WorldWideScience

Sample records for training carbon management

  1. Training management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, H.D.

    1986-01-01

    The following topics to be covered in this report are: Design principles for training programmes; training methods, materials and facilities; national and international organization; training assessment and documentation; relation between supplier and customer, licensing requirements and practices. (orig.)

  2. Technical Training for Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverland, Edgar M.

    The question has arisen as to what kind of information a manager without extensive technical training needs to learn to supervise effectively. For example, the Nike Hercules fire control platoon leader, usually an officer in his first active duty assignment, seldom has had extensive technical training. Yet he is responsibile for the…

  3. Training for emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grauf, E.

    1993-01-01

    There are specific boundary conditions where preparedness for in-plant emergency management is as necessary and useful as is the training for the management of design-based accidents. The shift personnel has to be trained to cope particularly with the difficult and demanding initial phase of an emergency, and care must be taken to be very close to reality. Only thus can weak points be discovered and removed by pinpointed measures such as organisational changes, optimization of emergency management procedures, or hardware conditions. (orig.) [de

  4. Carbon-14 waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, R.P.; Smith, G.M.; White, I.F

    1984-01-01

    Carbon-14 occurs in nature, but is also formed in nuclear reactors. Because of its long half-life and the biological significance of carbon, releases from nuclear facilities could have a significant radiological impact. Waste management strategies for carbon-14 are therefore of current concern. Carbon-14 is present in a variety of waste streams both at reactors and at reprocessing plants. A reliable picture of the production and release of carbon-14 from various reactor systems has been built up for the purposes of this study. A possible management strategy for carbon-14 might be the reduction of nitrogen impurity levels in core materials, since the activation of 14 N is usually the dominant source of carbon-14. The key problem in carbon-14 management is its retention of off-gas streams, particularly in the dissolver off-gas stream at reprocessing plants. Three alternative trapping processes that convert carbon dioxide into insoluble carbonates have been suggested. The results show that none of the options considered need be rejected on the grounds of potential radiation doses to individuals. All exposures should be as low as reasonably achievable, economic and social factors being taken into account. If, on these grounds, retention and disposal of carbon-14 is found to be beneficial, then, subject to the limitations noted, appropriate retention, immobilization and disposal technologies have been identified

  5. The real manager of training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowthert, W.H.

    1987-01-01

    For a training program to be truly effective it must belong to the line organization, not to the training group. The American nuclear industry has developed accredited training programs with large training staffs. Many managers agree that the organization receiving the training must be accountable for its quality and effectiveness. Most nuclear plant organizations actually delegate all authority and responsibility for training to the training manager. The Pennsylvania Power and Light Company (PPandL) has programs in place that ensure adequate control of training by the responsible line manager. This presentation discusses the importance of line manager accountability and authority concerning training

  6. Training of Managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabi Ogulin

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The article underlines the importance of training of managers and the role of students from different cultural environments. As a result of economic growth on an international level, the role of training managers on such a level has become increasingly important. This training method also offers an excellent opportunity for networking, which is very important in business today, especially for smaller countries. Main source of competitiveness today consists of a combination of know-how, technology and motivational environment with the ability to react fast to any changes on the market (access and flow of information. Thus it can be concluded that post-graduate studies abroad must have a much higher importance for countries in transition in comparison to studies offered in recently established organizations in the country of origin. Latter, nevertheless are trying to cooperate with similar institutions abroad, but this can never be compared to the possibility of gaining experience and making contacts abroad.

  7. Carbon-14 waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, R.P.

    1984-01-01

    As part of their research programme on Radioactive Waste Management, the Commission of the European Communities has provided financial support for a detailed study of wastes containing 14 C and the options for their management. The main results of this study are outlined. Carbon-14 is formed by neutron activation reactions in core materials and is therefore present in a variety of waste streams both at reactors and at reprocessing plants. Data on the production and release of 14 C from various reactor systems are presented. A possible management strategy for 14 C might be reduction of 14 N impurity levels in core materials, but only reductions of about a factor of five in arisings could be achieved in this way. The key problem in 14 C management is its retention in off-gas streams, particularly in the dissolver off-gas stream at reprocessing plants. In this stream the nuclide is present as carbon dioxide and is extensively isotopically diluted by the carbon dioxide content of the air. Processes for trapping 14 C from these off-gases must be integrated with the other processes in the overall off-gas treatment system, and should provide for conversion to a stable solid compound of carbon, suitable for subsequent immobilization and disposal. Three trapping processes that convert carbon dioxide into insoluble carbonates can be identified: the double alkali (NaOH/Ca(OH) 2 ) process, the direct calcium hydroxide slurry process, and the barium ocathydrate gas/solid process. Calcium or barium carbonates, produced in the above processes, could probably be incorporated into satisfactory immobilized waste forms. However, the stability of such waste forms to prolonged irradiation and to leaching remains to be investigated. (author)

  8. Hospitality Management Education and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotherton, Bob, Ed.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Seven articles on hospitality management training discuss the following: computerized management games for restaurant manager training, work placement, real-life exercises, management information systems in hospitality degree programs, modular programming, service quality concepts in the curriculum, and General National Vocational Qualifications…

  9. Management Training in Retailing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veness, C. Rosina

    Intended for prospective members of the new Distributive Industrial Training Board in Great Britain, this training guide concentrates on managerial functions in retailing; the selection of trainees; the planning of in-company and external training programs; scheduling and continuity of training; roles of training personnel; and the use of various…

  10. Training of radwaste management specialists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lifanova, S.D.

    2010-01-01

    Highly professional and knowledgeable employees for chemical, and especially radiochemical, technology companies are very much sought after these days. Taking into account the advancement of nuclear power and the associated expansion of radioactive waste management facilities, the demand for staff that possesses all the necessary knowledge is set to increase multi-tenfold. In such circumstances, training of personnel is becoming a key element of the human resource management process. The author says that training of personnel at SUE SIA Radon Moscow is conducted in accordance with the Program of Training, Advanced Training and Personnel Qualification, which prescribes areas of training, categories of trainees, approximate number of trainees for each area, schedule and budget of training sessions. The cooperation of SUE SIA Radon Moscow with higher-education institutions in the field of young specialists training and advanced training of managerial, technical and administrative staff is reported [ru

  11. Training centres - organization and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovar, P.

    1986-01-01

    In the lecture 'Training centres - organization and management' some principles and requirements which influence the organization, management and activity pattern of nuclear training centres, are briefly introduced. It is demonstrated, step by step, how these general principles are implemented in the development of the Czechoslovak nuclear power programme, it means, how the training of the NPP personnel proceeds in Czechoslovak nuclear training centres. General principles which are selected: a connection between the capacity of the training centre and the scope and needs of the nuclear power programme, a position of the training center within the institutional set-up, a structure and organization of the training system which complies with the system of NPP construction, reflect the pattern and the activity of the nuclear training centre and nuclear power technical level, a research group of workers in the nuclear training centre, main tasks and technical facilities, management of the training process and a transfer of knowledge and research results into the training process. The lecture is supplemented by pictures and slides. (orig.)

  12. Spaceflight Resource Management Training

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In an effort to streamline the way that International Space Station (ISS) flight controllers are trained, two new levels of flight controller have been developed –...

  13. "Tuberculosis Case Management" Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knebel, Elisa; Kolodner, Jennifer

    2001-01-01

    The need to isolated health providers with critical knowledge in tuberculosis (TB) case management prompted the development of "Tuberculosis Case Management" CD-ROM. Features include "Learning Center,""Examination Room," and "Library." The combination of audio, video, and graphics allows participants to…

  14. Management & Communication Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Nathalie Dumeaux

    2006-01-01

    Calendar of courses for March to June 2006 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary. Management Curriculum Title Date 1st semester 2006 Language CDP pour Superviseurs & chefs de section - part 2 7, 8 mars F CDP for Supervisors & section Leaders - part 2 16, 17 March E CDP for Supervisors & section Leaders - part 2 21, 22 March E Risk Management 20, 21 April E Managing by project 25, 26 April E CDP for Supervisors & section Leaders - part 2 2, 3 May E CDP for Supervisors & section Leaders - part 2 2, 3 May E CDP pour Superviseurs & chefs de section - part 2 11, 12 mai F Personal Awarness & Impact 9, 10, 11 May E-F Introduction to Leadership 17, 18, 19 May E CDP for Group Leaders - part 2 19, 20, 21 June E-F Leadership Competencies 22, 23 June E-F Project Management 19, 20, 21 June E...

  15. Management & Communication Training

    CERN Multimedia

    Nathalie Dumeaux

    2006-01-01

    Schedule of courses for March to June 2006 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Title Date 1st semester 2006 Language CDP pour Superviseurs & chefs de section - part 2 7, 8 mars F CDP for Supervisors & Section Leaders - part 2 16, 17 March E CDP for Supervisors & Section Leaders - part 2 21, 22 March E Risk Management 20, 21 April E Managing by project 25, 26 April E CDP for Supervisors & Section Leaders - part 2 2, 3 May E CDP for Supervisors & Section Leaders - part 2 2, 3 May E CDP pour Superviseurs & chefs de section - part 2 11, 12 mai F Personal Awareness & Impact 9, 10, 11 May E-F Introduction to Leadership 17, 18, 19 May E CDP for Group Leaders - part 2 19, 20, 21 June E-F Leadership Competencies 22, 23 June E-F Project Management 19, 20, 21 June E...

  16. Training for Preservation Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirjam M. Foot

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available In August 1997 the first of a series of summer schools in Preservation Management was held at the Archivschule in Marburg (Germany. The school was organised by the ECPA, the LIBER Division on Preservation, ICA and the Archivschule itself and was aimed at archivists and librarians in management positions from European institutions. It dealt with managerial, organisational and financial aspects of preservation and required active participation by those attending. Apart from introductory sessions by the teaching staff at the Archivschule, a large part of the course took the form of working groups, discussions, assignments and role play, to which participants were expected to take their own experience and problems. The school was conducted in German. Topics, spread over five days, ranged from preservation in the context of the core activities of libraries and archives; planning of preservation projects; general management issues, such as resource management, budgeting, priority setting, communication and effecting change; to more detailed considerations of day-to-day issues, such as storage, disaster control, microfilming and digitising, mass conservation processes, and moulds and fungi.

  17. Management & Communication Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary. Calendar of courses for May to June 2006 Management Curriculum 1st semester 2006 Titles Dates language CDP for Supervisors & section Leaders - part 2 2, 3 May English Personal Awareness & Impact 9, 10, 11 May Bilingual CDP pour superviseurs & chefs de section - part 2 11, 12 mai français Introduction to Leadership 17, 18, 19 May English Communicating Effectively - Residential 14, 15, 16 June Bilingual CDP for Group Leaders - part 2 19, 20, 21 June Bilingual Project Management 19, 20, 21 June Bilingual Personal Awareness & Impact - Follow-up 19, 20 June bilingual Leadership Competencies 27, 28 June Bilingual Communication curriculum 1st semester 2006 Titles Dates language Personal Awareness & Impact 9, 10, 11 May Bilingual Personal Awareness & Impact - Follow-up 19, 20 June Bilingual Communicating Effectively 15, 16 May &...

  18. Management & Communication Training

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    Date of courses for March to June 2008Please check our Web site (http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=300 )to find out the number of places available, which may vary. curriculum Management Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (part 2) 31 March, 1 April (Full) Introduction to Leadership 9, 10, 11 April (2 places available) Core Development Package pour nouveaux superviseurs et chefs de section (partie 2) 24, 25 avril (complet) Quality Management 6, 7 May (10 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact 13, 14, 15 May (full) Managing Teams 21, 22, 23 May (8 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (part 2) 28, 29 May (Full) Personal Awareness & Impact 2, 3, 4 June (3 places available) Dealing with Conflict 6 and 13 June (8 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact – Follow-up 9, 10 June (5 places available) Communicating to Convince 16, 17 June (4 places available) curriculum communication Mak...

  19. SAT in shift manager training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecuyer, F.

    1995-01-01

    EDF has improved the organization of the operation shift teams with the replacement of shift supervisor in shift manager function. The shift manager is not only responsible for tasks associated to plant operation (production), but he is also responsible for safety of these tasks and for management of shift team members. A job analysis of this new job position has been performed in order to design the training programme. It resulted in a 10-month training programme that includes 8 weeks in safety-related topics and 12 weeks in soft-skills related topics. The safety related training courses are mandatory, the other courses are optional courses depending on individual trainee needs. The training also includes the development of management competencies. During the 10 month period, each trainee develops an individual project that is evaluated by NPP manager. As well, as group project is undertaken by the trainees and overseen by a steering committee. The steering committee participates in the evaluation process and provides operational experience feedback to the trainee groups and to the overall programme

  20. Multiple Learning Tracks: For Training Multinational Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Michael G.; Kerin, Roger A.

    1977-01-01

    The problem of identifying and training college students to be effective multinational marketing managers is investigated in three parts: (1) Identification of multinational manager attributes, (2) selection of multinational managers, and (3) multiple "track" training programs. (TA)

  1. Training for Information Management in a Company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karivalo, Merja

    1989-01-01

    Argues that information resource management is an established philosophy that needs to be linked to human resources management and strategic planning in industrial companies. A training program for information management is presented, including training objectives, participants, contents, and structure. (CLB)

  2. Staff management, training and knowledge management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makino, Hitoshi; Umeki, Hiroyuki; Capouet, M.; Depaus, C.; Berckmans, A.

    2014-01-01

    Staff management/training and knowledge management are organisational issues that are particularly sensitive in long-term projects stretching over decades like the development and operation of a geological repository. The IAEA has already issued several publications that deal with this issue (IAEA, 2006, 2008). Organisational aspects were also discussed in the framework of a topical session organised by the Integration Group for the Safety Case (IGSC) at its annual meeting in 2009 and were regarded as a topic deserving future attention (NEA, 2009a). More recently, the Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) identified organisational, mission and behavioural features as attributes of confidence and trust (NEA, 2013). They also identified that aspects such as structural learning capacity, high levels of skill and competence in relevant areas, specific management plan, good operating records, transparency and consistency are associated with confidence building in a safety case. These aspects are considerably related to staff training/management and knowledge management. The IGSC has initiated a proposal of study dedicated to staff training/management and knowledge management with the objective to highlight how these recent concerns and the requirements issued by the IAEA are concretely implemented in the national programmes. The goal of this study is to acknowledge the differences of views and needs for staff management and knowledge management at different stages of individual programmes and between implementer and regulator. As a starting point to this study, the JAEA and ONDRAF/NIRAS prepared a draft questionnaire in order to succinctly capture processes and tools that the national organisations have implemented to meet the requirements and address the issues set out in the field of staff and knowledge management. For the purpose of this study, a questionnaire is now under development, which will be presented on the occasion of this symposium with guidance based on a

  3. Defense Management Education and Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-01

    Data Program F&T Education and Training FAA Economic Analysis Application 1[AC Estimates at Completion FAD Extended Active Duty [APM Economic Analysis...Management System Inteqrated Facilities System Inspector General Intcqrated Logistics Support Information Management 1T International Military Education ...in the grades of 0-2 or E-5 and above and civilians in grades GS-5 or WG-10 and above. Educational background: A course in basic statistics within the

  4. Information Systems and Management Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curry, B.; Smith, D. G.

    1991-01-01

    A case study of a South Wales manufacturer illustrates the need for companies to adopt an integrated strategy for computerization and information systems. Lack of management training blending computing and business skills can have a crippling effect on system development and organizational health. (SK)

  5. Carbon Dioxide Physiological Training at NASA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Jennifer; Young, Millennia; Alexander, David; Mason, Sara S; Wear, Mary L; Méndez, Claudia M; Stanley, David; Ryder, Valerie Meyers; Van Baalen, Mary

    2017-10-01

    Astronauts undergo CO2 exposure training to recognize their symptoms that can arise acutely both on the ground and in spaceflight. This article describes acute CO2 exposure training at NASA and examines the symptoms reported by astronauts during training. In a controlled training environment, astronauts are exposed to up to 8% CO2 (60 mmHg) by a rebreathing apparatus. Symptoms are reported using a standard form. Symptom documentation forms between April 1994 and February 2012 were obtained for 130 astronauts. The number of symptoms reported per session out of the possible 24 was related to age and sex, with those older slightly more likely to report symptoms. Women reported more symptoms on average than men (men: 3.7, women: 4.7). Respiratory symptoms (90%), flushing sensation/sweating (56%), and dizziness/feeling faint/lightheadedness (43%) were the top symptoms. Only headache reached statistical significance in differences between men (13%) and women (37%) after adjustment for multiple testing. Among those with multiple training sessions, respiratory symptoms were the most consistently reported. CO2 exposure training is an important tool to educate astronauts about their potential acute CO2 symptoms. Wide interindividual and temporal variations were observed in symptoms reported during astronaut CO2 exposure training. Headache could not be relied on as a marker of acute exposure during testing since fewer than half the subjects reported it. Our results support periodic refresher training since symptoms may change over time. Further study is needed to determine the optimal interval of training to maximize symptom recognition and inform operational decisions.Law J, Young M, Alexander D, Mason SS, Wear ML, Méndez CM, Stanley D, Meyers Ryder V, Van Baalen M. Carbon dioxide physiological training at NASA. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(10):897-902.

  6. Managing the training process in bodybuilding

    OpenAIRE

    Netík, Tomáš

    2011-01-01

    Anotation Title: Managing the training process in bodybuilding This thesis describes the sport of bodybuilding and its training process. It also describes aspects of managing the training process and based on own research determines what impact the training process is applied to changes in the state of training and performance. There is also considering the impact of specific training methods and intensification. In the research of this thesis, we used different testing methods. We performed ...

  7. Procrastination at work and time management training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Eerde, Wendelien

    2003-09-01

    The author examined the impact of time management training on self-reported procrastination. In an intervention study, 37 employees attended a 1 1/2-day time management training seminar. A control group of employees (n = 14) who were awaiting training also participated in the study to control for expectancy effects. One month after undergoing time management training, trainees reported a significant decrease in avoidance behavior and worry and an increase in their ability to manage time. The results suggest that time management training is helpful in lessening worry and procrastination at work.

  8. Training Hospital Managers as to Fire Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Khalili

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fire is one of the most dangerous phenomena in the world which yields main damages, healthy and economical, and is thus a major threat to hospitals. Since, most of the residents in hospitals are the individuals who cannot rescue themselves in such situations, fire in hospitals is more hazardous than any other public place; hence, it can endanger several sophisticated medical equipment. Therefore, security against fire plays a very vital role in hospitals and has to be taken into account by authorities. Among the personnel, hospital manager and the security guard supervisor are much more responsible. One of their responsibilities includes planning fire security scheme in hospitals to reduce the death rate caused by fire so that there is less threat to the building of hospital admits content. Due to the significance of this issue in hospitals, it seems necessary for the personnel to be aware of security measures against fire. Therefore, a study was carried out in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences teaching hospitals on all managers, their awareness about this issue was measured through a questionnaire. The results indicated that of a total of 60, the obtained average was (37.63+7.36 in the medium level. Also, most of the managers believed that proper and updated training by skillful trainers regarding hospital security measures and its application can be truly effective on their productivity. Thus, it is concluded that practical training the mentioned target group (hospital personnel especially clerks and the managers about the security plans can be effective in the control of fire and security measures, resulting in reduction of accidents and human and economic loss in the future.

  9. Management of nuclear training center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, In Suk; Lee, Han Young; Cho, Boung Jae; Lee, Seung Hee; Lee, Eoi Jin; You, Byung Hoon; Lee, Won Ku; Jeon, Hyung Ryeon; Seo, Kyung Won; Kim, Young Joong; Kim, Ik Hyun; Hyun, Ha Il; Choi, Il Ki; Hong, Choon Sun; Won, Jong Yeul; Joo, Yong Chang; Nam, Jae Yeul; Sin, Eun Jeong

    1996-02-01

    This report describes the annual results of training courses. The scope and contents are as follows : 1. Regional and interregional training courses, 2. Training courses assisted by foreign experts, 3. Training courses for nuclear industry personnel, 4. Training courses for internal staff-members, 5. Training courses under the law. The nuclear training center executed the open-door training courses for 2,699 engineers/scientists from the regulatory body, nuclear industries, research institutes and other related organizations by means of offering 69 training courses during the fiscal year 1995. (Author) .new

  10. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendar of courses for November to December 2007Calendrier des cours prévus de novembre à décembre 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary.Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier. Managing Teams (English) 13, 14, 15 November (Full) Communicating effectively - residential (Bilingual) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) FP7 Training - How to Negotiate and Administer Framework 7 Grant Agreements (English) 21 November (12 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (English) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (français) 5, 6, 7 décembre (4 places disponibles) Core Development Pa...

  11. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendar of courses for November to December 2007Calendrier des cours prévus de novembre à décembre 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary.Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier. Managing Teams (English) 13, 14, 15 November (Full) Communicating effectively - residential (Bilingual) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) FP7 Training - How to Negotiate and Administer Framework 7 Grant Agreements (English) 21 November (7 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (English) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercise) (français) 5, 6, 7 décembre (2 places disponibles) Core Development Pac...

  12. Training and Education of Environmental Managers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm; Sinding, Knud; Madsen, Henning

    An analysis of the training backgrounds of environmental managers in a range of environmentally advanced European companies reveals the very broad qualifications ideally required of these managers. At the same time, however, it is found that the provision of training opportunities relevant...... for this important category of managers is both limited in scope and foundation, and highly dependent on the randomly distributed efforts of educators with an environmental interest....

  13. Carbon Management In the Post-Cap-and-Trade Carbon Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGroff, F. A.

    2013-12-01

    This abstract outlines an economic model that integrates carbon externalities seamlessly into the national and international economies. The model incorporates a broad carbon metric used to value all carbon in the biosphere, as well as all transnational commerce. The model minimizes the cost associated with carbon management, and allows for the variation in carbon avidity between jurisdictions. When implemented over time, the model reduces the deadweight loss while minimizing social cost, thus maximizing the marginal social benefit commonly associated with Pigouvian taxes. Once implemented, the model provides a comprehensive economic construct for governments, industry and consumers to efficiently weigh the cost of carbon, and effectively participate in helping to reduce their direct and indirect use of carbon, while allowing individual jurisdictions to decide their own carbon value, without the need for explicit, express agreement of all countries. The model uses no credits, requires no caps, and matches climate changing behavior to costs. The steps to implement the model for a particular jurisdiction are: 1) Define the Carbon Metric to value changes in Carbon Quality. 2) Apply the Carbon Metric to assess the Carbon Toll a) for all changes in Carbon Quality and b) for imports and exports. This economic model has 3 clear advantages. 1) The carbon pricing and cost scheme use existing and generally accepted accounting methodologies to ensure the veracity and verifiability of carbon management efforts with minimal effort and expense using standard auditing protocols. Implementing this economic model will not require any special training, tools, or systems for any entity to achieve their minimum carbon target goals within their jurisdictional framework. 2) Given the spectrum of carbon affinities worldwide, the model recognizes and provides for flexible carbon pricing regimes, but does not penalize domestic carbon-consuming producers subject to imports from exporters in

  14. CERN hosts training event on international management

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    CERN held its first training event on international management at the Globe on 2 October, sharing its expertise with high-level Swiss managers as part of their year-long part-time executive training programme on advanced management. CERN is often talked about in terms of impressive statistics: the coldest place in the universe, the largest accelerator, the greatest volume of data. Whilst the science is undeniably remarkable, it is backed by a management infrastructure that has to be as cutting-edge as the research it supports. On 2 October, the Learning and Development section of HR organised an event for 60 delegates to come to CERN to learn about international management from those who have taken on the management challenges at the heart of this unique institution. It was the first time that CERN had prepared such an event. SKU, a non-profit organisation, approached our management training team to arrange the event as part of a wee...

  15. Training for operators and plant management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laverge, J.; Moroni, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    For many years, EDF has been making a lot of efforts to develop and to provide appropriate training to each of the different categories of personnel who participate in nuclear power plants operation and maintenance. With regard to training related to incidents and accidents management, if is important, among others, to make the difference between training of personnel on shift (plant operating teams and safety engineers) and training of personnel who makes up the emergency response teams that would be called upon in the event of a nuclear accident. Because of different origins, different backgrounds and especially different functions if an accident occurs on a unit, these two populations need completely different trainings. The training that EDF provides to these two categories of personnel is presented separately in the following pages. In both cases, links between functions to be sustained and characteristics of the training are tried to be shown. In conclusion, general perspectives on training evolution in EDF are given. 8 refs

  16. An Evaluation of Management Training and Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Morten Emil; Karlsen, Jan Terje

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The focus of this paper is on management training and development. The purpose has been to address how coaching can be applied to learn about leadership tools and what effect this has on management behaviour and development. Design/methodology/approach: This is a qualitative case study of a management development program. The empirical…

  17. Cockpit resource management training at People Express

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Keith D.; Jensen, Doug

    1987-01-01

    In January 1986 in a continuing effort to maintain and improve flight safety and solve some Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) problems, People Express implemented a new CRM training program. It is a continuously running program, scheduled over the next three years and includes state-of-the-art full-mission simulation (LOFT), semi-annual seminar workshops and a comprehensive academic program authored by Robert W. Mudge of Cockpit Management Resources Inc. That program is outlined and to maximize its contribution to the workshop's goals, is organized into four topic areas: (1) Program content: the essential elements of resource management training; (2) Training methods: the strengths and weaknesses of current approaches; (3) Implementation: the implementation of CRM training; and (4) Effectiveness: the effectiveness of training. It is confined as much as possible to concise descriptions of the program's basic components. Brief discussions of rationale are included, however no attempt is made to discuss or review popular CRM tenets or the supporting research.

  18. Data management strategies for nuclear training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerbo, J.N.; Gwinn, A.E.

    1993-01-01

    Use of systematic training development technologies has become a standard for the commercial nuclear power industry and for many Department of Energy facilities. Such systems involve detailed analysis of job functions, tasks and skill requirements and correlation of that information to the courses, curricula and testing instruments used in the training process. Nuclear training programs are subject to audit and evaluation by a number of government and industry organizations. The ability to establish an audit trail, from initial task analysis to final examination is crucial to demonstrating the completeness and validity of a systematic training program. This paper provides perspective on aspects of the training data management problem, status of technological solutions, and characteristics of data base management systems that are best suited for application to training programs

  19. Maternal Depression and Parent Management Training Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Jack; McQuillin, Samuel; Butler, Ashley M; Axelrad, Marni E

    2016-09-01

    This study examines the impact of maternal depression on reductions in children's behavior problems severity following implementation of the Brief Behavioral Intervention-a brief, manualized parent management training treatment. The parents of 87 children aged 2-6 years of age received parent management training at a metropolitan hospital. Parents of participants completed measures of externalizing behavior and maternal depression. The association between pre-post treatment change in externalizing behavior and maternal depression was examined using an autoregressive cross-lagged model. Results showed that self-reported maternal depressive symptoms at pre-treatment negatively influenced the overall magnitude of reduction of reported externalizing behaviors in children following treatment. Results indicate that aspects of family functioning not specifically targeted by parent management training, such as maternal depression, significantly affect treatment outcomes. Clinicians providing parent management training may benefit from assessing for maternal depression and modifying treatment as indicated.

  20. Small Business Management Training Tools Directory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of Community and Junior Colleges, Washington, DC. National Small Business Training Network.

    This directory is designed to assist in the identification of supplementary materials to support program development for small businesses. Following introductory comments and an overview of small business management training, section I lists training tools available from the Small Business Administration (SBA). Section II provides descriptions and…

  1. A Better Model for Management Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobele, H. Kenneth; Buchanan, Peter J.

    1976-01-01

    Greater precision in appraising training needs, greater clarity in defining training objectives, and an emphasis on a practical, skills-oriented approach to management development can result from using Henry Mintzberg's model which describes managerial work in terms of 6 job characteristics and 10 interpersonal, informational, or decisional roles.…

  2. New Management Practices and Enterprise Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew; Oczkowski, Eddie; Noble, Charles; Macklin, Robert

    The changing nature of the demand for training in Australian enterprises adopting new management practices and the implications of those changes for training providers were examined. More than 3,400 private sector enterprises were surveyed by mail, after which follow-up telephone interviews were conducted with 80 human resource practitioners from…

  3. Project management training : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    In 2005 the Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT) went through a complete reorganization of its operations going from centralized to decentralized (District) management. This reorganization gave Districts autonomy to manage construction projec...

  4. Project management training : [technical summary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    In 2005, the Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT) went through a complete reorganization of its operations going from centralized to decentralized (District) management. This reorganization gave Districts autonomy to manage construction proje...

  5. Training Requirements and Information Management System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cillan, T.F.; Hodgson, M.A.

    1992-05-01

    This is the software user's guide for the Training Requirements and Information Management System. This guide defines and describes the software operating procedures as they apply to the end user of the software program. This guide is intended as a reference tool for the user who already has an indepth knowledge of the Training Requirements and Information Management System functions and data reporting requirement.

  6. Human Factors in Training - Space Flight Resource Management Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryne, Vicky; Connell, Erin; Barshi, Immanuel; Arsintescu, L.

    2009-01-01

    Accidents and incidents show that high workload-induced stress and poor teamwork skills lead to performance decrements and errors. Research on teamwork shows that effective teams are able to adapt to stressful situations, and to reduce workload by using successful strategies for communication and decision making, and through dynamic redistribution of tasks among team members. Furthermore, superior teams are able to recognize signs and symptoms of workload-induced stress early, and to adapt their coordination and communication strategies to the high workload, or stress conditions. Mission Control Center (MCC) teams often face demanding situations in which they must operate as an effective team to solve problems with crew and vehicle during onorbit operations. To be successful as a team, flight controllers (FCers) must learn effective teamwork strategies. Such strategies are the focus of Space Flight Resource Management (SFRM) training. SFRM training in MOD has been structured to include some classroom presentations of basic concepts and case studies, with the assumption that skill development happens in mission simulation. Integrated mission simulations do provide excellent opportunities for FCers to practice teamwork, but also require extensive technical knowledge of vehicle systems, mission operations, and crew actions. Such technical knowledge requires lengthy training. When SFRM training is relegated to integrated simulations, FCers can only practice SFRM after they have already mastered the technical knowledge necessary for these simulations. Given the centrality of teamwork to the success of MCC, holding SFRM training till late in the flow is inefficient. But to be able to train SFRM earlier in the flow, the training cannot rely on extensive mission-specific technical knowledge. Hence, the need for a generic SFRM training framework that would allow FCers to develop basic teamwork skills which are mission relevant, but without the required mission knowledge

  7. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendrier des cours prévus de septembre à décembre 2007
Calendar of courses for September to December 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary. Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier. Management Curriculum / curriculum Management Personal Awareness & Impact (English) 10, 11, 12 September, (full) Managing by Project (English) 9, 10 October (2 places disponibles) Personal Awareness & Impact (English) 15, 16, 17 October, (full) Introduction to Leadership (English) 17, 18, 19 October, (full) Quality Management (Bilingual) 18, 19 October (10 places available) Managing Teams (English) 13, 14, 15 November (full) Communicating Effectively – residential (Bilingual) 20, 21, 22 November (full) Risk Management (English) 13, 14 December (6 places available) Communication Curriculum / curriculum communication Stress Management (English) 25, 26 September (6 places...

  8. Canadian residents' perceived manager training needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stergiopoulos, Vicky; Lieff, Susan; Razack, Saleem; Lee, A Curtis; Maniate, Jerry M; Hyde, Stacey; Taber, Sarah; Frank, Jason R

    2010-01-01

    Despite widespread endorsement for administrative training during residency, teaching and learning in this area remains intermittent and limited in most programmes. To inform the development of a Manager Train-the-Trainer program for faculty, the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada undertook a survey of perceived Manager training needs among postgraduate trainees. A representative sample of Canadian specialty residents received a web-based questionnaire in 2009 assessing their perceived deficiencies in 13 Manager knowledge and 11 Manager skill domains, as determined by gap scores (GSs). GSs were defined as the difference between residents' perceived current and desired level of knowledge or skill in selected Manager domains. Residents' educational preferences for furthering their Manager knowledge and skills were also elicited. Among the 549 residents who were emailed the survey, 199 (36.2%) responded. Residents reported significant gaps in most knowledge and skills domains examined. Residents' preferred educational methods for learning Manager knowledge and skills included workshops, web-based formats and interactive small groups. The results of this national survey, highlighting significant perceived gaps in multiple Manager knowledge and skills domains, may inform the development of Manager curricula and faculty development activities to address deficiencies in training in this important area.

  9. Medical Waste Management Training for Healthcare Managers - a Necessity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aclan Ozder

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:This is an interventional study, since a training has been given, performed in order to investigate whether training has significant impact on knowledge levels of healthcare managers (head-nurses, assistant head nurses, hospital managers and deputy managers regarding bio-medical waste management.Methods:The study was conducted on 240 volunteers during June – August 2010 in 12 hospitals serving in Istanbul (private, public, university, training-research hospitals and other healthcare institutions. A survey form prepared by the project guidance team was applied to the participants through the internet before and after the training courses. The training program was composed of 40 hours of theory and 16 hours of practice sessions taught by persons known to have expertise in their fields. Methods used in the analysis of the data chi-square and t-tests in dependent groups.Results:67.5% (162 of participants were female. 42.5% (102 are working in private, and 21.7% in state-owned hospitals. 50.4% are head-nurses, and 18.3% are hospital managers.A statistically significant difference was found among those who had received medical waste management training (preliminary test and final test and others who had not (p<0.01. It was observed that information levels of all healthcare managers who had received training on waste management had risen at the completion of that training session.Conclusion:On the subject of waste management, to have trained healthcare employees who are responsible for the safe disposal of wastes in hospitals is both a necessity for the safety of patients and important for its contribution to the economy of the country.

  10. Training evaluation: a case study of training Iranian health managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Maye; Gerein, Nancy; Tarin, Ehsanullah; Butcher, Christopher; Pearson, Stephen; Heidari, Gholamreza

    2009-03-05

    The Ministry of Health and Medical Education in the Islamic Republic of Iran has undertaken a reform of its health system, in which-lower level managers are given new roles and responsibilities in a decentralized system. To support these efforts, a United Kingdom-based university was contracted by the World Health Organization to design a series of courses for health managers and trainers. This process was also intended to develop the capacity of the National Public Health Management Centre in Tabriz, Iran, to enable it to organize relevant short courses in health management on a continuing basis. A total of seven short training courses were implemented, three in the United Kingdom and four in Tabriz, with 35 participants. A detailed evaluation of the courses was undertaken to guide future development of the training programmes. The Kirkpatrick framework for evaluation of training was used to measure participants' reactions, learning, application to the job, and to a lesser extent, organizational impact. Particular emphasis was put on application of learning to the participants' job. A structured questionnaire was administered to 23 participants, out of 35, between one and 13 months after they had attended the courses. Respondents, like the training course participants, were predominantly from provincial universities, with both health system and academic responsibilities. Interviews with key informants and ex-trainees provided supplemental information, especially on organizational impact. Participants' preferred interactive methods for learning about health planning and management. They found the course content to be relevant, but with an overemphasis on theory compared to practical, locally-specific information. In terms of application of learning to their jobs, participants found specific information and skills to be most useful, such as health systems research and group work/problem solving. The least useful areas were those that dealt with training and

  11. Training evaluation: a case study of training Iranian health managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butcher Christopher

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Ministry of Health and Medical Education in the Islamic Republic of Iran has undertaken a reform of its health system, in which-lower level managers are given new roles and responsibilities in a decentralized system. To support these efforts, a United Kingdom-based university was contracted by the World Health Organization to design a series of courses for health managers and trainers. This process was also intended to develop the capacity of the National Public Health Management Centre in Tabriz, Iran, to enable it to organize relevant short courses in health management on a continuing basis. A total of seven short training courses were implemented, three in the United Kingdom and four in Tabriz, with 35 participants. A detailed evaluation of the courses was undertaken to guide future development of the training programmes. Methods The Kirkpatrick framework for evaluation of training was used to measure participants' reactions, learning, application to the job, and to a lesser extent, organizational impact. Particular emphasis was put on application of learning to the participants' job. A structured questionnaire was administered to 23 participants, out of 35, between one and 13 months after they had attended the courses. Respondents, like the training course participants, were predominantly from provincial universities, with both health system and academic responsibilities. Interviews with key informants and ex-trainees provided supplemental information, especially on organizational impact. Results Participants' preferred interactive methods for learning about health planning and management. They found the course content to be relevant, but with an overemphasis on theory compared to practical, locally-specific information. In terms of application of learning to their jobs, participants found specific information and skills to be most useful, such as health systems research and group work/problem solving. The least

  12. Cash Management/Data Matching. Training Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Student Financial Assistance (ED), Washington, DC.

    This training guide for financial aid staff explains the process of direct loan reconciliation and suggests appropriate cash management accounting practices. Chapter 1 explains the importance of cash management, the role of data matching, and reviews basic reconciliation concepts and terms and direct loan reporting requirements. Chapter 2 reviews…

  13. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendrier des cours prévus de septembre à décembre 2007 Calendar of courses for September to December 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary. Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier.   Management Curriculum / curriculum Management NEW COURSE - Dealing with Conflict, 5 & 12 October (6 places available) Managing by Project (English) 9, 10 October (Full) Personal Awareness & Impact (English) 15, 16, 17 October\t(Full) Introduction to Leadership (English) 17, 18, 19 October\t(Full) Managing Teams (English) 13, 14, 15 November (1 place available) Communicating Effectively – residential (Bilingual) 20, 21, 22 November (Full) Risk Management (English) 13, 14 December (6 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercice) - 
Session to be scheduled from November 2007 to January 2008 &...

  14. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Calendrier des cours prévus de septembre à décembre 2007 Calendar of courses for September to December 2007 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary. Veuillez consulter notre site Web pour connaître le nombre de places disponibles qui peut varier. Management Curriculum / curriculum Management Managing by Project (English)\t9, 10 October (Full) Personal Awareness & Impact (English)\t15, 16, 17 October, (Full) Introduction to Leadership (English)\t17, 18, 19 October, (Full) Managing Teams (English)\t13, 14, 15 November\t(1 place available)) Communicating Effectively – residential (Bilingual)\t20, 21, 22 November (Full) Risk Management (English)\t13, 14 December (6 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (MARS exercice) Session to be scheduled from November 2007 to January 2008 Communication Curriculum / curriculum communication Stress Management (English)\t25, 26 September (4 p...

  15. Medical waste management training for healthcare managers - a necessity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozder, Aclan; Teker, Bahri; Eker, Hasan Huseyin; Altındis, Selma; Kocaakman, Merve; Karabay, Oguz

    2013-07-16

    This is an interventional study, since a training has been given, performed in order to investigate whether training has significant impact on knowledge levels of healthcare managers (head-nurses, assistant head nurses, hospital managers and deputy managers) regarding bio-medical waste management. The study was conducted on 240 volunteers during June - August 2010 in 12 hospitals serving in Istanbul (private, public, university, training-research hospitals and other healthcare institutions). A survey form prepared by the project guidance team was applied to the participants through the internet before and after the training courses. The training program was composed of 40 hours of theory and 16 hours of practice sessions taught by persons known to have expertise in their fields. Methods used in the analysis of the data chi-square and t-tests in dependent groups. 67.5% (162) of participants were female. 42.5% (102) are working in private, and 21.7% in state-owned hospitals. 50.4% are head-nurses, and 18.3% are hospital managers.A statistically significant difference was found among those who had received medical waste management training (preliminary test and final test) and others who had not (pnecessity for the safety of patients and important for its contribution to the economy of the country.

  16. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from October to December 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Communicating Leadership - 2 October, 29 October + 1 December - (full) CDP-SL for new supervisors, part 1 - 5, 6, 7 October - (2 places available) Introduction to Leadership - 7, 8, 9 October - (4 places available) Voice your Leadership - 13, 14 October - (full) Managing Teams - 10, 11, 12 November - (7 places available) Risk Management - 17, 18 November - (6 places available) Dealing with Conflict - 20, 27 November - (5 places available) CDP pour nouveaux superviseurs, part 1 - 30 novembre, 1, 2 décembre - (4 places disponibles) Communication Curriculum Making presentations - 14, 15 October + 9 November - (Full) Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe - 19, 20 octobre - (7 places disponibles) Gestion du stress - 20, 21 octobre - (8 places disponibles) Communiquer efficacement - 21, 22 octobre + 9, 10 novemb...

  17. TRAINING ON PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT AND LABOR ECONOMICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina V. Polevaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the training of spe-cialists in the eld of labor and the house-keeper personnel management within the federal state educational standards of higher education. The analysis of the possibility of training in these specialties in the various educational standards. The necessity of focusing on the prepara-tion of these destinations within certain standards.

  18. Environmental management control systems for carbon emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Di Giacomo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – This paper aims to focus on a global consulting company and examine how it struggled to establish an effective environmental management control system for carbon emissions for its employees’ air travel. The organisation was motivated to reduce its carbon emissions both to comply with regulation and to enhance or maintain corporate reputation. Design/methodology/approach – The paper takes a case study approach, examining internal and external documents as well as conducting interviews with senior staff. Findings – The case study investigates how Beta’s management implemented a system to reduce carbon emissions. The organisation focused on air travel, but the study finds that employee travel preferences did not radically change. Rather than reduction in carbon emissions, as planned by head office, air travel carbon emissions actually increased during the period, and, as a consequence, the reported reduction targets were significantly adjusted downwards to meet the new realities. Practical implications – The study has implications for both policy and practice for organisations seeking to improve their sustainability performance. Originality/value – The study responds to calls in the literature to undertake research to identify how management practices might reduce negative sustainability impacts, as there is little evidence of what management practices and accounting tools are being adopted, particularly in relation to carbon emissions from air travel. The paper adds to the creation of new accounting, giving visibility to carbon emission management through case study analysis.

  19. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Calendar of courses for February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary. Management Curriculum Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (3 + 2 days) 3, 4, 5 February (part 1) + 13, 14 May 2009 (part 2) (full) Core Development Package for Group Leaders (part 2) 24, 25, 26 February (full) Communicating Effectively – Residential\t23, 24, 25 March (2 places available) Quality Management 25, 26 March (10 places available) Introduction to Leadership 1, 2, 3 April (3 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact 5, 6, 7 May (full) 3, 4, 5 June (places available) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits\t5 + 12 June (8 places available) (Session in English or in French) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (4 places available) Communication Curriculum Managing stress\t23, 24 February (6 places available) Negotiating Effectively\t3, 4 March (2 places available) Négociation efficace\t17, 18 mar...

  20. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (3 + 2 days) 3, 4, 5 February (part 1) + 13, 14 May 2009 (part 2)\t(full) Core Development Package for Group Leaders (part 2) 24, 25, 26 February (full) Communicating Effectively – Residential\t23, 24, 25 March (2 places available) Quality Management\t25, 26 March (10 places available) Introduction to Leadership\t1, 2, 3 April (3 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact\t5, 6, 7 May (full) 3, 4, 5 June (places available) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits\t5 + 12 June (8 places available) (Session in English or in French) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (4 places available) Communication Curriculum Managing stress\t23, 24 February (6 places available) Negotiating Effectively\t3, 4 March (2 places available) Négociation efficace\t17, 18 mars (6 places d...

  1. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from September to December 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Project Scheduling & Costing\t3, 4 September (full) Communicating Effectively – Residential\t15, 16, 17 September (5 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact – Follow-up\t17, 18 September (2 places available) Project Management\t22, 23 September (full) Personal Awareness & Impact\t22, 23, 24 September (full) Introduction to Leadership\t7, 8, 9 October (full) Managing Teams\t10, 11, 12 November (full) Communication Curriculum Managing Time\t22 September + 27 October + 18 November (8 places available) Making presentations\t14, 15 October + 9 November (Full) Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t19, 20 octobre (2 places disponibles) Communiquer efficacement\t21, 22 octobre + 9, 10 novembre (1 place disponible) Techniques d’exposé et de présentations\t10, 11 novembre + 8 décembre (1...

  2. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from September to December 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Project Scheduling & Costing\t3, 4 September (2 places available) Communicating Effectively – Residential\t15, 16, 17 September (6 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact – Follow-up\t17, 18 September (full) Project Management\t22, 23 September (full) Personal Awareness & Impact\t22, 23, 24 September (full) Introduction to Leadership\t7, 8, 9 October (full) Managing Teams\t10, 11, 12 November (full) Communication Curriculum Managing Time\t22 September + 27 October + 18 November (3 places available) Making presentations\t14, 15 October + 9 November (Full) Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t19, 20 octobre (complet) Communiquer efficacement\t21, 22 octobre + 9, 10 novembre (complet) Techniques d’exposé et de présentations\t10, 11 novembre + 8 décembre (1 place disponible) Serv...

  3. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from September to December 2009 Please check our web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Project Scheduling & Costing\t3, 4 September (2 places available) Communicating Effectively – Residential\t15, 16, 17 September (6 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact – Follow-up\t17, 18 September (full) Project Management\t22, 23 September (full) Personal Awareness & Impact\t22, 23, 24 September (full) Introduction to Leadership\t7, 8, 9 October (full) Managing Teams\t10, 11, 12 November (full) Communication Curriculum Managing Time\t22 September + 27 October + 18 November (3 places available) Making presentations\t14, 15 October + 9 November (Full) Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t19, 20 octobre (complet) Communiquer efficacement\t21, 22 octobre + 9, 10 novembre (complet) Techniques d’exposé et de présentations\t10, 11 novembre + 8 décembre (1 place disponible) Service Orientation/Orienta...

  4. Training teams for emergency management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafstal, A.M.; Johnston, J.H.; Oser, R.L.

    2001-01-01

    Emergency management (EM), the decision making involved in directing the relief operation after a disaster or otherwise catastrophic accident is an issue of great public and private concern because of the high stakes involved. Due to the nature of emergencies, and especially mass emergencies, EM

  5. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from November to December 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Managing Teams\t10, 11, 12 November (4 places available) CDP pour nouveaux superviseurs, part 1\t30 novembre, 1, 2 décembre (2 places disponibles) Managing by Project\t1, 2 December (full) Communication Curriculum Techniques d’exposé et de présentations\t10, 11 novembre + 8 décembre (complet) Managing Stress\t10, 11 November (6 places available) Communicating Effectively\t11, 12 November + 8, 9 December (4 places available) Orientation service\t12, 13 novembre (5 places disponibles) Gestion du stress\t17, 18 novembre (6 places disponibles) Animer ou participer à une réunion de travail\t9, 10, 11 décembre (3 places disponibles) If you are interested in attending any of the above course sessions, please talk to your supervisor and/or your DTO, and apply electronically via EDH from the course description p...

  6. The benefits of management training

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    After six years an unusual management course remains very popular. Participants in the most recent session of 3CM course, with the external course leader Ton Bastiaans (left back), Lyn Evans, LHC project leader (3rd from the right) and Sudeshna Datta Cockerill (far right) who organises the management and communication courses. In 1996 a sceptical Lyn Evans agreed to act as the 'sponsor' from CERN's senior management for a new course on 'Introduction to management', aimed at young professionals at CERN who may in the near future have supervisory roles. CERN's LHC Project Leader quickly discovered that it is a 'remarkable course' and six years later he remains enthusiastic about its value. His role is to attend at the end of the last day and to listen to the reactions of the participants - how they have benefited and how they see the benefits to CERN. The session also gives the participants the opportunity to discuss with one of the Directorate their views on problems at CERN. Code-named 3CM, and run by an ex...

  7. Managing the training process: contracting for training services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, E.R.

    1985-01-01

    The need for using consultants and contracting for training services should be based on one or more of these three major reasons: the need to expand capability on a crash basis, the need for specialized expertise, and the need for objectivity, and independence. When the need for using a consultant exists, the training manager must first define the scope of work or services the consultant is to provide and how the consultant will interface with the training staff. The next step will be to develop a Request for Proposal which involves management, training staff, and contract services organizations. The critical parts of an RFP are scope and schedule. Consideration would be given to determining which consultant organizations should receive the RFP, and specifying who is on the bidders list. The third step will consist of evaluating the proposals and awarding the work. This step needs to be objective, defendable, and repeatable. The final phase will be the performance of the work. The activities included are project initiation, monitoring contractor performance, and formal conclusion

  8. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Communicating Effectively – Residential\t23, 24, 25 March (Full) Quality Management\t25, 26 March\t(6 places available) Introduction to Leadership\t1, 2, 3 April (2 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact\t5, 6, 7 May (full) 3, 4, 5 June (1 place available) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits\t5 + 12 June (3 places available) (Session in English or in French) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (3 places available) Communication Curriculum Negotiating Effectively\t3, 4 March (Full) Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t26, 27 mars (4 places disponibles) Gestion de temps\t27 avril + 27 mai + 23 juin (9 places disponibles) Communiquer efficacement\t27, 28 avril + 26, 27 mai (4 places disponibles) Service Orientation\t28, 29 April (6 places available) Communicating Effectively in your Team\t29, 30 April (7 places available) Nég...

  9. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    Calendar of courses for October to December 2008 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available which may vary. Management Curriculum Introduction to Leadership\t15, 16, 17 October (Full) Personal Awareness & Impact\t22, 23, 24 October (full) Core Development Package for Group Leaders (part 2)\t11, 12, 13 November (full) Risk Management\t13, 14 November (5 places available) Managing Teams\t18, 19, 20 November (2 places available) Communicating to Convince\t19, 20 November (5 places available) Core Development Package for new Supervisors and Section leaders (3 + 2 days) 25, 26, 27 November (part 1) + 3, 4 March 2009 (part 2) (full) Core Development Package pour nouveaux superviseurs et chefs de section (3 + 2 jours) 9, 10, 11 décembre (partie 1) + 21, 22 avril 2009 (partie 2) (full) Communication Curriculum Communicating Effectively\t21, 22 October + 27, 28 November (4 places available)\tCommuniquer efficacement\t23, 24 octobre + 2...

  10. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Personal Awareness & Impact\t5, 6, 7 May (2 places available) 3, 4, 5 June (full) Quality Management\t12, 13 May (6 places available) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits (Session in English or in French)\t5 + 12 June (2 places available) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (2 places available) Personal Awareness & Impact – Follow-up\t30 June + 1 July (6 places available) Communicating to Convince\t22, 23 June (7 places available) Communication Curriculum Négociation efficace\t5, 6 mai (3 places disponibles) Gestion de temps\t27 mai + 23 juin + 7 juillet (3 places disponibles) Making presentations\t13, 14 May + 11 June (Full) Writing of Successful FP7 Proposals\t26 May (20 places available) Communicating Effectively\t8, 29 May + 22, 23 June (2 places available) If you are interested in attending any of the above course sessio...

  11. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Communicating Effectively – Residential\t23, 24, 25 March (Full) Introduction to Leadership\t1, 2, 3 April (1 place available) Personal Awareness & Impact\t5, 6, 7 May (full) 3, 4, 5 June (1 place available) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits (Session in English or in French)\t5 + 12 June (3 places available) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (3 places available) Communication Curriculum Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t26, 27 mars\t(4 places disponibles) Gestion de temps\t27 avril + 27 mai + 23 juin (8 places disponibles) Communiquer efficacement\t27, 28 avril + 26, 27 mai (3 places disponibles) Service Orientation\t28, 29 April (6 places available) Communicating Effectively in your Team\t29, 30 April (7 places available) Négociation efficace\t5, 6 mai (6 places disponibles) Animer ou par...

  12. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Communicating Effectively – Residential\t23, 24, 25 March (Full) Introduction to Leadership\t1, 2, 3 April (1 place available) Personal Awareness & Impact\t5, 6, 7 May (full) 3, 4, 5 June (full) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits (Session in English or in French)\t5 + 12 June (2 places available) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (3 places available) Communication Curriculum Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t26, 27 mars\t(5 places disponibles) Gestion de temps\t27 avril + 27 mai + 23 juin (7 places disponibles) Communiquer efficacement\t27, 28 avril + 26, 27 mai (3 places disponibles) Service Orientation\t28, 29 April (5 places available) Communicating Effectively in your Team\t29, 30 April (7 places available) Négociation efficace\t5, 6 mai (6 places disponibles) Animer ou participer à une réunion de travail/Chairing ...

  13. CERN Management & Communication Training programme

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Timetable of courses from February to June 2009 Please check our Web site to find out the number of places available, which may vary. Management Curriculum Communicating Effectively – Residential\t23, 24, 25 March (Full) Introduction to Leadership\t1, 2, 3 April (1 place available) Personal Awareness & Impact\t5, 6, 7 May (full) 3, 4, 5 June (full) Dealing with conflict / Gestion des conflits (Session in English or in French)\t5 + 12 June (2 places available) Managing Teams\t9, 10, 11 June (3 places available) Communication Curriculum Communiquer efficacement dans votre équipe\t26, 27 mars\t(5 places disponibles) Gestion de temps\t27 avril + 27 mai + 23 juin (7 places disponibles) Communiquer efficacement\t27, 28 avril + 26, 27 mai (3 places disponibles) Service Orientation\t28, 29 April (5 places available) Communicating Effectively in your Team\t29, 30 April (7 places available) Négociation efficace\t5, 6 mai (6 places disponibles) Animer ou participer à un...

  14. Managing carbon sequestration and storage in northern hardwood forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eunice A. Padley; Deahn M. Donner; Karin S. Fassnacht; Ronald S. Zalesny; Bruce Birr; Karl J. Martin

    2011-01-01

    Carbon has an important role in sustainable forest management, contributing to functions that maintain site productivity, nutrient cycling, and soil physical properties. Forest management practices can alter ecosystem carbon allocation as well as the amount of total site carbon.

  15. Education and Training Module in Alertness Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallis, M. M.; Brandt, S. L.; Oyung, R. L.; Reduta, D. D.; Rosekind, M. R.

    2006-01-01

    The education and training module (ETM) in alertness management has now been integrated as part of the training regimen of the Pilot Proficiency Awards Program ("WINGS") of the Federal Aviation Administration. Originated and now maintained current by the Fatigue Countermeasures Group at NASA Ames Research Center, the ETM in Alertness Management is designed to give pilots the benefit of the best and most recent research on the basics of sleep physiology, the causes of fatigue, and strategies for managing alertness during flight operations. The WINGS program is an incentive program that encourages pilots at all licensing levels to participate in recurrent training, upon completion of which distinctive lapel or tie pins (wings) and certificates of completion are awarded. In addition to flight training, all WINGS applicants must attend at least one FAA-sponsored safety seminar, FAA-sanctioned safety seminar, or industry recurrent training program. The Fatigue Countermeasures Group provides an FAA-approved industry recurrent training program through an on-line General Aviation (GA) WINGS ETM in alertness management to satisfy this requirement. Since 1993, the Fatigue Countermeasures Group has translated fatigue and alertness information to operational environments by conducting two-day ETM workshops oriented primarily toward air-carrier operations subject to Part 121 of the Federal Aviation Regulations pertaining to such operations. On the basis of the information presented in the two-day ETM workshops, an ETM was created for GA pilots and was transferred to a Web-based version. To comply with the requirements of the WINGS Program, the original Web-based version has been modified to include hypertext markup language (HTML) content that makes information easily accessible, in-depth testing of alertness-management knowledge, new interactive features, and increased informational resources for GA pilots. Upon successful completion of this training module, a participant

  16. Nuclear education, training and knowledge management in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beeley, Phil; Slugen, Vladimir; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, Rita [European Nuclear Society ENS, Brussels (Belgium). ENS High Scientific Council

    2010-04-15

    The situation in the nuclear education today is complex as it relates to nuclear technology for both peaceful and security applications. After more than 20 years period of depression in nuclear facility construction (significant mainly in Europe and USA), there is strong renewed interest in nuclear-generated electricity. Many factors have contributed to ''nuclear renaissance'' including concerns about possible climate changes due to carbon emissions. The Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) study in 2000, ''Nuclear Education and Training. Cause for Concern'', highlighted the necessity for a renaissance in nuclear education and training with some recommendations. The European Nuclear Energy Forum (ENEF) identified the nuclear education as one of highest risks in nuclear industry. The nuclear renaissance depends on the increased number of engineers properly educated in wide spectrum of nuclear disciplines. The world has responded. Networks have been established to respond to the necessity to maintain and perpetuate nuclear knowledge in order to provide a suitably qualified workforce for the future operation of nuclear power plants. The quality in Education, Training and Knowledge Management (ETKM) is strongly influenced and supported by development of nuclear research, exploitation of experimental and training facilities, existence of proper education and training networks, software tools, distance and e-learning and a variety of knowledge management activities. The projected global annual requirements for new nuclear engineers over the next 10 years will challenge existing academic and training institutions with respect to capacity and load factors on classrooms, laboratories and other facilities such as basic principles simulators. Additionally, the nuclear academic workforce may need to increase to meet the demand for educating/training the new industrial workforce and this will take time. Within the European context many of the

  17. Nuclear education, training and knowledge management in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeley, Phil; Slugen, Vladimir; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, Rita

    2010-01-01

    The situation in the nuclear education today is complex as it relates to nuclear technology for both peaceful and security applications. After more than 20 years period of depression in nuclear facility construction (significant mainly in Europe and USA), there is strong renewed interest in nuclear-generated electricity. Many factors have contributed to ''nuclear renaissance'' including concerns about possible climate changes due to carbon emissions. The Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) study in 2000, ''Nuclear Education and Training. Cause for Concern'', highlighted the necessity for a renaissance in nuclear education and training with some recommendations. The European Nuclear Energy Forum (ENEF) identified the nuclear education as one of highest risks in nuclear industry. The nuclear renaissance depends on the increased number of engineers properly educated in wide spectrum of nuclear disciplines. The world has responded. Networks have been established to respond to the necessity to maintain and perpetuate nuclear knowledge in order to provide a suitably qualified workforce for the future operation of nuclear power plants. The quality in Education, Training and Knowledge Management (ETKM) is strongly influenced and supported by development of nuclear research, exploitation of experimental and training facilities, existence of proper education and training networks, software tools, distance and e-learning and a variety of knowledge management activities. The projected global annual requirements for new nuclear engineers over the next 10 years will challenge existing academic and training institutions with respect to capacity and load factors on classrooms, laboratories and other facilities such as basic principles simulators. Additionally, the nuclear academic workforce may need to increase to meet the demand for educating/training the new industrial workforce and this will take time. Within the European context many of the programmes will continue through

  18. Automation impact study of Army Training Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanquist, T.F.; Schuller, C.R.; McCallum, M.C.; Underwood, J.A.; Bettin, P.J.; King, J.L.; Melber, B.D.; Hostick, C.J.; Seaver, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The main objectives of this impact study were to identify the potential cost savings associated with automated Army Training Management (TM), and to perform a cost-benefit analysis for an Army-wide automated TM system. A subsidiary goal was to establish baseline data for an independent evaluation of a prototype Integrated Training Management System (ITMS), to be tested in the fall of 1988. A structured analysis of TM doctrine was performed for comparison with empirical data gathered in a job analysis survey of selected units of the 9ID (MTZ) at Ft. Lewis, Washington. These observations will be extended to other units in subsequent surveys. The survey data concerning staffing levels and amount of labor expended on eight distinct TM tasks were analyzed in a cost effectiveness model. The main results of the surveys and cost effectiveness modelling are summarized. 18 figs., 47 tabs.

  19. Automation impact study of Army Training Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanquist, T.F.; Schuller, C.R.; McCallum, M.C.; Underwood, J.A.; Bettin, P.J.; King, J.L.; Melber, B.D.; Hostick, C.J.; Seaver, D.A.

    1988-01-01

    The main objectives of this impact study were to identify the potential cost savings associated with automated Army Training Management (TM), and to perform a cost-benefit analysis for an Army-wide automated TM system. A subsidiary goal was to establish baseline data for an independent evaluation of a prototype Integrated Training Management System (ITMS), to be tested in the fall of 1988. A structured analysis of TM doctrine was performed for comparison with empirical data gathered in a job analysis survey of selected units of the 9ID (MTZ) at Ft. Lewis, Washington. These observations will be extended to other units in subsequent surveys. The survey data concerning staffing levels and amount of labor expended on eight distinct TM tasks were analyzed in a cost effectiveness model. The main results of the surveys and cost effectiveness modelling are summarized. 18 figs., 47 tabs

  20. Assessment of learning components of management training course ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of learning components of any training course provides a benchmark through which training institutions or organizers could assess the effectiveness of the training. The study assessed learning components of agricultural research management training course organized for senior research managers in Nigeria.

  1. Human Impacts and Management of Carbon Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, S.; Edmonds, J.; Socolow, R.; Surles, T.

    1999-08-20

    The energy system dominates human-induced carbon flows on our planet. Globally, six billion tons of carbon are contained in the fossil fuels removed from below the ground every year. More than 90% of the carbon in fossil fuels is used for energy purposes, with carbon dioxide as the carbon product and the atmosphere as the initial destination for the carbon dioxide. Significantly affecting the carbon flows associated with fossil fuels is an immense undertaking. Four principal technological approaches are available to affect these carbon flows: (1) Fossil fuels and other energy resources can be utilized more efficiently; (2) Energy sources other than fossil fuels can be used; (3) Carbon dioxide from the combustion of fossil fuels can be trapped and redirected, preventing it from reaching the atmosphere (fossil carbon sequestration); and (4) One can work outside the energy system to remove carbon dioxide biologically from the atmosphere (biological carbon sequestration). An optimum carbon management strategy will surely implement all four approaches and a wise R&D program will have vigorous sub-programs in all four areas. These programs can be effective by integrating scenario analyses into the planning process. A number of future scenarios must be evaluated to determine the need for the new technologies in a future energy mix. This planning activity must be an iterative process. At present, R&D in the first two areas--energy efficiency and non-fossil fuel energy resources--is relatively well developed. By contrast, R&D in the third and the fourth areas--the two carbon sequestration options--is less well developed. The task before the workshop was to recommend ways to initiate a vigorous carbon sequestration research program without compromising the strength of the current programs in the first two areas. We recommend that this task be fulfilled by initiating several new programs in parallel. First, we recommend that a vigorous carbon sequestration program be launched

  2. Simulation game provides financial management training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhles, Neville; Weimer-Elder, Barbette; Lee, James G

    2008-01-01

    Adventist HealthCare developed a workshop with a reality simulation game as an engaging means to teach nonfinancial managers about the relationships between cash flow, income statements, and balance sheets. Thirty AHC staff, about half financial and half nonfinancial, were trained as workshop facilitators, and all managers with budget oversight were asked to complete the workshop. The workshop was very positively received; participants' average scores on workshop questionnaires increased from 77.4 percent correct on a presession questionnaire to 91.3 percent correct on a postsession questionnaire.

  3. Waste-management QA training and motivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henderson, J.T.

    1982-01-01

    Early in the development of a QA Program for the Waste Management and Geotechnical Projects Directorate, thought was given to establishing a QA Training Program commensurate with the needs and appropriate to the motivation of a staff of more than 130 scientists and project leaders. These individuals, i.e., researchers rather than hardware designers, had no prior experience with QA programs, and from their perception generally did not believe that such controls had any merit. Therefore, historically proven approaches to QA training had to be quickly modified or totally discarded. For instance, due to the mobility and diversity of backgrounds of personnel at SNL, the QA training program had to accommodate many different levels of QA maturity at any given time. Furthermore, since the application of QA to R and D was continuing to profit from project-specific lessons learned, these improvements in the QA program had to be easily and quickly imparted in the general staff's evolving awareness of QA. A somewhat novel approach to QA training has been developed that draws heavily upon SNL's existing In-Hours Technical Education Courses (INTEC) studio capabilities. This training attempts to accommodate individual staff needs and to ensure the required QA skills and awareness for the diverse types of programs addressed

  4. The Effects of Types of Training Evaluation on Support of Training among Corporate Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusy, Mitchell E., Jr.

    A study was conducted to determine which type of training evaluation method elicited the most management support of the training function among corporate managers. The investigator designed and distributed a case study survey instrument called the Training Evaluation Methods Survey (TEMS) to assess the extent of management support for each type of…

  5. Energy management in fuel cell power trains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corbo, P.; Corcione, F.E.; Migliardini, F.; Veneri, O.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, experimental results obtained on a small size fuel cell power train (1.8 kW) based on a 500 W proton exchange membrane (PEM) stack are reported and discussed with specific regard to energy management issues to be faced for attainment of the maximum propulsion system efficiency. The fuel cell system (FCS) was realized and characterized via investigating the effects of the main operative variables on efficiency. This resulted in an efficiency higher than 30% in a wide power range with a maximum of 38% at medium load. The efficiency of the overall fuel cell power train measured during both steady state and dynamic conditions (European R40 driving cycle) was about 30%. A discussion about the control strategy to direct the power flows is reported with reference to two different test procedures used in dynamic experiments, i.e., load levelled and load following

  6. Forest carbon management in the United States: 1600-2100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard A. Birdsey; Kurt Pregitzer; Alan Lucier

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the effects of past forest management on carbon stocks in the United States, and the challenges for managing forest carbon resources in the 21st century. Forests in the United States were in approximate carbon balance with the atmosphere from 1600-1800. Utilization and land clearing caused a large pulse of forest carbon emissions during the 19th...

  7. A generic hazardous waste management training program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, R.J.; Karnofsky, B.

    1988-01-01

    The main purpose of this training program element is to familiarize personnel involved in hazardous waste management with the goals of RCRA and how they are to be achieved. These goals include: to protect health and the environment; to conserve valuable material and energy resources; to prohibit future open dumping on the land; to assure that hazardous waste management practices are conducted in a manner which protects human health and the environment; to insure that hazardous waste is properly managed thereby reducing the need for corrective actions in the future; to establish a national policy to reduce or eliminate the generation of hazardous waste, wherever feasible. Another objective of this progam element is to present a brief overview of the RCRA regulations and how they are implemented/enforced by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and each of the fifty states. This element also discusses where the RCRA regulations are published and how they are updated. In addition it details who is responsible for compliance with the regulations. Finally, this part of the training program provides an overview of the activities and materials that are regulated. 1 ref

  8. Managing service excellence. Internal customer service training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAnulty, P.C.

    1991-01-01

    WHO ARE OUR CUSTOMERS? Electric Users, regulators, vendors, suppliers, or our own employees? The answer is ALL exclamation point They are all customers. Regardless if they are external or internal customers, one must focus on quality of service delivery in order to maintain customer satisfaction. The most successful companies are quickly realizing that managing SERVICE EX NCE is our only future. For the next decade, the issue of service quality will exceed the issue of productivity. It is very easy to see that the business behind a utility is serving our electric consumers. However, internal customer service - service excellence to employees inside a company is the foundation for success. This paper describes a training program that is being implemented across Duke Power for employees on internal customer service. How we provide service to each other within a company impacts service quality to our external customers. This training refocuses behaviors and perceptions so to concentrate on quality service delivery to our internal customers - our employees. We all have positive and negative experiences with obtaining quality service by either external organizations or internal employees. Therefore, we start with a common foundation. Whether it be a supplier, vendor, or a station administrative group, we have experienced either excellent or poor customer service. All of us have potential in managing the delivery of excellent customer service. However, many of us may need new perspectives so to add depth with which we view and manage service excellence to our internal customers

  9. Organisational Change and the Management of Training in Australian Enterprises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew; Oczkowski, Edward; Macklin, Robert; Noble, Charles

    2003-01-01

    A survey of 584 Australian companies investigated the impact of 5 management practices (total quality management, teamwork, lean production, reengineering, learning organizations) in relation to 8 training practices. New management practices had significant but differing effects on the organization of training: total quality management had the…

  10. Forest management for fixing and sequestering carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marland, G.; Dale, V.; Graham, R.; Luxmoore, R.; Marland, S.; McLaughlin, S.; Norby, R.; Post, W.M.; Tschaplinski, T.; Tuskan, J.; Wright, L.

    1993-01-01

    The concept of planting trees as part of a strategy to confront the possibility of global climate change is now widely accepted. As trees grow they remove CO 2 from the atmosphere and thus slow the atmospheric build-up of CO 2 , an important greenhouse gas. Within the global-climate-change context, there are two fundamental problems with managing trees to store carbon. First, the magnitude of fossil-fuel related emissions of CO 2 is so large, 6 billion metric tons of carbon per year that it takes very large areas of tree planting to make a significant impact. Second, as trees mature their rate of growth, and hence rate of net carbon uptake, declines. lie large demand on land area suggests that there is a limit to the fraction of total CO 2 emissions that we might reasonably expect to offset with growing trees. The ultimate maturation of forests suggests that there is a limit on the length of time over which offsets are feasible and that we need to ask what to do as the rate of C uptake declines. Acknowledging a that the availability of land will constrain the ability of tree planting to offset industrial emissions of CO 2 , we consider how the land which is available can be used most effectively. This report speculates on how much land might be available for a forest management strategy motivated (at least partially) by concerns about climate change, but our principal focus is on how a given land area can be best used to minimize net emissions of CO 2 and how much might be achieved on a unit of land. We do not suggest that carbon management should be the principal criteria for land management, but we discuss the implications if it were. Confronting global and local changes in climate will be one of many objectives in land management and we explore for the most effective strategy for pursuing this objective

  11. Emerging carbon constraints for corporate risk management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busch, Timo; Hoffmann, Volker H.

    2007-01-01

    While discussions about global sustainability challenges abound, the financial risks that they incur, albeit important, have received less attention. We suggest that corporate risk assessments should include sustainability-related aspects, especially with relation to the natural environment, and encompass the flux of critical materials within a company's value chain. Such a comprehensive risk assessment takes into account input- as well as output-related factors. With this paper, we focus on the flux of carbon and define carbon constraints that emerge due to the disposition of fossil fuels in the input dimension and due to direct and indirect climate change effects in the output dimension. We review the literature regarding the financial consequences of carbon constraints on the macroeconomic, sector, and company level. We conclude that: a) financial consequences seem to be asymmetrically distributed between and within sectors, b) the individual risk exposure of companies depends on the intensity of and dependency on carbon-based materials and energy, and c) financial markets have only started to incorporate these aspects in their valuations. This paper ends with recommendations on how to incorporate our results in an integrated carbon risk management framework. (author)

  12. The Effect of Parent Management Training on children with attention ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Effect of Parent Management Training on children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. ... Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... Training (PMT) on behaviour of children diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity ...

  13. Server application for automated management training system of NPP personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poplavskij, I.A.; Pribysh, P.I.; Karpej, A.L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describer the server side of automated management training system. This system will increase the efficiency of planning and accounting training activities, simplifies the collecting the necessary documentation and analysis of the results. (authors)

  14. Human resource training and development. The outdoor management method.

    OpenAIRE

    THANOS KRIEMADIS; ANNA KOURTESOPOULOU

    2008-01-01

    In the age of international competition in today’s economy, companies must train their employees and prepare them for jobs in the future. There are many different types and educational approaches in human resource training, but the present study will focus on the Outdoor Management Development (OMD). For better understanding, the particular training method and the core stages of the training process will be examined and the definitions of OMD as an educational tool for management development ...

  15. Radiological control technician: Training program management manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This manual defines and describes the DOE Radiological Control Technician Core Training Program qualification and training process, material development requirements, standards and policies, and administration. The manual applies to Radiological Control Technician Training Programs at all DOE contractor sites

  16. Forest carbon calculators: a review for managers, policymakers, and educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harold S.J. Zald; Thomas A. Spies; Mark E. Harmon; Mark J. Twery

    2016-01-01

    Forests play a critical role sequestering atmospheric carbon dioxide, partially offsetting greenhouse gas emissions, and thereby mitigating climate change. Forest management, natural disturbances, and the fate of carbon in wood products strongly influence carbon sequestration and emissions in the forest sector. Government policies, carbon offset and trading programs,...

  17. A case for safety leadership team training of hospital managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Sara J; Hayes, Jennifer; Cooper, Jeffrey B; Vogt, Jay W; Sales, Michael; Aristidou, Angela; Gray, Garry C; Kiang, Mathew V; Meyer, Gregg S

    2011-01-01

    Delivering safe patient care remains an elusive goal. Resolving problems in complex organizations like hospitals requires managers to work together. Safety leadership training that encourages managers to exercise learning-oriented, team-based leadership behaviors could promote systemic problem solving and enhance patient safety. Despite the need for such training, few programs teach multidisciplinary groups of managers about specific behaviors that can enhance their role as leadership teams in the realm of patient safety. The aims of this study were to describe a learning-oriented, team-based, safety leadership training program composed of reinforcing exercises and to provide evidence confirming the need for such training and demonstrating behavior change among management groups after training. Twelve groups of managers from an academic medical center based in the Northeast United States were randomly selected to participate in the program and exposed to its customized, experience-based, integrated, multimodal curriculum. We extracted data from transcripts of four training sessions over 15 months with groups of managers about the need for the training in these groups and change in participants' awareness, professional behaviors, and group activity. Training transcripts confirmed the need for safety leadership team training and provided evidence of the potential for training to increase targeted behaviors. The training increased awareness and use of leadership behaviors among many managers and led to new routines and coordinated effort among most management groups. Enhanced learning-oriented leadership often helped promote a learning orientation in managers' work areas. Team-based training that promotes specific learning-oriented leader behaviors can promote behavioral change among multidisciplinary groups of hospital managers.

  18. The effectiveness of anger management's training on difficulty of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Fundamental and Applied Sciences ... The purpose of this research is the effect of anger management training on adolescents' emotional regulation. ... Keywords: Anger management, Difficulty in emotion regulation, Adolescent ...

  19. Management by Agreement: Its Impact on Training. A Summing Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Leonard S.

    1974-01-01

    Through education and training participative management, or management by agreement, can be implemented in business and industry to solve many of their problems. Participation can meet two primary needs: efficiency and economy, and greater job satisfaction for the individual. (DS)

  20. The Management of Training in Multinational Corporations: Comparative Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Charles

    1997-01-01

    Case studies of British and Australian multinational corporations in the food and drink industry investigated how training and development are managed. Competency-based education and industry boards are important elements in both countries. Lack of a training culture in the industry and little innovation in training were observed. (SK)

  1. POSTER FOR NRMRL QUALITY MANAGEMENT PLAN (QMP) TRAINING COURSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    NRMRL QMP Training CourseContact: Lauren Drees, NRMRL/STD (drees.lauren@epa.gov) NRMRL has developed a computer-based course to train personnel in the requirements of the NRMRL Quality Management Plan (QMP). This training course was developed using Trainersoft s...

  2. Directory of Instructional Programs in Supervision and Management Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civil Service Commission, Washington, DC. Training Assistance Div.

    This directory, which is designed for the use of training officers in the Washington, D.C. area in prescribing learning programs to meet employee training needs, describes available group and self instructional programs used for the training of supervisors and managers. Each of the 21 courses listed contains the pertinent information necessary to…

  3. The computer aided education and training system for accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Kubota, Ryuji; Fujiwara, Tadashi; Sakuma, Hitoshi

    1999-01-01

    The education and training system for Accident Management was developed by the Japanese BWR group and Hitachi Ltd. The education and training system is composed of two systems. One is computer aided instruction (CAI) education system and the education and training system with computer simulations. Both systems are designed to be executed on personal computers. The outlines of the CAI education system and the education and training system with simulator are reported below. These systems provides plant operators and technical support center staff with the effective education and training for accident management. (author)

  4. Human resource training and development. The outdoor management method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    THANOS KRIEMADIS

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the age of international competition in today’s economy, companies must train their employees and prepare them for jobs in the future. There are many different types and educational approaches in human resource training, but the present study will focus on the Outdoor Management Development (OMD. For better understanding, the particular training method and the core stages of the training process will be examined and the definitions of OMD as an educational tool for management development will be presented. Basic theories and models will be analysed as well as the benefits earned and evaluation concerns about the effectiveness of such training programs.

  5. B Plant Complex waste management training plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beam, T.G.

    1994-01-01

    This training program is designed to comply with all applicable federal, state and US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office training requirements. The training program complies with requirements contained within WAC 173-303-330 for the development of a written dangerous waste training program. The training program is designed to prepare personnel to manage and maintain waste treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) units, as well as generator units, in a safe, effective, efficient and environmentally sound manner. In addition to preparing employees to manage and maintain TSD and generator units under normal conditions, the training program ensures that employees are prepared to respond in a prompt and effective manner should an emergency occur. The training plan also identifies specific individuals holding key waste management positions at B Plant Complex

  6. Designing Mixed Reality Mobile Games for Crisis Management Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Loreto, Ines; Mora, Simone; Divitini, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Games for crisis management offer an interesting complement to traditional training. Experiments on their usage show that games can be promising tools able to address some of the limitations of traditional training. Also our first assessment with a board game for panic management shows that this particular kind of game could be useful for soft…

  7. Export Management Specialist. A Training Program. Instructor's Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This publication provides instructors with materials for an export management specialist (EMS) training program. The objective of the training program is to assist companies in reaching their export goals by educating current and potential managers about the basics of exporting. It provides a foundation for considering international trade and for…

  8. Decreasing Students' Stress through Time Management Training: An Intervention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häfner, Alexander; Stock, Armin; Oberst, Verena

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a time management training program on perceived control of time and perceived stress in the context of higher education. Twenty-three undergraduate students attended a time management training intervention and reported demands, perceived stress and perceived control of time directly before 2 and…

  9. Enrollment of SME Managers to Growth-oriented Training Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bager, Torben; Jensen, Kent Wickstrøm; Schou Nielsen, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Entrepreneurial learning through formal growth-oriented training programs for SME managers promises to enhance the growth competences and growth intentions of the enrolled managers. The impact of such programs, however, depends on who enrolls since initial competence and growth-intention......Purpose: Entrepreneurial learning through formal growth-oriented training programs for SME managers promises to enhance the growth competences and growth intentions of the enrolled managers. The impact of such programs, however, depends on who enrolls since initial competence and growth...... has from 2012 to 2015 trained about 700 SME managers. Data are currently available for 366 of these participants. This evidence is compared with survey results from a randomly selected control group of 292 growth oriented SME managers in the same firm-size group. The data were analyzed through...... of the program. Originality/value The paper is the first systematic study of the importance of who enrolls in training programs for SME managers....

  10. Getting the Most of Management Training - the Role of Identical Elements for Training Transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    prof. dr. Karen van Dam; drs. Martijn van der Locht; dr. Dan Chiaburu

    2013-01-01

    Purpose - Focusing on management training, this study aimed to establish whether identical elements in a training program (i.e. aspects resembling participants' work situation) can improve training transfer and whether they do so beyond the contribution of two well-established predictors --

  11. Spectrum Management From A Training Range Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    right up to the part where you got killed. • Goose: The defense department regrets to inform you that your sons are dead because they were stupid ...cost (time and lives) 4 Images source: Google images Training Basics • The “prime directives” of training: “Train As You’ll Fight – Fight As...Recording ground truth (movement, C2, actions) – Timely feedback and lessons learned 5 Image source: Google images The Realities of Live Training

  12. Training of technical staff and technical staff managers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moody, G.F.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of Technical Staff and Technical Staff Managers training is to provide job skills enhancement to individuals selected to fill key technical positions within a nuclear utility. This training is unique in that unlike other training programs accredited by the National Academy for Nuclear Training, it does not lead to specific task qualification. The problems encountered when determining the student population and curriculum are a direct result of this major difference. Major problems encountered are determining who should attend the training, what amount of training is necessary and sufficient, and how to obtain the best feedback in order to effect substantive program improvements. These topics will be explored and possible solutions discussed

  13. GESAT: System for management and evaluation of training programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arjona, O.; Venegas, M.; Rodriguez, L.; Lopez, M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describe the criteria considered to design the GESAT system, the elements considered to select the relational model, selection of the database language and the main features and possibilities of this system. GESAT allow the management of training programs based on the Systematic Approach to Training. Include the information related with all SAT phases, the results of the job analysis, training plans design, development of materials, training implementation, and the subsequent evaluation

  14. Middle Managers and the Environment: Attitudes and Training Interests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Henning; Ulhøi, John Parm

    It has long been recognised that education and training are essential to the development of environmental management in business organisations. So far, however, there has been little information about environmental management practice and related educational and training requirements in even...... European companies and the educational and training needs this will require in future. The results will then be compared with the findings of initiatives carried out at various educational and training institutions. The project has been divided into three stages: i) corporate environmental management, (ii......) middle managers, and (iii) workers. The project has been based partly on interviews in a small number of European companies at the forefront of environmental management and ditto educational and training institutions, and partly on more large-scale questionnaire surveys. This paper will briefly describe...

  15. Monitoring, modelling and managing Canada's forest carbon cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurz, W.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents information concerning the management of carbon stocks both globally and in Canada, with reference to the fact that forests may contribute to carbon emissions problems. Global fossil carbon emissions statistics were provided, as well as data of forest area per capita in Canada and various countries. Details of forest management options and carbon accounting with reference to the Kyoto Protocol were reviewed. An explanation of forest management credits in national accounts was provided. An explanation of carbon sinks and carbon sources was also presented, along with details of stand level carbon dynamics. A model for calculating landscape level carbon stocks was presented, with reference to increasing and decreasing disturbances. A hypothetical landscape example was provided. It was concluded that age-class structure affect the amount of carbon stored in landscape; age-class structure also affect carbon dynamics; and responses reflect the change in disturbance regimes. An overview of international reporting requirements was presented. Canadian harvests equal 54,000 tonnes of carbon per year. It was recommended that managed forests could increase carbon in forests while also managing carbon harvests to meet society's needs. A chart presenting forest management details was presented, along with a hypothetical landscape example and a forecast for cumulative changes after 50 years, The benefits and challenges of forest management were reviewed as well as options regarding salvaging and deforestation avoidance. A carbon budget model was presented. It was concluded that forests in Canada could be used in a greenhouse gas management strategy. However, changes in disturbance may mean the difference between net source or net sink. Details of biomass were presented and multi-mode combustion facilities. The feasibility of biomass as a fuel source was discussed, with reference to hydrogen fuel. Gas composition profiles were provided, as well as details of

  16. Tactical training of emergency management - the MUSTER concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, Verner.

    1996-08-01

    The efficiency with which complex, large-scale organisations respon d to emergencies and critical situations depends crucially on the co-ordination of actions and communication among decision makers. However, decision makers have typically few opportunities to train distributed crisis management under artificial, yet realistic conditions; and at the same time, real emergencies occur fortunately so relatively infrequently that few decision makers have a chance of establishing a useful real-life experience of crisis management. There is therefore a need for having available realistic and flexible multi-user training environments in which co-ordinated response to crises or emergencies may be trained. The objective of the MUSTER project (Multi-User System for Training and Evaluating Environmental Emergency Response) is to produce specifications for a training system supporting collaborative training and evaluation directed to the special needs of environmental emergency management. The MUSTER project was partially funced by CEC

  17. [Effectiveness of mental health training including active listening for managers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Kazunori; Tagawa, Yoshimasa; Mafune, Kosuke; Hiro, Hisanori; Nagata, Shoji

    2008-07-01

    We carried out mental health training with Active Listening for managers of A company, which was the electronics manufacturing company with 1,900 employees. The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect on managers and employees in the workplace on the training. The subjects were all persons who managed regular employees directly in A company. We performed the investigation from May 2006 to February 2007 and carried out the training from September to November in 2006. The contents of the training were from the chapter on "The education and training of managers" in the "The guideline for maintenance and promotion of mental health for workers" issued by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in Japan in 2006. We divided the contents and implemented them in two sessions. "Responding to worker consultation" was one of the contents of Active Listening. In the first session, we explained about Active Listening, and in the second session we ran a practical involving Inventive Experiential Listening. One month later, we distributed material summarizing the training to all the participants. To evaluate the effect of the training, we conducted surveys of the participants using the Active Listening Attitude Scale (ALAS), prior to and after the training, and distributed questionnaires, post-training about the contents of the training and changes of consciousness and action. Furthermore, we performed surveys pre- and post-training using the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire (BJSQ) 12 items version, distributed to all employees. We evaluated the effect of the training on 124 managers and 908 workers by the investigation. The score of each subscale was analyzed by repeated measures analysis of variance. There were no significant differences in the scores of both the "Listening attitude" and "Listening skill" subscales of ALAS between pre-training and post-training, but the mean scores post-training were higher than those pre-training on both subscales. There were

  18. Computer based training for oil spill management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, R.

    1993-01-01

    Large oil spills are infrequent occurrences, which poses a particular problem for training oil spill response staff and for maintaining a high level of response readiness. Conventional training methods involve table-top simulations to develop tactical and strategic response skills and boom-deployment exercises to maintain operational readiness. Both forms of training are quite effective, but they are very time-consuming to organize, are expensive to conduct, and tend to become repetitious. To provide a variety of response experiences, a computer-based system of oil spill response training has been developed which can supplement a table-top training program. Using a graphic interface, a realistic and challenging computerized oil spill response simulation has been produced. Integral to the system is a program editing tool which allows the teacher to develop a custom training exercise for the area of interest to the student. 1 ref

  19. Contingency theory, climate change, and low-carbon operations management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Furlan Matos Alves, Marcelo Wilson; Lopes de Sousa Jabbour, Ana Beatriz; Kannan, Devika

    2017-01-01

    of sustainability managers on the adoption of low-carbon operations management practices and their related benefits. Design/methodology/approach: To achieve this goal, this research uses NVivo software to gather evidence from interviews conducted with ten high-level managers in sustainability and related areas from...... seven leading companies located in Brazil. Findings: The authors present four primary results: a proposal of an original framework to understand the relationship between contingency theory, changes in organisational structure to embrace low-carbon management, adoption of low-carbon operations practices......-change contingencies at the supply chain level, organisational structure for low-carbon management and low-carbon operations management practices and benefits. This research also highlights evidence from an emerging economy and registers future research propositions....

  20. [Training of health-care employees in crisis resource management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanager, Lene; Østergaard, Doris; Lippert, Anne; Nielsen, Kurt; Dieckmann, Peter

    2013-03-25

    Studies show that human errors contribute to up to 70% of mistakes and mishaps in health care. Crisis resource management, CRM, is a conceptual framework for analysing and training individual and team skills in order to prevent and manage errors. Different CRM training methods, e.g. simulation, are in use and the literature emphasises the need of training the full team or organisation for maximal effect. CRM training has an effect on skill improvement, but few studies have shown an effect on patient outcome. However, these studies show great variability of quality.

  1. Vision training methods for sports concussion mitigation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Joseph F; Colosimo, Angelo; Ellis, James K; Mangine, Robert; Bixenmann, Benjamin; Hasselfeld, Kimberly; Graman, Patricia; Elgendy, Hagar; Myer, Gregory; Divine, Jon

    2015-05-05

    There is emerging evidence supporting the use vision training, including light board training tools, as a concussion baseline and neuro-diagnostic tool and potentially as a supportive component to concussion prevention strategies. This paper is focused on providing detailed methods for select vision training tools and reporting normative data for comparison when vision training is a part of a sports management program. The overall program includes standard vision training methods including tachistoscope, Brock's string, and strobe glasses, as well as specialized light board training algorithms. Stereopsis is measured as a means to monitor vision training affects. In addition, quantitative results for vision training methods as well as baseline and post-testing *A and Reaction Test measures with progressive scores are reported. Collegiate athletes consistently improve after six weeks of training in their stereopsis, *A and Reaction Test scores. When vision training is initiated as a team wide exercise, the incidence of concussion decreases in players who participate in training compared to players who do not receive the vision training. Vision training produces functional and performance changes that, when monitored, can be used to assess the success of the vision training and can be initiated as part of a sports medical intervention for concussion prevention.

  2. Large-scale computer-mediated training for management teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilly Salmon

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1995/6 the Open University Business School (OUBS trained 187 tutors in the UK and Continental Western Europe in Computer Mediated Conferencing (CMC for management education. The medium chosen for the training was FirstClassTM. In 1996/7 the OUBS trained a further 106 tutors in FirstClassTM using an improved version of the previous years training. The on line training was based on a previously developed model of learning on line. The model was tested both by means of the structure of the training programme and the improvements made. The training programme was evaluated and revised for the second cohort. Comparison was made between the two training programmes.

  3. Modernizing Training Options for Natural Areas Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedl, Sarah E.; Ober, Holly K.; Stein, Taylor V.; Andreu, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    A recent shift in desires among working professionals from traditional learning environments to distance education has emerged due to reductions in travel and training budgets. To accommodate this, the Natural Areas Training Academy replaced traditionally formatted workshops with a hybrid approach. Surveys of participants before and after this…

  4. Quality Management Builds Solid eTraining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echard, Rachel D.; Berge, Zane L.

    2008-01-01

    History has shown effective training techniques can produce significant business results especially in customer service, product development, and capability in obtaining new skill sets. This linkage of training to business strategy has given many businesses the needed competitive edge in today's global market. In today's technology age,…

  5. Better training, better management, better school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Gómez Delgado

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The school head is presented in the literature as a key factor in improving schools and school performance of students, so that training for managerial tasks is critical for achieving greater competence in the exercise of office. This research shows that in the Andalusian Community is organized a complex Initial Training Program, in which the mentoring and the Working Groups are the most valuable training modalities. Both modes, with expert presentations, case studies, online training, and regional development events, create a situation that allows new school head feel a level of competence higher than average in all managerial competences identified by Teixido (2007, except the leadership for learning. Therefore is needed better training on issues related to the curriculum and improving schools.

  6. Community-Based Solid Waste Management: A Training Facilitator's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peace Corps, Washington, DC. Information Collection and Exchange Div.

    Urban environmental management and environmental health issues are of increasing concern worldwide. The need for urban environmental management work at the local level where the Peace Corps works most effectively is significant, but training materials dedicated specifically to community-based solid waste management work in urban areas are lacking.…

  7. Title IV Cash Management Life Cycle Training. Participant's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Education, Washington, DC.

    This participant's guide includes: "Introduction: Welcome to Cash Management Life Cycle Training"; "Module 1: Review of Cash Management Principles" (cash management overview and activity); "Module 2: Common Origination and Disbursement (COD) System Overview" (e.g., full participants and phase-in participants, COD…

  8. [Greenhouse gas emissions, carbon leakage and net carbon sequestration from afforestation and forest management: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo Jie; Lu, Fei; Wang, Xiao Ke; Liu, Wei Wei

    2017-02-01

    Forests play an important role in climate change mitigation and concentration of CO 2 reduction in the atmosphere. Forest management, especially afforestation and forest protection, could increase carbon stock of forests significantly. Carbon sequestration rate of afforestation ranges from 0.04 to 7.52 t C·hm -2 ·a -1 , while that of forest protection is 0.33-5.20 t C·hm -2 ·a -1 . At the same time, greenhouse gas (GHG) is generated within management boundary due to the production and transportation of the materials consumed in relevant activities of afforestation and forest management. In addition, carbon leakage is also generated outside boundary from activity shifting, market effects and change of environments induced by forest management. In this review, we summarized the definition of emission sources of GHG, monitoring methods, quantity and rate of greenhouse gas emissions within boundary of afforestation and forest management. In addition, types, monitoring methods and quantity of carbon leakage outside boundary of forest management were also analyzed. Based on the reviewed results of carbon sequestration, we introduced greenhouse gas emissions within boundary and carbon leakage, net carbon sequestration as well as the countervailing effects of greenhouse gas emissions and carbon leakage to carbon sequestration. Greenhouse gas emissions within management boundary counteract 0.01%-19.3% of carbon sequestration, and such counteraction could increase to as high as 95% considering carbon leakage. Afforestation and forest management have substantial net carbon sequestration benefits, when only taking direct greenhouse gas emissions within boundary and measurable carbon leakage from activity shifting into consideration. Compared with soil carbon sequestration measures in croplands, afforestation and forest management is more advantageous in net carbon sequestration and has better prospects for application in terms of net mitigation potential. Along with the

  9. Hazardous materials management and compliance training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalton, T.F.

    1991-01-01

    OSHA training for hazardous waste site workers is required by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (SARA). In December 1986, a series of regulations was promulgated by OSHA on an interim basis calling for the training of workers engaged in hazardous waste operations. Subsequent to these interim regulations, final rules were promulgated and these final rules on hazardous waste operations and emergency response became effective on March 6, 1990. OSHA has conducted hearings on the accreditation of training programs. OSHA would like to follow the accreditation process under the AHERA regulations for asbestos, in which the model plan for accreditation of asbestos abatement training was included in Section 206 of Title 11 of the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA). OSHA proposed on January 26, 1990, to perform the accreditation of training programs for hazardous waste operations and that proposal suggested that they follow the model plan similar to the one used for AHERA. They did not propose to accredited training programs for workers engaged in emergency response. These new regulations pose a significant problem to the various contractors and emergency responders who deal with hazardous materials spill response, cleanup and site remediation since these programs have expanded so quickly that many people are not familiar with what particular segment of the training they are required to have and whether or not programs that have yet to be accredited are satisfactory for this type of training. Title III of SARA stipulates a training program for first responders which includes local emergency response organizations such as firemen and policemen. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the needs of workers at hazardous waste site remediation projects and workers who are dealing with hazardous substances, spill response and cleanup

  10. Managing Commercial Tree Species for Timber Production and Carbon Sequestration: Management Guidelines and Financial Returns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary D. Kronrad

    2006-09-19

    A carbon credit market is developing in the United States. Information is needed by buyers and sellers of carbon credits so that the market functions equitably and efficiently. Analyses have been conducted to determine the optimal forest management regime to employ for each of the major commercial tree species so that profitability of timber production only or the combination of timber production and carbon sequestration is maximized. Because the potential of a forest ecosystem to sequester carbon depends on the tree species, site quality and management regimes utilized, analyses have determined how to optimize carbon sequestration by determining how to optimally manage each species, given a range of site qualities, discount rates, prices of carbon credits and other economic variables. The effects of a carbon credit market on the method and profitability of forest management, the cost of sequestering carbon, the amount of carbon that can be sequestered, and the amount of timber products produced has been determined.

  11. Biofeedback Training in Crisis Managers: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janka, A; Adler, C; Brunner, B; Oppenrieder, S; Duschek, S

    2017-06-01

    Working in crisis environments represents a major challenge, especially for executive personnel engaged in directing disaster operations, i.e. crisis managers. Crisis management involves operating under conditions of extreme stress resulting, for instance, from high-level decision-making, principal responsibility for personnel, multitasking or working under conditions of risk and time pressure. The present study aimed to investigate the efficacy of a newly developed biofeedback training procedure based on electrodermal activity, especially designed for the target group of crisis managers. The training comprised exercises promoting acquisition of control over sympathetic arousal under resting conditions and during exposure to visual, acoustic and cognitive stressors resembling situations related to crisis management. In a randomized controlled design, 36 crisis managers were assigned to either a biofeedback training group or waiting list control group. Subjective stress was assessed using the Perceived Stress Scale. In the training group, stress level markedly decreased; the decrease remained stable at follow-up 2 months after the training. The results indicate that biofeedback training in crisis management is an effective method for stress management that may help to reduce vulnerability to stress-related performance decline and stress-related disease.

  12. TRAINING OF E-LEARNING MANAGERS: COMPETENCY APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliia V. Morze

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the competencies necessary for the successful professional activity of e-learning managers. The content of the professional qualification "e-learning manager" is revealed. The model of competency system of the e-learning manager is offered. The model, which defines the content, forms, methods and means of training, tools and indicators for assessing the results of training e-learning managers by levels, is substantiated. Examples of competency tasks for forming of professional competencies in innovative teaching methods and technologies, Web 2.0 services, e-learning expertise, e-environment design, IT infrastructure management, and the development of Soft skills are presented. It is proposed to solve the problem of training specialists who will be able not only to use ICT in educational activities, but also to master the competencies of e-learning management.

  13. Training Programs for Managing Well-being in Companies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treven Sonja

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discussed the significance of well-being (WB and well-being management (WBM. As successful WBM requires the implementation of different training programs, such programs are presented in detail. The cause–effect relationship between training and individual/organizational performance is researched as well. The aim of the research to support this article was to present WBM, its training programs, as well as the determination of WBM activities concerning the mentioned programs implemented in Slovenian organizations.

  14. Evaluation of pre-service training on integrated management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of pre-service training on integrated management of neonatal and childhood ... and reviews of pediatric course outlines and other teaching/learning materials. ... Of the 34 programs 22 were diploma nursing, 6 Bachelor of Sciences ...

  15. Exploring how Conflict Management Training Changes Workplace Conflicts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Elisabeth Naima

    2012-01-01

    While many organisations offer conflict management training to both staff and management, there has been little research investigating the changes resulting from such training. Using an interpretive framework of analysis, a qualitative case study was conducted to understand how 'sensemakings' about...... conflicts change when enacted from the perspective of staff and management in a non-profit organisation that participated in conflict management training. The case study was constructed as a longitudinal investigation with ethnographic fieldwork as the primary method of inquiry. The training worked...... as a catalyst for the development of new sensemakings about workplace conflicts. These included increasing acknowledgement of workplace conflicts, recognition of interdependent and context embedded relationships in interpersonal conflicts, and enactment of active resistance in a subordinated occupational group...

  16. 2014 National Asset Management Conference and training on implementation strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    This report documents the major research activities conducted as part of the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) : Transportation Pooled Fund (TPF) Program project, TPF-5(275) 2014 National Asset Management Conference and Training on : Implementati...

  17. Comparison of Anxiety Management Training and Self-Control Desensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deffenbacher, Jerry L.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Anxiety management training and self-control desensitization effectively reduced debilitating test anxiety and increased facilitating test anxiety. Follow-up demonstrated maintenance of debilitating test anxiety reduction. Subjects receiving treatment had significantly higher psychology grades. (Author)

  18. Does training affect quality of diarrhoea case management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, L A; Thaver, I

    1997-08-01

    Improvement in diarrhoea case management through training of health care providers in the government and the private sector was the key element of diarrhoea policy in Pakistan in 1989. Numerous training sessions were organized by the Child Survival project. The aim of this project was to look at the effect of training on quality of diarrhoea case management at the oral rehydration therapy (ORT) corners and diarrhoea treatment units (DTUs) of Sindh. A systematic random sample of 62 ORT corners and DTUs in Sindh was assessed using the WHO drafted Health Facility Survey manual. It was observed that the trained health providers were better in taking history for blood in stools (P Plan A" and correct rehydration (p management. Thus diagnosis was good and training did improve the quality of assessment of child but treatment (inclusive of advice giving) was not significantly affected by training, except for a child with no dehydration. It is recommended that on the job training should emphasize on skills for management of diarrhoea. Further studies are needed to identify why inspite of training. Health providers do not offer better treatment than the untrained ones.

  19. Developing Top Managers: The Impact of Interpersonal Skills Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, John W.; Baruch, Yehuda

    2003-01-01

    A study assessed the impact of interpersonal skills training on top managers (n=252) by analyzing feedback from subordinates. The skills most responsive to training had clear objectives and outcome criteria and could be expressed as step-by-step routines. Soft skills were more difficult to improve in this way. (Contains 62 references.) (JOW)

  20. Client application for automated management training system of NPP personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pribysh, P.I.; Poplavskij, I.A.; Karpej, A.L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the client side of automated management training system. This system will optimize the speed of the organization and quality of the training plan; reduce the time of collecting the necessary documentation and facilitate the analysis of the results. (authors)

  1. Quality Assurance Plan for Transportation Management Division Transportation Training Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) implemented new rules requiring minimum levels of training for certain key individuals who handle, package, transport, or otherwise prepare hazardous materials for transportation. In response to these rules, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Transportation Management Division (TMD), has developed a transportation safety training program. This program supplies designed instructional methodology and course materials to provide basic levels of DOT training to personnel for whom training has become mandatory. In addition, this program provides advanced hazardous waste and radioactive material packaging and transportation training to help personnel achieve proficiency and/or certification as hazardous waste and radioactive material shippers. This training program does not include site-specific or task-specific training beyond DOT requirements

  2. Training Requirements and Information Management System. Software user guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cillan, T.F.; Hodgson, M.A.

    1992-05-01

    This is the software user`s guide for the Training Requirements and Information Management System. This guide defines and describes the software operating procedures as they apply to the end user of the software program. This guide is intended as a reference tool for the user who already has an indepth knowledge of the Training Requirements and Information Management System functions and data reporting requirement.

  3. Training Support for Crisis Managers with Elements of Serious Gaming

    OpenAIRE

    Havlik , Denis; Deri , Oren; Rannat , Kalev; Warum , Manuel; Rafalowski , Chaim; Taveter , Kuldar; Kutschera , Peter; Meriste , Merik

    2015-01-01

    Part 3: Decision Support Tools and Systems; International audience; This paper presents a methodology and a prototypic software implementation of a simple system supporting resource management training for crisis managers. The application that is presented supports the execution and assessment of a desktop training for decision makers on a tactical and strategic level. It introduces elements of turn-based strategic “serious gaming”, with a possibility to roll back in time and re-try new decis...

  4. Training Packages: The Scientific Management of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, John

    The theory of scientific management was established as a way to increase workers' productivity. The following are among the key principles underpinning scientific management: task simplification and division of labor boost productivity; management must control the planning of work down to its minutiae; and remuneration should be based on output.…

  5. Determining water management training needs through stakeholder ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Africa is a water-stressed country and the efficient management of the demand for and frugal use of water is a topic that can no longer be avoided. Community-based natural resource management is an alternative approach to government stewardship of natural resources, and in the instance of water management it is ...

  6. Determinants and Characteristics of Korean Companies’ Carbon Management under the Carbon Pricing Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunhee Suk

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In response to the domestic emission trading scheme, Korean companies are required to shift their strategies from voluntary or regulation-driven management approaches to innovative carbon management utilizing their carbon option linked with economic value. Using a questionnaire survey targeting companies subjected to the emission trading scheme, this study explores the status of Korean companies’ carbon management in a series of five strategies and identifies the correlation between companies’ proactive carbon strategies and pre-listed determinant factors. This study found that Korean companies’ practices in accordance with carbon pricing deviate little from conventional energy and environmental management in this phase. They are likely to be affected by the need to appear socially responsible or to make a social contribution, without having to exceed this mandate in terms activities outside of this remit. Yet, only a small proportion of companies have advanced to the stage of proactive carbon management. For them, top managers’ support and understanding are essential factors together with government pressure to factor-in issues related to carbon with their business strategies. This study provides implications for policy and corporate in promoting carbon-oriented management under the carbon policy.

  7. The Impact of PMIS Training: Patterns of Benefit Realization in Project Management Information Systems Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew McCarty

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The benefits of project, program, and portfolio management software toolsets can be enhanced through training. Little is known about the realization of positive, beneficial outcomes and Project Management Information System (PMIS training. This research seeks to improve understanding of project management software toolset training practices and outcomes. This study examines the prevalence, effectiveness, and impact-per-hour efficiency of training in real-world organizations. We further explore relationships between individual and organizational characteristics and training outcomes. Formulae for estimating training costs are derived using regression modeling. Surveys were collected from 1,021 active professionals and analyzed using quantitative methods. Research participants were practitioners recruited by eight different companies, industry groups, and professional organizations within the PMIS community. The findings of this research indicate significant differences in utilization, efficacy, and efficiency of PMIS training in practice. The outcomes and methodologies of this study are being incorporated into ongoing research that focuses on improving PMIS training delivery, evaluation, and planning. The outcomes of this research may result in more effective, efficient, and economical PMIS training that is better tailored to the unique needs of each organization.

  8. RESEARCH ON ROMANIAN MANAGER TRAINING IN PRE-UNIVERSITY EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuşa Ana

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Following the implementation of educational reform, school leadership has become very important. School principals have become managers and it was necessary a qualification process for them. The purpose of this study was to establish training needs and training school managers. The research instrument was a questionnaire applied to a number of 38 school managers of the eight regions of Romania. Analyzing data from the questionnaires respondents received, we found the following: • there is a clear idea of managerial tasks • school management issues are not fully known by the respondents. School education directors reported several problems such as: • Requiring high problems that have not been trained • The need for skills in areas such as accounting, administration, legal, information technology • Making teaching standard together with managerial activity A percentage of 62.70% of executives felt they were not sufficiently prepared for effective business management.

  9. Q methodology, risk training and quality management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, M; Hinks, M; Stowell-Smith, M; Mercer, D; Forster, J

    1999-01-01

    The results of a Q methodological study of professional understandings of the notion of risk in mental health services within the UK are discussed in relation to the relevance for staff training and quality assurance. The study attempted to access the diversity of understandings of risk issues amongst a multi-professional group of staff (n = 60) attending inter-agency risk training workshops in 1998. Q methodology is presented as both an appropriate means for such inquiry and as a novel experiential technique for training purposes. A tentative argument is advanced that the qualitative accounts generated by Q research could assist in systematic reviews of quality, complementing the singularly quantitative approaches typically represented in the audit process.

  10. Management of pain through autogenic training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanji, N

    2000-08-01

    Physical and emotional pain are an inevitable part of human existence and are without natural antidotes. In view of this, and in the light of increasing professional reluctance to depend on analgesics, this paper proposes the widespread application of autogenic training, a relaxation technique which has been seen to confront pain very effectively, and also to reduce substantially drugs dependency. It analyses autogenic training in respect of some of the more common pain-allied disorders such as childbirth, headaches and migraines, back pain, cancer and palliative care, and cardiology.

  11. Development of severe accident management advisory and training simulator (SAMAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, K.-S.; Kim, K.-R.; Jung, W.-D.; Ha, J.-J.

    2002-01-01

    The most operator support systems including the training simulator have been developed to assist the operator and they cover from normal operation to emergency operation. For the severe accident, the overall architecture for severe accident management is being developed in some developed countries according to the development of severe accident management guidelines which are the skeleton of severe accident management architecture. In Korea, the severe accident management guideline for KSNP was recently developed and it is expected to be a central axis of logical flow for severe accident management. There are a lot of uncertainties in the severe accident phenomena and scenarios and one of the major issues for developing a operator support system for a severe accident is the reduction of these uncertainties. In this paper, the severe accident management advisory system with training simulator, SAMAT, is developed as all available information for a severe accident are re-organized and provided to the management staff in order to reduce the uncertainties. The developed system includes the graphical display for plant and equipment status, the previous research results by knowledge-base technique, and the expected plant behavior using the severe accident training simulator. The plant model used in this paper is oriented to severe accident phenomena and thus can simulate the plant behavior for a severe accident. Therefore, the developed system may make a central role of the information source for decision-making for a severe accident management, and will be used as the training simulator for severe accident management

  12. TRAININGS AND MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENT AT TESCO IN SZEGED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    László GULYÁS

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important function of human resource management is doing the human resource planning (HRP. It means that effective HRP should result the right people doing the right things in the right place at precisely the right time. If HR-experts do not able to handle precisely this function a gap arises. The exact name of it is training gap. The essence of training gap that there is a difference between employee’s actual performance and employee’s desire performance. The main aim of training is to eliminate this kind of gap. In this paper I examine one of the multinational firms – this is TESCO in Szeged – how to eliminate the training gaps and how to do human resource development. I survey what kind of trainings and manager development does TESCO have.

  13. "Introduction to Research Data Management" training presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Parsons, Georgina

    2017-01-01

    Slides used in one-hour introductory RDM training sessions provided at Cranfield University to doctoral students. (V1 is the 2016-2017 academic year version; pptx version includes notes. V2 is updated 2017 version with slight content tweaks and quiz addition.)

  14. Education and Training in Crisis Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hošková-Mayerová, Šárka

    2016-01-01

    Quality education is an indispensable prerequisite for all kinds of human activities. No area of human activity if it has to function properly can exist without sophisticated education that determines the quality of workers in the given area. Training of public administration officials is a very important step to ensure conditions for adequate…

  15. Training Staff to Manage Challenging Behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oorsouw, W.M.W.J. van; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Jahoda, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background - A training package for staff working with clients presenting challenging behaviour was developed to (1) increase their knowledge regarding challenging behaviour, and (2) to improve the quality of physical intervention techniques. The latter aim was intended to reduce staff anxiety about

  16. Training Staff to Manage Challenging Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oorsouw, Wietske M. W. J.; Embregts, Petri J. C. M.; Bosman, Anna M. T.; Jahoda, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Background: A training package for staff working with clients presenting challenging behaviour was developed to (1) increase their knowledge regarding challenging behaviour, and (2) to improve the quality of physical intervention techniques. The latter aim was intended to reduce staff anxiety about dealing with incidents and limit physical risk of…

  17. Training for Environmental Management - Industry and Sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulhøi, John Parm; Madsen, Henning; Kjær, M.

    Sustainable development requires innovative approaches at organisation level as well as a range of new skills and competencies throughout the workforce. The development of appropriate training materials and courses is an essential part of this equation. This report presents an overview...

  18. Time management training and perceived control of time at work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häfner, Alexander; Stock, Armin

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effects of time management training, which was based on psychological theory and research, on perceived control of time, perceived stress, and performance at work. The authors randomly assigned 71 employees to a training group (n = 35) or a waiting-list control group (n = 36). As hypothesized, time management training led to an increase in perceived control of time and a decrease in perceived stress. Time management training had no impact on different performance indicators. In particular, the authors explored the use and the perceived usefulness of the techniques taught. Participants judged the taught techniques as useful, but there were large differences concerning the actual use of the various techniques.

  19. Progress toward improved leadership and management training in pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Ronald L; Hassell, Lewis A; Parks, Eric R

    2014-04-01

    Competency gaps in leadership and laboratory management skills continue to exist between what training programs deliver and what recent graduates and future employers expect. A number of recent surveys substantiate this. Interest in delivering content in these areas is challenged by time constraints, the presence of knowledgeable faculty role models, and the necessary importance placed on diagnostic skills development, which overshadows any priority trainees have toward developing these skills. To describe the problem, the near-future horizon, the current solutions, and the recommendations for improving resident training in laboratory management. The demands of new health care delivery models and the value being placed on these skills by the Pathology Milestones and Next Accreditation System initiative of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education for training programs emphasizes their importance. This initiative includes 6 milestone competencies in laboratory management. Organizations like the American Society for Clinical Pathology, the American Pathology Foundation, the College of American Pathologists, and the Association of Pathology Chairs Program Directors Section recognize these competencies and are working to create new tools for training programs to deploy. It is our recommendation that (1) every training program develop a formal educational strategy for management training, (2) greater opportunity and visibility be afforded for peer-reviewed publications on management topics in mainstream pathology literature, and (3) pathology milestones-oriented tools be developed to assist program directors and their trainees in developing this necessary knowledge and skills.

  20. Evaluating the role of cogeneration for carbon management in Alberta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doluweera, G.H.; Jordaan, S.M.; Moore, M.C.; Keith, D.W.; Bergerson, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Developing long-term carbon control strategies is important in energy intensive industries such as the oil sands operations in Alberta. We examine the use of cogeneration to satisfy the energy demands of oil sands operations in Alberta in the context of carbon management. This paper evaluates the role of cogeneration in meeting Provincial carbon management goals and discusses the arbitrary characteristics of facility- and product-based carbon emissions control regulations. We model an oil sands operation that operates with and without incorporated cogeneration. We compare CO 2 emissions and associated costs under different carbon emissions control regulations, including the present carbon emissions control regulation of Alberta. The results suggest that incorporating cogeneration into the growing oil sands industry could contribute in the near-term to reducing CO 2 emissions in Alberta. This analysis also shows that the different accounting methods and calculations of electricity offsets could lead to very different levels of incentives for cogeneration. Regulations that attempt to manage emissions on a product and facility basis may become arbitrary and complex as regulators attempt to approximate the effect of an economy-wide carbon price. - Highlights: ► We assess the effectiveness of cogeneration for carbon management in Alberta. ► Cogeneration can offset a significant portion of Alberta's high carbon electricity. ► CO 2 reduction potential of cogeneration may be higher if installed immediately. ► Product based policies should approximate the effect of an economy-wide policy.

  1. Optimizing compliance training for the waste management worker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copenhaver, E.D.

    1988-01-01

    Waste management workers are required to participate in special training mandated by a variety of Federal laws and DOE Orders; these include the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Superfund Amendments Reauthorization Act (SARA) as implemented by OSHA in CFR 1920.120, in addition to requirements for Hazard Communication, Radiation Workers, Respiratory Protection, Transportation, and Waste Generator training. The Technical Resources and Training program is examining the course contents and mandated requirements to determine how to best meld these requirements into a training program that will still fulfill all requirements but eliminate the potential for duplication of some elements in successive courses. This approach may not eliminate all duplication between courses, but it should result in significant savings in manhours demanded in a training environment which requires similar information to meet a host of regulatory requirements. The training matrix planned for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be presented and discussed. 22 refs., 3 tabs

  2. Optimizing compliance training for the waste management worker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copenhaver, E.D.

    1988-01-01

    Waste management workers are required to participate in special training mandated by a variety of Federal laws and DOE (Department of Energy) Orders; these include the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Superfund Amendments Reauthorization Act (SARA) as implemented by OSHA (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) in CFR 1910.120, in addition to requirements for Hazard Communication, Radiation Workers, Respiratory Protection, Transportation, and Waste Generator training. The Technical Resources and Training Program is examining the course contents and mandated requirements to determine how to best meld these requirements into a training program that will still fulfill all requirements but eliminate the potential for duplication of some elements in successive courses. This approach may not eliminate all duplication between courses, but it should result in significant savings in man-hours demanded in a training environment which requires similar information to meet a host of regulatory requirements. The training matrix planned for Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will be presented and discussed

  3. Impression Management Training: Conceptualization and Application to Personal Selling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leathers, Dale G.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the importance of impression management, an individual's conscious attempt to exercise control over selected communicative behaviors and cues for purposes of making a desired impression. Provides a comprehensive conceptualization of the impression-management process, and demonstrates how this process can facilitate effective training of…

  4. Research Data Management Training for Geographers: First Impressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerstin Helbig

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Sharing and secondary analysis of data have become increasingly important for research. Especially in geography, the collection of digital data has grown due to technological changes. Responsible handling and proper documentation of research data have therefore become essential for funders, publishers and higher education institutions. To achieve this goal, universities offer support and training in research data management. This article presents the experiences of a pilot workshop in research data management, especially for geographers. A discipline-specific approach to research data management training is recommended. The focus of this approach increases researchers’ interest and allows for more specific guidance. The instructors identified problems and challenges of research data management for geographers. In regards to training, the communication of benefits and reaching the target groups seem to be the biggest challenges. Consequently, better incentive structures as well as communication channels have to be established.

  5. Real Time Cockpit Resource Management (CRM) Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    large numbers of these systems (Office of the Secretary of Defense, 2006). Future aircraft design is following current trends towards unmanned...effects of interactive immersive classroom training, eLearning , Web-based gaming and the hands-on team trainer. With the pertinent human factors skills...will be extremely valuable in making improvements to the course in the future . On a slightly less positive note, responses to questions 19-22

  6. Management of the Romanian Police Training

    OpenAIRE

    Valeria-Liliana-Amelia Purda-Nicoara

    2011-01-01

    In today's dynamic economic environment it is very important for organizations to view their employees as a priority, since they may represent one of their most valuable assets. Although many companies acknowledge the importance of the human factor for the success of the organization, there is sometimes a discrepancy between the company’s belief and the way it is implemented. Even in periods of economic recession, organizations must not perceive the costs of training and retraining of staff a...

  7. The Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division Management and Supervisor Training Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbreath, B.

    1992-01-01

    The Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division (WID) is the management and operating contractor (MOC) for the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Waste Isolation Plant (WIPP). Managers and supervisors at DOE facilities such as the WIPP are required to complete extensive training. To meet this requirement, WID created a self-paced, self-study program known as Management and Supervisor Training (MAST). All WID managers and supervisors are required to earn certification through the MAST program. Selected employees are permitted to participate in MAST with prior approval from their manager and the Human Resources Manager. Initial MAST certification requires the completion of 31 modules. MAST participants check out modules and read them when convenient. When they are prepared, participants take module examinations. To receive credit for a given module, participants must score at least 80 percent on the examination. Lessons learned from the development, implementation, and administration are presented in this paper

  8. A Training Intervention to Improve Information Management in Primary Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schifferdecker, Karen E.; Reed, Virginia A.; Homa, Karen

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives Training programs designed to improve information management have been implemented but not adequately tested. Three critical components for information management were tested in a randomized control study: (1) knowledge of valid, synthesized summary information, (2) skills to use Web-based resources that provide access to these summaries, and (3) use of Web-based resources in clinical practice. Methods Twenty-four primary care practices were provided with computers and high-speed Internet access and then matched, with half randomly assigned to receive training and half to receive training at a later date. Training was designed to address knowledge, skills, and use of Web-based information. Outcomes were assessed by comparing baseline and follow-up questionnaires that focused on five conceptual domains related to Web-based resource use for patient care decisions and patient education. Results Compared to the delayed training group, the initial training group increased their knowledge and skill of Web-based resources and use for patient care decisions. Some measures of communication with patients about using Web-based resources and of incorporating use of Web-based resources into daily practice increased from baseline to follow-up for all participants. Conclusions Our findings suggest that training and providing computers and Internet connections have measurable effects on information management behaviors. PMID:18773781

  9. Team training in the skies: does crew resource management (CRM) training work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas, E; Burke, C S; Bowers, C A; Wilson, K A

    2001-01-01

    The aviation community has invested great amounts of money and effort into crew resource management (CRM) training. Using D. L. Kirkpatrick's (1976) framework for evaluating training, we reviewed 58 published accounts of CRM training to determine its effectiveness within aviation. Results indicated that CRM training generally produced positive reactions, enhanced learning, and promoted desired behavioral changes. However, we cannot ascertain whether CRM has an effect on an organization's bottom line (i.e., safety). We discuss the state of the literature with regard to evaluation of CRM training programs and, as a result, call for the need to conduct systematic, multilevel evaluation efforts that will show the true effectiveness of CRM training. As many evaluations do not collect data across levels (as suggested by D. L. Kirkpatrick, 1976, and by G. M. Alliger, S. I. Tannenbaum, W. Bennett, Jr., & H. Traver, 1997), the impact of CRM cannot be truly determined; thus more and better evaluations are needed and should be demanded.

  10. Education, Training and the Role of Logistic Managers in Ireland

    OpenAIRE

    Mangan, John; Gregory, Orla

    2001-01-01

    The paper is based on the analysis of the responses of a questionnaire survey of logistics managers working in manufacturing firms in Ireland. The objectives of the survey were to establish the educational and training needs of the practicing logistics manager. The questionnaire was designed to address issues including the various logistics practices undertaken by the respondents' company and the time spent by respondents on these activities; the skills currently required by logistics manager...

  11. Training and Maintaining System-Wide Reliability in Outcome Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barwick, Melanie A; Urajnik, Diana J; Moore, Julia E

    2014-01-01

    The Child and Adolescent Functional Assessment Scale (CAFAS) is widely used for outcome management, for providing real time client and program level data, and the monitoring of evidence-based practices. Methods of reliability training and the assessment of rater drift are critical for service decision-making within organizations and systems of care. We assessed two approaches for CAFAS training: external technical assistance and internal technical assistance. To this end, we sampled 315 practitioners trained by external technical assistance approach from 2,344 Ontario practitioners who had achieved reliability on the CAFAS. To assess the internal technical assistance approach as a reliable alternative training method, 140 practitioners trained internally were selected from the same pool of certified raters. Reliabilities were high for both practitioners trained by external technical assistance and internal technical assistance approaches (.909-.995, .915-.997, respectively). 1 and 3-year estimates showed some drift on several scales. High and consistent reliabilities over time and training method has implications for CAFAS training of behavioral health care practitioners, and the maintenance of CAFAS as a global outcome management tool in systems of care.

  12. Hospital management training and improvement in managerial skills: Serbian experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supic, Zorica Terzic; Bjegovic, Vesna; Marinkovic, Jelena; Milicevic, Milena Santric; Vasic, Vladimir

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the improvement of managerial skills of hospitals' top managers after a specific management training programme, and to explore possible predictors and relations. The study was conducted during the years 2006 and 2007 with cohort of 107 managers from 20 Serbian general hospitals. The managers self-assessed the improvement in their managerial skills before and after the training programme. After the training programme, all managers' skills had improved. The biggest improvement was in the following skills: organizing daily activities, motivating and guiding others, supervising the work of others, group discussion, and situation analysis. The least improved were: applying creative techniques, working well with peers, professional self-development, written communication, and operational planning. Identified predictors of improvement were: shorter years of managerial experience, type of manager, type of profession, and recognizing the importance of the managerial skills in oral communication, evidence-based decision making, and supervising the work of others. Specific training programme related to strategic management can increase managerial competencies, which are an important source of competitive advantage for organizations. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Carbon sequestration in managed temperate coniferous forests under climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymond, Caren C.; Beukema, Sarah; Nitschke, Craig R.; Coates, K. David; Scheller, Robert M.

    2016-03-01

    Management of temperate forests has the potential to increase carbon sinks and mitigate climate change. However, those opportunities may be confounded by negative climate change impacts. We therefore need a better understanding of climate change alterations to temperate forest carbon dynamics before developing mitigation strategies. The purpose of this project was to investigate the interactions of species composition, fire, management, and climate change in the Copper-Pine Creek valley, a temperate coniferous forest with a wide range of growing conditions. To do so, we used the LANDIS-II modelling framework including the new Forest Carbon Succession extension to simulate forest ecosystems under four different productivity scenarios, with and without climate change effects, until 2050. Significantly, the new extension allowed us to calculate the net sector productivity, a carbon accounting metric that integrates aboveground and belowground carbon dynamics, disturbances, and the eventual fate of forest products. The model output was validated against literature values. The results implied that the species optimum growing conditions relative to current and future conditions strongly influenced future carbon dynamics. Warmer growing conditions led to increased carbon sinks and storage in the colder and wetter ecoregions but not necessarily in the others. Climate change impacts varied among species and site conditions, and this indicates that both of these components need to be taken into account when considering climate change mitigation activities and adaptive management. The introduction of a new carbon indicator, net sector productivity, promises to be useful in assessing management effectiveness and mitigation activities.

  14. Carbon strategy and management in the hydrogen economy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snyder, C.

    2006-01-01

    Greenhouse gas (carbon) emission reduction related to the beneficial use of hydrogen is an important aspect in the development and public acceptance of a greater role for hydrogen in the economy. This presentation is an overview of potential effects of the evolving regulatory framework for carbon emissions management in Canada on hydrogen infrastructure development and compare it with activities in other jurisdictions

  15. Virtual Reality Applications for Stress Management Training in the Military.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallavicini, Federica; Argenton, Luca; Toniazzi, Nicola; Aceti, Luciana; Mantovani, Fabrizia

    2016-12-01

    Stress Management Training programs are increasingly being adopted in the military field for resilience empowerment and primary stress prevention. In the last several years, advanced technologies (virtual reality in particular) have been integrated in order to develop more innovative and effective stress training programs for military personnel, including soldiers, pilots, and other aircrew professionals. This systematic review describes experimental studies that have been conducted in recent years to test the effectiveness of virtual reality-based Stress Management Training programs developed for military personnel. This promising state-of-the-art technology has the potential to be a successful new approach in empowering soldiers and increasing their resilience to stress. To provide an overview from 2001 to 2016 of the application of virtual reality for Stress Management Training programs developed for the military, a computer-based search for relevant publications was performed in several databases. Databases used in the search were PsycINFO, Web of Science (Web of Knowledge), PubMed, and Medline. The search string was: ("Virtual Reality") AND ("Military") AND ["Stress Training" OR ("Stress Management")]. There were 14 studies that met the inclusion criteria and were included in the review. The main observation to be drawn from this review is that virtual reality can provide interactive Stress Management Training to decrease levels of perceived stress and negative affect in military personnel. This technology appears to be a promising tool for assessing individuals' resilience to stress and for identifying the impact that stress can have on physiological reactivity and performance.Pallavicini F, Argenton L, Toniazzi N, Aceti L, Mantovani F. Virtual realtiy applications for stress management training in the military. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(12):1021-1030.

  16. 42 CFR 410.141 - Outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient diabetes self-management training. 410...-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.141 Outpatient diabetes self-management training... Part B covers outpatient diabetes self-management training for a beneficiary who has been diagnosed...

  17. Education and training of physicians for radiation emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiners, Christoph; Schneider, Rita

    2012-01-01

    The project orders implied the development, testing, and evaluation of a curriculum for educating and training physicians in prehospital radiation accident management and the development of a master curriculum. Objectives were to develop, preserve, and enlarge medical competence concerning prehospital care of radiation accident patients. The project is expected to contribute to qualify emergency physicians challenged by scenarios related to radiological and nuclear hazards. The development and the content of the curriculum for educating and training physicians in prehospital radiation accident management are being described. The conduction and evaluation of two pilot training courses with a total of 40 participating physicians are being presented. Successful testing of the pilot courses proves the value of the curriculum developed. Self-contained courses can be performed according to the master curriculum and the respective master presentations. Moreover, single modules can be integrated in existing education and training programmes. Suggestions for the implementation and accreditation of the curriculum are being made. (orig.)

  18. Developing Data Management Education, Support, and Training

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Plato

    2018-01-01

    This presentation was an invited guest lecture on data management for CISE graduates students of the CAP5108: Research Methods for Human-centered Computing course at the University of Florida on April 12, 2018 from 4:05 pm - 4:55 pm, period 9. Graduate students were introduced to the DCC Checklist for a Data Management Plan, OAIS Model (cessda adaptation), ORCiD, IR, high-performance computing (HPC) storage options at UF, data lifecycle models (USGS and UNSW), data publication guides (Beckles...

  19. Management of the Romanian Police Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria-Liliana-Amelia Purda-Nicoară (Netotea-Suciu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available In today's dynamic economic environment it is very important for organizations to viewtheir employees as a priority, since they may represent one of their most valuable assets. Althoughmany companies acknowledge the importance of the human factor for the success of the organization,there is sometimes a discrepancy between the company’s belief and the way it is implemented. Evenin periods of economic recession, organizations must not perceive the costs of training and retrainingof staff as arbitrary, a cost which may be reduced or eliminated, according to the budget available, butas an investment in a strategic resource, the results of which become more and more evident in timeand that determine the ability of survival, adaptation and development of the company in a rapidlychanging environment. Since over the last two decades the image of the Ministry of Administrationand Interior, and thus the image of the Romanian Police has depreciated considerably in the publicopinion, it is indispensable for the institution to focus intensely on staff training activities. For thisreason, it must attract the loyalty of skilled and motivated workforces that have the knowledge andability to perform the tasks required. The investment in people may not be sufficient for ensuring thequality and efficiency of services provided, but it certainly is a must.

  20. Training hospital managers for strategic planning and management: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzic-Supic, Zorica; Bjegovic-Mikanovic, Vesna; Vukovic, Dejana; Santric-Milicevic, Milena; Marinkovic, Jelena; Vasic, Vladimir; Laaser, Ulrich

    2015-02-26

    Training is the systematic acquisition of skills, rules, concepts, or attitudes and is one of the most important components in any organization's strategy. There is increasing demand for formal and informal training programs especially for physicians in leadership positions. This study determined the learning outcomes after a specific training program for hospital management teams. The study was conducted during 2006 and 2007 at the Centre School of Public Health and Management, Faculty of Medicine, University of Belgrade and included 107 participants involved in the management in 20 Serbian general hospitals. The management teams were multidisciplinary, consisting of five members on average: the director of the general hospital, the deputy directors, the head nurse, and the chiefs of support services. The managers attended a training program, which comprised four modules addressing specific topics. Three reviewers independently evaluated the level of management skills at the beginning and 12 months after the training program. Principal component analysis and subsequent stepwise multiple linear regression analysis were performed to determine predictors of learning outcomes. The quality of the SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats) analyses performed by the trainees improved with differences between 0.35 and 0.49 on a Likert scale (p strategic planning. Following the training program, the external environment, strategic positioning, and quality of care were predictors of learning outcomes. The four regression models used showed that the training program had positive effects (p Strategic Plan comprising the hospital mission, vision, strategic objectives, and action plan. This study provided evidence that training for strategic planning and management enhanced the strategic decision-making of hospital management teams, which is a requirement for hospitals in an increasingly competitive, complex and challenging context. For the first time, half of

  1. Training the Multi-Cultural Manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Vincent

    A West German electronics corporation designed a workshop to provide managers with fast access to the American culture through the cues provided in American language. The aim was to promote more effective communication with American business partners through sensitization to American communication styles, their principal modes of expression, their…

  2. Reducing Students' Carbon Footprints Using Personal Carbon Footprint Management System Based on Environmental Behavioural Theory and Persuasive Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shyh-ming

    2016-01-01

    This study applied environmental behavioural theories to develop a personal carbon footprint management system and used persuasive technology to implement it. The system serves as an educational system to improve the determinants of students' low-carbon behaviours, to promote low-carbon concepts and to facilitate their carbon management. To assess…

  3. Management and supervisory training: Changing the culture/system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, L.F.

    1991-01-01

    Professional development training courses, and a unique promoting appraisal system have been combined in the form of a training matrix and are being used as a culture change agent. This training and system modification is currently being implemented within the Nuclear Materials Processing Division of the Savannah River Site. It is designed to help solve the systems problems of managers and supervisors while enabling subordinates to develop themselves professionally, and starts with a promoting appraisal between a manager and a subordinate. These easy to apply appraisals are becoming an integral part of the business system, and result in giving a manager greater control over business change and greater influence over the work each employee accomplishes

  4. Nuclear power plant personnel training process management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arjona Vazquez, Orison; Venegas Bernal, Maria del Carmen; Armeteros Lopez, Ana L.

    1996-01-01

    The system in charge the management of the training process personnel from a nuclear power plant was designed taking into account all the requirements stated in the training guide for nuclear power plant personnel and their evaluation, which were prepared by the IAEA in 1995 in order to implement the SAT in the training programs for nuclear plant personnel. In the preparations of formats and elements that shape the system, account has been taken of the views expressed in such a guide, in some other bibliography that was consulted, and in the authors own opinion mainly with regard to those issues which the guide does not go deeper into

  5. Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response training Center needs assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGinnis, K.A.; Bolton, P.A.; Robinson, R.K.

    1993-09-01

    For the Hanford Site to provide high-quality training using simulated job-site situations to prepare the 4,000 Site workers and 500 emergency responders for known and unknown hazards a Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center is needed. The center will focus on providing classroom lecture as well as hands-on, realistic training. The establishment of the center will create a partnership among the US Department of Energy; its contractors; labor; local, state, and tribal governments; and Xavier and Tulane Universities of Louisiana. This report presents the background, history, need, benefits, and associated costs of the proposed center

  6. State forestry agency perspectives on carbon management and carbon market assistance to family forest owners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristell A. Miller; Stephanie A. Snyder; Michael A. Kilgore

    2015-01-01

    Family forest owners within the United States could potentially make significant contributions to sequestration efforts. However, we expect that landowners will need assistance if they are to successfully implement carbon management techniques and/or navigate through complex carbon market requirements. State forestry agencies were surveyed to gather their perspectives...

  7. Training waste generators: The first responder in proper waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, E.

    1989-01-01

    Dealing with waste effectively requires a ''cradle to grave'' approach to waste management. The first step in that chain of custody is the waste generator. The waste generator plays the key role in the correct identification, packaging, and disposal of waste. The Technical Resources and Training Section at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed several short training programs for waste generators. This training presents a consistent approach to proper handling of waste within the ORNL waste management system. This training has been developed for generators of solid low-level radioactive waste, hazardous and mixed waste, and transuranic waste. In addition to the above, a Waste Minimization training program has been developed for use by all organizations at ORNL who generate any type of hazardous waste. These training programs represent a combined effort of the training staff and the technical staff to assure that all ORNL staff accept their responsibility for handling all types of radioactive and hazardous wastes correctly from its generation to its disposal. 4 refs

  8. The computer aided education and training system for accident management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoneyama, Mitsuru; Masuda, Takahiro; Kubota, Ryuji; Fujiwara, Tadashi; Sakuma, Hitoshi

    2000-01-01

    Under severe accident conditions of a nuclear power plant, plant operators and technical support center (TSC) staffs will be under a amount of stress. Therefore, those individuals responsible for managing the plant should promote their understanding about the accident management and operations. Moreover, it is also important to train in ordinary times, so that they can carry out accident management operations effectively on severe accidents. Therefore, the education and training system which works on personal computers was developed by Japanese BWR group (Tokyo Electric Power Co.,Inc., Tohoku Electric Power Co. ,Inc., Chubu Electric Power Co. ,Inc., Hokuriku Electric Power Co.,Inc., Chugoku Electric Power Co.,Inc., Japan Atomic Power Co.,Inc.), and Hitachi, Ltd. The education and training system is composed of two systems. One is computer aided instruction (CAI) education system and the other is education and training system with a computer simulation. Both systems are designed to execute on MS-Windows(R) platform of personal computers. These systems provide plant operators and technical support center staffs with an effective education and training tool for accident management. TEPCO used the simulation system for the emergency exercise assuming the occurrence of hypothetical severe accident, and have performed an effective exercise in March, 2000. (author)

  9. THE EFFECTS OF DRAMA TRAINING ON INTERPERSONAL MANAGEMENT SKILL OF MANAGERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özgür KÖKALAN

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study is to examine the effects of drama training on interpersonal management skill of managers. The experimental study was conducted in this research. The participants of the study were 20 managers divided into 10 as an experimental group and 10 as a control group. The drama training was given to participants of the experimental group by a specialist trainer and then the effects of this training were analyzed by quantitative research methods. In the quantitave researh, a questionnaire that were used to determine the interpersonal management skill of managers were conducted before the training for both the participants of the experimental group and control group. In order to determine the effects of drama training, the same quantionnaire were again conducted to all participants after the training and the effects of training on the participants of experimental group were analyzed by a quantitative software program called as SPSS 20.0. According to research results, it was proved that the interpersonal management skill was developed because of drama training.

  10. Overcoming managers from a humanistic training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermina García Hernández

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The new changes accomplished in the cuban educational system face a challenge that requires a high professional level of the manegement staff in their humanistic formation in the stages of orienting, planning, doing and evaluating the capacity of manegement, so as to put into practice strategies that allow t hem to assume a protagonist role. The school is in charge of forming a pedagogical staff with a wide knowledge of the reality making emphasis on the management policy aiming at improving the efficiency and the competitiveness, so it is needed to integrate the pedagogic and directive principles in a process where the critical valuation becomes a priority of the management styles to form a new man.

  11. Training to Support Standardization and Improvement of Configuration Management Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dauber, V.; Scheffer, N.; Schoenfelder, C.

    2015-07-01

    In recent years AREVA has conducted several measures to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of configuration management-related activities within a nuclear power plant (NPP) new build as well as modernization projects, thereby further strengthening its commitment to achieving the highest level of safety in nuclear facilities. This paper describes a new training course that shall support the standardization and improvement of configuration management activities. Recommendations will be given that should be considered when designing and developing comparable training programs to support change processes within engineering units. (Author)

  12. Model of knowledge management in mobile systems used for training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadwick CARRETO ARELLANO

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This work shows the development of a Knowledge Management Model (MAC applied to the training process in mobile devices for ease of use and access of different types of users to relevant information (anywhere and anytime. The MAC permit to manage knowledge, so that helps in the process of collection, classification and search of information according to a profile and academic needs as well as services related to the transformation of data and information for knowledge generation. The MAC aims to provide users, tools for skills development and allow the development of the training process with the use of limited capacity device with Internet connection.

  13. Summary of the East Africa Training Consortium Biorisk Management Practices and Training Needs Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilder, Julie; Mancini, Giulio M.; Wakabi, Timothy; Boggs, Susan E.

    2017-03-01

    A survey was designed to query former Biorisk management (BRM) trainees in the East Africa region about their practices post-training and their perceived future training needs. A subset of those surveyed had been trained as BRM trainers. The survey was conducted to obtain a baseline of BRM practices that can serve as a benchmark for performance monitoring, to identify priorities for future BRM training and to gauge local BRM trainers' abilities to deliver effective training. The survey revealed that less than 50% of the respondents could identify evidence of a BRM system in their institute. Coaching and mentoring by BRM experts was identified as being of highest benefit to enable success as BRM practitioners. Local trainers reached 1538 trainees in the previous year and reported that trainings positively correlated with desired BRM behavior. Acknowledgements The authors wish to sincerely thank all of the former biorisk management trainees in East Africa who agreed to participate in this survey. Their candid and honest input was extremely insightful. We also thank Lora Grainger (06826) and Ben Brodsky (Manager, 06824) for careful and critical review of the report. We are grateful for the financial support of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Cooperative Biological Engagement Program.

  14. Technological sequence of creating components of the training system of the future officers to the management of physical training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olkhovy O.M.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal is to determine constructive ways of sequence of constructing components of the training system of the future officers to carry out official questions of managing the physical training in the process of the further military career. The structural logic circuit of the interconnections stages of optimum cycle management and technological sequence of constructing the components of the training system of the future officers to the management of physical training, which provides: definition of requirements to the typical problems of professional activities on the issues of the leadership, organization and conducting of physical training, the creation of the phased system model cadets training, training of the curriculum discipline ″Physical education, special physical training and sport″; model creation and definition of criteria of the integral evaluation of the readiness of the future officers to the management of physical training was determined through the analysis more than thirty documentary and scientific literature.

  15. A framework for identifying carbon hotspots and forest management drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilesh Timilsina; Francisco J. Escobedo; Wendell P. Cropper; Amr Abd-Elrahman; Thomas Brandeis; Sonia Delphin; Samuel Lambert

    2013-01-01

    Spatial analyses of ecosystem system services that are directly relevant to both forest management decision making and conservation in the subtropics are rare. Also, frameworks that identify and map carbon stocks and corresponding forest management drivers using available regional, national, and international-level forest inventory datasets could provide insights into...

  16. Project management plan, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgeson, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    For the next 30 years, the main activities at the Hanford Site will involve the handling and cleanup of toxic substances. Thousands of workers involved in these new activities will need systematic training appropriate to their tasks and associated risks. This project is an important part of the Hanford Site mission and will enable the US Department of Energy (DOE) to meet high standards for safety. The Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center (HAMMER) project will construct a centralized regional training center dedicated to training hazardous materials workers and emergency responders in classrooms and with hands-on, realistic training aids representing actual field conditions. The HAMMER Training Center will provide a cost-effective, high-quality way to meet the Hanford Site training needs. The training center creates a partnership among DOE; government contractors; labor; local, state, and tribal governments; and selected institutions of higher education

  17. Management of Corporate Culture through Local Managers' Training in Foreign Companies in China: A Qualitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Crystal L.

    2005-01-01

    Corporate culture is a complex phenomenon in foreign companies located in the People's Republic of China. For the management team of an international enterprise, it is a challenging task to manage cultural differences. Education and training provided to local managers might be one of the important solutions. Therefore, this study explores the…

  18. Team management as a condition for the implementation of competency management training of future specialists

    OpenAIRE

    Драч, Ірина Іванівна

    2015-01-01

    The article described the specific features that define the independent status of the competence-based management training of future specialists in the management of educational activities. The use of principles of team in the implementation of a new management paradigm is justified. The advantages of using a matrix organizational structure are characterized

  19. ENS and FORATOM Education, Training and Knowledge Management Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janisz, E.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The European Atomic Forum (FORATOM) and the European Nuclear Society (ENS) established in 2013 a joint Task Force dedicated to education, training and knowledge management (ETKM) issues in nuclear. The main purpose of the Task Force is to strengthen the link between the industry, research institutes and education and training stakeholders on the European level. Further to inform the European political institutions about the nuclear education and training activities undertaken by various stakeholders. The role of this paper is to present number of activities done in the framework of FORATOM and ENS Task Force and present the recommendations given by the E&T experts. The TF combines the expertise of Human Resources, Training and Education provided by the industry as well as universities and research institutes. The Task Force aims to play a role of a gateway for collaboration between different key players of the nuclear education, training and knowledge management field. Further TF is aiming as well to inform the European institutions about the actions and roles undertaken by ENS and FORATOM members in the area of education and training. (author

  20. Soil Organic Carbon assessment on two different forest management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Minguillón, Alex; Sauras Yera, Teresa; Vallejo Calzada, Ramón

    2017-04-01

    Soil Organic Carbon assessment on two different forest management. A.F. Minguillón1, T. Sauras1, V.R: Vallejo1. 1 Departamento de Biología Evolutiva, Ecología y Ciencias Ambientales, Universidad de Barcelona, Avenida Diagonal 643, 03080 Barcelona, Spain. Soils from arid and semiarid zones are characterized by a low organic matter content from scarce plant biomass and it has been proposed that these soils have a big capacity to carbon sequestration. According to IPCC ARS WG2 (2014) report and WG3 draft, increase carbon storage in terrestrial ecosystems has been identified such a potential tool for mitigation and adaptation to climate change. In ecological restoration context improve carbon sequestration is considered a management option with multiple benefits (win-win-win). Our work aims to analyze how the recently developed restoration techniques contributed to increases in terrestial ecosystem carbon storage. Two restoration techniques carried out in the last years have been evaluated. The study was carried out in 6 localities in Valencian Community (E Spain) and organic horizons of two different restoration techniques were evaluated; slash brush and thinning Aleppo pine stands. For each technique, carbon stock and its physical and chemical stability has been analysed. Preliminary results point out restoration zones acts as carbon sink due to (1) the relevant necromass input produced by slash brush increases C stock on the topsoil ;(2) Thinning increase carbon accumulation in vegetation.

  1. Using Emotional Intelligence in Training Crisis Managers: The Pandora Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinnon, Lachian; Bacon, Liz; Cortellessa, Gabriella; Cesta, Amedeo

    2013-01-01

    Multi-agency crisis management represents one of the most complex of real-world situations, requiring rapid negotiation and decision-making under extreme pressure. However, the training offered to strategic planners, called Gold Commanders, does not place them under any such pressure. It takes the form of paper-based, table-top exercises, or…

  2. Income Generation and Money Management: Training Women as Entrepreneurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Sheila

    Based on a workshop in Gambia in 1989, this manual was developed to help Peace Corps workers to develop training techniques for teaching women to run businesses producing and selling local products and to manage money. Topics covered include the following: (1) the role of the facilitator in adult learning; (2) problems women face in controlling…

  3. A management framework for training providers to improve skills ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    The competence levels of employees and organisations must be audited to determine the organisation's skills bank and stra- tegic plans for the future. The cost of training is also a significant management-planning question. Current workplace skills development legislation and strategies are aimed at curbing ineffective ...

  4. Providing Experiential Business and Management Training for Biomedical Research Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Kimberly A.; Carnahan, Robert H.; Brown, Abigail M.; Gould, Kathleen L.

    2017-01-01

    Many biomedical PhD trainees lack exposure to business principles, which limits their competitiveness and effectiveness in academic and industry careers. To fill this training gap, we developed Business and Management Principles for Scientists, a semester-long program that combined didactic exposure to business fundamentals with practical…

  5. Learning Characteristics of Small Business Managers: Principles for Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, Lynn M.; Hide, Sophie; Legg, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to report on the second half of a two-part study that identified relevant content for safety audit training in small businesses. The specific aim of the paper is to determine the preferred learning styles and approaches of managers in these businesses in order to identify some principles which could be used to tailor…

  6. The Use of Stress-Management Training for Obese Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Daniel; Del Porto, Delbert

    Stress management training contributes to weight loss, maintenance of weight loss and improved social and occupational functioning in obese women. Data from the Beck Depression Inventory and the Assertiveness Questionnaire indicate that obese persons have poor self-concepts which result in depression which is inversely related to assertiveness.…

  7. Human Resource Management in Australian Registered Training Organisations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew; Hawke Geof

    2008-01-01

    This report forms part of a comprehensive research program that has examined issues related to building the organisational capability of vocational education and training providers. In particular, this report focuses on the current state of human resource management practice in both technical and further education and private registered training…

  8. Use of Medicare's Diabetes Self-Management Training Benefit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strawbridge, Larisa M.; Lloyd, Jennifer T.; Meadow, Ann; Riley, Gerald F.; Howell, Benjamin L.

    2015-01-01

    Medicare began reimbursing for outpatient diabetes self-management training (DSMT) in 2000; however, little is known about program utilization. Individuals diagnosed with diabetes in 2010 were identified from a 20% random selection of the Medicare fee-for-service population (N = 110,064). Medicare administrative and claims files were used to…

  9. Employment Competence based Management to enhance Training Effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Goff, Solenn; Ristol, Santi; Estévez, José Antonio

    2006-01-01

    Please, cite this publication as: Le Goff, S., Ristol, S., & Estévez, J.A. (2006). Employing Competence based Management to enhance Training Effectiveness. Proceedings of International Workshop in Learning Networks for Lifelong Competence Development, TENCompetence Conference. March 30th-31st,

  10. QUALITY OF VOCATIONAL TRAINING THROUGH PRODUCT LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT INSTRUMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen\tCHAŞOVSCHI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It appears that, during the process of continuous training, there is a growing need from VET providers of a reliable and easy to use tool ensuring the quality of the services provided. Product life cycle active management, including the use of suitable PLM software, is or may be a tool for monitoring and controlling product portfolio of an educational institution. It can be recommended not only for reasons of quality assurance, but also to facilitate the development of products for greater transparency in strategic business areas, and not least, to maintain competitiveness of VET providers. The Q-PLM project analysed the core of the product life cycle management in other sectors, identified the relevant variables that have an impact on the life cycle of VET provision and, on this basis, developed the beta version of a IT tool (software for product life cycle management addressed to VET providers, and a user manual for product life cycle management. The Q-PLM software makes possible the identification of the training products lifecycle, the life cycle stages, the key success factors and indicators for the training products lifecycle, separately for each training program and for each college.

  11. NARDAC Civilian DP Training: A Need for Management Attention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-12-01

    POSITION DESCRIPTIONS ------------------------ 28 D. TRAINING ------------------------------------- 31 IV. NARDAC ORGANIZATIONAL DIAGNOSIS ------------------ 32...the production schedule. 31 IV. NARDAC ORGANIZATIONAL DIAGNOSIS The upper level manager of a highly sophisticated, production oriented ADP facility...14 September 1982. 22. Preziosi, R.C., " Organizational Diagnosis Questicnnaire", The 1990 Annual Handbook for Group Facilitators, p. 112, University

  12. Forest management strategies for reducing carbon emissions, the French case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valade, Aude; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan; Bellassen, Valentin; Vallet, Patrick; Martin, Manuel

    2015-04-01

    International agreements now recognize the role of forest in the mitigation of climate change through the levers of in-situ sequestration, storage in products and energy and product substitution. These three strategies of carbon management are often antagonistic and it is still not clear which strategy would have the most significant impact on atmospheric carbon concentrations. With a focus on France, this study compares several scenarios of forest management in terms of their effect on the overall carbon budget from trees to wood-products. We elaborated four scenarios of forest management that target different wood production objectives. One scenario is 'Business as usual' and reproduces the current forest management and wood production levels. Two scenarios target an increase in bioenergy wood production, with either long-term or short-term goals. One scenario aims at increasing the production of timber for construction. For this, an empirical regression model was developed building on the rich French inventory database. The model can project the current forest resource at a time horizon of 20 years for characteristic variables diameter, standing volume, above-ground biomass, stand age. A simplified life-cycle analysis provides a full carbon budget for each scenario from forest management to wood use and allows the identification of the scenario that most reduces carbon emissions.

  13. Surgeons’ and Emergency Physicians’ Perceptions of Trauma Management and Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hemphill, Robin R

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The study objective was to determine whether surgeons and emergency medicine physicians (EMPs have differing opinions on trauma residency training and trauma management in clinical practice.Methods: A survey was mailed to 250 EMPs and 250 surgeons randomly selected.Results: Fifty percent of surgeons perceived that surgery exclusively managed trauma compared to 27% of EMPs. Surgeons were more likely to feel that only surgeons should manage trauma on presentation to the ED. However, only 60% of surgeons currently felt comfortable with caring for the trauma patient, compared to 84% of EMPs. Compared to EMPs, surgeons are less likely to feel that EMPs can initially manage the trauma patient (71% of surgeons vs. 92% of EMPs.Conclusion: EMPs are comfortable managing trauma while many surgeons do not feel comfortable with the complex trauma patient although the majority of surgeons responded that surgeons should manage the trauma.[WestJEM. 2009;10:144-149.

  14. Training in Information Management for Army Brigade and Battalion Staff: Methods and Preliminary Findings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Freeman, Jared

    1997-01-01

    Training, training Support software, and measurement instruments were developed to help Army brigade and below staff manage information and overcome information overload in a digital messaging environment...

  15. Carbon Capture and Storage in the Permian Basin, a Regional Technology Transfer and Training Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rychel, Dwight [Petroleum Tech Transfer Council, Oak Hill, VA (United States)

    2013-09-30

    The Permian Basin Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage (CCUS) Training Center was one of seven regional centers formed in 2009 under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 and managed by the Department of Energy. Based in the Permian Basin, it is focused on the utilization of CO2 Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) projects for the long term storage of CO2 while producing a domestic oil and revenue stream. It delivers training to students, oil and gas professionals, regulators, environmental and academia through a robust web site, newsletter, tech alerts, webinars, self-paced online courses, one day workshops, and two day high level forums. While course material prominently features all aspects of the capture, transportation and EOR utilization of CO2, the audience focus is represented by its high level forums where selected graduate students with an interest in CCUS interact with Industry experts and in-house workshops for the regulatory community.

  16. Why should nuclear power plant management support the systematic approach to training?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haber, S.B.; Yoder, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    The presentation shows the role of management in training of NPP personnel especially in training for technology transfer and training for transfer of the training capabilities. Systematic approach to training should be used to achieve standard among different industries; consistent, effective and efficient training

  17. Managing carbon sinks by changing rotation length in European forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaipainen, Terhi; Liski, Jari; Pussinen, Ari; Karjalainen, Timo

    2004-01-01

    Elongation of rotation length is a forest management activity countries may choose to apply under Article 3.4 of the Kyoto Protocol to help them meet their commitments for reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. We used the CO2FIX model to analyze how the carbon stocks of trees, soil and wood products depend on rotation length in different European forests. Results predicted that the carbon stock of trees increased in each forest when rotation length was increased, but the carbon stock of soil decreased slightly in German and Finnish Scots pine forests; the carbon stock of wood products also decreased slightly in cases other than the Sitka spruce forest in UK. To estimate the efficiency of increasing rotation length as an Article 3.4 activity, we looked at changes in the carbon stock of trees resulting from a 20-year increase in current rotation lengths. To achieve the largest eligible carbon sink mentioned in Article 3.4 of the Kyoto Protocol, the rotation lengths need to be increased on areas varying from 0.3 to 5.1 Mha depending on the forest. This would in some forests cause 1-6% declines in harvesting possibilities. The possible decreases in the carbon stock of soil indicate that reporting the changes in the carbon stocks of forests under Article 3.4 may require measuring soil carbon

  18. Simulation Based Training Improves Airway Management for Helicopter EMS Teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhindsa, Harinder S.; Reid, Renee; Murray, David; Lovelady, James; Powell, Katie; Sayles, Jeff; Stevenson, Christopher; Baker, Kathy; Solada, Brian; Carroll, Scott; hide

    2011-01-01

    The use of paralytic medications in the performance of RSI intubation is a high risk intervention used by many HEMS crews. There is no margin for error in RSI intubation as the results can be fatal. Operating room access for airway management training has become more difficult, and is not representative of the environment in which HEMS crews typically function. LifeEvac of Virginia designed and implemented an SST airway management program to provide a realistic, consistent training platform. The dynamic program incorporates standardized scenarios, and real life challenging cases that this and other programs have encountered. SST is done in a variety of settings including the helicopter, back of ambulances, staged car crashes and simulation centers. The result has been the indoctrination of a well defined, consistent approach to every airway management intervention. The SST program facillitates enhancement of technical skills. as well as team dynamics and communication.

  19. Management training of physician executives, their leadership style, and care management performance: an empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xirasagar, Sudha; Samuels, Michael E; Curtin, Thomas F

    2006-02-01

    To examine associations between management training of physician executives and their leadership styles, as well as effectiveness in achieving disease management goals. Cross-sectional national survey. Executive directors of community health centers (269 respondents; response rate = 40.9%) were surveyed regarding their perceptions of the medical director's leadership, and for quantitative information on the center's achievement of clinical (mostly disease management) goals. The dependent variables were the medical director's scores (as perceived by the executive director) on transformational, transactional, and laissez-faire leadership, effectiveness, satisfaction with the leader, and subordinate extra effort, using an adapted Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire (43 items; 5-point Likert scale). The independent variable was the medical director's management training status. Compared with medical directors with or =30 days of in-service training, had 0.32, 0.35, 0.30, 0.36, and 0.37 higher scores on transformational leadership, transactional leadership, rated effectiveness, satisfaction, and subordinate extra effort, respectively, and 0.31 lower score on laissez-faire leadership (all P management degrees but with > or =30 days of in-service training had 0.34, 0.36, 0.50, and 0.47 higher scores on transformational leadership, transactional leadership, rated effectiveness, and satisfaction with the leader (all P management goals. Training may enable physician executives to develop leadership styles that are effective in influencing clinical providers' adoption of disease management guidelines under managed care.

  20. Forest managment options for sequestering carbon in Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masera, O.R.; Bellon, M.R.; Segura, G.

    1995-01-01

    This paper identifies and examines economic response options to avoid carbon emissions and increase carbon sequestration in Mexican forests. A ''Policy'' scenario covering the years 2000, 2010 and 2030 and a ''Technical Potential'' scenario (year 2030) are developed to examine the potential carbon sequestration and costs of each response option. Benefit-cost analyses for three case studies, including management of a pulpwood plantation, a native temperate forest and a native tropical evergreen forest are presented and discussed. The study suggests that a large potential for reducing carbon emissions and increasing carbon sequestration exists in Mexican forests. However, the achievement of this potential will require important reforms to the current institutional setting of the forest sector. The management of native temperate and tropical forests offers the most promising alternatives for carbon sequestration. The cost effectiveness of commercial plantations critically depends on very high site productivity. Restoration of degraded forest lands; particularly through the establishment of energy plantations, also shows a large carbon sequestration potential. (Author)

  1. Emergency department operations and management education in emergency medicine training

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bret A Nicks; Darrell Nelson

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND:This study was undertaken to examine the current level of operations and management education within US-based Emergency Medicine Residency programs.METHODS:Residency program directors at all US-based Emergency Medicine Residency programs were anonymously surveyed via a web-based instrument.Participants indicated their levels of residency education dedicated to documentation,billing/coding,core measure/quality indicator compliance,and operations management.Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics for the ordinal data/Likert scales.RESULTS:One hundred and six(106)program directors completed the study instrument of one hundred and fifty-six(156)programs(70%).Of these,82.6%indicated emergency department(ED)operations and management education within the training curriculum.Dedicated documentation training was noted in all but 1 program(99%).Program educational offerings also included billing/coding(83%),core measure/quality indicators(78%)and operations management training(71%).In all areas,the most common means of educating came through didactic sessions and direct attending feedback or 69%-94%and 72%-98%respectively.Residency leadership was most confident with resident understanding of quality documentation(80%)and less so with core measures(72%),billing/coding/RVUs(58%),and operations management tools(23%).CONCLUSIONS:While most EM residency programs integrate basic operational education related to documentation and billing/coding,a smaller number provide focused education on the dayto-day management and operations of the ED.Residency leadership perceives graduating resident understanding of operational management tools to be limited.All respondents value further resident curriculum development of ED operations and management.

  2. Educational and training needs in radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mele, I.; Mavko, B.; Jencic, I.

    2005-01-01

    For further safe use of nuclear technology it is highly important to maintain the achieved level of knowledge and expertise. The risk of losing nuclear knowledge accumulated in the past is being increasingly discussed in many countries. As part of this debate the knowledge of radioactive waste management is also being closely watched. The current position and future needs of education and training in radioactive waste management were investigated within the coordination action CETRAD as part of the 6 th Framework Programme of the EU. Twenty partners from 17 European countries, including Slovenia, took part in this investigation. The review focused on geological disposal. It has considered the training and education needs of national radioactive waste management organisations, regulatory and government advisory organisations, and other nuclear industry organisations employing staff in this area, and also the provision of education and training by university and non-university organisations to address these needs. The results and conclusions of this research are presented in this paper. Emphasis is given to the national survey results and estimations of our E and T needs in radioactive waste management. (author)

  3. Forest management techniques for carbon dioxide storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimori, Takao [Forestry and Forest Products Research Inst., Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1993-12-31

    In the global ecosystem concerning carbon dioxide content in the atmosphere, the forest ecosystem plays an important role. In effect, the ratio of forest biomass to total terrestrial biomass is about 90%, and the ratio of carbon stored in the forest biomass to that in the atmosphere is two thirds. When soils and detritus of forests are added, there is more C stored in forests than in the atmosphere, about 1.3 times or more. Thus, forests can be regarded as the great holder of C on earth. If the area of forest land on the earth is constantly maintained and forests are in the climax stage, the uptake of C and the release of C by and from the forests will balance. In this case, forests are neither sinks nor sources of CO{sub 2} although they store a large amount of C. However, when forests are deforested, they become a source of C; through human activities, forests have become a source of C. According to a report by the IPCC, 1.6{+-}1.2 PgC is annually added to the atmosphere by deforestation. According to the FAO (1992), the area of land deforested annually in the tropics from 1981 to 1990 was 16.9 x 10{sup 6} ha. This value is nearly half the area of Japanese land. The most important thing for the CO{sub 2} environment concerning forests is therefore how to reduce deforestation and to successfully implement a forestation or reforestation.

  4. TRADE instructional materials for SARA/OSHA training. Volume 2, Managers and supervisors training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-03-01

    This document provides instructional materials for an eight-hour training course for managers and supervisors of hazardous waste sites. It is one of three volumes of course materials TRADE is preparing to help DOE contractor training staff comply with 29 CFR 1910.120, the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA) rule that implements Title I of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) of 1986. OSHA`s final rule for hazardous waste operators was published in the Federal Register of March 6, 1989 (54 FR 9294). Combined with the materials in Volumes I and III and with appropriate site-specific information, these materials will help DOE contractors to meet the requirements of 1910.120 (e) that ``on-site management and supervisors directly responsible for, or who supervise employees engaged in, hazardous waste operations`` receive the same initial training as that of the employees they supervise and at least eight additional hours of specialized training in managing hazardous waste operations.

  5. Document management training for managers and technicians of municipal institutions files

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Barrial Martínez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective analysis of the permanent formation of human resources requires not departing from the present conditions in which the world develops, where the progress of neoliberal policies, globalization and the vertiginous advance of the scientific-technical and technological revolution demands that the training of Professionals, is subject to continuous transformation. This article responds to the need to increase the preparation of file managers and technicians of the municipal institutions of Pinar del Rio, from the perfection of the training process in documentary management, which allows them to develop archival skills in their professional performance. It explains theoretical and conceptual considerations that allow to understand the significance of the training of these subjects as a strategic factor in the labor entities, as well as to refer to the existing trends in the national scope, based on the study and assessment of literature related to the theme, which can contribute to the design and implementation of training alternatives, according to the characteristics and particularities of the context in which they are used. The training of professionals is a process that is an essential way to increase the preparation in document management of the managers and architects of the institutions for their professional performance. The Cuban experience in the preparation and training of archival managers and technicians has shown, from a trend analysis that it is possible the development of archival skills in their professional performance, as long as the

  6. Carbon stewardship: land management decisions and the potential for carbon sequestration in Colorado, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Failey, Elisabeth L; Dilling, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Land use and its role in reducing greenhouse gases is a key element of policy negotiations to address climate change. Calculations of the potential for enhanced terrestrial sequestration have largely focused on the technical characteristics of carbon stocks, such as vegetation type and management regime, and to some degree, on economic incentives. However, the actual potential for carbon sequestration critically depends on who owns the land and additional land management decision drivers. US land ownership patterns are complex, and consequently land use decision making is driven by a variety of economic, social and policy incentives. These patterns and incentives make up the 'carbon stewardship landscape'-that is, the decision making context for carbon sequestration. We examine the carbon stewardship landscape in the US state of Colorado across several public and private ownership categories. Achieving the full potential for land use management to help mitigate carbon emissions requires not only technical feasibility and financial incentives, but also effective implementing mechanisms within a suite of often conflicting and hard to quantify factors such as multiple-use mandates, historical precedents, and non-monetary decision drivers.

  7. [Continuing training plan in a clinical management unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa Antiñolo, Fernando Miguel; Bayol Serradilla, Elia; Gómez Camacho, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Continuing Care Unit (UCA) focused the attention of frail patients, polypathological patients and palliative care. UCA attend patients at home, consulting, day unit, telephone consulting and in two hospitals of the health area. From 2002 UCA began as a management unit, training has been a priority for development. Key elements include: providing education to the workplace, including key aspects of the most prevalent health care problems in daily work, directing training to all staff including organizational aspects of patient safety and the environment, improved working environment, development of new skills and knowledge supported by the evidence-based care for the development of different skills. The unit can be the ideal setting to undertake the reforms necessary conceptual training of professionals to improve the quality of care. 2010 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Certified training for nuclear and radioactive source security management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Radioactive sources are used by hospitals, research facilities and industry for such purposes as diagnosing and treating illnesses, sterilising equipment and inspecting welds. Unfortunately, many States, regulatory authorities and licensees may not appreciate how people with malevolent intentions could use radioactive sources, and statistics confirm that a number of security incidents happen around the globe. The adversary could be common thieves, activists, insiders, terrorists and organised crime groups. Mitigating this risk requires well trained and competent staff who have developed the knowledge, attributes and skills necessary to successfully discharge their security responsibilities. The International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Institute for Nuclear Security are leading international training efforts. The target audience is a multi-disciplinary group of professionals with management responsibilities for security at facilities with radioactive sources. These efforts to promote training and competence amongst practitioners have been recognised at the 2014 and 2016 Nuclear Security and Nuclear Industry Summits. (author)

  9. Training Middle Managers of South African Public Schools in Leadership and Management Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mampane, Sharon Thabo

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this conceptual explanatory research is to highlight the importance of training of Middle Managers or Heads of Department (HoDs) in leadership and management in South African public schools. Leadership responsibilities in schools are becoming more complex to the extent that principals can no longer be sole leaders in schools. The…

  10. Human Resource Strategic Management in NPOs: An Explorative Study on Managers' Psychosocial Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benevene, Paula; Cortini, Michela

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This explorative research aims at examining the social representation of psychosocial training in NPOs managers. Design/methodology/approach: An adopted multiple research approach was adopted to analyse a corpus of qualitative data. A detailed semi-structured interview was administered to 122 senior managers of as many Italian NPOs.…

  11. Advanced information technology for training and emergency management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahlstroem, B.

    1989-01-01

    Modern information technology provides many possibilities for improving both the safety and the availability of nuclear installations. A Nordic research programme was started in 1977, in which several organizations in Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden has been participating. The work has on a general level been addressing control rooms, human reliability and information technology for nuclear power plants. The research has had impact on the development of the control room solutions and the training simulators in Finland and also in the other Nordic countries. The present phase of the Nordic cooperation is investigating the use of advanced information technology in emergency management. The paper gives a brief introduction to the use of advance information technology for training and emergency management, which is based on the experience from the Nordic projects and other similar application projects in Finland. The paper includes also references to results from several of the projects. (author)

  12. Final Scientific/Technical Report Carbon Capture and Storage Training Northwest - CCSTNW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Workman, James

    2013-09-30

    This report details the activities of the Carbon Capture and Storage Training Northwest (CCSTNW) program 2009 to 2013. The CCSTNW created, implemented, and provided Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) training over the period of the program. With the assistance of an expert advisory board, CCSTNW created curriculum and conducted three short courses, more than three lectures, two symposiums, and a final conference. The program was conducted in five phases; 1) organization, gap analysis, and form advisory board; 2) develop list serves, website, and tech alerts; 3) training needs survey; 4) conduct lectures, courses, symposiums, and a conference; 5) evaluation surveys and course evaluations. This program was conducted jointly by Environmental Outreach and Stewardship Alliance (dba. Northwest Environmental Training Center – NWETC) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL).

  13. Training Guide for the Management Analyst Industrial Engineer Technician

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-07-01

    comtemporary work operations, and blending traditional and modern organization concepts, the student devwlops the facility to analyze and create organization...training, the attendee will know the functions of a computer as it processes business data to produce information for improved management. He will...action which is most cost effective when considering proposed investments. Emphasis is placed on the adaption of general business practices to

  14. Conflict management training and nurse-physician collaborative behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone, Brenda N; King, Major L; Gresham, Louise S; Wahl, Patricia; Suh, Eunice

    2008-01-01

    Collaboration between nurses and physicians continues to be elusive although it is a desirable goal for most in health care. This study used a quasi-experimental design to evaluate the outcomes of a conflict resolution (management) training program on nurses' perception of their collaboration with the physicians with whom they work. Results showed no differences between the experimental and control groups following the intervention. Individual readiness and evaluation of the antecedents of collaboration should be determined before implementing such an intervention.

  15. Mitigating wildfire carbon loss in managed northern peatlands through restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granath, Gustaf; Moore, Paul A.; Lukenbach, Maxwell C.; Waddington, James M.

    2016-06-01

    Northern peatlands can emit large amounts of carbon and harmful smoke pollution during a wildfire. Of particular concern are drained and mined peatlands, where management practices destabilize an array of ecohydrological feedbacks, moss traits and peat properties that moderate water and carbon losses in natural peatlands. Our results demonstrate that drained and mined peatlands in Canada and northern Europe can experience catastrophic deep burns (>200 t C ha-1 emitted) under current weather conditions. Furthermore, climate change will cause greater water losses in these peatlands and subject even deeper peat layers to wildfire combustion. However, the rewetting of drained peatlands and the restoration of mined peatlands can effectively lower the risk of these deep burns, especially if a new peat moss layer successfully establishes and raises peat moisture content. We argue that restoration efforts are a necessary measure to mitigate the risk of carbon loss in managed peatlands under climate change.

  16. Waste management activities and carbon emissions in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couth, R.; Trois, C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper summarizes research into waste management activities and carbon emissions from territories in sub-Saharan Africa with the main objective of quantifying emission reductions (ERs) that can be gained through viable improvements to waste management in Africa. It demonstrates that data on waste and carbon emissions is poor and generally inadequate for prediction models. The paper shows that the amount of waste produced and its composition are linked to national Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Waste production per person is around half that in developed countries with a mean around 230 kg/hd/yr. Sub-Saharan territories produce waste with a biogenic carbon content of around 56% (+/-25%), which is approximately 40% greater than developed countries. This waste is disposed in uncontrolled dumps that produce large amounts of methane gas. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from waste will rise with increasing urbanization and can only be controlled through funding mechanisms from developed countries.

  17. Training chiropractic students in weight management counseling using standardized patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, Cheryl; Ramcharan, Michael; Kruger, Carla LeRiche

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and assess an activity that trained chiropractic students to counsel patients on weight management through the use of standardized patients. This was a descriptive study using mixed methods. Students were trained to apply health behavior theory and the transtheoretical model. Standardized patients were given a case to portray with the students. Students had 15 minutes for the encounter. The encounters were assessed in 2 ways: (1) standardized patients answered a brief questionnaire about the students' performance, and (2) students answered a questionnaire about the utility of the intervention. Numerical data were extracted from the audiovisual management platform, and statistics were computed for each question. Comments made by students and patients were transferred verbatim for content analysis. A total of 102 students took part in the activity. Students' performance in the encounter was uniformly high, with over 90% "yes" responses to all questions except "gave me printed information material" and "discussed the printed material with me." The key issue identified in the comments by standardized patients was that students tended not to connect weight management with their chief complaint (low back pain). Nearly all students (97%) thought the activity would be useful to their future practice, and 97% felt it had increased their confidence in providing weight management counseling. This experiential activity was assessed to be useful to students' future practice and appeared to provide them with skills to successfully communicate with patients on weight management.

  18. Carbon Management Brochure - Assessing and managing business responses to climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-08-16

    The Carbon Management Programme, developed by the Carbon Trust and trialled with 50 leading companies, provides a systematic approach to managing the risks and realising the opportunities that climate change presents. In 2003-2004, the Carbon Trust successfully piloted the Carbon Management Programme with 50 leading UK companies including sixteen of the FTSE 100. The following sectors were represented: manufacturing, retail, finance, property and construction and food and drink. Alcan, Tesco, Pfizer, Royal Bank of Scotland, the companies that took part. For Scottish and Newcastle operational efficiency and reductions in cost base are vital to maintain competitive advantage. Moreover, as a branded goods company, Scottish and Newcastle has taken a leading position on its commitment to CSR and climate change mitigation. Carbon Management is a key part of this and has become a leading issue for investors, consumers and regulators. Scottish Courage undertook the Carbon Management Programme to explore further energy-efficiency potential, to seek CSR opportunities and to pilot ideas for potential international roll-out. The programme identified a wide range of opportunities and led to a plan to deliver annual energy cost savings of 15% as well as 13,000 tonnes of carbon emission reductions. The programme helped HBOS to understand the commercial implications of carbon issues on company activities, products, and services. It clarified the risk of climate change associated with property, lending and insurance portfolios; identified new product and service opportunities and facilitated internal engagement and raised the profile of Carbon Management issues within the company. The programme also highlighted opportunities for reputation and brand enhancement. For the Boots Group Carbon Management activities were aligned with corporate objectives for CSR, energy and transport. Site surveys were used to identify a list of specific carbon abatement projects. From this a 5-10 year

  19. Reducing carbon transaction costs in community based forest management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skutsch, Margaret

    The paper considers the potential for community based forest management (of existing forests) in developing countries, as a future CDM strategy, to sequester carbon and claim credits in future commitment periods. This kind of forestry is cost effective, and should bring many more benefits to local

  20. Management Plans for the UNESCO World Heritage Sites, Governance and Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Ricci

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The presentation analyses the correlation between management, namely the coordination activities in the territorial framework of a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and training at different levels (professional training, political and management training and what patterns emerge from this relationship. A detailed analysis of the role, in this context, of the Management Plans is given, with a focus on the Italian experience.

  1. 76 FR 3831 - Crew Resource Management Training for Crewmembers in Part 135 Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-21

    ... training in the use of crew resource management principles, as appropriate for their operation. This final... incorporation of team management concepts in flight operations. This training focuses on communication and... document. Title: Crew Resource Management Training for Crewmembers in Part 135 Operations. Summary: This...

  2. Comparison of Anxiety Management Training and Desensitization in Reducing Test and Other Anxieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deffenbacher, Jerry L.; Shelton, John L.

    1978-01-01

    Effects of systematic desensitization and anxiety management training in reducing test anxiety and generalizing to other anxieties were compared. Both desensitization and anxiety management training produced significant reduction of text anxiety, but by follow-up, anxiety management training produced significantly more test-anxiety reduction on…

  3. Accountable Accounting: Carbon-Based Management on Marginal Lands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara L. DiRocco

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Substantial discussion exists concerning the best land use options for mitigating greenhouse gas (GHG emissions on marginal land. Emissions-mitigating land use options include displacement of fossil fuels via biofuel production and afforestation. Comparing C recovery dynamics under these different options is crucial to assessing the efficacy of offset programs. In this paper, we focus on forest recovery on marginal land, and show that there is substantial inaccuracy and discrepancy in the literature concerning carbon accumulation. We find that uncertainty in carbon accumulation occurs in estimations of carbon stocks and models of carbon dynamics over time. We suggest that analyses to date have been largely unsuccessful at determining reliable trends in site recovery due to broad land use categories, a failure to consider the effect of current and post-restoration management, and problems with meta-analysis. Understanding of C recovery could be greatly improved with increased data collection on pre-restoration site quality, prior land use history, and management practices as well as increased methodological standardization. Finally, given the current and likely future uncertainty in C dynamics, we recommend carbon mitigation potential should not be the only environmental service driving land use decisions on marginal lands.

  4. Accelerating experience : utility sector case studies in training and knowledge management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trudel-Ferrari, C.C. [Kinectrics Inc., Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This paper discussed the development of effective training and knowledge management systems for recently hired personnel in electric utilities. Case studies of best practices from electric utilities in Ontario, consultants, and universities were used to develop an overview of current training practices. Methods of identifying, attracting, and recruiting personnel were presented and knowledge management and mentoring programs were discussed. The use of training programs in developing knowledge databases was also evaluated. Knowledge management formats included qualification training; simulation training; knowledge transfer; and curriculum development. Human resources, revenue, and management issues currently challenging electric utilities were discussed along with various new training practices. 2 refs., 3 tabs., 2 figs.

  5. How does soil management affect carbon losses from soils?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klik, A.; Trümper, G.

    2009-04-01

    Agricultural soils are a major source as well as a sink of organic carbon (OC). Amount and distribution of OC within the soil and within the landscape are driven by land management but also by erosion and deposition processes. At the other hand the type of soil management influences mineralization and atmospheric carbon dioxide losses by soil respiration. In a long-term field experiment the impacts of soil tillage systems on soil erosion processes were investigated. Following treatments were compared: 1) conventional tillage (CT), 2) conservation tillage with cover crop during the winter period (CS), and 3) no-till with cover crop during winter period (NT). The studies were carried out at three sites in the Eastern part of Austria with annual precipitation amounts from 650 to 900 mm. The soil texture ranged from silt loam to loam. Since 2007 soil CO2 emissions are measured with a portable soil respiration system in intervals of about one week, but also in relation to management events. Concurrent soil temperature and soil water content are measured and soil samples are taken for chemical and microbiological analyses. An overall 14-yr. average soil loss between 1.0 t.ha-1.yr-1 for NT and 6.1 t.ha-1.yr-1 for CT resulted in on-site OC losses from 18 to 79 kg ha-1.yr-1. The measurements of the carbon dioxide emissions from the different treatments indicate a high spatial variation even within one plot. Referred to CT plots calculated carbon losses amounted to 65-94% for NT plots while for the different RT plots they ranged between 84 and 128%. Nevertheless site specific considerations have to be taken into account. Preliminary results show that the adaptation of reduced or no-till management strategies has enormous potential in reducing organic carbon losses from agricultural used soils.

  6. A neurophysiological training evaluation metric for air traffic management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghini, G; Aricò, P; Ferri, F; Graziani, I; Pozzi, S; Napoletano, L; Imbert, J P; Granger, G; Benhacene, R; Babiloni, F

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze the possibility to apply a neuroelectrical cognitive metrics for the evaluation of the training level of subjects during the learning of a task employed by Air Traffic Controllers (ATCos). In particular, the Electroencephalogram (EEG), the Electrocardiogram (ECG) and the Electrooculogram (EOG) signals were gathered from a group of students during the execution of an Air Traffic Management (ATM) task, proposed at three different levels of difficulty. The neuroelectrical results were compared with the subjective perception of the task difficulty obtained by the NASA-TLX questionnaires. From these analyses, we suggest that the integration of information derived from the power spectral density (PSD) of the EEG signals, the heart rate (HR) and the eye-blink rate (EBR) return important quantitative information about the training level of the subjects. In particular, by focusing the analysis on the direct and inverse correlation of the frontal PSD theta (4-7 (Hz)) and HR, and of the parietal PSD alpha (10-12 (Hz)) and EBR, respectively, with the degree of mental and emotive engagement, it is possible to obtain useful information about the training improvement across the training sessions.

  7. Managing forests because carbon matters: integrating energy, products, and land management policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert W. Malmsheimer; James L. Bowyer; Jeremy S. Fried; Edmund Gee; Robert Izlar; Reid A. Miner; Ian A. Munn; Elaine Oneil; William C. Stewart

    2011-01-01

    The United States needs many different types of forests: some managed for wood products plus other benefits, and some managed for nonconsumptive uses and benefits. The objective of reducing global greenhouse gases (GHG) requires increasing carbon storage in pools other than the atmosphere. Growing more forests and keeping forests as forests are only part of the...

  8. Assessment and Management of Professionalism Issues in Pathology Residency Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald E. Domen MD

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Professionalism issues are common in residency training and can be very difficult to recognize and manage. Almost one-third of the milestones for pathology recently instituted by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education encompass aspects of professionalism. Program directors are often unsure of how and when to remediate residents for unprofessional behavior. We used a case-based educational approach in a workshop setting to assist program directors in the management of unprofessional behavior in residents. Eight case scenarios highlighting various aspects of unprofessional behavior by pathology residents were developed and presented in an open workshop forum at the annual pathology program director’s meeting. Prior to the workshop, 2 surveys were conducted: (1 to collect data on program directors’ experience with identifying, assessing, and managing unprofessional behavior in their residents and (2 to get feedback from workshop registrants on how they would manage each of the 8 case scenarios. A wide range of unprofessional behaviors have been observed by pathology program directors. Although there is occasionally general agreement on how to manage specific behaviors, there remains wide variation in how to manage many of the presented unprofessional behaviors. Remediation for unprofessional behavior in pathology residents remains a difficult and challenging process. Additional education and research in this area are warranted.

  9. Health care managers learning by listening to subordinates' dialogue training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grill, C; Ahlborg, G; Wikström, E

    2014-01-01

    Middle managers in health care today are expected to continuously and efficiently decide and act in administration, finance, care quality, and work environment, and strategic communication has become paramount. Since dialogical communication is considered to promote a healthy work environment, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the ways in which health care managers experienced observing subordinates' dialogue training. A qualitative study using semi-structured interviews and documents from eight middle managers in a dialogue programme intervention conducted by dialogue trainers. Focus was on fostering and assisting workplace dialogue. Conventional qualitative content analysis was used. Managers' experiences were both enriching and demanding, and consisted of becoming aware of communication, meaning perceiving interaction between subordinates as well as own silent interaction with subordinates and trainer; Discovering communicative actions for leadership, by gaining self-knowledge and recognizing relational leadership models from trainers--such as acting democratically and pedagogically--and converting theory into practice, signifying practising dialogue-promoting conversation behaviour with subordinates, peers, and superiors. Only eight managers participated in the intervention, but data afforded a basis for further research. Findings stressed the importance of listening, and of support from superiors, for well-functioning leadership communication at work. Studies focusing on health care managers' communication and dialogue are few. This study contributes to knowledge about these activities in managerial leadership.

  10. IBFAN Africa training initiatives: code implementation and lactation management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbuli, A

    1994-01-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to halt the decline of breast feeding rates in Africa, 35 representatives of 12 different African countries met in Mangochi, Malawi, in February 1994. The Code of Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes was scrutinized. National codes were drafted based on the "Model Law" of the IBFAN Code Documentation Centre (ICDC), Penang. Mechanisms of implementation, specific to each country, were developed. Strategies for the promotion, protection, and support of breast feeding, which is very important to child survival in Africa, were discussed. The training course was organized by ICDC, in conjunction with IBFAN Africa, and with the support of the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and the World Health Organization (WHO). Countries in eastern, central, and southern Africa were invited to send participants, who included professors, pediatricians, nutritionists, MCH personnel, nurses, and lawyers. IBFAN Africa has also been conducting lactation management workshops for a number of years in African countries. 26 health personnel (pediatricians, nutritionists, senior nursing personnel, and MCH workers), representing 7 countries in the southern African region, attended a training of trainers lactation management workshop in Swaziland in August, 1993 with the support of their UNICEF country offices. The workshop included lectures, working sessions, discussions, and slide and video presentations. Topics covered included national nutrition statuses, the importance of breast feeding, the anatomy and physiology of breast feeding, breast feeding problems, the International Code of Marketing, counseling skills, and training methods. The field trip to a training course covering primary health care that was run by the Traditional Healers Organization (THO) in Swaziland was of particular interest because of the strong traditional medicine sector in many African countries. IBFAN Africa encourages use of community workers (traditional healers, Rural Health

  11. The Role of Carbon Accountant in Corporate Carbon Management Systems: A Holistic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Chinedu Egbunike

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon accounting consists of a combination of advanced cost allocation techniques such as activity-based management and life-cycle costing; that improve the identification and assignments of carbon-related expenses and overheads to such objects as products, services, customers and organizational processes. The study therefore sets out to find the role of carbon accountant in corporate management systems. Data used for this investigation were collected from primary and secondary sources. Primary data are first-hand information from respondents while Secondary data include textbook, Annual Reports and financial statements and internet facilities. The study employed descriptive survey and ex-post facto research design and the formulated hypotheses were tested by use of T-Test and OLS Regression. Based on the analysis and the hypothesis tested, it showed that there is a statistically significant relationship between carbon accounting and corporate performance of selected quoted Manufacturing Companies and based on this findings, it was recommended amongst others that, adaptation to conditions that include long-term changing dynamics of the natural environment should be encouraged and the focus of finance and accounting system should not only cover short-term outcomes and management of short-term costing, reporting and disclosure but also long-term climate risks.

  12. Spectrum Management Guidelines for National and Service Test and Training Ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-12

    Frequency Management Group RCC 700-17 SPECTRUM MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES FOR NATIONAL AND SERVICE TEST AND TRAINING RANGES DISTRIBUTION...left blank. DOCUMENT 700-01 SPECTRUM MANAGEMENT GUIDELINES FOR NATIONAL AND SERVICE TEST AND TRAINING RANGES July 2017...Prepared by RANGE COMMANDERS COUNCIL FREQUENCY MANAGEMENT GROUP Published by Secretariat Range Commanders Council U.S. Army White

  13. The Current State of Middle Management Preparation, Training, and Development in Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the management experience, preparation, and training possessed by middle managers in academic libraries through the analysis of survey results. The analysis showed both advances in middle management preparation over recent decades and room for improvement in several aspects of management development and training within the…

  14. Carbon Management In the Post-Cap-and-Trade Carbon Economy-Part II

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGroff, F. A.

    2014-12-01

    This is the second installment in our search for a comprehensive economic model to mitigate climate change due to anthropogenic activity. Last year we presented how the unique features of our economic model measure changes in carbon flux due to anthropogenic activity, referred to as carbon quality or CQ, and how the model is used to value such changes in the climate system. This year, our paper focuses on how carbon quality can be implemented to capture the effect of economic activity and international trade on the climate system, thus allowing us to calculate a Return on Climate System (RoCS) for all economic assets and activity. The result is that the RoCS for each public and private economic activity and entity can be calculated by summing up the RoCS for each individual economic asset and activity in which an entity is engaged. Such a macro-level scale is used to rank public and private entities including corporations, governments, and even entire nations, as well as human adaptation and carbon storage activities, providing status and trending insights to evaluate policies on both a micro- and macro-economic level. With international trade, RoCS measures the embodied effects on climate change that will be needed to assess border fees to insure carbon parity on all imports and exports. At the core of our vision is a comprehensive, 'open-source' construct of which our carbon quality metric is the first element. One goal is to recognize each country's endemic resources and infrastructure that affect their ability to manage carbon, while preventing spatial and temporal shifting of carbon emissions that reduce or reverse efforts to mitigate climate change. The standards for calculating the RoCS can be promulgated as part of the Generally Accepted Accounted Principles (GAAP) and the International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) to ensure standard and consistent reporting. The value of such insights on the climate system at all levels will be crucial to managing

  15. Conflict management: a primer for doctors in training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltman, D C; O'Dea, N A; Kidd, M R

    2006-01-01

    Conflict in the health arena is a growing concern and is well recognised for doctors in training. Its most extreme expression, workplace violence is on the increase. There is evidence that many conflicts remain unsatisfactorily resolved or unresolved, and result in ongoing issues for staff morale. This paper describes the nature of conflict in the health care system and identifies the difference between conflict and disagreement. Using a conflict resolution model, strategies for dealing with conflict as it arises are explored and tips are provided on how to effectively manage conflict to a satisfactory resolution for all parties. PMID:16397073

  16. Conflict management: a primer for doctors in training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltman, D C; O'Dea, N A; Kidd, M R

    2006-01-01

    Conflict in the health arena is a growing concern and is well recognised for doctors in training. Its most extreme expression, workplace violence is on the increase. There is evidence that many conflicts remain unsatisfactorily resolved or unresolved, and result in ongoing issues for staff morale. This paper describes the nature of conflict in the health care system and identifies the difference between conflict and disagreement. Using a conflict resolution model, strategies for dealing with conflict as it arises are explored and tips are provided on how to effectively manage conflict to a satisfactory resolution for all parties.

  17. Managers' perceptions of the value and impact of HAZWOPER worker health and safety training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Kevin; Slatin, Craig; Rice, Carol; Rosen, Mitchel; Weidner, B Louise; Fleishman, Jane; Alerding, Linda; Delp, Linda

    2015-07-01

    Worker training is a core component of the OSHA Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) standard, but few studies have considered what motivates managers to provide HAZWOPER training to employees or what they value in that training. In 2012, four university-based programs conducted an exploratory survey of managers who sent employees to HAZWOPER courses. Results from 109 respondents were analyzed. Forty-two percent of respondents cited regulations as the most important reason to provide HAZWOPER training; many indicated they would provide less training if there were no standard in place. Three-quarters (74%) reported training had improved workplace conditions. Fewer than half said they were likely to involve trained employees in aspects of the organization's H&S program. Compliance with regulatory requirements is an important factor shaping managers' training delivery decisions. Managers recognize positive impacts of training. These impacts could be enhanced by further leveraging employee H&S knowledge and skills. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Quality management system of Saraykoy Nuclear Research and Training center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurellier, R.; Akchay, S.; Zararsiz, S.

    2014-01-01

    Full text : Technical competence and national/international acceptance of independency of laboratories is ensured by going through accreditations. It provides decreasing the risk of a slowdown in international trade due to unnecessary repetition of testing and analyses. It also eliminates the cost of additional experiments and analyses. Saraykoy Nuclear Research and Training Center (SANAEM) has performed intensive studies to establish an effective and well-functioning QMS (Quality Management System) by full accordance with the requirements of ISO/IEC 17025, since the begining of 2006. Laboratories, especially serving to public health studies and important trade duties require urgent accreditation. In this regard, SANAEM has established a quality management system and performed accreditation studies

  19. Certified Training for Nuclear and Radioactive Source Security Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    Radioactive sources are used by hospitals, research facilities and industry for such purposes as diagnosing and treating illnesses, sterilising equipment and inspecting welds. Unfortunately, many States, regulatory authorities and licensees may not appreciate how people with malevolent intentions could use radioactive sources, and statistics confirm that a number of security incidents happen around the globe. The adversary could be common thieves, activists, insiders, terrorists and organised crime groups. Mitigating this risk requires well trained and competent staff who have developed the knowledge, attributes and skills necessary to successfully discharge their security responsibilities. The International Atomic Energy Agency and the World Institute for Nuclear Security are leading international training efforts. The target audience is a multi-disciplinary group of professionals with management responsibilities for security at facilities with radioactive sources. These efforts to promote training and competence amongst practitioners have been recognised at the 2014 and 2016 Nuclear Security and Nuclear Industry Summits. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. The Century-Long Challenge of Global Carbon Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socolow, R.

    2002-05-01

    The time scale of the global carbon management is a century, not a decade and not a millennium. A century is the ratio of 1000 billion metric tons of carbon [Gt(C)] to 10 Gt(C)/yr. 1000 Gt(C) is the future emissions that will lead to approximately a doubling of the pre-industrial atmospheric CO2 concentration, 280 ppm, assuming the total net ocean plus terrestrial sink remains at half the strength of this source - since 2.1 Gt (C) = 1 ppm, and the concentration today is already 370 ppm. Doubling is the most widely used boundary between acceptable and unacceptable Greenhouse-related environmental disruption, or, in the language of the Framework Convention on Climate Change, the onset of "dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system." And 10 Gt(C)/yr is a conservative estimate of the average annual fossil-fuel carbon source over the century; it is now between 6 and 7 Gt(C). Conventional oil and gas are not sufficiently abundant to generate a serious Greenhouse problem on their own. Well before their cumulative carbon emissions reach 1000 Gt(C), both are expected to become non-competitive as a result of growing costs of access (costs related to resources being very deep underground, or below very deep water, or very remote, or very small.) But several times 1000 Gt(C) of coal resources will probably be competitive with non-fossil fuel alternatives, as will "unconventional" oil and gas resources, such as tar sands. The world will not be saved from a serious Greenhouse problem by fossil fuel depletion. There are four mitigation strategies for avoiding dangerous interference with the climate system. Fossil fuels can cease to dominate the global energy system well before the end of the century, yielding large market share to some combination of renewable energy and nuclear (fission and fusion) energy sources. Fossil fuels can continue to dominate, but most of the carbon in the century's fossil fuels can be prevented from reaching the atmosphere (fossil-carbon

  1. Understanding Carbon Sequestration Options in the United States: Capabilities of a Carbon Management Geographic Information System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahowski, Robert T.; Dooley, James J.; Brown, Daryl R.; Mizoguchi, Akiyoshi; Shiozaki, Mai

    2001-04-03

    While one can discuss various sequestration options at a national or global level, the actual carbon management approach is highly site specific. In response to the need for a better understanding of carbon management options, Battelle in collaboration with Mitsubishi Corporation, has developed a state-of-the-art Geographic Information System (GIS) focused on carbon capture and sequestration opportunities in the United States. The GIS system contains information (e.g., fuel type, location, vintage, ownership, rated capacity) on all fossil-fired generation capacity in the Untied States with a rated capacity of at least 100 MW. There are also data on other CO2 sources (i.e., natural domes, gas processing plants, etc.) and associated pipelines currently serving enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects. Data on current and prospective CO2 EOR projects include location, operator, reservoir and oil characteristics, production, and CO2 source. The system also contains information on priority deep saline aquifers and coal bed methane basins with potential for sequestering CO2. The GIS application not only enables data storage, flexible map making, and visualization capabilities, but also facilitates the spatial analyses required to solve complex linking of CO2 sources with appropriate and cost-effective sinks. A variety of screening criteria (spatial, geophysical, and economic) can be employed to identify sources and sinks most likely amenable to deployment of carbon capture and sequestration systems. The system is easily updateable, allowing it to stay on the leading edge of capture and sequestration technology as well as the ever-changing business landscape. Our paper and presentation will describe the development of this GIS and demonstrate its uses for carbon management analysis.

  2. Derived crop management data for the LandCarbon Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Gail; Liu, Shu-Guang; Oeding, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    The LandCarbon project is assessing potential carbon pools and greenhouse gas fluxes under various scenarios and land management regimes to provide information to support the formulation of policies governing climate change mitigation, adaptation and land management strategies. The project is unique in that spatially explicit maps of annual land cover and land-use change are created at the 250-meter pixel resolution. The project uses vast amounts of data as input to the models, including satellite, climate, land cover, soil, and land management data. Management data have been obtained from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS) and USDA Economic Research Service (ERS) that provides information regarding crop type, crop harvesting, manure, fertilizer, tillage, and cover crop (U.S. Department of Agriculture, 2011a, b, c). The LandCarbon team queried the USDA databases to pull historic crop-related management data relative to the needs of the project. The data obtained was in table form with the County or State Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) and the year as the primary and secondary keys. Future projections were generated for the A1B, A2, B1, and B2 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) scenarios using the historic data values along with coefficients generated by the project. The PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency (PBL) Integrated Model to Assess the Global Environment (IMAGE) modeling framework (Integrated Model to Assess the Global Environment, 2006) was used to develop coefficients for each IPCC SRES scenario, which were applied to the historic management data to produce future land management practice projections. The LandCarbon project developed algorithms for deriving gridded data, using these tabular management data products as input. The derived gridded crop type, crop harvesting, manure, fertilizer, tillage, and cover crop

  3. Education and training of future wetland scientists and managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, D.A.

    2008-01-01

    Wetland science emerged as a distinct discipline in the 1980s. In response, courses addressing various aspects of wetland science and management were developed by universities, government agencies, and private firms. Professional certification of wetland scientists began in the mid-1990s to provide confirmation of the quality of education and experience of persons involved in regulatory, management, restoration/construction, and research involving wetland resources. The education requirements for certification and the need for persons with specific wetland training to fill an increasing number of wetland-related positions identified a critical need to develop curriculum guidelines for an undergraduate wetland science and management major for potential accreditation by the Society of Wetland Scientists. That proposed major contains options directed toward either wetland science or management. Both options include required basic courses to meet the general education requirements of many universities, required upper-level specialized courses that address critical aspects of physical and biological sciences applicable to wetlands, and a minimum of four additional upper-level specialized courses that can be used to tailor a degree to students' interests. The program would be administered by an independent review board that would develop guidelines and evaluate university applications for accreditation. Students that complete the required coursework will fulfill the education requirements for professional wetland scientist certification and possess qualifications that make them attractive candidates for graduate school or entry-level positions in wetland science or management. Universities that offer this degree program could gain an advantage in recruiting highly qualified students with an interest in natural resources. Alternative means of educating established wetland scientists are likewise important, especially to provide specialized knowledge and experience or

  4. Effective e-Training: Using a Course Management System and e-Learning Tools to Train Library Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Andrew; Teetor, Travis Stephen

    2014-01-01

    In the summer of 2012, the University of Arizona Libraries implemented an online training program to effectively train Access Services staff and student employees at a large academic research library. This article discusses the program, which was built using a course management system (D2L) and various e-Learning software applications (Articulate…

  5. Environmental review of options for managing radioactively contaminated carbon steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to develop a strategy for the management of radioactively contaminated carbon steel (RCCS). Currently, most of this material either is placed in special containers and disposed of by shallow land burial in facilities designed for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or is stored indefinitely pending sufficient funding to support alternative disposition. The growing amount of RCCS with which DOE will have to deal in the foreseeable future, coupled with the continued need to protect the human and natural environment, has led the Department to evaluate other approaches for managing this material. This environmental review (ER) describes the options that could be used for RCCS management and examines the potential environmental consequences of implementing each. Because much of the analysis underlying this document is available from previous studies, wherever possible the ER relies on incorporating the conclusions of those studies as summaries or by reference

  6. Carbon sequestration, biological diversity, and sustainable development: Integrated forest management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cairns, M.A. (Environmental Research Lab., Corvallis, OR (United States)); Meganck, R.A. (United Nations Environment Programme for the Wider Caribbean, Kingston (Jamaica))

    Tropical deforestation provides a significant contribution to anthropogenic increases in atmospheric CO[sub 2] concentration that may lead to global warming. Forestation and other forest management options to sequester CO[sub 2] in the tropical latitudes may fail unless they address local economic, social, environmental, and political needs of people in the developing world. Forest management is discussed in terms of three objectives: Carbon sequestration, sustainable development, and biodiversity conservation. An integrated forest management strategy of land-use planning is proposed to achieve these objectives and is centered around: Preservation of primary forest, intensified use of nontimber resources, agroforestry, and selective use of plantation forestry. 89 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  7. TEAMproTM: The complete training evaluation, analysis, and management system, professional edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruno, Ronald J.; Armistead, Michael W.; Fish, James R. . Web sites: www. exitech. com; www. exitech.net

    2003-01-01

    The Systematic Approach to Training (SAT) has become the internationally accepted standard of identification, organization, development, and delivery of performance-based training. Through use of the SAT process the industry is provided with a consistent methodology to determine the level of knowledge and skills that are required to perform job related tasks at a nuclear power plant (NPP). However, due to the complexity of each NPP job position an enormous volume of data is required to develop, deliver, and maintain a performance based training program. The burden of managing this data has fallen upon the NPP training department. Proficient information management is essential to ensure all aspects of job performance are incorporated into the individual training programs. In addition, training program effectiveness can be increased through the relational tracking of analysis materials, which result in an efficient training setting delivery of learning objectives. The desire to increase training effectiveness and decrease the data management burden has driven NPP training department personnel to seek a SAT based information management system, in the form of a relational database. The desired database product will act as a tool to track and manage all aspects of the material used during development and conduct of training. There are several third party training management database products available in today's marketplace. Each provides solutions to specific needs in specialized training environments such as training of NPP Licensed Operators, and technical vocational training of electricians, mechanics, and crane operators. Each training area has its own unique training requirements, whether dictated by regulatory agencies, or mandated by in-house management decisions. This paper will offer a single relational database solution that is intended to support all aspects of NPP training requirements. This product is TEAMSpro TM . (author)

  8. Evaluation of mid-level management training in immunisation in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The Mid-Level Management (MLM) training course provides managers of immunisation programmes with new, advanced skills in planning, management, monitoring and evaluation. An evaluation was conducted of the MLM training courses held between 2000 and 2004 in the African Region, in order to assess its ...

  9. Technologies for improved soil carbon management and environmental quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reicosky, D.C. [USDA-Agricultural Research Service, Morris, MN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The objective of this paper is to create an environmental awareness of and to provide insight into the future balance of environment and economic issues in developing new technologies that benefit the farmer, the public, and agricultural product sales. Agricultural impacts of tillage-induced CO{sub 2} losses are addressed along with new and existing technologies to minimize tillage-induced flow of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere, Emphasis is placed on the carbon cycle and the cost of environmental damage to illustrate the need for improved technologies leading to reduced environmental impacts by business ventures. New technologies and concepts related to methods of tillage and stover management for carbon sequestration with the agricultural production systems are presented. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  10. Potential increases in natural disturbance rates could offset forest management impacts on ecosystem carbon stocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John B. Bradford; Nicholas R. Jensen; Grant M. Domke; Anthony W. D' Amato

    2013-01-01

    Forested ecosystems contain the majority of the world’s terrestrial carbon, and forest management has implications for regional and global carbon cycling. Carbon stored in forests changes with stand age and is affected by natural disturbance and timber harvesting. We examined how harvesting and disturbance interact to influence forest carbon stocks over the Superior...

  11. 76 FR 55846 - Hazardous Waste Management System: Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste: Carbon Dioxide...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-09

    ... carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) streams that are hazardous from the definition of hazardous waste, provided these... management under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) to conditionally exclude carbon dioxide... 2050-AG60 Hazardous Waste Management System: Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste: Carbon...

  12. Medical residents' perceptions of their competencies and training needs in health care management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berkenbosch, Lizanne; Schoenmaker, Suzanne Gerdien; Ahern, Susannah

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has shown that Dutch medical residents feel inadequate in certain management areas: 85% had a need for management training and reported preferences on the format of such training. Our objective was to explore if the perceived deficiencies and needs among Dutch residents were sim...... similar to those of their peers in other countries, and if a longer duration of the incorporation of the CanMEDS competency framework into curricula as well as management training had an influence on these perceptions....

  13. Implementation of ANAV Training Committees for managing the formation and consolidation of the SAT methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo Lopez, D.

    2013-01-01

    To that training is as effective as possible and cover the desired goals, such as, among others: To maintain qualifications, improve worker performance and address the shortcomings in performance, is need to be integrated and managed from the departments / units of the center themselves. The heads of unit leadership must be visible and reinforced. To do this in ANAV have constituted various Committees Training managers to monitor, validate and ultimately manage training programs.

  14. Collaborative training program in coastal management in the Philippines: a local initiative with a global perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Balgos, M.C.

    1995-01-01

    A collaborative project in developing a broad-based coastal management training program in the Philippines is being undertaken by a group of government and nongovernment agencies. It addresses the lack of expertise in planning an implementation for coastal management in the country. The process will be documented to serve as a guide in starting and maintaining the process of collaborative training in coastal management in the region. Other training initiatives are outlined including regional ...

  15. Principles of managed intellectual activity in training psychologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena I. Zakharova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the possibility of using the principles of gradual development of intellectual activity in the training experts of developmental psychology. The issue of the managed development of professional work components is being raised. A possible way of working is discussed analysing the features of child actual development aimed at discovering the reasons for the learning difficulties, which served as an excuse for the parents to seek psychological assistance. The method of analysis becomes an important competence of a consulting psychologist against the background of a high variety of forms of mental development. Development of readymade algorithms for solving a problem situation, covering all their diversity seems next to impossible. In this regard, there is a need to prepare students for an independent analysis of a specific life situation. It is the ability to this kind of analysis that ensures the expert’s preparedness to develop recommendations that contribute to harmonizing the child’s development. Elaboration of this competence implies the integration of knowledge and skills acquired in various training courses. This possibility is provided by shaping the student’s orientation in the learned action taking into account its level structure. Semantically speaking, orientation allows one to recover the logic of the child’s examination and child development according to the goal set. The orientation is based on the mechanisms and conditions of mental development. The choice of adequate diagnostic tools becomes an independent task of the analysis that requires understanding of the available techniques and diagnostic tools. Summing up, the operational level of orientation provides competent use of the means chosen during diagnostic examination. Taking into account the orientation level of the developed activity makes it possible to integrate the knowledge and skills gained in the process of training into psychologist expert

  16. Use of training dentures in management of gagging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Yadav

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gagging is a frequent impediment to the performance of dental procedures. This stimulation of the gagging reflex, or more accurately, the vomiting reflex, is a special problem in prosthodontic service. A hypersensitive gagging reflex often prevents the dentist from carrying out critical procedures or causes them to performat a less than satisfactory level. In addition, once having suffered an unpleasant gagging experience in a dentist′s office, the patients develop a fear of further visits to dentists. The purpose of this paper is to describe methods of managing the gagging patient that has a sound rationale based on modified treatment approaches starting from impression making to design of the prosthesis aided by training dentures to help the patient to tolerate prosthesis in mouth before fabrication of definite prosthesis.

  17. OER Usage by Instructional Designers and Training Managers in Corporations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anat Cohen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the development of Open Educational Resources (OERs, different models regarding the usage of these resources in education have appeared in the literature. Wiley’s 4-Rs model is considered to be one of the leading models. Research based on Wiley’s model shows that using materials without making changes is the most common use. Compared to the extensive literature regarding OER usage in education, the literature barely deals with OER usage by instructional designers or training managers in corporations. The purpose of this research is to examine the OER usage of these two stakeholders, distinguishing between Little and Big OER repositories, in which Little OER repositories such as YouTube and Wikipedia aren’t necessarily designed to fulfill educational purposes. Findings show that these stakeholders almost use only Little repositories and that their usage level is higher than what is documented in the literature: they mostly Revise–modify the form of the resource, and Remix–combine different resources to create new ones. These differences can be explained by the fact that materials from Little OER repositories are raw materials, requiring further editing and adjustment. Significant differences between instructional designers’ and training managers’ usage of OERs were found regarding the Reuse level of resources from internal repositories and the Google Images repository, and the frequency of this Reuse.

  18. A community needs responsive management training model: Re-envisioning management training for pastors of the International Assemblies of God Church

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malesela J. Masenya

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-profit organisations (NGO�s play an important role in helping satisfy society�s many needs. Churches, for example, are called upon to address critical challenges facing the South African society such as discrepancies in life chances, unemployment and corruption. It largely depends on the management skills of leaders of such organisations to succeed in their endeavour to meet community needs. In order to improve these skills, this study sought to redefine the initial training of student pastors, including their management training, at the colleges of the International Assemblies of God Church (IAG. A qualitative research approach was followed. Two focus group interviews and seven individual interviews were conducted. Interviews included members of the national and provincial executive committees of the IAG, serving pastors, directors of training colleges, pastor trainees in their final year of study, and a newly graduated student. The findings of the study support the importance of formal management training for pastors before being employed in the service of the IAG. This Church has moved away from accepting ministers for service based on their faith and profession of a call to ministry only. The investigation revealed shortcomings in the initial training programmes of pastors; for example, the emphasis on theological courses at the expense of courses that are responsive to community needs and management training issues. Leaders with the competency to respond to community needs are required. The implementation of a transformational management framework, which includes community responsive courses, is recommended as a way to effectively train church leaders.Intradisciplinary and/or interdisciplinary implications: Although this article is written within the framework of Educational Management, it touches on other fields like Practical Theology and Curriculum Development. It reflects on the perceived need to include management training in

  19. A Model for Behavioral Management and Relationship Training for Parents in Groups,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behavior, Human relations, *Training, *Families(Human), Symposia, Models, Children, Psychotherapy, Problem solving, Management, Control, Learning, Skills, Decision making , Group dynamics, Military psychology, Military medicine

  20. Pasture Management Strategies for Sequestering Soil Carbon - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzluebbers, Alan J.

    2006-03-15

    management indicated that soil organic carbon and nitrogen storage were greater with than without endophyte only under high soil fertility. This extra carbon and nitrogen in soil due to the presence of the endophyte was further found to be located in intermediately sized soil aggregates, which are important for reducing water runoff and improving water quality. These results suggest that well-fertilized tall fescue pastures with a high percentage of plants infected with the endophyte have the potential to help offset the rising carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This research has also shown positive ecological implications of tall fescue-endophyte association.

  1. Crew resource management training adapted to nuclear power plant operators for enhancing safety attitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Akira; Kitamura, Masaharu; Takahashi, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    A conventional training program for nuclear power plant operators mainly focuses on the improvement of knowledge and skills of individual operators. Although it has certainly contributed to safety operation of nuclear power plants, some recent incidents have indicated the necessity of an additional training program aiming at the improvement of team performance. In the aviation domain, crew resource management (CRM) training has demonstrated the effectiveness in resolving team management issues of flight crews, aircraft maintenance crews, and so on. In the present research, we attempt to introduce the CRM concept into operator training in nuclear power plant for the training of conceptual skill (that is, non-technical skill). In this paper an adapted CRM training for nuclear power plant operators is proposed. The proposed training method has been practically utilized in the training course of the managers of nuclear power plants. (author)

  2. The assessment of training efficiency. A management tool in Sta. Ma de Garona NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carretero, Felipe; Sanchez Alvarez, Francisco J.; Soriano, Santiago Lucas

    2003-01-01

    Nowadays, one of the critical factors which determines the success of the companies is their adaptability to changes and the development of key competencies in a more global and competitive market. The acquisition, maintenance and updating of those competencies is a fundamental concern of the training managers. Training management implies also to answer, as accurate as possible, questions as following: Which is the quality of the training activities? Are the taught knowledge, skills and attitudes fully assimilated? Are they transferred to job position? Is it possible to correlate training effort and company results? Which is the comprehensive cost of the training programme? and finally, Is the cost reasonable according to the results?, in other words, has been the training programme efficient enough?The present paper introduces the experience in implementing an assessment system of training efficiency, in Sta. M a de Garona, as a training management tool for decision making. (author)

  3. The effect of time-management training on employee attitudes and behavior: a field experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orpen, C

    1994-07-01

    This field experiment tested for the effect of time-management training on 56 employees at an Australian manufacturing company, half of whom attended a 3-day training program and half of whom did not. The training group subjects rated their management of time significantly higher after the program than did the group who did not attend the training program. The diary entries of the trained subjects over a 2-week period after the training program were also rated by three superiors as exhibiting significantly better time management than the diary entries of the untrained group. Given that subjects had been randomly assigned to the two conditions, these results suggest that appropriate training can cause employees to improve how they manage their time at work.

  4. TRAINING OF MANAGERS – SUPPORT FOR EXERTING A STRATEGIC EFFICIENT MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia BAESU

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Managers are an important component of human resources in a company, bringing a decisive contribution to the establishment and achievement of company’s objectives. In managerial training a special role is played by the change of ideas and experiences with managers from economic environments with different degrees of development, facing with the same type of problems, by holding round tables and seminars. These events may be important opportunities for the Romanian managers to get in direct contact with all the novelties at international level of improving their own knowledge and skills. In the context of global development of economy the roles and tasks assigned to managers of corporations have changed as well. Consequently, at present the success of an enterprise depends decisively on the managers’ quality.

  5. Carbon Sequestration and Forest Management at DoD Installations: An Exploratory Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barker, Jerry

    1995-01-01

    ... atmospheric carbon because many lands could be reforested, other lands could receive management practices that would improve tree growth, while additional lands support mature forests that are vast carbon reservoirs...

  6. Federal land management, carbon sequestration, and climate change in the Southeastern U.S.: a case study with fort benning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, S.; Liu, S.; Li, Z.; Sohl, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    Land use activities can have a major impact on the temporal trendsandspatialpatternsofregionalland-atmosphereexchange of carbon. Federal lands generally have substantially different land management strategies from surrounding areas, and the carbon consequences have rarely been quantified and assessed. Using the Fort Benning Installation as a case study, we used the General Ensemble biogeochemical Modeling System (GEMS) to simulate and compare ecosystem carbon sequestration between the U.S. Army's Fort Benning and surrounding areas from 1992 to 2050. Our results indicate that the military installation sequestered more carbon than surrounding areas from 1992 to 2007 (76.7 vs 18.5 g C m-2 yr-1), and is projected to continue sequestering more carbon from 2008 to 2050 (75.7 vs 25.6 g C m-2 yr-1), mostly because of the proactive management approaches adopted on military training lands. Our results suggest that federal lands might play a positive and important role in sequestering and conserving atmospheric carbon because some anthropogenic disturbances (e.g., urbanization, forest harvesting, and agriculture) can be minimized or prevented on federal lands

  7. Building capacity for water, sanitation, and hygiene programming: Training evaluation theory applied to CLTS management training in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, Jonny; Shields, Katherine F; Venkataramanan, Vidya; Saywell, Darren; Bartram, Jamie

    2016-10-01

    Training and capacity building are long established critical components of global water, sanitation, and hygiene (WaSH) policies, strategies, and programs. Expanding capacity building support for WaSH in developing countries is one of the targets of the Sustainable Development Goals. There are many training evaluation methods and tools available. However, training evaluations in WaSH have been infrequent, have often not utilized these methods and tools, and have lacked rigor. We developed a conceptual framework for evaluating training in WaSH by reviewing and adapting concepts from literature. Our framework includes three target outcomes: learning, individual performance, and improved programming; and two sets of influences: trainee and context factors. We applied the framework to evaluate a seven-month community-led total sanitation (CLTS) management training program delivered to 42 government officials in Kenya from September 2013 to May 2014. Trainees were given a pre-training questionnaire and were interviewed at two weeks and seven months after initial training. We qualitatively analyzed the data using our conceptual framework. The training program resulted in trainees learning the CLTS process and new skills, and improving their individual performance through application of advocacy, partnership, and supervision soft skills. The link from trainees' performance to improved programming was constrained by resource limitations and pre-existing rigidity of trainees' organizations. Training-over-time enhanced outcomes and enabled trainees to overcome constraints in their work. Training in soft skills is relevant to managing public health programs beyond WaSH. We make recommendations on how training programs can be targeted and adapted to improve outcomes. Our conceptual framework can be used as a tool both for planning and evaluating training programs in WaSH. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Exploring the Use of Microworld Models to Train Army Logistics Management Skills

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Levy, Dina

    2001-01-01

    The Army faces new challenges in training its logistics managers. As the Army evolves into a force-projection Army, the design and management of large-scale logistics systems assume increasing importance...

  9. Management of water extracted from carbon sequestration projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harto, C. B.; Veil, J. A. (Environmental Science Division)

    2011-03-11

    Throughout the past decade, frequent discussions and debates have centered on the geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). For sequestration to have a reasonably positive impact on atmospheric carbon levels, the anticipated volume of CO{sub 2} that would need to be injected is very large (many millions of tons per year). Many stakeholders have expressed concern about elevated formation pressure following the extended injection of CO{sub 2}. The injected CO{sub 2} plume could potentially extend for many kilometers from the injection well. If not properly managed and monitored, the increased formation pressure could stimulate new fractures or enlarge existing natural cracks or faults, so the CO{sub 2} or the brine pushed ahead of the plume could migrate vertically. One possible tool for management of formation pressure would be to extract water already residing in the formation where CO{sub 2} is being stored. The concept is that by removing water from the receiving formations (referred to as 'extracted water' to distinguish it from 'oil and gas produced water'), the pressure gradients caused by injection could be reduced, and additional pore space could be freed up to sequester CO{sub 2}. Such water extraction would occur away from the CO{sub 2} plume to avoid extracting a portion of the sequestered CO{sub 2} along with the formation water. While water extraction would not be a mandatory component of large-scale carbon storage programs, it could provide many benefits, such as reduction of pressure, increased space for CO{sub 2} storage, and potentially, 'plume steering.' Argonne National Laboratory is developing information for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to evaluate management of extracted water. If water is extracted from geological formations designated to receive injected CO{sub 2} for sequestration, the project operator will need to identify methods

  10. The development and implementation of environmental training for management and employees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grant, R.O.; Whelan, M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the design and implementation of an environmental training strategy in a major North Sea operating company. The training events were designed using in-house environmental and training advisers to include all levels of management, operational employees and contractors. As well as designing new courses, material was produced to introduce an environmental awareness component into some existing courses

  11. DOE Handbook: Guide to good practices for training of technical staff and managers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Training programs at DOE facilities should prepare personnel to safely and efficiently operate the facilities in accordance with DOE requirements. This guide contains information that can be used to develop or validate training programs for technical staff and managers at DOE nuclear facilities. Training programs based on the content of this guide should provide assurance that these personnel perform their jobs safely and competently

  12. Narrative Balance Management in an Intelligent Biosafety Training Application for Improving User Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Nahum; Sanchez-Ruiz, Antonio; Cavazza, Marc; Shigematsu, Mika; Prendinger, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    The use of three-dimensional virtual environments in training applications supports the simulation of complex scenarios and realistic object behaviour. While these environments have the potential to provide an advanced training experience to students, it is difficult to design and manage a training session in real time due to the number of…

  13. How Helpful Are Error Management and Counterfactual Thinking Instructions to Inexperienced Spreadsheet Users' Training Task Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputi, Peter; Chan, Amy; Jayasuriya, Rohan

    2011-01-01

    This paper examined the impact of training strategies on the types of errors that novice users make when learning a commonly used spreadsheet application. Fifty participants were assigned to a counterfactual thinking training (CFT) strategy, an error management training strategy, or a combination of both strategies, and completed an easy task…

  14. Management and training aspects of the emergency plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakey, J.R.A.

    1996-01-01

    The main objectives of an emergency management system are to prevent or reduce the likelihood of consequential loss in the event of an emergency occurring. In the event of a nuclear accident the effectiveness of measures for the protection of the public will depend on the advance preparation especially in education and training. This paper reviews two recent initiatives and concludes with comments on the future development of this subject. There is an increasing requirement in legal and moral terms for industry to inform the population of health hazards to which they are exposed. In a report published by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA/OECD) radiation protection was described as a subject which is impenetrable to the layman and as wide as it is complex. For this and other reasons radiation hazards are perceived to exceed all others and the public appear to have a poor image of the radiation protection specialists. Communication with the public and the media is widely recognized as a key pan of an emergency plan. This view is supported in the European Union which has sponsored the book on 'Radiation and Radiation Protection - a course for primary and secondary schools' which is described in this paper. The training of emergency teams includes the use of drills and exercises to maintain skills and can also be used to test the adequacy of plans. Every effort should be made to simulate the pressure on time and resources which would occur in a real event. Radiation emergencies are fortunately rare and so there is little practical experience of these events. The emergency worker must gain some radiation protection skills and must be able to use some technical language when communicating with specialist advisors. For this reason the European Union has sponsored the book 'Radiation Protection for Emergency Workers' which is also described in this paper. (author)

  15. Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breunig, Hanna M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Birkholzer, Jens T. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Borgia, Andrea [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Price, Phillip N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Oldenburg, Curtis M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; McKone, Thomas E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division

    2013-06-13

    Geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) is the injection of carbon dioxide (CO2), typically captured from stationary emission sources, into deep geologic formations to prevent its entry into the atmosphere. Active pilot facilities run by regional United States (US) carbon sequestration partnerships inject on the order of one million metric tonnes (mt) CO2 annually while the US electric power sector emits over 2000 million mt-CO2 annually. GCS is likely to play an increasing role in US carbon mitigation initiatives, but scaling up GCS poses several challenges. Injecting CO2 into sedimentary basins raises fluid pressure in the pore space, which is typically already occupied by naturally occurring, or native, brine. The resulting elevated pore pressures increase the likelihood of induced seismicity, of brine or CO2 escaping into potable groundwater resources, and of CO2 escaping into the atmosphere. Brine extraction is one method for pressure management, in which brine in the injection formation is brought to the surface through extraction wells. Removal of the brine makes room for the CO2 and decreases pressurization. Although the technology required for brine extraction is mature, this form of pressure management will only be applicable if there are cost-­effective and sustainable methods of disposing of the extracted brine. Brine extraction, treatment, and disposal may increase the already substantial capital, energy, and water demands of Carbon dioxide Capture and Sequestration (CCS). But, regionally specific brine management strategies may be able to treat the extracted water as a source of revenue, energy, and water to subsidize CCS costs, while minimizing environmental impacts. By this approach, value from the extracted water would be recovered before disposing of any resulting byproducts. Until a price is placed on carbon, we expect that utilities and other CO2 sources will be

  16. Training method for enhancement of safety attitude in nuclear power plant based on crew resource management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Akira; Karikawa, Daisuke; Takahashi, Makoto; Wakabayashi, Toshio; Kitamura, Masaharu

    2010-01-01

    A conventional training program for nuclear power plant operators has been developed with emphasis on improvement of knowledge and skills of individual operators. Although it has certainly contributed to safety operation of nuclear power plants, some recent incidents have indicated the necessity of an improved training program aiming at improvement of the performance of operators working as a team. In the aviation area, crew resource management (CRM) training has shown the effect of resolving team management issues of flight crews, aircraft maintenance crews, and so on. In the present research, we attempted to introduce the CRM concept into operator training in nuclear power plants as training for conceptual skill enhancement. In this paper, a training method specially customized for nuclear power plant operators based on CRM is proposed. The proposed method has been practically utilized in the management training course of Japan Nuclear Technology Institute. The validity of the proposed method has been evaluated by means of a questionnaire survey. (author)

  17. The management of carbon-14 in Canadian nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-07-01

    In Canada, Derived Emission Limits (DELs) for the release of radionuclides from nuclear facilities are set to ensure that the dose to a member of a critical group from one year's release does not exceed the limit on annual dose to a member of the public set by the Atomic Energy Control Regulations. The Advisory Committee on Radiological Protection (ACRP) has expressed concerns as to whether this procedure provides adequate protection to members of the public, including future generations, for certain radionuclides such as a carbon-14 ( 14 C), which can accumulate in the environment and which can be dispersed, through environmental processes, beyond the local region where the critical group is assumed to live. The ACRP subsequently established a Working Group to review the production, release, environmental levels, and waste management of 14 C arising in CANDU power reactors. The ACRP recommendations resulting from this review can be summarized as · Given the current levels of emissions from CANDU nuclear power stations resulting from the use of a carbon dioxide annulus gas and the limitations in the calculation and use of collective dose, the ACRP sees no need for and additional collective dose limit to be applied to these sources. · The AECB should require licensees of power reactors and waste management sites to provide an annual inventory of 14 C held within reactor buildings and waste management sites; to provide information on the stability of the ion exchange resins and their continuing ability to retain the 14 C; to demonstrate on an ongoing basis that releases of 14 C are maintained at a small fraction of the emission limits; and to report annually the critical group and local collective doses arising from releases of 14 C. 61 refs., 25 tabs., 4 figs

  18. Community Building Services Training Program: A Model Training Program to Provide Technical Training for Minority Adults in Construction, Building Maintenance,and Property Management. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Community Building Maintenance Corp., Chicago, IL.

    A demonstration program, administered by a community based building maintenance, management, and construction corporation, was developed to provide technical training for minority adults in construction, building maintenance, and property management in the Chicago area. The program was concerned with seeking solutions to the lack of housing, job…

  19. Effect of Emotion Management Training to Mothers on the Behavioral Problems of Offspring: Parents’ View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Gowdini

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion We conclude that the training intervention (especially, emotion management training for mothers who have male offspring with behavioral problems is beneficial not only for strengthening the parents to manage their emotions effectively but also for reducing behavioral problems in their offspring.

  20. A Cross-Sectional Study of Student Teachers' Behaviour Management Strategies throughout Their Training Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, Stuart; Reupert, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Despite the importance of behaviour management, many student teachers report being inadequately trained in this area. The aim of this study was to identify the strategies, confidence and reported levels of success in regard to various behaviour management strategies, across 509 first, second, third and fourth year student teachers training to be…

  1. Stress Prevention through a Time Management Training Intervention: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häfner, Alexander; Stock, Armin; Pinneker, Lydia; Ströhle, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a short-term time management training programme on perceived control of time and perceived stress. The sample of 177 freshmen was randomly assigned to a time management training (n?=?89) and an active control group (CG) (n?=?88). We expected that an increase in external demands during the…

  2. Transfer of Learning in Management Training: Building the Payoff Into the Instructional Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Michael J.; May, Gregory D.

    1986-01-01

    Describes two reinforcement techniques designed to ensure transfer of learning from management training courses to the workplace: (1) participant journal writing to capture management insights occurring during training and (2) support groups providing encouragement, feedback, and accountability. Results of an evaluation of the techniques'…

  3. Conflict Management Training for Peacekeepers: Assessment and Recommendations. Special Report 411

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milofsky, Alison; Sany, Joseph; Lancaster, Illana; Krentel, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    This report examines the role of conflict management training in preparing peacekeepers for United Nations/African Union missions through an assessment of the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) Conflict Management Training for Peacekeepers program. The assessment relies on data collected through 137 semistructured interviews with returned…

  4. Anxiety Management Training and Self-Control Desensitization: 15 Months Later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deffenbacher, Jerry L.; Michaels, Ann C.

    1981-01-01

    A 15-month follow-up study found that anxiety management training and self-control desensitization groups continued to report significantly less debilitating test anxiety than the control group. Anxiety management training and self-control desensitization groups also reported significantly less nontargeted anxiety than controls on both measures of…

  5. Carbon Sequestration and Forest Management at DoD Installations: An Exploratory Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barker, Jerry

    1995-01-01

    .... The primary purpose of this report is to explore the influence of management practices such as tree harvesting, deforestation, and reforestation on carbon sequestration potential by DOD forests...

  6. Disseminating contingency management: Impacts of staff training and implementation at an opiate treatment program

    OpenAIRE

    Hartzler, Bryan; Jackson, T. Ron; Jones, Brinn E.; Beadnell, Blair; Calsyn, Donald A.

    2013-01-01

    Guided by a comprehensive implementation model, this study examined training/implementation processes for a tailored contingency management (CM) intervention instituted at a Clinical Trials Network-affiliate opioid treatment program (OTP). Staff-level training outcomes (intervention delivery skill, knowledge, and adoption readiness) were assessed before and after a 16-hour training, and again following a 90-day trial implementation period. Management-level implementation outcomes (interventio...

  7. Training and Organizational Effectiveness: Moderating Role of Knowledge Management Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Azmawani Abd; Ng, Siew Imm; Sambasivan, Murali; Wong, Florence

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Training alone is not sufficient to enhance organizational effectiveness to a greater level because not all knowledge obtained from the training is properly transferred and applied to the organization. This study aims to investigate whether efforts invested by Malaysian manufacturers in employee training and knowledge transfer affect…

  8. High-intensity interval training vs. moderate-intensity continuous training in the prevention/management of cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hussain, S; Macaluso, A; Pearson, S

    2016-01-01

    Moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) has long been considered the most effective exercise treatment modality for the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease, but more recently high-intensity interval training (HIIT) has emerged into the clinical environment has been viewed as a potential alternative to MICT in accruing such benefits. HIIT was initially found to induce significant improvements in numerous physiological and health-related indices, to a similar if not superi...

  9. An Analysis of United States Marine Corps Enlisted Entry-Level Training Using Supply Chain and Operations Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    An Analysis of United States Marine Corps Enlisted Entry-Level Training Using Supply Chain and Operations Management ______________________________________ By...Report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE: An Analysis of United States Marine Corps Enlisted Entry-Level Training Using Supply Chain and Operations Management 6...Level Training; United States Marine Corps; Operations Management ; Supply Chain Management; Process Analysis 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY

  10. Hospital management training for the Eastern Mediterranean Region: time for a change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, Fauziah; Hashmani, Farah Naz; Mukhi, Aftab A Ali; Gul, Xaher; Pradhan, Nousheen; Hatcher, Peter; Farag, Mounir; Abbas, Farhat

    2015-01-01

    The WHO Eastern Mediterranean Regional Office has emphasized health system strengthening among the top five strategic priorities. One of the integral elements of health systems are the hospitals. The purpose of this paper is to review the need for formalized training in hospital management to improve the quality of care. Literature review and hands on experience of conducting a regional training in hospital management for Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR) countries. Majority of patients in EMR bypass Primary Health Care facilities due to inadequate quality of services and prefer seeking specialized care at a tertiary level. There is mounting evidence of mediocre to poor patient satisfaction due to inefficient health care practices in hospitals of EMR. Strengthening the management capacity of the hospitals through a formal training programme is therefore necessary for improving the performance of health care delivery and the overall health system. Hospital management encompasses hospital planning and operational activities including development and implementation of organizational strategies to ensure adequate numbers and quality of trained human resources and effective financial management, disaster management, health management information system utilization, support services, biomedical engineering, transport and waste management. Such training will prepare health care professionals with leadership skills to deliver quality hospital services. This is one of the first papers emphasizing the need for a formal structured regional training in hospital management for the countries of EMR. A modular incremental training approach developing an EMR Credit Transfer and Accumulation system is proposed.

  11. [Problems of X-ray mammology manpower training and management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozhkova, N I

    2014-01-01

    The paper considers the issues of manpower training in X-ray mammology. It mentions staff shortage and no special training, which reduces the efficient activities of X-ray mammographic rooms, as well as shortage of training facilities and no unified educational programs within interdisciplinary integration, inadequate technical equipment in the training facilities, the lack of an accounting system for training higher- and mid-level health workers, as well as engineers. Emphasis is placed on that the educational programs must comply with the organizational forms of testing the specialists to be employed. The introduction of a continuous education system should be accelerated to rule out the decay period of specialists' competence.

  12. Airway management education: simulation based training versus non-simulation based training-A systematic review and meta-analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yanxia; Pan, Chuxiong; Li, Tianzuo; Gan, Tong J

    2017-02-01

    Simulation-based training (SBT) has become a standard for medical education. However, the efficacy of simulation based training in airway management education remains unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate all published evidence comparing the effectiveness of SBT for airway management versus non-simulation based training (NSBT) on learner and patient outcomes. Systematic review with meta-analyses were used. Data were derived from PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Scopus, the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews from inception to May 2016. Published comparative trials that evaluated the effect of SBT on airway management training in compared with NSBT were considered. The effect sizes with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for outcomes measures. Seventeen eligible studies were included. SBT was associated with improved behavior performance [standardized mean difference (SMD):0.30, 95% CI: 0.06 to 0.54] in comparison with NSBT. However, the benefits of SBT were not seen in time-skill (SMD:-0.13, 95% CI: -0.82 to 0.52), written examination score (SMD: 0.39, 95% CI: -0.09 to 0.86) and success rate of procedure completion on patients [relative risk (RR): 1.26, 95% CI: 0.96 to 1.66]. SBT may be not superior to NSBT on airway management training.

  13. Rapid tree carbon stock recovery in managed Amazonian forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutishauser, Ervan; Hérault, Bruno; Baraloto, Christopher; Blanc, Lilian; Descroix, Laurent; Sotta, Eleneide Doff; Ferreira, Joice; Kanashiro, Milton; Mazzei, Lucas; d'Oliveira, Marcus V N; de Oliveira, Luis C; Peña-Claros, Marielos; Putz, Francis E; Ruschel, Ademir R; Rodney, Ken; Roopsind, Anand; Shenkin, Alexander; da Silva, Katia E; de Souza, Cintia R; Toledo, Marisol; Vidal, Edson; West, Thales A P; Wortel, Verginia; Sist, Plinio

    2015-09-21

    While around 20% of the Amazonian forest has been cleared for pastures and agriculture, one fourth of the remaining forest is dedicated to wood production. Most of these production forests have been or will be selectively harvested for commercial timber, but recent studies show that even soon after logging, harvested stands retain much of their tree-biomass carbon and biodiversity. Comparing species richness of various animal taxa among logged and unlogged forests across the tropics, Burivalova et al. found that despite some variability among taxa, biodiversity loss was generally explained by logging intensity (the number of trees extracted). Here, we use a network of 79 permanent sample plots (376 ha total) located at 10 sites across the Amazon Basin to assess the main drivers of time-to-recovery of post-logging tree carbon (Table S1). Recovery time is of direct relevance to policies governing management practices (i.e., allowable volumes cut and cutting cycle lengths), and indirectly to forest-based climate change mitigation interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Reducing Adolescent Rage Bullies: Study on Behavior Management Training Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Beirami

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aim: Adverse effects inner anger and interpersonal relationships will follow on from the other parent behavior management training and promoting and improving relations between parent-child.در این راستا هدف پژوهش حاضر بررسی اثربخشی آموزش مدیریت رفتار براساس مدل بارکلی در کاهش خشم دانش آموزان دختر و پسر قلدر دوره اول متوسطه بود. Methods: The present Experimental research used a pretest– posttest and a control group. جامعه آماری شامل دانش آموزان دختر و پسر دوره اول متوسطه شهر تبریز که در سال تحصیلی 93-1392 مشغول به تحصیل بودند. The population consisted of male and female junior high school students in Tabriz who were enrolled in the 2012-2013 school year. به منظور اجرای پژوهش پس از انجام سرند توسط معلمان و اجرای پرسشنامه قلدر/قربانی الویوس، 30نفر از کودکانی که براساس نمرات کسب شده در پرسشنامه الویوس، به عنوان قلدر طبقه بندی شده بودند به صورت تصادفی در دو گروه 15 نفری آزمایش و کنترل جایگزین شدند؛ و پس از تکمیل پرسشنامه خشم نیلسون(2000 توسط دانش آموزان قلدر؛ والدین گروه آزمایش به مدت 9جلسه (45 دقیقه ای در برنامه آموزش مدیریت رفتار قرارگرفتند، ولی گروه کنترل هیچگونه آموزشی دریافت نکرد.Therefore, after screening by the teachers and the Nelson anger questionnaire, 30 children who, according to scores on the questionnaire were bullies, were classified randomly into two groups of 15 cases and controls were replaced and after completing the questionnaire anger Nilsson (2000 bullying by students, parents groups

  15. Improving the training of managers in the sphere of physical culture and sports in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stadnik S.O.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Analyzed contemporary research on the training of managers in the sphere of physical culture and sports in Ukraine and abroad. Analyzed 50 references, which dealt with various aspects of the preparation of sports managers. It was found that in higher education of Great Britain, Germany, France, Switzerland, Russia is working to prepare managers for the sphere of physical culture and sports. It was found that training of managers in Ukraine is carried out only on the basis of two universities. Found that the content of the training of sports managers in our country needs to be improved, taking into account international experience and current market conditions of the functioning of sports organizations. Identified the main ways of improving the training of managers in the sphere of physical culture and sports in Ukraine.

  16. Social and cultural influences on management for carbon sequestration on US family forestlands: a literature synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Paige Fischer; Susan. Charnley

    2010-01-01

    Nonindustrial private—or "family"—forests hold great potential for sequestering carbon and have received much attention in discussions about forestry-based climate change mitigation. However, little is known about social and cultural influences on owners' willingness to manage for carbon and respond to policies designed to encourage carbon-oriented...

  17. General Employee Radiological Training and Radiological Worker Training: Program management manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This manual defines and describes the DOE General Employee Radiological Training (GERT) and Radiological Worker I and II (RW I and II) Training programs. It includes material development requirements, standards and policies, and program administration. This manual applies to General Employee Radiological Training and Radiological Worker Training at all DOE contractor sites. The training materials of both GERT and RW I and II training reflect the requirements identified in the DOE Radiological Control Manual and DOE Order 5480.11. The training programs represent the minimum requirement for the standardized core materials. Each contractor shall implement the program in its entirety and may augment the standardized core materials to increase the general employee and radiological worker level of competency

  18. Leadership and Management Education and Training (LMET) Effectiveness: A Pilot Study for Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    leadership / management theory complete with a specific vocabulary. This new vocabulary allows the graduate to be able to converse easier with...AD-AlG 9 NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA F/S 5/1 LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT EDUCATION AND TRAINING (LMET) EFFECTI-ECU UNLSIID JUN 81 D L...TITLE (A~d 8ItI. )o------~. .hss COVERED Leadership and Management Education and Training 198 (LMET) Effectiveness: A Pilot-Study for 6-- . *P.W..@*.On

  19. Project plan, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center: Project 95L-EWT-100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgeson, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    The Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center will provide for classroom lectures and hands-on practical training in realistic situations for workers and emergency responders who are tasked with handling and cleanup of toxic substances. The primary objective of the HAMMER project is to provide hands-on training and classroom facilities for hazardous material workers and emergency responders. This project will also contribute towards complying with the planning and training provisions of recent legislation. In March 1989 Title 29 Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Safety and Health Administration 1910 Rules and National Fire Protection Association Standard 472 defined professional requirements for responders to hazardous materials incidents. Two general types of training are addressed for hazardous materials: training for hazardous waste site workers and managers, and training for emergency response organizations

  20. Management effects on carbon fluxes in boreal forests (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindroth, A.; Mölder, M.; Lagergren, F.; Vestin, P.; Hellström, M.; Sundqvist, E.; Norunda Bgs Team

    2010-12-01

    Disturbance by management or natural causes such as wind throw or fire are believed to be one of the main factors that are controlling the carbon balance of vegetation. In Northern Europe a large fraction of the forest area is managed with clear cutting and thinning as the main silvicultural methods. The effect of clear-cutting on carbon dioxide exchanges were studied in different chrono-sequences located in Sweden, Finland, UK and France, respectively. The combined results from these studies showed that a simple model could be developed describing relative net ecosystem exchange as a function of relative rotation length (age). A stand with a rotation length of 100 years, typical for Swedish conditions, looses substantial amounts of carbon during the first 12-15 years and the time it takes to reach cumulative balance after clear-cut, is 25-30 years. The mean net ecosystem exchange over the whole rotation length equals 50% of the maximum uptake. An interesting question is if it is possible to harvest without the substantial carbon losses that take place after clear-cutting. Selective harvest by thinning could potentially be such a method. We therefore studied the effect of thinning on soil and ecosystem carbon fluxes in a mixed pine and spruce forest in Central Sweden, the Norunda forest, located in the semi-boreal zone at 60.08°N, 17.48 °E. The CO2 fluxes from the forest were measured by eddy covariance method and soil effluxes were measured by automatic chambers. Maximum canopy height of the ca. 100 years-old forest was 28 m. The stand was composed of ca 72% pine, 28% before the thinning while the composition after the thinning became 82% pine and 18% spruce. The thinning was made in November/December 2008 in a half- circle from the tower with a radius of 200 m. The LAI decreased from 4.5 to 2.8 after the thinning operation. Immediately after the thinning, we found significantly higher soil effluxes, probably due to increased decomposition of dead roots. The

  1. Educational and school managers training in the context of educational reforms: consensus and dissensus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Oliveira Rescia

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows some of the results from a doctoral research on the educational and school managers training to the beginning of XXI century, in the context of decentralization and trends of educational reforms in Latin America at the end of 1980s and 1990s. Guided by a qualitative, bibliographic and documentary research, the methodological procedures had reference in studies conducted by international organizations, such as: UNESCO, ECLAC and ILPE as well as scholars from different management paradigms, considering the Latin-American education systems’ needs. In Brazil, we sought to understand the requirements of transformation of local competences in planning and educational management after implications and managers training initiatives within this new reality. Therefore, it was analyzed for comparative purposes, three educational and school managers training programs in public schools: Management Circuit Program; Distance Learning Program for School Managers and the Managers’ School Program of Public Basic Education. It was intended to identify the trends of each program for educational and school managers training, with a view to the changes occurred in our society and education and the requirements to acquire new skills and abilities. As conclusion, the research indicated that although the training programs have originated from different instances and explain various guidelines, everything converges to the same set of skills in educational and school managers training.

  2. An annotated bibliography of scientific literature on managing forests for carbon benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarah J. Hines; Linda S. Heath; Richard A. Birdsey

    2010-01-01

    Managing forests for carbon benefits is a consideration for climate change, bioenergy, sustainability, and ecosystem services. A rapidly growing body of scientific literature on forest carbon management includes experimental, modeling, and synthesis approaches, at the stand- to landscape- to continental-level. We conducted a search of the scientific literature on the...

  3. Forest and grassland carbon in North America: A short course for land managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris Swanston; Michael J. Furniss; Kristen Schmitt; Jeffrey Guntle; Maria Janowiak; Sarah Hines

    2012-01-01

    This multimedia short-course presents a range of information on the science, management and policy of forest and grassland carbon. Forests and grasslands worldwide play a critical role in storing carbon and sequestering greenhouse gases from the atmosphere. The U.S. Forest Service, which manages 193 million acres of forests and grasslands, emphasizes the need for...

  4. Does grazing management matter for soil carbon sequestration in shortgrass steppe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Considerable uncertainty remains regarding the potential of grazing management on semiarid rangelands to sequester soil carbon. Short-term (less than 1 decade) studies have determined that grazing management potentially influences fluxes of carbon, but such studies are strongly influenced by prevail...

  5. Groundwater Management in Mining Areas. Proceedings of the 2nd Image-Train Advanced Study Course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prokop, G.; Younger, P.; Roehl, K.E.

    2004-01-01

    Innovative Management of Groundwater Resources in Europe - training and RTD coordination (IMAGE-TRAIN) has the ambition to improve cooperation and interaction between ongoing research projects in the field of soil and groundwater contamination and to communicate new technology achievements to young scientists by means of training courses. The 2nd IMAGE-TRAIN advanced study course focussed on mine water management. This report includes reviews papers of the key-note lectures dealing with flooded mines, mine water pollution, in-situ remediation technologies (uranium mine), and mine water regulation. Those reviews of INIS database scope are indexed separately. (nevyjel)

  6. Personnel training experience in the radioactive waste management: 10 years of Moscow SIA 'RADON' international education training centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batyukhnova, Olga; Dmitriev, Sergey; Arustamov, Artur; Ojovan, Mikhael

    2007-01-01

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The education service for specialists dealing with radioactive waste was established in Russia (former USSR) in 1983 and was based on the capabilities of two organisations: the Moscow Scientific and Industrial Association 'Radon' (SIA 'Radon') and the Chemical Department of Lomonosov's Moscow State University. These two organizations are able to offer training programs in the science fundamentals, applied research and in practical operational areas of the all pre-disposal activities of the radioactive waste management. Since 1997 this system was upgraded to the international level and now acts as International Education Training Centre (IETC) at SIA 'Radon' under the guidance of the IAEA. During 10 years more than 300 specialists from 26 European and Asian countries enhanced their knowledge and skills in radioactive waste management. The IAEA supported specialized regional training courses and workshops, fellowships, on-the-job training, and scientific visits are additional means to assure development of personnel capabilities. Efficiency of training was carefully analysed using the structural adaptation of educational process as well as factors, which have influence on education quality. Social-psychological aspects were also taken into account in assessing the overall efficiency. The analysis of the effect of individual factors and the efficiency of education activity were carried out based on attestation results and questioning attendees. A number of analytical methods were utilised such as Ishikawa's diagram method and Pareto's principle for improving of training programs and activities. (authors)

  7. Providing Experiential Business and Management Training for Biomedical Research Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Kimberly A; Carnahan, Robert H; Brown, Abigail M; Gould, Kathleen L

    2017-01-01

    Many biomedical PhD trainees lack exposure to business principles, which limits their competitiveness and effectiveness in academic and industry careers. To fill this training gap, we developed Business and Management Principles for Scientists, a semester-long program that combined didactic exposure to business fundamentals with practical team-based projects aimed at solving real business problems encountered by institutional shared--resource core facilities. The program also included a retreat featuring presentations by and networking with local life science entrepreneurs and final team presentations to expert judges. Quantitative and qualitative metrics were used to evaluate the program's impact on trainees. A pretest-posttest approach was used to assess trainees' baseline knowledge and mastery of module concepts, and each individual's pretest and posttest responses were compared. The mean score improved by more than 17 percentage points. Trainees also took an online survey to provide feedback about the module. Nearly all participants agreed or strongly agreed that the module was a valuable use of their time and will help guide their career decisions and that project work helped drive home module concepts. More than 75% of trainees reported discussing the module with their research advisors, and all of these participants reported supportive or neutral responses. Collectively, the trainee feedback about the module, improvement in test scores, and trainee perception of advisor support suggest that this short module is an effective method of providing scientists with efficient and meaningful exposure to business concepts. © 2017 K. A. Petrie et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http

  8. Quantifying and managing Scope 3 (Travel) carbon emissions in a UK university

    OpenAIRE

    Chelliah, JR

    2016-01-01

    Purpose:\\ud The Higher Education Statistics Agency requires Higher Education Institutes to reporting their Scope 3 (Travel) carbon emissions effective from January 2015 to show leadership in carbon reporting perspectives. This research contribution is to new knowledge and management processes involves the designing and implementing a hybrid environmental management system(EMS) for Scope 3 (Travel) carbon emissions accountability, developing new quantification tools and reporting by adopting G...

  9. Putting "Service" into Library Staff Training: A Library Manager's Training Guide. LAMA Occasional Papers Series. A Patron-Centered Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessler, Joanne M.

    This guide is built on librarianship training literature and customer service research from a variety of professions. It tells library managers how to identify and describe service ideals, to translate these ideals into realistic goals, and to lead new and experienced staff in fulfilling these service ideals. They are encouraged to focus the…

  10. Development of a Bilingual Training Tool to Train Dairy Workers on the Prevention and Management of Non-Ambulatory Cows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman-Muniz, Ivette N.; Van Metre, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Dairy cows at risk of becoming non-ambulatory or downers represent economic losses and animal well-being issues for the dairy industry. Colorado State University researchers and Extension faculty collaborated with Colorado's dairy industry to create a training tool for the early identification and management of cows at risk of becoming downers on…

  11. Agricultural management explains historic changes in regional soil carbon stocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wesemael, Bas; Paustian, Keith; Meersmans, Jeroen; Goidts, Esther; Barancikova, Gabriela; Easter, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Agriculture is considered to be among the economic sectors having the greatest greenhouse gas mitigation potential, largely via soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration. However, it remains a challenge to accurately quantify SOC stock changes at regional to national scales. SOC stock changes resulting from SOC inventory systems are only available for a few countries and the trends vary widely between studies. Process-based models can provide insight in the drivers of SOC changes, but accurate input data are currently not available at these spatial scales. Here we use measurements from a soil inventory dating from the 1960s and resampled in 2006 covering the major soil types and agricultural regions in Belgium together with region-specific land use and management data and a process-based model. The largest decreases in SOC stocks occurred in poorly drained grassland soils (clays and floodplain soils), consistent with drainage improvements since 1960. Large increases in SOC in well drained grassland soils appear to be a legacy effect of widespread conversion of cropland to grassland before 1960. SOC in cropland increased only in sandy lowland soils, driven by increasing manure additions. Modeled land use and management impacts accounted for more than 70% of the variation in observed SOC changes, and no bias could be demonstrated. There was no significant effect of climate trends since 1960 on observed SOC changes. SOC monitoring networks are being established in many countries. Our results demonstrate that detailed and long-term land management data are crucial to explain the observed SOC changes for such networks. PMID:20679194

  12. Training within integrated environmental and energy management; Efteruddannelse i integreret miljoe- og energiledelse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pommer, K. [Teknologisk Institut (Denmark)

    2006-05-19

    This report describes the results from the project Training of consultants and instructors within integrated environmental and energy management. The purpose was to develop a training programme to provide more knowledge for consultants and to promote the efforts regarding integrated systems. The training programme was planned, material developed and the courses tested in the period March 2003 to December 2004. At first one structure for the programme was developed, but because of lack of interest from potential participants the structure was changed. The second programme was interesting for potential participants, and material for the training was developed, the training was tested and the material revised according to the test. (au)

  13. Trends in management of the world's forests and impacts on carbon stocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard Birdsey; Yude. Pan

    2015-01-01

    Global forests are increasingly affected by land-use change, fragmentation, changing management objectives, and degradation. In this paper we broadly characterize trends in global forest area by intensity of management, and provide an overview of changes in global carbon stocks associated with managed forests. We discuss different interpretations of "management...

  14. The impact of health-management training programs in Latin America on job performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Díaz-Monsalve Sonia Janeth

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was undertaken in Mexico, Colombia, and El Salvador to determine the impact of a management training program on health managers' job performance. A quasi-experimental design was used where in the baseline study an intervention group of 85 district health managers in the three countries was compared with a control group of 71 managers who did not receive the training program. After the implementation of an 18-month training program (which included 5-day training workshops and a series of tasks to be carried out between the workshops, the outcome in terms of improved job performance (i.e. use of predefined management techniques was measured through twelve management performance indicators. The data collection tools were two questionnaires, participant observation in managers' workplaces, focus group discussions, staff interviews, and document analysis. In Mexico, the control group showed 8.3 times weaker management performance compared to the intervention group; in Colombia the value was 3.6 and in El Salvador 2.4. Factors associated with a successful training outcome were: (a training techniques, (b strengthening of enabling factors, and (c reinforcement mechanisms.

  15. Training future surgeons for management roles: the resident-surgeon-manager conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Waël C; Mulder, David S; Fried, Gerald M; Elhilali, Mostafa; Khwaja, Kosar A

    2012-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To demonstrate that senior surgical residents would benefit from focused training by professionals with management expertise. Although managerial skills are recognized as necessary for the successful establishment of a surgical practice, they are not often emphasized in traditional surgical residency curricula. DESIGN Senior residents from all surgical subspecialties at McGill University were invited to participate in a 1-day management seminar. Precourse questionnaires aimed at evaluating the residents' perceptions of their own managerial knowledge and preparedness were circulated. The seminar was then given in the form of interactive lectures and case-based discussions. The questionnaires were readministered at the end of the course, along with an evaluation form. Precourse and postcourse data were compared using the Freeman-Halton extension of the Fisher exact test to determine statistical significance (P < .05). SETTING McGill University Health Centre in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. PARTICIPANTS A total of 43 senior residents. RESULTS Before the course, the majority of residents (27 of 43 [63%]) thought that management instruction only happened "from time to time" in their respective programs. After the course, 15 residents (35%) felt that management topics were "well addressed," and 19 (44%) felt that management topics have been "very well addressed" (P < .01). Residents noted a significant improvement in their ability to perform the following skills after the course: giving feedback, delegating duties, coping with stress, effective learning, and effective teaching. On the ensemble of all managerial skills combined, 26 residents (60%) rated their performance as "good" or "excellent" after the course vs only 21 (49%) before the course (P = .02). Residents also noted a statistically significant improvement in their ability to perform the managerial duties necessary for the establishment of a surgical practice. CONCLUSIONS Surgical residency programs

  16. The role and responsibilities of management for the training and qualification of nuclear power plant personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mautner Markhof, F.

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide management-level personnel with an overview and understanding of their main role and responsibilities related to training, competence and qualification of NPP personnel. It addresses the responsibilities of various levels of management personnel, emphasizing performance excellence and effective management through successful dealing with key issues and problems

  17. 42 CFR 414.63 - Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management... SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.63 Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management..., payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training is made under the physician fee schedule in...

  18. New Roles and Training Models for Managers in the Printing and Communications Industry in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijhof, Wim J.; Streumer, Jan N.

    1998-01-01

    Interviews in five Dutch printing/communications firms, survey responses from 462 of 1069 managers, and a DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) process identified technical changes, skill needs, and management tasks in the industry. A new structure was developed for training managers in these roles: producer, innovator, motivator, administrator,…

  19. The effects of Crew Resource Management (CRM) training in airline maintenance: Results following three year's experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J. C.; Robertson, M. M.

    1995-01-01

    An airline maintenance department undertook a CRM training program to change its safety and operating culture. In 2 1/2 years this airline trained 2200 management staff and salaried professionals. Participants completed attitude surveys immediately before and after the training, as well as two months, six months, and one year afterward. On-site interviews were conducted to test and confirm the survey results. Comparing managers' attitudes immediately after their training with their pretraining attitudes showed significant improvement for three attitudes. A fourth attitude, assertiveness, improved significantly above the pretraining levels two months after training. The expected effect of the training on all four attitude scales did not change significantly thereafter. Participants' self-reported behaviors and interview comments confirmed their shift from passive to more active behaviors over time. Safety, efficiency, and dependability performance were measured before the onset of the training and for some 30 months afterward. Associations with subsequent performance were strongest with positive attitudes about sharing command (participation), assertiveness, and stress management when those attitudes were measured 2 and 12 months after the training. The two month follow-up survey results were especially strong and indicate that active behaviors learned from the CRM training consolidate and strengthen in the months immediately following training.

  20. Training Corporate Managers to Adopt a More Autonomy-Supportive Motivating Style toward Employees: An Intervention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardre, Patricia L.; Reeve, Johnmarshall

    2009-01-01

    Management style is treated in a variety of ways across the training and development literature. Yet few studies have tested the training-based malleability of management style in a for-profit, authentic work context. The present research tested whether or not training intervention would help managers adopt a more autonomy-supportive motivating…

  1. Assessing Water and Carbon Footprints for Sustainable Water Resource Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    The key points of this presentation are: (1) Water footprint and carbon footprint as two sustainability attributes in adaptations to climate and socioeconomic changes, (2) Necessary to evaluate carbon and water footprints relative to constraints in resource capacity, (3) Critical...

  2. Training frontline workforce on psychosis management: a prospective study of training effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørlie, Tore; Borg, Marit; Flage, Karin B; Kolbjørnsrud, Ole-Bjørn; Haugen, Gunnar B; Benth, Jūratė Šaltytė; Ruud, Torleif

    2015-01-01

    The care situation for persons experiencing severe mental illness is often complex and demands good coordination, communication, and interpersonal relationships among those involved from the primary and specialized mental health care systems. For 15 years, professional care providers from different service levels within the same geographical areas in Norway have been trained together in a 2-year local onsite training program with the aim of increasing skills, joint understanding, and collaboration in their work with individuals experiencing severe mental illness. The key aspects of competence addressed by the training program were measured at baseline, after 1 year, and at the end of the training period. Professional education and experience were also rated at baseline. Data were collected between 1999 and 2005 and were analyzed by estimating a linear mixed model. Results showed a significant increase in participants' experienced competence in all training goals, especially for the understanding of psychosis and relationship building. There was no significant variance at the program level, indicating consistent implementation of local programs. This prospective study indicates that the training program was successful in increasing perceived competence in the areas addressed, and training staff from different service levels together probably contributed to more collaboration. This training model still operates in Norway.

  3. Carbon storage, soil carbon dioxide efflux and water quality in three widths of piedmont streamside management zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erica F. Wadl; William Lakel; Michael Aust; John Seiler

    2010-01-01

    Streamside management zones (SMZs) are used to protect water quality. Monitoring carbon pools and fluxes in SMZs may a good indicator of the SMZ’s overall function and health. In this project we evaluated some of these pools and fluxes from three different SMZ widths (30.5, 15.3, and 7.6 m) in the Piedmont of Virginia. We quantified carbon storage in the soil (upper 10...

  4. Training Graduate and Undergraduate Students in Simulation and Risk Assessment for Carbon Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCray, John

    2013-09-30

    Capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) and injecting it into deep underground formations for storage (carbon capture and underground storage, or CCUS) is one way of reducing anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Gas or aqueous-phase leakage may occur due to transport via faults and fractures, through faulty well bores, or through leaky confining materials. Contaminants of concern include aqueous salts and dissolved solids, gaseous or aqueous-phase organic contaminants, and acidic gas or aqueous-phase fluids that can liberate metals from aquifer minerals. Understanding the mechanisms and parameters that can contribute to leakage of the CO2 and the ultimate impact on shallow water aquifers that overlie injection formations is an important step in evaluating the efficacy and risks associated with long-term CO2 storage. Three students were supported on the grant Training Graduate and Undergraduate Students in Simulation and Risk Assessment for Carbon Sequestration. These three students each examined a different aspect of simulation and risk assessment related to carbon dioxide sequestration and the potential impacts of CO2 leakage. Two performed numerical simulation studies, one to assess leakage rates as a function of fault and deep reservoir parameters and one to develop a method for quantitative risk assessment in the event of a CO2 leak and subsequent changes in groundwater chemistry. A third student performed an experimental evaluation of the potential for metal release from sandstone aquifers under simulated leakage conditions. This study has resulted in two student first-authored published papers {Siirila, 2012 #560}{Kirsch, 2014 #770} and one currently in preparation {Menke, In prep. #809}.

  5. Simulation-based crisis resource management training for pediatric critical care medicine: a review for instructors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Adam; Donoghue, Aaron; Gilfoyle, Elaine; Eppich, Walter

    2012-03-01

    To review the essential elements of crisis resource management and provide a resource for instructors by describing how to use simulation-based training to teach crisis resource management principles in pediatric acute care contexts. A MEDLINE-based literature source. OUTLINE OF REVIEW: This review is divided into three main sections: Background, Principles of Crisis Resource Management, and Tools and Resources. The background section provides the brief history and definition of crisis resource management. The next section describes all the essential elements of crisis resource management, including leadership and followership, communication, teamwork, resource use, and situational awareness. This is followed by a review of evidence supporting the use of simulation-based crisis resource management training in health care. The last section provides the resources necessary to develop crisis resource management training using a simulation-based approach. This includes a description of how to design pediatric simulation scenarios, how to effectively debrief, and a list of potential assessment tools that instructors can use to evaluate crisis resource management performance during simulation-based training. Crisis resource management principles form the foundation for efficient team functioning and subsequent error reduction in high-stakes environments such as acute care pediatrics. Effective instructor training is required for those programs wishing to teach these principles using simulation-based learning. Dissemination and integration of these principles into pediatric critical care practice has the potential for a tremendous impact on patient safety and outcomes.

  6. Conceptual design report, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly, K.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-11-09

    For the next 30 years, the main activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site will involve the management, handling, and cleanup of toxic substances. If the DOE is to meet its high standards of safety, the thousands of workers involved in these activities will need systematic training appropriate to their tasks and the risks associated with these tasks. Furthermore, emergency response for DOE shipments is the primary responsibility of state, tribal, and local governments. A collaborative training initiative with the DOE will strengthen emergency response at the Hanford Site and within the regional communities. Local and international labor has joined the Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) partnership, and will share in the HAMMER Training Center core programs and facilities using their own specialized trainers and training programs. The HAMMER Training Center will provide a centralized regional site dedicated to the training of hazardous material, emergency response, and fire fighting personnel.

  7. Conceptual design report, Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, K.E.

    1994-01-01

    For the next 30 years, the main activities at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site will involve the management, handling, and cleanup of toxic substances. If the DOE is to meet its high standards of safety, the thousands of workers involved in these activities will need systematic training appropriate to their tasks and the risks associated with these tasks. Furthermore, emergency response for DOE shipments is the primary responsibility of state, tribal, and local governments. A collaborative training initiative with the DOE will strengthen emergency response at the Hanford Site and within the regional communities. Local and international labor has joined the Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) partnership, and will share in the HAMMER Training Center core programs and facilities using their own specialized trainers and training programs. The HAMMER Training Center will provide a centralized regional site dedicated to the training of hazardous material, emergency response, and fire fighting personnel

  8. A study on the effectiveness of task manager board game as a training tool in managing project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Shahrul Azmi Mohd; Radzi, Shanizan Herman Md; Din, Sharifah Nadera Syed; Khalid, Nurhafizah

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays, games have become one of the useful tools in training. Many instructors choose to use games to enhance the way of delivering the subject. Failure to apply the suitable tool in training will lead to discouragement in learning and causing waste to the resources. An effective game will help the student understand the concept quickly. It can also help students to get involve in experiential learning where the student can manage and solve the problem as in the actual situation. This study will focus on the effectiveness of board game as a training tool for managing projects. This game has 4 tasks to be completed by students. They will be divided into a group of 4 or 5. Two methods are used in this study, pilot test, and post-test. These methods are chosen to analyze the effectiveness of using Task Manager Board Game as a teaching tool and the improvement of student's knowledge in project management. Three sub-components assessed were motivation, user experience and learning using case studies on Kirkpatrick's level one base on the perception of the students. The result indicated that the use of Task Manager board game as a training tool for managing project has a positive impact on students. It helps students to experience the situation of managing projects. It is one of the easiest ways for improving time management, human resources and communication skill.

  9. The Influence of Group Training in the Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management Program on Preschool Teachers' Classroom Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, John S.; Tiret, Holly B.; Bender, Stacy L.; Benson, Laurie

    2011-01-01

    This study examined changes in preschool teachers' perceptions of classroom management strategies following group training in the recently revised Incredible Years Teacher Classroom Management Program (C. Webster-Stratton, 2006). The authors used a pre/post follow-up design across 2 groups that each met for 8 sessions over an 8-10-week period for…

  10. Simulation-Based Tool for Traffic Management Training, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Both the current NAS, as well as NextGen, need successful use of advanced tools. Successful training is required today because more information gathering and...

  11. Simulation-Based Tool for Traffic Management Training, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Both the current NAS, as well as NextGen, need successful use of advanced tools. Successful training is required today because more information gathering and...

  12. Calming the campus: training school staff and crisis teams to manage student behavior during emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kendall

    2007-01-01

    Conversations with school and crisis personnel following large scale emergencies in and around schools, such as shootings, wildfires, and the attack on the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001, indicated a need for pre-incident training in managing student behavior during emergencies. This article outlines a training program of this kind and offers suggestions regarding both content and process of this training. The suggestions follow discussion of the unique context and needs of the school setting.

  13. Comparing hands-on and video training for postpartum hemorrhage management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Cecilia; Sørensen, Bjarke Lund; Sørensen, Jette Led

    2014-01-01

    , pass rates improved significantly. No significant differences in performance score or pass rates were found between the two methods. The findings indicate that postpartum hemorrhage management training by mobile media might be just as effective as conventional hands-on training and a feasible way...... to overcome the outreach gap in sub-Saharan Africa's rural areas, where peripheral health facilities are generally difficult to reach with conventional training programs....

  14. Space Flight Resource Management Training for International Space Station Flight Controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, William S.

    2011-01-01

    Training includes both SFRM-dedicated lessons and SFRM training embedded into technical lessons. Goal is to reduce certification times by 50% and integrated simulations by 75-90%. SFRM is practiced, evaluated and debriefed in part task trainers and full-task simulation lessons. SFRM model and training are constantly being evaluated against student/management feedback, best practices from industry/ military, and latest research.

  15. Preparing pharmacists to deliver a targeted service in hypertension management: evaluation of an interprofessional training program

    OpenAIRE

    Bajorek, Beata V.; Lemay, Kate S.; Magin, Parker J.; Roberts, Christopher; Krass, Ines; Armour, Carol L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-adherence to medicines by patients and suboptimal prescribing by clinicians underpin poor blood pressure (BP) control in hypertension. In this study, a training program was designed to enable community pharmacists to deliver a service in hypertension management targeting therapeutic adjustments and medication adherence. A comprehensive evaluation of the training program was undertaken. Methods Tailored training comprising a self-directed pre-work manual, practical workshop (usi...

  16. The effect of additional dead space on respiratory exchange ratio and carbon dioxide production due to training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolka, Lukasz; Borkowski, Jacek; Zaton, Marek

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of implementing additional respiratory dead space during cycloergometry-based aerobic training. The primary outcome measures were respiratory exchange ratio (RER) and carbon dioxide production (VCO2). Two groups of young healthy males: Experimental (Exp, n = 15) and Control (Con, n = 15), participated in this study. The training consisted of 12 sessions, performed twice a week for 6 weeks. A single training session consisted of continuous, constant-rate exercise on a cycle ergometer at 60% of VO2max which was maintained for 30 minutes. Subjects in Exp group were breathing through additional respiratory dead space (1200ml), while subjects in Con group were breathing without additional dead space. Pre-test and two post-training incremental exercise tests were performed for the detection of gas exchange variables. In all training sessions, pCO2 was higher and blood pH was lower in the Exp group (p exchange ratio and carbon dioxide production.In all training sessions, respiratory acidosis was gained by experimental group only.No significant difference in RER and VCO2 between experimental and control group due to the trainings.The lack of difference in post-training values of RER and VCO2 between groups means absence of inhibition in glycolysis and glycogenolysis during exercise with additional dead space.

  17. Managing Carbon on Federal Public Lands: Opportunities and Challenges in Southwestern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilling, Lisa; Kelsey, Katharine C.; Fernandez, Daniel P.; Huang, Yin D.; Milford, Jana B.; Neff, Jason C.

    2016-08-01

    Federal lands in the United States have been identified as important areas where forests could be managed to enhance carbon storage and help mitigate climate change. However, there has been little work examining the context for decision making for carbon in a multiple-use public land environment, and how science can support decision making. This case study of the San Juan National Forest and the Bureau of Land Management Tres Rios Field Office in southwestern Colorado examines whether land managers in these offices have adequate tools, information, and management flexibility to practice effective carbon stewardship. To understand how carbon was distributed on the management landscape we added a newly developed carbon map for the SJNF-TRFO area based on Landsat TM texture information (Kelsey and Neff in Remote Sens 6:6407-6422. doi: 10.3390/rs6076407, 2014). We estimate that only about 22 % of the aboveground carbon in the SJNF-TRFO is in areas designated for active management, whereas about 38 % is in areas with limited management opportunities, and 29 % is in areas where natural processes should dominate. To project the effects of forest management actions on carbon storage, staff of the SJNF are expected to use the Forest Vegetation Simulator (FVS) and extensions. While identifying FVS as the best tool generally available for this purpose, the users and developers we interviewed highlighted the limitations of applying an empirically based model over long time horizons. Future research to improve information on carbon storage should focus on locations and types of vegetation where carbon management is feasible and aligns with other management priorities.

  18. Management by Agreement: Its Impact on Training. Opening Address of the BACIE Annual Conference 1973

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadbury, G. A. H.

    1974-01-01

    One of the keys to decision making in business and industry today is through a proper balance of participation. Without participation, innovation and change cannot take place. Proper management education and training are the vital components of promoting participation. (DS)

  19. Financial Management: Opportunities to Improve Experience and Training of Key Navy Comptrollers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1997-01-01

    .... Furthermore, accurate financial data are needed for measuring performance under GPRA. One key factor in agencies being able to achieve these objectives will be having trained and experienced financial management staff in key positions...

  20. Planning and management support for NPP personnel SAT-based training programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziakova, M.

    1998-01-01

    Planning and management support for NPP personnel SAT-based training programmes is described for the following job positions: reactor operator; turbine operator; reactor maintenance worker; pump maintenance worker; chemistry foreman; health physics foreman; electric maintenance worker

  1. Preparing pharmacists to deliver a targeted service in hypertension management: evaluation of an interprofessional training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajorek, Beata V; Lemay, Kate S; Magin, Parker J; Roberts, Christopher; Krass, Ines; Armour, Carol L

    2015-09-28

    Non-adherence to medicines by patients and suboptimal prescribing by clinicians underpin poor blood pressure (BP) control in hypertension. In this study, a training program was designed to enable community pharmacists to deliver a service in hypertension management targeting therapeutic adjustments and medication adherence. A comprehensive evaluation of the training program was undertaken. Tailored training comprising a self-directed pre-work manual, practical workshop (using real patients), and practice scenarios, was developed and delivered by an inter-professional team (pharmacists, GPs). Supported by practical and written assessment, the training focused on the principles of BP management, BP measurement skills, and adherence strategies. Pharmacists' experience of the training (expectations, content, format, relevance) was evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively. Immediate feedback was obtained via a questionnaire comprising Likert scales (1 = "very well" to 7 = "poor") and open-ended questions. Further in-depth qualitative evaluation was undertaken via semi-structured interviews several months post-training (and post service implementation). Seventeen pharmacists were recruited, trained and assessed as competent. All were highly satisfied with the training; other than the 'amount of information provided' (median score = 5, "just right"), all aspects of training attained the most positive score of '1'. Pharmacists most valued the integrated team-based approach, GP involvement, and inclusion of real patients, as well as the pre-reading manual, BP measurement workshop, and case studies (simulation). Post-implementation the interviews highlighted that comprehensive training increased pharmacists' confidence in providing the service, however, training of other pharmacy staff and patient recruitment strategies were highlighted as a need in future. Structured, multi-modal training involving simulated and inter-professional learning is effective in preparing

  2. A Conceptual Model for Employer Training to Manage Employee Counter-Productive Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Naomi Spickard

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a model for employer training to manage employees who possess counter-productive behaviors. With the increasing encouragement for employers to hire without discriminating, the number of individuals with disabilities in the workforce will rise. There is limited training in universities and businesses to…

  3. [Training of managers and politicians in ethics of science and ethics of public health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudry, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    First of all, I will identify the various possible objectives of training in ethics of science and health. I will then examine the institutional context in which managers and politicians act in the light of what is done in Quebec. This analysis will lead me to defend the thesis that in Quebec at least such training is necessary.

  4. Determining Successful Approaches for a Total Quality Management Training Program for Tripler Army Medical Center, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-01

    job in the private sector ."’ 23) WHAT HAVE YOU LEARNED FROM THE TQM IMPLEMENTATION PROCESS? (LESSONS LEARNED?) 1) Top management support. 2) JIT...wanted ’blanket training’ for TQM familiarization. 10) HOW WAS YOUR TQM TRAINING PROGRAM FORMULATED (INTERNAL ASSESSMENT)? "We used a quality of worklife

  5. Financial Management and Job Social Skills Training Components in a Summer Business Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, Brad; Conway, Debbie; Beisecker, Monica; Murphy, Heather; Farley, Alisha; Waite, Melissa; Gugino, Kristin; Knatz, Danielle; Lopez-Frank, Carolina; Burns, Jack; Madison, Suzanne; Shorty, Carrie

    2005-01-01

    Ninety-two adolescents, predominantly ethnic minority high school students, participated in a structured Summer Business Institute (SBI). Participating youth were randomly assigned to receive either job social skills or financial management skills training components. Students who additionally received the job social skills training component were…

  6. STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGY FOR MANAGING HIGH-CARBON ASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Hurt; Eric Suuberg; John Veranth; Xu Chen; Indrek Kulaots

    2004-02-13

    The overall objective of the present project was to identify and assess strategies and solutions for the management of industry problems related to carbon in ash. Specific issues addressed included: (1) the effect of parent fuel selection on ash properties and adsorptivity, including a first ever examination of the air entrainment behavior of ashes from alternative (non-coal) fuels; (2) the effect of various low-NOx firing modes on ash properties and adsorptivity based on pilot-plant studies; and (3) the kinetics and mechanism of ash ozonation. This laboratory data has provided scientific and engineering support and underpinning for parallel process development activities. The development work on the ash ozonation process has now transitioned into a scale-up and commercialization project involving a multi-industry team and scheduled to begin in 2004. This report describes and documents the laboratory and pilot-scale work in the above three areas done at Brown University and the University of Utah during this three-year project.

  7. Qualification and training of the trainers, verifiers, licensors and upper management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recker, M.

    1986-01-01

    Within the scope of technology transfer, also the know-how transfer should be included. It is no longer sufficient to train once the operating personnel, retraining and training of new employees must be performed during all the time. For the performance of training, qualified trainers and instructors should be available. A suitable training program will be explained in detail. To operate a plant effectively, it is important to train the operating personnel, but of the same importance is also to have a well functioning management, which will be achieved by training methods and programs to be defined in detail. The adherence to rules and regulations has to be controlled by authorities. The duties and the respective training programs are shown in this report. (orig.)

  8. Integrating Space Flight Resource Management Skills into Technical Lessons for International Space Station Flight Controller Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Evelyn

    2008-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center s (JSC) International Space Station (ISS) Space Flight Resource Management (SFRM) training program is designed to teach the team skills required to be an effective flight controller. It was adapted from the SFRM training given to Shuttle flight controllers to fit the needs of a "24 hours a day/365 days a year" flight controller. More recently, the length reduction of technical training flows for ISS flight controllers impacted the number of opportunities for fully integrated team scenario based training, where most SFRM training occurred. Thus, the ISS SFRM training program is evolving yet again, using a new approach of teaching and evaluating SFRM alongside of technical materials. Because there are very few models in other industries that have successfully tied team and technical skills together, challenges are arising. Despite this, the Mission Operations Directorate of NASA s JSC is committed to implementing this integrated training approach because of the anticipated benefits.

  9. Training plan : Dallas Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) demonstration project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The Dallas Area Rapid Transit (DART) is leading the US 75 Integrated Corridor Management (ICM) Demonstration Project for the Dallas region. Coordinated corridor operations and management is predicated on being able to share transportation information...

  10. Does training managers enhance the effects of implementing teamworking? A longitudinal, mixed methods field study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Karina; Randall, R; Christensen, KB

    2010-01-01

    , transformational leadership and change management on the outcomes of team implementation. We used a combination of quantitative and qualitative research methods to isolate the impact of manager training on the success of the teamwork intervention. The results identified some significant, but modest, incremental......The introduction of team-working often has positive effects on team members but places significant new demands on managers. Unfortunately, little research has examined whether the impact of the intervention may be enhanced by providing managers with training during the change process. To test...

  11. Functional design criteria for the Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response (HAMMER) Training Center. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, P.K.

    1995-01-01

    Within the United States, there are few hands-on training centers capable of providing integrated technical training within a practical application environment. Currently, there are no training facilities that offer both radioactive and chemical hazardous response training. There are no hands-on training centers that provide training for both hazardous material operations and emergency response that also operate as a partnership between organized labor, state agencies, tribes, and local emergency responders within the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Available facilities appear grossly inadequate for training the thousands of people at Hanford, and throughout the Pacific Northwest, who are required to qualify under nationally-mandated requirements. It is estimated that 4,000 workers at the Hanford Site alone need hands-on training. Throughout the Pacific Northwest, the potential target audience would be over 30,000 public sector emergency response personnel, as well as another 10,000 clean-up workers represented by organized labor. The HAMMER Training Center will be an interagency-sponsored training center. It will be designed, built, and operated to ensure that clean-up workers, fire fighters, and public sector management and emergency response personnel are trained to handle accidental spills of hazardous materials. Training will cover wastes at clean-up sites, and in jurisdictions along the transportation corridors, to effectively protect human life, property, and the environment

  12. Evaluation of Soil Quality Using Labile Organic Carbon and Carbon Management Indices in Agricultural Lands of Neyriz, Fars Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahid Salmanpour

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Soil organic matter is considered as an indicator of soil quality, because of its role on the stability of soil structure, water holding capacity, microbial activity, storage and release of nutrients. Although changes and trends of organic matter are assessed on the basis of organic carbon, it responds slowly to changes of soil management. Therefore, identifying sensitive components of organic carbon such as carbon labile lead to better understanding of the effect of land use change and soil management on soil quality. The main components of sustainable agriculture in arid and semi-arid regions are the amount of water; and soil and water salinity. Water deficit and irrigation with saline water are important limiting factors for cropping and result in adverse effects on soil properties and soil quality. Soil carbon changes is a function of addition of plant debris and removal of it from soil by its decomposition. If the amount of organic carbon significantly reduced due to the degradation of the soil physical and chemical properties and soil quality, agricultural production will face serious problems. To this end, this study was done to evaluate soil quality using soil labile carbon and soil carbon management indices in some agricultural lands of Neyriz area, Fars province, Iran. Materials and Methods: Five fields were selected in two regions, Dehfazel and Tal-e-mahtabi, consisted of irrigated wheat and barley with different amount of irrigation water and water salinity levels. Three farms were located in Dehfazel and two farms in Tal-e-Mahtabi region. In each farm, three points were randomly selected and soil samples were collected from 0-40 cm of the surface layer. Plant samples were taken from a 1x1 square meter and grain crop yield was calculated per hectare. Water samples were obtained in each region from the wells at the last irrigation. Physical and chemical characteristics of the soil and water samples were determined. Soil

  13. Military Training: Management Actions Needed to Enhance DOD's Investment in the Joint National Training Capability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    St. Laurent, Janet; Durland, Laura; Harrison, Fred; Faley, Joe; Anderson, Bonita; Watson, Angela; Song, Yong; Keith, Kevin; Ditto, Susan; Shea, Rebecca

    2006-01-01

    .... While DOD's initial training transformation assessment set a basic framework for measuring future program performance, DOD has not developed a strategy to evaluate the overall impact of the JNTC...

  14. Forest sector carbon analyses support land management planning and projects: Assessing the influence of anthropogenic and natural factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexa J. Dugan; Richard Birdsey; Sean P. Healey; Yude Pan; Fangmin Zhang; Gang Mo; Jing Chen; Christopher W. Woodall; Alexander J. Hernandez; Kevin McCullough; James B. McCarter; Crystal L. Raymond; Karen. Dante-Wood

    2017-01-01

    Management of forest carbon stocks on public lands is critical to maintaining or enhancing carbon dioxide removal from the atmosphere. Acknowledging this, an array of federal regulations and policies have emerged that requires US National Forests to report baseline carbon stocks and changes due to disturbance and management and assess how management activities and...

  15. Quantifying, Understanding and Managing the Carbon Cycle in the Next Decades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canadell, J.G.; Ciais, P.; Cox, P.; Heimann, M.

    2004-01-01

    The human perturbation of the carbon cycle via the release of fossil CO2 and land use change is now well documented and agreed to be the principal cause of climate change. We address three fundamental research areas that require major development if we were to provide policy relevant knowledge for managing the carbon-climate system over the next few decades. The three research areas are: (1) carbon observations and multiple constraint data assimilation; (2) vulnerability of the carbon-climate system; and (3) carbon sequestration and sustainable development

  16. Nutrition training improves health workers' nutrition knowledge and competence to manage child undernutrition: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunguya, Bruno F; Poudel, Krishna C; Mlunde, Linda B; Urassa, David P; Yasuoka, Junko; Jimba, Masamine

    2013-09-24

    Medical and nursing education lack adequate practical nutrition training to fit the clinical reality that health workers face in their practices. Such a deficit creates health workers with poor nutrition knowledge and child undernutrition management practices. In-service nutrition training can help to fill this gap. However, no systematic review has examined its collective effectiveness. We thus conducted this study to examine the effectiveness of in-service nutrition training on health workers' nutrition knowledge, counseling skills, and child undernutrition management practices. We conducted a literature search on nutrition interventions from PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, ISI Web of Knowledge, and World Health Organization regional databases. The outcome variables were nutrition knowledge, nutrition-counseling skills, and undernutrition management practices of health workers. Due to heterogeneity, we conducted only descriptive analyses. Out of 3910 retrieved articles, 25 were selected as eligible for the final analysis. A total of 18 studies evaluated health workers' nutrition knowledge and showed improvement after training. A total of 12 studies with nutrition counseling as the outcome variable also showed improvement among the trained health workers. Sixteen studies evaluated health workers' child undernutrition management practices. In all such studies, child undernutrition management practices and competence of health workers improved after the nutrition training intervention. In-service nutrition training improves quality of health workers by rendering them more knowledge and competence to manage nutrition-related conditions, especially child undernutrition. In-service nutrition training interventions can help to fill the gap created by the lack of adequate nutrition training in the existing medical and nursing education system. In this way, steps can be taken toward improving the overall nutritional status of the child population.

  17. Role and responsibilities of management in NPP personnel training and competence. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The main aim and result of this seminar was imparting knowledge to various levels of Paks NPP management on their special tasks and responsibilities to achieve personnel competence, which include: meeting relevant regulatory and other requirements; defining the qualifications for NPP personnel jobs; training using systematic approach to training to attain the required level of qualification and competence of all NPP personnel, which includes management, operations, maintenance and technical support personnel and others; recruiting and retaining qualified personnel, including career development; supporting the training of all personnel on their responsibilities for introducing, maintaining and improving safety. Refs, figs and tabs

  18. Nuclear training as the integral part of managing of human resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazennov, A.Yu.; )

    2010-01-01

    The author reports on the personnel training that is one of important measures to achieve and maintain the required competence of various categories of nuclear facility employees, including nuclear power plants, and one of important activities in the framework of overall management system to improve organizational and human performance of a nuclear facility. The role of the IAEA in the assistance in the development of training systems for nuclear power plants is described, in particular the activity of the Technical Working Group on Managing Human Resources in the Field of Nuclear Energy (TWG-MHR) and The Education and Training Support Group (ETSG) [ru

  19. Crisis Management training at nuclear facilities: Simulations in bomb threats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, L.

    1993-01-01

    Substantial enhancements to the study of the theoretical and applied foundations of crisis management have been achieved in recent years. Whereas risk managers study 'the probability that a harmful consequence of a particular event will occur during a given time,' crisis management explores unexpected, potentially negative events with short or long-term implications involving injury to life or property. In this regard, crisis management focuses on the mitigation of organizational after-shock; risk management is preventative in scope. While the risk management function of nuclear facilities has been addressed widely in the literature, comparatively little has been written that addresses the myriad, interdisciplinary challenges associated with managing organizational disarray. The issue of crisis management has assumed paramount importance in recent years due to unexpected geopolitical events (e.g., Persian Gulf War), rampant violence facing organizations (e.g., mass shootings in Killeen, Texas and several U.S. Post Offices) and an acceleration of serious crisis impacting large organizations (e.g., Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, Exxon Valdez, NASA Challenger disaster). Without question, the public is increasingly demanding that organizational managers possess a fundamental understanding of crisis management and its principal underpinnings: effective public communication regarding the event and a return to normalcy, employee and public safety and evacuation measures, and other mitigation measures will protect life and property

  20. Computer-aided training exam creation and personnel records management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, R.K.; Louche, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    A problem has existed in nuclear power plant training departments about how to choose questions for examinations without instructor bias, how to permanently store this exam so that it can be reconstructed, how to statistically analyze class, instructor, and student performance, and how to keep accurate, easily accessible records of all training. The design of the software package discussed in the paper is such that a complete record of classes, quizzes, exams, instructors, and analysis is available for each trainee. The need for classes is automatically available from the computer with randomly created exams available on request

  1. IAEA activities and main achievements on human resource management and training of nuclear power plant personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kossilov, A.

    2002-01-01

    The Nuclear Power Engineering Section is responsible for implementation of the Agency's sub-programme on Engineering and Management Support for Competitive Nuclear Power. The objectives of the sub-programme is to increase Member State capabilities in utilizing the best engineering and management practices for improving NPP performance and competitiveness, optimizing plant service life and decommissioning and strengthening nuclear power infrastructure. NPES' main activities cover: Nuclear power infrastructure, Knowledge management, Personal training and qualification, Quality Management and QA, NPP life management including databases, Modern NPP control and instrumentation, and NPP performance management

  2. A conceptual framework for cost management training in the Limpopo Province of South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jooste, Karien; Mothiba, Tebogo Maria

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes the perceptions of nurse managers about their dual role in nursing units as cost centres. The tertiary hospital in the Limpopo province is the first institution to appoint nurse managers with a dual role in cost centres. The development of a conceptual framework for a context-specific programme for Cost Centre Managers is the first of its nature in South Africa. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive design was followed. The target population included nurse managers (n = 35) formally appointed as cost centre managers with a dual role of delivering quality care and cost management. A focus group and individual interviews were conducted until data saturation occurred. Personal and professional distress, an empowering potential of being a cost centre manager, and the need for decentralized cost centre management were indicated as barriers for nurse managers that led to a framework for a context-specific training programme. There is a need for a context-specific training programme for cost centre managers in a hospital with cost centres. The training of cost centre managers for their dual role in cost centres could enhance cost effectiveness, quality care and staff satisfaction. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Breakaway technique training as a means of increasing confidence in managing aggression in neuroscience nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamont, Scott; Brunero, Scott; Bailey, Alanah; Woods, Karen

    2012-08-01

    The objective of this paper was to evaluate breakaway technique training with neuroscience nursing staff as a measure of increased confidence and safety in managing aggression. A quasi experimental design was used in a sample of neuroscience nursing staff (n=31), participating in 2×1h breakaway technique workshops. The workshops consisted of supervised skills training in safe breakaway techniques. A pre- and postintervention-matched questionnaire measuring confidence and safety around managing aggressive patients, and exposure to and confidence in dealing with breakaways, was self administered. Statistically significant increases in confidence and safety in working with aggressive patients, and confidence levels for safe breakaways were reported. Qualitative comments demonstrated a desire for ongoing skills workshops. This study provides early evidence of the importance of incorporating breakaway training into existing training programs which aim to minimise and manage aggression and violence in generalist settings.

  4. Crew resource management training within the automotive industry: does it work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, Nicki; Robelski, Swantje; Hoeger, Rainer

    2010-04-01

    This article presents the development, implementation, and evaluation of a crew resource management (CRM) training program specifically designed for employees within the automotive industry. The central objective of this training program was to improve communication, teamwork, and stress management skills as well to increase the workers' situational awareness of potential errors that can occur during the production process. Participants in the training program of this study were 80 employees, all of whom were working in a production unit for gearbox manufacturing. Effectiveness of the CRM training course was evaluated two times (1 month and 6 months after the training program). The results showed a significant improvement in a wide range of CRM-relevant categories, especially in teamwork-related attitudes, in addition to an increase in the workers' situational awareness after the training program. On the basis of the results, it can be stated that CRM training, which was originally developed for the aviation industry, can be transferred to the automotive industry. However, because of the lack of behavioral observations, these effects are limited to CRM attitudes and knowledge changes. Several recommendations for future research and training development in the field of human factors training are made.

  5. The Effect of Stress Management Training on Hope in Hemodialysis Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorgholami, Farzad; Abdollahifard, Sareh; Zamani, Marzieh; Kargar Jahromi, Marzieh; Badiyepeyma Jahromi, Zohreh

    2015-11-18

    Chronic renal failure exposes patients to the risk of several complications, which will affect every aspect of patient's life, and eventually his hope. This study aims to determine the effect of stress management group training on hope in hemodialysis patients. In this quasi-experimental single-blind study, 50 patients with renal failure undergoing hemodialysis at Motahari Hospital in Jahrom were randomly divided into stress management training and control groups. Sampling was purposive, and patients in stress management training group received 60-minute in-person training by the researcher (in groups of 5 to 8 patients) before dialysis, over 5 sessions, lasting 8 weeks, and a researcher-made training booklet was made available to them in the first session. Patients in the control group received routine training given to all patients in hemodialysis department. Patients' hope was recorded before and after intervention. Data collection tools included demographic details form, checklist of problems of hemodialysis patients and Miller hope scale (MHS). Data were analyzed in SPSS-18, using Chi-square, one-way analysis of variance, and paired t-test. Fifty patients were studied in two groups of 25 each. No significant difference was observed between the two groups in terms of age, gender, or hope before intervention. After 8 weeks of training, hope reduced from 95.92±12.63 to 91.16±11.06 (P=0.404) in the control group, and increased from 97.24±11.16 to 170.96±7.99 (P=0.001) in the stress management training group. Significant differences were observed between the two groups in hope scores after the intervention. Stress management training by nurses significantly increased hope in hemodialysis patients. This low cost intervention can be used to improve hope in hemodialysis patients.

  6. Research Needs for Carbon Management in Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negra, C.; Lovejoy, T.; Ojima, D. S.; Ashton, R.; Havemann, T.; Eaton, J.

    2009-12-01

    Improved management of terrestrial carbon in agriculture, forestry, and other land use sectors is a necessary part of climate change mitigation. It is likely that governments will agree in Copenhagen in December 2009 to incentives for improved management of some forms of terrestrial carbon, including maintaining existing terrestrial carbon (e.g., avoiding deforestation) and creating new terrestrial carbon (e.g., afforestation, soil management). To translate incentives into changes in land management and terrestrial carbon stocks, a robust technical and scientific information base is required. All terrestrial carbon pools (and other greenhouse gases from the terrestrial system) that interact with the atmosphere at timescales less than centuries, and all land uses, have documented mitigation potential, however, most activity has focused on above-ground forest biomass. Despite research advances in understanding emissions reduction and sequestration associated with different land management techniques, there has not yet been broad-scale implementation of land-based mitigation activity in croplands, peatlands, grasslands and other land uses. To maximize long-term global terrestrial carbon volumes, further development of relevant data, methodologies and technologies are needed to complement policy and financial incentives. The Terrestrial Carbon Group, in partnership with UN-REDD agencies, the World Bank and CGIAR institutions, is reviewing literature, convening leading experts and surveying key research institutions to develop a Roadmap for Terrestrial Carbon: Research Needs for Implementation of Carbon Management in Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Uses. This work will summarize the existing knowledge base for emissions reductions and sequestration through land management as well as the current availability of tools and methods for measurement and monitoring of terrestrial carbon. Preliminary findings indicate a number of areas for future work. Enhanced information

  7. Forest management and carbon sequestration in the Mediterranean region: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz-Peinado, R.; Bravo-Oviedo, A.; López-Senespleda, E.; Bravo, F.; Río, M. Del

    2017-01-01

    Aim of the study: To review and acknowledge the value of carbon sequestration by forest management in the Mediterranean area. Material and methods: We review the main effects of forest management by comparing the effects of silviculture systems (even-aged vs. uneven-aged stands, coppice systems, agroforestry systems), silvicultural options (thinning, rotation period, species composition), afforestation, harvesting, fire impact or effects of shrub layer on carbon sequestration in the Mediterranean area. Main results: We illustrate as forest management can clearly improve forest carbon sequestration amounts. We conclude that forest management is an effective way to maintain and enhance high carbon sequestration rates in order to cope with climate change and provision of ecosystem services. We also think that although much effort has been put into this topic research, there are still certain gaps that must be dealt with to increase our scientific knowledge and in turn transfer this knowledge to forest practitioners in order to achieve sustainable management aimed at mitigating climate change. Research highlights: It is important to underline the importance of forests in the carbon cycle as this role can be enhanced by forest managers through sustainable forest management. The effects of different management options or disturbances can be critical as regards mitigating climate change. Understanding the effects of forest management is even more important in the Mediterranean area, given that the current high climatic variability together with historical human exploitation and disturbance events make this area more vulnerable to the effects of climate change

  8. Forest management and carbon sequestration in the Mediterranean region: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Ruiz-Peinado

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: To review and acknowledge the value of carbon sequestration by forest management in the Mediterranean area. Material and methods: We review the main effects of forest management by comparing the effects of silvicultural systems (even-aged vs. uneven-aged stands, coppice systems, agroforestry systems, silvicultural options (thinning, rotation period, species composition, afforestation, harvesting, fire impact or effects of shrub layer on carbon sequestration in the Mediterranean area. Main results: We illustrate as forest management can clearly improve forest carbon sequestration amounts. We conclude that forest management is an effective way to maintain and enhance high carbon sequestration rates in order to cope with climate change and provision of ecosystem services. We also think that although much effort has been put into this topic research, there are still certain gaps that must be dealt with to increase our scientific knowledge and in turn transfer this knowledge to forest practitioners in order to achieve sustainable management aimed at mitigating climate change. Research highlights: It is important to underline the importance of forests in the carbon cycle as this role can be enhanced by forest managers through sustainable forest management. The effects of different management options or disturbances can be critical as regards mitigating climate change. Understanding the effects of forest management is even more important in the Mediterranean area, given that the current high climatic variability together with historical human exploitation and disturbance events make this area more vulnerable to the effects of climate change

  9. Forest management and carbon sequestration in the Mediterranean region: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Peinado, R.; Bravo-Oviedo, A.; López-Senespleda, E.; Bravo, F.; Río, M. Del

    2017-11-01

    Aim of the study: To review and acknowledge the value of carbon sequestration by forest management in the Mediterranean area. Material and methods: We review the main effects of forest management by comparing the effects of silviculture systems (even-aged vs. uneven-aged stands, coppice systems, agroforestry systems), silvicultural options (thinning, rotation period, species composition), afforestation, harvesting, fire impact or effects of shrub layer on carbon sequestration in the Mediterranean area. Main results: We illustrate as forest management can clearly improve forest carbon sequestration amounts. We conclude that forest management is an effective way to maintain and enhance high carbon sequestration rates in order to cope with climate change and provision of ecosystem services. We also think that although much effort has been put into this topic research, there are still certain gaps that must be dealt with to increase our scientific knowledge and in turn transfer this knowledge to forest practitioners in order to achieve sustainable management aimed at mitigating climate change. Research highlights: It is important to underline the importance of forests in the carbon cycle as this role can be enhanced by forest managers through sustainable forest management. The effects of different management options or disturbances can be critical as regards mitigating climate change. Understanding the effects of forest management is even more important in the Mediterranean area, given that the current high climatic variability together with historical human exploitation and disturbance events make this area more vulnerable to the effects of climate change.

  10. Soil carbon under perennial pastures; benchmarking the influence of pasture age and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgill, Susan E.; Spoljaric, Nancy; Kelly, Georgina

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports baseline soil carbon stocks from a field survey of 19 sites; 8 pairs/triplet in the Monaro region of New South Wales. Site comparisons were selected by the Monaro Farming Systems group to demonstrate the influence of land management on soil carbon, and included: nutrient management, liming, pasture age and cropping history. Soil carbon stocks varied with parent material and with land management. The fertilised (phosphorus) native perennial pasture had a greater stock of soil carbon compared with the unfertilised site; 46.8 vs 40.4 Mg.C.ha to 0.50 m. However, the introduced perennial pasture which had been limed had a lower stock of soil carbon compared with the unlimed site; 62.8 vs 66.7 Mg.C.ha to 0.50 m. There was a greater stock of soil carbon under two of the three younger (35 yr old) pastures. Cropped sites did not have lower soil carbon stocks at all sites; however, this survey was conducted after three years of above average annual rainfall and most sites had been cropped for less than three years. At all sites more than 20% of the total carbon stock to 0.50 m was in the 0.30 to 0.50 m soil layer highlighting the importance of considering this soil layer when investigating the implications of land management on soil carbon. Our baseline data indicates that nutrient management may increase soil carbon under perennial pastures and highlights the importance of perennial pastures for soil carbon sequestration regardless of age.

  11. Carbon Footprint Management of Road Freight Transport under the Carbon Emission Trading Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Growing concern over environmental issues has considerably increased the number of regulations and legislation that aim to curb carbon emissions. Carbon emission trading mechanism, which is one of the most effective means, has been broadly adopted by several countries. This paper presents a road truck routing problem under the carbon emission trading mechanism. By introducing a calculation method of carbon emissions that considers the load and speed of the vehicle among other factors, a road truck routing optimizing model under the cap and trade mechanism based on the Travelling Salesman Problem (TSP is described. Compared with the classical TSP model that only considers the economic cost, this model suggests that the truck routing decision under the cap and trade mechanism is more effective in reducing carbon emissions. A modified tabu search algorithm is also proposed to obtain solutions within a reasonable amount of computation time. We theoretically and numerically examine the impacts of carbon trading, carbon cap, and carbon price on truck routing decision, carbon emissions, and total cost. From the results of numerical experiments, we derive interesting observations about how to control the total cost and reduce carbon emissions.

  12. Assessing Water and Carbon Footprints for Green Water Resource Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    This slide presentation will focus on the following points: (1) Water footprint and carbon footprint are two criteria evaluating the greenness in urban development, (2) Two cases are examined and presented: water footprints in energy productions and carbon footprints in water ...

  13. Soil carbon management in large-scale Earth system modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olin, S.; Lindeskog, M.; Pugh, T. A. M.

    2015-01-01

    , carbon sequestration and nitrogen leaching from croplands are evaluated and discussed. Compared to the version of LPJ-GUESS that does not include land-use dynamics, estimates of soil carbon stocks and nitrogen leaching from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems were improved. Our model experiments allow us...

  14. Integrating climate change considerations into forest management tools and training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linda M. Nagel; Christopher W. Swanston; Maria K. Janowiak

    2010-01-01

    Silviculturists are currently facing the challenge of developing management strategies that meet broad ecological and social considerations in spite of a high degree of uncertainty in future climatic conditions. Forest managers need state-of-the-art knowledge about climate change and potential impacts to facilitate development of silvicultural objectives and...

  15. Microbiology Managers: Managerial Training in the RItrain Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, R Russell M; Lima, Nelson; Brooksbank, Cath; Guarini, Enrico; Pasterk, Markus; Lavitrano, Marialuisa

    2017-06-01

    Leaders of research infrastructures (RIs) in Europe who are scientists require competencies in management. RItrain has addressed this issue by identifying skills required, locating relevant courses and finding gaps, whilst establishing a Master of Management programme. We describe how one contributing microbiology RI determined the most relevant skills. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Workplace Safety and Health Improvements Through a Labor/Management Training and Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Bruce; Morawetz, John; Ruttenberg, Ruth; Workman, Rick

    2014-01-01

    Seven hundred thirty-nine workers at Merck's Stonewall plant in Elkton, Virginia, have a safer and healthier workplace because four of them were enthusiastic about health and safety training they received from the union's training center in Cincinnati, Ohio. What emerged was not only that all 739 plant employees received OSHA 10-hour General Industry training, but that it was delivered by “OSHA-authorized” members of the International Chemical Workers Union Council who worked at the plant. Merck created a new fulltime position in its Learning and Development Department and hired one of the four workers who had received the initial training. Strong plant leadership promoted discussions both during the training, in evaluation, and in newly energized joint labor-management meetings following the training. These discussions identified safety and health issues needing attention. Then, in a new spirit of trust and collaboration, major improvements occurred. PMID:24704812

  17. Workplace safety and health improvements through a labor/management training and collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Bruce; Morawetz, John; Ruttenberg, Ruth; Workman, Rick

    2013-01-01

    Seven hundred thirty-nine workers at Merck's Stonewall plant in Elkton, Virginia, have a safer and healthier workplace because four of them were enthusiastic about health and safety training they received from the union's training center in Cincinnati, Ohio. What emerged was not only that all 739 plant employees received OSHA 10-hour General Industry training, but that it was delivered by "OSHA-authorized" members of the International Chemical Workers Union Council who worked at the plant. Merck created a new full-time position in its Learning and Development Department and filled it with one of the four workers who had received the initial training. Strong plant leadership promoted discussions both during the training, in evaluation, and in newly energized joint labor-management meetings following the training. These discussions identified safety and health issues needing attention. Then, in a new spirit of trust and collaboration, major improvements occurred.

  18. Manure management in the (Sub-)Tropics : training manual for extension workers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teenstra, E.D.; Buisonjé, de F.E.; Ndambi, A.; Pelster, D.

    2015-01-01

    Having identified a general lack of knowledge about the value of livestock manure and integrated manure management at multiple levels in government and society, a concerted action led to the compilation of a training manual for extension workers on manure management in the (sub-)tropics. Covering

  19. Classroom Profiling Training: Increasing Preservice Teachers' Confidence and Knowledge of Classroom Management Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Cliff; Simoncini, Kym; Davidson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Classroom management is a serious concern for beginning teachers including preservice teachers. The Queensland Department of Education, Training and Employment (DETE) has developed the Essential Skills for Classroom Management (ESCM), a system of positive and pro-active strategies for maintaining supportive learning environments. In addition, the…

  20. Farm Management and Leadership. Numeracy. Level 1. Level 2. Level 3. Support Materials for Agricultural Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batman, Kangan; Gadd, Nick; Lucas, Michele

    This publication contains the three numeracy units of the three levels of Support Materials for Agricultural Training (SMAT) in farm management and leadership: Level 1 (starting), 2 (continuing), and 3 (completing). The units are designed to help the learner improve his or her numeracy skills needed to deal with farm management. SMAT materials can…

  1. Business and Management Development Training Program for Hispanic Women. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda (L.) and Associates, Bethesda, MD.

    A program was conducted to develop and motivate minority women, in particular Hispanic origin women, in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area to participate in business ownership and management. Offered at no cost to participants, the training program sought to equip potential managers with information and techniques in the fundamental…

  2. Lessons learned: Managing the development of a corporate Ada training project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmon, Linda F.

    1986-01-01

    The management lessons learned during the implementation of a corporate mandate to develop and deliver an effective Ada training program to all divisions are discussed. The management process involved in obtaining cooperation from all levels in the development of a corporate-wide project is described. The problem areas are identified along with some possible solutions.

  3. Effects of Crew Resource Management Training on Medical Errors in a Simulated Prehospital Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carhart, Elliot D.

    2012-01-01

    This applied dissertation investigated the effect of crew resource management (CRM) training on medical errors in a simulated prehospital setting. Specific areas addressed by this program included situational awareness, decision making, task management, teamwork, and communication. This study is believed to be the first investigation of CRM…

  4. More explicit communication after classroom-based crew resource management training: results of a pragmatic trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek-van Noord, I.; Bruijne, M.C. de; Twisk, J.W.R.; Dyck, C. van; Wagner, C.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives: Aviation-based crew resource management trainings to optimize non-technical skills among professionals are often suggested for health care as a way to increase patient safety. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of a 2-day classroom-based crew resource management (CRM)

  5. More explicit communication after classroom-based crew resource management training: results of a pragmatic trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Noord, I.; de Bruijne, M.C.; Twisk, J.W.R.; van Dyck, C.; Wagner, C.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale, aims and objectives Aviation-based crew resource management trainings to optimize non-technical skills among professionals are often suggested for health care as a way to increase patient safety. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of a 2-day classroom-based crew resource management (CRM)

  6. Purchasing and Accounting. MAS-116. Waste Isolation Division (WID). Management and Supervisor Training (MAST) Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM.

    This learning module, which is part of a management and supervisor training program for managers and supervisors employed at the Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Division, is designed to prepare trainees to perform purchasing and accounting tasks efficiently and effectively. The first section is an introduction to the module. The next three…

  7. Technical Training Requirements of Middle Management in the Greek Textile and Clothing Industries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotinopoulou, K.; Manolopoulos, N.

    A case study of 16 companies in the Greek textile and clothing industry elicited the training needs of the industry's middle managers. The study concentrated on large and medium-sized work units, using a lengthy questionnaire. The study found that middle managers increasingly need to solve problems and ensure the reliability of new equipment and…

  8. Evaluation and Effectiveness of Pain Recognition and Management Training for Staff Working in Learning Disability Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Ellen; Dodd, Karen

    2011-01-01

    Following Beacroft & Dodd's (2009) audit of pain recognition and management within learning disability services in Surrey, it was recommended that learning disability services should receive training in pain recognition and management. Two hundred and seventy-five services were invited to participate, of which 197 services in Surrey accepted…

  9. Plant and Industry Experience. MAS-122. Waste Isolation Division (WID). Management and Supervisor Training (MAST) Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM.

    This learning module, which is part of a management and supervisor training program for managers and supervisors employed at the Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Division, is designed to prepare trainees to use plant and industry experience to improve plant safety and reliability. The following topics are covered in the module's individual…

  10. New Roles and training programs for managers in the communicating and printing industry in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhof, W.J.; Streumer, Jan

    1998-01-01

    The communications industry has been subject to radical changes in this decade. Managers working in this branch of industry need to adapt their management style to changing conditions. This study was carried out for the branch training and education institute in The Netherlands (STIVAKO) to provide

  11. Vocational Education and Training Manager Discursive Practices at the Frontline: Alternative Possibilities in a Victorian Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Annette

    2011-01-01

    This article looks at how the neoliberal reform process is affecting the professional identity of frontline managers in the Australian vocational education and training sector. The article examines how frontline managers are required to negotiate their working practices between their understandings and experiences as educators and the new…

  12. Crisis Management Simulation: Establishing a Dual Neurosurgery and Anesthesia Training Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciporen, Jeremy; Gillham, Haley; Noles, Michele; Dillman, Dawn; Baskerville, Mark; Haley, Caleb; Spight, Donn; Turner, Ryan C; Lucke-Wold, Brandon P

    2018-01-01

    Simulation training has been shown to be an effective teaching tool. Learner management of an intraoperative crisis such as a major cerebrovascular bleed requires effective teamwork, communication, and implementation of key skill sets at appropriate time points. This study establishes a first of a kind simulation experience in a neurosurgery/anesthesia resident (learners) team working together to manage an intraoperative crisis. Using a cadaveric cavernous carotid injury perfusion model, 7 neurosurgery and 6 anesthesia learners, were trained on appropriate vascular injury management using an endonasal endoscopic technique. Learners were evaluated on communication skills, crisis management algorithms, and implementation of appropriate skill sets at the right time. A preanatomic and postanatomic examination and postsimulation survey was administered to neurosurgery learners. Anesthesia learners provided posttraining evaluation through a tailored realism and teaching survey. Neurosurgery learners' anatomic examination score improved from presimulation (33.89%) to postsimulation (86.11%). No significant difference between learner specialties was observed for situation awareness, decision making, communications and teamwork, or leadership evaluations. Learners reported the simulation realistic, beneficial, and highly instructive. Realistic, first of kind, clinical simulation scenarios were presented to a neurosurgery/anesthesia resident team who worked together to manage an intraoperative crisis. Learners were effectively trained on crisis management, the importance of communication, and how to develop algorithms for future implementation in difficult scenarios. Learners were highly satisfied with the simulation training experience and requested that it be integrated more consistently into their residency training programs.

  13. Modelling the carbon cycle of grassland in the Netherlands under various management strategies and environmental conditions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol-van Dasselaar, van den A.; Lantinga, E.A.

    1995-01-01

    A simulation model of the grassland carbon cycle (CCGRASS) was developed to evaluate the long-term effects of different management strategies and various environmental conditions on carbon sequestration in a loam soil under permanent grassland in the Netherlands. The model predicted that the rate of

  14. Life cycle impacts of forest management and wood utilization on carbon mitigation : knowns and unknowns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce Lippke; Elaine Oneil; Rob Harrison; Kenneth Skog; Leif Gustavsson; Roger Sathre

    2011-01-01

    This review on research on life cycle carbon accounting examines the complexities in accounting for carbon emissions given the many different ways that wood is used. Recent objectives to increase the use of renewable fuels have raised policy questions, with respect to the sustainability of managing our forests as well as the impacts of how best to use wood from our...

  15. Sustainable forest management of tropical forests can reduce carbon emissions and stabilize timber production

    Science.gov (United States)

    N. Sasaki; G.P. Asner; Yude Pan; W. Knorr; P.B. Durst; H.O. Ma; I. Abe; A.J. Lowe; L.P. Koh

    2016-01-01

    The REDD+ scheme of the United Nations Framework Conventionon Climate Change has provided opportunities to manage tropical forests for timber production and carbon emission reductions. To determine the appropriate loggingtechniques, we analyzed potential timber production and carbon emission reductions under two logging techniques over a 40-year period of selective...

  16. A climate sensitive model of carbon transfer through atmosphere, vegetation and soil in managed forest ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loustau, D.; Moreaux, V.; Bosc, A.; Trichet, P.; Kumari, J.; Rabemanantsoa, T.; Balesdent, J.; Jolivet, C.; Medlyn, B. E.; Cavaignac, S.; Nguyen-The, N.

    2012-12-01

    For predicting the future of the forest carbon cycle in forest ecosystems, it is necessary to account for both the climate and management impacts. Climate effects are significant not only at a short time scale but also at the temporal horizon of a forest life cycle e.g. through shift in atmospheric CO2 concentration, temperature and precipitation regimes induced by the enhanced greenhouse effect. Intensification of forest management concerns an increasing fraction of temperate and tropical forests and untouched forests represents only one third of the present forest area. Predicting tools are therefore needed to project climate and management impacts over the forest life cycle and understand the consequence of management on the forest ecosystem carbon cycle. This communication summarizes the structure, main components and properties of a carbon transfer model that describes the processes controlling the carbon cycle of managed forest ecosystems. The model, GO+, links three main components, (i) a module describing the vegetation-atmosphere mass and energy exchanges in 3D, (ii) a plant growth module and a (iii) soil carbon dynamics module in a consistent carbon scheme of transfer from atmosphere back into the atmosphere. It was calibrated and evaluated using observed data collected on coniferous and broadleaved forest stands. The model predicts the soil, water and energy balance of entire rotations of managed stands from the plantation to the final cut and according to a range of management alternatives. It accounts for the main soil and vegetation management operations such as soil preparation, understorey removal, thinnings and clearcutting. Including the available knowledge on the climatic sensitivity of biophysical and biogeochemical processes involved in atmospheric exchanges and carbon cycle of forest ecosystems, GO+ can produce long-term backward or forward simulations of forest carbon and water cycles under a range of climate and management scenarios. This

  17. Carbon budgets for two Portuguese estuaries: implications for the management and conservation of coastal waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana P. Oliveira

    2014-07-01

    The results presented illustrate that Tagus and Sado estuaries represent an important land/ocean boundary for carbon transformation and emission, and confirm the anthropogenic pressure that these estuaries are subject to. Carbon budgets vary markedly within and between these two estuaries reflecting the human pressure. Anthropogenic inputs, autochthonous carbon production and primary production are indicated as the main responsible for the carbon production within the estuaries. Both estuaries export carbon to the ocean and to the atmosphere. The inorganic carbon faction has a major role in the carbon budget, enriching the ocean in carbon dioxide, contributing this for the greenhouse effect. Our understanding of organic and inorganic carbon fluxes in Tagus and Sado estuaries is vital for an efficient protection and preservation of such ecosystems being helpful in limit human-caused damage and in restoring damaged estuarine/coastal ecosystems. In addition, the economic impact of the carbon fluxes to the atmosphere, estimated as €375,000 per year, creates the appropriate incentives to reduce emissions and shift them to higher-value uses. Suggesting, therefore, a coastal management re-oriented towards a more adaptive approach through the use of carbon market-based policies. This study is a contribution to the integration of coastal and global carbon cycles. However, additional efforts are required to fully merge other components subsystems, such as salt marshes, with these budgets. Moreover, a fully comprehension of the community metabolism in these estuaries will greatly improve this integration.

  18. Application of classroom simulators in the training of managers at CANDU plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bereznai, G.; Rizk, K., E-mail: george.bereznai@uoit.ca, E-mail: khalid.rizk@uoit.ca [Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Technology, Oshawa, ON (Canada)

    2015-07-01

    Technical managers of Canada's nuclear power plants are required to have in-depth knowledge of the normal and abnormal integrated unit operations typical of the plant at which they work. The Advanced Operations Overview for Managers (AOOM) training program was developed by Ontario Power Generation to fulfil this need for many of its managers. The program makes extensive use of 'classroom' simulators that have the same software models as the full-scope training simulators, but use graphical user interface to replicate the control room devices. For the last several years the AOOM program has been delivered by the University of Ontario Institute of Technology. (author)

  19. Application of classroom simulators in the training of managers at CANDU plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bereznai, G.; Rizk, K.

    2015-01-01

    Technical managers of Canada's nuclear power plants are required to have in-depth knowledge of the normal and abnormal integrated unit operations typical of the plant at which they work. The Advanced Operations Overview for Managers (AOOM) training program was developed by Ontario Power Generation to fulfil this need for many of its managers. The program makes extensive use of 'classroom' simulators that have the same software models as the full-scope training simulators, but use graphical user interface to replicate the control room devices. For the last several years the AOOM program has been delivered by the University of Ontario Institute of Technology. (author)

  20. Stormwater Management Plan for the Arden Hills Army Training Site, Arden Hills, Minnesota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, Adrianne E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wuthrich, Kelsey K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ziech, Angela M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bowen, Esther E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Quinn, John [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2013-03-01

    This stormwater management plan focuses on the cantonment and training areas of the Arden Hills Army Training Site (AHATS). The plan relates the site stormwater to the regulatory framework, and it summarizes best management practices to aide site managers in promoting clean site runoff. It includes documentation for a newly developed, detailed model of stormwater flow retention for the entire AHATS property and adjacent upgradient areas. The model relies on established modeling codes integrated in a U.S. Department of Defense-sponsored software tool, the Watershed Modeling System (WMS), and it can be updated with data on changes in land use or with monitoring data.

  1. Development of the severe accident management guidance module for the SATS training simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. R.; Park, S. H.; Kim, D. H.

    2004-01-01

    Recently KAERI has developed severe accident management guidance to establish Korea standard severe accident management system. On the other hand PC-based severe accident training simulator SATS has been developed, which uses MELCOR computing code as the simulation engine. SATS graphically displays and simulates the severe accident progression with interactive user inputs. The control capability of SATS makes a severe accident training course more interesting and effective. In this paper the development and functions of HyperKAMG module are explained. Furthermore easiness and effectiveness of the HyperKAMG-SATS system in severe accident management are described

  2. The Second State of the Carbon Cycle Report: A Scientific Basis for Policy and Management Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdsey, R.; Mayes, M. A.; Reed, S.; Najjar, R.; Romero-Lankao, P.

    2017-12-01

    The second "State of the Carbon Cycle of North America Report" (SOCCR-2) includes an overview of the North American carbon budget and future projections, the consequences of changes to the carbon budget, details of the carbon budget in major terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems (including coastal ocean waters), information about anthropogenic drivers, and implications for policy and carbon management. SOCCR-2 includes new focus areas such as soil carbon, arctic and boreal ecosystems, tribal lands, and greater emphasis on aquatic systems and the role of societal drivers and decision making on the carbon cycle. In addition, methane is considered to a greater extent than before. SOCCR-2 will contribute to the next U.S. National Climate Assessment, as well as providing information to support science-based management decisions and policies that include climate change mitigation and adaptation in Canada, the United States, and Mexico. Although the Report is still in the review process, preliminary findings indicate that North America is a net emitter of carbon dioxide and methane to the atmosphere, and that natural sinks offset about 25% of emitted carbon dioxide. Combustion of fossil fuels represents the largest source of emissions, but show a decreasing trend over the last decade and a lower share (20%) of the global total compared with the previous decade. Forests, soils, grasslands, and coastal oceans comprise the largest carbon sinks, while emissions from inland waters are a significant source of carbon dioxide. The Report also documents the lateral transfers of carbon among terrestrial ecosystems and from terrestrial to near-coastal ecosystems, to complete the carbon cycle accounting. Further, the Report explores the consequences of rising atmospheric carbon dioxide on terrestrial and oceanic systems, and the capacity of these systems to continue to act as carbon sinks based on the drivers of future carbon cycle changes, including carbon-climate feedbacks

  3. Managing education/training resources to survive regulatory change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Headley-Walker, L.; DeSain, G.

    1985-01-01

    The road to development of nuclear training and education programs that prepare operators to not only competently operate a commercial nuclear power plant under routine conditions but also acquire the knowledge, experience, and confidence necessary to perform under the rigors of a significant off-normal incident has been filled with speculative opinion, recommendations, disagreement, guidelines, and downright confusion. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) had not produced a regulation that specifically addresses the nature of education/training related to off-normal incidents. No one educational process currently offered fully addresses the ideal solution for those employed in the nuclear industry. The only practical solution must be the result of collaborative efforts between utilities and educational resources. The Regents College Degree Collaboration Model provides a worthy vehicle for positive movement toward this solution and survival of the ever-changing regulatory constraints in education

  4. Potential increases in natural disturbance rates could offset forest management impacts on ecosystem carbon stocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, John B.; Jensen, Nicholas R.; Domke, Grant M.; D’Amato, Anthony W.

    2013-01-01

    Forested ecosystems contain the majority of the world’s terrestrial carbon, and forest management has implications for regional and global carbon cycling. Carbon stored in forests changes with stand age and is affected by natural disturbance and timber harvesting. We examined how harvesting and disturbance interact to influence forest carbon stocks over the Superior National Forest, in northern Minnesota. Forest inventory data from the USDA Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis program were used to characterize current forest age structure and quantify the relationship between age and carbon stocks for eight forest types. Using these findings, we simulated the impact of alternative management scenarios and natural disturbance rates on forest-wide terrestrial carbon stocks over a 100-year horizon. Under low natural mortality, forest-wide total ecosystem carbon stocks increased when 0% or 40% of planned harvests were implemented; however, the majority of forest-wide carbon stocks decreased with greater harvest levels and elevated disturbance rates. Our results suggest that natural disturbance has the potential to exert stronger influence on forest carbon stocks than timber harvesting activities and that maintaining carbon stocks over the long-term may prove difficult if disturbance frequency increases in response to climate change.

  5. Distinguishing feral and managed honeybees (Apis mellifera) using stable carbon isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson , Lucy; Dynes , Travis; Berry , Jennifer; Delaplane , Keith; McCormick , Lydia; Brosi , Berry

    2014-01-01

    International audience; The ability to distinguish feral and managed honeybees (Apis mellifera) has applications in studies of population genetics, parasite transmission, pollination, interspecific interactions, and bee breeding. We evaluated a diagnostic test based on theoretical differences in stable carbon isotope ratios generated by supplemental feeding. We evaluated (1) if carbon isotope ratios can distinguish feral and managed honeybees and (2) the temporal persistence of the signal aft...

  6. Why Training for Service Contract Management is Mission Essential

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Friar, Allen

    2005-01-01

    ... Programs provide vital services and act as force multipliers for forward deployment units. Consequently, a transformation in contracting and acquisition leadership along with proper planning is necessary to manage contracts...

  7. Training managers to facilitate their meetings: An intervention study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib

    2014-01-01

    -based intervention effort to improve organisational meetings. It reconceptualises classical meeting management, offering instead the practice of ‘meeting facilitation’: a more active and supportive approach, in which the manager-as-facilitator guides and directs conversations in meetings towards a positive goal...... showed that in the employees’ judgement, there were significant improvements in their managers’ competencies in both new meeting facilitation and classical meeting management, whereas other meeting outcomes resisted change.......Meetings in organisations are a common object of popular frustration. They are often run by managers who picked up their meeting skills from their superiors a generation previously, thus perpetuating obsolescent practices unsuited to today’s world of work. This paper reports on a research...

  8. Managing post-therapy fatigue for cancer survivors using energy conservation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Hon Keung; Mitcham, Maralynne; Morgan, Larissa

    2006-01-01

    This pilot study evaluated the effectiveness of energy conservation training to help post-therapy cancer survivors manage their fatigue. Twelve post-therapy cancer survivors were randomly assigned to an energy conservation training or usual care control (6 in each group). Participants in the intervention group received 1 to 2 hours of individual, face-to-face energy conservation training from an occupational therapist followed by once-a-week telephone monitoring sessions in the subsequent three weeks. Participants in the control group received standard care from their oncologist. Analysis of pre- and post-training data from the Piper Fatigue Scale (PFS) revealed significant reduction only in the sensory subscale of the PFS (Z = 2.21; p = 0.027) for the intervention group; but no significant reduction in the four subscale or total scores of the PFS for the control group. Findings demonstrate partial support for the effectiveness of energy conservation training in helping post-therapy cancer survivors manage their fatigue. Energy conservation training seems to be a viable strategy for managing cancer-related fatigue, though its efficacy is modest. Incorporating specific energy restoration strategies such as relaxation and meditation for future research may help advance the growing body of knowledge in symptom management for post-therapy cancer survivors.

  9. The relationship between hospital managers' leadership style and effectiveness with passing managerial training courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh Ardestani, Abbas; Sarabi Asiabar, Ali; Ebadifard Azar, Farbod; Abtahi, Seyyed Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Effective leadership that rises from managerial training courses is highly constructive in managing hospitals more effectively. This study aims at investigating the relationship between leadership effectiveness with providing management training courses for hospital managers. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study carried out on top and middle managers of 16 hospitals of Iran University of Medical Sciences. As a sample, 96 participants were selected through census method. Data were collected using leadership effectiveness and style questionnaire, whose validity and reliability were certified in previous studies. Pearson correlation coefficient and linear regressions were used for data analysis. Results: Leadership effectiveness score was estimated to be 4.36, showing a suitable status for managers' leadership effectiveness compared to the set criteria. No significant difference was found between leadership effectiveness and styles among managers who had passed the training courses with those who had not (p>0.05). Conclusion: Passing managerial training courses may have no significant effect on managers' leadership effectiveness, but there may be some other variables which should be meticulously studied.

  10. Effectiveness of management interventions on forest carbon stock in planted forests in Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dangal, Shambhu Prasad; Das, Abhoy Kumar; Paudel, Shyam Krishna

    2017-07-01

    Nepal has successfully established more than 370,000 ha of plantations, mostly with Pinus patula, in the last three and a half decades. However, intensive management of these planted forests is very limited. Despite the fact that the Kyoto Convention in 1997 recognized the role of plantations for forest-carbon sequestration, there is still limited knowledge on the effects of management practices and stand density on carbon-sequestration of popular plantation species (i.e. Pinus patula) in Nepal. We carried out case studies in four community forests planted between 1976 and 1990 to assess the impacts of management on forest carbon stocks. The study found that the average carbon stock in the pine plantations was 217 Mg C ha -1 , and was lower in forests with intensively managed plantations (214.3 Mg C ha -1 ) than in traditionally managed plantations (219 Mg C ha -1 ). However, it was the reverse in case of soil carbon, which was higher (78.65 Mg C ha -1 ) in the forests with intensive management. Though stand density was positively correlated with carbon stock, the proportionate increment in carbon stock was lower with increasing stand density, as carbon stock increased by less than 25% with a doubling of stand density (300-600). The total carbon stock was higher in plantations aged between 25 and 30 years compared to those aged between 30 and 35 years. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Climate Change Effects of Forest Management and Substitution of Carbon-Intensive Materials and Fossil Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathre, R.; Gustavsson, L.; Haus, S.; Lundblad, M.; Lundström, A.; Ortiz, C.; Truong, N.; Wikberg, P. E.

    2016-12-01

    Forests can play several roles in climate change mitigation strategies, for example as a reservoir for storing carbon and as a source of renewable materials and energy. To better understand the linkages and possible trade-offs between different forest management strategies, we conduct an integrated analysis where both sequestration of carbon in growing forests and the effects of substituting carbon intensive products within society are considered. We estimate the climate effects of directing forest management in Sweden towards increased carbon storage in forests, with more land set-aside for protection, or towards increased forest production for the substitution of carbon-intensive materials and fossil fuels, relative to a reference case of current forest management. We develop various scenarios of forest management and biomass use to estimate the carbon balances of the forest systems, including ecological and technological components, and their impacts on the climate in terms of cumulative radiative forcing over a 100-year period. For the reference case of current forest management, increasing the harvest of forest residues is found to give increased climate benefits. A scenario with increased set-aside area and the current level of forest residue harvest begins with climate benefits compared to the reference scenario, but the benefits cannot be sustained for 100 years because the rate of carbon storage in set-aside forests diminishes over time as the forests mature, but the demand for products and fuels remains. The most climatically beneficial scenario, expressed as reduced cumulative radiative forcing, in both the short and long terms is a strategy aimed at high forest production, high residue recovery rate, and high efficiency utilization of harvested biomass. Active forest management with high harvest level and efficient forest product utilization will provide more climate benefit, compared to reducing harvest and storing more carbon in the forest. Figure

  12. Management options to reduce the carbon footprint of livestock products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, John Erik; Kristensen, Troels

    2011-01-01

    Livestock products carry a large carbon footprint compared with other foods, and thus there is a need to focus on how to reduce it. The major contributing factors are emissions related to feed use and manure handling as well as the nature of the land required to produce the feed in question. We can....... Basically, it is important to make sure that all beneficial interactions in the livestock system are optimized instead of focusing only on animal productivity. There is an urgent need to arrive at a sound framework for considering the interaction between land use and carbon footprints of foods....... conclude that the most important mitigation options include - better feed conversion at the system level, - use of feeds that increase soil carbon sequestration versus carbon emission, - ensure that the manure produced substitutes for synthetic fertilizer, and - use manure for bio-energy production...

  13. Simulator as a tool of training to modern equipment management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmedyanova Gulnara

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the work, the learning process with the use of a simulator was studied. In this case, both the design and algorithmic content of the simulator, as well as the trainee, must pass their part of the path, only in this case the result of learning is maximized. Theoretically, it is shown that the effectiveness of simulator training is primarily a function of the cognitive-operational and professional-personal aspects of the trainee's competence. The experiment confirmed that, despite the differences above the indicated qualities, the result can be estimated as the sum of their estimates.

  14. Can joint carbon and biodiversity management in tropical agroforestry landscapes be optimized?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Michael; Hertel, Dietrich; Jungkunst, Hermann F; Kluge, Jürgen; Abrahamczyk, Stefan; Bos, Merijn; Buchori, Damayanti; Gerold, Gerhard; Gradstein, S Robbert; Köhler, Stefan; Leuschner, Christoph; Moser, Gerald; Pitopang, Ramadhanil; Saleh, Shahabuddin; Schulze, Christian H; Sporn, Simone G; Steffan-Dewenter, Ingolf; Tjitrosoedirdjo, Sri S; Tscharntke, Teja

    2012-01-01

    Managing ecosystems for carbon storage may also benefit biodiversity conservation, but such a potential 'win-win' scenario has not yet been assessed for tropical agroforestry landscapes. We measured above- and below-ground carbon stocks as well as the species richness of four groups of plants and eight of animals on 14 representative plots in Sulawesi, Indonesia, ranging from natural rainforest to cacao agroforests that have replaced former natural forest. The conversion of natural forests with carbon stocks of 227-362 Mg C ha(-1) to agroforests with 82-211 Mg C ha(-1) showed no relationships to overall biodiversity but led to a significant loss of forest-related species richness. We conclude that the conservation of the forest-related biodiversity, and to a lesser degree of carbon stocks, mainly depends on the preservation of natural forest habitats. In the three most carbon-rich agroforestry systems, carbon stocks were about 60% of those of natural forest, suggesting that 1.6 ha of optimally managed agroforest can contribute to the conservation of carbon stocks as much as 1 ha of natural forest. However, agroforestry systems had comparatively low biodiversity, and we found no evidence for a tight link between carbon storage and biodiversity. Yet, potential win-win agroforestry management solutions include combining high shade-tree quality which favours biodiversity with cacao-yield adapted shade levels.

  15. Simulating the physician as healthcare manager: An innovative course to train for the manager role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gradel, Maximilian

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: During their formal studies medical students acquire extensive medical expertise. However, the medical profession demands additional competencies, such as those involved in efficient resource allocation, business administration, development, organization, and process management in the healthcare system. At present students are not sufficiently prepared for the physician’s role as manager. In response, we designed the seminar course, MeCuM-SiGma, to impart basic knowledge about healthcare policy and management to students of medicine. This project report describes our teaching strategies and the initial evaluation of this educational project.Project description: In this semester-long, seminar course introduced in 2010, medical students gather experience with the competencies mentioned above as well as learn basic management skills. The course is offered each winter semester, and students sign up to attend voluntarily; course coordination and organization is done on a voluntary basis by physicians and employees of the Mentoring Office (MeCuM-Mentor at the Medical School of the Ludwig Maximilian University (LMU in Munich, Germany. The course is open to all students enrolled at the two medical schools in Munich.During the first part of this elective, students learn about the basic principles of the German political and healthcare systems in case-based, problem-based tutorials led by trained tutors and in lectures held by experts.In the second part of the course students take on the roles of the University Hospital’s executive board of directors and supervisory board to work on an existing hospital project as a group within the scope of a simulation. This phase of the course is accompanied by workshops conducted in cooperation with university-based and off-campus partners that address the procedural learning objectives (teamwork, project management, negotiation strategies, etc..A suitable, authentic issue currently facing the

  16. Simulating the physician as healthcare manager: An innovative course to train for the manager role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gradel, Maximilian; Moder, Stefan; Nicolai, Leo; Pander, Tanja; Hoppe, Boj; Pinilla, Severin; Von der Borch, Philip; Fischer, Martin R; Dimitriadis, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    During their formal studies medical students acquire extensive medical expertise. However, the medical profession demands additional competencies, such as those involved in efficient resource allocation, business administration, development, organization, and process management in the healthcare system. At present students are not sufficiently prepared for the physician's role as manager. In response, we designed the seminar course, MeCuM-SiGma, to impart basic knowledge about healthcare policy and management to students of medicine. This project report describes our teaching strategies and the initial evaluation of this educational project. In this semester-long, seminar course introduced in 2010, medical students gather experience with the competencies mentioned above as well as learn basic management skills. The course is offered each winter semester, and students sign up to attend voluntarily; course coordination and organization is done on a voluntary basis by physicians and employees of the Mentoring Office (MeCuM-Mentor) at the Medical School of the Ludwig Maximilian University (LMU) in Munich, Germany. The course is open to all students enrolled at the two medical schools in Munich. During the first part of this elective, students learn about the basic principles of the German political and healthcare systems in case-based, problem-based tutorials led by trained tutors and in lectures held by experts. In the second part of the course students take on the roles of the University Hospital's executive board of directors and supervisory board to work on an existing hospital project as a group within the scope of a simulation. This phase of the course is accompanied by workshops conducted in cooperation with university-based and off-campus partners that address the procedural learning objectives (teamwork, project management, negotiation strategies, etc.). A suitable, authentic issue currently facing the hospital is selected in advance by the course organizers

  17. Assessing the probability of carbon and greenhouse gas benefit from the management of peat soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worrall, F.; Bell, M.J.; Bhogal, A.

    2010-01-01

    This study proposes a method for assessing the probability that land management interventions will lead to an improvement in the carbon sink represented by peat soils. The method is able to: combine studies of different carbon uptake and release pathways in order to assess changes on the overall carbon or greenhouse gas budget; calculate the probability of the management or restoration leading to an improvement in the budget; calculate the uncertainty in that probability estimate; estimate the equivalent number of complete budgets available from the combination of the literature; test the difference in the outcome of different land management interventions; and provide a method for updating the predicted probabilities as new studies become available. Using this methodology, this study considered the impact of: afforestation, managed burning, drainage, drain-blocking, grazing removal; and revegetation, on the carbon budget of peat soils in the UK. The study showed that afforestation, drain-blocking, revegetation, grazing removal and cessation of managed burning would bring a carbon benefit, whereas deforestation, managed burning and drainage would bring a disbenefit. The predicted probabilities of a benefit are often equivocal as each management type or restoration often leads to increase in uptake in one pathway while increasing losses in another.

  18. Training requirements and responsibilities for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega, H.G.; French, S.B.; Rick, D.L.

    1992-09-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is scheduled to conduct intrusive (hydropunch screening tests, bore hole installation, soil sampling, etc.) and nonintrusive (geophysical surveys) studies at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). These studies and activities will be limited to specific locations at the RWMC. The duration of these activities will vary, but most tasks are not expected to exceed 90 days. The BWID personnel requested that the Waste Management Operational Support Group establish the training requirements and training responsibilities for BWID personnel and BWID subcontractor personnel. This document specifies these training requirements and responsibilities. While the responsibilities of BWID and the RWMC are, in general, defined in the interface agreement, the training elements are based on regulatory requirements, DOE orders, DOE-ID guidance, state law, and the nature of the work to be performed

  19. Interactive effects of environmental change and management strategies on regional forest carbon emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudiburg, Tara W; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan; Thornton, Peter E; Law, Beverly E

    2013-11-19

    Climate mitigation activities in forests need to be quantified in terms of the long-term effects on forest carbon stocks, accumulation, and emissions. The impacts of future environmental change and bioenergy harvests on regional forest carbon storage have not been quantified. We conducted a comprehensive modeling study and life-cycle assessment of the impacts of projected changes in climate, CO2 concentration, and N deposition, and region-wide forest management policies on regional forest carbon fluxes. By 2100, if current management strategies continue, then the warming and CO2 fertilization effect in the given projections result in a 32-68% increase in net carbon uptake, overshadowing increased carbon emissions from projected increases in fire activity and other forest disturbance factors. To test the response to new harvesting strategies, repeated thinnings were applied in areas susceptible to fire to reduce mortality, and two clear-cut rotations were applied in productive forests to provide biomass for wood products and bioenergy. The management strategies examined here lead to long-term increased carbon emissions over current harvesting practices, although semiarid regions contribute little to the increase. The harvest rates were unsustainable. This comprehensive approach could serve as a foundation for regional place-based assessments of management effects on future carbon sequestration by forests in other locations.

  20. Options for Enhancing Education, Training and Knowledge Management for Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, John

    2017-01-01

    UK Nuclear Sites: Decommissioning: 26 Magnox Reactors, 2 Fast Reactors; Operational: 14 AGRs, 1 PWR; 9.6 GWe Total Capacity. Nuclear Technology Education Consortium (NTEC) Decommissioning Modules: N04 Decommissioning, Radioactive Waste and Environmental Management; N07 Nuclear Safety Case Development; N08 Particle & Colloid Engineering in the Nuclear Industry; N09 Policy, Regulation & Licensing; N10 Processing, Storage & Disposal of Nuclear Waste; N31 Management of the Decommissioning Process; N01 Reactor Physics, Criticality & Design; N02 Nuclear Fuel Cycle; N03 Radiation & Radiological Protection; N06 Reactor Materials & Lifetime Behaviour; N11 Radiation Shielding; N12 Reactor Thermal Hydraulics; N13 Criticality Safety Management; N23 Environmental Impact Assessment; N32 Experimental Reactor Physics

  1. Project management initiative local development through specialized training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neisy Ramos Acevedo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The local development should complete a group of basic principles, such as: the design for training and the tools information adapted to the particularity of each territory. This training facilitates, also, the articulation of the stocks deployed by the local leaders, and it increases the administration of the knowledge and the transfer of technologies, processes in those that the nexuses are enlarged between the structures and the population, and where the participation of different present actors is potentialized in the territory. During the year 2010 the Ministry of Economy and Planning begins to offer the possibility to finance projects for the local development, nevertheless these initiatives should be accompanied by a rigorous study of feasibility of the investments. The University of Sancti Spíritus, committed in this zeal, designs the Diplomate of Administration of Projects for Local Initiatives, which offers theoretical tools and it develops practical abilities in the different actors of the local development that facilitate the realization of these studies. The exercise of this graduate's culmination consists on the defence of the study of feasibility of those projects that each municipality identifies as priority for its development.

  2. Whither CRM? Future directions in Crew Resource Management training in the cockpit and elsewhere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmreich, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    The past decade has shown worldwide adoption of human factors training in civil aviation, now known as Crew Resource Management (CRM). The shift in name from cockpit to crew reflects a growing trend to extend the training to other components of the aviation system including flight attendants, dispatchers, maintenance personnel, and Air Traffic Controllers. The paper reports findings and new directions in research into human factors.

  3. Planning and management support for NPP personnel SAT-based training programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziakova, M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper deals with planning and management support for NPP personnel SAT based training programmes based on IAEA TC Project SLR/0/003 on upgrading NPP personnel training, with the aim of upgrading NPP safety and reliability of NPP operation and maintenance. The costs needed include both Slovak and IAEA sources. Five stages of the Project are defined: planning; organizing; motivating; implementation; control, review and accountability

  4. Preliminary Analyses Showed Short-Term Mental Health Improvements after a Single-Day Manager Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boysen, Elena; Schiller, Birgitta; Mörtl, Kathrin; Gündel, Harald; Hölzer, Michael

    2018-01-10

    Psychosocial working conditions attract more and more attention when it comes to mental health in the workplace. Trying to support managers to deal with their own as well as their employees' psychological risk factors, we conducted a specific manager training. Within this investigation, we wanted to learn about the training's effects and acceptance. A single-day manager training was provided in a large industrial company in Germany. The participants were asked to fill out questionnaires regarding their own physical and mental health condition as well as their working situation. Questionnaires were distributed at baseline, 3-month, and 12-month follow-up. At this point of time the investigation is still ongoing. The current article focuses on short-term preliminary effects. Analyses only included participants that already completed baseline and three months follow-up. Preliminary results from three-month follow-up survey ( n = 33, nmale = 30, Mage = 47.5) indicated positive changes in the manager's mental health condition measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire for depression (PHQ-9: Mt1 = 3.82, Mt2 = 3.15). Training managers about common mental disorders and risk factors at the workplace within a single-day workshop seems to promote positive effects on their own mental health. Especially working with the managers on their own early stress symptoms might have been an important element.

  5. Advanced simulation and management software for nuclear emergency training and response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, K.W.

    2011-01-01

    The importance of training of safety personnel to deal with real world scenarios is prevalent amongst nuclear emergency preparedness and response organizations. For the development of training tools we have committed to ensure that field procedures, data collection software and decision making tools be identical during training sessions as they would be during a real emergency. By identifying the importance of a fully integrated tool, we have developed a safety support system capable of both functioning in training mode and real mode, enabling emergency response organizations to train more efficiently and effectively. This new fully integrated emergency management tool is called S3-FAST also known as Safety Support Systems - Field Assessment Survey Tool. (orig.)

  6. Training for QSC: How McDonald's Makes Library Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aycock, Anthony

    2001-01-01

    Written by a former McDonald's manager who earned a master's degree in library science, this article describes how "QSC"--quality, services, and cleanliness--can be applied to libraries in the same way it is used by restaurants. Argues that libraries are simply businesses that cater to customers. (Contains 42 references.) (NB)

  7. Diabetes self management training and psychological support weekends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smeesters, Hannah; Skinner, Chas; Martin, Jo

    2007-01-01

    A lack of knowledge in diabetes self management skills, such as insulin administration, glucose testing and diet, have been identified in a high percentage of adults with the condition ever since insulin treatment was first introduced (Watkins et al, 1967; Murata et al, 2003). Adult support weeke...

  8. Re-Envisioning Management Education and Training for Information Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajesh; Vorbach, James

    2017-01-01

    The evolving demand for workforce skills has often been a topic of discussion at various professional library and information science (LIS) conferences and in the academic literature. Although LIS schools tend to highlight the goal of preparing future members of the LIS profession to be effective leaders, a management and leadership curriculum gap…

  9. A Performance Support Tool for Cisco Training Program Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Angela D.; Bothra, Jashoda; Sharma, Priya

    2004-01-01

    Performance support systems can play an important role in corporations by managing and allowing distribution of information more easily. These systems run the gamut from simple paper job aids to sophisticated computer- and web-based software applications that support the entire corporate supply chain. According to Gery (1991), a performance…

  10. Legal Liability and Risk Management in Outdoor Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynon, John; Loynes, Chris

    1990-01-01

    Describes duties and responsibilities of outdoor instructors under British criminal and civil law. Discusses elements of negligence under civil law including damage, duty of care, standard of care, in loco parentis, students' duty of care, foreseeability, and employer's legal duty. Presents risk management in terms of primary, secondary, and…

  11. Project management of life-science research projects: project characteristics, challenges and training needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beukers, Margot W

    2011-02-01

    Thirty-four project managers of life-science research projects were interviewed to investigate the characteristics of their projects, the challenges they faced and their training requirements. A set of ten discriminating parameters were identified based on four project categories: contract research, development, discovery and call-based projects--projects set up to address research questions defined in a call for proposals. The major challenges these project managers are faced with relate to project members, leadership without authority and a lack of commitment from the respective organization. Two-thirds of the project managers indicated that they would be interested in receiving additional training, mostly on people-oriented, soft skills. The training programs that are currently on offer, however, do not meet their needs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Building utility executive strength. [Job rotation as part of management training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esser, N.J.

    1977-02-17

    The selection and development of strong executive talent to manage the utility industry is essential if some of the controversy and confusion over the role and policies of utilities is to be resolved. The industry has traditionally trained and elevated executives within the organization, but new technical developments have changed the managerial skills required of executives. Today's manager needs an understanding of the total industry regardless of his initial training, the politics involved in advocating issues, and the need to keep costs down. To develop managerial continuity, utilities can institute job rotation as part of their management training program. The option to bring in executives from outside the company allows more stringent standards and introduces new ideas. Competitive salaries increase the opportunity to attract and retain talent. The Board of Directors can actively develop a flexible organizational structure that allows the executive group to adjust to changing demand. (DCK)

  13. THE IMPACT OF HOSPITAL BASED INTEGRATED MANAGEMENT OF CHILDHOOD ILLNESS TRAINING ON PEDIATRIC NURSE COMPETENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fitri Haryanti

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although the WHO strategy integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI for primary care has been implemented in over 100 countries, there is less global experience with hospital-based IMCI training. Until recently, no training had been done in Indonesia, and globally there has been limited experience of the role of IMCI in rebuilding health systems after complex emergencies. Objective: We aimed to examine the effect of hospital-based IMCI training on pedicatric nurse competency and explore the perception of Indonesian doctors, nurse managers and paediatricians about IMCI training and its development in West Aceh, a region that was severely affected by the South-Asian tsunami in December 2004. Methods: This study used stepped wedge design. Training was conducted for 39 nurses staff, 13 midwifes, 6 Head nurses, 5 manager of nurses, 5 doctors, 1 paediatricians, and 3 support facilities (nutritionist, pharmacist, laboratory in Cut Nyak Dien (CND Hospital in Meulaboh, West Aceh, Indonesia. The IMCI training was developed based on the WHO Pocketbook of Hospital Care for Children. A nurses competency questionnaire was used based on the guideline of assessment of the quality of child health services at the first level reference hospitals in districts / municipalities issued by the Ministry of Health in 2007. A linear mixed model was used for data analysis. Results: The hospital based IMCI training improved the competences of nurses paediatric in assessing emergency signs of the sick children, management of cough and difficulty breathing, diarrhoea, fever, nutritional problems, supportive care, monitoring, discharge planning and follow up. The assessment highlighted several problems in adaptation process of material training, training process and implementation in an environment soon after a major disaster. Conclusion: Hospital based IMCI training can be implemented in a setting after major disasters or internal conflict as part of a

  14. Training staff to promote self-management in people with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandjojo, Janice; Zedlitz, Aglaia M E E; Gebhardt, Winifred A; Hoekman, Joop; Dusseldorp, Elise; den Haan, Jeanet A; Evers, Andrea W M

    2018-02-26

    People with intellectual disabilities have increasing difficulties managing their daily affairs. This study examined the effectiveness of a staff training, which teaches staff to promote self-management in people with intellectual disabilities. Effectiveness was assessed with questionnaires addressing clients' (n = 26) independence and self-reliance, support needs and challenging behaviour, using a pre-posttest control group design. Additionally, focus groups were conducted with trained staff members 6 months after the training. In the long term, the intervention group showed a significant increase in independence and self-reliance, in contrast to the comparison group. No effect was found on support needs and challenging behaviour. Trained staff members reported limited benefits of the training, but had noticed changes in their attitude and method of working afterwards. Further self-management research is required to investigate how independence and self-reliance can be promoted more effectively in this population. Future trainings should carefully consider their content, format, and implementation. © 2018 The Authors. Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Management competencies in higher education: Perceived job importance in relation to level of training required

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid L. Potgieter

    2010-11-01

    Research purpose: The aim of this article is to determine the relationship between a specific set of HOD managerial competencies identified as being important for the job and the level of training required in terms of these competencies. Motivation for the study: Research has provided evidence that HODs are often ill-prepared for their managerial role, which requires the development of specific management competencies to enable them to fulfil their roles effectively. Research design, approach and method: A non-experimental quantitative survey design approach was followed and correlational data analyses were performed. A cross-sectional sample of 41 HODs of 22 departments from various faculties of a higher education institution in Gauteng participated in this study. The Management Competency Inventory (MCI of Visser (2009 was applied as a measure. Main findings: The Pearson product-moment analysis indicated that there is a significant relationship between the competencies indicated as being important for the job and the level of training required. Practical/Managerial implications: Training needs of HODs should be formally assessed and the depth of training required in terms of the identified management competencies should be considered in the design of training programmes. Contributions/Value-add: The information obtained in this study may potentially serve as a foundation for the development of an HOD training programme in the South African higher education environment.

  16. Managing carbon emissions in China through building energy efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Colombier, Michel

    2009-06-01

    This paper attempts to analyse the role of building energy efficiency (BEE) in China in addressing climate change mitigation. It provides an analysis of the current situation and future prospects for the adoption of BEE technologies in Chinese cities. It outlines the economic and institutional barriers to large-scale deployment of the sustainable, low-carbon, and even carbon-free construction techniques. Based on a comprehensive overview of energy demand characteristics and development trends driven by economic and demographic growth, different policy tools for cost-effective CO(2) emission reduction in the Chinese construction sector are described. We propose a comprehensive approach combining building design and construction, and the urban planning and building material industries, in order to drastically improve BEE during this period of rapid urban development. A coherent institutional framework needs to be established to ensure the implementation of efficiency policies. Regulatory and incentive options should be integrated into the policy portfolios of BEE to minimise the efficiency gap and to realise sizeable carbon emissions cuts in the next decades. We analyse in detail several policies and instruments, and formulate relevant policy proposals fostering low-carbon construction technology in China. Specifically, Our analysis shows that improving building energy efficiency can generate considerable carbon emissions reduction credits with competitive price under the CDM framework.

  17. Carbon emissions and management scenarios for consumer-owned utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischlein, Miriam; Smith, Timothy M.; Wilson, Elizabeth J.

    2009-01-01

    An important subset of the utility sector has been scarcely explored for its ability to reduce carbon dioxide emissions: consumer-owned electric utilities significantly contribute to U.S. greenhouse gas emissions, but are often excluded from energy efficiency and renewable energy policies. They sell a quarter of the nation's electricity, yet the carbon impact of these sales is not well understood, due to their small size, unique ownership models, and high percentage of purchased power for distribution. This paper situates consumer-owned utilities in the context of emerging U.S. climate policy, quantifying for the first time the state-by-state carbon impact of electricity sales by consumer-owned utilities. We estimate that total retail sales by consumer-owned utilities account for roughly 568 million metric tons of CO 2 annually, making this sector the 7th largest CO 2 emitter globally, and examine state-level carbon intensities of the sector in light of the current policy environment and the share of COU distribution in the states. Based on efficiency and fuel mix pathways under conceivable regulations, carbon scenarios for 2030 are developed.

  18. A management framework for training providers to improve workplace skills development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Govender

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Deputy President, Ms Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka, says a skills revolution is necessary for South Africa’s (SA skills crisis. The SA skills revolution began with the skills legislation of 1998-9 when the Departments of Labour (DOL and Education (DOE intended a seamless, integrated approach to rapid skills development. The National Skills Development Strategy (NSDS, the Sector Education and Training Providers (SETAs, the South African Qualifications Authorities (SAQA and the National Qualifications Framework (NQF were established to drive the human resource and skills development revolutionary strategy. The purpose of this paper is to present the findings of the 2001-3 research investigating an internal management framework for training providers, employers and managers to accelerate workplace skills development. Design/Methodology/Approach: An integrated, multi-method research model was employed to gather empirical evidence on skills practices. A robust quantitative survey was conducted within 600 organisations. Simultaneously, rich, descriptive data was gathered from managers and employees using a structured qualitative interview strategy. The integrated data pool was factor analysed. The research findings, conclusion and recommended framework were reported in a PhD thesis. Findings: The research findings reveal major gaps in the effectiveness of SA training providers to radically accelerate and improve workplace skills development as per national skills legislation, implementation and management criteria. Implications: If the skills revolution in SA is to succeed, training providers especially, must become less complacent, more assertive and fully equipped when participating in the skills development arena. Originality/Value: Via this research, training providers will gain critical, reflective insight into their management framework for meeting skills legislative criteria and for managing training interventions and skills projects.

  19. Outcomes from two forms of training for first-responder competency in cholinergic crisis management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreatta, Pamela; Klotz, Jessica J; Madsen, James M; Hurst, Charles G; Talbot, Thomas B

    2015-04-01

    Military and civilian first responders must be able to recognize and effectively manage mass disaster casualties. Clinical management of injuries resulting from nerve agents provides different challenges for first responders than those of conventional weapons. We evaluated the impact of a mixed-methods training program on competency acquisition in cholinergic crisis clinical management using multimedia with either live animal or patient actor examples, and hands-on practice using SimMan3G mannequin simulators. A purposively selected sample of 204 civilian and military first responders who had not previously completed nerve agent training were assessed pre- and post-training for knowledge, performance, self-efficacy, and affective state. We conducted analysis of variance with repeated measures; statistical significance p 20%, performance > 50%, self-efficacy > 34%, and affective state > 15%. There were no significant differences between the live animal and patient actor groups. These findings could aid in the specification of training for first-responder personnel in military and civilian service. Although less comprehensive than U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense courses, the training outcomes associated with this easily distributed program demonstrate its value in increasing the competency of first responders in recognizing and managing a mass casualty cholinergic event. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  20. Management impacts on forest floor and soil organic carbon in northern temperate forests of the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coeli M. Hoover

    2011-01-01

    The role of forests in the global carbon cycle has been the subject of a great deal of research recently, but the impact of management practices on forest soil dynamics at the stand level has received less attention. This study used six forest management experimental sites in five northern states of the US to investigate the effects of silvicultural treatments (light...

  1. The cost of carbon abatement through community forest management in Nepal Himalaya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karky, B.S.; Skutsch, Margaret

    2010-01-01

    This paper estimates the economic returns to carbon abatement through biological sequestration in community managed forest under future REDD policy, and compares these for three possible management scenarios. For the estimation, the research relies on forest inventory data together with other

  2. International training workshop on quality control and management of food irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The International Training Workshop on Quality Control and Management of Food Indantrione was hold from 28-30, August, 2004 in Beijing, China and organized by Chinese Society of Nuclear Agriculture and China Isotope and Radiation Association. 10 Articles were collected in this symposium including training lectures. The contents included: international developments in food irradiation, Quality control and magement of food irradiation, industrializing development of irradiated food in China, Food irradiator and its quality management, research in setting standard for enterprise about irradiated products and etc.

  3. Performance of district disaster management teams after undergoing an operational level planners' training in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orach, Christopher Garimol; Mayega, Roy William; Woboya, Vincent; William, Bazeyo

    2013-06-01

    Uganda is vulnerable to several natural, man-made and a hybrid of disasters including drought, famine, floods, warfare, and disease outbreaks. We assessed the district disaster team's performance, roles and experiences following the training. The disasters most commonly experienced by the district teams were epidemics of diseases in humans (7 of 12), animals (epizoonotics) (3 of 12) and crops (3 of 12); hailstorms and floods (3 of 12). The capabilities viewed most useful for management of disasters were provision of health care services (9/12) and response management (8 of 12). The capability domains most often consulted during the disasters were general response management (31%), health services (29%) and water and sanitation (17%). The skills areas perceived to be vital following the training were response to epidemics 10/12, disaster management planning 8/12, hazards and vulnerability analysis 7/12 and principles of disaster planning 7/12 respectively. Main challenges mentioned by district teams were inadequacy of finance and logistics, lack of commitment by key partners towards disaster preparedness and response. The most common disaster experienced disasters related to outbreaks of diseases in man, animals and crops. The most frequently applied capabilities were response management and provision of emergency health services. The activities most frequently implemented following disaster management teams training were conducting planning meetings, refinement of plans and dissemination of skills gained. The main challenges were related to limited budget allocations and legal frameworks for disaster management that should be addressed by both central and local governments.

  4. Global assessment of promising forest management practices for sequestration of carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winjum, J.K.; Dixon, R.K.; Schroeder, P.E.

    1991-01-01

    In the 1980s, forests covered an estimated 4.08 billion hectares and contained a carbon pool of 1,400 gigatonnes, or 64% of the total terrestrial pool. Forest biomass productivity per unit of land can be enhanced by proper management practices and it is suggested that by implementing such practices, forests could store more carbon globally and thereby slow the increase in atmospheric CO 2 . Currently, only about 10% of world forests are managed at an active level. An assessment is presented of the amount of carbon that could be sequestered globally by implementing the practices of reforestation, afforestation, natural regeneration, silviculture, and agroforestry. The assessment is based on the development of a global database on managed forest and agroforestry systems. For each of the above five practices, the database contains information on carbon sequestered per hectare, implementation costs, and estimates of the amount of land technically suitable for such practices throughout the world. Results are presented for each practice in the boreal, temperate, and tropical regions. Preliminary estimates show that promising forestry and agroforestry practices could sequester, over a 50-y period, ca 50-100 gigatonnes of carbon at a cost of $170-340 million. This would be a significant contribution as a mitigating measure regarding atmospheric CO 2 buildup and projections for global warming, at present rates of anthropogenic carbon emissions (300-400 gigatonnes carbon over 50 y). 19 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  5. A Data Management System Integrating Web-based Training and Randomized Trials: Requirements, Experiences and Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muroff, Jordana; Amodeo, Maryann; Larson, Mary Jo; Carey, Margaret; Loftin, Ralph D

    2011-01-01

    This article describes a data management system (DMS) developed to support a large-scale randomized study of an innovative web-course that was designed to improve substance abuse counselors' knowledge and skills in applying a substance abuse treatment method (i.e., cognitive behavioral therapy; CBT). The randomized trial compared the performance of web-course-trained participants (intervention group) and printed-manual-trained participants (comparison group) to determine the effectiveness of the web-course in teaching CBT skills. A single DMS was needed to support all aspects of the study: web-course delivery and management, as well as randomized trial management. The authors briefly reviewed several other systems that were described as built either to handle randomized trials or to deliver and evaluate web-based training. However it was clear that these systems fell short of meeting our needs for simultaneous, coordinated management of the web-course and the randomized trial. New England Research Institute's (NERI) proprietary Advanced Data Entry and Protocol Tracking (ADEPT) system was coupled with the web-programmed course and customized for our purposes. This article highlights the requirements for a DMS that operates at the intersection of web-based course management systems and randomized clinical trial systems, and the extent to which the coupled, customized ADEPT satisfied those requirements. Recommendations are included for institutions and individuals considering conducting randomized trials and web-based training programs, and seeking a DMS that can meet similar requirements.

  6. Relaxation training methods for nurse managers in Hong Kong: a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yung, Paul M B; Fung, Man Yi; Chan, Tony M F; Lau, Bernard W K

    2004-12-01

    Nurse managers are under increased stress because of excessive workloads and hospitals' restructuring which is affecting their work tasks. High levels of stress could affect their mental health. Yet, few stress management training programmes are provided for this population. The purpose of this study was to apply stretch-release relaxation and cognitive relaxation training to enhance the mental health for nurse managers. A total of 65 nurse managers in Hong Kong were randomly assigned to stretch-release relaxation (n = 17), cognitive relaxation (n = 18), and a test control group (n = 35). Mental health status was assessed using the Chinese version of State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and the Chinese version of the General Health Questionnaire. Participants were assessed at the pretreatment session, the fourth posttreatment session, and at the 1-month follow-up session. The results revealed both the stretch-release and cognitive relaxation training enhanced mental health in nurse managers in Hong Kong. The application of relaxation training in enhancing mental health status for nurses and health professionals is discussed.

  7. The effects of Crew Resource Management (CRM) training on flight attendants' safety attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Jane; Henderson, Robert; O'Hare, David

    2014-02-01

    A number of well-known incidents and accidents had led the aviation industry to introduce Crew Resource Management (CRM) training designed specifically for flight attendants, and joint (pilot and flight attendant) CRM training as a way to improve teamwork and communication. The development of these new CRM training programs during the 1990s highlighted the growing need for programs to be evaluated using research tools that had been validated for the flight attendant population. The FSAQ (Flight Safety Attitudes Questionnaire-Flight Attendants) was designed specifically to obtain safety attitude data from flight attendants working for an Asia-Pacific airline. Flight attendants volunteered to participate in a study before receiving CRM training (N=563) and again (N=526) after CRM training. Almost half (13) of the items from the 36-item FSAQ showed highly significant changes following CRM training. Years of experience, crew position, seniority, leadership roles, flight attendant crew size, and length of route flown were all predictive of safety attitudes. CRM training for flight attendants is a valuable tool for increasing positive teamwork behaviors between the flight attendant and pilot sub-groups. Joint training sessions, where flight attendants and pilots work together to find solutions to in-flight emergency scenarios, provide a particularly useful strategy in breaking down communication barriers between the two sub-groups. Copyright © 2013 National Safety Council and Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Training Veterans to Provide Peer Support in a Weight-Management Program: MOVE!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes-Maslow, Lindsey; Carr, Carol; Orr, Melinda; Kahwati, Leila C.; Weiner, Bryan J.; Kinsinger, Linda

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The Veterans Health Administration (VHA) has implemented MOVE!, a weight-management program for veterans designed to address the increasing proportion of overweight and obese veterans. The objective of our study was to determine whether peer support employing motivational interviewing (MI) could positively influence lifestyle changes, thus expanding the reach of the MOVE! program. We describe the initial evaluation of the peer training program. Methods We developed an MI peer counselor training program for volunteer veterans, the “Buddies” program, to provide one-on-one telephone support for veterans enrolled in MOVE!. Buddies were recruited at 5 VHA sites and trained to provide peer support for the 6-month MOVE! intervention. We used a DVD to teach MI skills and followed with 2 to 3 booster sessions. We observed training, conducted pre- and posttraining surveys, and debriefed focus groups to assess training feasibility. Results Fifty-six Buddies were trained. Results indicate positive receipt of the program (89% reported learning about peer counseling and 87% reported learning communication skills). Buddies showed a small improvement in MI self-efficacy on posttraining surveys. We also identified key challenges to learning MI and training implementation. Conclusions MI training is feasible to implement and acceptable to volunteer Buddies. Trainers must assess how effectively volunteers learn MI skills in order to enhance its effective use in health promotion. PMID:24199738

  9. Healthcare team training programs aimed at improving depression management in primary care: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vöhringer, Paul A; Castro, Ariel; Martínez, Pablo; Tala, Álvaro; Medina, Simón; Rojas, Graciela

    2016-08-01

    Although evidence from Latin America and the Caribbean suggests that depression can be effectively treated in primary care settings, depression management remains unevenly performed. This systematic review evaluates all the international evidence on healthcare team training programs aimed at improving the outcomes of patients with depression. Three databases were searched for articles in English or Spanish indexed up to November 20, 2014. Studies were included if they fulfilled the following conditions: clinical trials, meta-analyses, or systematic reviews; and if they evaluated a training or educational program intended to improve the management of depression by primary healthcare teams, and assessed change in depressive symptoms, diagnosis or response rates, referral rates, patients' satisfaction and/or quality of life, and the effectiveness of treatments. Nine studies were included in this systematic review. Five trials tested the effectiveness of multi-component interventions (training included), and the remaining studies evaluated the effectiveness of specific training programs for depression management. All the studies that implemented multi-component interventions were efficacious, and half of the training trials were shown to be effective. Contribution of training programs alone to the effectiveness of multi-component interventions is yet to be established. The lack of specificity regarding health providers' characteristics might be a confounding factor. The review conducted suggests that stand-alone training programs are less effective than multi-component interventions. In applying the evidence gathered from developed countries to Latin America and the Caribbean, these training programs must consider and address local conditions of mental health systems, and therefore multi-component interventions may be warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. More explicit communication after classroom-based crew resource management training: results of a pragmatic trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeek-van Noord, Inge; de Bruijne, Martine C; Twisk, Jos W R; van Dyck, Cathy; Wagner, Cordula

    2015-02-01

    Aviation-based crew resource management trainings to optimize non-technical skills among professionals are often suggested for health care as a way to increase patient safety. Our aim was to evaluate the effect of a 2-day classroom-based crew resource management (CRM) training at emergency departments (EDs) on explicit professional oral communication (EPOC; non-technical skills). A pragmatic controlled before-after trial was conducted. Four EDs of general teaching hospitals were recruited (two intervention and two control departments). ED nurses and ED doctors were observed on their non-technical skills by means of a validated observation tool (EPOC). Our main outcome measure was the amount of EPOC observed per interaction in 30 minutes direct observations. Three outcome measures from EPOC were analysed: human interaction, anticipation on environment and an overall EPOC score. Linear and logistic mixed model analyses were performed. Models were corrected for the outcome measurement at baseline, days between training and observation, patient safety culture and error management culture at baseline. A statistically significant increase after the training was found on human interaction (β=0.27, 95% CI 0.08-0.49) and the overall EPOC score (β=0.25, 95% CI 0.06-0.43), but not for anticipation on environment (OR=1.19, 95% CI .45-3.15). This means that approximately 25% more explicit communication was shown after CRM training. We found an increase in the use of CRM skills after classroom-based crew resource management training. This study adds to the body of evidence that CRM trainings have the potential to increase patient safety by reducing communication flaws, which play an important role in health care-related adverse events. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Developing a Survey Instrument for Evaluating the Effectiveness of Data Management Training Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, C. Y.; Soyka, H.; Hutchison, V.; Budden, A. E.

    2016-12-01

    Education and training resources that focus on best practices and guidelines for working with data such as: data management, data sharing, quality metadata creation, and maintenance for reuse, have vital importance not only to the users of Data Observation Network for Earth (DataONE), but also to the broader scientific, research, and academic communities. However, creating and maintaining relevant training/educational materials that remain sensitive and responsive to community needs is dependent upon careful evaluations of the current landscape in order to promote and support thoughtful development of new resources. Using DataONE's existing training/educational resources as the basis for this project, the authors have worked to develop an evaluation instrument that can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of data management training/education resources. The evaluation instrument is in the form of a digital questionnaire/survey. The evaluation instrument also includes the structure and content as recommended by the best practices/guidelines of questionnaire/survey design, based on a review of the literature. Additionally, the evaluation instrument can be customized to evaluate various training/education modalities and be implemented using a web-based questionnaire/survey platform. Finally, the evaluation instrument can be used for site-wide evaluation of DataONE teaching materials and resources, and once made publicly available and openly accessible, other organizations may also utilize the instrument. One key outcome of developing the evaluation instrument is to help in increasing the effectiveness of data management training/education resources across the Earth/Geoscience community. Through this presentation, the authors will provide the full background and motivations for creating an instrument for evaluating the effectiveness of data management training/education resources. The presentation will also discuss in detail the process and results of the current

  12. The cost of carbon abatement through community forest management in Nepal Himalaya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karky, Bhaskar Singh [Economic Analysis Division, International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development, GPO Box 3226, Kathmandu (Nepal); Skutsch, Margaret [Centro de Investigaciones en Geographia Ambiental, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Morelia (Mexico); University of Twente, PO Box 217 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2010-01-15

    This paper estimates the economic returns to carbon abatement through biological sequestration in community managed forest under future REDD policy, and compares these for three possible management scenarios. For the estimation, the research relies on forest inventory data together with other socio-economic and resources use data collected from forest users in three sites of Nepal Himalaya. The paper estimates the incremental carbon from forest enhancement on a yearly basis over a five-year period using the value of 1 and 5 per tCO{sub 2} for conservative analysis. The results based on the three sites indicate that community forest management may be one of the least cost ways to abate carbon with a break-even price under Scenario 2 which ranges from 0.55 to 3.70 per tCO{sub 2}. However, bringing community forests into the carbon market may entail high opportunity costs as forests provide numerous non-monetary benefits to the local population, who regard these as the main incentive for conservation and management. An important finding of the research is that if forest resources use by local communities is not permitted, then carbon trading will not be attractive to them as revenue from carbon will not cover the cost foregone by not harvesting forest resources. (author)

  13. Carbon sequestration potential of forest land: Management for products and bioenergy versus preservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Deusen, P.

    2010-01-01

    A 40 year projection of potential carbon sequestration is based on USDA Forest Service Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) data from the state of Georgia. The objective is to compare carbon sequestration under a sustainable management strategy versus a preservation strategy. FIA plots are projected ahead in time with hotdeck matching. This matches each subject plot with another plot from the database that represents the subject plot at a future time. The matched plot sequences are used to provide input data to a harvest scheduling program to generate a management strategy for the state. The sequestration from the management strategy is compared with a preservation strategy that involves no harvesting. Harvested wood is assumed to go into products with various half life decay rates. Carbon sequestration is increased as increasing proportions go into wood for energy, which is treated like a product with an infinite half life. Therefore, the harvested carbon does not return immediately to the atmosphere. Public land and land close to cities is assumed to be unavailable, and all other private land is assumed to be accessible. The results are presented as gigatonnes of CO 2 equivalent to make them directly comparable to US annual carbon emissions. The conclusion is that forest management will sequester more above-ground carbon than preservation over a 40 year period if the wood is used for products with an average half life greater than 5 years.

  14. Organic loss in drained wetland: managing the carbon footprint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Durham, B.; van de Noort, R.; Martens, V.V.; Vorenhout, M.

    2012-01-01

    The recent installation of land drains at Star Carr, Yorkshire, UK, has been linked with loss of preservation quality in this important Mesolithic buried landscape, challenging the PARIS principle. Historically captured organic carbon, including organic artefacts, is being converted to soluble

  15. New training material management system. Tasks and first experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kummer, Simon; Schoenfelder, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Rather than bringing an end to the paper based era, the age of information technology has brought with it numerous types of publication and a plethora of new media. Anyone involved in documentation or digital paper based publication simply cannot escape the requirement for even more information to be printed and made available digitally in even shorter periods of time. Anyone wrestling with this issue is bound to hit upon buzz words such as ''content management'' and ''XML'' (Extensible Markup Language - ability to define the role of content within a document using tags). (orig.)

  16. New training material management system. Tasks and first experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kummer, Simon; Schoenfelder, Christian [AREVA NP GmbH (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    Rather than bringing an end to the paper based era, the age of information technology has brought with it numerous types of publication and a plethora of new media. Anyone involved in documentation or digital paper based publication simply cannot escape the requirement for even more information to be printed and made available digitally in even shorter periods of time. Anyone wrestling with this issue is bound to hit upon buzz words such as ''content management'' and ''XML'' (Extensible Markup Language - ability to define the role of content within a document using tags). (orig.)

  17. Competencies development and self-assessment in maintenance management e-training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathanassiou, Nikos; Pistofidis, Petros; Emmanouilidis, Christos

    2013-10-01

    The maintenance management function requires staff to possess a truly multidisciplinary set of skills. This includes competencies from engineering and information technology to health and safety, management and finance, while also taking into account the normative and legislative issues. This body of knowledge is rarely readily available within a single university course. The potential of e-learning in this field is significant, as it is a flexible and less costly alternative to conventional training. Furthermore, trainees can follow their own pace, as their available time is often a commodity. This article discusses the development of tools to support competencies development and self-assessment in maintenance management. Based on requirements arising from professional bodies' guidelines and a user survey, the developed tools implement a dedicated maintenance management training curriculum. The results from pilot testing on academic and industrial user groups are discussed and user evaluations are linked with specific e-learning design issues.

  18. THE TRAINING OF INTERNATIONAL MANAGERS – SUCCESS FACTOR IN INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion BOTESCU

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The amplification of extern economic activities made by firms demands new rules for those people that take part in transcultural actions. They have to deal with new challenges regarding the interpretation of actions or attitudes made by individuals or firms that have their activity in a cultural activity different from what they were accustomed to until that moment. International managers come in contact with people that not only have different objectives, but they also have different ways of achieving their objectives. The development of management activities is a laborious process that starts with the recurring and selecting of personnel and ends with the training and returning to their home country of the managers. The importance and the phases of the process of training managers that can action with competence in an intercultural context have represented the elements which I want to bring forward in this paper.

  19. Review of climate change impacts on future carbon stores and management of warm deserts of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michell L. Thomey; Paulette L. Ford; Matt C. Reeves; Deborah M. Finch; Marcy E. Litvak; Scott L. Collins

    2014-01-01

    Reducing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration through enhanced terrestrial carbon storage may help slow or reverse the rate of global climate change. As a result, Federal land management agencies, such as the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service and U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management, are implementing management policies to...

  20. Change management methodologies trained for automotive infotainment projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prostean, G.; Volker, S.; Hutanu, A.

    2017-01-01

    An Automotive Electronic Control Units (ECU) development project embedded within a car Environment is constantly under attack of a continuous flow of modifications of specifications throughout the life cycle. Root causes for those modifications are for instance simply software or hardware implementation errors or requirement changes to satisfy the forthcoming demands of the market to ensure the later commercial success. It is unavoidable that from the very beginning until the end of the project “requirement changes” will “expose” the agreed objectives defined by contract specifications, which are product features, budget, schedule and quality. The key discussions will focus upon an automotive radio-navigation (infotainment) unit, which challenges aftermarket devises such as smart phones. This competition stresses especially current used automotive development processes, which are fit into a 4 Year car development (introduction) cycle against a one-year update cycle of a smart phone. The research will focus the investigation of possible impacts of changes during all phases of the project: the Concept-Validation, Development and Debugging-Phase. Building a thorough understanding of prospective threats is of paramount importance in order to establish the adequate project management process to handle requirement changes. Personal automotive development experiences and Literature review of change- and configuration management software development methodologies led the authors to new conceptual models, which integrates into the structure of traditional development models used in automotive projects, more concretely of radio-navigation projects.

  1. A handbook for the junior financial management subspecialist-in-training.

    OpenAIRE

    Hine, Patricia S.

    1987-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited There is an ample body of directives, manuals and informative literature pertaining to Navy financial management, with the preponderance designed for the technician or mid-grade and senior officer. The officer assigned to a Navy financial management training billet, subspecialty coded 003 IT or 003 IS, by virtue of her or his inexperience, generally cannot comprehend such material and is ineligible and, in all like...

  2. TO THE QUESTION OF REDUCING FLIGHT DELAYS BY THE AIRLINE MANAGEMENT TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Pleskach

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article described in detail the problem of shortage of qualified managerial staff, which is currently facing the aviation industry, the impact of this problem on the regularity index, as well as management training opportunities at different stages of their work. Currently, the labor market is characterized by reduction skills, while quality control is largely determined by the level of professional competence of senior management and its ability to provide coordinated actions aimed at improving the efficiency of the airline.

  3. Management commitment to safety vs. employee perceived safety training and association with future injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yueng-Hsiang; Verma, Santosh K; Chang, Wen-Ruey; Courtney, Theodore K; Lombardi, David A; Brennan, Melanye J; Perry, Melissa J

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore and examine, specific to the restaurant industry, two important constructs emerging from the safety climate literature: employee perceptions of safety training and management commitment to safety. Are these two separate constructs? Are there both individual- and shared group-level safety perceptions for these two constructs? What are the relationships between these two constructs and future injury outcomes? A total of 419 employees from 34 limited-service restaurants participated in a prospective cohort study. Employees' perceptions of management commitment to safety and safety training and demographic variables were collected at the baseline. The survey questions were made available in three languages: English, Spanish, and Portuguese. For the following 12 weeks, participants reported their injury experience and weekly work hours. A multivariate negative binomial generalized estimating equation model with compound symmetry covariance structure was used to assess the association between the rate of self-reported injuries and measures of safety perceptions. Even though results showed that the correlation between employees'perceived safety training and management commitment to safety was high, confirmatory factor analysis of measurement models showed that two separate factors fit the model better than as two dimensions of a single factor. Homogeneity tests showed that there was a shared perception of the factor of management commitment to safety for the restaurant workers but there was no consistent perception among them for the factor of perceived safety training. Both individual employees'perceived management commitment to safety and perceptions of safety training can predict employees' subsequent injuries above and beyond demographic variables. However, there was no significant relationship between future injury and employees' shared perception of management commitment to safety. Further, our results suggest that the

  4. Disseminating contingency management: impacts of staff training and implementation at an opiate treatment program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzler, Bryan; Jackson, T Ron; Jones, Brinn E; Beadnell, Blair; Calsyn, Donald A

    2014-04-01

    Guided by a comprehensive implementation model, this study examined training/implementation processes for a tailored contingency management (CM) intervention instituted at a Clinical Trials Network-affiliate opioid treatment program (OTP). Staff-level training outcomes (intervention delivery skill, knowledge, and adoption readiness) were assessed before and after a 16-hour training, and again following a 90-day trial implementation period. Management-level implementation outcomes (intervention cost, feasibility, and sustainability) were assessed at study conclusion in a qualitative interview with OTP management. Intervention effectiveness was also assessed via independent chart review of trial CM implementation vs. a historical control period. Results included: 1) robust, durable increases in delivery skill, knowledge, and adoption readiness among trained staff; 2) positive managerial perspectives of intervention cost, feasibility, and sustainability; and 3) significant clinical impacts on targeted patient indices. Collective results offer support for the study's collaborative intervention design and the applied, skills-based focus of staff training processes. Implications for CM dissemination are discussed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. [Teaching non-technical skills for critical incidents: Crisis resource management training for medical students].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, A; Gillmann, B; Hardt, C; Döring, R; Beckers, S K; Rossaint, R

    2009-06-01

    Physicians have to demonstrate non-technical skills, such as communication and team leading skills, while coping with critical incidents. These skills are not taught during medical education. A crisis resource management (CRM) training was established for 4th to 6th year medical students using a full-scale simulator mannikin (Emergency Care Simulator, ECS, METI). The learning objectives of the course were defined according to the key points of Gaba's CRM concept. The training consisted of theoretical and practical parts (3 simulation scenarios with debriefing). Students' self-assessment before and after the training provided the data for evaluation of the training outcome. A total of 65 students took part in the training. The course was well received in terms of overall course quality, debriefings and didactic presentation, the mean overall mark being 1.4 (1: best, 6: worst). After the course students felt significantly more confident when facing incidents in clinical practice. The main learning objectives were achieved. The effectiveness of applying the widely used ECS full-scale simulator in interdisciplinary teaching has been demonstrated. The training exposes students to crisis resource management issues and motivates them to develop non-technical skills.

  6. High-Intensity Interval Training Versus Moderate-Intensity Continuous Training in the Prevention/Management of Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Syed R; Macaluso, Andrea; Pearson, Stephen J

    Moderate-intensity continuous training (MICT) has long been considered the most effective exercise treatment modality for the prevention and management of cardiovascular disease (CVD), but more recently high-intensity interval training (HIIT) has been viewed as a potential alternative to MICT in accruing such benefits. HIIT was initially found to induce significant improvements in numerous physiological and health-related indices, to a similar if not superior extent to MICT. Since then, many studies have attempted to explore the potential clinical utility of HIIT, relative to MICT, with respect to treating numerous cardiovascular conditions, such as coronary artery disease, heart failure, stroke, and hypertension. Despite this, however, the efficacy of HIIT in reversing the specific symptoms and risk factors of these cardiovascular pathologies is not well understood. HIIT is often perceived as very strenuous, which could render it unsafe for those at risk of or afflicted with CVD, but these issues are also yet to be reviewed. Furthermore, the optimal HIIT protocol for each of the CVD cohorts has not been established. Thus, the purpose of this review article is to (1) evaluate the efficacy of HIIT relative to MICT in the prevention and management of cardiovascular conditions, and (2) explore any potential safety issues surrounding the suitability and/or tolerability of HIIT for patients with CVD, and the potential optimal prescriptive variables of HIIT for application in the clinical environment.

  7. Training for Planning and Management: Improved Management Systems in Higher Education in Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillis, Kevin M.

    The management crisis within higher education in developing countries reflects the wider crisis in educational management and public administration. The contemporary management context is further threatened by narrowing management capacity and capability due to the continued dwindling of already scarce resources and the increasing across-the-board…

  8. Impacts of forest and land management on biodiversity and carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerie Kapos; Werner A. Kurz; Toby Gardner; Joice Ferreira; Manuel Guariguata; Lian Pin Koh; Stephanie Mansourian; John A. Parrotta; Nokea Sasaki; Christine B. Schmitt; Jos Barlow; Markku Kanninen; Kimiko Okabe; Yude Pan; Ian D. Thompson; Nathalie van Vliet

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the management of forest and non-forest land can contribute significantly to reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation. Such changes can include both forest management actions - such as improving the protection and restoration of existing forests, introducing ecologically responsible logging practices and regenerating forest on degraded...

  9. Carbon emissions reduction strategies in Africa from improved waste management: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couth, R.; Trois, C.

    2010-01-01

    The paper summarises a literature review into waste management practices across Africa as part of a study to assess methods to reduce carbon emissions. Research shows that the average organic content for urban Municipal Solid Waste in Africa is around 56% and its degradation is a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. The paper concludes that the most practical and economic way to manage waste in the majority of urban communities in Africa and therefore reduce carbon emissions is to separate waste at collection points to remove dry recyclables by door to door collection, compost the remaining biogenic carbon waste in windrows, using the maturated compost as a substitute fertilizer and dispose the remaining fossil carbon waste in controlled landfills.

  10. Management Systems of Gdynia Maritime University’s the Training Ships Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Muszynska

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this elaboration is to present management systems working in Gdynia Maritime University. Compliance with the International Safety Management Code (ISM Code, the International Safety Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS Code and with the Quality Management System complies with ISO 9001 standard, allows to ensure safe operations of ships and to meet requirements of regulations. In the theoretical parts of this elaboration it has been described the definition of the quality, according to different authors, as well as Quality Management Systems. Whole activity of the Gdynia Maritime University’s ships and Shipowner Brunch is covered by ISM and ISPS Code. The International Safety Management, it is a system of the training ships’ safe operation and prevention of pollution, elaborated by International Maritime Organization (IMO. ISPS system consists of detailed Ship Security Plan, is divided into unclassified part and the part which is classified and owned to shipowner. The Quality Management System refers to The University’s activity, and only the part of the procedures, which covers student’s trainings refers to the ships and Shipowner Branch. In view of very specific operational activity of the training ships: “Dar M?odzie?y” and “Horyzont II”, only the principle conventions, acts and regulations, which the Shipowner and the ships are obliged to obey, has been expressed.

  11. Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2): Science Overview and A-Train Synergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, David

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) was designed to provide global estimates of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) with the sensitivity, accuracy and sampling density needed to quantify regional scale carbon sources and sinks and characterize their behavior over the annual cycle.

  12. Carbon Emission Reduction Potential through Sustainable Forest Management in Forest Concession of PT Salaki Summa Sejahtera, Province of West Sumatera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwan Hilwan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A management unit (MU of a forest concession holder implementing the sustainable forest management (SFM principles, could be involved in reducing Emmission from Reforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+ and carbon trading project. The fact the strategic in implementing the REDD+ and carbon trading in MU level is still lack of pilot project and methodology. Therefore, some scenarios must be developed and tested to find out the best potential of carbon credit in MU level. The objectives of the research were: to calculate carbon credit in some SFM scenarios, to analyze of carbon trading project feasibility, and to determine carbon stock recovery period of logged over area (LOA. The result revealed that carbon stock and carbon credit of LOA was affected by timber cutting intensity.  The 6th scenario with lowest annual allowable cutting (AAC obtained greater carbon credit and profit coming from timber harvesting income and carbon trading. In other hand, this scenario has shortest duration of carbon stock recovery period (27 years and shorter than its cutting cycle.  In this case, the MU has to recalculate and to decrease its AAC to have highest benefits from carbon trading in the same cutting cycle period.  It will provide double benefits from carbon trading, those are contribution in achieving the SFM purposes (production, ecology, social and climate change mitigation.Keywords: sustainable forest management, AAC, carbon stocks, recovery period, carbon trading

  13. EVALUATION OF PRE AND POST TRAINING PRACTICES REGARDING MANAGEMENT OF DIABETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Mohanty

    1995-09-01

    Full Text Available The study was conducted on 112 diabetic patients in S.S. Hospital.Varanasi to evaluate the pre- and post- training practices regarding management of Diabetes mellitus. A pre-tested structured respondent schedule urn used to collect information regarding the socio-economic status and some of the managerial aspects of the disease by questionaire cum interview method. Education cum training was imparted to all the respondents in the first three months and in the fourth month evaluation programme was carried out and their level ofpractive regarding different aspects of diabetic management were assessed by using seven point score method. It was found that training was proved effective for the aspect "Physical exer­cise" and "Restricted diet" but slight improvement in the practive score was seen in "Precaution in Special Hygienic Condition" aspects. So. con­tinuous education programme was needed to improve their practice rate.

  14. THE SPORT FUNCTION OF THE HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT WITH A SPECIAL REVIEW ON THE TRAINING TECNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđe Nićin

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Human resources management in sport treats primarly the sport functions as the tasks of the increase of the training process, which implicitly brings to the high and reliable sport results. Training technology is the most responsible for the accomplishment of the high sport achievemens, but organized, planned, programmed, leaded, control led, and corrected by the experts, that is, by the team experts, at the head with a coach. The aim of the study is to, taking in to consideration all the sport and other functions of the human resource management, analyze participation and importance of the training technology in the creation of a sportsman and in maintaining of his resources, to achieve great probability in achieving stable sport results, that is, maintaining sport form.

  15. NURSING CARE KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT BASED TRAINING DECREASE NOSOCOMIAL INFECTION INCIDEN IN POST SECTIO CESAREA PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahsan Ahsan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Model of nursing care based on knowledge management can reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections through the performance of nurses in the prevention of infection. Nursing care based on knowledge management is established from identi fi cation knowledge which is required, prevention performance of nosocomial infections post caesarean section. Nosocomial infections component consists of wound culture result. Method: This study was an observational study with a quasy experimental design. The population were all of nursing staff who working in obstetrics installation and a number of patients who is treated in hospitals A and B post sectio caesarea. Sample is comparised a total population all the nursing staff who worked in obstetrics installation according to criteria of the sample, and most of patients were taken care by nursing staff post caesarean section which is taken by random sampling 15 patients. Data was collected through observation sheets and examination of the wound culture. Data analysis which is used the t test. Result: The result was showed that there was signi fi cant difference in the incidence of nosocomial infection in patients with post sesctio caesarea in hospital before and after nursing care training based on knowledge management (tvalue = 2.316 and p = 0.028 < α = 0.05 level, and the incidence of nosocomial infection was lower after training than before training. Discussion: It can be concluded that training knowledge management based on nursing care effectives to reduce Incidence of Nosocomial Infections in Patients after Sectio Caesarea.

  16. Errors and Understanding: The Effects of Error-Management Training on Creative Problem-Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robledo, Issac C.; Hester, Kimberly S.; Peterson, David R.; Barrett, Jamie D.; Day, Eric A.; Hougen, Dean P.; Mumford, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    People make errors in their creative problem-solving efforts. The intent of this article was to assess whether error-management training would improve performance on creative problem-solving tasks. Undergraduates were asked to solve an educational leadership problem known to call for creative thought where problem solutions were scored for…

  17. Ready to Lead? A Look into Jewish Religious School Principal Leadership and Management Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaisben, Eran

    2018-01-01

    Although most Jewish supplementary religious school principals have graduated from various academic training programs, there are no data about how these programs sufficiently prepare educational leaders. This study examined the essential leadership and management skills of effective Jewish religious school leaders, and assessed their preparation…

  18. Interaction and educational design of mobile equipment for crisis management training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke

    2011-01-01

    As researchers and designers of crisis management training in mobile learning settings, we need to consider ways in which principles of educational design and interaction design can co-exist, in order to reach a higher quality of the analysis and design process. The paper is an input...

  19. Teaching Quality Management Model for the Training of Innovation Ability and the Multilevel Decomposition Indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xingjiang; Yao, Chen; Zheng, Jianmin

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the training of undergraduate students' innovation ability. On top of the theoretical framework of the Quality Function Deployment (QFD), we propose a teaching quality management model. Based on this model, we establish a multilevel decomposition indicator system, which integrates innovation ability characterized by four…

  20. Cost-Effectiveness of Management Training in the Informal Sector. Discussion Paper No. 101.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nubler, Irmgard

    A research project in the Ivory Coast, Kenya, and Tanzania evaluated the cost effectiveness of management training seminars for women entrepreneurs in the informal sector. Women, a large and growing part of entrepreneurs, had less access to needed resources, skills, and information than men. Reasons for failure to study the cost effectiveness and…