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Sample records for transactivates viral gene

  1. Hepatitis B virus DNA integration and transactivation of cellular genes

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    Vijay Kumar

    2007-02-01

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    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is etiologically related to human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Most HCCs contain integrated HBV DNA in hepatocyte, suggesting that the integration may be involved in carcinogenesis. Available data on the integrants from human hepatocellular carcinomas seem to represent primary integrants as well as the products of secondary rearrangements. By means of structural analyses of the possible primary integrants, it has been observed that the replication intermediates of the viral genome are the preferred substrates for integration. The integrated HBV DNA and the target cellular DNA are invariably associated with deletions, possibly reflecting the substrate for, and the mechanism of, the integration reaction. The host DNA sequences as well as the target site of integration in chromosomes are selected randomly suggesting that HBV DNA integration should bring about random mutagenic effects. Analysis of the samples recovered from hepatocellular carcinomas show that the integrated HBV DNA can mediate secondary rearrangements of chromosomes, such as translocations, inversions, deletions and (possibly amplifications. The integration of HBV DNA into the host genome occurs at early steps of clonal tumor expansion. The integration has been shown in a number of cases to affect a variety of cancer-related genes and to exert insertional mutagenesis. However, in contrast to the woodchuck model, in which specific HBV-DNA integration is detectable in most cases, insertional activation or inactivation of cellular genes appears to be a rare event in man. The discovery of transactivating functions exerted by HBx and truncated HBs(urface proteins supports the notion that these could be relevant to hepatocarcinogenesis as these transactivator sequences have been found in a large number of HCC tumors or hepatoma-derived cell lines. The HBx

  2. The MHC-II transactivator CIITA, a restriction factor against oncogenic HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 retroviruses: similarities and differences in the inhibition of Tax-1 and Tax-2 viral transactivators

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    Forlani, Greta; Abdallah, Rawan; Accolla, Roberto S.; Tosi, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    The activation of CD4+ T helper cells is strictly dependent on the presentation of antigenic peptides by MHC class II (MHC-II) molecules. MHC-II expression is primarily regulated at the transcriptional level by the AIR-1 gene product CIITA (class II transactivator). Thus, CIITA plays a pivotal role in the triggering of the adaptive immune response against pathogens. Besides this well known function, we recently found that CIITA acts as an endogenous restriction factor against HTLV-1 (human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1) and HTLV-2 oncogenic retroviruses by targeting their viral transactivators Tax-1 and Tax-2, respectively. Here we review our findings on CIITA-mediated inhibition of viral replication and discuss similarities and differences in the molecular mechanisms by which CIITA specifically counteracts the function of Tax-1 and Tax-2 molecules. The dual function of CIITA as a key regulator of adaptive and intrinsic immunity represents a rather unique example of adaptation of host-derived factors against pathogen infections during evolution. PMID:23986750

  3. BFV activates the NF-κB pathway through its transactivator (BTas) to enhance viral transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jian; Tan Juan; Zhang Xihui; Guo Hongyan; Zhang Qicheng; Guo Tingting; Geng Yunqi; Qiao Wentao

    2010-01-01

    Multiple families of viruses have evolved sophisticated strategies to regulate nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling, which plays a pivotal role in diverse cellular events, including virus-host interactions. In this study, we report that bovine foamy virus (BFV) is able to activate the NF-κB pathway through the action of its transactivator, BTas. Both cellular IKKβ and IκBα also participate in this activation. In addition, we demonstrate that BTas induces the processing of p100, which implies that BTas can activate NF-κB through a noncanonical pathway as well. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis shows that BTas interacts with IKK catalytic subunits (IKKα and IKKβ), which may be responsible for regulation of IKK kinase activity and persistent NF-κB activation. Furthermore, our results indicate that the level of BTas-mediated LTR transcription correlates with the activity of cellular NF-κB. Together, this study suggests that BFV activates the NF-κB pathway through BTas to enhance viral transcription.

  4. Transactivation of the proenkephalin gene promoter by the Tax sub 1 protein of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I

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    Joshi, J.B. (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States)); Dave, H.P.G. (National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States))

    1992-02-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I), an etiologic agent for adult T-cell leukemia, is strongly associated with certain neurological diseases. The HTLV-I genome encodes a protein, Tax{sub 1}, that transactivates viral gene transcription. CD4-positive T helper lymphocytes express the proenkephalin gene, and enkephalins have been implicated as neuroimmunomodulators. The authors have investigated the effect of Tax{sub 1} on the proenkephalin gene promoter in C6 rat glioma cells and demonstrated its transactivation. Analysis using 5{prime} deletion mutants of the promoter region showed that sequences upstream of base pair - 190 are necessary for maximal transactivation. Forskolin, a cAMP modulator, synergistically increased Tax{sub 1}-mediated transactivation of the proenkephalin promoter. Neither Tax{sub 1} transactivation alone nor Tax{sub 1}/cAMP synergism exclusively involved cAMP-responsive elements. Endogenous proenkephalin gene expression increased in Tax{sub 1}-expressing C6 cells. Since HTLV-I infects lymphocytes, which express proenkephalin mRNA, Tax{sub 1} transregulation of proenkephalin expression may provide bidirectional communication between the nervous and immune systems in HTLV-I-related diseases.

  5. APOBEC3G inhibits HIV-1 RNA elongation by inactivating the viral trans-activation response element.

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    Nowarski, Roni; Prabhu, Ponnandy; Kenig, Edan; Smith, Yoav; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Kotler, Moshe

    2014-07-29

    Deamination of cytidine residues in viral DNA is a major mechanism by which APOBEC3G (A3G) inhibits vif-deficient human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. dC-to-dU transition following RNase-H activity leads to viral cDNA degradation, production of non-functional proteins, formation of undesired stop codons and decreased viral protein synthesis. Here, we demonstrate that A3G provides an additional layer of defense against HIV-1 infection dependent on inhibition of proviral transcription. HIV-1 transcription elongation is regulated by the trans-activation response (TAR) element, a short stem-loop RNA structure required for elongation factors binding. Vif-deficient HIV-1-infected cells accumulate short viral transcripts and produce lower amounts of full-length HIV-1 transcripts due to A3G deamination of the TAR apical loop cytidine, highlighting the requirement for TAR loop integrity in HIV-1 transcription. We further show that free single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) termini are not essential for A3G activity and a gap of CCC motif blocked with juxtaposed DNA or RNA on either or 3'+5' ends is sufficient for A3G deamination. These results identify A3G as an efficient mutator and that deamination of (-)SSDNA results in an early block of HIV-1 transcription. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Co-factors necessary for PPAR mediated transactivation of endogenous target genes

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    Grøntved, Lars; Nielsen, Ronni; Stunnenberg, Henk

    of endogenous target gene in different cell types are elusive. To mutually compare the ability of the PPAR subtypes to activate endogenous target genes in a given cell, PPARa, PPARb/d and PPARg2 were HA tagged and rapidly, equally and synchronously expressed using adenoviral delivery. Within a few hours after...... subtype specific activation of target genes. Accumulating evidence suggests that transcriptional co-factors can function as master regulators for nuclear receptors and impose promoter selectivity. To study co-factor necessity for PPAR mediated transactivation of endogenous target genes, specific co...

  7. The EBNA-2 N-Terminal Transactivation Domain Folds into a Dimeric Structure Required for Target Gene Activation.

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    Anders Friberg

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is a γ-herpesvirus that may cause infectious mononucleosis in young adults. In addition, epidemiological and molecular evidence links EBV to the pathogenesis of lymphoid and epithelial malignancies. EBV has the unique ability to transform resting B cells into permanently proliferating, latently infected lymphoblastoid cell lines. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA-2 is a key regulator of viral and cellular gene expression for this transformation process. The N-terminal region of EBNA-2 comprising residues 1-58 appears to mediate multiple molecular functions including self-association and transactivation. However, it remains to be determined if the N-terminus of EBNA-2 directly provides these functions or if these activities merely depend on the dimerization involving the N-terminal domain. To address this issue, we determined the three-dimensional structure of the EBNA-2 N-terminal dimerization (END domain by heteronuclear NMR-spectroscopy. The END domain monomer comprises a small fold of four β-strands and an α-helix which form a parallel dimer by interaction of two β-strands from each protomer. A structure-guided mutational analysis showed that hydrophobic residues in the dimer interface are required for self-association in vitro. Importantly, these interface mutants also displayed severely impaired self-association and transactivation in vivo. Moreover, mutations of solvent-exposed residues or deletion of the α-helix do not impair dimerization but strongly affect the functional activity, suggesting that the EBNA-2 dimer presents a surface that mediates functionally important intra- and/or intermolecular interactions. Our study shows that the END domain is a novel dimerization fold that is essential for functional activity. Since this specific fold is a unique feature of EBNA-2 it might provide a novel target for anti-viral therapeutics.

  8. Screening of the target genes trans-activated by HLA-HA8 in hepatocytes

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    Qi WANG

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To clone and identify the target genes trans-activated by human minor histocompatibility antigen HLA-HA8 in hepatocytes with suppression subtractive hybridization(SSH and bioinfomatics technique.Methods mRNA was isolated from HepG2 cells transfected by pcDNA3.1(--HLA-HA8 and pcDNA3.1(- empty vector,and then used to synthesize the double-stranded cDNA(marked as Tester and Driver,respectively by reverse transcription.After being digested with restriction enzyme Rsa I,the tester cDNA was divided into two parts and ligated to the specific adaptor 1 and adaptor 2,respectively,and then hybridized with driver cDNA twice and underwent PCR twice.The production was subcloned into pEGM-Teasy plasmid vectors to set up the subtractive library.The library was then amplified by transfection into E.coli strain DH5α.The cDNA was sequenced and analyzed in GenBank with Blast search after PCR amplification.Results The subtractive library of genes trans-activated by HLA-HA8 was constructed successfully.The amplified library contained 101 positive clones.Colony PCR showed that all these clones contained 200-1000bp inserts.Twenty eight clones were selected randomly to analyze the sequences.The result of homologous analysis showed that altogether 16 coding sequences were gotten,of which 4 sequences were with unknown function.Conclusions The obtained sequences trans-activated by HLA-HA8 may code different proteins and play important roles in cell growth and metabolism,energy synthesis and metabolism,material transport and signal transduction.This finding will bring some new clues for the studies not only on the biological functions of HLA-HA8,but also on the HBV infection mechanism.

  9. Transactivation of the proximal promoter of human oxytocin gene by TR4 orphan receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.-P.; Lee, Y.-F.; Chang, C.; Lee, H.-J.

    2006-01-01

    The human testicular receptor 4 (TR4) shares structural homology with members of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Some other members of this superfamily were able to regulate the transcriptional activity of the human oxytocin (OXT) promoter by binding to the first DR0 regulatory site. However, little investigation was conducted systematically in the study of the second dDR4 site of OXT proximal promoter, and the relationship between the first and the second sites of OXT promoter. Here, we demonstrated for the first time that TR4 could increase the proximal promoter activity of the human OXT gene via DR0, dDR4, and OXT (both DR0 and dDR4) elements, respectively. TR4 might induce OXT gene expression through the OXT element in a dose-dependent manner. However, there is no synergistic effect between DR0 and dDR4 elements during TR4 transactivation. Taken together, these results suggested that TR4 should be one of important regulators of OXT gene expression

  10. A role for NF-κB–dependent gene transactivation in sunburn

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    Abeyama, Kazuhiro; Eng, William; Jester, James V.; Vink, Arie A.; Edelbaum, Dale; Cockerell, Clay J.; Bergstresser, Paul R.; Takashima, Akira

    2000-01-01

    Exposure of skin to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is known to induce NF-κB activation, but the functional role for this pathway in UV-induced cutaneous inflammation remains uncertain. In this study, we examined whether experimentally induced sunburn reactions in mice could be prevented by blocking UV-induced, NF-κB–dependent gene transactivation with oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) containing the NF-κB cis element (NF-κB decoy ODNs). UV-induced secretion of IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α, and VEGF by skin-derived cell lines was inhibited by the decoy ODNs, but not by the scrambled control ODNs. Systemic or local injection of NF-κB decoy ODNs also inhibited cutaneous swelling responses to UV irradiation. Moreover, local UV-induced inflammatory changes (swelling, leukocyte infiltration, epidermal hyperplasia, and accumulation of proinflammatory cytokines) were all inhibited specifically by topically applied decoy ODNs. Importantly, these ODNs had no effect on alternative types of cutaneous inflammation caused by irritant or allergic chemicals. These results indicate that sunburn reactions culminate from inflammatory events that are triggered by UV-activated transcription of NF-κB target genes, rather than from nonspecific changes associated with tissue damage. PMID:10862790

  11. Methylation of class II transactivator gene promoter IV is not associated with susceptibility to Multiple Sclerosis

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    Lincoln Matthew R

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple sclerosis (MS is a complex trait in which alleles at or near the class II loci HLA-DRB1 and HLA-DQB1 contribute significantly to genetic risk. The MHC class II transactivator (MHC2TA is the master controller of expression of class II genes, and methylation of the promoter of this gene has been previously been shown to alter its function. In this study we sought to assess whether or not methylation of the MHC2TA promoter pIV could contribute to MS disease aetiology. Methods In DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a sample of 50 monozygotic disease discordant MS twins the MHC2TA promoter IV was sequenced and analysed by methylation specific PCR. Results No methylation or sequence variation of the MHC2TA promoter pIV was found. Conclusion The results of this study cannot support the notion that methylation of the pIV promoter of MHC2TA contributes to MS disease risk, although tissue and timing specific epigenetic modifications cannot be ruled out.

  12. Immediate-early gene region of human cytomegalovirus trans-activates the promoter of human immunodeficiency virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, M.G.; Kenney, S.C.; Kamine, J.; Pagano, J.S.; Huang, E.S.

    1987-01-01

    Almost all homosexual patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome are also actively infected with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The authors have hypothesized that an interaction between HCMV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the agent that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, may exist at a molecular level and contribute to the manifestations of HIV infection. In this report, they demonstrate that the immediate-early gene region of HCMV, in particular immediate-early region 2, trans-activates the expression of the bacterial gene chloramphenicol acetyltransferase that is fused to the HIV long terminal repeat and carried by plasmid pHIV-CAT. The HCMV immediate-early trans-activator increases the level of mRNA from the plamid pHIV-CAT. The sequences of HIV that are responsive to trans-activation by the HDMV immediate-early region are distinct from HIV sequences that are required for response to the HIV tat. The stimulation of HIV gene expression by HDMV gene functions could enhance the consequences of HIV infection in persons with previous or concurrent HCMV infection

  13. DNA alkylating agents alleviate silencing of class II transactivator gene expression in L1210 lymphoma cells.

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    Murphy, Shawn P; Holtz, Renae; Lewandowski, Nicole; Tomasi, Thomas B; Fuji, Hiroshi

    2002-09-15

    MHC class II (Ia) Ag expression is inversely correlated with tumorigenicity and directly correlated with immunogenicity in clones of the mouse L1210 lymphoma (1 ). Understanding the mechanisms by which class II Ag expression is regulated in L1210 lymphoma may facilitate the development of immunotherapeutic approaches for the treatment of some types of lymphoma and leukemia. This study demonstrates that the variation in MHC class II Ag expression among clones of L1210 lymphoma is due to differences in the expression of the class II transactivator (CIITA). Analysis of stable hybrids suggests that CIITA expression is repressed by a dominant mechanism in class II-negative L1210 clones. DNA-alkylating agents such as ethyl methanesulfonate and the chemotherapeutic drug melphalan activate CIITA and class II expression in class II negative L1210 cells, and this effect appears to be restricted to transformed cell lines derived from the early stages of B cell ontogeny. Transient transfection assays demonstrated that the CIITA type III promoter is active in class II(-) L1210 cells, despite the fact that the endogenous gene is not expressed, which suggests that these cells have all of the transacting factors necessary for CIITA transcription. An inverse correlation between methylation of the CIITA transcriptional regulatory region and CIITA expression was observed among L1210 clones. Furthermore, 5-azacytidine treatment activated CIITA expression in class II-negative L1210 cells. Collectively, our results suggest that 1) CIITA gene expression is repressed in class II(-) L1210 cells by methylation of the CIITA upstream regulatory region, and 2) treatment with DNA-alkylating agents overcomes methylation-based silencing of the CIITA gene in L1210 cells.

  14. Epstein-Barr virus immediate-early gene product trans-activates gene expression from the human immunodeficiency virus long terminal repeat

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    Kenney, S.; Kamine, J.; Markovitz, D.; Fenrick, R.; Pagano, J.

    1988-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients are frequently coinfected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). In this report, the authors demonstrate that an EBV immediate-early gene product, BamHI MLF1, stimulates expression of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene linked to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) promoter. The HIV promoter sequences necessary for trans-activation by EBV do not include the tat-responsive sequences. In addition, in contrast to the other herpesvirus trans-activators previously studied, the EBV BamHI MLF1 gene product appears to function in part by a posttranscriptional mechanism, since it increases pHIV-CAT protein activity more than it increases HIV-CAT mRNA. This ability of an EBV gene product to activate HIV gene expression may have biologic consequences in persons coinfected with both viruses

  15. Genus beta human papillomavirus E6 proteins vary in their effects on the transactivation of p53 target genes.

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    White, Elizabeth A; Walther, Johanna; Javanbakht, Hassan; Howley, Peter M

    2014-08-01

    The genus beta human papillomaviruses (beta HPVs) cause cutaneous lesions and are thought to be involved in the initiation of some nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs), particularly in patients with the genetic disorder epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV). We have previously reported that at least two of the genus beta HPV E6 proteins bind to and/or increase the steady-state levels of p53 in squamous epithelial cells. This is in contrast to a well-characterized ability of the E6 proteins of cancer-associated HPVs of genus alpha HPV, which inactivate p53 by targeting its ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. In this study, we have investigated the ability of genus beta E6 proteins from eight different HPV types to block the transactivation of p53 target genes following DNA damage. We find that the E6 proteins from diverse beta HPV species and types vary in their capacity to block the induction of MDM2, p21, and proapoptotic genes after genotoxic stress. We conclude that some genus beta HPV E6 proteins inhibit at least some p53 target genes, although perhaps not by the same mechanism or to the same degree as the high-risk genus alpha HPV E6 proteins. This study addresses the ability of various human papillomavirus E6 proteins to block the activation of p53-responsive cellular genes following DNA damage in human keratinocytes, the normal host cell for HPVs. The E6 proteins encoded by the high-risk, cancer-associated HPV types of genus alpha HPV have a well-established activity to target p53 degradation and thereby inhibit the response to DNA damage. In this study, we have investigated the ability of genus beta HPV E6 proteins from eight different HPV types to block the ability of p53 to transactivate downstream genes following DNA damage. We find that some, but not all, genus beta HPV E6 proteins can block the transactivation of some p53 target genes. This differential response to DNA damage furthers the understanding of cutaneous HPV biology and may help to explain the

  16. Protective effects of estrogen against vascular calcification via estrogen receptor α-dependent growth arrest-specific gene 6 transactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanao-Hamai, Michiko; Son, Bo-Kyung; Hashizume, Tsuyoshi; Ogawa, Sumito; Akishita, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification is one of the major complications of cardiovascular disease and is an independent risk factor for myocardial infarction and cardiac death. Postmenopausal women have a higher prevalence of vascular calcification compared with premenopausal women, suggesting protective effects of estrogen (E2). However, the underlying mechanisms of its beneficial effects remain unclear. In the present study, we examined the inhibitory effects of E2 on vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification, and found that growth arrest-specific gene 6 (Gas6), a crucial molecule in vascular calcification, is transactivated by estrogen receptor α (ERα) in response to E2. In human aortic smooth muscle cells, physiological levels of E2 inhibited inorganic phosphate (Pi)-induced calcification in a concentration-dependent manner. This inhibitory effect was significantly abolished by MPP, an ERα-selective antagonist, and ERα siRNA, but not by PHTPP, an ERβ-selective antagonist, and ERβ siRNA, implicating an ERα-dependent action. Apoptosis, an essential process for Pi-induced VSMC calcification, was inhibited by E2 in a concentration-dependent manner and further, MPP abolished this inhibition. Mechanistically, E2 restored the inhibited expression of Gas6 and phospho-Akt in Pi-induced apoptosis through ERα. Furthermore, E2 significantly activated Gas6 transcription, and MPP abrogated this E2-dependent Gas6 transactivation. E2-BSA failed to activate Gas6 transcription and to inhibit Ca deposition in VSMC, suggesting beneficial actions of genomic signaling by E2/nuclear ERα. Taken together, these results indicate that E2 exerts inhibitory effects on VSMC apoptosis and calcification through ERα-mediated Gas6 transactivation. These findings indicate a potential therapeutic strategy for the prevention of vascular calcification, especially in postmenopausal women. - Highlights: • E2 inhibits Pi-induced calcification in vascular smooth muscles cells. • E2 inhibits Pi

  17. Anyalysis of Msx1 and Msx2 Transactivation Function in the Context of the Heat Shock 70 (Hspa1b) Gene Promoter

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuang, Fengfeng; Nguyen, Manuel P.; Shuler, Charles; Liu, Yi-Hsin

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that Msx proteins control gene transcription predominantly through repression mechanisms. However, gene expression studies using either the gain-of-function or the loss-of-function mutants revealed many gene targets whose expression require functional Msx proteins. To date, investigations into the mechanisms of Msx-dependent trans-activation have been hindered by the lack of a responsive promoter. Here, we demonstrated the usefulness of the mouse Hspa1b promoter in...

  18. Trans-activation function of a 3' truncated X gene-cell fusion product from integrated hepatitis B virus DNA in chronic hepatitis tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Shinako; Koike, Katsuro

    1990-01-01

    To investigate the expression and transactivation function of the X gene in integrated hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA from chronic hepatitis tissues, a series of transfectants containing cloned integrated HBV DNAs was made and analyzed for X mRNA expression and trans-activation activity by using a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase assay. Most of the integrated HBV DNAs expressed X mRNA and encoded a product with trans-activation activity in spite of the loss of the 3' end region of the X gene due to integration. From cDNA cloning and sequence analysis of X mRNA transcribed from native or integrated HBV DNA, the X protein was found to be translated from the X open reading frame without splicing. For integrated HBV DNA, transcription was extended to a cellular flanking DNA and an X gene-cell fusion transcript was terminated by using a cellular poly(A) signal. The amino acid sequence deduced from an X-cell fusion transcript indicated truncation of the carboxyl-terminal five amino acids, but the upstream region of seven amino acids conserved among hepadnaviruses was retained in the integrated HBV DNA, suggesting that this conserved region is essential for the transactivation function of the X protein. These findings support the following explanation for hepatocarcinogenesis by HBV DNA integration: the expression of a cellular oncogene(s) is transactivated at the time of chronic infection by the increasing amounts of the integrated HBV gene product(s), such as the X-cell fusion product

  19. Inhibition of both HIV-1 reverse transcription and gene expression by a cyclic peptide that binds the Tat-transactivating response element (TAR RNA.

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    Matthew S Lalonde

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The RNA response element TAR plays a critical role in HIV replication by providing a binding site for the recruitment of the viral transactivator protein Tat. Using a structure-guided approach, we have developed a series of conformationally-constrained cyclic peptides that act as structural mimics of the Tat RNA binding region and block Tat-TAR interactions at nanomolar concentrations in vitro. Here we show that these compounds block Tat-dependent transcription in cell-free systems and in cell-based reporter assays. The compounds are also cell permeable, have low toxicity, and inhibit replication of diverse HIV-1 strains, including both CXCR4-tropic and CCR5-tropic primary HIV-1 isolates of the divergent subtypes A, B, C, D and CRF01_AE. In human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, the cyclic peptidomimetic L50 exhibited an IC(50 ∼250 nM. Surprisingly, inhibition of LTR-driven HIV-1 transcription could not account for the full antiviral activity. Timed drug-addition experiments revealed that L-50 has a bi-phasic inhibition curve with the first phase occurring after HIV-1 entry into the host cell and during the initiation of HIV-1 reverse transcription. The second phase coincides with inhibition of HIV-1 transcription. Reconstituted reverse transcription assays confirm that HIV-1 (- strand strong stop DNA synthesis is blocked by L50-TAR RNA interactions in-vitro. These findings are consistent with genetic evidence that TAR plays critical roles both during reverse transcription and during HIV gene expression. Our results suggest that antiviral drugs targeting TAR RNA might be highly effective due to a dual inhibitory mechanism.

  20. A central role for CK1 in catalysing phosphorylation of the P53 transactivation domain at serine 20 after HHV-6B viral infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maclaine, NJ; Øster, Bodil; Bundgaard, Bettina

    2008-01-01

    The tumour suppressor protein p53 is activated by distinct cellular stresses including radiation, hypoxia, type-I interferon, and DNA/RNA virus infection. The transactivation domain of p53 contains a phosphorylation site at serine 20 (Ser20) whose modification stabilises the binding of the transc...... was not blocked by D4476. These data highlight a central role for CK1 as the Ser20-site kinase for p53 in DNA virus-infected cells, but also suggest that distinct stresses may selectively trigger different protein kinases to modify the transactivation domain of p53 at Ser20....

  1. The Contribution of Transactivation Subdomains 1 and 2 to p53-Induced Gene Expression Is Heterogeneous But Not Subdomain-Specific

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    Jennifer M. Smith

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Two adjacent regions within the transactivation domain of p53 are sufficient to support sequence-specific transactivation when fused to a heterologous DNA binding domain. It has been hypothesized that these two subdomains of p53 may contribute to the expression of distinct p53-responsive genes. Here we have used oligonucleotide microarrays to identify transcripts induced by variants of p53 with point mutations within subdomains 1, 2, or 1 and 2 (QS1, QS2, QS1/QS2, respectively. The expression of 254 transcripts was increased in response to wild-type p53 expression but most of these transcripts were poorly induced by these variants of p53. Strikingly, a number of known p53regulated transcripts including TNFRSF10B, BAX, BTG2, POLH were increased to wild-type levels by p53QS1 and p53QS2 but not p53QS1/QS2, indicating that either sub domain 1 or 2 is sufficient for p53-dependent expression of a small subset of p53-responsive genes. Unexpectedly, there was no evidence for p53QS1- or p53QS2-specific gene expression. Taken together, we found heterogeneity in the requirement for transactivation subdomains 1 and 2 of p53 without any subdomain-specific contribution to p53-induced gene expression.

  2. SOX9 governs differentiation stage-specific gene expression in growth plate chondrocytes via direct concomitant transactivation and repression.

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    Victor Y L Leung

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Cartilage and endochondral bone development require SOX9 activity to regulate chondrogenesis, chondrocyte proliferation, and transition to a non-mitotic hypertrophic state. The restricted and reciprocal expression of the collagen X gene, Col10a1, in hypertrophic chondrocytes and Sox9 in immature chondrocytes epitomise the precise spatiotemporal control of gene expression as chondrocytes progress through phases of differentiation, but how this is achieved is not clear. Here, we have identified a regulatory element upstream of Col10a1 that enhances its expression in hypertrophic chondrocytes in vivo. In immature chondrocytes, where Col10a1 is not expressed, SOX9 interacts with a conserved sequence within this element that is analogous to that within the intronic enhancer of the collagen II gene Col2a1, the known transactivation target of SOX9. By analysing a series of Col10a1 reporter genes in transgenic mice, we show that the SOX9 binding consensus in this element is required to repress expression of the transgene in non-hypertrophic chondrocytes. Forced ectopic Sox9 expression in hypertrophic chondrocytes in vitro and in mice resulted in down-regulation of Col10a1. Mutation of a binding consensus motif for GLI transcription factors, which are the effectors of Indian hedgehog signaling, close to the SOX9 site in the Col10a1 regulatory element, also derepressed transgene expression in non-hypertrophic chondrocytes. GLI2 and GLI3 bound to the Col10a1 regulatory element but not to the enhancer of Col2a1. In addition to Col10a1, paired SOX9-GLI binding motifs are present in the conserved non-coding regions of several genes that are preferentially expressed in hypertrophic chondrocytes and the occurrence of pairing is unlikely to be by chance. We propose a regulatory paradigm whereby direct concomitant positive and negative transcriptional control by SOX9 ensures differentiation phase-specific gene expression in chondrocytes. Discrimination between

  3. Direct trans-activation of the human cyclin D2 gene by the oncogene product Tax of human T-cell leukemia virus type I.

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    Huang, Y; Ohtani, K; Iwanaga, R; Matsumura, Y; Nakamura, M

    2001-03-01

    Cyclins are one of the pivotal determinants regulating cell cycle progression. We previously reported that the trans-activator Tax of human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) induces endogenous cyclin D2 expression along with cell cycle progression in a resting human T-cell line, Kit 225, suggesting a role of cyclin D2 in Tax-mediated cell cycle progression. The cyclin D2 gene has a typical E2F binding element, raising the possibility that induction of cyclin D2 expression is a consequence of cell cycle progression. In this study, we examined the role and molecular mechanism of induction of the endogenous human cyclin D2 gene by Tax. Introduction of p19(INK4d), a cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor of the INK4 family specific for D-type CDK, inhibited Tax-mediated activation of E2F, indicating requirement of D-type CDK in Tax-mediated activation of E2F. Previously indicated E2F binding element and two NF-kappaB-like binding elements in the 1.6 kbp cyclin D2 promoter fragment had little, if any, effect on responsiveness to Tax. We found that trans-activation of the cyclin D2 promoter by Tax was mainly mediated by a newly identified NF-kappaB-like element with auxiliary contribution of a CRE-like element residing in sequences downstream of -444 which were by themselves sufficient for trans-activation by Tax. These results indicate that Tax directly trans-activates the cyclin D2 gene, resulting in growth promotion and perhaps leukemogenesis through activation of D-type CDK.

  4. Transactivation of Ds by Ac-transposase gene fusions in tobacco

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rommens, Caius M.T.; Haaren, Mark J.J. van; Buchel, Annemarie S.; Mol, Joseph N.M.; Tunen, Arjen J. van; Nijkamp, H. John J.; Hille, Jacques

    1992-01-01

    To study regulation of the (Ds) transposition process in heterologous plant species, the transposase gene of Ac was fused to several promoters that are active late during plant development. These promoters are the flower-specific chalcone synthase A promoter (CHS A), the anther-specific chalcone

  5. Transcription factor Nrf1 is topologically repartitioned across membranes to enable target gene transactivation through its acidic glucose-responsive domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiguo; Ren, Yonggang; Li, Shaojun; Hayes, John D

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-bound Nrf1 transcription factor regulates critical homeostatic and developmental genes. The conserved N-terminal homology box 1 (NHB1) sequence in Nrf1 targets the cap'n'collar (CNC) basic basic-region leucine zipper (bZIP) factor to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but it is unknown how its activity is controlled topologically within membranes. Herein, we report a hitherto unknown mechanism by which the transactivation activity of Nrf1 is controlled through its membrane-topology. Thus after Nrf1 is anchored within ER membranes, its acidic transactivation domains (TADs), including the Asn/Ser/Thr-rich (NST) glycodomain situated between acidic domain 1 (AD1) and AD2, are transiently translocated into the lumen of the ER, where NST is glycosylated in the presence of glucose to yield an inactive 120-kDa Nrf1 glycoprotein. Subsequently, portions of the TADs partially repartition across membranes into the cyto/nucleoplasmic compartments, whereupon an active 95-kDa form of Nrf1 accumulates, a process that is more obvious in glucose-deprived cells and may involve deglycosylation. The repartitioning of Nrf1 out of membranes is monitored within this protein by its acidic-hydrophobic amphipathic glucose-responsive domains, particularly the Neh5L subdomain within AD1. Therefore, the membrane-topological organization of Nrf1 dictates its post-translational modifications (i.e. glycosylation, the putative deglycosylation and selective proteolysis), which together control its ability to transactivate target genes.

  6. Differential transactivation by orphan nuclear receptor NOR1 and its fusion gene product EWS/NOR1: possible involvement of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase I, PARP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkura, Naganari; Nagamura, Yuko; Tsukada, Toshihiko

    2008-10-15

    In extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma, a chromosomal translocation creates a gene fusion between EWS and an orphan nuclear receptor, NOR1. The resulting fusion protein EWS/NOR1 has been believed to lead to malignant transformation by functioning as a transactivator for NOR1-target genes. By comparing the gene expression profiles of NOR1- and EWS/NOR1-overexpressing cells, we found that they largely shared up-regulated genes, but no significant correlation was observed with respect to the transactivation levels of each gene. In addition, the proteins associated with NOR1 and EWS/NOR1 were mostly the same in these cells. The results suggest that these proteins differentially transactivate overlapping target genes through a similar transcriptional machinery. To clarify the mechanisms underlying the transcriptional divergence between NOR1 and EWS/NOR1, we searched for alternatively associated proteins, and identified poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase I (PARP-1) as an NOR1-specific binding protein. Consistent with its binding properties, PARP-1 acted as a transcriptional repressor of NOR1, but not EWS/NOR1, in a luciferase reporter assay employing PARP-1(-/-) fibroblasts. Interestingly, suppressive activity of PARP-1 was observed in a DNA response element-specific manner, and in a subtype-specific manner toward the NR4A family (Nur77, Nurr1, and NOR1), suggesting that PARP-1 plays a role in the diversity of transcriptional regulation mediated by the NR4A family in normal cells. Altogether, our findings suggest that NOR1 and EWS/NOR1 regulate overlapping target genes differently by utilizing associated proteins, including PARP-1; and that EWS/NOR1 may acquire oncogenic activities by avoiding (or gaining) transcription factor-specific modulation by the associated proteins. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Proteomic analysis of the herpes simplex virus 1 virion protein 16 transactivator protein in infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suk, Hyung; Knipe, David M

    2015-06-01

    The herpes simplex virus 1 virion protein 16 (VP16) tegument protein forms a transactivation complex with the cellular proteins host cell factor 1 (HCF-1) and octamer-binding transcription factor 1 (Oct-1) upon entry into the host cell. VP16 has also been shown to interact with a number of virion tegument proteins and viral glycoprotein H to promote viral assembly, but no comprehensive study of the VP16 proteome has been performed at early times postinfection. We therefore performed a proteomic analysis of VP16-interacting proteins at 3 h postinfection. We confirmed the interaction of VP16 with HCF-1 and a large number of cellular Mediator complex proteins, but most surprisingly, we found that the major viral protein associating with VP16 is the infected cell protein 4 (ICP4) immediate-early (IE) transactivator protein. These results raise the potential for a new function for VP16 in associating with the IE ICP4 and playing a role in transactivation of early and late gene expression, in addition to its well-documented function in transactivation of IE gene expression. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Core Gene Expression and Association of Genotypes with Viral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine genotypic distribution, ribonucleic acid (RNA) RNA viral load and express core gene from Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infected patients in Punjab, Pakistan. Methods: A total of 1690 HCV RNA positive patients were included in the study. HCV genotyping was tested by type-specific genotyping assay, viral ...

  9. Dimerization of BTas is required for the transactivational activity of bovine foamy virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Juan; Qiao Wentao; Xu Fengwen; Han Hongqi; Chen Qimin; Geng Yunqi

    2008-01-01

    The BTas protein of bovine foamy virus (BFV) is a 249-amino-acid nuclear regulatory protein which transactivates viral gene expression directed by the long terminal repeat promoter (LTR) and the internal promoter (IP). Here, we demonstrate the BTas protein forms a dimeric complex in mammalian cells by using mammalian two hybrid systems and cross-linking assay. Functional analyses with deletion mutants reveal that the region of 46-62aa is essential for dimer formation. Furthermore, our results show that deleting the dimerization region of BTas did not affect the localization of BTas, but that it did result in the loss of its transactivational activity on the LTR and IP. Furthermore, BTas (Δ46-62aa) retained binding ability to the LTR and IP similar to that of the wild-type BTas. These data suggest the dimerization region is necessary for the transactivational function of BTas and is crucial to the replication of BFV

  10. Physical non-viral gene delivery methods for tissue engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellott, Adam J.; Forrest, M. Laird; Detamore, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    The integration of gene therapy into tissue engineering to control differentiation and direct tissue formation is not a new concept; however, successful delivery of nucleic acids into primary cells, progenitor cells, and stem cells has proven exceptionally challenging. Viral vectors are generally highly effective at delivering nucleic acids to a variety of cell populations, both dividing and non-dividing, yet these viral vectors are marred by significant safety concerns. Non-viral vectors are preferred for gene therapy, despite lower transfection efficiencies, and possess many customizable attributes that are desirable for tissue engineering applications. However, there is no single non-viral gene delivery strategy that “fits-all” cell types and tissues. Thus, there is a compelling opportunity to examine different non-viral vectors, especially physical vectors, and compare their relative degrees of success. This review examines the advantages and disadvantages of physical non-viral methods (i.e., microinjection, ballistic gene delivery, electroporation, sonoporation, laser irradiation, magnetofection, and electric field-induced molecular vibration), with particular attention given to electroporation because of its versatility, with further special emphasis on Nucleofection™. In addition, attributes of cellular character that can be used to improve differentiation strategies are examined for tissue engineering applications. Ultimately, electroporation exhibits a high transfection efficiency in many cell types, which is highly desirable for tissue engineering applications, but electroporation and other physical non-viral gene delivery methods are still limited by poor cell viability. Overcoming the challenge of poor cell viability in highly efficient physical non-viral techniques is the key to using gene delivery to enhance tissue engineering applications. PMID:23099792

  11. Physical non-viral gene delivery methods for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellott, Adam J; Forrest, M Laird; Detamore, Michael S

    2013-03-01

    The integration of gene therapy into tissue engineering to control differentiation and direct tissue formation is not a new concept; however, successful delivery of nucleic acids into primary cells, progenitor cells, and stem cells has proven exceptionally challenging. Viral vectors are generally highly effective at delivering nucleic acids to a variety of cell populations, both dividing and non-dividing, yet these viral vectors are marred by significant safety concerns. Non-viral vectors are preferred for gene therapy, despite lower transfection efficiencies, and possess many customizable attributes that are desirable for tissue engineering applications. However, there is no single non-viral gene delivery strategy that "fits-all" cell types and tissues. Thus, there is a compelling opportunity to examine different non-viral vectors, especially physical vectors, and compare their relative degrees of success. This review examines the advantages and disadvantages of physical non-viral methods (i.e., microinjection, ballistic gene delivery, electroporation, sonoporation, laser irradiation, magnetofection, and electric field-induced molecular vibration), with particular attention given to electroporation because of its versatility, with further special emphasis on Nucleofection™. In addition, attributes of cellular character that can be used to improve differentiation strategies are examined for tissue engineering applications. Ultimately, electroporation exhibits a high transfection efficiency in many cell types, which is highly desirable for tissue engineering applications, but electroporation and other physical non-viral gene delivery methods are still limited by poor cell viability. Overcoming the challenge of poor cell viability in highly efficient physical non-viral techniques is the key to using gene delivery to enhance tissue engineering applications.

  12. HMGB1-mediated DNA bending: Distinct roles in increasing p53 binding to DNA and the transactivation of p53-responsive gene promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štros, Michal; Kučírek, Martin; Sani, Soodabeh Abbasi; Polanská, Eva

    2018-03-01

    HMGB1 is a chromatin-associated protein that has been implicated in many important biological processes such as transcription, recombination, DNA repair, and genome stability. These functions include the enhancement of binding of a number of transcription factors, including the tumor suppressor protein p53, to their specific DNA-binding sites. HMGB1 is composed of two highly conserved HMG boxes, linked to an intrinsically disordered acidic C-terminal tail. Previous reports have suggested that the ability of HMGB1 to bend DNA may explain the in vitro HMGB1-mediated increase in sequence-specific DNA binding by p53. The aim of this study was to reinvestigate the importance of HMGB1-induced DNA bending in relationship to the ability of the protein to promote the specific binding of p53 to short DNA duplexes in vitro, and to transactivate two major p53-regulated human genes: Mdm2 and p21/WAF1. Using a number of HMGB1 mutants, we report that the HMGB1-mediated increase in sequence-specific p53 binding to DNA duplexes in vitro depends very little on HMGB1-mediated DNA bending. The presence of the acidic C-terminal tail of HMGB1 and/or the oxidation of the protein can reduce the HMGB1-mediated p53 binding. Interestingly, the induction of transactivation of p53-responsive gene promoters by HMGB1 requires both the ability of the protein to bend DNA and the acidic C-terminal tail, and is promoter-specific. We propose that the efficient transactivation of p53-responsive gene promoters by HMGB1 depends on complex events, rather than solely on the promotion of p53 binding to its DNA cognate sites. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Analysis of Msx1 and Msx2 transactivation function in the context of the heat shock 70 (Hspa1b) gene promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Fengfeng; Nguyen, Manuel P; Shuler, Charles; Liu, Yi-Hsin

    2009-04-03

    Previous studies have shown that Msx proteins control gene transcription predominantly through repression mechanisms. However, gene expression studies using either the gain-of-function or the loss-of-function mutants revealed many gene targets whose expression require functional Msx proteins. To date, investigations into the mechanisms of Msx-dependent transactivation have been hindered by the lack of a responsive promoter. Here, we demonstrated the usefulness of the mouse Hspa1b promoter in probing Msx-dependent mechanisms of gene activation. We showed that Msx protein activates Hspa1b promoter via its C-terminal domain. The activation absolutely depends on the HSEs and physical interactions between Msx proteins and heat shock factors may play a contributing role.

  14. Anyalysis of Msx1 and Msx2 Transactivation Function in the Context of the Heat Shock 70 (Hspa1b) Gene Promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Fengfeng; Nguyen, Manuel P.; Shuler, Charles; Liu, Yi-Hsin

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that Msx proteins control gene transcription predominantly through repression mechanisms. However, gene expression studies using either the gain-of-function or the loss-of-function mutants revealed many gene targets whose expression require functional Msx proteins. To date, investigations into the mechanisms of Msx-dependent trans-activation have been hindered by the lack of a responsive promoter. Here, we demonstrated the usefulness of the mouse Hspa1b promoter in probing Msx-dependent mechanisms of gene activation. We showed that Msx protein activates Hspa1b promoter via its C-terminal domain. The activation absolutely depends on the HSEs and physical interactions between Msx proteins and Heat shock factors may play a contributing role. PMID:19338779

  15. Vasopressin up-regulates the expression of growth-related immediate-early genes via two distinct EGF receptor transactivation pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Lida Q.; Reyes, Carlos E.; Sarmiento, José M.; Villanueva, Carolina I.; Figueroa, Carlos D.; Navarro, Javier; González, Carlos B.

    2008-01-01

    Activation of V1a receptor triggers the expression of growth-related immediate-early genes (IEGs), including c-Fos and Egr-1. Here we found that pre-treatment of rat vascular smooth muscle A-10 cell line with the EGF receptor inhibitor AG1478 or the over-expression of an EGFR dominant negative mutant (HEBCD533) blocked the vasopressin-induced expression of IEGs, suggesting that activation of these early genes mediated by V1a receptor is via transactivation of the EGF receptor. Importantly, the inhibition of the metalloproteinases, which catalyzed the shedding of the EGF receptor agonist HB-EGF, selectively blocked the vasopressin-induced expression c-Fos. On the other hand, the inhibition of c-Src selectively blocked the vasopressin-induced expression of Egr-1. Interestingly, in contrast to the expression of c-Fos, the expression of Egr-1 was mediated via the Ras/MEK/MAPK-dependent signalling pathway. Vasopressin-triggered expression of both genes required the release of intracellular calcium, activation of PKC and β-arrestin 2. These findings demonstrated that vasopressin up-regulated the expression of c-Fos and Erg-1 via transactivation of two distinct EGF receptor-dependent signalling pathways. PMID:18571897

  16. I-mfa domain proteins specifically interact with HTLV-1 Tax and repress its transactivating functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusano, Shuichi, E-mail: skusano@m2.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Division of Persistent and Oncogenic Viruses, Center for Chronic Viral Diseases, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Yoshimitsu, Makoto; Hachiman, Miho [Division of Hematology and Immunology, Center for Chronic Viral Diseases, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Ikeda, Masanori [Division of Persistent and Oncogenic Viruses, Center for Chronic Viral Diseases, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    The I-mfa domain proteins HIC (also known as MDFIC) and I-mfa (also known as MDFI) are candidate tumor suppressor genes that are involved in cellular and viral transcriptional regulation. Here, we show that HIC and I-mfa directly interact with human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) Tax protein in vitro. In addition, HIC and I-mfa repress Tax-dependent transactivation of an HTLV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) reporter construct in COS-1, Jurkat and high-Tax-producing HTLV-1-infected T cells. HIC also interacts with Tax through its I-mfa domain in vivo and represses Tax-dependent transactivation of HTLV-1 LTR and NF-κB reporter constructs in an interaction-dependent manner. Furthermore, we show that HIC decreases the nuclear distribution and stimulates the proteasomal degradation of Tax. These data reveal that HIC specifically interacts with HTLV-1 Tax and negatively regulates Tax transactivational activity by altering its subcellular distribution and stability. - Highlights: • I-mfa domain proteins, HIC and I-mfa, specifically interact with HTLV-1 Tax. • HIC and I-mfa repress the Tax-dependent transactivation of HTLV-1 LTR. • HIC represses the Tax-dependent transactivation of NF-κΒ. • HIC decreases the nuclear distribution of Tax. • HIC stimulates the proteasomal degradation of Tax.

  17. I-mfa domain proteins specifically interact with HTLV-1 Tax and repress its transactivating functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusano, Shuichi; Yoshimitsu, Makoto; Hachiman, Miho; Ikeda, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    The I-mfa domain proteins HIC (also known as MDFIC) and I-mfa (also known as MDFI) are candidate tumor suppressor genes that are involved in cellular and viral transcriptional regulation. Here, we show that HIC and I-mfa directly interact with human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) Tax protein in vitro. In addition, HIC and I-mfa repress Tax-dependent transactivation of an HTLV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) reporter construct in COS-1, Jurkat and high-Tax-producing HTLV-1-infected T cells. HIC also interacts with Tax through its I-mfa domain in vivo and represses Tax-dependent transactivation of HTLV-1 LTR and NF-κB reporter constructs in an interaction-dependent manner. Furthermore, we show that HIC decreases the nuclear distribution and stimulates the proteasomal degradation of Tax. These data reveal that HIC specifically interacts with HTLV-1 Tax and negatively regulates Tax transactivational activity by altering its subcellular distribution and stability. - Highlights: • I-mfa domain proteins, HIC and I-mfa, specifically interact with HTLV-1 Tax. • HIC and I-mfa repress the Tax-dependent transactivation of HTLV-1 LTR. • HIC represses the Tax-dependent transactivation of NF-κΒ. • HIC decreases the nuclear distribution of Tax. • HIC stimulates the proteasomal degradation of Tax.

  18. Massive activation of archaeal defense genes during viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quax, Tessa E F; Voet, Marleen; Sismeiro, Odile; Dillies, Marie-Agnes; Jagla, Bernd; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Sezonov, Guennadi; Forterre, Patrick; van der Oost, John; Lavigne, Rob; Prangishvili, David

    2013-08-01

    Archaeal viruses display unusually high genetic and morphological diversity. Studies of these viruses proved to be instrumental for the expansion of knowledge on viral diversity and evolution. The Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2 (SIRV2) is a model to study virus-host interactions in Archaea. It is a lytic virus that exploits a unique egress mechanism based on the formation of remarkable pyramidal structures on the host cell envelope. Using whole-transcriptome sequencing, we present here a global map defining host and viral gene expression during the infection cycle of SIRV2 in its hyperthermophilic host S. islandicus LAL14/1. This information was used, in combination with a yeast two-hybrid analysis of SIRV2 protein interactions, to advance current understanding of viral gene functions. As a consequence of SIRV2 infection, transcription of more than one-third of S. islandicus genes was differentially regulated. While expression of genes involved in cell division decreased, those genes playing a role in antiviral defense were activated on a large scale. Expression of genes belonging to toxin-antitoxin and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas systems was specifically pronounced. The observed different degree of activation of various CRISPR-Cas systems highlights the specialized functions they perform. The information on individual gene expression and activation of antiviral defense systems is expected to aid future studies aimed at detailed understanding of the functions and interplay of these systems in vivo.

  19. The C-terminal domain of the nuclear factor I-B2 isoform is glycosylated and transactivates the WAP gene in the JEG-3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sudit S.; Rosen, Jeffrey M.

    2007-01-01

    The transcription factor nuclear factor I (NFI) has been shown previously both in vivo and in vitro to be involved in the cooperative regulation of whey acidic protein (WAP) gene transcription along with the glucocorticoid receptor and STAT5. In addition, one of the specific NFI isoforms, NFI-B2, was demonstrated in transient co-transfection experiments in JEG cells, which lack endogenous NFI, to be preferentially involved in the cooperative regulation of WAP gene expression. A comparison of the DNA-binding specificities of the different NFI isoforms only partially explained their differential ability to activate the WAP gene transcription. Here, we analyzed the transactivation regions of two NFI isoforms by making chimeric proteins between the NFI-A and B isoforms. Though, their DNA-binding specificities were not altered as compared to the corresponding wild-type transcription factors, the C-terminal region of the NFI-B isoform was shown to preferentially activate WAP gene transcription in cooperation with GR and STAT5 in transient co-transfection assays in JEG-3 cells. Furthermore, determination of serine and threonine-specific glycosylation (O-linked N-acetylglucosamine) of the C-terminus of the NFI-B isoform suggested that the secondary modification by O-GlcNAc might play a role in the cooperative regulation of WAP gene transcription by NFI-B2 and STAT5

  20. Trans-activation of the 5' to 3' viral DNA strand transfer by nucleocapsid protein during reverse transcription of HIV1 RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlix, J L; Vincent, A; Gabus, C; de Rocquigny, H; Roques, B

    1993-08-01

    Two DNA strand transfer reactions take place during reverse transcription of the retroviral genome. The first transfer, that of the minus-strand strong stop DNA from the 5' end of the viral RNA to the 3' end, has been studied in vitro with two RNAs mimicking the 5' and 3' regions of the HIV1 genome and with nucleocapsid protein, NCp7, and reverse transcriptase. The results show that NCp7 strongly activates the 5' to 3' DNA strand transfer during reverse transcription while a basic peptide resembling NCp7 is inactive. Activation of the first transfer by several NCp7 derived peptides and the influence of the terminal redundancies (R) present at the 5' and 3' ends of HIV1 RNA were also examined. The first transfer is optimal in the presence of intact NCp7 and necessitates R on both the 5' and 3' RNAs. Sequencing of full length viral DNA products reveals approximately 40% misincorporations at the first nucleotide beyond the transfer point. If such base misincorporations occur during proviral DNA synthesis with possible homologous recombinations it may well contribute to the high level of genetic variability of HIV.

  1. Development of Viral Vectors for Gene Therapy for Chronic Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Huang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic pain is a major health concern that affects millions of people. There are no adequate long-term therapies for chronic pain sufferers, leading to significant cost for both society and the individual. The most commonly used therapy for chronic pain is the application of opioid analgesics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, but these drugs can lead to addiction and may cause side effects. Further studies of the mechanisms of chronic pain have opened the way for development of new treatment strategies, one of which is gene therapy. The key to gene therapy is selecting safe and highly efficient gene delivery systems that can deliver therapeutic genes to overexpress or suppress relevant targets in specific cell types. Here we review several promising viral vectors that could be applied in gene transfer for the treatment of chronic pain and further discuss the possible mechanisms of genes of interest that could be delivered with viral vectors for the treatment of chronic pain.

  2. A transgenic model of transactivation by the Tax protein of HTLV-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieberich, C J; King, C M; Tinkle, B T; Jay, G

    1993-09-01

    The human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) Tax protein is a transcriptional regulatory protein that has been suggested to play a causal role in the development of several HTLV-I-associated diseases. Tax regulates expression of its own LTR and of certain cellular promoters perhaps by usurping the function of the host transcriptional machinery. We have established a transgenic mouse model system to define the spectrum of tissues in vivo that are capable of supporting Tax-mediated transcriptional transactivation. Transgenic mice carrying the HTLV-I LTR driving expression of the Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase (beta gal) gene were generated, and this LTR-beta gal gene was transcriptionally inactive in all tissues. When LTR-beta gal mice were mated to transgenic mice carrying the same LTR driving expression of the HTLV-I tax gene, mice that carried both transgenes showed restricted expression of the beta gal reporter gene in several tissues including muscle, bone, salivary glands, skin, and nerve. In addition, a dramatic increase in the number of beta gal-expressing cells was seen in response to wounding. These observations provide direct evidence for viral transactivation in vivo, delimit the tissues capable of supporting that transactivation, and provide a model system to study the mechanism of gene regulation by Tax.

  3. Roles of PU.1 in monocyte- and mast cell-specific gene regulation: PU.1 transactivates CIITA pIV in cooperation with IFN-gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Tomonobu; Nishiyama, Chiharu; Nakano, Nobuhiro; Nishiyama, Makoto; Usui, Yoshihiko; Takeda, Kazuyoshi; Kanada, Shunsuke; Fukuyama, Kanako; Akiba, Hisaya; Tokura, Tomoko; Hara, Mutsuko; Tsuboi, Ryoji; Ogawa, Hideoki; Okumura, Ko

    2009-07-01

    Over-expression of PU.1, a myeloid- and lymphoid-specific transcription factor belonging to the Ets family, induces monocyte-specific gene expression in mast cells. However, the effects of PU.1 on each target gene and the involvement of cytokine signaling in PU.1-mediated gene expression are largely unknown. In the present study, PU.1 was over-expressed in two different types of bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells (BMMCs): BMMCs cultured with IL-3 plus stem cell factor (SCF) and BMMCs cultured with pokeweed mitogen-stimulated spleen-conditioned medium (PWM-SCM). PU.1 over-expression induced expression of MHC class II, CD11b, CD11c and F4/80 on PWM-SCM-cultured BMMCs, whereas IL-3/SCF-cultured BMMCs expressed CD11b and F4/80, but not MHC class II or CD11c. When IFN-gamma was added to the IL-3/SCF-based medium, PU.1 transfectant acquired MHC class II expression, which was abolished by antibody neutralization or in Ifngr(-/-) BMMCs, through the induction of expression of the MHC class II transactivator, CIITA. Real-time PCR detected CIITA mRNA driven by the fourth promoter, pIV, and chromatin immunoprecipitation indicated direct binding of PU.1 to pIV in PU.1-over-expressing BMMCs. PU.1-over-expressing cells showed a marked increase in IL-6 production in response to LPS stimulation in both IL-3/SCF and PWM-SCM cultures. These results suggest that PU.1 overproduction alone is sufficient for both expression of CD11b and F4/80 and for amplification of LPS-induced IL-6 production. However, IFN-gamma stimulation is essential for PU.1-mediated transactivation of CIITA pIV. Reduced expression of mast cell-related molecules and transcription factors GATA-1/2 and up-regulation of C/EBPalpha in PU.1 transfectants indicate that enforced PU.1 suppresses mast cell-specific gene expression through these transcription factors.

  4. Improved osteogenic vector for non-viral gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARA Hacobian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic compensation of deficient bone regeneration is a challenging task and a topic of on-going search for novel treatment strategies. One promising approach for improvement involves non-viral gene delivery using the bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2 gene to provide transient, local and sustained expression of the growth factor. However, since efficiency of non-viral gene delivery is low, this study focused on the improvement of a BMP-2 gene expression system, aiming for compensation of poor transfection efficiency. First, the native BMP-2 gene sequence was modified by codon optimisation and altered by inserting a highly truncated artificial intron (96 bp. Transfection of multiple cell lines and rat adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells with plasmids harbouring the improved BMP-2 sequence led to a several fold increased expression rate and subsequent osteogenic differentiation. Additionally, comparing expression kinetics of elongation factor 1 alpha (EF1α promoter with a state of the art CMV promoter revealed significantly higher BMP-2 expression when under the influence of the EF1α promoter. Results obtained by quantification of bone markers as well as osteogenic assays showed reduced sensitivity to promoter silencing effects of the EF1α promoter in rat adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells. Finally, screening of several protein secretion signals using either luciferase or BMP-2 as reporter protein revealed no superior candidates for potential replacement of the native BMP-2 secretion signal. Taken together, by enhancing the exogenous BMP-2 expression system, low transfection efficiencies in therapeutic applications can be compensated, making safe non-viral systems even more suitable for tissue regeneration approaches.

  5. Viral Genome DataBase: storing and analyzing genes and proteins from complete viral genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiscock, D; Upton, C

    2000-05-01

    The Viral Genome DataBase (VGDB) contains detailed information of the genes and predicted protein sequences from 15 completely sequenced genomes of large (&100 kb) viruses (2847 genes). The data that is stored includes DNA sequence, protein sequence, GenBank and user-entered notes, molecular weight (MW), isoelectric point (pI), amino acid content, A + T%, nucleotide frequency, dinucleotide frequency and codon use. The VGDB is a mySQL database with a user-friendly JAVA GUI. Results of queries can be easily sorted by any of the individual parameters. The software and additional figures and information are available at http://athena.bioc.uvic.ca/genomes/index.html .

  6. Junk DNA enhances pEI-based non-viral gene delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaal, E.V.B. van; Oosting, R.S.; Hennink, W.E.; Crommelin, D.J.A.; Mastrobattista, E.

    Gene therapy aims at delivering exogenous DNA into the nuclei of target cells to establish expression of a therapeutic protein. Non-viral gene delivery is examined as a safer alternative to viral approaches, but is presently characterized by a low efficiency. In the past years several non-viral

  7. Development of a Fish Cell Biosensor System for Genotoxicity Detection Based on DNA Damage-Induced Trans-Activation of p21 Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huarong Guo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available p21CIP1/WAF1 is a p53-target gene in response to cellular DNA damage. Here we report the development of a fish cell biosensor system for high throughput genotoxicity detection of new drugs, by stably integrating two reporter plasmids of pGL3-p21-luc (human p21 promoter linked to firefly luciferase and pRL-CMV-luc (CMV promoter linked to Renilla luciferase into marine flatfish flounder gill (FG cells, referred to as p21FGLuc. Initial validation of this genotoxicity biosensor system showed that p21FGLuc cells had a wild-type p53 signaling pathway and responded positively to the challenge of both directly acting genotoxic agents (bleomycin and mitomycin C and indirectly acting genotoxic agents (cyclophosphamide with metabolic activation, but negatively to cyclophosphamide without metabolic activation and the non-genotoxic agents ethanol and D-mannitol, thus confirming a high specificity and sensitivity, fast and stable response to genotoxic agents for this easily maintained fish cell biosensor system. This system was especially useful in the genotoxicity detection of Di(2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP, a rodent carcinogen, but negatively reported in most non-mammalian in vitro mutation assays, by providing a strong indication of genotoxicity for DEHP. A limitation for this biosensor system was that it might give false positive results in response to sodium butyrate and any other agents, which can trans-activate the p21 gene in a p53-independent manner.

  8. Inhibition of human T cell leukemia virus type 2 replication by the suppressive action of class II transactivator and nuclear factor Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Giovanna; Pilotti, Elisabetta; Mortara, Lorenzo; De Lerma Barbaro, Andrea; Casoli, Claudio; Accolla, Roberto S

    2006-08-22

    The master regulator of MHC-II gene transcription, class II transactivator (CIITA), acts as a potent inhibitor of human T cell leukemia virus type 2 (HTLV-2) replication by blocking the activity of the viral Tax-2 transactivator. Here, we show that this inhibitory effect takes place at the nuclear level and maps to the N-terminal 1-321 region of CIITA, where we identified a minimal domain, from positions 64-144, that is strictly required to suppress Tax-2 function. Furthermore, we show that Tax-2 specifically cooperates with cAMP response element binding protein-binding protein (CBP) and p300, but not with p300/CBP-associated factor, to enhance transcription from the viral promoter. This finding represents a unique difference with respect to Tax-1, which uses all three coactivators to transactivate the human T cell leukemia virus type 1 LTR. Direct sequestering of CBP or p300 is not the primary mechanism by which CIITA causes suppression of Tax-2. Interestingly, we found that the transcription factor nuclear factor Y, which interacts with CIITA to increase transcription of MHC-II genes, exerts a negative regulatory action on the Tax-2-mediated HTLV-2 LTR transactivation. Thus, CIITA may inhibit Tax-2 function, at least in part, through nuclear factor Y. These findings demonstrate the dual defensive role of CIITA against pathogens: it increases the antigen-presenting function for viral determinants and suppresses HTLV-2 replication in infected cells.

  9. Imaging living central neurones using viral gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschemacher, A G; Paton, J F R; Kasparov, S

    2005-01-02

    Studies of central neurones and other cellular components of the brain, such as glial and vascular cells, can be greatly advanced by the use of the modern optical techniques such as confocal live cell imaging. Fluorescent proteins have allowed imaging of particular cell types or intracellular elements to be visualised and distinguished from irrelevant background structures. To introduce the genetic information encoding for fluorescent proteins into relevant cellular targets, molecular tools are required. Viral vectors are one of the best ways of gene delivery into differentiated postnatal brain neurones and glia. Current progress in this field allows targeting of various cell types and therefore makes it possible to express a variety of fluorescent constructs in selected subpopulations of neurones, for example. In this review, we will discuss and compare the properties of the most popular viral gene delivery systems and the advantages of different brain cell preparations to illustrate how they can be used for high-resolution live cell confocal imaging in order to study new aspects of central nervous system (CNS) structure and function.

  10. A trans-activator function is generated by integration of hepatitis B virus preS/S sequences in human hepatocellular carcinoma DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caselmann, W.H.; Meyer, M.; Kekule, A.S.; Lauer, U.; Hofschneider, P.H.; Koshy, R.

    1990-01-01

    The X gene of wild-type hepatitis B virus or integrated DNA has recently been shown to stimulate transcription of a variety of enhancers and promoters. To further delineate the viral sequences responsible for trans-activation in hepatomas, the authors cloned the single hepatitis B virus insert from human hepatocellular carcinoma DNA M1. The plasmid pM1 contains 2004 base of hepatitis B virus DNA subtype adr, including truncated preS/S sequences and the enhancer element. The X promoter and 422 nucleotides of the X coding region are present. The entire preC/C gene is deleted. In transient cotransfection assays using Chang liver cells (CCL 13), pM1 DNA exerts a 6- to 10-fold trans-activating effect on the expression of the pSV2CAT reporter plasmid. The transactivation occurs by stimulation of transcription and is dependent on the simian virus 40 enhancer in the reporter plasmid. Deletion analysis of pM1 subclones reveals that the transactivator is encoded by preS/S and not by X sequences. A frameshift mutation within the preS2 open reading frame shows that this portion is indispensable for the trans-activating function. Initiation of transcription has been mapped to the S1 promoter. A comparable trans-activating effect is also observed with cloned wild-type hepatitis B virus sequences similarly truncated. These results show that a transcriptional trans-activator function not present in the intact gene is generated by 3' truncation of integrated hepatitis B virus DNA preS/S sequences

  11. Rce1, a novel transcriptional repressor, regulates cellulase gene expression by antagonizing the transactivator Xyr1 in Trichoderma reesei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanli; Zheng, Fanglin; Wang, Lei; Zhao, Guolei; Chen, Guanjun; Zhang, Weixin; Liu, Weifeng

    2017-07-01

    Cellulase gene expression in the model cellulolytic fungus Trichoderma reesei is supposed to be controlled by an intricate regulatory network involving multiple transcription factors. Here, we identified a novel transcriptional repressor of cellulase gene expression, Rce1. Disruption of the rce1 gene not only facilitated the induced expression of cellulase genes but also led to a significant delay in terminating the induction process. However, Rce1 did not participate in Cre1-mediated catabolite repression. Electrophoretic mobility shift (EMSA) and DNase I footprinting assays in combination with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) demonstrated that Rce1 could bind directly to a cbh1 (cellobiohydrolase 1-encoding) gene promoter region containing a cluster of Xyr1 binding sites. Furthermore, competitive binding assays revealed that Rce1 antagonized Xyr1 from binding to the cbh1 promoter. These results indicate that intricate interactions exist between a variety of transcription factors to ensure tight and energy-efficient regulation of cellulase gene expression in T. reesei. This study also provides important clues regarding increased cellulase production in T. reesei. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The synergistic transactivation of the hepatitis B viral (HBV) pregenomic promoter by the E6 protein of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16 E6) with HBV X protein was mediated through the AP1 site of E element in the enhancer I (EnI) in human liver cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D H; Choi, B H; Rho, H M

    1999-11-01

    Infection by HBV of a cell already infected with other viral species or vice versa has been suggested as being involved in hepatocellular carcinoma. Using the CAT assay method, we investigated the interactive roles of HBx and potentially oncogenic and transactivating viral early proteins such as Ad5 E1A, HPV-16 E6, and SV40 T ag. In the presence of HBx, only HPV-16 E6 showed significant synergistic transactivation of EnI. We further investigated the function of the HPV-16 E6 using deletion, heterologous promoter, and mutation analyses on the EnI promoter. The results showed that the synergistic effect was mediated through the AP1 site of the E element in EnI by the direct activation of AP1 and support the idea that the infection by HBV of the cell with other viral species such as HPV-16 could increase the transcription activity of the HBV and other oncogenes containing an AP1 site in the promoter. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  13. Optimizing viral and non-viral gene transfer methods for genetic modification of porcine mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiehler, Maik; Duch, Mogens; Mygind, Tina

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) provide an excellent source of pluripotent progenitor cells for tissue-engineering applications due to their proliferation capacity and differentiation potential. Genetic modification of MSCs with genes encoding tissue-specific growth factors...... viral and non-viral ex vivo gene delivery systems with respect to gene transfer efficiency, maintenance of transgene expression, and safety issues using primary porcine MSCs as target cells. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MSCs were purified from bone marrow aspirates from the proximal tibiae of four 3-month......-old Danish landrace pigs by Ficoll step gradient separation and polystyrene adherence technique. Vectors expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) were transferred to the cells by different non-viral methods and by use of recombinant adeno...

  14. The equine herpesvirus-1 IR3 gene that lies antisense to the sole immediate-early (IE) gene is trans-activated by the IE protein, and is poorly expressed to a protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Byung Chul; Breitenbach, Jonathan E.; Kim, Seong K.; O'Callaghan, Dennis J.

    2007-01-01

    The unique IR3 gene of equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) is expressed as a late 1.0-kb transcript. Previous studies confirmed the IR3 transcription initiation site and tentatively identified other cis-acting elements specific to IR3 such as a TATA box, a 443 base pair 5'untranslated region (UTR), a 285 base pair open reading frame (ORF), and a poly adenylation (A) signal [Holden, V.R., Harty, R.N., Yalamanchili, R.R., O'Callaghan, D.J., 1992. The IR3 gene of equine herpesvirus type 1: a unique gene regulated by sequences within the intron of the immediate-early gene. DNA Seq. 3, 143-152]. Transient transfection assays revealed that the IR3 promoter is strongly trans-activated by the IE protein (IEP) and that coexpression of the IEP with the early EICP0 and IR4 regulatory proteins results in maximal trans-activation of the IR3 promoter. Gel shift assays revealed that the IEP directly binds to the IR3 promoter region. Western blot analysis showed that the IR3 protein produced in E. coli was detected by antibodies to IR3 synthetic peptides; however, the IR3 protein was not detected in EHV-1 infected cell extracts by these same anti-IR3 antibodies, even though the IR3 transcript was detected by northern blot. These findings suggest that the IR3 may not be expressed to a protein. Expression of an IR3/GFP fusion gene was not observed, but expression of a GFP/IR3 fusion gene was detected by fluorescent microscopy. In further attempts to detect the IR3/GFP fusion protein using anti-GFP antibody, western blot analysis showed that the IR3/GFP fusion protein was not detected in vivo. Interestingly, a truncated form of the GFP/IR3 protein was synthesized from the GFP/IR3 fusion gene. However, GFP/IR3 and IR3/GFP fusion proteins of the predicted sizes were synthesized by in vitro coupled transcription and translation of the fusion genes, suggesting poor expression of the IR3 protein in vivo. The possible role of the IR3 transcript in EHV-1 infection is discussed

  15. DNA microarrays of baculovirus genomes: differential expression of viral genes in two susceptible insect cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagishi, J; Isobe, R; Takebuchi, T; Bando, H

    2003-03-01

    We describe, for the first time, the generation of a viral DNA chip for simultaneous expression measurements of nearly all known open reading frames (ORFs) in the best-studied members of the family Baculoviridae, Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) and Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV). In this study, a viral DNA chip (Ac-BmNPV chip) was fabricated and used to characterize the viral gene expression profile for AcMNPV in different cell types. The viral chip is composed of microarrays of viral DNA prepared by robotic deposition of PCR-amplified viral DNA fragments on glass for ORFs in the NPV genome. Viral gene expression was monitored by hybridization to the DNA fragment microarrays with fluorescently labeled cDNAs prepared from infected Spodoptera frugiperda, Sf9 cells and Trichoplusia ni, TnHigh-Five cells, the latter a major producer of baculovirus and recombinant proteins. A comparison of expression profiles of known ORFs in AcMNPV elucidated six genes (ORF150, p10, pk2, and three late gene expression factor genes lef-3, p35 and lef- 6) the expression of each of which was regulated differently in the two cell lines. Most of these genes are known to be closely involved in the viral life cycle such as in DNA replication, late gene expression and the release of polyhedra from infected cells. These results imply that the differential expression of these viral genes accounts for the differences in viral replication between these two cell lines. Thus, these fabricated microarrays of NPV DNA which allow a rapid analysis of gene expression at the viral genome level should greatly speed the functional analysis of large genomes of NPV.

  16. Coupled Transcriptome and Proteome Analysis of Human Lymphotropic Tumor Viruses: Insights on the Detection and Discovery of Viral Genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dresang, Lindsay R.; Teuton, Jeremy R.; Feng, Huichen; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Li, Zhihua; Smith, Richard D.; Sugden, Bill; Moore, Patrick S.; Chang, Yuan

    2011-12-20

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are related human tumor viruses that cause primary effusion lymphomas (PEL) and Burkitt's lymphomas (BL), respectively. Viral genes expressed in naturally-infected cancer cells contribute to disease pathogenesis; knowing which viral genes are expressed is critical in understanding how these viruses cause cancer. To evaluate the expression of viral genes, we used high-resolution separation and mass spectrometry coupled with custom tiling arrays to align the viral proteomes and transcriptomes of three PEL and two BL cell lines under latent and lytic culture conditions. Results The majority of viral genes were efficiently detected at the transcript and/or protein level on manipulating the viral life cycle. Overall the correlation of expressed viral proteins and transcripts was highly complementary in both validating and providing orthogonal data with latent/lytic viral gene expression. Our approach also identified novel viral genes in both KSHV and EBV, and extends viral genome annotation. Several previously uncharacterized genes were validated at both transcript and protein levels. Conclusions This systems biology approach coupling proteome and transcriptome measurements provides a comprehensive view of viral gene expression that could not have been attained using each methodology independently. Detection of viral proteins in combination with viral transcripts is a potentially powerful method for establishing virus-disease relationships.

  17. NLRC5: a newly discovered MHC class I transactivator (CITA)

    OpenAIRE

    Meissner, Torsten B.; Li, Amy; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2011-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II are crucial for the function of the human adaptive immune system. An NLR protein, CIITA (MHC class II transactivator), is a master regulator of MHC class II gene expression as well as of some of the genes involved in MHC class II antigen presentation. It has recently been discovered that another member of the NLR protein family, NLRC5, transcriptionally activates MHC class I genes, and thus acts as “CITA” (MHC class I transactivator)...

  18. Recent Advances in Non-viral Vectors for Gene Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xia; Huang, Leaf

    2011-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Non-viral vectors, typically based on cationic lipids or polymers, are preferred due to safety concerns with viral vectors. So far, non-viral vectors can proficiently transfect cells in culture, but obtaining efficient nanomedicines is far from evident. To overcome the hurdles associated with non-viral vectors is significant for improving delivery efficiency and therapeutic effect of nucleic acid. The drawbacks include the strong interaction of cationic delivery vehicles with blood components, uptake by the reticuloendothelial system (RES), toxicity, targeting ability of the carriers to the cells of interest, and so on. PEGylation is the predominant method used to reduce the binding of plasma proteins with non-viral vectors and minimize the clearance by RES after intravenous administration. The nanoparticles that are not rapidly cleared from the circulation accumulate in the tumors due to the enhanced permeability and retention effect, and the targeting ligands attached to the distal end of the PEGylated components allow binding to the receptors on the target cell surface. Neutral or anionic liposomes have been also developed for systemic delivery of nucleic acids in experimental animal model. Designing and synthesizing novel cationic lipids and polymers, and binding nucleic acid with peptides, targeting ligands, polymers, or environmentally sensitive moieties also attract many attentions for resolving the problems encountered by non-viral vectors. The application of inorganic nanoparticles in nucleic acid delivery is an emerging field, too. Recently, different classes of non-viral vectors appear to be converging and the features of different classes of non-viral vectors could be combined in one strategy. More hurdles associated with efficient nucleic acid delivery therefore might be expected to be overcome. In this account, we will focus on these novel non-viral vectors, which are classified into multifunctional hybrid nucleic acid vectors, novel

  19. Residues R199H200 of prototype foamy virus transactivator Bel1 contribute to its binding with LTR and IP promoters but not its nuclear localization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Qinglin; Tan, Juan; Cui, Xiaoxu; Luo, Di; Yu, Miao; Liang, Chen; Qiao, Wentao

    2014-01-01

    Prototype foamy virus encodes a transactivator called Bel1 that enhances viral gene transcription and is essential for PFV replication. Nuclear localization of Bel1 has been reported to rely on two proximal basic motifs R 199 H 200 and R 221 R 222 R 223 that likely function together as a bipartite nuclear localization signal. In this study, we report that mutating R 221 R 222 R 223 , but not R 199 H 200 , relocates Bel1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, suggesting an essential role for R 221 R 222 R 223 in the nuclear localization of Bel1. Although not affecting the nuclear localization of Bel1, mutating R 199 H 200 disables Bel1 from transactivating PFV promoters. Results of EMSA reveal that the R 199 H 200 residues are vital for the binding of Bel1 to viral promoter DNA. Moreover, mutating R 199 H 200 in Bel1 impairs PFV replication to a much greater extent than mutating R 221 R 222 R 223 . Collectively, our findings suggest that R 199 H 200 directly participate in Bel1 binding to viral promoter DNA and are indispensible for Bel1 transactivation activity. - Highlights: • The R 221 R 222 R 223 residues are essential for the nuclear localization of Bel1. • Although not affecting the nuclear localization of Bel1, mutating R 199 H 200 disables Bel1 from transactivating PFV promoters. • The R 199 H 200 residues directly participate in Bel1 binding to viral promoter DNA. • Mutating R 199 H 200 in Bel1 impairs PFV replication to a much greater extent than mutating R 221 R 222 R 223

  20. Progress in developing cationic vectors for non-viral systemic gene therapy against cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morille, Marie; Passirani, Catherine; Vonarbourg, Arnaud; Clavreul, Anne; Benoit, Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Initially, gene therapy was viewed as an approach for treating hereditary diseases, but its potential role in the treatment of acquired diseases such as cancer is now widely recognized. The understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in cancer and the development of nucleic acid delivery systems are two concepts that have led to this development. Systemic gene delivery systems are needed for therapeutic application to cells inaccessible by percutaneous injection and for multi-located tumor sites, i.e. metastases. Non-viral vectors based on the use of cationic lipids or polymers appear to have promising potential, given the problems of safety encountered with viral vectors. Using these non-viral vectors, the current challenge is to obtain a similarly effective transfection to viral ones. Based on the advantages and disadvantages of existing vectors and on the hurdles encountered with these carriers, the aim of this review is to describe the "perfect vector" for systemic gene therapy against cancer.

  1. Gene Expression Profiles Link Respiratory Viral Infection, Platelet Response to Aspirin, and Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyr, Derek D.; Lucas, Joseph E.; Zaas, Aimee K.; Woods, Christopher W.; Newby, L. Kristin; Kraus, William E.; Ginsburg, Geoffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Influenza infection is associated with myocardial infarction (MI), suggesting that respiratory viral infection may induce biologic pathways that contribute to MI. We tested the hypotheses that 1) a validated blood gene expression signature of respiratory viral infection (viral GES) was associated with MI and 2) respiratory viral exposure changes levels of a validated platelet gene expression signature (platelet GES) of platelet function in response to aspirin that is associated with MI. Methods A previously defined viral GES was projected into blood RNA data from 594 patients undergoing elective cardiac catheterization and used to classify patients as having evidence of viral infection or not and tested for association with acute MI using logistic regression. A previously defined platelet GES was projected into blood RNA data from 81 healthy subjects before and after exposure to four respiratory viruses: Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) (n=20), Human Rhinovirus (HRV) (n=20), Influenza A virus subtype H1N1 (H1N1) (n=24), Influenza A Virus subtype H3N2 (H3N2) (n=17). We tested for the change in platelet GES with viral exposure using linear mixed-effects regression and by symptom status. Results In the catheterization cohort, 32 patients had evidence of viral infection based upon the viral GES, of which 25% (8/32) had MI versus 12.2% (69/567) among those without evidence of viral infection (OR 2.3; CI [1.03-5.5], p=0.04). In the infection cohorts, only H1N1 exposure increased platelet GES over time (time course p-value = 1e-04). Conclusions A viral GES of non-specific, respiratory viral infection was associated with acute MI; 18% of the top 49 genes in the viral GES are involved with hemostasis and/or platelet aggregation. Separately, H1N1 exposure, but not exposure to other respiratory viruses, increased a platelet GES previously shown to be associated with MI. Together, these results highlight specific genes and pathways that link viral infection

  2. Massive activation of archaeal defense genes during viral infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quax, T.E.F.; Voet, M.; Sismeiro, O.; Dillies, M.A.; Jagla, B.; Coppée, J.Y.; Sezonov, G.; Forterre, P.; Oost, van der J.; Lavigne, R.; Prangishvili, D.

    2013-01-01

    Archaeal viruses display unusually high genetic and morphological diversity. Studies of these viruses proved to be instrumental for the expansion of knowledge on viral diversity and evolution. The Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2 (SIRV2) is a model to study virus-host interactions in

  3. Vaccines prepared from translation products of cloned viral genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patzer, J.; Obijeski, J.F.

    1985-01-01

    With the advent of recombinant DNA (rDNA) techniques and their application to viruses for vaccine research, there has been an explosion of information about the molecular structure and replication of many viruses. rDNA technology in conjunction with several other emerging technologies, e.g. monoclonal antibodies, solid phase synthesis of peptides and prediction of protein conformation on the basis of amino acid sequence, has provided a powerful battery of techniques that in many cases has allowed the identification of specific sites on the virion surface that elicit neutralizing antibodies. Knowledge of these sites allows one to design a subunit vaccine that utilizes one of the virion proteins or regions of a particular protein in the absence of any other viral proteins or the viral nucleic acid. The advantages of this approach are: that there are no potentially infectious agents contained in the vaccine if the inactivation procedure is incomplete, there is less chance of complications from the vaccine due to nonessential viral components in the vaccine, a purified protein or polypeptide is usually more stable than virus particles during storage, and many times larger quanitities of an antigen can be produced by rDNA techniques than by classical vaccine methods

  4. Bioreducible poly(amido amine)s for non-viral gene delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, C.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the design and development of bioreducible poly(amido amine)s as non-viral vectors for gene delivery in vitro and in vivo. The structural influences of these polymers on their physico-chemical properties and gene delivery properties, transfection capability and cytotoxicity in

  5. Properties of virion transactivator proteins encoded by primate cytomegaloviruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barry Peter A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a betaherpesvirus that causes severe disease in situations where the immune system is immature or compromised. HCMV immediate early (IE gene expression is stimulated by the virion phosphoprotein pp71, encoded by open reading frame (ORF UL82, and this transactivation activity is important for the efficient initiation of viral replication. It is currently recognized that pp71 acts to overcome cellular intrinsic defences that otherwise block viral IE gene expression, and that interactions of pp71 with the cell proteins Daxx and ATRX are important for this function. A further property of pp71 is the ability to enable prolonged gene expression from quiescent herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 genomes. Non-human primate cytomegaloviruses encode homologs of pp71, but there is currently no published information that addresses their effects on gene expression and modes of action. Results The UL82 homolog encoded by simian cytomegalovirus (SCMV, strain Colburn, was identified and cloned. This ORF, named S82, was cloned into an HSV-1 vector, as were those from baboon, rhesus monkey and chimpanzee cytomegaloviruses. The use of an HSV-1 vector enabled expression of the UL82 homologs in a range of cell types, and permitted investigation of their abilities to direct prolonged gene expression from quiescent genomes. The results show that all UL82 homologs activate gene expression, and that neither host cell type nor promoter target sequence has major effects on these activities. Surprisingly, the UL82 proteins specified by non-human primate cytomegaloviruses, unlike pp71, did not direct long term expression from quiescent HSV-1 genomes. In addition, significant differences were observed in the intranuclear localization of the UL82 homologs, and in their effects on Daxx. Strikingly, S82 mediated the release of Daxx from nuclear domain 10 substructures much more rapidly than pp71 or the other proteins tested. All

  6. Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus BM5 protein regulates progeny virus production and viral gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokusho, Ryuhei; Koh, Yoshikazu; Fujimoto, Masaru; Shimada, Toru; Katsuma, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) orf5 (Bm5) is a core gene of lepidopteran baculoviruses and encodes the protein with the conserved amino acid residues (DUF3627) in its C-terminus. Here, we found that Bm5 disruption resulted in lower titers of budded viruses and fewer numbers of occlusion bodies (OBs) in B. mori cultured cells and larvae, although viral genome replication was not affected. Bm5 disruption also caused aberrant expression of various viral genes at the very late stage of infection. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that BM5 localized to the nuclear membrane. We also found that DUF3627 is important for OB production, transcriptional regulation of viral genes, and subcellular localization of BM5. Compared with wild-type BmNPV infection, larval death was delayed when B. mori larvae were infected with Bm5 mutants. These results suggest that BM5 is involved in progeny virus production and regulation of viral gene expression at the very late stage of infection. -- Highlights: •The role of BmNPV BM5 protein was examined in B. mori cultured cells and larvae. •BM5 contributes to efficient production of budded viruses and occlusion bodies. •BM5 regulates viral gene expression at the very late stage of infection. •BM5 dominantly localizes to the nuclear membrane. •Bm5 mutant showed v-cath down-regulation and resulting delay of larval death.

  7. Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus BM5 protein regulates progeny virus production and viral gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokusho, Ryuhei, E-mail: kokusho@ss.ab.a.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Koh, Yoshikazu; Fujimoto, Masaru; Shimada, Toru; Katsuma, Susumu, E-mail: katsuma@ss.ab.a.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2016-11-15

    Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) orf5 (Bm5) is a core gene of lepidopteran baculoviruses and encodes the protein with the conserved amino acid residues (DUF3627) in its C-terminus. Here, we found that Bm5 disruption resulted in lower titers of budded viruses and fewer numbers of occlusion bodies (OBs) in B. mori cultured cells and larvae, although viral genome replication was not affected. Bm5 disruption also caused aberrant expression of various viral genes at the very late stage of infection. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that BM5 localized to the nuclear membrane. We also found that DUF3627 is important for OB production, transcriptional regulation of viral genes, and subcellular localization of BM5. Compared with wild-type BmNPV infection, larval death was delayed when B. mori larvae were infected with Bm5 mutants. These results suggest that BM5 is involved in progeny virus production and regulation of viral gene expression at the very late stage of infection. -- Highlights: •The role of BmNPV BM5 protein was examined in B. mori cultured cells and larvae. •BM5 contributes to efficient production of budded viruses and occlusion bodies. •BM5 regulates viral gene expression at the very late stage of infection. •BM5 dominantly localizes to the nuclear membrane. •Bm5 mutant showed v-cath down-regulation and resulting delay of larval death.

  8. Influenza virus gene expression: viral RNA replication in vivo and in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shapiro, G.I.

    1987-01-01

    To develop an overall scheme for the control of influenza virus gene expression, single-stranded M13 DNAs specific for the various genomic segments were used to analyze the synthesis of virus-specific RNAs in infected cells. The results showed that virus infection is divided into two distinct phases. During the early phase, the syntheses of specific virion RNAs (vRNAs), viral mRNAs, and viral proteins were coupled. This phase lasted for 2.5 hours in BHK-21 cells, the time when the rate of synthesis of all the viral mRNAs was maximal. During the late phase, the synthesis of all the vRNAs remained at or near maximum, whereas the rate of synthesis of all the viral mRNAs declined dramatically. Viral mRNA and protein syntheses were also not coupled, as the synthesis of all the viral proteins continued at maximum levels, indicating that protein synthesis during this phase was directed principally by previously synthesized viral mRNAs. Pulses with [ 3 H]uridine and nonaqueous fractionation of cells were used to show that influenza vRNA, like viral mRNAs, are synthesized in the nucleus and efficiently transported to the cytoplasm. In contrast, the full-length transcripts of the vRNAs, the templates for new vRNA synthesis, were synthesized only at early times, and remained sequestered in the nucleus to direct vRNA synthesis throughout infection

  9. BS69 : A novel adenovirus E1A-associated protein that inhibits E1A transactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hateboer, G.; Gennissen, A.M.C.; Ramos, Y.F.M.; Kerkhoven, R.; Sonntag-Buck, V.; Stunnenberg, H.G.; Bernards, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The adenovirus ElA gene products are nuclear phosphoproteins that can transactivate the other adenovirus early genes as well as several cellular genes, and can transform primary rodent cells in culture. Transformation and transactivation by ElA proteins is most likely to be mediated through

  10. Prospects for Foamy Viral Vector Anti-HIV Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun K. Nalla

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell gene therapy approaches for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infection have been explored in clinical trials and several anti-HIV genes delivered by retroviral vectors were shown to block HIV replication. However, gammaretroviral and lentiviral based retroviral vectors have limitations for delivery of anti-HIV genes into hematopoietic stem cells (HSC. Foamy virus vectors have several advantages including efficient delivery of transgenes into HSC in large animal models, and a potentially safer integration profile. This review focuses on novel anti-HIV transgenes and the potential of foamy virus vectors for HSC gene therapy of HIV.

  11. Discovery of Cationic Polymers for Non-viral Gene Delivery using Combinatorial Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barua, Sutapa; Ramos, James; Potta, Thrimoorthy; Taylor, David; Huang, Huang-Chiao; Montanez, Gabriela; Rege, Kaushal

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy is an attractive treatment option for diseases of genetic origin, including several cancers and cardiovascular diseases. While viruses are effective vectors for delivering exogenous genes to cells, concerns related to insertional mutagenesis, immunogenicity, lack of tropism, decay and high production costs necessitate the discovery of non-viral methods. Significant efforts have been focused on cationic polymers as non-viral alternatives for gene delivery. Recent studies have employed combinatorial syntheses and parallel screening methods for enhancing the efficacy of gene delivery, biocompatibility of the delivery vehicle, and overcoming cellular level barriers as they relate to polymer-mediated transgene uptake, transport, transcription, and expression. This review summarizes and discusses recent advances in combinatorial syntheses and parallel screening of cationic polymer libraries for the discovery of efficient and safe gene delivery systems. PMID:21843141

  12. Viral vectors for cystic fibrosis gene therapy: What does the future hold?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uta Griesenbach

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Uta Griesenbach1, Makoto Inoue2, Mamoru Hasegawa2, Eric WFW Alton11Department of Gene Therapy, Imperial College London, UK; The UK Cystic Fibrosis Gene Therapy Consortium; 2DNAVEC Corporation, Tsukuba, JapanAbstract: Gene transfer to the airway epithelium has been more difficult than originally anticipated, largely because of significant extra- and intracellular barriers in the lung. In general, viral vectors are more adapted to overcoming these barriers than nonviral gene transfer agents and are, therefore, more efficient in transferring genes into recipient cells. Viral vectors derived from adenovirus, adeno-associated virus, and Sendai virus, which all have a natural tropism for the airway epithelium, have been evaluated for cystic fibrosis (CF gene therapy. Although these vectors transduce airway epithelial cells efficiently, gene expression is transient and repeated administration is inefficient. They are, therefore, unlikely to be suitable for CF gene therapy. More recently, lentiviruses (LV have been assessed for lung gene transfer. In contrast to retroviruses, they transduce nondividing cells and randomly integrate into the genome. However, LVs do not have a natural tropism for the lung, and a significant amount of effort has been put into pseudotyping these vectors with proteins suitable for airway gene transfer. Several studies have shown that LV-mediated transduction leads to persistent gene expression (for the lifetime of the animal in the airways and, importantly, repeated administration is feasible. Thus, appropriately pseudotyped LV vectors are promising candidates for CF gene therapy. Here, we will review preclinical and clinical research related to viral CF gene therapy.Keywords: cystic fibrosis, gene therapy, adenovirus, AAV, lentivirus, Sendai virus

  13. EBV tegument protein BNRF1 disrupts DAXX-ATRX to activate viral early gene transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Tsai

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Productive infection by herpesviruses involve the disabling of host-cell intrinsic defenses by viral encoded tegument proteins. Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV typically establishes a non-productive, latent infection and it remains unclear how it confronts the host-cell intrinsic defenses that restrict viral gene expression. Here, we show that the EBV major tegument protein BNRF1 targets host-cell intrinsic defense proteins and promotes viral early gene activation. Specifically, we demonstrate that BNRF1 interacts with the host nuclear protein Daxx at PML nuclear bodies (PML-NBs and disrupts the formation of the Daxx-ATRX chromatin remodeling complex. We mapped the Daxx interaction domain on BNRF1, and show that this domain is important for supporting EBV primary infection. Through reverse transcription PCR and infection assays, we show that BNRF1 supports viral gene expression upon early infection, and that this function is dependent on the Daxx-interaction domain. Lastly, we show that knockdown of Daxx and ATRX induces reactivation of EBV from latently infected lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs, suggesting that Daxx and ATRX play a role in the regulation of viral chromatin. Taken together, our data demonstrate an important role of BNRF1 in supporting EBV early infection by interacting with Daxx and ATRX; and suggest that tegument disruption of PML-NB-associated antiviral resistances is a universal requirement for herpesvirus infection in the nucleus.

  14. EBV Tegument Protein BNRF1 Disrupts DAXX-ATRX to Activate Viral Early Gene Transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Kevin; Thikmyanova, Nadezhda; Wojcechowskyj, Jason A.; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Lieberman, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Productive infection by herpesviruses involve the disabling of host-cell intrinsic defenses by viral encoded tegument proteins. Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) typically establishes a non-productive, latent infection and it remains unclear how it confronts the host-cell intrinsic defenses that restrict viral gene expression. Here, we show that the EBV major tegument protein BNRF1 targets host-cell intrinsic defense proteins and promotes viral early gene activation. Specifically, we demonstrate that BNRF1 interacts with the host nuclear protein Daxx at PML nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) and disrupts the formation of the Daxx-ATRX chromatin remodeling complex. We mapped the Daxx interaction domain on BNRF1, and show that this domain is important for supporting EBV primary infection. Through reverse transcription PCR and infection assays, we show that BNRF1 supports viral gene expression upon early infection, and that this function is dependent on the Daxx-interaction domain. Lastly, we show that knockdown of Daxx and ATRX induces reactivation of EBV from latently infected lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), suggesting that Daxx and ATRX play a role in the regulation of viral chromatin. Taken together, our data demonstrate an important role of BNRF1 in supporting EBV early infection by interacting with Daxx and ATRX; and suggest that tegument disruption of PML-NB-associated antiviral resistances is a universal requirement for herpesvirus infection in the nucleus. PMID:22102817

  15. E1A-dependent trans-activation of the human MYC promoter is mediated by the E2F factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiebert, S.W.; Lipp, M.; Nevins, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    E2F is a cellular transcription factor that binds to two sites in the adenovirus E2 promoter. Previous experiments have implicated E2F in the E1A-dependent transactivation of the E2 gene since levels of active E2F increase markedly during adenovirus infection in parallel with the increase in E2 transcription, and an E2F binding site can confer E1A inducibility to a heterologous promoter. Here the authors show that E2F binds to two sequence elements within the P2 promoter of the human MYC gene which are within a region that is critical for promoter activity. The MYC promoter can be trans-activated in an E1A-dependent manner and site-directed mutagenesis demonstrates that these E2F elements are essential for trans-activation. Finally, they also find that adenovirus infection of quiescent cells results in a stimulation of the endogenous MYC gene. They conclude that the activation of the E2F factor, which is likely responsible for the activation of viral E2 transcription, is also responsible for the E1A-dependent induction of MYC transcription

  16. Non-viral gene therapy for bone tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegman, Fiona; Oner, F Cumhur; Dhert, Wouter J A; Alblas, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    The possibilities of using gene therapy for bone regeneration have been extensively investigated. Improvements in the design of new transfection agents, combining vectors and delivery/release systems to diminish cytotoxicity and increase transfection efficiencies have led to several successful in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo strategies. These include growth factor or short interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) delivery, or even enzyme replacement therapies, and have led to increased osteogenic differentiation and bone formation in vivo. These results provide optimism to consider use in humans with some of these gene-delivery strategies in the near future.

  17. Dynamic Changes in Host Gene Expression following In Vitro Viral Mimic Stimulation in Crocodile Cells

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    Subir Sarker

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The initial control of viral infection in a host is dominated by a very well orchestrated early innate immune system; however, very little is known about the ability of a host to control viral infection outside of mammals. The reptiles offer an evolutionary bridge between the fish and mammals, with the crocodile having evolved from the archosauria clade that included the dinosaurs, and being the largest living reptile species. Using an RNA-seq approach, we have defined the dynamic changes of a passaged primary crocodile cell line to stimulation with both RNA and DNA viral mimics. Cells displayed a marked upregulation of many genes known to be involved in the mammalian response to viral infection, including viperin, Mx1, IRF7, IRF1, and RIG-I with approximately 10% of the genes being uncharacterized transcripts. Both pathway and genome analysis suggested that the crocodile may utilize the main known mammalian TLR and cytosolic antiviral RNA signaling pathways, with the pathways being responsible for sensing DNA viruses less clear. Viral mimic stimulation upregulated the type I interferon, IFN-Omega, with many known antiviral interferon-stimulated genes also being upregulated. This work demonstrates for the first time that reptiles show functional regulation of many known and unknown antiviral pathways and effector genes. An enhanced knowledge of these ancient antiviral pathways will not only add to our understanding of the host antiviral innate response in non-mammalian species, but is critical to fully comprehend the complexity of the mammalian innate immune response to viral infection.

  18. Graphene materials as 2D non-viral gene transfer vector platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, M; de Lázaro, I; Kostarelos, K

    2017-03-01

    Advances in genomics and gene therapy could offer solutions to many diseases that remain incurable today, however, one of the critical reasons halting clinical progress is due to the difficulty in designing efficient and safe delivery vectors for the appropriate genetic cargo. Safety and large-scale production concerns counter-balance the high gene transfer efficiency achieved with viral vectors, while non-viral strategies have yet to become sufficiently efficient. The extraordinary physicochemical, optical and photothermal properties of graphene-based materials (GBMs) could offer two-dimensional components for the design of nucleic acid carrier systems. We discuss here such properties and their implications for the optimization of gene delivery. While the design of such vectors is still in its infancy, we provide here an exhaustive and up-to-date analysis of the studies that have explored GBMs as gene transfer vectors, focusing on the functionalization strategies followed to improve vector performance and on the biological effects attained.

  19. Comparative Annotation of Viral Genomes with Non-Conserved Gene Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Groot, Saskia; Mailund, Thomas; Hein, Jotun

    2007-01-01

    Motivation: Detecting genes in viral genomes is a complex task. Due to the biological necessity of them being constrained in length, RNA viruses in particular tend to code in overlapping reading frames. Since one amino acid is encoded by a triplet of nucleic acids, up to three genes may be coded...... allows for coding in unidirectional nested and overlapping reading frames, to annotate two homologous aligned viral genomes. Our method does not insist on conserved gene structure between the two sequences, thus making it applicable for the pairwise comparison of more distantly related sequences. Results...... and HIV2, as well as of two different Hepatitis Viruses, attaining results of ~87% sensitivity and ~98.5% specificity. We subsequently incorporate prior knowledge by "knowing" the gene structure of one sequence and annotating the other conditional on it. Boosting accuracy close to perfect we demonstrate...

  20. Adeno-associated viral vectors as agents for gene delivery : application in disorders and trauma of the central nervous system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruitenberg, Marc J; Eggers, Ruben; Boer, Gerard J; Verhaagen, J.

    2002-01-01

    The use of viral vectors as agents for gene delivery provides a direct approach to manipulate gene expression in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). The present article describes in detail the methodology for the injection of viral vectors, in particular adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors,

  1. Perinatal systemic gene delivery using adeno-associated viral vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajvinder eKarda

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative monogenic diseases can also affect a broad range of tissues and organs throughout the body. An effective treatment would require a systemic approach. The intravenous administration of novel therapies is ideal but is hampered by the inability of such drugs to cross the blood-brain barrier and precludes efficacy in the central nervous system. A number of these early lethal intractable diseases also present devastating irreversible pathology at birth or soon after. Therefore, any therapy would ideally be administered during the perinatal period to prevent, stop or ameliorate disease progression. The concept of perinatal gene therapy has moved a step further towards being a feasible approach to treating such disorders. This has primarily been driven by the recent discoveries that particular serotypes of adeno-associated virus (AAV gene delivery vectors have the ability to cross the blood-brain barrier following intravenous administration. Furthermore, this has been safely demonstrated in perinatal mice and non-human primates. This review focuses on the progress made in using AAV to achieve systemic transduction and what this means for developing perinatal gene therapy for early lethal neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Extensive gene remodeling in the viral world: new evidence for nongradual evolution in the mobilome network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jachiet, Pierre-Alain; Colson, Philippe; Lopez, Philippe; Bapteste, Eric

    2014-08-07

    Complex nongradual evolutionary processes such as gene remodeling are difficult to model, to visualize, and to investigate systematically. Despite these challenges, the creation of composite (or mosaic) genes by combination of genetic segments from unrelated gene families was established as an important adaptive phenomena in eukaryotic genomes. In contrast, almost no general studies have been conducted to quantify composite genes in viruses. Although viral genome mosaicism has been well-described, the extent of gene mosaicism and its rules of emergence remain largely unexplored. Applying methods from graph theory to inclusive similarity networks, and using data from more than 3,000 complete viral genomes, we provide the first demonstration that composite genes in viruses are 1) functionally biased, 2) involved in key aspects of the arm race between cells and viruses, and 3) can be classified into two distinct types of composite genes in all viral classes. Beyond the quantification of the widespread recombination of genes among different viruses of the same class, we also report a striking sharing of genetic information between viruses of different classes and with different nucleic acid types. This latter discovery provides novel evidence for the existence of a large and complex mobilome network, which appears partly bound by the sharing of genetic information and by the formation of composite genes between mobile entities with different genetic material. Considering that there are around 10E31 viruses on the planet, gene remodeling appears as a hugely significant way of generating and moving novel sequences between different kinds of organisms on Earth. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  3. Identification of functional domains of the IR2 protein of equine herpesvirus 1 required for inhibition of viral gene expression and replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong K.; Kim, Seongman; Dai Gan; Zhang Yunfei; Ahn, Byung C.; O'Callaghan, Dennis J.

    2011-01-01

    The equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) negative regulatory IR2 protein (IR2P), an early 1,165-amino acid (aa) truncated form of the 1487-aa immediate-early protein (IEP), lacks the trans-activation domain essential for IEP activation functions but retains domains for binding DNA, TFIIB, and TBP and the nuclear localization signal. IR2P mutants of the N-terminal region which lack either DNA-binding activity or TFIIB-binding activity were unable to down-regulate EHV-1 promoters. In EHV-1-infected cells expressing full-length IR2P, transcription and protein expression of viral regulatory IE, early EICP0, IR4, and UL5, and late ETIF genes were dramatically inhibited. Viral DNA levels were reduced to 2.1% of control infected cells, but were vey weakly affected in cells that express the N-terminal 706 residues of IR2P. These results suggest that IR2P function requires the two N-terminal domains for binding DNA and TFIIB as well as the C-terminal residues 707 to 1116 containing the TBP-binding domain. - Highlights: → We examine the functional domains of IR2P that mediates negative regulation. → IR2P inhibits at the transcriptional level. → DNA-binding mutant or TFIIB-binding mutant fails to inhibit. → C-terminal aa 707 to 1116 are required for full inhibition. → Inhibition requires the DNA-binding domain, TFIIB-binding domain, and C-terminus.

  4. Viral promoters can initiate expression of toxin genes introduced into Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Daniela

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expression of recombinant proteins in eukaryotic cells requires the fusion of the coding region to a promoter functional in the eukaryotic cell line. Viral promoters are very often used for this purpose. The preceding cloning procedures are usually performed in Escherichia coli and it is therefore of interest if the foreign promoter results in an expression of the gene in bacteria. In the case molecules toxic for humans are to be expressed, this knowledge is indispensable for the specification of safety measures. Results We selected five frequently used viral promoters and quantified their activity in E. coli with a reporter system. Only the promoter from the thymidine kinase gene from HSV1 showed no activity, while the polyhedrin promoter from baculovirus, the early immediate CMV promoter, the early SV40 promoter and the 5' LTR promoter from HIV-1 directed gene expression in E. coli. The determination of transcription start sites in the immediate early CMV promoter and the polyhedrin promoter confirmed the existence of bacterial -10 and -35 consensus sequences. The importance of this heterologous gene expression for safety considerations was further supported by analysing fusions between the aforementioned promoters and a promoter-less cytotoxin gene. Conclusion According to our results a high percentage of viral promoters have the ability of initiating gene expression in E. coli. The degree of such heterologous gene expression can be sufficient for the expression of toxin genes and must therefore be considered when defining safety measures for the handling of corresponding genetically modified organisms.

  5. CRISPR/Cas9 delivery with one single adenoviral vector devoid of all viral genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrke-Schulz, Eric; Schiwon, Maren; Leitner, Theo; Dávid, Stephan; Bergmann, Thorsten; Liu, Jing; Ehrhardt, Anja

    2017-12-07

    The Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9 system revolutionized the field of gene editing but viral delivery of the CRISPR/Cas9 system has not been fully explored. Here we adapted clinically relevant high-capacity adenoviral vectors (HCAdV) devoid of all viral genes for the delivery of the CRISPR/Cas9 machinery using a single viral vector. We present a platform enabling fast transfer of the Cas9 gene and gRNA expression units into the HCAdV genome including the option to choose between constitutive or inducible Cas9 expression and gRNA multiplexing. Efficacy and versatility of this pipeline was exemplified by producing different CRISPR/Cas9-HCAdV targeting the human papillomavirus (HPV) 18 oncogene E6, the dystrophin gene causing Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and the HIV co-receptor C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5). All CRISPR/Cas9-HCAdV proved to be efficient to deliver the respective CRISPR/Cas9 expression units and to introduce the desired DNA double strand breaks at their intended target sites in immortalized and primary cells.

  6. Non-Viral Transfection Methods Optimized for Gene Delivery to a Lung Cancer Cell Line

    OpenAIRE

    Salimzadeh, Loghman; Jaberipour, Mansooreh; Hosseini, Ahmad; Ghaderi, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Background Mehr-80 is a newly established adherent human large cell lung cancer cell line that has not been transfected until now. This study aims to define the optimal transfection conditions and effects of some critical elements for enhancing gene delivery to this cell line by utilizing different non-viral transfection Procedures. Methods In the current study, calcium phosphate (CaP), DEAE-dextran, superfect, electroporation and lipofection transfection methods were used to optimize deliver...

  7. Nano-sized calcium phosphate (CaP) carriers for non-viral gene deilvery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Donghyun, E-mail: dhlee@cau.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Division of Integrative Engineering, Chung-Ang University, 221 Heukseok-Dong, Dongjak-Gu, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of); Upadhye, Kalpesh [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Kumta, Prashant N., E-mail: pkumta@pitt.edu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Sceince, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Center for Complex Engineered Multifunctional Materials, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States)

    2012-02-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanostructured calcium phosphates (NanoCaPs): comprehensive review. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Non viral gene delivery mechanisms: detailed mechanisms are outlined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Barriers to non-viral gene delivery: detailed barriers are discussed. - Abstract: Gene therapy has garnered much interest due to the potential for curing multiple inherited and/or increases in the acquired diseases. As a result, there has been intense activity from multiple research groups for developing effective delivery methods and carriers, which is a critical step in advancing gene delivery technologies. In order for the carriers to effectively deliver the genetic payloads, multiple extracellular and intracellular barriers need to be overcome. Although overcoming these challenges to improve the effectiveness is critical, the development of safe gene delivery agents is even more vital to assure its use in clinical applications. The development of safe and effective strategies has therefore been a major challenge impeding gene therapy progress. In this regard, calcium phosphate (CaP) based nano-particles has been considered as one of the candidate non-viral gene delivery vehicles, but has been plagued by inconsistent and low transfection efficiencies limiting its progress. There has been major research effort to improve the consistency and effectiveness of CaP based vectors. Currently, it is therefore thought that by controlling the various synthesis factors such as Ca/P ratio, mode of mixing, and type of calcium phosphate phase, such variability and inefficiency could be modulated. This review attempts to provide a comprehensive analysis of the current research activity in the development of CaP based ceramic and polymer-ceramic hybrid systems for non-viral gene delivery. Preliminary transfection results of hydroxyapatite (HA or NanoCaPs), amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) and brushite phases are also compared to assess the

  8. Sustained Interleukin-1β Exposure Modulates Multiple Steps in Glucocorticoid Receptor Signaling, Promoting Split-Resistance to the Transactivation of Prominent Anti-Inflammatory Genes by Glucocorticoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Escoll

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical treatment with glucocorticoids (GC can be complicated by cytokine-induced glucocorticoid low-responsiveness (GC-resistance, GCR, a condition associated with a homogeneous reduction in the expression of GC-receptor- (GR- driven anti-inflammatory genes. However, GR level and phosphorylation changes modify the expression of individual GR-responsive genes differently. As sustained IL-1β exposure is key in the pathogenesis of several major diseases with prevalent GCR, we examined GR signaling and the mRNA expression of six GR-driven genes in cells cultured in IL-1β and afterwards challenged with GC. After a GC challenge, sustained IL-1β exposure reduced the cytoplasmic GR level, GRSer203 and GRSer211 phosphorylation, and GR nuclear translocation and led to selective GCR in the expression of the studied genes. Compared to GC alone, in a broad range of GC doses plus sustained IL-1β, FKBP51 mRNA expression was reduced by 1/3, TTP by 2/3, and IRF8 was completely knocked down. In contrast, high GC doses did not change the expression of GILZ and DUSP1, while IGFBP1 was increased by 5-fold. These effects were cytokine-selective, IL-1β dose- and IL-1R1-dependent. The integrated gain and loss of gene functions in the “split GCR” model may provide target cells with a survival advantage by conferring resistance to apoptosis, chemotherapy, and GC.

  9. The immune gene repertoire of an important viral reservoir, the Australian black flying fox

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    Papenfuss Anthony T

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bats are the natural reservoir host for a range of emerging and re-emerging viruses, including SARS-like coronaviruses, Ebola viruses, henipaviruses and Rabies viruses. However, the mechanisms responsible for the control of viral replication in bats are not understood and there is little information available on any aspect of antiviral immunity in bats. Massively parallel sequencing of the bat transcriptome provides the opportunity for rapid gene discovery. Although the genomes of one megabat and one microbat have now been sequenced to low coverage, no transcriptomic datasets have been reported from any bat species. In this study, we describe the immune transcriptome of the Australian flying fox, Pteropus alecto, providing an important resource for identification of genes involved in a range of activities including antiviral immunity. Results Towards understanding the adaptations that have allowed bats to coexist with viruses, we have de novo assembled transcriptome sequence from immune tissues and stimulated cells from P. alecto. We identified about 18,600 genes involved in a broad range of activities with the most highly expressed genes involved in cell growth and maintenance, enzyme activity, cellular components and metabolism and energy pathways. 3.5% of the bat transcribed genes corresponded to immune genes and a total of about 500 immune genes were identified, providing an overview of both innate and adaptive immunity. A small proportion of transcripts found no match with annotated sequences in any of the public databases and may represent bat-specific transcripts. Conclusions This study represents the first reported bat transcriptome dataset and provides a survey of expressed bat genes that complement existing bat genomic data. In addition, these data provide insight into genes relevant to the antiviral responses of bats, and form a basis for examining the roles of these molecules in immune response to viral infection.

  10. Adenovirus-encoding virus-associated RNAs suppress HDGF gene expression to support efficient viral replication.

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    Saki Kondo

    Full Text Available Non-coding small RNAs are involved in many physiological responses including viral life cycles. Adenovirus-encoding small RNAs, known as virus-associated RNAs (VA RNAs, are transcribed throughout the replication process in the host cells, and their transcript levels depend on the copy numbers of the viral genome. Therefore, VA RNAs are abundant in infected cells after genome replication, i.e. during the late phase of viral infection. Their function during the late phase is the inhibition of interferon-inducible protein kinase R (PKR activity to prevent antiviral responses; recently, mivaRNAs, the microRNAs processed from VA RNAs, have been reported to inhibit cellular gene expression. Although VA RNA transcription starts during the early phase, little is known about its function. The reason may be because much smaller amount of VA RNAs are transcribed during the early phase than the late phase. In this study, we applied replication-deficient adenovirus vectors (AdVs and novel AdVs lacking VA RNA genes to analyze the expression changes in cellular genes mediated by VA RNAs using microarray analysis. AdVs are suitable to examine the function of VA RNAs during the early phase, since they constitutively express VA RNAs but do not replicate except in 293 cells. We found that the expression level of hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF significantly decreased in response to the VA RNAs under replication-deficient condition, and this suppression was also observed during the early phase under replication-competent conditions. The suppression was independent of mivaRNA-induced downregulation, suggesting that the function of VA RNAs during the early phase differs from that during the late phase. Notably, overexpression of HDGF inhibited AdV growth. This is the first report to show the function, in part, of VA RNAs during the early phase that may be contribute to efficient viral growth.

  11. Recombination and population mosaic of a multifunctional viral gene, adeno-associated virus cap.

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    Yasuhiro Takeuchi

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination is a dominant force in evolution and results in genetic mosaics. To detect evidence of recombination events and assess the biological significance of genetic mosaics, genome sequences for various viral populations of reasonably large size are now available in the GenBank. We studied a multi-functional viral gene, the adeno-associated virus (AAV cap gene, which codes for three capsid proteins, VP1, VP2 and VP3. VP1-3 share a common C-terminal domain corresponding to VP3, which forms the viral core structure, while the VP1 unique N-terminal part contains an enzymatic domain with phospholipase A2 activity. Our recombinant detection program (RecI revealed five novel recombination events, four of which have their cross-over points in the N-terminal, VP1 and VP2 unique region. Comparison of phylogenetic trees for different cap gene regions confirmed discordant phylogenies for the recombinant sequences. Furthermore, differences in the phylogenetic tree structures for the VP1 unique (VP1u region and the rest of cap highlighted the mosaic nature of cap gene in the AAV population: two dominant forms of VP1u sequences were identified and these forms are linked to diverse sequences in the rest of cap gene. This observation together with the finding of frequent recombination in the VP1 and 2 unique regions suggests that this region is a recombination hot spot. Recombination events in this region preserve protein blocks of distinctive functions and contribute to convergence in VP1u and divergence of the rest of cap. Additionally the possible biological significance of two dominant VP1u forms is inferred.

  12. Non-viral gene delivery strategies for cancer therapy, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhise, Nupura S.

    Gene therapy involves the delivery of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) into cells to override or replace a malfunctioning gene for treating debilitating genetic diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. In addition to its use as a therapeutic, it can also serve as a technology to enable regenerative medicine strategies. The central challenge of the gene therapy research arena is developing a safe and effective delivery agent. Since viral vectors have critical immunogenic and tumorogenic safety issues that limit their clinical use, recent efforts have focused on developing non-viral biomaterial based delivery vectors. Cationic polymers are an attractive class of gene delivery vectors due to their structural versatility, ease of synthesis, biodegradability, ability to self-complex into nanoparticles with negatively charged DNA, capacity to carry large cargo, cellular uptake and endosomal escape capacity. In this thesis, we hypothesized that developing a biomaterial library of poly(betaamino esters) (PBAE), a newer class of cationic polymers consisting of biodegradable ester groups, would allow investigating vector design parameters and formulating effective non-viral gene delivery strategies for cancer drug delivery, tissue engineering and stem cell engineering. Consequently, a high-throughput transfection assay was developed to screen the PBAE-based nanoparticles in hard to transfect fibroblast cell lines. To gain mechanistic insights into the nanoparticle formulation process, biophysical properties of the vectors were characterized in terms of molecular weight (MW), nanoparticle size, zeta potential and plasmid per particle count. We report a novel assay developed for quantifying the plasmid per nanoparticle count and studying its implications for co-delivery of multiple genes. The MW of the polymers ranged from 10 kDa to 100 kDa, nanoparticle size was about 150 run, zeta potential was about 30 mV in sodium acetate buffer (25 mM, pH 5) and 30 to 100

  13. MicroRNA-Mediated Gene Silencing in Plant Defense and Viral Counter-Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Rui Liu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are non-coding RNAs of approximately 20–24 nucleotides in length that serve as central regulators of eukaryotic gene expression by targeting mRNAs for cleavage or translational repression. In plants, miRNAs are associated with numerous regulatory pathways in growth and development processes, and defensive responses in plant–pathogen interactions. Recently, significant progress has been made in understanding miRNA-mediated gene silencing and how viruses counter this defense mechanism. Here, we summarize the current knowledge and recent advances in understanding the roles of miRNAs involved in the plant defense against viruses and viral counter-defense. We also document the application of miRNAs in plant antiviral defense. This review discusses the current understanding of the mechanisms of miRNA-mediated gene silencing and provides insights on the never-ending arms race between plants and viruses.

  14. Hairpin RNA Targeting Multiple Viral Genes Confers Strong Resistance to Rice Black-Streaked Dwarf Virus

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    Fangquan Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV belongs to the genus Fijivirus in the family of Reoviridae and causes severe yield loss in rice-producing areas in Asia. RNA silencing, as a natural defence mechanism against plant viruses, has been successfully exploited for engineering virus resistance in plants, including rice. In this study, we generated transgenic rice lines harbouring a hairpin RNA (hpRNA construct targeting four RBSDV genes, S1, S2, S6 and S10, encoding the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, the putative core protein, the RNA silencing suppressor and the outer capsid protein, respectively. Both field nursery and artificial inoculation assays of three generations of the transgenic lines showed that they had strong resistance to RBSDV infection. The RBSDV resistance in the segregating transgenic populations correlated perfectly with the presence of the hpRNA transgene. Furthermore, the hpRNA transgene was expressed in the highly resistant transgenic lines, giving rise to abundant levels of 21–24 nt small interfering RNA (siRNA. By small RNA deep sequencing, the RBSDV-resistant transgenic lines detected siRNAs from all four viral gene sequences in the hpRNA transgene, indicating that the whole chimeric fusion sequence can be efficiently processed by Dicer into siRNAs. Taken together, our results suggest that long hpRNA targeting multiple viral genes can be used to generate stable and durable virus resistance in rice, as well as other plant species.

  15. Hairpin RNA Targeting Multiple Viral Genes Confers Strong Resistance to Rice Black-Streaked Dwarf Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangquan; Li, Wenqi; Zhu, Jinyan; Fan, Fangjun; Wang, Jun; Zhong, Weigong; Wang, Ming-Bo; Liu, Qing; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Zhou, Tong; Lan, Ying; Zhou, Yijun; Yang, Jie

    2016-05-11

    Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) belongs to the genus Fijivirus in the family of Reoviridae and causes severe yield loss in rice-producing areas in Asia. RNA silencing, as a natural defence mechanism against plant viruses, has been successfully exploited for engineering virus resistance in plants, including rice. In this study, we generated transgenic rice lines harbouring a hairpin RNA (hpRNA) construct targeting four RBSDV genes, S1, S2, S6 and S10, encoding the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, the putative core protein, the RNA silencing suppressor and the outer capsid protein, respectively. Both field nursery and artificial inoculation assays of three generations of the transgenic lines showed that they had strong resistance to RBSDV infection. The RBSDV resistance in the segregating transgenic populations correlated perfectly with the presence of the hpRNA transgene. Furthermore, the hpRNA transgene was expressed in the highly resistant transgenic lines, giving rise to abundant levels of 21-24 nt small interfering RNA (siRNA). By small RNA deep sequencing, the RBSDV-resistant transgenic lines detected siRNAs from all four viral gene sequences in the hpRNA transgene, indicating that the whole chimeric fusion sequence can be efficiently processed by Dicer into siRNAs. Taken together, our results suggest that long hpRNA targeting multiple viral genes can be used to generate stable and durable virus resistance in rice, as well as other plant species.

  16. Regulatory elements involved in tax-mediated transactivation of the HTLV-I LTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeler, J S; Muchardt, C; Podar, M; Gaynor, R B

    1993-10-01

    HTLV-I is the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia. In this study, we investigated the regulatory elements and cellular transcription factors which function in modulating HTLV-I gene expression in response to the viral transactivator protein, tax. Transfection experiments into Jurkat cells of a variety of site-directed mutants in the HTLV-1 LTR indicated that each of the three motifs A, B, and C within the 21-bp repeats, the binding sites for the Ets family of proteins, and the TATA box all influenced the degree of tax-mediated activation. Tax is also able to activate gene expression of other viral and cellular promoters. Tax activation of the IL-2 receptor and the HIV-1 LTR is mediated through NF-kappa B motifs. Interestingly, sequences in the 21-bp repeat B and C motifs contain significant homology with NF-kappa B regulatory elements. We demonstrated that an NF-kappa B binding protein, PRDII-BF1, but not the rel protein, bound to the B and C motifs in the 21-bp repeat. PRDII-BF1 was also able to stimulate activation of HTLV-I gene expression by tax. The role of the Ets proteins on modulating tax activation was also studied. Ets 1 but not Ets 2 was capable of increasing the degree of tax activation of the HTLV-I LTR. These results suggest that tax activates gene expression by either direct or indirect interaction with several cellular transcription factors that bind to the HTLV-I LTR.

  17. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α regulates chemotactic migration of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells through directly transactivating the CX3CR1 gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiansuo Zhao

    Full Text Available CX3CR1 is an important chemokine receptor and regulates the chemotactic migration of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC cells. Up to now, its regulatory mechanism remains largely undefined. Here, we report that hypoxia upregulates the expression of CX3CR1 in pancreatic cancer cells. When hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF-1α expression was knocked down in vitro and in vivo, the expression of CX3CR1 was significantly decreased. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that HIF-1α bound to the hypoxia-response element (HRE; 5'-A/GCGTG-3' of CX3CR1 promoter under normoxia, and this binding was significantly enhanced under hypoxia. Overexpression of HIF-1α significantly upregulated the expression of luciferase reporter gene under the control of the CX3CR1 promoter in pancreatic cancer cells. Importantly, we demonstrated that HIF-1α may regulate cancer cell migration through CX3CR1. The HIF-1α/CX3CR1 pathway might represent a valuable therapeutic target to prevent invasion and distant metastasis in PDAC.

  18. Deep sequencing of the viral phoH gene reveals temporal variation, depth-specific composition, and persistent dominance of the same viral phoH genes in the Sargasso Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn B. Goldsmith

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Deep sequencing of the viral phoH gene, a host-derived auxiliary metabolic gene, was used to track viral diversity throughout the water column at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS site in the summer (September and winter (March of three years. Viral phoH sequences reveal differences in the viral communities throughout a depth profile and between seasons in the same year. Variation was also detected between the same seasons in subsequent years, though these differences were not as great as the summer/winter distinctions. Over 3,600 phoH operational taxonomic units (OTUs; 97% sequence identity were identified. Despite high richness, most phoH sequences belong to a few large, common OTUs whereas the majority of the OTUs are small and rare. While many OTUs make sporadic appearances at just a few times or depths, a small number of OTUs dominate the community throughout the seasons, depths, and years.

  19. Chitosan-Graft-Polyethylenimine/DNA Nanoparticles as Novel Non-Viral Gene Delivery Vectors Targeting Osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Lulu; Zhao, Huiqing

    2014-01-01

    The development of safe and efficient gene carriers is the key to the clinical success of gene therapy. The present study was designed to develop and evaluate the chitosan-graft-polyethylenimine (CP)/DNA nanoparticles as novel non-viral gene vectors for gene therapy of osteoarthritis. The CP/DNA nanoparticles were produced through a complex coacervation of the cationic polymers with pEGFP after grafting chitosan (CS) with a low molecular weight (Mw) PEI (Mw = 1.8 kDa). Particle size and zeta potential were related to the weight ratio of CP:DNA, where decreases in nanoparticle size and increases in surface charge were observed as CP content increased. The buffering capacity of CP was significantly greater than that of CS. The transfection efficiency of CP/DNA nanoparticles was similar with that of the Lipofectamine™ 2000, and significantly higher than that of CS/DNA and PEI (25 kDa)/DNA nanoparticles. The transfection efficiency of the CP/DNA nanoparticles was dependent on the weight ratio of CP:DNA (w/w). The average cell viability after the treatment with CP/DNA nanoparticles was over 90% in both chondrocytes and synoviocytes, which was much higher than that of PEI (25 kDa)/DNA nanoparticles. The CP copolymers efficiently carried the pDNA inside chondrocytes and synoviocytes, and the pDNA was detected entering into nucleus. These results suggest that CP/DNA nanoparticles with improved transfection efficiency and low cytotoxicity might be a safe and efficient non-viral vector for gene delivery to both chondrocytes and synoviocytes. PMID:24392152

  20. The nucleotide-binding domain of NLRC5 is critical for nuclear import and transactivation activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meissner, Torsten B.; Li, Amy; Liu, Yuen-Joyce; Gagnon, Etienne; Kobayashi, Koichi S.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► NLRC5 requires an intact NLS for its function as MHC class I transactivator. ► Nuclear presence of NLRC5 is required for MHC class I induction. ► Nucleotide-binding controls nuclear import and transactivation activity of NLRC5. -- Abstract: Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II are crucial for the function of the human adaptive immune system. A member of the NLR (nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat) protein family, NLRC5, has recently been identified as a transcriptional regulator of MHC class I and related genes. While a ‘master regulator’ of MHC class II genes, CIITA, has long been known, NLRC5 specifically associates with and transactivates the proximal promoters of MHC class I genes. In this study, we analyzed the molecular requirements of NLRC5 nuclear import and transactivation activity. We show that NLRC5-mediated MHC class I gene induction requires an intact nuclear localization signal and nuclear distribution of NLRC5. In addition, we find that the nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) of NLRC5 is critical not only for nuclear translocation but also for the transactivation of MHC class I genes. Changing the cellular localization of NLRC5 is likely to immediately impact MHC class I expression as well as MHC class I-mediated antigen presentation. NLRC5 may thus provide a promising target for the modulation of MHC class I antigen presentation, especially in the setting of transplant medicine.

  1. Viral DNA Sensors IFI16 and Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase Possess Distinct Functions in Regulating Viral Gene Expression, Immune Defenses, and Apoptotic Responses during Herpesvirus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diner, Benjamin A; Lum, Krystal K; Toettcher, Jared E; Cristea, Ileana M

    2016-11-15

    The human interferon-inducible protein IFI16 is an important antiviral factor that binds nuclear viral DNA and promotes antiviral responses. Here, we define IFI16 dynamics in space and time and its distinct functions from the DNA sensor cyclic dinucleotide GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS). Live-cell imaging reveals a multiphasic IFI16 redistribution, first to viral entry sites at the nuclear periphery and then to nucleoplasmic puncta upon herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infections. Optogenetics and live-cell microscopy establish the IFI16 pyrin domain as required for nuclear periphery localization and oligomerization. Furthermore, using proteomics, we define the signature protein interactions of the IFI16 pyrin and HIN200 domains and demonstrate the necessity of pyrin for IFI16 interactions with antiviral proteins PML and cGAS. We probe signaling pathways engaged by IFI16, cGAS, and PML using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)/Cas9-mediated knockouts in primary fibroblasts. While IFI16 induces cytokines, only cGAS activates STING/TBK-1/IRF3 and apoptotic responses upon HSV-1 and HCMV infections. cGAS-dependent apoptosis upon DNA stimulation requires both the enzymatic production of cyclic dinucleotides and STING. We show that IFI16, not cGAS or PML, represses HSV-1 gene expression, reducing virus titers. This indicates that regulation of viral gene expression may function as a greater barrier to viral replication than the induction of antiviral cytokines. Altogether, our findings establish coordinated and distinct antiviral functions for IFI16 and cGAS against herpesviruses. How mammalian cells detect and respond to DNA viruses that replicate in the nucleus is poorly understood. Here, we decipher the distinct functions of two viral DNA sensors, IFI16 and cGAS, during active immune signaling upon infection with two herpesviruses, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). We show that IFI16

  2. Optimizing viral and non-viral gene transfer methods for genetic modification of porcine mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stiehler, Maik; Duch, Mogens R.; Mygind, Tina

    2006-01-01

    -old Danish landrace pigs by Ficoll step gradient separation and polystyrene adherence technique. Vectors expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) were transferred to the cells by different non-viral methods and by use of recombinant adeno...

  3. Gene expression of herpes simplex virus. II. Uv radiological analysis of viral transcription units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millette, R. L.; Klaiber, R.

    1980-01-01

    The transcriptional organization of the genome of herpes simplex virus type 1 was analyzed by measuring the sensitivity of viral polypeptide synthesis to uv irradiation of the infecting virus. Herpes simplex virus type 1 was irradiated with various doses of uv light and used to infect xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts. Immediate early transcription units were analyzed by having cycloheximide present throughout the period of infection, removing the drug at 8 h postinfection, and pulse-labeling proteins with [355]methionine. Delayed early transcription units were analyzed in similar studies by having 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine present during the experiment to block replication of the input irradiated genome. The results indicate that none of the immediate early genes analyzed can be cotranscribed, whereas some of the delayed early genes might be cotranscribed. No evidence was found for the existence of large, multigene transcription units

  4. Single cell genomics indicates horizontal gene transfer and viral infections in a deep subsurface Firmicutes population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica eLabonté

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A major fraction of Earth's prokaryotic biomass dwells in the deep subsurface, where cellular abundances per volume of sample are lower, metabolism is slower, and generation times are longer than those in surface terrestrial and marine environments. How these conditions impact biotic interactions and evolutionary processes is largely unknown. Here we employed single cell genomics to analyze cell-to-cell genome content variability and signatures of horizontal gene transfer (HGT and viral infections in five cells of Candidatus Desulforudis audaxviator, which were collected from a three km-deep fracture water in the 2.9 Ga-old Witwatersrand Basin of South Africa. Between 0 and 32 % of genes recovered from single cells were not present in the original, metagenomic assembly of Desulforudis, which was obtained from a neighboring subsurface fracture. We found a transposable prophage, a retron, multiple clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs and restriction-modification systems, and an unusually high frequency of transposases in the analyzed single cell genomes. This indicates that recombination, HGT and viral infections are prevalent evolutionary events in the studied population of microorganisms inhabiting a highly stable deep subsurface environment.

  5. Non-viral gene therapy that targets motor neurons in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary-Louise eRogers

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge in neurological gene therapy is safe delivery of transgenes to sufficient cell numbers from the circulation or periphery. This is particularly difficult for diseases involving spinal cord motor neurons such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. We have examined the feasibility of non-viral gene delivery to spinal motor neurons from intraperitoneal injections of plasmids carried by ‘immunogene’ nanoparticles targeted for axonal retrograde transport using antibodies. PEGylated polyethylenimine (PEI-PEG12 as DNA carrier was conjugated to an antibody (MLR2 to the neurotrophin receptor p75 (p75NTR. We used a plasmid (pVIVO2 designed for in vivo gene delivery that produces minimal immune responses, has improved nuclear entry into post mitotic cells and also expresses green fluorescent protein (GFP. MLR2-PEI-PEG12 carried pVIVO2 and was specific for mouse motor neurons in mixed cultures containing astrocytes. While only 8% of motor neurons expressed GFP 72 h post transfection in vitro, when the immunogene was given intraperitonealy to neonatal C57BL/6J mice GFP specific motor neuron expression was observed in 25.4% of lumbar, 18.3% of thoracic and 17.0 % of cervical motor neurons, 72 h post transfection. PEI-PEG12 carrying pVIVO2 by itself did not transfect motor neurons in vivo, demonstrating the need for specificity via the p75NTR antibody MLR2. This is the first time that specific transfection of spinal motor neurons has been achieved from peripheral delivery of plasmid DNA as part of a non-viral gene delivery agent. These results stress the specificity and feasibility of immunogene delivery targeted for p75NTR expressing motor neurons, but suggests that further improvements are required to increase the transfection efficiency of motor neurons in vivo.

  6. Optogenetic dissection of neuronal circuits in zebrafish using viral gene transfer and the Tet system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peixin Zhu

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The conditional expression of transgenes at high levels in sparse and specific populations of neurons is important for high-resolution optogenetic analyses of neuronal circuits. We explored two complementary methods, viral gene delivery and the iTet-Off system, to express transgenes in the brain of zebrafish. High-level gene expression in neurons was achieved by Sindbis and Rabies viruses. The Tet system produced strong and specific gene expression that could be modulated conveniently by doxycycline. Moreover, transgenic lines showed expression in distinct, sparse and stable populations of neurons that appeared to be subsets of the neurons targeted by the promoter driving the Tet activator. The Tet system therefore provides the opportunity to generate libraries of diverse expression patterns similar to gene trap approaches or the thy-1 promoter in mice, but with the additional possibility to pre-select cell types of interest. In transgenic lines expressing channelrhodopsin-2, action potential firing could be precisely controlled by two-photon stimulation at low laser power, presumably because the expression levels of the Tet-controlled genes were high even in adults. In channelrhodopsin-2-expressing larvae, optical stimulation with a single blue LED evoked distinct swimming behaviors including backward swimming. These approaches provide new opportunities for the optogenetic dissection of neuronal circuit structure and function.

  7. Shrimp miR-10a Is Co-opted by White Spot Syndrome Virus to Increase Viral Gene Expression and Viral Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiun-Yan Huang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Members of the microRNA miR-10 family are highly conserved and play many important roles in diverse biological mechanisms, including immune-related responses and cancer-related processes in certain types of cancer. In this study, we found the most highly upregulated shrimp microRNA from Penaeus vannamei during white spot syndrome virus (WSSV infection was miR-10a. After confirming the expression level of miR-10a by northern blot and quantitative RT-PCR, an in vivo experiment showed that the viral copy number was decreased in miR-10a-inhibited shrimp. We found that miR-10a targeted the 5′ untranslated region (UTR of at least three viral genes (vp26, vp28, and wssv102, and plasmids that were controlled by the 5′ UTR of these genes produced enhanced luciferase signals in transfected SF9 cells. These results suggest a previously unreported role for shrimp miR-10a and even a new type of host–virus interaction, whereby a co-opts the key cellular regulator miR-10a to globally enhance the translation of viral proteins.

  8. Shrimp miR-10a Is Co-opted by White Spot Syndrome Virus to Increase Viral Gene Expression and Viral Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiun-Yan; Kang, Shih-Ting; Chen, I-Tung; Chang, Li-Kwan; Lin, Shih-Shun; Kou, Guang-Hsiung; Chu, Chia-Ying; Lo, Chu-Fang

    2017-01-01

    Members of the microRNA miR-10 family are highly conserved and play many important roles in diverse biological mechanisms, including immune-related responses and cancer-related processes in certain types of cancer. In this study, we found the most highly upregulated shrimp microRNA from Penaeus vannamei during white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection was miR-10a. After confirming the expression level of miR-10a by northern blot and quantitative RT-PCR, an in vivo experiment showed that the viral copy number was decreased in miR-10a-inhibited shrimp. We found that miR-10a targeted the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of at least three viral genes ( vp26, vp28 , and wssv102 ), and plasmids that were controlled by the 5' UTR of these genes produced enhanced luciferase signals in transfected SF9 cells. These results suggest a previously unreported role for shrimp miR-10a and even a new type of host-virus interaction, whereby a co-opts the key cellular regulator miR-10a to globally enhance the translation of viral proteins.

  9. Non-Viral Transfection Methods Optimized for Gene Delivery to a Lung Cancer Cell Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimzadeh, Loghman; Jaberipour, Mansooreh; Hosseini, Ahmad; Ghaderi, Abbas

    2013-01-01

    Background Mehr-80 is a newly established adherent human large cell lung cancer cell line that has not been transfected until now. This study aims to define the optimal transfection conditions and effects of some critical elements for enhancing gene delivery to this cell line by utilizing different non-viral transfection Procedures. Methods In the current study, calcium phosphate (CaP), DEAE-dextran, superfect, electroporation and lipofection transfection methods were used to optimize delivery of a plasmid construct that expressed Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). Transgene expression was detected by fluorescent microscopy and flowcytometry. Toxicities of the methods were estimated by trypan blue staining. In order to evaluate the density of the transfected gene, we used a plasmid construct that expressed the Stromal cell-Derived Factor-1 (SDF-1) gene and measured its expression by real-time PCR. Results Mean levels of GFP-expressing cells 48 hr after transfection were 8.4% (CaP), 8.2% (DEAE-dextran), 4.9% (superfect), 34.1% (electroporation), and 40.1% (lipofection). Lipofection had the highest intense SDF-1 expression of the analyzed methods. Conclusion This study has shown that the lipofection and electroporation methods were more efficient at gene delivery to Mehr-80 cells. The quantity of DNA per transfection, reagent concentration, and incubation time were identified as essential factors for successful transfection in all of the studied methods. PMID:23799175

  10. Non-viral transfection methods optimized for gene delivery to a lung cancer cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimzadeh, Loghman; Jaberipour, Mansooreh; Hosseini, Ahmad; Ghaderi, Abbas

    2013-04-01

    Mehr-80 is a newly established adherent human large cell lung cancer cell line that has not been transfected until now. This study aims to define the optimal transfection conditions and effects of some critical elements for enhancing gene delivery to this cell line by utilizing different non-viral transfection Procedures. In the current study, calcium phosphate (CaP), DEAE-dextran, superfect, electroporation and lipofection transfection methods were used to optimize delivery of a plasmid construct that expressed Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP). Transgene expression was detected by fluorescent microscopy and flowcytometry. Toxicities of the methods were estimated by trypan blue staining. In order to evaluate the density of the transfected gene, we used a plasmid construct that expressed the Stromal cell-Derived Factor-1 (SDF-1) gene and measured its expression by real-time PCR. Mean levels of GFP-expressing cells 48 hr after transfection were 8.4% (CaP), 8.2% (DEAE-dextran), 4.9% (superfect), 34.1% (electroporation), and 40.1% (lipofection). Lipofection had the highest intense SDF-1 expression of the analyzed methods. This study has shown that the lipofection and electroporation methods were more efficient at gene delivery to Mehr-80 cells. The quantity of DNA per transfection, reagent concentration, and incubation time were identified as essential factors for successful transfection in all of the studied methods.

  11. An Optimized Protocol to Increase Virus-Induced Gene Silencing Efficiency and Minimize Viral Symptoms in Petunia

    OpenAIRE

    Broderick, Shaun R.; Jones, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is used to down-regulate endogenous plant genes. VIGS efficiency depends on viral proliferation and systemic movement throughout the plant. Although tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based VIGS has been successfully used in petunia (Petunia × hybrida), the protocol has not been thoroughly optimized for efficient and uniform gene down-regulation in this species. Therefore, we evaluated six parameters that improved VIGS in petunia. Inoculation of mechanically wounde...

  12. Viral DNA Sensors IFI16 and Cyclic GMP-AMP Synthase Possess Distinct Functions in Regulating Viral Gene Expression, Immune Defenses, and Apoptotic Responses during Herpesvirus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin A. Diner

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The human interferon-inducible protein IFI16 is an important antiviral factor that binds nuclear viral DNA and promotes antiviral responses. Here, we define IFI16 dynamics in space and time and its distinct functions from the DNA sensor cyclic dinucleotide GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS. Live-cell imaging reveals a multiphasic IFI16 redistribution, first to viral entry sites at the nuclear periphery and then to nucleoplasmic puncta upon herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infections. Optogenetics and live-cell microscopy establish the IFI16 pyrin domain as required for nuclear periphery localization and oligomerization. Furthermore, using proteomics, we define the signature protein interactions of the IFI16 pyrin and HIN200 domains and demonstrate the necessity of pyrin for IFI16 interactions with antiviral proteins PML and cGAS. We probe signaling pathways engaged by IFI16, cGAS, and PML using clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR/Cas9-mediated knockouts in primary fibroblasts. While IFI16 induces cytokines, only cGAS activates STING/TBK-1/IRF3 and apoptotic responses upon HSV-1 and HCMV infections. cGAS-dependent apoptosis upon DNA stimulation requires both the enzymatic production of cyclic dinucleotides and STING. We show that IFI16, not cGAS or PML, represses HSV-1 gene expression, reducing virus titers. This indicates that regulation of viral gene expression may function as a greater barrier to viral replication than the induction of antiviral cytokines. Altogether, our findings establish coordinated and distinct antiviral functions for IFI16 and cGAS against herpesviruses.

  13. Construction of a recombinant viral vector containing part of the nucleocapsid protein gene of newcastle disease virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bader, D.E.

    1995-09-01

    This report describes the procedures used to clone a 673 base pair gene fragment of the major nucleocapsid protein gene of Newcastle disease virus into a viral vector molecule for the purpose of maintaining a stable, long-term, renewable source of this target sequence for gene probe studies. The gene fragment was prepared by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction of Newcastle disease virus RNA and was cloned into the viral DNA vector Ml3mp18 RF to produce a recombinant DNA molecule. The cloned fragment was shown to be present in the recombinant clones based on (i) clonal selection on indicator plates; (ii) restriction enzyme analysis; (iii) gene probe analysis and (iv) nested PCR amplification.

  14. A new pathway for developing in vitro nanostructured non-viral gene carriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Benjamin [Chemistry Department, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States); Liang Dehai [Chemistry Department, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States); Hadjiargyrou, Michael [Biomedical Engineering Department, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States); Hsiao, Benjamin S [Chemistry Department, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-3400 (United States)

    2006-09-13

    Extracellular and intracellular barriers typically prevent the efficient transfection of non-viral gene vectors. The formulation of a gene delivery carrier that can overcome the barriers would be a key for successful gene therapy. We have developed a novel pathway for the preparation of core-shelled DNA nanoparticles by invoking solvent-induced condensation of plasmid DNA ({beta}-galactosidase) in a poor solvent mixture and subsequent encapsulation of the condensed DNA globule in a tri-block copolymer (e.g. polylactide-poly(ethylene glycol)-polylactide, L{sub 8}E{sub 78}L{sub 8}). The polylactide shell can protect the encapsulated DNA from degradation during electrospinning of a mixture of encapsulated DNA nanoparticles and biodegradable PLGA (a random copolymer of lactide and glycolide) to form a non-woven nanofibrous DNA-containing scaffold. The bioactive plasmid DNA can then be released in an intact form and in sufficient quantity from the scaffold with a controlled release rate and to transfect cells in vitro. Further consideration of the stability of the DNA in extracellular and intracellular environments is proposed. In particular, the use of block copolymers with a positively charged block and a hydrophilic block, as well as tri-arm block copolymers with an additional hydrophobic, biodegradable block to stabilize the DNA chain of interest, is discussed.

  15. Zn(II)-dipicolylamine-based metallo-lipids as novel non-viral gene vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Rong-Chuan; Liu, Qiang; Yi, Wen-Jing; Zhao, Zhi-Gang

    2017-08-01

    In this study, a series of Zn(II)-dipicolylamine (Zn-DPA) based cationic lipids bearing different hydrophobic tails (long chains, α-tocopherol, cholesterol or diosgenin) were synthesized. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) of these lipids was studied in detail by investigating the effects of several structural aspects including the type of hydrophobic tails, the chain length and saturation degree. In addition, several assays were used to study their interactions with plasmid DNA, and results reveal that these lipids could condense DNA into nanosized particles with appropriate size and zeta-potentials. MTT-based cell viability assays showed that lipoplexes 5 had low cytotoxicity. The in vitro gene transfection studies showed the hydrophobic tails clearly affected the TE, and hexadecanol-containing lipid 5b gives the best TE, which was 2.2 times higher than bPEI 25k in the presence of 10% serum. The results not only demonstrate that these lipids might be promising non-viral gene vectors, but also afford us clues for further optimization of lipidic gene delivery materials.

  16. Low-frequency ultrasound increases non-viral gene transfer to the mouse lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenariou, Stefania; Liang, Hai-Dong; Griesenbach, Uta; Zhu, Jie; Farley, Raymond; Somerton, Lucinda; Singh, Charanjit; Jeffery, Peter K; Scheule, Ronald K; Cheng, Seng H; Geddes, Duncan M; Blomley, Martin; Alton, Eric W F W

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess if low-frequency ultrasound (US), in the range of 30-35 kHz, increases non-viral gene transfer to the mouse lung. US is greatly attenuated in the lung due to large energy losses at the air/tissue interfaces. The advantages of low-frequency US, compared with high-frequency US are: (i) increased cavitation (responsible for the formation of transient pores in the cell membrane) and (ii) reduced energy losses during lung penetration. Cationic lipid GL67/plasmid DNA (pDNA), polyethylenimine (PEI)/pDNA and naked pDNA were delivered via intranasal instillation and the animals were then exposed to US (sonoporation) at 0.07 or 0.1 MPa for 10 min. Under these conditions, US did not enhance GL67 or PEI-mediated transfection. It did, however, increase naked pDNA gene transfer by approximately 4 folds. Importantly, this was achieved in the absence of microbubbles, which are crucial for the commonly used high-frequency (1 MHz) sonoporation but may not be able to withstand nebulization in a clinically relevant setup. Lung hemorrhage was also assessed and shown to increase with US pressure in a dose-dependent manner. We have thus, established that low-frequency US can enhance lung gene transfer with naked pDNA and this enhancement is more effective than the previously reported 1 MHz US.

  17. The transcription elongation factor ELL2 is specifically upregulated in HTLV-1-infected T-cells and is dependent on the viral oncoprotein Tax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Melanie C., E-mail: melanie.mann@viro.med.uni-erlangen.de; Strobel, Sarah, E-mail: sarah.strobel@viro.med.uni-erlangen.de; Fleckenstein, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.fleckenstein@viro.med.uni-erlangen.de; Kress, Andrea K., E-mail: andrea.kress@viro.med.uni-erlangen.de

    2014-09-15

    The oncoprotein Tax of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a potent transactivator of viral and cellular transcription. Here, we identified ELL2 as the sole transcription elongation factor to be specifically upregulated in HTLV-1-/Tax-transformed T-cells. Tax contributes to regulation of ELL2, since transient transfection of Tax increases ELL2 mRNA, Tax transactivates the ELL2 promoter, and repression of Tax results in decrease of ELL2 in transformed T-lymphocytes. However, we also measured upregulation of ELL2 in HTLV-1-transformed cells exhibiting undetectable amounts of Tax, suggesting that ELL2 can still be maintained independent of continuous Tax expression. We further show that Tax and ELL2 synergistically activate the HTLV-1 promoter, indicating that ELL2 cooperates with Tax in viral transactivation. This is supported by our findings that Tax and ELL2 accumulate in nuclear fractions and that they co-precipitate upon co-expression in transiently-transfected cells. Thus, upregulation of ELL2 could contribute to HTLV-1 gene regulation. - Highlights: • ELL2, a transcription elongation factor, is upregulated in HTLV-1-positive T-cells. • Tax transactivates the ELL2 promoter. • Tax and ELL2 synergistically activate the HTLV-1 promoter. • Tax and ELL2 interact in vivo.

  18. The transcription elongation factor ELL2 is specifically upregulated in HTLV-1-infected T-cells and is dependent on the viral oncoprotein Tax

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, Melanie C.; Strobel, Sarah; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Kress, Andrea K.

    2014-01-01

    The oncoprotein Tax of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a potent transactivator of viral and cellular transcription. Here, we identified ELL2 as the sole transcription elongation factor to be specifically upregulated in HTLV-1-/Tax-transformed T-cells. Tax contributes to regulation of ELL2, since transient transfection of Tax increases ELL2 mRNA, Tax transactivates the ELL2 promoter, and repression of Tax results in decrease of ELL2 in transformed T-lymphocytes. However, we also measured upregulation of ELL2 in HTLV-1-transformed cells exhibiting undetectable amounts of Tax, suggesting that ELL2 can still be maintained independent of continuous Tax expression. We further show that Tax and ELL2 synergistically activate the HTLV-1 promoter, indicating that ELL2 cooperates with Tax in viral transactivation. This is supported by our findings that Tax and ELL2 accumulate in nuclear fractions and that they co-precipitate upon co-expression in transiently-transfected cells. Thus, upregulation of ELL2 could contribute to HTLV-1 gene regulation. - Highlights: • ELL2, a transcription elongation factor, is upregulated in HTLV-1-positive T-cells. • Tax transactivates the ELL2 promoter. • Tax and ELL2 synergistically activate the HTLV-1 promoter. • Tax and ELL2 interact in vivo

  19. Hepatic transcriptome analysis of hepatitis C virus infection in chimpanzees defines unique gene expression patterns associated with viral clearance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Nanda

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus infection leads to a high rate of chronicity. Mechanisms of viral clearance and persistence are still poorly understood. In this study, hepatic gene expression analysis was performed to identify any molecular signature associated with the outcome of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in chimpanzees. Acutely HCV-infected chimpanzees with self-limited infection or progression to chronicity were studied. Interferon stimulated genes were induced irrespective of the outcome of infection. Early induction of a set of genes associated with cell proliferation and immune activation was associated with subsequent viral clearance. Specifically, two of the genes: interleukin binding factor 3 (ILF3 and cytotoxic granule-associated RNA binding protein (TIA1, associated with robust T-cell response, were highly induced early in chimpanzees with self-limited infection. Up-regulation of genes associated with CD8+ T cell response was evident only during the clearance phase of the acute self-limited infection. The induction of these genes may represent an initial response of cellular injury and proliferation that successfully translates to a "danger signal" leading to induction of adaptive immunity to control viral infection. This primary difference in hepatic gene expression between self-limited and chronic infections supports the concept that successful activation of HCV-specific T-cell response is critical in clearance of acute HCV infection.

  20. Mutations that abrogate transactivational activity of the feline leukemia virus long terminal repeat do not affect virus replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abujamra, Ana L.; Faller, Douglas V.; Ghosh, Sajal K.

    2003-01-01

    The U3 region of the LTR of oncogenic Moloney murine leukemia virus (Mo-MuLV) and feline leukemia viruses (FeLV) have been previously reported to activate expression of specific cellular genes in trans, such as MHC class I, collagenase IV, and MCP-1, in an integration-independent manner. It has been suggested that transactivation of these specific cellular genes by leukemia virus U3-LTR may contribute to the multistage process of leukemogenesis. The U3-LTR region, necessary for gene transactivational activity, also contains multiple transcription factor-binding sites that are essential for normal virus replication. To dissect the promoter activity and the gene transactivational activity of the U3-LTR, we conducted mutational analysis of the U3-LTR region of FeLV-A molecular clone 61E. We identified minimal nucleotide substitution mutants on the U3 LTR that did not disturb transcription factor-binding sites but abrogated its ability to transactivate the collagenase gene promoter. To determine if these mutations actually have altered any uncharacterized important transcription factor-binding site, we introduced these U3-LTR mutations into the full-length infectious molecular clone 61E. We demonstrate that the mutant virus was replication competent but could not transactivate cellular gene expression. These results thus suggest that the gene transactivational activity is a distinct property of the LTR and possibly not related to its promoter activity. The cellular gene transactivational activity-deficient mutant FeLV generated in this study may also serve as a valuable reagent for testing the biological significance of LTR-mediated cellular gene activation in the tumorigenesis caused by leukemia viruses

  1. A versatile family of degradable non-viral gene carriers based on hyperbranched poly(ester amine)s

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhong, Zhiyuan; Song, Y.; Engbersen, Johannes F.J.; Lok, Martin C.; Hennink, Wim E.; Feijen, Jan

    2005-01-01

    A variety of degradable hyperbranched poly(ester amine)s containing primary, secondary and tertiary amino groups, were synthesized and evaluated as non-viral gene carriers. The polymers were obtained in high yields through a Michael-type conjugate addition of diacrylate monomers with trifunctional

  2. A compact dual promoter adeno-associated viral vector for efficient delivery of two genes to dorsal root ganglion neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fagoe, N D; Eggers, R; Verhaagen, J; Mason, M R J

    Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors based on serotype 5 are an efficient means to target dorsal root ganglia (DRG) to study gene function in the primary sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system. In this study, we have developed a compact AAV dual promoter vector composed of the

  3. HIV Cell-to-Cell Spread Results in Earlier Onset of Viral Gene Expression by Multiple Infections per Cell.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikaël Boullé

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cell-to-cell spread of HIV, a directed mode of viral transmission, has been observed to be more rapid than cell-free infection. However, a mechanism for earlier onset of viral gene expression in cell-to-cell spread was previously uncharacterized. Here we used time-lapse microscopy combined with automated image analysis to quantify the timing of the onset of HIV gene expression in a fluorescent reporter cell line, as well as single cell staining for infection over time in primary cells. We compared cell-to-cell spread of HIV to cell-free infection, and limited both types of transmission to a two-hour window to minimize differences due to virus transit time to the cell. The mean time to detectable onset of viral gene expression in cell-to-cell spread was accelerated by 19% in the reporter cell line and by 35% in peripheral blood mononuclear cells relative to cell-free HIV infection. Neither factors secreted by infected cells, nor contact with infected cells in the absence of transmission, detectably changed onset. We recapitulated the earlier onset by infecting with multiple cell-free viruses per cell. Surprisingly, the acceleration in onset of viral gene expression was not explained by cooperativity between infecting virions. Instead, more rapid onset was consistent with a model where the fastest expressing virus out of the infecting virus pool sets the time for infection independently of the other co-infecting viruses.

  4. Advances in Viral Vector-Based TRAIL Gene Therapy for Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norian, Lyse A.; James, Britnie R.; Griffith, Thomas S.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous biologic approaches are being investigated as anti-cancer therapies in an attempt to induce tumor regression while circumventing the toxic side effects associated with standard chemo- or radiotherapies. Among these, tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) has shown particular promise in pre-clinical and early clinical trials, due to its preferential ability to induce apoptotic cell death in cancer cells and its minimal toxicity. One limitation of TRAIL use is the fact that many tumor types display an inherent resistance to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. To circumvent this problem, researchers have explored a number of strategies to optimize TRAIL delivery and to improve its efficacy via co-administration with other anti-cancer agents. In this review, we will focus on TRAIL-based gene therapy approaches for the treatment of malignancies. We will discuss the main viral vectors that are being used for TRAIL gene therapy and the strategies that are currently being attempted to improve the efficacy of TRAIL as an anti-cancer therapeutic

  5. The Canonical Immediate Early 3 Gene Product pIE611 of Mouse Cytomegalovirus Is Dispensable for Viral Replication but Mediates Transcriptional and Posttranscriptional Regulation of Viral Gene Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattay, Stephanie; Trilling, Mirko; Megger, Dominik A; Sitek, Barbara; Meyer, Helmut E; Hengel, Hartmut; Le-Trilling, Vu Thuy Khanh

    2015-08-01

    Transcription of mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) immediate early ie1 and ie3 is controlled by the major immediate early promoter/enhancer (MIEP) and requires differential splicing. Based on complete loss of genome replication of an MCMV mutant carrying a deletion of the ie3-specific exon 5, the multifunctional IE3 protein (611 amino acids; pIE611) is considered essential for viral replication. Our analysis of ie3 transcription resulted in the identification of novel ie3 isoforms derived from alternatively spliced ie3 transcripts. Construction of an IE3-hemagglutinin (IE3-HA) virus by insertion of an in-frame HA epitope sequence allowed detection of the IE3 isoforms in infected cells, verifying that the newly identified transcripts code for proteins. This prompted the construction of an MCMV mutant lacking ie611 but retaining the coding capacity for the newly identified isoforms ie453 and ie310. Using Δie611 MCMV, we demonstrated the dispensability of the canonical ie3 gene product pIE611 for viral replication. To determine the role of pIE611 for viral gene expression during MCMV infection in an unbiased global approach, we used label-free quantitative mass spectrometry to delineate pIE611-dependent changes of the MCMV proteome. Interestingly, further analysis revealed transcriptional as well as posttranscriptional regulation of MCMV gene products by pIE611. Cytomegaloviruses are pathogenic betaherpesviruses persisting in a lifelong latency from which reactivation can occur under conditions of immunosuppression, immunoimmaturity, or inflammation. The switch from latency to reactivation requires expression of immediate early genes. Therefore, understanding of immediate early gene regulation might add insights into viral pathogenesis. The mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV) immediate early 3 protein (611 amino acids; pIE611) is considered essential for viral replication. The identification of novel protein isoforms derived from alternatively spliced ie3 transcripts prompted

  6. Non-viral gene delivery strategies for gene therapy: a “ménage à trois” among nucleic acids, materials, and the biological environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pezzoli, Daniele; Candiani, Gabriele

    2013-01-01

    Gene delivery is the science of transferring genetic material into cells by means of a vector to alter cellular function or structure at a molecular level. In this context, a number of nucleic acid-based drugs have been proposed and experimented so far and, as they act on distinct steps along the gene transcription–translation pathway, specific delivery strategies are required to elicit the desired outcome. Cationic lipids and polymers, collectively known as non-viral delivery systems, have thus made their breakthrough in basic and medical research. Albeit they are promising alternatives to viral vectors, their therapeutic application is still rather limited as high transfection efficiencies are normally associated to adverse cytotoxic side effects. In this scenario, drawing inspiration from processes naturally occurring in vivo, major strides forward have been made in the development of more effective materials for gene delivery applications. Specifically, smart vectors sensitive to a variety of physiological stimuli such as cell enzymes, redox status, and pH are substantially changing the landscape of gene delivery by helping to overcome some of the systemic and intracellular barriers that viral vectors naturally evade. Herein, after summarizing the state-of-the-art information regarding the use of nucleic acids as drugs, we review the main bottlenecks still limiting the overall effectiveness of non-viral gene delivery systems. Finally, we provide a critical outline of emerging stimuli-responsive strategies and discuss challenges still existing on the road toward conceiving more efficient and safer multifunctional vectors.

  7. ATF3 inhibits PPARγ-stimulated transactivation in adipocyte cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Min-Kyung; Jung, Myeong Ho, E-mail: jung0603@pusan.ac.kr

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • ATF3 inhibits PPARγ-stimulated transcriptional activation. • ATF3 interacts with PPARγ. • ATF3 suppresses p300-mediated transcriptional coactivation. • ATF3 decreases the binding of PPARγ and recruitment of p300 to PPRE. - Abstract: Previously, we reported that activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) downregulates peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPARγ) gene expression and inhibits adipocyte differentiation in 3T3-L1 cells. Here, we investigated another role of ATF3 on the regulation of PPARγ activity. ATF3 inhibited PPARγ-stimulated transactivation of PPARγ responsive element (PPRE)-containing reporter or GAL4/PPARγ chimeric reporter. Thus, ATF3 effectively repressed rosiglitazone-stimulated expression of adipocyte fatty acid binding protein (aP2), PPARγ target gene, in 3T3-L1 cells. Coimmunoprecipitation and GST pulldown assay demonstrated that ATF3 interacted with PPARγ. Accordingly, ATF3 prevented PPARγ from binding to PPRE on the aP2 promoter. Furthermore, ATF3 suppressed p300-mediated transcriptional coactivation of PPRE-containing reporter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that overexpression of ATF3 blocked both binding of PPARγ and recruitment of p300 to PPRE on aP2 promoter induced by rosiglitazone treatment in 3T3-L1 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that ATF3 interacts with PPARγ and represses PPARγ-mediated transactivation through suppression of p300-stimulated coactivation in 3T3-L1 cells, which may play a role in inhibition of adipocyte differentiation.

  8. Roles of Polypyrimidine Tract Binding Proteins in Major Immediate-Early Gene Expression and Viral Replication of Human Cytomegalovirus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosme, Ruth S. Cruz; Yamamura, Yasuhiro; Tang, Qiyi

    2009-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a member of the β subgroup of the family Herpesviridae, causes serious health problems worldwide. HCMV gene expression in host cells is a well-defined sequential process: immediate-early (IE) gene expression, early-gene expression, DNA replication, and late-gene expression. The most abundant IE gene, major IE (MIE) gene pre-mRNA, needs to be spliced before being exported to the cytoplasm for translation. In this study, the regulation of MIE gene splicing was investigated; in so doing, we found that polypyrimidine tract binding proteins (PTBs) strongly repressed MIE gene production in cotransfection assays. In addition, we discovered that the repressive effects of PTB could be rescued by splicing factor U2AF. Taken together, the results suggest that PTBs inhibit MIE gene splicing by competing with U2AF65 for binding to the polypyrimidine tract in pre-mRNA. In intron deletion mutation assays and RNA detection experiments (reverse transcription [RT]-PCR and real-time RT-PCR), we further observed that PTBs target all the introns of the MIE gene, especially intron 2, and affect gene splicing, which was reflected in the variation in the ratio of pre-mRNA to mRNA. Using transfection assays, we demonstrated that PTB knockdown cells induce a higher degree of MIE gene splicing/expression. Consistently, HCMV can produce more viral proteins and viral particles in PTB knockdown cells after infection. We conclude that PTB inhibits HCMV replication by interfering with MIE gene splicing through competition with U2AF for binding to the polypyrimidine tract in MIE gene introns. PMID:19144709

  9. Roles of polypyrimidine tract binding proteins in major immediate-early gene expression and viral replication of human cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosme, Ruth S Cruz; Yamamura, Yasuhiro; Tang, Qiyi

    2009-04-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), a member of the beta subgroup of the family Herpesviridae, causes serious health problems worldwide. HCMV gene expression in host cells is a well-defined sequential process: immediate-early (IE) gene expression, early-gene expression, DNA replication, and late-gene expression. The most abundant IE gene, major IE (MIE) gene pre-mRNA, needs to be spliced before being exported to the cytoplasm for translation. In this study, the regulation of MIE gene splicing was investigated; in so doing, we found that polypyrimidine tract binding proteins (PTBs) strongly repressed MIE gene production in cotransfection assays. In addition, we discovered that the repressive effects of PTB could be rescued by splicing factor U2AF. Taken together, the results suggest that PTBs inhibit MIE gene splicing by competing with U2AF65 for binding to the polypyrimidine tract in pre-mRNA. In intron deletion mutation assays and RNA detection experiments (reverse transcription [RT]-PCR and real-time RT-PCR), we further observed that PTBs target all the introns of the MIE gene, especially intron 2, and affect gene splicing, which was reflected in the variation in the ratio of pre-mRNA to mRNA. Using transfection assays, we demonstrated that PTB knockdown cells induce a higher degree of MIE gene splicing/expression. Consistently, HCMV can produce more viral proteins and viral particles in PTB knockdown cells after infection. We conclude that PTB inhibits HCMV replication by interfering with MIE gene splicing through competition with U2AF for binding to the polypyrimidine tract in MIE gene introns.

  10. Promoter trans-activation of protooncogenes c-fos and c-myc, but not c-Ha-ras, by products of adenovirus early region 1A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sassone-Corsi, P.; Borrelli, E.

    1987-01-01

    The E1A (early region 1A) oncogene products of adenovirus type 2 trans-activate the other early viral transcription units, as well as some cellular promoters. Using a short-term cotransfection assay in murine NIH 3T3 fibroblasts, we show that c-fos and c-myc promoter activities are stimulated by the E1A proteins, whereas c-Ha-ras transcription is not affected. The product of E1A 13S mRNA is responsible for the trans-activation, whereas the 12S mRNA product has no effect. Analysis of the c-fos promoter sequences required for the E1A stimulation shows that responsive sequences are located between positions -402 and -240 upstream of the transcription initiation site. This same region also contains the c-fos serum-responsive element. Furthermore, transcription of the endogenous c-fos gene in HeLa cells is increased after E1A transfection

  11. Influenza NA and PB1 Gene Segments Interact during the Formation of Viral Progeny: Localization of the Binding Region within the PB1 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad Gilbertson

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The influenza A virus genome comprises eight negative-sense viral RNAs (vRNAs that form individual ribonucleoprotein (RNP complexes. In order to incorporate a complete set of each of these vRNAs, the virus uses a selective packaging mechanism that facilitates co-packaging of specific gene segments but whose molecular basis is still not fully understood. Recently, we used a competitive transfection model where plasmids encoding the A/Puerto Rico/8/34 (PR8 and A/Udorn/307/72 (Udorn PB1 gene segments were competed to show that the Udorn PB1 gene segment is preferentially co-packaged into progeny virions with the Udorn NA gene segment. Here we created chimeric PB1 genes combining both Udorn and PR8 PB1 sequences to further define the location within the Udorn PB1 gene that drives co-segregation of these genes and show that nucleotides 1776–2070 of the PB1 gene are crucial for preferential selection. In vitro assays examining specific interactions between Udorn NA vRNA and purified vRNAs transcribed from chimeric PB1 genes also supported the importance of this region in the PB1-NA interaction. Hence, this work identifies an association between viral genes that are co-selected during packaging. It also reveals a region potentially important in the RNP-RNP interactions within the supramolecular complex that is predicted to form prior to budding to allow one of each segment to be packaged in the viral progeny. Our study lays the foundation to understand the co-selection of specific genes, which may be critical to the emergence of new viruses with pandemic potential.

  12. Pur-Alpha Induces JCV Gene Expression and Viral Replication by Suppressing SRSF1 in Glial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilker Kudret Sariyer

    Full Text Available PML is a rare and fatal demyelinating disease of the CNS caused by the human polyomavirus, JC virus (JCV, which occurs in AIDS patients and those on immunosuppressive monoclonal antibody therapies (mAbs. We sought to identify mechanisms that could stimulate reactivation of JCV in a cell culture model system and targeted pathways which could affect early gene transcription and JCV T-antigen production, which are key steps of the viral life cycle for blocking reactivation of JCV. Two important regulatory partners we have previously identified for T-antigen include Pur-alpha and SRSF1 (SF2/ASF. SRSF1, an alternative splicing factor, is a potential regulator of JCV whose overexpression in glial cells strongly suppresses viral gene expression and replication. Pur-alpha has been most extensively characterized as a sequence-specific DNA- and RNA-binding protein which directs both viral gene transcription and mRNA translation, and is a potent inducer of the JCV early promoter through binding to T-antigen.Pur-alpha and SRSF1 both act directly as transcriptional regulators of the JCV promoter and here we have observed that Pur-alpha is capable of ameliorating SRSF1-mediated suppression of JCV gene expression and viral replication. Interestingly, Pur-alpha exerted its effect by suppressing SRSF1 at both the protein and mRNA levels in glial cells suggesting this effect can occur independent of T-antigen. Pur-alpha and SRSF1 were both localized to oligodendrocyte inclusion bodies by immunohistochemistry in brain sections from patients with HIV-1 associated PML. Interestingly, inclusion bodies were typically positive for either Pur-alpha or SRSF1, though some cells appeared to be positive for both proteins.Taken together, these results indicate the presence of an antagonistic interaction between these two proteins in regulating of JCV gene expression and viral replication and suggests that they play an important role during viral reactivation leading to

  13. Depletion of HPV16 early genes induces autophagy and senescence in a cervical carcinogenesis model, regardless of viral physical state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanning, Jennifer E; Saini, Harpreet K; Murray, Matthew J; Caffarel, Maria M; van Dongen, Stijn; Ward, Dawn; Barker, Emily M; Scarpini, Cinzia G; Groves, Ian J; Stanley, Margaret A; Enright, Anton J; Pett, Mark R; Coleman, Nicholas

    2013-11-01

    In cervical carcinomas, high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) may be integrated into host chromosomes or remain extra-chromosomal (episomal). We used the W12 cervical keratinocyte model to investigate the effects of HPV16 early gene depletion on in vitro cervical carcinogenesis pathways, particularly effects shared by cells with episomal versus integrated HPV16 DNA. Importantly, we were able to study the specific cellular consequences of viral gene depletion by using short interfering RNAs known not to cause phenotypic or transcriptional off-target effects in keratinocytes. We found that while cervical neoplastic progression in vitro was characterized by dynamic changes in HPV16 transcript levels, viral early gene expression was required for cell survival at all stages of carcinogenesis, regardless of viral physical state, levels of early gene expression or histology in organotypic tissue culture. Moreover, HPV16 early gene depletion induced changes in host gene expression that were common to both episome-containing and integrant-containing cells. In particular, we observed up-regulation of autophagy genes, associated with enrichment of senescence and innate immune-response pathways, including the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). In keeping with these observations, HPV16 early gene depletion induced autophagy in both episome-containing and integrant-containing W12 cells, as evidenced by the appearance of autophagosomes, punctate expression of the autophagy marker LC3, conversion of LC3B-I to LC3B-II, and reduced levels of the autophagy substrate p62. Consistent with the reported association between autophagy and senescence pathways, HPV16 early gene depletion induced expression of the senescence marker beta-galactosidase and increased secretion of the SASP-related protein IGFBP3. Together, these data indicate that depleting HR-HPV early genes would be of potential therapeutic benefit in all cervical carcinogenesis pathways, regardless of viral

  14. Viral gene products and replication of the human immunodeficiency type 1 virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, C D; Park, J; Wakefield, J K

    1994-05-01

    The acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic represents a modern-day plague that has not only resulted in a tragic loss of people from a wide spectrum of society but has reshaped our viewpoints regarding health care, the treatment of infectious diseases, and social issues regarding sexual behavior. There is little doubt now that the cause of the disease AIDS is a virus known as the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The HIV virus is a member of a large family of viruses termed retroviruses, which have as a hallmark the capacity to convert their RNA genome into a DNA form that then undergoes a process of integration into the host cell chromosome, followed by the expression of the viral genome and translation of viral proteins in the infected cell. This review describes the organization of the HIV-1 viral genome, the expression of viral proteins, as well as the functions of the accessory viral proteins in HIV replication. The replication of the viral genome is divided into two phases, the early phase and the late phase. The early phase consists of the interaction of the virus with the cell surface receptor (CD4 molecule in most cases), the uncoating and conversion of the viral RNA genome into a DNA form, and the integration into the host cell chromosome. The late phase consists of the expression of the viral proteins from the integrated viral genome, the translation of viral proteins, and the assembly and release of the virus. Points in the HIV-1 life cycle that are targets for therapeutic intervention are also discussed.

  15. A viral microRNA down-regulates multiple cell cycle genes through mRNA 5'UTRs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finn Grey

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Global gene expression data combined with bioinformatic analysis provides strong evidence that mammalian miRNAs mediate repression of gene expression primarily through binding sites within the 3' untranslated region (UTR. Using RNA induced silencing complex immunoprecipitation (RISC-IP techniques we have identified multiple cellular targets for a human cytomegalovirus (HCMV miRNA, miR-US25-1. Strikingly, this miRNA binds target sites primarily within 5'UTRs, mediating significant reduction in gene expression. Intriguingly, many of the genes targeted by miR-US25-1 are associated with cell cycle control, including cyclin E2, BRCC3, EID1, MAPRE2, and CD147, suggesting that miR-US25-1 is targeting genes within a related pathway. Deletion of miR-US25-1 from HCMV results in over expression of cyclin E2 in the context of viral infection. Our studies demonstrate that a viral miRNA mediates translational repression of multiple cellular genes by targeting mRNA 5'UTRs.

  16. Evidence of differential HLA class I-mediated viral evolution in functional and accessory/regulatory genes of HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabrina L Brumme

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the formidable mutational capacity and sequence diversity of HIV-1, evidence suggests that viral evolution in response to specific selective pressures follows generally predictable mutational pathways. Population-based analyses of clinically derived HIV sequences may be used to identify immune escape mutations in viral genes; however, prior attempts to identify such mutations have been complicated by the inability to discriminate active immune selection from virus founder effects. Furthermore, the association between mutations arising under in vivo immune selection and disease progression for highly variable pathogens such as HIV-1 remains incompletely understood. We applied a viral lineage-corrected analytical method to investigate HLA class I-associated sequence imprinting in HIV protease, reverse transcriptase (RT, Vpr, and Nef in a large cohort of chronically infected, antiretrovirally naïve individuals. A total of 478 unique HLA-associated polymorphisms were observed and organized into a series of "escape maps," which identify known and putative cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL epitopes under selection pressure in vivo. Our data indicate that pathways to immune escape are predictable based on host HLA class I profile, and that epitope anchor residues are not the preferred sites of CTL escape. Results reveal differential contributions of immune imprinting to viral gene diversity, with Nef exhibiting far greater evidence for HLA class I-mediated selection compared to other genes. Moreover, these data reveal a significant, dose-dependent inverse correlation between HLA-associated polymorphisms and HIV disease stage as estimated by CD4(+ T cell count. Identification of specific sites and patterns of HLA-associated polymorphisms across HIV protease, RT, Vpr, and Nef illuminates regions of the genes encoding these products under active immune selection pressure in vivo. The high density of HLA-associated polymorphisms in Nef compared to other

  17. Chitosan nanoparticles as non-viral gene delivery systems: determination of loading efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Carolina; Suñé, Josep Maria; Pérez-Lozano, Pilar; García-Montoya, Encarna; Sarrate, Rocío; Fàbregas, Anna; Miñarro, Montserrat; Ticó, Josep Ramon

    2014-07-01

    Chitosan has been studied for use in particle delivery systems for therapeutic purposes, since one of its most important applications is as a non-viral vector in gene therapy. Due to its positive charge, it is capable of forming DNA complexes (polyplexes) obtained through several methods and with the property of protecting nucleic acids. Two methods for obtaining the nanoparticles of chitosan-nucleic acids are reported in this study: simple complexation (of depolymerized chitosan or of different chitosan salts with plasmid) and ionic gelation (by adsorption of plasmid in the nanoparticles or by encapsulation of plasmid into nanoparticles). The determination of the loading efficiency of chitosan nanoparticles with the plasmid is carried out by electrophoretic mobility of the samples on agarose gel. Furthermore, the nanoparticles have been characterized according to their morphology, size and surface charge using AFM, TEM, laser diffraction and dynamic light scattering techniques. The polyplexes obtained have been found to be spherical and nanometric in size (between 100-230nm) with a zeta potential between 37 and 48mV. Positive results have been obtained by agarose gel electrophoresis for all studied cases: a concentration of between 20 and 30μg/mL of chitosan salts is required while for the remaining chitosan samples studied, 100% loading efficiency does not occur until a concentration equal to 100μg/mL (regardless of previous depolymerisation and the method performed). Chitosan-plasmid nanocapsules have been obtained at the polymer concentrations worked with (between 0.025 and 0.2%). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Differential impact of transplantation on peripheral and tissue-associated viral reservoirs: Implications for HIV gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Christopher W; Wang, Jianbin; Deleage, Claire; Reddy, Sowmya; Kaur, Jasbir; Polacino, Patricia; Reik, Andreas; Huang, Meei-Li; Jerome, Keith R; Hu, Shiu-Lok; Holmes, Michael C; Estes, Jacob D; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2018-04-01

    Autologous transplantation and engraftment of HIV-resistant cells in sufficient numbers should recapitulate the functional cure of the Berlin Patient, with applicability to a greater number of infected individuals and with a superior safety profile. A robust preclinical model of suppressed HIV infection is critical in order to test such gene therapy-based cure strategies, both alone and in combination with other cure strategies. Here, we present a nonhuman primate (NHP) model of latent infection using simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) and combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in pigtail macaques. We demonstrate that transplantation of CCR5 gene-edited hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) persist in infected and suppressed animals, and that protected cells expand through virus-dependent positive selection. CCR5 gene-edited cells are readily detectable in tissues, namely those closely associated with viral reservoirs such as lymph nodes and gastrointestinal tract. Following autologous transplantation, tissue-associated SHIV DNA and RNA levels in suppressed animals are significantly reduced (p ≤ 0.05), relative to suppressed, untransplanted control animals. In contrast, the size of the peripheral reservoir, measured by QVOA, is variably impacted by transplantation. Our studies demonstrate that CCR5 gene editing is equally feasible in infected and uninfected animals, that edited cells persist, traffic to, and engraft in tissue reservoirs, and that this approach significantly reduces secondary lymphoid tissue viral reservoir size. Our robust NHP model of HIV gene therapy and viral persistence can be immediately applied to the investigation of combinatorial approaches that incorporate anti-HIV gene therapy, immune modulators, therapeutic vaccination, and latency reversing agents.

  19. Differential impact of transplantation on peripheral and tissue-associated viral reservoirs: Implications for HIV gene therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher W Peterson

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Autologous transplantation and engraftment of HIV-resistant cells in sufficient numbers should recapitulate the functional cure of the Berlin Patient, with applicability to a greater number of infected individuals and with a superior safety profile. A robust preclinical model of suppressed HIV infection is critical in order to test such gene therapy-based cure strategies, both alone and in combination with other cure strategies. Here, we present a nonhuman primate (NHP model of latent infection using simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV and combination antiretroviral therapy (cART in pigtail macaques. We demonstrate that transplantation of CCR5 gene-edited hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs persist in infected and suppressed animals, and that protected cells expand through virus-dependent positive selection. CCR5 gene-edited cells are readily detectable in tissues, namely those closely associated with viral reservoirs such as lymph nodes and gastrointestinal tract. Following autologous transplantation, tissue-associated SHIV DNA and RNA levels in suppressed animals are significantly reduced (p ≤ 0.05, relative to suppressed, untransplanted control animals. In contrast, the size of the peripheral reservoir, measured by QVOA, is variably impacted by transplantation. Our studies demonstrate that CCR5 gene editing is equally feasible in infected and uninfected animals, that edited cells persist, traffic to, and engraft in tissue reservoirs, and that this approach significantly reduces secondary lymphoid tissue viral reservoir size. Our robust NHP model of HIV gene therapy and viral persistence can be immediately applied to the investigation of combinatorial approaches that incorporate anti-HIV gene therapy, immune modulators, therapeutic vaccination, and latency reversing agents.

  20. Vaccinia Virus Protein C6 Inhibits Type I IFN Signalling in the Nucleus and Binds to the Transactivation Domain of STAT2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer H Stuart

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The type I interferon (IFN response is a crucial innate immune signalling pathway required for defense against viral infection. Accordingly, the great majority of mammalian viruses possess means to inhibit this important host immune response. Here we show that vaccinia virus (VACV strain Western Reserve protein C6, is a dual function protein that inhibits the cellular response to type I IFNs in addition to its published function as an inhibitor of IRF-3 activation, thereby restricting type I IFN production from infected cells. Ectopic expression of C6 inhibits the induction of interferon stimulated genes (ISGs in response to IFNα treatment at both the mRNA and protein level. C6 inhibits the IFNα-induced Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT signalling pathway at a late stage, downstream of STAT1 and STAT2 phosphorylation, nuclear translocation and binding of the interferon stimulated gene factor 3 (ISGF3 complex to the interferon stimulated response element (ISRE. Mechanistically, C6 associates with the transactivation domain of STAT2 and this might explain how C6 inhibits the type I IFN signalling very late in the pathway. During virus infection C6 reduces ISRE-dependent gene expression despite the presence of the viral protein phosphatase VH1 that dephosphorylates STAT1 and STAT2. The ability of a cytoplasmic replicating virus to dampen the immune response within the nucleus, and the ability of viral immunomodulators such as C6 to inhibit multiple stages of the innate immune response by distinct mechanisms, emphasizes the intricacies of host-pathogen interactions and viral immune evasion.

  1. Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus ORF54, a viral desmoplakin gene, is associated with the infectivity of budded virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min-Juan; Tian, Cai-Hong; Fan, Xiao-Ying; Lou, Yi-Han; Cheng, Ruo-Lin; Zhang, Chuan-Xi

    2012-07-01

    Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) ORF54 (Bm54), a member of the viral desmoplakin N-terminus superfamily, is homologous to Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ORF66, which is required for the efficient egress of nucleocapsids from the nucleus and occlusion body formation. In this paper, we generated a bacmid with the Bm54 gene deleted via homologous recombination in Escherichia coli and characterized the mutant virus using a transfection-infection assay and transmission electron microscopy analysis. Our results demonstrated that the cells transfected with viral DNA lacking Bm54 produced non-infectious budded viruses (BVs). Electron microscopy showed that although the deletion of Bm54 did not affect assembly and release of nucleocapsids, it severely affected polyhedron formation. In conclusion, deletion of Bm54 resulted in non-infectious BV and defective polyhedra. Although the sequences of Bm54 and Ac66 are very similar, the two genes function quite differently in the regulation of viral life cycle.

  2. Interactions of Chromatin Context, Binding Site Sequence Content, and Sequence Evolution in Stress-Induced p53 Occupancy and Transactivation

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Dan; Wang, Xuting; Campbell, Michelle R.; Song, Lingyun; Safi, Alexias; Crawford, Gregory E.; Bell, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    Cellular stresses activate the tumor suppressor p53 protein leading to selective binding to DNA response elements (REs) and gene transactivation from a large pool of potential p53 REs (p53REs). To elucidate how p53RE sequences and local chromatin context interact to affect p53 binding and gene transactivation, we mapped genome-wide binding localizations of p53 and H3K4me3 in untreated and doxorubicin (DXR)-treated human lymphoblastoid cells. We examined the relationships among p53 occupancy, ...

  3. Non-viral ex vivo hepatic gene transfer by in situ lipofection of liver and intraperitoneal transplantation of hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarajan, P N; Vatsala, P G; Ashok, M S; Srinivas, V K; Habibullah, C M; Padmanaban, G

    1997-04-29

    Perfusion of liver with plasmid DNA-lipofectin complexes via the portal vein results in efficient accumulation of the vector in hepatocytes. Such hepatocytes, when administered intraperitoneally into a hepatectomized rat, repopulate the liver and express the transgene efficiently. This procedure obviates the need for large-scale hepatocyte culture for ex vivo gene transfer. Further, intraperitoneal transplantation is a simple and cost-effective strategy of introducing genetically modified hepatocytes into liver. Thus, in situ lipofection of liver and intraperitoneal transfer of hepatocytes can be developed into a novel method of non-viral ex vivo gene transfer technique that has applications in the treatment of metabolic disorders of liver and hepatic gene therapy.

  4. Replication of an incomplete alfalfa mosaic virus genome in plants transformed with viral replicase genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taschner, P. E.; van der Kuyl, A. C.; Neeleman, L.; Bol, J. F.

    1991-01-01

    RNAs 1 and 2 of alfalfa mosaic virus (AIMV) encode proteins P1 and P2, respectively, both of which have a putative role in viral RNA replication. Tobacco plants were transformed with DNA copies of RNA1 (P1-plants), RNA2 (P2-plants) or a combination of these two cDNAs (P12-plants). All transgenic

  5. Specific interaction between hnRNP H and HPV16 L1 proteins: Implications for late gene auto-regulation enabling rapid viral capsid protein production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Zi-Zheng; Sun, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Min; Huang, Hui [National Institute of Diagnostics and Vaccine Development in Infectious Diseases, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Zhang, Jun; Xia, Ning-Shao [National Institute of Diagnostics and Vaccine Development in Infectious Diseases, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Miao, Ji, E-mail: jmiao@xmu.edu.cn [National Institute of Diagnostics and Vaccine Development in Infectious Diseases, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); Zhao, Qinjian, E-mail: qinjian_zhao@xmu.edu.cn [National Institute of Diagnostics and Vaccine Development in Infectious Diseases, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China); School of Public Health, Xiamen University, Xiamen, Fujian 361005 (China)

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► The RNA-binding hnRNP H regulates late viral gene expression. ► hnRNP H activity was inhibited by a late viral protein. ► Specific interaction between HPV L1 and hnRNP H was demonstrated. ► Co-localization of HPV L1 and hnRNP H inside cells was observed. ► Viral capsid protein production, enabling rapid capsid assembly, was implicated. -- Abstract: Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), including hnRNP H, are RNA-binding proteins that function as splicing factors and are involved in downstream gene regulation. hnRNP H, which binds to G triplet regions in RNA, has been shown to play an important role in regulating the staged expression of late proteins in viral systems. Here, we report that the specific association between hnRNP H and a late viral capsid protein, human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 protein, leads to the suppressed function of hnRNP H in the presence of the L1 protein. The direct interaction between the L1 protein and hnRNP H was demonstrated by complex formation in solution and intracellularly using a variety of biochemical and immunochemical methods, including peptide mapping, specific co-immunoprecipitation and confocal fluorescence microscopy. These results support a working hypothesis that a late viral protein HPV16 L1, which is down regulated by hnRNP H early in the viral life cycle may provide an auto-regulatory positive feedback loop that allows the rapid production of HPV capsid proteins through suppression of the function of hnRNP H at the late stage of the viral life cycle. In this positive feedback loop, the late viral gene products that were down regulated earlier themselves disable their suppressors, and this feedback mechanism could facilitate the rapid production of capsid proteins, allowing staged and efficient viral capsid assembly.

  6. Inactivation of the host lipin gene accelerates RNA virus replication through viral exploitation of the expanded endoplasmic reticulum membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chingkai Chuang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available RNA viruses take advantage of cellular resources, such as membranes and lipids, to assemble viral replicase complexes (VRCs that drive viral replication. The host lipins (phosphatidate phosphatases are particularly interesting because these proteins play key roles in cellular decisions about membrane biogenesis versus lipid storage. Therefore, we examined the relationship between host lipins and tombusviruses, based on yeast model host. We show that deletion of PAH1 (phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase, which is the single yeast homolog of the lipin gene family of phosphatidate phosphatases, whose inactivation is responsible for proliferation and expansion of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER membrane, facilitates robust RNA virus replication in yeast. We document increased tombusvirus replicase activity in pah1Δ yeast due to the efficient assembly of VRCs. We show that the ER membranes generated in pah1Δ yeast is efficiently subverted by this RNA virus, thus emphasizing the connection between host lipins and RNA viruses. Thus, instead of utilizing the peroxisomal membranes as observed in wt yeast and plants, TBSV readily switches to the vastly expanded ER membranes in lipin-deficient cells to build VRCs and support increased level of viral replication. Over-expression of the Arabidopsis Pah2p in Nicotiana benthamiana decreased tombusvirus accumulation, validating that our findings are also relevant in a plant host. Over-expression of AtPah2p also inhibited the ER-based replication of another plant RNA virus, suggesting that the role of lipins in RNA virus replication might include several more eukaryotic viruses.

  7. Regulated expression of the human cytomegalovirus pp65 gene: Octamer sequence in the promoter is required for activation by viral gene products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depto, A.S.; Stenberg, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    To better understand the regulation of late gene expression in human cytomegalovirus (CMV)-infected cells, the authors examined expression of the gene that codes for the 65-kilodalton lower-matrix phosphoprotein (pp65). Analysis of RNA isolated at 72 h from cells infected with CMV Towne or ts66, a DNA-negative temperature-sensitive mutant, supported the fact that pp65 is expressed at low levels prior to viral DNA replication but maximally expressed after the initiation of viral DNA replication. To investigate promoter activation in a transient expression assay, the pp65 promoter was cloned into the indicator plasmid containing the gene for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT). Transfection of the promoter-CAT construct and subsequent superinfection with CMV resulted in activation of the promoter at early times after infection. Cotransfection with plasmids capable of expressing immediate-early (IE) proteins demonstrated that the promoter was activated by IE proteins and that both IE regions 1 and 2 were necessary. These studies suggest that interactions between IE proteins and this octamer sequence may be important for the regulation and expression of this CMV gene

  8. The transcription elongation factor ELL2 is specifically upregulated in HTLV-1-infected T-cells and is dependent on the viral oncoprotein Tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Melanie C; Strobel, Sarah; Fleckenstein, Bernhard; Kress, Andrea K

    2014-09-01

    The oncoprotein Tax of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is a potent transactivator of viral and cellular transcription. Here, we identified ELL2 as the sole transcription elongation factor to be specifically upregulated in HTLV-1-/Tax-transformed T-cells. Tax contributes to regulation of ELL2, since transient transfection of Tax increases ELL2 mRNA, Tax transactivates the ELL2 promoter, and repression of Tax results in decrease of ELL2 in transformed T-lymphocytes. However, we also measured upregulation of ELL2 in HTLV-1-transformed cells exhibiting undetectable amounts of Tax, suggesting that ELL2 can still be maintained independent of continuous Tax expression. We further show that Tax and ELL2 synergistically activate the HTLV-1 promoter, indicating that ELL2 cooperates with Tax in viral transactivation. This is supported by our findings that Tax and ELL2 accumulate in nuclear fractions and that they co-precipitate upon co-expression in transiently-transfected cells. Thus, upregulation of ELL2 could contribute to HTLV-1 gene regulation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Stem cell gene therapy for HIV: strategies to inhibit viral entry and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiGiusto, David L

    2015-03-01

    Since the demonstration of a cure of an HIV+ patient with an allogeneic stem cell transplant using naturally HIV-resistant cells, significant interest in creating similar autologous products has fueled the development of a variety of "cell engineering" approaches to stem cell therapy for HIV. Among the more well-studied strategies is the inhibition of viral entry through disruption of expression of viral co-receptors or through competitive inhibitors of viral fusion with the cell membrane. Preclinical evaluation of these approaches often starts in vitro but ultimately is tested in animal models prior to clinical implementation. In this review, we trace the development of several key approaches (meganucleases, short hairpin RNA (shRNA), and fusion inhibitors) to modification of hematopoietic stem cells designed to impart resistance to HIV to their T-cell and monocytic progeny. The basic evolution of technologies through in vitro and in vivo testing is discussed as well as the pros and cons of each approach and how the addition of postentry inhibitors may enhance the overall antiviral efficacy of these approaches.

  10. Chitosan in Non-Viral Gene Delivery: Role of Structure, Characterization Methods, and Insights in Cancer and Rare Diseases Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Santos-Carballal

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Non-viral gene delivery vectors have lagged far behind viral ones in the current pipeline of clinical trials of gene therapy nanomedicines. Even when non-viral nanovectors pose less safety risks than do viruses, their efficacy is much lower. Since the early studies to deliver pDNA, chitosan has been regarded as a highly attractive biopolymer to deliver nucleic acids intracellularly and induce a transgenic response resulting in either upregulation of protein expression (for pDNA, mRNA or its downregulation (for siRNA or microRNA. This is explained as the consequence of a multi-step process involving condensation of nucleic acids, protection against degradation, stabilization in physiological conditions, cellular internalization, release from the endolysosome (“proton sponge” effect, unpacking and enabling the trafficking of pDNA to the nucleus or the siRNA to the RNA interference silencing complex (RISC. Given the multiple steps and complexity involved in the gene transfection process, there is a dearth of understanding of the role of chitosan’s structural features (Mw and degree of acetylation, DA% on each step that dictates the net transfection efficiency and its kinetics. The use of fully characterized chitosan samples along with the utilization of complementary biophysical and biological techniques is key to bridging this gap of knowledge and identifying the optimal chitosans for delivering a specific gene. Other aspects such as cell type and administration route are also at play. At the same time, the role of chitosan structural features on the morphology, size and surface composition of synthetic virus-like particles has barely been addressed. The ongoing revolution brought about by the recent discovery of CRISPR-Cas9 technology will undoubtedly be a game changer in this field in the short term. In the field of rare diseases, gene therapy is perhaps where the greatest potential lies and we anticipate that chitosans will be key players

  11. TACN-based cationic lipids with amino acid backbone and double tails: materials for non-viral gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bing; Yi, Wen-Jing; Zhang, Ji; Zhang, Qin-Fang; Xun, Miao-Miao; Yu, Xiao-Qi

    2014-04-01

    Cationic lipids have become an efficient type of non-viral vectors for gene delivery. In this Letter, four cationic lipids containing 1,4,7-triazacyclononane (TACN) headgroup, glutamic/aspartic acid backbone and dioleyl tails were designed and synthesized. The TACN headgroup gives these lipids excellent pH buffering capacities, which were higher than branched 25 kDa PEI. Cationic liposomes prepared from these lipids and DOPE showed good DNA affinity, and full DNA condensation was found at N/P ratio of 3 via agarose gel electrophoresis. The lipoplexes were characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS) assay, which gave proper particle sizes and zeta-potentials for transfection. In vitro gene transfection results in two cell lines reveal that TAN (with aspartic acid and amide bond in the structure) shows the best transfection efficiency, which is close to commercially available transfection agent Lipofectamine 2000. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Multifunctional non-viral gene vectors with enhanced stability, improved cellular and nuclear uptake capability, and increased transfection efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhe; Jiang, Zhaozhong; Cao, Zhong; Zhang, Chao; Gao, Di; Luo, Xingen; Zhang, Xiaofang; Luo, Huiyan; Jiang, Qing; Liu, Jie

    2014-08-01

    We have developed a new multifunctional, non-viral gene delivery platform consisting of cationic poly(amine-co-ester) (PPMS) for DNA condensation, PEG shell for nanoparticle stabilization, poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA) and mTAT (a cell-penetrating peptide) for accelerated cellular uptake, and a nuclear localization signal peptide (NLS) for enhanced intracellular transport of DNA to the nucleus. In vitro study showed that coating of the binary PPMS/DNA polyplex with γ-PGA promotes cellular uptake of the polyplex particles, particularly by γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT)-positive cells through the GGT-mediated endocytosis pathway. Conjugating PEG to the γ-PGA led to the formation of a ternary PPMS/DNA/PGA-g-PEG polyplex with decreased positive charges on the surface of the polyplex particles and substantially higher stability in serum-containing aqueous medium. The cellular uptake rate was further improved by incorporating mTAT into the ternary polyplex system. Addition of the NLS peptide was designed to facilitate intracellular delivery of the plasmid to the nucleus--a rate-limiting step in the gene transfection process. As a result, compared with the binary PPMS/LucDNA polyplex, the new mTAT-quaternary PPMS/LucDNA/NLS/PGA-g-PEG-mTAT system exhibited reduced cytotoxicity, remarkably faster cellular uptake rate, and enhanced transport of DNA to the nucleus. All these advantageous functionalities contribute to the remarkable gene transfection efficiency of the mTAT-quaternary polyplex both in vitro and in vivo, which exceeds that of the binary polyplex and commercial Lipofectamine™ 2000/DNA lipoplex. The multifunctional mTAT-quaternary polyplex system with improved efficiency and reduced cytotoxicity represents a new type of promising non-viral vectors for the delivery of therapeutic genes to treat tumors.We have developed a new multifunctional, non-viral gene delivery platform consisting of cationic poly(amine-co-ester) (PPMS) for DNA condensation, PEG shell

  13. BRD4 is associated with raccoon polyomavirus genome and mediates viral gene transcription and maintenance of a stem cell state in neuroglial tumour cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, Molly E; Estrada, Marko; Leutenegger, Christian M; Dela Cruz, Florante N; Pesavento, Patricia A; Woolard, Kevin D

    2016-11-01

    Polyomavirus infection often results in persistence of the viral genome with little or no virion production. However, infection of certain cell types can result in high viral gene transcription and either cytolysis or neoplastic transformation. While infection by polyomavirus is common in humans and many animals, major questions regarding viral persistence of most polyomaviruses remain unanswered. Specifically, identification of target cells for viral infection and the mechanisms polyomaviruses employ to maintain viral genomes within cells are important not only in ascribing causality to polyomaviruses in disease, but in understanding specific mechanisms by which they cause disease. Here, we characterize the cell of origin in raccoon polyomavirus (RacPyV)-associated neuroglial brain tumours as a neural stem cell. Moreover, we identify an association between the viral genome and the host cell bromodomain protein, BRD4, which is involved in numerous cellular functions, including cell cycle progression, differentiation of stem cells, tethering of persistent DNA viruses, and regulation of viral and host-cell gene transcription. We demonstrate that inhibition of BRD4 by the small molecule inhibitors (+)-JQ1 and IBET-151 (GSK1210151A) results in reduced RacPyV genome within cells in vitro, as well as significant reduction of viral gene transcripts LT and VP1, highlighting its importance in both maintenance of the viral genome and in driving oncogenic transformation by RacPyV. This work implicates BRD4 as a central protein involved in RacPyV neuroglial tumour cell proliferation and in the maintenance of a stem cell state.

  14. Meta-Analysis of DNA Tumor-Viral Integration Site Selection Indicates a Role for Repeats, Gene Expression and Epigenetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet M. Doolittle-Hall

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Oncoviruses cause tremendous global cancer burden. For several DNA tumor viruses, human genome integration is consistently associated with cancer development. However, genomic features associated with tumor viral integration are poorly understood. We sought to define genomic determinants for 1897 loci prone to hosting human papillomavirus (HPV, hepatitis B virus (HBV or Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV. These were compared to HIV, whose enzyme-mediated integration is well understood. A comprehensive catalog of integration sites was constructed from the literature and experimentally-determined HPV integration sites. Features were scored in eight categories (genes, expression, open chromatin, histone modifications, methylation, protein binding, chromatin segmentation and repeats and compared to random loci. Random forest models determined loci classification and feature selection. HPV and HBV integrants were not fragile site associated. MCPyV preferred integration near sensory perception genes. Unique signatures of integration-associated predictive genomic features were detected. Importantly, repeats, actively-transcribed regions and histone modifications were common tumor viral integration signatures.

  15. Transcriptional activation of immediate-early gene ETR101 by human T-cell leukaemia virus type I Tax

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Li; Ma, Shiliang; Li, Bo

    2003-01-01

    Human T-cell leukaemia virus type I (HTLV-I) Tax regulates viral and cellular gene expression through interactions with multiple cellular transcription pathways. This study describes the finding of immediate-early gene ETR101 expression in HTLV-I-infected cells and its regulation by Tax. ETR101...... was persistently expressed in HTLV-I-infected cells but not in HTLV-I uninfected cells. Expression of ETR101 was dependent upon Tax expression in the inducible Tax-expressing cell line JPX-9 and also in Jurkat cells transiently transfected with Tax-expressing vectors. Tax transactivated the ETR101 gene promoter......-DNA complex in HTLV-I-infected cell lines. EMSA with specific antibodies confirmed that the CREB transcription factor was responsible for formation of this specific protein-DNA complex. These results suggested that Tax directly transactivated ETR101 gene expression, mainly through a CRE sequence via the CREB...

  16. Pan-viral specificity of IFN-induced genes reveals new roles for cGAS in innate immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoggins, John W.; MacDuff, Donna A.; Imanaka, Naoko; Gainey, Maria D.; Shrestha, Bimmi; Eitson, Jennifer L.; Mar, Katrina B.; Richardson, R. Blake; Ratushny, Alexander V.; Litvak, Vladimir; Dabelic, Rea; Manicassamy, Balaji; Aitchison, John D.; Aderem, Alan; Elliott, Richard M.; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Racaniello, Vincent; Snijder, Eric J.; Yokoyama, Wayne M.; Diamond, Michael S.; Virgin, Herbert W.; Rice, Charles M.

    2014-01-01

    The type I interferon (IFN) response protects cells from viral infection by inducing hundreds of interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs), some of which encode direct antiviral effectors. Recent screening studies have begun to catalogue ISGs with antiviral activity against several RNA and DNA viruses. However, antiviral ISG specificity across multiple distinct classes of viruses remains largely unexplored. Here we used an ectopic expression assay to screen a library of more than 350 human ISGs for effects on 14 viruses representing 7 families and 11 genera. We show that 47 genes inhibit one or more viruses, and 25 genes enhance virus infectivity. Comparative analysis reveals that the screened ISGs target positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses more effectively than negative-sense single-stranded RNA viruses. Gene clustering highlights the cytosolic DNA sensor cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS, also known as MB21D1) as a gene whose expression also broadly inhibits several RNA viruses. In vitro, lentiviral delivery of enzymatically active cGAS triggers a STING-dependent, IRF3-mediated antiviral program that functions independently of canonical IFN/STAT1 signalling. In vivo, genetic ablation of murine cGAS reveals its requirement in the antiviral response to two DNA viruses, and an unappreciated contribution to the innate control of an RNA virus. These studies uncover new paradigms for the preferential specificity of IFN-mediated antiviral pathways spanning several virus families.

  17. Novel adeno-associated viral vector delivering the utrophin gene regulator jazz counteracts dystrophic pathology in mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strimpakos, Georgios; Corbi, Nicoletta; Pisani, Cinzia; Di Certo, Maria Grazia; Onori, Annalisa; Luvisetto, Siro; Severini, Cinzia; Gabanella, Francesca; Monaco, Lucia; Mattei, Elisabetta; Passananti, Claudio

    2014-09-01

    Over-expression of the dystrophin-related gene utrophin represents a promising therapeutic strategy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). The strategy is based on the ability of utrophin to functionally replace defective dystrophin. We developed the artificial zinc finger transcription factor "Jazz" that up-regulates both the human and mouse utrophin promoter. We observed a significant recovery of muscle strength in dystrophic Jazz-transgenic mdx mice. Here we demonstrate the efficacy of an experimental gene therapy based on the systemic delivery of Jazz gene in mdx mice by adeno-associated virus (AAV). AAV serotype 8 was chosen on the basis of its high affinity for skeletal muscle. Muscle-specific expression of the therapeutic Jazz gene was enhanced by adding the muscle α-actin promoter to the AAV vector (mAAV). Injection of mAAV8-Jazz viral preparations into mdx mice resulted in muscle-specific Jazz expression coupled with up-regulation of the utrophin gene. We show a significant recovery from the dystrophic phenotype in mAAV8-Jazz-treated mdx mice. Histological and physiological analysis revealed a reduction of fiber necrosis and inflammatory cell infiltration associated with functional recovery in muscle contractile force. The combination of ZF-ATF technology with the AAV delivery can open a new avenue to obtain a therapeutic strategy for treatment of DMD. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Options to Expand HIV Viral Load Testing in South Africa: Evaluation of the GeneXpert® HIV-1 Viral Load Assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Gous

    Full Text Available Expansion of HIV viral load (VL testing services are required to meet increased targets for monitoring patients on antiretroviral treatment. South Africa currently tests >4million VLs per annum in 16 highly centralised, automated high-throughput laboratories. The Xpert HIV-1 VL assay (Cepheid was evaluated against in-country predicates, the Roche Cobas Taqmanv2 and Abbott HIV-1RT, to investigate options for expanding VL testing using GeneXpert's random access, polyvalent capabilities and already established footprint in South Africa with the Xpert MTB/RIF assay (207 sites. Additionally, the performance of Xpert HIV-1VL on alternative, off-label specimen types, Dried Blood Spots (DBS and whole blood, was investigated.Precision, accuracy (agreement and clinical misclassification (1000cp/ml of Xpert HIV-1VL plasma was compared to Taqmanv2 (n = 155 and Abbott HIV-1 RT (n = 145. Misclassification of Xpert HIV-1VL was further tested on DBS (n = 145 and whole blood (n = 147.Xpert HIV-1VL demonstrated 100% concordance with predicate platforms on a standardised frozen, plasma panel (n = 42 and low overall percentage similarity CV of 1.5% and 0.9% compared to Taqmanv2 and Abbott HIV-1 RT, respectively. On paired plasma clinical specimens, Xpert HIV-1VL had low bias (SD 0.32-0.37logcp/ml and 3% misclassification at the 1000cp/ml threshold compared to Taqmanv2 (fresh and Abbott HIV-1 RT (frozen, respectively. Xpert HIV-1VL on whole blood and DBS increased misclassification (upward by up to 14% with increased invalid rate. All specimen testing was easy to perform and compatible with concurrent Xpert MTB/RIF Tuberculosis testing on the same instrument.The Xpert HIV-1VL on plasma can be used interchangeably with existing predicate platforms in South Africa. Whole blood and DBS testing requires further investigation, but polyvalency of the GeneXpert offers a solution to extending VL testing services.

  19. Non-viral gene activated matrices for mesenchymal stem cells based tissue engineering of bone and cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raisin, Sophie; Belamie, Emmanuel; Morille, Marie

    2016-10-01

    Recent regenerative medicine and tissue engineering strategies for bone and cartilage repair have led to fascinating progress of translation from basic research to clinical applications. In this context, the use of gene therapy is increasingly being considered as an important therapeutic modality and regenerative technique. Indeed, in the last 20 years, nucleic acids (plasmid DNA, interferent RNA) have emerged as credible alternative or complement to proteins, which exhibited major issues including short half-life, loss of bioactivity in pathologic environment leading to high dose requirement and therefore high production costs. The relevance of gene therapy strategies in combination with a scaffold, following a so-called "Gene-Activated Matrix (GAM)" approach, is to achieve a direct, local and sustained delivery of nucleic acids from a scaffold to ensure efficient and durable cell transfection. Among interesting cells sources, Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) are promising for a rational use in gene/cell therapy with more than 1700 clinical trials approved during the last decade. The aim of the present review article is to provide a comprehensive overview of recent and ongoing work in non-viral genetic engineering of MSC combined with scaffolds. More specifically, we will show how this inductive strategy can be applied to orient stem cells fate for bone and cartilage repair. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Immune Modulation of NYVAC-Based HIV Vaccines by Combined Deletion of Viral Genes that Act on Several Signalling Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Elena Gómez

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An HIV-1 vaccine continues to be a major target to halt the AIDS pandemic. The limited efficacy of the RV144 phase III clinical trial with the canarypox virus-based vector ALVAC and a gp120 protein component led to the conclusion that improved immune responses to HIV antigens are needed for a more effective vaccine. In non-human primates, the New York vaccinia virus (NYVAC poxvirus vector has a broader immunogenicity profile than ALVAC and has been tested in clinical trials. We therefore analysed the HIV immune advantage of NYVAC after removing viral genes that act on several signalling pathways (Toll-like receptors—TLR—interferon, cytokines/chemokines, as well as genes of unknown immune function. We generated a series of NYVAC deletion mutants and studied immune behaviour (T and B cell to HIV antigens and to the NYVAC vector in mice. Our results showed that combined deletion of selected vaccinia virus (VACV genes is a valuable strategy for improving the immunogenicity of NYVAC-based vaccine candidates. These immune responses were differentially modulated, positive or negative, depending on the combination of gene deletions. The deletions also led to enhanced antigen- or vector-specific cellular and humoral responses. These findings will facilitate the development of optimal NYVAC-based vaccines for HIV and other diseases.

  1. Analysis of viral protein-2 encoding gene of avian encephalomyelitis virus from field specimens in Central Java region, Indonesia

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    Aris Haryanto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Avian encephalomyelitis (AE is a viral disease which can infect various types of poultry, especially chicken. In Indonesia, the incidence of AE infection in chicken has been reported since 2009, the AE incidence tends to increase from year to year. The objective of this study was to analyze viral protein 2 (VP-2 encoding gene of AE virus (AEV from various species of birds in field specimen by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR amplification using specific nucleotides primer for confirmation of AE diagnosis. Materials and Methods: A total of 13 AEV samples are isolated from various species of poultry which are serologically diagnosed infected by AEV from some areas in central Java, Indonesia. Research stage consists of virus samples collection from field specimens, extraction of AEV RNA, amplification of VP-2 protein encoding gene by RT-PCR, separation of RT-PCR product by agarose gel electrophoresis, DNA sequencing and data analysis. Results: Amplification products of the VP-2 encoding gene of AEV by RT-PCR methods of various types of poultry from field specimens showed a positive results on sample code 499/4/12 which generated DNA fragment in the size of 619 bp. Sensitivity test of RT-PCR amplification showed that the minimum concentration of RNA template is 127.75 ng/μl. The multiple alignments of DNA sequencing product indicated that positive sample with code 499/4/12 has 92% nucleotide homology compared with AEV with accession number AV1775/07 and 85% nucleotide homology with accession number ZCHP2/0912695 from Genbank database. Analysis of VP-2 gene sequence showed that it found 46 nucleotides difference between isolate 499/4/12 compared with accession number AV1775/07 and 93 nucleotides different with accession number ZCHP2/0912695. Conclusions: Analyses of the VP-2 encoding gene of AEV with RT-PCR method from 13 samples from field specimen generated the DNA fragment in the size of 619 bp from one sample with

  2. Cellular corepressor TLE2 inhibits replication-and-transcription- activator-mediated transactivation and lytic reactivation of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiheng; Liu, Yunhua; Liang, Deguang; Wang, Zhuo; Robertson, Erle S; Lan, Ke

    2010-02-01

    Replication and transcription activator (RTA) encoded by open reading frame 50 (ORF50) of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is essential and sufficient to initiate lytic reactivation. RTA activates its target genes through direct binding with high affinity to its responsive elements or by interaction with cellular factors, such as RBP-Jkappa, Ap-1, C/EBP-alpha, and Oct-1. In this study, we identified transducin-like enhancer of split 2 (TLE2) as a novel RTA binding protein by using yeast two-hybrid screening of a human spleen cDNA library. The interaction between TLE2 and RTA was confirmed by glutathione S-transferase (GST) binding and coimmunoprecipitation assays. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that TLE2 and RTA were colocalized in the same nuclear compartment in KSHV-infected cells. This interaction recruited TLE2 to RTA bound to its recognition sites on DNA and repressed RTA auto-activation and transactivation activity. Moreover, TLE2 also inhibited the induction of lytic replication and virion production driven by RTA. We further showed that the Q (Gln-rich), SP (Ser-Pro-rich), and WDR (Trp-Asp repeat) domains of TLE2 and the Pro-rich domain of RTA were essential for this interaction. RBP-Jkappa has been shown previously to bind to the same Pro-rich domain of RTA, and this binding can be subject to competition by TLE2. In addition, TLE2 can form a complex with RTA to access the cognate DNA sequence of the RTA-responsive element at different promoters. Intriguingly, the transcription level of TLE2 could be upregulated by RTA during the lytic reactivation process. In conclusion, we identified a new RTA binding protein, TLE2, and demonstrated that TLE2 inhibited replication and transactivation mediated by RTA. This provides another potentially important mechanism for maintenance of KSHV viral latency through interaction with a host protein.

  3. Development of a GAL4-VP16/UAS trans-activation system for tissue specific expression in Medicago truncatula.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélie Sevin-Pujol

    Full Text Available Promoters with tissue-specific activity are very useful to address cell-autonomous and non cell autonomous functions of candidate genes. Although this strategy is widely used in Arabidopsis thaliana, its use to study tissue-specific regulation of root symbiotic interactions in legumes has only started recently. Moreover, using tissue specific promoter activity to drive a GAL4-VP16 chimeric transcription factor that can bind short upstream activation sequences (UAS is an efficient way to target and enhance the expression of any gene of interest. Here, we developed a collection of promoters with different root cell layers specific activities in Medicago truncatula and tested their abilities to drive the expression of a chimeric GAL4-VP16 transcription factor in a trans-activation UAS: β-Glucuronidase (GUS reporter gene system. By developing a binary vector devoted to modular Golden Gate cloning together with a collection of adapted tissue specific promoters and coding sequences we could test the activity of four of these promoters in trans-activation GAL4/UAS systems and compare them to "classical" promoter GUS fusions. Roots showing high levels of tissue specific expression of the GUS activity could be obtained with this trans-activation system. We therefore provide the legume community with new tools for efficient modular Golden Gate cloning, tissue specific expression and a trans-activation system. This study provides the ground work for future development of stable transgenic lines in Medicago truncatula.

  4. Association of Interleukin 27 gene polymorphism and risk of Hepatitis B viral infection in Egyptian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser B.M. Ali

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: Our data suggested that polymorphisms in the IL-27 gene may not contribute to HBV susceptibility. Further studies with large sample size should be conducted to validate these results in Egyptian population.

  5. Progress in developing cationic vectors for non-viral systemic gene therapy against cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Morille , Marie; Passirani , Catherine; Vonarbourg , Arnaud; Clavreul , Anne; Benoit , Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    International audience; Initially, gene therapy was viewed as an approach for treating hereditary diseases, but its potential role in the treatment of acquired diseases such as cancer is now widely recognized. The understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in cancer and the development of nucleic acid delivery systems are two concepts that have led to this development. Systemic gene delivery systems are needed for therapeutic application to cells inaccessible by percutaneous injection...

  6. Human leukocyte antigen and cytokine receptor gene polymorphisms associated with heterogeneous immune responses to mumps viral vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsyannikova, Inna G; Jacobson, Robert M; Dhiman, Neelam; Vierkant, Robert A; Pankratz, V Shane; Poland, Gregory A

    2008-05-01

    Mumps outbreaks continue to occur throughout the world, including in highly vaccinated populations. Vaccination against mumps has been successful; however, humoral and cellular immune responses to mumps vaccines vary significantly from person to person. We set out to assess whether HLA and cytokine gene polymorphisms are associated with variations in the immune response to mumps viral vaccine. To identify genetic factors that might contribute to variations in mumps vaccine-induced immune responses, we performed HLA genotyping in a group of 346 healthy schoolchildren (12-18 years of age) who previously received 2 doses of live mumps vaccine. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (minor allele frequency of >5%) in cytokine and cytokine receptor genes were genotyped for a subset of 118 children. Median values for mumps-specific antibody titers and lymphoproliferative stimulation indices were 729 IU/mL and 4.8, respectively. Girls demonstrated significantly higher mumps antibody titers than boys, indicating gender-linked genetic differences in humoral immune response. Significant associations were found between the HLA-DQB1*0303 alleles and lower mumps-specific antibody titers. An interesting finding was the association of several HLA class II alleles with mumps-specific lymphoproliferation. Alleles of the DRB1 (*0101, *0301, *0801, *1001, *1201, and *1302), DQA1 (*0101, *0105, *0401, and *0501), and DQB1 (*0201, *0402, and *0501) loci were associated with significant variations in lymphoproliferative immune responses to mumps vaccine. Additional associations were observed with single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the interleukin-10RA, interleukin-12RB1, and interleukin-12RB2 cytokine receptor genes. Minor alleles for 4 single-nucleotide polymorphisms within interleukin-10RA and interleukin-12RB genes were associated with variations in humoral and cellular immune responses to mumps vaccination. These data suggest the important role of HLA and immunoregulatory cytokine receptor

  7. Full trans-activation mediated by the immediate-early protein of equine herpesvirus 1 requires a consensus TATA box, but not its cognate binding sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seong K; Shakya, Akhalesh K; O'Callaghan, Dennis J

    2016-01-04

    The immediate-early protein (IEP) of equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) has extensive homology to the IEP of alphaherpesviruses and possesses domains essential for trans-activation, including an acidic trans-activation domain (TAD) and binding domains for DNA, TFIIB, and TBP. Our data showed that the IEP directly interacted with transcription factor TFIIA, which is known to stabilize the binding of TBP and TFIID to the TATA box of core promoters. When the TATA box of the EICP0 promoter was mutated to a nonfunctional TATA box, IEP-mediated trans-activation was reduced from 22-fold to 7-fold. The IEP trans-activated the viral promoters in a TATA motif-dependent manner. Our previous data showed that the IEP is able to repress its own promoter when the IEP-binding sequence (IEBS) is located within 26-bp from the TATA box. When the IEBS was located at 100 bp upstream of the TATA box, IEP-mediated trans-activation was very similar to that of the minimal IE(nt -89 to +73) promoter lacking the IEBS. As the distance from the IEBS to the TATA box decreased, IEP-mediated trans-activation progressively decreased, indicating that the IEBS located within 100 bp from the TATA box sequence functions as a distance-dependent repressive element. These results indicated that IEP-mediated full trans-activation requires a consensus TATA box of core promoters, but not its binding to the cognate sequence (IEBS). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Using viral vectors as gene transfer tools (Cell Biology and Toxicology Special Issue: ETCS-UK 1 day meeting on genetic manipulation of cells).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, Joanna L; Lee, Youn Bok; Uney, James B

    2010-02-01

    In recent years, the development of powerful viral gene transfer techniques has greatly facilitated the study of gene function. This review summarises some of the viral delivery systems routinely used to mediate gene transfer into cell lines, primary cell cultures and in whole animal models. The systems described were originally discussed at a 1-day European Tissue Culture Society (ETCS-UK) workshop that was held at University College London on 1st April 2009. Recombinant-deficient viral vectors (viruses that are no longer able to replicate) are used to transduce dividing and post-mitotic cells, and they have been optimised to mediate regulatable, powerful, long-term and cell-specific expression. Hence, viral systems have become very widely used, especially in the field of neurobiology. This review introduces the main categories of viral vectors, focusing on their initial development and highlighting modifications and improvements made since their introduction. In particular, the use of specific promoters to restrict expression, translational enhancers and regulatory elements to boost expression from a single virion and the development of regulatable systems is described.

  9. Neonatal Gene Therapy for Hemophilia B by a Novel Adenovirus Vector Showing Reduced Leaky Expression of Viral Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iizuka, Shunsuke; Sakurai, Fuminori; Tachibana, Masashi; Ohashi, Kazuo; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2017-09-15

    Gene therapy during neonatal and infant stages is a promising approach for hemophilia B, a congenital disorder caused by deficiency of blood coagulation factor IX (FIX). An adenovirus (Ad) vector has high potential for use in neonatal or infant gene therapy for hemophilia B due to its superior transduction properties; however, leaky expression of Ad genes often reduces the transduction efficiencies by Ad protein-mediated tissue damage. Here, we used a novel Ad vector, Ad-E4-122aT, which exhibits a reduction in the leaky expression of Ad genes in liver, in gene therapy studies for neonatal hemophilia B mice. Ad-E4-122aT exhibited significantly higher transduction efficiencies than a conventional Ad vector in neonatal mice. In neonatal hemophilia B mice, a single neonatal injection of Ad-E4-122aT expressing human FIX (hFIX) (Ad-E4-122aT-AHAFIX) maintained more than 6% of the normal plasma hFIX activity levels for approximately 100 days. Sequential administration of Ad-E4-122aT-AHAFIX resulted in more than 100% of the plasma hFIX activity levels for more than 100 days and rescued the bleeding phenotypes of hemophilia B mice. In addition, immunotolerance to hFIX was induced by Ad-E4-122aT-AHAFIX administration in neonatal hemophilia B mice. These results indicated that Ad-E4-122aT is a promising gene delivery vector for neonatal or infant gene therapy for hemophilia B.

  10. Identifying the Viral Genes Encoding Envelope Glycoproteins for Differentiation of Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se Chang Park

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyprinid herpes virus 3 (CyHV-3 diseases have been reported around the world and are associated with high mortalities of koi (Cyprinus carpio. Although little work has been conducted on the molecular analysis of this virus, glycoprotein genes identified in the present study seem to be valuable targets for genetic comparison of this virus. Three envelope glycoprotein genes (ORF25, 65 and 116 of the CyHV-3 isolates from the USA, Israel, Japan and Korea were compared, and interestingly, sequence insertions or deletions were observed in these target regions. In addition, polymorphisms were presented in microsatellite zones from two glycoprotein genes (ORF65 and 116. In phylogenetic tree analysis, the Korean isolate was remarkably distinguished from USA, Israel, Japan isolates. These findings may be suitable for many applications including isolates differentiation and phylogeny studies.

  11. Identifying the Viral Genes Encoding Envelope Glycoproteins for Differentiation of Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jee Eun; Kim, Ji Hyung; Renault, Tristan; Choresca, Casiano; Shin, Sang Phil; Jun, Jin Woo; Park, Se Chang

    2013-01-01

    Cyprinid herpes virus 3 (CyHV-3) diseases have been reported around the world and are associated with high mortalities of koi (Cyprinus carpio). Although little work has been conducted on the molecular analysis of this virus, glycoprotein genes identified in the present study seem to be valuable targets for genetic comparison of this virus. Three envelope glycoprotein genes (ORF25, 65 and 116) of the CyHV-3 isolates from the USA, Israel, Japan and Korea were compared, and interestingly, sequence insertions or deletions were observed in these target regions. In addition, polymorphisms were presented in microsatellite zones from two glycoprotein genes (ORF65 and 116). In phylogenetic tree analysis, the Korean isolate was remarkably distinguished from USA, Israel, Japan isolates. These findings may be suitable for many applications including isolates differentiation and phylogeny studies. PMID:23435236

  12. Targeting of breast metastases using a viral gene vector with tumour-selective transcription.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rajendran, Simon

    2012-01-31

    BACKGROUND: Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have significant potential as gene delivery vectors for cancer gene therapy. However, broad AAV2 tissue tropism results in nonspecific gene expression. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We investigated use of the C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) promoter to restrict AAV expression to tumour cells, in subcutaneous MCF-7 xenograft mouse models of breast cancer and in patient samples, using bioluminescent imaging and flow cytometric analysis. RESULTS: Higher transgene expression levels were observed in subcutaneous MCF-7 tumours relative to normal tissue (muscle) using the CXCR4 promoter, unlike a ubiquitously expressing Cytomegalovirus promoter construct, with preferential AAVCXCR4 expression in epithelial tumour and CXCR4-positive cells. Transgene expression following intravenously administered AAVCXCR4 in a model of liver metastasis was detected specifically in livers of tumour bearing mice. Ex vivo analysis using patient samples also demonstrated higher AAVCXCR4 expression in tumour compared with normal liver tissue. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates for the first time, the potential for systemic administration of AAV2 vector for tumour-selective gene therapy.

  13. A reverse genetics system for the Great Lakes strain of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus: the NV gene is required for pathogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammayappan, Arun; Kurath, Gael; Thompson, Tarin M.; Vakharia, Vikram N.

    2011-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), belonging to the genus Novirhabdovirus in the family of Rhabdoviridae, causes a highly contagious disease of fresh and saltwater fish worldwide. Recently, a novel genotype of VHSV, designated IVb, has invaded the Great Lakes in North America, causing large-scale epidemics in wild fish. An efficient reverse genetics system was developed to generate a recombinant VHSV of genotype IVb from cloned cDNA. The recombinant VHSV (rVHSV) was comparable to the parental wild-type strain both in vitro and in vivo, causing high mortality in yellow perch (Perca flavescens). A modified recombinant VHSV was generated in which the NV gene was substituted with an enhanced green fluorescent protein gene (rVHSV-ΔNV-EGFP), and another recombinant was made by inserting the EGFP gene into the full-length viral clone between the P and M genes (rVHSV-EGFP). The in vitro replication kinetics of rVHSV-EGFP was similar to rVHSV; however, the rVHSV-ΔNV-EGFP grew 2 logs lower. In yellow perch challenges, wtVHSV and rVHSV induced 82-100% cumulative per cent mortality (CPM), respectively, whereas rVHSV-EGFP produced 62% CPM and rVHSV-ΔNV-EGFP caused only 15% CPM. No reversion of mutation was detected in the recovered viruses and the recombinant viruses stably maintained the foreign gene after several passages. These results indicate that the NV gene of VHSV is not essential for viral replication in vitro and in vivo, but it plays an important role in viral replication efficiency and pathogenicity. This system will facilitate studies of VHSV replication, virulence, and production of viral vectored vaccines.

  14. Selective Inhibition of Histone Deacetylation in Melanoma Increases Targeted Gene Delivery by a Bacteriophage Viral Vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Campbell

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The previously developed adeno-associated virus/phage (AAVP vector, a hybrid between M13 bacteriophage (phage viruses that infect bacteria only and human Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV, is a promising tool in targeted gene therapy against cancer. AAVP can be administered systemically and made tissue specific through the use of ligand-directed targeting. Cancer cells and tumor-associated blood vessels overexpress the αν integrin receptors, which are involved in tumor angiogenesis and tumor invasion. AAVP is targeted to these integrins via a double cyclic RGD4C ligand displayed on the phage capsid. Nevertheless, there remain significant host-defense hurdles to the use of AAVP in targeted gene delivery and subsequently in gene therapy. We previously reported that histone deacetylation in cancer constitutes a barrier to AAVP. Herein, to improve AAVP-mediated gene delivery to cancer cells, we combined the vector with selective adjuvant chemicals that inhibit specific histone deacetylases (HDAC. We examined the effects of the HDAC inhibitor C1A that mainly targets HDAC6 and compared this to sodium butyrate, a pan-HDAC inhibitor with broad spectrum HDAC inhibition. We tested the effects on melanoma, known for HDAC6 up-regulation, and compared this side by side with a normal human kidney HEK293 cell line. Varying concentrations were tested to determine cytotoxic levels as well as effects on AAVP gene delivery. We report that the HDAC inhibitor C1A increased AAVP-mediated transgene expression by up to ~9-fold. These findings indicate that selective HDAC inhibition is a promising adjuvant treatment for increasing the therapeutic value of AAVP.

  15. Correction of the retinal dystrophy phenotype of the RCS rat by viral gene transfer of Mertk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollrath, D; Feng, W; Duncan, J L; Yasumura, D; D'Cruz, P M; Chappelow, A; Matthes, M T; Kay, M A; LaVail, M M

    2001-10-23

    The Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat is a widely studied animal model of retinal degeneration in which the inability of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) to phagocytize shed photoreceptor outer segments leads to a progressive loss of rod and cone photoreceptors. We recently used positional cloning to demonstrate that the gene Mertk likely corresponds to the retinal dystrophy (rdy) locus of the RCS rat. In the present study, we sought to determine whether gene transfer of Mertk to a RCS rat retina would result in correction of the RPE phagocytosis defect and preservation of photoreceptors. We used subretinal injection of a recombinant replication-deficient adenovirus encoding rat Mertk to deliver the gene to the eyes of young RCS rats. Electrophysiological assessment of animals 30 days after injection revealed an increased sensitivity of treated eyes to low-intensity light. Histologic and ultrastructural assessment demonstrated substantial sparing of photoreceptors, preservation of outer segment structure, and correction of the RPE phagocytosis defect in areas surrounding the injection site. Our results provide definitive evidence that mutation of Mertk underlies the RCS retinal dystrophy phenotype, and that the phenotype can be corrected by treatment of juvenile animals. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of complementation of both a functional cellular defect (phagocytosis) and a photoreceptor degeneration by gene transfer to the RPE. These results, together with the recent discovery of MERTK mutations in individuals with retinitis pigmentosa, emphasize the importance of the RCS rat as a model for gene therapy of diseases that arise from RPE dysfunction.

  16. Regulation of T cell activation by HIV-1 accessory proteins: Vpr acts via distinct mechanisms to cooperate with Nef in NFAT-directed gene expression and to promote transactivation by CREB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lahti, Anna L.; Manninen, Aki; Saksela, Kalle

    2003-01-01

    Nef and Vpr are lentiviral accessory proteins that have been implicated in regulation of cellular gene expression. We noticed that Vpr can potentiate Nef-induced activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)-dependent transcription. Unlike Nef, which stimulated calcium signaling to activate NFAT, Vpr functioned farther downstream. Similar to the positive effects of Vpr on most of the transcriptional test systems that we used, potentiation of NFAT-directed gene expression was relatively modest in magnitude (two- to threefold) and depended on the cell cycle-arresting capacity of Vpr. By contrast, we found that Vpr could cause more than fivefold upregulation of cyclic AMP response element (CRE)-directed transcription via a mechanism that did not require Vpr-induced G2/M arrest. This effect, however, was only evident under suboptimal conditions known to lead to serine phosphorylation of the CRE binding factor (CREB) but not to CREB-dependent gene expression. This suggested that Vpr may act by stabilizing interactions with CREB and its transcriptional cofactor CREB binding protein (CBP). Indeed, this effect could be blocked by cotransfection of the adenoviral CBP inhibitor E1A. These results provide additional evidence for cell cycle-independent regulation of gene expression by Vpr and implicate CREB as a potentially important target for Vpr action in HIV-infected host cells

  17. Genetics and Molecular Biology of Epstein-Barr Virus-Encoded BART MicroRNA: A Paradigm for Viral Modulation of Host Immune Response Genes and Genome Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H. Dreyfus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus, a ubiquitous human herpesvirus, is associated through epidemiologic evidence with common autoimmune syndromes and cancers. However, specific genetic mechanisms of pathogenesis have been difficult to identify. In this review, the author summarizes evidence that recently discovered noncoding RNAs termed microRNA encoded by Epstein-Barr virus BARF (BamHI A right frame termed BART (BamHI A right transcripts are modulators of human immune response genes and genome stability in infected and bystander cells. BART expression is apparently regulated by complex feedback loops with the host immune response regulatory NF-κB transcription factors. EBV-encoded BZLF-1 (ZEBRA protein could also regulate BART since ZEBRA contains a terminal region similar to ankyrin proteins such as IκBα that regulate host NF-κB. BALF-2 (BamHI A left frame transcript, a viral homologue of the immunoglobulin and T cell receptor gene recombinase RAG-1 (recombination-activating gene-1, may also be coregulated with BART since BALF-2 regulatory sequences are located near the BART locus. Viral-encoded microRNA and viral mRNA transferred to bystander cells through vesicles, defective viral particles, or other mechanisms suggest a new paradigm in which bystander or hit-and-run mechanisms enable the virus to transiently or chronically alter human immune response genes as well as the stability of the human genome.

  18. Viral Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home A-Z Health Topics Viral hepatitis Viral hepatitis > A-Z Health Topics Viral hepatitis (PDF, 90 ... liver. Source: National Cancer Institute Learn more about hepatitis Watch a video. Learn who is at risk ...

  19. A molecular toolbox for rapid generation of viral vectors to up- or down-regulate in vivo neuronal gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie D. White

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a molecular toolbox for manipulation of neuronal gene expression in vivo. The toolbox includes promoters, ion channels, optogenetic tools, fluorescent proteins and intronic artificial microRNAs. The components are easily assembled into adeno-associated virus (AAV or lentivirus vectors using recombination cloning. We demonstrate assembly of toolbox components into lentivirus and AAV vectors and use these vectors for in vivo expression of inwardly rectifying potassium channels (Kir2.1, Kir3.1 and Kir3.2 and an artificial microRNA targeted against the ion channel HCN1 (HCN1 miR. We show that AAV assembled to express HCN1 miR produces efficacious and specific in vivo knockdown of HCN1 channels. Comparison of in vivo viral transduction using HCN1 miR with mice containing a germ line deletion of HCN1 reveals similar physiological phenotypes in cerebellar Purkinje cells. The easy assembly and re-usability of the toolbox components, together with the ability to up- or down-regulate neuronal gene expression in vivo, may be useful for applications in many areas of neuroscience.

  20. Viral vectors for gene modification of plants as chem/bio sensors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manginell, Monica; Harper, Jason C.; Arango, Dulce C.; Brozik, Susan Marie; Dolan, Patricia L.

    2006-11-01

    Chemical or biological sensors that are specific, sensitive, and robust allowing intelligence gathering for verification of nuclear non-proliferation treaty compliance and detouring production of weapons of mass destruction are sorely needed. Although much progress has been made in the area of biosensors, improvements in sensor lifetime, robustness, and device packaging are required before these devices become widely used. Current chemical and biological detection and identification techniques require less-than-covert sample collection followed by transport to a laboratory for analysis. In addition to being expensive and time consuming, results can often be inconclusive due to compromised sample integrity during collection and transport. We report here a demonstration of a plant based sensor technology which utilizes mature and seedling plants as chemical sensors. One can envision genetically modifying native plants at a site of interest that can report the presence of specific toxins or chemicals. In this one year project we used a developed inducible expression system to show the feasibility of plant sensors. The vector was designed as a safe, non-infectious vector which could be used to invade, replicate, and introduce foreign genes into mature host plants that then allow the plant to sense chem/bio agents. The genes introduced through the vector included a reporter gene that encodes for green fluorescent protein (GFP) and a gene that encodes for a mammalian receptor that recognizes a chemical agent. Specifically, GFP was induced by the presence of 17-{beta}-Estradiol (estrogen). Detection of fluorescence indicated the presence of the target chemical agent. Since the sensor is a plant, costly device packaging development or manufacturing of the sensor were not required. Additionally, the biological recognition and reporting elements are maintained in a living, natural environment and therefore do not suffer from lifetime disadvantages typical of most biosensing

  1. Development of Non-Viral, Trophoblast-Specific Gene Delivery for Placental Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noura Abd Ellah

    Full Text Available Low birth weight is associated with both short term problems and the fetal programming of adult onset diseases, including an increased risk of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Placental insufficiency leading to intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR contributes to the prevalence of diseases with developmental origins. Currently there are no therapies for IUGR or placental insufficiency. To address this and move towards development of an in utero therapy, we employ a nanostructure delivery system complexed with the IGF-1 gene to treat the placenta. IGF-1 is a growth factor critical to achieving appropriate placental and fetal growth. Delivery of genes to a model of human trophoblast and mouse placenta was achieved using a diblock copolymer (pHPMA-b-pDMAEMA complexed to hIGF-1 plasmid DNA under the control of trophoblast-specific promoters (Cyp19a or PLAC1. Transfection efficiency of pEGFP-C1-containing nanocarriers in BeWo cells and non-trophoblast cells was visually assessed via fluorescence microscopy. In vivo transfection and functionality was assessed by direct placental-injection into a mouse model of IUGR. Complexes formed using pHPMA-b-pDMAEMA and CYP19a-923 or PLAC1-modified plasmids induce trophoblast-selective transgene expression in vitro, and placental injection of PLAC1-hIGF-1 produces measurable RNA expression and alleviates IUGR in our mouse model, consequently representing innovative building blocks towards human placental gene therapies.

  2. Morphological correlates of genital HPV infection: Viral replication, transcription and gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crum, C.P.; Friedman, D.; Nuovo, G.; Silverstein, S.J.

    1987-01-01

    Current studies indicate a strong correlation between specific morphological changes and the presence of certain HPV strains in precancerous squamous epithelium of the cervix, vulva and vagina. HPV type 16 is the most commonly detected HPV type in cervical lesions in our experience, and 85% of these lesions exhibit some morphological features associated with aneuploid epithelium (CIN). However, over 50% of these lesions containing HPV 16 DNA exhibit, in addition, foci of epithelium indistinguishable from condyloma, although in our experience, only one HPV type(16) is detected in the majority of these lesions. DNA-DNA in situ hybridization analysis of these lesions containing HPV 16 DNA has demonstrated nucleic acids in areas resembling both condyloma and CIN, with the greatest concentration in mature cells containing cytoplasmic maturation. Ten percent of lesions containing HPV 16 produce detectable capsid antigens, and we have confirmed the presence of these antigens in the same areas which hybridize in-situ for HPV DNA. Recent studies using biotin and S-35 labeled RNa probes constructed in GEM-1 vectors indicate that early HPV genes are expressed primarily in the upper (more mature) regions of the neoplastic epithelium. Thus maturation appears to exert a positive influence on a variety of HPV functions in neoplastic epithelium, including DNA replication, early and late gene expression. It is possible that patterns of gene expression may vary between lesions associated with different HPV types or different morphologies. This possibility is being explored

  3. Myxovirus resistance 1 gene polymorphisms and outcomes of viral hepatitis B and C infections in Moroccan patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebbani, Khadija; Ababou, Mostafa; Nadifi, Sellama; Kandil, Mostafa; Marchio, Agnès; Pineau, Pascal; Ezzikouri, Sayeh; Benjelloun, Soumaya

    2017-04-01

    Host genetic factors may influence the establishment of chronicity or spontaneous clearance in viral hepatitis B and C infections. More light was shed on the role played by interferon-stimulated genes in the innate immunity. Myxovirus resistance 1 (MX1) is one of those key genes that have reported to inhibit several viruses. The present study aims to explore the possible association of -88G/T and -123C/A promoter variants of MX1 with susceptibility to chronic hepatitis B and C and/or with spontaneous clearance in a Moroccan population. The -88G/T and -123C/A SNPs were genotyped by PCR-RFLP in 538 individuals stratified into HBV chronically infected patients (n = 120), HCV-chronically infected patients (n = 115), HBV spontaneously resolved subjects (n = 114), HCV spontaneously resolved group (n = 52), and healthy controls (n = 137). A significant association of -123C allele with HBV spontaneous clearance has been found (P = 0.002, OR = 2.34; 95%CI [1.36-4]). In addition, a significant correlation between the MX1-GC haplotype and HBV spontaneous clearance (P C/A polymorphisms with regard to HCV infection was observed in this study. Here, we show that for North African patients with chronic hepatitis, MX1 gene variation at position -123 may influence the outcome of HBV infection but not HCV infection. J. Med. Virol. 89:647-652, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Oligopeptide complex for targeted non-viral gene delivery to adipocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Young-Wook; Adhikary, Partho Protim; Lim, Kwang Suk; Kim, Hyung Jin; Kim, Jang Kyoung; Kim, Yong-Hee

    2014-12-01

    Commercial anti-obesity drugs acting in the gastrointestinal tract or the central nervous system have been shown to have limited efficacy and severe side effects. Anti-obesity drug development is thus focusing on targeting adipocytes that store excess fat. Here, we show that an adipocyte-targeting fusion-oligopeptide gene carrier consisting of an adipocyte-targeting sequence and 9-arginine (ATS-9R) selectively transfects mature adipocytes by binding to prohibitin. Injection of ATS-9R into obese mice confirmed specific binding of ATS-9R to fat vasculature, internalization and gene expression in adipocytes. We also constructed a short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) for silencing fatty-acid-binding protein 4 (shFABP4), a key lipid chaperone in fatty-acid uptake and lipid storage in adipocytes. Treatment of obese mice with ATS-9R/shFABP4 led to metabolic recovery and body-weight reduction (>20%). The ATS-9R/shFABP4 oligopeptide complex could prove to be a safe therapeutic approach to regress and treat obesity as well as obesity-induced metabolic syndromes.

  5. Halting angiogenesis by non-viral somatic gene therapy alleviates psoriasis and murine psoriasiform skin lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibert, John Robert; Wallbrecht, Katrin; Schön, Margarete

    2011-01-01

    Dysregulated angiogenesis is a hallmark of chronic inflammatory diseases, including psoriasis, a common skin disorder that affects approximately 2% of the population. Studying both human psoriasis in 2 complementary xenotransplantation models and psoriasis-like skin lesions in transgenic mice......-15) by in vivo electroporation reduced cutaneous angiogenesis and vascularization in all 3 models. As demonstrated using red fluorescent protein-coupled RDD, the treatment resulted in muscular expression of the gene product and its deposition within the cutaneous hyperangiogenic connective tissue....... High-resolution ultrasound revealed reduced cutaneous blood flow in vivo after electroporation with RDD but not with control plasmids. In addition, angiogenesis- and inflammation-related molecular markers, keratinocyte proliferation, epidermal thickness, and clinical disease scores were downregulated...

  6. PA1 Protein, a New Competitive Decelerator Acting at More than One Step to Impede Glucocorticoid Receptor-mediated Transactivation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenhuan; Sun, Yunguang; Cho, Young-Wook; Chow, Carson C.; Simons, S. Stoney

    2013-01-01

    Numerous cofactors modulate the gene regulatory activity of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) by affecting one or more of the following three major transcriptional properties: the maximal activity of agonists (Amax), the potency of agonists (EC50), and the partial agonist activity of antisteroids (PAA). Here, we report that the recently described nuclear protein, Pax2 transactivation domain interaction protein (PTIP)-associated protein 1 (PA1), is a new inhibitor of GR transactivation. PA1 suppresses Amax, increases the EC50, and reduces the PAA of an exogenous reporter gene in a manner that is independent of associated PTIP. PA1 is fully active with, and strongly binds to, the C-terminal half of GR. PA1 reverses the effects of the coactivator TIF2 on GR-mediated gene induction but is unable to augment the actions of the corepressor SMRT. Analysis of competition assays between PA1 and TIF2 with an exogenous reporter indicates that the kinetic definition of PA1 action is a competitive decelerator at two sites upstream from where TIF2 acts. With the endogenous genes IGFBP1 and IP6K3, PA1 also represses GR induction, increases the EC50, and decreases the PAA. ChIP and re-ChIP experiments indicate that PA1 accomplishes this inhibition of the two genes via different mechanisms as follows: PA1 appears to increase GR dissociation from and reduce GR transactivation at the IGFBP1 promoter regions but blocks GR binding to the IP6K3 promoter. We conclude that PA1 is a new competitive decelerator of GR transactivation and can act at more than one molecularly defined step in a manner that depends upon the specific gene. PMID:23161582

  7. PA1 protein, a new competitive decelerator acting at more than one step to impede glucocorticoid receptor-mediated transactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenhuan; Sun, Yunguang; Cho, Young-Wook; Chow, Carson C; Simons, S Stoney

    2013-01-04

    Numerous cofactors modulate the gene regulatory activity of glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) by affecting one or more of the following three major transcriptional properties: the maximal activity of agonists (A(max)), the potency of agonists (EC(50)), and the partial agonist activity of antisteroids (PAA). Here, we report that the recently described nuclear protein, Pax2 transactivation domain interaction protein (PTIP)-associated protein 1 (PA1), is a new inhibitor of GR transactivation. PA1 suppresses A(max), increases the EC(50), and reduces the PAA of an exogenous reporter gene in a manner that is independent of associated PTIP. PA1 is fully active with, and strongly binds to, the C-terminal half of GR. PA1 reverses the effects of the coactivator TIF2 on GR-mediated gene induction but is unable to augment the actions of the corepressor SMRT. Analysis of competition assays between PA1 and TIF2 with an exogenous reporter indicates that the kinetic definition of PA1 action is a competitive decelerator at two sites upstream from where TIF2 acts. With the endogenous genes IGFBP1 and IP6K3, PA1 also represses GR induction, increases the EC(50), and decreases the PAA. ChIP and re-ChIP experiments indicate that PA1 accomplishes this inhibition of the two genes via different mechanisms as follows: PA1 appears to increase GR dissociation from and reduce GR transactivation at the IGFBP1 promoter regions but blocks GR binding to the IP6K3 promoter. We conclude that PA1 is a new competitive decelerator of GR transactivation and can act at more than one molecularly defined step in a manner that depends upon the specific gene.

  8. Transactivation mediated by B-Myb is dependent on TAF(II)250.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartusel, Thorsten; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2003-05-15

    B-Myb is a highly conserved member of the Myb family of transcription factors, which has been implicated in cell cycle regulation. B-Myb is expressed in most proliferating cells and its activity is highly regulated around the G1/S-phase border of the cell cycle. It is generally assumed that B-Myb regulates the expression of genes that are crucial for cell proliferation; however, the identity of these genes, the molecular mechanisms by which B-Myb stimulates their expression and the involvement of other proteins have not been sufficiently clarified. We have employed the hamster cell line ts13 as a tool to demonstrate a functional link between B-Myb and the coactivator TAF(II)250, a key component of the transcriptional machinery which itself is essential for cell proliferation. ts13 cells express a point-mutated version of TAF(II)250 whose intrinsic histone acetyl transferase activity is temperature sensitive. Transactivation of Myb-responsive reporter genes by B-Myb is temperature-dependent in ts13 cells but not in ts13 cells, which have been rescued by transfection with an expression vector for wild-type TAF(II)250. Furthermore, B-Myb and TAF(II)250 can be coprecipitated, suggesting that both proteins are present in a complex. The formation of this complex is dependent on the DNA-binding domain of B-Myb and not on its transactivation domain. Taken together, these observations provide the first evidence that the coactivator TAF(II)250 is involved in the activation of Myb responsive promoters by B-Myb. The finding that B-Myb transactivation is dependent on a key coactivator involved in cell cycle control is consistent with and strengthens the idea that B-Myb plays a crucial role as a transcription factor in proliferating cells.

  9. Human Antiviral Protein IFIX Suppresses Viral Gene Expression during Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) Infection and Is Counteracted by Virus-induced Proteasomal Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Marni S; Cristea, Ileana M

    2017-04-01

    The interferon-inducible protein X (IFIX), a member of the PYHIN family, was recently recognized as an antiviral factor against infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). IFIX binds viral DNA upon infection and promotes expression of antiviral cytokines. How IFIX exerts its host defense functions and whether it is inhibited by the virus remain unknown. Here, we integrated live cell microscopy, proteomics, IFIX domain characterization, and molecular virology to investigate IFIX regulation and antiviral functions during HSV-1 infection. We find that IFIX has a dynamic localization during infection that changes from diffuse nuclear and nucleoli distribution in uninfected cells to discrete nuclear puncta early in infection. This is rapidly followed by a reduction in IFIX protein levels. Indeed, using immunoaffinity purification and mass spectrometry, we define IFIX interactions during HSV-1 infection, finding an association with a proteasome subunit and proteins involved in ubiquitin-proteasome processes. Using synchronized HSV-1 infection, microscopy, and proteasome-inhibition experiments, we demonstrate that IFIX co-localizes with nuclear proteasome puncta shortly after 3 h of infection and that its pyrin domain is rapidly degraded in a proteasome-dependent manner. We further demonstrate that, in contrast to several other host defense factors, IFIX degradation is not dependent on the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of the viral protein ICP0. However, we show IFIX degradation requires immediate-early viral gene expression, suggesting a viral host suppression mechanism. The IFIX interactome also demonstrated its association with transcriptional regulatory proteins, including the 5FMC complex. We validate this interaction using microscopy and reciprocal isolations and determine it is mediated by the IFIX HIN domain. Finally, we show IFIX suppresses immediate-early and early viral gene expression during infection. Altogether, our study demonstrates that IFIX antiviral

  10. Genetic variation of viral protein 1 genes of field strains of waterfowl parvoviruses and their attenuated derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsiang-Jung; Tseng, Chun-hsien; Chang, Poa-chun; Mei, Kai; Wang, Shih-Chi

    2004-09-01

    To understand the genetic variations between the field strains of waterfowl parvoviruses and their attenuated derivatives, we analyzed the complete nucleotide sequences of the viral protein 1 (VP1) genes of nine field strains and two vaccine strains of waterfowl parvoviruses. Sequence comparison of the VP1 proteins showed that these viruses could be divided into goose parvovirus (GPV) related and Muscovy duck parvovirus (MDPV) related groups. The amino acid difference between GPV- and MDPV-related groups ranged from 13.1% to 15.8%, and the most variable region resided in the N terminus of VP2. The vaccine strains of GPV and MDPV exhibited only 1.2% and 0.3% difference in amino acid when compared with their parental field strains, and most of these differences resided in residues 497-575 of VP1, suggesting that these residues might be important for the attenuation of GPV and MDPV. When the GPV strains isolated in 1982 (the strain 82-0308) and in 2001 (the strain 01-1001) were compared, only 0.3% difference in amino acid was found, while MDPV strains isolated in 1990 (the strain 90-0219) and 1997 (the strain 97-0104) showed only 0.4% difference in amino acid. The result indicates that the genome of waterfowl parvovirus had remained highly stable in the field.

  11. NYVAC vector modified by C7L viral gene insertion improves T cell immune responses and effectiveness against leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Sampedro, L; Mejías-Pérez, E; S Sorzano, Carlos Óscar; Nájera, J L; Esteban, M

    2016-07-15

    The NYVAC poxvirus vector is used as vaccine candidate for HIV and other diseases, although there is only limited experimental information on its immunogenicity and effectiveness for use against human pathogens. Here we defined the selective advantage of NYVAC vectors in a mouse model by comparing the immune responses and protection induced by vectors that express the LACK (Leishmania-activated C-kinase antigen), alone or with insertion of the viral host range gene C7L that allows the virus to replicate in human cells. Using DNA prime/virus boost protocols, we show that replication-competent NYVAC-LACK that expresses C7L (NYVAC-LACK-C7L) induced higher-magnitude polyfunctional CD8(+) and CD4(+) primary adaptive and effector memory T cell responses (IFNγ, TNFα, IL-2, CD107a) to LACK antigen than non-replicating NYVAC-LACK. Compared to NYVAC-LACK, the NYVAC-LACK-C7L-induced CD8(+) T cell population also showed higher proliferation when stimulated with LACK antigen. After a challenge by subcutaneous Leishmania major metacyclic promastigotes, NYVAC-LACK-C7L-vaccinated mouse groups showed greater protection than the NYVAC-LACK-vaccinated group. Our results indicate that the type and potency of immune responses induced by LACK-expressing NYVAC vectors is improved by insertion of the C7L gene, and that a replication-competent vector as a vaccine renders greater protection against a human pathogen than a non-replicating vector. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. PRMT5 Is Upregulated in HTLV-1-Mediated T-Cell Transformation and Selective Inhibition Alters Viral Gene Expression and Infected Cell Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda R. Panfil

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1 is a tumorigenic retrovirus responsible for development of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL. This disease manifests after a long clinical latency period of up to 2–3 decades. Two viral gene products, Tax and HBZ, have transforming properties and play a role in the pathogenic process. Genetic and epigenetic cellular changes also occur in HTLV-1-infected cells, which contribute to transformation and disease development. However, the role of cellular factors in transformation is not completely understood. Herein, we examined the role of protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5 on HTLV-1-mediated cellular transformation and viral gene expression. We found PRMT5 expression was upregulated during HTLV-1-mediated T-cell transformation, as well as in established lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma cell lines and ATLL patient PBMCs. shRNA-mediated reduction in PRMT5 protein levels or its inhibition by a small molecule inhibitor (PRMT5i in HTLV-1-infected lymphocytes resulted in increased viral gene expression and decreased cellular proliferation. PRMT5i also had selective toxicity in HTLV-1-transformed T-cells. Finally, we demonstrated that PRMT5 and the HTLV-1 p30 protein had an additive inhibitory effect on HTLV-1 gene expression. Our study provides evidence for PRMT5 as a host cell factor important in HTLV-1-mediated T-cell transformation, and a potential target for ATLL treatment.

  13. Identification of sequences in herpes simplex virus type 1 ICP22 that influence RNA polymerase II modification and viral late gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastian, Thomas W; Rice, Stephen A

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) immediate-early protein ICP22 alters the phosphorylation of the host cell RNA polymerase II (Pol II) during viral infection. In this study, we have engineered several ICP22 plasmid and virus mutants in order to map the ICP22 sequences that are involved in this function. We identify a region in the C-terminal half of ICP22 (residues 240 to 340) that is critical for Pol II modification and further show that the N-terminal half of the protein (residues 1 to 239) is not required. However, immunofluorescence analysis indicates that the N-terminal half of ICP22 is needed for its localization to nuclear body structures. These results demonstrate that ICP22's effects on Pol II do not require that it accumulate in nuclear bodies. As ICP22 is known to enhance viral late gene expression during infection of certain cultured cells, including human embryonic lung (HEL) cells, we used our engineered viral mutants to map this function of ICP22. It was found that mutations in both the N- and C-terminal halves of ICP22 result in similar defects in viral late gene expression and growth in HEL cells, despite having distinctly different effects on Pol II. Thus, our results genetically uncouple ICP22's effects on Pol II from its effects on viral late gene expression. This suggests that these two functions of ICP22 may be due to distinct activities of the protein.

  14. NLRC5/MHC class I transactivator is a target for immune evasion in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshihama, Sayuri; Roszik, Jason; Downs, Isaac; Meissner, Torsten B; Vijayan, Saptha; Chapuy, Bjoern; Sidiq, Tabasum; Shipp, Margaret A; Lizee, Gregory A; Kobayashi, Koichi S

    2016-05-24

    Cancer cells develop under immune surveillance, thus necessitating immune escape for successful growth. Loss of MHC class I expression provides a key immune evasion strategy in many cancers, although the molecular mechanisms remain elusive. MHC class I transactivator (CITA), known as "NLRC5" [NOD-like receptor (NLR) family, caspase recruitment (CARD) domain containing 5], has recently been identified as a critical transcriptional coactivator of MHC class I gene expression. Here we show that the MHC class I transactivation pathway mediated by CITA/NLRC5 constitutes a target for cancer immune evasion. In all the 21 tumor types we examined, NLRC5 expression was highly correlated with the expression of MHC class I, with cytotoxic T-cell markers, and with genes in the MHC class I antigen-presentation pathway, including LMP2/LMP7, TAP1, and β2-microglobulin. Epigenetic and genetic alterations in cancers, including promoter methylation, copy number loss, and somatic mutations, were most prevalent in NLRC5 among all MHC class I-related genes and were associated with the impaired expression of components of the MHC class I pathway. Strikingly, NLRC5 expression was significantly associated with the activation of CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells and patient survival in multiple cancer types. Thus, NLRC5 constitutes a novel prognostic biomarker and potential therapeutic target of cancers.

  15. Infection-Induced Retrotransposon-Derived Noncoding RNAs Enhance Herpesviral Gene Expression via the NF-κB Pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Karijolich

    Full Text Available Short interspersed nuclear elements (SINEs are highly abundant, RNA polymerase III-transcribed noncoding retrotransposons that are silenced in somatic cells but activated during certain stresses including viral infection. How these induced SINE RNAs impact the host-pathogen interaction is unknown. Here we reveal that during murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68 infection, rapidly induced SINE RNAs activate the antiviral NF-κB signaling pathway through both mitochondrial antiviral-signaling protein (MAVS-dependent and independent mechanisms. However, SINE RNA-based signaling is hijacked by the virus to enhance viral gene expression and replication. B2 RNA expression stimulates IKKβ-dependent phosphorylation of the major viral lytic cycle transactivator protein RTA, thereby enhancing its activity and increasing progeny virion production. Collectively, these findings suggest that SINE RNAs participate in the innate pathogen response mechanism, but that herpesviruses have evolved to co-opt retrotransposon activation for viral benefit.

  16. Identification of an ovine atadenovirus gene whose product activates the viral E2 promoter: possible involvement of E2F-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuemin, Daniel; Hofmann, Christian; Uckert, Wolfgang; Both, Gerald W.; Loeser, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Activation of the adenoviral E2 promoter is an early step in adenovirus gene expression. For members of the mast- and aviadenoviruses, this requires induction of the cellular transcription factor E2F by virally encoded gene products such as E1A, E4orf6/7 and orf22/GAM-1. The newly recognized genus atadenovirus, of which the ovine isolate OAdV is the prototype, lacks any sequence homology to those genes. To find a possible link between E2 promoter activation and OAdV gene expression, we utilized a screening method to search for genes within the OAdV genome that were capable of stimulating the viral E2 promoter. One such gene, E43, was identified within the proposed E4 region toward the right-hand end of the OAdV genome. The E43 gene product was also found to be capable of stimulating E2F-1-dependent gene expression. A closer inspection of the E2 promoter revealed the presence of a non-palindromic E2F binding site within the OAdV E2 promoter. Mutation of this site markedly reduced both E2F-1- and E43-dependent promoter activation. Moreover, a direct protein-protein interaction of the E43 gene product with E2F, but not with the retinoblastoma protein pRb, suggested a possible cooperation between these two proteins in activating the E2 promoter. The importance of the E43 gene product for virus replication is also underlined by the finding that an OAdV recombinant with a functionally inactivated E43 gene showed severely inhibited virus growth

  17. Interleukin 28B gene variation at rs12979860 determines early viral kinetics during treatment in patients carrying genotypes 2 or 3 of hepatitis C virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindh, Magnus; Lagging, Martin; Färkkilä, Martti

    2011-01-01

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms upstream of the interleukin 28B (interferon λ3) gene (IL28B) strongly influence treatment efficacy in patients carrying hepatitis C virus (HCV) of genotype 1. In patients receiving 12 or 24 weeks of interferon-ribavirin therapy for infection with genotype 2 or 3 (n...... = 341), we found that rs12979860 strikingly determined the first phase of viral elimination (P

  18. Individual co-variation between viral RNA load and gene expression reveals novel host factors during early dengue virus infection of the Aedes aegypti midgut.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Raquin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV causes more human infections than any other mosquito-borne virus. The current lack of antiviral strategies has prompted genome-wide screens for host genes that are required for DENV infectivity. Earlier transcriptomic studies that identified DENV host factors in the primary vector Aedes aegypti used inbred laboratory colonies and/or pools of mosquitoes that erase individual variation. Here, we performed transcriptome sequencing on individual midguts in a field-derived Ae. aegypti population to identify new candidate host factors modulating DENV replication. We analyzed the transcriptomic data using an approach that accounts for individual co-variation between viral RNA load and gene expression. This approach generates a prediction about the agonist or antagonist effect of candidate genes on DENV replication based on the sign of the correlation between gene expression and viral RNA load. Using this method, we identified 39 candidate genes that went undetected by conventional pairwise comparison of gene expression levels between DENV-infected midguts and uninfected controls. Only four candidate genes were detected by both methods, emphasizing their complementarity. We demonstrated the value of our approach by functional validation of a candidate agonist gene encoding a sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP, which was identified by correlation analysis but not by pairwise comparison. We confirmed that SREBP promotes DENV infection in the midgut by RNAi-mediated gene knockdown in vivo. We suggest that our approach for transcriptomic analysis can empower genome-wide screens for potential agonist or antagonist factors by leveraging inter-individual variation in gene expression. More generally, this method is applicable to a wide range of phenotypic traits displaying inter-individual variation.

  19. Multiple-integrations of HPV16 genome and altered transcription of viral oncogenes and cellular genes are associated with the development of cervical cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xulian Lu

    Full Text Available The constitutive expression of the high-risk HPV E6 and E7 viral oncogenes is the major cause of cervical cancer. To comprehensively explore the composition of HPV16 early transcripts and their genomic annotation, cervical squamous epithelial tissues from 40 HPV16-infected patients were collected for analysis of papillomavirus oncogene transcripts (APOT. We observed different transcription patterns of HPV16 oncogenes in progression of cervical lesions to cervical cancer and identified one novel transcript. Multiple-integration events in the tissues of cervical carcinoma (CxCa are significantly more often than those of low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL. Moreover, most cellular genes within or near these integration sites are cancer-associated genes. Taken together, this study suggests that the multiple-integrations of HPV genome during persistent viral infection, which thereby alters the expression patterns of viral oncogenes and integration-related cellular genes, play a crucial role in progression of cervical lesions to cervix cancer.

  20. GeneXpert HIV-1 quant assay, a new tool for scale up of viral load monitoring in the success of ART programme in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Smita; Jadhav, Sushama; Khopkar, Priyanka; Sane, Suvarna; Londhe, Rajkumar; Chimanpure, Vaishali; Dhilpe, Veronica; Ghate, Manisha; Yelagate, Rajendra; Panchal, Narayan; Rahane, Girish; Kadam, Dilip; Gaikwad, Nitin; Rewari, Bharat; Gangakhedkar, Raman

    2017-07-21

    Recent WHO guidelines identify virologic monitoring for diagnosing and confirming ART failure. In view of this, validation and scale up of point of care viral load technologies is essential in resource limited settings. A systematic validation of the GeneXpert® HIV-1 Quant assay (a point-of-care technology) in view of scaling up HIV-1 viral load in India to monitor the success of national ART programme was carried out. Two hundred nineteen plasma specimens falling in nine viral load ranges (5 L copies/ml) were tested by the Abbott m2000rt Real Time and GeneXpert HIV-1 Quant assays. Additionally, 20 seronegative; 16 stored specimens and 10 spiked controls were also tested. Statistical analysis was done using Stata/IC and sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and %misclassification rates were calculated as per DHSs/AISs, WHO, NACO cut-offs for virological failure. The GeneXpert assay compared well with the Abbott assay with a higher sensitivity (97%), specificity (97-100%) and concordance (91.32%). The correlation between two assays (r = 0.886) was statistically significant (p performance and rapidity will aid in timely diagnosis of ART failures, integrated HIV-TB management and will facilitate the UNAIDS 90-90-90 target.

  1. Viral Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... better from treatment such as an antiviral medicine. Antibiotics do not help viral infections, so they are not useful in the treatment of viral meningitis. However, antibiotics do fight bacteria, so they are very important ...

  2. Pharyngitis - viral

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... throat is due to a viral infection. The antibiotics will not help. Using them to treat viral infections helps bacteria become resistant to antibiotics. With some sore throats (such as those caused ...

  3. Induction of Immune Tolerance to Foreign Protein via Adeno-Associated Viral Vector Gene Transfer in Mid-Gestation Fetal Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Marcus G.; Riley, John S.; Andrews, Abigail; Tyminski, Alec; Limberis, Maria; Pogoriler, Jennifer E.; Partridge, Emily; Olive, Aliza; Hedrick, Holly L.; Flake, Alan W.; Peranteau, William H.

    2017-01-01

    A major limitation to adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy is the generation of host immune responses to viral vector antigens and the transgene product. The ability to induce immune tolerance to foreign protein has the potential to overcome this host immunity. Acquisition and maintenance of tolerance to viral vector antigens and transgene products may also permit repeat administration thereby enhancing therapeutic efficacy. In utero gene transfer (IUGT) takes advantage of the immunologic immaturity of the fetus to induce immune tolerance to foreign antigens. In this large animal study, in utero administration of AAV6.2, AAV8 and AAV9 expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) to ~60 day fetal sheep (term: ~150 days) was performed. Transgene expression and postnatal immune tolerance to GFP and viral antigens were assessed. We demonstrate 1) hepatic expression of GFP 1 month following in utero administration of AAV6.2.GFP and AAV8.GFP, 2) in utero recipients of either AAV6.2.GFP or AAV8.GFP fail to mount an anti-GFP antibody response following postnatal GFP challenge and lack inflammatory cellular infiltrates at the intramuscular site of immunization, 3) a serotype specific anti-AAV neutralizing antibody response is elicited following postnatal challenge of in utero recipients of AAV6.2 or AAV8 with the corresponding AAV serotype, and 4) durable hepatic GFP expression was observed up to 6 months after birth in recipients of AAV8.GFP but expression was lost between 1 and 6 months of age in recipients of AAV6.2.GFP. The current study demonstrates, in a preclinical large animal model, the potential of IUGT to achieve host immune tolerance to the viral vector transgene product but also suggests that a single exposure to the vector capsid proteins at the time of IUGT is inadequate to induce tolerance to viral vector antigens. PMID:28141818

  4. A novel homologous model for gene therapy of dwarfism by non-viral transfer of the mouse growth hormone gene into immunocompetent dwarf mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchi, Claudia R; Higuti, Eliza; Oliveira, Nelio A J; Lima, Eliana R; Jakobsen, Maria; Dagnaes-Hansen, Frederick; Gissel, Hanne; Aagaard, Lars; Jensen, Thomas G; Jorge, Alexander A L; Bartolini, Paolo; Peroni, Cibele N

    2014-02-01

    The possibilities for non-viral GH gene therapy are studied in immunocompetent dwarf mice (lit/lit). As expression vector we used a plasmid previously employed in immunodeficient dwarf mice (pUBI-hGH-gDNA) by replacing the human GH gene with the genomic sequence of mouse-GH DNA (pUBI-mGH-gDNA). HEK-293 human cells transfected with pUBI-mGH-gDNA produced 3.0 µg mGH/10(6) cells/day compared to 3.7 µg hGH/10(6) cells/day for pUBIhGH- gDNA transfected cells. The weight of lit/lit mice treated with the same two plasmids (50 µg DNA/mouse) by electrotransfer into the quadriceps muscle was followed for 3 months. The weight increase up to 15 days for mGH, hGH and saline treated mice were 0.130, 0.112 and 0.027 g/mouse/day. Most sera from hGH-treated mice contained anti-hGH antibodies already on day 15, with the highest titers on day 45, while no significant anti-mGH antibodies were observed in mGH-treated mice. At the end of 3 months, the weight increase for mGH-treated mice was 34.3%, while the nose-to-tail and femur lengths increased 9.5% and 24.3%. Mouse-GH and hGH circulating levels were 4-5 ng/mL 15 days after treatment, versus control levels of ~0.7 ng GH/mL (Pdeficiency.

  5. Viral Disease Networks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulbahce, Natali; Yan, Han; Vidal, Marc; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2010-03-01

    Viral infections induce multiple perturbations that spread along the links of the biological networks of the host cells. Understanding the impact of these cascading perturbations requires an exhaustive knowledge of the cellular machinery as well as a systems biology approach that reveals how individual components of the cellular system function together. Here we describe an integrative method that provides a new approach to studying virus-human interactions and its correlations with diseases. Our method involves the combined utilization of protein - protein interactions, protein -- DNA interactions, metabolomics and gene - disease associations to build a ``viraldiseasome''. By solely using high-throughput data, we map well-known viral associated diseases and predict new candidate viral diseases. We use microarray data of virus-infected tissues and patient medical history data to further test the implications of the viral diseasome. We apply this method to Epstein-Barr virus and Human Papillomavirus and shed light into molecular development of viral diseases and disease pathways.

  6. A novel p53 mutational hotspot in skin tumors from UV-irradiated Xpc mutant mice alters transactivation functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inga, Alberto; Nahari, Dorit; Velasco-Miguel, Susana; Friedberg, Errol C; Resnick, Michael A

    2002-08-22

    A mutation in codon 122 of the mouse p53 gene resulting in a T to L amino acid substitution (T122-->L) is frequently associated with skin cancer in UV-irradiated mice that are both homozygous mutant for the nucleotide excision repair (NER) gene Xpc (Xpc(-/-)) and hemizygous mutant for the p53 gene. We investigated the functional consequences of the mouse T122-->L mutation when expressed either in mammalian cells or in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Similar to a non-functional allele, high expression of the T122-->L allele in p53(-/-) mouse embryo fibroblasts and human Saos-2 cells failed to suppress growth. However, the T122-->L mutant p53 showed wild-type transactivation levels with Bax and MDM2 promoters when expressed in either cell type and retained transactivation of the p21 and the c-Fos promoters in one cell line. Using a recently developed rheostatable p53 induction system in yeast we assessed the T122-->L transactivation capacity at low levels of protein expression using 12 different p53 response elements (REs). Compared to wild-type p53 the T122-->L protein manifested an unusual transactivation pattern comprising reduced and enhanced activity with specific REs. The high incidence of the T122-->L mutant allele in the Xpc(-/-) background suggests that both genetic and epigenetic conditions may facilitate the emergence of particular functional p53 mutations. Furthermore, the approach that we have taken also provides for the dissection of functions that may be retained in many p53 tumor alleles.

  7. Non-viral genetic transfection of rat Schwann cells with FuGENE HD© lipofection and AMAXA© nucleofection is feasible but impairs cell viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Armin; Täger, Joachim; Kohler, Konrad; Haerle, Max; Werdin, Frank; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard; Sinis, Nektarios

    2010-11-01

    To determine transfection efficiency of FuGENE HD© lipofection and AMAXA© nucleofection on rat Schwann cells (SC). The ischiadic and median nerves of 6-8 week old Lewis rats were cultured in modified melanocyte-growth medium. SCs were genetically transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP) as reporter gene using FuGENE HD© lipofection and AMAXA© nucleofection. Transfection rates were determined by visualization of GFP fluorescence under fluorescence microscopy and cell counting. Transfected cell to non-transfected cell relation was determined. Purity of Schwann cell culture was 88% as determined by immunohistologic staining. Transfection rate of FuGENE HD© lipofection was 2%, transfection rate of AMAXA© nucleofection was 10%. With both methods, Schwann cells showed pronounced aggregation behavior which made them unfeasible for further cultivation. Settling of Schwann cells on laminin and poly-L-ornithine coated plates was compromised by either method. Non-viral transfection of rat SC with FuGENE HD© lipofection and AMAXA© nucleofection is basically possible with a higher transfection rate for nucleofection than for lipofection. As cell viability is compromised by either method however, viral transfection is to be considered if higher efficiency is required.

  8. The full-length E1-circumflexE4 protein of human papillomavirus type 18 modulates differentiation-dependent viral DNA amplification and late gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, Regina; Ryan, Gordon B.; Knight, Gillian L.; Laimins, Laimonis A.; Roberts, Sally

    2007-01-01

    Activation of the productive phase of the human papillomavirus (HPV) life cycle in differentiated keratinocytes is coincident with high-level expression of E1-circumflexE4 protein. To determine the role of E1-circumflexE4 in the HPV replication cycle, we constructed HPV18 mutant genomes in which expression of the full-length E1-circumflexE4 protein was abrogated. Undifferentiated keratinocytes containing mutant genomes showed enhanced proliferation when compared to cells containing wildtype genomes, but there were no differences in maintenance of viral episomes. Following differentiation, cells with mutant genomes exhibited reduced levels of viral DNA amplification and late gene expression, compared to wildtype genome-containing cells. This indicates that HPV18 E1-circumflexE4 plays an important role in regulating HPV late functions, and it may also function in the early phase of the replication cycle. Our finding that full-length HPV18 E1-circumflexE4 protein plays a significant role in promoting viral genome amplification concurs with a similar report with HPV31, but is in contrast to an HPV11 study where viral DNA amplification was not dependent on full-length E1-circumflexE4 expression, and to HPV16 where only C-terminal truncations in E1-circumflexE4 abrogated vegetative genome replication. This suggests that type-specific differences exist between various E1-circumflexE4 proteins

  9. Latency of Epstein-Barr virus is stabilized by antisense-mediated control of the viral immediate-early gene BZLF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prang, N; Wolf, H; Schwarzmann, F

    1999-12-01

    The ability of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to avoid lytic replication and to establish a latent infection in B-lymphocytes is fundamental for its lifelong persistence and the pathogenesis of various EBV-associated diseases. The viral immediate-early gene BZLF-1 plays a key role for the induction of lytic replication and its activity is strictly regulated on different levels of gene expression. Recently, it was demonstrated that BZLF-1 is also controlled by a posttranscriptional mechanism. Transient synthesis of a mutated competitor RNA saturated this mechanism and caused both expression of the BZLF-1 protein and the induction of lytic viral replication. Using short overlapping fragments of the competitor, it is shown that this control acts on the unspliced primary transcript. RT-PCR demonstrated unspliced BZLF-1 RNA in latently infected B-lymphocytes in the absence of BZLF-1 protein. Due to the complementarity of the gene BZLF-1 and the latency-associated gene EBNA-1 on the opposite strand of the genome, we propose an antisense-mediated mechanism. RNase protection assays demonstrated transcripts in antisense orientation to the BZLF-1 transcript during latency, which comprise a comparable constellation to other herpesviruses. A combined RNAse protection/RT-PCR assay detected the double-stranded hybrid RNA, consisting of the unspliced BZLF-1 transcript and a noncoding intron of the EBNA-1 gene. Binding of BZLF-1 transcripts is suggested to be an important backup control mechanism in addition to transcriptional regulation, stabilizing latency and preventing inappropriate lytic viral replication in vivo. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. An efficient viral vector for functional genomic studies of Prunus fruit trees and its induced resistance to Plum pox virus via silencing of a host factor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hongguang; Wang, Aiming

    2017-03-01

    RNA silencing is a powerful technology for molecular characterization of gene functions in plants. A commonly used approach to the induction of RNA silencing is through genetic transformation. A potent alternative is to use a modified viral vector for virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) to degrade RNA molecules sharing similar nucleotide sequence. Unfortunately, genomic studies in many allogamous woody perennials such as peach are severely hindered because they have a long juvenile period and are recalcitrant to genetic transformation. Here, we report the development of a viral vector derived from Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV), a widespread fruit tree virus that is endemic in all Prunus fruit production countries and regions in the world. We show that the modified PNRSV vector, harbouring the sense-orientated target gene sequence of 100-200 bp in length in genomic RNA3, could efficiently trigger the silencing of a transgene or an endogenous gene in the model plant Nicotiana benthamiana. We further demonstrate that the PNRSV-based vector could be manipulated to silence endogenous genes in peach such as eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E isoform (eIF(iso)4E), a host factor of many potyviruses including Plum pox virus (PPV). Moreover, the eIF(iso)4E-knocked down peach plants were resistant to PPV. This work opens a potential avenue for the control of virus diseases in perennial trees via viral vector-mediated silencing of host factors, and the PNRSV vector may serve as a powerful molecular tool for functional genomic studies of Prunus fruit trees. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Dynamic properties of the Sulfolobus CRISPR/Cas and CRISPR/Cmr systems when challenged with vector-borne viral and plasmid genes and protospacers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guðbergsdóttir, Sóley Ruth; Deng, Ling; Chen, Zhengjun

    2011-01-01

    The adaptive immune CRISPR/Cas and CRISPR/Cmr systems of the crenarchaeal thermoacidophile Sulfolobus were challenged by a variety of viral and plasmid genes, and protospacers preceded by different dinucleotide motifs. The genes and protospacers were constructed to carry sequences matching...... individual spacers of CRISPR loci, and a range of mismatches were introduced. Constructs were cloned into vectors carrying pyrE/pyrF genes and transformed into uracil auxotrophic hosts derived from Sulfolobus solfataricus P2 or Sulfolobus islandicus REY15A. Most constructs, including those carrying different...... protospacer mismatches, yielded few viable transformants. These were shown to carry either partial deletions of CRISPR loci, covering a broad spectrum of sizes and including the matching spacer, or deletions of whole CRISPR/Cas modules. The deletions occurred independently of whether genes or protospacers...

  12. Mucosal immunization with recombinant adenoviral vectors expressing murine gammaherpesvirus-68 genes M2 and M3 can reduce latent viral load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoegh-Petersen, Mette; Thomsen, Allan R; Christensen, Jan P

    2009-01-01

    -68 (MHV-68) is a member of the Gammaherpesvirinae subfamily and represents a useful murine model for this category of infections, in which new vaccination strategies may initially be evaluated. Two attenuated variants of MHV-68 have successfully been used as vaccines, but the oncogenic potential...... of the gammaherpesvirinae speaks against using a similar approach in humans. DNA immunization with plasmids encoding the MHV-68 genes M2 or M3 caused a reduction in either acute or early latent viral load, respectively, but neither immunization had an effect at times later than 14 days post-infection. Adenovirus......-based vaccines are substantially more immunogenic than DNA vaccines and can be applied to induce mucosal immunity. Here we show that a significant reduction of the late viral load in the spleens, at 60 days post-infection, was achieved when immunizing mice both intranasally and subcutaneously with adenoviral...

  13. Impact of viral E2-gene status on outcome after radiotherapy for patients with human papillomavirus 16-positive cancer of the uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindel, Katja; Villiers, Ethel-Michele de; Burri, Philipp; Studer, Ueli; Altermatt, Hans J.; Greiner, Richard H.; Gruber, Guenther

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Integration of high-risk papillomavirus DNA has been considered an important step in oncogenic progression to cervical carcinoma. Disruption of the human papillomavirus (HPV) genome within the E2 gene is frequently a consequence. This study investigated the influence of episomal viral DNA on outcome in patients with advanced cervical cancer treated with primary radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Paraffin-embedded biopsies of 82 women with locally advanced cervical cancer could be analyzed for HPV infection by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) by use of SPF1/2 primers. E2-gene intactness of HPV-16-positive samples was analyzed in 3 separate amplification reactions by use of the E2A, E2B, E2C primers. Statistical analyses (Kaplan-Meier method; log-rank test) were performed for overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), local progression-free survival (LPFS), and distant metastases-free survival (DMFS). Results: Sixty-one (75%) of 82 carcinomas were HPV positive, 44 of them for HPV-16 (72%). Seventeen of the 44 HPV-16-positive tumors (39%) had an intact E2 gene. Patients with a HPV-16-positive tumor and an intact E2 gene showed a trend for a better DFS (58% vs. 38%, p = 0.06) compared with those with a disrupted E2 gene. A nonsignificant difference occurred regarding OS (87% vs. 66%, p = 0.16) and DMFS (57% vs. 48%, p = 0.15). Conclusion: E2-gene status may be a promising new target, but more studies are required to elucidate the effect of the viral E2 gene on outcome after radiotherapy in HPV-positive tumors

  14. DNA-transporting nanoparticles : design and in vitro evaluation of DNA and formulation for non-viral gene delivery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gaal, E.V.B.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of gene therapy is to treat, cure or prevent a disease by replacing defective genes, introducing new genes or changing the expression of a person’s genes. Success of gene therapy is dependent on successful delivery of DNA from the site of administration into cell nuclei. Naturally occurring

  15. Complete suppression of viral gene expression is associated with the onset and progression of lymphoid malignancy: observations in Bovine Leukemia Virus-infected sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burny Arsène

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During malignant progression, tumor cells need to acquire novel characteristics that lead to uncontrolled growth and reduced immunogenicity. In the Bovine Leukemia Virus-induced ovine leukemia model, silencing of viral gene expression has been proposed as a mechanism leading to immune evasion. However, whether proviral expression in tumors is completely suppressed in vivo was not conclusively demonstrated. Therefore, we studied viral expression in two selected experimentally-infected sheep, the virus or the disease of which had features that made it possible to distinguish tumor cells from their nontransformed counterparts. Results In the first animal, we observed the emergence of a genetically modified provirus simultaneously with leukemia onset. We found a Tax-mutated (TaxK303 replication-deficient provirus in the malignant B-cell clone while functional provirus (TaxE303 had been consistently monitored over the 17-month aleukemic period. In the second case, both non-transformed and transformed BLV-infected cells were present at the same time, but at distinct sites. While there was potentially-active provirus in the non-leukemic blood B-cell population, as demonstrated by ex-vivo culture and injection into naïve sheep, virus expression was completely suppressed in the malignant B-cells isolated from the lymphoid tumors despite the absence of genetic alterations in the proviral genome. These observations suggest that silencing of viral genes, including the oncoprotein Tax, is associated with tumor onset. Conclusion Our findings suggest that silencing is critical for tumor progression and identify two distinct mechanisms-genetic and epigenetic-involved in the complete suppression of virus and Tax expression. We demonstrate that, in contrast to systems that require sustained oncogene expression, the major viral transforming protein Tax can be turned-off without reversing the transformed phenotype. We propose that suppression

  16. Impact of polymorphisms in the HCP5 and HLA-C, and ZNRD1 genes on HIV viral load

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thørner, Lise Wegner; Erikstrup, Christian; Harritshøj, Lene Holm

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the human leucocyte antigen (HLA) complex P5 (HCP5), HLA-C, and near the zinc ribbon domain containing 1 (ZNRD1) have been shown to influence viral load (VL) set point in HIV-infected individuals with a known seroconversion onset. We aimed to determ...

  17. A combinational CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing approach can halt HIV replication and prevent viral escape

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lebbink, Robert Jan; de Jong, Dorien C M; Wolters, Femke; Kruse, Elisabeth M; van Ham, Petra M; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J; Nijhuis, Monique

    2017-01-01

    HIV presents one of the highest evolutionary rates ever detected and combination antiretroviral therapy is needed to overcome the plasticity of the virus population and control viral replication. Conventional treatments lack the ability to clear the latent reservoir, which remains the major obstacle

  18. Long-term correction of canine hemophilia B by gene transfer of blood coagulation factor IX mediated by adeno-associated viral vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, R W; Yang, E Y; Couto, L B; Hagstrom, J N; Elwell, D; Fields, P A; Burton, M; Bellinger, D A; Read, M S; Brinkhous, K M; Podsakoff, G M; Nichols, T C; Kurtzman, G J; High, K A

    1999-01-01

    Hemophilia B is a severe X-linked bleeding diathesis caused by the absence of functional blood coagulation factor IX, and is an excellent candidate for treatment of a genetic disease by gene therapy. Using an adeno-associated viral vector, we demonstrate sustained expression (>17 months) of factor IX in a large-animal model at levels that would have a therapeutic effect in humans (up to 70 ng/ml, adequate to achieve phenotypic correction, in an animal injected with 8.5x10(12) vector particles/kg). The five hemophilia B dogs treated showed stable, vector dose-dependent partial correction of the whole blood clotting time and, at higher doses, of the activated partial thromboplastin time. In contrast to other viral gene delivery systems, this minimally invasive procedure, consisting of a series of percutaneous intramuscular injections at a single timepoint, was not associated with local or systemic toxicity. Efficient gene transfer to muscle was shown by immunofluorescence staining and DNA analysis of biopsied tissue. Immune responses against factor IX were either absent or transient. These data provide strong support for the feasibility of the approach for therapy of human subjects.

  19. Site-targeted non-viral gene delivery by direct DNA injection into the pancreatic parenchyma and subsequent in vivo electroporation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Masahiro; Inada, Emi; Saitoh, Issei; Ohtsuka, Masato; Nakamura, Shingo; Sakurai, Takayuki; Watanabe, Satoshi

    2013-11-01

    The pancreas is considered an important gene therapy target because the organ is the site of several high burden diseases, including diabetes mellitus, cystic fibrosis, and pancreatic cancer. We aimed to develop an efficient in vivo gene delivery system using non-viral DNA. Direct intra-parenchymal injection of a solution containing circular plasmid pmaxGFP DNA was performed on adult anesthetized ICR female mice. The injection site was sandwiched with a pair of tweezer-type electrode disks, and electroporated using a square-pulse generator. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression within the injected pancreatic portion was observed one day after gene delivery. GFP expression reduced to baseline within a week of transfection. Application of voltages over 40 V resulted in tissue damage during electroporation. We demonstrate that electroporation is effective for safe and efficient transfection of pancreatic cells. This novel gene delivery method to the pancreatic parenchyma may find application in gene therapy strategies for pancreatic diseases and in investigation of specific gene function in situ. © 2013 The Authors. Biotechnology Journal published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs License, which permits use and distribution in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited, the use is non-commercial and no modifications or adaptions are made.

  20. Mucosal immunization with recombinant adenoviral vectors expressing murine gammaherpesvirus-68 genes M2 and M3 can reduce latent viral load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoegh-Petersen, Mette; Thomsen, Allan R; Christensen, Jan P; Holst, Peter J

    2009-11-12

    Gammaherpesviruses establish life-long latent infections in their hosts. If the host becomes immunosuppressed, these viruses may reactivate and cause severe disease, and even in immunocompetent individuals the gammaherpesviruses are presumed to have an oncogenic potential. Murine gammaherpesvirus-68 (MHV-68) is a member of the Gammaherpesvirinae subfamily and represents a useful murine model for this category of infections, in which new vaccination strategies may initially be evaluated. Two attenuated variants of MHV-68 have successfully been used as vaccines, but the oncogenic potential of the gammaherpesvirinae speaks against using a similar approach in humans. DNA immunization with plasmids encoding the MHV-68 genes M2 or M3 caused a reduction in either acute or early latent viral load, respectively, but neither immunization had an effect at times later than 14 days post-infection. Adenovirus-based vaccines are substantially more immunogenic than DNA vaccines and can be applied to induce mucosal immunity. Here we show that a significant reduction of the late viral load in the spleens, at 60 days post-infection, was achieved when immunizing mice both intranasally and subcutaneously with adenoviral vectors encoding both M2 and M3. Additionally we show that M3 immunization prevented the usual development of virus-induced splenomegaly at 2-3 weeks post-infection. This is the first time that immunization with a non-replicating vaccine has lead to a significantly reduced viral load at time points beyond 14 days post-infection, and thus demonstrates that a non-replicating vaccine may successfully be employed to reduce the viral burden during chronic gammaherpesvirus infection.

  1. Controlling cellular P-TEFb activity by the HIV-1 transcriptional transactivator Tat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Muniz

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1 transcriptional transactivator (Tat is essential for synthesis of full-length transcripts from the integrated viral genome by RNA polymerase II (Pol II. Tat recruits the host positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb to the HIV-1 promoter through binding to the transactivator RNA (TAR at the 5'-end of the nascent HIV transcript. P-TEFb is a general Pol II transcription factor; its cellular activity is controlled by the 7SK small nuclear RNA (snRNA and the HEXIM1 protein, which sequester P-TEFb into transcriptionally inactive 7SK/HEXIM/P-TEFb snRNP. Besides targeting P-TEFb to HIV transcription, Tat also increases the nuclear level of active P-TEFb through promoting its dissociation from the 7SK/HEXIM/P-TEFb RNP by an unclear mechanism. In this study, by using in vitro and in vivo RNA-protein binding assays, we demonstrate that HIV-1 Tat binds with high specificity and efficiency to an evolutionarily highly conserved stem-bulge-stem motif of the 5'-hairpin of human 7SK snRNA. The newly discovered Tat-binding motif of 7SK is structurally and functionally indistinguishable from the extensively characterized Tat-binding site of HIV TAR and importantly, it is imbedded in the HEXIM-binding elements of 7SK snRNA. We show that Tat efficiently replaces HEXIM1 on the 7SK snRNA in vivo and therefore, it promotes the disassembly of the 7SK/HEXIM/P-TEFb negative transcriptional regulatory snRNP to augment the nuclear level of active P-TEFb. This is the first demonstration that HIV-1 specifically targets an important cellular regulatory RNA, most probably to promote viral transcription and replication. Demonstration that the human 7SK snRNA carries a TAR RNA-like Tat-binding element that is essential for the normal transcriptional regulatory function of 7SK questions the viability of HIV therapeutic approaches based on small drugs blocking the Tat-binding site of HIV TAR.

  2. The interaction between endogenous 30S ribosomal subunit protein S11 and Cucumber mosaic virus LS2b protein affects viral replication, infection and gene silencing suppressor activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruilin Wang

    Full Text Available Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV is a model virus for plant-virus protein interaction and mechanism research because of its wide distribution, high-level of replication and simple genome structure. The 2b protein is a multifunctional protein encoded by CMV that suppresses RNA silencing-based antiviral defense and contributes to CMV virulence in host plants. In this report, 12 host proteins were identified as CMV LS2b binding partners using the yeast two-hybrid screen system from the Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA library. Among the host proteins, 30S ribosomal subunit protein S11 (RPS11 was selected for further studies. The interaction between LS2b and full-length RPS11 was confirmed using the yeast two-hybrid system. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BIFC assays observed by confocal laser microscopy and Glutathione S-transferase (GST pull-down assays were used to verify the interaction between endogenous NbRPS11 and viral CMVLS2b both in vivo and in vitro. TRV-based gene silencing vector was used to knockdown NbRPS11 transcription, and immunoblot analysis revealed a decline in infectious viral RNA replication and a decrease in CMV infection in RPS11 down-regulated Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Thus, the knockdown of RPS11 likely inhibited CMV replication and accumulation. The gene silencing suppressor activity of CMV2b protein was reduced by the RPS11 knockdown. This study demonstrated that the function of viral LS2b protein was remarkably affected by the interaction with host RPS11 protein.

  3. A Luciferase Reporter Gene Assay to Measure Ebola Virus Viral Protein 35-Associated Inhibition of Double-Stranded RNA-Stimulated, Retinoic Acid-Inducible Gene 1-Mediated Induction of Interferon β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannas, Valeria; Daino, Gian Luca; Corona, Angela; Esposito, Francesca; Tramontano, Enzo

    2015-10-01

    During Ebola virus (EBOV) infection, the type I interferon α/β (IFN-α/β) innate immune response is suppressed by EBOV viral protein 35 (VP35), a validated drug target. Identification of EBOV VP35 inhibitors requires a cellular system able to assess the VP35-based inhibitory functions of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) IFN-β induction. We established a miniaturized luciferase gene reporter assay in A549 cells that measures IFN-β induction by viral dsRNA and is dose-dependently inhibited by VP35 expression. When compared to influenza A virus NS1 protein, EBOV VP35 showed improved inhibition of viral dsRNA-based IFN-β induction. This assay can be used to screen for EBOV VP35 inhibitors. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Extracellular Hsp90 serves as a co-factor for MAPK activation and latent viral gene expression during de novo infection by KSHV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Zhiqiang; DeFee, Michael; Isaacs, Jennifer S.; Parsons, Chris

    2010-01-01

    The Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is the causative agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), an important cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. KSHV interaction with the cell membrane triggers activation of specific intracellular signal transduction pathways to facilitate virus entry, nuclear trafficking, and ultimately viral oncogene expression. Extracellular heat shock protein 90 localizes to the cell surface (csHsp90) and facilitates signal transduction in cancer cell lines, but whether csHsp90 assists in the coordination of KSHV gene expression through these or other mechanisms is unknown. Using a recently characterized non-permeable inhibitor specifically targeting csHsp90 and Hsp90-specific antibodies, we show that csHsp90 inhibition suppresses KSHV gene expression during de novo infection, and that this effect is mediated largely through the inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation by KSHV. Moreover, we show that targeting csHsp90 reduces constitutive MAPK expression and the release of infectious viral particles by patient-derived, KSHV-infected primary effusion lymphoma cells. These data suggest that csHsp90 serves as an important co-factor for KSHV-initiated MAPK activation and provide proof-of-concept for the potential benefit of targeting csHsp90 for the treatment or prevention of KSHV-associated illnesses.

  5. Expression kinetics of key genes in the early innate immune response to Great Lakes viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus IVb infection in yellow perch (Perca flavescens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Wendy; Emmenegger, Eveline; Glenn, Jolene; Simchick, Crystal; Winton, Jim; Goetz, Frederick

    2013-01-01

    The recently discovered strain of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, VHSV-IVb, represents an example of the introduction of an extremely pathogenic rhabdovirus capable of infecting a wide variety of new fish species in a new host-environment. The goal of the present study was to delineate the expression kinetics of key genes in the innate immune response relative to the very early stages of VHSV-IVb infection using the yellow perch (Perca flavescens) as a model. Administration of VHSV-IVb by IP-injection into juvenile yellow perch resulted in 84% cumulative mortality, indicating their high susceptibility to this disease. In fish sampled in the very early stages of infection, a significant up-regulation of Mx gene expression in the liver, as well as IL-1β and SAA activation in the head kidney, spleen, and liver was directly correlated to viral load. The potential down-regulation of Mx in the hematopoietic tissues, head kidney and spleen, may represent a strategy utilized by the virus to increase replication.

  6. Activation of erythropoietin receptors by Friend viral gp55 and by erythropoietin and down-modulation by the murine Fv-2r resistance gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoatlin, M.E.; Kozak, S.L.; Kabat, D.; Lilly, F.; Chakraborti, A.; Kozak, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    The leukemogenic membrane glycoprotein (gp55) encoded by Friend spleen focus-forming virus appears to bind to erythropoietin receptors (EpoR) to stimulate erythroblastosis. To directly compare the effects of gp55 with erythropoietin (Epo), the authors produced retrovirions that encode either gp55, Epo, or EpoR. After infection with EpoR virus, interleukin 3-dependent DA-3 cells bound 125 I-labeled Epo and grew without interleukin 3 in the presence of Epo. These latter cells, but not parental DA-3 cells, became factor-independent after superinfection either with Epo virus or with Friend spleen focus-forming virus. In addition, Epo virus caused a disease in mice that mimicked Friend erythroleukemia. Although Fv-2 r homozygotes are susceptible to all other retroviral diseases, they are resistant to both Epo viral and Friend viral erythroleukemia. These results indicate that both gp55 and Epo stimulate EpoR and that the Fv-2 gene encodes a protein that controls response to these ligands. However, the Fv-2 protein is not EpoR because the corresponding genes map to opposite ends of mouse chromosome 9. These results have important implications for understanding signal transduction by EpoR and the role of host genetic variation in controlling susceptibility to an oncogenic protein

  7. Genetic modification of adeno-associated viral vector type 2 capsid enhances gene transfer efficiency in polarized human airway epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, April F; Mazur, Marina; Sorscher, Eric J; Zinn, Kurt R; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2008-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a common genetic disease characterized by defects in the expression of the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene. Gene therapy offers better hope for the treatment of CF. Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors are capable of stable expression with low immunogenicity. Despite their potential in CF gene therapy, gene transfer efficiency by AAV is limited because of pathophysiological barriers in these patients. Although a few AAV serotypes have shown better transduction compared with the AAV2-based vectors, gene transfer efficiency in human airway epithelium has still not reached therapeutic levels. To engineer better AAV vectors for enhanced gene delivery in human airway epithelium, we developed and characterized mutant AAV vectors by genetic capsid modification, modeling the well-characterized AAV2 serotype. We genetically incorporated putative high-affinity peptide ligands to human airway epithelium on the GH loop region of AAV2 capsid protein. Six independent mutant AAV were constructed, containing peptide ligands previously reported to bind with high affinity for known and unknown receptors on human airway epithelial cells. The vectors were tested on nonairway cells and nonpolarized and polarized human airway epithelial cells for enhanced infectivity. One of the mutant vectors, with the peptide sequence THALWHT, not only showed the highest transduction in undifferentiated human airway epithelial cells but also indicated significant transduction in polarized cells. Interestingly, this modified vector was also able to infect cells independently of the heparan sulfate proteoglycan receptor. Incorporation of this ligand on other AAV serotypes, which have shown improved gene transfer efficiency in the human airway epithelium, may enhance the application of AAV vectors in CF gene therapy.

  8. Flock House virus subgenomic RNA3 is replicated and its replication correlates with transactivation of RNA2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckerle, Lance D.; Albarino, Cesar G.; Ball, L. Andrew.

    2003-01-01

    The nodavirus Flock House virus has a bipartite genome composed of RNAs 1 and 2, which encode the catalytic component of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and the capsid protein precursor, respectively. In addition to catalyzing replication of the viral genome, the RdRp also transcribes from RNA1 a subgenomic RNA3, which is both required for and suppressed by RNA2 replication. Here, we show that in the absence of RNA1 replication, FHV RdRp replicated positive-sense RNA3 transcripts fully and copied negative-sense RNA3 transcripts into positive strands. The two nonstructural proteins encoded by RNA3 were dispensable for replication, but sequences in the 3'-terminal 58 nucleotides were required. RNA3 variants that failed to replicate also failed to transactivate RNA2. These results imply that RNA3 is naturally produced both by transcription from RNA1 and by subsequent RNA1-independent replication and that RNA3 replication may be necessary for transactivation of RNA2

  9. Viral Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Sorina Raula Gîrboveanu; Silvia Puiu

    2008-01-01

    With consumers showing increasing resistance to traditional forms of advertising such as TV or newspaper ads, marketers have turned to alternate strategies, including viral marketing. Viral marketing exploits existing social networks by encouraging customers to share product information with their friends.In our study we are able to directly observe the effectiveness of person to person word of mouth advertising for hundreds of thousands of products for the first time

  10. In vitro efficacy of a gene-activated nerve guidance conduit incorporating non-viral PEI-pDNA nanoparticles carrying genes encoding for NGF, GDNF and c-Jun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackington, William A; Raftery, Rosanne M; O'Brien, Fergal J

    2018-06-07

    Despite the success of tissue engineered nerve guidance conduits (NGCs) for the treatment of small peripheral nerve injuries, autografts remain the clinical gold standard for larger injuries. The delivery of neurotrophic factors from conduits might enhance repair for more effective treatment of larger injuries but the efficacy of such systems is dependent on a safe, effective platform for controlled and localised therapeutic delivery. Gene therapy might offer an innovative approach to control the timing, release and level of neurotrophic factor production by directing cells to transiently sustain therapeutic protein production in situ. In this study, a gene-activated NGC was developed by incorporating non-viral polyethyleneimine-plasmid DNA (PEI-pDNA) nanoparticles (N/P 7 ratio, 2μg dose) with the pDNA encoding for nerve growth factor (NGF), glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) or the transcription factor c-Jun. The physicochemical properties of PEI-pDNA nanoparticles, morphology, size and charge, were shown to be suitable for gene delivery and demonstrated high Schwann cell transfection efficiency (60±13%) in vitro. While all three genes showed therapeutic potential in terms of enhancing neurotrophic cytokine production while promoting neurite outgrowth, delivery of the gene encoding for c-Jun showed the greatest capacity to enhance regenerative cellular processes in vitro. Ultimately, this gene-activated NGC construct was shown to be capable of transfecting both Schwann cells (S42 cells) and neuronal cells (PC12 and dorsal root ganglia) in vitro, demonstrating potential for future therapeutic applications in vivo. The basic requirements of biomaterial-based nerve guidance conduits have now been well established and include being able to bridge a nerve injury to support macroscopic guidance between nerve stumps, while being strong enough to withstand longitudinal tension and circumferential compression, in addition to being mechanically sound to facilitate

  11. A search for RNA insertions and NS3 gene duplication in the genome of cytopathic isolates of bovine viral diarrhea virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.L. Quadros

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Calves born persistently infected with non-cytopathic bovine viral diarrhea virus (ncpBVDV frequently develop a fatal gastroenteric illness called mucosal disease. Both the original virus (ncpBVDV and an antigenically identical but cytopathic virus (cpBVDV can be isolated from animals affected by mucosal disease. Cytopathic BVDVs originate from their ncp counterparts by diverse genetic mechanisms, all leading to the expression of the non-structural polypeptide NS3 as a discrete protein. In contrast, ncpBVDVs express only the large precursor polypeptide, NS2-3, which contains the NS3 sequence within its carboxy-terminal half. We report here the investigation of the mechanism leading to NS3 expression in 41 cpBVDV isolates. An RT-PCR strategy was employed to detect RNA insertions within the NS2-3 gene and/or duplication of the NS3 gene, two common mechanisms of NS3 expression. RT-PCR amplification revealed insertions in the NS2-3 gene of three cp isolates, with the inserts being similar in size to that present in the cpBVDV NADL strain. Sequencing of one such insert revealed a 296-nucleotide sequence with a central core of 270 nucleotides coding for an amino acid sequence highly homologous (98% to the NADL insert, a sequence corresponding to part of the cellular J-Domain gene. One cpBVDV isolate contained a duplication of the NS3 gene downstream from the original locus. In contrast, no detectable NS2-3 insertions or NS3 gene duplications were observed in the genome of 37 cp isolates. These results demonstrate that processing of NS2-3 without bulk mRNA insertions or NS3 gene duplications seems to be a frequent mechanism leading to NS3 expression and BVDV cytopathology.

  12. General and family-specific gene expression responses to viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus infection in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, H. B. H.; Sørensen, P.; Cooper, G. A.

    2011-01-01

    challenge) and a relatively high susceptibility (18% survival following challenge) trout family that were both split into a group exposed to virus and a non-exposed control group. In total, 939 genes were differentially expressed between infected and non-infected fish (FDR p = 0.05). Five groups of Gene...... Ontology categories were involved in immune-related processes and over-represented in infected fish: (i) stress and defense response, (ii) NFkappaB signal transduction, (iii) response to non-self, (iv) antigen processing and presentation, and (v) proteasome complexes. The first four categories were also...... over-represented among the 642 differentially expressed genes in the low-susceptibility trout family but not among the 556 differentially expressed genes in the high-susceptibility trout family. Expression profiles for most immune genes discussed showed increased transcription from day 3 post...

  13. Contribution to the investigation of the p53 in vivo and in vitro trans-activation activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meiller, A.

    2004-03-01

    Among the body's defence mechanisms, the programmed cellular death or apoptosis is an important safeguard way which allows the body to get rid of the injured cells before they acquire steady genetic modifications leading to an anarchistic multiplication. As p53 tumor suppressor gene plays a predominant role within this process, this research report first presents the p53 protein, its structure, its activities as a transcription factor, its modifications and the implications on its functional activities, its biological activities, and describes the p53 intracellular rate regulation and the use of this protein in radiology, particularly in 'in vivo' investigations on irradiated mice. It also presents the p53 family. Then, the author reports experimental investigations on possible other genes which could be trans-activated by p53. A gene is identified as a new target gene. She also demonstrates a new p53 activation path induced by another member of the p53 family, the p73 alpha protein

  14. High-resolution labeling and functional manipulation of specific neuron types in mouse brain by Cre-activated viral gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra J Kuhlman

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe a method that combines Cre-recombinase knockin mice and viral-mediated gene transfer to genetically label and functionally manipulate specific neuron types in the mouse brain. We engineered adeno-associated viruses (AAVs that express GFP, dsRedExpress, or channelrhodopsin (ChR2 upon Cre/loxP recombination-mediated removal of a transcription-translation STOP cassette. Fluorescent labeling was sufficient to visualize neuronal structures with synaptic resolution in vivo, and ChR2 expression allowed light activation of neuronal spiking. The structural dynamics of a specific class of neocortical neuron, the parvalbumin-containing (Pv fast-spiking GABAergic interneuron, was monitored over the course of a week. We found that although the majority of Pv axonal boutons were stable in young adults, bouton additions and subtractions on axonal shafts were readily observed at a rate of 10.10% and 9.47%, respectively, over 7 days. Our results indicate that Pv inhibitory circuits maintain the potential for structural re-wiring in post-adolescent cortex. With the generation of an increasing number of Cre knockin mice and because viral transfection can be delivered to defined brain regions at defined developmental stages, this strategy represents a general method to systematically visualize the structure and manipulate the function of different cell types in the mouse brain.

  15. Brain transcriptomes of harbor seals demonstrate gene expression patterns of animals undergoing a metabolic disease and a viral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie M. Rosales

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Diseases of marine mammals can be difficult to diagnose because of their life history and protected status. Stranded marine mammals have been a particularly useful resource to discover and comprehend the diseases that plague these top predators. Additionally, advancements in high-throughput sequencing (HTS has contributed to the discovery of novel pathogens in marine mammals. In this study, we use a combination of HTS and stranded harbor seals (Phoca vitulina to better understand a known and unknown brain disease. To do this, we used transcriptomics to evaluate brain tissues from seven neonatal harbor seals that expired from an unknown cause of death (UCD and compared them to four neonatal harbor seals that had confirmed phocine herpesvirus (PhV-1 infections in the brain. Comparing the two disease states we found that UCD animals showed a significant abundance of fatty acid metabolic transcripts in their brain tissue, thus we speculate that a fatty acid metabolic dysregulation contributed to the death of these animals. Furthermore, we were able to describe the response of four young harbor seals with PhV-1 infections in the brain. PhV-1 infected animals showed a significant ability to mount an innate and adaptive immune response, especially to combat viral infections. Our data also suggests that PhV-1 can hijack host pathways for DNA packaging and exocytosis. This is the first study to use transcriptomics in marine mammals to understand host and viral interactions and assess the death of stranded marine mammals with an unknown disease. Furthermore, we show the value of applying transcriptomics on stranded marine mammals for disease characterization.

  16. Novel non-viral vectors for gene delivery: synthesis of a second-generation library of mono-functionalized poly-(guanidinium)amines and their introduction into cationic lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byk, G; Soto, J; Mattler, C; Frederic, M; Scherman, D

    1998-01-01

    The development of new gene delivery technologies is a prerequisite towards gene therapy clinical trials. Because gene delivery mediated by viral vectors remains of limited scope due to immunological and propagation risks, the development of new non-viral gene delivery systems is of crucial importance. We have synthesized a secondary library of mono-functionalized poly-(guanidinium)amines generated from a library of mono-functionalized polyamines applying the concept of "libraries from libraries." The method allows a quick and easy access to mono-functionalized geometrically varied poly-(guanidinium)amines. The new building blocks were introduced into cationic lipids to obtain novel poly-(guanidinium)amine lipids, which are potential DNA vectors for gene delivery. Copyright 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  17. Robust Lentiviral Gene Delivery But Limited Transduction Capacity of Commonly Used Adeno-Associated Viral Serotypes in Xenotransplanted Human Skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, Maria; Askou, Anne Louise; Stenderup, Karin; Rosada, Cecilia; Dagnæs-Hansen, Frederik; Jensen, Thomas G; Corydon, Thomas J; Mikkelsen, Jacob Giehm; Aagaard, Lars

    2015-08-01

    Skin is an easily accessible organ, and therapeutic gene transfer to skin remains an attractive alternative for the treatment of skin diseases. Although we have previously documented potent lentiviral gene delivery to human skin, vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) rank among the most promising gene delivery tools for in vivo purposes. Thus, we compared the potential usefulness of various serotypes of recombinant AAV vectors and lentiviral vectors for gene transfer to human skin in a xenotransplanted mouse model. Vector constructs encoding firefly luciferase were packaged in AAV capsids of serotype 1, 2, 5, 6, 8, and 9 and separately administered by intradermal injection in human skin transplants. For all serotypes, live bioimaging demonstrated low levels of transgene expression in the human skin graft, and firefly luciferase expression was observed primarily in neighboring tissue outside of the graft. In contrast, gene delivery by intradermally injected lentiviral vectors was efficient and led to extensive and persistent firefly luciferase expression within the human skin graft only. The study demonstrates the limited capacity of single-stranded AAV vectors of six commonly used serotypes for gene delivery to human skin in vivo.

  18. Virally mediated Kcnq1 gene replacement therapy in the immature scala media restores hearing in a mouse model of human Jervell and Lange-Nielsen deafness syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Qing; Wang, Jianjun; Li, Qi; Kim, Yeunjung; Zhou, Binfei; Wang, Yunfeng; Li, Huawei; Lin, Xi

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in the potassium channel subunit KCNQ1 cause the human severe congenital deafness Jervell and Lange-Nielsen (JLN) syndrome. We applied a gene therapy approach in a mouse model of JLN syndrome (Kcnq1(-/-) mice) to prevent the development of deafness in the adult stage. A modified adeno-associated virus construct carrying a Kcnq1 expression cassette was injected postnatally (P0-P2) into the endolymph, which resulted in Kcnq1 expression in most cochlear marginal cells where native Kcnq1 is exclusively expressed. We also found that extensive ectopic virally mediated Kcnq1 transgene expression did not affect normal cochlear functions. Examination of cochlear morphology showed that the collapse of the Reissner's membrane and degeneration of hair cells (HCs) and cells in the spiral ganglia were corrected in Kcnq1(-/-) mice. Electrophysiological tests showed normal endocochlear potential in treated ears. In addition, auditory brainstem responses showed significant hearing preservation in the injected ears, ranging from 20 dB improvement to complete correction of the deafness phenotype. Our results demonstrate the first successful gene therapy treatment for gene defects specifically affecting the function of the stria vascularis, which is a major site affected by genetic mutations in inherited hearing loss. © 2015 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  19. POLYMORPHIC VARIANTS OF THE GENE OF INTERFERON LAMBDA 3 AND FEATURES OF IMMUNE RESPONSE IN CHILDREN WITH CHRONIC VIRAL HEPATITIS C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. B. Sentsova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the immune manifestations of the interferon-lambda 3 genepolymorphism in chronic viral hepatitis C, 110 Russian children (54 girls and 56 boys with chronic HCV infection aged from 3 to 17 years were examined. All children were on combined therapy (pegylated interferon + ribavirin. It was found that among the studied polymorphic variants of the IFN-λ 3 gene in children with chronic HCV infection, T allele of the marker rs12979860 is associated with infection and chronization of HCV. The T/T rs12979860 genotype of the IFN-λ3 gene is unfavorable for the course of chronic HCV infection due to low levels of activated T-lymphocytes, intactness of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1α, and interferon-γ inducible protein IP-10. The revealed relation of the polymorphic variants of C/C + C/T locus rs12979860 of INF-λ3 gene with the expression of activated T-lymphocytes discloses the protective nature of these genotypes to the development of chronic HCV infection in children. 

  20. Synthesis, and Characterization, and Evaluation of Cellular Effects of the FOL-PEG-g-PEI-GAL Nanoparticles as a Potential Non-Viral Vector for Gene Delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghiamkazemi, S.; Amanzadeh, A.; Dinarvand, R.; Rafiee-Tehrani, M.; Amini, M.; Ghiamkazemi, S.; Dinarvand, R.; Rafiee-Tehrani, M.; Ghiamkazemi, S.; Rafiee-Tehrani, M.; Amanzadeh, A.; Rafiee-Tehrani, M.

    2010-01-01

    In this manuscript, we synthesized the potential non viral vector for gene delivery with proper transfection efficiency and low cytotoxicity. Polyethylenimine (PEI) is a well-known cationic polymer which has high positive surface charge for condensing plasmid DNA. However; it is highly cytotoxic in many cell lines because of the high surface charge, non-biodegradability and non-biocompatibility. To enhance PEI biodegradability, the graft copolymer PEG-g-PEI was synthesized. To target cancer liver cells, two targeting ligands folic acid and galactose (lactobionic acid) which are over expressed on human hepatocyte carcinoma were attached to graft copolymer and FOL-PEG-g-PEI-GAL copolymer was synthesized. Composition of this grafted copolymer was characterized using 1H-NMR and FTIR spectra. The molecular weight and zeta potential of this copolymer was compared to PEI. The particle size and zeta potential of FOL-PEG-g-PEI-GAL/DNA complexes at various N/P ratio were measured using dynamic light scattering (DLS). Cytotoxicity of the copolymer was also studied in cultured HepG2 human hepatoblastoma cell line. The FOL-PEG-g-PEI-GAL/DNA complexes at various N/P ratios exhibited no cytotoxicity in HepG2 cell line compared to PEI 25K as a control. The novel copolymer showed enhanced biodegradability in physiological conditions in compared with PEI and targeted cultured HepG2 cells. More importantly, significant transfection efficiency was exhibited in cancer liver cells. Together, our results showed that FOL-PEG-g-PEI-GAL nanoparticles could be considered as a useful non-viral vector for targeted gene delivery.

  1. Sequence variation of the glycoprotein gene identifies three distinct lineages within field isolates of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus, a fish rhabdovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benmansour, A.; Bascuro, B.; Monnier, A.F.; Vende, P.; Winton, J.R.; de Kinkelin, P.

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the genetic diversity of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV), the sequence of the glycoprotein genes (G) of 11 North American and European isolates were determined. Comparison with the G protein of representative members of the family Rhabdoviridae suggested that VHSV was a different virus species from infectious haemorrhagic necrosis virus (IHNV) and Hirame rhabdovirus (HIRRV). At a higher taxonomic level, VHSV, IHNV and HIRRV formed a group which was genetically closest to the genus Lyssavirus. Compared with each other, the G genes of VHSV displayed a dissimilar overall genetic diversity which correlated with differences in geographical origin. The multiple sequence alignment of the complete G protein, showed that the divergent positions were not uniformly distributed along the sequence. A central region (amino acid position 245-300) accumulated substitutions and appeared to be highly variable. The genetic heterogeneity within a single isolate was high, with an apparent internal mutation frequency of 1.2 x 10(-3) per nucleotide site, attesting the quasispecies nature of the viral population. The phylogeny separated VHSV strains according to the major geographical area of isolation: genotype I for continental Europe, genotype II for the British Isles, and genotype III for North America. Isolates from continental Europe exhibited the highest genetic variability, with sub-groups correlated partially with the serological classification. Neither neutralizing polyclonal sera, nor monoclonal antibodies, were able to discriminate between the genotypes. The overall structure of the phylogenetic tree suggests that VHSV genetic diversity and evolution fit within the model of random change and positive selection operating on quasispecies.

  2. Evaluation of the zoonotic potential of a novel reassortant H1N2 swine influenza virus with gene constellation derived from multiple viral sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee Hoon; Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q; Decano, Arun G; Kim, Se Mi; Park, Su-Jin; Kwon, Hyeok-Il; Kim, Eun-Ha; Kim, Young-Il; Kim, HyongKyu; Kim, Seok-Yong; Song, Min-Suk; Jang, Hyung-Kwan; Park, Bong Kyun; Choi, Young Ki

    2015-08-01

    In 2011-2012, contemporary North American-like H3N2 swine influenza viruses (SIVs) possessing the 2009 pandemic H1N1 matrix gene (H3N2pM-like virus) were detected in domestic pigs of South Korea where H1N2 SIV strains are endemic. More recently, we isolated novel reassortant H1N2 SIVs bearing the Eurasian avian-like swine H1-like hemagglutinin and Korean swine H1N2-like neuraminidase in the internal gene backbone of the H3N2pM-like virus. In the present study, we clearly provide evidence on the genetic origins of the novel H1N2 SIVs virus through genetic and phylogenetic analyses. In vitro studies demonstrated that, in comparison with a pre-existing 2012 Korean H1N2 SIV [A/swine/Korea/CY03-11/2012 (CY03-11/2012)], the 2013 novel reassortant H1N2 isolate [A/swine/Korea/CY0423/2013 (CY0423-12/2013)] replicated more efficiently in differentiated primary human bronchial epithelial cells. The CY0423-12/2013 virus induced higher viral titers than the CY03-11/2012 virus in the lungs and nasal turbinates of infected mice and nasal wash samples of ferrets. Moreover, the 2013 H1N2 reassortant, but not the intact 2012 H1N2 virus, was transmissible to naïve contact ferrets via respiratory-droplets. Noting that the viral precursors have the ability to infect humans, our findings highlight the potential threat of a novel reassortant H1N2 SIV to public health and underscore the need to further strengthen influenza surveillance strategies worldwide, including swine populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Identifying optimal reference genes for the normalization of microRNA expression in cucumber under viral stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chaoqiong; Hao, Jianjun; Meng, Yan; Luo, Laixin; Li, Jianqiang

    2018-01-01

    Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) is an economically important pathogen and causes significant reduction of both yield and quality of cucumber (Cucumis sativus). Currently, there were no satisfied strategies for controlling the disease. A better understanding of microRNA (miRNA) expression related to the regulation of plant-virus interactions and virus resistance would be of great assistance when developing control strategies for CGMMV. However, accurate expression analysis is highly dependent on robust and reliable reference gene used as an internal control for normalization of miRNA expression. Most commonly used reference genes involved in CGMMV-infected cucumber are not universally expressed depending on tissue types and stages of plant development. It is therefore crucial to identify suitable reference genes in investigating the role of miRNA expression. In this study, seven reference genes, including Actin, Tubulin, EF-1α, 18S rRNA, Ubiquitin, GAPDH and Cyclophilin, were evaluated for the most accurate results in analyses using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). Gene expression was assayed on cucumber leaves, stems and roots that were collected at different days post inoculation with CGMMV. The expression data were analyzed using algorithms including delta-Ct, geNorm, NormFinder, and BestKeeper as well as the comparative tool RefFinder. The reference genes were subsequently validated using miR159. The results showed that EF-1α and GAPDH were the most reliable reference genes for normalizing miRNA expression in leaf, root and stem samples, while Ubiquitin and EF-1α were the most suitable combination overall. PMID:29543906

  4. Nearly neutral evolution in IFNL3 gene retains the immune function to detect and clear the viral infection in HCV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pratichi; Dass, J Febin Prabhu

    2018-05-07

    IFNL3 gene plays a crucial role in immune defense against viruses. It induces the interferon stimulated genes (ISGs) with antiviral properties by activating the JAK-STAT pathway. In this study, we investigated the evolutionary force involved in shaping the IFNL3 gene to perform its downstream function as a regulatory gene in HCV clearance. We have selected 25 IFNL3 coding sequences with human gene as a reference sequence and constructed a phylogeny. Furthermore, rate of variation, substitution saturation test, phylogenetic informativeness and differential selection were also analysed. The codon evolution result suggests that nearly neutral mutation is the key pattern in shaping the IFNL3 evolution. The results were validated by subjecting the human IFNL3 protein variants to that of the native through a molecular dynamics simulation study. The molecular dynamics simulation clearly depicts the negative impact on the reported variants in human IFNL3 protein. However, these detrimental mutations (R157Q and R157W) were shown to be negatively selected in the evolutionary study of the mammals. Hence, the variation revealed a mild impact on the IFNL3 function and may be removed from the population through negative selection due to its high functional constraints. In a nutshell, our study may contribute the overall evidence in phylotyping and structural transformation that takes place in the non-synonymous substitutions of IFNL3 protein. Substantially, our obtained theoretical knowledge will lay the path to extend the experimental validation in HCV clearance. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Valuable Virality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akpinar, E.; Berger, Jonah

    2017-01-01

    Given recent interest in social media, many brands now create content that they hope consumers will view and share with peers. While some campaigns indeed go “viral,” their value to the brand is limited if they do not boost brand evaluation or increase purchase. Consequently, a key question is how

  6. Cumulative Epigenetic Abnormalities in Host Genes with Viral and Microbial Infection during Initiation and Progression of Malignant Lymphoma/Leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Takashi; Sato, Hiaki; Ouchida, Mamoru; Utsunomiya, Atae; Yoshino, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    Although cancers have been thought to be predominantly driven by acquired genetic changes, it is becoming clear that microenvironment-mediated epigenetic alterations play important roles. Aberrant promoter hypermethylation is a prevalent phenomenon in human cancers as well as malignant lymphoma/leukemia. Tumor suppressor genes become frequent targets of aberrant hypermethylation in the course of gene-silencing due to the increased and deregulated DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). The purpose of this article is to review the current status of knowledge about the contribution of cumulative epigenetic abnormalities of the host genes after microbial and virus infection to the crisis and progression of malignant lymphoma/leukemia. In addition, the relevance of this knowledge to malignant lymphoma/leukemia assessment, prevention and early detection will be discussed

  7. Cumulative Epigenetic Abnormalities in Host Genes with Viral and Microbial Infection during Initiation and Progression of Malignant Lymphoma/Leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, Takashi, E-mail: oka@md.okayama-u.ac.jp [Department of Pathology, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Sato, Hiaki [Department of Medical Technology, Graduate School of Health Science, Okayama University Medical School, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Ouchida, Mamoru [Department of Molecular Genetics, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan); Utsunomiya, Atae [Department of Hematology, Imamura Bun-in Hospital, 11-23 Kamoike Shinnmachi, Kagoshima, 890-0064 (Japan); Yoshino, Tadashi [Department of Pathology, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, 2-5-1 Shikata-cho, Okayama 700-8558 (Japan)

    2011-02-04

    Although cancers have been thought to be predominantly driven by acquired genetic changes, it is becoming clear that microenvironment-mediated epigenetic alterations play important roles. Aberrant promoter hypermethylation is a prevalent phenomenon in human cancers as well as malignant lymphoma/leukemia. Tumor suppressor genes become frequent targets of aberrant hypermethylation in the course of gene-silencing due to the increased and deregulated DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs). The purpose of this article is to review the current status of knowledge about the contribution of cumulative epigenetic abnormalities of the host genes after microbial and virus infection to the crisis and progression of malignant lymphoma/leukemia. In addition, the relevance of this knowledge to malignant lymphoma/leukemia assessment, prevention and early detection will be discussed.

  8. Peripheral viral infection induced microglial sensome genes and enhanced microglial cell activity in the hippocampus of neonatal piglets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ji, Peng; Schachtschneider, Kyle M.; Schook, Lawrence B.; Walker, Frederick R.; Johnson, Rodney W.

    2016-01-01

    Although poorly understood, early-life infection is predicted to affect brain microglial cells, making them hypersensitive to subsequent stimuli. To investigate this, we assessed gene expression in hippocampal tissue obtained from a previously published study reporting increased microglial cell

  9. Viral vector-mediated gene expression in olfactory ensheathing glia implants in the lesioned rat spinal cord

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruitenberg, Marc J; Plant, Giles W; Christensen, C L; Blits, B; Niclou, Simone P; Harvey, Alan R; Boer, G J; Verhaagen, J

    Implantation of olfactory ensheathing glia (OEG) is a promising strategy to augment long-distance regeneration in the injured spinal cord. In this study, implantation of OEG following unilateral hemisection of the dorsal cervical spinal cord was combined with ex vivo gene transfer techniques. We

  10. Application of pulsed-magnetic field enhances non-viral gene delivery in primary cells from different origins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamau Chapman, Sarah W. [Institute of Veterinary Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstr. 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Hassa, Paul O. [Institute of Veterinary Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstr. 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL) Heidelberg, Meyerhofstrasse 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Koch-Schneidemann, Sabine; Rechenberg, Brigitte von [Musculoskeletal Research Unit, Equine Hospital, Vetsuisse Faculty Zurich, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstr. 260, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland); Hofmann-Amtenbrink, Margarethe [MatSearch, Chemin Jean Pavillard 14, 1009 Pully (Switzerland); Steitz, Benedikt; Petri-Fink, Alke; Hofmann, Heinrich [Laboratory of Powder Technology, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Hottiger, Michael O. [Institute of Veterinary Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Zurich, Winterthurerstr. 190, 8057 Zurich (Switzerland)], E-mail: hottiger@vetbio.uzh.ch

    2008-04-15

    Primary cell lines are more difficult to transfect when compared to immortalized/transformed cell lines, and hence new techniques are required to enhance the transfection efficiency in these cells. We isolated and established primary cultures of synoviocytes, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, melanocytes, macrophages, lung fibroblasts, and embryonic fibroblasts. These cells differed in several properties, and hence were a good representative sample of cells that would be targeted for expression and delivery of therapeutic genes in vivo. The efficiency of gene delivery in all these cells was enhanced using polyethylenimine-coated polyMAG magnetic nanoparticles, and the rates (17-84.2%) surpassed those previously achieved using other methods, especially in cells that are difficult to transfect. The application of permanent and pulsating magnetic fields significantly enhanced the transfection efficiencies in synoviocytes, chondrocytes, osteoblasts, melanocytes and lung fibroblasts, within 5 min of exposure to these magnetic fields. This is an added advantage for future in vivo applications, where rapid gene delivery is required before systemic clearance or filtration of the gene vectors occurs.

  11. Four regulatory elements in the human c-fos promoter mediate transactivation by HTLV-1 Tax protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandre, C; Verrier, B

    1991-04-01

    Expression of the human c-fos proto-oncogene is activated in trans by the Tax protein encoded by human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1). Indeed, we show here that a HeLa clone stably transfected by Tax expresses Fos at a high level. We also show that multiple elements of the human c-fos promoter, i.e. the v-sis conditioned medium inducible element (SIE), the dyad symmetry element (DSE) necessary for growth factor induction, the octanucleotide direct repeat element (DR), and the cyclic AMP response element (CRE) centred at -60, can all mediate Tax transactivation. In the DSE, the 10bp central core that binds the serum response factor (SRF) is, by itself, sufficient to mediate Tax transactivation. Moreover, a CRE-binding protein is involved in Tax activation through the CRE-60 element. Since Fos is a transregulator of cellular genes, our results suggest that the oncoprotein plays a crucial role in T-cell transformation by HTLV-1 in conjunction with other Tax-inducible genes.

  12. Sf29 Gene of Spodoptera frugiperda Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus Is a Viral Factor That Determines the Number of Virions in Occlusion Bodies▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simón, Oihane; Williams, Trevor; Asensio, Aaron C.; Ros, Sarhay; Gaya, Andrea; Caballero, Primitivo; Possee, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    The genome of Spodoptera frugiperda multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV) was inserted into a bacmid (Sfbac) and used to produce a mutant lacking open reading frame 29 (Sf29null). Sf29null bacmid DNA was able to generate an infection in S. frugiperda. Approximately six times less DNA was present in occlusion bodies (OBs) produced by the Sf29null bacmid in comparison to viruses containing this gene. This reduction in DNA content was consistent with fewer virus particles being packaged within Sf29null bacmid OBs, as determined by fractionation of dissolved polyhedra and comparison of occlusion-derived virus (ODV) infectivity in cell culture. DNA from Sfbac, Sf29null, or Sf29null-repair, in which the gene deletion had been repaired, were equally infectious when used to transfect S. frugiperda. All three viruses produced similar numbers of OBs, although those from Sf29null were 10-fold less infectious than viruses with the gene. Insects infected with Sf29null bacmid died ∼24 h later than positive controls, consistent with the reduced virus particle content of Sf29null OBs. Transcripts from Sf29 were detected in infected insects 12 h prior to those from the polyhedrin gene. Homologs to Sf29 were present in other group II NPVs, and similar sequences were present in entomopoxviruses. Analysis of the Sf29 predicted protein sequence revealed signal peptide and transmembrane domains, but the presence of 12 potential N-glycosylation sites suggest that it is not an ODV envelope protein. Other motifs, including zinc-binding and threonine-rich regions, suggest degradation and adhesion functions. We conclude that Sf29 is a viral factor that determines the number of ODVs occluded in each OB. PMID:18550678

  13. AML1/ETO trans-activates c-KIT expression through the long range interaction between promoter and intronic enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ying; Wang, Genjie; Hu, Qingzhu; Xiao, Xichun; Chen, Shuxia

    2018-04-01

    The AML1/ETO onco-fusion protein is crucial for the genesis of t(8;21) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is well documented as a transcriptional repressor through dominant-negative effect. However, little is known about the transactivation mechanism of AML1/ETO. Through large cohort of patient's expression level data analysis and a series of experimental validation, we report here that AML1/ETO transactivates c-KIT expression through directly binding to and mediating the long-range interaction between the promoter and intronic enhancer regions of c-KIT. Gene expression analyses verify that c-KIT expression is significantly high in t(8;21) AML. Further ChIP-seq analysis and motif scanning identify two regulatory regions located in the promoter and intronic enhancer region of c-KIT, respectively. Both regions are enriched by co-factors of AML1/ETO, such as AML1, CEBPe, c-Jun, and c-Fos. Further luciferase reporter assays show that AML1/ETO trans-activates c-KIT promoter activity through directly recognizing the AML1 motif and the co-existence of co-factors. The induction of c-KIT promoter activity is reinforced with the existence of intronic enhancer region. Furthermore, ChIP-3C-qPCR assays verify that AML1/ETO mediates the formation of DNA-looping between the c-KIT promoter and intronic enhancer region through the long-range interaction. Collectively, our data uncover a novel transcriptional activity mechanism of AML1/ETO and enrich our knowledge of the onco-fusion protein mediated transcription regulation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Differential Cotton leaf crumple virus-VIGS-mediated gene silencing and viral genome localization in different Gossypium hirsutum genetic backgrounds

    KAUST Repository

    Idris, Ali

    2010-12-01

    A Cotton leaf crumple virus (CLCrV)-based gene silencing vector containing a fragment of the Gossypium hirsutum Magnesium chelatase subunit I was used to establish endogenous gene silencing in cotton of varied genetic backgrounds. Biolistic inoculation resulted in systemic and persistent photo-bleaching of the leaves and bolls of the seven cultivars tested, however, the intensity of silencing was variable. CLCrV-VIGS-mediated expression of green fluorescent protein was used to monitor the in planta distribution of the vector, indicating successful phloem invasion in all cultivars tested. Acala SJ-1, one of the cotton cultivars, was identified as a particularly optimal candidate for CLCrV-VIGS-based cotton reverse-genetics. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Optimizing the Targeting of Mouse Parvovirus 1 to Murine Melanoma Selects for Recombinant Genomes and Novel Mutations in the Viral Capsid Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Marr

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Combining virus-enhanced immunogenicity with direct delivery of immunomodulatory molecules would represent a novel treatment modality for melanoma, and would require development of new viral vectors capable of targeting melanoma cells preferentially. Here we explore the use of rodent protoparvoviruses targeting cells of the murine melanoma model B16F10. An uncloned stock of mouse parvovirus 1 (MPV1 showed some efficacy, which was substantially enhanced following serial passage in the target cell. Molecular cloning of the genes of both starter and selected virus pools revealed considerable sequence diversity. Chimera analysis mapped the majority of the improved infectivity to the product of the major coat protein gene, VP2, in which linked blocks of amino acid changes and one or other of two apparently spontaneous mutations were selected. Intragenic chimeras showed that these represented separable components, both contributing to enhanced infection. Comparison of biochemical parameters of infection by clonal viruses indicated that the enhancement due to changes in VP2 operates after the virus has bound to the cell surface and penetrated into the cell. Construction of an in silico homology model for MPV1 allowed placement of these changes within the capsid shell, and revealed aspects of the capsid involved in infection initiation that had not been previously recognized.

  16. Identification and expression analysis of the sting gene, a sensor of viral DNA, in common carp Cyprinus carpio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, X L; Chen, J J; Cao, Y; Nie, G X; Su, J G

    2016-05-01

    Stimulator of interferon gene (sting) was identified and characterized from common carp Cyprinus carpio. The sting messenger (m)RNA encoded a polypeptide of 402 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 46·184 kDa and an isoelectronic point of 6·08. The deduced protein of sting contained a signal peptide, three transmembrane motifs in the N-terminal region and four putative motifs (RXR) found in resident endoplasmic reticulum proteins. mRNA expression of sting was present in twelve investigated tissues, and was up-regulated by koi herpesvirus (KHV) in vivo and in vitro. The transcription of sting was altered by poly(I:C) and poly(dT:dA) stimulation in vitro. The findings suggested that sting is an inducible gene involved in innate immunity against DNA- and RNA-derived pathogens. To investigate defence mechanisms in C. carpio development, sting level in embryos, larvae and juvenile fish was monitored following KHV challenge. The sting message was negligible in embryos prior to hatching, but observed at higher transcriptional levels throughout larval and juvenile stages. Investigation showed the mRNA expression profiles of genes encoding for proteins promoting various functions in the interferon pathway, from pattern recognition receptors to antiviral genes, to be significantly induced in all examined organs by in vivo infection with KHV. Following KHV infection, the ifn message was significantly downregulated in spleen, head kidney, brain and hepatopancreas but notably up-regulated in gill, intestine and skin, suggesting that ifn induction might be related to the mucosal immune system and virus anti-ifn mechanisms. These results provided the basis for further research into the role and mechanisms of sting in fishes. © 2016 The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  17. In vitro non-viral murine pro-neurotrophin 3 gene transfer into rat bone marrow stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darabi, Shahram; Tiraihi, Taki; Delshad, AliReza; Sadeghizadeh, Majid; Khalil, Wisam; Taheri, Taher

    2017-04-15

    Neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) is an important factor for promoting prenatal neural development, as well as regeneration, axogenesis and plasticity in postnatal life. Therapy with NT-3 was reported to improve the condition of patients suffering from degenerative diseases and traumatic injuries, however, the disadvantage of NT-3 protein delivery is its short half-life, thus our alternative approach is the use of NT-3 gene therapy. In this study, the bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were isolated from adult rats, cultured for 4 passages and transfected with either pEGFP-N1 or a constructed vector containing murine proNT-3 (pSecTag2/HygroB-murine proNT-3) using Lipofectamine 2000 followed by Hygromycin B (200mg/kg). The transfection efficiency of the transiently transfected BMSCs was evaluated using the green fluorescence protein containing vector (pEGFP-N1). A quantitative evaluation of the NT-3 expression of mRNA using real time qRT-PCR shows that there was double fold increase in NT-3 gene expression compared with non-transfected BMSCs, also, the culture supernatant yielded double fold increase in NT-3 using ELISA technique, the data were supported by immunoblotting technique. This suggests that the use of this transfection technique can be useful for gene therapy in different neurological disorders with neurodegenerative or traumatic origins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Cell-cycle-dependent localization of human cytomegalovirus UL83 phosphoprotein in the nucleolus and modulation of viral gene expression in human embryo fibroblasts in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcangeletti, Maria-Cristina; Rodighiero, Isabella; Mirandola, Prisco; De Conto, Flora; Covan, Silvia; Germini, Diego; Razin, Sergey; Dettori, Giuseppe; Chezzi, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    The nucleolus is a multifunctional nuclear compartment widely known to be involved in several cellular processes, including mRNA maturation and shuttling to cytoplasmic sites, control of the cell cycle, cell proliferation, and apoptosis; thus, it is logical that many viruses, including herpesvirus, target the nucleolus in order to exploit at least one of the above-mentioned functions. Recent studies from our group demonstrated the early accumulation of the incoming ppUL83 (pp65), the major tegument protein of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), in the nucleolus. The obtained results also suggested that a functional relationship might exist between the nucleolar localization of pp65, rRNA synthesis, and the development of the lytic program of viral gene expression. Here we present new data which support the hypothesis of a potentially relevant role of HCMV pp65 and its nucleolar localization for the control of the cell cycle by HCMV (arrest of cell proliferation in G1-G1/S), and for the promotion of viral infection. We demonstrated that, although the incoming pp65 amount in the infected cells appears to be constant irrespective of the cell-cycle phase, its nucleolar accumulation is prominent in G1 and G1/S, but very poor in S or G2/M. This correlates with the observation that only cells in G1 and G1/S support an efficient development of the HCMV lytic cycle. We propose that HCMV pp65 might be involved in regulatory/signaling pathways related to nucleolar functions, such as the cell-cycle control. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments have permitted to identify nucleolin as one of the nucleolar partners of pp65.

  19. Repeated nebulisation of non-viral CFTR gene therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2b trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alton, Eric W F W; Armstrong, David K; Ashby, Deborah; Bayfield, Katie J; Bilton, Diana; Bloomfield, Emily V; Boyd, A Christopher; Brand, June; Buchan, Ruaridh; Calcedo, Roberto; Carvelli, Paula; Chan, Mario; Cheng, Seng H; Collie, D David S; Cunningham, Steve; Davidson, Heather E; Davies, Gwyneth; Davies, Jane C; Davies, Lee A; Dewar, Maria H; Doherty, Ann; Donovan, Jackie; Dwyer, Natalie S; Elgmati, Hala I; Featherstone, Rosanna F; Gavino, Jemyr; Gea-Sorli, Sabrina; Geddes, Duncan M; Gibson, James S R; Gill, Deborah R; Greening, Andrew P; Griesenbach, Uta; Hansell, David M; Harman, Katharine; Higgins, Tracy E; Hodges, Samantha L; Hyde, Stephen C; Hyndman, Laura; Innes, J Alastair; Jacob, Joseph; Jones, Nancy; Keogh, Brian F; Limberis, Maria P; Lloyd-Evans, Paul; Maclean, Alan W; Manvell, Michelle C; McCormick, Dominique; McGovern, Michael; McLachlan, Gerry; Meng, Cuixiang; Montero, M Angeles; Milligan, Hazel; Moyce, Laura J; Murray, Gordon D; Nicholson, Andrew G; Osadolor, Tina; Parra-Leiton, Javier; Porteous, David J; Pringle, Ian A; Punch, Emma K; Pytel, Kamila M; Quittner, Alexandra L; Rivellini, Gina; Saunders, Clare J; Scheule, Ronald K; Sheard, Sarah; Simmonds, Nicholas J; Smith, Keith; Smith, Stephen N; Soussi, Najwa; Soussi, Samia; Spearing, Emma J; Stevenson, Barbara J; Sumner-Jones, Stephanie G; Turkkila, Minna; Ureta, Rosa P; Waller, Michael D; Wasowicz, Marguerite Y; Wilson, James M; Wolstenholme-Hogg, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Lung delivery of plasmid DNA encoding the CFTR gene complexed with a cationic liposome is a potential treatment option for patients with cystic fibrosis. We aimed to assess the efficacy of non-viral CFTR gene therapy in patients with cystic fibrosis. We did this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2b trial in two cystic fibrosis centres with patients recruited from 18 sites in the UK. Patients (aged ≥12 years) with a forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) of 50-90% predicted and any combination of CFTR mutations, were randomly assigned, via a computer-based randomisation system, to receive 5 mL of either nebulised pGM169/GL67A gene-liposome complex or 0.9% saline (placebo) every 28 days (plus or minus 5 days) for 1 year. Randomisation was stratified by % predicted FEV1 (<70 vs ≥70%), age (<18 vs ≥18 years), inclusion in the mechanistic substudy, and dosing site (London or Edinburgh). Participants and investigators were masked to treatment allocation. The primary endpoint was the relative change in % predicted FEV1. The primary analysis was per protocol. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01621867. Between June 12, 2012, and June 24, 2013, we randomly assigned 140 patients to receive placebo (n=62) or pGM169/GL67A (n=78), of whom 116 (83%) patients comprised the per-protocol population. We noted a significant, albeit modest, treatment effect in the pGM169/GL67A group versus placebo at 12 months' follow-up (3.7%, 95% CI 0.1-7.3; p=0.046). This outcome was associated with a stabilisation of lung function in the pGM169/GL67A group compared with a decline in the placebo group. We recorded no significant difference in treatment-attributable adverse events between groups. Monthly application of the pGM169/GL67A gene therapy formulation was associated with a significant, albeit modest, benefit in FEV1 compared with placebo at 1 year, indicating a stabilisation of lung function in the treatment group. Further improvements in

  20. Feline infectious peritonitis: insights into feline coronavirus pathobiogenesis and epidemiology based on genetic analysis of the viral 3c gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hui-Wen; de Groot, Raoul J; Egberink, Herman F; Rottier, Peter J M

    2010-02-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a lethal systemic disease caused by FIP virus (FIPV), a virulent mutant of apathogenic feline enteric coronavirus (FECV). We analysed the 3c gene--a proposed virulence marker--in 27 FECV- and 28 FIPV-infected cats. Our findings suggest that functional 3c protein expression is crucial for FECV replication in the gut, but dispensable for systemic FIPV replication. Whilst intact in all FECVs, the 3c gene was mutated in the majority (71.4 %) of FIPVs, but not in all, implying that mutation in 3c is not the (single) cause of FIP. Most cats with FIP had no detectable intestinal feline coronaviruses (FCoVs) and had seemingly cleared the primary FECV infection. In those with detectable intestinal FCoV, the virus always had an intact 3c and seemed to have been acquired by FECV superinfection. Apparently, 3c-inactivated viruses replicate not at all--or only poorly--in the gut, explaining the rare incidence of FIP outbreaks.

  1. Recurrent Skin and Lung Infections in Autosomal Dominant Hyper IgE Syndrome with Transactivation Domain STAT3 Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad J. Cooper

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hyper IgE is a rare systemic disease characterized by the clinical triad of high serum levels of IgE (>2000 IU/mL, eczema, and recurrent staphylococcal skin and lung infections. The presentation of hyper IgE syndrome is highly variable, which makes it easy to confuse the diagnosis with that of severe atopy or other rare immunodeficiency disorders. Case Report. A 23-year-old Hispanic presented with history of frequent respiratory and gastrointestinal infections as a child and multiple episodes of skin and lung infections (abscess with Staphylococcus aureus throughout his adult life. He had multiple eczematous lesions and folliculitis over his entire body, oral/esophageal candidiasis, and retention of his primary teeth. The IgE was elevated (>5000 IU/mL. Genetic mutation analysis revealed a mutation affecting the transactivation domain of the STAT3 gene. Conclusion. The hallmark of hyper IgE syndrome is serum IgE of >2000 IU/mL. Hyper IgE syndrome is a genetic disorder that is either autosomal dominant or recessive. A definite diagnosis can be made with genetic mutation analysis, and in this case, it revealed a very rare finding of the transactivation domain STAT3 mutation. Hyper IgE syndrome is a challenge for clinicians in establishing a diagnosis in suspected cases.

  2. The membrane-topogenic vectorial behaviour of Nrf1 controls its post-translational modification and transactivation activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yiguo; Hayes, John D

    2013-01-01

    The integral membrane-bound Nrf1 transcription factor fulfils important functions in maintaining cellular homeostasis and organ integrity, but how it is controlled vectorially is unknown. Herein, creative use of Gal4-based reporter assays with protease protection assays (GRAPPA), and double fluorescence protease protection (dFPP), reveals that the membrane-topogenic vectorial behaviour of Nrf1 dictates its post-translational modification and transactivation activity. Nrf1 is integrated within endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes through its NHB1-associated TM1 in cooperation with other semihydrophobic amphipathic regions. The transactivation domains (TADs) of Nrf1, including its Asn/Ser/Thr-rich (NST) glycodomain, are transiently translocated into the ER lumen, where it is glycosylated in the presence of glucose to become a 120-kDa isoform. Thereafter, the NST-adjoining TADs are partially repartitioned out of membranes into the cyto/nucleoplasmic side, where Nrf1 is subject to deglycosylation and/or proteolysis to generate 95-kDa and 85-kDa isoforms. Therefore, the vectorial process of Nrf1 controls its target gene expression.

  3. Conditional reverse tet-transactivator mouse strains for the efficient induction of TRE-regulated transgenes in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas E Dow

    Full Text Available Tetracycline or doxycycline (dox-regulated control of genetic elements allows inducible, reversible and tissue specific regulation of gene expression in mice. This approach provides a means to investigate protein function in specific cell lineages and at defined periods of development and disease. Efficient and stable regulation of cDNAs or non-coding elements (e.g. shRNAs downstream of the tetracycline-regulated element (TRE requires the robust expression of a tet-transactivator protein, commonly the reverse tet-transactivator, rtTA. Most rtTA strains rely on tissue specific promoters that often do not provide sufficient rtTA levels for optimal inducible expression. Here we describe the generation of two mouse strains that enable Cre-dependent, robust expression of rtTA3, providing tissue-restricted and consistent induction of TRE-controlled transgenes. We show that these transgenic strains can be effectively combined with established mouse models of disease, including both Cre/LoxP-based approaches and non Cre-dependent disease models. The integration of these new tools with established mouse models promises the development of more flexible genetic systems to uncover the mechanisms of development and disease pathogenesis.

  4. The Major Histocompatibility Complex Class II Transactivator CIITA Inhibits the Persistent Activation of NF-κB by the Human T Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Tax-1 Oncoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forlani, Greta; Abdallah, Rawan; Accolla, Roberto S; Tosi, Giovanna

    2016-01-20

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax-1, a key protein in HTLV-1-induced T cell transformation, deregulates diverse cell signaling pathways. Among them, the NF-κB pathway is constitutively activated by Tax-1, which binds to NF-κB proteins and activates the IκB kinase (IKK). Upon phosphorylation-dependent IκB degradation, NF-κB migrates into the nucleus, mediating Tax-1-stimulated gene expression. We show that the transcriptional regulator of major histocompatibility complex class II genes CIITA (class II transactivator), endogenously or ectopically expressed in different cells, inhibits the activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway by Tax-1 and map the region that mediates this effect. CIITA affects the subcellular localization of Tax-1, which is mostly retained in the cytoplasm, and this correlates with impaired migration of RelA into the nucleus. Cytoplasmic and nuclear mutant forms of CIITA reveal that CIITA exploits different strategies to suppress Tax-1-mediated NF-κB activation in both subcellular compartments. CIITA interacts with Tax-1 without preventing Tax-1 binding to both IKKγ and RelA. Nevertheless, CIITA affects Tax-1-induced IKK activity, causing retention of the inactive p50/RelA/IκB complex in the cytoplasm. Nuclear CIITA associates with Tax-1/RelA in nuclear bodies, blocking Tax-1-dependent activation of NF-κB-responsive genes. Thus, CIITA inhibits cytoplasmic and nuclear steps of Tax-1-mediated NF-κB activation. These results, together with our previous finding that CIITA acts as a restriction factor inhibiting Tax-1-promoted HTLV-1 gene expression and replication, indicate that CIITA is a versatile molecule that might also counteract Tax-1 transforming activity. Unveiling the molecular basis of CIITA-mediated inhibition of Tax-1 functions may be important in defining new strategies to control HTLV-1 spreading and oncogenic potential. HTLV-1 is the causative agent of human adult T cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATLL). The viral

  5. Effective gene expression in the rat dorsal root ganglia with a non-viral vector delivered via spinal nerve injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ming-Fong; Hsieh, Jung-Hsien; Chiang, Hao; Kan, Hung-Wei; Huang, Cho-Min; Chellis, Luke; Lin, Bo-Shiou; Miaw, Shi-Chuen; Pan, Chun-Liang; Chao, Chi-Chao; Hsieh, Sung-Tsang

    2016-01-01

    Delivering gene constructs into the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) is a powerful but challenging therapeutic strategy for sensory disorders affecting the DRG and their peripheral processes. The current delivery methods of direct intra-DRG injection and intrathecal injection have several disadvantages, including potential injury to DRG neurons and low transfection efficiency, respectively. This study aimed to develop a spinal nerve injection strategy to deliver polyethylenimine mixed with plasmid (PEI/DNA polyplexes) containing green fluorescent protein (GFP). Using this spinal nerve injection approach, PEI/DNA polyplexes were delivered to DRG neurons without nerve injury. Within one week of the delivery, GFP expression was detected in 82.8% ± 1.70% of DRG neurons, comparable to the levels obtained by intra-DRG injection (81.3% ± 5.1%, p = 0.82) but much higher than those obtained by intrathecal injection. The degree of GFP expression by neurofilament(+) and peripherin(+) DRG neurons was similar. The safety of this approach was documented by the absence of injury marker expression, including activation transcription factor 3 and ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 for neurons and glia, respectively, as well as the absence of behavioral changes. These results demonstrated the efficacy and safety of delivering PEI/DNA polyplexes to DRG neurons via spinal nerve injection. PMID:27748450

  6. The Paradigm of G Protein Receptor Transactivation: A Mechanistic Definition and Novel Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Little

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Seven transmembrane G protein—coupled receptors are among the most common in biology and they transduce cellular signals from a plethora of hormones. As well as their own well-characterized signaling pathways, they can also transactivate tyrosine kinase growth factor receptors to greatly expand their own cellular repertoire of responses. Recent data in vascular smooth muscle cells have expanded the breadth of transactivation to include serine/threonine kinase receptors, specifically the receptor for transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β. Stimulation with endothelin and thrombin leads to the rapid formation of C-terminal phosphorylated Smad2, which is the immediate product of activation of the TGF-β receptor. Additionally, it appears that no definition of transactivation based on mechanism is available, so we have provided a definition involving temporal aspects and the absence of de novo protein synthesis. The phenomenon of transactivation is an important biochemical mechanism and potential drug target in multiple diseases.

  7. Nanostructured silicate substituted calcium phosphate (NanoSiCaPs) nanoparticles — Efficient calcium phosphate based non-viral gene delivery systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shekhar, Sudhanshu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Center for Complex Engineered Multifunctional Materials, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); McGowan Institute of Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Roy, Abhijit; Hong, Daeho [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Kumta, Prashant N., E-mail: pkumta@pitt.edu [Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Center for Complex Engineered Multifunctional Materials, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States); McGowan Institute of Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Nanostructured ceramic particles, particularly, nanoparticles of calcium phosphate (CaP) remain an attractive option among the various types of non-viral gene delivery vectors studied because of their safety, biocompatibility, biodegradability, and ease of handling as well as their adsorptive capacity for DNA. We have accordingly developed an enhanced version of nanostructured calcium phosphates (NanoCaPs), by substituting known amounts of silicate for phosphate in the hydroxyapatite (HA) lattice (NanoSiCaPs). Results indicate that in addition to the excellent transfection levels exhibited by un-substituted NanoCaPs alone in vitro, an additional 20–50% increase in transfection is observed for NanoCaPs containing 8.3–50 mol% silicate aptly called NanoSiCaPs, owing to its rapid dissolution properties enabling nanoparticles escaping the lysosomal degradation. However, high silicate substitution (> 50 mol%) resulted in a drastic decline in transfection as the synthesized NanoCaPs deviated far from the characteristic hydroxyapatite phase formed as evidenced by the materials characterization results. - Highlights: • Successful demonstration of nanostructured NanoSiCaPs formation • Demonstration of superior transfection of NanoSiCaPs contrasted to NanoCaPs • Silicate substitution leads to smaller aggregates of nanoparticle complexes. • Enhanced dissolution of NanoSiCaPs demonstrated • Faster NanoSiCaPs dissolution leads to escape of pDNA from lysosomal degradation.

  8. Effects of anti-cocaine vaccine and viral gene transfer of cocaine hydrolase in mice on cocaine toxicity including motor strength and liver damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yang; Geng, Liyi; Orson, Frank; Kinsey, Berma; Kosten, Thomas R; Shen, Xiaoyun; Brimijoin, Stephen

    2013-03-25

    In developing an vivo drug-interception therapy to treat cocaine abuse and hinder relapse into drug seeking provoked by re-encounter with cocaine, two promising agents are: (1) a cocaine hydrolase enzyme (CocH) derived from human butyrylcholinesterase and delivered by gene transfer; (2) an anti-cocaine antibody elicited by vaccination. Recent behavioral experiments showed that antibody and enzyme work in a complementary fashion to reduce cocaine-stimulated locomotor activity in rats and mice. Our present goal was to test protection against liver damage and muscle weakness in mice challenged with massive doses of cocaine at or near the LD50 level (100-120 mg/kg, i.p.). We found that, when the interceptor proteins were combined at doses that were only modestly protective in isolation (enzyme, 1mg/kg; antibody, 8 mg/kg), they provided complete protection of liver tissue and motor function. When the enzyme levels were ~400-fold higher, after in vivo transduction by adeno-associated viral vector, similar protection was observed from CocH alone. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Transgenic Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeat/Cas9-Mediated Viral Gene Targeting for Antiviral Therapy of Bombyx mori Nucleopolyhedrovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuqing; Hou, Chengxiang; Bi, Honglun; Wang, Yueqiang; Xu, Jun; Li, Muwang; James, Anthony A; Huang, Yongping; Tan, Anjiang

    2017-04-15

    We developed a novel antiviral strategy by combining transposon-based transgenesis and the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated 9 (Cas9) system for the direct cleavage of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) genome DNA to promote virus clearance in silkworms. We demonstrate that transgenic silkworms constitutively expressing Cas9 and guide RNAs targeting the BmNPV immediate early-1 ( ie-1 ) and me53 genes effectively induce target-specific cleavage and subsequent mutagenesis, especially large (∼7-kbp) segment deletions in BmNPV genomes, and thus exhibit robust suppression of BmNPV proliferation. Transgenic animals exhibited higher and inheritable resistance to BmNPV infection than wild-type animals. Our approach will not only contribute to modern sericulture but also shed light on future antiviral therapy. IMPORTANCE Pathogen genome targeting has shown its potential in antiviral research. However, transgenic CRISPR/Cas9 system-mediated viral genome targeting has not been reported as an antiviral strategy in a natural animal host of a virus. Our data provide an effective approach against BmNPV infection in a real-world biological system and demonstrate the potential of transgenic CRISPR/Cas9 systems in antiviral research in other species. Copyright © 2017 Chen et al.

  10. Partial correction of the dwarf phenotype by non-viral transfer of the growth hormone gene in mice: Treatment age is critical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuti, Eliza; Cecchi, Cláudia R; Oliveira, Nélio A J; Lima, Eliana R; Vieira, Daniel P; Aagaard, Lars; Jensen, Thomas G; Jorge, Alexander A L; Bartolini, Paolo; Peroni, Cibele N

    2016-02-01

    Non-viral transfer of the growth hormone gene to different muscles of immunodeficient dwarf (lit/scid) mice is under study with the objective of improving phenotypic correction via this particular gene therapy approach. Plasmid DNA was administered into the exposed quadriceps or non-exposed tibialis cranialis muscle of lit/scid mice followed by electroporation, monitoring several growth parameters. In a 6-month bioassay, 50μg DNA were injected three times into the quadriceps muscle of 80-day old mice. A 50% weight increase, with a catch-up growth of 21%, together with a 16% increase for nose-to-tail and tail lengths (catch-up=19-21%) and a 24-28% increase for femur length (catch-up=53-60%), were obtained. mIGF1 serum levels were ~7-fold higher than the basal levels for untreated mice, but still ~2-fold lower than in non-dwarf scid mice. Since treatment age was found to be particularly important in a second bioassay utilizing 40-day old mice, these pubertal mice were compared in a third bioassay with adult (80-day old) mice, all treated twice with 50μg DNA injected into each tibialis cranialis muscle, via a less invasive approach. mIGF1 concentrations at the same level as co-aged scid mice were obtained 15days after administration in pubertal mice. Catch-up growth, based on femur length (77%), nose-to-tail (36%) and tail length (39%) increases was 40 to 95% higher than those obtained upon treating adult mice. These data pave the way for the development of more effective pre-clinical assays in pubertal dwarf mice for the treatment of GH deficiency via plasmid-DNA muscular administration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A sensitive, support-vector-machine method for the detection of horizontal gene transfers in viral, archaeal and bacterial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsirigos, Aristotelis; Rigoutsos, Isidore

    2005-01-01

    In earlier work, we introduced and discussed a generalized computational framework for identifying horizontal transfers. This framework relied on a gene's nucleotide composition, obviated the need for knowledge of codon boundaries and database searches, and was shown to perform very well across a wide range of archaeal and bacterial genomes when compared with previously published approaches, such as Codon Adaptation Index and C + G content. Nonetheless, two considerations remained outstanding: we wanted to further increase the sensitivity of detecting horizontal transfers and also to be able to apply the method to increasingly smaller genomes. In the discussion that follows, we present such a method, Wn-SVM, and show that it exhibits a very significant improvement in sensitivity compared with earlier approaches. Wn-SVM uses a one-class support-vector machine and can learn using rather small training sets. This property makes Wn-SVM particularly suitable for studying small-size genomes, similar to those of viruses, as well as the typically larger archaeal and bacterial genomes. We show experimentally that the new method results in a superior performance across a wide range of organisms and that it improves even upon our own earlier method by an average of 10% across all examined genomes. As a small-genome case study, we analyze the genome of the human cytomegalovirus and demonstrate that Wn-SVM correctly identifies regions that are known to be conserved and prototypical of all beta-herpesvirinae, regions that are known to have been acquired horizontally from the human host and, finally, regions that had not up to now been suspected to be horizontally transferred. Atypical region predictions for many eukaryotic viruses, including the alpha-, beta- and gamma-herpesvirinae, and 123 archaeal and bacterial genomes, have been made available online at http://cbcsrv.watson.ibm.com/HGT_SVM/.

  12. Mode of transgene expression after fusion to early or late viral genes of a conditionally replicating adenovirus via an optimized internal ribosome entry site in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, Angel A.; Wang Minghui; Suzuki, Kaori; Uil, Taco G.; Krasnykh, Victor; Curiel, David T.; Nettelbeck, Dirk M.

    2004-01-01

    The expression of therapeutic genes by oncolytic viruses is a promising strategy to improve viral oncolysis, to augment gene transfer compared with a nonreplicating adenoviral vector, or to combine virotherapy and gene therapy. Both the mode of transgene expression and the locale of transgene insertion into the virus genome critically determine the efficacy of this approach. We report here on the properties of oncolytic adenoviruses which contain the luciferase cDNA fused via an optimized internal ribosome entry site (IRES) to the immediate early adenoviral gene E1A (AdΔE1AIL), the early gene E2B (AdΔE2BIL), or the late fiber gene (AdΔfiberIL). These viruses showed distinct kinetics of transgene expression and luciferase activity. Early after infection, luciferase activities were lower for these viruses, especially for AdΔE2BIL, compared with nonreplicating AdTL, which contained the luciferase gene expressed from the strong CMV promoter. However, 6 days after infection, luciferase activities were approximately four (AdΔE1AIL) to six (AdΔfiberIL) orders of magnitude higher than for AdTL, reflecting virus replication and efficient transgene expression. Similar results were obtained in vivo after intratumoral injection of AdΔE2BIL, AdΔfiberIL, and AdTL. AdΔfiberIL and the parental virus, Ad5-Δ24, resulted in similar cytotoxicity, but AdΔE2BIL and AdΔE1AIL were slightly attenuated. Disruption of the expression of neighboring viral genes by insertion of the transgene was minimal for AdΔE2BIL and AdΔfiberIL, but substantial for AdΔE1AIL. Our observations suggest that insertion of IRES-transgene cassettes into viral transcription units is an attractive strategy for the development of armed oncolytic adenoviruses with defined kinetics and strength of transgene expression

  13. Analysis of transactivation potential of rice (Oryza sativa L.) heat shock factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavania, Dhruv; Dhingra, Anuradha; Grover, Anil

    2018-06-01

    Based on yeast one-hybrid assays, we show that the presence of C-terminal AHA motifs is not a prerequisite for transactivation potential in rice heat shock factors. Transcriptional activation or transactivation (TA) of heat stress responsive genes takes place by binding of heat shock factors (Hsfs) to heat shock elements. Analysis of TA potential of thirteen rice (Oryza sativa L.) Hsfs (OsHsfs) carried out in this study by yeast one-hybrid assay showed that OsHsfsA3 possesses strong TA potential while OsHsfs A1a, A2a, A2b, A4a, A4d, A5, A7b, B1, B2a, B2b, B2c and B4d lack TA potential. From a near complete picture of TA potential of the OsHsf family (comprising of 25 members) emerging from this study and an earlier report from our group (Mittal et al. in FEBS J 278(17):3076-3085, 2011), it is concluded that (1) overall, six OsHsfs, namely A3, A6a, A6b, A8, C1a and C1b possess TA potential; (2) four class A OsHsfs, namely A3, A6a, A6b and A8 have TA potential out of which A6a and A6b contain AHA motifs while A3 and A8 lack AHA motifs; (3) nine class A OsHsfs, namely A1a, A2a, A2b, A2e, A4a, A4d, A5, A7a and A7b containing AHA motif(s) lack TA function in the yeast assay system; (4) all class B OsHsfs lack AHA motifs and TA potential (B4a not analyzed) and (5) though all class C OsHsf members lack AHA motifs, two members C1a and C1b possess TA function, while one member C2a lacks TA potential (C2b not analyzed). Thus, the presence or absence of AHA motif is possibly not the only factor determining TA potential of OsHsfs. Our findings will help to identify the transcriptional activators of rice heat shock response.

  14. Anti-inflammatory and PPAR transactivational effects of components from the stem bark of Ginkgo biloba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngan, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Quang, Tran Hong; Tai, Bui Huu; Song, Seok Bean; Lee, Dongho; Kim, Young Ho

    2012-03-21

    Ginkgo biloba, which is considered a "living fossil", has been used for medicinal purposes for thousands of years. Currently, extracts of G. biloba are some of the most widely used herbal products and/or dietary supplements in the world. In this study, three new compounds, (2E,4E,1'R,3'S,5'R,8'S)-dihydrophaseic acid 3'-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (1), 7,8-dihydro-(R)-7-methoxyconiferyl alcohol (2), and (8S)-3-methoxy-8,4'-oxyneolignan-4,9,9'-triol 3'-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (3), and 13 known compounds (4-16) were isolated from the stem bark of G. biloba. Their structures were determined by extensive spectroscopic methods, including 1D and 2D NMR, MS, and circular dichroism spectra. Four of the compounds (1, 2, 7, and 10) inhibited TNFα-induced NF-κB transcriptional activity significantly in HepG2 cells in a dose-dependent manner, with IC₅₀ values ranging from 6.9 to 9.1 μM. Furthermore, the transcriptional inhibitory function of these compounds was confirmed based on decreases in COX-2 and iNOS gene expression in HepG2 cells. Compounds 1-5, 7, 9, 10, and 12-14 significantly activated the transcriptional activity of PPARs in a dose-dependent manner, with EC₅₀ values ranging from 0.7 to 12.8 μM. Compounds 2, 3, and 12 exhibited dose-dependent PPARα transactivational activity, with EC₅₀ values of 7.0, 3.3, and 10.1 μM, respectively. Compounds 1-3 activated PPARγ transcriptional activity, with EC₅₀ values of 11.9, 11.0, and 15.3 μM, whereas compounds 1 and 3 promoted the transactivational activity of PPARβ(δ) with EC₅₀ values of 10.7 and 11.2 μM, respectively. These results provide a scientific support for the use of G. biloba stem bark for the prevention and treatment of inflammatory and metabolic diseases. Moreover, these data provide the rationale for further studies of the potential of G. biloba stem bark in functional foods.

  15. Enhanced human somatic cell reprogramming efficiency by fusion of the MYC transactivation domain and OCT4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs holds great promise for regenerative medicine. However the iPSC induction efficiency is still very low and with lengthy reprogramming process. We utilized the highly potent transactivation domain (TAD of MYC protein to engineer the human OCT4 fusion proteins. Applying the MYC-TAD-OCT4 fusion proteins in mouse iPSC generation leads to shorter reprogramming dynamics, with earlier activation of pluripotent markers in reprogrammed cells than wild type OCT4 (wt-OCT4. Dramatic enhancement of iPSC colony induction efficiency and shortened reprogramming dynamics were observed when these MYC-TAD-OCT4 fusion proteins were used to reprogram primary human cells. The OCT4 fusion proteins induced human iPSCs are pluripotent. We further show that the MYC Box I (MBI is dispensable while both MBII and the linking region between MBI/II are essential for the enhanced reprogramming activity of MYC-TAD-OCT4 fusion protein. Consistent with an enhanced transcription activity, the engineered OCT4 significantly stimulated the expression of genes specifically targeted by OCT4-alone, OCT4/SOX2, and OCT4/SOX2/KLF4 during human iPSC induction, compared with the wt-OCT4. The MYC-TAD-OCT4 fusion proteins we generated will be valuable tools for studying the reprogramming mechanisms and for efficient iPSC generation for humans as well as for other species.

  16. Crystal Structure of the CLOCK Transactivation Domain Exon19 in Complex with a Repressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Zhiqiang; Su, Lijing; Pei, Jimin; Grishin, Nick V.; Zhang, Hong (UTSMC)

    2017-08-01

    In the canonical clock model, CLOCK:BMAL1-mediated transcriptional activation is feedback regulated by its repressors CRY and PER and, in association with other coregulators, ultimately generates oscillatory gene expression patterns. How CLOCK:BMAL1 interacts with coregulator(s) is not well understood. Here we report the crystal structures of the mouse CLOCK transactivating domain Exon19 in complex with CIPC, a potent circadian repressor that functions independently of CRY and PER. The Exon19:CIPC complex adopts a three-helical coiled-coil bundle conformation containing two Exon19 helices and one CIPC. Unique to Exon19:CIPC, three highly conserved polar residues, Asn341 of CIPC and Gln544 of the two Exon19 helices, are located at the mid-section of the coiled-coil bundle interior and form hydrogen bonds with each other. Combining results from protein database search, sequence analysis, and mutagenesis studies, we discovered for the first time that CLOCK Exon19:CIPC interaction is a conserved transcription regulatory mechanism among mammals, fish, flies, and other invertebrates.

  17. Vaccination with Gag, Vif, and Nef gene fragments affords partial control of viral replication after mucosal challenge with SIVmac239.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Mauricio A; Wilson, Nancy A; Piaskowski, Shari M; Weisgrau, Kim L; Furlott, Jessica R; Bonaldo, Myrna C; Veloso de Santana, Marlon G; Rudersdorf, Richard A; Rakasz, Eva G; Keating, Karen D; Chiuchiolo, Maria J; Piatak, Michael; Allison, David B; Parks, Christopher L; Galler, Ricardo; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Watkins, David I

    2014-07-01

    vaccinating rhesus macaques with minigenes encoding fragments of Gag, Vif, and Nef. In contrast to previous mouse studies, this strategy appeared to minimally affect monkey CD8(+) T-cell immundominance hierarchies, as seen by the detection of only one subdominant epitope in Mamu-A*01(+) vaccinees. This finding underscores the difficulty of inducing subdominant CD8(+) T cells by vaccination and demonstrates that strategies other than gene fragmentation may be required to significantly alter immunodominance in primates. Although some of the regimens tested here were extremely immunogenic, vaccine efficacy was limited to a modest reduction in set point viremia after challenge with SIVmac239. No correlates of protection were identified. These results reinforce the notion that vaccine immunogenicity does not predict control of AIDS virus replication. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax requires direct access to DNA for recruitment of CREB binding protein to the viral promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzmeier, B A; Giebler, H A; Nyborg, J K

    1998-02-01

    Efficient human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) replication and viral gene expression are dependent upon the virally encoded oncoprotein Tax. To activate HTLV-1 transcription, Tax interacts with the cellular DNA binding protein cyclic AMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) and recruits the coactivator CREB binding protein (CBP), forming a nucleoprotein complex on the three viral cyclic AMP-responsive elements (CREs) in the HTLV-1 promoter. Short stretches of dG-dC-rich (GC-rich) DNA, immediately flanking each of the viral CREs, are essential for Tax recruitment of CBP in vitro and Tax transactivation in vivo. Although the importance of the viral CRE-flanking sequences is well established, several studies have failed to identify an interaction between Tax and the DNA. The mechanistic role of the viral CRE-flanking sequences has therefore remained enigmatic. In this study, we used high resolution methidiumpropyl-EDTA iron(II) footprinting to show that Tax extended the CREB footprint into the GC-rich DNA flanking sequences of the viral CRE. The Tax-CREB footprint was enhanced but not extended by the KIX domain of CBP, suggesting that the coactivator increased the stability of the nucleoprotein complex. Conversely, the footprint pattern of CREB on a cellular CRE lacking GC-rich flanking sequences did not change in the presence of Tax or Tax plus KIX. The minor-groove DNA binding drug chromomycin A3 bound to the GC-rich flanking sequences and inhibited the association of Tax and the Tax-CBP complex without affecting CREB binding. Tax specifically cross-linked to the viral CRE in the 5'-flanking sequence, and this cross-link was blocked by chromomycin A3. Together, these data support a model where Tax interacts directly with both CREB and the minor-groove viral CRE-flanking sequences to form a high-affinity binding site for the recruitment of CBP to the HTLV-1 promoter.

  19. Niewirusowy transfer genów do komórek skóry – wybrane metody = Non-viral gene transfer into skin cells – selected methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewelina Wędrowska

    2016-01-01

    3Department of Pathobiochemistry and Clinical Chemistry, Nicolaus Copernicus University Collegium Medicum, Bydgoszcz, Poland       Streszczenie   Wprowadzenie: Skóra jako największy i najłatwiej dostępny narząd stanowi atrakcyjny cel dla terapii genowej, która od wielu lat budzi ogromne nadzieje środowiska naukowego. Jednakże, próby terapii przeprowadzone z wykorzystaniem wektorów wirusowych wykazały szereg wad i ograniczeń m.in. obserwowano indukcję odpowiedzi immunologicznej, losową integrację transgenu z genomem gospodarza i/lub niską wydajność jego ekspresji. Dlatego, wciąż poszukuje się alternatywnych, skuteczniejszych i jednocześnie bezpieczniejszych metod transferu genów. Atrakcyjnej alternatywy upatruje się w metodach niewirusowych. Cel pracy: Przedstawienie wybranych metod niewirusowego transferu genów wykorzystywanych w terapii genowej chorób skóry. Skrócony opis stanu wiedzy: Terapia genowa chorób skóry obejmuje wykorzystanie wektorów plazmidowych jako nośnika genów terapeutycznych, a także metod ich dostarczania do komórek takich jak: elektroporacja, mikroiniekcja, sonikacja, wykorzystanie nośników lipidowych i polimerów kationowych. Podsumowanie: Niewirusowe metody transferu genów oferują pewne zalety włączając niską toksyczność, brak infekcyjności oraz łatwość i niskie koszty produkcji w porównaniu z technikami wirusowymi. Niewirusowe metody wydają się być obiecującym narzędziem terapii genowej chorób skóry w szczególności nowotworów tego narządu.   Słowa kluczowe: plazmid, transfer genów, skóra, wirus, terapia genowa.     Summary Introduction: Skin, the largest and most accessible organ of the human body is considered as an ideal gene therapy target. However, various types of viral vectors used in classical gene therapy have a number of disadvantages, such as possibility of immune response induction, random integration of inserts into the host genome or low expression efficiency

  20. CD8 T cell memory to a viral pathogen requires trans cosignaling between HVEM and BTLA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Flynn

    Full Text Available Defining the molecular interactions required to program activated CD8 T cells to survive and become memory cells may allow us to understand how to augment anti-viral immunity. HVEM (herpes virus entry mediator is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR family that interacts with ligands in the TNF family, LIGHT and Lymphotoxin-α, and in the Ig family, B and T lymphocyte attenuator (BTLA and CD160. The Ig family members initiate inhibitory signaling when engaged with HVEM, but may also activate survival gene expression. Using a model of vaccinia virus infection, we made the unexpected finding that deficiency in HVEM or BTLA profoundly impaired effector CD8 T cell survival and development of protective immune memory. Mixed adoptive transfer experiments indicated that BTLA expressed in CD8α+ dendritic cells functions as a trans-activating ligand that delivers positive co-signals through HVEM expressed in T cells. Our data demonstrate a critical role of HVEM-BTLA bidirectional cosignaling system in antiviral defenses by driving the differentiation of memory CD8 T cells.

  1. Expression of microRNAs and interferon-related genes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum) infected with Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bela-Ong, Dennis; Schyth, Brian Dall; Lorenzen, Niels

    The fish rhabdovirus Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) causes severe disease in farmed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The potential threat from wildlife marine reservoir of VHSV, particularly to sea-farmed fish demands disease protection measures. Identification of biomarkers during...

  2. A proteomic perspective of inbuilt viral protein regulation: pUL46 tegument protein is targeted for degradation by ICP0 during herpes simplex virus type 1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Aaron E; Greco, Todd M; Döhner, Katinka; Sodeik, Beate; Cristea, Ileana M

    2013-11-01

    Much like the host cells they infect, viruses must also regulate their life cycles. Herpes simples virus type 1 (HSV-1), a prominent human pathogen, uses a promoter-rich genome in conjunction with multiple viral trans-activating factors. Following entry into host cells, the virion-associated outer tegument proteins pUL46 and pUL47 act to increase expression of viral immediate-early (α) genes, thereby helping initiate the infection life cycle. Because pUL46 has gone largely unstudied, we employed a hybrid mass spectrometry-based approach to determine how pUL46 exerts its functions during early stages of infection. For a spatio-temporal characterization of pUL46, time-lapse microscopy was performed in live cells to define its dynamic localization from 2 to 24 h postinfection. Next, pUL46-containing protein complexes were immunoaffinity purified during infection of human fibroblasts and analyzed by mass spectrometry to investigate virus-virus and virus-host interactions, as well as post-translational modifications. We demonstrated that pUL46 is heavily phosphorylated in at least 23 sites. One phosphorylation site matched the consensus 14-3-3 phospho-binding motif, consistent with our identification of 14-3-3 proteins and host and viral kinases as specific pUL46 interactions. Moreover, we determined that pUL46 specifically interacts with the viral E3 ubiquitin ligase ICP0. We demonstrated that pUL46 is partially degraded in a proteasome-mediated manner during infection, and that the catalytic activity of ICP0 is responsible for this degradation. This is the first evidence of a viral protein being targeted for degradation by another viral protein during HSV-1 infection. Together, these data indicate that pUL46 levels are tightly controlled and important for the temporal regulation of viral gene expression throughout the virus life cycle. The concept of a structural virion protein, pUL46, performing nonstructural roles is likely to reflect a theme common to many viruses

  3. Comprehensive Screening for Naturally Occurring Hepatitis C Virus Resistance to Direct-Acting Antivirals in the NS3, NS5A, and NS5B Genes in Worldwide Isolates of Viral Genotypes 1 to 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patiño-Galindo, Juan Ángel; Salvatierra, Karina; González-Candelas, Fernando; López-Labrador, F Xavier

    2016-04-01

    There is no comprehensive study available on the natural hepatitis C virus (HCV) polymorphism in sites associated with resistance including all viral genotypes which may present variable susceptibilities to particular direct-acting antivirals (DAAs). This study aimed to analyze the frequencies, genetic barriers, and evolutionary histories of naturally occurring resistance-associated variants (RAVs) in the six main HCV genotypes. A comprehensive analysis of up to 103 RAVs was performed in 2,901, 2,216, and 1,344 HCV isolates for the NS3, NS5A, and NS5B genes, respectively. We report significant intergenotypic differences in the frequencies of natural RAVs for these three HCV genes. In addition, we found a low genetic barrier for the generation of new RAVs, irrespective of the viral genotype. Furthermore, in 1,126 HCV genomes, including sequences spanning the three genes, haplotype analysis revealed a remarkably high frequency of viruses carrying more than one natural RAV to DAAs (53% of HCV-1a, 28.5% of HCV-1b, 67.1% of HCV-6, and 100% of genotype 2, 3, 4, and 5 haplotypes). With the exception of HCV-1a, the most prevalent haplotypes showed RAVs in at least two different viral genes. Finally, evolutionary analyses revealed that, while most natural RAVs appeared recently, others have been efficiently transmitted over time and cluster in well-supported clades. In summary, and despite the observed high efficacy of DAA-based regimens, we show that naturally occurring RAVs are common in all HCV genotypes and that there is an overall low genetic barrier for the selection of resistance mutations. There is a need for natural DAA resistance profiling specific for each HCV genotype. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Cyclin D1 represses p300 transactivation through a cyclin-dependent kinase-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Maofu; Wang, Chenguang; Rao, Mahadev; Wu, Xiaofang; Bouras, Toula; Zhang, Xueping; Li, Zhiping; Jiao, Xuanmao; Yang, Jianguo; Li, Anping; Perkins, Neil D; Thimmapaya, Bayar; Kung, Andrew L; Munoz, Alberto; Giordano, Antonio; Lisanti, Michael P; Pestell, Richard G

    2005-08-19

    Cyclin D1 encodes a regulatory subunit, which with its cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)-binding partner forms a holoenzyme that phosphorylates and inactivates the retinoblastoma protein. In addition to its Cdk binding-dependent functions, cyclin D1 regulates cellular differentiation in part by modifying several transcription factors and nuclear receptors. The molecular mechanism through which cyclin D1 regulates the function of transcription factors involved in cellular differentiation remains to be clarified. The histone acetyltransferase protein p300 is a co-integrator required for regulation of multiple transcription factors. Here we show that cyclin D1 physically interacts with p300 and represses p300 transactivation. We demonstrated further that the interaction of the two proteins occurs at the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-responsive element of the lipoprotein lipase promoter in the context of the local chromatin structure. We have mapped the domains in p300 and cyclin D1 involved in this interaction. The bromo domain and cysteine- and histidine-rich domains of p300 were required for repression by cyclin D1. Cyclin D1 repression of p300 was independent of the Cdk- and retinoblastoma protein-binding domains of cyclin D1. Cyclin D1 inhibits histone acetyltransferase activity of p300 in vitro. Microarray analysis identified a signature of genes repressed by cyclin D1 and induced by p300 that promotes cellular differentiation and induces cell cycle arrest. Together, our results suggest that cyclin D1 plays an important role in cellular proliferation and differentiation through regulation of p300.

  5. Adeno-associated viral vector-mediated neurotrophin gene transfer in the injured adult rat spinal cord improves hind-limb function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blits, B; Oudega, M.; Boer, G J; Bartlett Bunge, M; Verhaagen, J

    2003-01-01

    To foster axonal growth from a Schwann cell bridge into the caudal spinal cord, spinal cells caudal to the implant were transduced with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors encoding for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (AAV-NT-3). Control rats received AAV vectors encoding

  6. EBNA-2 of herpesvirus papio diverges significantly from the type A and type B EBNA-2 proteins of Epstein-Barr virus but retains an efficient transactivation domain with a conserved hydrophobic motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, P D; Ryon, J J; Hayward, S D

    1993-01-01

    EBNA-2 contributes to the establishment of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latency in B cells and to the resultant alterations in B-cell growth pattern by up-regulating expression from specific viral and cellular promoters. We have taken a comparative approach toward characterizing functional domains within EBNA-2. To this end, we have cloned and sequenced the EBNA-2 gene from the closely related baboon virus herpesvirus papio (HVP). All human EBV isolates have either a type A or type B EBNA-2 gene. However, the HVP EBNA-2 gene falls into neither the type A category nor the type B category, suggesting that the separation into these two subtypes may have been a recent evolutionary event. Comparison of the predicted amino acid sequences indicates 37% amino acid identity with EBV type A EBNA-2 and 35% amino acid identity with type B EBNA-2. To define the domains of EBNA-2 required for transcriptional activation, the DNA binding domain of the GAL4 protein was fused to overlapping segments of EBV EBNA-2. This approach identified a 40-amino-acid (40-aa) EBNA-2 activation domain located between aa 437 and 477. Transactivation ability was completely lost when the amino-terminal boundary of this domain was moved to aa 441, indicating that the motif at aa 437 to 440, Pro-Ile-Leu-Phe, contains residues critical for function. The aa 437 boundary identified in these experiments coincides precisely with a block of conserved sequences in HVP EBNA-2, and the comparable carboxy-terminal region of HVP EBNA-2 also functioned as a strong transcriptional activation domain when fused to the Gal4(1-147) protein. The EBV and HVP EBNA-2 activation domains share a mixed proline-rich, negatively charged character with a striking conservation of positionally equivalent hydrophobic residues. The importance of the individual amino acids making up the Pro-Ile-Leu-Phe motif was examined by mutagenesis. Any alteration of these residues was found to reduce transactivation efficiency, with changes at the

  7. Sox5 induces epithelial to mesenchymal transition by transactivation of Twist1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei, Xin-Hong; Lv, Xin-Quan; Li, Hui-Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Depletion of Sox5 inhibits breast cancer proliferation, migration, and invasion. • Sox5 transactivates Twist1 expression. • Sox5 induces epithelial to mesenchymal transition through transactivation of Twist1 expression. - Abstract: The epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT), a highly conserved cellular program, plays an important role in normal embryogenesis and cancer metastasis. Twist1, a master regulator of embryonic morphogenesis, is overexpressed in breast cancer and contributes to metastasis by promoting EMT. In exploring the mechanism underlying the increased Twist1 in breast cancer cells, we found that the transcription factor SRY (sex-determining region Y)-box 5(Sox5) is up-regulation in breast cancer cells and depletion of Sox5 inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Furthermore, depletion of Sox5 in breast cancer cells caused a dramatic decrease in Twist1 and chromosome immunoprecipitation assay showed that Sox5 can bind directly to the Twist1 promoter, suggesting that Sox5 transactivates Twist1 expression. We further demonstrated that knockdown of Sox5 up-regulated epithelial phenotype cell biomarker (E-cadherin) and down-regulated mesenchymal phenotype cell biomarkers (N-cadherin, Vimentin, and Fibronectin 1), resulting in suppression of EMT. Our study suggests that Sox5 transactivates Twist1 expression and plays an important role in the regulation of breast cancer progression

  8. Structure of the EGF receptor transactivation circuit integrates multiple signals with cell context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joslin, Elizabeth J.; Shankaran, Harish; Opresko, Lee K.; Bollinger, Nikki; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Wiley, H. S.

    2010-05-10

    Transactivation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been proposed to be a mechanism by which a variety of cellular inputs can be integrated into a single signaling pathway, but the regulatory topology of this important system is unclear. To understand the transactivation circuit, we first created a “non-binding” reporter for ligand shedding. We then quantitatively defined how signals from multiple agonists were integrated both upstream and downstream of the EGFR into the extracellular signal regulated kinase (ERK) cascade in human mammary epithelial cells. We found that transactivation is mediated by a recursive autocrine circuit where ligand shedding drives EGFR-stimulated ERK that in turn drives further ligand shedding. The time from shedding to ERK activation is fast (<5 min) whereas the recursive feedback is slow (>15 min). Simulations showed that this delay in positive feedback greatly enhanced system stability and robustness. Our results indicate that the transactivation circuit is constructed so that the magnitude of ERK signaling is governed by the sum of multiple direct inputs, while recursive, autocrine ligand shedding controls signal duration.

  9. Subcellular localisation of BAG-1 and its regulation of vitamin D receptor-mediated transactivation and involucrin expression in oral keratinocytes: Implications for oral carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, San San; Crabb, Simon J.; Janghra, Nari; Carlberg, Carsten; Williams, Ann C.; Cutress, Ramsey I.; Packham, Graham; Hague, Angela

    2007-01-01

    In oral cancers, cytoplasmic BAG-1 overexpression is a marker of poor prognosis. BAG-1 regulates cellular growth, differentiation and survival through interactions with diverse proteins, including the vitamin D receptor (VDR), a key regulator of keratinocyte growth and differentiation. BAG-1 is expressed ubiquitously in human cells as three major isoforms of 50 kDa (BAG-1L), 46 kDa (BAG-1M) and 36 kDa (BAG-1S) from a single mRNA. In oral keratinocytes BAG-1L, but not BAG-1M and BAG-1S, enhanced VDR transactivation in response to 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3. BAG-1L was nucleoplasmic and nucleolar, whereas BAG-1S and BAG-1M were cytoplasmic and nucleoplasmic in localisation. Having identified the nucleolar localisation sequence in BAG-1L, we showed that mutation of this sequence did not prevent BAG-1L from potentiating VDR activity. BAG-1L also potentiated transactivation of known vitamin-D-responsive gene promoters, osteocalcin and 24-hydroxylase, and enhanced VDR-dependent transcription and protein expression of the keratinocyte differentiation marker, involucrin. These results demonstrate endogenous gene regulation by BAG-1L by potentiating nuclear hormone receptor function and suggest a role for BAG-1L in 24-hydroxylase regulation of vitamin D metabolism and the cellular response of oral keratinocytes to 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 . By contrast to the cytoplasmic BAG-1 isoforms, BAG-1L may act to suppress tumorigenesis

  10. Estrogen receptor β (ERβ1) transactivation is differentially modulated by the transcriptional coregulator Tip60 in a cis-acting element-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Tsung; Leung, Yuet-Kin; Chung, Irving; Tarapore, Pheruza; Ho, Shuk-Mei

    2013-08-30

    Estrogen receptor (ER) β1 and ERα have overlapping and distinct functions despite their common use of estradiol as the physiological ligand. These attributes are explained in part by their differential utilization of coregulators and ligands. Although Tip60 has been shown to interact with both receptors, its regulatory role in ERβ1 transactivation has not been defined. In this study, we found that Tip60 enhances transactivation of ERβ1 at the AP-1 site but suppresses its transcriptional activity at the estrogen-response element (ERE) site in an estradiol-independent manner. However, different estrogenic compounds can modify the Tip60 action. The corepressor activity of Tip60 at the ERE site is abolished by diarylpropionitrile, genistein, equol, and bisphenol A, whereas its coactivation at the AP-1 site is augmented by fulvestrant (ICI 182,780). GRIP1 is an important tethering mediator for ERs at the AP-1 site. We found that coexpression of GRIP1 synergizes the action of Tip60. Although Tip60 is a known acetyltransferase, it is unable to acetylate ERβ1, and its coregulatory functions are independent of its acetylation activity. In addition, we showed the co-occupancy of ERβ1 and Tip60 at ERE and AP-1 sites of ERβ1 target genes. Tip60 differentially regulates the endogenous expression of the target genes by modulating the binding of ERβ1 to the cis-regulatory regions. Thus, we have identified Tip60 as the first dual-function coregulator of ERβ1.

  11. Recombinant hybrid infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) carrying viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) G or NV genes show different virulence properities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einer-Jensen, Katja; Biacchesi, S.; Stegmann, Anders

    . By a reverse genetics approach using the related novirrhabdovirus infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) as basis, four hybrid IHNV-VHSV variants were generated. These chimeric variants included substitution of the IHNV glyco(G) or nonstrutrual (Nv) protein with the corresponding G or Nv-protein from......Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) is the economically most important viral disease in European rainbow trout farming. The virus was introduced to fresh water farms in the 1950ies from a reservoir of VHSV in the marine environment. Isolates from wild marine fish and fresh water farms...... are difficult to distinguish serologically but they show different virulence profiles: marine isolates typically cause little or no mortality in rainbow trout fry following experimental waterborne challenge, while freshwater isolates often kill the majority of the fish. Genetic analysis reveal that the change...

  12. Adenovirus E4 open reading frame 4-induced dephosphorylation inhibits E1A activation of the E2 promoter and E2F-1-mediated transactivation independently of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mannervik, M; Fan, S; Ström, A C

    1999-01-01

    of the viral E4 open reading frame 4 (E4-ORF4) protein. This effect does not to require the retinoblastoma protein that previously has been shown to regulate E2F activity. The inhibitory activity of E4-ORF4 appears to be specific because E4-ORF4 had little effect on, for example, E4-ORF6/7 transactivation......Previous studies have shown that the cell cycle-regulated E2F transcription factor is subjected to both positive and negative control by phosphorylation. Here we show that in transient transfection experiments, adenovirus E1A activation of the viral E2 promoter is abrogated by coexpression...... of the E2 promoter. We further show that the repressive effect of E4-ORF4 on E2 transcription works mainly through the E2F DNA-binding sites in the E2 promoter. In agreement with this, we find that E4-ORF4 inhibits E2F-1/DP-1-mediated transactivation. We also show that E4-ORF4 inhibits E2 mRNA expression...

  13. The influence of TAP1 and TAP2 gene polymorphisms on TAP function and its inhibition by viral immune evasion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praest, P; Luteijn, R D; Brak-Boer, I G J; Lanfermeijer, J; Hoelen, H; Ijgosse, L; Costa, A I; Gorham, R D; Lebbink, R J; Wiertz, E J H J

    2018-06-04

    Herpesviruses encode numerous immune evasion molecules that interfere with the immune system, particularly with certain stages in the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway. In this pathway, the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) is a frequent target of viral immune evasion strategies. This ER-resident transporter is composed of the proteins TAP1 and TAP2, and plays a crucial role in the loading of viral peptides onto MHC class I molecules. Several variants of TAP1 and TAP2 occur in the human population, some of which are linked to autoimmune disorders and susceptibility to infections. Here, we assessed the influence of naturally occurring TAP variants on peptide transport and MHC class I expression. In addition, we tested the inhibitory capacity of three viral immune evasion proteins, the TAP inhibitors US6 from human cytomegalovirus, ICP47 from herpes simplex virus type 1 and BNLF2a from Epstein-Barr virus, for a series of TAP1 and TAP2 variants. Our results suggest that these TAP polymorphisms have no or limited effect on peptide transport or MHC class I expression. Furthermore, our study indicates that the herpesvirus-encoded TAP inhibitors target a broad spectrum of TAP variants; inhibition of TAP is not affected by the naturally occurring polymorphisms of TAP tested in this study. Our findings suggest that the long-term coevolution of herpesviruses and their host did not result in selection of inhibitor-resistant TAP variants in the human population. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Association of TNF-alpha (-308 A/G) and IFN-gamma (+874 A/T) gene polymorphisms in response to spontaneous and treatment induced viral clearance in HCV infected multitransfused thalassemic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Aritra; Gupta, Nabyendu; Gupta, Debanjali; Datta, Abira; Firdaus, Rushna; Chowdhury, Prosanto; Bhattacharyya, Maitreyee; Sadhukhan, Provash C

    2018-06-01

    Multitransfused thalassemic individuals are at high risk of developing transfusion transmitted Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. The aim of the study was to correlate the effects of host cytokine single nucleotide polymorphisms of TNF-α (-308 A/G) and IFN-γ (+874 A/T) in spontaneous or IFN induced treatment response in the HCV infected thalassemic individuals. A total of 427 HCV sero-reactive thalassemic individuals were processed for HCV viral genomic diversity and host gene polymorphisms analysis of TNF-α (-308 A/G) and IFN-γ (+874 A/T). Out of 427 HCV sero-reactive individuals, 69.09% were found to be HCV RNA positive with genotype 3 as the predominant infecting strain (94.29%). Study highlighted that, A allele was significantly associated with (p < .05) spontaneous clearance of HCV infection and G allele was correlated with viral persistence at TNF-α (-308) gene polymorphism. Whereas in case of IFN-γ (+874) SNPs, A allele was significantly responsible (p < .05) for spontaneous clearance than T allele. Our study also indicated that in relapsed cases, IFN-γ (+874) T allele is more responsible than A allele. Though no significant correlation was found at both TNF-α (-308) and IFN-γ (+874) gene polymorphism among SVR and relapsed thalassemic patients. A allele at both TNF-α (-308) and IFN-γ (+874) were strongly associated with spontaneous clearance among this population. But in case of SVR and relapsed cases no significant association was found. This cytokine gene polymorphisms pattern will help clinicians to take an informed decision about therapeutic management of HCV infected thalassemic individuals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular interactions involved in the transactivation of the human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 promoter mediated by Tax and CREB-2 (ATF-4).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachon, F; Thebault, S; Peleraux, A; Devaux, C; Mesnard, J M

    2000-05-01

    The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) Tax protein activates viral transcription through three 21-bp repeats located in the U3 region of the HTLV-1 long terminal repeat and called Tax-responsive elements (TxREs). Each TxRE contains nucleotide sequences corresponding to imperfect cyclic AMP response elements (CRE). In this study, we demonstrate that the bZIP transcriptional factor CREB-2 is able to bind in vitro to the TxREs and that CREB-2 binding to each of the 21-bp motifs is enhanced by Tax. We also demonstrate that Tax can weakly interact with CREB-2 bound to a cellular palindromic CRE motif such as that found in the somatostatin promoter. Mutagenesis of Tax and CREB-2 demonstrates that both N- and C-terminal domains of Tax and the C-terminal region of CREB-2 are required for direct interaction between the two proteins. In addition, the Tax mutant M47, defective for HTLV-1 activation, is unable to form in vitro a ternary complex with CREB-2 and TxRE. In agreement with recent results suggesting that Tax can recruit the coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP) on the HTLV-1 promoter, we provide evidence that Tax, CREB-2, and CBP are capable of cooperating to stimulate viral transcription. Taken together, our data highlight the major role played by CREB-2 in Tax-mediated transactivation.

  16. Transactivation of a cellular promoter by the NS1 protein of the parvovirus minute virus of mice through a putative hormone-responsive element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanacker, J M; Corbau, R; Adelmant, G; Perros, M; Laudet, V; Rommelaere, J

    1996-01-01

    The promoter of the thyroid hormone receptor alpha gene (c-erbA-1) is activated by the nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) of parvovirus minute virus of mice (prototype strain [MVMp]) in ras-transformed FREJ4 cells that are permissive for lytic MVMp replication. This stimulation may be related to the sensitivity of host cells to MVMp, as it does not take place in parental FR3T3 cells, which are resistant to the parvovirus killing effect. The analysis of a series of deletion and point mutants of the c-erbA-1 promoter led to the identification of an upstream region that is necessary for NS1-driven transactivation. This sequence harbors a putative hormone-responsive element and is sufficient to render a minimal promoter NS1 inducible in FREJ4 but not in FR3T3 cells, and it is involved in distinct interactions with proteins from the respective cell lines. The NS1-responsive element of the c-erbA-1 promoter bears no homology with sequences that were previously reported to be necessary for NS1 DNA binding and transactivation. Altogether, our data point to a novel, cell-specific mechanism of promoter activation by NS1. PMID:8642664

  17. Mobil Viral Pazarlama

    OpenAIRE

    Barutçu, Süleyman

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Mobile Viral Marketing, with using mobile phones, is one of the most importantinnovations after Word of Mouth Marketing performed by face to face amongpeople and Viral Marketing performed in the İnternet. The main objective of thisstudy is to call marketing communicators’ and academicians’ attentions whowant to increase the recognition of companies’ products, services and brands tobecome a current issue in the marketplace using Mobile Viral Marketingapplications by reason of techno...

  18. Identification of viral genes associated with the interferon-inducing phenotype of a synthetic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haiyan; Pattnaik, Asit K; Osorio, Fernando A; Vu, Hiep L X

    2016-12-01

    We recently generated a fully synthetic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus strain (designated as PRRSV-CON), which confers unprecedented levels of heterologous protection. We report herein that the synthetic PRRSV-CON possesses a unique phenotype in that it induces type-I interferons (IFNs) instead of suppressing these cytokines as most of the naturally occurring PRRSV isolates do. Through gain- and loss- of-function studies, the IFN-inducing phenotype of PRRSV-CON was mapped to the 3.3kb genomic fragment encoding three viral nonstructural proteins: nsp1α, nsp1β and the N-terminal part of nsp2. Further studies indicated that a cooperation among these 3 proteins was required for effective induction of IFNs. Collectively, this study constitutes the first step toward understanding the mechanisms by which the synthetic PRRSV-CON confers heterologous protection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Identification of an ICP27-responsive element in the coding region of a herpes simplex virus type 1 late gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlackova, Lenka; Perkins, Keith D; Meyer, Julia; Strain, Anna K; Goldman, Oksana; Rice, Stephen A

    2010-03-01

    During productive herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection, a subset of viral delayed-early (DE) and late (L) genes require the immediate-early (IE) protein ICP27 for their expression. However, the cis-acting regulatory sequences in DE and L genes that mediate their specific induction by ICP27 are unknown. One viral L gene that is highly dependent on ICP27 is that encoding glycoprotein C (gC). We previously demonstrated that this gene is posttranscriptionally transactivated by ICP27 in a plasmid cotransfection assay. Based on our past results, we hypothesized that the gC gene possesses a cis-acting inhibitory sequence and that ICP27 overcomes the effects of this sequence to enable efficient gC expression. To test this model, we systematically deleted sequences from the body of the gC gene and tested the resulting constructs for expression. In so doing, we identified a 258-bp "silencing element" (SE) in the 5' portion of the gC coding region. When present, the SE inhibits gC mRNA accumulation from a transiently transfected gC gene, unless ICP27 is present. Moreover, the SE can be transferred to another HSV-1 gene, where it inhibits mRNA accumulation in the absence of ICP27 and confers high-level expression in the presence of ICP27. Thus, for the first time, an ICP27-responsive sequence has been identified in a physiologically relevant ICP27 target gene. To see if the SE functions during viral infection, we engineered HSV-1 recombinants that lack the SE, either in a wild-type (WT) or ICP27-null genetic background. In an ICP27-null background, deletion of the SE led to ICP27-independent expression of the gC gene, demonstrating that the SE functions during viral infection. Surprisingly, the ICP27-independent gC expression seen with the mutant occurred even in the absence of viral DNA synthesis, indicating that the SE helps to regulate the tight DNA replication-dependent expression of gC.

  20. Construction of non-viral vector (mPEG5k-PCL1.2k)1.4-g-PEI10k and its gene delivery efficacy in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Wei HUANG; Ming LV; Zhong-gao GAO; Ming-ji JIN; Fei-fei YANG; Yu-li WANG

    2011-01-01

    Objective To construct(mPEG5k-PCL1.2k)1.4-g-PEI10k,a copolymer designed as delivery vector for non-viral gene therapy,and explore its cytotoxicity and efficacy in delivery of plasmid DNA(pDNA).Methods The copolymer,mPEG5k-PCL1.2k-OH,was prepared by ring-opening polymerization and then followed by a conversion of hydroxyl terminal(-OH) into N-hydroxysuccinimide(NHS) to prepare mPEG5k-PCL1.2k-NHS.One of the branches,PEI10k,was then reacted with mPEG5k-PCL1.2k-NHS to synthesize a ternary copolym...

  1. Mutation of neutralizing/antibody-dependent enhancing epitope on spike protein and 7b gene of feline infectious peritonitis virus: influences of viral replication in monocytes/macrophages and virulence in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Tomomi; Tomiyama, Yoshika; Katoh, Yasuichiroh; Nakamura, Michiyo; Satoh, Ryoichi; Hohdatsu, Tsutomu

    2011-03-01

    We previously prepared neutralizing monoclonal antibody (MAb)-resistant (mar) mutant viruses using a laboratory strain feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) 79-1146 (Kida et al., 1999). Mar mutant viruses are mutated several amino acids of the neutralizing epitope of Spike protein, compared with the parent strain, FIPV 79-1146. We clarified that MAb used to prepare mar mutant viruses also lost its activity to enhance homologous mar mutant viruses, strongly suggesting that neutralizing and antibody-dependent enhancing epitopes are present in the same region in the strain FIPV 79-1146. We also discovered that amino acid mutation in the neutralizing epitope reduced viral replication in monocytes/macrophages. We also demonstrated that the mutation or deletion of two nucleotides in 7b gene abrogate the virulence of strain FIPV 79-1146. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Transactivation of involucrin, a marker of differentiation in keratinocytes, by lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, E; Fatma, N; Sharma, P; Shinohara, T; Chylack, L T; Akagi, Y; Singh, D P

    2002-07-26

    Human involucrin (hINV), first appears in the cytosol of keratinocytes and ultimately cross-linked to membrane proteins via transglutaminase and forms a protective barrier as an insoluble envelope beneath the plasma membrane. Although the function and evolution of involucrin is known, the regulation of its gene expression is not well understood. An analysis of the hINV gene sequence, upstream of the transcription start site (-534 to +1 nt) revealed the presence of potential sites for binding of lens epithelium-derived growth factor (LEDGF); stress response element (STRE; A/TGGGGA/T) and heat shock element (HSE; nGAAn). We reported earlier that LEDGF activates stress-associated genes by binding to these elements and elevates cellular resistance to various stresses. Here, gel-shift and super-shift assays confirm the binding of LEDGF to the DNA fragments containing HSEs and STREs that are present in the involucrin gene promoter. Furthermore, hINV promoter linked to CAT reporter gene, cotransfected in human corneal simian virus 40-transformed keratinocytes (HCK), was transactivated by LEDGF significantly. In contrast, the activity of hINV promoter bearing mutations at the WT1 (containing HSE and STRE), WT2 (containing STRE) and WT3 (containing STRE) binding sites was diminished. In addition, in HCK cell over-expressing LEDGF, the levels of hINV mRNA and hINV protein are increased by four to five-fold. LEDGF is inducible to oxidants. Cells treated with 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), known to stimulate production of H(2)O(2), showed higher levels of LEDGF mRNA. Furthermore, our immunohistochemical studies revealed that hINV protein is found in the cytoplasm of HCK cells over-expressing LEDGF, but not detectable in the normal HCK cells or HCK cells transfected with vector. This regulation appears to be physiologically important, as over-expression of HCK with LEDGF increases the expression of the endogenous hINV gene and may provide new insight to understand

  3. [Emergent viral infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galama, J.M.D.

    2001-01-01

    The emergence and re-emergence of viral infections is an ongoing process. Large-scale vaccination programmes led to the eradication or control of some viral infections in the last century, but new viruses are always emerging. Increased travel is leading to a rise in the importation of exotic

  4. Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Skall, Helle Frank

    2013-01-01

    This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus.......This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus....

  5. Virally encoded 7TM receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Waldhoer, M; Lüttichau, H R

    2001-01-01

    expression of this single gene in certain lymphocyte cell lineages leads to the development of lesions which are remarkably similar to Kaposi's sarcoma, a human herpesvirus 8 associated disease. Thus, this and other virally encoded 7TM receptors appear to be attractive future drug targets.......A number of herpes- and poxviruses encode 7TM G-protein coupled receptors most of which clearly are derived from their host chemokine system as well as induce high expression of certain 7TM receptors in the infected cells. The receptors appear to be exploited by the virus for either immune evasion...

  6. MHC class II transactivator CIITA is a recurrent gene fusion partner in lymphoid cancers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steidl, Christian; Shah, Sohrab P.; Woolcock, Bruce W.; Rui, Lixin; Kawahara, Masahiro; Farinha, Pedro; Johnson, Nathalie A.; Zhao, Yongjun; Telenius, Adele; Ben Neriah, Susana; McPherson, Andrew; Meissner, Barbara; Okoye, Ujunwa C.; Diepstra, Arjan; van den Berg, Anke; Sun, Mark; Leung, Gillian; Jones, Steven J.; Connors, Joseph M.; Huntsman, David G.; Savage, Kerry J.; Rimsza, Lisa M.; Horsman, Douglas E.; Staudt, Louis M.; Steidl, Ulrich; Marra, Marco A.; Gascoyne, Randy D.

    2011-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations are critically involved in the molecular pathogenesis of B-cell lymphomas, and highly recurrent and specific rearrangements have defined distinct molecular subtypes linked to unique clinicopathological features(1,2). In contrast, several well-characterized lymphoma

  7. A role for NF-KB-dependent gene transactivation in sunburn

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abeyama, K.; Eng, W.; Jester, J.V.; Vink, A.A.; Edelbaum, D.; Cockerell, C.J.; Bergstresser, P.R.; Takashima, A.

    2000-01-01

    Exposure of skin to ultraviolet (UV) radiation is known to induce NF-κB activation, but the functional role for this pathway in UV-induced cutaneous inflammation remains uncertain. In this study, we examined whether experimentally induced sunburn reactions in mice could be prevented by blocking

  8. MicroRNA expression in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) vaccinated with a DNA vaccine encoding the glycoprotein gene of Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bela-Ong, Dennis; Schyth, Brian Dall; Lorenzen, Niels

    particularly to sea-farmed rainbow trout and thus necessitates strategies to mitigate potential disease outbreaks. A DNA vaccine encoding the glycoprotein gene of VHSV has been developed and shown to elicit protective immune responses in laboratory trials. It is important to identify key factors as biomarkers...

  9. Estrogen Receptor β (ERβ1) Transactivation Is Differentially Modulated by the Transcriptional Coregulator Tip60 in a cis-Acting Element-dependent Manner*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Tsung; Leung, Yuet-Kin; Chung, Irving; Tarapore, Pheruza; Ho, Shuk-Mei

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) β1 and ERα have overlapping and distinct functions despite their common use of estradiol as the physiological ligand. These attributes are explained in part by their differential utilization of coregulators and ligands. Although Tip60 has been shown to interact with both receptors, its regulatory role in ERβ1 transactivation has not been defined. In this study, we found that Tip60 enhances transactivation of ERβ1 at the AP-1 site but suppresses its transcriptional activity at the estrogen-response element (ERE) site in an estradiol-independent manner. However, different estrogenic compounds can modify the Tip60 action. The corepressor activity of Tip60 at the ERE site is abolished by diarylpropionitrile, genistein, equol, and bisphenol A, whereas its coactivation at the AP-1 site is augmented by fulvestrant (ICI 182,780). GRIP1 is an important tethering mediator for ERs at the AP-1 site. We found that coexpression of GRIP1 synergizes the action of Tip60. Although Tip60 is a known acetyltransferase, it is unable to acetylate ERβ1, and its coregulatory functions are independent of its acetylation activity. In addition, we showed the co-occupancy of ERβ1 and Tip60 at ERE and AP-1 sites of ERβ1 target genes. Tip60 differentially regulates the endogenous expression of the target genes by modulating the binding of ERβ1 to the cis-regulatory regions. Thus, we have identified Tip60 as the first dual-function coregulator of ERβ1. PMID:23857583

  10. HIV-1 infection induces changes in expression of cellular splicing factors that regulate alternative viral splicing and virus production in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purcell Damian FJ

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages are important targets and long-lived reservoirs of HIV-1, which are not cleared of infection by currently available treatments. In the primary monocyte-derived macrophage model of infection, replication is initially productive followed by a decline in virion output over ensuing weeks, coincident with a decrease in the levels of the essential viral transactivator protein Tat. We investigated two possible mechanisms in macrophages for regulation of viral replication, which appears to be primarily regulated at the level of tat mRNA: 1 differential mRNA stability, used by cells and some viruses for the rapid regulation of gene expression and 2 control of HIV-1 alternative splicing, which is essential for optimal viral replication. Results Following termination of transcription at increasing times after infection in macrophages, we found that tat mRNA did indeed decay more rapidly than rev or nef mRNA, but with similar kinetics throughout infection. In addition, tat mRNA decayed at least as rapidly in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Expression of cellular splicing factors in uninfected and infected macrophage cultures from the same donor showed an inverse pattern over time between enhancing factors (members of the SR family of RNA binding proteins and inhibitory factors (members of the hnRNP family. While levels of the SR protein SC35 were greatly up-regulated in the first week or two after infection, hnRNPs of the A/B and H groups were down-regulated. Around the peak of virus production in each culture, SC35 expression declined to levels in uninfected cells or lower, while the hnRNPs increased to control levels or above. We also found evidence for increased cytoplasmic expression of SC35 following long-term infection. Conclusion While no evidence of differential regulation of tat mRNA decay was found in macrophages following HIV-1 infection, changes in the balance of cellular splicing factors which regulate alternative

  11. Prolonged Expression of Secreted Enzymes in Dogs After Liver-Directed Delivery of Sleeping Beauty Transposons: Implications for Non-Viral Gene Therapy of Systemic Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronovich, Elena L; Hyland, Kendra A; Hall, Bryan C; Bell, Jason B; Olson, Erik R; Rusten, Myra Urness; Hunter, David W; Ellinwood, N Matthew; McIvor, R Scott; Hackett, Perry B

    2017-07-01

    The non-viral, integrating Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system is efficient in treating systemic monogenic disease in mice, including hemophilia A and B caused by deficiency of blood clotting factors and mucopolysaccharidosis types I and VII caused by α-L-iduronidase (IDUA) and β-glucuronidase (GUSB) deficiency, respectively. Modified approaches of the hydrodynamics-based procedure to deliver transposons to the liver in dogs were recently reported. Using the transgenic canine reporter secreted alkaline phosphatase (cSEAP), transgenic protein in the plasma was demonstrated for up to 6 weeks post infusion. This study reports that immunosuppression of dogs with gadolinium chloride (GdCl 3 ) prolonged the presence of cSEAP in the circulation up to 5.5 months after a single vector infusion. Transgene expression declined gradually but appeared to stabilize after about 2 months at approximately fourfold baseline level. Durability of transgenic protein expression in the plasma was inversely associated with transient increase of liver enzymes alanine transaminase and aspartate transaminase in response to the plasmid delivery procedure, which suggests a deleterious effect of hepatocellular toxicity on transgene expression. GdCl 3 treatment was ineffective for repeat vector infusions. In parallel studies, dogs were infused with potentially therapeutic transposons. Activities of transgenic IDUA and GUSB in plasma peaked at 50-350% of wildtype, but in the absence of immunosuppression lasted only a few days. Transposition was detectable by excision assay only when the most efficient transposase, SB100X, was used. Dogs infused with transposons encoding canine clotting factor IX (cFIX) were treated with GdCl 3 and showed expression profiles similar to those in cSEAP-infused dogs, with expression peaking at 40% wt (2 μg/mL). It is concluded that GdCl 3 can support extended transgene expression after hydrodynamic introduction of SB transposons in dogs, but that alternative

  12. Evolutionary relationship between Old World West Nile virus strains Evidence for viral gene flow between africa, the middle east, and europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charrel, R.N.; Brault, A.C.; Gallian, P.; Lemasson, J.-J.; Murgue, B.; Murri, S.; Pastorino, B.; Zeller, H.; Chesse, R. de; Micco, P. de; Lamballerie, X. de

    2003-01-01

    Little is known about the genetic relationships between European and other Old-World strains of West Nile virus (WNV) and persistence of WNV North of Mediterranean. We characterized the complete genomes of three WNV strains from France (horse-2000), Tunisia (human-1997) and Kenya (mosquito-1998), and the envelope, NS3 and NS5 genes of the Koutango virus. Phylogenetic analyses including all available full-length sequences showed that: (1) Koutango virus is a distant variant of WNV; (2) the three characterized strains belong to lineage 1, clade 1a; (3) the Tunisian strain roots the lineage of viruses introduced in North America. We established that currently available partial envelope sequences do not generate reliable phylogenies. Accordingly, establishing a large WNV sequence database is pivotal for the understanding of spatial and temporal epidemiology of this virus. For rapid completion of that purpose, colinearized E-NS3-NS5 gene sequences were shown to constitute a valuable surrogate for complete sequences

  13. Transactivation domain of p53 regulates DNA repair and integrity in human iPS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannappan, Ramaswamy; Mattapally, Saidulu; Wagle, Pooja A; Zhang, Jianyi

    2018-05-18

    The role of p53 transactivation domain (p53-TAD), a multifunctional and dynamic domain, on DNA repair and retaining DNA integrity in human iPS cells has never been studied. p53-TAD was knocked out in iPS cells using CRISPR/Cas9 and was confirmed by DNA sequencing. p53-TAD KO cells were characterized by: accelerated proliferation, decreased population doubling time, and unaltered Bcl2, BBC3, IGF1R, Bax and altered Mdm2, p21, and PIDD transcripts expression. In p53-TAD KO cells p53 regulated DNA repair proteins XPA, DNA polH and DDB2 expression were found to be reduced compared to p53-WT cells. Exposure to low dose of doxorubicin (Doxo) induced similar DNA damage and DNA damage response (DDR) measured by RAD50 and MRE11 expression, Checkpoint kinase 2 activation and γH2A.X recruitment at DNA strand breaks in both the cell groups indicating silencing p53-TAD do not affect DDR mechanism upstream of p53. Following removal of Doxo p53-WT hiPS cells underwent DNA repair, corrected their damaged DNA and restored DNA integrity. Conversely, p53-TAD KO hiPS cells did not undergo complete DNA repair and failed to restore DNA integrity. More importantly continuous culture of p53-TAD KO hiPS cells underwent G2/M cell cycle arrest and expressed cellular senescent marker p16 INK4a . Our data clearly shows that silencing transactivation domain of p53 did not affect DDR but affected the DNA repair process implying the crucial role of p53 transactivation domain in maintaining DNA integrity. Therefore, activating p53-TAD domain using small molecules may promote DNA repair and integrity of cells and prevent senescence.

  14. Understanding Image Virality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-07

    Example non-viral images. Figure 1: Top: Images with high viral scores in our dataset depict internet “celebrity” memes ex. “Grumpy Cat”; Bottom: Images...of images that is most similar to ours is the concurrently introduced viral meme generator of Wang et al., that combines NLP and Computer Vision (low...doing any of our tasks. The test included questions about widely spread Reddit memes and jargon so that anyone familiar with Reddit can easily get a high

  15. Neuroanatomy goes viral!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan eNassi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The nervous system is complex not simply because of the enormous number of neurons it contains but by virtue of the specificity with which they are connected. Unraveling this specificity is the task of neuroanatomy. In this endeavor, neuroanatomists have traditionally exploited an impressive array of tools ranging from the Golgi method to electron microscopy. An ideal method for studying anatomy would label neurons that are interconnected, and, in addition, allow expression of foreign genes in these neurons. Fortuitously, nature has already partially developed such a method in the form of neurotropic viruses, which have evolved to deliver their genetic material between synaptically connected neurons while largely eluding glia and the immune system. While these characteristics make some of these viruses a threat to human health, simple modifications allow them to be used in controlled experimental settings, thus enabling neuroanatomists to trace multi-synaptic connections within and across brain regions. Wild-type neurotropic viruses, such as rabies and alpha-herpes virus, have already contributed greatly to our understanding of brain connectivity, and modern molecular techniques have enabled the construction of recombinant forms of these and other viruses. These newly engineered reagents are particularly useful, as they can target genetically defined populations of neurons, spread only one synapse to either inputs or outputs, and carry instructions by which the targeted neurons can be made to express exogenous proteins, such as calcium sensors or light-sensitive ion channels, that can be used to study neuronal function. In this review, we address these uniquely powerful features of the viruses already in the neuroanatomist's toolbox, as well as the aspects of their biology that currently limit their utility. Based on the latter, we consider strategies for improving viral tracing methods by reducing toxicity, improving control of transsynaptic

  16. Comparative Analysis of V-Akt Murine Thymoma Viral Oncogene Homolog 3 (AKT3) Gene between Cow and Buffalo Reveals Substantial Differences for Mastitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattarai, Dinesh; Cheng, Zhangrui; Liang, Xianwei; Deng, Tingxian; Rehman, Zia Ur; Talpur, Hira Sajjad; Worku, Tesfaye; Brohi, Rahim Dad; Safdar, Muhammad; Ahmad, Muhammad Jamil; Salim, Mohammad; Khan, Momen; Ahmad, Hafiz Ishfaq

    2018-01-01

    AKT3 gene is a constituent of the serine/threonine protein kinase family and plays a crucial role in synthesis of milk fats and cholesterol by regulating activity of the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP). AKT3 is highly conserved in mammals and its expression levels during the lactation periods of cattle are markedly increased. AKT3 is highly expressed in the intestine followed by mammary gland and it is also expressed in immune cells. It is involved in the TLR pathways as effectively as proinflammatory cytokines. The aims of this study were to investigate the sequences differences between buffalo and cow. Our results showed that there were substantial differences between buffalo and cow in some exons and noteworthy differences of the gene size in different regions. We also identified the important consensus sequence motifs, variation in 2000 upstream of ATG, substantial difference in the “3′UTR” region, and miRNA association in the buffalo sequences compared with the cow. In addition, genetic analyses, such as gene structure, phylogenetic tree, position of different motifs, and functional domains, were performed to establish their correlation with other species. This may indicate that a buffalo breed has potential resistance to disease, environment changes, and airborne microorganisms and some good production and reproductive traits. PMID:29862252

  17. Comparative Analysis of V-Akt Murine Thymoma Viral Oncogene Homolog 3 (AKT3) Gene between Cow and Buffalo Reveals Substantial Differences for Mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Farman; Bhattarai, Dinesh; Cheng, Zhangrui; Liang, Xianwei; Deng, Tingxian; Rehman, Zia Ur; Talpur, Hira Sajjad; Worku, Tesfaye; Brohi, Rahim Dad; Safdar, Muhammad; Ahmad, Muhammad Jamil; Salim, Mohammad; Khan, Momen; Ahmad, Hafiz Ishfaq; Zhang, Shujun

    2018-01-01

    AKT3 gene is a constituent of the serine/threonine protein kinase family and plays a crucial role in synthesis of milk fats and cholesterol by regulating activity of the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP). AKT3 is highly conserved in mammals and its expression levels during the lactation periods of cattle are markedly increased. AKT3 is highly expressed in the intestine followed by mammary gland and it is also expressed in immune cells. It is involved in the TLR pathways as effectively as proinflammatory cytokines. The aims of this study were to investigate the sequences differences between buffalo and cow. Our results showed that there were substantial differences between buffalo and cow in some exons and noteworthy differences of the gene size in different regions. We also identified the important consensus sequence motifs, variation in 2000 upstream of ATG, substantial difference in the "3'UTR" region, and miRNA association in the buffalo sequences compared with the cow. In addition, genetic analyses, such as gene structure, phylogenetic tree, position of different motifs, and functional domains, were performed to establish their correlation with other species. This may indicate that a buffalo breed has potential resistance to disease, environment changes, and airborne microorganisms and some good production and reproductive traits.

  18. Comparative Analysis of V-Akt Murine Thymoma Viral Oncogene Homolog 3 (AKT3 Gene between Cow and Buffalo Reveals Substantial Differences for Mastitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farman Ullah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available AKT3 gene is a constituent of the serine/threonine protein kinase family and plays a crucial role in synthesis of milk fats and cholesterol by regulating activity of the sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP. AKT3 is highly conserved in mammals and its expression levels during the lactation periods of cattle are markedly increased. AKT3 is highly expressed in the intestine followed by mammary gland and it is also expressed in immune cells. It is involved in the TLR pathways as effectively as proinflammatory cytokines. The aims of this study were to investigate the sequences differences between buffalo and cow. Our results showed that there were substantial differences between buffalo and cow in some exons and noteworthy differences of the gene size in different regions. We also identified the important consensus sequence motifs, variation in 2000 upstream of ATG, substantial difference in the “3′UTR” region, and miRNA association in the buffalo sequences compared with the cow. In addition, genetic analyses, such as gene structure, phylogenetic tree, position of different motifs, and functional domains, were performed to establish their correlation with other species. This may indicate that a buffalo breed has potential resistance to disease, environment changes, and airborne microorganisms and some good production and reproductive traits.

  19. HTLV-1 Tax mediated downregulation of miRNAs associated with chromatin remodeling factors in T cells with stably integrated viral promoter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saifur Rahman

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is a natural cellular mechanism to silence gene expression and is predominantly mediated by microRNAs (miRNAs that target messenger RNA. Viruses can manipulate the cellular processes necessary for their replication by targeting the host RNAi machinery. This study explores the effect of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 transactivating protein Tax on the RNAi pathway in the context of a chromosomally integrated viral long terminal repeat (LTR using a CD4(+ T-cell line, Jurkat. Transcription factor profiling of the HTLV-1 LTR stably integrated T-cell clone transfected with Tax demonstrates increased activation of substrates and factors associated with chromatin remodeling complexes. Using a miRNA microarray and bioinformatics experimental approach, Tax was also shown to downregulate the expression of miRNAs associated with the translational regulation of factors required for chromatin remodeling. These observations were validated with selected miRNAs and an HTLV-1 infected T cells line, MT-2. miR-149 and miR-873 were found to be capable of directly targeting p300 and p/CAF, chromatin remodeling factors known to play critical role in HTLV-1 pathogenesis. Overall, these results are first in line establishing HTLV-1/Tax-miRNA-chromatin concept and open new avenues toward understanding retroviral latency and/or replication in a given cell type.

  20. A novel inducible transactivation domain in the androgen receptor: implications for PRK in prostate cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Metzger, Eric; Müller, Judith M.; Ferrari, Stefano; Buettner, Reinhard; Schüle, Roland

    2003-01-01

    In addition to the classical activation by ligands, nuclear receptor activity is also regulated by ligand-independent signalling. Here, we unravel a novel signal transduction pathway that links the RhoA effector protein kinase C-related kinase PRK1 to the transcriptional activation of the androgen receptor (AR). Stimulation of the PRK signalling cascade results in a ligand-dependent superactivation of AR. We show that AR and PRK1 interact both in vivo and in vitro. The transactivation unit 5 ...

  1. Multiple Mechanisms are Responsible for Transactivation of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodland, Karin D.; Bollinger, Nikki; Ippolito, Danielle L.; Opresko, Lee; Coffey, Robert J.; Zangar, Richard C.; Wiley, H. S.

    2008-11-14

    REVIEW ENTIRE DOCUMENT AT: https://pnlweb.pnl.gov/projects/bsd/ERICA%20Manuscripts%20for%20Review/KD%20Rodland%20D7E80/HMEC_transactivation_ms01_15+Figs.pdf ABSTRACT: Using a single nontransformed strain of human mammary epithelial cells, we found that the ability of multiple growth factors and cytokines to induce ERK phosphorylation was dependent on EGFR activity. These included lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), uridine triphosphate, growth hormone, vascular endothelial growth factor, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and tumor necrosis factoralpha. In contrast, hepatocyte growth factor could stimulate ERK phosphorylation independent of EGFR activity...

  2. Oxygen tension level and human viral infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morinet, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.morinet@sls.aphp.fr [Centre des Innovations Thérapeutiques en Oncologie et Hématologie (CITOH), CHU Saint-Louis, Paris (France); Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité Paris, Paris (France); Casetti, Luana [Institut Cochin INSERM U1016, Paris (France); François, Jean-Hugues; Capron, Claude [Institut Cochin INSERM U1016, Paris (France); Laboratoire d' Hématologie, Hôpital Ambroise Paré, Boulogne (France); Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin en Yvelynes, Versailles (France); Pillet, Sylvie [Laboratoire de Bactériologie-Virologie-Hygiène, CHU de Saint-Etienne, Saint-Etienne (France); Université de Lyon et Université de Saint-Etienne, Jean Monnet, GIMAP EA3064, F-42023 Saint-Etienne, Lyon (France)

    2013-09-15

    The role of oxygen tension level is a well-known phenomenon that has been studied in oncology and radiotherapy since about 60 years. Oxygen tension may inhibit or stimulate propagation of viruses in vitro as well as in vivo. In turn modulating oxygen metabolism may constitute a novel approach to treat viral infections as an adjuvant therapy. The major transcription factor which regulates oxygen tension level is hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). Down-regulating the expression of HIF-1α is a possible method in the treatment of chronic viral infection such as human immunodeficiency virus infection, chronic hepatitis B and C viral infections and Kaposi sarcoma in addition to classic chemotherapy. The aim of this review is to supply an updating concerning the influence of oxygen tension level in human viral infections and to evoke possible new therapeutic strategies regarding this environmental condition. - Highlights: • Oxygen tension level regulates viral replication in vitro and possibly in vivo. • Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α) is the principal factor involved in Oxygen tension level. • HIF-1α upregulates gene expression for example of HIV, JC and Kaposi sarcoma viruses. • In addition to classical chemotherapy inhibition of HIF-1α may constitute a new track to treat human viral infections.

  3. Low Molecular Weight pDMAEMA-block-pHEMA Block-Copolymers Synthesized via RAFT-Polymerization: Potential Non-Viral Gene Delivery Agents?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kissel

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate non-viral pDNA carriers based on diblock-copolymers consisting of poly(2-(dimethyl aminoethyl methacrylate (pDMAEMA and poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (pHEMA. Specifically the block-lengths and molecular weights were varied to determine the minimal requirements for transfection. Such vectors should allow better transfection at acceptable toxicity levels and the entire diblock-copolymer should be suitable for renal clearance. For this purpose, a library of linear poly(2-(dimethyl aminoethyl methacrylate-block-poly(2-hydroxyl methacrylate (pDMAEMA-block-pHEMA copolymers was synthesized via RAFT (reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization in a molecular weight (Mw range of 17–35.7 kDa and analyzed using 1H and 13C NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance, ATR (attenuated total reflectance, GPC (gel permeation chromatography and DSC (differential scanning calorimetry. Copolymers possessing short pDMAEMA-polycation chains were 1.4–9.7 times less toxic in vitro than polyethylenimine (PEI 25 kDa, and complexed DNA into polyplexes of 100–170 nm, favorable for cellular uptake. The DNA-binding affinity and polyplex stability against competing polyanions was comparable with PEI 25 kDa. The zeta-potential of polyplexes of pDMAEMA-grafted copolymers remained positive (+15–30 mV. In comparison with earlier reported low molecular weight homo pDMAEMA vectors, these diblock-copolymers showed enhanced transfection efficacy under in vitro conditions due to their lower cytotoxicity, efficient cellular uptake and DNA packaging. The homo pDMAEMA115 (18.3 kDa self-assembled with DNA into small positively charged polyplexes, but was not able to transfect cells. The grafting of 6 and 57 repeating units of pHEMA (0.8 and 7.4 kDa to pDMAEMA115 increased the transfection efficacy significantly, implying a crucial impact of pHEMA on vector-cell interactions. The intracellular trafficking, in vivo transfection

  4. Viral hemorrhagic septicemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batts, William N.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS) is one of the most important viral diseases of finfish worldwide. In the past, VHS was thought to affect mainly rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss reared at freshwater facilities in Western Europe where it was known by various names including Egtved disease and infectious kidney swelling and liver degeneration (Wolf 1988). Today, VHS is known as an important source of mortality for cultured and wild fish in freshwater and marine environments in several regions of the northern hemisphere (Dixon 1999; Gagné et al. 2007; Kim and Faisal 2011; Lumsden et al. 2007; Marty et al. 1998, 2003; Meyers and Winton 1995; Skall et al. 2005b; Smail 1999; Takano et al. 2001). Viral hemorrhagic septicemia is caused by the fish rhabdovirus, viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV), a member of the genus Novirhabdovirus of the family Rhabdoviridae

  5. Hepatitis viral aguda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Rubén Hernández Garcés

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión bibliográfica de las hepatitis virales agudas sobre aspectos vinculados a su etiología. Se tuvieron en cuenta además algunos datos epidemiológicos, las formas clínicas más importantes, los exámenes complementarios con especial énfasis en los marcadores virales y el diagnóstico positivoA bibliographical review of acute viral hepatitis was made taking into account those aspects connected with its etiology. Some epidemiological markers, the most important clinical forms, and the complementary examinations with special emphasis on the viral markers and the positive diagnosis were also considered

  6. Wastewater viral community

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The dataset contains the information used to generate the figures in the manuscript. The data describes the viral loss measured at all steps of sample processing,...

  7. Viral pathogenesis in diagrams

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tremblay, Michel; Berthiaume, Laurent; Ackermann, Hans-Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    .... The 268 diagrams in Viral Pathogenesis in Diagrams were selected from over 800 diagrams of English and French virological literature, including one derived from a famous drawing by Leonardo da Vinci...

  8. Neuroprotective effect of non-viral gene therapy treatment based on tetanus toxin C-fragment in a severe mouse model of Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Olivan Garcia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a hereditary childhood disease that causes paralysis and progressive degeneration of skeletal muscles and spinal motor neurons. SMA is associated with reduced levels of full-length Survival of Motor Neuron (SMN protein, due to mutations in the Survival of Motor Neuron 1 gene. Nowadays there are no effective therapies available to treat patients with SMA, so our aim was to test whether the non-toxic carboxy-terminal fragment of tetanus toxin heavy chain (TTC, which exhibits neurotrophic properties, might have a therapeutic role or benefit in SMA. In this manuscript, we have demonstrated that TTC enhance the SMN expression in motor neurons in vitro and evaluated the effect of intramuscular injection of TTC-encoding plasmid in the spinal cord and the skeletal muscle of SMNdelta7 mice. For this purpose, we studied the weight and the survival time, as well as, the survival and cell death pathways and muscular atrophy. Our results showed that TTC treatment reduced the expression of autophagy markers (Becn1, Atg5, Lc3 and p62 and pro-apoptotic genes such as Bax and Casp3 in spinal cord. In skeletal muscle, TTC was able to downregulate the expression of the main marker of autophagy, Lc3, to wild type levels and the expression of the apoptosis effector protein, Casp3. Regarding the genes related to muscular atrophy (Ankrd1, Calm1, Col19a1, Fbox32, Mt2, Myod1, NogoA, Pax7, Rrad, and Sln, TTC suggest a compensatory effect for muscle damage response, diminished oxidative stress and modulated calcium homeostasis. These preliminary findings suggest the need for further experiments to depth study the effect of TTC in SMA disease.

  9. Whole-genome analysis of genetic recombination of hepatitis delta virus: molecular domain in delta antigen determining trans-activating efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Mei; Lin, Chia-Chi; Lin, Feng-Ming; Li, Hsin-Pai; Iang, Shan-Bei

    2015-12-01

    Hepatitis delta virus (HDV) is the only animal RNA virus that has an unbranched rod-like genome with ribozyme activity and is replicated by host RNA polymerase. HDV RNA recombination was previously demonstrated in patients and in cultured cells by analysis of a region corresponding to the C terminus of the delta antigen (HDAg), the only viral-encoded protein. Here, a whole-genome recombination map of HDV was constructed using an experimental system in which two HDV-1 sequences were co-transfected into cultured cells and the recombinants were analysed by sequencing of cloned reverse transcription-PCR products. Fifty homologous recombinants with 60 crossovers mapping to 22 junctions were identified from 200 analysed clones. Small HDAg chimeras harbouring a junction newly detected in the recombination map were then constructed. The results further indicated that the genome-replication level of HDV was sensitive to the sixth amino acid within the N-terminal 22 aa of HDAg. Therefore, the recombination map established in this study provided a tool for not only understanding HDV RNA recombination, but also elucidating the related mechanisms, such as molecular elements responsible for the trans-activation levels of the small HDAg.

  10. Metabolism goes viral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake-Stoner, Shigeki J; O'Shea, Clodagh C

    2014-04-01

    Viral and cellular oncogenes converge in targeting critical protein interaction networks to reprogram the cellular DNA and protein replication machinery for pathological replication. In this issue, Thai et al. (2014) show that adenovirus E4ORF1 activates MYC glycolytic targets to induce a Warburg-like effect that converts glucose into nucleotides for viral replication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Hepatic expression of proteasome subunit alpha type-6 is upregulated during viral hepatitis and putatively regulates the expression of ISG15 ubiquitin-like modifier, a proviral host gene in hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broering, R; Trippler, M; Werner, M; Real, C I; Megger, D A; Bracht, T; Schweinsberg, V; Sitek, B; Eisenacher, M; Meyer, H E; Baba, H A; Weber, F; Hoffmann, A-C; Gerken, G; Schlaak, J F

    2016-05-01

    The interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. ISG15-regulated proteins have previously been identified that putatively affect this proviral interaction. The present observational study aimed to elucidate the relation between ISG15 and these host factors during HCV infection. Transcriptomic and proteomic analyses were performed using liver samples of HCV-infected (n = 54) and uninfected (n = 10) or HBV-infected controls (n = 23). Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) were treated with Toll-like receptor ligands, interferons and kinase inhibitors. Expression of ISG15 and proteasome subunit alpha type-6 (PSMA6) was suppressed in subgenomic HCV replicon cell lines using specific siRNAs. Comparison of hepatic expression patterns revealed significantly increased signals for ISG15, IFIT1, HNRNPK and PSMA6 on the protein level as well as ISG15, IFIT1 and PSMA6 on the mRNA level in HCV-infected patients. In contrast to interferon-stimulated genes, PSMA6 expression occurred independent of HCV load and genotype. In PHH, the expression of ISG15 and PSMA6 was distinctly induced by poly(I:C), depending on IRF3 activation or PI3K/AKT signalling, respectively. Suppression of PSMA6 in HCV replicon cells led to significant induction of ISG15 expression, thus combined knock-down of both genes abrogated the antiviral effect induced by the separate suppression of ISG15. These data indicate that hepatic expression of PSMA6, which is upregulated during viral hepatitis, likely depends on TLR3 activation. PSMA6 affects the expression of immunoregulatory ISG15, a proviral factor in the pathogenesis of HCV infection. Therefore, the proteasome might be involved in the enigmatic interaction between ISG15 and HCV. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Effects of heterocyclic-based head group modifications on the structure-activity relationship of tocopherol-based lipids for non-viral gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosangi, Mallikarjun; Mujahid, Thasneem Yoosuf; Gopal, Vijaya; Patri, Srilakshmi V

    2016-07-12

    Gene therapy, a promising strategy for the delivery of therapeutic nucleic acids, is greatly dependent on the development of efficient vectors. In this study, we designed and synthesized several tocopherol-based lipids varying in the head group region. Here, we present the structure-activity relationship of stable aqueous suspensions of lipids that were synthetically prepared and formulated with 1,2-dioleoyl phosphatidyl ethanolamine (DOPE) as the co-lipid. The physicochemical properties such as the hydrodynamic size, zeta potential, stability and morphology of these formulations were investigated. Interaction with plasmid DNA was clearly demonstrated through gel binding and EtBr displacement assays. Further, the transfection potential was examined in mouse neuroblastoma Neuro-2a, hepatocarcinoma HepG2, human embryonic kidney and Chinese hamster ovarian cell lines, all of different origins. Cell-uptake assays with N-methylpiperidinium, N-methylmorpholinium, N-methylimidazolium and N,N-dimethylaminopyridinium head group containing formulations evidently depicted efficient cell uptake as observed by particulate cytoplasmic fluorescence. Trafficking of lipoplexes using an endocytic marker and rhodamine-labeled phospholipid DHPE indicated that the lipoplexes were not sequestered in the lysosomes. Importantly, lipoplexes were non-toxic and mediated good transfection efficiency as analyzed by β-Gal and GFP reporter gene expression assays which established the superior activity of lipids whose structures correlate strongly with the transfection efficiency.

  13. Bile acids for viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Liu, J; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    The viral hepatitides are common causes of liver diseases globally. Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus was reached regarding their usefulness.......The viral hepatitides are common causes of liver diseases globally. Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus was reached regarding their usefulness....

  14. Endogenous MCM7 microRNA cluster as a novel platform to multiplex small interfering and nucleolar RNAs for combinational HIV-1 gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Janet; Zhang, Jane; Li, Haitang; Ouellet, Dominique L; DiGiusto, David L; Rossi, John J

    2012-11-01

    Combinational therapy with small RNA inhibitory agents against multiple viral targets allows efficient inhibition of viral production by controlling gene expression at critical time points. Here we explore combinations of different classes of therapeutic anti-HIV-1 RNAs expressed from within the context of an intronic MCM7 (minichromosome maintenance complex component-7) platform that naturally harbors 3 microRNAs (miRNAs). We replaced the endogenous miRNAs with anti-HIV small RNAs, including small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting HIV-1 tat and rev messages that function to induce post-transcriptional gene silencing by the RNA interference pathway, a nucleolar-localizing RNA ribozyme that targets the conserved U5 region of HIV-1 transcripts for degradation, and finally nucleolar trans-activation response (TAR) and Rev-binding element (RBE) RNA decoys designed to sequester HIV-1 Tat and Rev proteins inside the nucleolus. We demonstrate the versatility of the MCM7 platform in expressing and efficiently processing the siRNAs as miRNA mimics along with nucleolar small RNAs. Furthermore, three of the combinatorial constructs tested potently suppressed viral replication during a 1-month HIV challenge, with greater than 5-log inhibition compared with untransduced, HIV-1-infected CEM T lymphocytes. One of the most effective constructs contains an anti-HIV siRNA combined with a nucleolar-localizing U5 ribozyme and TAR decoy. This represents the first efficacious example of combining Drosha-processed siRNAs with small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein (snoRNP)-processed nucleolar RNA chimeras from a single intron platform for effective inhibition of viral replication. Moreover, we demonstrated enrichment/selection for cells expressing levels of the antiviral RNAs that provide optimal inhibition under the selective pressure of HIV. The combinations of si/snoRNAs represent a new paradigm for combinatorial RNA-based gene therapy applications.

  15. Transactivation of the TIEG1 confers growth inhibition of transforming growth factor-β-susceptible hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lei; Lai, Yiu-Kay; Zhang, Jin-Fang; Chan, Chu-Yan; Lu, Gang; Lin, Marie CM; He, Ming-Liang; Li, Ji-Cheng; Kung, Hsiang-Fu

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β-inducible early gene 1 (TIEG1) in TGF-β-induced growth inhibition in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. METHODS: Human hepatocyte and HCC cell lines with varied susceptibilities to TGF-β1 were tested by methylthiazoletetrazolium (MTT) assay. The expression changes of Smad2, Smad3, Smad4, Smad7, TIEG1 and TIEG2 gene following treatment with TGF-β1 in a TGF-β-sensitive hepatocyte cell line (MIHA), a TGF-β-sensitive hepatoma cell line (Hep3B) and two TGF-β-insensitive hepatoma cell lines (HepG2 and Bel7404) were examined. SiRNA targeting TIEG1 was transfected into Hep3B cells and the sensitivity of cells to TGF-β1 was examined. Overexpression of TIEG1 was induced by lentiviral-mediated transduction in TGF-β1-resistant hepatoma cell lines (Bel7404 and HepG2). MTT assay and 4’,6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole staining were used to identify cell viability and apoptosis, respectively. The expression level of stathmin was measured by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western-blotting analysis, and stathmin promoter activity by TIEG1 was monitored by a luciferase reporter gene system. RESULTS: TIEG1 was significantly upregulated by TGF-β1 in the TGF-β1-sensitive HCC cell line, Hep3B, but not in the resistant cell lines. The suppression of TIEG1 by siRNAs decreased the sensitivity of Hep3B cells to TGF-β1, whereas the overexpression of TIEG1 mediated growth inhibition and apoptosis in TGF-β1-resistant HCC cell lines, which resembled those of TGF-β1-sensitive HCC cells treated with TGF-β1. Our data further suggested that stathmin was a direct target of TIEG1, as stathmin was significantly downregulated by TIEG1 overexpression, and stathmin promoter activity was inhibited by TIEG1 in a dose-dependent manner. CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that transactivation of TIEG1 conferred growth inhibition of TGF-β-susceptible human HCC cells. PMID:22563190

  16. Highly Effective Non-Viral Antitumor Gene Therapy System Comprised of Biocompatible Small Plasmid Complex Particles Consisting of pDNA, Anionic Polysaccharide, and Fully Deprotected Linear Polyethylenimine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Koyama

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We have reported that ternary complexes of plasmid DNA with conventional linear polyethylenimine (l-PEI and certain polyanions were very stably dispersed, and, with no cryoprotectant, they could be freeze-dried and re-hydrated without the loss of transfection ability. These properties enabled the preparation of a concentrated suspension of very small pDNA complex, by preparing the complexes at highly diluted conditions, followed by condensation via lyophilization-and-rehydration procedure. Recently, a high potency linear polyethylenimine having no residual protective groups, i.e., Polyethylenimine “Max” (PEI “Max”, is available, which has been reported to induce much higher gene expression than conventional l-PEI. We tried to prepare the small DNA/PEI “Max”/polyanion complexes by a similar freeze-drying method. Small complex particles could be obtained without apparent aggregation, but transfection activity of the rehydrated complexes was severely reduced. Complex-preparation conditions were investigated in details to achieve the freeze-dried DNA/PEI “Max”/polyanion small ternary complexes with high transfection efficiency. DNA/PEI “Max”/polyanion complexes containing cytokine-coding plasmids were then prepared, and their anti-tumor therapeutic efficacy was examined in tumor-bearing mice.

  17. Interferon-β induced microRNA-129-5p down-regulates HPV-18 E6 and E7 viral gene expression by targeting SP1 in cervical cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiarong Zhang

    Full Text Available Infection by human papillomavirus (HPV can cause cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN and cancer. Down-regulation of E6 and E7 expression may be responsible for the positive clinical outcomes observed with IFN treatment, but the molecular basis has not been well determined. As miRNAs play an important role in HPV induced cervical carcinogenesis, we hypothesize that IFN-β can regulate the expressions of specific miRNAs in cervical cancer cells, and that these miRNAs can mediate E6 and E7 expression, thus modulate their oncogenic potential. In this study, we found that miR-129-5p to be a candidate IFN-β inducible miRNA. MiR-129-5p levels gradually decrease with the development of cervical intraepithelial lesions. Manipulation of miR-129-5p expression in Hela cells modulates HPV-18 E6 and E7 viral gene expression. Exogenous miR-129-5p inhibits cell proliferation in Hela cells, promotes apoptosis and blocks cell cycle progression in Hela cells. SP1 is a direct target of miR-129-5p in Hela cells. This study is the first report of a cellular miRNA with anti-HPV activity and provides new insights into regulatory mechanisms between the HPV and the IFN system in host cells at the miRNA level.

  18. HTLV Tax: A Fascinating Multifunctional Co-Regulator of Viral and Cellular Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currer, Robert; Van Duyne, Rachel; Jaworski, Elizabeth; Guendel, Irene; Sampey, Gavin; Das, Ravi; Narayanan, Aarthi; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2012-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) has been identified as the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The virus infects between 15 and 20 million people worldwide of which approximately 2–5% develop ATL. The past 35 years of research have yielded significant insight into the pathogenesis of HTLV-1, including the molecular characterization of Tax, the viral transactivator, and oncoprotein. In spite of these efforts, the mechanisms of oncogenesis of this pleiotropic protein remain to be fully elucidated. In this review, we illustrate the multiple oncogenic roles of Tax by summarizing a recent body of literature that refines our understanding of cellular transformation. A focused range of topics are discussed in this review including Tax-mediated regulation of the viral promoter and other cellular pathways, particularly the connection of the NF-κB pathway to both post-translational modifications (PTMs) of Tax and subcellular localization. Specifically, recent research on polyubiquitination of Tax as it relates to the activation of the IkappaB kinase (IKK) complex is highlighted. Regulation of the cell cycle and DNA damage responses due to Tax are also discussed, including Tax interaction with minichromosome maintenance proteins and the role of Tax in chromatin remodeling. The recent identification of HTLV-3 has amplified the importance of the characterization of emerging viral pathogens. The challenge of the molecular determination of pathogenicity and malignant disease of this virus lies in the comparison of the viral transactivators of HTLV-1, -2, and -3 in terms of transformation and immortalization. Consequently, differences between the three proteins are currently being studied to determine what factors are required for the differences in tumorogenesis. PMID:23226145

  19. HTLV Tax: a fascinating multifunctional co-regulator of viral and cellular pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eCurrer

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 has been identified as the causative agent of adult T cell leukemia (ATL and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. The virus infects between 15 and 20 million people worldwide of which approximately 2 to 5% develop ATL. The past 35 years of research have yielded significant insight into the pathogenesis of HTLV-1, including the molecular characterization of Tax, the viral transactivator and oncoprotein. In spite of these efforts, the mechanisms of oncogenesis of this pleiotropic protein remain to be fully elucidated. In this review, we illustrate the multiple oncogenic roles of Tax by summarizing a recent body of literature that refines our understanding of cellular transformation. A focused range of topics are discussed in this review including Tax-mediated regulation of the viral promoter and other cellular pathways, particularly the connection of the NF-κB pathway to both post-translational modifications of Tax and sub-cellular localization. Specifically, recent research on polyubiquitination of Tax as it relates to the activation of the IkappaB kinase (IKK complex is highlighted. Regulation of the cell cycle and DNA damage responses due to Tax are also discussed, including Tax interaction with minichromosome maintenance proteins and the role of Tax in chromatin remodeling. The recent identification of HTLV-3 has amplified the importance of the characterization of emerging viral pathogens. The challenge of the molecular determination of pathogenicity and malignant disease of this virus lies in the comparison of the viral transactivators of HTLV-1, -2, and -3 in terms of transformation and immortalization. Consequently, differences between the three proteins are currently being studied to determine what factors are required for the differences in tumorogenesis.

  20. Interferon-β induces cellular senescence in cutaneous human papilloma virus-transformed human keratinocytes by affecting p53 transactivating activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria V Chiantore

    Full Text Available Interferon (IFN-β inhibits cell proliferation and affects cell cycle in keratinocytes transformed by both mucosal high risk Human Papilloma Virus (HPV and cutaneous HPV E6 and E7 proteins. In particular, upon longer IFN-β treatments, cutaneous HPV38 expressing cells undergo senescence. IFN-β appears to induce senescence by upregulating the expression of the tumor suppressor PML, a well known IFN-induced gene. Indeed, experiments in gene silencing via specific siRNAs have shown that PML is essential in the execution of the senescence programme and that both p53 and p21 pathways are involved. IFN-β treatment leads to a modulation of p53 phosphorylation and acetylation status and a reduction in the expression of the p53 dominant negative ΔNp73. These effects allow the recovery of p53 transactivating activity of target genes involved in the control of cell proliferation. Taken together, these studies suggest that signaling through the IFN pathway might play an important role in cellular senescence. This additional understanding of IFN antitumor action and mechanisms influencing tumor responsiveness or resistance appears useful in aiding further promising development of biomolecular strategies in the IFN therapy of cancer.

  1. Raw Sewage Harbors Diverse Viral Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantalupo, Paul G.; Calgua, Byron; Zhao, Guoyan; Hundesa, Ayalkibet; Wier, Adam D.; Katz, Josh P.; Grabe, Michael; Hendrix, Roger W.; Girones, Rosina; Wang, David; Pipas, James M.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT At this time, about 3,000 different viruses are recognized, but metagenomic studies suggest that these viruses are a small fraction of the viruses that exist in nature. We have explored viral diversity by deep sequencing nucleic acids obtained from virion populations enriched from raw sewage. We identified 234 known viruses, including 17 that infect humans. Plant, insect, and algal viruses as well as bacteriophages were also present. These viruses represented 26 taxonomic families and included viruses with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), positive-sense ssRNA [ssRNA(+)], and dsRNA genomes. Novel viruses that could be placed in specific taxa represented 51 different families, making untreated wastewater the most diverse viral metagenome (genetic material recovered directly from environmental samples) examined thus far. However, the vast majority of sequence reads bore little or no sequence relation to known viruses and thus could not be placed into specific taxa. These results show that the vast majority of the viruses on Earth have not yet been characterized. Untreated wastewater provides a rich matrix for identifying novel viruses and for studying virus diversity. Importance At this time, virology is focused on the study of a relatively small number of viral species. Specific viruses are studied either because they are easily propagated in the laboratory or because they are associated with disease. The lack of knowledge of the size and characteristics of the viral universe and the diversity of viral genomes is a roadblock to understanding important issues, such as the origin of emerging pathogens and the extent of gene exchange among viruses. Untreated wastewater is an ideal system for assessing viral diversity because virion populations from large numbers of individuals are deposited and because raw sewage itself provides a rich environment for the growth of diverse host species and thus their viruses. These studies suggest that

  2. [Viral hepatitis in travellers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Cândida

    2007-01-01

    Considering the geographical asymmetric distribution of viral hepatitis A, B and E, having a much higher prevalence in the less developed world, travellers from developed countries are exposed to a considerable and often underestimated risk of hepatitis infection. In fact a significant percentage of viral hepatitis occurring in developed countries is travel related. This results from globalization and increased mobility from tourism, international work, humanitarian and religious missions or other travel related activities. Several studies published in Europe and North America shown that more than 50% of reported cases of hepatitis A are travel related. On the other hand frequent outbreaks of hepatitis A and E in specific geographic areas raise the risk of infection in these restricted zones and that should be clearly identified. Selected aspects related with the distribution of hepatitis A, B and E are reviewed, particularly the situation in Portugal according to the published studies, as well as relevant clinical manifestations and differential diagnosis of viral hepatitis. Basic prevention rules considering enteric transmitted hepatitis (hepatitis A and hepatitis E) and parenteral transmitted (hepatitis B) are reviewed as well as hepatitis A and B immunoprophylaxis. Common clinical situations and daily practice "pre travel" advice issues are discussed according to WHO/CDC recommendations and the Portuguese National Vaccination Program. Implications from near future availability of a hepatitis E vaccine, a currently in phase 2 trial, are highlighted. Potential indications for travellers to endemic countries like India, Nepal and some regions of China, where up to 30% of sporadic cases of acute viral hepatitis are caused by hepatitis E virus, are considered. Continued epidemiological surveillance for viral hepatitis is essential to recognize and control possible outbreaks, but also to identify new viral hepatitis agents that may emerge as important global health

  3. Lack of a synergistic effect of a non-viral ALS gene therapy based on BDNF and a TTC fusion molecule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navarro Xavier

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is one of the most devastating neurodegenerative diseases. Neurotrophic factors have been widely tested to counteract neurodegenerative conditions, despite their unspecific neuronal access. The non-toxic C-terminal fragment of the tetanus toxin (TTC heavy chain has been studied not only as a carrier molecule to the CNS but also as a neuroprotective agent. Because the neurotrophic effects of BDNF have been demonstrated in vitro and in vivo, the question addressed in this work is whether a fusion molecule of BDNF-TTC may have a synergistic effect and enhance the neuroprotective properties of TTC alone in a mouse model of ALS. Methods Recombinant plasmid constructs (pCMV-TTC and pCMV-BDNF-TTC were injected into the quadriceps femoris and triceps brachialis muscles of SOD1G93A transgenic mice at 8 weeks of age. The hanging wire and rotarod tests were performed to assess motor coordination, strength and balance. Electrophysiological tests, morphological assays of spinal cord sections of L2 and L4 segments, and gene and protein expression analyses were performed. The Kaplan-Meier survival analysis test was used for comparisons of survival. Multiple comparisons of data were analyzed using a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA. Results Treatment with the fusion-molecule BDNF-TTC and with TTC alone significantly delayed the onset of symptoms and functional deficits of SOD1G93A mice. Muscle innervation was partially preserved with these treatments, and the number of surviving motoneurons in L2 spinal cord segment was increased particularly by the fusion protein induction. Inhibition of pro-apoptotic protein targets (caspase-3 and Bax and significant phosphorylation of Akt and ERK were also found in the spinal cord of treated mice. Conclusions Significant improvements in behavioral and electrophysiological results, motoneuron survival and anti-apoptotic/survival-activated pathways were observed with

  4. Molecular imaging of oncolytic viral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Haddad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses have made their mark on the cancer world as a potential therapeutic option, with the possible advantages of reduced side effects and strengthened treatment efficacy due to higher tumor selectivity. Results have been so promising, that oncolytic viral treatments have now been approved for clinical trials in several countries. However, clinical studies may benefit from the ability to noninvasively and serially identify sites of viral targeting via molecular imaging in order to provide safety, efficacy, and toxicity information. Furthermore, molecular imaging of oncolytic viral therapy may provide a more sensitive and specific diagnostic technique to detect tumor origin and, more importantly, presence of metastases. Several strategies have been investigated for molecular imaging of viral replication broadly categorized into optical and deep tissue imaging, utilizing several reporter genes encoding for fluorescence proteins, conditional enzymes, and membrane protein and transporters. Various imaging methods facilitate molecular imaging, including computer tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, single photon emission CT, gamma-scintigraphy, and photoacoustic imaging. In addition, several molecular probes are used for medical imaging, which act as targeting moieties or signaling agents. This review will explore the preclinical and clinical use of in vivo molecular imaging of replication-competent oncolytic viral therapy.

  5. 20180416 - Retrofitting an Estrogen Receptor Transactivation Assay with Metabolic Competence Using Alginate Immobilization of Metabolic Enzymes (AIME) (SETAC HTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The VM7Luc4E2 estrogen receptor (ER) transactivation assay is an OECD approved method (TG 457) for the detection of ER agonists and antagonists, and is also part of the Tox21 high-throughput screening (HTS) portfolio. Despite international acceptance as a screening assay, immorta...

  6. 20180312 - Retrofitting an Estrogen Receptor Transactivation Assay with Metabolic Competence Using Alginate Immobilization of Metabolic Enzymes (AIME) (SOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The VM7Luc4E2 estrogen receptor (ER) transactivation assay is an OECD approved method (TG 457) for the detection of ER agonists and antagonists, and is also part of the Tox21 high-throughput screening (HTS) portfolio. Despite its international acceptance as a screening assay, imm...

  7. Recombinant viruses as vaccines against viral diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P.D. Souza

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine approaches to infectious diseases are widely applied and appreciated. Amongst them, vectors based on recombinant viruses have shown great promise and play an important role in the development of new vaccines. Many viruses have been investigated for their ability to express proteins from foreign pathogens and induce specific immunological responses against these antigens in vivo. Generally, gene-based vaccines can stimulate potent humoral and cellular immune responses and viral vectors might be an effective strategy for both the delivery of antigen-encoding genes and the facilitation and enhancement of antigen presentation. In order to be utilized as a vaccine carrier, the ideal viral vector should be safe and enable efficient presentation of required pathogen-specific antigens to the immune system. It should also exhibit low intrinsic immunogenicity to allow for its re-administration in order to boost relevant specific immune responses. Furthermore, the vector system must meet criteria that enable its production on a large-scale basis. Several viral vaccine vectors have thus emerged to date, all of them having relative advantages and limits depending on the proposed application, and thus far none of them have proven to be ideal vaccine carriers. In this review we describe the potential, as well as some of the foreseeable obstacles associated with viral vaccine vectors and their use in preventive medicine.

  8. A novel local anesthetic system: transcriptional transactivator peptide-decorated nanocarriers for skin delivery of ropivacaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen CY

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Chuanyu Chen, Peijun You Department of Anesthesiology, Shandong Jining No 1 People’s Hospital, Jining, Shandong, People’s Republic of China Purpose: Barrier properties of the skin and physicochemical properties of drugs are the main factors for the delivery of local anesthetic molecules. The present work evaluates the anesthetic efficacy of drug-loaded nanocarrier (NC systems for the delivery of local anesthetic drug, ropivacaine (RVC. Methods: In this study, transcriptional transactivator peptide (TAT-decorated RVC-loaded NCs (TAT-RVC/NCs were successfully fabricated. Physicochemical properties of NCs were determined in terms of particle size, zeta potential, drug encapsulation efficiency, drug-loading capacity, stability, and in vitro drug release. The skin permeation of NCs was examined using a Franz diffusion cell mounted with depilated mouse skin in vitro, and in vivo anesthetic effect was evaluated in mice. Results: The results showed that TAT-RVC/NCs have a mean diameter of 133.2 nm and high drug-loading capacity of 81.7%. From the in vitro skin permeation results, it was observed that transdermal flux of TAT-RVC/NCs was higher than that of RVC-loaded NCs (RVC/NCs and RVC injection. The evaluation of in vivo anesthetic effect illustrated that TAT-RVC/NCs can enhance the transdermal delivery of RVC by reducing the pain threshold in mice. Conclusion: These results indicate that TAT-decorated NCs systems are useful for overcoming the barrier function of the skin, decreasing the dosage of RVC and enhancing the anesthetic effect. Therefore, TAT-decorated NCs can be used as an effective transdermal delivery system for local anesthesia. Keywords: local anesthetic system, ropivacaine, transcriptional transactivator peptide, nanocarriers, skin delivery

  9. Hypo- and hypermorphic FOXC1 mutations in dominant glaucoma: transactivation and phenotypic variability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Medina-Trillo

    Full Text Available Dominant glaucoma, a heterogeneous, infrequent and irreversible optic neuropathy, is often associated with elevated intraocular pressure and early-onset. The role of FOXC1 in this type of glaucoma was investigated in twelve Spanish probands via nucleotide variation screening of its proximal promoter and unique exon. Functional evaluations of the identified variants included analyses of the transcriptional activity, protein stability, DNA binding ability and subcellular localization. Four different mutations that were identified in four probands (33.3% were associated with remarkable phenotypic variability and were functionally classified as either hypermorphic (p.Y47X, p.Q106X and p.G447_G448insDG or hypomorphic (p.I126S alleles. To the best of our knowledge, three of the variants are novel (p.Y47X, p.I126S and p.G447_G448insDG and, in addition, hypermorphic FOXC1 mutations are reported herein for the first time. The presence of an intact N-terminal activation domain in the truncated proteins p.Y47X and p.Q106X may underlie their associated transactivation hyperactivity by a gain-of-function mechanism involving dysregulated protein-protein interactions. Similarly, altered molecular interactions may also lead to increased p.G447_G448insDG activity. In contrast, the partial loss-of-function associated with p.I126S was due to impaired protein stability, DNA binding, protein phosphorylation and subcellular distribution. These results support that moderate and variable FOXC1 transactivation changes are associated with moderate goniodysgenesis, dominant glaucoma and remarkable phenotypic variability.

  10. Hypo- and Hypermorphic FOXC1 Mutations in Dominant Glaucoma: Transactivation and Phenotypic Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina-Trillo, Cristina; Sánchez-Sánchez, Francisco; Aroca-Aguilar, José-Daniel; Ferre-Fernández, Jesús-José; Morales, Laura; Méndez-Hernández, Carmen-Dora; Blanco-Kelly, Fiona; Ayuso, Carmen; García-Feijoo, Julián; Escribano, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Dominant glaucoma, a heterogeneous, infrequent and irreversible optic neuropathy, is often associated with elevated intraocular pressure and early-onset. The role of FOXC1 in this type of glaucoma was investigated in twelve Spanish probands via nucleotide variation screening of its proximal promoter and unique exon. Functional evaluations of the identified variants included analyses of the transcriptional activity, protein stability, DNA binding ability and subcellular localization. Four different mutations that were identified in four probands (33.3%) were associated with remarkable phenotypic variability and were functionally classified as either hypermorphic (p.Y47X, p.Q106X and p.G447_G448insDG) or hypomorphic (p.I126S) alleles. To the best of our knowledge, three of the variants are novel (p.Y47X, p.I126S and p.G447_G448insDG) and, in addition, hypermorphic FOXC1 mutations are reported herein for the first time. The presence of an intact N-terminal activation domain in the truncated proteins p.Y47X and p.Q106X may underlie their associated transactivation hyperactivity by a gain-of-function mechanism involving dysregulated protein-protein interactions. Similarly, altered molecular interactions may also lead to increased p.G447_G448insDG activity. In contrast, the partial loss-of-function associated with p.I126S was due to impaired protein stability, DNA binding, protein phosphorylation and subcellular distribution. These results support that moderate and variable FOXC1 transactivation changes are associated with moderate goniodysgenesis, dominant glaucoma and remarkable phenotypic variability. PMID:25786029

  11. Treating viral hemorrhagic fever.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mairuhu, A.T.; Brandjes, D.P.; Gorp, E. van

    2003-01-01

    Viral hemorrhagic fevers are illnesses associated with a number of geographically restricted, mostly tropical areas. Over recent decades a number of new hemorrhagic fever viruses have emerged. Advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of these diseases have improved our initial supportive

  12. HIV Viral Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PF4 Antibody Hepatitis A Testing Hepatitis B Testing Hepatitis C Testing HER2/neu Herpes Testing High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP) Histamine Histone Antibody HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) HIV Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Testing, Genotypic HIV Viral Load HLA Testing HLA- ...

  13. HIV and Viral Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... common causes of viral hepatitis are hepatitis A virus (HAV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV). HBV and HCV are common ... gov/ mmwr/ preview/ mmwrhtml/ rr5516a1. htm? s_ cid= rr5516a1_ e. The Numbers • • Of people with HIV in the ...

  14. Immigration and viral hepatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Sharma (Suraj); M. Carballo (Manuel); J.J. Feld (Jordan J.); H.L.A. Janssen (Harry)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractWHO estimates reveal that the global prevalence of viral hepatitis may be as high as 500 million, with an annual mortality rate of up to 1.3 million individuals. The majority of this global burden of disease is borne by nations of the developing world with high rates of vertical and

  15. Sequence similarity between the viral cp gene and the transgene in transgenic papayas Similaridade de seqüência entre o gene cp do vírus e do transgene presente em mamoeiros transgênicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoel Teixeira Souza Júnior

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available The Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV coat protein transgene present in 'Rainbow' and 'SunUp' papayas disclose high sequence similarity (>89% to the cp gene from PRSV BR and TH. Despite this, both isolates are able to break down the resistance in 'Rainbow', while only the latter is able to do so in 'SunUp'. The objective of this work was to evaluate the degree of sequence similarity between the cp gene in the challenge isolate and the cp transgene in transgenic papayas resistant to PRSV. The production of a hybrid virus containing the genome backbone of PRSV HA up to the Apa I site in the NIb gene, and downstream from there, the sequence of PRSV TH was undertaken. This hybrid virus, PRSV HA/TH, was obtained and used to challenge 'Rainbow', 'SunUp', and an R2 population derived from line 63-1, all resistant to PRSV HA. PRSV HA/TH broke down the resistance in both papaya varieties and in the 63-1 population, demonstrating that sequence similarity is a major factor in the mechanism of resistance used by transgenic papayas expressing the cp gene. A comparative analysis of the cp gene present in line 55-1 and 63-1-derived transgenic plants and in PRSV HA, BR, and TH was also performed.O gene da capa protéica (cp do vírus da mancha anelar do mamoeiro (Papaya ringspot virus, PRSV, presente nos mamoeiros 'Rainbow' e 'SunUp', tem alta similaridade de seqüência (>89% com o gene cp dos isolados PRSV BR e TH. Apesar deste alto grau de similaridade, ambos isolados são capazes de quebrar a resistência observada em 'Rainbow', ao passo que TH quebra a resistência em 'SunUp'. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o grau de similaridade de seqüência entre o gene cp do vírus desafiante e do transgene em mamoeiros transgênicos resistentes a PRSV. Produziu-se um vírus híbrido contendo o genoma do isolado PRSV HA até o sítio de restrição Apa I no gene NIb, e, a partir deste ponto, este vírus continha o genoma do isolado PRSV TH. PRSV HA/TH foi utilizado

  16. A comprehensive and quantitative exploration of thousands of viral genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudabadi, Gita

    2018-01-01

    The complete assembly of viral genomes from metagenomic datasets (short genomic sequences gathered from environmental samples) has proven to be challenging, so there are significant blind spots when we view viral genomes through the lens of metagenomics. One approach to overcoming this problem is to leverage the thousands of complete viral genomes that are publicly available. Here we describe our efforts to assemble a comprehensive resource that provides a quantitative snapshot of viral genomic trends – such as gene density, noncoding percentage, and abundances of functional gene categories – across thousands of viral genomes. We have also developed a coarse-grained method for visualizing viral genome organization for hundreds of genomes at once, and have explored the extent of the overlap between bacterial and bacteriophage gene pools. Existing viral classification systems were developed prior to the sequencing era, so we present our analysis in a way that allows us to assess the utility of the different classification systems for capturing genomic trends. PMID:29624169

  17. Poly[N-(2-aminoethyl)ethyleneimine] as a New Non-Viral Gene Delivery Carrier : The Effect of Two Protonatable Nitrogens in the Monomer Unit on Gene Delivery Efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khazaie, Yahya; Novo, Luis; van Gaal, Ethlinn; Fassihi, Afshin; Mirahmadi-Zareh, Seyedeh Zohreh; Esfahani, Mohammad Hossein Nasr; van Nostrum, Cornelus F.; Hennink, Wim E.; Dorkoosh, Farid

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro gene delivery efficiency of poly[N-(2-aminoethyl)ethylene-imine](PAEEI), a polymer with a linear Polyethyleneimine (LPEI) backbone and with aminoethyl side groups that has two protonatable nitrogen atoms per monomer unit instead of one

  18. Bile acids for viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Liu, J; Gluud, C

    2007-01-01

    Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness.......Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness....

  19. Hepatitis A through E (Viral Hepatitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Wilson Disease Hepatitis (Viral) View or Print All Sections What is Viral Hepatitis? Viral hepatitis is an infection that causes liver inflammation ...

  20. Hit-and-run stimulation: a novel concept to reactivate latent HIV-1 infection without cytokine gene induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolschendorf, Frank; Duverger, Alexandra; Jones, Jennifer; Wagner, Frederic H; Huff, Jason; Benjamin, William H; Saag, Michael S; Niederweis, Michael; Kutsch, Olaf

    2010-09-01

    Current antiretroviral therapy (ART) efficiently controls HIV-1 replication but fails to eradicate the virus. Even after years of successful ART, HIV-1 can conceal itself in a latent state in long-lived CD4(+) memory T cells. From this latent reservoir, HIV-1 rebounds during treatment interruptions. Attempts to therapeutically eradicate this viral reservoir have yielded disappointing results. A major problem with previously utilized activating agents is that at the concentrations required for efficient HIV-1 reactivation, these stimuli trigger high-level cytokine gene expression (hypercytokinemia). Therapeutically relevant HIV-1-reactivating agents will have to trigger HIV-1 reactivation without the induction of cytokine expression. We present here a proof-of-principle study showing that this is a possibility. In a high-throughput screening effort, we identified an HIV-1-reactivating protein factor (HRF) secreted by the nonpathogenic bacterium Massilia timonae. In primary T cells and T-cell lines, HRF triggered a high but nonsustained peak of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) activity. While this short NF-kappaB peak potently reactivated latent HIV-1 infection, it failed to induce gene expression of several proinflammatory NF-kappaB-dependent cellular genes, such as those for tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). Dissociation of cellular and viral gene induction was achievable, as minimum amounts of Tat protein, synthesized following application of a short NF-kappaB pulse, triggered HIV-1 transactivation and subsequent self-perpetuated HIV-1 expression. In the absence of such a positive feedback mechanism, cellular gene expression was not sustained, suggesting that strategies modulating the NF-kappaB activity profile could be used to selectively trigger HIV-1 reactivation.

  1. Value of Sharing: Viral Advertisement

    OpenAIRE

    Duygu Aydın; Aşina Gülerarslan; Süleyman Karaçor; Tarık Doğan

    2013-01-01

    Sharing motivations of viral advertisements by consumers and the impacts of these advertisements on the perceptions for brand will be questioned in this study. Three fundamental questions are answered in the study. These are advertisement watching and sharing motivations of individuals, criteria of liking viral advertisement and the impact of individual attitudes for viral advertisement on brand perception respectively. This study will be carried out via a viral advertise...

  2. Viral Marketing and Academic Institution

    OpenAIRE

    Koktová, Silvie

    2010-01-01

    This bachelor thesis examines modern and constantly developing kind of internet marketing -- the so called viral marketing. It deals with its origin, principle, process, advantages and disadvantages, types of viral marketing and presumptions of creating successful viral campaign. The aim of the theoretical part is especially the understanding of viral marketing as one of the effective instruments of contemporary marketing. In this theoretical part the thesis also elaborates a marketing school...

  3. Biological species in the viral world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobay, Louis-Marie; Ochman, Howard

    2018-06-05

    Due to their dependence on cellular organisms for metabolism and replication, viruses are typically named and assigned to species according to their genome structure and the original host that they infect. But because viruses often infect multiple hosts and the numbers of distinct lineages within a host can be vast, their delineation into species is often dictated by arbitrary sequence thresholds, which are highly inconsistent across lineages. Here we apply an approach to determine the boundaries of viral species based on the detection of gene flow within populations, thereby defining viral species according to the biological species concept (BSC). Despite the potential for gene transfer between highly divergent genomes, viruses, like the cellular organisms they infect, assort into reproductively isolated groups and can be organized into biological species. This approach revealed that BSC-defined viral species are often congruent with the taxonomic partitioning based on shared gene contents and host tropism, and that bacteriophages can similarly be classified in biological species. These results open the possibility to use a single, universal definition of species that is applicable across cellular and acellular lifeforms.

  4. Dengue viral infections

    OpenAIRE

    Malavige, G; Fernando, S; Fernando, D; Seneviratne, S

    2004-01-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito borne diseases in the world. They may be asymptomatic or may give rise to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), or dengue shock syndrome. Annually, 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of DHF occur worldwide. Ninety percent of DHF subjects are children less than 15 years of age. At present, dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. No vaccine is available for preventing...

  5. Viral membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism

  6. [History of viral hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, José Carlos Ferraz da

    2010-01-01

    The history of viral hepatitis goes back thousands of years and is a fascinating one. When humans were first infected by such agents, a natural repetitive cycle began, with the capacity to infect billions of humans, thus decimating the population and causing sequelae in thousands of lives. This article reviews the available scientific information on the history of viral hepatitis. All the information was obtained through extensive bibliographic review, including original and review articles and consultations on the internet. There are reports on outbreaks of jaundice epidemics in China 5,000 years ago and in Babylon more than 2,500 years ago. The catastrophic history of great jaundice epidemics and pandemics is well known and generally associated with major wars. In the American Civil War, 40,000 cases occurred among Union troops. In 1885, an outbreak of catarrhal jaundice affected 191 workers at the Bremen shipyard (Germany) after vaccination against smallpox. In 1942, 28,585 soldiers became infected with hepatitis after inoculation with the yellow fever vaccine. The number of cases of hepatitis during the Second World War was estimated to be 16 million. Only in the twentieth century were the main agents causing viral hepatitis identified. The hepatitis B virus was the first to be discovered. In this paper, through reviewing the history of major epidemics caused by hepatitis viruses and the history of discovery of these agents, singular peculiarities were revealed. Examples of this include the accidental or chance discovery of the hepatitis B and D viruses.

  7. Viral membrane fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Stephen C., E-mail: harrison@crystal.harvard.edu

    2015-05-15

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism.

  8. TGF{beta} induces proHB-EGF shedding and EGFR transactivation through ADAM activation in gastric cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebi, Masahide [Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Kataoka, Hiromi, E-mail: hkataoka@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Shimura, Takaya; Kubota, Eiji; Hirata, Yoshikazu; Mizushima, Takashi; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Mamoru; Mabuchi, Motoshi; Tsukamoto, Hironobu; Tanida, Satoshi; Kamiya, Takeshi [Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan); Higashiyama, Shigeki [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, Ehime University Graduate School of Medicine, Ehime (Japan); Joh, Takashi [Department of Gastroenterology and Metabolism, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya (Japan)

    2010-11-19

    Research highlights: {yields} TGF{beta} induces EGFR transactivation through proHB-EGF shedding by activated ADAM members in gastric cancer cells. {yields} TGF{beta} induces nuclear translocation of HB-EGF-CTF cleaved by ADAM members. {yields} TGF{beta} enhances cell growth by EGFR transactivation and HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation and ADAM inhibitors block these effects. {yields} Silencing of ADAM17 also blocks EGFR transactivation, HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation and cancer cell growth by TGF{beta}. {yields} ADAM17 may play a crucial role in this TGF{beta}-HB-EGF signal transduction. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF{beta}) is known to potently inhibit cell growth. Loss of responsiveness to TGF{beta} inhibition on cell growth is a hallmark of many types of cancer, yet its mechanism is not fully understood. Membrane-anchored heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (proHB-EGF) ectodomain is cleaved by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) members and is implicated in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation. Recently, nuclear translocation of the C-terminal fragment (CTF) of pro-HB-EGF was found to induce cell growth. We investigated the association between TGF{beta} and HB-EGF signal transduction via ADAM activation. Materials and methods: The CCK-8 assay in two gastric cancer cell lines was used to determine the effect for cell growth by TGF{beta}. The effect of two ADAM inhibitors was also evaluated. Induction of EGFR phosphorylation by TGF{beta} was analyzed and the effect of the ADAM inhibitors was also examined. Nuclear translocation of HB-EGF-CTF by shedding through ADAM activated by TGF{beta} was also analyzed. EGFR transactivation, HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation, and cell growth were examined under the condition of ADAM17 knockdown. Result: TGF{beta}-induced EGFR phosphorylation of which ADAM inhibitors were able to inhibit. TGF{beta} induced shedding of proHB-EGF allowing HB-EGF-CTF to

  9. TGFβ induces proHB-EGF shedding and EGFR transactivation through ADAM activation in gastric cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebi, Masahide; Kataoka, Hiromi; Shimura, Takaya; Kubota, Eiji; Hirata, Yoshikazu; Mizushima, Takashi; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Tanaka, Mamoru; Mabuchi, Motoshi; Tsukamoto, Hironobu; Tanida, Satoshi; Kamiya, Takeshi; Higashiyama, Shigeki; Joh, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → TGFβ induces EGFR transactivation through proHB-EGF shedding by activated ADAM members in gastric cancer cells. → TGFβ induces nuclear translocation of HB-EGF-CTF cleaved by ADAM members. → TGFβ enhances cell growth by EGFR transactivation and HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation and ADAM inhibitors block these effects. → Silencing of ADAM17 also blocks EGFR transactivation, HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation and cancer cell growth by TGFβ. → ADAM17 may play a crucial role in this TGFβ-HB-EGF signal transduction. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ) is known to potently inhibit cell growth. Loss of responsiveness to TGFβ inhibition on cell growth is a hallmark of many types of cancer, yet its mechanism is not fully understood. Membrane-anchored heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (proHB-EGF) ectodomain is cleaved by a disintegrin and metalloproteinase (ADAM) members and is implicated in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) transactivation. Recently, nuclear translocation of the C-terminal fragment (CTF) of pro-HB-EGF was found to induce cell growth. We investigated the association between TGFβ and HB-EGF signal transduction via ADAM activation. Materials and methods: The CCK-8 assay in two gastric cancer cell lines was used to determine the effect for cell growth by TGFβ. The effect of two ADAM inhibitors was also evaluated. Induction of EGFR phosphorylation by TGFβ was analyzed and the effect of the ADAM inhibitors was also examined. Nuclear translocation of HB-EGF-CTF by shedding through ADAM activated by TGFβ was also analyzed. EGFR transactivation, HB-EGF-CTF nuclear translocation, and cell growth were examined under the condition of ADAM17 knockdown. Result: TGFβ-induced EGFR phosphorylation of which ADAM inhibitors were able to inhibit. TGFβ induced shedding of proHB-EGF allowing HB-EGF-CTF to translocate to the nucleus. ADAM inhibitors blocked this nuclear translocation. TGF

  10. Nucleocapsid-Independent Specific Viral RNA Packaging via Viral Envelope Protein and Viral RNA Signal

    OpenAIRE

    Narayanan, Krishna; Chen, Chun-Jen; Maeda, Junko; Makino, Shinji

    2003-01-01

    For any of the enveloped RNA viruses studied to date, recognition of a specific RNA packaging signal by the virus's nucleocapsid (N) protein is the first step described in the process of viral RNA packaging. In the murine coronavirus a selective interaction between the viral transmembrane envelope protein M and the viral ribonucleoprotein complex, composed of N protein and viral RNA containing a short cis-acting RNA element, the packaging signal, determines the selective RNA packaging into vi...

  11. Vitamin D receptor displays DNA binding and transactivation as a heterodimer with the retinoid X receptor, but not with the thyroid hormone receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, P D; Hsieh, J C; Whitfield, G K; Haussler, C A; Jurutka, P W; Galligan, M A; Tillman, J B; Spindler, S R; Haussler, M R

    1999-12-01

    The vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a transcription factor believed to function as a heterodimer with the retinoid X receptor (RXR). However, it was reported [Schräder et al., 1994] that, on putative vitamin D response elements (VDREs) within the rat 9k and mouse 28k calcium binding protein genes (rCaBP 9k and mCaBP 28k), VDR and thyroid hormone receptor (TR) form heterodimers that transactivate in response to both 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D(3) (1,25(OH)(2)D(3)) and triiodothyronine (T(3)). We, therefore, examined associations of these receptors on the putative rCaBP 9k and mCaBP 28k VDREs, as well as on established VDREs from the rat osteocalcin (rOC) and mouse osteopontin (mOP) genes, plus the thyroid hormone response element (TRE) from the rat myosin heavy chain (rMHC) gene. In gel mobility shift assays, we found no evidence for VDR-TR heterodimer interaction with any tested element. Further, employing these hormone response elements linked to reporter genes in transfected cells, VDR and TR mediated responses to their cognate ligands only from the rOC/mOP and rMHC elements, respectively, while the CaBP elements were unresponsive to any combination of ligand(s). Utilizing the rOC and mOP VDREs, two distinct repressive actions of TR on VDR-mediated signaling were demonstrated: a T(3)-independent action, presumably via direct TR-RXR competition for DNA binding, and a T(3)-dependent repression, likely by diversion of limiting RXR from VDR-RXR toward the formation of TR-RXR heterodimers. The relative importance of these two mechanisms differed in a response element-specific manner. These results may provide a partial explanation for the observed association between hyperthyroidism and bone demineralization/osteoporosis. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. AKT increases VEGF expression in tumor cells by transactivating the proximal VEGF promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pore, N.; Bernhard, E.J.; Shu, H.-K.; Li, B.; O'Rourke, D.M.; Maity, A.; Haas-Kogan, D.

    2003-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is overexpressed in many cancers including glioblastomas and may contribute to their growth. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) amplification and loss of PTEN, commonly found in glioblastomas leading to increase phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) activity and VEGF expression. In the current study we show that AKT, which is downstream of PI3K, regulates VEGF expression. U87MG human glioblastoma cells lack wildtype PTEN and express high levels of phosphorylated AKT. Over expression of AKT either by stable expression in immortalized human astrocytes or by transduction with adenovirus containing activated myristoylated AKT in SF188 glioblastoma cells increases VEGF expression. Moreover the elevation of angiogenesis by constitutively expressed AKT is further confirmed by in vivo matrigel plug assay in nude mice. The upregulation of VEGF by AKT is mediated through a region in the proximal promoter located between -88 and -70 (+1 is transcription start site). In transient transfection activity of a luciferase reporter containing the -88/+54 region of the VEGF promoter is increased by cotransfection with myristoylated AKT and downregulated by a dominant negative AKT expression vector. Mutation of the putative Sp1 binding sites located in the -88/-70 region we show that AKT acts through Sp1 to transactivate the VEGF promoter. Cotransfection of the VEGF promoter reporter with both Sp1 and myristoylated AKT expression vectors increases promoter activity to a greater extent than either Sp1 or Akt by itself. In vivo phosphate labeling of proteins reveals that AKT leads to increased Sp1 phosphorylation. Gel shift assays using a radio labeled probe corresponding to nucleotides -88 through -66 in the promoter show increased binding with nuclear extracts from cells transduced with adenovirus expressing myristoylated AKT. In conclusion, our results suggest that loss of PTEN leads to increased VEGF expression by increasing AKT

  13. Role of EGFR transactivation in preventing apoptosis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa-infected human corneal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Hui; Wang, Jinzhao; Dong, Zheng; Mian, Shahzad; Yu, Fu-Shin X

    2004-08-01

    To determine the role of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR)-mediated signaling pathways in preventing infection-induced apoptosis in human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs). Epithelial monolayers of a telomerase-immortalized HCEC line, HUCL, and primary culture of HCECs were infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the presence of the EGFR inhibitor tyrphostin AG1478, the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor U0126, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002, the heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) antagonist CRM197, the HB-EGF neutralizing antibody, or the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001. The activation of EGFR was analyzed by immunoprecipitation using EGFR antibodies, followed by Western blot analysis with phosphotyrosine antibody. Phosphorylation of ERK and Akt, a major substrate of PI3K, and generation of cleaved caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) were determined by Western blot analysis. Apoptotic cells were characterized by positive staining of active caspase-3, loss of mitochondrial cytochrome c, and condensation of chromosomes. Apoptosis was also confirmed by measuring caspase-3 activity and assessing the generation of cleaved caspase-3 and PARP. P. aeruginosa infection of HUCL cells resulted in EGFR activation and EGFR-dependent ERK1/2 and PI3K phosphorylation. Inhibition of EGFR, ERK1/2, and PI3K activities with kinase-specific inhibitors (AG1478, U0126, and LY294002, respectively) resulted in an increase in the number of apoptotic cells, in elevated cellular caspase-3 activity, and/or in increased cleaved PARP in P. aeruginosa-infected HUCL cells or primary culture of HCECs. Blocking HB-EGF ectodomain shedding by inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-mediated proteolysis, downregulation of HB-EGF, or neutralization of its activity retarded infection-induced EGFR transactivation and, as a consequence, increased infection-induced HUCL apoptosis. Bacterial infection of HCECs induces

  14. Role of EGFR Transactivation in Preventing Apoptosis in Pseudomonas aeruginosa–Infected Human Corneal Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Li, Hui; Wang, Jinzhao; Dong, Zheng; Mian, Shahzad; Yu, Fu-Shin X.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE To determine the role of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR)–mediated signaling pathways in preventing infection-induced apoptosis in human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs). METHODS Epithelial monolayers of a telomerase-immortalized HCEC line, HUCL, and primary culture of HCECs were infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the presence of the EGFR inhibitor tyrphostin AG1478, the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor U0126, the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002, the heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) antagonist CRM197, the HB-EGF neutralizing antibody, or the matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor GM6001. The activation of EGFR was analyzed by immunoprecipitation using EGFR antibodies, followed by Western blot analysis with phosphotyrosine antibody. Phosphorylation of ERK and Akt, a major substrate of PI3K, and generation of cleaved caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) were determined by Western blot analysis. Apoptotic cells were characterized by positive staining of active caspase-3, loss of mitochondrial cytochrome c, and condensation of chromosomes. Apoptosis was also confirmed by measuring caspase-3 activity and assessing the generation of cleaved caspase-3 and PARP. RESULTS P. aeruginosa infection of HUCL cells resulted in EGFR activation and EGFR-dependent ERK1/2 and PI3K phosphorylation. Inhibition of EGFR, ERK1/2, and PI3K activities with kinase-specific inhibitors (AG1478, U0126, and LY294002, respectively) resulted in an increase in the number of apoptotic cells, in elevated cellular caspase-3 activity, and/or in increased cleaved PARP in P. aeruginosa–infected HUCL cells or primary culture of HCECs. Blocking HB-EGF ectodomain shedding by inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase–mediated proteolysis, downregulation of HB-EGF, or neutralization of its activity retarded infection-induced EGFR transactivation and, as a consequence, increased infection-induced HUCL apoptosis

  15. Epstein-Barr virus latent gene sequences as geographical markers of viral origin: unique EBNA3 gene signatures identify Japanese viruses as distinct members of the Asian virus family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Akihisa; Croom-Carter, Deborah; Kondo, Osamu; Yasui, Masahiro; Koyama-Sato, Maho; Inoue, Masami; Kawa, Keisei; Rickinson, Alan B; Tierney, Rosemary J

    2011-05-01

    Polymorphisms in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent genes can identify virus strains from different human populations and individual strains within a population. An Asian EBV signature has been defined almost exclusively from Chinese viruses, with little information from other Asian countries. Here we sequenced polymorphic regions of the EBNA1, 2, 3A, 3B, 3C and LMP1 genes of 31 Japanese strains from control donors and EBV-associated T/NK-cell lymphoproliferative disease (T/NK-LPD) patients. Though identical to Chinese strains in their dominant EBNA1 and LMP1 alleles, Japanese viruses were subtly different at other loci. Thus, while Chinese viruses mainly fall into two families with strongly linked 'Wu' or 'Li' alleles at EBNA2 and EBNA3A/B/C, Japanese viruses all have the consensus Wu EBNA2 allele but fall into two families at EBNA3A/B/C. One family has variant Li-like sequences at EBNA3A and 3B and the consensus Li sequence at EBNA3C; the other family has variant Wu-like sequences at EBNA3A, variants of a low frequency Chinese allele 'Sp' at EBNA3B and a consensus Sp sequence at EBNA3C. Thus, EBNA3A/B/C allelotypes clearly distinguish Japanese from Chinese strains. Interestingly, most Japanese viruses also lack those immune-escape mutations in the HLA-A11 epitope-encoding region of EBNA3B that are so characteristic of viruses from the highly A11-positive Chinese population. Control donor-derived and T/NK-LPD-derived strains were similarly distributed across allelotypes and, by using allelic polymorphisms to track virus strains in patients pre- and post-haematopoietic stem-cell transplant, we show that a single strain can induce both T/NK-LPD and B-cell-lymphoproliferative disease in the same patient.

  16. Non-transactivational, dual pathways for LPA-induced Erk1/2 activation in primary cultures of brown pre-adipocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmstroem, Therese E.; Mattsson, Charlotte L.; Wang, Yanling; Iakovleva, Irina; Petrovic, Natasa; Nedergaard, Jan

    2010-01-01

    In many cell types, G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-induced Erk1/2 MAP kinase activation is mediated via receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) transactivation, in particular via the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), acting via GPCRs, is a mitogen and MAP kinase activator in many systems, and LPA can regulate adipocyte proliferation. The mechanism by which LPA activates the Erk1/2 MAP kinase is generally accepted to be via EGF receptor transactivation. In primary cultures of brown pre-adipocytes, EGF can induce Erk1/2 activation, which is obligatory and determinant for EGF-induced proliferation of these cells. Therefore, we have here examined whether LPA, via EGF transactivation, can activate Erk1/2 in brown pre-adipocytes. We found that LPA could induce Erk1/2 activation. However, the LPA-induced Erk1/2 activation was independent of transactivation of EGF receptors (or PDGF receptors) in these cells (whereas in transformed HIB-1B brown adipocytes, the LPA-induced Erk1/2 activation indeed proceeded via EGF receptor transactivation). In the brown pre-adipocytes, LPA instead induced Erk1/2 activation via two distinct non-transactivational pathways, one G i -protein dependent, involving PKC and Src activation, the other, a PTX-insensitive pathway, involving PI3K (but not Akt) activation. Earlier studies showing LPA-induced Erk1/2 activation being fully dependent on RTK transactivation have all been performed in cell lines and transfected cells. The present study implies that in non-transformed systems, RTK transactivation may not be involved in the mediation of GPCR-induced Erk1/2 MAP kinase activation.

  17. Dengue viral infections

    OpenAIRE

    Gurugama Padmalal; Garg Pankaj; Perera Jennifer; Wijewickrama Ananda; Seneviratne Suranjith

    2010-01-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito-borne diseases in the world. Presently dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. It has been estimated that almost 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) occur worldwide. An increasing proportion of DHF is in children less than 15 years of age, especially in South East and South Asia. The unique structure of the dengue virus and the pathophysiologic responses of the host...

  18. Brain-targeted delivery of trans-activating transcriptor-conjugated magnetic PLGA/lipid nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangru Wen

    Full Text Available Magnetic poly (D,L-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA/lipid nanoparticles (MPLs were fabricated from PLGA, L-α-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE, 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-amino (polyethylene glycol (DSPE-PEG-NH2, and magnetic nanoparticles (NPs, and then conjugated to trans-activating transcriptor (TAT peptide. The TAT-MPLs were designed to target the brain by magnetic guidance and TAT conjugation. The drugs hesperidin (HES, naringin (NAR, and glutathione (GSH were encapsulated in MPLs with drug loading capacity (>10% and drug encapsulation efficiency (>90%. The therapeutic efficacy of the drug-loaded TAT-MPLs in bEnd.3 cells was compared with that of drug-loaded MPLs. The cells accumulated higher levels of TAT-MPLs than MPLs. In addition, the accumulation of QD-loaded fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-labeled TAT-MPLs in bEnd.3 cells was dose and time dependent. Our results show that TAT-conjugated MPLs may function as an effective drug delivery system that crosses the blood brain barrier to the brain.

  19. The regulation of transactivator of transcription on the activity of DNA-PKcs promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Tianyi; Zhang Shimeng; Qin Xia; Li Bing; Liu Xiaodan; Zhou Pingkun

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To explore the influence of human immunodeficiency virus transactivator of transcription (TAT) on the promoter activity of DNA dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). Methods: The truncated promoters of DNA-PKcs were cloned by PCR from the template DNA from HeLa genomic DNA, and the pGL3-basic-DNA-PKcs promoter reporter plasmids were constructed. The activity of DNA-PKcs promoters was detected by dual-luciferase reporter assay system. A Lac-repressor and Lacoperator based green fluorescent protein imaging system was used to assay the chromatin remodeling activity. Results: A series of reporter plasmids harboring the truncated promoters of DNA-PKcs from -939 bp to -1 bp were constructed. The sequence of -64 bp to-1 bp was identified as a critical element for the activity of DNA-PKes promoter. TAT can suppress the activity of DNA-PKcs promoter. TAT participates in the regulation of the large scale chromatin relaxation. Ionizing radiation attenuates the activity of TAT played in the chromatin remodeling. Conclusion: TAT represses the promoter activity of DNA repair protein DNA-PKcs, and also play a role of large scale chromatin remodeling which can te attenuated by ionizing radiation. (authors)

  20. A Slow Conformational Switch in the BMAL1 Transactivation Domain Modulates Circadian Rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, Chelsea L; Parsley, Nicole C; Asimgil, Hande; Lee, Hsiau-Wei; Ahlbach, Christopher; Michael, Alicia K; Xu, Haiyan; Williams, Owen L; Davis, Tara L; Liu, Andrew C; Partch, Carrie L

    2017-05-18

    The C-terminal transactivation domain (TAD) of BMAL1 (brain and muscle ARNT-like 1) is a regulatory hub for transcriptional coactivators and repressors that compete for binding and, consequently, contributes to period determination of the mammalian circadian clock. Here, we report the discovery of two distinct conformational states that slowly exchange within the dynamic TAD to control timing. This binary switch results from cis/trans isomerization about a highly conserved Trp-Pro imide bond in a region of the TAD that is required for normal circadian timekeeping. Both cis and trans isomers interact with transcriptional regulators, suggesting that isomerization could serve a role in assembling regulatory complexes in vivo. Toward this end, we show that locking the switch into the trans isomer leads to shortened circadian periods. Furthermore, isomerization is regulated by the cyclophilin family of peptidyl-prolyl isomerases, highlighting the potential for regulation of BMAL1 protein dynamics in period determination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Abnormal XPD-induced nuclear receptor transactivation in DNA repair disorders: trichothiodystrophy and xeroderma pigmentosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaolong; Khan, Sikandar G; Tamura, Deborah; Ueda, Takahiro; Boyle, Jennifer; Compe, Emmanuel; Egly, Jean-Marc; DiGiovanna, John J; Kraemer, Kenneth H

    2013-08-01

    XPD (ERCC2) is a DNA helicase involved in nucleotide excision repair and in transcription as a structural bridge tying the transcription factor IIH (TFIIH) core with the cdk-activating kinase complex, which phosphorylates nuclear receptors. Mutations in XPD are associated with several different phenotypes, including trichothiodystrophy (TTD), with sulfur-deficient brittle hair, bone defects, and developmental abnormalities without skin cancer, xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), with pigmentary abnormalities and increased skin cancer, or XP/TTD with combined features, including skin cancer. We describe the varied clinical features and mutations in nine patients examined at the National Institutes of Health who were compound heterozygotes for XPD mutations but had different clinical phenotypes: four TTD, three XP, and two combined XP/TTD. We studied TFIIH-dependent transactivation by nuclear receptor for vitamin D (VDR) and thyroid in cells from these patients. The vitamin D stimulation ratio of CYP24 and osteopontin was associated with specific pairs of mutations (reduced in 5, elevated in 1) but not correlated with distinct clinical phenotypes. Thyroid receptor stimulation ratio for KLF9 was not significantly different from normal. XPD mutations frequently were associated with abnormal VDR stimulation in compound heterozygote patients with TTD, XP, or XP/TTD.

  2. Light-grown plants of transgenic tobacco expressing an introduced oat phytochrome A gene under the control of a constitutive viral promoter exhibit persistent growth inhibition by far-red light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCormac, A.; Whitelam, G.; Smith, H.

    1992-01-01

    A comparison of the photoregulation of development has been made for etiolated and light-grown plants of wild-type (WT) tobacco (Nicotiana tabacun L.) and an isogenic transgenic line which expresses an introduced oat phytochrome gene (phyA) under the control of a constitutive viral promoter. Etiolated seedlings of both the WT and transgenic line showed irradiance-dependent inhibition of hypocotyl growth under continuous far-red (FR) light; transgenic seedlings showed a greater level of inhibition under a given fluence rate and this is considered to be the result of the heterologous phytochrome protein (PhyA) functioning in a compatible manner with the native etiolated phytochrome. Deetiolation of WT seedlings resulted in a loss of responsiveness to prolonged FR. Light-grown transgenic seedlings, however, continued to respond in an irradiance-dependent manner to prolonged FR and it is proposed that this is a specific function of the constitutive PhyA. Mature green plants of the WT and transgenic lines showed a qualitatively similar growth promotion to a brief end-of-day FR-treatment but this response was abolished in the transgenic plants under prolonged irradiation by this same FR source. Growth inhibition (McCormac et al. 1991, Planta 185, 162-170) and enhanced levels of nitrate-reductase activity under irradiance of low red:far-red ratio, as achieved by the FR-supplementation of white light, emphasised that the introduced PhyA was eliciting an aberrant mode of photoresponse compared with the normal phytochrome population of light-grown plants. Total levels of the oat-encoded phytochrome in the etiolated transgenic tobacco were shown to be influenced by the wavelength of continuous irradiation in a manner which was qualitatively similar to that seen for the native, etiolated tobacco phytochrome, and distinct from that seen in etiolated oat tissues. These results are discussed in terms of the proposal that the constitutive oat-PhyA pool in the transgenic plants

  3. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  4. Transactivation of the Brassica napus napin promoter by ABI3 requires interaction of the conserved B2 and B3 domains of ABI3 with different cis-elements: B2 mediates activation through an ABRE, whereas B3 interacts with an RY/G-box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezcurra, I; Wycliffe, P; Nehlin, L; Ellerström, M; Rask, L

    2000-10-01

    The transcriptional activator ABI3 is a key regulator of gene expression during embryo maturation in crucifers. In monocots, the related VP1 protein regulates the Em promoter synergistically with abscisic acid (ABA). We identified cis-elements in the Brassica napus napin napA promoter mediating regulation by ABI3 and ABA, by analyzing substitution mutation constructs of napA in transgenic tobacco plantlets ectopically expressing ABI3. In transient analysis using particle bombardment of tobacco leaf sections, a tetramer of the distB ABRE (abscisic acid-responsive element) mediated transactivation by ABI3 and ABI3-dependent response to ABA, whereas a tetramer of the composite RY/G complex, containing RY repeats and a G-box, mediated only ABA-independent transactivation by ABI3. Deletion of the conserved B2 and B3 domains of ABI3 abolished transactivation of napA by ABI3. The two domains of ABI3 interact with different cis-elements: B2 is necessary for ABA-independent and ABA-dependent activations through the distB ABRE, whereas B3 interacts with the RY/G complex. Thus B2 mediates the interaction of ABI3 with the protein complex at the ABRE. The regulation of napA by ABI3 differs from Em regulation by VP1, in that the B3 domain of ABI3 is essential for the ABA-dependent regulation of napA.

  5. Viral marketing as epidemiological model

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Helena Sofia; Fonseca, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    In epidemiology, an epidemic is defined as the spread of an infectious disease to a large number of people in a given population within a short period of time. In the marketing context, a message is viral when it is broadly sent and received by the target market through person-to-person transmission. This specific marketing communication strategy is commonly referred as viral marketing. Due to this similarity between an epidemic and the viral marketing process and because the understanding of...

  6. Viral/Host interaction in viral infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Grand, R.

    2006-01-01

    The major objectives of the Neuro-virology Department (SNV for 'Service de Neurovirologie') are related to the study of host/pathogen interactions, particularly during primate lentiviral infections. Various experimental models have been developed such as non-human primates infected with the HIV-related simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIV), as an animal model of human AIDS. The current research programs of the SNV following four main directions: 1) Study of the pathogenesis of primate lentiviral infection, including mucosal transmission of HIV/SIV, primary infection, dissemination to various reservoirs, neuro-pathogenesis and hematopoietic disorders; 2) Prevention of HIV transmission, particularly through vaccination but also by means of microbicides applied to genital mucosa and post-exposure treatment with antiviral drugs; 3) Cellular and molecular pharmacology of new antiviral compounds; 4) Development of new primate models of human hematological disorders like chronic myeloid leukemia cells and development on new gene transfer in hematopoietic cells based on the use of lentiviral vectors Main programs of the SNV will be presented as well as the perspective focused on the use of non invasive in vivo imaging approaches for the exploration of immune and hematopoietic cells

  7. Viral/Host interaction in viral infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Grand, R. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, Service de Neurovirologie, 92 (France)

    2006-07-01

    The major objectives of the Neuro-virology Department (SNV for 'Service de Neurovirologie') are related to the study of host/pathogen interactions, particularly during primate lentiviral infections. Various experimental models have been developed such as non-human primates infected with the HIV-related simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIV), as an animal model of human AIDS. The current research programs of the SNV following four main directions: 1) Study of the pathogenesis of primate lentiviral infection, including mucosal transmission of HIV/SIV, primary infection, dissemination to various reservoirs, neuro-pathogenesis and hematopoietic disorders; 2) Prevention of HIV transmission, particularly through vaccination but also by means of microbicides applied to genital mucosa and post-exposure treatment with antiviral drugs; 3) Cellular and molecular pharmacology of new antiviral compounds; 4) Development of new primate models of human hematological disorders like chronic myeloid leukemia cells and development on new gene transfer in hematopoietic cells based on the use of lentiviral vectors Main programs of the SNV will be presented as well as the perspective focused on the use of non invasive in vivo imaging approaches for the exploration of immune and hematopoietic cells.

  8. Equine viral arteritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosec Marjan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Equine viral arteritis (EVA is a contagious disease of equids caused by equine artheritis virus (EAV, widespread in most countries in the world, where patients are diagnosed. The infection usually starts asymptomatic. Clinical signs indicate respiratory infection of different intensity and also abortions are present at different stages of gestation. Large prevalence of this disease in the world has become a growing economic problem. The disease is specific to a particular kind of animals, and it affects only equids (horses, donkeys, mules, mule and zebras. In countries where the infection has been confirmed, the percentage of positive animals differ. Likewise, there is difference in percentage among certain animal kinds. The highest percentage of positive animals has been found in totters and the lowest in cold-blooded.

  9. Viral pathogen discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Charles Y

    2015-01-01

    Viral pathogen discovery is of critical importance to clinical microbiology, infectious diseases, and public health. Genomic approaches for pathogen discovery, including consensus polymerase chain reaction (PCR), microarrays, and unbiased next-generation sequencing (NGS), have the capacity to comprehensively identify novel microbes present in clinical samples. Although numerous challenges remain to be addressed, including the bioinformatics analysis and interpretation of large datasets, these technologies have been successful in rapidly identifying emerging outbreak threats, screening vaccines and other biological products for microbial contamination, and discovering novel viruses associated with both acute and chronic illnesses. Downstream studies such as genome assembly, epidemiologic screening, and a culture system or animal model of infection are necessary to establish an association of a candidate pathogen with disease. PMID:23725672

  10. The immunomodulatory gene products of myxoma virus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    273. Keywords. Gene products; myxoma virus; Oryctolagus cuniculus; poxvirus; skin lesions ...... these data is that these viral proteins do not promote class .... Cudmore S, Reckmann I and Way M 1997 Viral manipulations of the actin ...

  11. Frontotemporal dementia with trans-activation response DNA-binding protein 43 presenting with catatonic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ryohei; Kawakami, Ito; Onaya, Mitsumoto; Higashi, Shinji; Arai, Nobutaka; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Hasegawa, Masato; Arai, Tetsuaki

    2017-11-07

    Catatonia is a clinical syndrome characterized by symptoms such as immobility, mutism, stupor, stereotypy, echophenomena, catalepsy, automatic obedience, posturing, negativism, gegenhalten and ambitendency. This syndrome occurs mostly in mood disorder and schizophrenic patients, and is related to neuronal dysfunction involving the frontal lobe. Some cases of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) with catatonia have been reported, but these cases were not examined by autopsy. Here, we report on a FTD case which showed catatonia after the first episode of brief psychotic disorder. At the age of 58, the patient had a sudden onset of disorganized behavior and meaningless speech. Psychotropic drugs were effective for catatonic symptoms. However, after remission apathy, hyperorality, socially inappropriate behavior, hoarding, and an instinctive grasp reaction appeared and persisted. Brain MRI showed significant atrophy of the bilateral fronto-temporal lobes. A neuropathological examination revealed extensive trans-activation response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) positive neurocytoplasmic inclusions and dystrophic neurites in the brain, including the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, and brainstem. Pathological diagnosis was frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with TDP-43 (FTLD-TDP) type C, which was also confirmed by the band pattern of C-terminal fragments of TDP-43 on western blotting of sarkosyl-insoluble fractions extracted from the frozen brain. Dysfunction of the thalamus, globus pallidus, supplementary motor area, amygdala and cingulate cortex have been said to be related to the catatonic syndrome. In this case, these areas were affected, showing abnormal TDP-43-positive structures. Further studies are expected to confirm further clinical - pathological correlations to FTLD. © 2017 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  12. Viral impacts on microbial carbon cycling in thawing permafrost soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubl, G. G.; Roux, S.; Bolduc, B.; Jang, H. B.; Emerson, J. B.; Solonenko, N.; Li, F.; Solden, L. M.; Vik, D. R.; Wrighton, K. C.; Saleska, S. R.; Sullivan, M. B.; Rich, V. I.

    2017-12-01

    Permafrost contains 30-50% of global soil carbon (C) and is rapidly thawing. While the fate of this C is unknown, it will be shaped in part by microbes and their associated viruses, which modulate host activities via mortality and metabolic control. To date, viral research in soils has been outpaced by that in aquatic environments, due to the technical challenges of accessing viruses as well as the dramatic physicochemical heterogeneity in soils. Here, we describe advances in soil viromics from our research on permafrost-associated soils, and their implications for associated terrestrial C cycling. First, we optimized viral resuspension-DNA extraction methods for a range of soil types. Second, we applied cutting-edge viral-specific informatics methods to recover viral populations, define their gene content, connect them to potential hosts, and analyze their relationships to environmental parameters. A total of 781 viral populations were recovered from size-fractionated virus samples of three soils along a permafrost thaw gradient. Ecological analyses revealed endemism as recovered viral populations were largely unique to each habitat and unlike those in aquatic communities. Genome- and network-based classification assigned these viruses into 226 viral clusters (VCs; genus-level taxonomy), 55% of which were novel. This increases the number of VCs by a third and triples the number of soil viral populations in the RefSeq database (currently contains 256 VCs and 316 soil viral populations). Genomic analyses revealed 85% of the genes were functionally unknown, though 5% of the annotatable genes contained C-related auxiliary metabolic genes (AMGs; e.g. glycoside hydrolases). Using sequence-based features and microbial population genomes, we were able to in silico predict hosts for 30% of the viral populations. The identified hosts spanned 3 phyla and 6 genera but suggested these viruses have species-specific host ranges as >80% of hosts for a given virus were in the same

  13. Viral myositis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Haley; Goldman, Ran D

    2017-05-01

    Question I recently evaluated a child in my clinic after an emergency department visit where she presented having woken up that morning refusing to walk and was crawling around the house. The parents reported she was getting over a cold, and I recall similar cases of myositis during the H1N1 influenza epidemic a few years ago. What are the key features of myositis that I should recognize? Which investigations are needed to confirm the diagnosis and how should affected patients be managed? Answer Benign acute childhood myositis is a mild and self-limited sudden onset of lower extremity pain during or following recovery from a viral illness. Presentation can include tiptoe gait or refusal to walk, secondary to symmetric bilateral lower extremity pain that resolves quickly, usually within 3 days. In general, no investigation is needed except in severe cases for which screening bloodwork and a urine myoglobin test can confirm the diagnosis and rule out complications. Myoglobinuria and highly elevated creatine phosphokinase levels are rare but should be a consideration for admission to hospital. Prognosis is excellent and management might include rest and analgesia. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  14. Dengue viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurugama Padmalal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito-borne diseases in the world. Presently dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. It has been estimated that almost 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF occur worldwide. An increasing proportion of DHF is in children less than 15 years of age, especially in South East and South Asia. The unique structure of the dengue virus and the pathophysiologic responses of the host, different serotypes, and favorable conditions for vector breeding have led to the virulence and spread of the infections. The manifestations of dengue infections are protean from being asymptomatic to undifferentiated fever, severe dengue infections, and unusual complications. Early recognition and prompt initiation of appropriate supportive treatment are often delayed resulting in unnecessarily high morbidity and mortality. Attempts are underway for the development of a vaccine for preventing the burden of this neglected disease. This review outlines the epidemiology, clinical features, pathophysiologic mechanisms, management, and control of dengue infections.

  15. Emerging zoonotic viral diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L-F; Crameri, G

    2014-08-01

    Zoonotic diseases are infectious diseases that are naturally transmitted from vertebrate animals to humans and vice versa. They are caused by all types of pathogenic agents, including bacteria, parasites, fungi, viruses and prions. Although they have been recognised for many centuries, their impact on public health has increased in the last few decades due to a combination of the success in reducing the spread of human infectious diseases through vaccination and effective therapies and the emergence of novel zoonotic diseases. It is being increasingly recognised that a One Health approach at the human-animal-ecosystem interface is needed for effective investigation, prevention and control of any emerging zoonotic disease. Here, the authors will review the drivers for emergence, highlight some of the high-impact emerging zoonotic diseases of the last two decades and provide examples of novel One Health approaches for disease investigation, prevention and control. Although this review focuses on emerging zoonotic viral diseases, the authors consider that the discussions presented in this paper will be equally applicable to emerging zoonotic diseases of other pathogen types.

  16. Viral Hepatitis: A through E and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse What is viral hepatitis? Viral hepatitis is inflammation of the liver caused by ... and serious. Drugs are available to treat chronic hepatitis. 4 Viral Hepatitis: A through E and Beyond What else ...

  17. MicroRNAs: role and therapeutic targets in viral hepatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ree, Meike H.; de Bruijne, Joep; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Jansen, Peter Lm; Reesink, Hendrik W.

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs regulate gene expression by binding to the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of target messenger RNAs (mRNAs). The importance of microRNAs has been shown for several liver diseases, for example, viral hepatitis. MicroRNA-122 is highly abundant in the liver and is involved in the regulation of

  18. Viral evasion of intracellular DNA and RNA sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ying Kai; Gack, Michaela U.

    2016-01-01

    The co-evolution of viruses with their hosts has led to the emergence of viral pathogens that are adept at evading or actively suppressing host immunity. Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are key components of antiviral immunity that detect conserved molecular features of viral pathogens and initiate signalling that results in the expression of antiviral genes. In this Review, we discuss the strategies that viruses use to escape immune surveillance by key intracellular sensors of viral RNA or DNA, with a focus on RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs), cyclic GMP–AMP synthase (cGAS) and interferon-γ (IFNγ)-inducible protein 16 (IFI16). Such viral strategies include the sequestration or modification of viral nucleic acids, interference with specific post-translational modifications of PRRs or their adaptor proteins, the degradation or cleavage of PRRs or their adaptors, and the sequestration or relocalization of PRRs. An understanding of viral immune-evasion mechanisms at the molecular level may guide the development of vaccines and antivirals. PMID:27174148

  19. Endogenous viral elements in animal genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aris Katzourakis

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Integration into the nuclear genome of germ line cells can lead to vertical inheritance of retroviral genes as host alleles. For other viruses, germ line integration has only rarely been documented. Nonetheless, we identified endogenous viral elements (EVEs derived from ten non-retroviral families by systematic in silico screening of animal genomes, including the first endogenous representatives of double-stranded RNA, reverse-transcribing DNA, and segmented RNA viruses, and the first endogenous DNA viruses in mammalian genomes. Phylogenetic and genomic analysis of EVEs across multiple host species revealed novel information about the origin and evolution of diverse virus groups. Furthermore, several of the elements identified here encode intact open reading frames or are expressed as mRNA. For one element in the primate lineage, we provide statistically robust evidence for exaptation. Our findings establish that genetic material derived from all known viral genome types and replication strategies can enter the animal germ line, greatly broadening the scope of paleovirological studies and indicating a more significant evolutionary role for gene flow from virus to animal genomes than has previously been recognized.

  20. Viral Evolution Core | FNLCR Staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon F. Keele, Ph.D. PI/Senior Principal Investigator, Retroviral Evolution Section Head, Viral Evolution Core Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc. Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research Frederick, MD 21702-1201 Tel: 301-846-173

  1. FastStats: Viral Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Viral Hepatitis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are for the U.S. Morbidity Number of new hepatitis A cases: 1,239 (2014) Number of new ...

  2. A Herpesviral Immediate Early Protein Promotes Transcription Elongation of Viral Transcripts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah L. Fox

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 genes are transcribed by cellular RNA polymerase II (RNA Pol II. While four viral immediate early proteins (ICP4, ICP0, ICP27, and ICP22 function in some capacity in viral transcription, the mechanism by which ICP22 functions remains unclear. We observed that the FACT complex (comprised of SSRP1 and Spt16 was relocalized in infected cells as a function of ICP22. ICP22 was also required for the association of FACT and the transcription elongation factors SPT5 and SPT6 with viral genomes. We further demonstrated that the FACT complex interacts with ICP22 throughout infection. We therefore hypothesized that ICP22 recruits cellular transcription elongation factors to viral genomes for efficient transcription elongation of viral genes. We reevaluated the phenotype of an ICP22 mutant virus by determining the abundance of all viral mRNAs throughout infection by transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq. The accumulation of almost all viral mRNAs late in infection was reduced compared to the wild type, regardless of kinetic class. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq, we mapped the location of RNA Pol II on viral genes and found that RNA Pol II levels on the bodies of viral genes were reduced in the ICP22 mutant compared to wild-type virus. In contrast, the association of RNA Pol II with transcription start sites in the mutant was not reduced. Taken together, our results indicate that ICP22 plays a role in recruiting elongation factors like the FACT complex to the HSV-1 genome to allow for efficient viral transcription elongation late in viral infection and ultimately infectious virion production.

  3. Microbiological diagnostics of viral hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    HASDEMİR, Ufuk

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is an infection that primarily affects the liverbut may also have systemic clinical manifestations. The vastmajority of viral hepatitis are caused by one of five hepatotropicviruses: hepatitis A virus (HAV), hepatitis B virus (HBV),hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D (delta) virus (HDV), andhepatitis E virus (HEV) (Table I) [1]. HBV, HCV, and HDValso cause chronic hepatitis, whereas HAV does not. HEVcauses acute hepatitis in normal hosts but can cause protractedand chronic he...

  4. Resveratrol prevents angiotensin II-induced hypertrophy of vascular smooth muscle cells through the transactivation of growth factor receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Ekhtear; Anand-Srivastava, Madhu B

    2017-08-01

    We previously showed that augmented levels of endogenous angiotensin II (AngII) contribute to vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) hypertrophy through the transactivation of growth factor receptors in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Resveratrol (RV), a polyphenolic component of red wine, has also been shown to attenuate AngII-evoked VSMC hypertrophy; however, the molecular mechanism mediating this response is obscure. The present study was therefore undertaken to examine whether RV could prevent AngII-induced VSMC hypertrophy through the transactivation of growth factor receptor and associated signaling pathways. AngII treatment of VSMC enhanced the protein synthesis that was attenuated towards control levels by RV pretreatment as well as by the inhibitors of NADPH oxidase, c-Src, and growth factor receptors. Furthermore, RV pretreatment also inhibited enhanced levels of superoxide anion, NADPH oxidase activity, increased expression of NADPH oxidase subunits, and phosphorylation of c-Src, EGF-R, PDGE-R, ERK1/2, and AKT1/2. In conclusion, these results indicate that RV attenuates AngII-induced VSMC hypertrophy through the inhibition of enhanced oxidative stress and activation of c-Src, growth factor receptors, and MAPK/AKT signaling. We suggest that RV could be used as a therapeutic agent in the treatment of vascular complications associated with hypertension and hypertrophy.

  5. Direct interaction of TFIIB and the IE protein of equine herpesvirus 1 is required for maximal trans-activation function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albrecht, Randy A.; Jang, Hyung K.; Kim, Seong K.; O'Callaghan, Dennis J.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, we reported that the immediate-early (IE) protein of equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) associates with transcription factor TFIIB [J. Virol. 75 (2001), 10219]. In the current study, the IE protein purified as a glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusion protein was shown to interact directly with purified TFIIB in GST-pulldown assays. A panel of TFIIB mutants employed in protein-binding assays revealed that residues 125 to 174 within the first direct repeat of TFIIB mediate its interaction with the IE protein. This interaction is physiologically relevant as transient transfection assays demonstrated that (1) exogenous native TFIIB did not perturb IE protein function, and (2) ectopic expression of a TFIIB mutant that lacked the IE protein interactive domain significantly diminished the ability of the IE protein to trans-activate EHV-1 promoters. These results suggest that an interaction of the IE protein with TFIIB is an important aspect of the regulatory role of the IE protein in the trans-activation of EHV-1 promoters

  6. The Pacific Ocean virome (POV: a marine viral metagenomic dataset and associated protein clusters for quantitative viral ecology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonnie L Hurwitz

    Full Text Available Bacteria and their viruses (phage are fundamental drivers of many ecosystem processes including global biogeochemistry and horizontal gene transfer. While databases and resources for studying function in uncultured bacterial communities are relatively advanced, many fewer exist for their viral counterparts. The issue is largely technical in that the majority (often 90% of viral sequences are functionally 'unknown' making viruses a virtually untapped resource of functional and physiological information. Here, we provide a community resource that organizes this unknown sequence space into 27 K high confidence protein clusters using 32 viral metagenomes from four biogeographic regions in the Pacific Ocean that vary by season, depth, and proximity to land, and include some of the first deep pelagic ocean viral metagenomes. These protein clusters more than double currently available viral protein clusters, including those from environmental datasets. Further, a protein cluster guided analysis of functional diversity revealed that richness decreased (i from deep to surface waters, (ii from winter to summer, (iii and with distance from shore in surface waters only. These data provide a framework from which to draw on for future metadata-enabled functional inquiries of the vast viral unknown.

  7. The Pacific Ocean virome (POV): a marine viral metagenomic dataset and associated protein clusters for quantitative viral ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Bonnie L; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria and their viruses (phage) are fundamental drivers of many ecosystem processes including global biogeochemistry and horizontal gene transfer. While databases and resources for studying function in uncultured bacterial communities are relatively advanced, many fewer exist for their viral counterparts. The issue is largely technical in that the majority (often 90%) of viral sequences are functionally 'unknown' making viruses a virtually untapped resource of functional and physiological information. Here, we provide a community resource that organizes this unknown sequence space into 27 K high confidence protein clusters using 32 viral metagenomes from four biogeographic regions in the Pacific Ocean that vary by season, depth, and proximity to land, and include some of the first deep pelagic ocean viral metagenomes. These protein clusters more than double currently available viral protein clusters, including those from environmental datasets. Further, a protein cluster guided analysis of functional diversity revealed that richness decreased (i) from deep to surface waters, (ii) from winter to summer, (iii) and with distance from shore in surface waters only. These data provide a framework from which to draw on for future metadata-enabled functional inquiries of the vast viral unknown.

  8. Viral infections in transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razonable, R R; Eid, A J

    2009-12-01

    Solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients are uniquely predisposed to develop clinical illness, often with increased severity, due to a variety of common and opportunistic viruses. Patients may acquire viral infections from the donor (donor-derived infections), from reactivation of endogenous latent virus, or from the community. Herpes viruses, most notably cytomegalovirus and Epstein Barr virus, are the most common among opportunistic viral pathogens that cause infection after solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The polyoma BK virus causes opportunistic clinical syndromes predominantly in kidney and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. The agents of viral hepatitis B and C present unique challenges particularly among liver transplant recipients. Respiratory viral illnesses due to influenza, respiratory syncytial virus, and parainfluenza virus may affect all types of transplant recipients, although severe clinical disease is observed more commonly among lung and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. Less common viral infections affecting transplant recipients include those caused by adenoviruses, parvovirus B19, and West Nile virus. Treatment for viruses with proven effective antiviral drug therapies should be complemented by reduction in the degree of immunosuppression. For others with no proven antiviral drugs for therapy, reduction in the degree of immunosuppression remains as the sole effective strategy for management. Prevention of viral infections is therefore of utmost importance, and this may be accomplished through vaccination, antiviral strategies, and aggressive infection control measures.

  9. Microbial and viral-like rhodopsins present in coastal marine sediments from four polar and subpolar regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López, José L.; Golemba, Marcelo; Hernández, Edgardo; Lozada, Mariana; Dionisi, Hebe; Jansson, Janet K.; Carroll, Jolynn; Lundgren, Leif; Sjöling, Sara; Mac Cormack, Walter P.; Sobecky, Patricia

    2016-11-03

    Rhodopsins are broadly distributed. In this work, we analyzed 23 metagenomes corresponding to marine sediment samples from four regions that share cold climate conditions (Norway; Sweden; Argentina and Antarctica). In order to investigate the genes evolution of viral rhodopsins, an initial set of 6224 bacterial rhodopsin sequences according to COG5524 were retrieved from the 23 metagenomes. After selection by the presence of transmembrane domains and alignment, 123 viral (51) and non-viral (72) sequences (>50 amino acids) were finally included in further analysis. Viral rhodopsin genes were homologs of Phaeocystis globosa virus and Organic lake Phycodnavirus. Non-viral microbial rhodopsin genes were ascribed to Bacteroidetes, Planctomycetes, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, Cyanobacteria, Proteobacteria, Deinococcus-Thermus and Cryptophyta and Fungi. A rescreening using Blastp, using as queries the viral sequences previously described, retrieved 30 sequences (>100 amino acids). Phylogeographic analysis revealed a geographical clustering of the sequences affiliated to the viral group. This clustering was not observed for the microbial non-viral sequences. The phylogenetic reconstruction allowed us to propose the existence of a putative ancestor of viral rhodopsin genes related to Actinobacteria and Chloroflexi. This is the first report about the existence of a phylogeographic association of the viral rhodopsin sequences from marine sediments.

  10. Viral infections as controlling factors for the deep biosphere? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelen, B.; Engelhardt, T.; Sahlberg, M.; Cypionka, H.

    2009-12-01

    The marine deep biosphere represents the largest biotope on Earth. Throughout the last years, we have obtained interesting insights into its microbial community composition. However, one component that was completely overlooked so far is the viral inventory of deep-subsurface sediments. While viral infections were identified to have a major impact on the benthic microflora of deep-sea surface sediments (Danavaro et al. 2008), no studies were performed on deep-biosphere samples, so far. As grazers probably play only a minor role in anoxic and highly compressed deep sediments, viruses might be the main “predators” for indigenous microorganisms. Furthermore, the release of cell components, called “the viral shunt”, could have a major impact on the deep biosphere in providing labile organic compounds to non-infected microorganisms in these generally nutrient depleted sediments. However, direct counting of viruses in sediments is highly challenging due to the small size of viruses and the high background of small particles. Even molecular surveys using “universal” PCR primers that target phage-specific genes fail due to the vast phage diversity. One solution for this problem is the lysogenic viral life cycle as many bacteriophages integrate their DNA into the host genome. It is estimated that up to 70% of cultivated bacteria contain prophages within their genome. Therefore, culture collections (Batzke et al. 2007) represent an archive of the viral composition within the respective habitat. These prophages can be induced to become free phage particles in stimulation experiments in which the host cells are set under certain stress situations such as a treatment with UV exposure or DNA-damaging antibiotics. The study of the viral component within the deep biosphere offers to answer the following questions: To which extent are deep-biosphere populations controlled by viral infections? What is the inter- and intra-specific diversity and the host-specific viral

  11. Delivery of viral vectors to tumor cells: extracellular transport, systemic distribution, and strategies for improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Yuan, Fan

    2006-01-01

    It is a challenge to deliver therapeutic genes to tumor cells using viral vectors because (i) the size of these vectors are close to or larger than the space between fibers in extracellular matrix and (ii) viral proteins are potentially toxic in normal tissues. In general, gene delivery is hindered by various physiological barriers to virus transport from the site of injection to the nucleus of tumor cells and is limited by normal tissue tolerance of toxicity determined by local concentrations of transgene products and viral proteins. To illustrate the obstacles encountered in the delivery and yet limit the scope of discussion, this review focuses only on extracellular transport in solid tumors and distribution of viral vectors in normal organs after they are injected intravenously or intratumorally. This review also discusses current strategies for improving intratumoral transport and specificity of viral vectors.

  12. Retroviral Vectors for Analysis of Viral Mutagenesis and Recombination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan M.O. Rawson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Retrovirus population diversity within infected hosts is commonly high due in part to elevated rates of replication, mutation, and recombination. This high genetic diversity often complicates the development of effective diagnostics, vaccines, and antiviral drugs. This review highlights the diverse vectors and approaches that have been used to examine mutation and recombination in retroviruses. Retroviral vectors for these purposes can broadly be divided into two categories: those that utilize reporter genes as mutation or recombination targets and those that utilize viral genes as targets of mutation or recombination. Reporter gene vectors greatly facilitate the detection, quantification, and characterization of mutants and/or recombinants, but may not fully recapitulate the patterns of mutagenesis or recombination observed in native viral gene sequences. In contrast, the detection of mutations or recombination events directly in viral genes is more biologically relevant but also typically more challenging and inefficient. We will highlight the advantages and disadvantages of the various vectors and approaches used as well as propose ways in which they could be improved.

  13. Oncogenic N-Ras Stimulates SRF-Mediated Transactivation via H3 Acetylation at Lysine 9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Ju Yi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Signal transduction pathways regulate the gene expression by altering chromatin dynamics in response to mitogens. Ras proteins are key regulators linking extracellular stimuli to a diverse range of biological responses associated with gene regulation. In mammals, the three ras genes encode four Ras protein isoforms: H-Ras, K-Ras4A, K-Ras4B, and N-Ras. Although emerging evidence suggests that Ras isoforms differentially regulate gene expressions and are functionally nonredundant, the mechanisms underlying Ras specificity and Ras signaling effects on gene expression remain unclear. Here, we show that oncogenic N-Ras acts as the most potent regulator of SRF-, NF-κB-, and AP-1-dependent transcription. N-Ras-RGL2 axis is a distinct signaling pathway for SRF target gene expression such as Egr1 and JunB, as RGL2 Ras binding domain (RBD significantly impaired oncogenic N-Ras-induced SRE activation. By monitoring the effect of Ras isoforms upon the change of global histone modifications in oncogenic Ras-overexpressed cells, we discovered that oncogenic N-Ras elevates H3K9ac/H3K23ac levels globally in the chromatin context. Importantly, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays revealed that H3K9ac is significantly enriched at the promoter and coding regions of Egr1 and JunB. Collectively, our findings define an undocumented role of N-Ras in modulating of H3 acetylation and in gene regulation.

  14. NF45/ILF2 tissue expression, promoter analysis, and interleukin-2 transactivating function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Guohua; Shi Lingfang; Qiu Daoming; Hu Hong; Kao, Peter N.

    2005-01-01

    NF45/ILF2 associates with NF90/ILF3 in the nucleus and regulates IL-2 gene transcription at the antigen receptor response element (ARRE)/NF-AT DNA target sequence (P.N. Kao, L. Chen, G. Brock, J. Ng, A.J. Smith, B. Corthesy, J. Biol. Chem. 269 (1994) 20691-20699). NF45 is widely expressed in normal tissues, especially testis, brain, and kidney, with a predominantly nuclear distribution. NF45 mRNA expression is increased in lymphoma and leukemia cell lines. The human and murine NF45 proteins differ only by substitution of valine by isoleucine at amino acid 142. Fluorescence in situ hybridization localized the human NF45 gene to chromosome 1q21.3, and mouse NF45 gene to chromosome 3F1. Promoter analysis of 2.5 kB of the murine NF45 gene reveals that significant activation is conferred by factors, possible including NF-Y, that bind to the CCAAT-box sequence. The function of human NF45 in regulating IL-2 gene expression was characterized in Jurkat T-cells stably transfected with plasmids directing expression of NF45 cDNA in sense or antisense orientations. NF45 sense expression increased IL-2 luciferase reporter gene activity 120-fold, and IL-2 protein expression 2-fold compared to control cells. NF45 is a highly conserved, regulated transcriptional activator, and one target gene is IL-2

  15. Beyond viral suppression of HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeffrey V.; Safreed-Harmon, Kelly; Barton, Simon E

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) adopted a new Global Health Sector Strategy on HIV for 2016-2021. It establishes 15 ambitious targets, including the '90-90-90' target calling on health systems to reduce under-diagnosis of HIV, treat a greater number of those diagnosed......, and ensure that those being treated achieve viral suppression. DISCUSSION: The WHO strategy calls for person-centered chronic care for people living with HIV (PLHIV), implicitly acknowledging that viral suppression is not the ultimate goal of treatment. However, it stops short of providing an explicit target...... for health-related quality of life. It thus fails to take into account the needs of PLHIV who have achieved viral suppression but still must contend with other intense challenges such as serious non-communicable diseases, depression, anxiety, financial stress, and experiences of or apprehension about HIV...

  16. VirSorter: mining viral signal from microbial genomic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Simon; Enault, Francois; Hurwitz, Bonnie L.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses of microbes impact all ecosystems where microbes drive key energy and substrate transformations including the oceans, humans and industrial fermenters. However, despite this recognized importance, our understanding of viral diversity and impacts remains limited by too few model systems and reference genomes. One way to fill these gaps in our knowledge of viral diversity is through the detection of viral signal in microbial genomic data. While multiple approaches have been developed and applied for the detection of prophages (viral genomes integrated in a microbial genome), new types of microbial genomic data are emerging that are more fragmented and larger scale, such as Single-cell Amplified Genomes (SAGs) of uncultivated organisms or genomic fragments assembled from metagenomic sequencing. Here, we present VirSorter, a tool designed to detect viral signal in these different types of microbial sequence data in both a reference-dependent and reference-independent manner, leveraging probabilistic models and extensive virome data to maximize detection of novel viruses. Performance testing shows that VirSorter’s prophage prediction capability compares to that of available prophage predictors for complete genomes, but is superior in predicting viral sequences outside of a host genome (i.e., from extrachromosomal prophages, lytic infections, or partially assembled prophages). Furthermore, VirSorter outperforms existing tools for fragmented genomic and metagenomic datasets, and can identify viral signal in assembled sequence (contigs) as short as 3kb, while providing near-perfect identification (>95% Recall and 100% Precision) on contigs of at least 10kb. Because VirSorter scales to large datasets, it can also be used in “reverse” to more confidently identify viral sequence in viral metagenomes by sorting away cellular DNA whether derived from gene transfer agents, generalized transduction or contamination. Finally, VirSorter is made available through the i

  17. VirSorter: mining viral signal from microbial genomic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Roux

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Viruses of microbes impact all ecosystems where microbes drive key energy and substrate transformations including the oceans, humans and industrial fermenters. However, despite this recognized importance, our understanding of viral diversity and impacts remains limited by too few model systems and reference genomes. One way to fill these gaps in our knowledge of viral diversity is through the detection of viral signal in microbial genomic data. While multiple approaches have been developed and applied for the detection of prophages (viral genomes integrated in a microbial genome, new types of microbial genomic data are emerging that are more fragmented and larger scale, such as Single-cell Amplified Genomes (SAGs of uncultivated organisms or genomic fragments assembled from metagenomic sequencing. Here, we present VirSorter, a tool designed to detect viral signal in these different types of microbial sequence data in both a reference-dependent and reference-independent manner, leveraging probabilistic models and extensive virome data to maximize detection of novel viruses. Performance testing shows that VirSorter’s prophage prediction capability compares to that of available prophage predictors for complete genomes, but is superior in predicting viral sequences outside of a host genome (i.e., from extrachromosomal prophages, lytic infections, or partially assembled prophages. Furthermore, VirSorter outperforms existing tools for fragmented genomic and metagenomic datasets, and can identify viral signal in assembled sequence (contigs as short as 3kb, while providing near-perfect identification (>95% Recall and 100% Precision on contigs of at least 10kb. Because VirSorter scales to large datasets, it can also be used in “reverse” to more confidently identify viral sequence in viral metagenomes by sorting away cellular DNA whether derived from gene transfer agents, generalized transduction or contamination. Finally, VirSorter is made

  18. Macrophage Transactivation for Chemokine Production Identified as a Negative Regulator of Granulomatous Inflammation Using Agent-Based Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Moyo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Cellular activation in trans by interferons, cytokines, and chemokines is a commonly recognized mechanism to amplify immune effector function and limit pathogen spread. However, an optimal host response also requires that collateral damage associated with inflammation is limited. This may be particularly so in the case of granulomatous inflammation, where an excessive number and/or excessively florid granulomas can have significant pathological consequences. Here, we have combined transcriptomics, agent-based modeling, and in vivo experimental approaches to study constraints on hepatic granuloma formation in a murine model of experimental leishmaniasis. We demonstrate that chemokine production by non-infected Kupffer cells in the Leishmania donovani-infected liver promotes competition with infected KCs for available iNKT cells, ultimately inhibiting the extent of granulomatous inflammation. We propose trans-activation for chemokine production as a novel broadly applicable mechanism that may operate early in infection to limit excessive focal inflammation.

  19. Anti-viral RNA silencing: do we look like plants ?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lecellier Charles-Henri

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The anti-viral function of RNA silencing was first discovered in plants as a natural manifestation of the artificial 'co-suppression', which refers to the extinction of endogenous gene induced by homologous transgene. Because silencing components are conserved among most, if not all, eukaryotes, the question rapidly arose as to determine whether this process fulfils anti-viral functions in animals, such as insects and mammals. It appears that, whereas the anti-viral process seems to be similarly conserved from plants to insects, even in worms, RNA silencing does influence the replication of mammalian viruses but in a particular mode: micro(miRNAs, endogenous small RNAs naturally implicated in translational control, rather than virus-derived small interfering (siRNAs like in other organisms, are involved. In fact, these recent studies even suggest that RNA silencing may be beneficial for viral replication. Accordingly, several large DNA mammalian viruses have been shown to encode their own miRNAs. Here, we summarize the seminal studies that have implicated RNA silencing in viral infection and compare the different eukaryotic responses.

  20. A Herpesviral Immediate Early Protein Promotes Transcription Elongation of Viral Transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Hannah L; Dembowski, Jill A; DeLuca, Neal A

    2017-06-13

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) genes are transcribed by cellular RNA polymerase II (RNA Pol II). While four viral immediate early proteins (ICP4, ICP0, ICP27, and ICP22) function in some capacity in viral transcription, the mechanism by which ICP22 functions remains unclear. We observed that the FACT complex (comprised of SSRP1 and Spt16) was relocalized in infected cells as a function of ICP22. ICP22 was also required for the association of FACT and the transcription elongation factors SPT5 and SPT6 with viral genomes. We further demonstrated that the FACT complex interacts with ICP22 throughout infection. We therefore hypothesized that ICP22 recruits cellular transcription elongation factors to viral genomes for efficient transcription elongation of viral genes. We reevaluated the phenotype of an ICP22 mutant virus by determining the abundance of all viral mRNAs throughout infection by transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq). The accumulation of almost all viral mRNAs late in infection was reduced compared to the wild type, regardless of kinetic class. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq), we mapped the location of RNA Pol II on viral genes and found that RNA Pol II levels on the bodies of viral genes were reduced in the ICP22 mutant compared to wild-type virus. In contrast, the association of RNA Pol II with transcription start sites in the mutant was not reduced. Taken together, our results indicate that ICP22 plays a role in recruiting elongation factors like the FACT complex to the HSV-1 genome to allow for efficient viral transcription elongation late in viral infection and ultimately infectious virion production. IMPORTANCE HSV-1 interacts with many cellular proteins throughout productive infection. Here, we demonstrate the interaction of a viral protein, ICP22, with a subset of cellular proteins known to be involved in transcription elongation. We determined that ICP22 is required to recruit the FACT complex and other transcription

  1. Potyviral VPg enhances viral RNA Translation and inhibits reporter mRNA translation in planta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskelin, Katri; Hafrén, Anders; Rantalainen, Kimmo I; Mäkinen, Kristiina

    2011-09-01

    Viral protein genome-linked (VPg) plays a central role in several stages of potyvirus infection. This study sought to answer questions about the role of Potato virus A (PVA; genus Potyvirus) VPg in viral and host RNA expression. When expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves in trans, a dual role of VPg in translation is observed. It repressed the expression of monocistronic luciferase (luc) mRNA and simultaneously induced a significant upregulation in the expression of both replicating and nonreplicating PVA RNAs. This enhanced viral gene expression was due at least to the 5' untranslated region (UTR) of PVA RNA, eukaryotic initiation factors 4E and iso 4E [eIF4E/eIF(iso)4E], and the presence of a sufficient amount of VPg. Coexpression of VPg with viral RNA increased the viral RNA amount, which was not the case with the monocistronic mRNA. Both mutations at certain lysine residues in PVA VPg and eIF4E/eIF(iso)4E depletion reduced its ability to upregulate the viral RNA expression. These modifications were also involved in VPg-mediated downregulation of monocistronic luc expression. These results suggest that VPg can titrate eIF4Es from capped monocistronic RNAs. Because VPg-mediated enhancement of viral gene expression required eIF4Es, it is possible that VPg directs eIF4Es to promote viral RNA expression. From this study it is evident that VPg can serve as a specific regulator of PVA expression by boosting the viral RNA amounts as well as the accumulation of viral translation products. Such a mechanism could function to protect viral RNA from being degraded and to secure efficient production of coat protein (CP) for virion formation.

  2. Potyviral VPg Enhances Viral RNA Translation and Inhibits Reporter mRNA Translation In Planta▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskelin, Katri; Hafrén, Anders; Rantalainen, Kimmo I.; Mäkinen, Kristiina

    2011-01-01

    Viral protein genome-linked (VPg) plays a central role in several stages of potyvirus infection. This study sought to answer questions about the role of Potato virus A (PVA; genus Potyvirus) VPg in viral and host RNA expression. When expressed in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves in trans, a dual role of VPg in translation is observed. It repressed the expression of monocistronic luciferase (luc) mRNA and simultaneously induced a significant upregulation in the expression of both replicating and nonreplicating PVA RNAs. This enhanced viral gene expression was due at least to the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of PVA RNA, eukaryotic initiation factors 4E and iso 4E [eIF4E/eIF(iso)4E], and the presence of a sufficient amount of VPg. Coexpression of VPg with viral RNA increased the viral RNA amount, which was not the case with the monocistronic mRNA. Both mutations at certain lysine residues in PVA VPg and eIF4E/eIF(iso)4E depletion reduced its ability to upregulate the viral RNA expression. These modifications were also involved in VPg-mediated downregulation of monocistronic luc expression. These results suggest that VPg can titrate eIF4Es from capped monocistronic RNAs. Because VPg-mediated enhancement of viral gene expression required eIF4Es, it is possible that VPg directs eIF4Es to promote viral RNA expression. From this study it is evident that VPg can serve as a specific regulator of PVA expression by boosting the viral RNA amounts as well as the accumulation of viral translation products. Such a mechanism could function to protect viral RNA from being degraded and to secure efficient production of coat protein (CP) for virion formation. PMID:21697470

  3. Recycling Endosomes and Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale-Costa, Sílvia; Amorim, Maria João

    2016-03-08

    Many viruses exploit specific arms of the endomembrane system. The unique composition of each arm prompts the development of remarkably specific interactions between viruses and sub-organelles. This review focuses on the viral-host interactions occurring on the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC), and mediated by its regulatory Ras-related in brain (Rab) GTPase Rab11. This protein regulates trafficking from the ERC and the trans-Golgi network to the plasma membrane. Such transport comprises intricate networks of proteins/lipids operating sequentially from the membrane of origin up to the cell surface. Rab11 is also emerging as a critical factor in an increasing number of infections by major animal viruses, including pathogens that provoke human disease. Understanding the interplay between the ERC and viruses is a milestone in human health. Rab11 has been associated with several steps of the viral lifecycles by unclear processes that use sophisticated diversified host machinery. For this reason, we first explore the state-of-the-art on processes regulating membrane composition and trafficking. Subsequently, this review outlines viral interactions with the ERC, highlighting current knowledge on viral-host binding partners. Finally, using examples from the few mechanistic studies available we emphasize how ERC functions are adjusted during infection to remodel cytoskeleton dynamics, innate immunity and membrane composition.

  4. Ventilator and viral induced inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennus, M.P.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis expands current knowledge on ventilator induced lung injury and provides insights on the immunological effects of mechanical ventilation during viral respiratory infections. The experimental studies in the first part of this thesis improve our understanding of how mechanical ventilation

  5. Non-Viral Deoxyribonucleoside Kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Louise Slot; Munch-Petersen, Birgitte; Knecht, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleoside kinases (dNKs) phosphorylate deoxyribonucleosides to their corresponding monophosphate compounds. dNks also phosphorylate deoxyribonucleoside analogues that are used in the treatment of cancer or viral infections. The study of the mammalian dNKs has therefore always been of gr...

  6. Viral hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juei-Low, Sung [ed.; National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei (Republic of China Taiwan). Department of Internal Medicine; Ding-Shinn, Chen [ed.; National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei (Republic of China Taiwan). Hepatitis Research Center National Taiwan University College of Medicine, Taipei (Republic of China Taiwan). Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine

    1990-01-01

    Two papers in this volume are in INIS scope, respectively dealing with MRI in the study of viral hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma, and The use of {sup 131}I-labeled Lipidol in the diagnosis of hepato-cellular carcinoma. (H.W.). refs.; figs.; tabs.

  7. Viral hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung Juei-Low; Chen Ding-Shinn

    1990-01-01

    Two papers in this volume are in INIS scope, respectively dealing with MRI in the study of viral hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma, and The use of 131 I-labeled Lipidol in the diagnosis of hepato-cellular carcinoma. (H.W.). refs.; figs.; tabs

  8. Inhibition of E2F-1 transactivation by direct binding of the retinoblastoma protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, K; Harlow, E; Fattaey, A

    1993-01-01

    Loss of a functional retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene product, pRB, is a key step in the development of many human tumors. pRB is a negative regulator of cell proliferation and appears to participate in control of entry into the S phase of the cell cycle. The recent demonstration that pRB binds...

  9. Inhibition of β-catenin-mediated transactivation by flavanone in AGS gastric cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chi Hoon; Hahm, Eun Ryeong; Lee, Ju Hyung; Jung, Kyung Chae; Yang, Chul Hak

    2005-01-01

    Recently, data which prove that Wnt pathway activation may be an early event in multistep carcinogenesis in the stomach have been accumulating. We examined the effect of flavanone against β-catenin/Tcf signaling in AGS gastric cancer cells. Reporter gene assay showed that flavanone inhibited β-catenin/Tcf signaling efficiently. In addition, the inhibition of β-catenin/Tcf signaling by flavanone in HEK293 cells transiently transfected with constitutively mutant β-catenin gene, whose product is not phosphorylated by GSK3β, indicates that its inhibitory mechanism was related to β-catenin itself or downstream components. To investigate the precise inhibitory mechanism, we performed immunofluorescence, Western blot, and EMSA. As a result, our data revealed that there is no change of β-catenin distribution and of nuclear β-catenin levels through flavanone. In addition, the binding of Tcf complexes to DNA is not influenced by flavanone. The β-catenin/Tcf transcriptional target gene cyclinD1 was downregulated by flavanone. These data suggest that flavanone inhibits the transcription of β-catenin/Tcf responsive genes, by modulating Tcf activity without disrupting β-catenin/Tcf complex formation

  10. The Effect of MHC Class II Transactivator on the Growth and Metastasis of Breast Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-01

    F. Manca, and R. S. Accolla. 1998. HLA class II expression in uninducible hepatocarcinoma cells after transfection of AIR-1 gene product CIITA...Cestari, A. D’Agostino, ’ A M Megiovanni, F. Manca, and R. S. Accolla. 1998. HLA class II expression in uninducible hepatocarcinoma cells after

  11. Reverse transcriptase directs viral evolution in a deep ocean methane seep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, B. G.; Bagby, S. C.

    2013-12-01

    Deep ocean methane seeps are sites of intense microbial activity, with complex communities fueled by aerobic and anaerobic methanotrophy. Methane consumption in these communities has a substantial impact on the global carbon cycle, yet little is known about their evolutionary history or their likely evolutionary trajectories in a warming ocean. As in other marine systems, viral predation and virally mediated horizontal gene transfer are expected to be major drivers of evolutionary change in these communities; however, the host cells' resistance to cultivation has impeded direct study of the viral population. We conducted a metagenomic study of viruses in the anoxic sediments of a deep methane seep in the Santa Monica Basin in the Southern California Bight. We retrieved 1660 partial viral genomes, tentatively assigning 1232 to bacterial hosts and 428 to archaea. One abundant viral genome, likely hosted by Clostridia species present in the sediment, was found to encode a diversity-generating retroelement (DGR), a module for reverse transcriptase-mediated directed mutagenesis of a distal tail fiber protein. While DGRs have previously been described in the viruses of human pathogens, where diversification of viral tail fibers permits infection of a range of host cell types, to our knowledge this is the first description of such an element in a marine virus. By providing a mechanism for massively broadening potential host range, the presence of DGRs in these systems may have a major impact on the prevalence of virally mediated horizontal gene transfer, and even on the phylogenetic distances across which genes are moved.

  12. Mast cells in viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Witczak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available  There are some premises suggesting that mast cells are involved in the mechanisms of anti-virus defense and in viral disease pathomechanisms. Mast cells are particularly numerous at the portals of infections and thus may have immediate and easy contact with the external environment and invading pathogens. These cells express receptors responsible for recognition of virus-derived PAMP molecules, mainly Toll-like receptors (TLR3, TLR7/8 and TLR9, but also RIG-I-like and NOD-like molecules. Furthermore, mast cells generate various mediators, cytokines and chemokines which modulate the intensity of inflammation and regulate the course of innate and adaptive anti-viral immunity. Indirect evidence for the role of mast cells in viral infections is also provided by clinical observations and results of animal studies. Currently, more and more data indicate that mast cells can be infected by some viruses (dengue virus, adenoviruses, hantaviruses, cytomegaloviruses, reoviruses, HIV-1 virus. It is also demonstrated that mast cells can release pre formed mediators as well as synthesize de novo eicosanoids in response to stimulation by viruses. Several data indicate that virus-stimulated mast cells secrete cytokines and chemokines, including interferons as well as chemokines with a key role in NK and Tc lymphocyte influx. Moreover, some information indicates that mast cell stimulation via TLR3, TLR7/8 and TLR9 can affect their adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins and chemotaxis, and influence expression of some membrane molecules. Critical analysis of current data leads to the conclusion that it is not yet possible to make definitive statements about the role of mast cells in innate and acquired defense mechanisms developing in the course of viral infection and/or pathomechanisms of viral diseases.

  13. Hijacking of the O-GlcNAcZYME complex by the HTLV-1 Tax oncoprotein facilitates viral transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groussaud, Damien; Khair, Mostafa; Tollenaere, Armelle I; Waast, Laetitia; Kuo, Mei-Shiue; Mangeney, Marianne; Martella, Christophe; Fardini, Yann; Coste, Solène; Souidi, Mouloud; Benit, Laurence; Pique, Claudine; Issad, Tarik

    2017-07-01

    The viral Tax oncoprotein plays a key role in both Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-replication and HTLV-1-associated pathologies, notably adult T-cell leukemia. Tax governs the transcription from the viral 5'LTR, enhancing thereby its own expression, via the recruitment of dimers of phosphorylated CREB to cAMP-response elements located within the U3 region (vCRE). In addition to phosphorylation, CREB is also the target of O-GlcNAcylation, another reversible post-translational modification involved in a wide range of diseases, including cancers. O-GlcNAcylation consists in the addition of O-linked-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) on Serine or Threonine residues, a process controlled by two enzymes: O-GlcNAc transferase (OGT), which transfers O-GlcNAc on proteins, and O-GlcNAcase (OGA), which removes it. In this study, we investigated the status of O-GlcNAcylation enzymes in HTLV-1-transformed T cells. We found that OGA mRNA and protein expression levels are increased in HTLV-1-transformed T cells as compared to control T cell lines while OGT expression is unchanged. However, higher OGA production coincides with a reduction in OGA specific activity, showing that HTLV-1-transformed T cells produce high level of a less active form of OGA. Introducing Tax into HEK-293T cells or Tax-negative HTLV-1-transformed TL-om1 T cells is sufficient to inhibit OGA activity and increase total O-GlcNAcylation, without any change in OGT activity. Furthermore, Tax interacts with the OGT/OGA complex and inhibits the activity of OGT-bound OGA. Pharmacological inhibition of OGA increases CREB O-GlcNAcylation as well as HTLV-1-LTR transactivation by Tax and CREB recruitment to the LTR. Moreover, overexpression of wild-type CREB but not a CREB protein mutated on a previously described O-GlcNAcylation site enhances Tax-mediated LTR transactivation. Finally, both OGT and OGA are recruited to the LTR. These findings reveal the interplay between Tax and the O-GlcNAcylation pathway

  14. Surveillance for Viral Hepatitis - United States, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resource Center Anonymous Feedback Viral Hepatitis Surveillance for Viral Hepatitis – United States, 2014 Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... Cases Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Discussion Hepatitis A virus Index PAGE DESCRIPTION Table 2.1 Reported ...

  15. Host-derived viral transporter protein for nitrogen uptake in infected marine phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambouvet, Aurélie; Milner, David S.; Attah, Victoria; Terrado, Ramón; Lovejoy, Connie; Moreau, Hervé; Derelle, Évelyne; Richards, Thomas A.

    2017-01-01

    Phytoplankton community structure is shaped by both bottom–up factors, such as nutrient availability, and top–down processes, such as predation. Here we show that marine viruses can blur these distinctions, being able to amend how host cells acquire nutrients from their environment while also predating and lysing their algal hosts. Viral genomes often encode genes derived from their host. These genes may allow the virus to manipulate host metabolism to improve viral fitness. We identify in the genome of a phytoplankton virus, which infects the small green alga Ostreococcus tauri, a host-derived ammonium transporter. This gene is transcribed during infection and when expressed in yeast mutants the viral protein is located to the plasma membrane and rescues growth when cultured with ammonium as the sole nitrogen source. We also show that viral infection alters the nature of nitrogen compound uptake of host cells, by both increasing substrate affinity and allowing the host to access diverse nitrogen sources. This is important because the availability of nitrogen often limits phytoplankton growth. Collectively, these data show that a virus can acquire genes encoding nutrient transporters from a host genome and that expression of the viral gene can alter the nutrient uptake behavior of host cells. These results have implications for understanding how viruses manipulate the physiology and ecology of phytoplankton, influence marine nutrient cycles, and act as vectors for horizontal gene transfer. PMID:28827361

  16. Biodegradable nanoparticles for gene therapy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein; He, Wen-Jie; Chiang, Chiao-Hsi; Hong, Po-Da; Yu, Dah-Shyong; Domb, Abraham J.; Ou, Keng-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Rapid propagations in materials technology together with biology have initiated great hopes in the possibility of treating many diseases by gene therapy technology. Viral and non-viral gene carriers are currently applied for gene delivery. Non-viral technology is safe and effective for the delivery of genetic materials to cells and tissues. Non-viral systems are based on plasmid expression containing a gene encoding a therapeutic protein and synthetic biodegradable nanoparticles as a safe carrier of gene. Biodegradable nanoparticles have shown great interest in drug and gene delivery systems as they are easy to be synthesized and have no side effect in cells and tissues. This review provides a critical view of applications of biodegradable nanoparticles on gene therapy technology to enhance the localization of in vitro and in vivo and improve the function of administered genes

  17. Faktor Risiko Non Viral Pada Karsinoma Nasofaring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukri Rahman

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak           Latar belakang: Karsinoma nasofaring adalah tumor ganas epitel nasofaring yang sampai saat ini penyebabnya belum diketahui, infeksi virus Epstein Barr dilaporkan sebagai faktor dominan terjadinya karsinoma nasofaring tetapi faktor non viral juga berperan untuk timbulnya keganasan nasofaring. Tujuan: Untuk mengetahui faktor non viral  yang dapat meningkatkan kejadian karsinoma nasofaring sehingga dapat mencegah dan menghindari faktor-faktor non viral tersebut. Tinjauan Pustaka: Karsinoma nasofaring merupakan tumor ganas epitel nasofaring yang penyebabnya berhubungan dengan faktor viral dan non viral diantaranya asap rokok, ikan asin, formaldehid, genetik, asap kayu bakar , debu kayu, infeksi kronik telinga hidung tenggorok, alkohol dan obat tradisional. Kesimpulan: Pembuktian secara klinis dan ilmiah terhadap faktor non viral sebagai penyebab timbulnya karsinoma nasofaring masih belum dapat dijelaskan secara pasti. Faktor non viral merupakan salah satu faktor risiko yang dapat meningkatkan angka kejadian timbulnya keganasan nasofaring Kata kunci: karsinoma nasofaring, faktor risiko, non viral AbstractBackground: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma is a malignant epithelial nasopharyngeal tumor that until now the cause still unknown, Epstein barr virus infection had reported as predominant occurance of nasopharyngeal carcinoma but non viral factors may also contribute to the onset of the incidence of nasopharyngeal malignancy. Purpose: To find non viral factors that may increase the incidence of nasopharyngel carcinoma in order to prevent and avoid non-viral factors Literature: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma is a malignant tumor that causes nasopharyngeal epithelium associated with viral and non-viral factors such as cigarette smoke, salt fish, formaldehyde, genetic, wood smoke ,wood dust, ear nose throat chronic infections, alcohol, and traditional medicine. Conclusion: Clinically and scientifically proving the non-viral factors as

  18. Assembly of viral genomes from metagenomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.L. Smits (Saskia); R. Bodewes (Rogier); A. Ruiz-Gonzalez (Aritz); V. Baumgärtner (Volkmar); M.P.G. Koopmans D.V.M. (Marion); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); A. Schürch (Anita)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractViral infections remain a serious global health issue. Metagenomic approaches are increasingly used in the detection of novel viral pathogens but also to generate complete genomes of uncultivated viruses. In silico identification of complete viral genomes from sequence data would allow

  19. Viral O-GalNAc peptide epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olofsson, Sigvard; Blixt, Klas Ola; Bergström, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    Viral envelope glycoproteins are major targets for antibodies that bind to and inactivate viral particles. The capacity of a viral vaccine to induce virus-neutralizing antibodies is often used as a marker for vaccine efficacy. Yet the number of known neutralization target epitopes is restricted o...

  20. Viral commercials: the consumer as marketeer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, P.E.; Lucassen, P.; Kregting, G.H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Research into the reasons why consumers pass along viral commercials: their motives, the content characteristics of viral commercials and the medium context in which viral commercials appear. Based on the uses and gratifications perspective this study has determined which motives of consumers,

  1. Expression Study of Banana Pathogenic Resistance Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenny M. Dwivany

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Banana is one of the world's most important trade commodities. However, infection of banana pathogenic fungi (Fusarium oxysporum race 4 is one of the major causes of decreasing production in Indonesia. Genetic engineering has become an alternative way to control this problem by isolating genes that involved in plant defense mechanism against pathogens. Two of the important genes are API5 and ChiI1, each gene encodes apoptosis inhibitory protein and chitinase enzymes. The purpose of this study was to study the expression of API5 and ChiI1 genes as candidate pathogenic resistance genes. The amplified fragments were then cloned, sequenced, and confirmed with in silico studies. Based on sequence analysis, it is showed that partial API5 gene has putative transactivation domain and ChiI1 has 9 chitinase family GH19 protein motifs. Data obtained from this study will contribute in banana genetic improvement.

  2. Endocrine aspects of cancer gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzon, Luisa; Boscaro, Marco; Palù, Giorgio

    2004-02-01

    The field of cancer gene therapy is in continuous expansion, and technology is quickly moving ahead as far as gene targeting and regulation of gene expression are concerned. This review focuses on the endocrine aspects of gene therapy, including the possibility to exploit hormone and hormone receptor functions for regulating therapeutic gene expression, the use of endocrine-specific genes as new therapeutic tools, the effects of viral vector delivery and transgene expression on the endocrine system, and the endocrine response to viral vector delivery. Present ethical concerns of gene therapy and the risk of germ cell transduction are also discussed, along with potential lines of innovation to improve cell and gene targeting.

  3. Viral diseases and human evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leal Élcio de Souza

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of man with viral agents was possibly a key factor shaping human evolution, culture and civilization from its outset. Evidence of the effect of disease, since the early stages of human speciation, through pre-historical times to the present suggest that the types of viruses associated with man changed in time. As human populations progressed technologically, they grew in numbers and density. As a consequence different viruses found suitable conditions to thrive and establish long-lasting associations with man. Although not all viral agents cause disease and some may in fact be considered beneficial, the present situation of overpopulation, poverty and ecological inbalance may have devastating effets on human progress. Recently emerged diseases causing massive pandemics (eg., HIV-1 and HCV, dengue, etc. are becoming formidable challenges, which may have a direct impact on the fate of our species.

  4. APLASTIC ANEMIA AND VIRAL HEPATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cudillo

    2009-11-01

    Liver histology is characterized by T cell infiltrating the parenchyma as reported in acute hepatitis. Recently in HAA it has been demonstrated intrahepatic  and blood lymphocytes with  T cell repertoire similar to that of confirmed viral acute hepatitis. The expanded T cell clones return to a normal distribution after response to immunosuppressive treatment, suggesting the antigen or T cell clearance. Therapeutic options are the same as acquired aplastic anemia.

  5. [Immunotherapy for refractory viral infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morio, Tomohiro; Fujita, Yuriko; Takahashi, Satoshi

    Various antiviral agents have been developed, which are sometimes associated with toxicity, development of virus-resistant strain, and high cost. Virus-specific T-cell (VST) therapy provides an alternative curative therapy that can be effective for a prolonged time without eliciting drug resistance. VSTs can be directly separated using several types of capture devices and can be obtained by stimulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells with viral antigens (virus, protein, or peptide) loaded on antigen-presenting cells (APC). APC can be transduced with virus-antigen coding plasmid or pulsed with overlapping peptides. VST therapy has been studied in drug non-responsive viral infections after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Several previous studies have demonstrated the efficacy of VST therapy without significant severe GVHD. In addition, VSTs from a third-party donor have been prepared and administered for post-HCT viral infection. Although target viruses of VSTs include herpes virus species and polyomavirus species, a wide variety of pathogens, such as papillomavirus, intracellular bacteria, and fungi, can be treated by pathogen-specific T-cells. Perhaps, these specific T-cells could be used for opportunistic infections in other immunocompromised hosts in the near future.

  6. An integrated approach to elucidate the intra-viral and viral-cellular protein interaction networks of a gamma-herpesvirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoying Lee

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide yeast two-hybrid (Y2H screens were conducted to elucidate the molecular functions of open reading frames (ORFs encoded by murine γ-herpesvirus 68 (MHV-68. A library of 84 MHV-68 genes and gene fragments was generated in a Gateway entry plasmid and transferred to Y2H vectors. All possible pair-wise interactions between viral proteins were tested in the Y2H assay, resulting in the identification of 23 intra-viral protein-protein interactions (PPIs. Seventy percent of the interactions between viral proteins were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation experiments. To systematically investigate virus-cellular protein interactions, the MHV-68 Y2H constructs were screened against a cellular cDNA library, yielding 243 viral-cellular PPIs involving 197 distinct cellar proteins. Network analyses indicated that cellular proteins targeted by MHV-68 had more partners in the cellular PPI network and were located closer to each other than expected by chance. Taking advantage of this observation, we scored the cellular proteins based on their network distances from other MHV-68-interacting proteins and segregated them into high (Y2H-HP and low priority/not-scored (Y2H-LP/NS groups. Significantly more genes from Y2H-HP altered MHV-68 replication when their expression was inhibited with siRNAs (53% of genes from Y2H-HP, 21% of genes from Y2H-LP/NS, and 16% of genes randomly chosen from the human PPI network; p<0.05. Enriched Gene Ontology (GO terms in the Y2H-HP group included regulation of apoptosis, protein kinase cascade, post-translational protein modification, transcription from RNA polymerase II promoter, and IκB kinase/NFκB cascade. Functional validation assays indicated that PCBP1, which interacted with MHV-68 ORF34, may be involved in regulating late virus gene expression in a manner consistent with the effects of its viral interacting partner. Our study integrated Y2H screening with multiple functional validation approaches to create

  7. p53 Activation following Rift Valley fever virus infection contributes to cell death and viral production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Austin

    Full Text Available Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV is an emerging viral zoonosis that is responsible for devastating outbreaks among livestock and is capable of causing potentially fatal disease in humans. Studies have shown that upon infection, certain viruses have the capability of utilizing particular cellular signaling pathways to propagate viral infection. Activation of p53 is important for the DNA damage signaling cascade, initiation of apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and transcriptional regulation of multiple genes. The current study focuses on the role of p53 signaling in RVFV infection and viral replication. These results show an up-regulation of p53 phosphorylation at several serine sites after RVFV MP-12 infection that is highly dependent on the viral protein NSs. qRT-PCR data showed a transcriptional up-regulation of several p53 targeted genes involved in cell cycle and apoptosis regulation following RVFV infection. Cell viability assays demonstrate that loss of p53 results in less RVFV induced cell death. Furthermore, decreased viral titers in p53 null cells indicate that RVFV utilizes p53 to enhance viral production. Collectively, these experiments indicate that the p53 signaling pathway is utilized during RVFV infection to induce cell death and increase viral production.

  8. Biodegradable charged polyester-based vectors (BCPVs) as an efficient non-viral transfection nanoagent for gene knockdown of the BCR-ABL hybrid oncogene in a human chronic myeloid leukemia cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chengbin; Panwar, Nishtha; Wang, Yucheng; Zhang, Butian; Liu, Maixian; Toh, Huiting; Yoon, Ho Sup; Tjin, Swee Chuan; Chong, Peter Han Joo; Law, Wing-Cheung; Chen, Chih-Kuang; Yong, Ken-Tye

    2016-04-01

    First-line therapy of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) has always involved the use of BCR-ABL tyrosine-kinase inhibitors which is associated with an abnormal chromosome called Philadelphia chromosome. Although the overall survival rate has been improved by the current therapeutic regime, the presence of resistance has resulted in limited efficacy. In this study, an RNA interference (RNAi)-based therapeutic regime is proposed with the aim to knockdown the BCR-ABL hybrid oncogene using small interfering RNA (siRNA). The siRNA transfection rates have usually been limited due to the declining contact probability among polyplexes and the non-adherent nature of leukemic cells. Our work aims at addressing this limitation by using a biodegradable charged polyester-based vector (BCPV) as a nanocarrier for the delivery of BCR-ABL-specific siRNA to the suspension culture of a K562 CML cell line. BCR-ABL siRNAs were encapsulated in the BCPVs by electrostatic force. Cell internalization was facilitated by the BCPV and assessed by confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. The regulation of the BCR-ABL level in K562 cells as a result of RNAi was analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). We observed that BCPV was able to form stable nanoplexes with siRNA molecules, even in the presence of fetal bovine serum (FBS), and successfully assisted in vitro siRNA transfection in the non-adherent K562 cells. As a consequence of downregulation of BCR-ABL, BCPV-siRNA nanoplexes inhibited cell proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis. All results were compared with a commercial transfection reagent, Lipofectamine2000™, which served as a positive control. More importantly, this class of non-viral vector exhibits biodegradable features and negligible cytotoxicity, thus providing a versatile platform to deliver siRNA to non-adherent leukemia cells with high transfection efficiency by effectively overcoming extra- and intra-cellular barriers. Due to the excellent in vitro

  9. Parvovirus b19 DNA CpG dinucleotide methylation and epigenetic regulation of viral expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Bonvicini

    Full Text Available CpG DNA methylation is one of the main epigenetic modifications playing a role in the control of gene expression. For DNA viruses whose genome has the ability to integrate in the host genome or to maintain as a latent episome, a correlation has been found between the extent of DNA methylation and viral quiescence. No information is available for Parvovirus B19, a human pathogenic virus, which is capable of both lytic and persistent infections. Within Parvovirus B19 genome, the inverted terminal regions display all the characteristic signatures of a genomic CpG island; therefore we hypothesised a role of CpG dinucleotide methylation in the regulation of viral genome expression.The analysis of CpG dinucleotide methylation of Parvovirus B19 DNA was carried out by an aptly designed quantitative real-time PCR assay on bisulfite-modified DNA. The effects of CpG methylation on the regulation of viral genome expression were first investigated by transfection of either unmethylated or in vitro methylated viral DNA in a model cell line, showing that methylation of viral DNA was correlated to lower expression levels of the viral genome. Then, in the course of in vitro infections in different cellular environments, it was observed that absence of viral expression and genome replication were both correlated to increasing levels of CpG methylation of viral DNA. Finally, the presence of CpG methylation was documented in viral DNA present in bioptic samples, indicating the occurrence and a possible role of this epigenetic modification in the course of natural infections.The presence of an epigenetic level of regulation of viral genome expression, possibly correlated to the silencing of the viral genome and contributing to the maintenance of the virus in tissues, can be relevant to the balance and outcome of the different types of infection associated to Parvovirus B19.

  10. Parvovirus B19 DNA CpG Dinucleotide Methylation and Epigenetic Regulation of Viral Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonvicini, Francesca; Manaresi, Elisabetta; Di Furio, Francesca; De Falco, Luisa; Gallinella, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    CpG DNA methylation is one of the main epigenetic modifications playing a role in the control of gene expression. For DNA viruses whose genome has the ability to integrate in the host genome or to maintain as a latent episome, a correlation has been found between the extent of DNA methylation and viral quiescence. No information is available for Parvovirus B19, a human pathogenic virus, which is capable of both lytic and persistent infections. Within Parvovirus B19 genome, the inverted terminal regions display all the characteristic signatures of a genomic CpG island; therefore we hypothesised a role of CpG dinucleotide methylation in the regulation of viral genome expression. The analysis of CpG dinucleotide methylation of Parvovirus B19 DNA was carried out by an aptly designed quantitative real-time PCR assay on bisulfite-modified DNA. The effects of CpG methylation on the regulation of viral genome expression were first investigated by transfection of either unmethylated or in vitro methylated viral DNA in a model cell line, showing that methylation of viral DNA was correlated to lower expression levels of the viral genome. Then, in the course of in vitro infections in different cellular environments, it was observed that absence of viral expression and genome replication were both correlated to increasing levels of CpG methylation of viral DNA. Finally, the presence of CpG methylation was documented in viral DNA present in bioptic samples, indicating the occurrence and a possible role of this epigenetic modification in the course of natural infections. The presence of an epigenetic level of regulation of viral genome expression, possibly correlated to the silencing of the viral genome and contributing to the maintenance of the virus in tissues, can be relevant to the balance and outcome of the different types of infection associated to Parvovirus B19. PMID:22413013

  11. MicroRNA Roles in the NF-κB Signaling Pathway during Viral Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeqian Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available NF-κB signaling network is a crucial component of innate immunity. miRNAs are a subtype of small noncoding RNAs, involved in regulation of gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. Increasing evidence has emerged that miRNAs play an important role in regulation of NF-κB signaling pathway during viral infections. Both host and viral miRNAs are attributed to modulation of NF-κB activity, thus affecting viral infection and clearance. Understandings of the mechanisms of these miRNAs will open a direction for development of novel antivirus drugs.

  12. Laboratory procedures to generate viral metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Rebecca V; Haynes, Matthew; Breitbart, Mya; Wegley, Linda; Rohwer, Forest

    2009-01-01

    This collection of laboratory protocols describes the steps to collect viruses from various samples with the specific aim of generating viral metagenome sequence libraries (viromes). Viral metagenomics, the study of uncultured viral nucleic acid sequences from different biomes, relies on several concentration, purification, extraction, sequencing and heuristic bioinformatic methods. No single technique can provide an all-inclusive approach, and therefore the protocols presented here will be discussed in terms of hypothetical projects. However, care must be taken to individualize each step depending on the source and type of viral-particles. This protocol is a description of the processes we have successfully used to: (i) concentrate viral particles from various types of samples, (ii) eliminate contaminating cells and free nucleic acids and (iii) extract, amplify and purify viral nucleic acids. Overall, a sample can be processed to isolate viral nucleic acids suitable for high-throughput sequencing in approximately 1 week.

  13. Viral vectors for production of recombinant proteins in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lico, Chiara; Chen, Qiang; Santi, Luca

    2008-08-01

    Global demand for recombinant proteins has steadily accelerated for the last 20 years. These recombinant proteins have a wide range of important applications, including vaccines and therapeutics for human and animal health, industrial enzymes, new materials and components of novel nano-particles for various applications. The majority of recombinant proteins are produced by traditional biological "factories," that is, predominantly mammalian and microbial cell cultures along with yeast and insect cells. However, these traditional technologies cannot satisfy the increasing market demand due to prohibitive capital investment requirements. During the last two decades, plants have been under intensive investigation to provide an alternative system for cost-effective, highly scalable, and safe production of recombinant proteins. Although the genetic engineering of plant viral vectors for heterologous gene expression can be dated back to the early 1980s, recent understanding of plant virology and technical progress in molecular biology have allowed for significant improvements and fine tuning of these vectors. These breakthroughs enable the flourishing of a variety of new viral-based expression systems and their wide application by academic and industry groups. In this review, we describe the principal plant viral-based production strategies and the latest plant viral expression systems, with a particular focus on the variety of proteins produced and their applications. We will summarize the recent progress in the downstream processing of plant materials for efficient extraction and purification of recombinant proteins. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. DNA cleavage enzymes for treatment of persistent viral infections: Recent advances and the pathway forward

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Nicholas D., E-mail: nweber@fhcrc.org [Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Ave N, E5-110, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States); Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Aubert, Martine, E-mail: maubert@fhcrc.org [Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Ave N, E5-110, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States); Dang, Chung H., E-mail: cdang@fhcrc.org [Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Ave N, E5-110, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States); Stone, Daniel, E-mail: dstone2@fhcrc.org [Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Ave N, E5-110, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States); Jerome, Keith R., E-mail: kjerome@fhcrc.org [Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Ave N, E5-110, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States); Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Department of Microbiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Treatment for most persistent viral infections consists of palliative drug options rather than curative approaches. This is often because long-lasting viral DNA in infected cells is not affected by current antivirals, providing a source for viral persistence and reactivation. Targeting latent viral DNA itself could therefore provide a basis for novel curative strategies. DNA cleavage enzymes can be used to induce targeted mutagenesis of specific genes, including those of exogenous viruses. Although initial in vitro and even in vivo studies have been carried out using DNA cleavage enzymes targeting various viruses, many questions still remain concerning the feasibility of these strategies as they transition into preclinical research. Here, we review the most recent findings on DNA cleavage enzymes for human viral infections, consider the most relevant animal models for several human viral infections, and address issues regarding safety and enzyme delivery. Results from well-designed in vivo studies will ideally provide answers to the most urgent remaining questions, and allow continued progress toward clinical application. - Highlights: • Recent in vitro and in vivo results for DNA cleavage enzymes targeting persistent viral infections. • Analysis of the best animal models for testing enzymes for HBV, HSV, HIV and HPV. • Challenges facing in vivo delivery of therapeutic enzymes for persistent viral infections. • Safety issues to be addressed with proper animal studies.

  15. Phage and Nucleocytoplasmic Large Viral Sequences Dominate Coral Viromes from the Arabian Gulf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Huda; Jose, Liny

    2017-01-01

    Corals that naturally thrive under extreme conditions are gaining increasing attention due to their importance as living models to understand the impact of global warming on world corals. Here, we present the first metagenomic study of viral communities in corals thriving in a thermally variable water body in which the temperature fluctuates between 11 and 39°C in different seasons. The viral assemblages of two of the most abundant massive ( Porites harrisoni ) and branching ( Acropora downingi ) corals in offshore and inshore reef systems in the northern Arabian Gulf were investigated. Samples were collected from five reef systems during summer, autumn and winter of 2011/2012. The two coral viromes contain 12 viral families, including 10 dsDNA viral families [Siphoviridae, Podoviridae, Myoviridae, Phycodnaviridae, Baculoviridae, Herpesviridae, Adenoviridae, Alloherpesviridae, Mimiviridae and one unclassified family], one-ssDNA viral family (Microviridae) and one RNA viral family (Retroviridae). Overall, sequences significantly similar to Podoviridae were the most abundant in the P. harrisoni and A. downingi viromes. Various morphological types of virus-like particles (VLPs) were confirmed in the healthy coral tissue by transmission electron microscopy, including large tailless VLPs and electron-dense core VLPs. Tailed bacteriophages were isolated from coral tissue using a plaque assay. Higher functional gene diversity was recorded in A. downingi than in P. harrisoni , and comparative metagenomics revealed that the Gulf viral assemblages are functionally distinct from Pacific Ocean coral viral communities.

  16. Phage and Nucleocytoplasmic Large Viral Sequences Dominate Coral Viromes from the Arabian Gulf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda Mahmoud

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Corals that naturally thrive under extreme conditions are gaining increasing attention due to their importance as living models to understand the impact of global warming on world corals. Here, we present the first metagenomic study of viral communities in corals thriving in a thermally variable water body in which the temperature fluctuates between 11 and 39°C in different seasons. The viral assemblages of two of the most abundant massive (Porites harrisoni and branching (Acropora downingi corals in offshore and inshore reef systems in the northern Arabian Gulf were investigated. Samples were collected from five reef systems during summer, autumn and winter of 2011/2012. The two coral viromes contain 12 viral families, including 10 dsDNA viral families [Siphoviridae, Podoviridae, Myoviridae, Phycodnaviridae, Baculoviridae, Herpesviridae, Adenoviridae, Alloherpesviridae, Mimiviridae and one unclassified family], one-ssDNA viral family (Microviridae and one RNA viral family (Retroviridae. Overall, sequences significantly similar to Podoviridae were the most abundant in the P. harrisoni and A. downingi viromes. Various morphological types of virus-like particles (VLPs were confirmed in the healthy coral tissue by transmission electron microscopy, including large tailless VLPs and electron-dense core VLPs. Tailed bacteriophages were isolated from coral tissue using a plaque assay. Higher functional gene diversity was recorded in A. downingi than in P. harrisoni, and comparative metagenomics revealed that the Gulf viral assemblages are functionally distinct from Pacific Ocean coral viral communities.

  17. Reading the viral signature by Toll-like receptors and other pattern recognition receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogensen, Trine H; Paludan, Søren R

    2005-03-01

    Successful host defense against viral infections relies on early production of type I interferon (IFN) and subsequent activation of a cellular cytotoxic response. The acute IFN and inflammatory response against virus infections is mediated by cellular pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) that recognize specific molecular structures on viral particles or products of viral replication. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) constitute a class of membrane-bound PRRs capable of detecting microbial infections. While TLR2 and TLR4, which were first identified to recognize Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, respectively, sense specific viral proteins on the cell surface, TLRs 3, 7, 8, and 9 serve as receptors for viral nucleic acids in endosomic compartments. In addition to TLRs, cells express cytoplasmic PRRs such as the RNA helicase retinoic acid inducible gene I and the kinase double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase R, both of which sense dsRNA, a characteristic signature of viral replication, and initiate a protective cellular response. Here we review the recent progress in our understanding of PRRs and viral infections and discuss the molecular and cellular responses evoked by virus-activated PRRs. Finally, we look into what is currently known about the role of PRRs in viral infections in vivo.

  18. Analysis of the Varicella-Zoster Virus IE62 N-Terminal Acidic Transactivating Domain and Its Interaction with the Human Mediator Complex▿

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Shinobu; Eletsky, Alexander; Szyperski, Thomas; Hay, John; Ruyechan, William T.

    2009-01-01

    The varicella-zoster virus major transactivator, IE62, contains a potent N-terminal acidic transcriptional activation domain (TAD). Our experiments revealed that the minimal IE62 TAD encompasses amino acids (aa) 19 to 67. We showed that the minimal TAD interacts with the human Mediator complex. Site-specific mutations revealed residues throughout the minimal TAD that are important for both activation and Mediator interaction. The TAD interacts directly with aa 402 to 590 of the MED25 subunit,...

  19. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester downregulates phospholipase D1 via direct binding and inhibition of NFκB transactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Mi Hee; Kang, Dong Woo [Department of Molecular Biology, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Yunjin [College of Pharmacy, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kang-Yell [Translational Research Center for Protein Function Control, Department of Biotechnology, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Min, Do Sik, E-mail: minds@pusan.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Biology, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-06

    Highlights: •We found CAFÉ, a natural product that suppresses expression and activity of PLD1. •CAPE decreased PLD1 expression by inhibiting NFκB transactivation. •CAPE rapidly inhibited PLD activity via its binding to a Cys837 of PLD1. •PLD1 downregulation by CAPE inhibited invasion and proliferation of glioma cells. -- Abstract: Upregulation of phospholipase D (PLD) is functionally linked with oncogenic signals and tumorigenesis. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is an active compound of propolis extract that exhibits anti-proliferative, anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, and antineoplastic properties. In this study, we demonstrated that CAPE suppressed the expression of PLD1 at the transcriptional level via inhibition of binding of NFκB to PLD1 promoter. Moreover, CAPE, but not its analogs, bound to a Cys837 residue of PLD1 and inhibited enzymatic activity of PLD. CAPE also decreased activation of matrix metalloproteinases-2 induced by phosphatidic acid, a product of PLD activity. Ultimately, CAPE-induced downregulation of PLD1 suppressed invasion and proliferation of glioma cells. Taken together, the results of this study indicate that CAPE might contribute to anti-neoplastic effect by targeting PLD1.

  20. Paired related homeobox 1 transactivates dopamine D2 receptor to maintain propagation and tumorigenicity of glioma-initiating cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yamu Li; Ying Liu; Shu Li; Xiaobing Jiang; Guangwei Du; Yan Zhou; Wen Wang; Fangyu Wang; Qiushuang Wu; Wei Li; Xiaoling Zhong; Kuan Tian; Tao Zeng; Liang Gao

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly invasive brain tumor with limited therapeutic means and poor prognosis.Recent studies indicate that glioma-initiating cells/glioma stem cells (GICs/GSCs) may be responsible for tumor initiation,infiltration,and recurrence.GlCs could aberrantly employ molecular machinery balancing self-renewal and differentiation of embryonic neural precursors.Here,we find that paired related homeobox 1 (PRRX1),a homeodomain transcription factor that was previously reported to control skeletal development,is expressed in cortical neural progenitors and is required for their self-renewal and proper differentiation.Further,PRRX1 is overrepresented in glioma samples and labels GlCs.Glioma cells and GlCs depleted with PRRX1 could not propagate in vitro or form tumors in the xenograft mouse model.The GIC self-renewal function regulated by PRRX1 is mediated by dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2).PRRX1 directly binds to the DRD2 promoter and transactivates its expression in GlCs.Blockage of the DRD2 signaling hampers GIC self-renewal,whereas its overexpression restores the propagating and tumorigenic potential of PRRX1-depleted GlCs.Finally,PRRX1 potentiates GlCs via DRD2-mediated extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) and AKT activation.Thus,our study suggests that therapeutic targeting the PRRX1-DRD2-ERK/AKT axis in GlCs is a promising strategy for treating GBMs.

  1. Zinc-mediated transactivation of TrkB potentiates the hippocampal mossy fiber-CA3 pyramid synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yang Z; Pan, Enhui; Xiong, Zhi-Qi; McNamara, James O

    2008-02-28

    The receptor tyrosine kinase, TrkB, is critical to diverse functions of the mammalian nervous system in health and disease. Evidence of TrkB activation during epileptogenesis in vivo despite genetic deletion of its prototypic neurotrophin ligands led us to hypothesize that a non-neurotrophin, the divalent cation zinc, can transactivate TrkB. We found that zinc activates TrkB through increasing Src family kinase activity by an activity-regulated mechanism independent of neurotrophins. One subcellular locale at which zinc activates TrkB is the postsynaptic density of excitatory synapses. Exogenous zinc potentiates the efficacy of the hippocampal mossy fiber (mf)-CA3 pyramid synapse by a TrkB-requiring mechanism. Long-term potentiation of this synapse is impaired by deletion of TrkB, inhibition of TrkB kinase activity, and by CaEDTA, a selective chelator of zinc. The activity-dependent activation of synaptic TrkB in a neurotrophin-independent manner provides a mechanism by which this receptor can regulate synaptic plasticity.

  2. Coordinate viral induction of tumor necrosis factor α and interferon β in human B cells and monocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldfeld, A.E.; Maniatis, T.

    1989-01-01

    Human tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) gene expression can be induced primarily in cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage by a variety of inducers, including lipopolysaccharide, phorbol esters such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, and virus or synthetic double-stranded RNA [poly(I)·poly(C)]. In this paper the authors show that the TNF-α gene also responds to virus and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate in B lymphocytes and that virus is the most potent inducer of TNF-α mRNA in both monocyte and B-cell lines. In addition, they show that viral infection coinduces the expression of TNF-α and interferon β mRNA and that viral induction of both genes is blocked by the kinase inhibitor 2-aminopurine. Inhibition of protein synthesis with cycloheximide had no effect on mRNA expression of the genes in one of three cell lines tested (U937) but blocked the viral induction of both genes in another (Namalwa). Thus, the regulatory factors required for mRNA induction of both genes are present prior to the addition of virus in U937 but not in Namalwa cells. However, in a third cell line (JY), cycloheximide blocked viral induction of the interferon β gene but not the TNF-α gene. Taken together, these observations suggest that viral induction of TNF-α and interferon β gene expression may involve overlapping pathways with both common and distinct regulatory factors

  3. Association of coral algal symbionts with a diverse viral community responsive to heat shock

    KAUST Repository

    Brüwer, Jan D.

    2017-08-17

    Stony corals provide the structural foundation of coral reef ecosystems and are termed holobionts given they engage in symbioses, in particular with photosynthetic dinoflagellates of the genus Symbiodinium. Besides Symbiodinium, corals also engage with bacteria affecting metabolism, immunity, and resilience of the coral holobiont, but the role of associated viruses is largely unknown. In this regard, the increase of studies using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) to assess gene expression provides an opportunity to elucidate viral signatures encompassed within the data via careful delineation of sequence reads and their source of origin.Here, we re-analyzed an RNA-Seq dataset from a cultured coral symbiont (Symbiodinium microadriaticum, Clade A1) across four experimental treatments (control, cold shock, heat shock, dark shock) to characterize associated viral diversity, abundance, and gene expression. Our approach comprised the filtering and removal of host sequence reads, subsequent phylogenetic assignment of sequence reads of putative viral origin, and the assembly and analysis of differentially expressed viral genes. About 15.46% (123 million) of all sequence reads were non-host-related, of which <1% could be classified as archaea, bacteria, or virus. Of these, 18.78% were annotated as virus and comprised a diverse community consistent across experimental treatments. Further, non-host related sequence reads assembled into 56,064 contigs, including 4856 contigs of putative viral origin that featured 43 differentially expressed genes during heat shock. The differentially expressed genes included viral kinases, ubiquitin, and ankyrin repeat proteins (amongst others), which are suggested to help the virus proliferate and inhibit the algal host\\'s antiviral response.Our results suggest that a diverse viral community is associated with coral algal endosymbionts of the genus Symbiodinium, which prompts further research on their ecological role in coral health and resilience.

  4. Evaluation of Viral Meningoencephalitis Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handan Ilhan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate retrospectively adult cases of viral encephalitis. METHOD: Fifteen patients described viral encephalitis hospitalized between the years 2006-2011 follow-up and treatment at the infectious diseases clinic were analyzed retrospectively. RESULTS: Most of the patients (%60 had applied in the spring. Fever (87%, confusion (73%, neck stiffness (73%, headache (73%, nausea-vomiting (33%, loss of consciousness (33%, amnesia (33%, agitation (20%, convulsion (%20, focal neurological signs (13%, Brudzinski-sign (13% were most frequently encountered findings. Electroencephalography test was applied to 13 of 14 patients, and pathological findings compatible with encephalitis have been found. Radiological imaging methods such as CT and MRI were performed in 9 of the 14 patients, and findings consistent with encephalitis were reported. All of initial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples were abnormal. The domination of the first examples was lymphocytes in 14 patients; only one patient had an increase in neutrophilic cells have been found. CSF protein level was high in nine patients, and low glucose level was detected in two patients. Herpes simplex virus polymerized chain reaction (PCR analyze was performed to fourteen patients CSF. Only two of them (14% were found positive. One of the patients sample selectively examined was found to be Parvovirus B19 (+, the other patient urine sample Jacobs-creutzfeld virus PCR was found to be positively. Empiric acyclovir therapy was given to all patients. Neuropsychiatric squeal developed at the one patient. CONCLUSION: The cases in the forefront of change in mental status viral meningoencephalitis should be considered and empirical treatment with acyclovir should be started. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(4.000: 447-452

  5. Encefalitis virales en la infancia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monserrat Téllez de Meneses

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available La encefalitis viral es una enfermedad grave que implica el compromiso inflamatorio del parénquima cerebral. Las infecciones virales del SNC ocurren con frecuencia como complicación de infecciones virales sistémicas. Más de 100 virus están implicados como agentes causales, entre los cuales el virus Herpes simplex tipo I, es el agente causal más frecuente de encefalitis no epidémica en todos los grupos poblacionales del mundo; es el responsable de los casos más graves en todas las edades. Muchos de los virus para los cuales existe vacunas también pueden causar encefalitis como: sarampión, paperas, polio, rabia, rubéola, varicela. El virus produce una inflamación del tejido cerebral, la cual puede evolucionar a una destrucción de neuronas, provocar hemorragia y daño cerebral, dando lugar a encefalitis graves, como la encefalitis necrotizante o hemorrágica, con mucho peor pronóstico, produciendo secuelas graves, incluso la muerte. El cuadro clínico, incluye la presencia de cefalea, fiebre y alteración de la conciencia, de rápida progresión. El pronóstico de las encefalitis víricas es variable, algunos casos son leves, con recuperación completa, sin embargo existen casos graves que pueden ocasionar secuelas importantes a nivel cerebral. Es fundamental realizar un diagnóstico lo antes posible, a través de pruebas de laboratorio (bioquímica, PCR, cultivos y de neuroimagen (TAC, RM y ante todo, la instauración de un tratamiento precoz para evitar la evolución del proceso y sus posibles complicaciones. El pronóstico empeora si se retrasa la instauración del tratamiento.

  6. Anti-metastatic effects of viral and non-viral mediated Nk4 delivery to tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhles, Alexandra; Collins, Sara A; van Pijkeren, Jan P; Rajendran, Simon; Miles, Michelle; O'Sullivan, Gerald C; O'Hanlon, Deirdre M; Tangney, Mark

    2009-03-09

    The most common cause of death of cancer sufferers is through the occurrence of metastases. The metastatic behaviour of tumour cells is regulated by extracellular growth factors such as hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a ligand for the c-Met receptor tyrosine kinase, and aberrant expression/activation of the c-Met receptor is closely associated with metastatic progression. Nk4 (also known as Interleukin (IL)32b) is a competitive antagonist of the HGF c-Met system and inhibits c-Met signalling and tumour metastasis. Nk4 has an additional anti-angiogenic activity independent of its HGF-antagonist function. Angiogenesis-inhibitory as well as cancer-specific apoptosis inducing effects make the Nk4 sequence an attractive candidate for gene therapy of cancer. This study investigates the inhibition of tumour metastasis by gene therapy mediated production of Nk4 by the primary tumour. Optimal delivery of anti-cancer genes is vital in order to achieve the highest therapeutic responses. Non-viral plasmid delivery methods have the advantage of safety and ease of production, providing immediate transgene expression, albeit short-lived in most tumours. Sustained presence of anti-angiogenic molecules is preferable with anti-angiogenic therapies, and the long-term expression mediated by Adeno-associated Virus (AAV) might represent a more appropriate delivery in this respect. However, the incubation time required by AAV vectors to reach appropriate gene expression levels hampers efficacy in many fast-growing murine tumour models. Here, we describe murine trials assessing the effects of Nk4 on the spontaneously metastatic Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) model when delivered to primary tumour via plasmid lipofection or AAV2 vector. Intratumoural AAV-Nk4 administration produced the highest therapeutic response with significant reduction in both primary tumour growth and incidence of lung metastases. Plasmid-mediated therapy also significantly reduced metastatic growth, but with moderate

  7. A pH and Redox Dual Responsive 4-Arm Poly(ethylene glycol-block-poly(disulfide histamine Copolymer for Non-Viral Gene Transfection in Vitro and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kangkang An

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel 4-arm poly(ethylene glycol-b-poly(disulfide histamine copolymer was synthesized by Michael addition reaction of poly(ethylene glycol (PEG vinyl sulfone and amine-capped poly(disulfide histamine oligomer, being denoted as 4-arm PEG-SSPHIS. This copolymer was able to condense DNA into nanoscale polyplexes (<200 nm in average diameter with almost neutral surface charge (+(5–10 mV. Besides, these polyplexes were colloidal stable within 4 h in HEPES buffer saline at pH 7.4 (physiological environment, but rapidly dissociated to liberate DNA in the presence of 10 mM glutathione (intracellular reducing environment. The polyplexes also revealed pH-responsive surface charges which markedly increased with reducing pH values from 7.4–6.3 (tumor microenvironment. In vitro transfection experiments showed that polyplexes of 4-arm PEG-SSPHIS were capable of exerting enhanced transfection efficacy in MCF-7 and HepG2 cancer cells under acidic conditions (pH 6.3–7.0. Moreover, intravenous administration of the polyplexes to nude mice bearing HepG2-tumor yielded high transgene expression largely in tumor rather other normal organs. Importantly, this copolymer and its polyplexes had low cytotoxicity against the cells in vitro and caused no death of the mice. The results of this study indicate that 4-arm PEG-SSPHIS has high potential as a dual responsive gene delivery vector for cancer gene therapy.

  8. Viral diseases of marine invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, P. T.

    1984-03-01

    Approximately 40 viruses are known from marine