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Sample records for trainee performance depending

  1. Quality of colonoscopy performance among gastroenterology and surgical trainees: a need for common training standards for all trainees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyden, J E; Doherty, G A; Hanley, A; McNamara, D A; Shields, C; Leader, M; Murray, F E; Patchett, S E; Harewood, G C

    2011-11-01

    Cecal intubation and polyp detection rates are objective measures of colonoscopy performance. Minimum cecal intubation rates greater than 90% have been endorsed by the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) and the Joint Advisory Group (JAG) UK. Performance data for medical and surgical trainee endoscopists are limited, and we used endoscopy quality parameters to compare these two groups. Retrospective review of all single-endoscopist colonoscopies done by gastroenterology and surgical trainees ("registrars," equivalent to fellows, postgraduate year 5) with more than two years' endoscopy experience, in 2006 and 2007 at a single academic medical center. Completion rates and polyp detection rates for endoscopists performing more than 50 colonoscopies during the study period were audited. Colonoscopy withdrawal time was prospectively observed in a representative subset of 140 patients. Among 3079 audited single-endoscopist colonoscopies, seven gastroenterology trainees performed 1998 procedures and six surgery trainees performed 1081. The crude completion rate was 82%, 84% for gastroenterology trainees and 78% for surgery trainees (P gastroenterology trainees, and 84% for surgical trainees (P gastroenterology and surgical trainees, respectively (P gastroenterology trainees 14% and surgical trainees 9% (P = 0.0065). In the prospectively audited procedures, median withdrawal time was greater in the gastroenterology trainee group and polyp detection rates correlated closely with withdrawal time (r = 0.99). The observed disparity in endoscopic performance between surgical and gastroenterology trainees suggests the need for a combined or unitary approach to endoscopy training for specialist medical and surgical trainees. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Safe laparoscopic colorectal surgery performed by trainees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langhoff, Peter Koch; Schultz, Martin; Harvald, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery for colorectal cancer is safe, but there have been hesitations to implement the technique in all departments. One of the reasons for this may be suboptimal learning possibilities since supervised trainees have not been allowed to do the operations to an adequate extent...

  3. Making robust assessments of specialist trainees' workplace performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, J M; Castanelli, D J; Chen, Y; Jolly, B

    2017-02-01

    Workplace-based assessments should provide a reliable measure of trainee performance, but have met with mixed success. We proposed that using an entrustability scale, where supervisors scored trainees on the level of supervision required for the case would improve the utility of compulsory mini-clinical evaluation exercise (CEX) assessments in a large anaesthesia training program. We analysed mini-CEX scores from all Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists trainees submitted to an online database over a 12-month period. Supervisors' scores were adjusted for the expected supervision requirement for the case for trainees at different stages of training. We used generalisability theory to determine score reliability. 7808 assessments were available for analysis. Supervision requirements decreased significantly (P  0.7) with a feasible number of assessments. Adjusting scores against the expected supervision requirement considerably improved reliability, with G > 0.8 achieved with only nine assessments. Three per cent of trainees generated average mini-CEX scores below the expected standard. Using an entrustment scoring system, where supervisors score trainees on the level of supervision required, mini-CEX scores demonstrated moderate reliability within a feasible number of assessments, and evidence of validity. When scores were adjusted against an expected standard, underperforming trainees could be identified, and reliability much improved. Taken together with other evidence on trainee ability, the mini-CEX is of sufficient reliability for inclusion in high stakes decisions on trainee progression towards independent specialist practice. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Effect of Engaging Trainees by Assessing Peer Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loumann Krogh, Charlotte; Ringsted, Charlotte; Kromann, Charles B

    2014-01-01

    during training. Outcome measures were in-training performance and performance, both of which were measured two weeks after the course. Trainees' performances were videotaped and assessed by two expert raters using a checklist that included a global rating. Trainees' satisfaction with the training...... was also evaluated. RESULTS: The intervention group obtained a significantly higher overall in-training performance score than the control group: mean checklist score 20.87 (SD 2.51) versus 19.14 (SD 2.65) P = 0.003 and mean global rating 3.25 SD (0.99) versus 2.95 (SD 1.09) P = 0.014. Postcourse...

  5. Correlating Trainee Attributes to Performance in 3D CAD Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamade, Ramsey F.; Artail, Hassan A.; Sikstrom, Sverker

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this exploratory study is to identify trainee attributes relevant for development of skills in 3D computer-aided design (CAD). Design/methodology/approach: Participants were trained to perform cognitive tasks of comparable complexity over time. Performance data were collected on the time needed to construct test models, and…

  6. Quality of colonoscopy performance among gastroenterology and surgical trainees: a need for common training standards for all trainees?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leyden, J E

    2011-11-01

    Cecal intubation and polyp detection rates are objective measures of colonoscopy performance. Minimum cecal intubation rates greater than 90% have been endorsed by the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) and the Joint Advisory Group (JAG) UK. Performance data for medical and surgical trainee endoscopists are limited, and we used endoscopy quality parameters to compare these two groups.

  7. An audit of ultrasonography performed and reported by trainee radiologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eze, K C; Marchie, T T; Eze, C U

    2009-01-01

    Proforma information, instructions and procedures of training in radiology are lacking in Nigeria. To describe the errors in ultrasonography performed by unsupervised trainee radiologists. The radiology records of all ultrasound scans (USS) carried out and all reports that came back to the unit of the authors on account of misdiagnosis, doubtful diagnosis, misinformation or error in the reports were studied. The patients with the returned reports were rescanned where available by consultants and the collected data analysed. A total of 4680 patients had ultrasound studies without supervision resulting in 605 (12.93%) queried reports. The USS scans of 235 (5.02%) patients were repeated with consultants in attendance resulting in significant change in reports of 95 (2.03%) patients. Analysis of the request cards of 605 queried reports showed omission of relevant clinical information 463 (76.53%), outright wrong information 65 (10.73%),and unconventional abbreviations 139 (22.98%), while 493 (81.49%) were completed by a nurse, medical student or junior resident. Typographical errors comprised 174 (28.76%) of the 605 queried reports. False negative error was the highest type of error seen in 55 (57.89%) of the 95 patients with significant change in their report after repeat scan as lesions not detected were not documented. Trainee radiologists make significant errors in carrying out and reporting ultrasonography without adequate direct supervision of the study by their training consultants. Majority of the errors originate from lack of accurate filling of the patients request cards by the requesting physicians, lack of adequate preparation for the intended study, and typographical errors in writing reports. False negative reports are by far the greatest cause of errors recorded as lesions not detected were not documented.

  8. Effect of Engaging Trainees by Assessing Peer Performance: A Randomised Controlled Trial Using Simulated Patient Scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Loumann Krogh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The aim of this study was to explore the learning effect of engaging trainees by assessing peer performance during simulation-based training. Methods. Eighty-four final year medical students participated in the study. The intervention involved trainees assessing peer performance during training. Outcome measures were in-training performance and performance, both of which were measured two weeks after the course. Trainees’ performances were videotaped and assessed by two expert raters using a checklist that included a global rating. Trainees’ satisfaction with the training was also evaluated. Results. The intervention group obtained a significantly higher overall in-training performance score than the control group: mean checklist score 20.87 (SD 2.51 versus 19.14 (SD 2.65 P=0.003 and mean global rating 3.25 SD (0.99 versus 2.95 (SD 1.09 P=0.014. Postcourse performance did not show any significant difference between the two groups. Trainees who assessed peer performance were more satisfied with the training than those who did not: mean 6.36 (SD 1.00 versus 5.74 (SD 1.33 P=0.025. Conclusion. Engaging trainees in the assessment of peer performance had an immediate effect on in-training performance, but not on the learning outcome measured two weeks later. Trainees had a positive attitude towards the training format.

  9. Decreasing radiation doses in digital subtraction angiographies consecutively performed by trainees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, G.; Zhao, W.; Zheng, L.; Fan, X.; Yin, Q.; Liu, X.

    2012-01-01

    Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) performed by trainees may be related to increased radiation exposure. This study was aimed to investigate and quantify this learning effect, with fluoroscopy time and dose-area product (DAP) as parameters. We collected procedure data of the first to the fortieth cerebral DSA consecutively performed by 13 trainees in a training centre. DAP, procedure time, fluoroscopy time, number of cine-frames of the first 20 DSA procedures performed by these trainees were compared with that of the second 20 procedures. There was no significant difference concerning the procedure time between the first and the second 20 procedures (56.3 ±29.5 vs 51.5±20.2 min, p = 0.113). Numbers of cine-frames were very similar between the first and the second 20 procedures (750.7 ±290.3 vs 744.5 ±188.7, p = 0.830). Fluoroscopy time of the first 20 procedures was significantly longer than that of the second 20 procedures (17.8 ±15.4 vs 12.6 ±9.0, p = 0.001). DAP of the first 20 procedures was significantly higher than that of the second 20 procedures (6.4 ±4.9 vs 3.8 ±1.8, p < 0.001). DAP was correlated significantly with the performer's experience (R = -0.288, p < 0.001). There exists a learning effect of radiation exposure during cerebral DSA procedures performed by trainees. The learning effect is significant during the first 20 procedures, and becomes insignificant after 20 procedures. Insufficient catheter skills in novice trainees may be one reason for this effect. (authors)

  10. Knowledge Tracing and Prediction of Future Trainee Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jastrzembski, Tiffany S; Gluck, Kevin A; Gunzelmann, Glenn

    2006-01-01

    ...). This model represents the system's estimate of the student's current knowledge or skill level, established from a performance history. Knowledge tracing (Aleven & Koedinger, 2002; Anderson, Conrad, & Corbett, 1989...

  11. Simulator training and non-technical factors improve laparoscopic performance among OBGYN trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlborg, Liv; Hedman, Leif; Nisell, Henry; Felländer-Tsai, Li; Enochsson, Lars

    2013-10-01

    To investigate how simulator training and non-technical factors affect laparoscopic performance among residents in obstetrics and gynecology. In this prospective study, trainees were randomized into three groups. The first group was allocated to proficiency-based training in the LapSimGyn(®) virtual reality simulator. The second group received additional structured mentorship during subsequent laparoscopies. The third group served as control group. At baseline an operation was performed and visuospatial ability, flow and self-efficacy were assessed. All groups subsequently performed three tubal occlusions. Self-efficacy and flow were assessed before and/or after each operation. Simulator training was conducted at the Center for Advanced Medical Simulation and Training, Karolinska University Hospital. Sterilizations were performed at each trainee's home clinic. Twenty-eight trainees/residents from 21 hospitals in Sweden were included. Visuospatial ability was tested by the Mental Rotation Test-A. Flow and self-efficacy were assessed by validated scales and questionnaires. Laparoscopic performance was measured as the duration of surgery. Visuospatial ability, self-efficacy and flow were correlated to the laparoscopic performance using Spearman's correlations. Differences between groups were analyzed by the Mann-Whitney U-test. No differences across groups were detected at baseline. Self-efficacy scores before and flow scores after the third operation were significantly higher in the trained groups. Duration of surgery was significantly shorter in the trained groups. Flow and self-efficacy correlate positively with laparoscopic performance. Simulator training and non-technical factors appear to improve the laparoscopic performance among trainees/residents in obstetrics and gynecology. © 2013 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  12. CHANGES IN FLIGHT TRAINEE PERFORMANCE FOLLOWING SYNTHETIC HELICOPTER FLIGHT TRAINING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CARO, PAUL W., JR.; ISLEY, ROBERT N.

    A STUDY WAS CONDUCTED AT THE U.S. ARMY PRIMARY HELICOPTER SCHOOL, FORT WOLTERS, TEXAS, TO DETERMINE WHETHER THE USE OF A HELICOPTER TRAINING DEVICE WOULD IMPROVE STUDENT PERFORMANCE DURING SUBSEQUENT HELICOPTER CONTACT FLIGHT TRAINING. SUBJECTS WERE TWO EXPERIMENTAL GROUPS AND TWO CONTROL GROUPS OF WARRANT OFFICER CANDIDATES ENROLLED FOR A…

  13. The Effects of Formalism on Teacher Trainees' Algebraic and Geometric Interpretation of the Notions of Linear Dependency/Independency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertekin, E.; Solak, S.; Yazici, E.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the effects of formalism in teaching on primary and secondary school mathematics teacher trainees' algebraic and geometric interpretations of the notions of linear dependency/independency. Quantitative research methods are drawn in order to determine differences in success levels between algebraic and geometric…

  14. PERSONALITY TYPE AND TRANSLATION PERFORMANCE OF PERSIAN TRANSLATOR TRAINEES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Shaki

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated the relationship between the personality typology of a sample of Iranian translation students and their translation quality in terms of expressive, appellative, and informative text types. The study also attempted to identify the personality types that can perform better in English to Persian translation of the three text types. For that purpose, the personality type and the translation quality of the participants was assessed using Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI personality test and translation quality assessment (TQA, respectively. The analysis of the data revealed that the personality type of the participants seemed relevant to the translation quality of all the text types. The translation quality of the participants with intuitive and thinking types was significantly better than the sensing type counterparts in translating expressive texts. The participants with intuitive and feeling types also performed better than their counterparts with sensing type in translation of the informative text. Moreover, the participants with intuitive, feeling, and thinking personality types performed more successfully than the participants with sensing type in translation of the appellative text. The findings of the study are discussed in light of the existing research literature.

  15. The laparoscopic performance of novice surgical trainees: testing for acquisition, loss, and reacquisition of psychomotor skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor, J A; Zoha, F

    2005-08-01

    It has been suggested that virtual reality (VR) might be useful for the selection of surgical trainees and the measurement of technical performance during preoperative training and retraining. This study was designed to determine whether it is possible to define and measure the acquisition, loss, and reacquisition of psychomotor skills in novice surgical trainees. Novice surgical trainees (NSTs n = 10, junior surgical registrars with little or no prior experience with laparoscopic surgery) were tested and retested after 1 month using the Minimally Invasive Surgical Trainer-Virtual Reality. Two tasks were used: the simple task [stretch diathermy (SD)] and the more complex task [manipulation diathermy (MD)]. The score was derived from the time taken to complete the task and the number of errors that occurred. Acquisition is the difference between the first and last score of the first training session, loss is the difference in score that occurs between the last score of the first training session and the first score of the second training session, and reacquisition is the difference in the first and last scores of the second training session. A performance criterion level was defined for each task by testing a group of experienced laparoscopic surgeons (n = 10). Groups were compared using the nonparametric Wilcoxon signed rank test, with p psychomotor skills in individual NSTs and to compare them with a predefined performance criterion level. This study defines parameters that will be useful in repeated training sessions of NSTs in the preoperative phase of training and during retraining.

  16. SELECTION OF ENDOCRINOLOGY SUBSPECIALTY TRAINEES: WHICH APPLICANT CHARACTERISTICS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH PERFORMANCE DURING FELLOWSHIP TRAINING?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natt, Neena; Chang, Alice Y; Berbari, Elie F; Kennel, Kurt A; Kearns, Ann E

    2016-01-01

    To determine which residency characteristics are associated with performance during endocrinology fellowship training as measured by competency-based faculty evaluation scores and faculty global ratings of trainee performance. We performed a retrospective review of interview applications from endocrinology fellows who graduated from a single academic institution between 2006 and 2013. Performance measures included competency-based faculty evaluation scores and faculty global ratings. The association between applicant characteristics and measures of performance during fellowship was examined by linear regression. The presence of a laudatory comparative statement in the residency program director's letter of recommendation (LoR) or experience as a chief resident was significantly associated with competency-based faculty evaluation scores (β = 0.22, P = .001; and β = 0.24, P = .009, respectively) and faculty global ratings (β = 0.85, P = .006; and β = 0.96, P = .015, respectively). The presence of a laudatory comparative statement in the residency program director's LoR or experience as a chief resident were significantly associated with overall performance during subspecialty fellowship training. Future studies are needed in other cohorts to determine the broader implications of these findings in the application and selection process.

  17. Identifying Gaps in the Performance of Pediatric Trainees Who Receive Marginal/Unsatisfactory Ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Su-Ting T; Tancredi, Daniel J; Schwartz, Alan; Guillot, Ann; Burke, Ann; Trimm, R Franklin; Guralnick, Susan; Mahan, John D; Gifford, Kimberly A

    2018-01-01

    To perform a derivation study to determine in which subcompetencies marginal/unsatisfactory pediatric residents had the greatest deficits compared with their satisfactorily performing peers and which subcompetencies best discriminated between marginal/unsatisfactory and satisfactorily performing residents. Multi-institutional cohort study of all 21 milestones (rated on four or five levels) reported to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, and global marginal/unsatisfactory versus satisfactory performance reported to the American Board of Pediatrics. Data were gathered in 2013-2014. For each level of training (postgraduate year [PGY] 1, 2, and 3), mean differences between milestone levels of residents with marginal/unsatisfactory and satisfactory performance adjusted for clustering by program and C-statistics (area under receiver operating characteristic curve) were calculated. A Bonferroni-corrected significance threshold of .0007963 was used to account for multiple comparisons. Milestone and overall performance evaluations for 1,704 pediatric residents in 41 programs were obtained. For PGY1s, two subcompetencies had almost a one-point difference in milestone levels between marginal/unsatisfactory and satisfactory trainees and outstanding discrimination (≥ 0.90): organize/prioritize (0.93; C-statistic: 0.91) and transfer of care (0.97; C-statistic: 0.90). The largest difference between marginal/unsatisfactory and satisfactory PGY2s was trustworthiness (0.78). The largest differences between marginal/unsatisfactory and satisfactory PGY3s were ethical behavior (1.17), incorporating feedback (1.03), and professionalization (0.96). For PGY2s and PGY3s, no subcompetencies had outstanding discrimination. Marginal/unsatisfactory pediatric residents had different subcompetency gaps at different training levels. While PGY1s may have global deficits, senior residents may have different performance deficiencies requiring individualized counseling and

  18. Radiographers and trainee radiologists reporting accident radiographs: A comparative plain film-reading performance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buskov, L.; Abild, A.; Christensen, A.; Holm, O.; Hansen, C.; Christensen, H.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To compare the diagnostic accuracy and clinical validity of reporting radiographers with that of trainee radiologists whom they have recently joined in reporting emergency room radiographs at Bispebjerg University Hospital. Materials and methods: Plain radiographs of the appendicular skeleton from 1000 consecutive emergency room patients were included in the study: 500 primarily reported by radiographers and 500 by trainee radiologists. The final reporting was subsequently undertaken by a consultant radiologist in consensus with an orthopaedic surgeon. Two observers classified reports as either true positive/negative or false positive/negative based on the final report, which was considered the reference standard. To evaluate the severity of incorrect primary reports, errors were graded into three categories concerning clinical impact and erroneous reports graded as the most severe category were subsequently analysed. Mann–Whitney and Chi-squared tests were used to compare differences and associations between radiographers versus trainee radiologists regarding film reporting. Results: The sensitivity for correct diagnosis was 99% for reporting radiographers and 94% for trainee radiologists. The specificity was found to be 97% for reporting radiographers and 99% for trainee radiologists. Radiographers missed significantly fewer fractures (n = 2) than trainee radiologists (n = 14; p = 0.006) but had a higher, but not significant, degree of overcalling. No significant difference was found between groups regarding clinical impact of incorrect reporting. Conclusion: Trained radiographers report accident radiographs of the extremities with high accuracy and constitute a qualified resource to help meet increasing workload and demands in quality standards.

  19. Effect of exposure to good vs poor medical trainee performance on attending physician ratings of subsequent performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Peter; O'Neill, Paul; Mann, Karen; Eva, Kevin W

    2012-12-05

    Competency-based models of education require assessments to be based on individuals' capacity to perform, yet the nature of human judgment may fundamentally limit the extent to which such assessment is accurately possible. To determine whether recent observations of the Mini Clinical Evaluation Exercise (Mini-CEX) performance of postgraduate year 1 physicians influence raters' scores of subsequent performances, consistent with either anchoring bias (scores biased similar to previous experience) or contrast bias (scores biased away from previous experience). Internet-based randomized, blinded experiment using videos of Mini-CEX assessments of postgraduate year 1 trainees interviewing new internal medicine patients. Participants were 41 attending physicians from England and Wales experienced with the Mini-CEX, with 20 watching and scoring 3 good trainee performances and 21 watching and scoring 3 poor performances. All then watched and scored the same 3 borderline video performances. The study was completed between July and November 2011. The primary outcome was scores assigned to the borderline videos, using a 6-point Likert scale (anchors included: 1, well below expectations; 3, borderline; 6, well above expectations). Associations were tested in a multivariable analysis that included participants' sex, years of practice, and the stringency index (within-group z score of initial 3 ratings). The mean rating scores assigned by physicians who viewed borderline video performances following exposure to good performances was 2.7 (95% CI, 2.4-3.0) vs 3.4 (95% CI, 3.1-3.7) following exposure to poor performances (difference of 0.67 [95% CI, 0.28-1.07]; P = .001). Borderline videos were categorized as consistent with failing scores in 33 of 60 assessments (55%) in those exposed to good performances and in 15 of 63 assessments (24%) in those exposed to poor performances (P performances compared with 25 of 63 assessments (39.5%) in those exposed to poor performances (P poor

  20. Re-Searching Secondary Teacher Trainees in Distance Education and Face-to-Face Mode: Study of Their Background Variables, Personal Characteristics and Academic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Mamta; Gakhar, Sudesh

    2011-01-01

    The present investigation was conducted to describe and compare the background variables, personal characteristics and academic performance of secondary teacher trainees in distance education and face-to-face mode. The results indicated that teacher trainees in distance education differed from their counterparts in age, marital status, sex and…

  1. Assessment of classroom performance of trainees in nondestructive testing (NDT) training courses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elauria, Erla Rhysa R.; Banaga, Renato T.; Loterina, Roel A.

    2009-01-01

    Criterion-referenced tests in an NDT course for Radiography, Level 2, are constructed and evaluated using item analysis such as item difficulty index and discrimination index. A 10-part test item was given to 37 students in a Radiography course and an item analysis of the test questions was conducted right after.The results showed that the indices of difficulty of the test items were within the desired values. Three of the test items were relatively easy questions (items 2, 3, and 4). Three of the test items were moderately difficult (items 1, 5, and 10). The discriminating indices of the items revealed acceptable values for all but a low value of 0.2 for two test items (item 2 and 10) were measured. These two items should be modified to increase their discriminating ability or eliminated. The study concluded that the said test is a reliable test with adequate discriminatory power in assessing classroom performance of NDT trainees. The study recommended that similar studies be conducted on other NDT methods like Ultrasonic Testing, Eddy Current Testing, and Surface Methods Testing. (author)

  2. RE-SEARCHING SECONDARY TEACHER TRAINEES IN DISTANCE EDUCATION AND FACE-TO-FACE MODE: Study of Their Background Variables, Personal Characteristics and Academic Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamta GARG

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation was conducted to describe and compare the background variables, personal characteristics and academic performance of secondary teacher trainees in distance education and face-to-face mode. The results indicated that teacher trainees in distance education differed from their counterparts in age, marital status, sex and socio-economic status. Distance trainees outperformed the on-campus trainees on their preference for left-hemispheric styles of learning and thinking, budgeting time, learning motivation, overall study habits, academic motivation, attitude towards education, work methods, interpersonal relations, and on their perception about relevance of course content of theory papers in B.Ed., but on-campus trainees outperformed distance trainees on preference for right-hemispheric learning styles, need for achievement, motivation for sports, attitude towards teaching profession, child-centered practices, teachers, overall attitude towards teaching along with their perception for development of teaching skills and attitude, personality development during B.Ed. course. In academic performance distance trainees lag behind the on-campus trainee in their marks in theory papers, skills in teaching and in aggregate.

  3. The Effect of Self and In Vivo Desensitization on Counselor Trainee Anxiety and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Thomas V.

    The rationale, planning and implementing of this research is discussed in terms of its three hypotheses: (1) that both self desensitization and in vivo desensitization would result in lower Fear Index and Anxiety Differential scores of counselor trainees just prior to communicating with a role playing client in a counseling room where they are…

  4. Evaluation of trainees' ability to perform obstetrical ultrasound using simulation: challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalouhi, Gihad E; Bernardi, Valeria; Gueneuc, Alexandra; Houssin, Isabelle; Stirnemann, Julien J; Ville, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Evaluation of trainee's ability in obstetrical ultrasound is a time-consuming process, which requires involving patients as volunteers. With the use of obstetrical ultrasound simulators, virtual reality could help in assessing competency and evaluating trainees in this field. The objective of the study was to test the validity of an obstetrical ultrasound simulator as a tool for evaluating trainees following structured training by comparing scores obtained on obstetrical ultrasound simulator with those obtained on volunteers and by assessing correlations between scores of images and of dexterity given by 2 blinded examiners. Trainees, taking the 2013 French national examination for the practice of obstetrical ultrasound were asked to obtain standardized ultrasound planes both on volunteer pregnant women and on an obstetrical ultrasound simulator. These planes included measurements of biparietal diameter, abdominal circumference, and femur length as well as reference planes for cardiac 4-chamber and outflow tracts, kidneys, stomach/diaphragm, spine, and face. Images were stored and evaluated subsequently by 2 national examiners who scored each picture according to previously established quality criteria. Dexterity was also evaluated and subjectively scored between 0 and 10. The Raghunathan's modification of Pearson, Filon's z, Spearman's rank correlation, and analysis of variance tests were used to assess correlations between the scores by the 2 examiners and scores of dexterity and also to compare the final scores between the 2 different methods. We evaluated 29 trainees. The mean dexterity scores in simulation (6.5 ± 2.0) and real examination (5.9 ± 2.3) were comparable (P = .31). Scores with an obstetrical ultrasound simulator were significantly higher than those obtained on volunteers (P = .027). Nevertheless, there was a good correlation between the scores of the 2 examiners judging on simulation (R = 0.888) and on volunteers (R = 0.873) (P = .81). An

  5. Validity and reliability of global operative assessment of laparoscopic skills (GOALS) in novice trainees performing a laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramp, Kelvin H; van Det, Marc J; Hoff, Christiaan; Lamme, Bas; Veeger, Nic J G M; Pierie, Jean-Pierre E N

    2015-01-01

    Global Operative Assessment of Laparoscopic Skills (GOALS) assessment has been designed to evaluate skills in laparoscopic surgery. A longitudinal blinded study of randomized video fragments was conducted to estimate the validity and reliability of GOALS in novice trainees. In total, 10 trainees each performed 6 consecutive laparoscopic cholecystectomies. Sixty procedures were recorded on video. Video fragments of (1) opening of the peritoneum; (2) dissection of Calot's triangle and achievement of critical view of safety; and (3) dissection of the gallbladder from the liver bed were blinded, randomized, and rated by 2 consultant surgeons using GOALS. Also, a grade was given for overall competence. The correlation of GOALS with live observation Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) scores was calculated. Construct validity was estimated using the Friedman 2-way analysis of variance by ranks and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. The interrater reliability was calculated using the absolute and consistency agreement 2-way random-effects model intraclass correlation coefficient. A high correlation was found between mean GOALS score (r = 0.879, p = 0.021) and mean OSATS score. The GOALS score increased significantly across the 6 procedures (p = 0.002). The trainees performed significantly better on their sixth when compared with their first cholecystectomy (p = 0.004). The consistency agreement interrater reliability was 0.37 for the mean GOALS score (p = 0.002) and 0.55 for overall competence (p < 0.001) of the 3 video fragments. The validity observed in this randomized blinded longitudinal study supports the existing evidence that GOALS is a valid tool for assessment of novice trainees. A relatively low reliability was found in this study. Copyright © 2014 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Assessing trainees' oral performance in a Chilean teacher trainingprogram: A corpus-based study

    OpenAIRE

    Ortega Pérez, Maritza Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    The present paper reports the implementation of syllabus innovations in EFL teacher education in Chile after diagnosing a lack of language achievement standards common to all EFL teacher training programs offered in public and private universities alike. The aim of this study is to collect linguistic data in natural and artificial social contexts - EFL trainees' intermediate status between their native language (Spanish) and the target language (English) - in order to create the first Chilean...

  7. Individual versus interprofessional team performance in formulating care transition plans: A randomised study of trainees from five professional groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Timothy W; Supiano, Katherine P; Wong, Bob; Luptak, Marilyn K; Luther, Brenda; Andersen, Troy C; Wilson, Rebecca; Wilby, Frances; Yang, Rumei; Pepper, Ginette A; Brunker, Cherie P

    2018-05-01

    Health professions trainees' performance in teams is rarely evaluated, but increasingly important as the healthcare delivery systems in which they will practice move towards team-based care. Effective management of care transitions is an important aspect of interprofessional teamwork. This mixed-methods study used a crossover design to randomise health professions trainees to work as individuals and as teams to formulate written care transition plans. Experienced external raters assessed the quality of the written care transition plans as well as both the quality of team process and overall team performance. Written care transition plan quality did not vary between individuals and teams (21.8 vs. 24.4, respectively, p = 0.42). The quality of team process did not correlate with the quality of the team-generated written care transition plans (r = -0.172, p = 0.659). However, there was a significant correlation between the quality of team process and overall team performance (r = 0.692, p = 0.039). Teams with highly engaged recorders, performing an internal team debrief, had higher-quality care transition plans. These results suggest that high-quality interprofessional care transition plans may require advance instruction as well as teamwork in finalising the plan.

  8. Teaching and Working With Millennial Trainees: Impact on Radiological Education and Work Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourenco, Ana P; Cronan, John J

    2017-01-01

    Many feel that the generational differences encountered with Millennial trainees are novel; the reality is that prior generations have always bemoaned generational differences. This is not a new problem; some of the same things may even have been said about us during our own training! There are a variety of myths and misconceptions about the Millennial generation (also known as Generation Y). In this article we review some of the differences frequently encountered as we educate and work alongside our Millennial colleagues, dispelling some of the myths and misconceptions. With increased understanding of this talented group of individuals, we hope to be more effective teachers and have more successful professional relationships. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Self-entrustment: how trainees' self-regulated learning supports participation in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagasser, Margaretha H; Kramer, Anneke W M; Fluit, Cornelia R M G; van Weel, Chris; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2017-10-01

    Clinical workplaces offer postgraduate trainees a wealth of opportunities to learn from experience. To promote deliberate and meaningful learning self-regulated learning skills are foundational. We explored trainees' learning activities related to patient encounters to better understand what aspects of self-regulated learning contribute to trainees' development, and to explore supervisor's role herein. We conducted a qualitative non-participant observational study in seven general practices. During two days we observed trainee's patient encounters, daily debriefing sessions and educational meetings between trainee and supervisor and interviewed them separately afterwards. Data collection and analysis were iterative and inspired by a phenomenological approach. To organise data we used networks, time-ordered matrices and codebooks. Self-regulated learning supported trainees to increasingly perform independently. They engaged in self-regulated learning before, during and after encounters. Trainees' activities depended on the type of medical problem presented and on patient, trainee and supervisor characteristics. Trainees used their sense of confidence to decide if they could manage the encounter alone or if they should consult their supervisor. They deliberately used feedback on their performance and engaged in reflection. Supervisors appeared vital in trainees' learning by reassuring trainees, discussing experience, knowledge and professional issues, identifying possible unawareness of incompetence, assessing performance and securing patient safety. Self-confidence, reflection and feedback, and support from the supervisor are important aspects of self-regulated learning in practice. The results reflect how self-regulated learning and self-entrustment promote trainees' increased participation in the workplace. Securing organized moments of interaction with supervisors is beneficial to trainees' self-regulated learning.

  10. Westinghouse European trainee program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez, G.

    2010-01-01

    with managers. The third session occurred in September 2008 in Madrid, Spain. During four days, the Trainees attended presentations about the business of Westinghouse in Spain, as well as various technical and management courses. Highlights of the week included the visit of 'El Cabril', the Spanish low-level waste disposal and Cordoba, one of Spain's most beautiful cities. The next session took place in Nivelles, Belgium, in December 2008. During five days the Trainees took some useful management courses and got a good overview of the activities of Westinghouse Belgium. The Trainees also visited one of the most important research centers in Europe: the SKC-CEN as well as the controlled area of Field Services. The last session took place in Mannheim, Germany, in February 2009. During four days the Trainees took some further management-related courses and got to know Westinghouse Germany a little more. They also had the opportunity to visit a nuclear power plant in operation, which was both really interesting and very useful. For the last six months of the program, the Trainees were able to choose a location for their international assignment: two Trainees went to the US, two went to Belgium, two went to Spain and one each went to Sweden, Germany, UK and France. In October 2009 a new wave of the European Trainee Program started, with trainees from Sweden, Spain, Germany, Belgium and France as well. The program has the same basic outline as before. The Trainees have the opportunity to become acquainted with Westinghouse during 18 months with the most part of the program spent in the country of hire, and the last six months on abroad assignment. The European Trainee Program gave the trainees the chance to work in an international environment for one year and a half. During the time based in their country of hire, they all tried different departments and projects to get to know more about the work being performed. It gave them also the chance to work with different managers

  11. When should we perform a repeat training on adrenaline auto-injector use for physician trainees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topal, E; Bakirtas, A; Yilmaz, O; Karagol, I H E; Arga, M; Demirsoy, M S; Turktas, I

    2014-01-01

    Studies demonstrate that both doctors and patients may use adrenaline auto-injector improperly and the usage skills are improved by training. In this study, we aimed to determine the appropriate frequency of training to maintain skills for adrenaline auto-injector use. We invited all interns of 2011-2012 training period. At baseline, all participants were given theoretical and practical training on adrenaline auto-injector use. The participants were randomly assigned into two groups. We asked those in group 1 to demonstrate the use of adrenaline auto-injector trainer in the third month and those in group 2 in the sixth month. One hundred and sixty interns were enrolled. Compared with the beginning score, demonstration of skills at all the steps and total scores did not change for the group tested in the third month (p=0.265 and p=0.888, respectively). However; for the group examined in the sixth month; the demonstration of skills for proper use of the auto-injector at all steps and the mean time to administer adrenaline decreased (p=0.018 and padrenaline (p<0.001) and presumptive self-injection into thumb (p=0.029). Auto-injector usage skills of physician trainees decrease after the sixth month and are better in those who had skill reinforcement at 3 months, suggesting continued education and skill reinforcement may be useful. Copyright © 2013 SEICAP. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. The effect of prosody awareness training on the performance of consecutive interpretation by Farsi-English interpreter trainees : an experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yenkimaleki, M.; V.J., van Heuven

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the effect of prosody awareness training on the performance of Farsi-English interpreter trainees. Two groups of student interpreters were formed. All were native speakers of Farsi who studied English translation and interpreting at the BA level at the State University of

  13. Assessing Trainee Surgeons’ Nontechnical Skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanager, Lene; Konge, Lars; Dieckmann, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Trainee surgeons would benefit from regular, formative assessments to ensure they learn the nontechnical aspects of surgical performance. Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons in Denmark (NOTSSdk) is a tool to assess surgeons' nontechnical skills (NTS) during an operation. The aims...... of this study were to explore which parts of NOTSSdk supervisors use to assess trainee surgeons' NTS, to determine the internal consistency reliability of NOTSSdk, and to estimate how many operations were needed to obtain reliable ratings of a trainee surgeon's NTS. METHODS: A total of 12 supervisors from 2...

  14. Fifteen-hour day shifts have little effect on the performance of taskwork by anaesthesia trainees during uncomplicated clinical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garden, A L; Robinson, B J; Kappus, L J; Macleod, I; Gander, P H

    2012-11-01

    Shiftwork and work-hour limits for junior doctors are now well established in hospital work patterns. In order to ensure that trainees have adequate exposure to daytime elective surgical procedures, there is a tendency to have long shifts that include an after-hours component. However, long shifts can cause performance decrement due to time-on-task fatigue. In addition, shifts that encroach upon sleep time result in sleep loss. Using a high-fidelity patient simulation environment, we undertook a randomised, controlled trial to examine fatigue effects. A within-subjects comparison was used to evaluate the effect of 15-hour day shifts on the performance of 12 anaesthesia registrars. Preoperative assessment, machine check and taskwork using 42 task categories were evaluated. In both conditions, there was failure to meet current guidelines for preoperative evaluation or machine check, and when fatigued there was a 'trend' (P=0.06) to a reduction in the number of items in the machine check. With increase in time awake, there was an increase in time taken for explanation to the patient, an increase in mean duration of explanation to the patient, more time looking at the intravenous line or fluids when multi-tasking but less time adjusting the intravenous fluid. These effects are minor during routine uncomplicated induction of anaesthesia, but further investigation is needed to examine fatigue effects during non-routine circumstances.

  15. An Analysis of Information Technology Training Effectiveness: The Impact on Trainee Reactions, Learning, and Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scherrer, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    .... "Information Dominance" has assumed a central role in such environments. In order to achieve Information Dominance, the Air Force must have trained and skilled personnel able to perform highly intensive activities using information technologies...

  16. How do trained raters take context factors into account when assessing GP trainee communication performance? An exploratory, qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essers, Geurt; Dielissen, Patrick; van Weel, Chris; van der Vleuten, Cees; van Dulmen, Sandra; Kramer, Anneke

    2015-03-01

    Communication assessment in real-life consultations is a complex task. Generic assessment instruments help but may also have disadvantages. The generic nature of the skills being assessed does not provide indications for context-specific behaviour required in practice situations; context influences are mostly taken into account implicitly. Our research questions are: 1. What factors do trained raters observe when rating workplace communication? 2. How do they take context factors into account when rating communication performance with a generic rating instrument? Nineteen general practitioners (GPs), trained in communication assessment with a generic rating instrument (the MAAS-Global), participated in a think-aloud protocol reflecting concurrent thought processes while assessing videotaped real-life consultations. They were subsequently interviewed to answer questions explicitly asking them to comment on the influence of predefined contextual factors on the assessment process. Results from both data sources were analysed. We used a grounded theory approach to untangle the influence of context factors on GP communication and on communication assessment. Both from the think-aloud procedure and from the interviews we identified various context factors influencing communication, which were categorised into doctor-related (17), patient-related (13), consultation-related (18), and education-related factors (18). Participants had different views and practices on how to incorporate context factors into the GP(-trainee) communication assessment. Raters acknowledge that context factors may affect communication in GP consultations, but struggle with how to take contextual influences into account when assessing communication performance in an educational context. To assess practice situations, raters need extra guidance on how to handle specific contextual factors.

  17. Assessing trainees' oral performance in a Chilean teacher training program: A corpus-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maritza Fernanda Ortega

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The present paper reports the implementation of syllabus innovations in EFL teacher education in Chile after diagnosing a lack of language achievement standards common to all EFL teacher training programs offered in public and private universities alike. The aim of this study is to collect linguistic data in natural and artificial social contexts – EFL trainees’ intermediate status between their native language (Spanish and the target language (English – in order to create the first Chilean corpus of spoken English as a foreign language, in the interest of analyzing the errors that are most likely to be made and fossilized by native speakers of Chilean Spanish. Once the results of this exercise are available, EFL trainers, professors, and SLA researchers will be able to design a newly sequenced syllabus based on the Content-based Approach and tailored to students’ needs so as to enhance oral performance in L2 English.

  18. Piano instruction for nursery school trainees

    OpenAIRE

    新海, 節; Makoto, SHINKAI; 藤女子大学人間生活学部保育学科

    2012-01-01

    It is important piano instruction in childcare training schools be viewed primarily as "music for childcare". To this end,it is also important that the view of piano instruction for nursery school trainees be switched from one mainly focused on the technical aspects of performance using many etudes to a form of instruction based on developing the musicality of the trainees and their ability to display emotion through music. Further, through this instruction, the trainees need to develop the a...

  19. Effect of exposure to good vs poor medical trainee performance on attending physician ratings of subsequent performances

    OpenAIRE

    Yeates, Peter; O'Neill, Paul; Mann, Karen; Eva, Kevin W.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Competency-based models of education require assessments to be based on individuals' capacity to perform, yet the nature of human judgment may fundamentally limit the extent to which such assessment is accurately possible. Objective: To determine whether recent observations of the Mini Clinical Evaluation Exercise (Mini-CEX) performance of postgraduate year 1 physicians influence raters' scores of subsequent performances, consistent with either anchoring bias (scores biased similar t...

  20. Formative assessment of GP trainees' clinical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiener-Ogilvie, Sharon; Begg, Drummond

    2012-03-01

    Clinical skill assessment (CSA) has been an integral part of the Royal College of General Practitioners' membership examination (MRCGP) since 2008. It is an expensive, high-stakes examination with first time pass rates ranging from 76.4 to 81.3. In this paper we describe the South East Scotland Deanery, NHS Education Scotland, pilot of a formative clinical skills assessment (fCSA) using the principles of formative assessment and OSCE. The purpose of the study was to assess the acceptability of the fCSA and to examine whether trainees, identified during the fCSA as 'at risk of failing the MRCGP CSA exam', are more likely to fail the MRCGP CSA exam later on in the year. Trainees were assessed in four clinical skills stations under exam conditions. After each station they were given verbal feedback and subsequently both trainee and their trainer received written feedback. We assessed the value of the exercise through written feedback from trainees and trainers. Each trainee's performance in fCSA was triangulated with trainer assessment to identify 'flagged trainees'. We compared flagged and non-flagged trainees' performance in MRCGP CSA. Both trainees and trainers highly rated the fCSA. Overall 97% of non-flagged trainees have passed the RCGP CSA exam by May of that year in comparison to 80% of flagged trainees who have passed the RCGP CSA (P = 0.005). Trainers and trainees rated the fCSA as excellent and useful. We were able to demonstrate that the fCSA can be used to identify those trainees likely to fail the RCGP CSA. Contrary to reservations about the potential to demoralise trainees, the fCSA was viewed as a useful and a positive experience by both trainees and trainers. In addition, we suggest that feedback from fCSA was useful in triggering appropriate educational interventions. Early intervention with trainees who are predicted to fail the CSA has the potential to reduce deaneries overall fail rate. Preventing one trainee failure could save over £30 000.

  1. Performance of atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) depending on operator-experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Rainer A; Gaengler, Peter; Markovic, Ljubisa; Zimmer, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    Oral health care is not of major interest in developing countries because of lack of infrastructure and professional manpower. Therefore, atraumatic restorative treatment (ART) was introduced by the World Health Organization to be performed by dental auxiliary personnel. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of ART depending on operator-experience in The Republic of The Gambia. One hundred twenty-eight newly inserted restorations were followed up for 12 months using the clinical ART index in a prospective and blinded study design. The patients were randomly assigned to operators. The clinical performance was compared among three groups: trainees, experienced Community Oral Health Workers (COHW), and professional dentists. The difference in success rates was calculated at a 95 percent confidence interval. There was a statistically significant difference between trainees and dentists in performing leakage/gap-free one-surface restorations (P 0.05). Finally, both groups--experienced COHWs and dentists--performed restorations not showing statistically significant differences (P > 0.05). For The Republic of The Gambia--especially for areas with underdeveloped medical infrastructure--training and assignment to perform ART can be recommended for auxiliary dental staff of Community Oral Health Workers.

  2. How to select aspirant laparoscopic surgical trainees: establishing concurrent validity comparing Xitact LS500 index performance scores with standardized psychomotor aptitude test battery scores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijven, Marlies P.; Jakimowicz, Jack J.; Carter, Fiona J.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although a controversial topic in medical education, the selection of aspirant surgical trainees is a subject that needs to be addressed. In the view of preventing surgical trainee drop-outs and of appropriate allocation of limited resources, it is an issue critical to the profession.

  3. Trainee-Associated Factors and Proficiency at Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghamir, Seyed Mohammad Kazem; Behtash, Negar; Hamidi, Morteza; Farahmand, Hasan; Salavati, Alborz; Mortaz Hejri, Sara

    2017-07-01

    Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) is a complicated procedure for urology trainees. This study was designed to investigate the effect of trainees' ages and previous experience, as well as the number of operated cases, on proficiency at PNL by using patient outcomes. A cross sectional observational study was designed during a five-year period. Trainees in PNL fellowship programs were included. At the end of the program, the trainees' performance in PNL was assessed regarding five competencies and scored 1-5. If the overall score was 4 or above, the trainee was considered as proficient. The trainees' age at the beginning of the program and the years passed from their residency graduation were asked and recorded. Also, the number of PNL cases operated by each trainee was obtained via their logbooks. The age, years passed from graduation, and number of operated cases were compared between two groups of proficient and non-proficient trainees. Univariate and multivariate binary logistic regression analysis was applied to estimate the effect of aforementioned variables on the occurrence of the proficiency. Forty-two trainees were included in the study. The mean and standard deviation for the overall score were 3.40 (out of 5) and 0.67, respectively. Eleven trainees (26.2%) recognized as proficient in performing PNL. Univariate regression analysis indicated that each of three variables (age, years passed from graduation and number of operated cases) had statistically significant effect on proficiency. However, the multivariate regression analysis revealed that just the number of cases had significant effect on achieving proficiency. Although it might be assumed that trainees' age negatively correlates with their scores, in fact, it is their amount of practice that makes a difference. A certain number of cases is required to be operated by a trainee in order to reach the desired competency in PNL.

  4. Pre-simulation orientation for medical trainees: An approach to decrease anxiety and improve confidence and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommer, Cassidy; Sullivan, Sarah; Campbell, Krystle; Ahola, Zachary; Agarwal, Suresh; O'Rourke, Ann; Jung, Hee Soo; Gibson, Angela; Leverson, Glen; Liepert, Amy E

    2018-02-01

    We assessed the effect of basic orientation to the simulation environment on anxiety, confidence, and clinical decision making. Twenty-four graduating medical students participated in a two-week surgery preparatory curriculum, including three simulations. Baseline anxiety was assessed pre-course. Scenarios were completed on day 2 and day 9. Prior to the first simulation, participants were randomly divided into two groups. Only one group received a pre-simulation orientation. Before the second simulation, all students received the same orientation. Learner anxiety was reported immediately preceding and following each simulation. Confidence was assessed post-simulation. Performance was evaluated by surgical faculty. The oriented group experienced decreased anxiety following the first simulation (p = 0.003); the control group did not. Compared to the control group, the oriented group reported less anxiety and greater confidence and received higher performance scores following all three simulations (all p simulation orientation reduces anxiety while increasing confidence and improving performance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Trainees' Perceptions of a Final Oral Competency Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Robert W.; Young, Kevin R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The focus on competency attainment by professional psychology trainees obligates training programs to assess these competencies prior to completion of an internship. However, little is known about how trainees may perceive such testing. This study examines relationships between performance on an Oral Final Competency Examination of a…

  6. The Three-Month Effects of a Ketogenic Diet on Body Composition, Blood Parameters, and Performance Metrics in CrossFit Trainees: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kephart, Wesley C.; Pledge, Coree D.; Roberson, Paul A.; Mumford, Petey W.; Romero, Matthew A.; Mobley, Christopher B.; Young, Kaelin C.; Lowery, Ryan P.; Wilson, Jacob M.; Huggins, Kevin W.; Roberts, Michael D.

    2018-01-01

    adopting a ketogenic diet causes marked reductions in whole-body adiposity while not impacting performance measures in recreationally-trained CrossFit trainees. Whether decrements in dual-leg muscle mass and vastus lateralis thickness in KD participants were due to fluid shifts remain unresolved, and increased LDL-C in these individuals warrants further investigation.

  7. The Three-Month Effects of a Ketogenic Diet on Body Composition, Blood Parameters, and Performance Metrics in CrossFit Trainees: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesley C. Kephart

    2018-01-01

    that adopting a ketogenic diet causes marked reductions in whole-body adiposity while not impacting performance measures in recreationally-trained CrossFit trainees. Whether decrements in dual-leg muscle mass and vastus lateralis thickness in KD participants were due to fluid shifts remain unresolved, and increased LDL-C in these individuals warrants further investigation.

  8. Educational strategies in performing cesarean section

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristine; Grønbeck, Lene; Larsen, Christian Rifbjerg

    2012-01-01

    Cesarean section is a common operation and one of the first surgeries performed independently by trainees/residents in obstetrics and gynecology. Determination of trainees' technical skills level is dependent upon subjective faculty assessment. Based on three studies on learning curves in cesarea...... Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica © 2012 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology....

  9. Analysing the operative experience of basic surgical trainees in Ireland using a web-based logbook

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lonergan, Peter E

    2011-09-25

    Abstract Background There is concern about the adequacy of operative exposure in surgical training programmes, in the context of changing work practices. We aimed to quantify the operative exposure of all trainees on the National Basic Surgical Training (BST) programme in Ireland and compare the results with arbitrary training targets. Methods Retrospective analysis of data obtained from a web-based logbook (http:\\/\\/www.elogbook.org) for all general surgery and orthopaedic training posts between July 2007 and June 2009. Results 104 trainees recorded 23,918 operations between two 6-month general surgery posts. The most common general surgery operation performed was simple skin excision with trainees performing an average of 19.7 (± 9.9) over the 2-year training programme. Trainees most frequently assisted with cholecystectomy with an average of 16.0 (± 11.0) per trainee. Comparison of trainee operative experience to arbitrary training targets found that 2-38% of trainees achieved the targets for 9 emergency index operations and 24-90% of trainees achieved the targets for 8 index elective operations. 72 trainees also completed a 6-month post in orthopaedics and recorded 7,551 operations. The most common orthopaedic operation that trainees performed was removal of metal, with an average of 2.90 (± 3.27) per trainee. The most common orthopaedic operation that trainees assisted with was total hip replacement, with an average of 10.46 (± 6.21) per trainee. Conclusions A centralised web-based logbook provides valuable data to analyse training programme performance. Analysis of logbooks raises concerns about operative experience at junior trainee level. The provision of adequate operative exposure for trainees should be a key performance indicator for training programmes.

  10. Field Dependency and Performance in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwumere, Onyebuchi; Reid, Norman

    2014-01-01

    Mathematics is an important school subject but one which often poses problems for learners. It has been found that learners do not possess the cognitive capacity to handle understanding procedures, representations, concepts, and applications at the same time. while the extent of field dependency may hold the key to one way by which the working…

  11. Evaluation of formal feedback on endoscopic competence among trainees: the EFFECT trial.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harewood, G C

    2008-09-01

    The medical literature describes disparity in colonoscopy performance. This randomised, controlled study aimed to characterise the impact of feedback on colonoscopy performance among gastroenterology (GI) trainees.

  12. Systematic Review of Voluntary Participation in Simulation-Based Laparoscopic Skills Training: Motivators and Barriers for Surgical Trainee Attendance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostlow, Hannah; Marlow, Nicholas; Babidge, Wendy; Maddern, Guy

    To examine and report on evidence relating to surgical trainees' voluntary participation in simulation-based laparoscopic skills training. Specifically, the underlying motivators, enablers, and barriers faced by surgical trainees with regard to attending training sessions on a regular basis. A systematic search of the literature (PubMed; CINAHL; EMBASE; Cochrane Collaboration) was conducted between May and July 2015. Studies were included on whether they reported on surgical trainee attendance at voluntary, simulation-based laparoscopic skills training sessions, in addition to qualitative data regarding participant's perceived barriers and motivators influencing their decision to attend such training. Factors affecting a trainee's motivation were categorized as either intrinsic (internal) or extrinsic (external). Two randomised control trials and 7 case series' met our inclusion criteria. Included studies were small and generally poor quality. Overall, voluntary simulation-based laparoscopic skills training was not well attended. Intrinsic motivators included clearly defined personal performance goals and relevance to clinical practice. Extrinsic motivators included clinical responsibilities and available free time, simulator location close to clinical training, and setting obligatory assessments or mandated training sessions. The effect of each of these factors was variable, and largely dependent on the individual trainee. The greatest reported barrier to attending voluntary training was the lack of available free time. Although data quality is limited, it can be seen that providing unrestricted access to simulator equipment is not effective in motivating surgical trainees to voluntarily participate in simulation-based laparoscopic skills training. To successfully encourage participation, consideration needs to be given to the factors influencing motivation to attend training. Further research, including better designed randomised control trials and large

  13. Should we assess clinical performance in single patient encounters or consistent behaviors of clinical performance over a series of encounters? A qualitative exploration of narrative trainee profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, M.; Dielissen, P.W.; Timmerman, A.; Ram, P.; Maiburg, B.; Muris, J.; Vleuten, C. van der

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A variety of tools have been developed to assess performance which typically use a single clinical encounter as a source for making competency inferences. This strategy may miss consistent behaviors. We therefore explored experienced clinical supervisors' perceptions of behavioral

  14. Trainee-Associated Factors and Proficiency at Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Kazem Aghamir

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL is a complicated procedure for urology trainees. This study was designed to investigate the effect of trainees’ ages and previous experience, as well as the number of operated cases, on proficiency at PNL by using patient outcomes. A cross sectional observational study was designed during a five-year period. Trainees in PNL fellowship programs were included. At the end of the program, the trainees’ performance in PNL was assessed regarding five competencies and scored 1-5. If the overall score was 4 or above, the trainee was considered as proficient. The trainees’ age at the beginning of the program and the years passed from their residency graduation were asked and recorded. Also, the number of PNL cases operated by each trainee was obtained via their logbooks. The age, years passed from graduation, and number of operated cases were compared between two groups of proficient and non-proficient trainees. Univariate and multivariate binary logistic regression analysis was applied to estimate the effect of aforementioned variables on the occurrence of the proficiency. Forty-two trainees were included in the study. The mean and standard deviation for the overall score were 3.40 (out of 5 and 0.67, respectively. Eleven trainees (26.2% recognized as proficient in performing PNL. Univariate regression analysis indicated that each of three variables (age, years passed from graduation and number of operated cases had statistically significant effect on proficiency. However, the multivariate regression analysis revealed that just the number of cases had significant effect on achieving proficiency. Although it might be assumed that trainees’ age negatively correlates with their scores, in fact, it is their amount of practice that makes a difference. A certain number of cases is required to be operated by a trainee in order to reach the desired competency in PNL.

  15. Psychiatric trainees in Finland 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putkonen, Hanna; Holi, Matti; Kaltiala-Heino, Riittakerttu; Korkeila, Jyrki; Eronen, Markku

    2005-01-01

    This study examined Finnish psychiatric trainees' views on their education. This was a survey study of nationwide data on Finnish psychiatric trainees in 2001. The quality of training was considered at least moderate by 84% of the respondents. Training on epidemiology, on taking history and status, and on psychopharmacology was considered the best. Quality was rated bad for training in leadership and administration, and educating the community. Research was done by 20%, and a personal clinical supervisor was appointed to 52% of the respondents. Offensive treatment had been experienced by 49% of the trainees in this study. Generally, studies of training also reflect strengths and weaknesses of the profession. Based on our results, it seems especially that training in leadership and in educating the community need to be improved; both of these are quintessential skills to survive in the struggle for economic and human resources. Furthermore, treatment of the trainees could still be better; attention should be paid to supervision of all trainees. Moreover, research must become more attractive. Psychiatry can be developed by the development of psychiatric training.

  16. Does direct observation of procedural skills reflect trainee's progress in otolaryngology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Z; Hayden, L; Muthuswamy, K; Ziprin, P; Darzi, A; Tolley, N S

    2014-06-01

    UK surgical trainees are required to undertake work-based assessments each year in order to progress in their training. Direct Observation of Procedural Skills (DOPS) is one of these assessments. We aim to investigate the validity of DOPS in assessing otolaryngology trainees at all levels. A retrospective search of the portfolios of all otolaryngology trainees in North Thames was carried out to identify otolaryngology-specific DOPS. A score (Cs) was calculated for each DOPS based on the percentage of satisfactorily-rated items. The overall performance rating (Ps) was analysed as a separate variable and compared with Cs. The Ps and Cs results were then compared across trainee grades and levels within each grade: Core trainees (CT1-CT2) and specialty trainees (ST3-ST8). Seven hundred and sixty-seven otolaryngology DOPS were completed between August 2008 and September 2013. The tool was found to be reliable and internally consistent. Trainees in ST grade had higher Cs and Ps scores than CT grade (P Otolaryngology DOPS is a useful tool in assessing otolaryngology trainees especially from CT1-ST3 level. DOPS can also differentiate between junior and senior trainees. However, it was not able to demonstrate progress at levels above ST3, most likely due to the simplicity of the procedures which trainees tend to master in the first few years of training. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Identifying influential factors of business process performance using dependency analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzstein, Branimir; Leitner, Philipp; Rosenberg, Florian; Dustdar, Schahram; Leymann, Frank

    2011-02-01

    We present a comprehensive framework for identifying influential factors of business process performance. In particular, our approach combines monitoring of process events and Quality of Service (QoS) measurements with dependency analysis to effectively identify influential factors. The framework uses data mining techniques to construct tree structures to represent dependencies of a key performance indicator (KPI) on process and QoS metrics. These dependency trees allow business analysts to determine how process KPIs depend on lower-level process metrics and QoS characteristics of the IT infrastructure. The structure of the dependencies enables a drill-down analysis of single factors of influence to gain a deeper knowledge why certain KPI targets are not met.

  18. The objective structured clinical examination revisited for postgraduate trainees in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenmakers, Birgitte; Wens, Johan

    2014-03-04

    To investigate if the psychometric qualities of an OSCE consisting of more complex simulated patient encounters remain valid and reliable in the assessment of postgraduate trainees in general practice. In this intervention study without control group, the traditional OSCE was formally replaced by the new, complex version. The study population was composed by all postgraduate trainees (second and third phase) in general practice during the ongoing academic year. Data were handled and collected as part of the formal assessment program. Univariate analyses, the variance of scores and multivariate analyses were performed to assess the test qualities. A total of 340 students participated. Average final scores were slightly higher for third-phase students (t-test, p =0.05). Overall test scores were equally distributed on station level, circuit level and phase level. A multiple regression analysis revealed that test scores were dependent on the stations and circuits, but not on the master phase. In a changing learning environment, assessment and evaluation strategies require reorientation. The reliability and validity of the OSCE remain subject to discussion. In particular, when it comes to content and design, the traditional OSCE might underestimate the performance level of postgraduate trainees in general practice. A reshaping of this OSCE to a more sophisticated design with more complex patient encounters appears to restore the validity of the test results.

  19. Information for New Trainees and Fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellows and cancer research trainees will find information to support their onboarding at NCI, including stipend and tax information and NIH rules and regulations. Learn more about orientation for NCI trainees.

  20. Library Anxiety of Teacher Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Savita; Attri, Poonam

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates the library anxiety in Teacher Trainees and found it to be a prevalent phenomenon in students. The five dimensions of library anxiety, namely, barriers with staff, affective barriers, comfort with the library, knowledge of the library, and mechanical barriers have been identified. The sample of the study constituted 58…

  1. Density dependence of reactor performance with thermal confinement scalings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stotler, D.P.

    1992-03-01

    Energy confinement scalings for the thermal component of the plasma published thus far have a different dependence on plasma density and input power than do scalings for the total plasma energy. With such thermal scalings, reactor performance (measured by Q, the ratio of the fusion power to the sum of the ohmic and auxiliary input powers) worsens with increasing density. This dependence is the opposite of that found using scalings based on the total plasma energy, indicating that reactor operation concepts may need to be altered if this density dependence is confirmed in future research

  2. Performance Estimation for Embedded Systems with Data and Control Dependencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pop, Paul; Eles, Petru; Peng, Zebo

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present an approach to performance estimation for hard real-time systems. We consider architectures consisting of multiple processors. The scheduling policy is based on a preemptive strategy with static priorities. Our model of the system captures both data and control dependencies...

  3. Investment horizons : A time-dependent measure of asset performance

    OpenAIRE

    Ingve Simonsen; Anders Johansen; Mogens H. Jensen

    2005-01-01

    We review a resent {\\em time-dependent} performance measure for economical time series -- the (optimal) investment horizon approach. For stock indices, the approach shows a pronounced gain-loss asymmetry that is {\\em not} observed for the individual stocks that comprise the index. This difference may hint towards an synchronize of the draw downs of the stocks.

  4. The use of smartphone applications by urology trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nason, G J; Burke, M J; Aslam, A; Kelly, M E; Akram, C M; Giri, S K; Flood, H D

    2015-10-01

    Mobile phone technology is continuously advancing- the smartphone allows users instant access to information via the internet. Downloadable applications (apps) are becoming widespread across medical specialities. The aim of this study was to assess the use of smartphone apps among urology trainees in Ireland. An anonymous electronic survey was distributed via Survey Monkey(®) to all urology trainees in Ireland assessing their ownership and use of smartphones and downloadable apps. A search of urology apps was performed using the Apple App Store and the Android Market. 36 (81.8%) of trainees responded with 100% ownership of smartphones. 28 (77%) report downloading apps with 11 (30.6%) reporting paying for them. The mean number of apps downloaded was 4 (Range 1-12). 16 (44.4%) trainees think apps for smartphones are very useful in clinical practice, 14 (42.4%) think they are useful. A total of 126 urology apps were available. 76 (60.3%) were designed for physicians, 46 (36.5%) for patients, 2 (1.6%) for students and 2 (1.6%) for urological nurses. There are an ever increasing number of urology apps available. Urology trainees are using smartphones as an educational and reference tool and find them a useful aide in clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. EWTD compliance amongst Anaesthesia trainees in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brohan, J; Moore, D

    2017-02-01

    The implications of the EWTD include a limit of 48 h working week and 11 consecutive hours rest every 24 h. This survey was designed to assess EWTD compliance over designated 1-week and 1-month periods amongst College of Anaesthesetists of Ireland (CAI) trainees and non-training Anaesthesia NCHDs. The two key elements of EWTD compliance were assessed; the compliance to a 48 h working week, and a minimizing of shift duration to 24 h. Existence of protected training time and teaching time were also assessed. This survey was completed by 191 Anaesthesia NCHDs, including 151 responses from CAI trainees; 75 % response rate from CAI trainees. 71 % of respondents worked in excess of 48 h. 37 % of respondents reported to have worked a shift >24 h duration. The average hours worked was 66 h (range 48.5-103 h). Our figures are a contrast to the reported figures in the HSE "Performance Assurance Report". 49 % of respondents reported a change in their working patterns to facilitate EWTD compliance. There appears to be a negative impact on training however, with 68 % respondents missing departmental teaching sessions and 30 % not receiving protected training time. 33 % of respondents were not in favour of full EWTD compliance. As work patterns change, it is vital to ensure that training is not compromised. Previous reports have recommended an increase in consultant numbers, which has yet to be achieved. This may provide a solution to allow service provision, NCHD training and EWTD compliance amongst NCHDs.

  6. Unsupervised laparoscopic appendicectomy by surgical trainees is safe and time-effective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kenneth; Duncan, Tristram; Pearson, Andrew

    2007-07-01

    Open appendicectomy is the traditional standard treatment for appendicitis. Laparoscopic appendicectomy is perceived as a procedure with greater potential for complications and longer operative times. This paper examines the hypothesis that unsupervised laparoscopic appendicectomy by surgical trainees is a safe and time-effective valid alternative. Medical records, operating theatre records and histopathology reports of all patients undergoing laparoscopic and open appendicectomy over a 15-month period in two hospitals within an area health service were retrospectively reviewed. Data were analysed to compare patient features, pathology findings, operative times, complications, readmissions and mortality between laparoscopic and open groups and between unsupervised surgical trainee operators versus consultant surgeon operators. A total of 143 laparoscopic and 222 open appendicectomies were reviewed. Unsupervised trainees performed 64% of the laparoscopic appendicectomies and 55% of the open appendicectomies. There were no significant differences in complication rates, readmissions, mortality and length of stay between laparoscopic and open appendicectomy groups or between trainee and consultant surgeon operators. Conversion rates (laparoscopic to open approach) were similar for trainees and consultants. Unsupervised senior surgical trainees did not take significantly longer to perform laparoscopic appendicectomy when compared to unsupervised trainee-performed open appendicectomy. Unsupervised laparoscopic appendicectomy by surgical trainees is safe and time-effective.

  7. Survey of UK radiology trainees in the aftermath of ‘Modernising Medical Careers’

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mair Grant

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following implementation of Modernising Medical Careers (MMC in the UK, potential radiology trainees must decide on their career and apply sooner than ever before. We aimed to determine whether current trainees were sufficiently informed to make an earlier career decision by comparing the early radiology experiences of Traditional and Foundation Trainees. Methods 344 radiology trainees were appointed through MMC in 2007/08. This cohort was surveyed online. Results Response rate was 174/344 (51%. Traditional Trainees made their career decision 2.6 years after graduation compared with 1.2 years for Foundation Trainees (57/167, 34%. Nearly half of responders (79/169, 47% experienced no formal radiology teaching as undergraduates. Most trainees regularly attended radiology meetings, spent time in a radiology department and/or performed radiology research. Many trainees received no career advice specific to radiology (69/163, 42% at any point prior to entering the specialty; this includes both formal and informal advice. Junior doctor experiences were more frequently cited as influencing career choice (98/164, 60%. An earlier career decision was associated with; undergraduate radiology projects (-0.72 years, p = 0.018, career advice (-0.63 years, p = 0.009 and regular attendance at radiology meetings (-0.65 years, p = 0.014. Conclusion Early experience of radiology enables trainees to make an earlier career decision, however current radiology trainees were not always afforded relevant experiences prior to entering training. Radiologists need to be more proactive in encouraging the next generation of trainees.

  8. Survey of UK radiology trainees in the aftermath of ‘Modernising Medical Careers’

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Following implementation of Modernising Medical Careers (MMC) in the UK, potential radiology trainees must decide on their career and apply sooner than ever before. We aimed to determine whether current trainees were sufficiently informed to make an earlier career decision by comparing the early radiology experiences of Traditional and Foundation Trainees. Methods 344 radiology trainees were appointed through MMC in 2007/08. This cohort was surveyed online. Results Response rate was 174/344 (51%). Traditional Trainees made their career decision 2.6 years after graduation compared with 1.2 years for Foundation Trainees (57/167, 34%). Nearly half of responders (79/169, 47%) experienced no formal radiology teaching as undergraduates. Most trainees regularly attended radiology meetings, spent time in a radiology department and/or performed radiology research. Many trainees received no career advice specific to radiology (69/163, 42%) at any point prior to entering the specialty; this includes both formal and informal advice. Junior doctor experiences were more frequently cited as influencing career choice (98/164, 60%). An earlier career decision was associated with; undergraduate radiology projects (-0.72 years, p = 0.018), career advice (-0.63 years, p = 0.009) and regular attendance at radiology meetings (-0.65 years, p = 0.014). Conclusion Early experience of radiology enables trainees to make an earlier career decision, however current radiology trainees were not always afforded relevant experiences prior to entering training. Radiologists need to be more proactive in encouraging the next generation of trainees. PMID:23031228

  9. Exploring the Context Dependency of the PSM-Performance Relationship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lynggard, Mikkel; Pedersen, Mogens Jin; Andersen, Lotte Bøgh

    2016-01-01

    The public service motivation (PSM) of public employees matters to their performance at work. Yet research on how context factors moderate the PSM–performance relationship is sparse. This article shows how the PSM–performance relationship may depend on two context factors: (a) the extent of work...... autonomy that a public organization provides its employees and (b) the service users’ capacity to affect the organization’s service provision. We test a set of moderation hypotheses using school data (teacher survey data with administrative data on schools and student). Using within-student between......-teachers fixed effects regression, we find a stronger PSM–performance relationship in organizational contexts involving greater regulation of employee work autonomy for users with low to moderate user capacity....

  10. The development of scientific communication skills: a qualitative study of the perceptions of trainees and their mentors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Carrie; Collie, Candice L; Baldwin, Constance D; Bartholomew, L Kay; Palmer, J Lynn; Greer, Marilyn; Chang, Shine

    2013-10-01

    Scientific communication, both written and oral, is the cornerstone of success in biomedical research, yet formal instruction is rarely provided. Trainees with little exposure to standard academic English may find developing scientific communication skills challenging. In this exploratory, hypothesis-generating qualitative study, the authors examined the process by which mentored junior researchers learn scientific communication skills, their feelings about the challenges, and their mentor's role in the process. In 2010, the authors conducted semistructured focus groups and interviews to explore research trainees' and faculty mentors' perceptions and practices regarding scientific communication skills development, as part of the development phase of a larger quantitative study. The facilitator took detailed notes and verified their accuracy with participants during the sessions; a second member of the research team observed and verified the recorded notes. Three coders performed a thematic analysis, and the other authors reviewed it. Forty-three trainees and 50 mentors participated. Trainees and mentors had diverging views on the role of mentoring in fostering communication skills development. Trainees expressed varying levels of self-confidence but considerable angst. Mentors felt that most trainees have low self-confidence. Trainees expressed interest in learning scientific communication skills, but mentors reported that some trainees were insufficiently motivated and seemed resistant to guidance. Both groups agreed that trainees found mentors' feedback difficult to accept. The degree of distress, dissatisfaction, and lack of mutual understanding between mentors and trainees was striking. These themes have important implications for best practices and resource development.

  11. Autonomy vs. dependency of scientific collaboration in scientific performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinchilla-Rodriguez, Z.; Miguel, S.; Perianes-Rodriguez, A.; Ovalle-Perandones, M.A.; Olmeda-Gomez, C.

    2016-07-01

    This article explores the capacity of Latin America in the generation of scientific knowledge and its visibility at the global level. The novelty of the contribution lies in the decomposition of leadership, plus its combination with the results of performance indicators. We compare the normalized citation of all output against the leading output, as well as scientific excellence (Chinchilla, et al. 2016a; 2016b), technological impact and the trends in collaboration types and normalized citation. The main goal is to determine to what extent the main Latin American producers of scientific output depend on collaboration to heighten research performance in terms of citation; or to the contrary, whether there is enough autonomy and capacity to leverage its competitiveness through the design of research and development agendas. To the best of our knowledge this is the first study adopting this approach at the country level within the field of N&N. (Author)

  12. Performance in eyeblink conditioning is age and sex dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Löwgren

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence suggests that the cerebellum is involved in both cognition and language. Abnormal cerebellar development may contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, autism, fetal alcohol syndrome, dyslexia, and specific language impairment. Performance in eyeblink conditioning, which depends on the cerebellum, can potentially be used to clarify the neural mechanisms underlying the cerebellar dysfunction in disorders like these. However, we must first understand how the performance develops in children who do not have a disorder. In this study we assessed the performance in eyeblink conditioning in 42 typically developing children between 6 and 11 years old as well as in 26 adults. Older children produced more conditioned eyeblink responses than younger children and adults produced more than children. In addition, females produced more conditioned eyeblink responses than males among both children and adults. These results highlight the importance of considering the influence of age and sex on the performance when studying eyeblink conditioning as a measure of cerebellar development.

  13. North American Pediatric Gastroenterology Fellowship Needs Assessment in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Trainee and Program Director Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotson, Jennifer L; Falaiye, Tolulope; Bricker, Josh B; Strople, Jennifer; Rosh, Joel

    2016-07-01

    Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) care is complex and rapidly evolving. The Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America and North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition cosponsored a needs assessment survey of pediatric gastroenterology trainees and program directors (PDs) to inform on educational programming. A Web-based, self-completed survey was provided to North American trainees and PDs during the 2013-2014 academic year. Standard descriptive statistics summarized demographics and responses. One hundred sixty-six of 326 (51%) trainees (62% female) and 37 of 74 (50%) PDs responded. Median trainees per program = 5 and median total faculty = 10 (3 IBD experts); 15% of programs did not have a self-identified "IBD expert" faculty member. Sixty-nine percent of trainees were confident/somewhat confident in their IBD inpatient training, whereas 54% were confident/somewhat confident in their outpatient training. Trainees identified activities that would most improve their education, including didactics (55%), interaction with national experts (50%), trainee-centered IBD Web resources (42%), and increased patient exposure (42%). Trainees were most confident in managing inpatient active Crohn's disease/ulcerative colitis, phenotype classification, managing biological therapies, and using clinical disease activity indices. They were least confident in managing J-pouch complications, performing pouchoscopy, managing extraintestinal manifestations, and ostomy-related complications. Eighty-five percent would like an IBD-focused training elective. Most directors (86%) would allow trainees to do electives at other institutions. This IBD needs assessment survey of pediatric gastroenterology trainees and PDs demonstrated a strong resource commitment to IBD training and clinical care. Areas for educational enrichment emerged, including pouch and ostomy complications.

  14. Completion rates of anterior and posterior continuous curvilinear capsulorrhexis in pediatric cataract surgery for surgery performed by trainee surgeons with the use of a low-cost viscoelastic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Muralidhar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Context : Pediatric cataract surgery is traditionally done with the aid of high-molecular-weight viscoelastics which are expensive. It needs to be determined if low-cost substitutes are just as successful. Aims : The study aims to determine the success rates for anterior and posterior capsulorrhexis and intraocular lens (IOL implantation in the bag for pediatric cataract surgery performed with the aid of a low-molecular-weight viscoelastic. Settings and Design : Nonrandomized observational study. Materials and Methods: Children less than 6 years of age who underwent cataract surgery with IOL implantation in the period May 2008-May 2009 were included. The surgeries were done by pediatric ophthalmology fellows. A standard procedure of anterior capsulorrhexis, lens aspiration with primary posterior capsulorrhexis, anterior vitrectomy, and IOL implantation was followed. Three parameters were studied: successful completion of anterior and posterior capsulorrhexis and IOL implantation in the bag. Results: 33 eyes of 28 children were studied. The success rate for completion was 66.7% and 88.2 % for anterior and posterior capsulorrhexis, respectively. IOL implantation in the bag was successful in 87.9%. Conclusions: 2% hydroxypropylmethylcellulose is a viable low-cost alternative to more expensive options similar to high-molecular-weight viscoelastics. This is of great relevance to hospitals in developing countries.

  15. English Primary Trainee Teachers' Perceptions of Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Emma

    2012-01-01

    This paper summarises the findings of research conducted with one cohort of English undergraduate primary teacher trainees on point of entry to a 4-year course. The research examines the perceptions held of geography as a subject discipline and the purposes of teaching the subject. Two hundred and eleven trainees were asked to define geography and…

  16. Understanding Trainees' Perception Concerning the Educational ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Trainees' skills and the teaching process can be improved by consideration of candidates' views. Aim: To find out the trainees' perception and views about the features and teaching methods of the Family Practice Training Program (FPSTP) in Kuwait to upgrade its standard. Methods: The study design is cross ...

  17. Factors for Personal Counseling among Counseling Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, J. Stephen; Shufelt, Brett

    2014-01-01

    The present study explored the use of counseling among counselor trainees and the characteristics of consumers and nonconsumers. Approximately 61% of those surveyed (n = 85) reported that they had received counseling, with the majority being mental health counseling trainees. Nonconsumers (n = 54) indicated that they coped with problems in other…

  18. Evaluation of feedback given to trainees in medical specialties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tham, Tony Ck; Burr, Bill; Boohan, Mairead

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of feedback provided to specialty trainees (ST3 or higher) in medical specialties during their workplace-based assessments (WBAs). The feedback given in WBAs was examined in detail in a group of 50 ST3 or higher trainees randomly selected from those taking part in a pilot study of changes to the WBA system conducted by the Joint Royal Colleges of Physicians Training Board. They were based in Health Education Northeast (Northern Deanery) and Health Education East of England (Eastern Deanery). Thematic analysis was used to identify commonly occurring themes. Feedback was mainly positive but there were differences in quality between specialties. Problems with feedback included insufficient detail, such that it was not possible to map the progression of the trainee, insufficient action plans made and the timing of feedback not being contemporaneous (feedback not being given at the time of assessment). Recommendations included feedback should be more specific; there need to be more options in the feedback forms for the supervisor to compare the trainee's performance to what is expected and action plans need to be made. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  19. The Influence of Organisational Commitment, Job Involvement and Utility Perceptions on Trainees' Motivation to Improve Work through Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Treuer, Kathryn; McHardy, Katherine; Earl, Celisha

    2013-01-01

    Workplace training is a key strategy often used by organisations to optimise performance. Further, trainee motivation is a key determinant of the degree to which the material learned in a training programme will be transferred to the workplace, enhancing the performance of the trainee. This study investigates the relationship between several…

  20. A Peer-Reviewed Instructional Video is as Effective as a Standard Recorded Didactic Lecture in Medical Trainees Performing Chest Tube Insertion: A Randomized Control Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saun, Tomas J; Odorizzi, Scott; Yeung, Celine; Johnson, Marjorie; Bandiera, Glen; Dev, Shelly P

    Online medical education resources are becoming an increasingly used modality and many studies have demonstrated their efficacy in procedural instruction. This study sought to determine whether a standardized online procedural video is as effective as a standard recorded didactic teaching session for chest tube insertion. A randomized control trial was conducted. Participants were taught how to insert a chest tube with either a recorded didactic teaching session, or a New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) video. Participants filled out a questionnaire before and after performing the procedure on a cadaver, which was filmed and assessed by 2 blinded evaluators using a standardized tool. Western University, London, Ontario. Level of clinical care: institutional. A total of 30 fourth-year medical students from 2 graduating classes at the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry were screened for eligibility. Two students did not complete the study and were excluded. There were 13 students in the NEJM group, and 15 students in the didactic group. The NEJM group׳s average score was 45.2% (±9.56) on the prequestionnaire, 67.7% (±12.9) for the procedure, and 60.1% (±7.65) on the postquestionnaire. The didactic group׳s average score was 42.8% (±10.9) on the prequestionnaire, 73.7% (±9.90) for the procedure, and 46.5% (±7.46) on the postquestionnaire. There was no difference between the groups on the prequestionnaire (Δ + 2.4%; 95% CI: -5.16 to 9.99), or the procedure (Δ -6.0%; 95% CI: -14.6 to 2.65). The NEJM group had better scores on the postquestionnaire (Δ + 11.15%; 95% CI: 3.74-18.6). The NEJM video was as effective as video-recorded didactic training for teaching the knowledge and technical skills essential for chest tube insertion. Participants expressed high satisfaction with this modality. It may prove to be a helpful adjunct to standard instruction on the topic. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc

  1. How clinical supervisors develop trust in their trainees: a qualitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hauer, K.E.; Oza, S.K.; Kogan, J.R.; Stankiewicz, C.A.; Stenfors-Hayes, T.; ten Cate, TJ; Batt, Joanne; O’Sullivan, P.S.

    2015-01-01

    Context Clinical supervisors oversee trainees’ performance while granting them increasing opportunities to work independently. Although the factors contributing to supervisors’ trust in their trainees to conduct clinical work have been identified, how the development of trust is shaped by these

  2. How Supervisor Experience Influences Trust, Supervision, and Trainee Learning: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Leslie; Kogan, Jennifer R; Hauer, Karen E

    2017-09-01

    Appropriate trust and supervision facilitate trainees' growth toward unsupervised practice. The authors investigated how supervisor experience influences trust, supervision, and subsequently trainee learning. In a two-phase qualitative inductive content analysis, phase one entailed reviewing 44 internal medicine resident and attending supervisor interviews from two institutions (July 2013 to September 2014) for themes on how supervisor experience influences trust and supervision. Three supervisor exemplars (early, developing, experienced) were developed and shared in phase two focus groups at a single institution, wherein 23 trainees validated the exemplars and discussed how each impacted learning (November 2015). Phase one: Four domains of trust and supervision varying with experience emerged: data, approach, perspective, clinical. Early supervisors were detail oriented and determined trust depending on task completion (data), were rule based (approach), drew on their experiences as trainees to guide supervision (perspective), and felt less confident clinically compared with more experienced supervisors (clinical). Experienced supervisors determined trust holistically (data), checked key aspects of patient care selectively and covertly (approach), reflected on individual experiences supervising (perspective), and felt comfortable managing clinical problems and gauging trainee abilities (clinical). Phase two: Trainees felt the exemplars reflected their experiences, described their preferences and learning needs shifting over time, and emphasized the importance of supervisor flexibility to match their learning needs. With experience, supervisors differ in their approach to trust and supervision. Supervisors need to trust themselves before being able to trust others. Trainees perceive these differences and seek supervision approaches that align with their learning needs.

  3. Measuring performance in virtual reality phacoemulsification surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söderberg, Per; Laurell, Carl-Gustaf; Simawi, Wamidh; Skarman, Eva; Nordh, Leif; Nordqvist, Per

    2008-02-01

    We have developed a virtual reality (VR) simulator for phacoemulsification surgery. The current work aimed at developing a relative performance index that characterizes the performance of an individual trainee. We recorded measurements of 28 response variables during three iterated surgical sessions in 9 experienced cataract surgeons, separately for the sculpting phase and the evacuation phase of phacoemulsification surgery and compared their outcome to that of a reference group of naive trainees. We defined an individual overall performance index, an individual class specific performance index and an individual variable specific performance index. We found that on an average the experienced surgeons performed at a lower level than a reference group of naive trainees but that this was particularly attributed to a few surgeons. When their overall performance index was further analyzed as class specific performance index and variable specific performance index it was found that the low level performance was attributed to a behavior that is acceptable for an experienced surgeon but not for a naive trainee. It was concluded that relative performance indices should use a reference group that corresponds to the measured individual since the definition of optimal surgery may vary among trainee groups depending on their level of experience.

  4. Appropriate working hours for surgical training according to Australasian trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Gregory; Harper, Simon; Loveday, Benjamin; Adams, Brandon; Civil, Ian D; Peters, Matthew

    2012-04-01

    The demands of surgical training, learning and service delivery compete with the need to minimize fatigue and maintain an acceptable lifestyle. The optimal balance of working hours is uncertain. This study aimed to define the appropriate hours to meet these requirements according to trainees. All Australian and New Zealand surgical trainees were surveyed. Roster structures, weekly working hours and weekly 'sleep loss hours' (work practices were then correlated with sufficiency of training time, time for study, fatigue and its impacts, and work-life balance preferences. Multivariate and univariate analyses were performed. The response rate was 55.3% with responders representative of the total trainee body. Trainees who worked median 60 h/week (interquartile range: 55-65) considered their work hours to be appropriate for 'technical' and 'non-technical' training needs compared with 55 h/week (interquartile range: 50-60) regarded as appropriate for study/research needs. Working ≥65 h/week, or accruing ≥5.5 weekly 'sleep loss hours', was associated with increased fatigue, reduced ability to study, more frequent dozing while driving and impaired concentration at work. Trainees who considered they had an appropriate work-life balance worked median 55 h/week. Approximately, 60 h/week proved an appropriate balance of working hours for surgical training, although study and lifestyle demands are better met at around 55 h/week. Sleep loss is an important determinant of fatigue and its impacts, and work hours should not be considered in isolation. © 2012 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2012 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  5. Strengthening Your Surgical Hand: Strengths-Based Profiling and Coaching of Surgical Trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.A.L. Macafee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction As scientific and professional disciplines, medicine and surgery have a tendency to focus on deficiencies, namely what trainees do not know or are not good at doing. The philosophy of Positive Psychology and the notion of “Strengths” takes a different stance. It is an inherently positive process, seeing each trainee as an individual bringing a unique set of strengths to every situation. There is clear evidence from the commercial sector regarding improved performance and well-being when focusing on one's strengths. We were therefore keen to investigate its potential role in the global development of trainee surgeons. Methods Surgical trainees from Core Training 1 to Specialty Training 8 in one training region of the United Kingdom were invited to voluntarily undertake the online Strengthscope™ assessment tool. The computer-generated report was reviewed by an Occupational Psychologist and trainees were then invited to have a strengths-focused feedback discussion on that report, either face-to-face or via telephone. Results Thirty four surgical trainees ranging from CT1 to ST6 completed the tool and 28 undertook the voluntary feedback sessions. Decisiveness, self-improvement, efficiency, emotional control and critical thinking were common strengths identified. Less commonly represented were leading, creativity and developing others. Trainees found that the tool and feedback helped them identify their strengths and embrace them, rather than fitting the surgical mould. It further aided the recognition of strengths in-overdrive and for some trainees it helped explain difficulties they had experienced in previous jobs. It provided insight into individual motivations and character whilst also highlighting how others in the workplace might perceive them. Trainees liked the emphasis on the building up of positive attributes and utilizing innate skills and strengths. The feedback consultation from an accredited coach trained in the

  6. Working hours and roster structures of surgical trainees in Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Gregory; Loveday, Benjamin; Harper, Simon; Adams, Brandon; Civil, Ian D; Peters, Matthew

    2010-12-01

    The working hours of surgical trainees are a subject of international debate. Excessive working hours are fatiguing, and compromise performance, learning and work-life balance. However, reducing hours can impact on continuity of care, training experience and service provision. This study defines the current working hours of Australasian trainees, to inform the working hours debate in our regions. An online survey was conducted of all current Australasian trainees. Questions determined hours spent at work (AW) and off-site on-call (OC) per week, and roster structures were evaluated by training year, specialty and location. The response rate was 55.3%. Trainees averaged 61.4 ± 11.7 h/week AW, with 5% working ≥80 h. OC shifts were worked by 73.5%, for an average of 27.8 ± 14.3 h/week. Trainees of all levels worked similar hours (P= 0.10); however, neurosurgical trainees worked longer hours than most other specialties (P hours (P= 0.01) and rural rotations more OC (P Long days (>12 h) were worked by 86%; median frequency 1:4.4 days; median duration 15 h. OC shifts of 24-h duration were worked by 75%; median frequency 1:4.2 days; median sleep: 5-7 h/shift; median uninterrupted sleep: 3-5 h/shift. This study has quantified the working hours and roster structures of Australasian surgical trainees. By international standards, Australasian trainee working hours are around average. However, some rosters demand long hours and/or induce chronic sleep loss, placing some trainees at risk of fatigue. Ongoing efforts are needed to promote safe rostering practices. © 2010 The Authors. ANZ Journal of Surgery © 2010 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  7. Allergen immunotherapy: clinical and practical education of Italian trainees in allergy and clinical immunology schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridolo, E; Incorvaia, C; Senna, G E; Montagni, M; Olivieri, E; Canonica, G W

    2013-10-01

    We performed a survey, based on a questionnaire including 20 items, submitted anonymously to Italian trainees in Allergology and Clinical Immunology, in order to obtain information about their specific allergen immunotherapy (AIT) practices. The questionnaire was sent to 40 trainees, who had attended the last two years of the training course. Thirty-four subjects (mean age: 27 years, 65% females) adequately completed the survey. The answers to the questionnaire showed that only 60% of the training programs included lectures on AIT. Among the trainees using AIT, only 40% declared being able to prescribe it independently, while 60% were guided by a tutor. Of the trainees who were able to prescribe AIT autonomously, 60% were familiar with both routes of administration, i.e. subcutaneous (SCIT) and sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT), while 25% of these used only SLIT. In 80% of the training institutions involved, the trainees could attend a dedicated AIT outpatient ward for SCIT administration; only 40% administered AIT personally, and in half of these cases, they were guided by a tutor. Only 70% of trainees had experience in the follow-up of patients still under treatment and of patients who had completed treatment. Analysis of the answers obtained for questions on venom immunotherapy (VIT) showed that, in 90% of cases, the trainees attended a dedicated outpatients ward where VIT is administered, but with a role limited to observation/cooperation. Only 30% were involved in the follow-up of patients who were under treatment or who had completed VIT. Only 20% of the trainees felt confident enough about VIT to prescribe this treatment independently, 80% knew there were several administration protocols, and the majority prescribed products from three different manufacturers. These findings suggest that there is significant room for improving the instructions provided regarding allergology and clinical immunology to trainees in Italy with respect to AIT.

  8. Visual memory performance for color depends on spatiotemporal context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivers, Christian N L; Schreij, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Performance on visual short-term memory for features has been known to depend on stimulus complexity, spatial layout, and feature context. However, with few exceptions, memory capacity has been measured for abruptly appearing, single-instance displays. In everyday life, objects often have a spatiotemporal history as they or the observer move around. In three experiments, we investigated the effect of spatiotemporal history on explicit memory for color. Observers saw a memory display emerge from behind a wall, after which it disappeared again. The test display then emerged from either the same side as the memory display or the opposite side. In the first two experiments, memory improved for intermediate set sizes when the test display emerged in the same way as the memory display. A third experiment then showed that the benefit was tied to the original motion trajectory and not to the display object per se. The results indicate that memory for color is embedded in a richer episodic context that includes the spatiotemporal history of the display.

  9. Serotonin as a Biomarker: Stress Resilience among Battlefield Airmen Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-21

    anxiety, anger, impulsivity, lethargy, sleepiness, and mood disorders [2-5,11,12]. Studies have also shown that prolonged exercise increases...are likely to abandon training on their own. These data may improve the design of biomarker performance prediction models for stress, cognitive...findings demonstrate potential for using serotonin data to identify trainees who are likely to abandon training on their own. These data may improve

  10. Radiographers and trainee radiologists reporting accident radiographs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buskov, L; Abild, A; Christensen, A

    2013-01-01

    To compare the diagnostic accuracy and clinical validity of reporting radiographers with that of trainee radiologists whom they have recently joined in reporting emergency room radiographs at Bispebjerg University Hospital....

  11. Autobiographical Memory Performance in Alzheimer's Disease Depends on Retrieval Frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Stephan; Mychajliw, Christian; Reichert, Carolin; Melcher, Tobias; Leyhe, Thomas

    2016-04-18

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by memory disturbances primarily caused by pathogenic mechanisms affecting medial temporal lobe structures. As proposed by current theories of memory formation, this decrease is mediated by the age of the acquired knowledge. However, they cannot fully explain specific patterns of retrograde amnesia in AD. In the current study we examined an alternative approach and investigated whether the extent and severity of retrograde amnesia in AD is mediated by the frequency of memory retrieval or whether it depends on the mere age of knowledge. We compared recall of autobiographical incidents from three life periods in patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), patients with early dementia of Alzheimer type (eDAT), and healthy control (HC) individuals using the Autobiographical Memory Interview. Retrieval frequency was operationalized by a paired comparison analysis. In contrast to HC individuals, recall of autobiographical incidents was impaired in patients with aMCI and eDAT following Ribot's gradient, with a reduced memory loss for remote compared to more recent life events. However, there was a strong effect of retrieval frequency on memory performance with frequently retrieved incidents memorized in more detail than less frequently retrieved episodes. Remote memories were recalled more often than recent ones. These findings suggest that more frequently retrieved autobiographical memories generally become more independent of the hippocampal complex and might thus be better protected against early hippocampal damage related to AD. Hence, the extent of retrograde amnesia in AD appears mainly mediated by the frequency of memory retrieval, which could plausibly explain why cognitive activity can effectively delay the onset of memory decline in AD.

  12. Pedestal performance dependence upon plasma shape in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, A.W.; Casper, T.A.; Groebner, R.J.; Osborne, T.H.; Snyder, P.B.; Thomas, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    Higher moments of the plasma shape than triangularity are found to significantly affect the pedestal pressure and the edge localized mode (ELM) characteristics in DIII-D. The shape dependence of the pedestal pressure was experimentally examined by varying the squareness in the proposed ITER configuration while holding the triangularity fixed. Over this scan the pedestal pressure increased by ∼50% from highest squareness to lowest squareness. The variation of pedestal energy is found to be consistent with the stability analysis of the measured profiles. The ELM energy also varied with the shape to maintain a nearly constant fraction of the pedestal energy. Stability analysis using model shapes and pressure profiles indicates that much of the advantage of high triangularity for high pedestal pressure can be achieved in lower triangularity shapes by optimizing squareness and/or the distance of the secondary upper separatrix from the primary separatrix. In high beta discharges an increase in pedestal pressure is observed with higher global stored energy. The greatest pedestal pressure increase is at low squareness due to an increase in both the pressure gradient stability limit and the width of the pedestal. The variation in pedestal pressure with squareness was also used to optimize 'hybrid' discharges in DIII-D where a lower pedestal pressure was required for an improved overall performance. In the 'hybrid' regime low squareness resulted in a high pedestal pressure with large infrequent ELMs that eventually triggered an internal 2/1 tearing mode that locked, resulting in a disruption. At higher squareness the pedestal pressure was reduced with smaller and more rapid ELMs, resulting in the maintenance of a steady beneficial internal 3/2 tearing mode and good confinement. For all the cases studied, an increase in the pedestal width at low squareness appears to be a significant factor in the increase in the total pedestal pressure

  13. Trainees' perceptions of practitioner competence during patient transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grierson, Lawrence; Dubrowski, Adam; So, Steph; Kistner, Nicole; Carnahan, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Technical and communicative skills are both important features for one's perception of practitioner competence. This research examines how trainees' perceptions of practitioner competence change as they view health care practitioners who vary in their technical and communicative skill proficiencies. Occupational therapy students watched standardized encounters of a practitioner performing a patient transfer in combinations of low and high technical and communicative proficiency and then reported their perceptions of practitioner competence. The reports indicate that technical and communicative skills have independently identifiable impacts on the perceptions of practitioner competency, but technical proficiency has a special impact on the students' perceptions of practitioner communicative competence. The results are discussed with respect to the way in which students may evaluate their own competence on the basis of either technical or communicative skill. The issue of how this may lead trainees to dedicate their independent learning efforts to an incomplete set of features needed for the development of practitioner competency is raised.

  14. Implementation of a novel population panel management curriculum among interprofessional health care trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminetzky, Catherine P; Beste, Lauren A; Poppe, Anne P; Doan, Daniel B; Mun, Howard K; Woods, Nancy Fugate; Wipf, Joyce E

    2017-12-22

    Gaps in chronic disease management have led to calls for novel methods of interprofessional, team-based care. Population panel management (PPM), the process of continuous quality improvement across groups of patients, is rarely included in health professions training for physicians, nurses, or pharmacists. The feasibility and acceptance of such training across different healthcare professions is unknown. We developed and implemented a novel, interprofessional PPM curriculum targeted to diverse health professions trainees. The curriculum was implemented annually among internal medicine residents, nurse practitioner students and residents, and pharmacy residents co-located in a large, academic primary care site. Small groups of interprofessional trainees participated in supervised quarterly seminars focusing on chronic disease management (e.g., diabetes mellitus, hypertension, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) or processes of care (e.g., emergency department utilization for nonacute conditions or chronic opioid management). Following brief didactic presentations, trainees self-assessed their clinic performance using patient-level chart review, presented individual cases to interprofessional staff and faculty, and implemented subsequent feedback with their clinic team. We report data from 2011 to 2015. Program evaluation included post-session participant surveys regarding attitudes, knowledge and confidence towards PPM, ability to identify patients for referral to interprofessional team members, and major learning points from the session. Directed content analysis was performed on an open-ended survey question. Trainees (n = 168) completed 122 evaluation assessments. Trainees overwhelmingly reported increased confidence in using PPM and increased knowledge about managing their patient panel. Trainees reported improved ability to identify patients who would benefit from multidisciplinary care or referral to another team member. Directed content analysis

  15. Improving Novice Radiology Trainees' Perception Using Fine Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Thomas Rob; Kelleher, Michael

    2017-10-01

    To determine if fine art perception training improved performance in novice radiology trainees. On the first day of their residency, 15 radiology residents underwent a basic radiology perception test in which they were shown 15 different radiographs that each had a significant abnormality. This was followed by a focused session of interpretation training at a local art gallery where art experts taught the trainees how to thoroughly analyze a painting. After this fine art session, the residents were once again shown 15 different radiographs and asked, in the same manner as before, to identify the location of the abnormality. The results of both radiograph assessments were then compared. The 15 residents correctly identified the areas of abnormality on 35 of 225 cases pre-art training with a mean score of 2.33 and a SD of 1.4. After art training, the figure for correctly identifying the area of abnormality rose to 94 of 225 cases with a mean score of 6.27 and a SD of 1.79 (P art gallery may be a novel, effective transitional starting point for novice radiology trainees. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Junior Radiologists' Forum (JRF): National trainee survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilyas, S.; Beatie, A.; Pettet, G.; Kharay, A.; Hedayati, V.; Hameed, S.; McCleery, M.A.; Papadakos, N.; Chari, B.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To gather information in order to highlight areas within training that could be improved and share ideas of good practice and, in addition, to compare national results with those of local training schemes. Materials and methods: A request to participate in the survey was emailed to 1158 radiology trainees across 36 UK training schemes in October 2012. The electronic replies were anonymous. The survey remained active for 6 weeks. The data were collated and analysed by members of the JRF. The survey itself was divided into seven sections, covering a diverse range of topics. Results: Six hundred and four trainees from 36 UK training schemes completed the survey, resulting in a response rate of 52%. - Highlights: • First Radiology specific national survey, written by trainees. • Training schemes can benchmark their performance against a national average. • Also can share areas of good practice; and highlight those that need improvement. • Summary of the results, highlighting the most pertinent findings from each section

  17. Survey of core medical trainees in the United Kingdom 2013 - inconsistencies in training experience and competing with service demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasker, Fiona; Newbery, Nina; Burr, Bill; Goddard, Andrew F

    2014-04-01

    There is currently considerable concern about the attractiveness of hospital medicine as a career and experiences in core medical training (CMT) are a key determinant of whether trainees continue in the medical specialties. Little is understood about the quality and impact of the current CMT programme and this survey was designed to assess this. Three key themes emerged. Firstly, the demands of providing service have led to considerable loss of training opportunities, particularly in outpatients and formal teaching sessions. Trainees spend a lot of this service time doing menial tasks and over 90% report that service takes up 80-100% of their time. Secondly, clinical and educational supervision is variable, with trainees sometimes getting little consultant feedback on their clinical performance. Finally, 44% of trainees report that CMT has not prepared them to be a medical registrar and many trainees are put off acute medical specialties by their experiences in CMT.

  18. Predicting error in detecting mammographic masses among radiology trainees using statistical models based on BI-RADS features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimm, Lars J., E-mail: Lars.grimm@duke.edu; Ghate, Sujata V.; Yoon, Sora C.; Kim, Connie [Department of Radiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3808, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Kuzmiak, Cherie M. [Department of Radiology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, 2006 Old Clinic, CB No. 7510, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599 (United States); Mazurowski, Maciej A. [Duke University Medical Center, Box 2731 Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) features as predictors of individual errors made by trainees when detecting masses in mammograms. Methods: Ten radiology trainees and three expert breast imagers reviewed 100 mammograms comprised of bilateral medial lateral oblique and craniocaudal views on a research workstation. The cases consisted of normal and biopsy proven benign and malignant masses. For cases with actionable abnormalities, the experts recorded breast (density and axillary lymph nodes) and mass (shape, margin, and density) features according to the BI-RADS lexicon, as well as the abnormality location (depth and clock face). For each trainee, a user-specific multivariate model was constructed to predict the trainee's likelihood of error based on BI-RADS features. The performance of the models was assessed using area under the receive operating characteristic curves (AUC). Results: Despite the variability in errors between different trainees, the individual models were able to predict the likelihood of error for the trainees with a mean AUC of 0.611 (range: 0.502–0.739, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.543–0.680,p < 0.002). Conclusions: Patterns in detection errors for mammographic masses made by radiology trainees can be modeled using BI-RADS features. These findings may have potential implications for the development of future educational materials that are personalized to individual trainees.

  19. Predicting error in detecting mammographic masses among radiology trainees using statistical models based on BI-RADS features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Lars J; Ghate, Sujata V; Yoon, Sora C; Kuzmiak, Cherie M; Kim, Connie; Mazurowski, Maciej A

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) features as predictors of individual errors made by trainees when detecting masses in mammograms. Ten radiology trainees and three expert breast imagers reviewed 100 mammograms comprised of bilateral medial lateral oblique and craniocaudal views on a research workstation. The cases consisted of normal and biopsy proven benign and malignant masses. For cases with actionable abnormalities, the experts recorded breast (density and axillary lymph nodes) and mass (shape, margin, and density) features according to the BI-RADS lexicon, as well as the abnormality location (depth and clock face). For each trainee, a user-specific multivariate model was constructed to predict the trainee's likelihood of error based on BI-RADS features. The performance of the models was assessed using area under the receive operating characteristic curves (AUC). Despite the variability in errors between different trainees, the individual models were able to predict the likelihood of error for the trainees with a mean AUC of 0.611 (range: 0.502-0.739, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.543-0.680,p errors for mammographic masses made by radiology trainees can be modeled using BI-RADS features. These findings may have potential implications for the development of future educational materials that are personalized to individual trainees.

  20. Predicting error in detecting mammographic masses among radiology trainees using statistical models based on BI-RADS features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimm, Lars J.; Ghate, Sujata V.; Yoon, Sora C.; Kim, Connie; Kuzmiak, Cherie M.; Mazurowski, Maciej A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to explore Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) features as predictors of individual errors made by trainees when detecting masses in mammograms. Methods: Ten radiology trainees and three expert breast imagers reviewed 100 mammograms comprised of bilateral medial lateral oblique and craniocaudal views on a research workstation. The cases consisted of normal and biopsy proven benign and malignant masses. For cases with actionable abnormalities, the experts recorded breast (density and axillary lymph nodes) and mass (shape, margin, and density) features according to the BI-RADS lexicon, as well as the abnormality location (depth and clock face). For each trainee, a user-specific multivariate model was constructed to predict the trainee's likelihood of error based on BI-RADS features. The performance of the models was assessed using area under the receive operating characteristic curves (AUC). Results: Despite the variability in errors between different trainees, the individual models were able to predict the likelihood of error for the trainees with a mean AUC of 0.611 (range: 0.502–0.739, 95% Confidence Interval: 0.543–0.680,p < 0.002). Conclusions: Patterns in detection errors for mammographic masses made by radiology trainees can be modeled using BI-RADS features. These findings may have potential implications for the development of future educational materials that are personalized to individual trainees

  1. Night shift fatigue among anaesthesia trainees at a major metropolitan teaching hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancman, B M

    2016-05-01

    Night shifts expose anaesthesia trainees to the risk of fatigue and, potentially, fatigue-related performance impairment. This study examined the workload, fatigue and coping strategies of anaesthesia trainees during night shifts. A blinded survey-based study was undertaken at a major single centre metropolitan teaching hospital in Australia. All ten anaesthesia trainees who worked night shifts participated. The survey collected data on duration of night shifts, workload, and sleep patterns. Fatigue was assessed using the Karolinska Sleepiness Scale (KSS). There were 93 night shifts generating data out of a potential 165. Trainees tended to sleep an increasing amount before their shift as the nights progressed from 1 to 5. Night 1 was identified as an 'at risk' night due to the amount of time spent awake before arriving at work (32% awake for U+003E8 hours); on all other nights trainees were most likely to have slept 6-8 hours. The KSS demonstrated an increase in sleepiness of 3 to 4 points on the scale from commencement to conclusion of a night shift. The Night 1 conclusion sleepiness was markedly worse than any other night with 42% falling into an 'at-risk' category. The findings demonstrate fatigue and inadequate sleep in anaesthesia trainees during night shifts in a major metropolitan teaching hospital. The data obtained may help administrators prepare safer rosters, and junior staff develop improved strategies to reduce the likelihood of fatigue.

  2. Adaptive leadership curriculum for Indian paramedic trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantha, Aditya; Coggins, Nathaniel L; Mahadevan, Aditya; Strehlow, Rebecca N; Strehlow, Matthew C; Mahadevan, S V

    2016-12-01

    Paramedic trainees in developing countries face complex and chaotic clinical environments that demand effective leadership, communication, and teamwork. Providers must rely on non-technical skills (NTS) to manage bystanders and attendees, collaborate with other emergency professionals, and safely and appropriately treat patients. The authors designed a NTS curriculum for paramedic trainees focused on adaptive leadership, teamwork, and communication skills critical to the Indian prehospital environment. Forty paramedic trainees in the first academic year of the 2-year Advanced Post-Graduate Degree in Emergency Care (EMT-paramedic equivalent) program at the GVK-Emergency Management and Research Institute campus in Hyderabad, India, participated in the 6-day leadership course. Trainees completed self-assessments and delivered two brief video-recorded presentations before and after completion of the curriculum. Independent blinded observers scored the pre- and post-intervention presentations delivered by 10 randomly selected paramedic trainees. The third-party judges reported significant improvement in both confidence (25 %, p leadership (2.6 vs. 4.6, p confidence (3.0 vs. 4.8, p leadership curriculum for prehospital providers demonstrated significant improvement in self-reported NTS commonly required of paramedics in the field. The authors recommend integrating focused NTS development curriculum into Indian paramedic education and further evaluation of the long term impacts of this adaptive leadership training.

  3. A multisource feedback tool to assess ward round leadership skills of senior paediatric trainees: (2) Testing reliability and practicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodyear, Helen M; Lakshminarayana, Indumathy; Wall, David; Bindal, Taruna

    2015-05-01

    A five-domain multisource feedback (MSF) tool was previously developed in 2009-2010 by the authors to assess senior paediatric trainees' ward round leadership skills. To determine whether this MSF tool is practicable and reliable, whether individuals' feedback varies over time and trainees' views of the tool. The MSF tool was piloted (April-July 2011) and field tested (September 2011-February 2013) with senior paediatric trainees. A focus group held at the end of field testing obtained trainees' views of the tool. In field testing, 96/115 (84%) trainees returned 633 individual assessments from three different ward rounds over 18 months. The MSF tool had high reliability (Cronbach's α 0.84, G coefficient 0.8 for three raters). In all five domains, data were shifted to the right with scores of 3 (good) and 4 (excellent). Consultants gave significantly lower scores (p<0.001), as did trainees for self-assessment (p<0.001). There was no significant change in MSF scores over 18 months but comments showed that trainees' performance improved. Trainees valued these comments and the MSF tool but had concerns about time taken for feedback and confusion about tool use and the paediatric assessment strategy. A five-domain MSF tool was found to be reliable on pilot and field testing, practicable to use and liked by trainees. Comments on performance were more helpful than scores in giving trainees feedback. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. Attitudes and intentions of current anaesthetic trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fröhlich, S; Moriarty, J

    2013-03-01

    We report the results of a survey of Irish anaesthetic specialist trainees to establish their future training intentions, their interest in seeking a Consultant position in Ireland and identification of factors that may reduce the attractiveness of future employment in the HSE. 149 responses were received (71% of trainees). 137 (92%) are likely to complete further training abroad, but only 24 (16.1%) are definitely planning to return to work in Ireland. Factors, in order of importance that influence their return to Ireland include equivalence of all Consultants, salary level and availability of flexible work practices. Almost all (131 - 91%) would only consider working in Ireland at Consultant level. These results reveal that the current cohort of specialist trainees do not consider Ireland an attractive place to work, and any further diminution of the current Consultant grade will only serve to worsen this perception.

  5. True versus spurious state dependence in firm performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Ulrich; Kongsted, Hans Christian

    2008-01-01

    This paper analyzes the persistence of firms' exporting behavior in a panel of German manufacturing firms using dynamic binary choice models. We distinguish between true and spurious state dependence in exports and apply fixed effects methods that allow us to verify the robustness of our results ...... determinants. Our results, which are consistent with the findings of previous studies on firms in developing countries and in the United States, show the presence of important sunk costs in export market entry and a depreciation of knowledge and experience in export markets....

  6. True Versus Spurious State Dependence in Firm Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Ulrich; Kongsted, Hans Christian

    This paper analyzes the persistence of firms' exporting behavior in a panel of German manufacturing firms using dynamic binary choice models. We distinguish between true and spurious state dependence in exports and apply fixed effects methods that allow us to verify the robustness of our results ...... determinants. Our results, which are consistent with the findings of previous studies on firms in developing countries and in the United States, show the presence of important sunk costs in export market entry and a depreciation of knowledge and experience in export markets...

  7. Is There Dependence Between Process Maturity and Process Performance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joost Spekschoor; Pascal Ravesteijn; Roeland Loggen; dr. Martijn Zoet

    2012-01-01

    During recent years the world has seen rapid changes such as globalization, the Internet, and the rise of new economies. To survive these changes organizations need to be in control of their processes, and be able to continuously improve the process performance. Therefore many organizations are

  8. The effect of trainee involvement on procedure and list times: A statistical analysis with discussion of current issues affecting orthopaedic training in UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, T; Sahu, A; Johnson, D S; Turner, P G

    2010-02-01

    Training surgeons adds time to the duration of procedures and operation lists. This is not accounted for in the finance received to perform the operation by the hospital in the Payment by Results (PbR) system. To find out: 1. The effect on the duration of a procedure and the number of procedures performed on the list when a trainee is involved. 2. The percentage of orthopaedic cases with trainee involvement. 3. The effect of European working time directive (EWTD) on the trainee involvement in cases from theatre data in 2008 versus logbook data from 2004 - 2008. Data was taken from two different sources. Firstly, the Operating Room Information System (ORMIS) and patient operation notes. The second source was a consultant's logbook comprising 227 primary total knee replacements performed between 2004 and 2008. The data produced trends suggesting trainees took longer to perform procedures than consultants. In orthopaedic operations, 92% of cases had trainees present and of these 17% of cases were performed by trainees in 2008. Before the implementation of the EWTD, trainees performed more procedures when compared with current logbook data (38% versus 17% cases). Time taken by a trainee to perform the procedure under direct consultant supervision was significantly higher in comparison to procedures performed by a consultant alone (P = < 0.0001). Analysing the ORMIS and logbook data gave similar conclusions. Hospitals should be given financial recognition for training. In this debate, we should remain focused on the provision of quality training for the next generation of surgeons.

  9. The direction of bilateral transfer depends on the performance parameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhujun; van Gemmert, Arend W A

    2013-10-01

    To acquire a more comprehensive understanding of the learning benefits associated with bilateral transfer and to gain knowledge of possible mechanisms behind bilateral transfer, we investigated the transfer direction of several parameters which are assumed to represent important features of movement control in a visuo-motor task. During the study, participants learned a multidirectional point-to-point drawing task in which the visual feedback was rotated 45° and the gain was increased. Performance changes of the untrained hand in movement time, trajectory length, normalized jerk, initial direction error, ratio of the primary sub-movement time to the total movement time, and the accuracy of the aiming movement after the primary sub-movement were investigated as indices of learning from bilateral transfer. The results showed that performance parameters related to the initial production of the movement, such as the initial direction, ratio of primary sub-movement to the total movement time, and movement accuracy after the primary sub-movement, only transferred to the non-dominant, while hand performance variables related to the overall outcome, such as movement duration, movement smoothness, and trajectory length, transferred in both directions. The findings of the current study support the basic principle of the "dynamic dominance model" because it is suggested that overall improvements in the non-dominant system are controlled by trajectory parameters in visuo-motor tasks, which resulted in transference of the afore mentioned production parameters to rather occur to the non-dominant hand as opposed to transference to the dominant hand. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Attitudes towards attrition among UK trainees in obstetrics and gynaecology

    OpenAIRE

    Gafson, I.; Currie, J.; O Dwyer, S.; Woolf, K.; Griffin, A.

    2017-01-01

    Physician dissatisfaction in the workplace has consequences for patient safety. Currently in the UK, 1 in 5 doctors who enter specialist training in obstetrics and gynaecology leave the programme before completion. Trainee attrition has implications for workforce planning, organization of health-care services and patient care. The authors conducted a survey of current trainees' and former trainees' views concerning attrition and ‘peri-attrition’ – a term coined to describe the trainee who has...

  11. Technological pedagogical content knowledge and teaching practice of mathematics trainee teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajudin, Nor'ain Mohd.; Kadir, Noor Zarinawaty Abd.

    2014-07-01

    This study aims to identify the level of technological pedagogical content knowledge (TPCK) of mathematics trainee teachers at Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris (UPSI) and explore their teaching practices during practical training at school. The study was conducted in two phases using a mix-method research. In the first phase, a survey method using a questionnaire was carried out on 156 trainee teachers of Bachelor of Mathematics Education (AT14) and Bachelor of Science (Mathematics) with Education (AT48). The instrument used was a questionnaire that measures the level of content knowledge, pedagogy, technology and TPCK of mathematics. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, namely the mean. While in the second phase, the interview method involved four trainee teachers were performed. The instrument used was the semi-structured interview protocol to assess the trainee teacher's TPCK integration in their teaching practice. Data were analyzed using the content analysis. The findings showed that the level of knowledge of TPCK among trainee teachers was moderate with overall mean score of 3.60. This level did not show significant differences between the two programs with mean scores of 3.601 for the AT14 group and 3.603 for the AT48 group. However, there was a difference for gender classification such that the female trainees had mean score of 3.58 and male trainees with mean score of 3.72. Although students' TPCK level was moderate, the level of content knowledge (CK), technological knowledge (TK) and pedagogical knowledge (PK), showed a higher level with overall mean scores of 3.75, 3.87 and 3.84 respectively. The findings also showed that in terms of content knowledge, trainee teacher's learning mathematics background was good, but the knowledge of mathematics was limited in the curriculum, philosophy and application aspect. In terms of pedagogical content knowledge, all respondents tend to use lecture and discussion methods in teaching Trigonometry topic

  12. Sleep enhances false memories depending on general memory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekelmann, Susanne; Born, Jan; Wagner, Ullrich

    2010-04-02

    Memory is subject to dynamic changes, sometimes giving rise to the formation of false memories due to biased processes of consolidation or retrieval. Sleep is known to benefit memory consolidation through an active reorganization of representations whereas acute sleep deprivation impairs retrieval functions. Here, we investigated whether sleep after learning and sleep deprivation at retrieval enhance the generation of false memories in a free recall test. According to the Deese, Roediger, McDermott (DRM) false memory paradigm, subjects learned lists of semantically associated words (e.g., "night", "dark", "coal", etc.), lacking the strongest common associate or theme word (here: "black"). Free recall was tested after 9h following a night of sleep, a night of wakefulness (sleep deprivation) or daytime wakefulness. Compared with memory performance after a retention period of daytime wakefulness, both post-learning nocturnal sleep as well as acute sleep deprivation at retrieval significantly enhanced false recall of theme words. However, these effects were only observed in subjects with low general memory performance. These data point to two different ways in which sleep affects false memory generation through semantic generalization: one acts during consolidation on the memory trace per se, presumably by active reorganization of the trace in the post-learning sleep period. The other is related to the recovery function of sleep and affects cognitive control processes of retrieval. Both effects are unmasked when the material is relatively weakly encoded. Crown Copyright 2009. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Communication Skills among Surgical Trainees: Perceptions of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective Communication between the surgeon and the patient is a core clinical skill. The ability to communicate with patients and their family members is very important in the optimum care of the surgical patient. Few studies have assessed communication between surgical trainees and their patients in sub-Saharan Africa.

  14. Trainee underperformance: a guide to achieving resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Prem; Grills, Richard; Kuan, Melvyn; Klein, Deborah

    2015-05-01

    Underperformance and the disharmony it can cause are not commonly faced by trainees. However, when it occurs, a process to recognize and manage the issues compassionately must be put in place. A literature review was undertaken to outline processes and themes in addressing and resolving these types of issues. A PubMed search using 'surgical underperformance' and 'remedial teaching' was used as a broad template to find papers that illustrated key concepts. One thousand four hundred and fifteen papers were identified. In papers where the titles were in line with the stated topic, 294 abstracts were reviewed. Key papers were used to develop themes. Additional cross-referenced papers were also included where relevant. There can be a variety of reasons for trainee underperformance. The root cause is not always clear. Disharmony can result in a surgical unit during this time. The involved trainee as well as the members of the clinical unit may experience a variety of stressors. A systematic process of management can be used to evaluate the situation and bring some resolution to difficulties in working relationships. Early constructive intervention improves outcomes. There should be a process to systematically and compassionately resolve underlying issues. This paper outlines the disharmony that can result from trainee underperformance and offers guidance for resolution to those involved. © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  15. Job burnout in 159 anesthesiology trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yesim Cokay Abut

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anesthesiology may be stressful and most anesthesiologists develop mechanisms for coping. However, inexperienced trainee anesthesiologists seem to be vulnerable. We studied stress perception and job burnout in trainee anesthesiologists. Methods: Responses to perceived stress scale (PSS and Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI were evaluated in 159 trainee anesthesiologists. Results: In our results, when perceived stress was increased, emotional exhaustion and depersonalization increased but personal accomplishment decreased, as expected. Perceived stress was very high in the early years of training. There was a negative correlation between age and emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, but positive correlation with personal accomplishment. Female anesthesiologists had higher personal accomplishment, but lower depersonalization points than male anesthesiologists in our study. There was no statistical association between marital status, PSS, and MBI; ≥2 children group had a significant high personal accomplishment but low depersonalization and emotional exhaustion scores. Line regression analysis showed a statistically significant relationship between PSS and emotional exhaustion and between age and depersonalization. Conclusions: Social factors such as gender and number of children affect the work life of our trainees.

  16. 360-degree feedback for medical trainees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Ellen; Holm, Kirsten; Sørensen, Jette Led

    2015-01-01

    feedback and assessment. In order to secure reliability 8-15 respondents are needed. It is a matter of discussion whether the respondents should be chosen by the trainee or by a third part, and if respondents should be anonymous. The process includes a feedback session with a trained supervisor....

  17. 29 CFR 553.214 - Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trainees. 553.214 Section 553.214 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR REGULATIONS APPLICATION OF THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT TO EMPLOYEES OF STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENTS Fire Protection and Law...

  18. Psychosocial Resolution and Counsellor Trainee Empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Joshua M.

    1992-01-01

    Entry-level counseling students (n=74) were surveyed to investigate the relationship between resolution of Erikson's psychosocial stage of intimacy/isolation and counselor trainee empathy. Results revealed a significant positive relationship between measures of psychosocial stage resolution and counselor empathy and a significant main effect for…

  19. Educational Supervision Appropriate for Psychiatry Trainee's Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rele, Kiran; Tarrant, C. Jane

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The authors studied the regularity and content of supervision sessions in one of the U.K. postgraduate psychiatric training schemes (Mid-Trent). Methods: A questionnaire sent to psychiatry trainees assessed the timing and duration of supervision, content and protection of supervision time, and overall quality of supervision. The authors…

  20. Frequency-dependent left ventricular performance in women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wainstein, Rodrigo V; Sasson, Zion; Mak, Susanna

    2012-06-01

    We aimed to determine whether sex differences in humans extend to the dynamic response of the left ventricular (LV) chamber to changes in heart rate (HR). Several observations suggest sex influences LV structure and function in health; moreover, this physiology is also affected in a sex-specific manner by aging. Eight postmenopausal women and eight similarly aged men underwent a cardiac catheterization-based study for force-interval relationships of the LV. HR was controlled by right atrial (RA) pacing, and LV +dP/dt(max) and volume were assessed by micromanometer-tipped catheter and Doppler echocardiography, respectively. Analysis of approximated LV pressure-volume relationships was performed using a time-varying model of elastance. External stroke work was also calculated. The relationship between HR and LV +dP/dt(max) was expressed as LV +dP/dt(max) = b + mHR. The slope (m) of the relationship was steeper in women compared with men (11.8 ± 4.0 vs. 6.1 ± 4.1 mmHg·s(-1)·beats(-1)·min(-1), P = 0.01). The greater increase in contractility in women was reproducibly observed after normalizing LV +dP/dt(max) to LV end-diastolic volume (LVVed) or by measuring end-systolic elastance. LVVed and stroke volume decreased more in women. Thus, despite greater increases in contractility, HR was associated with a lesser rise in cardiac output and a steeper fall in external stroke work in women. Compared with men, women exhibit greater inotropic responses to incremental RA pacing, which occurs at the same time as a steeper decline in external stroke work. In older adults, we observed sexual dimorphism in determinants of LV mechanical performance.

  1. Is laparoscopic appendicectomy a safe procedure for trainees in the peripheral hospital setting?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Emmanuel, A

    2011-10-01

    Laparoscopic appendicectomy has become standard in the treatment of acute appendicitis in most hospitals in Ireland. Studies have shown that it is a safe procedure for trainees to perform. However, these studies were conducted in university teaching hospitals whereas a significant proportion of training in Ireland takes place in peripheral hospitals which provide a different training environment. The aim of this study was to determine whether laparoscopic appendicectomy is a safe procedure for surgical trainees to perform in a peripheral hospital setting. A retrospective analysis was performed of appendicectomies carried out at a peripheral hospital over a 12 month period. Comparisons were made between consultant surgeons and trainees for a variety of outcomes. Of 155 appendicectomies, 129 (83.2%) were performed laparoscopically, of which 10 (7.75%) were converted to open. Consultants performed 99 (77%) laparoscopic appendicectomies. There were no statistically significant differences between consultants and trainees in complication rates (19 (19.2%) vs. 4 (13.3%), p = 0.46), mean length of hospital stay (4.7 +\\/- 4.0 vs. 3.4 +\\/- 3.3 days, p = 0.13), or rate of conversion to open operation (9 (9.1%) vs. 1 (3.3%), p = 0.45). For cases of complicated appendicitis there were no significant differences between consultants and trainees in complication rates (12 vs. 2, p = 0.40) or length of hospital stay (6.4 +\\/- 3.9 vs. 4.7 +\\/- 5.6 days, p = 0.27). We conclude that laparoscopic appendicectomy is a safe procedure for trainees to perform in the peripheral hospital setting and should be incorporated into surgical training programs at an early stage of training.

  2. What causes trainees to leave oral and maxillofacial surgery? A questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, C; Kent, S; Magennis, P; Cleland, J

    2017-01-01

    Understanding what causes trainees to leave OMFS is essential if we are to retain them within the specialty. Although these factors have been defined for medicine, we know of no previous study for OMFS. An online survey was distributed to roughly 1500 people who had registered an interest in OMFS during the past seven years. Personal information and details of education and employment were gathered along with personal factors that attracted them to OMFS. Of 251 trainees who responded, 50 (30%) were no longer interested. Factors that significantly correlated with an interest in OMFS included male sex (p=0.020), dual qualification (p=0.024), and (only for women) being single (p=0.024) and having no dependants (p=0.005). We used qualitative analysis to identify work-life balance, duration of training, and financial implications, as significant factors. Identification of key factors that affect OMFS trainees allows us to develop ways to keep them in the specialty. The predominant factor is work-life balance, and for women this included having children and being married. Financial issues related to the junior doctors' contract and competition ratios to second degrees, are also factors for both sexes. Also important are the "sunk costs" fallacy that causes some trainees to stay in training. This information can be used to help develop higher training, in negotiations of contracts, and to attract and retain future OMFS trainees. Copyright © 2016 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Impact of child death on paediatric trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Clare E; Wesley, Carla; Huckridge, Jaymie; Finn, Gabrielle M; Griksaitis, Michael J

    2018-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of symptoms of acute stress reactions (ASR) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in paediatric trainees following their involvement in child death. A survey designed to identify trainees' previous experiences of child death combined with questions to identify features of PTSD. Quantitative interpretation was used alongside a χ 2 test. A p value of death of a child, although 190/284 (67%) had no training in child death. 118/248 (48%) of trainees were given a formal debrief session following their most recent experience. 203/251 (81%) of trainees reported one or more symptoms or behaviours that could contribute to a diagnosis of ASR/PTSD. 23/251 (9%) of trainees met the complete criteria for ASR and 13/251 (5%) for PTSD. Attending a formal debrief and reporting feelings of guilt were associated with an increase in diagnostic criteria for ASR/PTSD (p=0.036 and pdeath of a child. The feeling of guilt should be identified and acknowledged to allow prompt signposting to further support, including psychological assessment or intervention if required. Clear recommendations need to be made about the safety of debriefing sessions as, in keeping with existing evidence, our data suggest that debrief after the death of a child may be associated with the development of symptoms suggestive of ASR/PTSD. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Verbal Aggressiveness Among Physicians and Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Jenny Lynn; Hosseini, Motahar; Kamangar, Farin; Levien, David H; Rowland, Pamela A; Kowdley, Gopal C; Cunningham, Steven C

    2016-01-01

    To better understand verbal aggressiveness among physicians and trainees, including specialty-specific differences. The Infante Verbal Aggressiveness Scale (IVAS) was administered as part of a survey to 48 medical students, 24 residents, and 257 attending physicians. The 72 trainees received the IVAS and demographic questions, whereas the attending physicians received additional questions regarding type of practice, career satisfaction, litigation, and personality type. The IVAS scores showed high reliability (Cronbach α = 0.83). Among all trainees, 56% were female with mean age 28 years, whereas among attending physicians, 63% were male with mean age 50 years. Average scores of trainees were higher than attending physicians with corresponding averages of 1.88 and 1.68, respectively. Among trainees, higher IVAS scores were significantly associated with male sex, non-US birthplace, choice of surgery, and a history of bullying. Among attending physicians, higher IVAS scores were significantly associated with male sex, younger age, self-reported low-quality of patient-physician relationships, and low enjoyment talking to patients. General surgery and general internal medicine physicians were significantly associated with higher IVAS scores than other specialties. General practitioners (surgeons and medical physicians) had higher IVAS scores than the specialists in their corresponding fields. No significant correlation was found between IVAS scores and threats of legal action against attending physicians, or most personality traits. Additional findings regarding bullying in medical school, physician-patient interactions, and having a method to deal with inappropriate behavior at work were observed. Individuals choosing general specialties display more aggressive verbal communication styles, general surgeons displaying the highest. The IVAS scoring system may identify subgroups of physicians with overly aggressive (problematic) communication skills and may provide a

  5. Travel Medicine Encounters of Australian General Practice Trainees-A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Simon; Henderson, Kim M; Tapley, Amanda; Scott, John; van Driel, Mieke L; Spike, Neil A; McArthur, Lawrie A; Davey, Andrew R; Catzikiris, Nigel F; Magin, Parker J

    2015-01-01

    Travel medicine is a common and challenging area of clinical practice and practitioners need up-to-date knowledge and experience in a range of areas. Australian general practitioners (GPs) play a significant role in the delivery of travel medicine advice. We aimed to describe the rate and nature of travel medicine consultations, including both the clinical and educational aspects of the consultations. A cross-sectional analysis from an ongoing cohort study of GP trainees' clinical consultations was performed. Trainees contemporaneously recorded demographic, clinical, and educational details of consecutive patient consultations. Proportions of all problems/diagnoses managed in these consultations that were coded "travel-related" and "travel advice" were both calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Associations of a problem/diagnosis being "travel-related" or "travel advice" were tested using simple logistic regression within the generalized estimating equations (GEE) framework. A total of 856 trainees contributed data on 169,307 problems from 108,759 consultations (2010-2014). Travel-related and travel advice problems were managed at a rate of 1.1 and 0.5 problems per 100 encounters, respectively. Significant positive associations of travel-related problems were younger trainee and patient age; new patient to the trainee and practice; privately billing, larger, urban, and higher socioeconomic status practices; and involvement of the practice nurse. Trainees sought in-consultation information and generated learning goals in 34.7 and 20.8% of travel advice problems, respectively, significantly more than in non-travel advice problems. Significant positive associations of travel advice problems were seeking in-consultation information, generation of learning goals, longer consultation duration, and more problems managed. Our findings reinforce the importance of focused training in travel medicine for GP trainees and adequate exposure to patients in the practice

  6. Responses to clinical uncertainty in Australian general practice trainees: a cross-sectional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Georga; Tapley, Amanda; Holliday, Elizabeth; Morgan, Simon; Henderson, Kim; Ball, Jean; van Driel, Mieke; Spike, Neil; Kerr, Rohan; Magin, Parker

    2017-12-01

    Tolerance for ambiguity is essential for optimal learning and professional competence. General practice trainees must be, or must learn to be, adept at managing clinical uncertainty. However, few studies have examined associations of intolerance of uncertainty in this group. The aim of this study was to establish levels of tolerance of uncertainty in Australian general practice trainees and associations of uncertainty with demographic, educational and training practice factors. A cross-sectional analysis was performed on the Registrar Clinical Encounters in Training (ReCEnT) project, an ongoing multi-site cohort study. Scores on three of the four independent subscales of the Physicians' Reaction to Uncertainty (PRU) instrument were analysed as outcome variables in linear regression models with trainee and practice factors as independent variables. A total of 594 trainees contributed data on a total of 1209 occasions. Trainees in earlier training terms had higher scores for 'Anxiety due to uncertainty', 'Concern about bad outcomes' and 'Reluctance to disclose diagnosis/treatment uncertainty to patients'. Beyond this, findings suggest two distinct sets of associations regarding reaction to uncertainty. Firstly, affective aspects of uncertainty (the 'Anxiety' and 'Concern' subscales) were associated with female gender, less experience in hospital prior to commencing general practice training, and graduation overseas. Secondly, a maladaptive response to uncertainty (the 'Reluctance to disclose' subscale) was associated with urban practice, health qualifications prior to studying medicine, practice in an area of higher socio-economic status, and being Australian-trained. This study has established levels of three measures of trainees' responses to uncertainty and associations with these responses. The current findings suggest differing 'phenotypes' of trainees with high 'affective' responses to uncertainty and those reluctant to disclose uncertainty to patients. More

  7. Co-Relates between Anxiety and Academic Achievement in Teacher Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Shivani; Sharma, Savita

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety is one of the major predictors of academic performance. Teacher trainees with anxiety disorder display a passive attitude in their studies such as lack of interest in learning, poor performance in exams, and on lesson plans & assignments. This research observes the relationship between level of anxiety and academic achievement of…

  8. Innovative model of delivering quality improvement education for trainees – a pilot project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kannan Ramar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: After incorporating quality improvement (QI education as a required curriculum for our trainees in 2010, a need arose to readdress our didactic sessions as they were too long, difficult to schedule, and resulting in a drop in attendance. A ‘flipped classroom’ (FC model to deliver QI education was touted to be an effective delivery method as it allows the trainees to view didactic materials on videos, on their own time, and uses the classroom to clarify concepts and employ learned tools on case-based scenarios including workshops. Methods: The Mayo Quality Academy prepared 29 videos that incorporated the previously delivered 17 weekly didactic sessions, for a total duration of 135 min. The half-day session clarified questions related to the videos, followed by case examples and a hands-on workshop on how to perform and utilize a few commonly used QI tools and methods. Results: Seven trainees participated. There was a significant improvement in knowledge as measured by pre- and post-FC model test results [improvement by 40.34% (SD 16.34, p<0.001]. The survey results were overall positive about the FC model with all trainees strongly agreeing that we should continue with this model to deliver QI education. Conclusions: The pilot project of using the FC model to deliver QI education was successful in a small sample of trainees.

  9. Taekwondo trainees' satisfaction towards using the virtual taekwondo training environment prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelani, Nur Ain Mohd; Zulkifli, Abdul Nasir; Ismail, Salina; Yusoff, Mohd Fitri

    2017-10-01

    Taekwondo is among the most popular martial arts which have existed more than 3000 years ago and have millions of followers all around the world. The typical taekwondo training session takes place in a hall or large open spaces in the presence of a trainer. Even though this is the most widely used approach of Taekwondo training, this approach has some limitations in supporting self-directed training. Self-directed taekwondo training is required for the trainees to improve their skills and performance. There are varieties of supplementary taekwondo training materials available, however, most of them are still lacking in terms of three-dimensional visualization. This paper introduces the Virtual Taekwondo Training Environment (VT2E) prototype for self-directed training. The aim of this paper is to determine whether the intervention of the new taekwondo training approach using virtual reality contributes to the trainees' satisfaction in self-directed training. Pearson Correlation and Regression analyses were used to determine the effects of Engaging, Presence, Usefulness and Ease of Use on trainees' satisfaction in using the prototype. The results provide empirical support for the positive and statistically significant relationship between Usefulness and Ease of Use and trainees' satisfaction for taekwondo training. However, Engaging and Presence do not have a positive and significant relationship with trainees' satisfaction for self-directed training.

  10. Trainee satisfaction in surgery residency programs: modern management tools ensure trainee motivation and success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Websky, Martin W; Oberkofler, Christian E; Rufibach, Kaspar; Raptis, Dimitri A; Lehmann, Kuno; Hahnloser, Dieter; Clavien, Pierre-Alain

    2012-11-01

    To assess trainee satisfaction in their surgery residency with a validated instrument and identify the contributing factors. Currently, surgery is deemed unattractive by medical students and ignored by many candidates planning to enter an academic career. New insights on the rational for such lack of interest are needed. Job satisfaction is a central concept in organizational and behavioral research that is well understood by large companies such as Google, IBM, and Toyota. Similar assessment can likewise be used to improve trainee satisfaction in surgery residency. A survey among 2039 surgery residents was conducted in three European countries analyzing satisfaction at work using the Global Job Satisfaction Instrument (validated in Emergency Room physicians). Crucial factors covering different aspects of surgery residency where identified using the GJS instrument combined with multiple logistic regression analysis. With an overall response rate of 23%, we identified trainee dissatisfaction in one third of residents. Factors affecting satisfaction related almost exclusively to training issues, such as assignment of surgery procedures according to skills (OR 4.2), training courses (OR 2.7), availability of a structured training curriculum (OR 2.4), bedside teaching, and availability of morbidity-mortality conferences (OR 2.3). A good working climate among residents (OR 3.7) and the option for part time work (OR 2.1) were also significant factors for trainee satisfaction. Increased working hours had a modest (OR 0.98)-though cumulative- negative effect. The sex of the trainee was not related to trainee satisfaction. Validated measurement of job satisfaction as used in the industry appears to be an efficient tool to assess trainee satisfaction in surgery residency and thereby identify the key contributing factors. Improvement of conceptual training structures and working conditions might facilitate recruitment, decrease drop-out, and attract motivated candidates with

  11. Developing Communication Skills of EFL Teacher Trainees

    OpenAIRE

    Akpınar, Kadriye Dilek

    2009-01-01

    Higher Education Council of Turkey has added a one term course named as “Effective Communication Skills” to the curriculum since 2006 in Foreign Language Education Departments because of the crucial importance of communication in the information society. In order to test the effectiveness of this course, a research project was developed by looking at the pre-and post course interviews conducted with first year teacher trainees about communication skills compared with the fourth year students’...

  12. The delivery of general paediatric surgery in Ireland: a survey of higher surgical trainees.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Boyle, E

    2012-12-01

    The delivery of general paediatric surgery is changing in Ireland. Fewer paediatric surgical procedures are being performed by newly appointed consultant general surgeons, resulting in increased referrals to the specialist paediatric surgeons of uncomplicated general paediatric surgical problems. We surveyed current higher surgical trainees about their views on provision of paediatric surgical services.

  13. Students' performance in accounting: differential effect of field dependence-independence as a learning style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Richard A

    2003-08-01

    This study examined the differential moderating effects associated with field dependence-independence and perceptions of stress on students' performance after controlling for SAT Mathematics and Verbal scores as well as students' actual effort on homework. The average performance of 178 third-year accounting majors over three examinations was used to evaluate their understanding of financial accounting. The students also took the Group Embedded Figures Test. While the data indicate that the most significant variables were students' effort, SAT Verbal scores, and their perceptions of stress, these variables were differentially associated with students' performance depending upon whether the student was classified as a field-independent or field-dependent learner.

  14. 'Oh my God, I can't handle this!': trainees' emotional responses to complex situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmich, Esther; Diachun, Laura; Joseph, Radha; LaDonna, Kori; Noeverman-Poel, Nelleke; Lingard, Lorelei; Cristancho, Sayra

    2018-02-01

    Dealing with emotions is critical for medical trainees' professional development. Taking a sociocultural and narrative approach to understanding emotions, we studied complex clinical situations as a specific context in which emotions are evoked and influenced by the social environment. We sought to understand how medical trainees respond to emotions that arise in those situations. In an international constructivist grounded theory study, 29 trainees drew two rich pictures of complex clinical situations, one exciting and one frustrating. Rich pictures are visual representations that capture participants' perceptions about the people, situations and factors that create clinical complexity. These pictures were used to guide semi-structured, individual interviews. We analysed visual materials and interviews in an integrated way, starting with looking at the drawings, doing a 'gallery walk', and using the interviews to inform the aesthetic analysis. Participants' drawings depicted a range of personal emotions in response to complexity, and disclosed unsettling feelings and behaviours that might be considered unprofessional. When trainees felt confident, they were actively participating, engaged in creative problem-solving strategies, and emphasised their personal involvement. When trainees felt the situation was beyond their control, they described how they were running away from the situation, hiding themselves behind others or distancing themselves from patients or families. A sense of control seems to be a key factor influencing trainees' emotional and behavioural responses to complexity. This is problematic, as complex situations are by their nature emergent and dynamic, which limits possibilities for control. Following a social performative approach to emotions, we should help students understand that feeling out of control is an inherent property of participating in complex clinical situations, and, by extension, that it is not something they will 'grow out of

  15. What do gastroenterology trainees want: recognition, remuneration or recreation?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harewood, G C

    2010-07-27

    BACKGROUND: Occupational psychologists have identified three factors important in motivating physicians: financial reward, academic recognition, time off. AIM: To assess motivators among gastroenterology (GI) trainees. METHODS: A questionnaire was distributed to GI trainees to assess their motivators: (1) work fewer hours for less lucrative rate, (2) reduction in salary\\/increase in hours for academic protected time, and (3) work longer hours for higher total salary, but less lucrative hourly rate. RESULTS: Overall, 61 trainees responded; 52% of trainees would work shorter hours for less lucrative rate; 60% would accept a disproportionate reduction in salary\\/increase in hours for academic protected time; 54% would work longer hours for more money but less lucrative rate. Most trainees (93%) accepted at least one scenario. CONCLUSIONS: Most GI trainees are willing to modify their job description to align with their personal values. Tailoring job descriptions according to these values can yield economic benefits to GI Divisions.

  16. What do gastroenterology trainees want: recognition, remuneration or recreation?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harewood, G C

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Occupational psychologists have identified three factors important in motivating physicians: financial reward, academic recognition, time off. AIM: To assess motivators among gastroenterology (GI) trainees. METHODS: A questionnaire was distributed to GI trainees to assess their motivators: (1) work fewer hours for less lucrative rate, (2) reduction in salary\\/increase in hours for academic protected time, and (3) work longer hours for higher total salary, but less lucrative hourly rate. RESULTS: Overall, 61 trainees responded; 52% of trainees would work shorter hours for less lucrative rate; 60% would accept a disproportionate reduction in salary\\/increase in hours for academic protected time; 54% would work longer hours for more money but less lucrative rate. Most trainees (93%) accepted at least one scenario. CONCLUSIONS: Most GI trainees are willing to modify their job description to align with their personal values. Tailoring job descriptions according to these values can yield economic benefits to GI Divisions.

  17. ENT audit and research in the era of trainee collaboratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew E; Hardman, John; Ellis, Matthew; Williams, Richard J

    2018-05-26

    Large surgical audits and research projects are complex and costly to deliver, but increasingly surgical trainees are delivering these projects within formal collaboratives and research networks. Surgical trainee collaboratives are now recognised as a valuable part of the research infrastructure, with many perceived benefits for both the trainees and the wider surgical speciality. In this article, we describe the activity of ENT trainee research collaboratives within the UK, and summarise how INTEGRATE, the UK National ENT Trainee Research Network, successfully delivered a national audit of epistaxis management. The prospective audit collected high-quality data from 1826 individuals, representing 94% of all cases that met the inclusion criteria at the 113 participating sites over the 30-day audit period. It is hoped that the audit has provided a template for subsequent high-quality and cost-effective national studies, and we discuss the future possibilities for ENT trainee research collaboratives.

  18. Virtual reality laparoscopy: which potential trainee starts with a higher proficiency level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschold, M; Schröder, M; Kauff, D W; Gorbauch, T; Herzer, M; Lang, H; Kneist, W

    2011-09-01

    Minimally invasive surgery requires technical skills distinct from those used in conventional surgery. The aim of this prospective study was to identify personal characteristics that may predict the attainable proficiency level of first-time virtual reality laparoscopy (VRL) trainees. Two hundred and seventy-nine consecutive undergraduate medical students without experience attended a standardized VRL training. Performance data of an abstract and a procedural task were correlated with possible predictive factors providing potential competence in VRL. Median global score requirement status was 86.7% (interquartile range (IQR) 75-93) for the abstract task and 74.4% (IQR 67-88) for the procedural task. Unadjusted analysis showed significant increase in the global score in both tasks for trainees who had a gaming console at home and frequently used it as well as for trainees who felt self-confident to assist in a laparoscopic operation. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified frequency of video gaming (often/frequently vs. rarely/not at all, odds ratio: abstract model 2.1 (95% confidence interval 1.2; 3.6), P = 0.009; virtual reality operation procedure 2.4 (95% confidence interval 1.3; 4.2), P = 0.003) as a predictive factor for VRL performance. Frequency of video gaming is associated with quality of first-time VRL performance. Video game experience may be used as trainee selection criteria for tailored concepts of VRL training programs.

  19. Open cholecystectomy: Exposure and confidence of surgical trainees and new fellows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Beth M; Lambrianides, Andreas L; Dulhunty, Joel M

    2018-03-01

    The laparoscopic approach to cholecystectomy has overtaken open procedures in terms of frequency, despite open procedures playing an important role in certain clinical situations. This study explored exposure and confidence of Australasian surgical trainees and new fellows in performing an open versus laparoscopic cholecystectomy. An online survey was disseminated via the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons to senior general surgery trainees (years 3-5 of surgical training) and new fellows (fellowship within the previous 5 years). The survey included questions regarding level of experience and confidence in performing an open cholecystectomy and converting from a laparoscopic to an open approach. A total of 135 participants responded; 58 (43%) were surgical trainees, 58 (43%) were fellows and 19 (14%) did not specify their level of training. Respondents who were involved in more than 20 open cholecystectomy procedures as an assistant or independent operator compared with those less exposed were more likely to feel confident to independently perform an elective open cholecystectomy (87.8% vs. 57.3%, P = 0.001), independently convert from a laparoscopic to open cholecystectomy (87.8% vs. 58.7%, P = 0.001) and independently perform an open cholecystectomy as a surgical consultant based on their level of exposure as a trainee (73.2% vs. 45.3%, P = 0.004). This study suggests the need to ensure surgical trainees are exposed to sufficient open cholecystectomies to enable confidence and skill with performing these procedures when indicated. Greater recognition of the need for exposure during training, including meaningful simulation, may assist. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Developing skilled doctor-patient communication in the workplace: a qualitative study of the experiences of trainees and clinical supervisors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroldi, Esther; Veldhuijzen, Wemke; Geelen, Kristel; Muris, Jean; Bareman, Frits; Bueving, Herman; van der Weijden, Trudy; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2017-12-01

    To inform the development of recommendations to facilitate learning of skilled doctor-patient communication in the workplace, this qualitative study explores experiences of trainees and supervisors regarding how trainees learn communication and how supervisors support trainees' learning in the workplace. We conducted a qualitative study in a general practice training setting, triangulating various sources of data to obtain a rich understanding of trainees and supervisors' experiences: three focus group discussions, five discussions during training sessions and five individual interviews. Thematic network analysis was performed during an iterative process of data collection and analysis. We identified a communication learning cycle consisting of six phases: impactful experience, change in frame of reference, identification of communication strategies, experimentation with strategies, evaluation of strategies and incorporation into personal repertoire. Supervisors supported trainees throughout this process by creating challenges, confronting trainees with their behaviour and helping them reflect on its underlying mechanisms, exploring and demonstrating communication strategies, giving concrete practice assignments, creating safety, exploring the effect of strategies and facilitating repeated practice and reflection. Based on the experiences of trainees and supervisors, we conclude that skilled communication involves the development of a personal communication repertoire from which learners are able to apply strategies that fit the context and their personal style. After further validation of our findings, it may be recommended to give learners concrete examples, opportunities for repeated practise and reflection on personal frames of reference and the effect of strategies, as well as space for authenticity and flexibility. In the workplace, the clinical supervisor is able to facilitate all these essential conditions to support his/her trainee in becoming a skilled

  1. Future career intentions of higher specialist trainees in general Paediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Grainne; Breatnach, Colm; Harty, Sinead; Gavin, Patrick; O'Donnell, Colm; O'Grady, Michael J

    2018-03-27

    A survey of paediatric higher specialist trainees was carried out in 2002 assessing career intentions and perception of training. Fourteen years later, with increased numbers of trainees and a national model of care and a tertiary paediatric hospital on the horizon, we re-evaluated the career intentions of the current trainee workforce. To assess the career intentions of the current paediatric higher specialist trainees. A 28-item questionnaire was developed based on a previously validated instrument and distributed online using the Royal College of Physicians of Ireland trainee database. We distributed the questionnaire to 118 eligible trainees and received responses from 92 (78%). Seventy-nine (86%) respondents desire a consultant post in Ireland. Seventy-five (82%) indicated that their preferred consultant post location was in a tertiary paediatric centre. Sixty-two trainees (67%) intend to become subspecialists with 25 (27%) planning a career in general paediatrics. This contrasts with the 2002 survey when 76% wished to work in urban centres and 61% of trainees planned a career in general paediatrics. There appears to be a mismatch between the career goals of the future paediatric consultant workforce and the requirements for staffing paediatric units nationally. This has the potential to complicate the proposed expansion of general paediatricians in regional centres and result in a significant proportion of current trainees failing to secure a post in their desired location.

  2. Automatically rating trainee skill at a pediatric laparoscopic suturing task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oquendo, Yousi A; Riddle, Elijah W; Hiller, Dennis; Blinman, Thane A; Kuchenbecker, Katherine J

    2018-04-01

    Minimally invasive surgeons must acquire complex technical skills while minimizing patient risk, a challenge that is magnified in pediatric surgery. Trainees need realistic practice with frequent detailed feedback, but human grading is tedious and subjective. We aim to validate a novel motion-tracking system and algorithms that automatically evaluate trainee performance of a pediatric laparoscopic suturing task. Subjects (n = 32) ranging from medical students to fellows performed two trials of intracorporeal suturing in a custom pediatric laparoscopic box trainer after watching a video of ideal performance. The motions of the tools and endoscope were recorded over time using a magnetic sensing system, and both tool grip angles were recorded using handle-mounted flex sensors. An expert rated the 63 trial videos on five domains from the Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skill (OSATS), yielding summed scores from 5 to 20. Motion data from each trial were processed to calculate 280 features. We used regularized least squares regression to identify the most predictive features from different subsets of the motion data and then built six regression tree models that predict summed OSATS score. Model accuracy was evaluated via leave-one-subject-out cross-validation. The model that used all sensor data streams performed best, achieving 71% accuracy at predicting summed scores within 2 points, 89% accuracy within 4, and a correlation of 0.85 with human ratings. 59% of the rounded average OSATS score predictions were perfect, and 100% were within 1 point. This model employed 87 features, including none based on completion time, 77 from tool tip motion, 3 from tool tip visibility, and 7 from grip angle. Our novel hardware and software automatically rated previously unseen trials with summed OSATS scores that closely match human expert ratings. Such a system facilitates more feedback-intensive surgical training and may yield insights into the fundamental

  3. Neonatal resuscitation: a knowledge gap amongst obstetrical trainees. A cross-sectional survey amongst medical graduates of Civil Hospital Karachi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Tooba; Raza, Natasha; Haq, Gulfishan

    2014-07-01

    To evaluate the neonatal resuscitation competence of obstetrical trainees to assess the gap in knowledge and to determine training needs. The cross-sectional study was conducted at the Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Civil Hospital, Karachi, from January to March 2013 and comprised House Officers and Postgraduate trainees. A questionnaire was used to test the evaluation skills of different conditions and choice of appropriate action required during neonatal resuscitation. Data was collected and analysed through SPSS 17.0. Of the 102 obstetrical trainees, 44 (43.1%) were House Officers and 58 (56.9%) were Postgraduate trainees with an overall mean age 25.69 +/- 2.3 years. Only 19 (18.6%) subjects cleared the test; 8 (42.1%) of them were House Officers and 11 (57.9%) were Postgraduate trainees. The result did not show any significant difference between those who had previous training or those who had performed neonatal resuscitation and those who had no such exposure. Majority, 92 (90.2%) considered their knowledge inadequate and 99 (97%) favoured that updated neonatal resuscitation programmes should be periodically arranged. The study showed inadequate level of knowledge on neonatal resuscitation amongst obstetrical trainees. There is urgent need of formal training programmes which can make doctors skilful enough to face any adverse neonatal outcome professionally.

  4. Mersey deanery ophthalmology trainees' views of the objective assessment of surgical and technical skills (OSATS) workplace-based assessment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsagkataki, Myrto; Choudhary, Anshoo

    2013-02-01

    Objective assessment of surgical and technical skills (OSATS) workplace-based assessment tool is now mandatory during ophthalmology speciality training in the United Kingdom. The opinions of those undergoing this assessment have not been formally sought. This study evaluated the views of ophthalmology trainees on OSATS assessment as applied to cataract surgery. A questionnaire was circulated to 34 ophthalmology speciality trainees of the Mersey deanery. A total of 28 responses were received. The most positive aspects of the process identified were feedback, learning and opportunity for reflective practice. The most negative aspects were time constraints, assessor's availability and case selection. Of the trainees, 93 % mentioned that no previous agreed action was taken into consideration when filling in subsequent forms and their performance was not discussed in their annual summative assessment. This study highlights important aspects of trainees' perceptions of OSATS. Trainees appreciate the formative aspects of OSATS assessment. Some problems came to light, which can be resolved by specification of standards, training of assessors, and commitment from both trainers and trainees. Changes are needed to allow demonstration of surgical progression with time. The issues identified here will be relevant to other specialities as well. A larger survey would be beneficial.

  5. Socialising journalist trainees in the newsroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravengaard, Gitte; Rimestad, Lene

    2014-01-01

    In this article we investigate socialisation practices in the newsroom. The analyses demonstrate how journalist trainees are socialised into this particular professional culture and community of practice. Theoretically, we combine the traditional news ethnography with linguistic anthropology...... play a key role in the socialisation process as important loci for learning about the craft because of the constant reinforcement of competent practice which takes place here. Thus, these interactions are important sites for cultural production and reproduction supporting the construction of the craft...... ethos, the enactment of expertise, and the building of professional vision....

  6. Novel real-time feedback and integrated simulation model for teaching and evaluating ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia skills in pediatric anesthesia trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, David L; Ding, Lili; Sadhasivam, Senthilkumar

    2012-09-01

    To assess, teach, and improve core competencies and skills sets associated with ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia (UGRA) of pediatric anesthesia trainees. To effectively assess and improve UGRA-associated cognitive and technical skills and proficiency of pediatric anesthesia trainees using simulators and real-time feedback. Ultrasound usage has been increasingly adopted by anesthesiologists to perform regional anesthesia. Pediatric UGRA performance significantly lags behind adult UGRA practice. Lack of effective UGRA training is the major reason for this unfortunate lag. Integration of ultrasound imaging, target location, and needling skills are crucial in safely performing UGRA. However, there are no standards to ensure proficiency in practice, nor in training. We implemented an UGRA instructional program for all trainees, in two parts. First, we used a unique training model for initial assessment and training of technical skills. Second, we used an instructional program that encompasses UGRA and equipment-associated cognitive skills. After baseline assessment at 0 months, we retested these trainees at 6 and 12 months to identify progression of proficiency over time. Cognitive and technical UGRA skills of trainees improved significantly over the course of time. UGRA performance average accuracy improved to 79% at 12 months from the baseline accuracy of 57%. Cognitive UGRA-related skills of trainees improved from baseline results of 52.5-79.2% at 12 months. Implementing a multifaceted assessment and real-time feedback-based training has significantly improved UGRA-related cognitive and technical skills and proficiency of pediatric anesthesia trainees. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Brain Bioenergetics, Sleep, and Cognitive Performance in Cocaine-Dependent Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trksak, George H.; Bracken, Bethany K.; Jensen, J. Eric; Plante, David T.; Penetar, David M.; Tartarini, Wendy L.; Maywalt, Melissa A.; Dorsey, Cynthia M.; Renshaw, Perry F.; Lukas, Scott E.

    2013-01-01

    In cocaine-dependent individuals, sleep is disturbed during cocaine use and abstinence, highlighting the importance of examining the behavioral and homeostatic response to acute sleep loss in these individuals. The current study was designed to identify a differential effect of sleep deprivation on brain bioenergetics, cognitive performance, and sleep between cocaine-dependent and healthy control participants. 14 healthy control and 8 cocaine-dependent participants experienced consecutive nights of baseline, total sleep deprivation, and recovery sleep in the research laboratory. Participants underwent [31]P magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) brain imaging, polysomnography, Continuous Performance Task, and Digit Symbol Substitution Task. Following recovery sleep, [31]P MRS scans revealed that cocaine-dependent participants exhibited elevated global brain β-NTP (direct measure of adenosine triphosphate), α-NTP, and total NTP levels compared to those of healthy controls. Cocaine-dependent participants performed worse on the Continuous Performance Task and Digit Symbol Substitution Task at baseline compared to healthy control participants, but sleep deprivation did not worsen cognitive performance in either group. Enhancements of brain ATP levels in cocaine dependent participants following recovery sleep may reflect a greater impact of sleep deprivation on sleep homeostasis, which may highlight the importance of monitoring sleep during abstinence and the potential influence of sleep loss in drug relapse. PMID:24250276

  8. Virtual reality training for surgical trainees in laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagendran, Myura; Gurusamy, Kurinchi Selvan; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Loizidou, Marilena; Davidson, Brian R

    2013-08-27

    Standard surgical training has traditionally been one of apprenticeship, where the surgical trainee learns to perform surgery under the supervision of a trained surgeon. This is time-consuming, costly, and of variable effectiveness. Training using a virtual reality simulator is an option to supplement standard training. Virtual reality training improves the technical skills of surgical trainees such as decreased time for suturing and improved accuracy. The clinical impact of virtual reality training is not known. To assess the benefits (increased surgical proficiency and improved patient outcomes) and harms (potentially worse patient outcomes) of supplementary virtual reality training of surgical trainees with limited laparoscopic experience. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Science Citation Index Expanded until July 2012. We included all randomised clinical trials comparing virtual reality training versus other forms of training including box-trainer training, no training, or standard laparoscopic training in surgical trainees with little laparoscopic experience. We also planned to include trials comparing different methods of virtual reality training. We included only trials that assessed the outcomes in people undergoing laparoscopic surgery. Two authors independently identified trials and collected data. We analysed the data with both the fixed-effect and the random-effects models using Review Manager 5 analysis. For each outcome we calculated the mean difference (MD) or standardised mean difference (SMD) with 95% confidence intervals based on intention-to-treat analysis. We included eight trials covering 109 surgical trainees with limited laparoscopic experience. Of the eight trials, six compared virtual reality versus no supplementary training. One trial compared virtual reality training versus box-trainer training and versus no supplementary training, and one trial compared

  9. Human Performance Technology (HPT): An Examination of Definitions through Dependent and Independent Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irlbeck, Sonja A.

    2002-01-01

    Provides a chronological perspective of human performance technology (HPT) definitions and an evaluation of them in terms of independent and dependent variables. Discusses human competence and performance technology and compares the definitions with the goals that have been articulated for HPT. (Author/LRW)

  10. Modelling and assessment of dependent performance shaping factors through Analytic Network Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Ambroggi, Massimiliano; Trucco, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Despite continuous progresses in research and applications, one of the major weaknesses of current HRA methods dwells in their limited capability of modelling the mutual influences between performance shaping factors (PSFs). Indeed at least two types of dependencies between PSFs can be defined: (i) dependency between the states of the PSFs; (ii) dependency between the influences (impacts) of the PSFs on the human performance. This paper introduces a method, based on Analytic Network Process (ANP), for the quantification of the latter, where the overall contribution of each PSF (weight) to the human error probability (HEP) is eventually returned. The core of the method is the modelling process, articulated into two steps: firstly, a qualitative network of dependencies between PSFs is identified, then, the importance of each PSF is quantitatively assessed using ANP. The model allows to distinguish two components of the PSF influence: direct influence that is the influence that the considered PSF is able to express by itself, notwithstanding the presence of other PSFs and indirect influence that is the incremental influence of the considered PSF through its influence on other PSFs. A case study in Air Traffic Control is presented where the proposed approach is integrated into the cognitive simulator PROCOS. The results demonstrated a significant modification of the influence of PSFs over the operator performance when dependencies are taken into account, underlining the importance of considering not only the possible correlation between the states of PSFs but also their mutual dependency in affecting human performance in complex systems.

  11. Trainee ophthalmologists' opinions on ways to improve cataract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To know the opinions of trainee ophthalmologists on ways to improve cataract surgical rate (CSR) with a view to having insight into actions that should be of high priority for achieving this improvement. Methods: A survey of 27 trainee ophthalmologists using structured self-administered questionnaire. Results: ...

  12. Training family medicine residents to practice collaboratively with psychology trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcerelli, John H; Fowler, Shannon L; Murdoch, William; Markova, Tsveti; Kimbrough, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This article will describe a training curriculum for family medicine residents to practice collaboratively with psychology (doctoral) trainees at the Wayne State University/Crittenton Family Medicine Residency program. The collaborative care curriculum involves a series of patient care and educational activities that require collaboration between family medicine residents and psychology trainees. Activities include: (1) clinic huddle, (2) shadowing, (3) pull-ins and warm handoffs, (4) co-counseling, (5) shared precepting, (6) feedback from psychology trainees to family medicine residents regarding consults, brief interventions, and psychological testing, (7) lectures, (8) video-observation and feedback, (9) home visits, and (10) research. The activities were designed to teach the participants to work together as a team and to provide a reciprocal learning experience. In a brief three-item survey of residents at the end of their academic year, 83% indicated that they had learned new information or techniques from working with the psychology trainees for assessment and intervention purposes; 89% indicated that collaborating with psychology trainees enhanced their patient care; and 89% indicated that collaborating with psychology trainees enhanced their ability to work as part of a team. Informal interviews with the psychology trainees indicated that reciprocal learning had taken place. Family medicine residents can learn to work collaboratively with psychology trainees through a series of shared patient care and educational activities within a primary care clinic where an integrated approach to care is valued.

  13. Life and Work Values of Counselor Trainees: A National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busacca, Louis A.; Beebe, Ronald S.; Toman, Sarah M.

    2010-01-01

    This national web-based study used the Schwartz Value Survey (Schwartz, 1994) and Super's Work Values Inventory-Revised (Zytowski, n.d.) to identify general life and work value orientations of 674 female and male entry-level counselor trainees residing in 27 states. In general, trainees emphasized benevolence, self-direction, and achievement and…

  14. Competent Counseling for Middle Eastern American Clients: Implications for Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soheilian, Sepideh S.; Inman, Arpana G.

    2015-01-01

    The authors used a factorial multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) to determine whether counselor trainees' group differences on measures of multicultural competence, empathy, and multicultural counseling self-efficacy (CSE) when working with Middle Eastern American (MEA) clients were moderated by trainee race. Two hundred and fifty-six…

  15. Education in medical billing benefits both neurology trainees and academic departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, Jeff L

    2014-11-11

    The objective of residency training is to produce physicians who can function independently within their chosen subspecialty and practice environment. Skills in the business of medicine, such as clinical billing, are widely applicable in academic and private practices but are not commonly addressed during formal medical education. Residency and fellowship training include limited exposure to medical billing, but our academic department's performance of these skills was inadequate: in 56% of trainee-generated outpatient notes, documentation was insufficient to sustain the chosen billing level. We developed a curriculum to improve the accuracy of documentation and coding and introduced practice changes to address our largest sources of error. In parallel, we developed tools that increased the speed and efficiency of documentation. Over 15 months, we progressively eliminated note devaluation, increased the mean level billed by trainees to nearly match that of attending physicians, and increased outpatient revenue by $34,313/trainee/year. Our experience suggests that inclusion of billing education topics into the formal medical curriculum benefits both academic medical centers and trainees. © 2014 American Academy of Neurology.

  16. Training in hospitals: what do GP specialist trainees think of workplace-based assessments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabey, Abigail; Harris, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Workplace-based assessment (WBPA) was introduced in 2007 as a new approach to monitoring competence of GP specialist trainees (GPSTs). It includes a raft of assessments carried out in the workplace to assess what a trainee actually does in clinical practice. The assessment tools used are adapted from other contexts of doctors' training but little is known about how they function in day-to-day practice within GP training or how valid and useful they are found to be by trainees. To establish how the new system of WPBA is working in day-to-day practice for GPSTs in hospital posts. A mixed methods design including quantitative and qualitative phases of data collection. Two training locations within Severn Deanery. A questionnaire was completed by 52 GPSTs (67% response rate) currently in hospital posts. Twenty-two took part in focus groups and semi-structured interviews to explore key findings from the questionnaire in greater depth. There is value in the face-to-face contact between trainees and senior doctors. However, quality and depth of feedback are not consistent and there is evidence of poor use of the tools, reducing the value of the assessments. The system is further undermined by a clear perception of bias and lack of honesty in judgements which limit the scope for assessment to lead to learning. Overall, these weaknesses may impair the validity and usefulness of the system and its potential to improve the performance of doctors. General practice trainees in this study have a low opinion of how WPBA assessments function in the hospital setting. Changes are needed to optimise the potential of WPBA to improve the performance of doctors in training and to increase its credibility.

  17. Trainees May Add Value to Patient Care by Decreasing Addendum Utilization in Radiology Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balthazar, Patricia; Konstantopoulos, Christina; Wick, Carson A; DeSimone, Ariadne K; Tridandapani, Srini; Simoneaux, Stephen; Applegate, Kimberly E

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of trainee involvement and other factors on addendum rates in radiology reports. This retrospective study was performed in a tertiary care pediatric hospital. From the institutional radiology data repository, we extracted all radiology reports from January 1 to June 30, 2016, as well as trainee (resident or fellow) involvement, imaging modality, patient setting (emergency, inpatient, or outpatient), order status (routine vs immediate), time of interpretation (regular work hours vs off-hours), radiologist's years of experience, and sex. We grouped imaging modalities as advanced (CT, MRI, and PET) or nonadvanced (any modality that was not CT, MRI, or PET) and radiologist experience level as ≤ 20 years or > 20 years. Our outcome measure was the rate of addenda in radiology reports. Statistical analysis was performed using multivariate logistic regression. From 129,033 reports finalized during the study period, 418 (0.3%) had addenda. Reports generated without trainees were 12 times more likely than reports with trainee involvement to have addenda (odds ratio [OR] = 12.2, p use (OR = 4.7, p use than those in an inpatient setting (OR = 1.5, p = 0.04; and OR = 1.3, p = 0.04, respectively). Routine orders had a slightly higher likelihood of addendum use compared with immediate orders (OR = 1.3, p = 0.01). We found no difference in addendum use by radiologist's sex, radiologist's years of experience, emergency versus outpatient setting, or time of interpretation. Trainees may add value to patient care by decreasing addendum rates in radiology reports.

  18. Assessing the assessments: U.K. dermatology trainees' views of the workplace assessment tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S N; Farrant, P B J; Taibjee, S M

    2009-07-01

    The workplace assessments, direct observation of procedural skills (DOPS), mini-clinical evaluation exercise (mini-CEX) and multisource feedback (MSF, formerly known as 360 degrees appraisal), are now mandatory during dermatology specialist training in the U.K. The opinions of those undergoing such assessments in any medical specialty have rarely been sought. To collate the experience and views of U.K. dermatology trainees on the three workplace assessments. A questionnaire was circulated in autumn 2006 to all U.K. dermatology specialist registrars (SpRs) registered as members of the British Association of Dermatologists (n = 269). A total of 138 responses were received (51%). Seventeen SpRs had not experienced any of the assessments; 92 had undergone MSF, 95 DOPS and 54 mini-CEX. The total experience of the respondents amounted to a minimum of 251 DOPS, 122 MSF and 142 mini-CEX. Trainees appreciated the formative aspects of the assessments, especially feedback and training opportunities, although not all trainees reported receiving useful feedback. MSF was praised for the insights that it provides. All of the assessments were found to be time-consuming and difficult to organize. DOPS and mini-CEX carried a degree of stress and artificiality. Concerns were raised over the possibility of victimization by MSF raters. Discussion of performance in the assessments was rarely prominent in trainees' annual summative reviews. Trainees appreciate the formative benefits which derive from the assessments, namely feedback, reassurance of satisfactory performance and, in the case of DOPS and mini-CEX, additional one-to-one training from consultants. Some problems came to light. The issues raised will not be unique to dermatology and other specialties should take note.

  19. Attitudes towards attrition among UK trainees in obstetrics and gynaecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafson, Irene; Currie, Jane; O'Dwyer, Sabrina; Woolf, Katherine; Griffin, Ann

    2017-06-02

    Physician dissatisfaction in the workplace has consequences for patient safety. Currently in the UK, 1 in 5 doctors who enter specialist training in obstetrics and gynaecology leave the programme before completion. Trainee attrition has implications for workforce planning, organization of health-care services and patient care. The authors conducted a survey of current trainees' and former trainees' views concerning attrition and 'peri-attrition' - a term coined to describe the trainee who has seriously considered leaving the specialty. The authors identified six key themes which describe trainees' feelings about attrition in obstetrics and gynaecology: morale and undermining; training processes and paperwork; support and supervision; work-life balance and realities of life; NHS environment; and job satisfaction. This article discusses themes of an under-resourced health service, bullying, lack of work-life balance and poor personal support.

  20. A new rate-dependent model for high-frequency tracking performance enhancement of piezoactuator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lizhi; Xiong, Zhenhua; Wu, Jianhua; Ding, Han

    2017-05-01

    Feedforward-feedback control is widely used in motion control of piezoactuator systems. Due to the phase lag caused by incomplete dynamics compensation, the performance of the composite controller is greatly limited at high frequency. This paper proposes a new rate-dependent model to improve the high-frequency tracking performance by reducing dynamics compensation error. The rate-dependent model is designed as a function of the input and input variation rate to describe the input-output relationship of the residual system dynamics which mainly performs as phase lag in a wide frequency band. Then the direct inversion of the proposed rate-dependent model is used to compensate the residual system dynamics. Using the proposed rate-dependent model as feedforward term, the open loop performance can be improved significantly at medium-high frequency. Then, combining the with feedback controller, the composite controller can provide enhanced close loop performance from low frequency to high frequency. At the frequency of 1 Hz, the proposed controller presents the same performance as previous methods. However, at the frequency of 900 Hz, the tracking error is reduced to be 30.7% of the decoupled approach.

  1. Peer mentoring for core medical trainees: uptake and impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Jessica; Brightwell, Alexandra; Sarkar, Pamela; Rabbie, Roy; Chakravorty, Indranil

    2015-04-01

    To assess the uptake and impact of a peer mentoring scheme for core medical trainees on both mentors and mentees. All second year core medical trainees in the Southwest London Training programme in September 2012 were invited to mentor a first year core medical trainee. In parallel, all first year core medical trainees were invited to be mentored. Both potential mentors and mentees were asked to submit personal statements, to attend a three-session mentoring training programme and to be matched into mentoring pairs. The impact of the mentoring scheme on trainees' behaviour and outlook was assessed through questionnaires distributed at the start and at the end of the year. 31 of 72 (43%) core medical trainees submitted personal statements and 40 of 72 (56%) attended training sessions. 42 trainees (58%) participated in the scheme (21 mentor/mentee pairs were established). Of the trainees who participated, 23 of 42 (55%) completed the end of year questionnaire. Participating trainees viewed the scheme positively. Reported benefits included changes in their behaviour and acquiring transferable skills that might help them in later career roles, such as an educational supervisor. The end of year questionnaire was sent to all trainees and 10 responded who had not participated. They were asked why they had not participated and their reasons included lack of time, lack of inclination and a desire for more senior mentors. Their suggestions for improvement included more structured sessions to allow the mentor/mentee pairs to meet. This simple peer mentoring scheme was popular despite busy workloads and benefited all concerned. It is a simple effective way of supporting doctors. More work is needed to improve training for mentors and to improve access to mentoring. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. State-Dependent Decoding Algorithms Improve the Performance of a Bidirectional BMI in Anesthetized Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito De Feo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs promise to improve the quality of life of patients suffering from sensory and motor disabilities by creating a direct communication channel between the brain and the external world. Yet, their performance is currently limited by the relatively small amount of information that can be decoded from neural activity recorded form the brain. We have recently proposed that such decoding performance may be improved when using state-dependent decoding algorithms that predict and discount the large component of the trial-to-trial variability of neural activity which is due to the dependence of neural responses on the network's current internal state. Here we tested this idea by using a bidirectional BMI to investigate the gain in performance arising from using a state-dependent decoding algorithm. This BMI, implemented in anesthetized rats, controlled the movement of a dynamical system using neural activity decoded from motor cortex and fed back to the brain the dynamical system's position by electrically microstimulating somatosensory cortex. We found that using state-dependent algorithms that tracked the dynamics of ongoing activity led to an increase in the amount of information extracted form neural activity by 22%, with a consequently increase in all of the indices measuring the BMI's performance in controlling the dynamical system. This suggests that state-dependent decoding algorithms may be used to enhance BMIs at moderate computational cost.

  3. State-Dependent Decoding Algorithms Improve the Performance of a Bidirectional BMI in Anesthetized Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Feo, Vito; Boi, Fabio; Safaai, Houman; Onken, Arno; Panzeri, Stefano; Vato, Alessandro

    2017-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) promise to improve the quality of life of patients suffering from sensory and motor disabilities by creating a direct communication channel between the brain and the external world. Yet, their performance is currently limited by the relatively small amount of information that can be decoded from neural activity recorded form the brain. We have recently proposed that such decoding performance may be improved when using state-dependent decoding algorithms that predict and discount the large component of the trial-to-trial variability of neural activity which is due to the dependence of neural responses on the network's current internal state. Here we tested this idea by using a bidirectional BMI to investigate the gain in performance arising from using a state-dependent decoding algorithm. This BMI, implemented in anesthetized rats, controlled the movement of a dynamical system using neural activity decoded from motor cortex and fed back to the brain the dynamical system's position by electrically microstimulating somatosensory cortex. We found that using state-dependent algorithms that tracked the dynamics of ongoing activity led to an increase in the amount of information extracted form neural activity by 22%, with a consequently increase in all of the indices measuring the BMI's performance in controlling the dynamical system. This suggests that state-dependent decoding algorithms may be used to enhance BMIs at moderate computational cost.

  4. Supervisor-trainee continuity and the quality of work-based assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Warren J; Dudek, Nancy L; Wood, Timothy J; Frank, Jason R

    2017-12-01

    Work-based assessments (WBAs) represent an increasingly important means of reporting expert judgements of trainee competence in clinical practice. However, the quality of WBAs completed by clinical supervisors is of concern. The episodic and fragmented interaction that often occurs between supervisors and trainees has been proposed as a barrier to the completion of high-quality WBAs. The primary purpose of this study was to determine the effect of supervisor-trainee continuity on the quality of assessments documented on daily encounter cards (DECs), a common form of WBA. The relationship between trainee performance and DEC quality was also examined. Daily encounter cards representing three differing degrees of supervisor-trainee continuity (low, intermediate, high) were scored by two raters using the Completed Clinical Evaluation Report Rating (CCERR), a previously published nine-item quantitative measure of DEC quality. An analysis of variance (anova) was performed to compare mean CCERR scores among the three groups. Linear regression analysis was conducted to examine the relationship between resident performance and DEC quality. Differences in mean CCERR scores were observed between the three continuity groups (p = 0.02); however, the magnitude of the absolute differences was small (partial eta-squared = 0.03) and not educationally meaningful. Linear regression analysis demonstrated a significant inverse relationship between resident performance and CCERR score (p < 0.001, r 2  = 0.18). This inverse relationship was observed in both groups representing on-service residents (p = 0.001, r 2  = 0.25; p = 0.04, r 2  = 0.19), but not in the Off-service group (p = 0.62, r 2  = 0.05). Supervisor-trainee continuity did not have an educationally meaningful influence on the quality of assessments documented on DECs. However, resident performance was found to affect assessor behaviours in the On-service group, whereas DEC quality remained poor regardless

  5. Evaluation of the educational climate for specialty trainees in dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, J M R; Passi, V

    2016-06-01

    Dermatology specialty trainees (STs) in the United Kingdom (UK) are few in number and will join a thinly spread national consultant body. It is of paramount importance to deliver training programmes of the highest quality for these doctors, central to which is the establishment and maintenance of an educational climate conducive to learning. To conduct a pilot study to evaluate the educational climate for dermatology STs in one UK deanery (West Midlands). Secondary analysis of published data was performed, from the UK's General Medical Council (GMC) national training survey, and the Job Evaluation Survey Tool (JEST) administered by the West Midlands deanery. A modified online version of the Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM) was circulated among dermatology STs. The GMC's survey data show that UK dermatology STs rated their training highly in comparison with undifferentiated UK postgraduate trainees. West Midlands dermatology STs (n = 22) scored very similarly to UK dermatology STs. The JEST gave broadly encouraging results, with 21/22 (95%) happy to recommend their posts to colleagues. The modified PHEEM yielded a global mean score of 96.5/152, attracting the descriptor 'more positive than negative but room for improvement'. Despite inherent methodological limitations, the GMC, JEST and modified PHEEM surveys have revealed useful comparative triangulated data which allows the conclusion that West Midlands dermatology STs seem to be training in a favourable educational climate. This represents an important facet of the quality assurance process for medical education, and allows insight into areas which may require improvement. © 2015 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  6. Developing Communication Skills of EFL Teacher Trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadriye Dilek Akpınar

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Higher Education Council of Turkey has added a one term course named as “Effective Communication Skills” to the curriculum since 2006 in Foreign Language Education Departments because of the crucial importance of communication in the information society. In order to test the effectiveness of this course, a research project was developed by looking at the pre-and post course interviews conducted with first year teacher trainees about communication skills compared with the fourth year students’ ideas who did not take the course. This paper describes both the significance of effective communication skills and the benefits of the course for developing teacher trainees’ effective communication skills. The implementations and suggestions for teacher education has also been discussed.

  7. Assessing the Nontechnical Skills of Surgical Trainees: Views of the Theater Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jundi, Wissam; Wild, Jonathan; Ritchie, Judith; Daniels, Sarah; Robertson, Eleanor; Beard, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to explore the views of members of theater teams regarding the proposed introduction of a workplace-based assessment of nontechnical skills of surgeons (NOTSS) into the Intercollegiate Surgical Curriculum Programme in the United Kingdom. In addition, the previous training and familiarity of the members of the surgical theater team with the concept and assessment of NOTSS would be evaluated. A regional survey of members of theater teams (consultant surgeons, anesthetists, scrub nurses, and trainees) was performed at 1 teaching and 2 district general hospitals in South Yorkshire. There were 160 respondents corresponding to a response rate of 81%. The majority (77%) were not aware of the NOTSS assessment tool with only 9% of respondents reporting to have previously used the NOTSS tool and just 3% having received training in NOTSS assessment. Overall, 81% stated that assessing NOTSS was as important as assessing technical skills. Trainees attributed less importance to nontechnical skills than the other groups (p ≤ 0.016). Although opinion appears divided as to whether the presence of a consultant surgeon in theater could potentially make it difficult to assess a trainee's leadership skills and decision-making capabilities, overall 60% agree that the routine use of NOTSS assessment would enhance safety in the operating theater and 80% agree that the NOTSS tool should be introduced to assess the nontechnical skills of trainees in theater. However, a significantly lower proportion of trainees (45%) agreed on the latter compared with the other groups (p = 0.001). Our survey demonstrates acceptability among the theater team for the introduction of the NOTSS tool into the surgical curriculum. However, lack of familiarity highlights the importance of faculty training for assessors before such an introduction. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pick up a book or "google it?" a survey of radiologist and trainee-preferred references and resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederhauser, Blake D; Liaw, Kevin; McDonald, Robert J; Thomas, Kristen B; Hudson, Kathleen T; Kallmes, David F

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate radiologist and trainee-preferred sources for solving imaging questions. The institutional review board determined this study to be exempt from informed consent requirements. Web-based surveys were distributed to radiology staff and trainees at 16 academic institutions. Surveys queried ownership and use of tablet computers and habits of utilization of various electronic and hardcopy resources for general reference. For investigating specific cases, respondents identified a single primary resource. Comparisons were performed using Fisher's exact test. For staff, use of Google and online journals was nearly universal for general imaging questions (93 [103/111] and 94 % [104/111], respectively). For trainees, Google and resident-generated study materials were commonly utilized for such questions (82 [111/135] and 74 % [100/135], respectively). For specific imaging questions, online journals and PubMed were rarely chosen as a primary resource; the most common primary resources were STATdx for trainees and Google for staff (44 [55/126] and 52 % [51/99], respectively). Use of hard copy journals was nearly absent among trainees. Sixty percent of trainees (78/130) own a tablet computer versus 41 % of staff (46/111; p = 0.005), and 71 % (55/78) of those trainees reported at least weekly use of radiology-specific tablet applications, compared to 48 % (22/46) of staff (p Staff radiologists rely heavily on Google for both general and specific imaging queries, while residents utilize customized, radiology-focused products and apps. Interestingly, residents note continued use of hard copy books but have replaced hard copy journals with online resources.

  9. Trainee Knowledge of Imaging Appropriateness and Safety: Results of a Series of Surveys From a Large Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Thaddeus D; Duszak, Richard; Vijayasarathi, Arvind; Gelbard, Rondi B; Mullins, Mark E

    2017-10-31

    In order to provide high quality care to their patients and utilize imaging most judiciously, physician trainees should possess a working knowledge of appropriate use, radiation dose, and safety. Prior work has suggested knowledge gaps in similar areas. We aimed to evaluate the knowledge of imaging appropriateness, radiation dose, and MRI and contrast safety of physician trainees across a variety of specialties. Between May 2016 and January 2017, three online surveys were distributed to all interns, residents, and fellows in ACGME accredited training programs at a large academic institution over two academic years. Response rates to three surveys ranged from 17.2% (218 of 1266) for MRI and contrast material safety, 19.1% (242 of 1266) for imaging appropriateness, to19.9% (246 of 1238) for radiation dose. Overall 72% (509 of 706) of survey respondents reported regularly ordering diagnostic imaging examinations, but fewer than half (47.8%; 470 of 984) could correctly estimate radiation dose across four commonly performed imaging studies. Only one third (34%; 167 of 488) of trainees chose appropriate imaging in scenarios involving pregnant patients. Trainee post-graduate year was not significantly correlated with overall radiation safety scores, and no significant difference was found between radiation safety or appropriate imaging scores of those who participated in a medical school radiology elective vs. those who did not. A total of 84% (57 of 68) of radiology trainees and 43% (269 of 630) of non-radiology trainees considered their knowledge adequate but that correlated only weakly correlated to actual knowledge scores (pimaging safety exist among many trainees. In order to enhance the value of imaging at the population level, further work is needed to assess the most appropriate method and stage of training to address these knowledge gaps. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of stress on the satisfactory completion of a simulated crisis scenario by reactor operator and senior reactor operator requalification trainees at the Susquehanna Training Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wircenski, S.S.

    1985-01-01

    The sample of 21 requalification trainees used in this study involved four groups of trainees, who participated in the requalification training cycle from December 19, 1984, to January 16, 1985. The interference-response stress measurement was studied through the performance of tasks as measured by the instructor on the Trainee Scenario Evaluation Report. The direct-response stress measurement was examined through the measurement of heart beat and blood pressure of the trainees during the crisis scenarios as monitored by the Pollenex Digital Blood Pressure Machine. The reported-response stress measurement was studied through the trainee's self-evaluation on the Multiple Affect Adjective Check List (Anxiety Scale)-Today Form. The major findings are: (1) because of the satisfactory completion of the crisis scenario by all of the requalification trainees, the study was unable to draw a significant relationship between any single trainee characteristic and the satisfactory completion of a crisis scenario; (2) an overall pattern exists in the heart beat and blood pressure of the direct-response stress measurement and in the MAACL of the reported-response stress measurement; and (3) twelve pairs of variables compared the unusual event, the general emergency event, and following the scenario means with the baseline mean for significance. Those twelve pairs included a significant difference at the 0.05 level between six pairs

  11. Interdependency in joint ventures: The relationship between dependency asymmetry and performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemp, R.G.M.; Ghauri, P.N.

    2001-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey on joint venture collaborations. It focuses on the relations between the level and intensity of conflict, trust and norms of exchange, and ultimately the performance of a joint venture, in case of dependency asymmetry between the partners. In management

  12. Influences of Radiology Trainees on Screening Mammography Interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, Jeffrey R; Taylor, Clayton R; Cubbison, Alyssa M; Erdal, B Selnur; Yildiz, Vedat O; Carkaci, Selin

    2016-05-01

    Participation of radiology trainees in screening mammographic interpretation is a critical component of radiology residency and fellowship training. The aim of this study was to investigate and quantify the effects of trainee involvement on screening mammographic interpretation and diagnostic outcomes. Screening mammograms interpreted at an academic medical center by six dedicated breast imagers over a three-year period were identified, with cases interpreted by an attending radiologist alone or in conjunction with a trainee. Trainees included radiology residents, breast imaging fellows, and fellows from other radiology subspecialties during breast imaging rotations. Trainee participation, patient variables, results of diagnostic evaluations, and pathology were recorded. A total of 47,914 mammograms from 34,867 patients were included, with an overall recall rate for attending radiologists reading alone of 14.7% compared with 18.0% when involving a trainee (P radiology trainees, with no change in cancer detection rate. Radiology faculty members should be aware of this potentiality and mitigate tendencies toward greater false positives. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Developing leadership as a trainee- opportunities, barriers and potential improvements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Rachel; Lawson, Sara; Mc Laughlin, Laura; Donaghy, Grainne; Courtney, Julia; Gardiner, Keith

    2018-05-01

    The General Medical Council explicitly state that doctors completing training should demonstrate capabilities in leadership and teamwork. 1 However, most trainees receive little formal training in leadership. In March 2017, at the Faculty of Medical Leadership and Management (FMLM) Northern Ireland Regional Conference, a workshop on developing leadership skills as a trainee was hosted and the views of doctors in training regarding current opportunities, potential barriers and improvements were sought. In Northern Ireland presently there are a number of opportunities available for trainees to gain experience in leadership - both by learning through observation and learning through experience. These range from informal activities which do not require significant time commitment to focused, immersive leadership experiences such as ADEPT (Achieve Develop Explore Programme for Trainees) 2 , and the Royal College of Physicians' Chief Registrar scheme. 3 Several barriers to developing leadership have been identified, including limited understanding of what constitutes leadership, a lack of senior support and little formal recognition for trainees leading teams. Time pressures, frequently rotating jobs, limited resources and difficulty upscaling can also undermine the sustainability of improvement and other leadership projects. Incorporating awareness of and training in leadership skills, as well as greater engagement with senior leaders and managers, at an early stage in training could promote understanding and encourage trainees. Formalising leadership roles within training posts may improve experience. Deaneries and Trusts can also enable leadership opportunities by facilitating study leave, raising awareness amongst supervisors, and providing career enhancing incentives for interested trainees.

  14. Comprehensive feedback on trainee surgeons’ non-technical skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieckmann, Peter; Beier-Holgersen, Randi; Rosenberg, Jacob; Oestergaard, Doris

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to explore the content of conversations, feedback style, and perceived usefulness of feedback to trainee surgeons when conversations were stimulated by a tool for assessing surgeons’ non-technical skills. Methods Trainee surgeons and their supervisors used the Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons in Denmark tool to stimulate feedback conversations. Audio recordings of post-operation feedback conversations were collected. Trainees and supervisors provided questionnaire responses on the usefulness and comprehensiveness of the feedback. The feedback conversations were qualitatively analyzed for content and feedback style. Usefulness was investigated using a scale from 1 to 5 and written comments were qualitatively analyzed. Results Six trainees and six supervisors participated in eight feedback conversations. Eighty questionnaires (response rate 83 percent) were collected from 13 trainees and 12 supervisors. Conversations lasted median eight (2-15) minutes. Supervisors used the elements and categories in the tool to structure the content of the conversations. Supervisors tended to talk about the trainees’ actions and their own frames rather than attempting to understand the trainees’ perceptions. Supervisors and trainees welcomed the feedback opportunity and agreed that the conversations were useful and comprehensive. Conclusions The content of the feedback conversations reflected the contents of the tool and the feedback was considered useful and comprehensive. However, supervisors talked primarily about their own frames, so in order for the feedback to reach its full potential, supervisors may benefit from training techniques to stimulate a deeper reflection among trainees. PMID:25602262

  15. The irradiance and temperature dependent mathematical model for estimation of photovoltaic panel performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barukčić, M.; Ćorluka, V.; Miklošević, K.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The temperature and irradiance dependent model for the I–V curve estimation is presented. • The purely mathematical model based on the analysis of the I–V curve shape is presented. • The model includes the Gompertz function with temperature and irradiance dependent parameters. • The input data are extracted from the data sheet I–V curves. - Abstract: The temperature and irradiance dependent mathematical model for photovoltaic panel performances estimation is proposed in the paper. The base of the model is the mathematical function of the photovoltaic panel current–voltage curve. The model of the current–voltage curve is based on the sigmoid function with temperature and irradiance dependent parameters. The temperature and irradiance dependencies of the parameters are proposed in the form of analytic functions. The constant parameters are involved in the analytical functions. The constant parameters need to be estimated to get the temperature and irradiance dependent current–voltage curve. The mathematical model contains 12 constant parameters and they are estimated by using the evolutionary algorithm. The optimization problem is defined for this purpose. The optimization problem objective function is based on estimated and extracted (measured) current and voltage values. The current and voltage values are extracted from current–voltage curves given in datasheet of the photovoltaic panels. The new procedure for estimation of open circuit voltage value at any temperature and irradiance is proposed in the model. The performance of the proposed mathematical model is presented for three different photovoltaic panel technologies. The simulation results indicate that the proposed mathematical model is acceptable for estimation of temperature and irradiance dependent current–voltage curve and photovoltaic panel performances within temperature and irradiance ranges

  16. Paediatric trainee supervision: management changes and perceived education value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Boom, Mirjam; Pinnock, Ralph; Weller, Jennifer; Reed, Peter; Shulruf, Boaz

    2012-07-01

    Supervision in postgraduate training is an under-researched area. We measured the amount, type and effect of supervision on patient care and perceived education value in a general paediatric service. We designed a structured observation form and questionnaire to document the type, duration and effect of supervision on patient management and perceived education value. Most supervision occurred without the paediatrician confirming the trainee's findings. Direct observation of the trainee was rare. Management was changed in 30% of patients seen on the inpatient ward round and in 42% of the patients discussed during the chart reviews but not seen by the paediatrician. Management was changed in 48% of the cases when the paediatrician saw the patient with the trainee in outpatients but in only 21% of patients when the patient was but not seen. Changes made to patient management, understanding and perceived education value, differed between inpatient and out patient settings. There was more impact when the paediatrician saw the patient with the trainee in outpatients; while for inpatients, the opposite was true. Trainees rated the value of the supervision more highly than their supervisors did. Trainees' comments on what they learnt from their supervisor related almost exclusively to clinical knowledge rather than professional behaviours. We observed little evidence of supervisors directly observing trainees and trainees learning professional behaviours. A review of supervisory practices to promote more effective learning is needed. Communicating to paediatricians the value their trainees place on their input could have a positive effect on their engagement in supervision. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health © 2012 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  17. Auckland regional emergency medicine trainee mentoring uptake survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Gordon Michael Mike; Lawrey, Emma; Jones, Peter

    2017-10-01

    The primary objective of this study is to quantify how many Auckland region emergency medicine (EM) trainees would like a formal mentoring programme. The secondary objectives were to quantify how many Auckland region EM trainees would like to participate in a formal mentoring programme; to determine trainees' current understanding of mentoring; how trainees prefer mentors to be allocated; why trainees may want a mentor; what mentees perceive would be good qualities in a mentor; and trainees' prior experience with mentoring. Online survey of EM trainees in the Auckland region in June 2015. Of 61 potential respondents, 40 (65.6%) respondents replied to the survey. Of the 40, 38 (95%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 82.6-99.5) respondents indicated they would like some form of mentoring system, and of the 38, 25 (65.8%; 95% CI 49.8-78.9) preferred this to be formal. Of the 38, 19 (50%; 95% CI 34.9-65.2) currently wanted assistance obtaining a mentor. Of the 40, 30 (75%; 95% CI 59.6-86.0) are not currently in any form of mentoring relationship. Respondents believed that mentors would be most beneficial in critical incidents, career development and with work/life balance. The attributes participants considered most important in a mentor were respecting confidentiality, being honest and the ability to provide constructive feedback. Many EM trainees in Auckland want a formal mentoring system and would like a mentor. Appropriate mentor-mentee matching through a formalised voluntary system, with adequate mentor training, may enable the Auckland region to develop a suitable mentoring programme for EM trainees. © 2017 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  18. Comprehensive feedback on trainee surgeons' non-technical skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanager, Lene; Dieckmann, Peter; Beier-Holgersen, Randi

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore the content of conversations, feedback style, and perceived usefulness of feedback to trainee surgeons when conversations were stimulated by a tool for assessing surgeons' non-technical skills. METHODS: Trainee surgeons and their supervisors used the Non...... qualitatively analyzed for content and feedback style. Usefulness was investigated using a scale from 1 to 5 and written comments were qualitatively analyzed. RESULTS: Six trainees and six supervisors participated in eight feedback conversations. Eighty questionnaires (response rate 83 percent) were collected...

  19. International perspectives on plagiarism and considerations for teaching international trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitman, Elizabeth; Litewka, Sergio

    2011-01-01

    In the increasingly global community of biomedical science and graduate science education, many US academic researchers work with international trainees whose views on scientific writing and plagiarism can be strikingly different from US norms. Although a growing number of countries and international professional organizations identify plagiarism as research misconduct, many international trainees come from research environments where plagiarism is ill-defined and even commonly practiced. Two research-ethics educators consider current perspectives on plagiarism around the world and contend that US research-training programs should focus on trainees' scientific writing skills and acculturation, not simply on preventing plagiarism. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Integrating dependency on the leader and empowerment into the transformational leadership-creative performance relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Kollmann

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous literature highlights employees’ creativity as an important means of fostering innovation and competitiveadvantage in companies. Transformational leadership is an approach aimed at stimulating and encouraging thecreative performance of employees. However, contradictory empirical fi ndings indicate that the relationship betweentransformational leadership and creativity may be more complex than a simple direct link. Drawing from the existingliterature, we propose that dependency on the leader is a partial mediator of this relationship, impeding employees’ creativity.Synthesizing theories of leadership and creativity, we propose that empowerment, as a moderator, is able to reducethe dependency on the leader caused by transformational leadership as well as contribute to turning possible negativeoutcomes of transformational leadership on creative performance into positive outcomes. The fi ndings of a PLS analysisof 271 employees support the predicted mediating and moderating effects. Our results indicate that the transformationalleadership style should be combined with empowering behavior to enhance employees’ creative performance.

  1. Performance prediction for silicon photonics integrated circuits with layout-dependent correlated manufacturing variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zeqin; Jhoja, Jaspreet; Klein, Jackson; Wang, Xu; Liu, Amy; Flueckiger, Jonas; Pond, James; Chrostowski, Lukas

    2017-05-01

    This work develops an enhanced Monte Carlo (MC) simulation methodology to predict the impacts of layout-dependent correlated manufacturing variations on the performance of photonics integrated circuits (PICs). First, to enable such performance prediction, we demonstrate a simple method with sub-nanometer accuracy to characterize photonics manufacturing variations, where the width and height for a fabricated waveguide can be extracted from the spectral response of a racetrack resonator. By measuring the spectral responses for a large number of identical resonators spread over a wafer, statistical results for the variations of waveguide width and height can be obtained. Second, we develop models for the layout-dependent enhanced MC simulation. Our models use netlist extraction to transfer physical layouts into circuit simulators. Spatially correlated physical variations across the PICs are simulated on a discrete grid and are mapped to each circuit component, so that the performance for each component can be updated according to its obtained variations, and therefore, circuit simulations take the correlated variations between components into account. The simulation flow and theoretical models for our layout-dependent enhanced MC simulation are detailed in this paper. As examples, several ring-resonator filter circuits are studied using the developed enhanced MC simulation, and statistical results from the simulations can predict both common-mode and differential-mode variations of the circuit performance.

  2. Career planning and mentorship: a few key considerations for trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Sherif M

    2017-01-01

    Publishing and securing funding are considered our "academic currency", and therefore, both should be emphasized during training, both residency and fellowship. Trainees should make an effort to find funding opportunities at or outside of their institutions and try to identify their short- and long-term goals. Establishing a track record of publications can help trainees get hired, funded, and promoted as junior faculty, and effective networking and mentorship are critical determinants of academic success. Given the positive effects of mentorship, trainees should understand what comprises a good mentor-mentee relationship and how to optimize the mentoring process. The objective of this article is to discuss few key considerations for trainees in residency or fellowship regarding mentorship and career planning in academic medicine.

  3. A survey of British senior psychiatry trainees' ethnocultural personal values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelam, Kishen; Duddu, Venugopal; Chaudhry, Imran Bashir; Antonysamy, A S; Husain, Nusrat

    2009-01-01

    The authors explored the ethnocultural values of a group of senior psychiatry trainees in the northwest region of England. The authors surveyed senior psychiatry trainees using the Personal Values Questionnaire and analyzed responses under the headings of ethnic stereotypes, ethnocultural service issues, and perceptions of racism. They also explored training requirements on cultural issues in a subsample of trainees. The majority of the trainees disagreed with certain commonly held ethnic stereotypes and acknowledged the role of culture in mental health. However, they had contrasting views on the need for culture-specific services and on perceptions of racism. They expressed interest in training programs on cultural issues in psychiatric practice. In multicultural settings, personal beliefs, perceptions, and values are likely to influence psychiatric practice. A training program on cultural aspects of mental health could help improve awareness and sensitivity of these issues and the quality of care.

  4. Radiation safety knowledge and practices among Irish orthopaedic trainees.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nugent, M

    2014-04-23

    Fluoroscopy is frequently used in orthopaedic surgery, particularly in a trauma setting. Exposure of patients and staff to ionising radiation has been studied extensively; however, little work has been done to evaluate current knowledge and practices among orthopaedic trainees.

  5. CONCEPTS AND PRACTICES OF THE EDUCATIONAL PLANNING BASED ON A COMPETENCIES APPROACH OF TEACHERS OF TRAINEE TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inocente Melitón-García

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the challenges faced by teachers in response to the innovation of curriculum and teaching matters, it is important to go deep into the the state of knowledge of trainee teachers education, analyze and systematize the production generated around this field called "didactic planning of the faculty". It is possible to state that talking about a daily basis teaching practice, it is a must to consider two aspects; on the one hand, referring to the work that prepares the teacher to the practice in schools for trainee teachers; on the other, updating and improvement during the professional performance. As a result, the hinge point to study all related to the planning of teaching from the perception of teachers of trainee school teachers, has been poorly treated by researchers or education specialist.

  6. Sexual harassment of psychiatric trainees: experiences and attitudes

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, J.; Porter, S.

    1999-01-01

    A survey was carried out of psychiatric trainees' work-related experiences of unwanted sexual contact. A structured postal questionnaire was administered to 100 psychiatric trainees from senior house officer to specialist registrar level in a large psychiatric rotation. There was an 85% response rate; 86% (73) of the sample had experienced unwanted sexual contact, with 47% (40) experiencing deliberate touching, leaning over or cornering, and 18% (15) receiving letters, telephone calls or mate...

  7. Medical microbiology training needs and trainee experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, Josephine; Elamin, Wael; Millar, Michael

    2014-02-01

    Training in microbiology is continuing to evolve. Standardisation of this process has, in part, been achieved through the development of a training curriculum by the Royal College of Pathologists (RCPath). A substantial proportion of microbiology training occurs through telephone consultations. To ascertain the content of these interactions and the extent to which the necessary skills outlined by the curriculum are attainable via these consultations. Records of telephone consultations made by microbiology registrars (SpR) on the Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) over a 6 month period were analysed with regard to who initiated contact and the type of advice provided. An average of 426 SpR entries per month were made on the LIMS following telephone consultations. These consultations were predominantly initiated by fellow clinicians as opposed to the SpR. The majority (79%) of advice entailed guidance as to the use of antimicrobials which resulted in an alteration of the current regimen in 54% of cases. This study represents the first attempt to quantify the telephone consultations of microbiology trainees. It is concluded that although such interactions provide a means of attaining some of the competencies outlined by the RCPath curriculum, the bias towards antimicrobial advice reflects a discrepancy between the needs of the service users and the broad skill set advocated by the current microbiology training programme. Future modifications will need to take this into account to ensure both the training of SpRs and the microbiology service is fit for purpose.

  8. How do postgraduate GP trainees regulate their learning and what helps and hinders them? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagasser, Margaretha H; Kramer, Anneke W M; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2012-08-06

    Self-regulation is essential for professional development. It involves monitoring of performance, identifying domains for improvement, undertaking learning activities, applying newly learned knowledge and skills and self-assessing performance. Since self-assessment alone is ineffective in identifying weaknesses, learners should seek external feedback too. Externally regulated educational interventions, like reflection, learning portfolios, assessments and progress meetings, are increasingly used to scaffold self-regulation.The aim of this study is to explore how postgraduate trainees regulate their learning in the workplace, how external regulation promotes self-regulation and which elements facilitate or impede self-regulation and learning. In a qualitative study with a phenomenologic approach we interviewed first- and third-year GP trainees from two universities in the Netherlands. Twenty-one verbatim transcripts were coded. Through iterative discussion the researchers agreed on the interpretation of the data and saturation was reached. Trainees used a short and a long self-regulation loop. The short loop took one week at most and was focused on problems that were easy to resolve and needed minor learning activities. The long loop was focused on complex or recurring problems needing multiple and planned longitudinal learning activities. External assessments and formal training affected the long but not the short loop. The supervisor had a facilitating role in both loops. Self-confidence was used to gauge competence.Elements influencing self-regulation were classified into three dimensions: personal (strong motivation to become a good doctor), interpersonal (stimulation from others) and contextual (organizational and educational features). Trainees did purposefully self-regulate their learning. Learning in the short loop may not be visible to others. Trainees should be encouraged to actively seek and use external feedback in both loops. An important question for

  9. How do postgraduate GP trainees regulate their learning and what helps and hinders them? A qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Self-regulation is essential for professional development. It involves monitoring of performance, identifying domains for improvement, undertaking learning activities, applying newly learned knowledge and skills and self-assessing performance. Since self-assessment alone is ineffective in identifying weaknesses, learners should seek external feedback too. Externally regulated educational interventions, like reflection, learning portfolios, assessments and progress meetings, are increasingly used to scaffold self-regulation. The aim of this study is to explore how postgraduate trainees regulate their learning in the workplace, how external regulation promotes self-regulation and which elements facilitate or impede self-regulation and learning. Methods In a qualitative study with a phenomenologic approach we interviewed first- and third-year GP trainees from two universities in the Netherlands. Twenty-one verbatim transcripts were coded. Through iterative discussion the researchers agreed on the interpretation of the data and saturation was reached. Results Trainees used a short and a long self-regulation loop. The short loop took one week at most and was focused on problems that were easy to resolve and needed minor learning activities. The long loop was focused on complex or recurring problems needing multiple and planned longitudinal learning activities. External assessments and formal training affected the long but not the short loop. The supervisor had a facilitating role in both loops. Self-confidence was used to gauge competence.Elements influencing self-regulation were classified into three dimensions: personal (strong motivation to become a good doctor), interpersonal (stimulation from others) and contextual (organizational and educational features). Conclusions Trainees did purposefully self-regulate their learning. Learning in the short loop may not be visible to others. Trainees should be encouraged to actively seek and use external feedback in

  10. Myocellular limitations of human performance and their modification through genome-dependent responses at altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flueck, Martin

    2010-03-01

    Human muscle operates along a continuum of power output, which is set through bioenergetic and anatomical principles. In turn, environmental and intrinsic factors during contractile work exert pronounced control over muscle performance by instructing muscle remodelling. This phenotypic control is specifically indicated with intense exercise at altitude, when extra strain is put on energy supply and the temperature-dependent mechanical efficiency of contraction. While it is classically thought that chronic exposure to hypoxia is maladaptive, repeated short episodes of reduced oxygenation alone or in combination with intense endurance work is now understood to preserve exercise performance when atmospheric oxygen levels are low. Endurance training at moderate altitude exploits the temperature-dependent malleability of energy supply that may maximize metabolic flux at altitude. The contribution of genomic mechanisms is important to the plasticity of metabolic pathways in exercised muscle. This is highlighted by the association of distinct gene polymorphisms in master governors of mitochondrial and vascular growth with exercise phenotypes. Feedforward control of human locomoter muscle by exercise involves the transient upregulation of transcript expression for metabolic processes. The response of the mitochondrial transcriptome to intense exercise is graded with respect to mitochondrial content and deoxygenation during muscle work and reflects exercise-induced mitochondrial biogenesis. This supports the notion that genome-mediated muscle malleability is under feedback control by design constraints of the pathway of oxygen. Thus, activity-dependent and genetic mechanisms contribute to the interindividual difference in the metabolic bottlenecks in athletes performing in exceptional environmental conditions.

  11. Factors influencing the approaches to studying of preclinical and clinical students and postgraduate trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samarasekera Dharmabandu N

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Students can be classified into three categories depending on their approaches to studying; namely, deep approach (DA, strategic approach (SA and surface apathetic or superficial approach (SAA. The aim of this study was to identify factors affecting the approaches to studying among Sri Lankan medical undergraduates and post graduate trainees and to analyze the change in the pattern of study skills with time and experience. Method Pre-clinical and clinical students of the Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo and postgraduate trainees in Surgery at the National Hospital of Sri Lanka were invited to complete the Approaches and Study Skills Inventory for Students (ASSIST questionnaire. Results A total of 187 pre clinical (M: F = 96:91, 124 clinical (M: F = 61:63 and 53 post graduate trainees (M: F = 50:3 participated in the study. Approaches of male and female students were similar. SA was significantly affected by age among the preclinical students (p = 0.01, but not in other groups. Among pre-clinical students, males preferred a teacher who supported understanding (p = 0.04 but females preferred a passive transmission of information (p Conclusion Different factors affect the approach to studying in different groups but these explain only a small fraction of the variance observed.

  12. Study on safety educations against individual causal factors of unsafe acts and specification of target trainees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Ayako; Takeda, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Many accidents and incidents are caused by unsafe acts. It is important to reduce these unsafe acts for preventing the accidents. The countermeasures for each causal factor behind unsafe acts are needed, however, comparing with improvement of facilities, workers-oriented measures such as safety educations are not sufficient. Then the purposes of this study are as follows: 1) to investigate the individual factors which have great impact of unsafe acts and the existing safety educations which aim to mitigate the impact of these factors, 2) to specify the target trainees to perform these safety educations. To identify common factors that affect unsafe act significantly, a web survey was conducted to 500 workers who have regularly carried out accident prediction training (i.e. Kiken-Yochi training). They were asked the situation which they were apt to act unsafely by free description. As the result, the following three main factors were extracted: impatience, overconfidence, and bothersome. Also, it was found that there were few existing safety educations which aim to mitigate the impact of these factors except for overconfidence. To specify the target trainees to perform safety educations which aim to mitigate the impact of these three factors, another web survey was conducted to 200 personnel in charge of safety at the workplace. They were asked the features of workers who tended to act unsafely by age group. The relationship between the factor that need to mitigate and the trainee who need to receive the education were clarified from the survey. (author)

  13. Prospective Controlled Assessment of Impact of Feedback on Gastroenterology Trainees in Outpatient Practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harewood, Gavin C

    2011-03-29

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Previous studies have demonstrated the value of systematic feedback in enhancing endoscopic procedure performance. It remains unknown whether feedback may play a role in modifying physician performance in outpatient practice. This study aimed to assess the impact of systematic feedback on duration of office visits of gastroenterology (GI) trainees in outpatient practice. METHODS: Patients attending a GI outpatient department in an academic medical center were prospectively followed over 4 months. The duration of office visits for consecutive patients seen by five GI fellows of similar experience level were recorded for 2 months (pre-feedback); confidential feedback was then provided to each fellow on a weekly basis for 2 months detailing their individual consultation times and the comparative, anonymous times of the other fellows (post-feedback). RESULTS: Over the course of the study, 1,647 outpatients were seen by five GI fellows. Pre-feedback consultation durations differed significantly with one fellow taking 2.5 times longer than their colleague. Following feedback, times shortened significantly for all fellows, with the greatest impact observed in those trainees taking longer at baseline. There were no significant differences in satisfaction levels among patients seen by each trainee. CONCLUSIONS: There was a wide disparity in the consultation times among GI fellows. Systematic feedback shortened times among all trainees and enhanced uniformity by having the greatest impact among those fellows taking longer at baseline. Routine provision of feedback may be valuable in enhancing uniformity of outpatient practice although clinicians should ensure that shortening consultation visits does not compromise quality of patient care. Future larger studies of feedback in this setting will be enhanced by incorporating objective measures of quality of care and patient satisfaction.

  14. Prospective controlled assessment of impact of feedback on gastroenterology trainees in outpatient practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harewood, Gavin C

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Previous studies have demonstrated the value of systematic feedback in enhancing endoscopic procedure performance. It remains unknown whether feedback may play a role in modifying physician performance in outpatient practice. This study aimed to assess the impact of systematic feedback on duration of office visits of gastroenterology (GI) trainees in outpatient practice. METHODS: Patients attending a GI outpatient department in an academic medical center were prospectively followed over 4 months. The duration of office visits for consecutive patients seen by five GI fellows of similar experience level were recorded for 2 months (pre-feedback); confidential feedback was then provided to each fellow on a weekly basis for 2 months detailing their individual consultation times and the comparative, anonymous times of the other fellows (post-feedback). RESULTS: Over the course of the study, 1,647 outpatients were seen by five GI fellows. Pre-feedback consultation durations differed significantly with one fellow taking 2.5 times longer than their colleague. Following feedback, times shortened significantly for all fellows, with the greatest impact observed in those trainees taking longer at baseline. There were no significant differences in satisfaction levels among patients seen by each trainee. CONCLUSIONS: There was a wide disparity in the consultation times among GI fellows. Systematic feedback shortened times among all trainees and enhanced uniformity by having the greatest impact among those fellows taking longer at baseline. Routine provision of feedback may be valuable in enhancing uniformity of outpatient practice although clinicians should ensure that shortening consultation visits does not compromise quality of patient care. Future larger studies of feedback in this setting will be enhanced by incorporating objective measures of quality of care and patient satisfaction.

  15. Delineating species with DNA barcodes: a case of taxon dependent method performance in moths.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Kekkonen

    Full Text Available The accelerating loss of biodiversity has created a need for more effective ways to discover species. Novel algorithmic approaches for analyzing sequence data combined with rapidly expanding DNA barcode libraries provide a potential solution. While several analytical methods are available for the delineation of operational taxonomic units (OTUs, few studies have compared their performance. This study compares the performance of one morphology-based and four DNA-based (BIN, parsimony networks, ABGD, GMYC methods on two groups of gelechioid moths. It examines 92 species of Finnish Gelechiinae and 103 species of Australian Elachistinae which were delineated by traditional taxonomy. The results reveal a striking difference in performance between the two taxa with all four DNA-based methods. OTU counts in the Elachistinae showed a wider range and a relatively low (ca. 65% OTU match with reference species while OTU counts were more congruent and performance was higher (ca. 90% in the Gelechiinae. Performance rose when only monophyletic species were compared, but the taxon-dependence remained. None of the DNA-based methods produced a correct match with non-monophyletic species, but singletons were handled well. A simulated test of morphospecies-grouping performed very poorly in revealing taxon diversity in these small, dull-colored moths. Despite the strong performance of analyses based on DNA barcodes, species delineated using single-locus mtDNA data are best viewed as OTUs that require validation by subsequent integrative taxonomic work.

  16. Primary Trainee Teachers' Attitudes to and Use of Computer and Technology in Mathematics: The Case of Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Mustafa

    2010-01-01

    This study explores Turkish primary mathematics trainee teachers' attitudes to computer and technology. A survey was conducted with a self constructed questionnaire. Piloting, factor and reliability ([alpha] = 0.94) analyses were performed. The final version of the questionnaire has three parts with a total of 48 questions including a Likert type…

  17. Board leadership structure and firm performance: An examination of resource dependence role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afzalur Rashid

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines if the CEO duality influence the firm economic performance in Bangladesh and the moderating effects of board composition in the form of outside independent directors. While doing so, it examines the relationship between CEO duality and firm performance during the pre appointment of outside independent directors and post appointment of outside independent directors (the role of other corporate governance mechanism as moderating variable. The finding is that there is there is a negative (non-significant relationship between CEO duality and firm performance before appointment of outside independent directors in the board. However, independent leadership structure and firm performance is found to be positively related following the acquisition of resource (outside independent directors in the board supporting the ’resource dependence theory’. The findings of this study partially support the ’agency theory’ and ’resource dependence theory’ but do not support the stewardship theory. This study contributes to the literature on CEO duality in the context of less a developed country.

  18. Dependence of Performance of Si Nanowire Solar Cells on Geometry of the Nanowires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firoz Khan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of performance of silicon nanowires (SiNWs solar cells on the growth condition of the SiNWs has been described. Metal-assisted electroless etching (MAE technique has been used to grow SiNWs array. Different concentration of aqueous solution containing AgNO3 and HF for Ag deposition is used. The diameter and density of SiNWs are found to be dependent on concentration of solution used for Ag deposition. The diameter and density of SiNWs have been used to calculate the filling ratio of the SINWs arrays. The filling ratio is increased with increase in AgNO3 concentration, whereas it is decreased with increase in HF concentration. The minimum reflectance value achieved is ~1% for SiNWs of length of ~1.2 μm in the wavelength range of 300–1000 nm. The performance and diode parameters strongly depend on the geometry of SiNWs. The maximum short circuit current density achieved is 35.6 mA/cm2. The conversion efficiency of solar cell is 9.73% for SiNWs with length, diameter, and wire density of ~1.2 μm, ~75 nm, and 90 μm−2, respectively.

  19. Sex differences in guanfacine effects on stress-induced stroop performance in cocaine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milivojevic, Verica; Fox, Helen C; Jayaram-Lindstrom, Nitya; Hermes, Gretchen; Sinha, Rajita

    2017-10-01

    Chronic drug abuse leads to sex-specific changes in drug cue and stress physiologic and neuroendocrine reactivity as well as in neural responses to stress and cue-related challenges and in executive function such as inhibitory control, cognitive flexibility and self control. Importantly, these functions have been associated with high risk of relapse and treatment. Alpha-2 agonism may enhance inhibitory cognitive processes in the face of stress with sex-specific effects, however this has not been previously assessed in cocaine dependence. Forty inpatient treatment-seeking cocaine dependent individuals (13F/27M) were randomly assigned to receive either placebo or up to 3mgs of Guanfacine. Three laboratory sessions were conducted following 3-4 weeks of abstinence, where patients were exposed to three 10-min personalized guided imagery conditions (stress, drug cue, combined stress/cue), one per day, on consecutive days in a random, counterbalanced order. The Stroop task was administered at baseline and immediately following imagery exposure. Guanfacine treated women improved their performance on the Stroop task following exposure to all 3 imagery conditions compared with placebo women (p=0.02). This improvement in cognitive inhibitory performance was not observed in the men. Enhancing the ability to cognitively regulate in the face of stress, drug cues and combined stress and drug cue reactivity may be key targets for medications development in cocaine dependent women. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Dependence of performance of Si nanowire solar cells on geometry of the nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Firoz; Baek, Seong-Ho; Kim, Jae Hyun

    2014-01-01

    The dependence of performance of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) solar cells on the growth condition of the SiNWs has been described. Metal-assisted electroless etching (MAE) technique has been used to grow SiNWs array. Different concentration of aqueous solution containing AgNO3 and HF for Ag deposition is used. The diameter and density of SiNWs are found to be dependent on concentration of solution used for Ag deposition. The diameter and density of SiNWs have been used to calculate the filling ratio of the SINWs arrays. The filling ratio is increased with increase in AgNO3 concentration, whereas it is decreased with increase in HF concentration. The minimum reflectance value achieved is ~1% for SiNWs of length of ~1.2 μ m in the wavelength range of 300-1000 nm. The performance and diode parameters strongly depend on the geometry of SiNWs. The maximum short circuit current density achieved is 35.6 mA/cm(2). The conversion efficiency of solar cell is 9.73% for SiNWs with length, diameter, and wire density of ~1.2 μ m, ~75 nm, and 90 μ m(-2), respectively.

  1. Age- and size-dependent mating performance and fertility in a pelagic copepod, Temora longicornis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sichlau, Mie Hylstofte; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Prepress abstract: In many species, size and age have been shown to be strong determinants of the reproductive success for both sexes. Here we examine age- and size dependent reproductive performance (egg- and sperm production, mating success) in a pelagic copepod. Compared to smaller males, larger...... males produce larger spermatophores containing more spermatozoa, and fertilize a larger fraction of available females. Females mating with large males produce more offspring than those mating with small males. Similarly, large females have higher egg production rates as well as a higher life-time egg...... fertilize females for only about eight days after they mature. The strong size- and age-dependent fertility observed in this species is conducive to the development of sexual selection via mate choice for young and large partners, as has been shown in one other copepod species...

  2. Providing Experiential Business and Management Training for Biomedical Research Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Kimberly A; Carnahan, Robert H; Brown, Abigail M; Gould, Kathleen L

    2017-01-01

    Many biomedical PhD trainees lack exposure to business principles, which limits their competitiveness and effectiveness in academic and industry careers. To fill this training gap, we developed Business and Management Principles for Scientists, a semester-long program that combined didactic exposure to business fundamentals with practical team-based projects aimed at solving real business problems encountered by institutional shared--resource core facilities. The program also included a retreat featuring presentations by and networking with local life science entrepreneurs and final team presentations to expert judges. Quantitative and qualitative metrics were used to evaluate the program's impact on trainees. A pretest-posttest approach was used to assess trainees' baseline knowledge and mastery of module concepts, and each individual's pretest and posttest responses were compared. The mean score improved by more than 17 percentage points. Trainees also took an online survey to provide feedback about the module. Nearly all participants agreed or strongly agreed that the module was a valuable use of their time and will help guide their career decisions and that project work helped drive home module concepts. More than 75% of trainees reported discussing the module with their research advisors, and all of these participants reported supportive or neutral responses. Collectively, the trainee feedback about the module, improvement in test scores, and trainee perception of advisor support suggest that this short module is an effective method of providing scientists with efficient and meaningful exposure to business concepts. © 2017 K. A. Petrie et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http

  3. Deafness among physicians and trainees: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreland, Christopher J; Latimore, Darin; Sen, Ananda; Arato, Nora; Zazove, Philip

    2013-02-01

    To describe the characteristics of and accommodations used by the deaf and hard-of-hearing (DHoH) physician and trainee population and examine whether these individuals are more likely to care for DHoH patients. Multipronged snowball sampling identified 86 potential DHoH physician and trainee participants. In July to September 2010, a Web-based survey investigated accommodations used by survey respondents. The authors analyzed participants' demographics, accommodation and career satisfaction, sense of institutional support, likelihood of recommending medicine as a career, and current/anticipated DHoH patient population size. The response rate was 65% (56 respondents; 31 trainees and 25 practicing physicians). Modified stethoscopes were the most frequently used accommodation (n = 50; 89%); other accommodations included auditory equipment, note-taking, computer-assisted real-time captioning, signed interpretation, and oral interpretation. Most respondents reported that their accommodations met their needs well, although 2 spent up to 10 hours weekly arranging accommodations. Of 25 physicians, 17 reported primary care specialties; 7 of 31 trainees planned to enter primary care specialties. Over 20% of trainees anticipated working with DHoH patients, whereas physicians on average spent 10% of their time with DHoH patients. Physicians' accommodation satisfaction was positively associated with career satisfaction and recommending medicine as a career. DHoH physicians and trainees seemed satisfied with frequent, multimodal accommodations from employers and educators. These results may assist organizations in planning accommodation provisions. Because DHoH physicians and trainees seem interested in primary care and serving DHoH patients, recruiting and training DHoH physicians has implications for the care of this underserved population.

  4. Work-family balance by women GP specialist trainees in Slovenia: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petek, Davorina; Gajsek, Tadeja; Petek Ster, Marija

    2016-01-28

    Women physicians face many challenges while balancing their many roles: doctor, specialist trainee, mother and partner. The most opportune biological time for a woman to start a family coincides with a great deal of demands and requirements at work. In this study we explored the options and capabilities of women GP specialist trainees in coordinating their family and career. This is a phenomenological qualitative research. Ten GP specialist trainees from urban and rural areas were chosen by the purposive sampling technique, and semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted, recorded, transcribed and analysed by using thematic analysis process. Open coding and the book of codes were formed. Finally, we performed the process of code reduction by identifying the themes, which were compared, interpreted and organised in the highest analytical units--categories. One hundred fifty-five codes were identified in the analysis, which were grouped together into eleven themes. The identified themes are: types, causes and consequences of burdens, work as pleasure and positive attitude toward self, priorities, planning and help, and understanding of superiors, disburdening and changing in specialisation. The themes were grouped into four large categories: burdens, empowerment, coordination and needs for improvement. Women specialist trainees encounter intense burdens at work and home due to numerous demands and requirements during their specialisation training. In addition, there is also the issue of the work-family conflict. There are many consequences regarding burden and strain; however, burnout stands out the most. In contrast, reconciliation of work and family life and needs can be successful. The key element is empowerment of women doctors. The foremost necessary systemic solution is the reinforcement of general practitioners in primary health care and their understanding of the specialisation training scheme with more flexible possibilities for time adaptations of

  5. A mixed methods evaluation of paediatric trainee preparedness to manage cardiopulmonary arrests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Órla; Lydon, Sinéad; O'Connor, Paul

    2017-12-01

    Paediatric cardiopulmonary arrest (CPA) survival rates are strongly linked to the training of the doctors responding to the event. This study sought to characterise the level of experience in managing CPAs among paediatric trainees and to investigate the nontechnical (NTS) required to effectively lead a paediatric CPA team. A mixed-methods research design was used. For the quantitative phase, a questionnaire was developed to assess training, confidence, and experiences related to CPA management. During the qualitative phase, 17 paediatric trainees participated in a series of critical incident technique (CIT) interviews to explore the NTS used during the management of paediatric CPAs. A total of 56 of 131 (37.1% response rate) trainees responded to the preparedness questionnaire. A total of 48.2% of respondents expressed low confidence in their skill as a team leader during the management of a CPA. The CIT interviews highlighted deficiencies in specific NTS (identifying options, prioritising, and identifying and utilising resources). Our results indicate that there is a desire for more training in CPA management among paediatric trainees, in particular as a team leader, which includes a focus on key NTS. What is Known • Levels of preparedness to be a paediatric cardiopulmonary arrests team member/leader are generally lower than desirable. • The importance of nontechnical skills to the effective performance of adult cardiopulmonary arrests teams has been identified. What is New • Levels of preparedness to be a cardiopulmonary arrests team member were higher than reported in US studies. • There is a need for greater training in cardiopulmonary arrest management which includes a focus on key nontechnical skills to include identifying options, prioritising, identifying and utilising resources.

  6. Dependence of the source performance on plasma parameters at the BATMAN test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, C.; Fantz, U.

    2015-04-01

    The investigation of the dependence of the source performance (high jH-, low je) for optimum Cs conditions on the plasma parameters at the BATMAN (Bavarian Test MAchine for Negative hydrogen ions) test facility is desirable in order to find key parameters for the operation of the source as well as to deepen the physical understanding. The most relevant source physics takes place in the extended boundary layer, which is the plasma layer with a thickness of several cm in front of the plasma grid: the production of H-, its transport through the plasma and its extraction, inevitably accompanied by the co-extraction of electrons. Hence, a link of the source performance with the plasma parameters in the extended boundary layer is expected. In order to characterize electron and negative hydrogen ion fluxes in the extended boundary layer, Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy and Langmuir probes have been applied for the measurement of the H- density and the determination of the plasma density, the plasma potential and the electron temperature, respectively. The plasma potential is of particular importance as it determines the sheath potential profile at the plasma grid: depending on the plasma grid bias relative to the plasma potential, a transition in the plasma sheath from an electron repelling to an electron attracting sheath takes place, influencing strongly the electron fraction of the bias current and thus the amount of co-extracted electrons. Dependencies of the source performance on the determined plasma parameters are presented for the comparison of two source pressures (0.6 Pa, 0.45 Pa) in hydrogen operation. The higher source pressure of 0.6 Pa is a standard point of operation at BATMAN with external magnets, whereas the lower pressure of 0.45 Pa is closer to the ITER requirements (p ≤ 0.3 Pa).

  7. Dependence of the source performance on plasma parameters at the BATMAN test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wimmer, C.; Fantz, U.

    2015-01-01

    The investigation of the dependence of the source performance (high j H − , low j e ) for optimum Cs conditions on the plasma parameters at the BATMAN (Bavarian Test MAchine for Negative hydrogen ions) test facility is desirable in order to find key parameters for the operation of the source as well as to deepen the physical understanding. The most relevant source physics takes place in the extended boundary layer, which is the plasma layer with a thickness of several cm in front of the plasma grid: the production of H − , its transport through the plasma and its extraction, inevitably accompanied by the co-extraction of electrons. Hence, a link of the source performance with the plasma parameters in the extended boundary layer is expected. In order to characterize electron and negative hydrogen ion fluxes in the extended boundary layer, Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy and Langmuir probes have been applied for the measurement of the H − density and the determination of the plasma density, the plasma potential and the electron temperature, respectively. The plasma potential is of particular importance as it determines the sheath potential profile at the plasma grid: depending on the plasma grid bias relative to the plasma potential, a transition in the plasma sheath from an electron repelling to an electron attracting sheath takes place, influencing strongly the electron fraction of the bias current and thus the amount of co-extracted electrons. Dependencies of the source performance on the determined plasma parameters are presented for the comparison of two source pressures (0.6 Pa, 0.45 Pa) in hydrogen operation. The higher source pressure of 0.6 Pa is a standard point of operation at BATMAN with external magnets, whereas the lower pressure of 0.45 Pa is closer to the ITER requirements (p ≤ 0.3 Pa)

  8. The Influence of Gender on ProfessionalismFemale in Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jae Hee

    2012-06-01

    This study aimed to analyze the experience of female trainees who were trained in hospitals after graduating from medical school, focusing on methods of representing their gender in training courses. We interviewed 8 trainees who had been trained in a hospital in Seoul and 4 faculties from June 2010 to October 2010. We analyzed their similarities and differences and developed a vocational identity formation process to represent gender. Gender was represented contradictorily in their training course, affecting their choice of specialties and interactions with patients. But, female trainees did not want to their being distinguished from their male counterparts with regard to being a good doctor to be influenced by meritocracy. It was difficult for them to bear children and balance work and family life due to aspects of the training system, including long work hours and the lack of replacement workers. Consequently, they asked their parents to help with child care, because hospitals are not interested in the maternity system. Female trainees did not consider being a doctor to be a male profession. Likely, they believed that their femininity influenced their professionalism positively. The methods of representing gender are influenced by the training system, based a male-dominated apprenticeship. Thus, we will research the mechanisms that influence gender-discriminated choices in specialties, hospitals, and medical schools and prepare a maternity care system for female trainees. Strategies that maximize recruitment and retention of women in medicine should include a consideration of alternative work schedules and optimization of maternity leave and child care opportunities.

  9. Documentation of in-training assessment for radiology trainees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Gillian

    2001-01-01

    AIM: To determine if the assessment of radiology trainees can be improved by modifying the in-training assessment form issued by the Royal College of Radiologists (RCR). MATERIALS AND METHODS: A qualitative study comparing the RCR assessment form with other alternative forms in use in the U.K. Individual semi-structured interviews were conducted with trainees (21) and trainers (18) in Sheffield to collect their views on the RCR form and an alternative form introduced on the North Trent Training Scheme. A postal questionnaire was sent to Heads of Training (24) to find out what assessment forms were in use at other centres and collect their views on the different forms. RESULTS: Trainees and trainers in Sheffield were virtually unanimous in their support of the new North Trent assessment form. The main advantages perceived were the encouragement of appraisal, setting of objectives and feedback from the trainees. Six other radiology training centres were using alternative assessment forms and all believed their forms had advantages over the RCR in-training assessment form. CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that the assessment process for radiology trainees can be improved by modifications to the RCR in-training assessment form and allows various recommendations to be made. Long, G. (2001)

  10. Numerical simulation of radioisotope's dependency on containment performance for large dry PWR containment under severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehboob, Khurram; Xinrong, Cao; Ahmed, Raheel; Ali, Majid

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Calculation and comparison of activity of BURN-UP code with ORIGEN2 code. • Development of SASTC computer code. • Radioisotopes dependency on containment ESFs. • Mitigation in atmospheric release with ESFs operation. • Variation in radioisotopes source term with spray flow and pH value. -- Abstract: During the core melt accidents large amount of fission products can be released into the containment building. These fission products escape into the environment to contribute in accident source term. The mitigation in environmental release is demanded for such radiological consequences. Thus, countermeasures to source term, mitigations of release of radioactivity have been studied for 1000 MWe PWR reactor. The procedure of study is divided into five steps: (1) calculation and verification of core inventory, evaluated by BURN-UP code, (2) containment modeling based on radioactivity removal factors, (3) selection of potential accidents initiates the severe accident, (4) calculation of release of radioactivity, (5) study the dependency of release of radioactivity on containment engineering safety features (ESFs) inducing mitigation. Loss of coolant accident (LOCA), small break LOCA and flow blockage accidents (FBA) are selected as initiating accidents. The mitigation effect of ESFs on source term has been studied against ESFs performance. Parametric study of release of radioactivity has been carried out by modeling and simulating the containment parameters in MATLAB, which takes BURN-UP outcomes as input along with the probabilistic data. The dependency of iodine and aerosol source term on boric and caustic acid spray has been determined. The variation in source term mitigation with the variation of containment spray flow rate and pH values have been studied. The variation in containment retention factor (CRF) has also been studied with the ESF performance. A rapid decrease in source term is observed with the increase in pH value

  11. Programas trainees corporativos e o governo das almas Trainees corporate programs and the government of souls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Antônio da Cruz

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available O artigo busca problematizar as transformações do trabalho na passagem da Modernidade para a Contemporaneidade, e alguns de seus efeitos nos domínios educacionais. Para tanto, mostramos o deslocamento de ênfase de um trabalho fabril para um trabalho que vem sendo chamado imaterial, que já não prioriza um sistema baseado na obediência a regulamentos e na vigilância do corpo. Sua organização lança mão de formas muito mais sutis de poder, apoiando-se em formas mais sofisticadas e complexas de atuar sobre os sujeitos. Esse quadro teórico serve de suporte para a análise de três programas trainees corporativos, que buscam capturar "grandes talentos" egressos de cursos superiores e torná-los fiéis colaboradores das organizações empresariais, fazendo com que desejem e passem a agir como autoem-presários prestadores de serviços.The article attempts to discuss changes in work in the passage from Modernity to Contemporary and some of its effects in education. For this, we show the displacement in emphasis from a factory work, guided by a disciplinary organization, to a work that is being called immaterial. This is no longer a priority a system based on obedience to rules and surveillance of the body. Its organization makes use of more subtle forms of power, relying on more sophisticated and complex ways of acting on the subject. This theoretical framework supports the analysis of three trainees corporate programs, whose purpose is capturing "great talents" graduates from colleges and making them loyal employees of business organizations, making they wish and start to act as self-entrepreneurs service providers.

  12. Psychiatry trainees' attitudes towards euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontaxaki, M-I; Paplos, K; Dasopoulou, M; Kontaxakis, V

    2018-01-01

    We investigated the attitudes towards Euthanasia (EUT) and Physician-Assisted Suicide (PAS) in a sample of Greek Psychiatry trainees (PT), (n=120, mean age 32.01±0.21, male 60.0%) and compared these to those of medical trainees of other specialties (OMT), i.e. internal medicine, surgery, intensive care (n=154, mean age 32.97±1.17, male 57.1%). Most of the responders were for the acceptance of EUT and PAS under some circumstances. More often PT answer "never" in the question regarding the permission to withdraw life-sustaining medical treatment to hasten death, if that requested by a terminally ill patient (pquality of life (plife decisions. Also, it is important for educators to have understanding the views of the trainees since soon in the future, the new generation of physicians will have to make end of life decisions.

  13. Occupational Blood Exposure among Health Care Personnel and Hospital Trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Hajjaji Darouiche

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Blood and body fluid Exposure is a major occupational safety problems for health care workers. Therefore, we conducted a descriptive and retrospective study to identify the characteristics of blood exposure accidents in health care settings which lasted five years (2005-2009 at the two university hospitals of Sfax. We have 593 blood exposure accidents in health care settings 152 (25.6% health personnel and 441 (74.4% trainees' doctors, nurses and health technicians. The mechanism of blood and body fluid exposure was accidental needle-stick injury in 78.9% of health staff, and 81% of trainees, accidental cut in 14.7% of health workers and 10.2% of trainees. The increasing severity of blood exposure accidents is linked to the lack of safe behavior against this risk.

  14. Short-term immobilization influences use-dependent cortical plasticity and fine motor performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opie, George M; Evans, Alexandra; Ridding, Michael C; Semmler, John G

    2016-08-25

    Short-term immobilization that reduces muscle use for 8-10h is known to influence cortical excitability and motor performance. However, the mechanisms through which this is achieved, and whether these changes can be used to modify cortical plasticity and motor skill learning, are not known. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of short-term immobilization on use-dependent cortical plasticity, motor learning and retention. Twenty-one adults were divided into control and immobilized groups, both of which underwent two experimental sessions on consecutive days. Within each session, transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to assess motor-evoked potential (MEP) amplitudes, short- (SICI) and long-interval intracortical inhibition (LICI), and intracortical facilitation (ICF) before and after a grooved pegboard task. Prior to the second training session, the immobilized group underwent 8h of left hand immobilization targeting the index finger, while control subjects were allowed normal limb use. Immobilization produced a reduction in MEP amplitudes, but no change in SICI, LICI or ICF. While motor performance improved for both groups in each session, the level of performance was greater 24-h later in control, but not immobilized subjects. Furthermore, training-related MEP facilitation was greater after, compared with before, immobilization. These results indicate that immobilization can modulate use-dependent plasticity and the retention of motor skills. They also suggest that changes in intracortical excitability are unlikely to contribute to the immobilization-induced modification of cortical excitability. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Local Use-Dependent Sleep in Wakefulness Links Performance Errors to Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quercia, Angelica; Zappasodi, Filippo; Committeri, Giorgia; Ferrara, Michele

    2018-01-01

    Sleep and wakefulness are no longer to be considered as discrete states. During wakefulness brain regions can enter a sleep-like state (off-periods) in response to a prolonged period of activity (local use-dependent sleep). Similarly, during nonREM sleep the slow-wave activity, the hallmark of sleep plasticity, increases locally in brain regions previously involved in a learning task. Recent studies have demonstrated that behavioral performance may be impaired by off-periods in wake in task-related regions. However, the relation between off-periods in wake, related performance errors and learning is still untested in humans. Here, by employing high density electroencephalographic (hd-EEG) recordings, we investigated local use-dependent sleep in wake, asking participants to repeat continuously two intensive spatial navigation tasks. Critically, one task relied on previous map learning (Wayfinding) while the other did not (Control). Behaviorally awake participants, who were not sleep deprived, showed progressive increments of delta activity only during the learning-based spatial navigation task. As shown by source localization, delta activity was mainly localized in the left parietal and bilateral frontal cortices, all regions known to be engaged in spatial navigation tasks. Moreover, during the Wayfinding task, these increments of delta power were specifically associated with errors, whose probability of occurrence was significantly higher compared to the Control task. Unlike the Wayfinding task, during the Control task neither delta activity nor the number of errors increased progressively. Furthermore, during the Wayfinding task, both the number and the amplitude of individual delta waves, as indexes of neuronal silence in wake (off-periods), were significantly higher during errors than hits. Finally, a path analysis linked the use of the spatial navigation circuits undergone to learning plasticity to off periods in wake. In conclusion, local sleep regulation in

  16. One or two trainees per workplace in a structured multimodality training curriculum for laparoscopic surgery?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nickel, Felix; Jede, Felix; Minassian, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    . After a standardized introduction to laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC) with online learning modules, the participants perform a baseline test for basic skills and LC performance on a virtual reality (VR) trainer. A total of 100 students will be randomized into three study arms, in a 2:2:1 ratio...... different approaches for optimal training outcome. However, no standards currently exist for the number of trainees assigned per workplace. Methods. This is a monocentric, open, three-arm randomized controlled trial. The participants are laparoscopically-naive medical students from Heidelberg University...

  17. E-learning teaches attendings "how to" objectively assess pediatric urology trainees' surgery skills for orchiopexy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Nicolas; Maizels, Max; Farhat, Walid; Smith, Edwin; Liu, Dennis; Chua, Michael; Bhanji, Yasin

    2018-04-01

    Established methods to train pediatric urology surgery by residency training programs require updating in response to administrative changes such as new, reduced trainee duty hours. Therefore, new objective methods must be developed to teach trainees. We approached this need by creating e-learning to teach attendings objective assessment of trainee skills using the Zwisch scale, an established assessment tool. The aim of this study was to identify whether or not e-learning is an appropriate platform for effective teaching of this assessment tool, by assessing inter-rater correlation of assessments made by the attendings after participation in the e-learning. Pediatric orchiopexy was used as the index case. An e-learning tool was created to teach attending surgeons objective assessment of trainees' surgical skills. First, e-learning content was created which showed the assessment method videotape of resident surgery done in the operating room. Next, attendings were enrolled to e-learn this method. Finally, the ability of enrollees to assess resident surgery skill performance was tested. Namely, test video was made showing a trainee performing inguinal orchiopexy. All enrollees viewed the same online videos. Assessments of surgical skills (Zwisch scale) were entered into an online survey. Data were analyzed by intercorrelation coefficient kappa analysis (strong correlation was ICC ≥ 0.7). A total of 11 attendings were enrolled. All accessed the online learning and then made assessments of surgical skills trainees showed on videotapes. The e-learning comprised three modules: 1. "Core concepts," in which users learned the assessment tool methods; 2. "Learn to assess," in which users learned how to assess by watching video clips, explaining the assessment method; and 3. "Test," in which users tested their skill at making assessments by watching video clips and then actively inputting their ratings of surgical and global skills as viewed in the video clips (Figure

  18. Tactile-dependant corticomotor facilitation is influenced by discrimination performance in seniors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tremblay François

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Active contraction leads to facilitation of motor responses evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS. In small hand muscles, motor facilitation is known to be also influenced by the nature of the task. Recently, we showed that corticomotor facilitation was selectively enhanced when young participants actively discriminated tactile symbols with the tip of their index or little finger. This tactile-dependant motor facilitation reflected, for the large part, attentional influences associated with performing tactile discrimination, since execution of a concomitant distraction task abolished facilitation. In the present report, we extend these observations to examine the influence of age on the ability to produce extra motor facilitation when the hand is used for sensory exploration. Methods Corticomotor excitability was tested in 16 healthy seniors (58-83 years while they actively moved their right index finger over a surface under two task conditions. In the tactile discrimination (TD condition, participants attended to the spatial location of two tactile symbols on the explored surface, while in the non discrimination (ND condition, participants simply moved their finger over a blank surface. Changes in amplitude, in latency and in the silent period (SP duration were measured from recordings of motor evoked potentials (MEP in the right first dorsal interosseous muscle in response to TMS of the left motor cortex. Results Healthy seniors exhibited widely varying levels of performance with the TD task, older age being associated with lower accuracy and vice-versa. Large inter-individual variations were also observed in terms of tactile-specific corticomotor facilitation. Regrouping seniors into higher (n = 6 and lower performance groups (n = 10 revealed a significant task by performance interaction. This latter interaction reflected differences between higher and lower performance groups; tactile-related facilitation being

  19. Analysis of qualitative interviews with Action Research Trainees, February 2007

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Bente; Levinsen, Karin

    Interviews with trainees were conducted after the Action Research period (November-December 2006), when LBs 1-4 were tested on trainees. The aim of the interviews was to understand how teachers learn to teach and to relate to the online environment through the specific context of the Lancelot live...... online course.  The focus of the interviews was on the one hand the ability of the course to support this learning process and on the other hand the correction and adjustment of the syllabus for the spring pilot testing phase (beginning March 2007)....

  20. Structure dependent electrochemical performance of Li-rich layered oxides in lithium-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Fang; Yao, Yuze; Wang, Haiyan; Xu, Gui-Liang; Amine, Khalil; Sun, Shi-Gang; Shao, Minhua

    2017-04-08

    Rational and precise control of the structure and dimension of electrode materials is an efficient way to improve their electrochemical performance. In this work, solvothermal or co-precipitation method is used to synthesize lithium-rich layered oxide materials of Li1.2Mn0.56Co0.12Ni0.12O2 (LLO) with various morphologies and structures, including microspheres, microrods, nanoplates, and irregular nanoparticles. These materials exhibit strong structure- dependent electrochemical properties. The porous hierarchical structured LLO microrods exhibit the best performance, delivering a discharge capacity of 264.6 mAh g(-1) at 0.5 C with over 91% retention after 100 cycles. At a high rate of 5 C, a high discharge capacity of 173.6 mAh g(-1) can be achieved. This work reveals the relationship between the morphologies and electrochemical properties of LLO cathode materials, and provides a feasible approach to fabricating robust and high-performance electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries.

  1. Frequency dependence of magnetic shielding performance of HTS plates in mixed states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamitani, Atsushi; Yokono, Takafumi [Yamagata Univ., Yonezawa (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Yokono, Takafumi [Tsukuba Univ., Ibaraki (Japan). Inst. of Information Sciences and Electronics

    2000-06-01

    The magnetic shielding performance of the high-Tc superconducting (HTS) plate is investigated numerically. The behavior of the shielding current density in the HTS plate is expressed as the integral-differential equation with a normal component of the current vector potential as a dependent variable. The numerical code for solving the equation has been developed by using the combination of the Newton-Raphson method and the successive substitution method and, by use of the code, damping coefficients and shielding factors are evaluated for the various values of the frequency {omega}. The results of computations show that the HTS plate has a possibility of shielding the high-frequency magnetic field with {omega} > or approx. 1 kHz. (author)

  2. [Performance dependence of organic light-emitting devices on the thickness of Alq3 emitting layer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Jia-rong; Liao, Qiao-sheng; Yang, Rui-bo; Zheng, Wei; Zeng, Peng-ju

    2010-10-01

    The dependence of opto-electronical characteristics in organic light-emitting devices on the thickness of Alq3 emitter layer was studied, where MoO3, NPB, and Alq3 were used as hole injector, hole transporter, and emitter/electron transporter, respectively. By increasing the thickness of Alq3 layer from 20 to 100 nm, the device current decreased gradually, and the EL spectra of devices performed a little red shift with an obvious broadening in long wavelength range but a little decrease in intensity of short wavelength range. The authors simulated the EL spectra using the photoluminescence (PL) spectra of Alq3 as Alq3 intrinsic emission, which coincided with the experimental EL spectra well. The simulated results suggested that the effect of interference takes the major role in broadening the long wavelength range of EL spectra, and the distribution of emission zone largely affects the profile of EL spectra in short wavelength range.

  3. Gate dielectric strength dependent performance of CNT MOSFET and CNT TFET: A tight binding study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Shamim Sarker

    Full Text Available This paper presents a comparative study between CNT MOSFET and CNT TFET taking into account of different dielectric strength of gate oxide materials. Here we have studied the transfer characteristics, on/off current (ION/IOFF ratio and subthreshold slope of the device using Non Equilibrium Greens Function (NEGF formalism in tight binding frameworks. The results are obtained by solving the NEGF and Poisson’s equation self-consistently in NanoTCADViDES environment and found that the ON state performance of CNT MOSFET and CNT TFET have significant dependency on the dielectric strength of the gate oxide materials. The figure of merits of the devices also demonstrates that the CNT TFET is promising for high-speed and low-power logic applications. Keywords: CNT TFET, Subthreshold slop, Barrier width, Conduction band (C.B and Valance band (V.B, Oxide dielectric strength, Tight binding approach

  4. Frequency dependence of magnetic shielding performance of HTS plates in mixed states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamitani, Atsushi; Yokono, Takafumi; Yokono, Takafumi

    2000-01-01

    The magnetic shielding performance of the high-Tc superconducting (HTS) plate is investigated numerically. The behavior of the shielding current density in the HTS plate is expressed as the integral-differential equation with a normal component of the current vector potential as a dependent variable. The numerical code for solving the equation has been developed by using the combination of the Newton-Raphson method and the successive substitution method and, by use of the code, damping coefficients and shielding factors are evaluated for the various values of the frequency ω. The results of computations show that the HTS plate has a possibility of shielding the high-frequency magnetic field with ω > or approx. 1 kHz. (author)

  5. Modulation format dependence of digital nonlinearity compensation performance in optical fibre communication systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tianhua; Shevchenko, Nikita A; Lavery, Domaniç; Semrau, Daniel; Liga, Gabriele; Alvarado, Alex; Killey, Robert I; Bayvel, Polina

    2017-02-20

    The relationship between modulation format and the performance of multi-channel digital back-propagation (MC-DBP) in ideal Nyquist-spaced optical communication systems is investigated. It is found that the nonlinear distortions behave independent of modulation format in the case of full-field DBP, in contrast to the cases of electronic dispersion compensation and partial-bandwidth DBP. It is shown that the minimum number of steps per span required for MC-DBP depends on the chosen modulation format. For any given target information rate, there exists a possible trade-off between modulation format and back-propagated bandwidth, which could be used to reduce the computational complexity requirement of MC-DBP.

  6. Scale-dependent performances of CMIP5 earth system models in simulating terrestrial vegetation carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, L.; Luo, Y.; Yan, Y.; Hararuk, O.

    2013-12-01

    Mitigation of global changes will depend on reliable projection for the future situation. As the major tools to predict future climate, Earth System Models (ESMs) used in Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) for the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report have incorporated carbon cycle components, which account for the important fluxes of carbon between the ocean, atmosphere, and terrestrial biosphere carbon reservoirs; and therefore are expected to provide more detailed and more certain projections. However, ESMs are never perfect; and evaluating the ESMs can help us to identify uncertainties in prediction and give the priorities for model development. In this study, we benchmarked carbon in live vegetation in the terrestrial ecosystems simulated by 19 ESMs models from CMIP5 with an observationally estimated data set of global carbon vegetation pool 'Olson's Major World Ecosystem Complexes Ranked by Carbon in Live Vegetation: An Updated Database Using the GLC2000 Land Cover Product' by Gibbs (2006). Our aim is to evaluate the ability of ESMs to reproduce the global vegetation carbon pool at different scales and what are the possible causes for the bias. We found that the performance CMIP5 ESMs is very scale-dependent. While CESM1-BGC, CESM1-CAM5, CESM1-FASTCHEM and CESM1-WACCM, and NorESM1-M and NorESM1-ME (they share the same model structure) have very similar global sums with the observation data but they usually perform poorly at grid cell and biome scale. In contrast, MIROC-ESM and MIROC-ESM-CHEM simulate the best on at grid cell and biome scale but have larger differences in global sums than others. Our results will help improve CMIP5 ESMs for more reliable prediction.

  7. A method to stabilize the temperature dependent performance of G-APD arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Yoonsuk [Molecular Imaging Research and Education (MiRe) Laboratory, Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sungkyunkwan University, School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Yong; Ho Jung, Jin; Jung, Jiwoong [Molecular Imaging Research and Education (MiRe) Laboratory, Department of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents a compensation method to stabilize the temperature dependent performance of Geiger-mode Avalanche Photodiode (G-APD) arrays for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). The compensation method is used to identify the bias voltage range that provides stable performance even at different temperatures using the G-APD’s characteristics, and to control the photo-peak variation as a function of temperature using the preamplifier gain within the identified bias voltage range. A pair of G-APD detectors and temperature sensors were located in the temperature chamber and the preamplifiers which can control the gain of the detectors using the digital potentiometer were positioned outside the chamber. The performance of the G-APD detector, especially energy resolution and coincidence timing resolution, was characterized as a function of bias voltage at different temperatures from 20 °C to 40 °C at 5 °C increments; the energy resolution, coincidence timing resolution, and photo-peak position of all channels of G-APD PET detectors before and after the preamplifier gain correction were then measured and compared. The results of this study demonstrated that the optimal bias voltage range providing the good energy and coincidence timing resolution, 12.1±1.2% and 1.30±0.09 ns, respectively, could be identified at the temperature range and the photo-peak variation and the performance at different temperatures could be stabilized by adjusting the preamplifier gain within the identified bias voltage range. We concluded the proposed method to be reliable and useful for the development of the PET system using G-APD arrays.

  8. Fluoroscopically guided transforaminal epidural steroid injections at a quaternary-care teaching institution: effect of trainee involvement and patient body mass index on fluoroscopy time and patient dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiegs-Heiden, C.A.; Murthy, N.S.; Geske, J.R.; Diehn, F.E.; Schueler, B.A.; Wald, J.T.; Kaufmann, T.J.; Lehman, V.T.; Carr, C.M.; Amrami, K.K.; Morris, J.M.; Thielen, K.R.; Maus, T.P.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether there are differences in fluoroscopy time and patient dose for fluoroscopically guided lumbar transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TFESIs) performed by staff radiologists versus with trainees and to evaluate the effect of patient body mass index (BMI) on fluoroscopy time and patient dose, including their interactions with other variables. Materials and methods: Single-level lumbar TFESIs (n=1844) between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2013 were reviewed. Fluoroscopy time, reference point air kerma (K_a_,_r), and kerma area product (KAP) were recorded. BMI and trainee involvement were examined as predictors of fluoroscopy time, K_a_,_r, and KAP in models adjusted for age and gender in multivariable linear models. Stratified models of BMI groups by trainee presence were performed. Results: Increased age was the only significant predictor of increased fluoroscopy time (p<0.0001). K_a_,_r and KAP were significantly higher in patients with a higher BMI (p<0.0001 and p=0.0009). When stratified by BMI, longer fluoroscopy time predicted increased K_a_,_r and KAP in all groups (p<0.0001). Trainee involvement was not a statistically significant predictor of fluoroscopy time or K_a_,_r in any BMI category. KAP was lower with trainees in the overweight group (p=0.0009) and higher in male patients for all BMI categories (p<0.02). Conclusion: Trainee involvement did not result in increased fluoroscopy time or patient dose. BMI did not affect fluoroscopy time; however, overweight and obese patients received significantly higher K_a_,_r and KAP. Male patients received a higher KAP in all BMI categories. Limiting fluoroscopy time and good collimation practices should be reinforced in these patients. - Highlights: • Trainee involvement did not contribute to increased fluoroscopy time or dose. • BMI did not affect fluoroscopy time. • Overweight and obese patients received significantly higher Ka,r and KAP.

  9. [Disagreements between GP trainees and their seniors. Management and impacts on the hidden curriculum. Qualitative study of 37 situations in Paris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galam, Éric; Multon, Romain

    2016-03-01

    Disagreements and conflicts have a negative impact on the satisfaction and the performances of working team members. Young doctors in training are part of the health care team. The management of the disagreements with which they are confronted is a part of their professionalization process. To clarify and analyze the disagreements between GP trainees and their seniors in patients care and their consequences in doctor curriculum. Qualitative descriptive study. Five focus groups including a total of 25 Parisian trainees were performed to explore situations of disagreements with their seniors about patients care. Phenomenical analysis was performed by two researchers. Thirty-seven situations were reported. A number of potential sources of conflicts were highlighted. Factors that can transform a disagreement into an insoluble conflict were identified. The consequences of these disagreements on the quality of care and their impact on the empowerment of trainees were analysed. Number of disagreements related patients facing end of life. Specificities of emergency contexts and ambulatory practice were underlined. The role of the hierarchical link in the genesis and the development of the conflicts was confirmed. The personality of the trainee, his conception of responsibility, the exchange of knowledge, the "commercial" aspects of doctors practice can be at the origin of conflicts. The disagreements can play a positive role in trainees empowerment. A training in the management of anticipated or known conflicts can usefully clarify and optimize the hidden curriculum of the medical students towards professionalism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. The Efficacy of a Restart Break for Recycling with Optimal Performance Depends Critically on Circadian Timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dongen, Hans P.A.; Belenky, Gregory; Vila, Bryan J.

    2011-01-01

    deficits. Conclusions: The 34-hour restart break was adequate for maintaining performance in the case of optimal circadian placement of sleep and duty periods (control condition) but was inadequate (and perhaps even detrimental) for maintaining performance in a simulated nighttime duty schedule (experimental condition). Current US transportation hours-of-service regulations mandate time off duty but do not consider the circadian aspects of shift scheduling. Reinforcing a recent trend of applying sleep science to inform policymaking for duty and rest times, our findings indicate that restart provisions in hours-of-service regulations could be improved by taking the circadian timing of the duty schedules into account. Citation: Van Dongen HPA; Belenky G; Vila BJ. The efficacy of a restart break for recycling with optimal performance depends critically on circadian timing. SLEEP 2011;34(7):917-929. PMID:21731142

  11. Self-motivated and stress-response performance assays in mice are age-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Xuan; Ciol, Marcia A; Pettan-Brewer, Christina; Goh, Jorming; Rabinovitch, Peter; Ladiges, Warren

    2017-05-01

    Chronic health conditions of the elderly lead to limitations in physical activity with disability, anxiety, and increased need for medical care and assisted living conditions. Physical performance tests are used to screen for pending loss of mobility and can serve as endpoints to monitor the effectiveness of intervention measures. Since limited mobility is associated with the physical and mental health of a person, evaluation of this in preclinical aging studies in mice will provide a translational approach for testing new intervention strategies. We assessed physiological parameters in 4, 12, 20 and 28month old C57BL/6 and CB6F1 male mice using a rotating rod, a free running wheel, and a photo beam activity field, designed to determine changes in coordinated walking ability, self-motivated running distance, and anxiety response to a novel environment, respectively. Older mice showed decreased coordinated walking times and decreased running distances, predictive of physical performance ability and motivation in the elderly. Changes in both lateral and vertical movements were observed in a novel cage environment suggesting different levels of anxiety. Because the genetic background of the two mouse strains influenced test results in an age-dependent manner, it is imperative to recognize that diverse genetic backgrounds in mice may yield different data in preclinical studies and would need to be interpreted individually for translational applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Antagonism and Mutual Dependency. Critial Models of Performance and “Piano Interpretation Schools”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Cruz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available To polarize and, coincidently, intersect two different concepts, in terms of a distinction/analogy between “piano interpretation schools” and “critical models” is the aim of this paper. The former, with its prior connotations of both empiricism and dogmatism and not directly shaped by aesthetic criteria or interpretational ideals, depends mainly on the aural and oral tradition as well the teacher-student legacy; the latter employs ideally the generic criteria of interpretativeness, which can be measured in accordance to an aesthetic formula and can include features such as non-obviousness, inferentially, lack of consensus, concern with meaning or significance, concern with structure or design, etc. The relative autonomy of the former is a challenge to the latter, which embraces the range of perspectives available in the horizon of the history of ideas about music and interpretation. The effort of recognizing models of criticism within musical interpretation creates the vehicle for new understandings of the nature and the historical development of Western classical piano performance, promoting also the production of quality critical argument and the communication of key performance tendencies and styles.

  13. Coffee grounds as filler for pectin: Green composites with competitive performances dependent on the UV irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Vincenzo Alessandro; Cavallaro, Giuseppe; Lazzara, Giuseppe; Milioto, Stefana; Parisi, Filippo

    2017-08-15

    Novel composite bioplastics were successfully prepared by filling pectin matrix with treated coffee grounds. The amount of coffee dispersed into the pectin was changed within a wide filler range. The morphology of the pectin/coffee hybrid films was studied by microscopic techniques in order to investigate their mesoscopic structure as well as the sizes distribution of the particles dispersed into the matrix. The micrographs showed that the coffee grounds are uniformly dispersed within the polymeric matrix. The morphological characteristics of the biocomposite films were correlated to their properties, such as wettability, water uptake, thermal behavior and mechanical performances. Dynamic mechanical test were conducted as a function of the humidity conditions. As a general result, a worsening of the mechanical performances was induced by the addition of the coffee grounds into the pectin. An additional UV curing treatment was conducted on the pectin/coffee films with the aim to improve their tensile and viscoelastic features. The cured films showed promising and tunable properties that are dependent on both the filler content and the UV irradiation. In particular, the presence of single coffee particles into the pectin matrix renders the UV curing treatment effective in the enhancement of the elasticity as well as the traction resistance, whereas the cured composite films containing coffee clusters showed only more elastic characteristics. With this study, we fabricated pectin/coffee bioplastics with controlled behavior appealing for specific application within the food packaging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Testing anti-smoking messages for Air Force trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popova, Lucy; Linde, Brittany D.; Bursac, Zoran; Talcott, G. Wayne; Modayil, Mary V.; Little, Melissa A.; Ling, Pamela M.; Glantz, Stanton A.; Klesges, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Young adults in the military are aggressively targeted by tobacco companies and are at high risk of tobacco use. Existing anti-smoking advertisements developed for the general population might be effective in educating young adults in the military. This study evaluated the effects of different themes of existing anti-smoking advertisements on perceived harm and intentions to use cigarettes and other tobacco products among Air Force trainees. Methods In a pretest-posttest experiment, 782 Airmen were randomized to view anti-smoking advertisements in one of six conditions: anti-industry, health effects+anti-industry, sexual health, secondhand smoke, environment+anti-industry, or control. We assessed the effect of different conditions on changes in perceived harm and intentions to use cigarettes, electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), smokeless tobacco, hookah and cigarillos from pretest to posttest with multivariable linear regression models (perceived harm) and zero-inflated Poisson regression model (intentions). Results Anti-smoking advertisements increased perceived harm of various tobacco products and reduced intentions to use. Advertisements featuring negative effects of tobacco on health and sexual performance coupled with revealing tobacco industry manipulations had the most consistent pattern of effects on perceived harm and intentions. Conclusion Anti-smoking advertisements produced for the general public might also be effective with a young adult military population and could have spillover effects on perceptions of harm and intentions to use other tobacco products besides cigarettes. Existing anti-smoking advertising may be a cost-effective tool to educate young adults in the military. PMID:26482786

  15. Assessing Technical Competence in Surgical Trainees: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szasz, Peter; Louridas, Marisa; Harris, Kenneth A; Aggarwal, Rajesh; Grantcharov, Teodor P

    2015-06-01

    To systematically examine the literature describing the methods by which technical competence is assessed in surgical trainees. The last decade has witnessed an evolution away from time-based surgical education. In response, governing bodies worldwide have implemented competency-based education paradigms. The definition of competence, however, remains elusive, and the impact of these education initiatives in terms of assessment methods remains unclear. A systematic review examining the methods by which technical competence is assessed was conducted by searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO, and the Cochrane database of systematic reviews. Abstracts of retrieved studies were reviewed and those meeting inclusion criteria were selected for full review. Data were retrieved in a systematic manner, the validity and reliability of the assessment methods was evaluated, and quality was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation classification. Of the 6814 studies identified, 85 studies involving 2369 surgical residents were included in this review. The methods used to assess technical competence were categorized into 5 groups; Likert scales (37), benchmarks (31), binary outcomes (11), novel tools (4), and surrogate outcomes (2). Their validity and reliability were mostly previously established. The overall Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation for randomized controlled trials was high and low for the observational studies. The definition of technical competence continues to be debated within the medical literature. The methods used to evaluate technical competence predominantly include instruments that were originally created to assess technical skill. Very few studies identify standard setting approaches that differentiate competent versus noncompetent performers; subsequently, this has been identified as an area with great research potential.

  16. Illinois School Bus Driver Instructional Program. Trainee Guide. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois State Board of Education, Springfield.

    This trainee guide contains six units of materials for use by those studying to become school bus drivers in the State of Illinois. Covered in the units are the following topics: school bus driver role and responsibility, passenger control, first aid, driving fundamentals, accidents and emergencies, and detecting hazards. Each unit contains a…

  17. Exploration of Support Behavior in Counseling Groups with Counseling Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harel, Yoni; Shechtman, Zipora; Cutrona, Carolyn

    2012-01-01

    The study explores the types of support expressed in counseling groups attended by trainee counselors. Support is a crucial factor in human life in general, and in groups in particular, yet little is known about the type of support presented in counseling groups. Type of support was categorized by means of the Social Support Behavior Code (SSBC;…

  18. Exploring the impact of workplace cyberbullying on trainee doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Samuel; Coyne, Iain; Sprigg, Christine; Axtell, Carolyn; Subramanian, Ganesh

    2015-04-01

    Workplace bullying is an occupational hazard for trainee doctors. However, little is known about their experiences of cyberbullying at work. This study examines the impact of cyberbullying among trainee doctors, and how attributions of blame for cyberbullying influence individual and work-related outcomes. Doctors at over 6 months into training were asked to complete an online survey that included measures of cyberbullying, blame attribution, negative emotion, job satisfaction, interactional justice and mental strain. A total of 158 trainee doctors (104 women, 54 men) completed the survey. Overall, 73 (46.2%) respondents had experienced at least one act of cyberbullying. Cyberbullying adversely impacted on job satisfaction (β = - 0.19; p cyberbullying influenced its impact and the path of mediation. Negative emotion mediated the relationship between self-blame for a cyber-bullying act and mental strain, whereas interactional injustice mediated the association between blaming the perpetrator and job dissatisfaction. Acts of cyberbullying had been experienced by nearly half of the sample during their training and were found to significantly relate to ill health and job dissatisfaction. The deleterious impact of cyberbullying can be addressed through both workplace policies, and training for trainee doctors and experienced medical professionals. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Counseling Psychology Doctoral Trainees' Satisfaction with Clinical Methods Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Kristen Ann

    2015-01-01

    Counseling psychology doctoral trainees' satisfaction with their clinical methods training is an important predictor of their self-efficacy as counselors, persistence in graduate programs, and probability of practicing psychotherapy in their careers (Fernando & Hulse-Killacky, 2005; Hadjipavlou & Ogrodniczuk, 2007; Morton & Worthley,…

  20. The Impact of Facebook in Teaching Practicum: Teacher Trainees' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goktalay, Sehnaz Baltaci

    2015-01-01

    Prompt feedback is one of the critical components of teacher education programs. To reap the greatest benefit from the teaching practicum process, the quality of feedback as well as its implementation by stakeholders, supervisors, cooperating teachers, and teacher trainees, takes on great importance. The purpose of this study is to examine how Web…

  1. Spine surgery training and competence of European Neurosurgical Trainees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boszczyk, Bronek Maximilian; Mooij, Jan Jakob; Schmitt, Natascha; Di Rocco, Concezio; Fakouri, Baroum Baroum; Lindsay, Kenneth W.

    Little is known about the nature of spine surgery training received by European neurosurgical trainees during their residency and the level of competence they acquire in dealing with spinal disorders. A three-part questionnaire entailing 32 questions was devised and distributed to the neurosurgical

  2. Providing Experiential Business and Management Training for Biomedical Research Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Kimberly A.; Carnahan, Robert H.; Brown, Abigail M.; Gould, Kathleen L.

    2017-01-01

    Many biomedical PhD trainees lack exposure to business principles, which limits their competitiveness and effectiveness in academic and industry careers. To fill this training gap, we developed Business and Management Principles for Scientists, a semester-long program that combined didactic exposure to business fundamentals with practical…

  3. Appraisal of in-service trainee teachers' competency on applications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most procedures used to obtain information about student learning are subsumed under assessment. This study appraised in-service trainee teachers' competency on applications of principles of test items writing. One Study Centre was purposively drawn from the National Teachers' Institute for the study. A sample of 33 ...

  4. Burnout and the learning environment of anaesthetic trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanelli, D J; Wickramaarachchi, S A; Wallis, S

    2017-11-01

    Burnout has a high prevalence among healthcare workers and is increasingly recognised as an environmental problem rather than reflecting a personal inability to cope with work stress. We distributed an electronic survey, which included the Maslach Burnout Inventory Health Services Survey and a previously validated learning environment instrument, to 281 Victorian anaesthetic trainees. The response rate was 50%. We found significantly raised rates of burnout in two of three subscales. Ninety-one respondents (67%) displayed evidence of burnout in at least one domain, with 67 (49%) reporting high emotional exhaustion and 57 (42%) reporting high depersonalisation. The clinical learning environment tool demonstrated a significant negative correlation with burnout (r=-0.56, P Burnout was significantly more common than when previously measured in Victoria in 2008 (62% versus 38%). Trainees rated examination preparation the most stressful aspect of the training program. There is a high prevalence of burnout among Victorian anaesthetic trainees. We have shown a significant correlation exists between the clinical learning environment measure and the presence of burnout. This correlation supports the development of interventions to improve the clinical learning environment, as a means to improve trainee wellbeing and address the high prevalence of burnout.

  5. Knowledge, attitude and practice of the trainee seafarers to HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Each trainee completed an anonymous self- administered questionnaire and was tested for syphilis, trichomoniasis and HIV. Seventy one (75.5%) of the respondents were between ages 21-25 years. Twenty three (25%) did not believe that having sex with commercial sex workers puts them at high risk of HIV while eighteen ...

  6. Experiences of Pharmacy Trainees from an Interprofessional Immersion Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daubney Boland

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Interprofessional education is essential in that it helps healthcare disciplines better utilize each other and provide team-based collaboration that improves patient care. Many pharmacy training programs struggle to implement interprofessional education. This purpose of the study was to examine the effect of a 30-h interprofessional training that included pharmacy students to determine if the training helped these students build valuable knowledge and skills while working alongside other health care professions. The interprofessional training included graduate-level trainees from pharmacy, behavioral health, nursing, and family medicine programs where the trainees worked within teams to build interprofessional education competencies based on the Interprofessional Education Collaborative core competencies. Sixteen pharmacy trainees participated in the training and completed pre- and post-test measures. Data were collected over a two-year period with participants completing the Team Skills Scale and the Interprofessional Attitudes Scale. Paired sample t-tests indicated that, after this training, pharmacy trainees showed significant increases in feeling better able to work in healthcare teams and valuing interprofessional practice.

  7. Competence development of synchronously coached trainee teachers in collaborative learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooreman, Ralph W.; Kommers, Petrus A.M.; Jochems, Wim M.G.

    2007-01-01

    The need to make trainee teachers more prepared to coach collaborative learning effectively is increasing, as collaborative learning is becoming more important. One complication in this training process is that it is hard for the teacher trainer to hear and understand the students’ utterances and

  8. Trainee Teachers with Dyslexia: Personal Narratives of Resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazzard, Jonathan; Dale, Kirsty

    2013-01-01

    This paper tells the stories of two trainee teachers and their personal experiences of dyslexia. Both informants were English and training to be primary school teachers in England. Through drawing on their own experiences of education, the stories illustrate how dyslexia has shaped the self-concept, self-esteem and resilience of each informant.…

  9. Engaging trainees in shaping the future of health policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Stephen; Sachedina, Nabihah; King, Judith; Mak, Matthew; Morganstein, Louise; Mytton, Oliver T; Thomas, Justyn

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the views and ideas generated at a recent health policy discussion for doctors in training. This provides an illustration of the creativity and enthusiasm that trainees can bring to the policy sphere by providing unique insights and a fresh perspective.

  10. Counselor Trainee Attitudes toward Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Sharon J.; Sneed, Zachery B.; Koch, D. Shane

    2010-01-01

    Using the Counselor Trainee Attitudes Measure (CTAM) to assess student attitudes toward alcohol and other drug abuse (AODA), results indicated that students had more positive attitudes toward AODA when they were in recovery or had a family member in recovery. Furthermore, completion of AODA related courses predicted more positive attitudes toward…

  11. Parental Leave Policies and Pediatric Trainees in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Avika; Feldman-Winter, Lori; Szucs, Kinga A

    2015-08-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) states that each residency program should have a clearly delineated, written policy for parental leave. Parental leave has important implications for trainees' ability to achieve their breastfeeding goals. This study aimed to measure the knowledge and awareness among members of the AAP Section on Medical Students, Residents, and Fellowship Trainees (SOMSRFT) regarding parental leave. An online survey was emailed to SOMSRFT members in June 2013. Quantitative data are presented as percentage of respondents. Awareness of leave policies was analyzed based on having children and the sex of respondents. Nine hundred twenty-seven members responded to the survey. Among those with children, 40% needed to extend the duration of their training in order to have longer maternity leave, 44% of whom did so in order to breastfeed longer. Thirty percent of respondents did not know if their program had a written, accessible policy for parental leave. Trainees without children and men were more unaware of specific aspects of parental leave such as eligibility for the Family Medical Leave Act as compared to women and those with children. Despite the fact that United States national policies support parental leave during pediatrics training, and a majority of programs comply, trainees' awareness regarding these policies needs improvement. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. How Do Primary Education Trainee Teachers Perceive Educational Psychology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Ibis M.; Weise, Crista; Vall, Berta; González, Montserrat; Morodo, Andy

    2018-01-01

    Educational Psychology makes a significant contribution to the development of skills to research the effectivity of teacher practices in class. However, there is little agreement on what educational psychology concepts are most relevant for teacher training. This paper reports on trainee teachers' self-perceived mastery of, and attributed…

  13. Experiences of Pharmacy Trainees from an Interprofessional Immersion Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Daubney; White, Traci; Adams, Eve

    2018-04-25

    Interprofessional education is essential in that it helps healthcare disciplines better utilize each other and provide team-based collaboration that improves patient care. Many pharmacy training programs struggle to implement interprofessional education. This purpose of the study was to examine the effect of a 30-h interprofessional training that included pharmacy students to determine if the training helped these students build valuable knowledge and skills while working alongside other health care professions. The interprofessional training included graduate-level trainees from pharmacy, behavioral health, nursing, and family medicine programs where the trainees worked within teams to build interprofessional education competencies based on the Interprofessional Education Collaborative core competencies. Sixteen pharmacy trainees participated in the training and completed pre- and post-test measures. Data were collected over a two-year period with participants completing the Team Skills Scale and the Interprofessional Attitudes Scale. Paired sample t -tests indicated that, after this training, pharmacy trainees showed significant increases in feeling better able to work in healthcare teams and valuing interprofessional practice.

  14. Writing Autobiographies: A Meaningful Way to Sensitize Trainee Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Josefina C.; López, Margarita M.; Zuluaga, Carmen T. C.

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the final results from a research work which aimed to identify the pedagogical processes that emerge from the autobiographies that modern languages trainee teachers at the University of Caldas write. These autobiographies become a starting point to develop their teaching practicum, and are considered to be of great…

  15. Ethical dilemmas experienced by clinical psychology trainee therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhola, Poornima; Sinha, Ananya; Sonkar, Suruchi; Raguram, Ahalya

    2015-01-01

    Ethical dilemmas are inevitable during psychotherapeutic interactions, and these complexities and challenges may be magnified during the training phase. The experience of ethical dilemmas in the arena of therapy and the methods of resolving these dilemmas were examined among 35 clinical psychologists in training, through an anonymous and confidential online survey. The trainees' responses to four open-ended questions on any one ethical dilemma encountered during therapy were analysed, using thematic content analysis. The results highlighted that the salient ethical dilemmas related to confidentiality and boundary issues. The trainees also raised ethical questions regarding therapist competence, the beneficence and non-maleficence of therapeutic actions, and client autonomy. Fifty-seven per cent of the trainees reported that the dilemmas were resolved adequately, the prominent methods of resolution being supervision or consultation and guidance from professional ethical guidelines. The trainees felt that the professional codes had certain limitations as far as the effective resolution of ethical dilemmas was concerned. The findings indicate the need to strengthen training and supervision methodologies and professional ethics codes for psychotherapists and counsellors in India.

  16. Exploring Emotional Intelligence among Master's-Level Counseling Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Daniel; Mullen, Patrick R.; Fox, Jesse

    2017-01-01

    The authors explored the relationship between counseling trainees' emotional intelligence (EI), empathy, stress, distress, and demographics. Results indicated that higher levels of EI were associated with lower stress and distress, higher affective and cognitive empathy, and age. These findings suggest curricular integration of EI and potential…

  17. Psychiatry Trainees' Training and Experience in Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyal, Roy; O'Connor, Mary J.

    2011-01-01

    Background/Objective: Alcohol is a teratogen. Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs) affect about 1% of live births, causing severe impairment. Individuals affected by FASDs are overrepresented in psychiatric settings. This study reports on the education and experience of psychiatry trainees in approaching FASDs. Method: Data were collected from…

  18. Clinical Skills Verification, Formative Feedback, and Psychiatry Residency Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalack, Gregory W.; Jibson, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The authors describe the implementation of Clinical Skills Verification (CSV) in their program as an in-training assessment intended primarily to provide formative feedback to trainees, strengthen the supervisory experience, identify the need for remediation of interviewing skills, and secondarily to demonstrating resident competence…

  19. Knowledge model of trainee for training support system of plant operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuhama, Yutaka; Furuta, Kazuo; Kondo, Shunsuke [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-10-01

    We have already proposed a knowledge model of a trainee, which model consists of two layers: hierarchical function and qualitative structure. We developed a method to generate normative operator knowledge based on this knowledge model structure, and to identify trainee`s intention by means of truth maintenance. The methods were tested by cognitive experiment using a prototype of training support system. (author)

  20. Assessing Changes in Counselor Trainees' Multicultural Competence Related to Service Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Debbiesiu L.; Rosen, Adam D.; McWhirter, J. Jeffries

    2014-01-01

    This mixed methods study examined changes in self-reported multicultural competence and distress reactions of 32 counselor trainees engaged in service learning. Whereas 3 trainees significantly increased in self-reported multicultural competence, 5 significantly decreased. Trainees who significantly increased in multicultural competence reported…

  1. PENDELEGASIAN TUGAS KEPADA TRAINEE DI MAIN KITCHEN GRAND ROYAL PANGHEGAR HOTEL BANDUNG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asep Rijwan

    2016-03-01

      Abstrak - Masalah yang di teliti adalah bagaimana pendelegasian tugas kepadatraineedi main kitchen, bagaimana standar operasional prosedur pendelegasian tugas kepada trainee di main kitchen, serta bagaimana kesempatan dan peluang dari pendelegasian tugas kepada trainee di main kitchen.  Dalam hal pengolahan data, penulis menggunakan analisis deskriptif, yaitu metode yang berusaha mengumpulkan data dan sesuai dengan keadaan yang sebenarnya, menyajikan serta menganalisanya sehigga dapat memberikan gambaran yang cukup jelas atas objek yang diteliti dan kemudian di ambil kesimpulannya. Berdasarkan hasil observasi ini dapat disimpulkan bahwa pendelegasian tugas kepada trainee di Main Kitchen Grand Royal Panghegar Hotel sudah dilaksanakan dengan sangat baik, hal ini dapat dilihat dengan di selesaikannya delegasi tugas dengan baik pula oleh trainee. Standar operasional prosedur pendelegasian kepada trainee di Main Kitchen Grand Royal Panghegar Hotel sudah baik, hal ini dapat dilihat bahwa trainee dapat melaksanakan kegiatan- kegiatan yang ada di main kitchen dengan baik pula. Peluang dari pendelegasian tugas kepada trainee di Main Kitchen Grand Royal Panghegar Hotel menjadikan trainee lebih percaya diri, memiliki pengalaman baru dalam mengolah makanan, lebih meningkatnya skill trainee, dan memiliki pengetahuan yang lebih dari sebelumnya, dan staff pun tidak akan mendapat terlalu banyak beban pekerjaan, karena sebagian dapat dikerjakan oleh trainee dengan baik. Berdasarkan dari hasil observasi dan pembahasan tersebut, penulis menyimpulkan bahwa apabila standar operasional prosedur pendelegasian kepada Trainee dijalankan dengan baik, maka selain berdampak baik kepada trainee akan berdampak baik pula kepada staff atau hotel itu sendiri.

  2. Emotional Creativity (EC) among Pre-Service and In-Service Trainee Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Gaurav; Kumar, Girijesh

    2010-01-01

    In the personality of a teacher, his emotional creativity is an important counterpart. In current study, researchers have carried out an investigation of emotional creativity of trainee teachers of pre-service and in-service trainee teachers. The objectives were to compare the emotional creativity of Trainee teachers of Pre-service Courses and…

  3. Self-Esteem and Emotional Intelligence among B.Ed Trainees of Tsunami Affected Coastal Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu M, Sameer

    2008-01-01

    Through this study the author investigates the relationship between self-esteem and emotional intelligence among B.Ed trainees of Tsunami affected coastal belt of Alappey district of Kerala, India. Stream of study, marital status and age based comparisons were made among the B.Ed trainees. 92 B.Ed trainees were the participants in the study. It…

  4. 29 CFR 783.33 - Employment “as a seaman” depends on the work actually performed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Employment âas a seamanâ depends on the work actually... § 783.33 Employment “as a seaman” depends on the work actually performed. Whether an employee is “employed as a seaman”, within the meaning of the Act, depends upon the character of the work he actually...

  5. What IAPT CBT High-Intensity Trainees Do After Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liness, Sheena; Lea, Susan; Nestler, Steffen; Parker, Hannah; Clark, David M

    2017-01-01

    The UK Department of Health Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) initiative set out to train a large number of therapists in cognitive behaviour therapies (CBT) for depression and anxiety disorders. Little is currently known about the retention of IAPT CBT trainees, or the use of CBT skills acquired on the course in the workplace after training has finished. This study set out to conduct a follow-up survey of past CBT trainees on the IAPT High Intensity CBT Course at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience (IoPPN), King's College London (KCL), one of the largest IAPT High Intensity courses in the UK. Past trainees (n = 212) across 6 cohorts (2008-2014 intakes) were contacted and invited to participate in a follow-up survey. A response rate of 92.5% (n = 196) was achieved. The vast majority of IAPT trainees continue to work in IAPT services posttraining (79%) and to practise CBT as their main therapy modality (94%); 61% have become CBT supervisors. A minority (23%) have progressed to other senior roles in the services. Shortcomings are reported in the use of out-of-office CBT interventions, the use of disorder-specific outcome measures and therapy recordings to inform therapy and supervision. Past trainees stay working in IAPT services and continue to use CBT methods taught on the course. Some NICE recommended treatment procedures that are likely to facilitate patients' recovery are not being routinely implemented across IAPT services. The results have implications for the continued roll out of the IAPT programme, and other future large scale training initiatives.

  6. Do trainees feel that they belong to a team?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Sophie; Lusznat, Rosie

    2017-05-18

    Postgraduate medical education has undergone significant reorganisation in recent years, with changes to the traditional apprenticeship model and an increasing reliance on shift working. The importance of teamwork in clinical care is well established; however, there is little literature on the extent to which trainees actually feel part of a team in the context of current working patterns. This is a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews of medical and surgical trainees. Data were analysed thematically using an inductive qualitative approach. Fifteen trainees who had worked in a range of hospitals across the UK participated. Emerging themes fell into several categories: what constitutes the team; the effect of shift patterns on the team; the role of the team in education, support and well-being; and influences on team rapport. Whilst in general interviewees felt part of a team, this was not true for all posts. The nature of the team was also highly variable, and had evolved from the traditional 'Firm' structure to a more nebulous concept. Shift-working patterns could result in the fragmentation of the team, which had implications for patient care as well as for training. The team played an important role in both education and well-being for trainees, and several factors were identified that could engender a more supportive team. With an ageing population and with increasing demands on limited resources, the requirement for shift work is likely to increase, and there is a fundamental need to maintain support for the next generation of doctors. There is little literature on the extent to which trainees actually feel part of a team. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  7. [Professional Development Processes of Trainee and Experienced Psychotherapists in Turkey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilican, F Işıl; Soygüt, Gonca

    2015-01-01

    This study explored professional characteristics of psychotherapists in Turkey, examined the changes in their professional developmental processes, and compared the professional characteristics of the trainees and experienced therapists. The participants were 88 psychotherapists, including trainee (N=37) and experienced (N=51) psychotherapists in Turkey. They completed the Development of Psychotherapists International Study-Common Core Questionnaire (DPCCQ), developed by the Collaborative Research Network. The participants identified with the cognitive theoretical orientation most often. 30% of the participants had more than two salient orientations. The most prevalent therapy modality was individual, followed by couples, family, and group psychotherapy. Ongoing supervision rate was 44%. Trainees scored lower on effectiveness in engaging patients in a working alliance, feeling natural while working with patients, effectiveness in communicating their understanding and concern to their patients, and feeling confident in their role as a therapist. Experienced therapists made changes in the therapeutic contract and invited collaboration from families more compared to the trainees. 63% of the variance in Healing Involvement was explained by Overall Career Development, Currently Experienced Growth, being influenced by the humanistic approach, and the impact of the main therapeutic environment; 26% of the variance in Stressful Involvement was explained by the length of official supervision received and having control over the length of therapy sessions. Therapists were more cognitively oriented, less eclectic, and had less supervision compared to their international counterparts. Experienced therapists were more flexible, natural, and confident than the trainees. Supervision, a supportive work environment, the humanistic approach, and investing in career development were essential to providing a healing experience.

  8. Female Surgeons as Counter Stereotype: The Impact of Gender Perceptions on Trainee Evaluations of Physician Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassiotto, Magali; Li, Jie; Maldonado, Yvonne; Kothary, Nishita

    2018-02-02

    Similar to women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics disciplines, women in medicine are subject to negative stereotyping when they do not adhere to their sex-role expectations. These biases may vary by specialty, largely dependent on the gender's representation in that specialty. Thus, females in male-dominated surgical specialties are especially at risk of stereotype threat. Herein, we present the role of gender expectations using trainee evaluations of physician faculty at a single academic center, over a 5-year period (2010-2014). Using Graduate Medical Education evaluation data of physician faculty from MedHub, we examined the differences in evaluation scores for male and female physicians within specialties that have traditionally had low female representation (e.g., surgical fields) compared to those with average or high female representation (e.g., pediatrics). Stanford Medicine residents and fellows' MedHub ratings of their physician faculty from 2010 to 2014. A total of 3648 evaluations across 1066 physician faculty. Overall, female physicians received lower median scores than their male counterparts across all specialties. When using regression analyses controlling for race, age, rank, and specialty-specific characteristics, the negative effect persists only for female physicians in specialties with low female representation. This finding suggests that female physicians in traditionally male-dominated specialties may face different criteria based on sex-role expectations when being evaluated by trainees. As trainee evaluations play an important role in career advancement decisions, dictate perceptions of quality within academic medical centers and affect overall job satisfaction, we propose that these differences in evaluations based merely on gender stereotypes could account, in part, for the narrowing pipeline of women promoted to higher ranks in academic medicine. Copyright © 2018 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published

  9. Integration of the time-dependent heat equation in the fuel rod performance program IAMBUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, G.

    1982-01-01

    An iterative numerical method for integration of the time-dependent heat equation is described. No presuppositions are made for the dependency of the thermal conductivity and heat capacity on space, time and temperature. (orig.) [de

  10. Barriers to community-based drug dependence treatment: implications for police roles, collaborations and performance indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yi; Du, Chunhua; Cai, Thomas; Han, Qingfeng; Yuan, Huanhuan; Luo, Tingyan; Ren, Guoliang; Mburu, Gitau; Wang, Bangyuan; Golichenko, Olga; Zhang, Chaoxiong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Worldwide, people who use drugs (PWUD) are among the populations at highest risk for HIV infection. In China, PWUD are primarily sentenced to compulsory detainment centres, in which access to healthcare, including HIV treatment and prevention services, is limited or non-existent. In 2008, China's 2008 Anti-Drug Law encouraged the development and use of community-based drug dependence rehabilitation, yet there is limited evidence evaluating the efficacy and challenges of this model in China. In this study, we explore these challenges and describe how cooperation between law enforcement and health departments can meet the needs of PWUD. Methods In 2015, we conducted semi-structured, in-depth interviews with all four staff members and 16 clients of the Ping An Centre No. 1 for community-based drug treatment, three local police officers and three officials from the local Centre for Disease Control. Interviews explored obstacles in implementing community-based drug dependence treatment and efforts to resolve these difficulties. Transcripts were coded and analyzed with qualitative data analysis software (MAXQDA 11). Results We identified three challenges to community-based drug treatment at the Ping An Centre No. 1: (1) suboptimal coordination among parties involved, (2) a divergence in attitudes towards PWUD and harm reduction between law enforcement and health officials and (3) conflicting performance targets for police and health officials that undermine the shared goal of treatment. We also identified the take-home methadone maintenance treatment model at the Ping An Centre No. 1 as an example of an early successful collaboration between the police, the health department and PWUD. Conclusions To overcome barriers to effective community-based drug treatment, we recommend aligning the goals of law enforcement and public health agencies towards health-based performance indicators. Furthermore, tensions between PWUD and police need to be addressed and trust

  11. Nickel hydroxide–carbon nanotube nanocomposites as supercapacitor electrodes: crystallinity dependent performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Wenchao; Zhai, Shengli; Wei, Li; Yuan, Yang; Yu, Dingshan; Chen, Yuan; Wang, Liang; Wei, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Nickel hydroxide (Ni(OH)_2) is a promising pseudocapacitive material to increase the energy storage capacity of supercapacitors. Ni(OH)_2 has three common crystalline structures: amorphous (amor-), α-, and β-Ni(OH)_2. There is a lack of good understanding on their pros and cons as supercapacitor electrodes. In this work, we synthesized three nanocomposites with thin layers (10–15 nm) of amor-, α-, and β-Ni(OH)_2 deposited on conductive multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The mass loading of Ni(OH)_2 is analogous in these nanocomposites, ranging from 49.1–52.2 wt% with a comparable narrow-pore size distribution centered around 4–5 nm. They were fabricated into supercapacitor electrodes at a mass loading of 6 mg cm"−"2 with a thickness of ∼250 μm, similar to the electrodes used in commercial supercapacitors. Our results show that MWCNT/amor-Ni(OH)_2 has the highest specific capacitance (1495 or 2984 F g"−"1, based on the mass of total active materials or Ni(OH)_2 only at the scan rate of 5 mV s"−"1 in 1 M KOH electrolyte). It also has the best rate capability among the three nanocomposites. Better performances can be attributed to its disordered structure, which increases its effective surface area and reduces diffusion resistance for redox reactions. However, superior performances gradually deteriorate to the same level as that of MWCNT/β-Ni(OH)_2 over 3000 charge/discharge cycles, because amor- and α-Ni(OH)_2 transform slowly to more ordered β-Ni(OH)_2. Our results highlight that the electrochemical performances of MWCNT/Ni(OH)_2 nanocomposites depend on the crystallinity of Ni(OH)_2, and the performances of electrodes change upon the crystalline structure transformation of Ni(OH)_2 under repeated redox reactions. Future research should focus on improving the structure stability of amor-Ni(OH)_2. (paper)

  12. Dependence of behavioral performance on material category in an object grasping task with monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Isao; Tachibana, Atsumichi; Minamimoto, Takafumi; Goda, Naokazu; Komatsu, Hidehiko

    2018-05-02

    Material perception is an essential part of our cognitive function that enables us to properly interact with our complex daily environment. One important aspect of material perception is its multimodal nature. When we see an object, we generally recognize its haptic properties as well as its visual properties. Consequently, one must examine behavior using real objects that are perceived both visually and haptically to fully understand the characteristics of material perception. As a first step, we examined whether there is any difference in the behavioral responses to different materials in monkeys trained to perform an object grasping task in which they saw and grasped rod-shaped real objects made of various materials. We found that the monkeys' behavior in the grasping task, measured based on the success rate and the pulling force, differed depending on the material category. Monkeys easily and correctly grasped objects of some materials, such as metal and glass, but failed to grasp objects of other materials. In particular, monkeys avoided grasping fur-covered objects. The differences in the behavioral responses to the material categories cannot be explained solely based on the degree of familiarity with the different materials. These results shed light on the organization of multimodal representation of materials, where their biological significance is an important factor. In addition, a monkey that avoided touching real fur-covered objects readily touched images of the same objects presented on a CRT display. This suggests employing real objects is important when studying behaviors related to material perception.

  13. Design Dependent Cutoff Frequency of Nanotransistors Near the Ultimate Performance Limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordrostami, Zoheir; Sheikhi, M. Hossein; Zarifkar, Abbas

    2012-12-01

    We have studied the effect of different structural designs of double gate MOSFETs (DG-MOSFETs) and carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNTFETs) on the cutoff frequency (fT). The effects of metallic contacts with Schottky barriers, gate work function, dual material gate (DMG), halo doped channel and lightly doped drain and source (LDDS) architectures on the fT have been investigated for DG-MOSFETs and CNTFETs and the design dependent fT for both types of transistors has been studied for the first time. The simulations are based on the Schrödinger-Poisson solvers developed for each nanotransistor separately. The ballistic limit has been studied as the ultimate performance limit of the DG-MOSFETs and CNTFETs. The results of this paper, for the first time, show how some designations used for modification of short channel effects or current-voltage characteristics affect the fT. The results revealed that the cutoff frequencies of both types of the transistors exhibit the same behavior with changing design parameters. We have shown that the Schottky barriers, parasitic capacitances and halo doping reduce the fT and have proposed the DMG and LDDS artchitectures as ways to increase the fT for DG-MOSFETs and CNTFETs for the first time.

  14. Clouds and silver linings: training experiences of psychodynamically oriented mental health trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouff, L C

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses the experiences of today's psychodynamically oriented mental health trainees. Recent changes in the training environment, such as the increase in managed care, rise in use of psychotropic medication, the waning popularity of psychodynamic thinking, and reduced funding for psychotherapy training, in general, have all affected current trainees' professional development. In particular, trainees struggle with problems of demoralization, professional isolation, and reduced financial opportunities. Advantages that current trainees experience, as well as suggestions for training directors and trainees, will also be discussed.

  15. Implementation of a competency check-off in diagnostic fluoroscopy for radiology trainees: impact on reducing radiation for three common fluoroscopic exams in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Sweta [University of Missouri-Kansas City SOM, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Desouches, Stephane L. [University of Missouri-Kansas City SOM, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); St. Luke' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Lowe, Lisa H.; Kasraie, Nima; Reading, Brenton [University of Missouri-Kansas City SOM, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States); Children' s Mercy Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2014-07-24

    Fluoroscopy is an important tool for diagnosis in the pediatric population, but it carries the risk of radiation exposure. Because radiology resident education and experience in the use of fluoroscopy equipment in children vary, we implemented an intervention to standardize fluoroscopy training. The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of implementing a fluoroscopy competency check-off for radiology resident trainees aimed at decreasing radiation exposure in three common pediatric fluoroscopic studies. A fluoroscopy competency check-off form was developed for radiology resident trainees performing pediatric procedures. Techniques used to limit radiation exposure for common pediatric radiologic studies were reviewed as part of the check-off process. Pediatric radiologists supervised each trainee until they demonstrated competence to independently perform three specified procedures. Radiation dose was recorded for the three procedures, upper GI (UGI), voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) and oropharyngeal (OPM) exams, over 6 months preceding and 6 months following implementation of the competency check-off. The mean cumulative dose for each procedure was compared before and after implementation of competency check-off using a Kruskal-Wallis test. During the 12-month study period doses from 909 fluoroscopic procedures were recorded. In the 6 months preceding competency check-off implementation, procedures were performed by 24 radiology resident trainees including 171 UGI, 176 VCUG and 171 OPM exams. In the 6 months following competency check-off, 23 trainees performed 114 UGI, 145 VCUG and 132 OPM exams. After competency check-off implementation, a statistically significant reduction in average radiation dose was found for all three studies (P < 0.001). Median cumulative doses (mGy) were decreased by 33%, 36% and 13% for UGIs, VCUGs and OPMs, respectively. Implementation of a competency check-off for radiology resident trainees can reduce average radiation

  16. Implementation of a competency check-off in diagnostic fluoroscopy for radiology trainees: impact on reducing radiation for three common fluoroscopic exams in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Sweta; Desouches, Stephane L.; Lowe, Lisa H.; Kasraie, Nima; Reading, Brenton

    2015-01-01

    Fluoroscopy is an important tool for diagnosis in the pediatric population, but it carries the risk of radiation exposure. Because radiology resident education and experience in the use of fluoroscopy equipment in children vary, we implemented an intervention to standardize fluoroscopy training. The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of implementing a fluoroscopy competency check-off for radiology resident trainees aimed at decreasing radiation exposure in three common pediatric fluoroscopic studies. A fluoroscopy competency check-off form was developed for radiology resident trainees performing pediatric procedures. Techniques used to limit radiation exposure for common pediatric radiologic studies were reviewed as part of the check-off process. Pediatric radiologists supervised each trainee until they demonstrated competence to independently perform three specified procedures. Radiation dose was recorded for the three procedures, upper GI (UGI), voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG) and oropharyngeal (OPM) exams, over 6 months preceding and 6 months following implementation of the competency check-off. The mean cumulative dose for each procedure was compared before and after implementation of competency check-off using a Kruskal-Wallis test. During the 12-month study period doses from 909 fluoroscopic procedures were recorded. In the 6 months preceding competency check-off implementation, procedures were performed by 24 radiology resident trainees including 171 UGI, 176 VCUG and 171 OPM exams. In the 6 months following competency check-off, 23 trainees performed 114 UGI, 145 VCUG and 132 OPM exams. After competency check-off implementation, a statistically significant reduction in average radiation dose was found for all three studies (P < 0.001). Median cumulative doses (mGy) were decreased by 33%, 36% and 13% for UGIs, VCUGs and OPMs, respectively. Implementation of a competency check-off for radiology resident trainees can reduce average radiation

  17. Individual recognition of social rank and social memory performance depends on a functional circadian system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, L; Weinert, D

    2016-11-01

    In a natural environment, social abilities of an animal are important for its survival. Particularly, it must recognize its own social rank and the social rank of a conspecific and have a good social memory. While the role of the circadian system for object and spatial recognition and memory is well known, the impact of the social rank and circadian disruptions on social recognition and memory were not investigated so far. In the present study, individual recognition of social rank and social memory performance of Djungarian hamsters revealing different circadian phenotypes were investigated. Wild type (WT) animals show a clear and well-synchronized daily activity rhythm, whereas in arrhythmic (AR) hamsters, the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) do not generate a circadian signal. The aim of the study was to investigate putative consequences of these deteriorations in the circadian system for animalś cognitive abilities. Hamsters were bred and kept under standardized housing conditions with food and water ad libitum and a 14l/10 D lighting regimen. Experimental animals were assigned to different groups (WT and AR) according to their activity pattern obtained by means of infrared motion sensors. Before the experiments, the animals were given to develop a dominant-subordinate relationship in a dyadic encounter. Experiment 1 dealt with individual recognition of social rank. Subordinate and dominant hamsters were tested in an open arena for their behavioral responses towards a familiar (known from the agonistic encounters) or an unfamiliar hamster (from another agonistic encounter) which had the same or an opposite social rank. The investigation time depended on the social rank of the WT subject hamster and its familiarity with the stimulus animal. Both subordinate and dominant WT hamsters preferred an unfamiliar subordinate stimulus animal. In contrast, neither subordinate nor dominant AR hamsters preferred any of the stimulus animals. Thus, disruptions in circadian

  18. 29 CFR 541.705 - Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... DELIMITING THE EXEMPTIONS FOR EXECUTIVE, ADMINISTRATIVE, PROFESSIONAL, COMPUTER AND OUTSIDE SALES EMPLOYEES... executive, administrative, professional, outside sales or computer employee capacity who are not actually performing the duties of an executive, administrative, professional, outside sales or computer employee. ...

  19. Power and conflict: the effect of a superior's interpersonal behaviour on trainees' ability to challenge authority during a simulated airway emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Z; Hayter, M A; Everett, T C; Matava, C T; Noble, L M K; Bould, M D

    2015-10-01

    A key factor that may contribute to communication failures is status asymmetry between team members. We examined the effect of a consultant anaesthetist's interpersonal behaviour on trainees' ability to effectively challenge clearly incorrect clinical decisions. Thirty-four trainees were recruited to participate in a video-recorded scenario of an airway crisis. They were randomised to a group in which a confederate consultant anaesthetist's interpersonal behaviour was scripted to recreate either a strict/exclusive or an open/inclusive communication dynamic. The scenario allowed trainees four opportunities to challenge clearly wrong decisions. Performances were scored using the modified Advocacy-Inquiry Score. The highest median (IQR [range]) score was 3.0 (2.2-4.0 [1.0-5.0]) in the exclusive communication group, and 3.5 (3.0-4.5 [2.5-6.0]) in the inclusive communication group (p = 0.06). The study did not show a significant effect of consultant behaviour on trainees' ability to challenge their superior. It did demonstrate trainees' inability to challenge their seniors effectively, resulting in critical communication gaps. © 2015 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  20. ["General Practice is a great job anyway" - a qualitative study with vocational trainees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhäuser, Jost; Paulus, Jan; Roos, Marco; Peters-Klimm, Frank; Ledig, Thomas; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Joos, Stefanie

    2011-01-01

    Due to the increasing lack of physicians, an ageing and thus multi-morbid society and a misdistribution of physicians in Germany primary care provided by general practitioners is at risk. Therefore, approaches to recruit more physicians for general practice are being sought. The aim of the present study was to explore individual motivations for choosing a career in general practice, vocational trainees' perspectives on the current situation of vocational training and to identify possible approaches to improve the situation with suggestions from vocational trainees in Germany. A qualitative study was conducted by interviewing 13 trainees. The interviews that were based on a predefined interview guideline were recorded and transcribed. The analysis was performed according to Mayring supported by the software Atlas.ti. In general, the reasons given for choosing general practice include the holistic view towards patients, the opportunity to see the direct impact of therapies and self-employment. Furthermore, general practice was perceived as a job with a positive work-life balance. Barriers to vocational training are the lack of structure of individual rotations and the low salaries during the rotation in practice. Furthermore, the basic conditions for working as a self-employed general practitioner in Germany were described as being a disincentive. A general suggestion for improvement was to promote professional recognition of general practice at universities. A qualification of vocational trainers was requested. Specific suggestions were: better payment, better-structured rotations and a specific preparation for the self-employed general practitioner. The results of this study reveal that a single measure is insufficient for recruiting more young doctors for general practice. In fact, a package of measures is necessary to improve aspects of the vocational training but also general conditions for the profession. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  1. Visiting Trainees in Global Settings: Host and Partner Perspectives on Desirable Competencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniak, William; Latham, Emily; Astle, Barbara; Anguyo, Geoffrey; Beaunoir, Tessa; Buenaventura, Joel; DeCamp, Matthew; Diaz, Karla; Eichbaum, Quentin; Hedimbi, Marius; Myser, Cat; Nwobu, Charles; Standish, Katherine; Evert, Jessica

    Current competencies in global health education largely reflect perspectives from high-income countries (HICs). Consequently, there has been underrepresentation of the voices and perspectives of partners in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) who supervise and mentor trainees engaged in short-term experiences in global health (STEGH). The objective of this study was to better understand the competencies and learning objectives that are considered a priority from the perspective of partners in LMICs. A review of current interprofessional global health competencies was performed to design a web-based survey instrument in English and Spanish. Survey data were collected from a global convenience sample. Data underwent descriptive statistical analysis and logistic regression. The survey was completed by 170 individuals; 132 in English and 38 in Spanish. More than 85% of respondents rated cultural awareness and respectful conduct while on a STEGH as important. None of the respondents said trainees arrive as independent practitioners to fill health care gaps. Of 109 respondents, 65 (60%) reported that trainees gaining fluency in the local language was not important. This study found different levels of agreement between partners across economic regions of the world when compared with existing global health competencies. By gaining insight into host partners' perceptions of desired competencies, global health education programs in LMICs can be more collaboratively and ethically designed to meet the priorities, needs, and expectations of those stakeholders. This study begins to shift the paradigm of global health education program design by encouraging North-South/East-West shared agenda setting, mutual respect, empowerment, and true collaboration. Copyright © 2017 Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Final examination of trainees for nuclear power plant operators at an education and training centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gieci, A.

    1986-01-01

    General and specialized theoretical training, on-the-job training in the training power plant and simulator training is followed by a final examination. The examination which is obligatory for all trainees is conceived according to Hick's law which requires linear dependence between the time which the operator needs for taking a decision on how to cope with a certain situation and the measure of entropy of the situation. Research in the field of man-machine relations has helped clarify the thinking of the operator who on the basis of received signals forms what is termed the conceptual model of the situation. The final examination should assess the trainee's ability to form conceptual models - the examination must therefore be something more than just a test of knowledge. The given questions and required answers must create a stress situation for the examinee such that the measure to which he is able to cope is conditioned by his ability to form conceptual models. The statutes of the final examinations were drawn up with the aim of achieving standardization and reproducibility. Questions are put through a special form (a model form is also given). (A.K.)

  3. Performance Comparison of Controllers with Fault-Dependent Control Allocation for UAVs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard Sørensen, Mikkel Eske; Hansen, Søren; Breivik, Morten

    2017-01-01

    This paper combines fault-dependent control allocation with three different control schemes to obtain fault tolerance in the longitudinal control of unmanned aerial vehicles. The paper shows that fault-dependent control allocation is able to accommodate actuator faults that would otherwise be cri...

  4. How do postgraduate GP trainees regulate their learning and what helps and hinders them? A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagasser Margaretha H

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Self-regulation is essential for professional development. It involves monitoring of performance, identifying domains for improvement, undertaking learning activities, applying newly learned knowledge and skills and self-assessing performance. Since self-assessment alone is ineffective in identifying weaknesses, learners should seek external feedback too. Externally regulated educational interventions, like reflection, learning portfolios, assessments and progress meetings, are increasingly used to scaffold self-regulation. The aim of this study is to explore how postgraduate trainees regulate their learning in the workplace, how external regulation promotes self-regulation and which elements facilitate or impede self-regulation and learning. Methods In a qualitative study with a phenomenologic approach we interviewed first- and third-year GP trainees from two universities in the Netherlands. Twenty-one verbatim transcripts were coded. Through iterative discussion the researchers agreed on the interpretation of the data and saturation was reached. Results Trainees used a short and a long self-regulation loop. The short loop took one week at most and was focused on problems that were easy to resolve and needed minor learning activities. The long loop was focused on complex or recurring problems needing multiple and planned longitudinal learning activities. External assessments and formal training affected the long but not the short loop. The supervisor had a facilitating role in both loops. Self-confidence was used to gauge competence.Elements influencing self-regulation were classified into three dimensions: personal (strong motivation to become a good doctor, interpersonal (stimulation from others and contextual (organizational and educational features. Conclusions Trainees did purposefully self-regulate their learning. Learning in the short loop may not be visible to others. Trainees should be encouraged to actively seek

  5. MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN TRAINEES IN PHYSICAL THERAPY OF UESB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Rodrigues Barreto Neta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To determine musculoskeletal disorders presented in algic way of undergraduates supervised I and II of the physiotherapy course at the State University of Southwest Bahia, Jequié campus. The study of descriptive, transversal and quantitative character, with a sample of 35 trainees of the physiotherapy course at the State University of Southwest Bahia. Data were obtained through questionnaires demographic social, Nordic and Mc Gill. Of the participants 20% were male and 80% female, aged between 20-29 years (23 ± 2. The regions most affected by musculoskeletal disorders in the current period, 7 days and 12 months were the lower back (40%, shoulder (28,6%, neck and upper back (25.7%. Regarding the classification of pain, trainees described as tiring (60%; thin (40%; sharp and stabbing (34%. This study concluded that physiotherapy graduates have high musculoskeletal pain complaints, before entering the labor market.

  6. MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN TRAINEES IN PHYSICAL THERAPY OF UESB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Rodrigues Barreto Neta

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available To determine musculoskeletal disorders presented in algic way of undergraduates supervised I and II of the physiotherapy course at the State University of Southwest Bahia, Jequié campus. The study of descriptive, transversal and quantitative character, with a sample of 35 trainees of the physiotherapy course at the State University of Southwest Bahia. Data were obtained through questionnaires demographic social, Nordic and Mc Gill. Of the participants 20% were male and 80% female, aged between 20-29 years (23 ± 2. The regions most affected by musculoskeletal disorders in the current period, 7 days and 12 months were the lower back (40%, shoulder (28,6%, neck and upper back (25.7%. Regarding the classification of pain, trainees described as tiring (60%; thin (40%; sharp and stabbing (34%. This study concluded that physiotherapy graduates have high musculoskeletal pain complaints, before entering the labor market.

  7. Palatalization in English: An Articulation Problem for Turkish Teacher Trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prof. Dr. Mehmet Demirezen

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available In the field of teacher training, there is a scarcity of teaching pronunciation teachingmethodology to cure the fossilized mistakes of teacher trainees and foreign language teacherson-the-job. A case study pertaining to this situation is handled for the first time in this articleunder the title of “Audio-articulation Method” (Demirezen, 2003; Hişmanoğlu, 2004. Thismethod takes up a fossilized mistake of teacher trainees or teachers on-the-job in fifty minutesand brings in pronunciation correction by using tongue-twisters, idioms, proverbs, and thelike. Thus, it cures the fossilized mistake to a grater extent by creating a higher awareness andimproving communicative fluency. This method through task-based point of view removesthe related fossilized mistake and brings in pronunciation betterment to the teacher traineesand the teachers on-the-job.

  8. [What do family medicine trainees think about gratitude payment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Győrffy, Zsuzsa; Kalabay, László; Mohos, András; Márkus, Bernadett; Nánási, Anna; Rinfel, József; Girasek, Edmond; Torzsa, Péter

    2017-07-01

    The issue of gratuity is one of the most important health policy issues in Hungary. The authors' aim is to investigate the attitude of Hungarian family medicine trainees towards gratitude payment. Quantitative, paper-based survey among trainees from four Departments of Family Medicine in Hungary (n = 152). More than 50 percent of the residents do not approve of accepting gratitude money. Men (pgratitude patients feel (52%). According to the participants, the least influencing factor was the low salary of physicians (14.4%). They believe that accepting gratuity is a corruption, and it's humiliating for doctors (80-80%). Family medicine residents approve of gratitude money even less as compared to the results of previous studies, but related to other gratitude payment issues we have found similar opinions. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(26): 1028-1035.

  9. Inclusion and exclusion processes in teacher trainees' professional practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elle, Birgitte

    In the autumn of 2009, a new initiative and way of thinking about teacher education started on a small scale in Denmark. This new Danish initiative consisted of a simultaneous trainee employment at a school, and maintaining the study activities at the teacher education college. This initiative...... differs from other ways that are well-known in western countries, of organising teacher education as school-based, with a strong workplace focus, as well as from the use of the teacher assistant as support staff in schools, or later in-service teacher education. This paper will discuss key findings...... between the teacher training college, the trainee jobs and the learning processes of the students. The results of the study are important for rethinking teacher education, but also for future discussions on the possible directions for the renewal of university colleges. It contributes to an understanding...

  10. Peer Assisted Study Sessions for Research Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cusick, Anne; Camer, Danielle; Stamenkovic, Alexander; Zaccagnini, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Research training should facilitate effective researcher role development. While researcher roles require the performance of specialised knowledge and skill, they also require development of personal research identities within social contexts. Interaction with research peers can provide opportunities for reflective role development. Ad-hoc…

  11. Factors influencing career choices in radiology trainees in Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, S W; Ko, H S; Applegate, K E

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate factors influencing career choices in radiology trainees. We distributed a 27-question written survey to all radiology registrars in Queensland. The questions investigated whether radiology was their first specialty choice, career satisfaction, ideal working conditions and attitudes regarding having children during the time of training. Forty-four of 51 surveys were returned (86% participation rate, 73% men, P = 0.048055) with 100% reporting a high job satisfaction; 28% of male registrars compared to 8% of female registrars did extra work outside of training to earn extra money (P = 0.000003), and 17% of female registrars took a leave of absence during their training, while no male registrar did (P = 0.087923). Only one female trainee worked part-time (P = 0.272727). In addition, 58% of female registrars planned a pregnancy (P = 0.731789) before completion of training; 83% of women versus 75% of men had no children (P = 0.329263). Only 5% of trainees agreed that it was easy to arrange part-time training, only 14% stated that it was easy to negotiate flexible work schedules and 7% agreed that it was easy to return to work after a period of absence. 'Time spent with immediate family' was rated the most important lifestyle factor, followed by 'work hours' and 'on-call duty'. The least important factors were 'being away from extended family', 'availability of part-time work' and whether 'work was in a rural location'. Overall job satisfaction is high among radiology trainees. Nevertheless, lifestyle factors, particularly those related to work time, are becoming more important for career decisions. This should be taken into account when designing and structuring radiology training to ensure that it is considered an attractive career choice.

  12. An ethics curriculum for short-term global health trainees

    OpenAIRE

    DeCamp, Matthew; Rodriguez, Joce; Hecht, Shelby; Barry, Michele; Sugarman, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    Background Interest in short-term global health training and service programs continues to grow, yet they can be associated with a variety of ethical issues for which trainees or others with limited global health experience may not be prepared to address. Therefore, there is a clear need for educational interventions concerning these ethical issues. Methods We developed and evaluated an introductory curriculum, ?Ethical Challenges in Short-term Global Health Training.? The curriculum was deve...

  13. Clinical Leadership: can the skills be learned by trainee paediatricians?

    OpenAIRE

    Klaber, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To explore whether paediatricians in training can develop leadership skills through participating in a specifically designed leadership development initiative. Methods: A systematic review was conducted to explore the healthcare leadership literature for empirical evidence of different approaches to leadership development. Informed by this review, and conceptualised by key leadership theories, a work-based leadership development initiative was established within a newly formed trainee co...

  14. Surgeons' and trainees' perceived self-efficacy in operating theatre non-technical skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, G; Altree, M; Field, J; Thomas, M J W; Hewett, P; Babidge, W; Maddern, G J

    2015-05-01

    An important factor that may influence an individual's performance is self-efficacy, a personal judgement of capability to perform a particular task successfully. This prospective study explored newly qualified surgeons' and surgical trainees' self-efficacy in non-technical skills compared with their non-technical skills performance in simulated scenarios. Participants undertook surgical scenarios challenging non-technical skills in two simulation sessions 6 weeks apart. Some participants attended a non-technical skills workshop between sessions. Participants completed pretraining and post-training surveys about their perceived self-efficacy in non-technical skills, which were analysed and compared with their performance in surgical scenarios in two simulation sessions. Change in performance between sessions was compared with any change in participants' perceived self-efficacy. There were 40 participants in all, 17 of whom attended the non-technical skills workshop. There was no significant difference in participants' self-efficacy regarding non-technical skills from the pretraining to the post-training survey. However, there was a tendency for participants with the highest reported self-efficacy to adjust their score downwards after training and for participants with the lowest self-efficacy to adjust their score upwards. Although there was significant improvement in non-technical skills performance from the first to second simulation sessions, a correlation between participants' self-efficacy and performance in scenarios in any of the comparisons was not found. The results suggest that new surgeons and surgical trainees have poor insight into their non-technical skills. Although it was not possible to correlate participants' self-belief in their abilities directly with their performance in a simulation, in general they became more critical in appraisal of their abilities as a result of the intervention. © 2015 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Does medical education erode medical trainees' ethical attitude and behavior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavari, Neda

    2016-01-01

    In the last few years, medical education policy makers have expressed concern about changes in the ethical attitude and behavior of medical trainees during the course of their education. They claim that newly graduated physicians (MDs) are entering residency years with inappropriate habits and attitudes earned during their education. This allegation has been supported by numerous research on the changes in the attitude and morality of medical trainees. The aim of this paper was to investigate ethical erosion among medical trainees as a serious universal problem, and to urge the authorities to take urgent preventive and corrective action. A comparison with the course of moral development in ordinary people from Kohlberg’s and Gilligan's points of view reveals that the growth of ethical attitudes and behaviors in medical students is stunted or even degraded in many medical schools. In the end, the article examines the feasibility of teaching ethics in medical schools and the best approach for this purpose. It concludes that there is considerable controversy among ethicists on whether teaching ethical virtues is plausible at all. Virtue-based ethics, principle-based ethics and ethics of care are approaches that have been considered as most applicable in this regard. PMID:28050246

  16. Stocking density affects the growth performance of broilers in a sex-dependent fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuowei, S; Yan, L; Yuan, L; Jiao, H; Song, Z; Guo, Y; Lin, H

    2011-07-01

    The effects of stocking density, sex, and dietary ME concentration on live performance, footpad burns, and leg weakness of broilers were investigated. A total of 876 male and 1,020 female 1-d-old chicks were placed in 24 pens to simulate final stocking density treatments of 26 kg (LSD; 10 males or 12 females/m(2)) and 42 kg (HSD; 16 males or 18 females/m(2)) of BW/m(2) floor space. Two series of experimental diets with a 150 kcal/kg difference in ME concentration (2,800, 2,900, and 3,000 or 2,950, 3,050, and 3,150 kcal of ME/kg) were compared in a 3-phase feeding program. The HSD treatment significantly decreased BW gain and feed conversion ratio (FCR). The HSD chickens consumed less feed by 35 d of age; thereafter, the reverse was true. Male chickens had significantly higher feed intake (FI), BW gain, and FCR compared with females. A significant interaction was found of stocking density and age for FI, BW gain, and FCR. Compared with LSD treatment, HSD broilers had a higher FI and a lower FCR from 36 to 42 d of age. Stocking density, sex, and age had a significant interaction for BW gain and FCR. Female broilers had worse BW gain and FCR when stocked at high density from 36 to 42 d of age. Stocking density had no significant influence on breast, thigh, or abdominal fat yield. Female broilers had significantly higher breast yield and abdominal fat. Male broilers and HSD treatment had high footpad burn and gait scores. A low ME diet increased footpad burn score but had no effect on gait score. The result indicated that stocking density had a more severe effect on the growth of male broilers before 35 d of age. Female broilers need more space than males at similar BW per square meter near marketing age. The incidence and severity of leg weakness are associated with sex, diet, and stocking density. This result suggests that the deteriorated effect of high stocking density is sex and age dependent.

  17. Muscle performance in a soft-bodied terrestrial crawler: constitutive modelling of strain-rate dependency

    OpenAIRE

    Dorfmann, A. Luis; Woods, William A; Trimmer, Barry A

    2007-01-01

    Experimental data on the passive mechanical properties of the ventral interior lateral muscle of the tobacco hornworm caterpillar, Manduca sexta, are reported. The stress–deformation response of the Manduca muscle is shown to be nonlinear pseudo-elastic, capable of large deformations and subject to stress softening during initial loading cycles. The muscle passive mechanical properties also depend on multiple time-dependent processes. In particular, we show new experimental data from cyclic l...

  18. PERCEPTION AND PERFORMANCE OF THE INTERDISCIPLINARY TEAM IN SERVING DRUG DEPENDENTS IN SPECIALIZED NETWORK OF MENTAL HEALTH SINOP, MATO GROSSO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. C. Santos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Chemical dependency is currently one of the most important public health problems in our country. The study deals with a quantitative and qualitative research, whose goal is to evaluate the perception and performance of the interdisciplinary team in serving drug dependents in specialized network of mental health Sinop, Mato Grosso. Applied a semi-structured questionnaire with objective and subjective questions with 11 professionals in health care at the Psychosocial Care Center (CAPS and Medical Specialties Center (EMC. The results reveal the importance of the preparation of these professionals to work in service to dependents and interdisciplinarity proved to be the best option to achieve a dignified and humane care

  19. The Effect of Cerebellar Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on A Throwing Task Depends on Individual Level of Task Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuguchi, Nobuaki; Katayama, Takashi; Kanosue, Kazuyuki

    2018-02-10

    The effect of cerebellar transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on motor performance remains controversial. Some studies suggest that the effect of tDCS depends upon task-difficulty and individual level of task performance. Here, we investigated whether the effect of cerebellar tDCS on the motor performance depends upon the individual's level of performance. Twenty-four naïve participants practiced dart throwing while receiving a 2-mA cerebellar tDCS for 20 min under three stimulus conditions (anodal-, cathodal-, and sham-tDCS) on separate days with a double-blind, counter-balanced cross-over design. Task performance was assessed by measuring the distance between the center of the bull's eye and the dart's position. Although task performance tended to improve throughout the practice under all stimulus conditions, improvement within a given day was not significant as compared to the first no-stimulus block. In addition, improvement did not differ among stimulation conditions. However, the magnitude of improvement was associated with an individual's level of task performance only under cathodal tDCS condition (p performance improvement only for the sub-group of participants with lower performance levels as compared to that with sham-tDCS (p task performance. Thus, cerebellar tDCS would facilitate learning of a complex motor skill task only in a subset of individuals. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Role of Scientific Communication Skills in Trainees' Intention to Pursue Biomedical Research Careers: A Social Cognitive Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Carrie; Lee, Hwa Young; Anderson, Cheryl; Byars-Winston, Angela; Baldwin, Constance D; Chang, Shine

    2015-01-01

    Scientific communication (SciComm) skills are indispensable for success in biomedical research, but many trainees may not have fully considered the necessity of regular writing and speaking for research career progression. Our purpose was to investigate the relationship between SciComm skill acquisition and research trainees' intentions to remain in research careers. We used social cognitive career theory (SCCT) to test a model of the relationship of SciComm skills to SciComm-related cognitive variables in explaining career intentions. A sample of 510 graduate students and postdoctoral fellows at major academic health science centers in the Texas Medical Center, Houston, Texas, were surveyed online. Results suggested that interest in performing SciComm tasks, SciComm outcome expectations (SCOEs), and SciComm productivity predicted intention to remain in a research career, while SciComm self-efficacy did not directly predict career intention. SCOEs also predicted interest in performing SciComm tasks. As in other SCCT studies, SciComm self-efficacy predicted SCOEs. We conclude that social cognitive factors of SciComm skill acquisition and SciComm productivity significantly predict biomedical trainees' intentions to pursue research careers whether within or outside academia. While further studies are needed, these findings may lead to evidence-based interventions to help trainees remain in their chosen career paths. © 2015 C. Cameron et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2015 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  1. Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Training in Schools: A Comparison of Trainee Satisfaction among Different Age Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Shingo; Suzuki, Masaru; Yamazaki, Motoyasu; Aikawa, Naoki; Yamazaki, Hajime

    2016-09-25

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has recently been added to the school curriculum worldwide and is currently taught to students between the ages of 10 and 16 years. The effect of the age of trainees on their satisfaction with CPR training has yet been elucidated. The aim of this study was to compare the satisfaction of trainees of different ages who participated in CPR training in schools in Japan. In total, 392 primary school students (10-11 years old), 1798 junior high school students (12-13 years old), and 4162 high schools students (15-16 years old) underwent the same 3-h course of CPR training, according to the guidelines of 2000 for Emergency Cardiovascular Care and CPR. The course was evaluated by a questionnaire completed by the participants. Primary school students responded most positively to all questions, including those reflecting enjoyment and the confidence of participants to apply CPR (Jonckheere-Terpstra test: P CPR training was strongly related to their age. Primary school students enjoyed CPR training more and were more confident in their ability to perform CPR than junior high and high school students were. Therefore, children aged 10-11 years may be the most appropriate candidates for the introduction of CPR training in schools.

  2. Core trainee boot camp-A method for improving technical and non-technical skills of novice surgical trainees. A before and after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, R; Langdon, L; Rodd, C A; Eastaugh-Waring, S; Coulston, J E

    2018-04-10

    The transition to surgical training can be a stressful time for trainees and is most evident during national handover periods where new graduates start and senior trainees rotate to new programmes. During this time, patient mortality can increase and Hospital efficiency reduces. This influence is compounded by the impact of working time directives. Intensive, simulation rich training programmes or "Boot Camps" have been postulated as a solution. This article highlights the development of a surgical boot camp for novice surgical trainees and the impact this can have on training. A novel surgical boot camp was developed for all trainees within a surgical training region including nine acute NHS trusts. Participating cohort of trainees completed pre and post course questionnaires to assess technical and non-technical skills. 25 trainees attended and completed the pre and post boot camp questionnaire. Significant improvements were seen with technical skills (p = 0.0429), overall non-technical skills (p skills (p = 0.005) and outpatient skill (p = 0.002). Trainees reported significantly increased ability to assess and manage a critically unwell patient (p = 0.001) and a trauma patient (p = 0.001). 96% of trainees have utilised the skills they learnt on Boot Camp and all trainees would recommend it as an induction programme. Surgical Boot Camps offer a timely chance to develop technical and non-technical skills whilst enhancing a trainee's confidence and knowledge and reduce the patient safety impact of the handover period. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Hardware dependencies of GPU-accelerated beamformer performances for microwave breast cancer detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salomon Christoph J.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available UWB microwave imaging has proven to be a promising technique for early-stage breast cancer detection. The extensive image reconstruction time can be accelerated by parallelizing the execution of the underlying beamforming algorithms. However, the efficiency of the parallelization will most likely depend on the grade of parallelism of the imaging algorithm and of the utilized hardware. This paper investigates the dependencies of two different beamforming algorithms on multiple hardware specification of several graphics boards. The parallel implementation is realized by using NVIDIA’s CUDA. Three conclusions are drawn about the behavior of the parallel implementation and how to efficiently use the accessible hardware.

  4. Micromagnetic Design of Spin Dependent Tunnel Junctions for Optimized Sensing Performance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tondra, Mark; Daughton, James M; Nordman, Catherine; Wang, Dexin; Taylor, John

    1999-01-01

    Pinned Spin Dependent Tunneling (SDT) devices have been fabricated into high sensitivity magnetic field sensors with many favorable properties including high sensitivity (̃ 10 umOe / Hz @ 1 Hz and ̃ 100 nOe / Hz @ > 10 kHz...

  5. Monetary incentives and recycling: Behavioral and psychological reactions to a performance-dependent garbage fee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thøgersen, John

    on a random sample (n = 1955) drawn from two groups of three matched municipalities, where households in one group pay a fixed fee for garbage collection and in the other a fee depending on the weight of their garbage. The study finds that the latter deliver more to recycling and compost more in the garden...

  6. Does Negotiation Training Improve Negotiators' Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ElShenawy, Eman

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper's objective is to test the main effect of negotiation training-level on acquiring negotiation skills. Training level refers to the time a trainee spends in a negotiation training course receiving the standard style and methods of training. Negotiation skills are manifested through trainees' performance after receiving training.…

  7. Trainee Occupational Therapists Scoring the Barthel ADL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Elizabeth; Nugent, Chris; Bond, Raymond; Martin, Suzanne

    2015-09-01

    Within medical applications there are two main types of information design; paper-based and digital information [1]. As technology is constantly changing, information within healthcare management and delivery is continually being transitioned from traditional paper documents to digital and online resources. Activity of Daily Living (ADL) charts are still predominantly paper based and are therefore prone to "human error" [2]. In light of this, an investigation has taken place into the design for reducing the amount of human error, between a paper based ADL, specifically the Barthel Index, and the same ADL created digitally. The digital ADL was developed as an online platform as this offers the best method of data capture for a large group of participants all together [3]. The aim of the study was to evaluate the usability of the Barthel Index ADL in paper format and then reproduce the same ADL digitally. This paper presents the findings of a study involving 26 participants who were familiar with ADL charts, and used three scenarios requiring them to complete both a paper ADL and a digital ADL. An evaluation was undertaken to ascertain if there were any 'human errors' in completing the paper ADL and also to find similarities/differences through using the digital ADL. The results from the study indicated that 22/26 participants agreed that the digital ADL was better, if not the same as a paper based ADL. Further results indicated that participants rate highly the added benefit of the digital ADL being easy to use and also that calculation of assessment scores were performed automatically. Statistically the digital BI offered a 100 % correction rate in the total calculation, in comparison to the paper based BI where it is more common for users to make mathematical calculation errors. Therefore in order to minimise handwriting and calculation errors, the digital BI proved superior than the traditional paper based method.

  8. Diagnostic Performance of Ultrasonography for Pediatric Appendicitis: A Night and Day Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangona, Kate Louise M; Guillerman, R Paul; Mangona, Victor S; Carpenter, Jennifer; Zhang, Wei; Lopez, Monica; Orth, Robert C

    2017-12-01

    For imaging pediatric appendicitis, ultrasonography (US) is preferred because of its lack of ionizing radiation, but is limited by operator dependence. This study investigates the US diagnostic performance during night shifts covered by radiology trainees compared to day shifts covered by attending radiologists. Appy-Scores (1 = completely visualized normal appendix; 2 = partially visualized normal appendix; 3 = nonvisualized appendix with no inflammatory changes in the expected region of the appendix; 4 = equivocal; 5a = nonperforated appendicitis; 5b = perforated appendicitis) from 2935 US examinations (2161:774, day-to-night) from July 2013 to 2014 were correlated with the intraoperative diagnoses and the clinical follow-up. The diagnostic performance of trainees and attendings was compared with Fisher exact test. Interobserver agreement was measured by Cohen kappa coefficient. Appendicitis prevalence was 25.3% (day) and 22.5% (night). Sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, negative predictive value, and positive predictive vale were 94.0%, 93.7%, 93.8%, 97.9%, and 83.4% during the day and 92.0%, 91.2%, 91.3%, 97.5%, and 75.2% at night. Specificity (P = .048) and positive predictive value (P = .011) differed, with more false positives at night (7%) than during the day (4.7%). Trainee and attending agreement was high (k = 0.995), with Appy-Scores of 1, 4, and 5a most frequently discordant. US has a high diagnostic performance and interobserver agreement for pediatric appendicitis when interpreted by radiology trainees during night shifts or attending radiologists during day shifts. However, lower specificity and positive predictive value at night warrants a thorough trainee education to avoid false-positive examinations. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Searing sentiment or cold calculation? the effects of leader emotional displays on team performance depend on follower epistemic motivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kleef, G.A.; Homan, A.C.; Beersma, B.; van Knippenberg, D.; van Knippenberg, B.; Damen, F.

    2009-01-01

    We examined how leader emotional displays affect team performance. We developed and tested the idea that effects of leader displays of anger versus happiness depend on followers' epistemic motivation, which is the desire to develop a thorough understanding of a situation. Experimental data on

  10. Dependence of crystal size on the catalytic performance of a porous coordination polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyonaga, Tomokazu; Higuchi, Masakazu; Kajiwara, Takashi; Takashima, Yohei; Duan, Jingui; Nagashima, Kazuro; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2015-02-14

    Submicrosized MOF-76(Yb) exhibits a higher catalytic performance for esterification than microsized MOF-76(Yb). Control of the crystal size of porous heterogeneous catalysts, such as PCP/MOFs, offers a promising approach to fabricating high-performance catalysts based on accessibility to the internal catalytic sites.

  11. Coping With Stress of Teacher Trainees With Different Levels of Computer Anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Ceyhan, Esra

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine whether levels and styles of coping with the stress of teacher trainees having low and high levels of computer anxiety across a number of variables. This research was carried out with 800 teacher trainees. Data were collected using the Computer Anxiety Scale, Coping With Stress Scale, and an Information Form. The results of the study indicate that the computer anxiety levels of teacher trainees differentiate levels and styles of coping with stress. It was f...

  12. Maternal overprotection score of the Parental Bonding Instrument predicts the outcome of cognitive behavior therapy by trainees for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Motoshi; Esaki, Kosei; Wakamatsu, Aya; Kitajima, Tomoko; Narita, Tomohiro; Naitoh, Hiroshi; Ozaki, Norio; Iwata, Nakao

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to predict the outcome of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) by trainees for major depressive disorder (MDD) based on the Parental Bonding Instrument (PBI). The hypothesis was that the higher level of care and/or lower level of overprotection score would predict a favorable outcome of CBT by trainees. The subjects were all outpatients with MDD treated with CBT as a training case. All the subjects were asked to fill out the Japanese version of the PBI before commencing the course of psychotherapy. The difference between the first and the last Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) score was used to represent the improvement of the intensity of depression by CBT. In order to predict improvement (the difference of the BDI scores) as the objective variable, multiple regression analysis was performed using maternal overprotection score and baseline BDI score as the explanatory variables. The multiple regression model was significant (P = 0.0026) and partial regression coefficient for the maternal overprotection score and the baseline BDI was -0.73 (P = 0.0046) and 0.88 (P = 0.0092), respectively. Therefore, when a patient's maternal overprotection score of the PBI was lower, a better outcome of CBT was expected. The hypothesis was partially supported. This result would be useful in determining indications for CBT by trainees for patients with MDD. © 2013 The Authors. Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences © 2013 Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology.

  13. Knowledge of the Costs of Diagnostic Imaging: A Survey of Physician Trainees at a Large Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayasarathi, Arvind; Duszak, Richard; Gelbard, Rondi B; Mullins, Mark E

    2016-11-01

    To study the awareness of postgraduate physician trainees across a variety of specialties regarding the costs of common imaging examinations. During early 2016, we conducted an online survey of all 1,238 physicians enrolled in internships, residencies, and fellowships at a large academic medical center. Respondents were asked to estimate Medicare national average total allowable fees for five commonly performed examinations: two-view chest radiograph, contrast-enhanced CT abdomen and pelvis, unenhanced MRI lumbar spine, complete abdominal ultrasound, and unenhanced CT brain. Responses within ±25% of published amounts were deemed correct. Respondents were also asked about specialty, postgraduate year of training, previous radiology education, and estimated number of imaging examinations ordered per week. A total of 381 of 1,238 trainees returned complete surveys (30.8%). Across all five examinations, only 5.7% (109/1,905) of responses were within the correct ±25% range. A total of 76.4% (291/381) of all respondents incorrectly estimated every examination's cost. Estimation accuracy was not associated with number of imaging examinations ordered per week or year of training. There was no significant difference in cost estimation accuracy between those who participated in medical school radiology electives and those who did not (P = .14). Only 17.5% of trainees considered their imaging cost knowledge adequate. Overall, 75.3% desire integration of cost data into clinical decision support and/or computerized physician order entry systems. Postgraduate physician trainees across all disciplines demonstrate limited awareness of the costs of commonly ordered imaging examinations. Targeted medical school education and integration of imaging cost information into clinical decision support / computerized physician order entry systems seems indicated. Copyright © 2016 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Temperature-dependent piezoresistivity in an MWCNT/epoxy nanocomposite temperature sensor with ultrahigh performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alamusi; Li, Yuan; Hu, Ning; Wu, Liangke; Liu, Yaolu; Ning, Huiming; Li, Jinhua; Surina; Yuan, Weifeng; Chang, Christiana; Atobe, Satoshi; Fukunaga, Hisao

    2013-01-01

    A temperature sensor was fabricated from a polymer nanocomposite with multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) as nanofiller (i.e., MWCNT/epoxy). The electrical resistance and temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) of the temperature sensor were characterized experimentally. The effects of temperature (within the range 333–373 K) and MWCNT content (within the range 1–5 wt%) were investigated thoroughly. It was found that the resistance increases with increasing temperature and decreasing MWCNT content. However, the resistance change ratio related to the TCR increases with increasing temperature and MWCNT content. The highest value of TCR (0.021 K −1 ), which was observed in the case of 5 wt% MWCNT, is much higher than those of traditional metals and MWCNT-based temperature sensors. Moreover, the corresponding numerical simulation—conducted to explain the above temperature-dependent piezoresistivity of the nanocomposite temperature sensor—indicated the key role of a temperature-dependent tunneling effect. (paper)

  15. Effects of SOC-dependent electrolyte viscosity on performance of vanadium redox flow batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Q.; Zhao, T.S.; Zhang, C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The correlations of electrolyte viscosity and SOC are obtained. • Effect of SOC-dependent electrolyte viscosity is considered in this model. • This model enables a more realistic simulation of variable distributions. • It provides accurate estimations of pumping work and system efficiency. - Abstract: The viscosity of the electrolyte in vanadium redox flow batteries (VRFBs) varies during charge and discharge as the concentrations of acid and vanadium ions in the electrolyte continuously change with the state of charge (SOC). In previous VRFB models, however, the electrolyte has been treated as a constant-viscosity solution. In this work, a mass-transport and electrochemical model taking account of the effect of SOC-dependent electrolyte viscosity is developed. The comparison between the present model and the model with the constant-viscosity simplification indicates that the consideration of the SOC-dependent electrolyte viscosity enables (i) a more realistic simulation of the distributions of overpotential and current density in the electrodes, and (ii) more accurate estimations of pumping work and the system efficiency of VRFBs

  16. Acute and chronic safety and efficacy of dose dependent creatine nitrate supplementation and exercise performance

    OpenAIRE

    Galvan, Elfego; Walker, Dillon K.; Simbo, Sunday Y.; Dalton, Ryan; Levers, Kyle; O?Connor, Abigail; Goodenough, Chelsea; Barringer, Nicholas D.; Greenwood, Mike; Rasmussen, Christopher; Smith, Stephen B.; Riechman, Steven E.; Fluckey, James D.; Murano, Peter S.; Earnest, Conrad P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Creatine monohydrate (CrM) and nitrate are popular supplements for improving exercise performance; yet have not been investigated in combination. We performed two studies to determine the safety and exercise performance-characteristics of creatine nitrate (CrN) supplementation. Methods Study 1 participants (N?=?13) ingested 1.5?g CrN (CrN-Low), 3?g CrN (CrN-High), 5?g CrM or a placebo in a randomized, crossover study (7d washout) to determine supplement safety (hepatorenal and musc...

  17. Videogame-Based Training Success: The Impact of Trainee Characteristics - Year 2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Orvis, Karin A; Horn, Daniel B; Belanich, James

    2006-01-01

    .... Specifically, this follow-up research examines prior videogame experience, videogame self-efficacy, and goal orientation as antecedents that maximize trainee motivation, as well as other learner...

  18. Temperature and intensity dependence of the performance of an electron-irradiated (AlGa)As/GaAs solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, C. K.; Hart, R. E., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The performance of a Hughes, liquid-phase epitaxial 2 centimeter-by-2 centimeter, (AlGa)As/GaAs solar cell was measured before and after irradiations with 1 MeV electrons to fluences of 1 x 10 to the 16th power electrons/sq cm. The temperature dependence of performance was measured over the temperature range 135 to 415 K at each fluence level. In addition, temperature dependences were measured at five intensity levels from 137 to 2.57 mW/sq cm before irradiation and after a fluence of 1 x 10 to the 16th power electrons/sq cm. For the intermediate fluences, performance was measured as a function of intensity at 298 K only.

  19. Outage Performance of CRNs with Best Relay Selection in Dependent Nonidentical Distributed Nakagami-m Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zongsheng Zhang

    2014-01-01

    of primary users, and interference temperature on the system performance are examined through some representative numerical plots, and the Monte Carlo results match perfectly with theory results which validates our theory analysis.

  20. Mission possible? The performance of prosocially motivated employees depends on manager trustworthiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Adam M; Sumanth, John J

    2009-07-01

    The authors propose that in mission-driven organizations, prosocially motivated employees are more likely to perform effectively when trust cues enhance their perceptions of task significance. The authors develop and test a model linking prosocial motivation, trust cues, task significance, and performance across 3 studies of fundraisers using 3 different objective performance measures. In Study 1, perceiving managers as trustworthy strengthened the relationship between employees' prosocial motivation and performance, measured in terms of calls made. This moderated relationship was mediated by employees' perceptions of task significance. Study 2 replicated the interaction of manager trustworthiness and prosocial motivation in predicting a new measure of performance: dollars raised. It also revealed 3-way interactions between prosocial motivation, manager trustworthiness, and dispositional trust propensity, such that high trust propensity compensated for low manager trustworthiness to strengthen the association between employees' prosocial motivation and performance. Study 3 replicated all of the previous mediation and moderation findings in predicting initiative taken by professional fundraisers. Implications for work motivation, work design, and trust in organizations are discussed.

  1. A Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Boot Camp improves trainee confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Catherine K; Tannous, Paul; DeWitt, Elizabeth; Farias, Michael; Mansfield, Laura; Ronai, Christina; Schidlow, David; Sanders, Stephen P; Lock, James E; Newburger, Jane W; Brown, David W

    2016-12-01

    Introduction New paediatric cardiology trainees are required to rapidly assimilate knowledge and gain clinical skills to which they have limited or no exposure during residency. The Pediatric Cardiology Fellowship Boot Camp (PCBC) at Boston Children's Hospital was designed to provide incoming fellows with an intensive exposure to congenital cardiac pathology and a broad overview of major areas of paediatric cardiology practice. The PCBC curriculum was designed by core faculty in cardiac pathology, echocardiography, electrophysiology, interventional cardiology, exercise physiology, and cardiac intensive care. Individual faculty contributed learning objectives, which were refined by fellowship directors and used to build a programme of didactics, hands-on/simulation-based activities, and self-guided learning opportunities. A total of 16 incoming fellows participated in the 4-week boot camp, with no concurrent clinical responsibilities, over 2 years. On the basis of pre- and post-PCBC surveys, 80% of trainees strongly agreed that they felt more prepared for clinical responsibilities, and a similar percentage felt that PCBC should be offered to future incoming fellows. Fellows showed significant increase in their confidence in all specific knowledge and skills related to the learning objectives. Fellows rated hands-on learning experiences and simulation-based exercises most highly. We describe a novel 4-week-long boot camp designed to expose incoming paediatric cardiology fellows to the broad spectrum of knowledge and skills required for the practice of paediatric cardiology. The experience increased trainee confidence and sense of preparedness to begin fellowship-related responsibilities. Given that highly interactive activities were rated most highly, boot camps in paediatric cardiology should strongly emphasise these elements.

  2. Simulated parents: developing paediatric trainees' skills in giving bad news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Jenny K; Frydenberg, Alexis R; Donath, Susan K; Marks, Michael M

    2009-03-01

    In curriculum documents for medicine in undergraduate, post-graduate and continuing professional development, there is now a focus on communication skills. The challenges are to place communication skills in the crowded curriculum and then to construct and sustain a programme that uses an evidence-based approach to the teaching and learning of communication skills. For 6 years, we have conducted a programme that involves simulated parents supporting junior medical staff to refine their skills in communication, particularly in giving parents bad news. The aim of our study was to obtain a better understanding of the trainees' experiences of the programme. Nine junior residents individually worked through two scenarios and received feedback from the simulated parent. They gave bad news to a simulated parent/actor who then gave feedback. A recording of the simulation was provided for discussion with a designated colleague at an arranged time. The tapes were then separately appraised by two independent raters - another actor and a paediatrician. Brief written reports and conducted semi-structured interviews provided more insights into the trainees' experience of the simulation. Other participating medical/medical education staff were interviewed about the simulation programme. Five themes emerged from the qualitative data: timeliness, emotional safety, the complexity of communication, practical usefulness and the challenge of effecting change. In addition, the ratings of the videos helped to clarify those 'parent-centred' communication skills that trainees may neglect in difficult conversations: 'ask about support', 'encourage the parent to ask questions' and 'repeat key messages'. The evaluation highlighted the value of an early-career experiential programme to highlight the importance of communication skills in post-graduate paediatrics practice.

  3. Effects of caffeine on performance and mood depend on the level of caffeine abstinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeomans, Martin R; Ripley, Tamzin; Davies, Laura H; Rusted, Jennifer M; Rogers, Peter J

    2002-11-01

    Most studies of the effects of caffeine on performance have used regular caffeine consumers who are deprived at test. Thus the reported effects of caffeine could be explained through reversal of caffeine withdrawal. To test how preloading deprived caffeine consumers with 0, 1 or 2 mg/kg caffeine altered the subsequent ability of caffeine to modify mood and performance. Thirty moderate caffeine consumers were given a drink containing 0, 1 or 2 mg/kg caffeine at breakfast followed 60 min later by a second drink containing either 0 or 1 mg/kg caffeine. Performance on a measure of sustained attention and mood were measured before and after each drink. Administration of both 1 and 2 mg/kg caffeine at breakfast decreased reaction time and 1 mg/kg caffeine also increased performance accuracy on the sustained attention (RVIP) task relative to placebo. Both breakfast doses of caffeine also improved rated mental alertness. Similarly, 1 mg/kg caffeine administered 60 min after breakfast decreased reaction time and increased rated mental alertness in the group who had not been given caffeine at breakfast. However, this second dose of caffeine had no effect on subsequent performance or mood in the two groups who had received caffeine at breakfast. Caffeine reliably improved performance on a sustained attention task, and increased rated mental alertness, in moderate caffeine consumers who were tested when caffeine-deprived. However, caffeine had no such effects when consumers were no longer caffeine deprived. These data are consistent with the view that reversal of caffeine withdrawal is a major component of the effects of caffeine on mood and performance.

  4. The influence of observers’ sex on attention-demanding performance depends on performers’ sex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun eWang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Post-error slowing (PES indicates the slower responses after errors than after correct responses. Prior studies mainly focus on how the observation errors influence one own’s performance, there is no study investigating how other’s monitoring influence one own’s performance. Additionally, the issue that whether social context influences the PES effect differently for females and males is still unclear. To address aforementioned issues, we required the participants to interact with a same-sex or opposite-sex partner to complete a color flanker task together (they sat next to each other, Experiment 1. One was the performer (perform the flanker task, and the other was the observer (monitor the error responses of performer. They alternated their roles in two successive blocks. To further verify the role of the interaction context, a control experiment was conducted in the individual context (Experiment 2. The results revealed that (1 larger PES effect was observed in females than in males in the interaction context; (2 the sex difference of PES effect mainly benefited from the opposite-sex interaction; (3 larger PES effect was observed in the interaction context than in the individual context; (4 females’ performances were influenced after an interaction with a same-sex or opposite-sex partner, whereas males’ performances were merely influenced after an interaction with an opposite-sex partner. Taken together, these findings may suggest that (1 interaction context modulates the PES effect differently for females and males; (2 females are more susceptible to social information and hence more effective to adjust the post-error behaviors.

  5. The educational value of ward rounds for junior trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faidon-Marios Laskaratos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The ward round (WR is a complex task and medical teachers are often faced with the challenge of finding a balance between service provision and clinical development of learners. The educational value of WRs is an under-researched area. This short communication aims to evaluate the educational role of WRs for junior trainees and provides insight into current practices. It also identifies obstacles to effective teaching/training in this setting and provides suggestions for improving the quality of WR teaching.

  6. Living an unstable everyday life while attempting to perform normality - the meaning of living as an alcohol-dependent woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurang, Anna; Bengtsson Tops, Anita

    2013-02-01

    To illuminate the meaning of living with alcohol dependency as a woman. The number of women suffering from alcohol dependency is increasing. Today there are shortcomings in knowledge about the lived experiences of being a woman with alcohol dependency; knowledge which might be of importance for meeting these women's specific needs of care. The study has a qualitative design. Fourteen women with alcohol dependency participated in open in-depth interviews. Data were analysed according to a phenomenological-hermeneutic method, and interpreted by help from gender and caring perspectives as well as results from previous research of alcohol dependency. In relation to the women's senses of well-being, four main gender formations were found; An unstable self involving continual and rapid swings between emotional and bodily reactions. Ambivalence - meaning ambiguous feelings towards themselves as human beings and how they lead their lives. Introspectiveness - involving reflections, pondering and being introverted. Attempts to perform normality - covering - dealing with life through various strategies and facades to live up to the expectations of how to behave as a woman. Living with alcohol dependency as a woman constitutes of a rapid shifting everyday life resulting in senses of alienation as well as private introspection leading to self-degradation, and to a lesser extent meaningfulness and hope. It also constitutes of managing to perform normality. When supporting women with alcohol dependency towards wellbeing, professionals need to work towards approaching the woman's inner thoughts, share them and reflect over them together. To support these women to find balance in life, caregivers need to cooperate with the women to find out how best to live a life adjusted to the woman's abilities and wishes. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. The thermal dependency of locomotor performance evolves rapidly within an invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmala, Georgia K; Brown, Gregory P; Christian, Keith A; Hudson, Cameron M; Shine, Richard

    2018-05-01

    Biological invasions can stimulate rapid shifts in organismal performance, via both plasticity and adaptation. We can distinguish between these two proximate mechanisms by rearing offspring from populations under identical conditions and measuring their locomotor abilities in standardized trials. We collected adult cane toads ( Rhinella marina ) from invasive populations that inhabit regions of Australia with different climatic conditions. We bred those toads and raised their offspring under common-garden conditions before testing their locomotor performance. At high (but not low) temperatures, offspring of individuals from a hotter location (northwestern Australia) outperformed offspring of conspecifics from a cooler location (northeastern Australia). This disparity indicates that, within less than 100 years, thermal performance in cane toads has adapted to the novel abiotic challenges that cane toads have encountered during their invasion of tropical Australia.

  8. Ultrahigh sensitivity and layer-dependent sensing performance of phosphorene-based gas sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Shumao; Pu, Haihui; Wells, Spencer A.; Wen, Zhenhai; Mao, Shun; Chang, Jingbo; Hersam, Mark C.; Chen, Junhong

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) layered materials have attracted significant attention for device applications because of their unique structures and outstanding properties. Here, a field-effect transistor (FET) sensor device is fabricated based on 2D phosphorene nanosheets (PNSs). The PNS sensor exhibits an ultrahigh sensitivity to NO2 in dry air and the sensitivity is dependent on its thickness. A maximum response is observed for 4.8-nm-thick PNS, with a sensitivity up to 190% at 20 parts per billion (p.p.b.) at room temperature. First-principles calculations combined with the statistical thermodynamics modelling predict that the adsorption density is ∼1015 cm−2 for the 4.8-nm-thick PNS when exposed to 20 p.p.b. NO2 at 300 K. Our sensitivity modelling further suggests that the dependence of sensitivity on the PNS thickness is dictated by the band gap for thinner sheets (10 nm). PMID:26486604

  9. Basic Laparoscopic Skills Assessment Study: Validation and Standard Setting among Canadian Urology Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jason Y; Andonian, Sero; Pace, Kenneth T; Grober, Ethan

    2017-06-01

    As urology training programs move to a competency based medical education model, iterative assessments with objective standards will be required. To develop a valid set of technical skills standards we initiated a national skills assessment study focusing initially on laparoscopic skills. Between February 2014 and March 2016 the basic laparoscopic skill of Canadian urology trainees and attending urologists was assessed using 4 standardized tasks from the AUA (American Urological Association) BLUS (Basic Laparoscopic Urological Surgery) curriculum, including peg transfer, pattern cutting, suturing and knot tying, and vascular clip applying. All performances were video recorded and assessed using 3 methods, including time and error based scoring, expert global rating scores and C-SATS (Crowd-Sourced Assessments of Technical Skill Global Rating Scale), a novel, crowd sourced assessment platform. Different methods of standard setting were used to develop pass-fail cut points. Six attending urologists and 99 trainees completed testing. Reported laparoscopic experience and training level correlated with performance (p standard setting methods to define pass-fail cut points for all 4 AUA BLUS tasks. The 4 AUA BLUS tasks demonstrated good construct validity evidence for use in assessing basic laparoscopic skill. Performance scores using the novel C-SATS platform correlated well with traditional time-consuming methods of assessment. Various standard setting methods were used to develop pass-fail cut points for educators to use when making formative and summative assessments of basic laparoscopic skill. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The performance of broilers on a feed depends on the feed protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Birds were initially offered one of two feeds with widely different protein to energy ratios until they reached a pre-defined liveweight, after which they were given one of two feed protein contents in Experiment 1 and four in Experiment 2. Their performance was monitored until a second pre-defined liveweight was reached, ...

  11. Effect of cellulose fiber reinforcement on the temperature dependent mechanical performance of nylon 6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdi Tajvidi; Mokhtar Feizmand; Robert H. Falk; Colin Felton

    2009-01-01

    In order to quantify the effect of temperature on the mechanical properties of pure nylon 6 and its composite with cellulose fibers (containing 25 wt% cellulose fibers), the materials were sampled and tested at three representative temperatures of 256, 296, and 336 K. Flexural and tensile tests were performed and the reductions in mechanical properties were evaluated....

  12. The performance of broilers on a feed depends on the feed protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    liveweight, after which they were given one of two feed protein contents in ... Their performance was monitored until a second pre-defined liveweight was .... procedure ensured that all feeds contained the same amino acid balance. ... Keeping birds to 2500 g liveweight in cages led to some problems with leg weakness.

  13. Performance Analysis of High-Order Numerical Methods for Time-Dependent Acoustic Field Modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Moy, Pedro Henrique Rocha

    2012-07-01

    The discretization of time-dependent wave propagation is plagued with dispersion in which the wavefield is perceived to travel with an erroneous velocity. To remediate the problem, simulations are run on dense and computationally expensive grids yielding plausible approximate solutions. This work introduces an error analysis tool which can be used to obtain optimal simulation parameters that account for mesh size, orders of spatial and temporal discretizations, angles of propagation, temporal stability conditions (usually referred to as CFL conditions), and time of propagation. The classical criteria of 10-15 nodes per wavelength for second-order finite differences, and 4-5 nodes per wavelength for fourth-order spectral elements are shown to be unrealistic and overly-optimistic simulation parameters for different propagation times. This work analyzes finite differences, spectral elements, optimally-blended spectral elements, and isogeometric analysis.

  14. Methodical aspects of group work organization of the trainees in the professional development programs in long distance format

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor A. Valdman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In Russia and abroad the teamwork gained popularity in the labor market as a form of collective interaction between multiprofessional groups of specialists in implementing business projects, carrying out research and development projects, designing technological solutions and creating innovative products. At the same time, in the educational practice, especially when using distant educational technologies, the command method of instruction is quite rare. The reason for this is that the teamwork in the implementation of educational programs requires fixating individual educational outcomes of each trainee, their contribution to the performance of the group task. It complicates the organization of the educational process. As the result, educational organizations do not often use this educational form because of the complexity of its application in the conduct of intermediate and final attestation.Research goal. search and validation of a problem solution that can be formulated as a contradiction between the need to perform group homework assignments in distant learning and the necessity to fix the individual educational results of each trainee for the purpose of intermediate and final attestation. The authors of the article offer basic methodological principles that allow finding the balance in-between the requirements of legislation and preserving the team approach in the process of group work of trainees.Materials and methods. The initial materials of the research are an overview of existing publications on the organization of teamwork of trainees is used, including the implementation of training in a long distance format, the legislation of the Russian Federation regarding interim and final certification of trainees, as well as practical experience in implementing training programs, based on ANO “E-learning for Nanoindustry (“eNano””. Based on these materials, the authors offer basic methodological principles, obtained empirically and

  15. Performance analysis of pin fins with temperature dependent thermal parameters using the variation of parameters method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihat Arslantürk

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The performance of pin fins transferring heat by convection and radiation and having variable thermal conductivity, variable emissivity and variable heat transfer coefficient was investigated in the present paper. Nondimensionalizing the fin equation, the problem parameters which affect the fin performance were obtained. Dimensionless nonlinear fin equation was solved with the variation of parameters method, which is quite new in the solution of nonlinear heat transfer problems. The solution of variation of parameters method was compared with known analytical solutions and some numerical solution. The comparisons showed that the solutions are seen to be perfectly compatible. The effects of problem parameters were investigated on the heat transfer rate and fin efficiency and results were presented graphically.

  16. Identifying significant uncertainties in thermally dependent processes for repository performance analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gansemer, J.D.; Lamont, A.

    1994-01-01

    In order to study the performance of the potential Yucca Mountain Nuclear Waste Repository, scientific investigations are being conducted to reduce the uncertainty about process models and system parameters. This paper is intended to demonstrate a method for determining a strategy for the cost effective management of these investigations. It is not meant to be a complete study of all processes and interactions, but does outline a method which can be applied to more in-depth investigations

  17. Fully coupled modeling of burnup dependent light water reactor fuel performance using COMSOL Multiphysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Rong; Zhou Wenzhong; Prudil, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a light water reactor fuel performance code, which considers almost all the related physical models, including heat generation and conduction, species diffusion, thermomechanics (thermal expansion, elastic strain, densification, and fission product swelling strain), grain growth, fission gas production and release, gap heat transfer, mechanical contact, gap/plenum pressure with plenum volume, cladding thermal and irradiation creep and oxidation. All the equations are implemented into COMSOL Multiphysics finite-element platform with a 2D axisymmetric geometry of a fuel pellet and cladding. Comparisons are made for the simulation results between COMSOL and another simulation tool of BISON. The comparisons show the capability of our simulation tool to predict light water UO 2 fuel performances. In our modeling and simulation work, the performance of enhanced thermal conductivity UO 2 -BeO fuel and newly-adopted corrosion resistant SiC cladding material was also studied. UO 2 -BeO high thermal conductivity nuclear fuel would decrease fuel temperatures and facilitate a reduction in pellet cladding interaction through lessening thermal stresses that result in fuel cracking, relocation, and swelling. The safety of the reactor would be improved. However, for SiC cladding, although due to its high thermal expansion, the gap closure time is delayed, irradiation induced point defects and defect-clusters in the SiC crystal will dramatically decrease SiC thermal conductivity, and cause significant increase in the fuel temperature. (author)

  18. Performance Analysis of Stop-Skipping Scheduling Plans in Rail Transit under Time-Dependent Demand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhichao; Yuan, Zhenzhou; Zhang, Silin

    2016-07-13

    Stop-skipping is a key method for alleviating congestion in rail transit, where schedules are sometimes difficult to implement. Several mechanisms have been proposed and analyzed in the literature, but very few performance comparisons are available. This study formulated train choice behavior estimation into the model considering passengers' perception. If a passenger's train path can be identified, this information would be useful for improving the stop-skipping schedule service. Multi-performance is a key characteristic of our proposed five stop-skipping schedules, but quantified analysis can be used to illustrate the different effects of well-known deterministic and stochastic forms. Problems in the novel category of forms were justified in the context of a single line rather than transit network. We analyzed four deterministic forms based on the well-known A/B stop-skipping operating strategy. A stochastic form was innovatively modeled as a binary integer programming problem. We present a performance analysis of our proposed model to demonstrate that stop-skipping can feasibly be used to improve the service of passengers and enhance the elasticity of train operations under demand variations along with an explicit parametric discussion.

  19. Performance Analysis of Stop-Skipping Scheduling Plans in Rail Transit under Time-Dependent Demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhichao Cao

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Stop-skipping is a key method for alleviating congestion in rail transit, where schedules are sometimes difficult to implement. Several mechanisms have been proposed and analyzed in the literature, but very few performance comparisons are available. This study formulated train choice behavior estimation into the model considering passengers’ perception. If a passenger’s train path can be identified, this information would be useful for improving the stop-skipping schedule service. Multi-performance is a key characteristic of our proposed five stop-skipping schedules, but quantified analysis can be used to illustrate the different effects of well-known deterministic and stochastic forms. Problems in the novel category of forms were justified in the context of a single line rather than transit network. We analyzed four deterministic forms based on the well-known A/B stop-skipping operating strategy. A stochastic form was innovatively modeled as a binary integer programming problem. We present a performance analysis of our proposed model to demonstrate that stop-skipping can feasibly be used to improve the service of passengers and enhance the elasticity of train operations under demand variations along with an explicit parametric discussion.

  20. PEMFC Performance with Metal Bipolar Plates Depending on the Channel Dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon Kuikam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar plates of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC play an important role in removing liquid phase water as a by-product in order to facilitate the reaction between fuel and oxygen. A great amount of effort has been made to improve the performance of a fuel cell such as maximum current density or maximum power, by improving water removability of a bipolar plate. Most of the studies, however, are conducted numerically because of the complexity of analysing gas and liquid and the poor manufacturability of graphite bipolar plates. In this proceeding, we demonstrate that the performance of a PEMFC with metal bipolar plates can be enhanced by reducing the dimension of the channel. Bipolar plates were machined with stainless steel (type 316L to have three different channel size (1000 μm, 500 μm and 300 μm and the performance of each assembled cells were tested. As a result, the maximum power density and the maximum current density increased by 25%.

  1. Assessment of breadmaking performance of wheat flour dough by means of frequency dependent ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunstein, D; Peressini, D; Page, J H; Strybulevych, A; Scanlon, M G

    2012-01-01

    Technological performance of wheat flour varies among different wheat varieties. Gluten plays a key role within the solid phase of dough in the formation and the retention of gas bubbles during breadmaking. Rheological tests are usually performed to predict breadmaking potential. The aim here was to investigate the ability of ultrasound to discriminate wheat doughs based on breadmaking qualities. The ultimate goal is the development of an online quality control system currently unavailable in the baked goods industry, rendering this work innovative. Samples were prepared from a strong wheat flour, with one control sample and one added with inulin and distilled monoglycerides, producing doughs of distinct breadmaking quality. Doughs were subjected to density determination, elongation tests, and ultrasound analysis. The ultrasound tests were performed in the frequency range of 300 kHz – 6 MHz. Ultrasonic phase velocity increased with increasing frequency to about 2 MHz, becoming constant and then decreasing from 3 MHz for the control sample. Distinct differences in attenuation coefficient between the fibre-enriched and control doughs were observed. Ultrasound can potentially add to a better understanding of dough quality and can discriminate between doughs of contrasting properties.

  2. Temperature dependence of Ni3S2 nanostructures with high electrochemical performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. L.; Wei, X. Q.; Li, M. B.; Hou, P. Y.; Xu, X. J.

    2018-04-01

    Different Ni3S2 nanostructures have been successfully synthesized at different temperatures by a facile and efficient solvothermal method. The Ni3S2 nanostructures with three-dimensional (3D) nanosheets array and silkworm eggs-like morphologies were obtained by adjusting the reaction temperature. A large number of 3D nanosheets are interconnected to form an open network structure with porous of Ni3S2 at 180 °C, and electrochemical tests showed that the special structure exhibited the outstanding specific capacitance (1357 F g -1 at 1 A g-1) and excellent cycling stability (maintained 91% after 3000 cycles). In comparison, the performance of Ni3S2 silkworm eggs-like structure is not very perfect. This may be due to the fact that the 3D nanosheets with porous structure can improve the electrochemical performance by shortening effectively the diffusion path of electrolyte ions and increasing the active sites during charging and discharging. Among them, the reaction temperature is the main factor to control the formation of the 3D nanosheets array. These results indicated the Ni3S2 nanosheets promising applications as high-performance supercapacitor electrode materials.

  3. Dependence of the organic nonvolatile memory performance on the location of ultra-thin Ag film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao Bo; Wu Zhaoxin; He Qiang; Mao Guilin; Hou Xun; Tian Yuan

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrated organic nonvolatile memory devices based on 4,4',4''-tris[N-(3-methylphenyl)-N-phenylamino] triphenylamine (m-MTDATA) inserted by an ultra-thin Ag film. The memory devices with different locations of ultra-thin Ag film in m-MTDATA were investigated, and it was found that the location of the Ag film could affect the performance of the organic memory, such as ON/OFF ratio, retention time and cycling endurance. When the Ag film was located at the ITO/m-MTDATA interface, the largest ON/OFF ratio (about 10 5 ) could be achieved, but the cycling endurance was poor. When the Ag film was located in the middle region of the m-MTDATA layer, the ON/OFF ratios came down by about 10 3 , but better performance of cycling endurance was exhibited. When the Ag film was located close to the Al electrode, the ON/OFF ratios and the retention time of this device decreased sharply and the bistable phenomenon almost disappeared. Our works show a simple approach to improve the performance of organic memory by adjusting the location of the metal film.

  4. Assessment of breadmaking performance of wheat flour dough by means of frequency dependent ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunstein, D.; Page, J. H.; Strybulevych, A.; Peressini, D.; Scanlon, M. G.

    2012-12-01

    Technological performance of wheat flour varies among different wheat varieties. Gluten plays a key role within the solid phase of dough in the formation and the retention of gas bubbles during breadmaking. Rheological tests are usually performed to predict breadmaking potential. The aim here was to investigate the ability of ultrasound to discriminate wheat doughs based on breadmaking qualities. The ultimate goal is the development of an online quality control system currently unavailable in the baked goods industry, rendering this work innovative. Samples were prepared from a strong wheat flour, with one control sample and one added with inulin and distilled monoglycerides, producing doughs of distinct breadmaking quality. Doughs were subjected to density determination, elongation tests, and ultrasound analysis. The ultrasound tests were performed in the frequency range of 300 kHz - 6 MHz. Ultrasonic phase velocity increased with increasing frequency to about 2 MHz, becoming constant and then decreasing from 3 MHz for the control sample. Distinct differences in attenuation coefficient between the fibre-enriched and control doughs were observed. Ultrasound can potentially add to a better understanding of dough quality and can discriminate between doughs of contrasting properties.

  5. Sexual harassment of psychiatric trainees: experiences and attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, J.; Porter, S.

    1999-01-01

    A survey was carried out of psychiatric trainees' work-related experiences of unwanted sexual contact. A structured postal questionnaire was administered to 100 psychiatric trainees from senior house officer to specialist registrar level in a large psychiatric rotation. There was an 85% response rate; 86% (73) of the sample had experienced unwanted sexual contact, with 47% (40) experiencing deliberate touching, leaning over or cornering, and 18% (15) receiving letters, telephone calls or material of a sexual nature. Three-quarters (64) of respondents had experienced unwanted sexual contact from patients and 64% (54) from staff. Experiences and attitudes did not generally differ by gender, grade or training experience. Four out of 48 female respondents described stalking by patients. Of the 39 respondents who had reported harassment by patients, 31 felt supported by colleagues, while of the 13 who had reported harassment by colleagues, eight felt supported. Two-thirds of the respondents considered sexual harassment `sometimes' or `frequently' a problem for the profession. Diagnoses of confusional states, mania or schizophrenia made subjects less likely to consider unwanted sexual behaviour to be `sexual harassment' (86%, 80%, and 67%, respectively), but not for other diagnoses. Levels of threatening and intrusive sexual harassment are unacceptably high in this study group. Health trusts should adopt policies of `zero tolerance' and all incidents should be reported. Psychological impact on victims should be acknowledged even when the behaviour of the perpetrator can be explained by diagnosis.
 PMID:10474725

  6. Sexual harassment of psychiatric trainees: experiences and attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, J F; Porter, S

    1999-07-01

    A survey was carried out of psychiatric trainees' work-related experiences of unwanted sexual contact. A structured postal questionnaire was administered to 100 psychiatric trainees from senior house officer to specialist registrar level in a large psychiatric rotation. There was an 85% response rate; 86% (73) of the sample had experienced unwanted sexual contact, with 47% (40) experiencing deliberate touching, leaning over or cornering, and 18% (15) receiving letters, telephone calls or material of a sexual nature. Three-quarters (64) of respondents had experienced unwanted sexual contact from patients and 64% (54) from staff. Experiences and attitudes did not generally differ by gender, grade or training experience. Four out of 48 female respondents described stalking by patients. Of the 39 respondents who had reported harassment by patients, 31 felt supported by colleagues, while of the 13 who had reported harassment by colleagues, eight felt supported. Two-thirds of the respondents considered sexual harassment 'some-times' or 'frequently' a problem for the profession. Diagnoses of confusional states, mania or schizophrenia made subjects less likely to consider unwanted sexual behaviour to be 'sexual harassment' (86%, 80%, and 67%, respectively), but not for other diagnoses. Levels of threatening and intrusive sexual harassment are unacceptably high in this study group. Health trusts should adopt policies of 'zero tolerance' and all incidents should be reported. Psychological impact on victims should be acknowledged even when the behaviour of the perpetrator can be explained by diagnosis.

  7. Bullying among trainee doctors in Southern India: A questionnaire study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bairy K

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Workplace bullying is an important and serious issue in a healthcare setting because of its potential impact on the welfare of care-providers as well as the consumers. Aims: To gauge the extent of bullying among the medical community in India; as a subsidiary objective, to assess the personality trait of the bullying victims. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional, anonymous, self-reported questionnaire survey was undertaken among a convenient sample of all the trainee doctors at a Government Medical College in Tamil Nadu, India. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire, in English with standard written explanation of bullying was used. Basic information like age, sex, job grade and the specialty in case of Postgraduates (PGs were also collected. Statistical Analysis: The results were subjected to descriptive statistical analysis and Chi-square test for comparison of frequencies. Results: A total of 174 doctors (115 PGs and 59 junior doctors, took part in the study with a cent percent response. Nearly half of the surveyed population reported being subjected to bullying. Nearly 54 (53% of the men and 35 (48% of women were subjected to bullying. Significant proportions ( P < 0.0001 of medical personnel and paramedical staff bullied the PGs and junior doctors, respectively. More than 85 (90% of bullying incidents went unreported. A significant ( P < 0.0001 percentage of PGs and junior doctors revealed a personality trait towards bully. Conclusions: Workplace bullying is common among trainee doctors and usually goes unreported.

  8. Optimising motivation and reducing burnout for radiation oncology trainees: A framework using self-determination theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Michael; Poulsen, Anne A

    2018-05-02

    Radiation oncology trainees in Australia and New Zealand have relatively high levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation which are core components of burnout. The stresses of a demanding clinical load, studying for exams as well as family commitments are all contributing factors. Self-Deter mination Theory (SDT) provides a framework for optimising motivation which may be intrinsic or extrinsic. The three core components of SDT are competence, relatedness and autonomy. These factors should be addressed at a college level, Institutional and a personal level if the best outcomes are to be achieved. An environment that supports the individual's experience of competency, relatedness and autonomy will foster motivation and work engagement which in turn will improve performance, energy, resilience and creativity and reduce levels of burnout. © 2018 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  9. A national survey of the effects of fatigue on trainees in anaesthesia in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, L; Holland, J; Lomas, J-P; Redfern, N; Plunkett, E

    2017-09-01

    Long daytime and overnight shifts remain a major feature of working life for trainees in anaesthesia. Over the past 10 years, there has been an increase in awareness and understanding of the potential effects of fatigue on both the doctor and the patient. The Working Time Regulations (1998) implemented the European Working Time Directive into UK law, and in August 2009 it was applied to junior doctors, reducing the maximum hours worked from an average of 56 per week to 48. Despite this, there is evidence that problems with inadequate rest and fatigue persist. There is no official guidance regarding provision of a minimum standard of rest facilities for doctors in the National Health Service, and the way in which rest is achieved by trainee anaesthetists during their on-call shift depends on rota staffing and workload. We conducted a national survey to assess the incidence and effects of fatigue among the 3772 anaesthetists in training within the UK. We achieved a response rate of 59% (2231/3772 responses), with data from 100% of NHS trusts. Fatigue remains prevalent among junior anaesthetists, with reports that it has effects on physical health (73.6% [95%CI 71.8-75.5]), psychological wellbeing (71.2% [69.2-73.1]) and personal relationships (67.9% [65.9-70.0]). The most problematic factor remains night shift work, with many respondents commenting on the absence of breaks, inadequate rest facilities and 57.0% (55.0-59.1) stating they had experienced an accident or near-miss when travelling home from night shifts. We discuss potential explanations for the results, and present a plan to address the issues raised by this survey, aiming to change the culture around fatigue for the better. © 2017 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  10. Density-dependent habitat selection and performance by a large mobile reef fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, William J; Frazer, Thomas K; Portier, Kenneth M; Vose, Frederic; Loftin, James; Murie, Debra J; Mason, Doran M; Nagy, Brian; Hart, Mary K

    2006-04-01

    condition. Density-dependent habitat selection for shelter and individual growth dynamics were therefore interdependent ecological processes that help to explain how patchy reef habitat sustains gag production. Moreover, gag selected shelter at the expense of maximizing their growth. Thus, mobile reef fishes could experience density-dependent effects on growth, survival, and/or reproduction (i.e., demographic parameters) despite reduced stock sizes as a consequence of fishing.

  11. A Performance Evaluation of Diagnostic X-ray Unit Depends on the Hospitals Size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Ju Hun; Im, In Chul; Dong, Kyung Rae; Kang, Se Sik

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to measure the tube voltage, the tube current/volume, exposure time and exposure dose of diagnostic X-ray unit in each doctor offices, hospitals and general hospitals for evaluating the performance of such device, to learn the method and technology of its measurement and to suggest its importance. Research subjects were total 30 X-ray units and divided into groups of 10 X-ray units each. The tube voltage, the tube current/volume, exposure time and exposure dose were measured using percentage average error, and then reproducibility of exposure dose was measured through calculating coefficient of variation. The results are like followings; The tube voltage correctness examination showed that incongruent devices among total 30 X-ray units were 5 devices (16.7%). The tube current correctness examination showed that incongruent X-ray units were 3 devices (10.0%). The tube current volume correctness examination showed that incongruent X-ray units were 4 devices (13.3%). Finally, according to exposure time correctness examination, incongruent X-ray units were 5 devices (16.7%) and according to reproducibility examination of exposure dose, incongruent X-ray units were 7 devices (23.3%). Above results showed serious problem in performance management based on management regulation of diagnostic X-ray unit; it means that regular checkout and safety management are required, and as doing so, patients will be able to receive good quality of medical service by the reduction of radiation exposure time, image quality administration, unnecessary retake and etc. Therefore, this study suggests that the performance of diagnostic X-ray units should be checked regularly

  12. A Performance Evaluation of Diagnostic X-ray Unit Depends on the Hospitals Size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ju Hun [Kaya University, Gimhae (Korea, Republic of); Im, In Chul [Gwangju Health College University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Dong, Kyung Rae [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Se Sik [College of Health Science, Catholic University of Pusan, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    The purpose of this study is to measure the tube voltage, the tube current/volume, exposure time and exposure dose of diagnostic X-ray unit in each doctor offices, hospitals and general hospitals for evaluating the performance of such device, to learn the method and technology of its measurement and to suggest its importance. Research subjects were total 30 X-ray units and divided into groups of 10 X-ray units each. The tube voltage, the tube current/volume, exposure time and exposure dose were measured using percentage average error, and then reproducibility of exposure dose was measured through calculating coefficient of variation. The results are like followings; The tube voltage correctness examination showed that incongruent devices among total 30 X-ray units were 5 devices (16.7%). The tube current correctness examination showed that incongruent X-ray units were 3 devices (10.0%). The tube current volume correctness examination showed that incongruent X-ray units were 4 devices (13.3%). Finally, according to exposure time correctness examination, incongruent X-ray units were 5 devices (16.7%) and according to reproducibility examination of exposure dose, incongruent X-ray units were 7 devices (23.3%). Above results showed serious problem in performance management based on management regulation of diagnostic X-ray unit; it means that regular checkout and safety management are required, and as doing so, patients will be able to receive good quality of medical service by the reduction of radiation exposure time, image quality administration, unnecessary retake and etc. Therefore, this study suggests that the performance of diagnostic X-ray units should be checked regularly

  13. Age-dependent and coordinated shift in performance between implicit and explicit skill learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dezso eNemeth

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available It has been reported recently that while general sequence learning across ages conforms to the typical inverted-U shape pattern, with best performance in early adulthood, surprisingly, the basic ability of picking up in an implicit manner triplets that occur with high vs. low probability in the sequence is best before 12 years of age and it significantly weakens afterwards. Based on these findings, it has been hypothesized that the cognitively controlled processes coming online at around 12 are useful for more targeted explicit learning at the cost of becoming relatively less sensitive to raw probabilities of events. To test this hypothesis, we collected data in a sequence learning task using probabilistic sequences in five age groups from 11 to 39 years of age (N=288, replicating the original implicit learning paradigm in an explicit task setting where subjects were guided to find repeating sequences. We found that in contrast to the implicit results, performance with the high- vs. low-probability triplets was at the same level in all age groups when subjects sought patterns in the sequence explicitly. Importantly, measurements of explicit knowledge about the identity of the sequences revealed a significant increase in ability to explicitly access the true sequences exactly around the age where the earlier study found the significant drop in ability to learn implicitly raw probabilities. These findings support the conjecture that the gradually increasing involvement of more complex internal models optimizes our skill learning abilities by compensating for the performance loss due to down-weighting the raw probabilities of the sensory input, while expanding our ability to acquire more sophisticated skills.

  14. Age-dependent and coordinated shift in performance between implicit and explicit skill learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Dezso; Janacsek, Karolina; Fiser, József

    2013-01-01

    It has been reported recently that while general sequence learning across ages conforms to the typical inverted-U shape pattern, with best performance in early adulthood, surprisingly, the basic ability of picking up in an implicit manner triplets that occur with high vs. low probability in the sequence is best before 12 years of age and it significantly weakens afterwards. Based on these findings, it has been hypothesized that the cognitively controlled processes coming online at around 12 are useful for more targeted explicit learning at the cost of becoming relatively less sensitive to raw probabilities of events. To test this hypothesis, we collected data in a sequence learning task using probabilistic sequences in five age groups from 11 to 39 years of age (N = 288), replicating the original implicit learning paradigm in an explicit task setting where subjects were guided to find repeating sequences. We found that in contrast to the implicit results, performance with the high- vs. low-probability triplets was at the same level in all age groups when subjects sought patterns in the sequence explicitly. Importantly, measurements of explicit knowledge about the identity of the sequences revealed a significant increase in ability to explicitly access the true sequences exactly around the age where the earlier study found the significant drop in ability to learn implicitly raw probabilities. These findings support the conjecture that the gradually increasing involvement of more complex internal models optimizes our skill learning abilities by compensating for the performance loss due to down-weighting the raw probabilities of the sensory input, while expanding our ability to acquire more sophisticated skills.

  15. Determination of Age-Dependent Reference Ranges for Coagulation Tests Performed Using Destiny Plus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Fatma Demet; Serdar, Muhittin; Merve Ari, Elif; Onur Oztan, Mustafa; Hikmet Kozcu, Sureyya; Tarhan, Huseyin; Cakmak, Ozgur; Zeytinli, Merve; Yasar Ellidag, Hamit

    2016-06-01

    In order to apply the right treatment for hemostatic disorders in pediatric patients, laboratory data should be interpreted with age-appropriate reference ranges. The purpose of this study was to determining age-dependent reference range values for prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT), fibrinogen tests, and D-dimer tests. A total of 320 volunteers were included in the study with the following ages: 1 month - 1 year (n = 52), 2 - 5 years (n = 50), 6 - 10 years (n = 48), 11 - 17 years (n = 38), and 18 - 65 years (n = 132). Each volunteer completed a survey to exclude hemostatic system disorder. Using a nonparametric method, the lower and upper limits, including 95% distribution and 90% confidence intervals, were calculated. No statistically significant differences were found between PT and aPTT values in the groups consisting of children. Thus, the reference ranges were separated into child and adult age groups. PT and aPTT values were significantly higher in the children than in the adults. Fibrinogen values in the 6 - 10 age group and the adult age group were significantly higher than in the other groups. D-dimer levels were significantly lower in those aged 2 - 17; thus, a separate reference range was established. These results support other findings related to developmental hemostasis, confirming that adult and pediatric age groups should be evaluated using different reference ranges.

  16. Poststimulation time interval-dependent effects of motor cortex anodal tDCS on reaction-time task performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molero-Chamizo, Andrés; Alameda Bailén, José R; Garrido Béjar, Tamara; García López, Macarena; Jaén Rodríguez, Inmaculada; Gutiérrez Lérida, Carolina; Pérez Panal, Silvia; González Ángel, Gloria; Lemus Corchero, Laura; Ruiz Vega, María J; Nitsche, Michael A; Rivera-Urbina, Guadalupe N

    2018-02-01

    Anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) induces long-term potentiation-like plasticity, which is associated with long-lasting effects on different cognitive, emotional, and motor performances. Specifically, tDCS applied over the motor cortex is considered to improve reaction time in simple and complex tasks. The timing of tDCS relative to task performance could determine the efficacy of tDCS to modulate performance. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of a single session of anodal tDCS (1.5 mA, for 15 min) applied over the left primary motor cortex (M1) versus sham stimulation on performance of a go/no-go simple reaction-time task carried out at three different time points after tDCS-namely, 0, 30, or 60 min after stimulation. Performance zero min after anodal tDCS was improved during the whole course of the task. Performance 30 min after anodal tDCS was improved only in the last block of the reaction-time task. Performance 60 min after anodal tDCS was not significantly different throughout the entire task. These findings suggest that the motor cortex excitability changes induced by tDCS can improve motor responses, and these effects critically depend on the time interval between stimulation and task performance.

  17. Rate-dependent performance of ion chambers for particle-ID at the GSI fragment separator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hucka, Jan-Paul; Allred, Timothy; Enders, Joachim [Institut fuer Kernphysik, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Gernhaeuser, Roman; Maurus, Steffen [Physik Department, TU Muenchen (Germany); Nociforo, Chiara; Pietri, Stephane; Prochazka, Andrej [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    At the GSI Fragment Separator (FRS), multi-sampling ion chambers (MUSIC) employing a Frisch grid are used for charge identification of secondary ion beams. At the FAIR Super-FRS, higher rates are expected, and an event-by-event determination of the charge of secondary ions will be needed at rates of several 100000 events per second. The comparison of results from test measurements for the MUSIC performance with that of a recently constructed tilted-electrode gas ion chamber (TEGIC), which was designed similar to the one discussed, is presented.

  18. Torsion angle dependence of the rectifying performance in molecular device with asymmetrical anchoring groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.H.; Guo, Y.; Tian, C.F.; Song, X.P.; Ding, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    Using first-principles density functional theory and nonequilibrium Green's function formalism, we investigate the effect of torsion angle on the rectifying characteristics of 4'-thiolate-biphenyl-4-dithiocarboxylate sandwiched between two Au(111) electrodes. The results show that the torsion angle has an evident influence on rectifying performance of such devices. By increasing the dihedral angle between two phenyl rings, namely changing the magnitude of the intermolecular coupling effect, a different rectifying behavior can be observed in these systems. Our findings highlight that the rectifying characteristics are intimately related to dihedral angles and can provide fundamental guidelines for the design of functional molecular devices.

  19. Predicting the microstructure-dependent mechanical performance of materials for early-stage design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimiduk, D.M.; Uchic, M.D.; Parathasarathy, T.A.; Rao, S.I.; Choi, Y.-S.

    2004-01-01

    A description is offered of a simulation and testing methodology for structural materials that incorporates the influence of the local, microscopic and submicroscopic heterogeneous nature of material properties directly into design procedures. The new methodology builds upon a multitude of rapid microstructural and property assessments of selected local regions of a material (i.e. single-crystal regions, defected regions, grain aggregates, etc.), perhaps from a fully-processed component, or from materials specifically prepared to represent selected aspects of the full-scale process. The results from these assessments are used to define parameters within a hierarchy of mathematical and numerical representations of the material, and together in turn these may be used in design performance simulation codes to predict the intrinsic response of larger-scale structures. Further, the methodology may be used to anticipate the effects of defects on the performance of the full-scale structure. Most steps of this alternative design and test methodology are amenable to automation, and the methodology as a whole will reduce the number of iterative large-scale cycles required to qualify a material's suitability for structural service; thus, the new method is a framework for accelerating the development of structural materials

  20. Acute and chronic safety and efficacy of dose dependent creatine nitrate supplementation and exercise performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvan, Elfego; Walker, Dillon K; Simbo, Sunday Y; Dalton, Ryan; Levers, Kyle; O'Connor, Abigail; Goodenough, Chelsea; Barringer, Nicholas D; Greenwood, Mike; Rasmussen, Christopher; Smith, Stephen B; Riechman, Steven E; Fluckey, James D; Murano, Peter S; Earnest, Conrad P; Kreider, Richard B

    2016-01-01

    Creatine monohydrate (CrM) and nitrate are popular supplements for improving exercise performance; yet have not been investigated in combination. We performed two studies to determine the safety and exercise performance-characteristics of creatine nitrate (CrN) supplementation. Study 1 participants (N = 13) ingested 1.5 g CrN (CrN-Low), 3 g CrN (CrN-High), 5 g CrM or a placebo in a randomized, crossover study (7d washout) to determine supplement safety (hepatorenal and muscle enzymes, heart rate, blood pressure and side effects) measured at time-0 (unsupplemented), 30-min, and then hourly for 5-h post-ingestion. Study 2 participants (N = 48) received the same CrN treatments vs. 3 g CrM in a randomized, double-blind, 28d trial inclusive of a 7-d interim testing period and loading sequence (4 servings/d). Day-7 and d-28 measured Tendo™ bench press performance, Wingate testing and a 6x6-s bicycle ergometer sprint. Data were analyzed using a GLM and results are reported as mean ± SD or mean change ± 95 % CI. In both studies we observed several significant, yet stochastic changes in blood markers that were not indicative of potential harm or consistent for any treatment group. Equally, all treatment groups reported a similar number of minimal side effects. In Study 2, there was a significant increase in plasma nitrates for both CrN groups by d-7, subsequently abating by d-28. Muscle creatine increased significantly by d-7 in the CrM and CrN-High groups, but then decreased by d-28 for CrN-High. By d-28, there were significant increases in bench press lifting volume (kg) for all groups (PLA, 126.6, 95 % CI 26.3, 226.8; CrM, 194.1, 95 % CI 89.0, 299.2; CrN-Low, 118.3, 95 % CI 26.1, 210.5; CrN-High, 267.2, 95 % CI 175.0, 359.4, kg). Only the CrN-High group was significantly greater than PLA (p power (PLA, 59.0, 95 % CI 4.5, 113.4; CrM, 68.6, 95 % CI 11.4, 125.8; CrN-Low, 40.9, 95 % CI -9.2, 91.0; CrN-High, 60.9, 95 % CI 10.8, 111.1, W) and

  1. Empathy and Emotional Intelligence among Eastern and Western Counsellor Trainees: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young Kaelber, Kara A.; Schwartz, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored degree of empathy and emotional intelligence among Thai (n?=?48) and American (n?=?53) counsellor trainees to determine if differences in Eastern and Western cultural orientations (e.g., interdependent versus independent self-construals) affect foundational counselling skills. Results indicated that Western trainees showed…

  2. Information Activities and Appropriation in Teacher Trainees' Digital, Group-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanell, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This paper reports results from an ethnographic study of teacher trainees' information activities in digital, group-based learning and their relation to the interplay between use and appropriation of digital tools and the learning environment. Method: The participants in the present study are 249 pre-school teacher trainees in…

  3. Choosing a career in paediatrics: do trainees' views change over the first year of specialty training?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodyear, Helen M; Lakshminarayana, Indumathy; Wall, David; Bindal, Taruna

    2014-09-01

    To look at why a regional cohort of UK doctors chose a paediatric career and to ascertain views on their career near the end of training year one. A 20-item questionnaire was sent to all new regional paediatric specialty trainees. Three focus groups were held with trainees near the end of year one to elicit key themes. West Midlands Deanery, UK. Twenty-nine new regional paediatric specialty trainees in year one completed the questionnaire. A total of 15 trainees participated in the focus groups near the end of year one training. Reasons for choosing a paediatric career and factors which further influence career choice for trainees during their first specialty training year. Key influencing factors for choosing paediatrics were enjoying working with children and positive undergraduate experience of the specialty. All trainees had paediatrics as their first choice specialty and undertook a paediatric Foundation post. Near the end of year one, doubts were cast on career aspirations due to seeing middle grade colleagues struggling with work-life balance and a growing feeling that family came first. Senior trainees need to be aware that they act as powerful role models for their more junior colleagues and therefore have an influential role on how juniors perceive a paediatric career. Family friendly flexible working patterns in paediatrics are vital to retain junior trainees. All paediatric staff are role models and need to be enthusiastic, keen to teach and to promote a positive working environment.

  4. Supervising Family Therapy Trainees in Primary Care Medical Settings: Context Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Todd M.; Patterson, Jo Ellen

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to identify and describe four essential skills for effective supervision of family therapy trainees in primary care medical settings. The supervision skills described include: (1) Understand medical culture; (2) Locate the trainee in the treatment system; (3) Investigate the biological/health issues; and (4) Be…

  5. Burnout among Slovenian family medicine trainees: A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polona Selič

    2012-03-01

    Conclusions: The prevalence of burnout syndrome among family medicine trainees is high and consistent with data from other studies among the physicians worldwide using the same instrument. Family medicine trainees are at risk of burnout regardless of their demographic characteristics. Increased workload affects EE and D.

  6. Non-Music Specialist Trainee Primary School Teachers' Confidence in Teaching Music in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Frederick; Biasutti, Michele

    2008-01-01

    Prior research has revealed that non-music specialist trainee primary school teachers lack confidence in teaching music in spite of changes to teacher training and the introduction of music in the National Curriculum in England. The current study investigated the effects on non-music specialist trainee primary teachers' confidence to teach music…

  7. Does interpersonal behavior of psychotherapy trainees differ in private and professional relationships?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fincke, Janna I; Möller, Heidi; Taubner, Svenja

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of trainees' interpersonal behavior on work involvement (WI) and compared their social behavior within professional and private relationships as well as between different psychotherapeutic orientations. The interpersonal scales of the Intrex short-form questionnaire and the Work Involvement Scale (WIS) were used to evaluate two samples of German psychotherapy trainees in psychoanalytic, psychodynamic, and cognitive behavioral therapy training. Trainees from Sample 1 (N = 184) were asked to describe their interpersonal behavior in relation to their patients when filling out the Intrex, whereas trainees from Sample 2 (N = 135) were asked to describe the private relationship with a significant other. Interpersonal affiliation in professional relationships significantly predicted the level of healing involvement, while stress involvement was predicted by interpersonal affiliation and interdependence in trainees' relationships with their patients. Social behavior within professional relationships provided higher correlations with WI than private interpersonal behavior. Significant differences were found between private and professional relation settings in trainees' interpersonal behavior with higher levels of affiliation and interdependence with significant others. Differences between therapeutic orientation and social behavior could only be found when comparing trainees' level of interdependence with the particular relationship setting. Trainees' interpersonal level of affiliation in professional relationships is a predictor for a successful psychotherapeutic development. Vice versa, controlling behavior in professional settings can be understood as a risk factor against psychotherapeutic growth. Both results strengthen an evidence-based approach for competence development during psychotherapy training.

  8. Vocational trainees' views and experiences regarding the learning and teaching of communication skills in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Nuland, Marc; Thijs, Gabie; Van Royen, Paul; Van den Noortgate, Wim; Goedhuys, Jo

    2010-01-01

    To explore the views and experiences of general practice (GP) vocational trainees regarding communication skills (CS) and the teaching and learning of these skills. A purposive sample of second and third (final) year GP trainees took part in six focus group (FG) discussions. Transcripts were coded and analysed in accordance with a grounded theory approach by two investigators using Alas-ti software. Finally results were triangulated by means of semi-structured telephone interviews. The analysis led to three thematic clusters: (1) trainees acknowledge the essential importance of communication skills and identified contextual factors influencing the learning and application of these skills; (2) trainees identified preferences for learning and receiving feedback on their communication skills; and (3) trainees perceived that the assessment of communication skills is subjective. These themes are organised into a framework for a better understanding of trainees' communication skills as part of their vocational training. The framework helps in leading to a better understanding of the way in which trainees learn and apply communication skills. The unique context of vocational training should be taken into account when trainees' communication skills are assessed. The teaching and learning should be guided by a learner-centred approach. The framework is valuable for informing curricular reform and future research.

  9. The British Neurosurgical Trainee Research Collaborative: Five years on.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chari, Aswin; Jamjoom, Aimun A; Edlmann, Ellie; Ahmed, Aminul I; Coulter, Ian C; Ma, Ruichong; May, Paul; Brennan, Paul M; Hutchinson, Peter J A; Kolias, Angelos G

    2018-01-01

    Since its inception in 2012, the British Neurosurgical Trainee Research Collaborative (BNTRC) has established itself as a robust example of a trainee-led research collaborative. This article summarises the work of the collaborative over its first 5 years of existence, outlining the structure, its research projects, impact and future directions.

  10. Improving Workplace Learning of Lifelong Learning Sector Trainee Teachers in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Bronwen

    2014-01-01

    Learning in the teaching workplace is crucial for the development of all trainee teachers. Workplace learning is particularly important for trainee teachers in the lifelong learning sector (LLS) in the UK, the majority of whom are already working as teachers, tutors, trainers or lecturers while undertaking initial teacher education. However,…

  11. Exploring Malaysian Trainee Teachers' Adoption of the Internet as Information Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teck-Chai, Lau; Kim-Hong, Yeoh; Ching-Ching, Choong

    2010-01-01

    This study reports the usage of three commercial Internet search engines in information seeking among trainee teachers at a teacher training institute in Malaysia. It attempts to investigate the information seeking behavior of the trainees via three Internet search engines (Google, Yahoo and MSN) as gateways to information for research in academic…

  12. Teacher Trainees' Strategies for Managing the Behaviours of Students with Special Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Manisah Mohd.; Abdullah, Rozila; Majid, Rosadah Abdul

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine how a group of teacher trainees handled challenging behaviour by students during teaching practice. A total of 35 teacher trainees from the special education programme of a local university were chosen as respondents. A questionnaire based on a 5-point Likert-type scale was administered in this study. The data were…

  13. Reliability and validity of a tool to assess airway management skills in anesthesia trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliya Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The tool designed to assess bag-mask ventilation and tracheal intubation skills in anesthesia trainees demonstrated excellent inter-rater reliability, fair test-retest reliability, and good construct validity. The authors recommend its use for formative and summative assessment of junior anesthesia trainees.

  14. Ethics Education Adherence by Teacher Trainees during Teaching Practice: A Botswana Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moswela, Bernard; Gobagoba, Marina

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a survey conducted to find out the extent to which teacher trainees understand and observe professional ethics. It also sought the contribution of the Faculty of Education and secondary schools make in promoting teacher ethics among trainees on teaching practice. Data were gathered from randomly chosen 90…

  15. Supervision in Language Teaching: A Supervisor's and Three Trainee Teachers' Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahyalar, Eda; Yazici, lkay Çelik

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on the findings from a study which investigated supervision in language teaching from a supervisor's and her three trainee teachers' perspectives. The data in the study were from three sources: 1) audio recordings of the supervisor's feedback sessions with each trainee teacher, 2) audio recording of an interview between the…

  16. Self-Entrustment: How Trainees' Self-Regulated Learning Supports Participation in the Workplace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagasser, Margaretha H.; Kramer, Anneke W. M.; Fluit, Cornelia R. M. G.; van Weel, Chris; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.

    2017-01-01

    Clinical workplaces offer postgraduate trainees a wealth of opportunities to learn from experience. To promote deliberate and meaningful learning self-regulated learning skills are foundational. We explored trainees' learning activities related to patient encounters to better understand what aspects of self-regulated learning contribute to…

  17. Tools for the direct observation and assessment of psychomotor skills in medical trainees: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelovsek, J Eric; Kow, Nathan; Diwadkar, Gouri B

    2013-07-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) Milestone Project mandates programmes to assess the attainment of training outcomes, including the psychomotor (surgical or procedural) skills of medical trainees. The objectives of this study were to determine which tools exist to directly assess psychomotor skills in medical trainees on live patients and to identify the data indicating their psychometric and edumetric properties. An electronic search was conducted for papers published from January 1948 to May 2011 using the PubMed, Education Resource Information Center (ERIC), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and Web of Science electronic databases and the review of references in article bibliographies. A study was included if it described a tool or instrument designed for the direct observation of psychomotor skills in patient care settings by supervisors. Studies were excluded if they referred to tools that assessed only clinical or non-technical skills, involved non-medical health professionals, or assessed skills performed on a simulator. Overall, 4114 citations were screened, 168 (4.1%) articles were reviewed for eligibility and 51 (1.2%) manuscripts were identified as meeting the study inclusion criteria. Three authors abstracted and reviewed studies using a standardised form for the presence of key psychometric and edumetric elements as per ACGME and American Psychological Association (APA) recommendations, and also assigned an overall grade based on the ACGME Committee on Educational Outcome Assessment grading system. A total of 30 tools were identified. Construct validity based on associations between scores and training level was identified in 24 tools, internal consistency in 14, test-retest reliability in five and inter-rater reliability in 20. The modification of attitudes, knowledge or skills was reported using five tools. The seven-item Global Rating Scale and the Procedure-Based Assessment received an

  18. Burnout, stress and satisfaction among Australian and New Zealand radiation oncology trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, John; Rioseco, Pilar

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the incidence of burnout among radiation oncology trainees in Australia and New Zealand and the stress and satisfaction factors related to burnout. A survey of trainees was conducted in mid-2015. There were 42 Likert scale questions on stress, 14 Likert scale questions on satisfaction and the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey assessed burnout. A principal component analysis identified specific stress and satisfaction areas. Categorical variables for the stress and satisfaction factors were computed. Associations between respondent's characteristics and stress and satisfaction subscales were examined by independent sample t-tests and analysis of variance. Effect sizes were calculated using Cohens's d when significant mean differences were observed. This was also done for respondent characteristics and the three burnout subscales. Multiple regression analyses were performed. The response rate was 81.5%. The principal component analysis for stress identified five areas: demands on time, professional development/training, delivery demands, interpersonal demands and administration/organizational issues. There were no significant differences by demographic group or area of interest after P-values were adjusted for the multiple tests conducted. The principal component analysis revealed two satisfaction areas: resources/professional activities and value/delivery of services. There were no significant differences by demographic characteristics or area of interest in the level of satisfaction after P-values were adjusted for the multiple tests conducted. The burnout results revealed 49.5% of respondents scored highly in emotional exhaustion and/or depersonalization and 13.1% had burnout in all three measures. Multiple regression analysis revealed the stress subscales 'demands on time' and 'interpersonal demands' were associated with emotional exhaustion. 'Interpersonal demands' was also associated with depersonalization and correlated negatively

  19. Does Innovation Performance Depend on Economic Growth?: The Case of a Country in Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej H Jasinski

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an attempt to analyze a possible influence of economic growth on innovation performance. Econometric model based on principal component analysis is the research tool. Poland, as a country in transition, is here a case-study. The analysis has confirmed an interesting pattern: in 1989-2007, corporate innovation performance was changing, in principle, in the same direction as macro-economic changes but with a one-to-two-year delay. This is some proof that the innovation activity followed the cyclical development of the national economy. Innovation performance was demand-driven, i.e., pulled by demand resulting from the economy's recovery and high economic growth. So, technological innovation appeared to be highly sensitive to the general economic situation in Poland as a transitional economy. Economic growth seems to be a kind of tag-boat pulling innovation activities in the business sector.Este artículo intenta analizar una posible influencia del crecimiento económico en el desempeño de la innovación. La herramienta de investigación empleada es el modelo econométrico basado en un componente principal de análisis. El estudio de caso es Polonia, una economía en transición. El análisis ha confirmado un patrón interesante: durante el periodo 1989-2007, el desempeño de la innovación cambió, en principio, en la misma dirección que los cambios macroeconómicos pero con un retraso de uno a dos años. Esto muestra de algún modo que la actividad innovadora correspondió al desarrollo cíclico de la economía nacional. El desempeño innovador se orientó por la demanda, es decir, una demanda impulsada por la recuperación económica y el alto crecimiento económico. Por lo tanto, la innovación tecnológica parece ser muy sensible a la situación económica en general de Polonia, como economía en transición. El crecimiento económico parece ser una especie de motor que impulsa las actividades innovadoras del sector de negocios.

  20. Thickness-dependent photocatalytic performance of graphite oxide for degrading organic pollutants under visible light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Junghoon; Chang, Yun Hee; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Park, Sungjin

    2016-04-28

    Photocatalysts use sustainable solar light energy to trigger various catalytic reactions. Metal-free nanomaterials have been suggested as cost-effective and environmentally friendly photocatalysts. In this work, we propose thickness-controlled graphite oxide (GO) as a metal-free photocatalyst, which is produced by exfoliating thick GO particles via stirring and sonication. All GO samples exhibit photocatalytic activity for degrading an organic pollutant, rhodamine B under visible light, and the thickest sample shows the best catalytic performance. UV-vis-NIR diffuse reflectance absorption spectra indicate that thicker GO samples absorb more vis-NIR light than thinner ones. Density-functional theory calculations show that GO has a much smaller band gap than that of single-layer graphene oxide, and thus suggest that the largely-reduced band gap is responsible for this trend of light absorption.

  1. Volume Fraction Dependent Thermal Performance of UAlx-Al Dispersion Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Eui Hyun; Tahk, Young Wook; Kim, Hyun Jung; Oh, Jae Yong; Yim, Jeong Sik [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Unlike U-Al alloys, properties of UAl{sub x}-Al dispersion target can be highly sensitive to volume fraction of UAlx in a target meat due to the interface resistance between target particles and matrix. The interface resistance effects on properties of the target meat including thermal conductivity, thermal expansion coefficient, specific heat, elastic modulus and so on. Thermal performances of a dispersion target meat were theoretically evaluated under normal operation condition of KJRR (Kijang Research Reactor) during short effective full power days (EFPD) of 7 days, based on reported measured thermal conductivities of UAl{sub x}-Al dispersion fuels. Effective thermal conductivity determines maximum temperature of dispersion target plate. And for that volume fraction of UAlx in target meat has to be determined considering manufacturing of target plate without degradation of physical and mechanical characteristics.

  2. Time-dependent performance of soil mix technology stabilized/solidified contaminated site soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Wang, Hailing; Al-Tabbaa, Abir

    2015-04-09

    This paper presents the strength and leaching performance of stabilized/solidified organic and inorganic contaminated site soil as a function of time and the effectiveness of modified clays applied in this project. Field trials of deep soil mixing application of stabilization/solidification (S/S) were performed at a site in Castleford in 2011. A number of binders and addictives were applied in this project including Portland cement (PC), ground granulated blastfurnace slag (GGBS), pulverised fuel ash (PFA), MgO and modified clays. Field trial samples were subjected to unconfined compressive strength (UCS), BS CN 12457 batch leaching test and the extraction of total organics at 28 days and 1.5 years after treatment. The results of UCS test show that the average strength values of mixes increased from 0-3250 kPa at 28 days to 250-4250 kPa at 1.5 years curing time. The BS EN 12457 leachate concentrations of all metals were well below their drinking water standard, except Ni in some mixes exceed its drinking water standard at 0.02 mg/l, suggesting that due to varied nature of binders, not all of them have the same efficiency in treating contaminated soil. The average leachate concentrations of total organics were in the range of 20-160 mg/l at 28 days after treatment and reduced to 18-140 mg/l at 1.5 years. In addition, organo clay (OC)/inorgano-organo clay (IOC) slurries used in this field trial were found to have a negative effect on the strength development, but were very effective in immobilizing heavy metals. The study also illustrates that the surfactants used to modify bentonite in this field trail were not suitable for the major organic pollutants exist in the site soil in this project. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Donor/Acceptor Molecular Orientation-Dependent Photovoltaic Performance in All-Polymer Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ke; Zhang, Rui; Liu, Jiangang; Li, Mingguang; Yu, Xinhong; Xing, Rubo; Han, Yanchun

    2015-11-18

    The correlated donor/acceptor (D/A) molecular orientation plays a crucial role in solution-processed all-polymer solar cells in term of photovoltaic performance. For the conjugated polymers PTB7-th and P(NDI2OD-T2), the preferential molecular orientation of neat PTB7-th films kept face-on regardless of the properties of processing solvents. However, an increasing content of face-on molecular orientation in the neat P(NDI2OD-T2) films could be found by changing processing solvents from chloronaphthalene (CN) and o-dichlorobenzene (oDCB) to chlorobenzene (CB). Besides, the neat P(NDI2OD-T2) films also exhibited a transformation of preferential molecular orientation from face-on to edge-on when extending film drying time by casting in the same solution. Consequently, a distribution diagram of molecular orientation for P(NDI2OD-T2) films was depicted and the same trend could be observed for the PTB7-th/P(NDI2OD-T2) blend films. By manufacture of photovoltaic devices with blend films, the relationship between the correlated D/A molecular orientation and device performance was established. The short-circuit current (Jsc) of devices processed by CN, oDCB, and CB enhanced gradually from 1.24 to 8.86 mA/cm(2) with the correlated D/A molecular orientation changing from face-on/edge-on to face-on/face-on, which could be attributed to facile exciton dissociation at D/A interface with the same molecular orientation. Therefore, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of devices processed by CN, oDCB, and CB improved from 0.53% to 3.52% ultimately.

  4. The trainee leadership blueprint: opportunities, benefits, and a call to action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, Amanda; Block, Cady K; Brown, Daniel S; Sunderaraman, Preeti

    2018-02-01

    Leadership experiences are vital not only to individual long-term career success but also the development, direction, and operation of higher spheres including professional organizations and the field of clinical neuropsychology itself. The present paper presents a blueprint guide for neuropsychology trainees on available opportunities and resources for increasing their involvement in professional governance and developing leadership skills. First, we present a discussion of the benefits of leadership and professional service, including the acquisition of interpersonal skills and new professional competencies, the prospect of recognition and advancement, and the opportunity to participate in advocacy efforts. Then, we present an overview of existing opportunities for involvement, followed by the provision of specific, actionable items for trainees, mentors and leadership committees, and for neuropsychology organizations to ensure continued trainee engagement. These resources can serve as a guide for trainees and early career neuropsychologists seeking to acquire leadership proficiencies, and the recommendations aspire to promote advancement for trainees, professionals, and organizations alike.

  5. Performance, nutritional behavior, and metabolic responses of calves supplemented with forage depend on starch fermentability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojahedi, S; Khorvash, M; Ghorbani, G R; Ghasemi, E; Mirzaei, M; Hashemzadeh-Cigari, F

    2018-05-16

    This study evaluated the interactive effects of forage provision on performance, nutritional behavior, apparent digestibility, rumen fermentation, and blood metabolites of dairy calves when corn grains with different fermentability were used. Sixty 3-d-old Holstein calves were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatments in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement. Dietary treatments were (1) steam-flaked (SF) corn without alfalfa hay (AH) supplementation (SF-NO), (2) SF corn with AH supplementation (SF-AH), (3) cracked (CR) corn without AH supplementation (CR-NO), and (4) CR corn with AH supplementation (CR-AH). All calves received the same amount of pasteurized whole milk and weaned on d 56 of the experiment; the study was terminated on d 70. Steam-flaked corn contained higher amounts of gelatinized starch in comparison with cracked corn (44.1 vs. 12.5% of total starch, respectively). Starter intake was not affected by corn processing methods or AH provision during the pre- or postweaning periods. However, we noted an interaction between corn processing methods and forage supplementation for starter intake during d 31 to 50 of the experiment, where calves fed on SF-AH starter had greater starter intake than those fed SF-NO starter, but the starter intake was not different between CR-NO and CR-AH fed calves. Furthermore, AH increased average daily gain (ADG) of calves fed an SF-based diet but not in calves fed a CR-based diet during the preweaning and overall periods. Interaction between forage provision and time was significant for ADG and feed efficiency, as calves supplemented with forage had higher ADG (0.982 vs. 0.592, respectively) and feed efficiency compared with forage unsupplemented calves at the weaning week. Forage supplementation resulted in more stable ruminal condition compared with nonforage-fed calves, as evidenced by higher ruminal pH (5.71 vs. 5.29, respectively) at postweaning and lower non-nutritive oral behavior around weaning time (55 vs. 70.5 min

  6. Personality-dependent differences in problem-solving performance in a social context reflect foraging strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandberg, Lies; Quinn, John L; Naguib, Marc; van Oers, Kees

    2017-01-01

    Individuals develop innovative behaviours to solve foraging challenges in the face of changing environmental conditions. Little is known about how individuals differ in their tendency to solve problems and in their subsequent use of this solving behaviour in social contexts. Here we investigated whether individual variation in problem-solving performance could be explained by differences in the likelihood of solving the task, or if they reflect differences in foraging strategy. We tested this by studying the use of a novel foraging skill in groups of great tits (Parus major), consisting of three naive individuals with different personality, and one knowledgeable tutor. We presented them with multiple, identical foraging devices over eight trials. Though birds of different personality type did not differ in solving latency; fast and slow explorers showed a steeper increase over time in their solving rate, compared to intermediate explorers. Despite equal solving potential, personality influenced the subsequent use of the skill, as well as the pay-off received from solving. Thus, variation in the tendency to solve the task reflected differences in foraging strategy among individuals linked to their personality. These results emphasize the importance of considering the social context to fully understand the implications of learning novel skills. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Geometry dependent performance of bucky gel actuators: Increasing operating frequency by miniaturization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biso, Maurizio; Ansaldo, Alberto; Ricci, Davide

    2012-01-01

    Bucky gel actuators are one of the most promising type of electrochemical actuators based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs). They are lightweight, they are able to work in air without any liquid electrolyte and require just few volts to operate. In order to find real world applications where bucky gel actuators can outperform conventional motors, there are still some issues to be addressed. One key aspect in CNT-based electrochemical actuators is that their actuation speed is limited by the ability of charging and discharging the device without exceeding the electrochemical stability window of the electrolyte. This speed is macroscopically related with the product of the resistance and the capacitance of the equivalent circuit (circuit time constant), and with the ion diffusion speed inside the active electrodes. To enhance the actuator performance it is necessary to increase the ion drift current in the electrolyte avoiding to significantly raise the voltage at the electrodes and shorten the ion path necessary to charge the bucky gel electrodes. By proper material processing, we have successfully addressed this issue. A reduced thickness of the actuators to one third of the original size results in a one order of magnitude increase both of the strain at higher frequencies and of the maximum operating frequency. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Temperature-dependent performance of all-NbN DC-SQUID magnetometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Quansheng; Wang, Huiwu; Zhang, Qiyu; Wang, Hai; Peng, Wei; Wang, Zhen

    2017-05-01

    Integrated NbN direct current superconducting quantum interference device (DC-SQUID) magnetometers were developed based on high-quality epitaxial NbN/AlN/NbN Josephson junctions for SQUID applications operating at high temperatures. We report the current-voltage and voltage-flux characteristics and the noise performance of the NbN DC-SQUIDs for temperatures ranging from 4.2 to 9 K. The critical current and voltage swing of the DC-SQUIDs decreased by 15% and 25%, respectively, as the temperature was increased from 4.2 to 9 K. The white flux noise of the DC-SQUID magnetometer at 1 kHz increased from 3.9 μΦ0/Hz1/2 at 4.2 K to 4.8 μΦ0/Hz1/2 at 9 K with 23% increase, corresponding to the magnetic field noise of 6.6 and 8.1 fT/Hz1/2, respectively. The results show that NbN DC-SQUIDs improve the tolerance of the operating temperatures and temperature fluctuations in SQUID applications.

  9. Context-dependent enhancement of declarative memory performance following acute psychosocial stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, T; Giesbrecht, T; Jelicic, M; Merckelbach, H

    2007-09-01

    Studies on how acute stress affects learning and memory have yielded inconsistent findings, with some studies reporting enhancing effects while others report impairing effects. Recently, Joëls et al. [Joëls, M., Pu, Z., Wiegert, O., Oitzl, M.S., Krugers, H.J., 2006. Learning under stress: how does it work? Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 10, 152-158] argued that stress will enhance memory only when the memory acquisition phase and stressor share the same spatiotemporal context (i.e., context-congruency). The current study tested this hypothesis by looking at whether context-congruent stress enhances declarative memory performance. Undergraduates were assigned to a personality stress group (n=16), a memory stress group (n=18), or a no-stress control group (n=18). While being exposed to the acute stressor or a control task, participants encoded personality- and memory-related words and were tested for free recall 24h later. Relative to controls, stress significantly enhanced recall of context-congruent words, but only for personality words. This suggests that acute stress may strengthen the consolidation of memory material when the stressor matches the to-be-remembered information in place and time.

  10. Temperature-dependent performance of competitive native and alien invasive plant species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Uhram

    2017-10-01

    To assess the likely impacts of environmental change, the responses of two well-known invasive plant species, native Pueraria lobata and alien Humulus japonicus, to differences in growth temperature were studied in South Korea. Habitat preferences, physiological responses such as photosynthetic rates and chlorophyll contents, growth rates, and nutrient contents were quantified for each species. A competition experiment was conducted to evaluate the temperature preferences of the two species. All results indicated that the alien species H. japonicus can take advantage of elevated temperatures (35 °C) to enhance its competitive advantage against the native species P. lobata. While H. japonicus took advantage of elevated temperatures and preferred high-temperature areas, P. lobata showed reduced performance and dominance in high-temperature areas. Therefore, in future, due to global warming and urbanization, there are possibilities that H. japonicus takes advantage of elevated temperature against P. lobata that could lead to increased H. japonicus coverage over time. Therefore, consistent monitoring of both species especially where P. lobata is dominated are required because both species are found in every continents in the world. Controlling P. lobata requires thorough inspection of H. japonicus presence of the habitat in advance to prevent post P. lobata management invasion of H. japonicus.

  11. Incorporating Scale-Dependent Fracture Stiffness for Improved Reservoir Performance Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, B. R.; Tsenn, M. C.; Homburg, J. M.; Stehle, R. C.; Freysteinson, J. A.; Reese, W. C.

    2017-12-01

    We present a novel technique for predicting dynamic fracture network response to production-driven changes in effective stress, with the potential for optimizing depletion planning and improving recovery prediction in stress-sensitive naturally fractured reservoirs. A key component of the method involves laboratory geomechanics testing of single fractures in order to develop a unique scaling relationship between fracture normal stiffness and initial mechanical aperture. Details of the workflow are as follows: tensile, opening mode fractures are created in a variety of low matrix permeability rocks with initial, unstressed apertures in the micrometer to millimeter range, as determined from image analyses of X-ray CT scans; subsequent hydrostatic compression of these fractured samples with synchronous radial strain and flow measurement indicates that both mechanical and hydraulic aperture reduction varies linearly with the natural logarithm of effective normal stress; these stress-sensitive single-fracture laboratory observations are then upscaled to networks with fracture populations displaying frequency-length and length-aperture scaling laws commonly exhibited by natural fracture arrays; functional relationships between reservoir pressure reduction and fracture network porosity, compressibility and directional permeabilities as generated by such discrete fracture network modeling are then exported to the reservoir simulator for improved naturally fractured reservoir performance prediction.

  12. Geometry dependent performance of bucky gel actuators: Increasing operating frequency by miniaturization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biso, Maurizio; Ansaldo, Alberto; Ricci, Davide [Robotics, Brain and Cognitive Sciences Department, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Morego 30, 16163 Genoa (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    Bucky gel actuators are one of the most promising type of electrochemical actuators based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs). They are lightweight, they are able to work in air without any liquid electrolyte and require just few volts to operate. In order to find real world applications where bucky gel actuators can outperform conventional motors, there are still some issues to be addressed. One key aspect in CNT-based electrochemical actuators is that their actuation speed is limited by the ability of charging and discharging the device without exceeding the electrochemical stability window of the electrolyte. This speed is macroscopically related with the product of the resistance and the capacitance of the equivalent circuit (circuit time constant), and with the ion diffusion speed inside the active electrodes. To enhance the actuator performance it is necessary to increase the ion drift current in the electrolyte avoiding to significantly raise the voltage at the electrodes and shorten the ion path necessary to charge the bucky gel electrodes. By proper material processing, we have successfully addressed this issue. A reduced thickness of the actuators to one third of the original size results in a one order of magnitude increase both of the strain at higher frequencies and of the maximum operating frequency. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  13. Improvements on neuromuscular performance with caffeine ingestion depend on the time-of-day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Rodríguez, Ricardo; Pallarés, Jesús G; López-Gullón, José María; López-Samanes, Álvaro; Fernández-Elías, Valentín E; Ortega, Juan F

    2015-05-01

    To determine whether the ergogenic effects of caffeine ingestion on neuromuscular performance are similar when ingestion takes place in the morning and in the afternoon. Double blind, cross-over, randomized, placebo controlled design. Thirteen resistance-trained males carried out bench press and full squat exercises against four incremental loads (25%, 50%, 75% and 90% 1RM), at maximal velocity. Trials took place 60 min after ingesting either 6 mg kg(-1) of caffeine or placebo. Two trials took place in the morning (AMPLAC and AMCAFF) and two in the afternoon (PMPLAC and PMCAFF), all separated by 36-48 h. Tympanic temperature, plasma caffeine concentration and side-effects were measured. Plasma caffeine increased similarly during AMCAFF and PMCAFF. Tympanic temperature was lower in the mornings without caffeine effects (36.7±0.4 vs. 37.0±0.5°C for AM vs. PM; pperformance, but increases the rate of negative side-effects reported. Copyright © 2014 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A survey of UK optometry trainees' smoking cessation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorencatto, Fabiana; Harper, Alice M; Francis, Jill J; Lawrenson, John G

    2016-07-01

    Smoking is a risk factor for a number of eye conditions, including age-related macular degeneration, cataracts and thyroid eye disease. Smoking cessation interventions have been shown to be highly cost-effective when delivered by a range of healthcare professionals. Optometrists are well placed to deliver smoking cessation advice to a wide population of otherwise healthy smokers. Yet optometrists remain a relatively neglected healthcare professional group in smoking cessation research and policy. Surveys of UK medical/nursing schools and of optometrists' training internationally demonstrate significant deficits in current curricular coverage regarding smoking cessation. This study aimed to identify the extent of smoking cessation training in UK optometry trainees' undergraduate and pre-registration training. All undergraduate optometry schools in the UK (n = 9) were invited to participate in a web-based survey of their curricular coverage and assessment related to smoking cessation, and of perceived barriers to delivering smoking cessation training. A content analysis of the College of Optometrists Scheme for Registration Trainee Handbook 2014 was conducted to identify competence indicators related to smoking cessation. Nine undergraduate optometry schools (100%) responded to the survey. The majority reported dedicating limited hours (0-3) to teaching smoking cessation, and predominantly focused on teaching the harmful effects of smoking (89%). Only one school provides practical skills training for delivering evidence-based smoking cessation interventions, including very brief advice. The majority of schools (78%) reported that they did not formally examine students on their knowledge or skills for supporting smoking cessation, and rated confidence in their graduates' abilities to deliver smoking cessation interventions as 'poor' (78%). Lack of knowledge amongst staff was identified as the key barrier to teaching about smoking cessation support. The pre

  15. A deterministic guide for material and mode dependence of on-chip electro-optic modulator performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Rubab; Suer, Can; Ma, Zhizhen; Sarpkaya, Ibrahim; Khurgin, Jacob B.; Agarwal, Ritesh; Sorger, Volker J.

    2017-10-01

    Electro-optic modulation is a key function in optical data communication and possible future optical computing engines. The performance of modulators intricately depends on the interaction between the actively modulated material and the propagating waveguide mode. While high-performing modulators were demonstrated before, the approaches were taken as ad-hoc. Here we show the first systematic investigation to incorporate a holistic analysis for high-performance and ultra-compact electro-optic modulators on-chip. We show that intricate interplay between active modulation material and optical mode plays a key role in the device operation. Based on physical tradeoffs such as index modulation, loss, optical confinement factors and slow-light effects, we find that bias-material-mode regions exist where high phase modulation and high loss (absorption) modulation is found. This work paves the way for a holistic design rule of electro-optic modulators for on-chip integration.

  16. Harnessing technology to provide the support that trainees require to write high quality reflective statements\\ud

    OpenAIRE

    Mawson, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Trainees work within schools spending 80% of their time away from University. The one day a week during which they are based at Warwick is full of content delivery, subject knowledge improvement and pedagogy training. The course uses ICT to support trainees, through Moodle as the VLE for online course delivery and Mahara as the e-portfolio for assessment, where trainees display their evidence against the eight teaching standards. Trainees produce an e-portfolio where they write reflective sta...

  17. LCLS X-Ray FEL Output Performance in the Presence of Highly Time-Dependent Undulator Wakefields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bane, Karl L.F.; Emma, Paul; Huang, Heinz-Dieter Nuhn; Stupakov, Gennady; Fawley, William M.; Reiche, Sven

    2005-01-01

    Energy loss due to wakefields within a long undulator, if not compensated by an appropriate tapering of the magnetic field strength, can degrade the FEL process by detuning the resonant FEL frequency. The wakefields arise from the vacuum chamber wall resistivity, its surface roughness, and abrupt changes in its aperture. For LCLS parameters, the resistive-wall component is the most critical and depends upon the chamber material (e.g., Cu) and its radius. Of recent interest[1] is the so-called ''AC'' component of the resistive-wall wake which can lead to strong variations on very short timescales (e.g., ∼ 20 0fs). To study the expected performance of the LCLS in the presence of these wakefields, we have made an extensive series of start-to-end SASE simulations with tracking codes PARMELA and ELEGANT, and time-dependent FEL simulation codes GENESIS1.3 and GINGER. We discuss the impact of the wakefield losses upon output energy, spectral bandwidth, and temporal envelope of the output FEL pulse, as well as the benefits of a partial compensation of the time-dependent wake losses obtained with a slight z-dependent taper in the undulator field. We compare the taper results to those predicted analytically[2

  18. Building on prior knowledge: schema-dependent encoding processes relate to academic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kesteren, Marlieke T R; Rijpkema, Mark; Ruiter, Dirk J; Morris, Richard G M; Fernández, Guillén

    2014-10-01

    The acquisition and retention of conceptual knowledge is more effective in well-structured curricula that provide an optimal conceptual framework for learning new material. However, the neural mechanisms by which preexisting conceptual schemas facilitate learning are not yet well understood despite their fundamental importance. A preexisting schema has been shown to enhance memory by influencing the balance between activity within the medial-temporal lobe and the medial pFC during mnemonic processes such as encoding, consolidation, and retrieval. Specifically, correctly encoding and retrieving information that is related to preexisting schemas appears rather related to medial prefrontal processing, whereas information unrelated or inconsistent with preexisting schemas rather relates to enhanced medial temporal processing and enhanced interaction between these structures. To further investigate interactions between these regions during conceptual encoding in a real-world university setting, we probed human brain activity and connectivity using fMRI during educationally relevant conceptual encoding carefully embedded within two course programs. Early second-year undergraduate biology and education students were scanned while encoding new facts that were either related or unrelated to the preexisting conceptual knowledge they had acquired during their first year of study. Subsequently, they were tested on their knowledge of these facts 24 hr later. Memory scores were better for course-related information, and this enhancement was associated with larger medial-prefrontal, but smaller medial-temporal subsequent memory effects. These activity differences went along with decreased functional interactions between these regions. Furthermore, schema-related medial-prefrontal subsequent memory effects measured during this experiment were found to be predictive of second-year course performance. These results, obtained in a real-world university setting, reveal brain

  19. Short-term Retention of Relational Memory in Amnesia Revisited: Accurate Performance Depends on Hippocampal Integrity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia T.S. Yee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, it has been proposed that the hippocampus and adjacent medial temporal lobe cortical structures are selectively critical for long-term declarative memory, which entails memory for inter-item and item-context relationships. Whether the hippocampus might also contribute to short-term retention of relational memory representations has remained controversial. In two experiments, we revisit this question by testing memory for relationships among items embedded in scenes using a standard working memory trial structure in which a sample stimulus is followed by a brief delay and the corresponding test stimulus. In each experimental block, eight trials using different exemplars of the same scene were presented. The exemplars contained the same items but with different spatial relationships among them. By repeating the pictures across trials, any potential contributions of item or scene memory to performance were minimized, and relational memory could be assessed more directly than has been done previously. When test displays were presented, participants indicated whether any of the item-location relationships had changed. Then, regardless of their responses (and whether any item did change its location, participants indicated on a forced-choice test, which item might have moved, guessing if necessary. Amnesic patients were impaired on the change detection test, and were frequently unable to specify the change after having reported correctly that a change had taken place. Comparison participants, by contrast, frequently identified the change even when they failed to report the mismatch, an outcome that speaks to the sensitivity of the change specification measure. These results confirm past reports of hippocampal contributions to short-term retention of relational memory representations, and suggest that the role of the hippocampus in memory has more to do with relational memory requirements than the length of a retention interval.

  20. Morphology-Dependent Trap Formation in High Performance Polymer Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Beiley, Zach M.

    2011-06-28

    Bulk heterojunction solar cells (BHJs) based on poly[N-9″-hepta- decanyl-2,7-carbazole- alt -5,5-(4′,7′-di-2-thienyl-2′, 1′,3′-benzothiadiazole)] (PCDTBT) can have internal quantum efficiencies approaching 100% but require active layers that are too thin to absorb more than ∼70% of the above band gap light. When the active layer thickness is increased so that the cell absorbs more light, the fi ll factor and open circuit voltage decrease rapidly, so that the overall power conversion efficiency decreases. We fi nd that hole-traps in the polymer, which we characterize using space-charge limited current measurements, play an important role in the performance of PCDTBT-based BHJs and may limit the active layer thickness. Recombination due to carrier trapping is not often considered in BHJs because it is not believed to be a dominant loss mechanism in the "fruit-fl y" P3HT system. Furthermore, we show that in contrast to P3HT, PCDTBT has only weak short-range molecular order, and that annealing at temperatures above the glass transition decreases the order in the π-π stacking. The decrease in structural order is matched by the movement of hole-traps deeper into the band gap, so that thermal annealing worsens hole transport in the polymer and reduces the efficiency of PCDTBTbased BHJs. These fi ndings suggest that P3HT is not prototypical of the new class of high efficiency polymers, and that further improvement of BHJ efficiencies will necessitate the study of high efficiency polymers with low structural order. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Morphology-Dependent Trap Formation in High Performance Polymer Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Beiley, Zach M.; Hoke, Eric T.; Noriega, Rodrigo; Dacuñ a, Javier; Burkhard, George F.; Bartelt, Jonathan A.; Salleo, Alberto; Toney, Michael F.; McGehee, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Bulk heterojunction solar cells (BHJs) based on poly[N-9″-hepta- decanyl-2,7-carbazole- alt -5,5-(4′,7′-di-2-thienyl-2′, 1′,3′-benzothiadiazole)] (PCDTBT) can have internal quantum efficiencies approaching 100% but require active layers that are too thin to absorb more than ∼70% of the above band gap light. When the active layer thickness is increased so that the cell absorbs more light, the fi ll factor and open circuit voltage decrease rapidly, so that the overall power conversion efficiency decreases. We fi nd that hole-traps in the polymer, which we characterize using space-charge limited current measurements, play an important role in the performance of PCDTBT-based BHJs and may limit the active layer thickness. Recombination due to carrier trapping is not often considered in BHJs because it is not believed to be a dominant loss mechanism in the "fruit-fl y" P3HT system. Furthermore, we show that in contrast to P3HT, PCDTBT has only weak short-range molecular order, and that annealing at temperatures above the glass transition decreases the order in the π-π stacking. The decrease in structural order is matched by the movement of hole-traps deeper into the band gap, so that thermal annealing worsens hole transport in the polymer and reduces the efficiency of PCDTBTbased BHJs. These fi ndings suggest that P3HT is not prototypical of the new class of high efficiency polymers, and that further improvement of BHJ efficiencies will necessitate the study of high efficiency polymers with low structural order. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Simulation for Teaching and Assessment of Nodule Perception on Chest Radiography in Nonradiology Health Care Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auffermann, William F; Henry, Travis S; Little, Brent P; Tigges, Stefan; Tridandapani, Srini

    2015-11-01

    Simulation has been used as an educational and assessment tool in several fields, generally involving training of physical skills. To date, simulation has found limited application in teaching and assessment of skills related to image perception and interpretation. The goal of this pilot study was to evaluate the feasibility of simulation as a tool for teaching and assessment of skills related to perception of nodules on chest radiography. This study received an exemption from the institutional review board. Subjects consisted of nonradiology health care trainees. Subjects underwent training and assessment of pulmonary nodule identification skills on chest radiographs at simulated radiology workstations. Subject performance was quantified by changes in area under the localization receiver operating characteristic curve. At the conclusion of the study, all subjects were given a questionnaire with five questions comparing learning at a simulated workstation with training using conventional materials. Statistical significance for questionnaire responses was tested using the Wilcoxon signed rank test. Subjects demonstrated statistically significant improvement in nodule identification after training at a simulated radiology workstation (change in area under the curve, 0.1079; P = .015). Subjects indicated that training on simulated radiology workstations was preferable to conventional training methods for all questions; P values for all questions were less than .01. Simulation may be a useful tool for teaching and assessment of skills related to medical image perception and interpretation. Further study is needed to determine which skills and trainee populations may be most amenable to training and assessment using simulation. Copyright © 2015 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Developing Skilled Doctor-Patient Communication in the Workplace: A Qualitative Study of the Experiences of Trainees and Clinical Supervisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroldi, Esther; Veldhuijzen, Wemke; Geelen, Kristel; Muris, Jean; Bareman, Frits; Bueving, Herman; van der Weijden, Trudy; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2017-01-01

    To inform the development of recommendations to facilitate learning of skilled doctor-patient communication in the workplace, this qualitative study explores experiences of trainees and supervisors regarding how trainees learn communication and how supervisors support trainees' learning in the workplace. We conducted a qualitative study in a…

  4. BJPsych Bulletin author mentoring scheme - helping trainees become published authors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimm, Jonathan; Galbraith, Niall

    2016-02-01

    The publishing world is changing rapidly. Innovations include the move to open access, the rise of social media and the transition to digitalisation. In the light of these developments and with ever-increasing pressures on early career psychiatrists and trainees to publish papers in journals with a recognised pedigree, the BJPsych Bulletin is piloting an author mentoring scheme. Mentors will help clinicians and aspiring academics develop articles from a pedestrian manuscript to one that will hopefully provoke important debate and aid changes in current practices. The scheme will run on a trial basis for approximately 12 months and will then be reviewed. Mentoring has been found to have an important effect of research output including publication and grant success; the hope is that this new initiative at the BJPsych Bulletin will result in such dividends to all involved.

  5. To grade or not to grade: balancing formative and summative assessment in post-16 teacher trainee observations

    OpenAIRE

    Matthews, Richard; Noyes, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The issue of whether trainee teachers in the post-16 sector should have their classroom practice graded has been debated for a number of years. The case for training courses retaining an emphasis on written and verbal ‘developmental’ feedback at the expense of ‘judgements’ appears to be lost. This article is set within the context of an ever-growing culture of performativity in English further education colleges, where grading is regarded as an essential requirement to ensure high quality tea...

  6. Non-technical skills of surgical trainees and experienced surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostlow, H; Marlow, N; Thomas, M J W; Hewett, P J; Kiermeier, A; Babidge, W; Altree, M; Pena, G; Maddern, G

    2017-05-01

    In addition to technical expertise, surgical competence requires effective non-technical skills to ensure patient safety and maintenance of standards. Recently the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons implemented a new Surgical Education and Training (SET) curriculum that incorporated non-technical skills considered essential for a competent surgeon. This study sought to compare the non-technical skills of experienced surgeons who completed their training before the introduction of SET with the non-technical skills of more recent trainees. Surgical trainees and experienced surgeons undertook a simulated scenario designed to challenge their non-technical skills. Scenarios were video recorded and participants were assessed using the Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS) scoring system. Participants were divided into subgroups according to years of experience and their NOTSS scores were compared. For most NOTSS elements, mean scores increased initially, peaking around the time of Fellowship, before decreasing roughly linearly over time. There was a significant downward trend in score with increasing years since being awarded Fellowship for six of the 12 NOTSS elements: considering options (score -0·015 units per year), implementing and reviewing decisions (-0·020 per year), establishing a shared understanding (-0·014 per year), setting and maintaining standards (-0·024 per year), supporting others (-0·031 per year) and coping with pressure (-0·015 per year). The drop in NOTSS score was unexpected and highlights that even experienced surgeons are not immune to deficiencies in non-technical skills. Consideration should be given to continuing professional development programmes focusing on non-technical skills, regardless of the level of professional experience. © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Emergencies in radiology: a survey of radiologist and radiology trainees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig, Simon; Naidoo, Parmanand

    2014-01-01

    Emergencies in radiology are infrequent but potentially lethal. Australian and New Zealand radiologists are advised to undergo resuscitation training at least every three years; however, little is known about their experience and confidence in managing common emergencies relevant to their clinical practice. This paper describes the current experience and confidence of radiologists and radiology trainees in Australia and New Zealand in the management of common medical emergencies. A cross-sectional online survey of trainees and fellows of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiology collected data on training and learning preferences relating to resuscitation and life-support skills, access to emergency medical care, and knowledge, confidence and ability in managing a variety of medical emergencies. There were 602 responses to the survey (response rate 23.4%). The majority of respondents were interested in learning more about the management of contrast reactions, cardiac arrest, ischaemic chest pain and basic life support. Self-rated knowledge, confidence and ability were higher in respondents who had completed life-support training within the previous three years. In this group, however, more than 40% rated their ability at managing contrast reactions as poor or fair, while more than 60% rated their ability as poor or fair for management of cardiac arrest, basic life support, advanced life support and dosing of adrenaline. Preferred resuscitation training modalities included simulation, small-group tutorials and workshops. Self-reported level of skill and expertise in the management of potential emergencies in radiology is suboptimal among a large number of respondents. Consideration should be given to addressing this by improving access to specific training.

  8. Reading speed, comprehension and eye movements while reading Japanese novels: evidence from untrained readers and cases of speed-reading trainees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromitsu Miyata

    . The trainees overall tended to show poor performance influenced by the speed-accuracy trade-off, although this trade-off may be reduced in the case of at least one high-level expert.

  9. Thermal dependence of sprint performance in the lizard Psammodromus algirus along a 2200-meter elevational gradient: Cold-habitat lizards do not perform better at low temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora-Camacho, Francisco Javier; Rubiño-Hispán, María Virtudes; Reguera, Senda; Moreno-Rueda, Gregorio

    2015-08-01

    Sprint speed has a capital relevance in most animals' fitness, mainly for fleeing from predators. Sprint performance is maximal within a certain range of body temperatures in ectotherms, whose thermal upkeep relies on exogenous thermal sources. Ectotherms can respond to diverse thermal environments either by shifting their thermal preferences or maintaining them through different adaptive mechanisms. Here, we tested whether maximum sprint speed of a lizard that shows conservative thermal ecology along a 2200-meter elevational gradient differs with body temperature in lizards from different elevations. Lizards ran faster at optimum than at suboptimum body temperature. Notably, high-elevation lizards were not faster than mid- and low-elevation lizards at suboptimum body temperature, despite their low-quality thermal environment. This result suggests that both preferred body temperature and thermal dependence of speed performance are co-adapted along the elevational gradient. High-elevation lizards display a number of thermoregulatory strategies that allow them to achieve high optimum body temperatures in a low thermal-quality habitat and thus maximize speed performance. As for reproductive condition, we did not find any effect of it on sprint speed, or any significant interaction with elevation or body temperature. However, strikingly, gravid females were significantly slower than males and non-gravid females at suboptimum temperature, but performed similarly well at optimal temperature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. How can educators support general practice (GP) trainees to develop resilience to prevent burnout?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Bryony; Macdonald, Alexandra; Scallan, Samantha; Crane, Sue

    2016-11-01

    Burnout impacts adversely on professional and personal life, and holds implications for patient care. Current research on burnout mainly focuses on established general practitioners but it is unclear how early the signs of burnout really start. This work seeks to identify whether specific GP trainee groups are particularly at risk of burnout and the aspects of training they find stressful. A longitudinal cohort study, collecting qualitative and quantitative data through a single mode of data collection (questionnaire) took place with trainees from all GP training years (ST1-3), across a vocational training scheme (n = 48). Data gathered included the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory (OLBI). Higher than anticipated levels of burnout were displayed by all trainees. A sub-group self reporting higher levels of burnout comprised all-female, UK-trained-at-undergraduate GP trainees, with a partner but no children. Top reported stressors included knowledge/uncertainty, workload/time pressures and ePortfolio. Less than 50% of trainees perceived their burnout levels to be as high as their OLBI showing potential lack of insight. This research demonstrates that high levels of burnout are experienced in GP trainees as early as the first year of training. Early identification of burnout amongst trainees is essential by GP educators to help protect the future GP workforce.

  11. Does interpersonal behaviour of psychotherapy trainees differ in private and professional relationships?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janna Ida Fincke

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of trainees' interpersonal behaviour on Work Involvement (WI and compared their social behaviour within professional and private relationships as well as between different psychotherapeutic orientations. Methods: The interpersonal scales of the Intrex short-form questionnaire and the Work Involvement Scale (WIS were used to evaluate two samples of German psychotherapy trainees in psychoanalytic (PA, psychodynamic (PD and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT training. Trainees from sample 1 (N = 184 were asked to describe their interpersonal behaviour in relation to their patients when filling out the Intrex, whereas trainees from sample 2 (N = 135 were asked to describe the private relationship with a significant other. Results: Interpersonal affiliation in professional relationships significantly predicted the level of Healing Involvement (HI, while Stress Involvement (SI was predicted by interpersonal affiliation and interdependence in trainees' relationships with their patients. Social behaviour within professional relationships provided higher correlations with WI than private interpersonal behaviour. Significant differences were found between private and professional relation settings in trainees’ interpersonal behaviour with higher levels of affiliation and interdependence with significant others. Differences between therapeutic orientation and social behaviour could only be found when comparing trainees' level of interdependence with the particular relationship setting. Conclusion: Trainees' interpersonal level of affiliation in professional relationships is a predictor for a successful psychotherapeutic development. Vice versa, controlling behaviour in professional settings can be understood as a risk factor against psychotherapeutic growth. Both results strengthen an evidence-based approach for competence development during psychotherapy training.

  12. 2015 American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology (AACN) student affairs committee survey of neuropsychology trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteside, Douglas M; Guidotti Breting, Leslie M; Butts, Alissa M; Hahn-Ketter, Amanda E; Osborn, Katie; Towns, Stephanie J; Barisa, Mark; Santos, Octavio A; Smith, Daniel

    2016-07-01

    Surveys of practicing neuropsychologists have been conducted for years; however, there have been no comprehensive surveys of neuropsychology trainees, which may result in important issues being overlooked by the profession. This survey assessed trainees' experiences in areas such as student debt, professional development, and training satisfaction. Survey items were written by a task force of the AACN Student Affairs Committee (SAC), and neuropsychology trainees were recruited via neuropsychology-focused listservs. In total, 344 trainees completed the survey (75% female) and included participants from every region of the US and Canada. Based on the survey questions, nearly half of all trainees (47%) indicated financial factors were the greatest limitation in their training. Student debt had a bimodal distribution; 32.7% had minimal debt, but 45% had debt >$100,000. In contrast, expected starting salaries were modest, but consistent with findings ($80-100,000). While almost all trainees intended to pursue board certification (97% through ABPP), many were 'not at all' or only 'somewhat' familiar with the process. Results indicated additional critical concerns beyond those related to debt and lack of familiarity with board certification procedures. The results will inform SAC conference programming and the profession on the current 'state of the trainees' in neuropsychology.

  13. The knowledge and attitudes of orthodontic trainees towards orthodontic therapists: a national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sameer; Mack, Gavin

    2017-09-01

    To assess the knowledge and attitudes of orthodontic trainees towards orthodontic therapists (OTs) in the UK. Cross-sectional survey. UK-based orthodontic trainees. An electronic survey was sent to all members of the Training Grades Group of the British Orthodontic Society assessing exposure to OTs and their knowledge regarding current supervision guidelines and scope of practice. Attitudes towards OTs were also explored. Seventy-six responses (response rate 57%) were returned. Nearly 90% of trainees had no formal training regarding OTs. A total of 15.5% were aware of the correct current supervision guidelines and there was large variation in the knowledge of OTs' scope of practice. The majority of trainees were happy to supervise OTs, but only 22.4% felt prepared for this during training. In total, 63% of trainees felt that OTs could impact their own future job prospects. Currently, there is minimal formal training provided to trainees regarding the role of OTs. This is reflected in the lack of knowledge regarding supervision guidelines and scope of practice. Overall, trainees felt OTs were positive for the workforce but were concerned regarding the impact of their own future employment.

  14. Short-term memory of motor network performance via activity-dependent potentiation of Na+/K+ pump function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Yan; Sillar, Keith T

    2012-03-20

    Brain networks memorize previous performance to adjust their output in light of past experience. These activity-dependent modifications generally result from changes in synaptic strengths or ionic conductances, and ion pumps have only rarely been demonstrated to play a dynamic role. Locomotor behavior is produced by central pattern generator (CPG) networks and modified by sensory and descending signals to allow for changes in movement frequency, intensity, and duration, but whether or how the CPG networks recall recent activity is largely unknown. In Xenopus frog tadpoles, swim bout duration correlates linearly with interswim interval, suggesting that the locomotor network retains a short-term memory of previous output. We discovered an ultraslow, minute-long afterhyperpolarization (usAHP) in network neurons following locomotor episodes. The usAHP is mediated by an activity- and sodium spike-dependent enhancement of electrogenic Na(+)/K(+) pump function. By integrating spike frequency over time and linking the membrane potential of spinal neurons to network performance, the usAHP plays a dynamic role in short-term motor memory. Because Na(+)/K(+) pumps are ubiquitously expressed in neurons of all animals and because sodium spikes inevitably accompany network activity, the usAHP may represent a phylogenetically conserved but largely overlooked mechanism for short-term memory of neural network function. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dependency of human target detection performance on clutter and quality of supporting image analysis algorithms in a video surveillance task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Samuel; Dunau, Patrick; Wellig, Peter; Stein, Karin

    2017-10-01

    Background: In target detection, the success rates depend strongly on human observer performances. Two prior studies tested the contributions of target detection algorithms and prior training sessions. The aim of this Swiss-German cooperation study was to evaluate the dependency of human observer performance on the quality of supporting image analysis algorithms. Methods: The participants were presented 15 different video sequences. Their task was to detect all targets in the shortest possible time. Each video sequence showed a heavily cluttered simulated public area from a different viewing angle. In each video sequence, the number of avatars in the area was altered to 100, 150 and 200 subjects. The number of targets appearing was kept at 10%. The number of marked targets varied from 0, 5, 10, 20 up to 40 marked subjects while keeping the positive predictive value of the detection algorithm at 20%. During the task, workload level was assessed by applying an acoustic secondary task. Detection rates and detection times for the targets were analyzed using inferential statistics. Results: The study found Target Detection Time to increase and Target Detection Rates to decrease with increasing numbers of avatars. The same is true for the Secondary Task Reaction Time while there was no effect on Secondary Task Hit Rate. Furthermore, we found a trend for a u-shaped correlation between the numbers of markings and RTST indicating increased workload. Conclusion: The trial results may indicate useful criteria for the design of training and support of observers in observational tasks.

  16. Performance study of a PET scanner based on monolithic scintillators for different DoI-dependent methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preziosi, E.; Sánchez, S.; González, A.J.; Rodriguez-Alvarez, M.J.; González-Montoro, A.; Moliner, L.; Benlloch, J.M.; Pani, R.; Borrazzo, C.; Bettiol, M.

    2016-01-01

    One of the technical objectives of the MindView project is developing a brain-dedicated PET insert based on monolithic scintillation crystals. It will be inserted in MRI systems with the purpose to obtain simultaneous PET and MRI brain images. High sensitivity, high image quality performance and accurate detection of the Depth-of-Interaction (DoI) of the 511keV photons are required. We have developed a DoI estimation method, dedicated to monolithic scintillators, allowing continuous DoI estimation and a DoI-dependent algorithm for the estimation of the photon planar impact position, able to improve the single module imaging capabilities. In this work, through experimental measurements, the proposed methods have been used for the estimation of the impact positions within the monolithic crystal block. We have evaluated the PET system performance following the NEMA NU 4-2008 protocol by reconstructing the images using the STIR 3D platform. The results obtained with two different methods, providing discrete and continuous DoI information, are compared with those obtained from an algorithm without DoI capabilities and with the ideal response of the detector. The proposed DoI-dependent imaging methods show clear improvements in the spatial resolution (FWHM) of reconstructed images, allowing to obtain values from 2mm (at the center FoV) to 3mm (at the FoV edges).

  17. Benefits of flooding-induced aquatic adventitious roots depend on the duration of submergence: linking plant performance to root functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qian; Huber, Heidrun; Beljaars, Simone J M; Birnbaum, Diana; de Best, Sander; de Kroon, Hans; Visser, Eric J W

    2017-07-01

    Temporal flooding is a common environmental stress for terrestrial plants. Aquatic adventitious roots (aquatic roots) are commonly formed in flooding-tolerant plant species and are generally assumed to be beneficial for plant growth by supporting water and nutrient uptake during partial flooding. However, the actual contribution of these roots to plant performance under flooding has hardly been quantified. As the investment into aquatic root development in terms of carbohydrates may be costly, these costs may - depending on the specific environmental conditions - offset the beneficial effects of aquatic roots. This study tested the hypothesis that the balance between potential costs and benefits depends on the duration of flooding, as the benefits are expected to outweigh the costs in long-term but not in short-term flooding. The contribution of aquatic roots to plant performance was tested in Solanum dulcamara during 1-4 weeks of partial submergence and by experimentally manipulating root production. Nutrient uptake by aquatic roots, transpiration and photosynthesis were measured in plants differing in aquatic root development to assess the specific function of these roots. As predicted, flooded plants benefited from the presence of aquatic roots. The results showed that this was probably due to the contribution of roots to resource uptake. However, these beneficial effects were only present in long-term but not in short-term flooding. This relationship could be explained by the correlation between nutrient uptake and the flooding duration-dependent size of the aquatic root system. The results indicate that aquatic root formation is likely to be selected for in habitats characterized by long-term flooding. This study also revealed only limited costs associated with adventitious root formation, which may explain the maintenance of the ability to produce aquatic roots in habitats characterized by very rare or short flooding events. © The Author 2017. Published by

  18. Numerical simulation of radioisotope's dependency on containment performance for large dry PWR containment under severe accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehboob, Khurram, E-mail: khurramhrbeu@gmail.com [College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Harbin Engineering University, 145-31 Nantong Street, Nangang District, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Xinrong, Cao [College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Harbin Engineering University, 145-31 Nantong Street, Nangang District, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Ahmed, Raheel [College of Automation, Harbin Engineering University, 145-31 Nantong Street, Nangang District, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China); Ali, Majid [College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Harbin Engineering University, 145-31 Nantong Street, Nangang District, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150001 (China)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • Calculation and comparison of activity of BURN-UP code with ORIGEN2 code. • Development of SASTC computer code. • Radioisotopes dependency on containment ESFs. • Mitigation in atmospheric release with ESFs operation. • Variation in radioisotopes source term with spray flow and pH value. -- Abstract: During the core melt accidents large amount of fission products can be released into the containment building. These fission products escape into the environment to contribute in accident source term. The mitigation in environmental release is demanded for such radiological consequences. Thus, countermeasures to source term, mitigations of release of radioactivity have been studied for 1000 MWe PWR reactor. The procedure of study is divided into five steps: (1) calculation and verification of core inventory, evaluated by BURN-UP code, (2) containment modeling based on radioactivity removal factors, (3) selection of potential accidents initiates the severe accident, (4) calculation of release of radioactivity, (5) study the dependency of release of radioactivity on containment engineering safety features (ESFs) inducing mitigation. Loss of coolant accident (LOCA), small break LOCA and flow blockage accidents (FBA) are selected as initiating accidents. The mitigation effect of ESFs on source term has been studied against ESFs performance. Parametric study of release of radioactivity has been carried out by modeling and simulating the containment parameters in MATLAB, which takes BURN-UP outcomes as input along with the probabilistic data. The dependency of iodine and aerosol source term on boric and caustic acid spray has been determined. The variation in source term mitigation with the variation of containment spray flow rate and pH values have been studied. The variation in containment retention factor (CRF) has also been studied with the ESF performance. A rapid decrease in source term is observed with the increase in pH value.

  19. Are factors related to dual-task performance in people with Parkinson's disease dependent on the type of dual task?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strouwen, Carolien; Molenaar, Esther A L M; Keus, Samyra H J; Münks, Liesbeth; Heremans, Elke; Vandenberghe, Wim; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Nieuwboer, Alice

    2016-02-01

    Impaired dual-task performance significantly impacts upon functional mobility in people with Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of this study was to identify determinants of dual-task performance in people with PD in three different dual tasks to assess their possible task-dependency. We recruited 121 home-dwelling patients with PD (mean age 65.93 years; mean disease duration 8.67 years) whom we subjected to regular walking (control condition) and to three dual-task conditions: walking combined with a backwards Digit Span task, an auditory Stroop task and a Mobile Phone task. We measured dual-task gait velocity using the GAITRite mat and dual-task reaction times and errors on the concurrent tasks as outcomes. Motor, cognitive and descriptive variables which correlated to dual-task performance (p task gait velocity and executive function, tested by the alternating intake test, was significantly associated with gait velocity during the Digit Span (R(2) = 0.65; p task (R(2) = 0.62; p task. Age was a surplus determinant of gait velocity while using a mobile phone. Single-task gait velocity and executive function as measured by a verbal fluency switching task were independent determinants of dual-task gait performance in people with PD. In contrast to expectation, these factors were the same across different tasks, supporting the robustness of the findings. Future study needs to determine whether these factors predict dual-task abnormalities prospectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Pre-Enlistment Maltreatment Histories of U.S. Navy Basic Trainees: Prevalence of Abusive Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-11-13

    screen groups similar in age to Navy trainees. Table 13 summarizes the MAST results for trainees and for the two studies of college students ( Favazza ... Favazza & Cannell: 245 20.0 32 Silber et al.: 200 22.0 17 Total: 445 21.0 25 Trainees 3,152 20.2 69 Note. * A score of 4 is categorized as "suggestive...Journal of Studies of Alcohol, 54(3), 334-344. Favazza , A. R., & Cannell, B. (1977). Screening for alcoholism among college students. American Journal of

  1. Perspectives of an Interdisciplinaryg Research Team to Engage Practice: Lessons from a Knowledge Exchange Trainee Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquhart, Robin L.; Johnston, Grace M.; McVorran, Shauna M.; Burge, Fred I.

    2010-01-01

    End-of-life (EOL) care is an area of health services that will ultimately affect us all. To share the knowledge emerging from EOL research and to address inequities in the quality of EOL care in Nova Scotia, a knowledge exchange (KE) trainee was hired to translate research and surveillance into a Surveillance Report. The purpose of this paper is to reflect upon this initiative and share the research team's perspectives on their KE experiences. We describe four key competencies of the KE trainee selected, and discuss lessons learned from this KE trainee experience, to expand our understanding of KE. PMID:21532769

  2. 'That blasted Facebook page': supporting trainee-teachers' professional learning through social media

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Martyn; Darwent, Dave; Irons, Charly

    2015-01-01

    The creation and use of a Facebook group amongst trainee-teachers in post-16 and further education on a PGCE course at a large university in the North of England was studied. The Facebook group was self-initiated and self-managed by the trainee-teachers as a means of socialisation and peer-support amongst themselves. Data was gathered through parallel interviews with a PGCE trainee and a course tutor. Interviews were semi-structured using Tuckman's stages of group development (forming, stormi...

  3. Where did the acute medical trainees go? A review of the career pathways of acute care common stem acute medical trainees in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowland, Emily; Ball, Karen Le; Bryant, Catherine; Birns, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    Acute care common stem acute medicine (ACCS AM) training was designed to develop competent multi-skilled acute physicians to manage patients with multimorbidity from 'door to discharge' in an era of increasing acute hospital admissions. Recent surveys by the Royal College of Physicians have suggested that acute medical specialties are proving less attractive to trainees. However, data on the career pathways taken by trainees completing core acute medical training has been lacking. Using London as a region with a 100% fill rate for its ACCS AM training programme, this study showed only 14% of trainees go on to higher specialty training in acute internal medicine and a further 10% to pursue higher medical specialty training with dual accreditation with internal medicine. 16% of trainees switched from ACCS AM to emergency medicine or anaesthetics during core ACCS training, and intensive care medicine proved to be the most popular career choice for ACCS AM trainees (21%). The ACCS AM training programme therefore does not appear to be providing what it was set out to do and this paper discusses the potential causes and effects. © Royal College of Physicians 2016. All rights reserved.

  4. Pediatric Trainees Managing a Difficult Airway: Comparison of Laryngeal Mask Airway, Direct, and Video-Assisted Laryngoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Art Ambrosio MD

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective Difficult airway management is a key skill required by all pediatric physicians, yet training on multiple modalities is lacking. The objective of this study was to compare the rate of, and time to, successful advanced infant airway placement with direct laryngoscopy, video-assisted laryngoscopy, and laryngeal mask airway (LMA in a difficult airway simulator. This study is the first to compare the success with 3 methods for difficult airway management among pediatric trainees. Study Design Randomized crossover pilot study. Setting Tertiary academic medical center. Methods Twenty-two pediatric residents, interns, and medical students were tested. Participants were provided 1 training session by faculty using a normal infant manikin. Subjects then performed all 3 of the aforementioned advanced airway modalities in a randomized order on a difficult airway model of a Robin sequence. Success was defined as confirmed endotracheal intubation or correct LMA placement by the testing instructor in ≤120 seconds. Results Direct laryngoscopy demonstrated a significantly higher placement success rate (77.3% than video-assisted laryngoscopy (36.4%, P = .0117 and LMA (31.8%, P = .0039. Video-assisted laryngoscopy required a significantly longer amount of time during successful intubations (84.8 seconds; 95% CI, 59.4-110.1 versus direct laryngoscopy (44.9 seconds; 95% CI, 33.8-55.9 and LMA placement (36.6 seconds; 95% CI, 24.7-48.4. Conclusions Pediatric trainees demonstrated significantly higher success using direct laryngoscopy in a difficult airway simulator model. However, given the potential lifesaving implications of advanced airway adjuncts, including video-assisted laryngoscopy and LMA placement, more extensive training on adjunctive airway management techniques may be useful for trainees.

  5. The outcomes of recent patient safety education interventions for trainee physicians and medical students: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkman, Matthew A; Sevdalis, Nick; Arora, Sonal; Baker, Paul; Vincent, Charles; Ahmed, Maria

    2015-05-20

    To systematically review the latest evidence for patient safety education for physicians in training and medical students, updating, extending and improving on a previous systematic review on this topic. A systematic review. Embase, Ovid Medline and PsycINFO databases. Studies including an evaluation of patient safety training interventions delivered to trainees/residents and medical students published between January 2009 and May 2014. The review was performed using a structured data capture tool. Thematic analysis also identified factors influencing successful implementation of interventions. We identified 26 studies reporting patient safety interventions: 11 involving students and 15 involving trainees/residents. Common educational content included a general overview of patient safety, root cause/systems-based analysis, communication and teamwork skills, and quality improvement principles and methodologies. The majority of courses were well received by learners, and improved patient safety knowledge, skills and attitudes. Moreover, some interventions were shown to result in positive behaviours, notably subsequent engagement in quality improvement projects. No studies demonstrated patient benefit. Availability of expert faculty, competing curricular/service demands and institutional culture were important factors affecting implementation. There is an increasing trend for developing educational interventions in patient safety delivered to trainees/residents and medical students. However, significant methodological shortcomings remain and additional evidence of impact on patient outcomes is needed. While there is some evidence of enhanced efforts to promote sustainability of such interventions, further work is needed to encourage their wider adoption and spread. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Virtual reality simulation training for health professions trainees in gastrointestinal endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Catharine M; Sherlock, Mary E; Ling, Simon C; Carnahan, Heather

    2012-06-13

    another method of virtual reality training (e.g. comparison of two different virtual reality simulators) were also included. Only trials measuring outcomes on humans in the clinical setting (as opposed to animals or simulators) were included. Two authors (CMS, MES) independently assessed the eligibility and methodological quality of trials, and extracted data on the trial characteristics and outcomes. Due to significant clinical and methodological heterogeneity it was not possible to pool study data in order to perform a meta-analysis. Where data were available for each continuous outcome we calculated standardized mean difference with 95% confidence intervals based on intention-to-treat analysis. Where data were available for dichotomous outcomes we calculated relative risk with 95% confidence intervals based on intention-to-treat-analysis. Thirteen trials, with 278 participants, met the inclusion criteria. Four trials compared simulation-based training with conventional patient-based endoscopy training (apprenticeship model) whereas nine trials compared simulation-based training with no training. Only three trials were at low risk of bias. Simulation-based training, as compared with no training, generally appears to provide participants with some advantage over their untrained peers as measured by composite score of competency, independent procedure completion, performance time, independent insertion depth, overall rating of performance or competency error rate and mucosal visualization. Alternatively, there was no conclusive evidence that simulation-based training was superior to conventional patient-based training, although data were limited. The results of this systematic review indicate that virtual reality endoscopy training can be used to effectively supplement early conventional endoscopy training (apprenticeship model) in diagnostic oesophagogastroduodenoscopy, colonoscopy and/or sigmoidoscopy for health professions trainees with limited or no prior endoscopic

  7. Acute Improvement of Vertical Jump Performance After Isometric Squats Depends on Knee Angle and Vertical Jumping Ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoukos, Athanasios; Bogdanis, Gregory C; Terzis, Gerasimos; Veligekas, Panagiotis

    2016-08-01

    Tsoukos, A, Bogdanis, GC, Terzis, G, and Veligekas, P. Acute improvement of vertical jump performance after isometric squats depends on knee angle and vertical jumping ability. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2250-2257, 2016-This study examined the acute effects of maximum isometric squats at 2 different knee angles (90 or 140°) on countermovement jump (CMJ) performance in power athletes. Fourteen national-level male track and field power athletes completed 3 main trials (2 experimental and 1 control) in a randomized and counterbalanced order 1 week apart. Countermovement jump performance was evaluated using a force-plate before and 15 seconds, 3, 6, 9, and 12 minutes after 3 sets of 3 seconds maximum isometric contractions with 1-minute rest in between, from a squat position with knee angle set at 90 or 140°. Countermovement jump performance was improved compared with baseline only in the 140° condition by 3.8 ± 1.2% on the 12th minute of recovery (p = 0.027), whereas there was no change in CMJ height in the 90° condition. In the control condition, there was a decrease in CMJ performance over time, reaching -3.6 ± 1.2% (p = 0.049) after 12 minutes of recovery. To determine the possible effects of baseline jump performance on subsequent CMJ performance, subjects were divided into 2 groups ("high jumpers" and "low jumpers"). The baseline CMJ values of "high jumpers" and "low jumpers" differed significantly (CMJ: 45.1 ± 2.2 vs. 37.1 ± 3.9 cm, respectively, p = 0.001). Countermovement jump was increased only in the "high jumpers" group by 5.4 ± 1.4% (p = 0.001) and 7.4 ± 1.2% (p = 0.001) at the knee angles of 90 and 140°, respectively. This improvement was larger at the 140° angle (p = 0.049). Knee angle during isometric squats and vertical jumping ability are important determinants of the acute CMJ performance increase observed after a conditioning activity.

  8. Comparison of three phenotypic techniques for detection of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus spp. reveals a species-dependent performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Michael A; Burden, Julia; Stuart, J Ian; Reyes, Romina C; Lannigan, Robert; Milburn, Sue; Diagre, Deb; Wilson, Bev; Hussain, Zafar

    2009-03-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of the cefoxitin screen in Vitek 2 Gram-positive panels for recognizing methicillin-resistant strains of staphylococci. Seven hundred and ninety-nine non-duplicate isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative strains were included in the study. Methicillin resistance was measured using PCR for the mecA gene, the CLSI cefoxitin disc diffusion method, the Vitek 2 cefoxitin screen and the Vitek 2 oxacillin susceptibility test. Compared with the molecular detection of methicillin resistance the overall sensitivities and specificities of the phenotypic tests for cefoxitin disc diffusion were 94.9% and 97.0%, for Vitek 2 cefoxitin screen were 94.6% and 93.5% and for Vitek 2 oxacillin susceptibility test were 93.8% and 77.9%. The cephamycin tests (cefoxitin disc diffusion and Vitek 2 screen) were not able to identify mecA-positive strains of Staphylococcus simulans. In addition, the performance of the Vitek 2 system was poor against Staphylococcus cohnii subspecies, Staphylococcus hominis hominis and Staphylococcus saprophyticus. Overall, the performance of the Vitek 2 system for differentiating mecA-positive staphylococci was comparable to PCR and the CLSI disc diffusion method; however, performance was species-dependent. Thus, before accepting the results produced by Vitek 2, species identification may be required.

  9. Thickness dependence of the levitation performance of double-layer high-temperature superconductor bulks above a magnetic rail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, R.X.; Zheng, J.; Liao, X.L.; Che, T.; Gou, Y.F.; He, D.B.; Deng, Z.G.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Thickness optimization of double-layer bulk HTSC arrangement is studied. • The new bulk HTSC arrangement makes better use of the flux distribution of the magnetic rails. • Levitation performance can be enhanced with the optimization. • The optimization can meet large levitation force requirements for HTS Maglev system. - Abstract: A double-layer high-temperature superconductor (HTSC) arrangement was proposed and proved to be able to bring improvements to both levitation force and guidance force compared with present single-layer HTSC arrangement. To fully exploit the applied magnetic field by a magnetic rail, the thickness dependence of a double-layer HTSC arrangement on the levitation performance was further investigated in the paper. In this study, the lower-layer bulk was polished step by step to different thicknesses, and the upper-layer bulk with constant thickness was directly superimposed on the lower-layer one. The levitation force and the force relaxation of the double-layer HTSC arrangement were measured above a Halbach magnetic rail. Experimental result shows that a bigger levitation force and a less levitation force decay could be achieved by optimizing the thickness of the lower-layer bulk HTSC. This thickness optimization method could be applied together with former reported double-layer HTSC arrangement method with aligned growth sector boundaries pattern. This series of study on the optimized combination method do bring a significant improvement on the levitation performance of present HTS maglev systems

  10. Thickness dependence of the levitation performance of double-layer high-temperature superconductor bulks above a magnetic rail

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, R.X.; Zheng, J.; Liao, X.L.; Che, T.; Gou, Y.F.; He, D.B.; Deng, Z.G., E-mail: zgdeng@gmail.com

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Thickness optimization of double-layer bulk HTSC arrangement is studied. • The new bulk HTSC arrangement makes better use of the flux distribution of the magnetic rails. • Levitation performance can be enhanced with the optimization. • The optimization can meet large levitation force requirements for HTS Maglev system. - Abstract: A double-layer high-temperature superconductor (HTSC) arrangement was proposed and proved to be able to bring improvements to both levitation force and guidance force compared with present single-layer HTSC arrangement. To fully exploit the applied magnetic field by a magnetic rail, the thickness dependence of a double-layer HTSC arrangement on the levitation performance was further investigated in the paper. In this study, the lower-layer bulk was polished step by step to different thicknesses, and the upper-layer bulk with constant thickness was directly superimposed on the lower-layer one. The levitation force and the force relaxation of the double-layer HTSC arrangement were measured above a Halbach magnetic rail. Experimental result shows that a bigger levitation force and a less levitation force decay could be achieved by optimizing the thickness of the lower-layer bulk HTSC. This thickness optimization method could be applied together with former reported double-layer HTSC arrangement method with aligned growth sector boundaries pattern. This series of study on the optimized combination method do bring a significant improvement on the levitation performance of present HTS maglev systems.

  11. Psychotherapy trainees' multicultural case conceptualization content: thematic differences across three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Debbiesiu L; Sheridan, Daniel J; Rosen, Adam D; Jones, Isaiah

    2013-06-01

    This study examined thematic differences in the multicultural case conceptualization content of 61 psychotherapy trainees across three different cases and trainee demographics (number of multicultural courses completed, years of supervised clinical practicum completed, and White trainee vs. trainee of color). Themes across cases included general counseling skills (attend to affect, build rapport, focus on specific client concerns, use of specific clinical interventions, and use of external resources not related to culture), as well as multicultural specific counseling skills (focus on culture, focus on discrimination, use of culturally competent interventions, and use of external resources related to culture). Thematic differences across case were found in three of the nine themes (affect, culture, discrimination). No systematic differences were found across multicultural training, clinical training, or race. Implications of these results are discussed.

  12. A Survey of Clinical Uncertainty from the Paediatric Basic Specialist Trainee Perspective

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’Neill, MB

    2017-06-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate uncertainty from the Basic Specialist Trainee perspective. The survey of trainees explored 1) factors in decision making, 2) the personal impact of uncertainty, 3) the responses to both clinical errors and challenges to their decision making and 4) the potential strategies to address uncertainty. Forty-one (93%) of trainees surveyed responded. Important factors in decision making were clinical knowledge and senior colleague’s opinion. Sixty percent experienced significant anxiety post call as a consequence of their uncertainty. When errors are made by colleagues, the trainee’s response is acceptance (52.5%), and sympathy (32%).Trainees are strongly influenced by the opinions of senior colleagues often changing their opinions having made confident decisions. Solutions to address uncertainty include enhanced knowledge translation, and to a lesser extent, enhanced personal awareness and resilience awareness. To enhance the training experience for BST and lessen the uncertainty experienced these strategies need to be enacted within the training milieu.

  13. FDC Mentor-Mentee Mixer Breaks the Ice Between Investigators and Trainees | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Frederick Diversity Committee’s mentor-mentee mixer gave research trainees, senior investigators, scientists, and administrative staff a chance to meet and mingle over refreshments and games following the Spring Research Festival.

  14. Knowledge, Skills and Experience Managing Tracheostomy Emergencies: A Survey of Critical Care Medicine trainees

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nizam, AA

    2016-10-01

    Since the development of percutaneous tracheostomy, the number of tracheostomy patients on hospital wards has increased. Problems associated with adequate tracheostomy care on the wards are well documented, particularly the management of tracheostomy-related emergencies. A survey was conducted among non-consultant hospital doctors (NCHDs) starting their Critical Care Medicine training rotation in a university affiliated teaching hospital to determine their basic knowledge and skills in dealing with tracheostomy emergencies. Trainees who had received specific tracheostomy training or who had previous experience of dealing with tracheostomy emergencies were more confident in dealing with such emergencies compared to trainees without such training or experience. Only a minority of trainees were aware of local hospital guidelines regarding tracheostomy care. Our results highlight the importance of increased awareness of tracheostomy emergencies and the importance of specific training for Anaesthesia and Critical Care Medicine trainees.

  15. Cu−In−Ga−S quantum dot composition-dependent device performance of electrically driven light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong-Hoon; Lee, Ki-Heon; Jo, Dae-Yeon; Yang, Heesun, E-mail: hyang@hongik.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Hongik University, Seoul 121-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yangjin; Hwang, Jun Yeon [Institute of Advanced Composite Materials, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Jeonbuk 565-905 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-29

    Colloidal synthesis of ternary and quaternary quantum dots (QDs) of In/Ga ratio-varied Cu−In{sub 1−x}−Ga{sub x}−S (CIGS) with nominal x = 0, 0.5, 0.7, and 1 and their application for the fabrication of quantum dot-light-emitting diodes (QLEDs) are reported. Four QLEDs having CIGS QDs with different compositions are all solution-processed in the framework of multilayered structure, where QD emitting layer is sandwiched by hybrid charge transport layers of poly(9-vinlycarbazole) and ZnO nanoparticles. The device performance such as luminance and efficiency is found to be strongly dependent on the composition of CIGS QDs, and well interpreted by the device energy level diagram proposed through the determination of QD valence band minima by photoelectron emission spectroscopic measurement.

  16. LCLS X-Ray FEL Output Performance in the Presence of Highly Time-Dependent Undulator Wakefields

    CERN Document Server

    Fawley, W M; Emma, P; Huang, Z; Nuhn, H D; Reiche, S; Stupakov, G

    2005-01-01

    Energy loss due to wakefields within a long undulator, if not compensated by an appropriate tapering of the magnetic field strength, can degrade the FEL process by detuning the resonant FEL frequency. The wakefields arise from the vacuum chamber wall resistivity, its surface roughness, and abrupt changes in its aperture. For LCLS parameters, the resistive component is the most critical and depends upon the chamber wall material (e.g. Cu) and its radius. Of recent interest [1] is the so-called "AC" component of the resistive wake which can lead to strong variations on very short timescales (e.g. ~20 fs). To study the expected performance of the LCLS in the presence of these wakefields, we have made an extensive series of start-to-end SASE simulations with tracking codes PARMELA and ELEGANT, and time-dependent FEL simulation codes GENESIS1.3 and GINGER. We discuss the impact of the wakefield losses upon output energy, spectral bandwidth, and temporal envelope of the output FEL pulse, as well a...

  17. Significance of size dependent and material structure coupling on the characteristics and performance of nanocrystalline micro/nano gyroscopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, K.; Ghommem, M.; Abdelkefi, A.

    2018-05-01

    Capacitive-based sensing microelectromechanical (MEMS) and nanoelectromechanical (NEMS) gyroscopes have significant advantages over conventional gyroscopes, such as low power consumption, batch fabrication, and possible integration with electronic circuits. However, inadequacies in the modeling of these inertial sensors have presented issues of reliability and functionality of micro-/nano-scale gyroscopes. In this work, a micromechanical model is developed to represent the unique microstructure of nanocrystalline materials and simulate the response of micro-/nano-gyroscope comprising an electrostatically-actuated cantilever beam with a tip mass at the free end. Couple stress and surface elasticity theories are integrated into the classical Euler-Bernoulli beam model in order to derive a size-dependent model. This model is then used to investigate the influence of size-dependent effects on the static pull-in instability, the natural frequencies and the performance output of gyroscopes as the scale decreases from micro-to nano-scale. The simulation results show significant changes in the static pull-in voltage and the natural frequency as the scale of the system is decreased. However, the differential frequency between the two vibration modes of the gyroscope is observed to drastically decrease as the size of the gyroscope is reduced. As such, the frequency-based operation mode may not be an efficient strategy for nano-gyroscopes. The results show that a strong coupling between the surface elasticity and material structure takes place when smaller grain sizes and higher void percentages are considered.

  18. Test ordering by GP trainees: Effects of an educational intervention on attitudes and intended practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Simon; Morgan, Andy; Kerr, Rohan; Tapley, Amanda; Magin, Parker

    2016-09-01

    To assess the effectiveness of an educational intervention on test-ordering attitudes and intended practice of GP trainees, and any associations between changes in test ordering and trainee characteristics. Preworkshop and postworkshop survey of attitudes to test ordering, intended test-ordering practices for 3 clinical scenarios (fatigue, screening, and shoulder pain), and tolerance for uncertainty. Three Australian regional general practice training providers. General practice trainees (N = 167). A 2-hour workshop session and an online module. Proportion of trainees who agreed with attitudinal statements before and after the workshop; proportion of trainees who would order tests, mean number of tests ordered, and number of appropriate and inappropriate tests ordered for each scenario before and after the workshop. Of 167 trainees, 132 (79.0%) completed both the preworkshop and postworkshop questionnaires. A total of 122 trainees attended the workshop. At baseline, 88.6% thought that tests can harm patients, 84.8% believed overtesting was a problem, 72.0% felt pressured by patients, 52.3% believed that tests would reassure patients, and 50.8% thought that they were less likely to be sued if they ordered tests. There were desirable changes in all attitudes after the workshop. Before the workshop, the mean number of tests that trainees would have ordered was 4.4, 4.8, and 1.5 for the fatigue, screening, and shoulder pain scenarios, respectively. After the workshop there were decreases in the mean number of both appropriate tests (decrease of 0.94) and inappropriate tests (decrease of 0.24) in the fatigue scenario; there was no change in the mean number of appropriate tests and a decrease in inappropriate tests (decrease of 0.76) in the screening scenario; and there was an increase in the proportion of trainees who would appropriately not order tests in the shoulder pain scenario. There were no significant associations between changes in test ordering and trainee

  19. Depth-dependent variations in Achilles tendon deformations with age are associated with reduced plantarflexor performance during walking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelen, Darryl G.

    2015-01-01

    The anatomical arrangement of the Achilles tendon (AT), with distinct fascicle bundles arising from the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles, may facilitate relatively independent behavior of the triceps surae muscles. A reduced capacity for sliding between adjacent tendon fascicles with age may couple gastrocnemius and soleus muscle behavior, thereby potentially contributing to diminished plantarflexor performance commonly observed in old adults. Nine healthy young (mean age, 23.9 yr) and eight healthy old (69.9 yr) adults walked at three speeds (0.75, 1.00, and 1.25 m/s) on a force-sensing treadmill. We coupled dynamic ultrasound imaging of the free AT with motion capture and inverse dynamic analyses to compute, in part: 1) depth-dependent variations in AT tissue displacements and elongations and 2) net ankle joint kinetics during push-off. The difference in displacements between superficial and deep AT regions, and in their corresponding elongations, did not differ between old and young adults at the slower two walking speeds (P > 0.61). However, old adults walked with 41% smaller depth-dependent variations in free AT displacements and elongations at 1.25 m/s (P = 0.02). These more uniform tendon deformations in old adults most strongly correlated with reduced peak ankle moment (R2 = 0.40), but also significantly correlated with reduced peak power generation (R2 = 0.15) and positive ankle work during push-off (R2 = 0.19) (P > 0.01). Our findings: 1) demonstrate a potential role for nonuniform AT deformations in governing gastrocnemius and soleus muscle-tendon function and 2) allude to altered tendon behavior that may contribute to the age-related reduction in plantarflexor performance during walking. PMID:26023223

  20. A national UK survey of radiology trainees special interest choices: what and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvizi, Nassim; Bhuva, Shaheel

    2017-11-01

    A national survey was designed to better understand factors influencing special interest choices, future aspirations of UK radiology trainees and perceptions of breast radiology. A SurveyMonkey questionnaire was developed and distributed to all radiology trainees in the UK through the British Institute of Radiology, RCR Junior Radiologists Forum and by directly contacting UK training schemes as well as by social media between December 2015 and January 2016. From 21 training schemes across the UK, 232 responses were received. Over half entered radiology after foundation training and 62% were ST1-3; one-fifth of trainees intended to leave the NHS. The most popular special interests were musculoskeletal (18%), abdominal imaging (16%) and neuroradiology (13%). Gynaecological and oncological imaging proved to be the least popular. Strong personal interest, a successful rotation during training, a mix of imaging modalities, direct impact on patient care and job prospects were the most popular factors influencing career choice. Research and potential for private income were the least influential factors. Respondents detailed their perceptions of breast radiology, selecting an awareness of career prospects (41%) and a better trainee experience (36%) as factors that would increase their interest in pursuing it as a career. Understanding the factors that influence special interest choice is essential to addressing the alarming staffing shortfalls that will befall certain radiology special interests. Addressing trainee's preconceptions and improving the trainee experience are key to attracting trainees to breast radiology. Advances in knowledge: This is the first survey of its kind in the UK literature designed to evaluate special interest career choices and the factors that influence those among radiology trainees.

  1. Does interpersonal behavior of psychotherapy trainees differ in private and professional relationships?

    OpenAIRE

    Fincke, Janna I.; Möller, Heidi; Taubner, Svenja

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of trainees' interpersonal behaviour on Work Involvement (WI) and compared their social behaviour within professional and private relationships as well as between different psychotherapeutic orientations. Methods: The interpersonal scales of the Intrex short-form questionnaire and the Work Involvement Scale (WIS) were used to evaluate two samples of German psychotherapy trainees in psychoanalytic (PA), psychodynamic (PD) and cognitive behavi...

  2. Career Preferences and Perceptions of Cardiology Among US Internal Medicine Trainees: Factors Influencing Cardiology Career Choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Pamela S; Rzeszut, Anne K; Bairey Merz, C Noel; Duvernoy, Claire S; Lewis, Sandra J; Walsh, Mary Norine; Gillam, Linda

    2018-05-30

    Few data exist on internal medicine trainees' selection of cardiology training, although this is important for meeting future cardiology workforce needs. To discover trainees' professional development preferences and perceptions of cardiology, and their relationship to trainees' career choice. We surveyed trainees to discover their professional development preferences and perceptions of cardiology and the influence of those perceptions and preferences on the trainees' career choices. Participants rated 38 professional development needs and 19 perceptions of cardiology. Data collection took place from February 2009, through January 2010. Data analysis was conducted from May 2017 to December 2017. Multivariable models were used to determine the association of demographics and survey responses with prospective career choice. A total of 4850 trainees were contacted, and 1123 trainees (of whom 625 [55.7%] were men) in 198 residency programs completed surveys (23.1% response; mean [SD] age, 29.4 [3.5] years). Principal component analysis of survey responses resulted in 8-factor and 6-factor models. Professional development preferences in descending order of significance were stable hours, family friendliness, female friendliness, the availability of positive role models, financial benefits, professional challenges, patient focus, and the opportunity to have a stimulating career. The top perceptions of cardiology in descending order of significance were adverse job conditions, interference with family life, and a lack of diversity. Women and future noncardiologists valued work-life balance more highly and had more negative perceptions of cardiology than men or future cardiologists, who emphasized the professional advantages available in cardiology. Professional development factors and cardiology perceptions were strongly associated with a decision to pursue or avoid a career in cardiology in both men and women. Alignment of cardiology culture with trainees' preferences

  3. Leadership and followership in the healthcare workplace: exploring medical trainees' experiences through narrative inquiry

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Lisi J.; Rees, Charlotte E.; Ker, Jean S.; Cleland, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    This research was part of LJG’s PhD research which was generously funded by NHS Education for Scotland through SMERC. OBJECTIVES: To explore medical trainees' experiences of leadership and followership in the interprofessional healthcare workplace. DESIGN: A qualitative approach using narrative interviewing techniques in 11 group and 19 individual interviews with UK medical trainees. SETTING: Multisite study across four UK health boards. PARTICIPANTS: Through maximum variation sampling, 65...

  4. Classroom Simulation for Trainee Teachers Using 3D Virtual Environments and Simulated Smartbot Student Behaviours

    OpenAIRE

    Alotaibi, Fahad Mazaed

    2014-01-01

    his thesis consists of an analysis of a classroom simulation using a Second Life (SL) experiment that aims to investigate the teaching impact on smartbots (virtual students) from trainee teacher avatars with respect to interaction, simulated behaviour, and observed teaching roles. The classroom-based SL experiments’ motivation is to enable the trainee teacher to acquire the necessary skills and experience to manage a real classroom environment through simulations of a real classroom. This ty...

  5. To which countries do European psychiatric trainees want to move to and why?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto da Costa, M; Giurgiuca, A; Holmes, K; Biskup, E; Mogren, T; Tomori, S; Kilic, O; Banjac, V; Molina-Ruiz, R; Palumbo, C; Frydecka, D; Kaaja, J; El-Higaya, E; Kanellopoulos, A; Amit, B H; Madissoon, D; Andreou, E; Uleviciute-Belena, I; Rakos, I; Dragasek, J; Feffer, K; Farrugia, M; Mitkovic-Voncina, M; Gargot, T; Baessler, F; Pantovic-Stefanovic, M; De Picker, L

    2017-09-01

    There is a shortage of psychiatrists worldwide. Within Europe, psychiatric trainees can move between countries, which increases the problem in some countries and alleviates it in others. However, little is known about the reasons psychiatric trainees move to another country. Survey of psychiatric trainees in 33 European countries, exploring how frequently psychiatric trainees have migrated or want to migrate, their reasons to stay and leave the country, and the countries where they come from and where they move to. A 61-item self-report questionnaire was developed, covering questions about their demographics, experiences of short-term mobility (from 3 months up to 1 year), experiences of long-term migration (of more than 1 year) and their attitudes towards migration. A total of 2281 psychiatric trainees in Europe participated in the survey, of which 72.0% have 'ever' considered to move to a different country in their future, 53.5% were considering it 'now', at the time of the survey, and 13.3% had already moved country. For these immigrant trainees, academic was the main reason they gave to move from their country of origin. For all trainees, the overall main reason for which they would leave was financial (34.4%), especially in those with lower (2500€) incomes, personal reasons were paramount (44.5%). A high number of psychiatric trainees considered moving to another country, and their motivation largely reflects the substantial salary differences. These findings suggest tackling financial conditions and academic opportunities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevalence of Hepatitis B and C in US Air Force Basic Military Trainees

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-29

    REPORT TYPE 08/29/2017 Journal -4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Prevalence ofliepatitis B and C in US Air Force Basic Military Trainees 6. AUTHOR(S) Capt...unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF 18. NUMBER a. REPORT b.ABSTRACT c ...Prescnbed by ANSI Sld, Z3B.16 Adobe Prnfeodohal 7.0 Prevalence of Hepatitis Band C in US Air Force Basic Military Trainees from Blood Donations 2 3

  7. Caveats of smartphone applications for the cardiothoracic trainee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlin, Joy C E; Deshpande, Ranjit P

    2013-12-01

    The clinical environment is becoming increasingly dominated by information technology, most recently the smartphone with its applications (apps) of a multitude of uses. There are already tens of thousands of medical apps available for download, to educate both patients and trainees, and many more are being designed to facilitate delivery of care. The rapid development of this technology has outgrown its quality evaluation and regulation, both urgently required to maintain patient safety, protect sensitive data, and ensure dissemination of accurate information. We review medical apps themed towards cardiothoracic surgery in terms of medical professional involvement in their content and design. iTunes and Play Store were searched for cardiothoracic surgery-themed medical apps, using the terms cardiothoracic, thoracic, cardiac, heart, lung, surgery, and variations thereof and including the term medical. A focused search yielded 379 apps, of which 6% were associated with a named medical professional, 15% with a publisher or professional society, and 63% with a user rating. The findings suggest inadequate input from the medical profession. The article discusses the pressing issues regarding quality evaluation, regulation, and information security, required for smartphones and handheld devices to become an integral and safe part of delivery of care. Copyright © 2013 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Radiology Residents' Performance in Screening Mammography Interpretation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Eun Hye; Lyou, Chae Yeon

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate radiology residents' performance in screening mammography interpretation and to analyze the factors affecting performance. We enrolled 203 residents from 21 institutions and performed mammography interpretation tests. Between the trainee and non-trainee groups, we compared the interpretation score, recall rate, sensitivity, positive predictive value (PPV) and false-positive rate (FPR). We estimated the training effect using the score differences between trainee and non-trainee groups. We analyzed the factors affecting performance between training-effective and non-effective groups. Trainees were superior to non-trainees regarding interpretation score (43.1 vs. 37.1), recall rate (11.0 vs. 15.5%), sensitivity (83.6 vs. 72.0%), PPV (53.0 vs. 32.4%) and FPR (13.5 vs. 25.5). The longer the training period, the better were the interpretation score, recall rate, sensitivity, PPV and FPR (rho = 0.486, -0.375, 0.343, 0.504, -0.446, respectively). The training affected an increase by an average of 6 points; however, 31.6% of institutions showed no effect. A difference was noted in the volume of mammography interpretation during a month (594.0 vs. 476.9) and dedication of breast staff (61.5 vs. 0%) between training-effective and non-effective groups. Trainees showed better performance in mammography interpretation compared to non-trainees. Moreover, performance was correlated with the training period. The factors affecting performance were the volume of mammography interpretation and the dedication of the breast staff.

  9. Assessing the surgical skills of trainees in the operating theatre: a prospective observational study of the methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beard, J D; Marriott, J; Purdie, H; Crossley, J

    2011-01-01

    To compare user satisfaction and acceptability, reliability and validity of three different methods of assessing the surgical skills of trainees by direct observation in the operating theatre across a range of different surgical specialties and index procedures. A 2-year prospective, observational study in the operating theatres of three teaching hospitals in Sheffield. The assessment methods were procedure-based assessment (PBA), Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) and Non-technical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS). The specialties were obstetrics and gynaecology (O&G) and upper gastrointestinal, colorectal, cardiac, vascular and orthopaedic surgery. Two to four typical index procedures were selected from each specialty. Surgical trainees were directly observed performing typical index procedures and assessed using a combination of two of the three methods (OSATS or PBA and NOTSS for O&G, PBA and NOTSS for the other specialties) by the consultant clinical supervisor for the case and the anaesthetist and/or scrub nurse, as well as one or more independent assessors from the research team. Information on user satisfaction and acceptability of each assessment method from both assessor and trainee perspectives was obtained from structured questionnaires. The reliability of each method was measured using generalisability theory. Aspects of validity included the internal structure of each tool and correlation between tools, construct validity, predictive validity, interprocedural differences, the effect of assessor designation and the effect of assessment on performance. Of the 558 patients who were consented, a total of 437 (78%) cases were included in the study: 51 consultant clinical supervisors, 56 anaesthetists, 39 nurses, 2 surgical care practitioners and 4 independent assessors provided 1635 assessments on 85 trainees undertaking the 437 cases. A total of 749 PBAs, 695 NOTSS and 191 OSATSs were performed. Non-O&G clinical supervisors and

  10. EXPLORING MALAYSIAN TRAINEE TEACHERS’ ADOPTION OF THE INTERNET AS INFORMATION TOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau Teck-Chai

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This study reports the usage of three commercial Internet search engines in information seeking among trainee teachers at a teacher training institute in Malaysia. It attempts to investigate the information seeking behavior of the trainees via three Internet search engines (Google, Yahoo and MSN as gateways to information for research in academic learning using two cohorts of trainee teachers. The study surveyed 166 trainee teachers undergoing a 5-year Bachelor’s Degree program and compares the statistical differences on gender, programs and years of computer technology experiences. The results revealed that there were significant differences between gender for all the three search engines. Furthermore it also indicated that there was a significant difference between TESL and PISMP group for Yahoo and MSN but not for Google. A significant difference was also observed between years of computer technology experiences and the frequency of usage in the case of MSN. Post hoc test revealed a significant difference in the Internet search between those with more than 7 years of experience with those with less than 2 years experience and those between 2-4 years computing experience. The results provide insight into TESL and PPISMP trainee teachers’ use of the Internet search engines as a tool in information seeking when approaching research for their academic learning activities. Implications on the impact of the Internet to the trainee teachers’ academic learning in approaching research needs were discussed.

  11. BEST-TEST2: assessment of hematology trainee knowledge of transfusion medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yulia; Tinmouth, Alan; Mallick, Ranjeeta; Haspel, Richard L

    2016-02-01

    As transfusion is a common therapy and key component in every hematologist's practice, hematology training programs should dedicate significant time and effort to delivering high-quality transfusion medicine education to their trainees. The current state of hematology trainee knowledge of transfusion medicine is not known. A validated assessment tool developed by the Biomedical Excellence for Safer Transfusion (BEST) Collaborative was used to assess prior transfusion medicine education, attitudes, perceived ability, and transfusion medicine knowledge of hematology trainees. A total of 149 hematology trainees at 17 international sites were assessed. The overall mean exam score was 61.6% (standard deviation, 13.4%; range, 30%-100%) with no correlation in exam scores with postgraduate year or previous transfusion medicine education in medical school or internal medicine residency. However, better scores correlated with 3 or more hours of transfusion medicine education (p = 0.0003) and perceived higher-quality education during hematology training (p = 0.03). Hematology trainees at US sites, where hematology is often combined with oncology training, had statistically lower scores than trainees at non-US sites (56.2% vs. 67.4%; p hematology training programs to reevaluate the quality and quantity of transfusion medicine training and can assist in the development of targeted curricula. © 2015 AABB.

  12. Minimal Access Surgery Educational Needs of Trainees from Africa: Perspectives from an Asian Training Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, J I; Mishra, R K

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of minimal access surgery (MAS) in the last three decades brought new dimensions to surgical training. The sole role of traditional apprenticeship training model was challenged and adjunctive surgical simulation models were introduced. Knowledge of the trainees' educational needs is important in designing MAS training curriculum. To study the MAS educational needs of trainees from Africa, review MAS training models and offer recommendations for MAS training. Data was obtained from questionnaires filled by trainees from Africa who attended the monthly MAS training at the World Laparoscopy Hospital, India from October 2013 to May 2014 about their MAS educational needs. There were 38 trainees from different parts of Africa (Central, East, North, South and West Africa) with average age of 41.92 ± 8.67 years (minimum-28 years and maximum 63 years) and majority were males (92%). General surgeons constituted 57% while Gynaecologists were 41%. Only a quarter have MAS training integrated in their training curriculum. Box trainers, Animal models, live human surgeries and virtual reality simulation were the commonest models used in previous trainings and favoured in the educational needs for MAS training. Using cadaveric models and self sponsorship were deemphasised. Widespread application of MAS, globalisation and trainees educational needs call for establishing training programmes. Box trainers, animal models, live human surgeries and virtual reality simulators should be adopted and a synergy between Postgraduate surgical programmes, biomedical industry, universities and trainees will facilitate the setting of MAS skills laboratories and programmes.

  13. Irish (Republic) versus British (North West) orthopaedic trainees: what are the differences?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Banks, L N

    2012-02-01

    British Trainees have gradually had their working week curtained over the last 8 years. The Republic of Ireland Trainees have not been subjected to the European Working Time Directive prior to 2009 and have therefore worked on average, more hours than their British counterparts. We wanted to see if the differing schemes had an impact on recruiting and training orthopaedic surgeons. We surveyed Republic of Ireland orthopaedic specialist registrars (SpRs) and North West (NW) British SpRs\\/specialist trainees (ST3 and above) to see if there were any discernable differences in working patterns and subsequent training exposure. A standard proforma was given to Irish Trainees and to NW SpRs\\/STs at their National or regional teaching (January\\/February 2009). 62% of Irish and 47% of British NW Trainees responded. Irish trainees were more likely to have obtained a post-graduate degree (p = 0.03). The Irish worked more hours per week (p < 0.001) doing more trauma operative lists (p = 0.003) and more total cases per 6 months than the NW British (p = 0.003). This study suggests that more hours worked, equals more operative exposure, without detriment to the academic side of training. Obviously it is not possible to say whether fewer operations make for a poorer surgeon, but the evidence suggests that it may be true.

  14. Peer teaching as a means of enhancing communication skills in anaesthesia training: trainee perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shaughnessy, S M

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to introduce peer teaching of communication skills to first-year anaesthesia trainees in Ireland and to evaluate their perception of this teaching modality. Seventy-nine first-year anaesthesia trainees participated in a novel peer-led communication skills programme over a 2-year period (Y1, Y2). A Likert scaling questionnaire was developed to explore trainee perception of the peer teaching programme. Of the 79 respondents (36 in Y1 and 43 in Y2), 99% either agreed or strongly agreed that the peer teachers were successful in their role. Ninety-two percent requested formal peer teaching in other areas of training. The trainees regarded a peer teacher as an appropriate information provider (92%), role model (88%), planner (88%) and facilitator (94%), but less so as an assessor (70%). The most consistently stated strength of peer teaching was the relatability of peer teachers with their lack of experience cited as the main weakness. Eighty percent of participants preferred peer teaching to regular expert teaching. This study highlights the positive attitudes of first-year anaesthesia trainees towards a novel peer teaching programme in communication skills. This author recommends that peer teaching is further developed within postgraduate medical programmes to maximise learning for trainees in the student and teacher roles and to redistribute the teaching burden within clinical departments.

  15. Performance of nitrate-dependent anaerobic ferrous oxidizing (NAFO) process: a novel prospective technology for autotrophic denitrification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Zheng, Ping; Li, Wei; Wang, Ru; Ding, Shuang; Abbas, Ghulam

    2015-03-01

    Nitrate-dependent anaerobic ferrous oxidizing (NAFO) is a valuable biological process, which utilizes ferrous iron to convert nitrate into nitrogen gas, removing nitrogen from wastewater. In this work, the performance of NAFO process was investigated as a nitrate removal technology. The results showed that NAFO system was feasible for autotrophic denitrification. The volumetric loading rate (VLR) and volumetric removal rate (VRR) under steady state were 0.159±0.01 kg-N/(m(3) d) and 0.073±0.01 kg-N/(m(3) d), respectively. In NAFO system, the effluent pH was suggested as an indicator which demonstrated a good correlation with nitrogen removal. The nitrate concentration was preferred to be less than 130 mg-N/L. Organic matters had little influence on NAFO performance. Abundant iron compounds were revealed to accumulate in NAFO sludge with peak value of 51.73% (wt), and they could be recycled for phosphorus removal, with capacity of 16.57 mg-P/g VS and removal rate of 94.77±2.97%, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The performance of fine-grained and coarse-grained elastic network models and its dependence on various factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Hyuntae; Song, Guang

    2015-07-01

    In a recent work we developed a method for deriving accurate simplified models that capture the essentials of conventional all-atom NMA and identified two best simplified models: ssNMA and eANM, both of which have a significantly higher correlation with NMA in mean square fluctuation calculations than existing elastic network models such as ANM and ANMr2, a variant of ANM that uses the inverse of the squared separation distances as spring constants. Here, we examine closely how the performance of these elastic network models depends on various factors, namely, the presence of hydrogen atoms in the model, the quality of input structures, and the effect of crystal packing. The study reveals the strengths and limitations of these models. Our results indicate that ssNMA and eANM are the best fine-grained elastic network models but their performance is sensitive to the quality of input structures. When the quality of input structures is poor, ANMr2 is a good alternative for computing mean-square fluctuations while ANM model is a good alternative for obtaining normal modes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. In search of work/life balance: trainee perspectives on part-time obstetrics and gynaecology specialist training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Part-time training (PTT is accessed by approximately 10% of Australian obstetrics and gynaecology trainees, a small but increasing minority which reflects the growing demand for improved work/life balance amongst the Australian medical workforce. This survey reports the attitudes and experiences of both full-time and part-time trainees to PTT. Methods An email-based anonymous survey was sent to all Australian obstetrics and gynaecology trainees in April 2009, collecting demographic and training status data, data on personal experiences of PTT and/or trainees, and attitudes towards PTT. Results 105 responses were received (20% response rate. These indicated strong support (90% from both full-time (FT and part-time (PT trainees for the availability of PTT. PT trainees were significantly more likely than FT trainees to be female with children. Improved morale was seen as a particular advantage of PTT; decreased continuity of care as a disadvantage. Conclusions Although limited by poor response rate, both PT and FT Australian obstetric trainees were supportive of part-time training. Both groups recognised important advantages and disadvantages of this mode of training. Currently, part-time training is accessed primarily by female trainees with family responsibilities, with many more trainees considering part-time training than the number that access it.

  18. In search of work/life balance: trainee perspectives on part-time obstetrics and gynaecology specialist training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Amanda; Clements, Sarah; Kingston, Ashley; Abbott, Jason

    2012-01-10

    Part-time training (PTT) is accessed by approximately 10% of Australian obstetrics and gynaecology trainees, a small but increasing minority which reflects the growing demand for improved work/life balance amongst the Australian medical workforce. This survey reports the attitudes and experiences of both full-time and part-time trainees to PTT. An email-based anonymous survey was sent to all Australian obstetrics and gynaecology trainees in April 2009, collecting demographic and training status data, data on personal experiences of PTT and/or trainees, and attitudes towards PTT. 105 responses were received (20% response rate). These indicated strong support (90%) from both full-time (FT) and part-time (PT) trainees for the availability of PTT. PT trainees were significantly more likely than FT trainees to be female with children. Improved morale was seen as a particular advantage of PTT; decreased continuity of care as a disadvantage. Although limited by poor response rate, both PT and FT Australian obstetric trainees were supportive of part-time training. Both groups recognised important advantages and disadvantages of this mode of training. Currently, part-time training is accessed primarily by female trainees with family responsibilities, with many more trainees considering part-time training than the number that access it.

  19. Time-Dependent Effects of Acute Exercise on University Students’ Cognitive Performance in Temperate and Cold Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Yu Ji

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Few studies have examined the acute exercise-induced changes in cognitive performance in different thermal environments and the time course effects.Objective: Investigate the time-dependent effects of acute exercise on university students’ processing speed, working memory and cognitive flexibility in temperate and cold environments.Method: Twenty male university students (age 23.5 ± 2.0 years with moderate physical activity level participated in a repeated-measures within-subjects design. Processing speed, working memory and cognitive flexibility were assessed using CogState test battery at baseline (BASE, followed by a 45-min rest (REST, immediately after (EX and 30 min after (POST-EX 30-min moderate-intensity treadmill running in both temperate (TEMP; 25°C and cold (COLD; 10°C environments. Mean skin temperature (MST and thermal sensation (TS were also recorded. Two-way repeated measures ANOVA was performed to analyze each variable. Spearman’s rho was used to identify the correlations between MST, TS and cognitive performance.Results: Reaction time (RT of processing speed and working memory decreased immediately after exercise in both conditions (processing speed: p = 0.003; working memory: p = 0.007. The facilitating effects on processing speed disappeared within 30 min after exercise in TEMP (p = 0.163 and COLD (p = 0.667, while improvements on working memory remained 30 min after exercise in TEMP (p = 0.047, but not in COLD (p = 0.663. Though RT of cognitive flexibility reduced in both conditions (p = 0.003, no significance was found between EX and REST (p = 0.135. Increased MST and TS were significantly associated with reductions in processing speed RT (MST: r = -0.341, p < 0.001; TS: r = -0.262, p = 0.001 and working memory RT (MST: r = -0.282, p < 0.001; TS: r = -0.2229, p = 0.005, and improvements in working memory accuracy (MST: r = 0.249, p = 0.002; TS: r = 0.255, p = 0.001.Conclusion: The results demonstrate

  20. Performance of the air2stream model that relates air and stream water temperatures depends on the calibration method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Adam P.; Napiorkowski, Jaroslaw J.

    2018-06-01

    A number of physical or data-driven models have been proposed to evaluate stream water temperatures based on hydrological and meteorological observations. However, physical models require a large amount of information that is frequently unavailable, while data-based models ignore the physical processes. Recently the air2stream model has been proposed as an intermediate alternative that is based on physical heat budget processes, but it is so simplified that the model may be applied like data-driven ones. However, the price for simplicity is the need to calibrate eight parameters that, although have some physical meaning, cannot be measured or evaluated a priori. As a result, applicability and performance of the air2stream model for a particular stream relies on the efficiency of the calibration method. The original air2stream model uses an inefficient 20-year old approach called Particle Swarm Optimization with inertia weight. This study aims at finding an effective and robust calibration method for the air2stream model. Twelve different optimization algorithms are examined on six different streams from northern USA (states of Washington, Oregon and New York), Poland and Switzerland, located in both high mountains, hilly and lowland areas. It is found that the performance of the air2stream model depends significantly on the calibration method. Two algorithms lead to the best results for each considered stream. The air2stream model, calibrated with the chosen optimization methods, performs favorably against classical streamwater temperature models. The MATLAB code of the air2stream model and the chosen calibration procedure (CoBiDE) are available as Supplementary Material on the Journal of Hydrology web page.

  1. Defining our destiny: trainee working group consensus statement on the future of emergency surgery training in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharrock, A E; Gokani, V J; Harries, R L; Pearce, L; Smith, S R; Ali, O; Chu, H; Dubois, A; Ferguson, H; Humm, G; Marsden, M; Nepogodiev, D; Venn, M; Singh, S; Swain, C; Kirkby-Bott, J

    2015-01-01

    The United Kingdom National Health Service treats both elective and emergency patients and seeks to provide high quality care, free at the point of delivery. Equal numbers of emergency and elective general surgical procedures are performed, yet surgical training prioritisation and organisation of NHS institutions is predicated upon elective care. The increasing ratio of emergency general surgery consultant posts compared to traditional sub-specialities has yet to be addressed. How should the capability gap be bridged to equip motivated, skilled surgeons of the future to deliver a high standard of emergency surgical care? The aim was to address both training requirements for the acquisition of necessary emergency general surgery skills, and the formation of job plans for trainee and consultant posts to meet the current and future requirements of the NHS. Twenty nine trainees and a consultant emergency general surgeon convened as a Working Group at The Association of Surgeons in Training Conference, 2015, to generate a united consensus statement to the training requirement and delivery of emergency general surgery provision by future general surgeons. Unscheduled general surgical care provision, emergency general surgery, trauma competence, training to meet NHS requirements, consultant job planning and future training challenges arose as key themes. Recommendations have been made from these themes in light of published evidence. Careful workforce planning, education, training and fellowship opportunities will provide well-trained enthusiastic individuals to meet public and societal need.

  2. Working conditions survey and trainees situation: new approach to auditing the situation of European trainees in obstetrics and gynaecology ten years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, David; Christopoulos, Panagiotis; Martins, Nuno; Pärgmäe, Pille; Werner, Henrica M J

    2009-12-01

    (1) To review the training and working conditions for trainees in obstetrics and gynaecology (Ob/Gyn) in Europe. (2) To suggest further improvements in working conditions for trainees in Ob/Gyn. It is an observational, descriptive, and cross-sectional study. The sample is constituted of the answers from the representatives of 25 European Network of Trainees in Ob/Gyn (ENTOG) member countries to a survey designed by ENTOG's executive. The current survey is based on the former ENTOG working conditions survey published in 1997, but has been extended to include questions that have become important recently, and to include new countries that have entered the European Union (EU) since that time. The total number of trainees represented in this study is 6056. The male/female ratio is 35/65. The average number of official working hours is 51.6 h weekly, but varies widely. The average number of duties/month is five, but varies widely from two to nine. Fewer than 50% of countries have a hospital visitation system implemented. Training abroad is possible in most training systems. Compared with the 1997 survey further harmonisation is taking place. Steps towards harmonisation are being made. Hospital visitation systems should be further introduced. Not all countries have remunerated training posts. Assessment should become more homogeneous. Compliance with the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) is a big challenge.

  3. Diet and density dependent competition affect larval performance and oviposition site selection in the mosquito species Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshioka Miho

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oviposition-site choice is an essential component of the life history of all mosquito species. According to the oviposition-preference offspring-performance (P-P hypothesis, if optimizing offspring performance and fitness ensures high overall reproductive fitness for a given species, the female should accurately assess details of the heterogeneous environment and lay her eggs preferentially in sites with conditions more suitable to offspring. Methods We empirically tested the P-P hypothesis using the mosquito species Aedes albopictus by artificially manipulating two habitat conditions: diet (measured as mg of food added to a container and conspecific density (CD; number of pre-existing larvae of the same species. Immature development (larval mortality, development time to pupation and time to emergence and fitness (measured as wing length were monitored from first instar through adult emergence using a factorial experimental design over two ascending gradients of diet (2.0, 3.6, 7.2 and 20 mg food/300 ml water and CD (0, 20, 40 and 80 larvae/300 ml water. Treatments that exerted the most contrasting values of larval performance were recreated in a second experiment consisting of single-female oviposition site selection assay. Results Development time decreased as food concentration increased, except from 7.2 mg to 20.0 mg (Two-Way CR ANOVA Post-Hoc test, P > 0.1. Development time decreased also as conspecific density increased from zero to 80 larvae (Two-Way CR ANOVA Post-Hoc test, P . Combined, these results support the role of density-dependent competition for resources as a limiting factor for mosquito larval performance. Oviposition assays indicated that female mosquitoes select for larval habitats with conspecifics and that larval density was more important than diet in driving selection for oviposition sites. Conclusions This study supports predictions of the P-P hypothesis and provides a mechanistic understanding

  4. Job-sharing in paediatric training in Australia: availability and trainee perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitelaw, C M; Nash, M C

    2001-04-16

    To examine the current availability of job-sharing in paediatric training hospitals in Australia and to evaluate job-sharing from the trainees' perspective. National survey with structured telephone interviews and postal questionnai res. The eight major paediatric training hospitals in Australia. Directors of Paediatric Physician Training (DPPTs) at each hospital (or a staff member nominated by them) provided information by phone interview regarding job-sharing. All paediatric trainees who job-shared in 1998 (n=34) were sent written questionnaires, of which 25 were returned. Hospitals differed in terms of whether a trainee was required to give a reason for wishing to job-share, and what reasons were acceptable. One hospital stated that two specialty units (Intensive Care and Neonatal Intensive Care) were excluded from job-sharing, and another stated that certain units were unlikely to be allocated job-sharers. The remaining six hospitals said that all units were available for job-sharing, but the majority of their trainees disagreed. Only one hospital had a cap on the number of job-share positions available yearly. Trainees perceived benefits of job-sharing to include decreased tiredness, increased enthusiasm for work, and the ability to strike a balance between training and other aspects of life. Trainees believed job-sharing did not adversely affect the quality of service provided to patients, and that part-time training was not of lower quality than full-time training. Job-sharing in Australian paediatric training hospitals varies in terms of the number of positions available, eligibility criteria, and which units are available for job-sharing. In our survey, trainees' experience of job-sharing was overwhelmingly positive.

  5. Dimensions, discourses and differences: trainees conceptualising health care leadership and followership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Lisi J; Rees, Charlotte E; Ker, Jean S; Cleland, Jennifer

    2015-12-01

    As doctors in all specialties are expected to undertake leadership within health care organisations, leadership development has become an inherent part of medical education. Whereas the leadership literature within medical education remains mostly focused on individual, hierarchical leadership, contemporary theory posits leadership as a group process, which should be distributed across all levels of health care organisation. This gap between theory and practice indicates that there is a need to understand what leadership and followership mean to medical trainees working in today's interprofessional health care workplace. Epistemologically grounded in social constructionism, this research involved 19 individual and 11 group interviews with 65 UK medical trainees across all stages of training and a range of specialties. Semi-structured interviewing techniques were employed to capture medical trainees' conceptualisations of leadership and followership. Interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic framework analysis to identify leadership and followership dimensions which were subsequently mapped onto leadership discourses found in the literature. Although diversity existed in terms of medical trainees' understandings of leadership and followership, unsophisticated conceptualisations focusing on individual behaviours, hierarchy and personality were commonplace in trainees' understandings. This indicated the dominance of an individualist discourse. Patterns in understandings across all stages of training and specialties, and whether definitions were solicited or unsolicited, illustrated that context heavily influenced trainees' conceptualisations of leadership and followership. Our findings suggest that UK trainees typically hold traditional understandings of leadership and followership, which are clearly influenced by the organisational structures in which they work. Although education may change these understandings to some extent

  6. Essential competencies in global health research for medical trainees: A narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mary T; Satterfield, Caley A; Blackard, Jason T

    2017-09-01

    Participation in short-term educational experiences in global health (STEGHs) among medical trainees is increasingly accompanied by interest in conducting research while abroad. Because formal training in both global health and research methods is currently under-represented in most medical curricula, trainees are often unfamiliar with the knowledge, attitudes, and skills necessary to design and conduct research successfully. This narrative review identifies essential global health research competencies for medical trainees engaged in STEGHs. The authors searched the literature using the terms global health, competency, research, research methods/process/training, scholarly project, medical student, and medical education/education. Because articles directly addressing global health research competencies for medical trainees were limited, the authors additionally drew on the broader literature addressing general research competencies and global health competencies. Articles yielded by the literature search, combined with established guidelines in research ethics and global health ethics, were used to identify six core domains and twenty discrete competencies fundamental to global health research at a level appropriate for medical trainees enrolled in STEGHs. Consideration was given to diverse research modalities, varying levels of training, and the availability of mentoring and on-site support. Research may provide important benefits to medical trainees and host partners. These competencies provide a starting point; however, circumstances at any host site may necessitate additional competencies specific to that setting. These competencies are also limited by the methodology employed in their development and the need for additional perspectives from host partners. The competencies identified outline basic knowledge, attitudes, and skills necessary for medical trainees to conduct limited global health research while participating in STEGHS. They may also be used as a

  7. Workplace-based assessments in Foundation Programme training: do trainees in difficulty use them differently?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Colin; Bhat, Sarita; Herbert, Anne; Baker, Paul

    2013-03-01

    Trainee-led workplace-based assessment (WPBA) is increasingly used in postgraduate medical training. Trainees in difficulty are known to behave differently from their peers; these differences may be reflected in their use of WPBAs and may give new insights into the behaviour and assessment of struggling trainees. Data were extracted for 76 115 assessments, completed by 1900 UK Foundation Programme (FP) trainees. Of these 1900 trainees, 95 (5%) were FP trainees in difficulty (FTiDs). We analysed aspects of the use of WPBAs, using multiple logistic regressions, to compare the behaviours of FTiDs with those of their peers. Of 48 possible comparisons, only two (i.e. the rate expected to occur by chance) showed statistically significant differences: relative to their peers, FTiDs were more likely to choose nurse assessors in direct observations of procedural skills (odds ratio [OR] 7.05, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.23-40.43) and more likely to choose non-clinical assessors for assessments using the mini-peer assessment tool (OR 30.44, 95% CI 1.34-689.29). Key features of assessor choice for FTiDs are familiarity and likelihood of receiving a positive assessment. This analysis has not demonstrated that FTiDs use WPBAs any differently from their peers who are not in difficulty, although it does suggest associations and trends that require further exploration. These null results are interesting and raise hypotheses for prospective confirmation or disproof, and for further qualitative work investigating how struggling trainees use WPBAs in order to guide the future implementation of WPBAs in postgraduate training. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2013.

  8. Multiple and multidimensional transitions from trainee to trained doctor: a qualitative longitudinal study in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Lisi; Jindal-Snape, Divya; Morrison, Jill; Muldoon, Janine; Needham, Gillian; Siebert, Sabina; Rees, Charlotte

    2017-12-01

    To explore trainee doctors' experiences of the transition to trained doctor, we answer three questions: (1) What multiple and multidimensional transitions (MMTs) are experienced as participants move from trainee to trained doctor? (2) What facilitates and hinders doctors' successful transition experiences? (3) What is the impact of MMTs on trained doctors? A qualitative longitudinal study underpinned by MMT theory. Four training areas (health boards) in the UK. 20 doctors, 19 higher-stage trainees within 6 months of completing their postgraduate training and 1 staff grade, associate specialist or specialty doctor, were recruited to the 9-month longitudinal audio-diary (LAD) study. All completed an entrance interview, 18 completed LADs and 18 completed exit interviews. Data were analysed cross-sectionally and longitudinally using thematic Framework Analysis. Participants experienced a multiplicity of expected and unexpected, positive and negative work-related transitions (eg, new roles) and home-related transitions (eg, moving home) during their trainee-trained doctor transition. Factors facilitating or inhibiting successful transitions were identified at various levels: individual (eg, living arrangements), interpersonal (eg, presence of supportive relationships), systemic (eg, mentoring opportunities) and macro (eg, the curriculum provided by Medical Royal Colleges). Various impacts of transitions were also identified at each of these four levels: individual (eg, stress), interpersonal (eg, trainees' children spending more time in childcare), systemic (eg, spending less time with patients) and macro (eg, delayed start in trainees' new roles). Priority should be given to developing supportive relationships (both formal and informal) to help trainees transition into their trained doctor roles, as well as providing more opportunities for learning. Further longitudinal qualitative research is now needed with a longer study duration to explore transition journeys for

  9. Working hours of obstetrics and gynaecology trainees in Australia and New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, Jade; Tucker, Paige E; Bulsara, Max K; Cohen, Paul A

    2017-10-01

    The importance of doctors' working hours has gained significant attention with evidence suggesting long hours and fatigue may compromise the safety and wellbeing of both patients and doctors. This study aims to quantify the working hours of The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RANZCOG) specialist trainees in order to better inform discussions of working hours and safety within our region. An anonymous, online survey of RANZCOG trainees was conducted. Demographic data were collected. The primary outcomes were: hours per week at work and hours per week on-call. Secondary outcomes included the frequency of long days (>12 h) and 24-h shifts, time spent studying, staff shortages and opinions regarding current rostering. Response rate was 49.5% (n = 259). Full-time trainees worked an average of 53.1 ± 10.0 h/week, with 11.6% working on-call. Long-day shifts were reported by 85.8% of respondents, with an average length of 14.2 h. Fifteen percent reported working 24-h shifts, with a median duration of uninterrupted sleep during this shift being 1-2 h. Trainees in New Zealand worked 7.0 h/week more than Australian trainees (P ≤0.001), but reported less on-call (P = 0.021). Trainees in Western Australia were more likely to work on-call (P ≤0.001) and 24-h shifts (P ≤0.001). While 53.1 h/week at work is similar to the average Australian hospital doctor, high rates of long days and 24-h shifts with minimal sleep were reported by RANZCOG trainees in this survey. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  10. Race trouble: experiences of Black medical specialist trainees in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackwell, Nicola; Swartz, Leslie; Dlamini, Sipho; Phahladira, Lebogang; Muloiwa, Rudzani; Chiliza, Bonginkosi

    2016-12-03

    This research aimed to identify and explore the experiences of Black registrars in their training in the Western Cape's academic hospitals in order to identify structures, practices, attitudes and ideologies that may promote or impede the advancement of Black doctors into specialist medicine. This is justified by the requirement for universities to work towards monitoring and evaluating efforts to create non-discriminatory and inclusive training environments. This study employed qualitative research methods. Ten Black African medical specialists were interviewed about their training experiences in two university training hospitals in the Western Cape Province, South Africa. Interview data was collected using open-ended questions and coded and analysed using thematic and critical discursive analysis techniques. Four experiential themes emerged from the interview data, they included: 1) experiences of everyday racism during work hours, 2) the physical and psychological effects of tokenism and an increased need to perform, 3) institutional racism as a result of inconsistent and unclear methods of promotion and clinical competence building, and 4) an organisational culture that was experienced as having a race and gender bias. This is a pilot study and there are limits on the generalizability of the data due to the small sample. What is clear from our participants, though, is the strong experiential component of finding it challenging to be a Black trainee in a White-dominated profession. We are undertaking further research to explore the issues raised in more detail.

  11. [Vocational training in general practice in Germany: a nation-wide survey among trainees].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roos, Marco; Blauth, Eckart; Steinhäuser, Jost; Ledig, Thomas; Joos, Stefanie; Peters-Klimm, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The increasing shortage of (primary care) physicians in Germany is currently being discussed within and outside the profession. A national survey among general practice trainees aimed to explore their perspectives of vocational training (VT). After translation, cultural adaptation and web implementation of the questionnaire of the "Vasco da Gama Movement," the survey was conducted during 2009. Descriptive analyses were performed. Among 436 participants (mean age 36 years, 64% female, 49 months of VT) discipline-specific ("medically diverse discipline", "one-to-one care", and "holistic approach"), but also gender-related (females: "compatibility with family life", males: "autonomy and independence", and "opportunities to start their own practice") aspects were important to their choice of career. Despite the heavy workload job satisfaction, but not salary satisfaction, was generally high. Participants rated the following general conditions and content of VT as important: "structured rotations", "rotations in hospitals", "management skills", "working in a local care setting and in a multidisciplinary team" (all>88%). These results provide clues to improving VT in General Practice with respect to organisation and content including the consideration of gender-related living conditions. Furthermore, improvement and further development of VT programmes should ideally be part of an area-wide, interdisciplinary and intersectoral approach. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  12. Pengaruh Trainee terhadap Kinerja Karyawan di Unit Front Office di Hotel X Ancol Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliana Yuliana

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Front office (FO is the poster image of a hotel. That is because this part of the first to welcome guests and can be regarded as the image of the hotel. Therefore, the officer who was in the front office should be able to serve guests with the best service so the guest will satisfaction can be realized and the image is formed with a good hotel. The existence of the front office as an image other than the hotel, as well as the information center. Customers only know part of this front office that can provide all the information you need, be it a hotel facilities as well as all information related to guest attractions such as location, schedule a show or concert. Hence, a front office staff should be kept up to date on the information circumstances surrounding the hotel and also the hotel. Officers in the unit front office should be able to well communicate and able to provide the needed of the guest. Because of limited number of employees, the trainees are very instrumental in petrified duties and responsibilities in the front office. Its presence will bring influence to the performance of employees in the front office. 

  13. In search of work/life balance: trainee perspectives on part-time obstetrics and gynaecology specialist training

    OpenAIRE

    Henry Amanda; Clements Sarah; Kingston Ashley; Abbott Jason

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Part-time training (PTT) is accessed by approximately 10% of Australian obstetrics and gynaecology trainees, a small but increasing minority which reflects the growing demand for improved work/life balance amongst the Australian medical workforce. This survey reports the attitudes and experiences of both full-time and part-time trainees to PTT. Methods An email-based anonymous survey was sent to all Australian obstetrics and gynaecology trainees in April 2009, collecting d...

  14. Comparing the content of leadership theories and managers' shared perceptions of effective leadership: a Q-method study of trainee managers in the English NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Tim

    2013-08-01

    Health service managers face potential conflicts between corporate and professional agendas, a tension sharpened for trainees by their junior status and relative inexperience. While academic leadership theory forms an integral part of contemporary management development programmes, relatively little is known of trainees' patterned subjectivities in relation to leadership theories. The objective of this study was to explore such subjectivities within a cohort of trainees on the National Health Service Graduate Management Training Scheme (NHS GMTS), a 'fast-track' programme which prepares graduate entrants for director-level health service management posts. A Q-method design was used and four shared subjectivities were identified: leadership as collaborative social process ('relational'); leadership as integrity ('moral'); leadership as effective support of subordinates ('team'); and leadership as construction of a credible leadership persona ('identity'). While the factors broadly map onto competencies indicated within the NHS Leadership Qualities Framework which underpin assessments of performance for this student group, it is important not to overstate the governance effect of the assessment regime. Rather, factors reflect tensions between required competencies, namely the mobilisation of diverse interest groups, the ethical base of decisions and the identity work required to convince others of leadership status. Indeed, factor 2 ('moral') effectively defines leadership as the embodiment of public service ethos. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  15. Probing the structural dependence of carbon space lengths of poly(N-hydroxyalkyl acrylamide)-based brushes on antifouling performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jintao; Zhang, Mingzhen; Chen, Hong; Chang, Yung; Chen, Zhan; Zheng, Jie

    2014-08-11

    Numerous biocompatible antifouling polymers have been developed for a wide variety of fundamental and practical applications in drug delivery, biosensors, marine coatings, and many other areas. Several antifouling mechanisms have been proposed, but the exact relationship among molecular structure, surface hydration property, and antifouling performance of antifouling polymers still remains elusive. Here this work strives to provide a better understanding of the structure-property relationship of poly(N-hydroxyalkyl acrylamide)-based materials. We have designed, synthesized, and characterized a series of polyHAAA brushes of various carbon spacer lengths (CSLs), that is, poly(N-hydroxymethyl acrylamide) (polyHMAA), poly(N-(2-hydroxyethyl)acrylamide) (polyHEAA), poly(N-(3-hydroxypropyl)acrylamide) (polyHPAA), and poly(N-(5-hydroxypentyl)acrylamide) (polyHPenAA), to study the structural dependence of CSLs on their antifouling performance. HMAA, HEAA, HPAA, and HPenAA monomers contained one, two, three, and five methylene groups between hydroxyl and amide groups, while the other groups in polymer backbones were the same as each other. The relation of such small structural differences of polymer brushes to their surface hydration and antifouling performance was studied by combined experimental and computational methods including surface plasmon resonance sensors, sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy, cell adhesion assay, and molecular simulations. Antifouling results showed that all polyHAAA-based brushes were highly surface resistant to protein adsorption from single protein solutions, undiluted blood serum and plasma, as well as cell adhesion up to 7 days. In particular, polyHMAA and polyHEAA with the shorter CSLs exhibited higher surface hydration and better antifouling ability than polyHPMA and polyHPenAA. SFG and molecular simulations further revealed that the variation of CSLs changed the ratio of hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity of polymers

  16. Understanding Faculty and Trainee Needs Related to Scholarly Activity in a Large, Nonuniversity Graduate Medical Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Davida; Garth, Hanna; Hollander, Rachel; Klein, Felice; Klau, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Graduate medical education (GME) programs must develop curriculum to ensure scholarly activity among trainees and faculty to meet accreditation requirements and to support evidence-based medicine. Test whether research-related needs and interests varied across four groups: primary care trainees, specialty trainees, primary care faculty, and specialty faculty. We surveyed a random sample of trainees and faculty in Kaiser Permanente Southern California's GME programs. We investigated group differences in outcomes using Fisher exact and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Research experiences, skills, barriers, motivators, and interests in specific research skills development. Participants included 47 trainees and 26 faculty (response rate = 30%). Among primary care faculty, 12 (71%) reported little or no research experience vs 1 (11%) for specialty faculty, 14 (41%) for primary care trainees, and 1 (8%) for specialty trainees (p work roles taking priority; desire for work-life balance; and lack of managerial support, research equipment, administrative support, and funding. Faculty and trainees in primary care and specialties have differing research-related needs that GME programs should consider when designing curricula to support scholarly activity. Developing research skills of primary care faculty is a priority to support trainees' scholarly activity.

  17. General Practitioner (GP) trainees' experience of a '1-h protected supervision model' given during psychiatry placements in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gareth; McNeill, Helen

    2018-01-05

    Background A '1-hour protected supervision model' is well established for Psychiatry trainees. This model is also extended to GP trainees who are on placement in psychiatry. To explore the experiences of the '1-hour protected supervision model' for GP trainees in psychiatry placements in the UK. Methods Using a mixed methods approach, an anonymous online questionnaire was sent to GP trainees in the North West of England who had completed a placement in Psychiatry between February and August 2015. Results Discussing clinical cases whilst using the e-portfolio was the most useful learning event in this model. Patient care can potentially improve if a positive relationship develops between trainee/supervisor, which is impacted by the knowledge of this model at the start of the placement. Trainees found that clinical pressures were impacting on the occurrence of supervision. Conclusion The model works best when both GP trainees and their supervisors understand the model. The most frequently used and educationally beneficial aspect for GP trainees in psychiatry is the exploration of clinical cases using the learning portfolio as an educational tool. For effective delivery of this model of supervision, organisations must reflect on the balance between service delivery and allowing the supervisor and trainee adequate time for it to occur.

  18. The effect of medical trainees on pediatric emergency department flow: a discrete event simulation modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genuis, Emerson D; Doan, Quynh

    2013-11-01

    Providing patient care and medical education are both important missions of teaching hospital emergency departments (EDs). With medical school enrollment rising, and ED crowding becoming an increasing prevalent issue, it is important for both pediatric EDs (PEDs) and general EDs to find a balance between these two potentially competing goals. The objective was to determine how the number of trainees in a PED affects patient wait time, total ED length of stay (LOS), and rates of patients leaving without being seen (LWBS) for PED patients overall and stratified by acuity level as defined by the Pediatric Canadian Triage and Acuity Scale (CTAS) using discrete event simulation (DES) modeling. A DES model of an urban tertiary care PED, which receives approximately 40,000 visits annually, was created and validated. Thirteen different trainee schedules, which ranged from averaging zero to six trainees per shift, were input into the DES model and the outcome measures were determined using the combined output of five model iterations. An increase in LOS of approximately 7 minutes was noted to be associated with each additional trainee per attending emergency physician working in the PED. The relationship between the number of trainees and wait time varied with patients' level of acuity and with the degree of PED utilization. Patient wait time decreased as the number of trainees increased for low-acuity visits and when the PED was not operating at full capacity. With rising numbers of trainees, the PED LWBS rate decreased in the whole department and in the CTAS 4 and 5 patient groups, but it rose in patients triaged CTAS 3 or higher. A rising numbers of trainees was not associated with any change to flow outcomes for CTAS 1 patients. The results of this study demonstrate that trainees in PEDs have an impact mainly on patient LOS and that the effect on wait time differs between patients presenting with varying degrees of acuity. These findings will assist PEDs in finding a

  19. A casemix study of patients seen by a dermatology trainee in rural and urban outpatient settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilakaratne, Dev; Warren, Lachlan; Menz, Jennifer

    2016-02-01

    For 8 years South Australian dermatologists have provided an outreach service to the Northern Territory (NT), including rural and remote areas. In 2012 and 2013, a trainee accompanied a dermatologist on these outreach visits. This is the first prospective study that documents the spectrum of dermatological diseases requiring outpatient specialist input in various settings in the NT, and also the first study to compare the clinical experience of one Australian dermatology trainee in urban and rural settings. Characteristics of patients managed primarily by the outreach dermatology registrar were recorded prospectively from February 2013 to July 2013. The data from the trainee's urban encounters were compared to that of the rural centres. The spectrum of conditions seen in these two settings was placed in the disease categories specified in the Australasian College of Dermatologists (ACD) curriculum. The Royal Adelaide Hospital outpatient experience provided greater exposure to skin neoplasms, lymphoproliferative and myeloproliferative disorders and non-infectious neutrophilic/eosinophilic disorders. The outreach sites provided greater exposure to infections, adnexal diseases and genodermatoses. Both urban and rural experiences provided a broad exposure to the disease categories outlined in the ACD curriculum. The spectrum of disease requiring specialist dermatology input varies between urban South Australia and rural NT. The inclusion of dermatology trainees in outreach visits broadens their clinical exposure. It is recommended that other dermatology service providers in Australia consider documenting clinical casemix comparisons to assess dermatology demand, outcomes and trainee exposure. © 2014 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  20. Peer-mentoring junior surgical trainees in the United Kingdom: a pilot program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulliamy, Paul; Junaid, Islam

    2012-04-16

    Peer-mentoring has attracted substantial interest in various healthcare professions, but has not been formally integrated into postgraduate surgical training. This study aimed to assess the feasibility and acceptability of a peer-mentor scheme among junior surgical trainees in the United Kingdom. Trainees entering the first year of core surgical training (CST) in a single postgraduate school of surgery were allocated a mentor in the second year of CST. Allocation was based on location of the initial clinical placement. An anonymised questionnaire regarding the mentorship scheme was sent to all participants in the third month following its introduction. 18 trainees participated in the scheme, of whom 12 (67%) responded to the questionnaire. All respondents had made contact with their allocated mentor or mentee, and no trainees had opted out of the scheme. Areas in which the mentees received guidance included examinations (83%), CV development (67%), and workplace-based assessments (67%). All respondents felt that the mentor scheme was a good addition to CST. Suggestions for improvement of the scheme included introduction of structured meetings and greater engagement with allocated mentors. A pilot peer-mentoring scheme was well received by junior surgical trainees. Consideration should be given to expansion of this scheme and more rigorous assessment of its value.

  1. The "new normal": Adapting doctoral trainee career preparation for broad career paths in science.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebekah St Clair

    Full Text Available Doctoral recipients in the biomedical sciences and STEM fields are showing increased interest in career opportunities beyond academic positions. While recent research has addressed the interests and preferences of doctoral trainees for non-academic careers, the strategies and resources that trainees use to prepare for a broad job market (non-academic are poorly understood. The recent adaptation of the Social Cognitive Career Theory to explicitly highlight the interplay of contextual support mechanisms, individual career search efficacy, and self-adaptation of job search processes underscores the value of attention to this explicit career phase. Our research addresses the factors that affect the career search confidence and job search strategies of doctoral trainees with non-academic career interests and is based on nearly 900 respondents from an NIH-funded survey of doctoral students and postdoctoral fellows in the biomedical sciences at two U.S. universities. Using structural equation modeling, we find that trainees pursuing non-academic careers, and/or with low perceived program support for career goals, have lower career development and search process efficacy (CDSE, and receive different levels of support from their advisors/supervisors. We also find evidence of trainee adaptation driven by their career search efficacy, and not by career interests.

  2. Preserving professional credibility: grounded theory study of medical trainees' requests for clinical support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Tara J T; Regehr, Glenn; Baker, G Ross; Lingard, Lorelei

    2009-02-09

    To develop a conceptual framework of the influences on medical trainees' decisions regarding requests for clinical support from a supervisor. Phase 1: members of teaching teams in internal and emergency medicine were observed during regular clinical activities (216 hours) and subsequently completed brief interviews. Phase 2: 36 in depth interviews were conducted using videotaped vignettes to probe tacit influences on decisions to request support. Data collection and analysis used grounded theory methods. Three teaching hospitals in an urban setting in Canada. 124 members of teaching teams on general internal medicine wards and in the emergency department, comprising 31 attending physicians, 57 junior and senior residents, 28 medical students, and eight nurses. Purposeful sampling to saturation was conducted. Trainees' decisions about whether or not to seek clinical support were influenced by three issues: the clinical question (clinical importance, scope of practice), supervisor factors (availability, approachability), and trainee factors (skill, desire for independence, evaluation). Trainees perceived that requesting frequent/inappropriate support threatened their credibility and used rhetorical strategies to preserve credibility. These strategies included building a case for the importance of requests, saving requests for opportune moments, making a plan before requesting support, and targeting requests to specific team members. Trainees consider not only clinical implications but also professional credibility when requesting support from clinical supervisors. Exposing the complexity of this process provides the opportunity to make changes to training programmes to promote timely supervision and provides a framework for further exploration of the impact of clinical training on quality of care of patients.

  3. Leveraging Trainees to Improve Quality and Safety at the Point of Care: Three Models for Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson Faherty, Laura; Mate, Kedar S; Moses, James M

    2016-04-01

    Trainees, as frontline providers who are acutely aware of quality improvement (QI) opportunities and patient safety (PS) issues, are key partners in achieving institutional quality and safety goals. However, as academic medical centers accelerate their initiatives to prioritize QI and PS, trainees have not always been engaged in these efforts. This article describes the development of an organizing framework with three suggested models of varying scopes and time horizons to effectively involve trainees in the quality and safety work of their training institutions. The proposed models, which were developed through a literature review, expert interviews with key stakeholders, and iterative testing, are (1) short-term, team-based, rapid-cycle initiatives; (2) medium-term, unit-based initiatives; and (3) long-term, health-system-wide initiatives. For each, the authors describe the objective, scope, duration, role of faculty leaders, steps for implementation in the clinical setting, pros and cons, and examples in the clinical setting. There are many barriers to designing the ideal training environments that fully engage trainees in QI/PS efforts, including lack of protected time for faculty mentors, time restrictions due to rotation-based training, and structural challenges. However, one of the most promising strategies for overcoming these barriers is integrating QI/PS principles into routine clinical care. These models provide opportunities for trainees to successfully learn and apply quality and safety principles to routine clinical care at the team, unit, and system level.

  4. How we treat our own: the experiences and characteristics of psychology trainees with disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Emily M; Andrews, Erin E; Holt, Judith M

    2014-11-01

    To better understand the characteristics and experiences of psychologists and trainees with disabilities. An invitation to participate in a survey of psychologists and psychology trainees with disabilities was sent to professional listservs related to psychology and/or disability. Fifty-six trainees and psychologists with doctoral training in clinical, counseling, school, or rehabilitation psychology completed the survey. Over half (57.1%) were practicing psychologists and 42.9% were current trainees. The most commonly reported disabilities were physical, sensory, and chronic health. The majority of the participants reported experiencing disability-related discrimination during their training, and less than one third had received mentorship from psychologists with disabilities. Less than half of respondents disclosed their disability to a university disability services office, and many relied on informal accommodations alone. Most participants did not disclose their disability during the graduate school, internship, or postdoctoral application processes. Professional psychology programs and training sites should work to remove barriers and provide support for trainees with disabilities, especially during preinternship doctoral training. Programs should not expect disability services offices to provide all support for students with disabilities, especially support related to clinical training. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Virtual study groups and online Observed Structured Clinical Examinations practices - enabling trainees to enable themselves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Dennisa; Evans, Lois

    2018-03-01

    To explore online study groups as augmentation tools in preparing for the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists Observed Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE) for fellowship. An online survey of New Zealand trainees was carried out to assess exam preparedness and openness to virtual study groups and results analysed. Relevant material around virtual study groups for fellowship examinations was reviewed and used to inform a pilot virtual study group. Four New Zealand trainees took part in the pilot project, looking at using a virtual platform to augment OSCE preparation. Of the 50 respondents 36% felt adequately prepared for the OSCE. Sixty-four per cent were interested in using a virtual platform to augment their study. Virtual study groups were noted to be especially important for rural trainees, none of whom felt able to form study groups for themselves. The pilot virtual study group was trialled successfully. All four trainees reported the experience as subjectively beneficial to their examination preparation. Virtual platforms hold promise as an augmentation strategy for exam preparation, especially for rural trainees who are more geographically isolated and less likely to have peers preparing for the same examinations.

  6. Assessing Primary Care Trainee Comfort in the Diagnosis and Management of Thermal Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrouwe, Sebastian Q; Shahrokhi, Shahriar

    Thermal injuries are common and the majority will initially present to primary care physicians. Despite being a part of the objectives of training in family medicine (FM) and emergency medicine (EM), previous study has shown that in practice, gaps exist in the delivery of care. An electronic survey was sent to all FM/EM trainees at our university for the 2014 to 2015 academic year. Plastic Surgery trainees were included as a control group. Demographics and educational/clinical experience were assessed. Trainee comfort was measured on a five-point Likert scale across 15 domains related to thermal injuries. Preferences for educational interventions were also ranked. Descriptive statistics and the Kruskal-Wallis test were used (P comfort levels across all 15 domains when compared with plastic surgery trainees. Preferences for educational interventions were ranked, with clinical rotations and traditional lecture scoring the highest. Primary care trainees are not comfortable in the diagnosis and management of thermal injuries. This may be attributed to limited clinical exposure and teaching during their postgraduate training. There exists an opportunity for specialists in burn care to collaborate with primary care training programs and deliver an educational intervention with the aim of long-lasting quality improvement.

  7. Integrating Family as a Discipline by Providing Parent Led Curricula: Impact on LEND Trainees' Leadership Competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keisling, Bruce L; Bishop, Elizabeth A; Roth, Jenness M

    2017-05-01

    Background While the MCH Leadership Competencies and family as a discipline have been required elements of Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and related Disabilities (LEND) programs for over a decade, little research has been published on the efficacy of either programmatic component in the development of the next generation of leaders who can advocate and care for Maternal and Child Health (MCH) populations. Objective To test the effectiveness of integrating the family discipline through implementation of parent led curricula on trainees' content knowledge, skills, and leadership development in family-centered care, according to the MCH Leadership Competencies. Methods One hundred and two long-term (≥ 300 h) LEND trainees completed a clinical and leadership training program which featured intensive parent led curricula supported by a full-time family faculty member. Trainees rated themselves on the five Basic and Advanced skill items that comprise MCH Leadership Competency 8: Family-centered Care at the beginning and conclusion of their LEND traineeship. Results When compared to their initial scores, trainees rated themselves significantly higher across all family-centered leadership competency items at the completion of their LEND traineeship. Conclusions The intentional engagement of a full-time family faculty member and parent led curricula that include didactic and experiential components are associated with greater identification and adoption by trainees of family-centered attitudes, skills, and practices. However, the use of the MCH Leadership Competencies as a quantifiable measure of program evaluation, particularly leadership development, is limited.

  8. Using patients' charts to assess medical trainees in the workplace: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Wassia, Heidi; Al-Wassia, Rolina; Shihata, Shadi; Park, Yoon Soo; Tekian, Ara

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this review is to summarize and critically appraise existing evidence on the use of chart stimulated recall (CSR) and case-based discussion (CBD) as an assessment tool for medical trainees. Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Educational Resources Information Centre (ERIC), Web of Science, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched for original articles on the use of CSR or CBD as an assessment method for trainees in all medical specialties. Four qualitative and three observational non-comparative studies were eligible for this review. The number of patient-chart encounters needed to achieve sufficient reliability varied across studies. None of the included studies evaluated the content validity of the tool. Both trainees and assessors expressed high level of satisfaction with the tool; however, inadequate training, different interpretation of the scoring scales and skills needed to give feedback were addressed as limitations for conducting the assessment. There is still no compelling evidence for the use of patient's chart to evaluate medical trainees in the workplace. A body of evidence that is valid, reliable, and documents the educational effect in support of the use of patients' charts to assess medical trainees is needed.

  9. Fit-for-purpose: species distribution model performance depends on evaluation criteria - Dutch Hoverflies as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre-Gutiérrez, Jesús; Carvalheiro, Luísa G; Polce, Chiara; van Loon, E Emiel; Raes, Niels; Reemer, Menno; Biesmeijer, Jacobus C

    2013-01-01

    Understanding species distributions and the factors limiting them is an important topic in ecology and conservation, including in nature reserve selection and predicting climate change impacts. While Species Distribution Models (SDM) are the main tool used for these purposes, choosing the best SDM algorithm is not straightforward as these are plentiful and can be applied in many different ways. SDM are used mainly to gain insight in 1) overall species distributions, 2) their past-present-future probability of occurrence and/or 3) to understand their ecological niche limits (also referred to as ecological niche modelling). The fact that these three aims may require different models and outputs is, however, rarely considered and has not been evaluated consistently. Here we use data from a systematically sampled set of species occurrences to specifically test the performance of Species Distribution Models across several commonly used algorithms. Species range in distribution patterns from rare to common and from local to widespread. We compare overall model fit (representing species distribution), the accuracy of the predictions at multiple spatial scales, and the consistency in selection of environmental correlations all across multiple modelling runs. As expected, the choice of modelling algorithm determines model outcome. However, model quality depends not only on the algorithm, but also on the measure of model fit used and the scale at which it is used. Although model fit was higher for the consensus approach and Maxent, Maxent and GAM models were more consistent in estimating local occurrence, while RF and GBM showed higher consistency in environmental variables selection. Model outcomes diverged more for narrowly distributed species than for widespread species. We suggest that matching study aims with modelling approach is essential in Species Distribution Models, and provide suggestions how to do this for different modelling aims and species' data

  10. Acute, low-dose methamphetamine administration improves attention/information processing speed and working memory in methamphetamine-dependent individuals displaying poorer cognitive performance at baseline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, James J; Jackson, Brian J; Kalechstein, Ari D; De La Garza, Richard; Newton, Thomas F

    2011-03-30

    Abstinent methamphetamine (Meth) dependent individuals demonstrate poorer performance on tests sensitive to attention/information processing speed, learning and memory, and working memory when compared to non-Meth dependent individuals. The poorer performance on these tests may contribute to the morbidity associated with Meth-dependence. In light of this, we sought to determine the effects of acute, low-dose Meth administration on attention, working memory, and verbal learning and memory in 19 non-treatment seeking, Meth-dependent individuals. Participants were predominantly male (89%), Caucasian (63%), and cigarette smokers (63%). Following a four day, drug-free washout period, participants were given a single-blind intravenous infusion of saline, followed the next day by 30 mg of Meth. A battery of neurocognitive tasks was administered before and after each infusion, and performance on measures of accuracy and reaction time were compared between conditions. While acute Meth exposure did not affect test performance for the entire sample, participants who demonstrated relatively poor performance on these tests at baseline, identified using a median split on each test, showed significant improvement on measures of attention/information processing speed and working memory when administered Meth. Improved performance was seen on the following measures of working memory: choice reaction time task (p≤0.04), a 1-back task (p≤0.01), and a 2-back task (p≤0.04). In addition, those participants demonstrating high neurocognitive performance at baseline experienced similar or decreased performance following Meth exposure. These findings suggest that acute administration of Meth may temporarily improve Meth-associated neurocognitive performance in those individuals experiencing lower cognitive performance at baseline. As a result, stimulants may serve as a successful treatment for improving cognitive functioning in those Meth-dependent individuals experiencing

  11. The 2nd Annual Clinical Scientist Trainee Symposium, August 22, 2017, London, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Charles; Blom, Jessica N; Lewis, James F

    2018-03-27

    Clinician scientists play a critical role in bridging research and clinical practice. Unfortunately, the neglect of research training in medical schools has created clinicians who are unable to translate evidence from literature to practice. Furthermore, the erosion of research training in medical education has resulted in clinicians who lack the skills required for successful scientific investigation. To counteract this, the Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry has made an effort to engage trainees, at all levels, in the research process. The 2nd Annual Clinician Scientist Trainee Symposium was held in London, Ontario, Canada on August 22, 2017. Organized each year since 2016 by the Schulich Research Office, the symposium features research being conducted by trainees in Schulich's Clinical Research Training Program. The focus this year was on the current state of clinician-scientist training in Canada and visions for the path ahead.

  12. A modern approach to teaching pancreatic surgery: stepwise pancreatoduodenectomy for trainees.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Marangoni, Gabriele

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatoduodenectomy (PD) has always been regarded as one of the most technically demanding abdominal procedures, even when carried out in high-volume centers by experienced surgeons. The reduction in higher surgical trainees working hours has led to reduced exposure, and consequently less experience in operative procedures. Furthermore, trainees have also become victims as health care systems striving for operating room efficiency, have attempted to reduce procedure duration by encouraging consultant led procedures at the expense of training. A strategy therefore needs to be developed to match the ability of the trainee with the complexity of the surgical procedure. As a PD can be deconstructed into a number of different steps, it may indeed be an ideal training operation for varying levels of ability.

  13. The need for more workshops in laparoscopic surgery and surgical anatomy for European gynaecological oncology trainees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manchanda, Ranjit; Halaska, Michael J; Piek, Jurgen M

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to highlight the relative preference of European gynecologic oncology trainees for workshops that could support and supplement their training needs. METHODS: A Web-based survey was sent to 900 trainees on the European Network of Young Gynaecological...... to the survey, giving a 21% response rate. The 3 most important topics reported were laparoscopic surgery; surgical anatomy, and imaging techniques in gynecologic oncology. The Dendron plot indicated 4 different clusters of workshops (research related skills, supportive ancillary skills, related nonsurgical...... questionnaire was 0.78, which suggests good internal consistency/reliability. CONCLUSIONS: This report for the first time highlights the relative importance and significance European trainees attach to some of their training needs in gynecologic oncology. Laparoscopic surgery, surgical anatomy, and imaging...

  14. Providing Transthoracic Echocardiography Training for Intensive Care Unit Trainees: An Educational Improvement Initiat