-6 overexpression in mouse NIH/3T3 fibroblasts transfected with two plasmids. The plasmid pUHrT62-1 encodes a tetracycline-dependant trans-activator, the protein rtTA, the plasmid pBI-SURF6--the genes of EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) and of mouse SURF-6 which expression was controlled by the rtTA-responsive bi-directorial promoter. Western blot analysis showed that the SURF-6 level was severely augmented in cells transfected with pUHrT62-1 and pBI-SURF6 and incubated with the inducer--doxycycline opposed to the transfected but not-induced cells. The increase of SURF-6 was observed in 24 and 48 h after adding the inducer doxycycline. Dot-hybridization of isolated RNA with biotinilated oligonucleotide probes to various regions of mouse primarily pre-rRNA transcripts showed that overexpression of SURF-6 enhanced levels of the second intragenic transcribed spacer ITS2 in about seven folds and of the 5' external transcribed spacer 5'ETS in two folds. Amounts of fragments corresponding to 18S, 5.8S and 28S rRNA remained almost unchanged. These observations for the first time demonstrated that mammalian SURF-6 helps to stabilize or prevents premature cleavage of the pre-rRNA intragenic transcribed spacers, particularly of ITS2, similar to its homologue in S. cerevisiae the protein Rrp14. Today metazoan proteins that play a similar role in ribosome biogenesis, are not described.

  8. Crosstalk between the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}) and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) in human breast cancer cells: PPAR{gamma} binds to VDR and inhibits 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} mediated transactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alimirah, Fatouma; Peng, Xinjian; Yuan, Liang; Mehta, Rajeshwari R. [Cancer Biology Division, IIT Research Institute, 10 West 35th Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Knethen, Andreas von [Institute of Biochemistry, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt (Germany); Choubey, Divaker [Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati, 3223 Eden Avenue, P.O. Box 670056, Cincinnati, OH 45267 (United States); Mehta, Rajendra G., E-mail: rmehta@iitri.org [Cancer Biology Division, IIT Research Institute, 10 West 35th Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Heterodimerization and cross-talk between nuclear hormone receptors often occurs. For example, estrogen receptor alpha (ER{alpha}) physically binds to peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) and inhibits its transcriptional activity. The interaction between PPAR{gamma} and the vitamin D receptor (VDR) however, is unknown. Here, we elucidate the molecular mechanisms linking PPAR{gamma} and VDR signaling, and for the first time we show that PPAR{gamma} physically associates with VDR in human breast cancer cells. We found that overexpression of PPAR{gamma} decreased 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D{sub 3}) mediated transcriptional activity of the vitamin D target gene, CYP24A1, by 49% and the activity of VDRE-luc, a vitamin D responsive reporter, by 75% in T47D human breast cancer cells. Deletion mutation experiments illustrated that helices 1 and 4 of PPAR{gamma}'s hinge and ligand binding domains, respectively, governed this suppressive function. Additionally, abrogation of PPAR{gamma}'s AF2 domain attenuated its repressive action on 1,25D{sub 3} transactivation, indicating that this domain is integral in inhibiting VDR signaling. PPAR{gamma} was also found to compete with VDR for their binding partner retinoid X receptor alpha (RXR{alpha}). Overexpression of RXR{alpha} blocked PPAR{gamma}'s suppressive effect on 1,25D{sub 3} action, enhancing VDR signaling. In conclusion, these observations uncover molecular mechanisms connecting the PPAR{gamma} and VDR pathways. -- Highlights: PPAR{gamma}'s role on 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} transcriptional activity is examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} physically binds to VDR and inhibits 1{alpha},25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} action. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma}'s hinge and ligand binding domains are important for this inhibitory effect. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PPAR{gamma} competes with VDR for the availability of their binding

  9. Protein kinesis: The dynamics of protein trafficking and stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this conference is to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on protein kinesis. This volume contains abstracts of papers in the following areas: protein folding and modification in the endoplasmic reticulum; protein trafficking; protein translocation and folding; protein degradation; polarity; nuclear trafficking; membrane dynamics; and protein import into organelles.

  10. PROTEIN - WHICH IS BEST?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Falvo

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Protein intake that exceeds the recommended daily allowance is widely accepted for both endurance and power athletes. However, considering the variety of proteins that are available much less is known concerning the benefits of consuming one protein versus another. The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyze key factors in order to make responsible recommendations to both the general and athletic populations. Evaluation of a protein is fundamental in determining its appropriateness in the human diet. Proteins that are of inferior content and digestibility are important to recognize and restrict or limit in the diet. Similarly, such knowledge will provide an ability to identify proteins that provide the greatest benefit and should be consumed. The various techniques utilized to rate protein will be discussed. Traditionally, sources of dietary protein are seen as either being of animal or vegetable origin. Animal sources provide a complete source of protein (i.e. containing all essential amino acids, whereas vegetable sources generally lack one or more of the essential amino acids. Animal sources of dietary protein, despite providing a complete protein and numerous vitamins and minerals, have some health professionals concerned about the amount of saturated fat common in these foods compared to vegetable sources. The advent of processing techniques has shifted some of this attention and ignited the sports supplement marketplace with derivative products such as whey, casein and soy. Individually, these products vary in quality and applicability to certain populations. The benefits that these particular proteins possess are discussed. In addition, the impact that elevated protein consumption has on health and safety issues (i.e. bone health, renal function are also reviewed

  11. Protein oxidation and peroxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Proteins are major targets for radicals and two-electron oxidants in biological systems due to their abundance and high rate constants for reaction. With highly reactive radicals damage occurs at multiple side-chain and backbone sites. Less reactive species show greater selectivity with regard...... and modified turnover. In the presence of O2, high yields of peroxyl radicals and peroxides (protein peroxidation) are formed; the latter account for up to 70% of the initial oxidant flux. Protein peroxides can oxidize both proteins and other targets. One-electron reduction results in additional radicals...... and chain reactions with alcohols and carbonyls as major products; the latter are commonly used markers of protein damage. Direct oxidation of cysteine (and less commonly) methionine residues is a major reaction; this is typically faster than with H2O2, and results in altered protein activity and function...

  12. Protein Misfolding Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartl, F Ulrich

    2017-06-20

    The majority of protein molecules must fold into defined three-dimensional structures to acquire functional activity. However, protein chains can adopt a multitude of conformational states, and their biologically active conformation is often only marginally stable. Metastable proteins tend to populate misfolded species that are prone to forming toxic aggregates, including soluble oligomers and fibrillar amyloid deposits, which are linked with neurodegeneration in Alzheimer and Parkinson disease, and many other pathologies. To prevent or regulate protein aggregation, all cells contain an extensive protein homeostasis (or proteostasis) network comprising molecular chaperones and other factors. These defense systems tend to decline during aging, facilitating the manifestation of aggregate deposition diseases. This volume of the Annual Review of Biochemistry contains a set of three articles addressing our current understanding of the structures of pathological protein aggregates and their associated disease mechanisms. These articles also discuss recent insights into the strategies cells have evolved to neutralize toxic aggregates by sequestering them in specific cellular locations.

  13. Computational Protein Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Kristoffer Enøe

    with a novel method based on probability theory. With the aim of assembling a complete pipeline for protein design, this work touches upon several aspects of protein design. The presented work is the computational half of a design project where the other half is dedicated to the experimental part......Proteins are the major functional group of molecules in biology. The impact of protein science on medicine and chemical productions is rapidly increasing. However, the greatest potential remains to be realized. The fi eld of protein design has advanced computational modeling from a tool of support...... to a central method that enables new developments. For example, novel enzymes with functions not found in natural proteins have been de novo designed to give enough activity for experimental optimization. This thesis presents the current state-of-the-art within computational design methods together...

  14. Computational Protein Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Kristoffer Enøe

    Proteins are the major functional group of molecules in biology. The impact of protein science on medicine and chemical productions is rapidly increasing. However, the greatest potential remains to be realized. The fi eld of protein design has advanced computational modeling from a tool of support...... to a central method that enables new developments. For example, novel enzymes with functions not found in natural proteins have been de novo designed to give enough activity for experimental optimization. This thesis presents the current state-of-the-art within computational design methods together...... with a novel method based on probability theory. With the aim of assembling a complete pipeline for protein design, this work touches upon several aspects of protein design. The presented work is the computational half of a design project where the other half is dedicated to the experimental part...

  15. Specificity and affinity quantification of protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhiqiang; Guo, Liyong; Hu, Liang; Wang, Jin

    2013-05-01

    Most biological processes are mediated by the protein-protein interactions. Determination of the protein-protein structures and insight into their interactions are vital to understand the mechanisms of protein functions. Currently, compared with the isolated protein structures, only a small fraction of protein-protein structures are experimentally solved. Therefore, the computational docking methods play an increasing role in predicting the structures and interactions of protein-protein complexes. The scoring function of protein-protein interactions is the key responsible for the accuracy of the computational docking. Previous scoring functions were mostly developed by optimizing the binding affinity which determines the stability of the protein-protein complex, but they are often lack of the consideration of specificity which determines the discrimination of native protein-protein complex against competitive ones. We developed a scoring function (named as SPA-PP, specificity and affinity of the protein-protein interactions) by incorporating both the specificity and affinity into the optimization strategy. The testing results and comparisons with other scoring functions show that SPA-PP performs remarkably on both predictions of binding pose and binding affinity. Thus, SPA-PP is a promising quantification of protein-protein interactions, which can be implemented into the protein docking tools and applied for the predictions of protein-protein structure and affinity. The algorithm is implemented in C language, and the code can be downloaded from http://dl.dropbox.com/u/1865642/Optimization.cpp.

  16. Brief report: Glucocorticoid receptor polymorphism affects transrepression but not transactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.L.T. van den Akker (Erica); H. Russcher (Henk); E.F.C. van Rossum (Liesbeth); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); F.H. de Jong (Frank); A.C.S. Hokken-Koelega (Anita); H.A.P. Pols (Huib); J.W. Koper (Jan); S.W.J. Lamberts (Steven)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractContext: Glucocorticoids (GCs) are extensively used in the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Their beneficial effects are thought to be mediated by GC transrepression on gene expression. However, their use is limited by serious adverse effects, presumably mediated by GC

  17. Successful Protein Production

    OpenAIRE

    Culp, J.

    2011-01-01

    Successful production of functional proteins is more than an immunoreactive band on a Western blot. Availability of multiple expression vectors make accessible a variety of expression systems and parallel expression approaches can speed results and increase chance of success. The next hurdle is isolation of the protein target in sufficient amounts and with sufficient purity to support subsequent experimental work. Occasionally, protein refolding is the only method available to achieve the des...

  18. Pressure cryocooling protein crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae Un [Ithaca, NY; Gruner, Sol M [Ithaca, NY

    2011-10-04

    Preparation of cryocooled protein crystal is provided by use of helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal allowing collection of high resolution data and by heavier noble gas (krypton or xenon) binding followed by helium pressurizing and cryocooling to obtain cryocooled protein crystal for collection of high resolution data and SAD phasing simultaneously. The helium pressurizing is carried out on crystal coated to prevent dehydration or on crystal grown in aqueous solution in a capillary.

  19. Protein intakes in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swaminathan, Sumathi; Vaz, Mario; Kurpad, Anura V

    2012-08-01

    Indian diets derive almost 60 % of their protein from cereals with relatively low digestibility and quality. There have been several surveys of diets and protein intakes in India by the National Nutrition Monitoring Board (NNMB) over the last 25 years, in urban and rural, as well as in slum dwellers and tribal populations. Data of disadvantaged populations from slums, tribals and sedentary rural Indian populations show that the protein intake (mainly from cereals) is about 1 gm/kg/day. However, the protein intake looks less promising in terms of the protein digestibility corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS), using lysine as the first limiting amino acid, where all populations, particularly rural and tribal, appear to have an inadequate quality to their protein intake. The protein: energy (PE) ratio is a measure of dietary quality, and has been used in the 2007 WHO/FAO/UNU report to define reference requirement values with which the adequacy of diets can be evaluated in terms of a protein quality corrected PE ratio. It is likely that about one third of this sedentary rural population is at risk of not meeting their requirements. These levels of risk of deficiency are in a population with relatively low BMI populations, whose diets are also inadequate in fruits and vegetables. Therefore, while the burden of enhancing the quality of protein intake in rural India exists, the quality of the diet, in general, represents a challenge that must be met.

  20. Protein carbonylation in plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ian Max; Havelund, Jesper; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2017-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the current knowledge on protein carbonylation in plants and its role in plant physiology. It starts with a brief outline of the turnover and production sites of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants and the causes of protein carbonylation. This is followed...... by a description of the methods used to study protein carbonylation in plants, which is also very brief as the methods are similar to those used in studies on animals. The chapter also focuses on protein carbonylation in plants in general and in mitochondria and in seeds in particular, as case stories where...

  1. MicroProteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eguen, Teinai Ebimienere; Straub, Daniel; Graeff, Moritz

    2015-01-01

    MicroProteins (miPs) are short, usually single-domain proteins that, in analogy to miRNAs, heterodimerize with their targets and exert a dominant-negative effect. Recent bioinformatic attempts to identify miPs have resulted in a list of potential miPs, many of which lack the defining characterist......MicroProteins (miPs) are short, usually single-domain proteins that, in analogy to miRNAs, heterodimerize with their targets and exert a dominant-negative effect. Recent bioinformatic attempts to identify miPs have resulted in a list of potential miPs, many of which lack the defining...

  2. Acanthamoeba castellanii STAT protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kicinska, Anna; Leluk, Jacek; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2014-01-01

    STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription) proteins are one of the important mediators of phosphotyrosine-regulated signaling in metazoan cells. We described the presence of STAT protein in a unicellular, free-living amoebae with a simple life cycle, Acanthamoeba castellanii. A. castellanii is the only, studied to date, Amoebozoan that does not belong to Mycetozoa but possesses STATs. A sequence of the A. castellanii STAT protein includes domains similar to those of the Dictyostelium STAT proteins: a coiled coil (characteristic for Dictyostelium STAT coiled coil), a STAT DNA-binding domain and a Src-homology domain. The search for protein sequences homologous to A. castellanii STAT revealed 17 additional sequences from lower eukaryotes. Interestingly, all of these sequences come from Amoebozoa organisms that belong to either Mycetozoa (slime molds) or Centramoebida. We showed that there are four separated clades within the slime mold STAT proteins. The A. castellanii STAT protein branches next to a group of STATc proteins from Mycetozoa. We also demonstrate that Amoebozoa form a distinct monophyletic lineage within the STAT protein world that is well separated from the other groups.

  3. Acanthamoeba castellanii STAT protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kicinska

    Full Text Available STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription proteins are one of the important mediators of phosphotyrosine-regulated signaling in metazoan cells. We described the presence of STAT protein in a unicellular, free-living amoebae with a simple life cycle, Acanthamoeba castellanii. A. castellanii is the only, studied to date, Amoebozoan that does not belong to Mycetozoa but possesses STATs. A sequence of the A. castellanii STAT protein includes domains similar to those of the Dictyostelium STAT proteins: a coiled coil (characteristic for Dictyostelium STAT coiled coil, a STAT DNA-binding domain and a Src-homology domain. The search for protein sequences homologous to A. castellanii STAT revealed 17 additional sequences from lower eukaryotes. Interestingly, all of these sequences come from Amoebozoa organisms that belong to either Mycetozoa (slime molds or Centramoebida. We showed that there are four separated clades within the slime mold STAT proteins. The A. castellanii STAT protein branches next to a group of STATc proteins from Mycetozoa. We also demonstrate that Amoebozoa form a distinct monophyletic lineage within the STAT protein world that is well separated from the other groups.

  4. FOXO1 is a direct target of EWS-Fli1 oncogenic fusion protein in Ewing's sarcoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Liu; Hu, Hsien-Ming; Zielinska-Kwiatkowska, Anna; Chansky, Howard A.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Inducible and reversible siRNA knockdown of an oncogenic fusion protein such as EWS-Fli1 is feasible and more advantageous than other siRNA methods. → The tumor suppressor gene FOXO1 is a new EWS-Fli1 target. → While trans-activators are known for the FOXO1 gene, there has been no report on negative regulators of FOXO1 transcription. → This study provides first evidence that the EWS-Fli1 oncogenic fusion protein can function as a transcriptional repressor of the FOXO1 gene. -- Abstract: Ewing's family tumors are characterized by a specific t(11;22) chromosomal translocation that results in the formation of EWS-Fli1 oncogenic fusion protein. To investigate the effects of EWS-Fli1 on gene expression, we carried out DNA microarray analysis after specific knockdown of EWS-Fli1 through transfection of synthetic siRNAs. EWS-Fli1 knockdown increased expression of genes such as DKK1 and p57 that are known to be repressed by EWS-Fli1 fusion protein. Among other potential EWS-Fli1 targets identified by our microarray analysis, we have focused on the FOXO1 gene since it encodes a potential tumor suppressor and has not been previously reported in Ewing's cells. To better understand how EWS-Fli1 affects FOXO1 expression, we have established a doxycycline-inducible siRNA system to achieve stable and reversible knockdown of EWS-Fli1 in Ewing's sarcoma cells. Here we show that FOXO1 expression in Ewing's cells has an inverse relationship with EWS-Fli1 protein level, and FOXO1 promoter activity is increased after doxycycline-induced EWS-Fli1 knockdown. In addition, we have found that direct binding of EWS-Fli1 to FOXO1 promoter is attenuated after doxycycline-induced siRNA knockdown of the fusion protein. Together, these results suggest that suppression of FOXO1 function by EWS-Fli1 fusion protein may contribute to cellular transformation in Ewing's family tumors.

  5. What properties characterize the hub proteins of the protein-protein interaction network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae?

    OpenAIRE

    Ekman, Diana; Light, Sara; Bj?rklund, ?sa K; Elofsson, Arne

    2006-01-01

    Background Most proteins interact with only a few other proteins while a small number of proteins (hubs) have many interaction partners. Hub proteins and non-hub proteins differ in several respects; however, understanding is not complete about what properties characterize the hubs and set them apart from proteins of low connectivity. Therefore, we have investigated what differentiates hubs from non-hubs and static hubs (party hubs) from dynamic hubs (date hubs) in the protein-protein interact...

  6. Allosteric Regulation of Proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    For example, the structural changes that allowed for allosteric regulation of haemoglobin were re- vealed through structural elucidation of the protein in free and oxygen-bound forms by X-ray crystallography. Following this,. X-ray crystallography has been utilized to study a variety of al- losteric proteins including ATCase. 2.

  7. Modular protein domains

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cesareni, Giovanni

    2005-01-01

    ... encodes not only sequence, but somehow explicitly specifies folding, structure, and biological function as well. How, then, can one learn to read this 'language of proteins'? One of the most powerful approaches to 'cracking the protein code' has involved sequence comparisons between and within species, a task now greatly simplified by the ever...

  8. Amino acids and proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Vlaardingerbroek, Hester; van den Akker, Chris H.; de Groof, Femke; van der Schoor, Sophie R. D.

    2014-01-01

    Amino acids and protein are key factors for growth. The neonatal period requires the highest intake in life to meet the demands. Those demands include amino acids for growth, but proteins and amino acids also function as signalling molecules and function as neurotransmitters. Often the nutritional

  9. MODELS OF PROTEIN FOLDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unnati Ahluwalia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In an attempt to explore the understanding of protein folding mechanism, various models have been proposed in the literature. Advances in recent experimental and computational techniques rationalized our understanding on some of the fundamental features of the protein folding pathways. The goal of this review is to revisit the various models and outline the essential aspects of the folding reaction.

  10. Green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalfie, M

    1995-10-01

    Several bioluminescent coelenterates use a secondary fluorescent protein, the green fluorescent protein (GFP), in an energy transfer reaction to produce green light. The most studied of these proteins have been the GFPs from the jellyfish Aequorea victoria and the sea pansy Renilla reniformis. Although the proteins from these organisms are not identical, they are thought to have the same chromophore, which is derived from the primary amino acid sequence of GFP. The differences are thought to be due to changes in the protein environment of the chromophore. Recent interest in these molecules has arisen from the cloning of the Aequorea gfp cDNA and the demonstration that its expression in the absence of other Aequorea proteins results in a fluorescent product. This demonstration indicated that GFP could be used as a marker of gene expression and protein localization in living and fixed tissues. Bacterial, plant and animal (including mammalian) cells all express GFP. The heterologous expression of the gfp cDNA has also meant that it could be mutated to produce proteins with different fluorescent properties. Variants with more intense fluorescence or alterations in the excitation and emission spectra have been produced.

  11. Proteins at surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Efimova, Y.M.

    2006-01-01

    Understanding protein adsorption is of vital importance in many fields of medicine and industry that can be divided into two categories: those in which it is desired to minimize adsorption, and those in which protein adsorption is desired. The first category covers materials for kidney dialysis

  12. Protein Attachment on Nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chung-Lun; Lin, Cheng-Huang; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Su, Meng-Chih

    2015-07-16

    A recent advance in nanotechnology is the scale-up production of small and nonaggregated diamond nanoparticles suitable for biological applications. Using detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) with an average diameter of ∼4 nm as the adsorbents, we have studied the static attachment of three proteins (myoglobin, bovine serum albumin, and insulin) onto the nanoparticles by optical spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and dynamic light scattering, and electrophoretic zeta potential measurements. Results show that the protein surface coverage is predominantly determined by the competition between protein-protein and protein-ND interactions, giving each protein a unique and characteristic structural configuration in its own complex. Specifically, both myoglobin and bovine serum albumin show a Langmuir-type adsorption behavior, forming 1:1 complexes at saturation, whereas insulin folds into a tightly bound multimer before adsorption. The markedly different adsorption patterns appear to be independent of the protein concentration and are closely related to the affinity of the individual proteins for the NDs. The present study provides a fundamental understanding for the use of NDs as a platform for nanomedical drug delivery.

  13. Poxviral Ankyrin Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael H. Herbert

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Multiple repeats of the ankyrin motif (ANK are ubiquitous throughout the kingdoms of life but are absent from most viruses. The main exception to this is the poxvirus family, and specifically the chordopoxviruses, with ANK repeat proteins present in all but three species from separate genera. The poxviral ANK repeat proteins belong to distinct orthologue groups spread over different species, and align well with the phylogeny of their genera. This distribution throughout the chordopoxviruses indicates these proteins were present in an ancestral vertebrate poxvirus, and have since undergone numerous duplication events. Most poxviral ANK repeat proteins contain an unusual topology of multiple ANK motifs starting at the N-terminus with a C-terminal poxviral homologue of the cellular F-box enabling interaction with the cellular SCF ubiquitin ligase complex. The subtle variations between ANK repeat proteins of individual poxviruses suggest an array of different substrates may be bound by these protein-protein interaction domains and, via the F-box, potentially directed to cellular ubiquitination pathways and possible degradation. Known interaction partners of several of these proteins indicate that the NF-κB coordinated anti-viral response is a key target, whilst some poxviral ANK repeat domains also have an F-box independent affect on viral host-range.

  14. Advances in Protein Precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golubovic, M.

    2009-01-01

    Proteins are biological macromolecules, which are among the key components of all living organisms. Proteins are nowadays present in all fields of biotech industry, such as food and feed, synthetic and pharmaceutical industry. They are isolated from their natural sources or produced in different

  15. NMR of unfolded proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2005-01-03

    Jan 3, 2005 ... emerged as the sole, most powerful technique to help characterize these disordered protein systems. In ... tion of a protein is related to its significant and ...... This is likely to allow a number of both charged and hydrophobic groups to be presented to fibronectin for highly spe- cific binding.76. 5.3 Lysozyme.

  16. NMR of unfolded proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the post-genomic era, as more and more genome sequences are becoming known and hectic efforts are underway to decode the information content in them, it is becoming increasingly evident that flexibility in proteins plays a crucial role in many of the biological functions. Many proteins have intrinsic disorder either ...

  17. Brushes and proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosker, W.T.E.

    2011-01-01

      Brushes and Proteins   Wouter T. E. Bosker         Protein adsorption at solid surfaces can be prevented by applying a polymer brush at the surface. A polymer brush consists of polymer chains end-grafted to the surface at such a grafting density that

  18. Ciliary neurotrophic factor fused to a protein transduction domain retains full neuroprotective activity in the absence of cytokine-like side effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezende, Alexandre C; Peroni, Daniele; Vieira, Andrè S; Rogerio, Fabio; Talaisys, Rafael L; Costa, Fabio T M; Langone, Francesco; Skaper, Stephen D; Negro, Alessandro

    2009-06-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) is a multifunctional cytokine that can regulate the survival and differentiation of many types of developing and adult neurons. CNTF prevents the degeneration of motor neurons after axotomy and in mouse mutant progressive motor neuronopathy, which has encouraged trials of CNTF for human motor neuron disease. Given systemically, however, CNTF causes severe side effects, including cachexia and a marked immune response, which has limited its clinical application. The present work describes a novel approach for administering recombinant human CNTF (rhCNTF) while conserving neurotrophic activity and avoiding deleterious side effects. rhCNTF was fused to a protein transduction domain derived from the human immunodeficiency virus-1 TAT (transactivator) protein. The resulting fusion protein (TAT-CNTF) crosses the plasma membrane within minutes and displays a nuclear localization. TAT-CNTF was equipotent to rhCNTF in supporting the survival of cultured chicken embryo dorsal root ganglion neurons. Local or subcutaneous administration of TAT-CNTF, like rhCNTF rescued motor neurons from death in neonatal rats subjected to sciatic nerve transection. In contrast to subcutaneous rhCNTF, which caused a 20-30% decrease in body weight in neonatal rats between postnatal days 2 and 7 together with a considerable fat mobilization in brown adipose tissue, TAT-CNTF lacked such side effects. Together, these results indicate that rhCNTF fused with the protein transduction domain/TAT retains neurotrophic activity in the absence of CNTFs cytokine-like side effects and may be a promising candidate for the treatment of motor neuron and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  19. Depletion of the cellular levels of Bag-1 proteins attenuates phorbol ester-induced downregulation of IκBα and nuclear accumulation of NF-κB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, Jana V.; Volz, Yvonne; Berger, Caroline; Schneider, Sandra; Cato, Andrew C.B.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: →Bag-1 depletion only marginally affects the action of the glucocorticoid receptor but strongly regulates the activity of NF-κB. →Bag-1 depletion attenuates phosphorylation and degradation of IκBα and nuclear accumulation of NF-κB p65 and p50. →Bag-1 interacts with IκBα and partially restores IκBα and NF-κB activation in Bag-1 depleted cells. -- Abstract: Bag-1 consists in humans of four isoforms generated from the same RNA by alternative translation. Overexpression of single Bag-1 isoforms has identified Bag-1 as a negative regulator of action of many proteins including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Here we have analysed the ability of Bag-1 to regulate the transrepression function of the GR. Silencing Bag-1 expression only marginally affects the transrepression action of the GR but decreased the action of the transcription factor NF-κB. Furthermore phosphorylation and degradation of the inhibitor protein IκBα and nuclear accumulation of p65 and p50 NF-κB proteins in response to phorbol ester was attenuated following Bag-1 depletion in HeLa cells. Reconstitution of Bag-1 in depleted cells partially restored IκBα and NF-κB activation. Knock-down of Bag-1 expression also did not significantly alter GR-mediated transactivation but affected the basal transcription of some of the target genes. Thus Bag-1 proteins function as regulators of the action of selective transcription factors.

  20. Artificially Engineered Protein Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yun Jung; Holmberg, Angela L; Olsen, Bradley D

    2017-06-07

    Modern polymer science increasingly requires precise control over macromolecular structure and properties for engineering advanced materials and biomedical systems. The application of biological processes to design and synthesize artificial protein polymers offers a means for furthering macromolecular tunability, enabling polymers with dispersities of ∼1.0 and monomer-level sequence control. Taking inspiration from materials evolved in nature, scientists have created modular building blocks with simplified monomer sequences that replicate the function of natural systems. The corresponding protein engineering toolbox has enabled the systematic development of complex functional polymeric materials across areas as diverse as adhesives, responsive polymers, and medical materials. This review discusses the natural proteins that have inspired the development of key building blocks for protein polymer engineering and the function of these elements in material design. The prospects and progress for scalable commercialization of protein polymers are reviewed, discussing both technology needs and opportunities.

  1. Protein restriction and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jie; Ren, Wenkai; Huang, Xingguo; Li, Tiejun; Yin, Yulong

    2018-03-26

    Protein restriction without malnutrition is currently an effective nutritional intervention known to prevent diseases and promote health span from yeast to human. Recently, low protein diets are reported to be associated with lowered cancer incidence and mortality risk of cancers in human. In murine models, protein restriction inhibits tumor growth via mTOR signaling pathway. IGF-1, amino acid metabolic programing, FGF21, and autophagy may also serve as potential mechanisms of protein restriction mediated cancer prevention. Together, dietary intervention aimed at reducing protein intake can be beneficial and has the potential to be widely adopted and effective in preventing and treating cancers. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Sensitizing properties of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Lars K.; Ladics, Gregory S; McClain, Scott

    2014-01-01

    The scope of allergy risk is diverse considering the myriad ways in which protein allergenicity is affected by physiochemical characteristics of proteins. The complexity created by the matrices of foods and the variability of the human immune system add additional challenges to understanding...... the relationship between sensitization potential and allergy disease. To address these and other issues, an April 2012 international symposium was held in Prague, Czech Republic, to review and discuss the state-of-the-science of sensitizing properties of protein allergens. The symposium, organized by the Protein...... Allergenicity Technical Committee of the International Life Sciences Institute's Health and Environmental Sciences Institute, featured presentations on current methods, test systems, research trends, and unanswered questions in the field of protein sensitization. A diverse group of over 70 interdisciplinary...

  3. The Protein Model Portal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Konstantin; Kiefer, Florian; Kopp, Jürgen; Battey, James N D; Podvinec, Michael; Westbrook, John D; Berman, Helen M; Bordoli, Lorenza; Schwede, Torsten

    2009-03-01

    Structural Genomics has been successful in determining the structures of many unique proteins in a high throughput manner. Still, the number of known protein sequences is much larger than the number of experimentally solved protein structures. Homology (or comparative) modeling methods make use of experimental protein structures to build models for evolutionary related proteins. Thereby, experimental structure determination efforts and homology modeling complement each other in the exploration of the protein structure space. One of the challenges in using model information effectively has been to access all models available for a specific protein in heterogeneous formats at different sites using various incompatible accession code systems. Often, structure models for hundreds of proteins can be derived from a given experimentally determined structure, using a variety of established methods. This has been done by all of the PSI centers, and by various independent modeling groups. The goal of the Protein Model Portal (PMP) is to provide a single portal which gives access to the various models that can be leveraged from PSI targets and other experimental protein structures. A single interface allows all existing pre-computed models across these various sites to be queried simultaneously, and provides links to interactive services for template selection, target-template alignment, model building, and quality assessment. The current release of the portal consists of 7.6 million model structures provided by different partner resources (CSMP, JCSG, MCSG, NESG, NYSGXRC, JCMM, ModBase, SWISS-MODEL Repository). The PMP is available at http://www.proteinmodelportal.org and from the PSI Structural Genomics Knowledgebase.

  4. Transcriptional Regulation of the HMGA1 Gene by Octamer-Binding Proteins Oct-1 and Oct-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possidente, Katiuscia; Iiritano, Stefania; Ventura, Valeria; Pandolfo, Rosantony; Brunetti, Francesco Saverio; Greco, Manfredi; Foti, Daniela; Brunetti, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The High-Mobility Group AT-Hook 1 (HMGA1) protein is an architectural transcription factor that binds to AT-rich sequences in the promoter region of DNA and functions as a specific cofactor for gene activation. Previously, we demonstrated that HMGA1 is a key regulator of the insulin receptor (INSR) gene and an important downstream target of the INSR signaling cascade. Moreover, from a pathogenic point of view, overexpression of HMGA1 has been associated with human cancer, whereas functional variants of the HMGA1 gene have been recently linked to type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome. However, despite of this biological and pathological relevance, the mechanisms that control HMGA1 gene expression remain unknown. In this study, to define the molecular mechanism(s) that regulate HMGA1 gene expression, the HMGA1 gene promoter was investigated by transient transfection of different cell lines, either before or after DNA and siRNA cotransfections. An octamer motif was identified as an important element of transcriptional regulation of this gene, the interaction of which with the octamer transcription factors Oct-1 and Oct-2 is crucial in modulating HMGA1 gene and protein expression. Additionally, we demonstrate that HMGA1 binds its own promoter and contributes to its transactivation by Oct-2 (but not Oct-1), supporting its role in an auto-regulatory circuit. Overall, our results provide insight into the transcriptional regulation of the HMGA1 gene, revealing a differential control exerted by both Oct-1 and Oct-2. Furthermore, they consistently support the hypothesis that a putative defect in Oct-1 and/or Oct-2, by affecting HMGA1 expression, may cause INSR dysfunction, leading to defects of the INSR signaling pathway. PMID:24367622

  5. Transcriptional regulation of the HMGA1 gene by octamer-binding proteins Oct-1 and Oct-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eusebio Chiefari

    Full Text Available The High-Mobility Group AT-Hook 1 (HMGA1 protein is an architectural transcription factor that binds to AT-rich sequences in the promoter region of DNA and functions as a specific cofactor for gene activation. Previously, we demonstrated that HMGA1 is a key regulator of the insulin receptor (INSR gene and an important downstream target of the INSR signaling cascade. Moreover, from a pathogenic point of view, overexpression of HMGA1 has been associated with human cancer, whereas functional variants of the HMGA1 gene have been recently linked to type 2 diabetes mellitus and metabolic syndrome. However, despite of this biological and pathological relevance, the mechanisms that control HMGA1 gene expression remain unknown. In this study, to define the molecular mechanism(s that regulate HMGA1 gene expression, the HMGA1 gene promoter was investigated by transient transfection of different cell lines, either before or after DNA and siRNA cotransfections. An octamer motif was identified as an important element of transcriptional regulation of this gene, the interaction of which with the octamer transcription factors Oct-1 and Oct-2 is crucial in modulating HMGA1 gene and protein expression. Additionally, we demonstrate that HMGA1 binds its own promoter and contributes to its transactivation by Oct-2 (but not Oct-1, supporting its role in an auto-regulatory circuit. Overall, our results provide insight into the transcriptional regulation of the HMGA1 gene, revealing a differential control exerted by both Oct-1 and Oct-2. Furthermore, they consistently support the hypothesis that a putative defect in Oct-1 and/or Oct-2, by affecting HMGA1 expression, may cause INSR dysfunction, leading to defects of the INSR signaling pathway.

  6. The Compass-like locus, exclusive to the Ambulacrarians, encodes a chromatin insulator binding protein in the sea urchin embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Cavalieri

    Full Text Available Chromatin insulators are eukaryotic genome elements that upon binding of specific proteins display barrier and/or enhancer-blocking activity. Although several insulators have been described throughout various metazoans, much less is known about proteins that mediate their functions. This article deals with the identification and functional characterization in Paracentrotus lividus of COMPASS-like (CMPl, a novel echinoderm insulator binding protein. Phylogenetic analysis shows that the CMPl factor, encoded by the alternative spliced Cmp/Cmpl transcript, is the founder of a novel ambulacrarian-specific family of Homeodomain proteins containing the Compass domain. Specific association of CMPl with the boxB cis-element of the sns5 chromatin insulator is demonstrated by using a yeast one-hybrid system, and further corroborated by ChIP-qPCR and trans-activation assays in developing sea urchin embryos. The sns5 insulator lies within the early histone gene cluster, basically between the H2A enhancer and H1 promoter. To assess the functional role of CMPl within this locus, we challenged the activity of CMPl by two distinct experimental strategies. First we expressed in the developing embryo a chimeric protein, containing the DNA-binding domain of CMPl, which efficiently compete with the endogenous CMPl for the binding to the boxB sequence. Second, to titrate the embryonic CMPl protein, we microinjected an affinity-purified CMPl antibody. In both the experimental assays we congruently observed the loss of the enhancer-blocking function of sns5, as indicated by the specific increase of the H1 expression level. Furthermore, microinjection of the CMPl antiserum in combination with a synthetic mRNA encoding a forced repressor of the H2A enhancer-bound MBF1 factor restores the normal H1 mRNA abundance. Altogether, these results strongly support the conclusion that the recruitment of CMPl on sns5 is required for buffering the H1 promoter from the H2A enhancer

  7. Arabidopsis KHZ1 and KHZ2, two novel non-tandem CCCH zinc-finger and K-homolog domain proteins, have redundant roles in the regulation of flowering and senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zongyun; Jia, Jianheng; Yan, Xiaoyuan; Shi, Huiying; Han, Yuzhen

    2017-12-01

    The two novel CCCH zinc-finger and K-homolog (KH) proteins, KHZ1 and KHZ2, play important roles in regulating flowering and senescence redundantly in Arabidopsis. The CCCH zinc-finger proteins and K-homolog (KH) proteins play important roles in plant development and stress responses. However, the biological functions of many CCCH zinc-finger proteins and KH proteins remain uncharacterized. In Arabidopsis, KHZ1 and KHZ2 are characterized as two novel CCCH zinc-finger and KH domain proteins which belong to subfamily VII in CCCH family. We obtained khz1, khz2 mutants and khz1 khz2 double mutants, as well as overexpression (OE) lines of KHZ1 and KHZ2. Compared with the wild type (WT), the khz2 mutants displayed no defects in growth and development, and the khz1 mutants were slightly late flowering, whereas the khz1 khz2 double mutants showed a pronounced late flowering phenotype. In contrast, artificially overexpressing KHZ1 and KHZ2 led to the early flowering. Consistent with the late flowering phenotype, the expression of flowering repressor gene FLC was up-regulated, while the expression of flowering integrator and floral meristem identity (FMI) genes were down-regulated significantly in khz1 khz2. In addition, we also observed that the OE plants of KHZ1 and KHZ2 showed early leaf senescence significantly, whereas the khz1 khz2 double mutants showed delayed senescence of leaf and the whole plant. Both KHZ1 and KHZ2 were ubiquitously expressed throughout the tissues of Arabidopsis. KHZ1 and KHZ2 were localized to the nucleus, and possessed both transactivation activities and RNA-binding abilities. Taken together, we conclude that KHZ1 and KHZ2 have redundant roles in the regulation of flowering and senescence in Arabidopsis.

  8. Protein trapping of nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ang, Joo C.; Lin, Jack M.; Yaron, Peter N.; White, John W.

    2009-01-01

    Full text: We have observed the formation of protein-nanoparticle complexes at the air-water interfaces from three different methods of presenting the nanoparticles to proteins. The structures formed resemble the 'protein-nanoparticle corona' proposed by Lynch et al. [1-3) in relation to a possible route for nanoparticle entry into living cells. To do this, the methods of x-ray and neutron reflectivity (with isotopic contrast variation between the protein and nanoparticles) have been used to study the structures formed at the air-water interface of l 3 - casein presented to silica nanoparticle dispersions. Whilst the silica dispersions showed no observable reflectivity, strong signals appear in the reflectivity when protein is present. Drop-wise spreading of a small amount of protein at the air-silica sol interface and presentation of the silica sol to an isolated monomolecular protein film (made by the 'flow-trough' method [4]) gave an immediate signal. Mixing the components in solution only produces a slow response but in all cases a similar structure is formed. The different responses are interpreted in structural and stoichiometric ways.

  9. Anchored design of protein-protein interfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven M Lewis

    Full Text Available Few existing protein-protein interface design methods allow for extensive backbone rearrangements during the design process. There is also a dichotomy between redesign methods, which take advantage of the native interface, and de novo methods, which produce novel binders.Here, we propose a new method for designing novel protein reagents that combines advantages of redesign and de novo methods and allows for extensive backbone motion. This method requires a bound structure of a target and one of its natural binding partners. A key interaction in this interface, the anchor, is computationally grafted out of the partner and into a surface loop on the design scaffold. The design scaffold's surface is then redesigned with backbone flexibility to create a new binding partner for the target. Careful choice of a scaffold will bring experimentally desirable characteristics into the new complex. The use of an anchor both expedites the design process and ensures that binding proceeds against a known location on the target. The use of surface loops on the scaffold allows for flexible-backbone redesign to properly search conformational space.This protocol was implemented within the Rosetta3 software suite. To demonstrate and evaluate this protocol, we have developed a benchmarking set of structures from the PDB with loop-mediated interfaces. This protocol can recover the correct loop-mediated interface in 15 out of 16 tested structures, using only a single residue as an anchor.

  10. Intercellular protein-protein interactions at synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaofei; Hou, Dongmei; Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Chen

    2014-06-01

    Chemical synapses are asymmetric intercellular junctions through which neurons send nerve impulses to communicate with other neurons or excitable cells. The appropriate formation of synapses, both spatially and temporally, is essential for brain function and depends on the intercellular protein-protein interactions of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) at synaptic clefts. The CAM proteins link pre- and post-synaptic sites, and play essential roles in promoting synapse formation and maturation, maintaining synapse number and type, accumulating neurotransmitter receptors and ion channels, controlling neuronal differentiation, and even regulating synaptic plasticity directly. Alteration of the interactions of CAMs leads to structural and functional impairments, which results in many neurological disorders, such as autism, Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the functions of CAMs during development and in the mature neural system, as well as in the pathogenesis of some neurological disorders. Here, we review the function of the major classes of CAMs, and how dysfunction of CAMs relates to several neurological disorders.

  11. Protein oxidation in aquatic foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline P.

    2014-01-01

    The chapter discusses general considerations about protein oxidation and reviews the mechanisms involved in protein oxidation and consequences of protein oxidation on fish proteins. It presents two case studies, the first deals with protein and lipid oxidation in frozen rainbow trout......, and the second with oxidation in salted herring. The mechanisms responsible for initiation of protein oxidation are unclear, but it is generally accepted that free radical species initiating lipid oxidation can also initiate protein oxidation. The chapter focuses on interaction between protein and lipid...... oxidation. The protein carbonyl group measurement is the widely used method for estimating protein oxidation in foods and has been used in fish muscle. The chapter also talks about the impact of protein oxidation on protein functionality, fish muscle texture, and food nutritional value. Protein oxidation...

  12. Protein oxidation and ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linton, S; Davies, Michael Jonathan; Dean, R T

    2001-01-01

    of redox-active metal ions that could catalyse oxidant formation. As a result of this decrease in antioxidant defences, and increased rate of ROS formation, it is possible that the impact of ROS increases with age. ROS are known to oxidise biological macromolecules, with proteins an important target....... If the argument that the impact of ROS increases with age is true, then proteins would be expected to accumulate oxidised materials with age, and the rate of such accumulation should increase with time, reflecting impaired inefficiency of homeostasis. Here we review the evidence for the accumulation of oxidised......, or modified, extra- and intra-cellular proteins in vivo....

  13. Protein crystallography prescreen kit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segelke, Brent W.; Krupka, Heike I.; Rupp, Bernhard

    2005-07-12

    A kit for prescreening protein concentration for crystallization includes a multiplicity of vials, a multiplicity of pre-selected reagents, and a multiplicity of sample plates. The reagents and a corresponding multiplicity of samples of the protein in solutions of varying concentrations are placed on sample plates. The sample plates containing the reagents and samples are incubated. After incubation the sample plates are examined to determine which of the sample concentrations are too low and which the sample concentrations are too high. The sample concentrations that are optimal for protein crystallization are selected and used.

  14. Sound of proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    In my group we work with Molecular Dynamics to model several different proteins and protein systems. We submit our modelled molecules to changes in temperature, changes in solvent composition and even external pulling forces. To analyze our simulation results we have so far used visual inspection...... and statistical analysis of the resulting molecular trajectories (as everybody else!). However, recently I started assigning a particular sound frequency to each amino acid in the protein, and by setting the amplitude of each frequency according to the movement amplitude we can "hear" whenever two aminoacids...

  15. Alpha Shapes and Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Pawel; Sterner, Henrik; Sterner, Peter

    2009-01-01

    We provide a unified description of (weighted) alpha shapes, beta shapes and the corresponding simplicialcomplexes. We discuss their applicability to various protein-related problems. We also discuss filtrations of alpha shapes and touch upon related persistence issues.We claim that the full...... potential of alpha-shapes and related geometrical constructs in protein-related problems yet remains to be realized and verified. We suggest parallel algorithms for (weighted) alpha shapes, and we argue that future use of filtrations and kinetic variants for larger proteins will need such implementation....

  16. Protein Crystal Malic Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Malic Enzyme is a target protein for drug design because it is a key protein in the life cycle of intestinal parasites. After 2 years of effort on Earth, investigators were unable to produce any crystals that were of high enough quality and for this reason the structure of this important protein could not be determined. Crystals obtained from one STS-50 were of superior quality allowing the structure to be determined. This is just one example why access to space is so vital for these studies. Principal Investigator is Larry DeLucas.

  17. Designing microcapsules based on protein fibrils and protein - polysaccharide complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hua, K.N.P.

    2012-01-01

    Keywords: encapsulation, microcapsule, protein, fibril, protein-polysaccharide complex, controlled release, interfacial rheology, lysozyme, ovalbumin This thesis describes the design of encapsulation systems using mesostructures from proteins and polysaccharides. The approach was to first

  18. Designing microcapsules based on protein fibrils and protein - polysaccharide complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hua, K.N.P.

    2012-01-01

    Keywords: encapsulation, microcapsule, protein, fibril, protein-polysaccharide complex, controlled release, interfacial rheology, lysozyme, ovalbumin

    This thesis describes the design of encapsulation systems using mesostructures from proteins and polysaccharides. The approach

  19. Cellular prion protein (PrPc and hypoxia: true to each other in good times and in bad, in sickness and in health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanja Ramljak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The cellular prion protein (PrPc and hypoxia appear to be tightly intertwined. Beneficial effects of PrPc on neuronal survival under hypoxic conditions such as focal cerebral ischemia are strongly supported. Conversely, increasing evidence indicates detrimental effects of increased PrPc expression on cancer progression, another condition accompanied by low oxygen tensions. A switch between anaerobic and aerobic metabolism characterizes both conditions. A cellular process that might unite both is glycolysis. Putative role of PrPc in stimulation of glycolysis in times of need is indeed thought provoking. A significance of astrocytic PrPc expression for neuronal survival under hypoxic conditions and possible association of PrPc with the astrocyte-neuron lactate shuttle (ANLS is considered. We posit PrPc-induced lactate production via transactivation of lactate dehydrogenase A by hypoxia inducible factor 1α as an important factor for survival of both neurons and tumor cells in hypoxic microenvironment. Concomitantly, we discuss a cross-talk between Wnt/ß-catenin and PI-3K/Akt signaling pathways in executing PrPc-induced activation of glycolysis. Finally, we would like to emphasize that we see a great potential in joining expertise from both fields, neuroscience and cancer research in revealing the mechanisms underlying hypoxia-related pathologies. PrPc may prove focal point for future research.

  20. The cardiac electrogenic sodium/bicarbonate cotransporter (NBCe1) is activated by aldosterone through the G protein-coupled receptor 30 (GPR 30).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlowski, Alejandro; De Giusti, Verónica C; Ciancio, María C; Espejo, María S; Aiello, Ernesto A

    2016-09-02

    The sodium/bicarbonate cotransporter (NBC) transports extracellular Na + and HCO 3 - into the cytoplasm upon intracellular acidosis, restoring the acidic pH i to near neutral values. Two different NBC isoforms have been described in the heart, the electroneutral NBCn1 (1Na + :1HCO 3 - ) and the electrogenic NBCe1 (1Na + :2HCO 3 - ). Certain non-genomic effects of aldosterone (Ald) were due to an orphan G protein-couple receptor 30 (GPR30). We have recently demonstrated that Ald activates GPR30 in adult rat ventricular myocytes, which transactivates the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and in turn triggers a reactive oxygen species (ROS)- and PI3K/AKT-dependent pathway, leading to the stimulation of NBC. The aim of this study was to investigate the NBC isoform involved in the Ald/GPR30-induced NBC activation. Using specific NBCe1 inhibitory antibodies (a-L3) we demonstrated that Ald does not affect NBCn1 activity. Ald was able to increase NBCe1 activity recorded in isolation. Using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy analysis we showed in this work that both NBCe1 and GPR30 are localized in t-tubules. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that NBCe1 is the NBC isoform activated by Ald in the heart.

  1. Cleavage of the JunB Transcription Factor by Caspases Generates a Carboxyl-terminal Fragment That Inhibits Activator Protein-1 Transcriptional Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jason K. H.; Pearson, Joel D.; Maser, Brandon E.; Ingham, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    The activator protein-1 (AP-1) family transcription factor, JunB, is an important regulator of proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, and the immune response. In this report, we show that JunB is cleaved in a caspase-dependent manner in apoptotic anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive, anaplastic large cell lymphoma cell lines and that ectopically expressed JunB is cleaved in murine RAW 264.7 macrophage cells treated with the NALP1b inflammasome activator, anthrax lethal toxin. In both cases, we identify aspartic acid 137 as the caspase cleavage site and demonstrate that JunB can be directly cleaved in vitro by multiple caspases at this site. Cleavage of JunB at aspartic acid 137 separates the N-terminal transactivation domain from the C-terminal DNA binding and dimerization domains, and we show that the C-terminal cleavage fragment retains both DNA binding activity and the ability to interact with AP-1 family transcription factors. Furthermore, this fragment interferes with the binding of full-length JunB to AP-1 sites and inhibits AP-1-dependent transcription. In summary, we have identified and characterized a novel mechanism of JunB post-translational modification and demonstrate that the C-terminal JunB caspase cleavage product functions as a potent inhibitor of AP-1-dependent transcription. PMID:23749999

  2. Cleavage of the JunB transcription factor by caspases generates a carboxyl-terminal fragment that inhibits activator protein-1 transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jason K H; Pearson, Joel D; Maser, Brandon E; Ingham, Robert J

    2013-07-26

    The activator protein-1 (AP-1) family transcription factor, JunB, is an important regulator of proliferation, apoptosis, differentiation, and the immune response. In this report, we show that JunB is cleaved in a caspase-dependent manner in apoptotic anaplastic lymphoma kinase-positive, anaplastic large cell lymphoma cell lines and that ectopically expressed JunB is cleaved in murine RAW 264.7 macrophage cells treated with the NALP1b inflammasome activator, anthrax lethal toxin. In both cases, we identify aspartic acid 137 as the caspase cleavage site and demonstrate that JunB can be directly cleaved in vitro by multiple caspases at this site. Cleavage of JunB at aspartic acid 137 separates the N-terminal transactivation domain from the C-terminal DNA binding and dimerization domains, and we show that the C-terminal cleavage fragment retains both DNA binding activity and the ability to interact with AP-1 family transcription factors. Furthermore, this fragment interferes with the binding of full-length JunB to AP-1 sites and inhibits AP-1-dependent transcription. In summary, we have identified and characterized a novel mechanism of JunB post-translational modification and demonstrate that the C-terminal JunB caspase cleavage product functions as a potent inhibitor of AP-1-dependent transcription.

  3. Integral UBL domain proteins: a family of proteasome interacting proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Gordon, Colin

    2004-01-01

    The family of ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain proteins (UDPs) comprises a conserved group of proteins involved in a multitude of different cellular activities. However, recent studies on UBL-domain proteins indicate that these proteins appear to share a common property in their ability to interact......-domain proteins catalyse the formation of ubiquitin-protein conjugates, whereas others appear to target ubiquitinated proteins for degradation and interact with chaperones. Hence, by binding to the 26S proteasome the UBL-domain proteins seem to tailor and direct the basic proteolytic functions of the particle...

  4. Interactive protein manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SNCrivelli@lbl.gov

    2003-07-01

    We describe an interactive visualization and modeling program for the creation of protein structures ''from scratch''. The input to our program is an amino acid sequence -decoded from a gene- and a sequence of predicted secondary structure types for each amino acid-provided by external structure prediction programs. Our program can be used in the set-up phase of a protein structure prediction process; the structures created with it serve as input for a subsequent global internal energy minimization, or another method of protein structure prediction. Our program supports basic visualization methods for protein structures, interactive manipulation based on inverse kinematics, and visualization guides to aid a user in creating ''good'' initial structures.

  5. Retinoblastoma protein partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, E J; Dyson, N J

    2001-01-01

    Studies of the retinoblastoma gene (Rb) have shown that its protein product (pRb) acts to restrict cell proliferation, inhibit apoptosis, and promote cell differentiation. The frequent mutation of the Rb gene, and the functional inactivation of pRb in tumor cells, have spurred interest in the mechanism of pRb action. Recently, much attention has focused on pRb's role in the regulation of the E2F transcription factor. However, biochemical studies have suggested that E2F is only one of many pRb-targets and, to date, at least 110 cellular proteins have been reported to associate with pRb. The plethora of pRb-binding proteins raises several important questions. How many functions does pRb possess, which of these functions are important for development, and which contribute to tumor suppression? The goal of this review is to summarize the current literature of pRb-associated proteins.

  6. Interactive protein manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    We describe an interactive visualization and modeling program for the creation of protein structures ''from scratch''. The input to our program is an amino acid sequence -decoded from a gene- and a sequence of predicted secondary structure types for each amino acid-provided by external structure prediction programs. Our program can be used in the set-up phase of a protein structure prediction process; the structures created with it serve as input for a subsequent global internal energy minimization, or another method of protein structure prediction. Our program supports basic visualization methods for protein structures, interactive manipulation based on inverse kinematics, and visualization guides to aid a user in creating ''good'' initial structures

  7. The Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vetting,M.; Hegde, S.; Fajardo, J.; Fiser, A.; Roderick, S.; Takiff, H.; Blanchard, J.

    2006-01-01

    The Pentapeptide Repeat Protein (PRP) family has over 500 members in the prokaryotic and eukaryotic kingdoms. These proteins are composed of, or contain domains composed of, tandemly repeated amino acid sequences with a consensus sequence of [S, T,A, V][D, N][L, F]-[S, T,R][G]. The biochemical function of the vast majority of PRP family members is unknown. The three-dimensional structure of the first member of the PRP family was determined for the fluoroquinolone resistance protein (MfpA) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The structure revealed that the pentapeptide repeats encode the folding of a novel right-handed quadrilateral {beta}-helix. MfpA binds to DNA gyrase and inhibits its activity. The rod-shaped, dimeric protein exhibits remarkable size, shape and electrostatic similarity to DNA.

  8. Protein Colloidal Aggregation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathways and kinetics of protein aggregation to allow accurate predictive modeling of the process and evaluation of potential inhibitors to prevalent diseases including cataract formation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and others.

  9. The protein protocols handbook

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Walker, John M

    2002-01-01

    .... The new chapters cover with many rapidly developing areas, particularly the application of mass spectrometry in protein characterization, as well as the now well-established 2-D PAGE technique in proteomics...

  10. Polymers for Protein Conjugation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Pasut

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyethylene glycol (PEG at the moment is considered the leading polymer for protein conjugation in view of its unique properties, as well as to its low toxicity in humans, qualities which have been confirmed by its extensive use in clinical practice. Other polymers that are safe, biodegradable and custom-designed have, nevertheless, also been investigated as potential candidates for protein conjugation. This review will focus on natural polymers and synthetic linear polymers that have been used for protein delivery and the results associated with their use. Genetic fusion approaches for the preparation of protein-polypeptide conjugates will be also reviewed and compared with the best known chemical conjugation ones.

  11. Recombinant Collagenlike Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertala, Andzej

    2007-01-01

    A group of collagenlike recombinant proteins containing high densities of biologically active sites has been invented. The method used to express these proteins is similar to a method of expressing recombinant procollagens and collagens described in U. S. Patent 5,593,859, "Synthesis of human procollagens and collagens in recombinant DNA systems." Customized collagenous proteins are needed for biomedical applications. In particular, fibrillar collagens are attractive for production of matrices needed for tissue engineering and drug delivery. Prior to this invention, there was no way of producing customized collagenous proteins for these and other applications. Heretofore, collagenous proteins have been produced by use of such biological systems as yeasts, bacteria, and transgenic animals and plants. These products are normal collagens that can also be extracted from such sources as tendons, bones, and hides. These products cannot be made to consist only of biologically active, specific amino acid sequences that may be needed for specific applications. Prior to this invention, it had been established that fibrillar collagens consist of domains that are responsible for such processes as interaction with cells, binding of growth factors, and interaction with a number of structural proteins present in the extracellular matrix. A normal collagen consists of a sequence of domains that can be represented by a corresponding sequence of labels, e.g., D1D2D3D4. A collagenlike protein of the present invention contains regions of collagen II that contain multiples of a single domain (e.g., D1D1D1D1 or D4D4D4D4) chosen for its specific biological activity. By virtue of the multiplicity of the chosen domain, the density of sites having that specific biological activity is greater than it is in a normal collagen. A collagenlike protein according to this invention can thus be made to have properties that are necessary for tissue engineering.

  12. Protein targeting protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Clegg, Roger A

    1998-01-01

    ... of intracellular environment. Because the concept of protein targeting is intuitive rather than explicitly defined, it has been variously used by different groups of researchers in cell biology, biochemistry, and molecular biology. For those working in the field of intracellular signaling, an influential introduction to the topic was the seminal article by Hubbard & Cohen (TIBS [1993] 18, 172- 177), which was based on the work of Cohen's laboratory on protein phosphatases. Subsequently, the ideas that t...

  13. Protein conducting nanopores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harsman, Anke; Krueger, Vivien; Bartsch, Philipp; Honigmann, Alf; Wagner, Richard; Schmidt, Oliver; Rao, Sanjana; Meisinger, Christof

    2010-01-01

    About 50% of the cellular proteins have to be transported into or across cellular membranes. This transport is an essential step in the protein biosynthesis. In eukaryotic cells secretory proteins are transported into the endoplasmic reticulum before they are transported in vesicles to the plasma membrane. Almost all proteins of the endosymbiotic organelles chloroplasts and mitochondria are synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes and posttranslationally imported. Genetic, biochemical and biophysical approaches led to rather detailed knowledge on the composition of the translocon-complexes which catalyze the membrane transport of the preproteins. Comprehensive concepts on the targeting and membrane transport of polypeptides emerged, however little detail on the molecular nature and mechanisms of the protein translocation channels comprising nanopores has been achieved. In this paper we will highlight recent developments of the diverse protein translocation systems and focus particularly on the common biophysical properties and functions of the protein conducting nanopores. We also provide a first analysis of the interaction between the genuine protein conducting nanopore Tom40 SC as well as a mutant Tom40 SC (S 54 →E) containing an additional negative charge at the channel vestibule and one of its native substrates, CoxIV, a mitochondrial targeting peptide. The polypeptide induced a voltage-dependent increase in the frequency of channel closure of Tom40 SC corresponding to a voltage-dependent association rate, which was even more pronounced for the Tom40 SC S54E mutant. The corresponding dwelltime reflecting association/transport of the peptide could be determined with t-bar off ≅1.1 ms for the wildtype, whereas the mutant Tom40 SC S54E displayed a biphasic dwelltime distribution ( t-bar off 1 ≅0.4 ms; t-bar off 2 ≅4.6 ms).

  14. The effect of protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions on membrane fouling in ultrafiltration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huisman, I.H.; Prádanos, P.; Hernández, A.

    2000-01-01

    It was studied how protein-protein and protein-membrane interactions influence the filtration performance during the ultrafiltration of protein solutions over polymeric membranes. This was done by measuring flux, streaming potential, and protein transmission during filtration of bovine serum albumin

  15. Characterization of the regulatory domains of the human skn-1a/Epoc-1/Oct-11 POU transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildesheim, J; Foster, R A; Chamberlin, M E; Vogel, J C

    1999-09-10

    The Skn-1a POU transcription factor is primarily expressed in keratinocytes of murine embryonic and adult epidermis. Although some POU factors expressed in a tissue-specific manner are important for normal differentiation, the biological function of Skn-1a remains unknown. Previous in vitro studies indicate that Skn-1a has the ability to transactivate markers of keratinocyte differentiation. In this study, we have characterized Skn-1a's transactivation domain(s) and engineered a dominant negative protein that lacked this transactivation domain. Deletional analysis of the human homologue of Skn-1a with three target promoters revealed the presence of two functional domains: a primary C-terminal transactivation domain and a combined N-terminal inhibitory domain and transactivation domain. Skn-1a lacking the C-terminal region completely lost transactivation ability, irrespective of the promoter tested, and was able to block transactivation by normal Skn-1a in competition assays. Compared with full-length, Skn-1a lacking the N-terminal region demonstrated either increased transactivation (bovine cytokeratin 6 promoter), comparable transactivation (human papillomavirus type 1a long control region), or loss of transactivation (human papillomavirus type 18 long control region). The identification of a primary C-terminal transactivation domain enabled us to generate a dominant negative Skn-1a factor, which will be useful in the quest for a better understanding of this keratinocyte-specific gene regulator.

  16. Similarity measures for protein ensembles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    Analyses of similarities and changes in protein conformation can provide important information regarding protein function and evolution. Many scores, including the commonly used root mean square deviation, have therefore been developed to quantify the similarities of different protein conformatio...

  17. Similarity measures for protein ensembles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    Analyses of similarities and changes in protein conformation can provide important information regarding protein function and evolution. Many scores, including the commonly used root mean square deviation, have therefore been developed to quantify the similarities of different protein conformations...

  18. Protein: MPA1 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MPA1 TLR signaling molecules RSAD2 CIG5 Radical S-adenosyl methionine domain-containing protein 2 Cytomegalo...virus-induced gene 5 protein, Viperin, Virus inhibitory protein, endoplasmic reticu

  19. More protein in cereals?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    Ways in which the protein content of plant crops may be raised by the use of nuclear radiation are to be discussed at a symposium in Vienna in June next year, organized by the joint Food and Agriculture Organization/Agency Division of Atomic Energy in Food and Agriculture. Plant crops - especially cereal grains - are the basic food and protein source of most of the world's population, particularly in less-developed countries. But their natural protein content is low; increasing the quantity and nutritional quality of plant protein is potentially the most feasible way to combat widespread protein malnutrition. This improvement in seed stock can be achieved by plant breeding methods in which nuclear irradiation techniques are used to induce mutations in grain, and other isotopic techniques can be used to select only those mutants which have the desired properties. The scientists who attend the symposium will have an opportunity to review what mutation plant breeders have achieved, the application of nuclear techniques to screening for protein and amino-acid content and nutritional value, and isotopic methods which contribute to research in plant nutrition and physiology. (author)

  20. Disease specific protein corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M.; Mahmoudi, M.

    2015-03-01

    It is now well accepted that upon their entrance into the biological environments, the surface of nanomaterials would be covered by various biomacromolecules (e.g., proteins and lipids). The absorption of these biomolecules, so called `protein corona', onto the surface of (nano)biomaterials confers them a new `biological identity'. Although the formation of protein coronas on the surface of nanoparticles has been widely investigated, there are few reports on the effect of various diseases on the biological identity of nanoparticles. As the type of diseases may tremendously changes the composition of the protein source (e.g., human plasma/serum), one can expect that amount and composition of associated proteins in the corona composition may be varied, in disease type manner. Here, we show that corona coated silica and polystyrene nanoparticles (after interaction with in the plasma of the healthy individuals) could induce unfolding of fibrinogen, which promotes release of the inflammatory cytokines. However, no considerable releases of inflammatory cytokines were observed for corona coated graphene sheets. In contrast, the obtained corona coated silica and polystyrene nanoparticles from the hypofibrinogenemia patients could not induce inflammatory cytokine release where graphene sheets do. Therefore, one can expect that disease-specific protein coronas can provide a novel approach for applying nanomedicine to personalized medicine, improving diagnosis and treatment of different diseases tailored to the specific conditions and circumstances.

  1. Electrophoretic transfer protein zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Daniel; Hill, Adam P; Kashou, Anthony; Wilson, Karl A; Tan-Wilson, Anna

    2011-04-15

    Zymography detects and characterizes proteolytic enzymes by electrophoresis of protease-containing samples into a nonreducing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) gel containing a copolymerized protein substrate. The usefulness of zymography for molecular weight determination and proteomic analysis is hampered by the fact that some proteases exhibit slower migration through a gel that contains substrate protein. This article introduces electrophoretic transfer protein zymography as one solution to this problem. In this technique, samples containing proteolytic enzymes are first resolved in nonreducing SDS-PAGE on a gel without protein substrate. The proteins in the resolving gel are then electrophoretically transferred to a receiving gel previously prepared with a copolymerized protein substrate. The receiving gel is then developed as a zymogram to visualize clear or lightly stained bands in a dark background. Band intensities are linearly related to the amount of protease, extending the usefulness of the technique so long as conditions for transfer and development of the zymogram are kept constant. Conditions of transfer, such as the pore sizes of resolving and receiving gels and the transfer time relative to the molecular weight of the protease, are explored. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Modelling of proteins in membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; May, S.; Baumgaertner, A.

    2006-01-01

    This review describes some recent theories and simulations of mesoscopic and microscopic models of lipid membranes with embedded or attached proteins. We summarize results supporting our understanding of phenomena for which the activities of proteins in membranes are expected to be significantly...... oppositely charged lipid membranes, lipid-induced tilting of proteins embedded in lipid bilayers, protein-induced bilayer deformations, protein insertion and assembly, and lipid-controlled functioning of membrane proteins....

  3. Peptide Signals Encode Protein Localization▿

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, Jay H.; Keiler, Kenneth C.

    2007-01-01

    Many bacterial proteins are localized to precise intracellular locations, but in most cases the mechanism for encoding localization information is not known. Screening libraries of peptides fused to green fluorescent protein identified sequences that directed the protein to helical structures or to midcell. These peptides indicate that protein localization can be encoded in 20-amino-acid peptides instead of complex protein-protein interactions and raise the possibility that the location of a ...

  4. Protein hydrolysates in sports nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manninen Anssi H

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been suggested that protein hydrolysates providing mainly di- and tripeptides are superior to intact (whole proteins and free amino acids in terms of skeletal muscle protein anabolism. This review provides a critical examination of protein hydrolysate studies conducted in healthy humans with special reference to sports nutrition. The effects of protein hydrolysate ingestion on blood amino acid levels, muscle protein anabolism, body composition, exercise performance and muscle glycogen resynthesis are discussed.

  5. Hypoxic Induction of the Regulator of G-Protein Signalling 4 Gene Is Mediated by the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olechnowicz, Sam W. Z.; Fedele, Anthony O.; Peet, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    The transcriptional response to hypoxia is largely dependent on the Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIF-1 and HIF-2) in mammalian cells. Many target genes have been characterised for these heterodimeric transcription factors, yet there is evidence that the full range of HIF-regulated genes has not yet been described. We constructed a TetON overexpression system in the rat pheochromocytoma PC-12 cell line to search for novel HIF and hypoxia responsive genes. The Rgs4 gene encodes the Regulator of G-Protein Signalling 4 (RGS4) protein, an inhibitor of signalling from G-protein coupled receptors, and dysregulation of Rgs4 is linked to disease states such as schizophrenia and cardiomyopathy. Rgs4 was found to be responsive to HIF-2α overexpression, hypoxic treatment, and hypoxia mimetic drugs in PC-12 cells. Similar responses were observed in human neuroblastoma cell lines SK-N-SH and SK-N-BE(2)C, but not in endothelial cells, where Rgs4 transcript is readily detected but does not respond to hypoxia. Furthermore, this regulation was found to be dependent on transcription, and occurs in a manner consistent with direct HIF transactivation of Rgs4 transcription. However, no HIF binding site was detectable within 32 kb of the human Rgs4 gene locus, leading to the possibility of regulation by long-distance genomic interactions. Further research into Rgs4 regulation by hypoxia and HIF may result in better understanding of disease states such as schizophrenia, and also shed light on the other roles of HIF yet to be discovered. PMID:22970249

  6. Hypoxic induction of the regulator of G-protein signalling 4 gene is mediated by the hypoxia-inducible factor pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam W Z Olechnowicz

    Full Text Available The transcriptional response to hypoxia is largely dependent on the Hypoxia Inducible Factors (HIF-1 and HIF-2 in mammalian cells. Many target genes have been characterised for these heterodimeric transcription factors, yet there is evidence that the full range of HIF-regulated genes has not yet been described. We constructed a TetON overexpression system in the rat pheochromocytoma PC-12 cell line to search for novel HIF and hypoxia responsive genes. The Rgs4 gene encodes the Regulator of G-Protein Signalling 4 (RGS4 protein, an inhibitor of signalling from G-protein coupled receptors, and dysregulation of Rgs4 is linked to disease states such as schizophrenia and cardiomyopathy. Rgs4 was found to be responsive to HIF-2α overexpression, hypoxic treatment, and hypoxia mimetic drugs in PC-12 cells. Similar responses were observed in human neuroblastoma cell lines SK-N-SH and SK-N-BE(2C, but not in endothelial cells, where Rgs4 transcript is readily detected but does not respond to hypoxia. Furthermore, this regulation was found to be dependent on transcription, and occurs in a manner consistent with direct HIF transactivation of Rgs4 transcription. However, no HIF binding site was detectable within 32 kb of the human Rgs4 gene locus, leading to the possibility of regulation by long-distance genomic interactions. Further research into Rgs4 regulation by hypoxia and HIF may result in better understanding of disease states such as schizophrenia, and also shed light on the other roles of HIF yet to be discovered.

  7. Oct-1 potentiates CREB-driven cyclin D1 promoter activation via a phospho-CREB- and CREB binding protein-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulon, Séverine; Dantonel, Jean-Christophe; Binet, Virginie; Vié, Annick; Blanchard, Jean-Marie; Hipskind, Robert A; Philips, Alexandre

    2002-11-01

    Cyclin D1, the regulatory subunit for mid-G(1) cyclin-dependent kinases, controls the expression of numerous cell cycle genes. A cyclic AMP-responsive element (CRE), located upstream of the cyclin D1 mRNA start site, integrates mitogenic signals that target the CRE-binding factor CREB, which can recruit the transcriptional coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP). We describe an alternative mechanism for CREB-driven cyclin D1 induction that involves the ubiquitous POU domain protein Oct-1. In the breast cancer cell line MCF-7, overexpression of Oct-1 or its POU domain strongly increases transcriptional activation of cyclin D1 and GAL4 reporter genes that is specifically dependent upon CREB but independent of Oct-1 DNA binding. Gel retardation and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirm that POU forms a complex with CREB bound to the cyclin D1 CRE. In solution, CREB interaction with POU requires the CREB Q2 domain and, notably, occurs with CREB that is not phosphorylated on Ser 133. Accordingly, Oct-1 also potently enhances transcriptional activation mediated by a Ser133Ala CREB mutant. Oct-1/CREB synergy is not diminished by the adenovirus E1A 12S protein, a repressor of CBP coactivator function. In contrast, E1A strongly represses CBP-enhanced transactivation by CREB phosphorylated on Ser 133. Our observation that Oct-1 potentiates CREB-dependent cyclin D1 transcriptional activity independently of Ser 133 phosphorylation and E1A-sensitive coactivator function offers a new paradigm for the regulation of cyclin D1 induction by proliferative signals.

  8. Expansion of human and murine hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells ex vivo without genetic modification using MYC and Bcl-2 fusion proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory A Bird

    Full Text Available The long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cell (HSC population can self-renew in vivo, support hematopoiesis for the lifetime of the individual, and is of critical importance in the context of bone marrow stem cell transplantation. The mechanisms that regulate the expansion of HSCs in vivo and in vitro remain unclear to date. Since the current set of surface markers only allow for the identification of a population of cells that is highly enriched for HSC activity, we will refer to the population of cells we expand as Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor cells (HSPCs. We describe here a novel approach to expand a cytokine-dependent Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell (HSPC population ex vivo by culturing primary adult human or murine HSPCs with fusion proteins including the protein transduction domain of the HIV-1 transactivation protein (Tat and either MYC or Bcl-2. HSPCs obtained from either mouse bone marrow, human cord blood, human G-CSF mobilized peripheral blood, or human bone marrow were expanded an average of 87 fold, 16.6 fold, 13.6 fold, or 10 fold, respectively. The expanded cell populations were able to give rise to different types of colonies in methylcellulose assays in vitro, as well as mature hematopoietic populations in vivo upon transplantation into irradiated mice. Importantly, for both the human and murine case, the ex vivo expanded cells also gave rise to a self-renewing cell population in vivo, following initial transplantation, that was able to support hematopoiesis upon serial transplantation. Our results show that a self-renewing cell population, capable of reconstituting the hematopoietic compartment, expanded ex vivo in the presence of Tat-MYC and Tat-Bcl-2 suggesting that this may be an attractive approach to expand human HSPCs ex vivo for clinical use.

  9. Modeling Mercury in Proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Parks, Jerry M [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is a naturally occurring element that is released into the biosphere both by natural processes and anthropogenic activities. Although its reduced, elemental form Hg(0) is relatively non-toxic, other forms such as Hg2+ and, in particular, its methylated form, methylmercury, are toxic, with deleterious effects on both ecosystems and humans. Microorganisms play important roles in the transformation of mercury in the environment. Inorganic Hg2+ can be methylated by certain bacteria and archaea to form methylmercury. Conversely, bacteria also demethylate methylmercury and reduce Hg2+ to relatively inert Hg(0). Transformations and toxicity occur as a result of mercury interacting with various proteins. Clearly, then, understanding the toxic effects of mercury and its cycling in the environment requires characterization of these interactions. Computational approaches are ideally suited to studies of mercury in proteins because they can provide a detailed picture and circumvent issues associated with toxicity. Here we describe computational methods for investigating and characterizing how mercury binds to proteins, how inter- and intra-protein transfer of mercury is orchestrated in biological systems, and how chemical reactions in proteins transform the metal. We describe quantum chemical analyses of aqueous Hg(II), which reveal critical factors that determine ligand binding propensities. We then provide a perspective on how we used chemical reasoning to discover how microorganisms methylate mercury. We also highlight our combined computational and experimental studies of the proteins and enzymes of the mer operon, a suite of genes that confers mercury resistance in many bacteria. Lastly, we place work on mercury in proteins in the context of what is needed for a comprehensive multi-scale model of environmental mercury cycling.

  10. Protein quality control and cancerogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trcka, F; Vojtesek, B; Muller, P

    2012-01-01

    Both nascent and mature proteins are prone to damaging changes induced by either external or internal stimuli. Dysfunctional or misfolded proteins cause direct physiological risk in crowded cellular environment and must be readily and efficiently eliminated. To ensure protein homeostasis, eukaryotic cells have evolved several protein quality control machineries. Protein quality control plays a special role in cancer cells. Genetic instability causing increased production of damaged and/or deregulated proteins is a hallmark of cancer cells. Therefore, intrinsic genetic instability together with hostile tumour microenvironment represents a demanding task for protein quality control machineries in tumours. Regulation of general protein turnover as well as degradation of tumour-promoting/suppressing proteins by protein quality control machineries thus represent an important processes involved in cancer development and progression. The review focuses on the description of three major protein quality control pathways and their roles in cancer.

  11. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Nathanael S.; Schultz, Peter; Kim, Sung-Hou; Meijer, Laurent

    2001-07-03

    The present invention relates to purine analogs that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such purine analogs to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  12. Measuring protein breakdown rate in individual proteins in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars; Kjaer, Michael

    2010-01-01

    To outline different approaches of how protein breakdown can be quantified and to present a new approach to determine the fractional breakdown rate of individual slow turnover proteins in vivo.......To outline different approaches of how protein breakdown can be quantified and to present a new approach to determine the fractional breakdown rate of individual slow turnover proteins in vivo....

  13. Integral UBL domain proteins: a family of proteasome interacting proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Gordon, Colin

    2004-01-01

    The family of ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain proteins (UDPs) comprises a conserved group of proteins involved in a multitude of different cellular activities. However, recent studies on UBL-domain proteins indicate that these proteins appear to share a common property in their ability to interact wi...

  14. Protein Correlation Profiles Identify Lipid Droplet Proteins with High Confidence*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahmer, Natalie; Hilger, Maximiliane; Kory, Nora; Wilfling, Florian; Stoehr, Gabriele; Mann, Matthias; Farese, Robert V.; Walther, Tobias C.

    2013-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are important organelles in energy metabolism and lipid storage. Their cores are composed of neutral lipids that form a hydrophobic phase and are surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer that harbors specific proteins. Most well-established LD proteins perform important functions, particularly in cellular lipid metabolism. Morphological studies show LDs in close proximity to and interacting with membrane-bound cellular organelles, including the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria, peroxisomes, and endosomes. Because of these close associations, it is difficult to purify LDs to homogeneity. Consequently, the confident identification of bona fide LD proteins via proteomics has been challenging. Here, we report a methodology for LD protein identification based on mass spectrometry and protein correlation profiles. Using LD purification and quantitative, high-resolution mass spectrometry, we identified LD proteins by correlating their purification profiles to those of known LD proteins. Application of the protein correlation profile strategy to LDs isolated from Drosophila S2 cells led to the identification of 111 LD proteins in a cellular LD fraction in which 1481 proteins were detected. LD localization was confirmed in a subset of identified proteins via microscopy of the expressed proteins, thereby validating the approach. Among the identified LD proteins were both well-characterized LD proteins and proteins not previously known to be localized to LDs. Our method provides a high-confidence LD proteome of Drosophila cells and a novel approach that can be applied to identify LD proteins of other cell types and tissues. PMID:23319140

  15. Utilization of soya protein as an alternative protein source in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of replacing fish protein with soya protein in tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) diets was examined. Three isoproteic (35%) diets containing 0% (FD); 50% (MD) and 100% (SD) fish protein substituted by soya protein were formulated. Fish (initial weight = 11.56 ± 4.22 g) was fed with experimental diets for 180 days.

  16. Changes in protein composition and protein phosphorylation during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Changes in protein profiles and protein phosphorylation were studied in various stages of germinating somatic and zygotic embryos. Many proteins, which were expressed in cotyledonary stage somatic embryos, were also present in the zygotic embryos obtained from mature dry seed. The intensity of 22 kDa protein was ...

  17. A Stevedore's protein knot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Bölinger

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Protein knots, mostly regarded as intriguing oddities, are gradually being recognized as significant structural motifs. Seven distinctly knotted folds have already been identified. It is by and large unclear how these exceptional structures actually fold, and only recently, experiments and simulations have begun to shed some light on this issue. In checking the new protein structures submitted to the Protein Data Bank, we encountered the most complex and the smallest knots to date: A recently uncovered alpha-haloacid dehalogenase structure contains a knot with six crossings, a so-called Stevedore knot, in a projection onto a plane. The smallest protein knot is present in an as yet unclassified protein fragment that consists of only 92 amino acids. The topological complexity of the Stevedore knot presents a puzzle as to how it could possibly fold. To unravel this enigma, we performed folding simulations with a structure-based coarse-grained model and uncovered a possible mechanism by which the knot forms in a single loop flip.

  18. Thermal hysteresis proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, J

    2001-02-01

    Extreme environments present a wealth of biochemical adaptations. Thermal hysteresis proteins (THPs) have been found in vertebrates, invertebrates, plants, bacteria and fungi and are able to depress the freezing point of water (in the presence of ice crystals) in a non-colligative manner by binding to the surface of nascent ice crystals. The THPs comprise a disparate group of proteins with a variety of tertiary structures and often no common sequence similarities or structural motifs. Different THPs bind to different faces of the ice crystal, and no single mechanism has been proposed to account for THP ice binding affinity and specificity. Experimentally THPs have been used in the cryopreservation of tissues and cells and to induce cold tolerance in freeze susceptible organisms. THPs represent a remarkable example of parallel and convergent evolution with different proteins being adapted for an anti-freeze role.

  19. Protein Polymers and Amyloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risør, Michael Wulff

    2014-01-01

    Several human disorders are caused by a common general disease mechanism arising from abnormal folding and aggregation of the underlying protein. These include the prevalent dementias like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, where accumulation of protein fibrillar structures, known as amyloid fibrils...... that inhibits its target protease through a large conformational change but mutations compromise this function and cause premature structural collapse into hyperstable polymers. Understanding the conformational disorders at a molecular level is not only important for our general knowledge on protein folding......, underlining the importance of understanding this relationship. The monomeric C-36 peptide was investigated by liquid-state NMR spectroscopy and found to be intrinsically disordered with minor propensities towards β-sheet structure. The plasticity of such a peptide makes it suitable for a whole range...

  20. Polarizable protein packing

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Albert H.

    2011-01-24

    To incorporate protein polarization effects within a protein combinatorial optimization framework, we decompose the polarizable force field AMOEBA into low order terms. Including terms up to the third-order provides a fair approximation to the full energy while maintaining tractability. We represent the polarizable packing problem for protein G as a hypergraph and solve for optimal rotamers with the FASTER combinatorial optimization algorithm. These approximate energy models can be improved to high accuracy [root mean square deviation (rmsd) < 1 kJ mol -1] via ridge regression. The resulting trained approximations are used to efficiently identify new, low-energy solutions. The approach is general and should allow combinatorial optimization of other many-body problems. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Comput Chem, 2011 Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Trisulfides in Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus W.; Tachibana, Christine; Hansen, Niels Erik

    2011-01-01

    Trisulfides and other oligosulfides are widely distributed in the biological world. In plants, e.g., garlic, trisulfides are associated with potentially beneficial properties. However, an extra neutral sulfur atom covalently bound between the two sulfur atoms of a pair of cysteines is not a commo...... post-translational modification, and the number of proteins in which a trisulfide has been unambiguously identified is small. Nevertheless, we believe that its prevalence may be underestimated, particularly with the increasing evidence for significant pools of sulfides in living tissues...... and their possible roles in cellular metabolism. This review focuses on examples of proteins that are known to contain a trisulfide bridge, and gives an overview of the chemistry of trisulfide formation, and the methods by which it is detected in proteins....

  2. Accessory Proteins at ERES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klinkenberg, Rafael David

    proteins. Together these components co‐operate in cargo‐selection as well as forming, loading and releasing budding vesicles from specific regions on the membrane surface of the ER. Coat components furthermore convey vesicle targeting towards the Golgi. However, not much is known about the mechanisms...... that regulate the COPII assembly at the vesicle bud site. This thesis provides the first regulatory mechanism of COPII assembly in relation to ER‐membrane lipid‐signal recognition by the accessory protein p125A (Sec23IP). The aim of the project was to characterize p125A function by dissecting two main domains...... in the protein; a putative lipid‐associating domain termed the DDHD domain that is defined by the four amino acid motif that gives the domain its name; and a ubiquitously found domain termed Sterile α‐motif (SAM), which is mostly associated with oligomerization and polymerization. We first show, that the DDHD...

  3. Vibrational spectroscopy of proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwaighofer, A.

    2013-01-01

    Two important steps for the development of a biosensor are the immobilization of the biological component (e.g. protein) on a surface and the enhancement of the signal to improve the sensitivity of detection. To address these subjects, the present work describes Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) investigations of several proteins bound to the surface of an attenuated total reflection (ATR) crystal. Furthermore, new nanostructured surfaces for signal enhancement were developed for use in FTIR microscopy. The mitochondrial redox-protein cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) was incorporated into a protein-tethered bilayer lipid membrane (ptBLM) on an ATR crystal featuring a roughened two-layer gold surface for signal enhancement. Electrochemical excitation by periodic potential pulses at different modulation frequencies was followed by time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy. Phase sensitive detection was used for deconvolution of the IR spectra into vibrational components. A model based on protonation-dependent chemical reaction kinetics could be fitted to the time evolution of IR bands attributed to several different redox centers of the CcO. Further investigations involved the odorant binding protein 14 (OBP14) of the honey bee (Apis mellifera), which was studied using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and circular dichroism. OBP14 was found to be thermally stable up to 45 °C, thus permitting the potential application of this protein for the fabrication of biosensors. Thermal denaturation measurements showed that odorant binding increases the thermal stability of the OBP-odorant complex. In another project, plasmonic nanostructures were fabricated that enhance the absorbance in FTIR microscopy measurements. The nanostructures are composed of an array of round-shaped insulator and gold discs on top of a continuous gold layer. Enhancement factors of up to ⁓125 could be observed with self-assembled monolayers of dodecanethiol molecules immobilized on the gold surface (author) [de

  4. Can infrared spectroscopy provide information on protein-protein interactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haris, Parvez I

    2010-08-01

    For most biophysical techniques, characterization of protein-protein interactions is challenging; this is especially true with methods that rely on a physical phenomenon that is common to both of the interacting proteins. Thus, for example, in IR spectroscopy, the carbonyl vibration (1600-1700 cm(-1)) associated with the amide bonds from both of the interacting proteins will overlap extensively, making the interpretation of spectral changes very complicated. Isotope-edited infrared spectroscopy, where one of the interacting proteins is uniformly labelled with (13)C or (13)C,(15)N has been introduced as a solution to this problem, enabling the study of protein-protein interactions using IR spectroscopy. The large shift of the amide I band (approx. 45 cm(-1) towards lower frequency) upon (13)C labelling of one of the proteins reveals the amide I band of the unlabelled protein, enabling it to be used as a probe for monitoring conformational changes. With site-specific isotopic labelling, structural resolution at the level of individual amino acid residues can be achieved. Furthermore, the ability to record IR spectra of proteins in diverse environments means that isotope-edited IR spectroscopy can be used to structurally characterize difficult systems such as protein-protein complexes bound to membranes or large insoluble peptide/protein aggregates. In the present article, examples of application of isotope-edited IR spectroscopy for studying protein-protein interactions are provided.

  5. Protein: FBA7 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FBA7 claudin-zona occluden TJP1 ZO1 TJP1 Tight junction protein ZO-1 Tight junction pro...tein 1, Zona occludens protein 1, Zonula occludens protein 1 9606 Homo sapiens Q07157 7082 2H2C, 2H2B, 3

  6. Protein: FBA7 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FBA7 claudin-zona occluden Tjp1 Zo1 Tight junction protein ZO-1 Tight junction protein 1, Zona occludens pr...otein 1, Zonula occludens protein 1 10090 Mus musculus 21872 P39447 2RRM P39447 21431884 ...

  7. Protein: FEA3 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FEA3 AREB pathway: Signaling proteins At4g11890/T26M18_100 At4g11890, Protein kinase family pr...otein, Putative uncharacterized protein At4g11890/T26M18_100 3702 Arabidopsis thaliana 826796 Q8GY82 22225700 ...

  8. Ubiquitin domain proteins in disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Louise Kjær; Schulze, Andrea; Seeger, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The human genome encodes several ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain proteins (UDPs). Members of this protein family are involved in a variety of cellular functions and many are connected to the ubiquitin proteasome system, an essential pathway for protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. Despite...... and cancer. Publication history: Republished from Current BioData's Targeted Proteins database (TPdb; http://www.targetedproteinsdb.com)....

  9. Protein–protein interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Janin, J.; Bonvin, A.M.J.J.

    2013-01-01

    We are proud to present the first edition of the Protein–protein interactions Section of Current Opinion in Structural Biology. The Section is new, but the topic has been present in the journal from the very start. Volume 1, Issue 1, dated February 1991, had a review by Janin entitled Protein–protein interactions and assembly, and others by Bode and Huber on Proteinase–inhibitor interaction, and by Chothia on Antigen recognition. The Editorial Overview, signed by TE Creighton and PS Kim, note...

  10. Heme Sensor Proteins*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girvan, Hazel M.; Munro, Andrew W.

    2013-01-01

    Heme is a prosthetic group best known for roles in oxygen transport, oxidative catalysis, and respiratory electron transport. Recent years have seen the roles of heme extended to sensors of gases such as O2 and NO and cell redox state, and as mediators of cellular responses to changes in intracellular levels of these gases. The importance of heme is further evident from identification of proteins that bind heme reversibly, using it as a signal, e.g. to regulate gene expression in circadian rhythm pathways and control heme synthesis itself. In this minireview, we explore the current knowledge of the diverse roles of heme sensor proteins. PMID:23539616

  11. Protein production and purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräslund, Susanne; Nordlund, Pär; Weigelt, Johan; Hallberg, B Martin; Bray, James; Gileadi, Opher; Knapp, Stefan; Oppermann, Udo; Arrowsmith, Cheryl; Hui, Raymond; Ming, Jinrong; dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Park, Hee-won; Savchenko, Alexei; Yee, Adelinda; Edwards, Aled; Vincentelli, Renaud; Cambillau, Christian; Kim, Rosalind; Kim, Sung-Hou; Rao, Zihe; Shi, Yunyu; Terwilliger, Thomas C; Kim, Chang-Yub; Hung, Li-Wei; Waldo, Geoffrey S; Peleg, Yoav; Albeck, Shira; Unger, Tamar; Dym, Orly; Prilusky, Jaime; Sussman, Joel L; Stevens, Ray C; Lesley, Scott A; Wilson, Ian A; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Collart, Frank; Dementieva, Irina; Donnelly, Mark I; Eschenfeldt, William H; Kim, Youngchang; Stols, Lucy; Wu, Ruying; Zhou, Min; Burley, Stephen K; Emtage, J Spencer; Sauder, J Michael; Thompson, Devon; Bain, Kevin; Luz, John; Gheyi, Tarun; Zhang, Fred; Atwell, Shane; Almo, Steven C; Bonanno, Jeffrey B; Fiser, Andras; Swaminathan, Sivasubramanian; Studier, F William; Chance, Mark R; Sali, Andrej; Acton, Thomas B; Xiao, Rong; Zhao, Li; Ma, Li Chung; Hunt, John F; Tong, Liang; Cunningham, Kellie; Inouye, Masayori; Anderson, Stephen; Janjua, Heleema; Shastry, Ritu; Ho, Chi Kent; Wang, Dongyan; Wang, Huang; Jiang, Mei; Montelione, Gaetano T; Stuart, David I; Owens, Raymond J; Daenke, Susan; Schütz, Anja; Heinemann, Udo; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Büssow, Konrad; Gunsalus, Kristin C

    2008-02-01

    In selecting a method to produce a recombinant protein, a researcher is faced with a bewildering array of choices as to where to start. To facilitate decision-making, we describe a consensus 'what to try first' strategy based on our collective analysis of the expression and purification of over 10,000 different proteins. This review presents methods that could be applied at the outset of any project, a prioritized list of alternate strategies and a list of pitfalls that trip many new investigators.

  12. Protein energy malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Zubin; Ee, Looi C

    2009-10-01

    Protein energy malnutrition (PEM) is a common problem worldwide and occurs in both developing and industrialized nations. In the developing world, it is frequently a result of socioeconomic, political, or environmental factors. In contrast, protein energy malnutrition in the developed world usually occurs in the context of chronic disease. There remains much variation in the criteria used to define malnutrition, with each method having its own limitations. Early recognition, prompt management, and robust follow up are critical for best outcomes in preventing and treating PEM.

  13. Stability of Hyperthermophilic Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiefler-Jensen, Daniel

    to life at high temperatures so are their enzymes, as a result the high stability is accompanied by low activity at moderate temperatures. Thus, much effort had been put into decoding the mechanisms behind the high stability of the thermophilic enzymes. The hope is to enable scientist to design enzymes...... in the high stability of hyperthermophilic enzymes. The thesis starts with an introduction to the field of protein and enzyme stability with special focus on the thermophilic and hyperthermophilic enzymes and proteins. After the introduction three original research manuscripts present the experimental data...

  14. A simple dependence between protein evolution rate and the number of protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirsh Aaron E

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been shown for an evolutionarily distant genomic comparison that the number of protein-protein interactions a protein has correlates negatively with their rates of evolution. However, the generality of this observation has recently been challenged. Here we examine the problem using protein-protein interaction data from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and genome sequences from two other yeast species. Results In contrast to a previous study that used an incomplete set of protein-protein interactions, we observed a highly significant correlation between number of interactions and evolutionary distance to either Candida albicans or Schizosaccharomyces pombe. This study differs from the previous one in that it includes all known protein interactions from S. cerevisiae, and a larger set of protein evolutionary rates. In both evolutionary comparisons, a simple monotonic relationship was found across the entire range of the number of protein-protein interactions. In agreement with our earlier findings, this relationship cannot be explained by the fact that proteins with many interactions tend to be important to yeast. The generality of these correlations in other kingdoms of life unfortunately cannot be addressed at this time, due to the incompleteness of protein-protein interaction data from organisms other than S. cerevisiae. Conclusions Protein-protein interactions tend to slow the rate at which proteins evolve. This may be due to structural constraints that must be met to maintain interactions, but more work is needed to definitively establish the mechanism(s behind the correlations we have observed.

  15. Transport of Proteins through Nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Binquan

    In biological cells, a malfunctioned protein (such as misfolded or damaged) is degraded by a protease in which an unfoldase actively drags the protein into a nanopore-like structure and then a peptidase cuts the linearized protein into small fragments (i.e. a recycling process). Mimicking this biological process, many experimental studies have focused on the transport of proteins through a biological protein pore or a synthetic solid-state nanopore. Potentially, the nanopore-based sensors can provide a platform for interrogating proteins that might be disease-related or be targeted by a new drug molecule. The single-profile of a protein chain inside an extremely small nanopore might even permit the sequencing of the protein. Here, through all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, I will show various types of protein transport through a nanopore and reveal the nanoscale mechanics/energetics that plays an important role governing the protein transport.

  16. Cauliflower mosaic virus protein P6 inhibits signaling responses to salicylic acid and regulates innate immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Love

    Full Text Available Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV encodes a multifunctional protein P6 that is required for translation of the 35S RNA and also acts as a suppressor of RNA silencing. Here we demonstrate that P6 additionally acts as a pathogenicity effector of an unique and novel type, modifying NPR1 (a key regulator of salicylic acid (SA- and jasmonic acid (JA-dependent signaling and inhibiting SA-dependent defence responses We find that that transgene-mediated expression of P6 in Arabidopsis and transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana has profound effects on defence signaling, suppressing expression of representative SA-responsive genes and increasing expression of representative JA-responsive genes. Relative to wild-type Arabidopsis P6-expressing transgenics had greatly reduced expression of PR-1 following SA-treatment, infection by CaMV or inoculation with an avirulent bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato (Pst. Similarly transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana of P6 (including a mutant form defective in translational transactivation activity suppressed PR-1a transcript accumulation in response to Agrobacterium infiltration and following SA-treatment. As well as suppressing the expression of representative SA-regulated genes, P6-transgenic Arabidopsis showed greatly enhanced susceptibility to both virulent and avirulent Pst (titres elevated 10 to 30-fold compared to non-transgenic controls but reduced susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea. Necrosis following SA-treatment or inoculation with avirulent Pst was reduced and delayed in P6-transgenics. NPR1 an important regulator of SA/JA crosstalk, was more highly expressed in the presence of P6 and introduction of the P6 transgene into a transgenic line expressing an NPR1:GFP fusion resulted in greatly increased fluorescence in nuclei even in the absence of SA. Thus in the presence of P6 an inactive form of NPR1 is mislocalized in the nucleus even in uninduced plants

  17. Truly Absorbed Microbial Protein Synthesis, Rumen Bypass Protein, Endogenous Protein, and Total Metabolizable Protein from Starchy and Protein-Rich Raw Materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parand, Ehsan; Vakili, Alireza; Mesgaran, Mohsen Danesh; Duinkerken, Van Gert; Yu, Peiqiang

    2015-01-01

    This study was carried out to measure truly absorbed microbial protein synthesis, rumen bypass protein, and endogenous protein loss, as well as total metabolizable protein, from starchy and protein-rich raw feed materials with model comparisons. Predictions by the DVE2010 system as a more

  18. FOXO1 is a direct target of EWS-Fli1 oncogenic fusion protein in Ewing's sarcoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Liu, E-mail: lyang@u.washington.edu [Department of Orthopedics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Medical Research Service, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, WA 98108 (United States); Hu, Hsien-Ming; Zielinska-Kwiatkowska, Anna; Chansky, Howard A. [Department of Orthopedics, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Medical Research Service, VA Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle, WA 98108 (United States)

    2010-11-05

    Research highlights: {yields} Inducible and reversible siRNA knockdown of an oncogenic fusion protein such as EWS-Fli1 is feasible and more advantageous than other siRNA methods. {yields} The tumor suppressor gene FOXO1 is a new EWS-Fli1 target. {yields} While trans-activators are known for the FOXO1 gene, there has been no report on negative regulators of FOXO1 transcription. {yields} This study provides first evidence that the EWS-Fli1 oncogenic fusion protein can function as a transcriptional repressor of the FOXO1 gene. -- Abstract: Ewing's family tumors are characterized by a specific t(11;22) chromosomal translocation that results in the formation of EWS-Fli1 oncogenic fusion protein. To investigate the effects of EWS-Fli1 on gene expression, we carried out DNA microarray analysis after specific knockdown of EWS-Fli1 through transfection of synthetic siRNAs. EWS-Fli1 knockdown increased expression of genes such as DKK1 and p57 that are known to be repressed by EWS-Fli1 fusion protein. Among other potential EWS-Fli1 targets identified by our microarray analysis, we have focused on the FOXO1 gene since it encodes a potential tumor suppressor and has not been previously reported in Ewing's cells. To better understand how EWS-Fli1 affects FOXO1 expression, we have established a doxycycline-inducible siRNA system to achieve stable and reversible knockdown of EWS-Fli1 in Ewing's sarcoma cells. Here we show that FOXO1 expression in Ewing's cells has an inverse relationship with EWS-Fli1 protein level, and FOXO1 promoter activity is increased after doxycycline-induced EWS-Fli1 knockdown. In addition, we have found that direct binding of EWS-Fli1 to FOXO1 promoter is attenuated after doxycycline-induced siRNA knockdown of the fusion protein. Together, these results suggest that suppression of FOXO1 function by EWS-Fli1 fusion protein may contribute to cellular transformation in Ewing's family tumors.

  19. Accessory proteins for heterotrimeric G-proteins in the kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins play a fundamentally important role in regulating signal transduction pathways in the kidney. Accessory proteins are being identified as direct binding partners for heterotrimeric G-protein α or βγ subunits to promote more diverse mechanisms by which G-protein signaling is controlled. In some instances, accessory proteins can modulate the signaling magnitude, localization, and duration following the activation of cell membrane-associated receptors. Alternatively, accessory proteins complexed with their G-protein α or βγ subunits can promote non-canonical models of signaling activity within the cell. In this review, we will highlight the expression profile, localization and functional importance of these newly identified accessory proteins to control the function of select G-protein subunits under normal and various disease conditions observed in the kidney.

  20. Complementarity of structure ensembles in protein-protein binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünberg, Raik; Leckner, Johan; Nilges, Michael

    2004-12-01

    Protein-protein association is often accompanied by changes in receptor and ligand structure. This interplay between protein flexibility and protein-protein recognition is currently the largest obstacle both to our understanding of and to the reliable prediction of protein complexes. We performed two sets of molecular dynamics simulations for the unbound receptor and ligand structures of 17 protein complexes and applied shape-driven rigid body docking to all combinations of representative snapshots. The crossdocking of structure ensembles increased the likelihood of finding near-native solutions. The free ensembles appeared to contain multiple complementary conformations. These were in general not related to the bound structure. We suggest that protein-protein binding follows a three-step mechanism of diffusion, free conformer selection, and refolding. This model combines previously conflicting ideas and is in better agreement with the current data on interaction forces, time scales, and kinetics.

  1. Interaction between plate make and protein in protein crystallisation screening.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon J King

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein crystallisation screening involves the parallel testing of large numbers of candidate conditions with the aim of identifying conditions suitable as a starting point for the production of diffraction quality crystals. Generally, condition screening is performed in 96-well plates. While previous studies have examined the effects of protein construct, protein purity, or crystallisation condition ingredients on protein crystallisation, few have examined the effect of the crystallisation plate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a statistically rigorous examination of protein crystallisation, and evaluated interactions between crystallisation success and plate row/column, different plates of same make, different plate makes and different proteins. From our analysis of protein crystallisation, we found a significant interaction between plate make and the specific protein being crystallised. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Protein crystal structure determination is the principal method for determining protein structure but is limited by the need to produce crystals of the protein under study. Many important proteins are difficult to crystallize, so that identification of factors that assist crystallisation could open up the structure determination of these more challenging targets. Our findings suggest that protein crystallisation success may be improved by matching a protein with its optimal plate make.

  2. Fragments of protein A eluted during protein A affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter-Franklin, Jayme N; Victa, Corazon; McDonald, Paul; Fahrner, Robert

    2007-09-07

    Protein A affinity chromatography is a common method for process scale purification of monoclonal antibodies. During protein A affinity chromatography, protein A ligand co-elutes with the antibody (commonly called leaching), which is a potential disadvantage since the leached protein A may need to be cleared for pharmaceutical antibodies. To determine the mechanism of protein A leaching and characterize the leached protein A, we fluorescently labeled the protein A ligand in situ on protein A affinity chromatography media. We found that intact protein A leaches when loading either purified antibody or unpurified antibody in harvested cell culture fluid (HCCF), and that additionally fragments of protein A leach when loading HCCF. The leaching of protein A fragments can be reduced by EDTA, suggesting that proteinases contribute to the generation of protein A fragments. We found that protein A fragments larger than about 6000 Da can be measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, and that they can be more difficult to clear than whole protein A by cation-exchange chromatography.

  3. Mobility of photosynthetic proteins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaňa, Radek

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 116, 2-3 (2013), s. 465-479 ISSN 0166-8595 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP501/12/0304; GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0110 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Photosynthesis * Protein mobility * FRAP Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.185, year: 2013

  4. Combinable protein crop production

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, Isobel

    2008-01-01

    This research topic review aims to summarise research knowledge and observational experience of combinable protein crop production in organic farming systems for the UK. European research on peas, faba beans and lupins is included; considering their role in the rotation, nitrogen fixation, varieties, establishment, weed control, yields, problems experienced and intercropping with cereals.

  5. Antifreeze Proteins of Bacteria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 12. Antifreeze Proteins of Bacteria. M K Chattopadhyay. General Article Volume 12 Issue 12 December 2007 pp 25-30. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/012/12/0025-0030 ...

  6. Protein oxidation and ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linton, S; Davies, Michael Jonathan; Dean, R T

    2001-01-01

    of redox-active metal ions that could catalyse oxidant formation. As a result of this decrease in antioxidant defences, and increased rate of ROS formation, it is possible that the impact of ROS increases with age. ROS are known to oxidise biological macromolecules, with proteins an important target...

  7. Protein thin film machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federici, Stefania; Oliviero, Giulio; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly; Bergese, Paolo

    2010-12-01

    We report the first example of microcantilever beams that are reversibly driven by protein thin film machines fueled by cycling the salt concentration of the surrounding solution. We also show that upon the same salinity stimulus the drive can be completely reversed in its direction by introducing a surface coating ligand. Experimental results are throughout discussed within a general yet simple thermodynamic model.

  8. Tuber Storage Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHEWRY, PETER R.

    2003-01-01

    A wide range of plants are grown for their edible tubers, but five species together account for almost 90 % of the total world production. These are potato (Solanum tuberosum), cassava (Manihot esculenta), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatus), yams (Dioscorea spp.) and taro (Colocasia, Cyrtosperma and Xanthosoma spp.). All of these, except cassava, contain groups of storage proteins, but these differ in the biological properties and evolutionary relationships. Thus, patatin from potato exhibits activity as an acylhydrolase and esterase, sporamin from sweet potato is an inhibitor of trypsin, and dioscorin from yam is a carbonic anhydrase. Both sporamin and dioscorin also exhibit antioxidant and radical scavenging activity. Taro differs from the other three crops in that it contains two major types of storage protein: a trypsin inhibitor related to sporamin and a mannose‐binding lectin. These characteristics indicate that tuber storage proteins have evolved independently in different species, which contrasts with the highly conserved families of storage proteins present in seeds. Furthermore, all exhibit biological activities which could contribute to resistance to pests, pathogens or abiotic stresses, indicating that they may have dual roles in the tubers. PMID:12730067

  9. Electron transfer in proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1991-01-01

    Electron migration between and within proteins is one of the most prevalent forms of biological energy conversion processes. Electron transfer reactions take place between active centers such as transition metal ions or organic cofactors over considerable distances at fast rates and with remarkable...

  10. Antifreeze Proteins of Bacteria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 12. Antifreeze Proteins of Bacteria. M K Chattopadhyay. General Article Volume 12 Issue 12 December 2007 pp 25-30. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/012/12/0025-0030. Keywords.

  11. NMR of unfolded proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    2005-01-03

    Jan 3, 2005 ... out' response to environmental changes with structural complexity ... of 3D structure at atomic resolution of folded proteins ...... 5.14 HIV-1 protease. NMR identification of local structural preferences in. HIV-1 protease in the 'unfolded state' at 6 M gua- nidine hydrochloride has been reported.49 Analyses.

  12. Thermodynamics of meat proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sman, van der R.G.M.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the water activity of meat, being a mixture of proteins, salts and water, by the Free-Volume-Flory–Huggins (FVFH) theory augmented with the equation. Earlier, the FVFH theory is successfully applied to describe the thermodynamics to glucose homopolymers like starch, dextrans and

  13. and heat shock proteins

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    concentrations of Cu and tributylin in zebra mussels in the laboratory. The time period of sampling appears to have had no signifi- cant relationship with enzyme activity, protein quantity and metal concentration in this study. Metal bioaccumulation and bioconcentration values were different in the pectoral muscles.

  14. Tuber storage proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewry, Peter R

    2003-06-01

    A wide range of plants are grown for their edible tubers, but five species together account for almost 90 % of the total world production. These are potato (Solanum tuberosum), cassava (Manihot esculenta), sweet potato (Ipomoea batatus), yams (Dioscorea spp.) and taro (Colocasia, Cyrtosperma and Xanthosoma spp.). All of these, except cassava, contain groups of storage proteins, but these differ in the biological properties and evolutionary relationships. Thus, patatin from potato exhibits activity as an acylhydrolase and esterase, sporamin from sweet potato is an inhibitor of trypsin, and dioscorin from yam is a carbonic anhydrase. Both sporamin and dioscorin also exhibit antioxidant and radical scavenging activity. Taro differs from the other three crops in that it contains two major types of storage protein: a trypsin inhibitor related to sporamin and a mannose-binding lectin. These characteristics indicate that tuber storage proteins have evolved independently in different species, which contrasts with the highly conserved families of storage proteins present in seeds. Furthermore, all exhibit biological activities which could contribute to resistance to pests, pathogens or abiotic stresses, indicating that they may have dual roles in the tubers.

  15. Allosteric Regulation of Proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    triguingly, the substrate or the product of the inhibited enzyme can be structurally different from the inhibitor. ... ulation of proteins in this fashion as 'allosteric' in the year 1961. [9]. The word allostery originated from the ..... flux occurs via the conformational selec- tion pathway at low concentrations of the ligand, while the trend.

  16. Allosteric Regulation of Proteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Lecture Workshops · Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 1. Allosteric Regulation of Proteins: A Historical Perspective on the Development of Concepts and Techniques. General Article Volume 22 Issue 1 January 2017 pp 37-50 ...

  17. Protein Sorting Prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Many computational methods are available for predicting protein sorting in bacteria. When comparing them, it is important to know that they can be grouped into three fundamentally different approaches: signal-based, global-property-based and homology-based prediction. In this chapter, the strengths...

  18. Hedgehog-Gli activators direct osteo-chondrogenic function of bone morphogenetic protein toward osteogenesis in the perichondrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojo, Hironori; Ohba, Shinsuke; Taniguchi, Kiyomi; Shirai, Masataka; Yano, Fumiko; Saito, Taku; Ikeda, Toshiyuki; Nakajima, Keiji; Komiyama, Yuske; Nakagata, Naomi; Suzuki, Kentaro; Mishina, Yuji; Yamada, Masahisa; Konno, Tomohiro; Takato, Tsuyoshi; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Kambara, Hideki; Chung, Ung-il

    2013-04-05

    Specification of progenitors into the osteoblast lineage is an essential event for skeletogenesis. During endochondral ossification, cells in the perichondrium give rise to osteoblast precursors. Hedgehog (Hh) and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) are suggested to regulate the commitment of these cells. However, properties of perichondrial cells and regulatory mechanisms of the specification process are still poorly understood. Here, we investigated the machineries by combining a novel organ culture system and single-cell expression analysis with mouse genetics and biochemical analyses. In a metatarsal organ culture reproducing bone collar formation, activation of BMP signaling enhanced the bone collar formation cooperatively with Hh input, whereas the signaling induced ectopic chondrocyte formation in the perichondrium without Hh input. Similar phenotypes were also observed in compound mutant mice, where signaling activities of Hh and BMP were genetically manipulated. Single-cell quantitative RT-PCR analyses showed heterogeneity of perichondrial cells in terms of natural characteristics and responsiveness to Hh input. In vitro analyses revealed that Hh signaling suppressed BMP-induced chondrogenic differentiation; Gli1 inhibited the expression of Sox5, Sox6, and Sox9 (SRY box-containing gene 9) as well as transactivation by Sox9. Indeed, ectopic expression of chondrocyte maker genes were observed in the perichondrium of metatarsals in Gli1(-/-) fetuses, and the phenotype was more severe in Gli1(-/-);Gli2(-/-) newborns. These data suggest that Hh-Gli activators alter the function of BMP to specify perichondrial cells into osteoblasts; the timing of Hh input and its target populations are critical for BMP function.

  19. The Orosomucoid 1 protein is involved in the vitamin D – mediated macrophage de-activation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gemelli, Claudia; Martello, Andrea; Montanari, Monica; Zanocco Marani, Tommaso; Salsi, Valentina; Zappavigna, Vincenzo; Parenti, Sandra; Vignudelli, Tatiana; Selmi, Tommaso; Ferrari, Sergio; Grande, Alexis

    2013-01-01

    Orosomucoid 1 (ORM1), also named Alpha 1 acid glycoprotein A (AGP-A), is an abundant plasma protein characterized by anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating properties. The present study was designed to identify a possible correlation between ORM1 and Vitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), a hormone exerting a widespread effect on cell proliferation, differentiation and regulation of the immune system. In particular, the data described here indicated that ORM1 is a 1,25(OH)2D3 primary response gene, characterized by the presence of a VDRE element inside the 1 kb sequence of its proximal promoter region. This finding was demonstrated with gene expression studies, Chromatin Immunoprecipitation and luciferase transactivation experiments and confirmed by VDR full length and dominant negative over-expression. In addition, several experiments carried out in human normal monocytes demonstrated that the 1,25(OH)2D3 – VDR – ORM1 pathway plays a functional role inside the macrophage de-activation process and that ORM1 may be considered as a signaling molecule involved in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and remodeling. - Highlights: • ORM1 is a Vitamin D primary response gene. • VD and its receptor VDR are involved in the de-activation process mediated by human resident macrophages. • The signaling pathway VD-VDR-ORM1 plays an important role in the control of macrophage de-activation process. • ORM1 may be defined as a signaling molecule implicated in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and remodeling

  20. The Orosomucoid 1 protein is involved in the vitamin D – mediated macrophage de-activation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gemelli, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.gemelli@unimore.it [Department of Life Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 287, 41125 Modena (Italy); Center for Regenerative Medicine, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Gottardi 100, 41125 Modena (Italy); Martello, Andrea; Montanari, Monica; Zanocco Marani, Tommaso; Salsi, Valentina; Zappavigna, Vincenzo; Parenti, Sandra; Vignudelli, Tatiana; Selmi, Tommaso; Ferrari, Sergio; Grande, Alexis [Department of Life Sciences, University of Modena and Reggio Emilia, Via Campi 287, 41125 Modena (Italy)

    2013-12-10

    Orosomucoid 1 (ORM1), also named Alpha 1 acid glycoprotein A (AGP-A), is an abundant plasma protein characterized by anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating properties. The present study was designed to identify a possible correlation between ORM1 and Vitamin D3 (1,25(OH)2D3), a hormone exerting a widespread effect on cell proliferation, differentiation and regulation of the immune system. In particular, the data described here indicated that ORM1 is a 1,25(OH)2D3 primary response gene, characterized by the presence of a VDRE element inside the 1 kb sequence of its proximal promoter region. This finding was demonstrated with gene expression studies, Chromatin Immunoprecipitation and luciferase transactivation experiments and confirmed by VDR full length and dominant negative over-expression. In addition, several experiments carried out in human normal monocytes demonstrated that the 1,25(OH)2D3 – VDR – ORM1 pathway plays a functional role inside the macrophage de-activation process and that ORM1 may be considered as a signaling molecule involved in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and remodeling. - Highlights: • ORM1 is a Vitamin D primary response gene. • VD and its receptor VDR are involved in the de-activation process mediated by human resident macrophages. • The signaling pathway VD-VDR-ORM1 plays an important role in the control of macrophage de-activation process. • ORM1 may be defined as a signaling molecule implicated in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis and remodeling.

  1. TATA-binding protein-associated factor 7 regulates polyamine transport activity and polyamine analog-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuchi, Junichi; Hiipakka, Richard A; Kokontis, John M; Nishimura, Kazuhiro; Igarashi, Kazuei; Liao, Shutsung

    2004-07-16

    Identification of the polyamine transporter gene will be useful for modulating polyamine accumulation in cells and should be a good target for controlling cell proliferation. Polyamine transport activity in mammalian cells is critical for accumulation of the polyamine analog methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) that induces apoptosis, although a gene responsible for transport activity has not been identified. Using a retroviral gene trap screen, we generated MGBG-resistant Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells to identify genes involved in polyamine transport activity. One gene identified by the method encodes TATA-binding protein-associated factor 7 (TAF7), which functions not only as one of the TAFs, but also a coactivator for c-Jun. TAF7-deficient cells had decreased capacity for polyamine uptake (20% of CHO cells), decreased AP-1 activation, as well as resistance to MGBG-induced apoptosis. Stable expression of TAF7 in TAF7-deficient cells restored transport activity (55% of CHO cells), AP-1 gene transactivation (100% of CHO cells), and sensitivity to MGBG-induced apoptosis. Overexpression of TAF7 in CHO cells did not increase transport activity, suggesting that TAF7 may be involved in the maintenance of basal activity. c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase inhibitors blocked MGBG-induced apoptosis without alteration of polyamine transport. Decreased TAF7 expression, by RNA interference, in androgen-independent human prostate cancer LN-CaP104-R1 cells resulted in lower polyamine transport activity (25% of control) and resistance to MGBG-induced growth arrest. Taken together, these results reveal a physiological function of TAF7 as a basal regulator for mammalian polyamine transport activity and MGBG-induced apoptosis.

  2. ATF3, an HTLV-1 bZip factor binding protein, promotes proliferation of adult T-cell leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohshima Koichi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL is an aggressive malignancy of CD4+ T-cells caused by human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1. The HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ gene, which is encoded by the minus strand of the viral genome, is expressed as an antisense transcript in all ATL cases. By using yeast two-hybrid screening, we identified activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3 as an HBZ-interacting protein. ATF3 has been reported to be expressed in ATL cells, but its biological significance is not known. Results Immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed that ATF3 interacts with HBZ. Expression of ATF3 was upregulated in ATL cell lines and fresh ATL cases. Reporter assay revealed that ATF3 could interfere with the HTLV-1 Tax's transactivation of the 5' proviral long terminal repeat (LTR, doing so by affecting the ATF/CRE site, as well as HBZ. Suppressing ATF3 expression inhibited proliferation and strongly reduced the viability of ATL cells. As mechanisms of growth-promoting activity of ATF3, comparative expression profiling of ATF3 knockdown cells identified candidate genes that are critical for the cell cycle and cell death, including cell division cycle 2 (CDC2 and cyclin E2. ATF3 also enhanced p53 transcriptional activity, but this activity was suppressed by HBZ. Conclusions Thus, ATF3 expression has positive and negative effects on the proliferation and survival of ATL cells. HBZ impedes its negative effects, leaving ATF3 to promote proliferation of ATL cells via mechanisms including upregulation of CDC2 and cyclin E2. Both HBZ and ATF3 suppress Tax expression, which enables infected cells to escape the host immune system.

  3. Direct and indirect targets of the E2A-PBX1 leukemia-specific fusion protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christofer Diakos

    Full Text Available E2A-PBX1 is expressed as a result of the t(1;19 chromosomal translocation in nearly 5% of cases of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The E2A-PBX1 chimeric transcription factor contains the N-terminal transactivation domain of E2A (TCF3 fused to the C-terminal DNA-binding homeodomain of PBX1. While there is no doubt of its oncogenic potential, the mechanisms of E2A-PBX1-mediated pre-B cell transformation and the nature of direct E2A-PBX1 target genes and pathways remain largely unknown. Herein we used chromatin immunoprecipitation assays (ChIP-chip to identify direct targets of E2A-PBX1, and we used gene expression arrays of siRNA E2A-PBX1-silenced cells to evaluate changes in expression induced by the fusion protein. Combined ChIP-chip and expression data analysis gave rise to direct and functional targets of E2A-PBX1. Further we observe that the set of ChIP-chip identified E2A-PBX1 targets show a collective down-regulation trend in the E2A-PBX1 silenced samples compared to controls suggesting an activating role of this fusion transcription factor. Our data suggest that the expression of the E2A-PBX1 fusion gene interferes with key regulatory pathways and functions of hematopoietic biology. Among these are members of the WNT and apoptosis/cell cycle control pathways, and thus may comprise an essential driving force for the propagation and maintenance of the leukemic phenotype. These findings may also provide evidence of potentially attractive therapeutic targets.

  4. Direct and indirect targets of the E2A-PBX1 leukemia-specific fusion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diakos, Christofer; Xiao, Yuanyuan; Zheng, Shichun; Kager, Leo; Dworzak, Michael; Wiemels, Joseph L

    2014-01-01

    E2A-PBX1 is expressed as a result of the t(1;19) chromosomal translocation in nearly 5% of cases of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The E2A-PBX1 chimeric transcription factor contains the N-terminal transactivation domain of E2A (TCF3) fused to the C-terminal DNA-binding homeodomain of PBX1. While there is no doubt of its oncogenic potential, the mechanisms of E2A-PBX1-mediated pre-B cell transformation and the nature of direct E2A-PBX1 target genes and pathways remain largely unknown. Herein we used chromatin immunoprecipitation assays (ChIP-chip) to identify direct targets of E2A-PBX1, and we used gene expression arrays of siRNA E2A-PBX1-silenced cells to evaluate changes in expression induced by the fusion protein. Combined ChIP-chip and expression data analysis gave rise to direct and functional targets of E2A-PBX1. Further we observe that the set of ChIP-chip identified E2A-PBX1 targets show a collective down-regulation trend in the E2A-PBX1 silenced samples compared to controls suggesting an activating role of this fusion transcription factor. Our data suggest that the expression of the E2A-PBX1 fusion gene interferes with key regulatory pathways and functions of hematopoietic biology. Among these are members of the WNT and apoptosis/cell cycle control pathways, and thus may comprise an essential driving force for the propagation and maintenance of the leukemic phenotype. These findings may also provide evidence of potentially attractive therapeutic targets.

  5. Activation of epidermal growth factor receptor mediates mucin production stimulated by p40, a Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-derived protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihong; Cao, Hailong; Liu, Liping; Wang, Bangmao; Walker, W Allan; Acra, Sari A; Yan, Fang

    2014-07-18

    The mucus layer coating the gastrointestinal tract serves as the first line of intestinal defense against infection and injury. Probiotics promote mucin production by goblet cells in the intestine. p40, a Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG-derived soluble protein, has been shown to transactivate the EGF receptor (EGFR) in intestinal epithelial cells, which is required for inhibition of apoptosis and preservation of barrier function in the colon, thereby ameliorating intestinal injury and colitis. Because activation of EGFR has been shown to up-regulate mucin production in goblet cells, the purpose of this study was to investigate the effects and mechanisms of p40 regulation of mucin production. p40 activated EGFR and its downstream target, Akt, in a concentration-dependent manner in LS174T cells. p40 stimulated Muc2 gene expression and mucin production in LS174T cells, which were abolished by inhibition of EGFR kinase activity, down-regulation of EGFR expression by EGFR siRNA transfection, or suppression of Akt activation. Treatment with p40 increased mucin production in the colonic epithelium, thus thickening the mucus layer in the colon of wild type, but not of Egfr(wa5) mice, which have a dominant negative mutation in the EGFR kinase domain. Furthermore, inhibition of mucin-type O-linked glycosylation suppressed the effect of p40 on increasing mucin production and protecting intestinal epithelial cells from TNF-induced apoptosis in colon organ culture. Thus, these results suggest that p40-stimulated activation of EGFR mediates up-regulation of mucin production, which may contribute to the mechanisms by which p40 protects the intestinal epithelium from injury. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Regulators of G-protein-signaling proteins: negative modulators of G-protein-coupled receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Geoffrey E; Jardín, Isaac; Berna-Erro, A; Salido, Gines M; Rosado, Juan A

    2015-01-01

    Regulators of G-protein-signaling (RGS) proteins are a category of intracellular proteins that have an inhibitory effect on the intracellular signaling produced by G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). RGS along with RGS-like proteins switch on through direct contact G-alpha subunits providing a variety of intracellular functions through intracellular signaling. RGS proteins have a common RGS domain that binds to G alpha. RGS proteins accelerate GTPase and thus enhance guanosine triphosphate hydrolysis through the alpha subunit of heterotrimeric G proteins. As a result, they inactivate the G protein and quickly turn off GPCR signaling thus terminating the resulting downstream signals. Activity and subcellular localization of RGS proteins can be changed through covalent molecular changes to the enzyme, differential gene splicing, and processing of the protein. Other roles of RGS proteins have shown them to not be solely committed to being inhibitors but behave more as modulators and integrators of signaling. RGS proteins modulate the duration and kinetics of slow calcium oscillations and rapid phototransduction and ion signaling events. In other cases, RGS proteins integrate G proteins with signaling pathways linked to such diverse cellular responses as cell growth and differentiation, cell motility, and intracellular trafficking. Human and animal studies have revealed that RGS proteins play a vital role in physiology and can be ideal targets for diseases such as those related to addiction where receptor signaling seems continuously switched on. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Protein Molecular Structures, Protein SubFractions, and Protein Availability Affected by Heat Processing: A Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, P.

    2007-01-01

    The utilization and availability of protein depended on the types of protein and their specific susceptibility to enzymatic hydrolysis (inhibitory activities) in the gastrointestine and was highly associated with protein molecular structures. Studying internal protein structure and protein subfraction profiles leaded to an understanding of the components that make up a whole protein. An understanding of the molecular structure of the whole protein was often vital to understanding its digestive behavior and nutritive value in animals. In this review, recently obtained information on protein molecular structural effects of heat processing was reviewed, in relation to protein characteristics affecting digestive behavior and nutrient utilization and availability. The emphasis of this review was on (1) using the newly advanced synchrotron technology (S-FTIR) as a novel approach to reveal protein molecular chemistry affected by heat processing within intact plant tissues; (2) revealing the effects of heat processing on the profile changes of protein subfractions associated with digestive behaviors and kinetics manipulated by heat processing; (3) prediction of the changes of protein availability and supply after heat processing, using the advanced DVE/OEB and NRC-2001 models, and (4) obtaining information on optimal processing conditions of protein as intestinal protein source to achieve target values for potential high net absorbable protein in the small intestine. The information described in this article may give better insight in the mechanisms involved and the intrinsic protein molecular structural changes occurring upon processing.

  8. Inferring protein function by domain context similarities in protein-protein interaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Zhirong

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome sequencing projects generate massive amounts of sequence data but there are still many proteins whose functions remain unknown. The availability of large scale protein-protein interaction data sets makes it possible to develop new function prediction methods based on protein-protein interaction (PPI networks. Although several existing methods combine multiple information resources, there is no study that integrates protein domain information and PPI networks to predict protein functions. Results The domain context similarity can be a useful index to predict protein function similarity. The prediction accuracy of our method in yeast is between 63%-67%, which outperforms the other methods in terms of ROC curves. Conclusion This paper presents a novel protein function prediction method that combines protein domain composition information and PPI networks. Performance evaluations show that this method outperforms existing methods.

  9. In Situ Protein Binding Assay Using Fc-Fusion Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanabhan, Nirmala; Siddiqui, Tabrez J

    2017-01-01

    This protocol describes an in situ protein-protein interaction assay between tagged recombinant proteins and cell-surface expressed synaptic proteins. The assay is arguably more sensitive than other traditional protein binding assays such as co-immunoprecipitation and pull-downs and provides a visual readout for binding. This assay has been widely used to determine the dissociation constant of binding of trans-synaptic adhesion proteins. The step-wise description in the protocol should facilitate the adoption of this method in other laboratories.

  10. High quality protein microarray using in situ protein purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleischmann Robert D

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the postgenomic era, high throughput protein expression and protein microarray technologies have progressed markedly permitting screening of therapeutic reagents and discovery of novel protein functions. Hexa-histidine is one of the most commonly used fusion tags for protein expression due to its small size and convenient purification via immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC. This purification process has been adapted to the protein microarray format, but the quality of in situ His-tagged protein purification on slides has not been systematically evaluated. We established methods to determine the level of purification of such proteins on metal chelate-modified slide surfaces. Optimized in situ purification of His-tagged recombinant proteins has the potential to become the new gold standard for cost-effective generation of high-quality and high-density protein microarrays. Results Two slide surfaces were examined, chelated Cu2+ slides suspended on a polyethylene glycol (PEG coating and chelated Ni2+ slides immobilized on a support without PEG coating. Using PEG-coated chelated Cu2+ slides, consistently higher purities of recombinant proteins were measured. An optimized wash buffer (PBST composed of 10 mM phosphate buffer, 2.7 mM KCl, 140 mM NaCl and 0.05% Tween 20, pH 7.4, further improved protein purity levels. Using Escherichia coli cell lysates expressing 90 recombinant Streptococcus pneumoniae proteins, 73 proteins were successfully immobilized, and 66 proteins were in situ purified with greater than 90% purity. We identified several antigens among the in situ-purified proteins via assays with anti-S. pneumoniae rabbit antibodies and a human patient antiserum, as a demonstration project of large scale microarray-based immunoproteomics profiling. The methodology is compatible with higher throughput formats of in vivo protein expression, eliminates the need for resin-based purification and circumvents

  11. Dairy Proteins and Energy Balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Line Quist

    High protein diets affect energy balance beneficially through decreased hunger, enhanced satiety and increased energy expenditure. Dairy products are a major source of protein. Dairy proteins are comprised of two classes, casein (80%) and whey proteins (20%), which are both of high quality......, but casein is absorbed slowly and whey is absorbed rapidly. The present PhD study investigated the effects of total dairy proteins, whey, and casein, on energy balance and the mechanisms behind any differences in the effects of the specific proteins. The results do not support the hypothesis that dairy...... proteins, whey or casein are more beneficial than other protein sources in the regulation of energy balance, and suggest that dairy proteins, whey or casein seem to play only a minor role, if any, in the prevention and treatment of obesity....

  12. Depletion of the cellular levels of Bag-1 proteins attenuates phorbol ester-induced downregulation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and nuclear accumulation of NF-{kappa}B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier, Jana V., E-mail: Jana.maier@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Toxicology and Genetics, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Volz, Yvonne [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Toxicology and Genetics, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Berger, Caroline [Joint Research Division Vascular Biology of the Medical Faculty Mannheim, University of Heidelberg, and the German Cancer Research Center, Ludolf-Krehl-Str. 13-17, D-68167 Mannheim (Germany); Schneider, Sandra; Cato, Andrew C.B. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute of Toxicology and Genetics, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields}Bag-1 depletion only marginally affects the action of the glucocorticoid receptor but strongly regulates the activity of NF-{kappa}B. {yields}Bag-1 depletion attenuates phosphorylation and degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and nuclear accumulation of NF-{kappa}B p65 and p50. {yields}Bag-1 interacts with I{kappa}B{alpha} and partially restores I{kappa}B{alpha} and NF-{kappa}B activation in Bag-1 depleted cells. -- Abstract: Bag-1 consists in humans of four isoforms generated from the same RNA by alternative translation. Overexpression of single Bag-1 isoforms has identified Bag-1 as a negative regulator of action of many proteins including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Here we have analysed the ability of Bag-1 to regulate the transrepression function of the GR. Silencing Bag-1 expression only marginally affects the transrepression action of the GR but decreased the action of the transcription factor NF-{kappa}B. Furthermore phosphorylation and degradation of the inhibitor protein I{kappa}B{alpha} and nuclear accumulation of p65 and p50 NF-{kappa}B proteins in response to phorbol ester was attenuated following Bag-1 depletion in HeLa cells. Reconstitution of Bag-1 in depleted cells partially restored I{kappa}B{alpha} and NF-{kappa}B activation. Knock-down of Bag-1 expression also did not significantly alter GR-mediated transactivation but affected the basal transcription of some of the target genes. Thus Bag-1 proteins function as regulators of the action of selective transcription factors.

  13. Regulation of protein turnover by heat shock proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozaykut, Perinur; Ozer, Nesrin Kartal; Karademir, Betul

    2014-12-01

    Protein turnover reflects the balance between synthesis and degradation of proteins, and it is a crucial process for the maintenance of the cellular protein pool. The folding of proteins, refolding of misfolded proteins, and also degradation of misfolded and damaged proteins are involved in the protein quality control (PQC) system. Correct protein folding and degradation are controlled by many different factors, one of the most important of which is the heat shock protein family. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are in the class of molecular chaperones, which may prevent the inappropriate interaction of proteins and induce correct folding. On the other hand, these proteins play significant roles in the degradation pathways, including endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD), the ubiquitin-proteasome system, and autophagy. This review focuses on the emerging role of HSPs in the regulation of protein turnover; the effects of HSPs on the degradation machineries ERAD, autophagy, and proteasome; as well as the role of posttranslational modifications in the PQC system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Circular dichroism spectroscopy of fluorescent proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, N.V.; Hink, M.A.; Borst, J.W.; Krogt, van der G.N.M.; Visser, A.J.W.G.

    2002-01-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectra have been obtained from several variants of green fluorescent protein: blue fluorescent protein (BFP), enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP), enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), all from Aequorea victoria, and the red

  15. TMPRSS2-ERG fusion protein regulates insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) gene expression in prostate cancer: involvement of transcription factor Sp1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisel Sharon, Shilhav; Pozniak, Yair; Geiger, Tamar; Werner, Haim

    2016-08-09

    Prostate cancer is a major health issue in the Western world. The most common gene rearrangement in prostate cancer is the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion, which results in aberrant expression of the transcription factor ERG. The insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF1R) plays a key role in cell growth and tumorigenesis, and is overexpressed in most malignancies, including prostate cancer. In this study we show that TMPRSS2-ERG mediates its tumorigenic effects through regulation of IGF1R gene expression. Silencing of T-ERG in VCaP cells resulted in downregulation of both IGF1R and Sp1, a critical IGF1R regulator. Co-immunoprecipitation assays revealed a physical interaction between transcription factors ERG and Sp1, with potential relevance in IGF1R gene regulation. In addition, transactivation of the IGF1R gene by ERG was mediated at the level of transcription, as indicated by results of promoter assays. To identify new co-activators of the TMPRSS2-ERG fusion protein we performed mass spectrometry-based proteomic analyses. Among other interactors, we identified AP-2 complex subunit mu (AP2M1) and caveolin-1 (CAV1) in association with ERG in cell nuclei. These proteins play a mechanistic role in IGF1R internalization. Our analyses are consistent with a potential novel function of TMPRSS2-ERG as a major regulator of IGF1R gene expression. Results may impinge upon ongoing efforts to target the IGF1R in the clinics.

  16. Role of Bioavailable Iron in Coal Dust-Induced Activation of Activator Protein-1 and Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chuanshu; Li, Jingxia; Zhang, Qi; Huang, Xi

    2010-01-01

    Activator protein-1 (AP-1) and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) are two important transcription factors responsible for the regulation of cytokines, which are involved in cell proliferation and inflammation. Coal workers’ pneumoconiosis (CWP) is an occupational lung disease that may be related to chronic inflammation caused by coal dust exposure. In the present study, we demonstrate that coal from the Pennsylvania (PA) coalmine region, which has a high prevalence of CWP, can activate both AP-1 and NFAT in JB6 mouse epidermal cells. In contrast, coal from the Utah (UT) coalmine region, which has a low prevalence of CWP, has no such effects. The PA coal stimulates mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family members of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) and p38 MAPK but not c-Jun-NH2-terminal kinases, as determined by the phosphorylation assay. The increase in AP-1 by the PA coal was completely eliminated by the pretreatment of cells with PD98059, a specific MAPK kinase inhibitor, and SB202190, a p38 kinase inhibitor, further confirming that the PA coal-induced AP-1 activation is mediated through ERKs and p38 MAPK pathways. Deferoxamine (DFO), an iron chelator, synergistically enhanced the PA coal-induced AP-1 activity, but inhibited NFAT activity. For comparison, cells were treated with ferrous sulfate and/or DFO. We have found that iron transactivated both AP-1 and NFAT, and DFO further enhanced iron-induced AP-1 activation but inhibited NFAT. These results indicate that activation of AP-1 and NFAT by the PA coal is through bioavailable iron present in the coal. These data are in agreement with our previous findings that the prevalence of CWP correlates well with levels of bioavailable iron in coals from various mining regions. PMID:12397016

  17. Markers of protein oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Headlam, Henrietta A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Exposure of proteins to radicals in the presence of O2 gives both side-chain oxidation and backbone fragmentation. These processes can be interrelated, with initial side-chain oxidation giving rise to backbone damage via transfer reactions. We have shown previously that alkoxyl radicals formed...... on the C-3 carbons of Ala, Val, Leu, and Asp residu