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Sample records for trained distance runners

  1. Prescribed and self-reported seasonal training of distance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, D J; Hopkins, W G

    1995-12-01

    A survey of 123 distance-running coaches and their best runners was undertaken to describe prescribed seasonal training and its relationship to the performance and self-reported training of the runners. The runners were 43 females and 80 males, aged 24 +/- 8 years (mean +/- S.D.), training for events from 800 m to the marathon, with seasonal best paces of 86 +/- 6% of sex- and age-group world records. The coaches and runners completed a questionnaire on typical weekly volumes of interval and strength training, and typical weekly volumes and paces of moderate and hard continuous running, for build-up, pre-competition, competition and post-competition phases of a season. Prescribed training decreased in volume and increased in intensity from the build-up through to the competition phase, and had similarities with 'long slow distance' training. Coaches of the faster runners prescribed longer build-ups, greater volumes of moderate continuous running and slower relative paces of continuous running (r = 0.19-0.36, P training close to competition pace. The mean training volumes and paces prescribed by the coaches were similar to those reported by the runners, but the correlations between prescribed and reported training were poor (r = 0.2-0.6). Coaches may therefore need to monitor their runners' training more closely.

  2. Factors affecting running economy in trained distance runners.

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    Saunders, Philo U; Pyne, David B; Telford, Richard D; Hawley, John A

    2004-01-01

    Running economy (RE) is typically defined as the energy demand for a given velocity of submaximal running, and is determined by measuring the steady-state consumption of oxygen (VO2) and the respiratory exchange ratio. Taking body mass (BM) into consideration, runners with good RE use less energy and therefore less oxygen than runners with poor RE at the same velocity. There is a strong association between RE and distance running performance, with RE being a better predictor of performance than maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) in elite runners who have a similar VO2max). RE is traditionally measured by running on a treadmill in standard laboratory conditions, and, although this is not the same as overground running, it gives a good indication of how economical a runner is and how RE changes over time. In order to determine whether changes in RE are real or not, careful standardisation of footwear, time of test and nutritional status are required to limit typical error of measurement. Under controlled conditions, RE is a stable test capable of detecting relatively small changes elicited by training or other interventions. When tracking RE between or within groups it is important to account for BM. As VO2 during submaximal exercise does not, in general, increase linearly with BM, reporting RE with respect to the 0.75 power of BM has been recommended. A number of physiological and biomechanical factors appear to influence RE in highly trained or elite runners. These include metabolic adaptations within the muscle such as increased mitochondria and oxidative enzymes, the ability of the muscles to store and release elastic energy by increasing the stiffness of the muscles, and more efficient mechanics leading to less energy wasted on braking forces and excessive vertical oscillation. Interventions to improve RE are constantly sought after by athletes, coaches and sport scientists. Two interventions that have received recent widespread attention are strength training and

  3. Effects of Strength Training on Postpubertal Adolescent Distance Runners.

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    Blagrove, Richard C; Howe, Louis P; Cushion, Emily J; Spence, Adam; Howatson, Glyn; Pedlar, Charles R; Hayes, Philip R

    2018-06-01

    Strength training activities have consistently been shown to improve running economy (RE) and neuromuscular characteristics, such as force-producing ability and maximal speed, in adult distance runners. However, the effects on adolescent (training on several important physiological and neuromuscular qualities associated with distance running performance. Participants (n = 25, 13 female, 17.2 ± 1.2 yr) were paired according to their sex and RE and randomly assigned to a 10-wk strength training group (STG) or a control group who continued their regular training. The STG performed twice weekly sessions of plyometric, sprint, and resistance training in addition to their normal running. Outcome measures included body mass, maximal oxygen uptake (V˙O2max), speed at V˙O2max, RE (quantified as energy cost), speed at fixed blood lactate concentrations, 20-m sprint, and maximal voluntary contraction during an isometric quarter-squat. Eighteen participants (STG: n = 9, 16.1 ± 1.1 yr; control group: n = 9, 17.6 ± 1.2 yr) completed the study. The STG displayed small improvements (3.2%-3.7%; effect size (ES), 0.31-0.51) in RE that were inferred as "possibly beneficial" for an average of three submaximal speeds. Trivial or small changes were observed for body composition variables, V˙O2max and speed at V˙O2max; however, the training period provided likely benefits to speed at fixed blood lactate concentrations in both groups. Strength training elicited a very likely benefit and a possible benefit to sprint time (ES, 0.32) and maximal voluntary contraction (ES, 0.86), respectively. Ten weeks of strength training added to the program of a postpubertal distance runner was highly likely to improve maximal speed and enhances RE by a small extent, without deleterious effects on body composition or other aerobic parameters.

  4. Incidence of chronic knee lesions in long-distance runners based on training level: Findings at MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueller-Weidekamm, Claudia; Schueller, Gerd; Uffmann, Martin; Bader, Till

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of chronic knee changes in long-distance runners based on the training status, including distance, running frequency, training pace, and running experience. Methods: MRI of the knee was performed in 26 non-professional runners 5 days after their last training unit. Lesions of the menisci and cartilage (5-point scale), bone marrow and ligaments (3-point scale), and joint effusion were evaluated. A total score comprising all knee lesions in each runner was evaluated. The incidence of the knee changes was correlated with the training level, gender, and age of the runners. Results: Grade 1 lesions of the menisci were found in six runners with a high training level, and in only four runners with a low training level. Grade 1 cartilage lesions were found in three high-trained runners and in one low-trained runner, and grade 2 lesions were found in one high-trained runner and in two low-trained runners, respectively. Grade 1 anterior cruciate ligament lesions were seen in three runners with a high- and in two runners with a low-training level. Runners with a higher training level showed a statistically significant higher score for all chronic knee lesions than those with a lower training level (p < 0.05). Conclusions: MRI findings indicate that a higher training level in long-distance runners is a risk factor for chronic knee lesions

  5. Incidence of chronic knee lesions in long-distance runners based on training level: Findings at MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schueller-Weidekamm, Claudia [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: claudia.schueller-weidekamm@meduniwien.ac.at; Schueller, Gerd [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Uffmann, Martin [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Bader, Till [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the incidence of chronic knee changes in long-distance runners based on the training status, including distance, running frequency, training pace, and running experience. Methods: MRI of the knee was performed in 26 non-professional runners 5 days after their last training unit. Lesions of the menisci and cartilage (5-point scale), bone marrow and ligaments (3-point scale), and joint effusion were evaluated. A total score comprising all knee lesions in each runner was evaluated. The incidence of the knee changes was correlated with the training level, gender, and age of the runners. Results: Grade 1 lesions of the menisci were found in six runners with a high training level, and in only four runners with a low training level. Grade 1 cartilage lesions were found in three high-trained runners and in one low-trained runner, and grade 2 lesions were found in one high-trained runner and in two low-trained runners, respectively. Grade 1 anterior cruciate ligament lesions were seen in three runners with a high- and in two runners with a low-training level. Runners with a higher training level showed a statistically significant higher score for all chronic knee lesions than those with a lower training level (p < 0.05). Conclusions: MRI findings indicate that a higher training level in long-distance runners is a risk factor for chronic knee lesions.

  6. No Change in Running Mechanics With Live High-Train Low Altitude Training in Elite Distance Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickford, Abigail S L; Wilhite, Daniel P; Chapman, Robert F

    2017-01-01

    Investigations into ventilatory, metabolic, and hematological changes with altitude training have been completed; however, there is a lack of research exploring potential gait-kinematic changes after altitude training, despite a common complaint of athletes being a lack of leg "turnover" on return from altitude training. To determine if select kinematic variables changed in a group of elite distance runners after 4 wk of altitude training. Six elite male distance runners completed a 28-d altitude-training intervention in Flagstaff, AZ (2150 m), following a modified "live high-train low" model, wherein higherintensity runs were performed at lower altitudes (945-1150 m) and low-intensity sessions were completed at higher altitudes (1950-2850 m). Gait parameters were measured 2-9 d before departure to altitude and 1 to 2 d after returning to sea level at running speeds of 300-360 m/min. No differences were found in ground-contact time, swing time, or stride length or frequency after altitude training (P > .05). Running mechanics are not affected by chronic altitude training in elite distance runners. The data suggest that either chronic training at altitude truly has no effect on running mechanics or completing the live high-train low model of altitude training, where higher-velocity workouts are completed at lower elevations, mitigates any negative mechanical adaptations that may be associated with chronic training at slower speeds.

  7. Concurrent fatigue and postactivation potentiation during extended interval training in long-distance runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Ángel Latorre-Román

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to analyze acute effect of running extended interval training(EIT on vertical jump (VJ and handgrip strength (HS performance in experienced endurance athletes. In order to analyze mechanical parameters of the VJ and HS between runs, sixteen experienced male athletes performed an EIT (4x3x400m. The results show that fatigue induced by EIT does not impair handgrip strength or VJ performance. A significant improvement (p< .05 was noted for VJ due to the postactivation potentiation (PAP phenomenon. A positive correlation (r= .619, p= .011 was found between VJ and lactate. The results suggest that experienced long-distance runners can maintain their strength levels and, consequently, work capacity, despite the induced fatigue by the field training demand. Therefore, VJ performance during EIT can be used as an indicator of muscular adaptations to training and, together, with handgrip strength, become indicators of fatigue. These indicators allow proper prescription training routines.

  8. Load management in elite German distance runners during 3-weeks of high-altitude training.

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    Sperlich, Billy; Achtzehn, Silvia; de Marées, Markus; von Papen, Henning; Mester, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    There is a debate on the optimal way of monitoring training loads in elite endurance athletes especially during altitude training camps. In this case report, including nine members of the German national middle distance running team, we describe a practical approach to monitor the psychobiological stress markers during 21 days of altitude training (~2100 m above sea-level) to estimate the training load and to control muscle damage, fatigue, and/or chronic overreaching. Daily examination included: oxygen saturation of hemoglobin, resting heart rate, body mass, body and sleep perception, capillary blood concentration of creatine kinase. Every other day, venous serum concentration of blood urea nitrogen, venous blood concentration of hemoglobin, hematocrit, red and white blood cell were measured. If two or more of the above-mentioned stress markers were beyond or beneath the athlete's normal individual range, the training load of the subsequent training session was reduced. Running speed at 3 mmol L(-1) blood lactate (V3) improved and no athlete showed any signs of underperformance, chronic muscle damage, decrease body and sleep perception as well as activated inflammatory process during the 21 days. The dense screening of biomarkers in the present case study may stimulate further research to identify candidate markers for load monitoring in elite middle- and long-distance runners during a training camp at altitude. © 2016 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  9. Effect of training load structure on purine metabolism in middle-distance runners.

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    Zieliński, Jacek; Kusy, Krzysztof; Rychlewski, Tadeusz

    2011-09-01

    There are no studies analyzing the effect of training loads on purine metabolism during long training periods. The study's purpose was to evaluate the effect of training load changes and subsequent detraining on purine metabolism in middle-distance runners during a 1-yr cycle. In four characteristic points of the training cycle, loads assigned to five intensity zones, pre- and postexercise plasma hypoxanthine (Hx) and uric acid, and erythrocyte Hx-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) activity were determined in 11 male middle-distance runners at the national level, practicing competitive sport for 8.1 ± 0.3 yr and with a mean age of 22.3 ± 0.7 yr, body mass of 73.0 ± 3.4 kg, and body height of 180 ± 2.2 cm. In the competition phase (CP), training loads in aerobic compensation and threshold zones decreased by 65.4% and by 20.5%, respectively. At the same time, anaerobic training loads increased by 132.5% in the VO(2max) zone and by 74.6% in the lactic acid tolerance zone. Postexercise Hx decreased significantly in CP by 6.2 μmol·L(-1). and increased in the transition phase (TP) by 17.4 μmol·L(-1). Both pre- and postexercise HGPRT activity increased significantly in CP by 9.3 nmol·mg(-1)·h(-1). and by 4.9 nmol·mg(-1)·h(-1). , respectively, and decreased significantly in TP by 10.6 nmol·mg(-1)·h(-1). and by 12.0 nmol·mg(-1)·h(-1). , respectively. A significant uric acid increase of 54 μmol·L(-1). was revealed merely in TP. The effect of anaerobic training on purine metabolism is significant despite of a very short total duration of anaerobic loads. Elevated preexercise HGPRT activity in CP suggests adaptation changes consisting in a "permanent readiness" for purine salvage. The detraining in TP leads to reverse adaptation changes. Probably, plasma Hx concentration and erythrocyte HGPRT activity may be considered as a useful measure of training status.

  10. Effects of Ramadan intermittent fasting on middle-distance running performance in well-trained runners.

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    Brisswalter, Jeanick; Bouhlel, Ezzedine; Falola, Jean Marie; Abbiss, Christopher R; Vallier, Jean Marc; Hausswirth, Christophe; Hauswirth, Christophe

    2011-09-01

    To assess whether Ramadan intermittent fasting (RIF) affects 5000-m running performance and physiological parameters classically associated with middle-distance performance. Two experimental groups (Ramadan fasting, n = 9, vs control, n = 9) participated in 2 experimental sessions, one before RIF and the other at the last week of fasting. For each session, subjects completed 4 tests in the same order: a maximal running test, a maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of knee extensor, 2 rectangular submaximal exercises on treadmill for 6 minutes at an intensity corresponding to the first ventilatory threshold (VT1), and a running performance test (5000 m). Eighteen, well-trained, middle-distance runners. Maximal oxygen consumption, MVC, running performance, running efficiency, submaximal VO(2) kinetics parameters (VO(2), VO(2)b, time constant τ, and amplitude A1) and anthropometric parameters were recorded or calculated. At the end of Ramadan fasting, a decrease in MVC was observed (-3.2%; P < 0.00001; η, 0.80), associated with an increase in the time constant of oxygen kinetics (+51%; P < 0.00007; η, 0.72) and a decrease in performance (-5%; P < 0.0007; η, 0.51). No effect was observed on running efficiency or maximal aerobic power. These results suggest that Ramadan changes in muscular performance and oxygen kinetics could affect performance during middle-distance events and need to be considered to choose training protocols during RIF.

  11. Effects of Interval Training-Based Glycolytic Capacity on Physical Fitness in Recreational Long-Distance Runners

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    Zatoń Marek

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of 8-week-long interval training (targeting glycolytic capacity on selected markers of physical fitness in amateur long-distance runners. Methods. The study involved 17 amateur long-distance runners randomly divided into an experimental (n = 8 and control (n = 9 group. The control group performed three or four continuous training sessions per week whereas the experimental group performed two interval running training sessions and one continuous running training session. A graded treadmill exercise test and the 12-min Cooper test were performed pre- and post-training. Results. O2max and the rate of recovery increased in the experimental group. Relative oxygen uptake, minute ventilation, and heart rate speed decreased in low- (6 km/h and medium-intensity (12 km/h running. Conclusions. Both training modalities showed similar results. However, the significant differences in training volume (4-8 min interval training vs. 40-150 min continuous training indicates that the modalities targeting glycolytic capacity may be more efficient for amateur runners prepare for long-distance events.

  12. Optimization of special physical fitness of sportswomen - super long distances runners by means of run training

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    S.I. Karaulova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: improvement of special physical fitness of sportswomen – super long distances runners by means of run training. Material: in the research 6 elite sportswomen of 25-27 years’ age participated. We analyzed documents of training proves planning; analyzed sportswomen’s diaries. Results: three cycle system of annual macro cycle’s construction was put in the base of modern training system for elite marathon sportswomen. We found general and partial volumes of run load of different orientation in annual macro cycle. Optimal duration of maximal load’s segments during anaerobic training was from 30 sec. to 3 minutes. Rest between segments was slow run during 3 – 8 minutes. With it, sportswomen fulfilled repeated run at segments of 15х200 m, 15х400 m, 12х600 m. Conclusions: effectiveness of system of sportswomen’s special physical fitness improvement is determined by rational correlation of differently oriented run means, which were directed at increase of special fitness level in marathon.

  13. Elevated Serum Hepcidin Levels during an Intensified Training Period in Well-Trained Female Long-Distance Runners

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    Aya Ishibashi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Iron is essential for providing oxygen to working muscles during exercise, and iron deficiency leads to decreased exercise capacity during endurance events. However, the mechanism of iron deficiency among endurance athletes remains unclear. In this study, we compared iron status between two periods involving different training regimens. Sixteen female long-distance runners participated. Over a seven-month period, fasting blood samples were collected during their regular training period (LOW; middle of February and during an intensified training period (INT; late of August to determine blood hematological, iron, and inflammatory parameters. Three-day food diaries were also assessed. Body weight and lean body mass did not differ significantly between LOW and INT, while body fat and body fat percentage were significantly lower in INT (p < 0.05. Blood hemoglobin, serum ferritin, total protein, and iron levels, total iron-binding capacity, and transferrin saturation did not differ significantly between the two periods. Serum hepcidin levels were significantly higher during INT than LOW (p < 0.05. Carbohydrate and iron intakes from the daily diet were significantly higher during INT than LOW (p < 0.05. In conclusion, an elevated hepcidin level was observed during an intensified training period in long-distance runners, despite an apparently adequate daily intake of iron.

  14. Elevated Serum Hepcidin Levels during an Intensified Training Period in Well-Trained Female Long-Distance Runners.

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    Ishibashi, Aya; Maeda, Naho; Sumi, Daichi; Goto, Kazushige

    2017-03-14

    Iron is essential for providing oxygen to working muscles during exercise, and iron deficiency leads to decreased exercise capacity during endurance events. However, the mechanism of iron deficiency among endurance athletes remains unclear. In this study, we compared iron status between two periods involving different training regimens. Sixteen female long-distance runners participated. Over a seven-month period, fasting blood samples were collected during their regular training period (LOW; middle of February) and during an intensified training period (INT; late of August) to determine blood hematological, iron, and inflammatory parameters. Three-day food diaries were also assessed. Body weight and lean body mass did not differ significantly between LOW and INT, while body fat and body fat percentage were significantly lower in INT ( p daily diet were significantly higher during INT than LOW ( p daily intake of iron.

  15. The efficacy of downhill running as a method to enhance running economy in trained distance runners.

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    Shaw, Andrew J; Ingham, Stephen A; Folland, Jonathan P

    2018-06-01

    Running downhill, in comparison to running on the flat, appears to involve an exaggerated stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) due to greater impact loads and higher vertical velocity on landing, whilst also incurring a lower metabolic cost. Therefore, downhill running could facilitate higher volumes of training at higher speeds whilst performing an exaggerated SSC, potentially inducing favourable adaptations in running mechanics and running economy (RE). This investigation assessed the efficacy of a supplementary 8-week programme of downhill running as a means of enhancing RE in well-trained distance runners. Nineteen athletes completed supplementary downhill (-5% gradient; n = 10) or flat (n = 9) run training twice a week for 8 weeks within their habitual training. Participants trained at a standardised intensity based on the velocity of lactate turnpoint (vLTP), with training volume increased incrementally between weeks. Changes in energy cost of running (E C ) and vLTP were assessed on both flat and downhill gradients, in addition to maximal oxygen uptake (⩒O 2max). No changes in E C were observed during flat running following downhill (1.22 ± 0.09 vs 1.20 ± 0.07 Kcal kg -1  km -1 , P = .41) or flat run training (1.21 ± 0.13 vs 1.19 ± 0.12 Kcal kg -1  km -1 ). Moreover, no changes in E C during downhill running were observed in either condition (P > .23). vLTP increased following both downhill (16.5 ± 0.7 vs 16.9 ± 0.6 km h -1 , P = .05) and flat run training (16.9 ± 0.7 vs 17.2 ± 1.0 km h -1 , P = .05), though no differences in responses were observed between groups (P = .53). Therefore, a short programme of supplementary downhill run training does not appear to enhance RE in already well-trained individuals.

  16. The correlation between running economy and maximal oxygen uptake: cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships in highly trained distance runners.

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    Shaw, Andrew J; Ingham, Stephen A; Atkinson, Greg; Folland, Jonathan P

    2015-01-01

    A positive relationship between running economy and maximal oxygen uptake (V̇O2max) has been postulated in trained athletes, but previous evidence is equivocal and could have been confounded by statistical artefacts. Whether this relationship is preserved in response to running training (changes in running economy and V̇O2max) has yet to be explored. This study examined the relationships of (i) running economy and V̇O2max between runners, and (ii) the changes in running economy and V̇O2max that occur within runners in response to habitual training. 168 trained distance runners (males, n = 98, V̇O2max 73.0 ± 6.3 mL∙kg-1∙min-1; females, n = 70, V̇O2max 65.2 ± 5.9 mL kg-1∙min-1) performed a discontinuous submaximal running test to determine running economy (kcal∙km-1). A continuous incremental treadmill running test to volitional exhaustion was used to determine V̇O2max 54 participants (males, n = 27; females, n = 27) also completed at least one follow up assessment. Partial correlation analysis revealed small positive relationships between running economy and V̇O2max (males r = 0.26, females r = 0.25; Peconomy and V̇O2max in response to habitual training (r = 0.35; Peconomy and V̇O2max in highly trained distance runners. With >85% of the variance in these parameters unexplained by this relationship, these findings reaffirm that running economy and V̇O2max are primarily determined independently.

  17. Four Weeks of Classical Altitude Training Increases Resting Metabolic Rate in Highly Trained Middle-Distance Runners.

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    Woods, Amy L; Sharma, Avish P; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Saunders, Philo U; Rice, Anthony J; Thompson, Kevin G

    2017-02-01

    High altitude exposure can increase resting metabolic rate (RMR) and induce weight loss in obese populations, but there is a lack of research regarding RMR in athletes at moderate elevations common to endurance training camps. The present study aimed to determine whether 4 weeks of classical altitude training affects RMR in middle-distance runners. Ten highly trained athletes were recruited for 4 weeks of endurance training undertaking identical programs at either 2200m in Flagstaff, Arizona (ALT, n = 5) or 600m in Canberra, Australia (CON, n = 5). RMR, anthropometry, energy intake, and hemoglobin mass (Hb mass ) were assessed pre- and posttraining. Weekly run distance during the training block was: ALT 96.8 ± 18.3km; CON 103.1 ± 5.6km. A significant interaction for Time*Group was observed for absolute (kJ.day -1 ) (F-statistic, p-value: F (1,8) =13.890, p = .01) and relative RMR (F (1,8) =653.453, p = .003) POST-training. No significant changes in anthropometry were observed in either group. Energy intake was unchanged (mean ± SD of difference, ALT: 195 ± 3921kJ, p = .25; CON: 836 ± 7535kJ, p = .75). A significant main effect for time was demonstrated for total Hb mass (g) (F (1,8) =13.380, p = .01), but no significant interactions were observed for either variable [Total Hb mass (g): F (1,8) =1.706, p = .23; Relative Hb mass (g.kg -1 ): F (1,8) =0.609, p = .46]. These novel findings have important practical application to endurance athletes routinely training at moderate altitude, and those seeking to optimize energy management without compromising training adaptation. Altitude exposure may increase RMR and enhance training adaptation,. During training camps at moderate altitude, an increased energy intake is likely required to support an increased RMR and provide sufficient energy for training and performance.

  18. The reliability of running economy expressed as oxygen cost and energy cost in trained distance runners.

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    Shaw, Andrew J; Ingham, Stephen A; Fudge, Barry W; Folland, Jonathan P

    2013-12-01

    This study assessed the between-test reliability of oxygen cost (OC) and energy cost (EC) in distance runners, and contrasted it with the smallest worthwhile change (SWC) of these measures. OC and EC displayed similar levels of within-subject variation (typical error < 3.85%). However, the typical error (2.75% vs 2.74%) was greater than the SWC (1.38% vs 1.71%) for both OC and EC, respectively, indicating insufficient sensitivity to confidently detect small, but meaningful, changes in OC and EC.

  19. long-distance runners

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Other problems are eating disorders and skeletal abnormalities, including re~ stress fractures and failure to reach peak bone mass.1. The BMD might be influenced by several variables, such as current men- strual status, menstrual history, body mass, functional loading, family history of osteoporosis, nutritional status, train ...

  20. Body Mass and Weekly Training Distance Influence the Pain and Injuries Experienced by Runners Using Minimalist Shoes: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

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    Fuller, Joel T; Thewlis, Dominic; Buckley, Jonathan D; Brown, Nicholas A T; Hamill, Joseph; Tsiros, Margarita D

    2017-04-01

    Minimalist shoes have been popularized as a safe alternative to conventional running shoes. However, a paucity of research is available investigating the longer-term safety of minimalist shoes. To compare running-related pain and injury between minimalist and conventional shoes in trained runners and to investigate interactions between shoe type, body mass, and weekly training distance. Randomized clinical trial; Level of evidence, 2. Sixty-one trained, habitual rearfoot footfall runners (mean ± SD: body mass, 74.6 ± 9.3 kg; weekly training distance, 25 ± 14 km) were randomly allocated to either minimalist or conventional shoes. Runners gradually increased the time spent running in their allocated shoes over 26 weeks. Running-related pain intensity was measured weekly by use of 100-mm visual analog scales. Time to first running-related injury was also assessed. Interactions were found between shoe type and weekly training distance for weekly running-related pain; greater pain was experienced with minimalist shoes ( P 10 mm) were noted when the weekly training distance was more than 35 km/wk. Eleven of 30 runners sustained an injury in conventional shoes compared with 16 of 31 runners in minimalist shoes (hazard ratio, 1.64; 95% confidence interval, 0.63-4.27; P = .31). A shoe × body mass interaction was found for time to first running-related injury ( P = .01). For runners using minimalist shoes, relative to runners using conventional shoes, the risk of sustaining an injury became more likely with increasing body mass above 71.4 kg, and the risk was moderately increased (hazard ratio, 2.00; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-3.66; P = .02) for runners using minimalist shoes who had a body mass of 85.7 kg. Runners should limit weekly training distance in minimalist shoes to avoid running-related pain. Heavier runners are at greater risk of injury when running in minimalist shoes. Registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12613000642785).

  1. Echocardiographic left ventricular masses in distance runners and weight lifters

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    Longhurst, J. C.; Gonyea, W. J.; Mitchell, J. H.; Kelly, A. R.

    1980-01-01

    The relationships of different forms of exercise training to left ventricular mass and body mass are investigated by echocardiographic studies of weight lifters, long-distance runners, and comparatively sized untrained control subjects. Left ventricular mass determinations by the Penn convention reveal increased absolute left ventricular masses in long-distance runners and competitive weight lifters with respect to controls matched for age, body weight, and body surface area, and a significant correlation between ventricular mass and lean body mass. When normalized to lean body mass, the ventricular masses of distance runners are found to be significantly higher than those of the other groups, suggesting that dynamic training elevates left ventricular mass compared to static training and no training, while static training increases ventricular mass only to the extent that lean body mass is increased.

  2. Cardiovascular Risks in Long Distance Runners.

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    Witham, Bethany Rolfe; Babbitt, Keven

    Distance running has become increasingly popular since the 1970s. Despite the health benefits, long-distance running has been associated with an increased risk for cardiac events. Healthcare professionals should be familiar with distance running cardiac risk factors and preparticipation screening recommendations from the American Heart Association, and should screen and educate patients during healthcare encounters. Nurses are particularly well suited to educate runners on risks and symptoms of cardiac dysfunction.

  3. Haematological status in elite long-distance runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suetta, C; Kanstrup, I L; Fogh-Andersen, N

    1996-01-01

    In 10 female and eight male Danish elite middle- and long-distance runners, haematological status, including blood volume, was examined. Haemoglobin, haematocrit and serum (s)-ferritin concentrations were all within the normal range. In both men and women, blood volume, plasma volume...... and erythrocyte volume were increased in relation to various reference values. However, the runners had a low body weight due to a reduced fat level, 9.5% (7.3-15.1%) fat for the women, 5.9% (5.0-8.8%) fat (median and ranges) for the men, measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) scanning. When...... the runners' body weights were 'normalized' to a reference population (25% fat for women, 15% fat for men), only plasma volume remained increased in relation to body weight for the women, whereas all the volumes remained increased for the men. This confirms that endurance training induces a true increased...

  4. The Effect of Training at 2100-m Altitude on Running Speed and Session Rating of Perceived Exertion at Different Intensities in Elite Middle-Distance Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Avish P; Saunders, Philo U; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Clark, Brad; Stanley, Jamie; Robertson, Eileen Y; Thompson, Kevin G

    2017-04-01

    To determine the effect of training at 2100-m natural altitude on running speed (RS) during training sessions over a range of intensities relevant to middle-distance running performance. In an observational study, 19 elite middle-distance runners (mean ± SD age 25 ± 5 y, VO 2 max, 71 ± 5 mL · kg -1 · min -1 ) completed either 4-6 wk of sea-level training (CON, n = 7) or a 4- to 5-wk natural altitude-training camp living at 2100 m and training at 1400-2700 m (ALT, n = 12) after a period of sea-level training. Each training session was recorded on a GPS watch, and athletes also provided a score for session rating of perceived exertion (sRPE). Training sessions were grouped according to duration and intensity. RS (km/h) and sRPE from matched training sessions completed at sea level and 2100 m were compared within ALT, with sessions completed at sea level in CON describing normal variation. In ALT, RS was reduced at altitude compared with sea level, with the greatest decrements observed during threshold- and VO 2 max-intensity sessions (5.8% and 3.6%, respectively). Velocity of low-intensity and race-pace sessions completed at a lower altitude (1400 m) and/or with additional recovery was maintained in ALT, though at a significantly greater sRPE (P = .04 and .05, respectively). There was no change in velocity or sRPE at any intensity in CON. RS in elite middle-distance athletes is adversely affected at 2100-m natural altitude, with levels of impairment dependent on the intensity of training. Maintenance of RS at certain intensities while training at altitude can result in a higher perceived exertion.

  5. ANTHROPOMETRIC, GAIT AND STRENGTH CHARACTERISTICS OF KENYAN DISTANCE RUNNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pui W. Kong

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study intended to take a biomechanical approach to understand the success of Kenyan distance runners. Anthropometric, gait and lower extremity strength characteristics of six elite Kenyan distance runners were analyzed. Stride frequency, relative stride length and ground contact time were measured at five running speeds (3.5 - 5.4 m/s using a motion capture system. Isometric knee extension and flexion torques were measured at six angles and hamstrings and quadriceps (H:Q ratios at three angular velocities were determined using an isokinetic dynamometer. These runners were characterized by a low body mass index (20.1 ± 1.8 kg·m- 2, low percentage body fat (5.1 ± 1.6% and small calf circumference (34.5 ± 2.3 cm. At all running speeds, the ground contact time was shorter (p < 0.05 during right (170 - 212 ms compared to left (177 - 220 ms foot contacts. No bilateral difference was observed in other gait or strength variables. Their maximal isometric strength was lower than other runners (knee extension: 1.4 - 2.6 Nm·kg-1, knee flexion: 1.0 - 1.4 Nm·kg-1 but their H:Q ratios were higher than athletes in other sports (1.03 ± 0.51 at 60o/s, 1.44 ± 0.46 at 120o/s, 1.59 ± 0.66 at 180o/s. The slim limbs of Kenyan distance runners may positively contribute to performance by having a low moment of inertia and thus requiring less muscular effort in leg swing. The short ground contact time observed may be related to good running economy since there is less time for the braking force to decelerate forward motion of the body. These runners displayed minor gait asymmetry, though the difference may be too small to be practically significant. Further investigations are needed to confirm whether the bilateral symmetry in strength and high H:Q ratios are related to genetics, training or the lack of injuries in these runners

  6. Study of speed endurance middle distance runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.V. Golovaschenko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To investigate the boost performance speed endurance runners who specialize in middle-distance running . Material and methods : The study involved team members Vinnytsia region in an amount of 44 people, whose average age was 20,2 ± 2,1 years. Classes are held during the 21-day mesocycle, 5 times a week, twice a day. Things were aimed at enhancing the development of indicators of special speed endurance. Results : The dynamics of the running speed of the model segments that characterize speed endurance athletes. Proved that the improved running 400 meter intervals helps reduce travel time competitive distance of 1500 meters. Conclusion : The use of the program contributes to higher speed endurance, which determines the result in the women's 1,500 meters.

  7. Kenyan and Ethiopian distance runners: what makes them so good?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilber, Randall L; Pitsiladis, Yannis P

    2012-06-01

    Since the 1968 Mexico City Olympics, Kenyan and Ethiopian runners have dominated the middle- and long-distance events in athletics and have exhibited comparable dominance in international cross-country and road-racing competition. Several factors have been proposed to explain the extraordinary success of the Kenyan and Ethiopian distance runners, including (1) genetic predisposition, (2) development of a high maximal oxygen uptake as a result of extensive walking and running at an early age, (3) relatively high hemoglobin and hematocrit, (4) development of good metabolic "economy/efficiency" based on somatotype and lower limb characteristics, (5) favorable skeletal-muscle-fiber composition and oxidative enzyme profile, (6) traditional Kenyan/Ethiopian diet, (7) living and training at altitude, and (8) motivation to achieve economic success. Some of these factors have been examined objectively in the laboratory and field, whereas others have been evaluated from an observational perspective. The purpose of this article is to present the current data relative to factors that potentially contribute to the unprecedented success of Kenyan and Ethiopian distance runners, including recent studies that examined potential links between Kenyan and Ethiopian genotype characteristics and elite running performance. In general, it appears that Kenyan and Ethiopian distance-running success is not based on a unique genetic or physiological characteristic. Rather, it appears to be the result of favorable somatotypical characteristics lending to exceptional biomechanical and metabolic economy/efficiency; chronic exposure to altitude in combination with moderate-volume, high-intensity training (live high + train high), and a strong psychological motivation to succeed athletically for the purpose of economic and social advancement.

  8. Vegetative provision of central hemodynamics and physical performance of middle distance sportswomen-runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Mikhalyuk

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To determine the autonomic provision of the central hemodynamics and physical performance in middle distance sportswomen-runners. Methods and results. A comprehensive survey of 34 sportswomen-sprinters, qualifications from II-III level to the IMS, was carried out. For the analysis of vegetative cardiovascular regulation mathematical methods of HRV were used. In middle distance sportswomen-runners with qualifications of MS-IMS parasympathetic link of autonomic nervous system, hypokinetic types of circulation, large quantities of physical performance and index of functional state prevail compared with sportswomen-runners with qualifications of CMS, I-st, II-nd and III-rd level. Conclusion. Correlation analysis showed a significant interconnection, indicating that the optimal vegetative providing of training process of middle distance runners is accompanied by hypokinetic TC and high digits of PWC170/kg and IFS.

  9. a case series in habitual distance runners

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    muscle injury, aponeurotic tears, ligament injuries, tendinopathy and evaluation of soft tissue ... the point of preventing visualisation of sections of the vessel lumen. (Figure 6). ... 11 constant, then intermittent. Short distances ... Gielen S, Schuler G, Adams V. Cardiovascular effects of exercise training: molecular mechanisms.

  10. Eating disorders and health in elite women distance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulley, A J; Hill, A J

    2001-11-01

    To examine the presence of eating disorder syndromes in elite women distance runners in the United Kingdom and any associated differences in training, dieting, general health, and well-being. Athletes were selected from the top of their respective ranking lists for all middle and long-distance races in 1996/1997. All running disciplines were included (track, road, cross-country, and fell/mountain running). Athletes were sent the Eating Disorders Examination Questionnaire and a questionnaire on demographics, athletic training, diet, and health. Of the 226 athletes identified, 181 (81%) completed and returned the questionnaires. Twenty-nine athletes (16%) had an eating disorder at the time of the study (7 had anorexia nervosa [AN], 2 had bulimia nervosa [BN], and 20 had eating disorders not otherwise specified [EDNOS]) and a further 6 had received previous treatment. Comparing the eating disorder group with the rest of the sample showed no difference in age, height, preferred race distance, or the number of hours/week spent training. However, they had a significantly lower body mass index (BMI), lower self-esteem, and poorer mental health. Current and past dieting were significantly more common in the eating disorder group. The levels of AN and EDNOS are higher than would be expected in similarly aged, nonathletic women. The demands for leanness rather than exercise intensity appear to be the main risk in these elite runners. The early detection and prevention of eating disorders in women athletes should have high priority. Copyright 2001 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  11. Eighteen days of "living high, training low" stimulate erythropoiesis and enhance aerobic performance in elite middle-distance runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brugniaux, Julien V; Schmitt, Laurent; Robach, Paul

    2005-01-01

    The efficiency of "living high, training low" (LHTL) remains controversial, despite its wide utilization. This study aimed to verify whether maximal and/or submaximal aerobic performance were modified by LHTL and whether these effects persist for 15 days after returning to normoxia. Last, we trie...

  12. Altered neuroendocrine regulation of gonadotropin secretion in women distance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuis, J D; Evans, W S; Demers, L M; Thorner, M O; Wakat, D; Rogol, A D

    1985-09-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the neuroendocrine control of gonadotropin secretion is altered in certain women distance runners with secondary amenorrhea. To this end, we quantitated the frequency and amplitude of spontaneous pulsatile LH secretion during a 24-h interval in nine such women. The ability of the pituitary gland to release LH normally was assessed by administration of graded bolus doses of GnRH during the subsequent 8 h. Compared to normally menstruating women, six of nine amenorrheic distance runners had a distinct reduction in spontaneous LH pulse frequency, with one, three, six, five, four, or two pulses per 24 h (normal, 8-15 pulses/24 h). This reduction in LH pulse frequency occurred without any significant alterations in plasma concentrations of estradiol and free testosterone or 24-h integrated serum concentrations of LH, FSH, or PRL. Moreover, in long-distance runners, the capacity of the pituitary gland to release LH was normal or accentuated in response to exogenous pulses of GnRH. In the six women athletes with diminished spontaneous LH pulsatility, acute ovarian responsiveness also was normal, since serum estradiol concentrations increased normally in response to the GnRH-induced LH pulses. Although long-distance runners had significantly lower estimated percent body fat compared to control women, specific changes in pulsatile gonadotropin release did not correlate with degree of body leanness. In summary, certain long-distance runners with secondary amenorrhea or severe oligomenorrhea have unambiguously decreased spontaneous LH pulse frequency with intact pituitary responsiveness to GnRH. This neuroendocrine disturbance may be relevant to exercise-associated amenorrhea, since pulsatile LH release is a prerequisite for cyclic ovarian function. We speculate that such alterations in pulsatile LH release in exercising women reflect an adaptive response of the hypothalamic pulse generator controlling the intermittent GnRH signal to the

  13. Stress Fracture of the Pubic Ramus in a Female Long Distance Runner: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seçkin Şenışık

    2017-06-01

    Stress fractures of the pelvis should be included in the differential diagnosis of female distance runners who have prolonged groin pain increasing with exercise. Detailed medical history, physical examination, blood tests, and radiological images are keys to reach certain diagnosis. Treatment plan should include risk factor analysis and progressive training programs.

  14. Reliability and accuracy of Cooper's test in male long distance runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.R. Alvero-Cruz

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions: All together, our results may confirm a good accuracy and reliability of Cooper's test in amateur long distance runners. Also, improvements or impairment lower than 52.2 m must not be associated with exercise training or retraining, since they are below the values of intra-subject reliability.

  15. Gonadotropin Pulsatllity in FemaIe Long Distance Runners

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-10-24

    findings as well as her current knowledge of this area, she developed her own model of GnRH release. She believe that norepinephrine has a tonic...that . ,·. ~ only long distance runners and cross country skiers had trouble with their menstrual cycles. Similarly, Erdelyi (1976) found a higher

  16. Sulfur status in long distance runners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, L; Zamboni, C; Lourenço, T; Macedo, D

    2015-01-01

    In sports medicine, sulfur plays an important role and its deficiency can cause muscle injury affecting the performance of the athletes. However, its evaluation is unusual in conventional clinical practice. In this study the sulfur levels were determined in Brazilian amateur athlete's blood using Neutron Activation Analyses (NAA) technique. Twenty six male amateur runners, age 18 to 36 years, participated of this study. The athletes had a balanced diet, without multivitamin/mineral supplements. The blood collection was performed at LABEX (Laboratoriode Bioquimica do Exercicio, UNICAMP-SP) and the samples were irradiated for 300 seconds in a pneumatic station in the nuclear reactor (IEA-R1, 3-4.5MW, pool type) at IPEN/CNEN-SP. The results were compared with the control group (subjects of same age but not involved with physical activities) and showed that the sulfur concentration was 44% higher in amateurs athletes than control group. These data can be considered for preparation of balanced diet, as well as contributing for proposing new protocols of clinical evaluation. (paper)

  17. Sulfur status in long distance runners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, L.; Zamboni, C.; Lourenço, T.; Macedo, D.

    2015-07-01

    In sports medicine, sulfur plays an important role and its deficiency can cause muscle injury affecting the performance of the athletes. However, its evaluation is unusual in conventional clinical practice. In this study the sulfur levels were determined in Brazilian amateur athlete's blood using Neutron Activation Analyses (NAA) technique. Twenty six male amateur runners, age 18 to 36 years, participated of this study. The athletes had a balanced diet, without multivitamin/mineral supplements. The blood collection was performed at LABEX (Laboratoriode Bioquimica do Exercicio, UNICAMP-SP) and the samples were irradiated for 300 seconds in a pneumatic station in the nuclear reactor (IEA-R1, 3-4.5MW, pool type) at IPEN/CNEN-SP. The results were compared with the control group (subjects of same age but not involved with physical activities) and showed that the sulfur concentration was 44% higher in amateurs athletes than control group. These data can be considered for preparation of balanced diet, as well as contributing for proposing new protocols of clinical evaluation.

  18. Incidence and determinants of lower extremity running injuries in long distance runners: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gent, R N; Siem, D; van Middelkoop, M; van Os, A G; Bierma‐Zeinstra, S M A; Koes, B W

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to present a systematic overview of published reports on the incidence and associated potential risk factors of lower extremity running injuries in long distance runners. An electronic database search was conducted using the PubMed–Medline database. Two observers independently assessed the quality of the studies and a best evidence synthesis was used to summarise the results. The incidence of lower extremity running injuries ranged from 19.4% to 79.3%. The predominant site of these injuries was the knee. There was strong evidence that a long training distance per week in male runners and a history of previous injuries were risk factors for injuries, and that an increase in training distance per week was a protective factor for knee injuries. PMID:17473005

  19. Physiological and training characteristics of recreational marathon runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Dan; Wightman, Sarah; Basevitch, Itay; Johnstone, James; Espejo-Sanchez, Carolina; Beckford, Chelsea; Boal, Mariette; Scruton, Adrian; Ferrandino, Mike; Merzbach, Viviane

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the physical and training characteristics of recreational marathon runners within finish time bandings (2.5-3 h, 3-3.5 h, 3.5-4 h, 4-4.5 h and >4.5 h). A total of 97 recreational marathon runners (age 42.4 ± 9.9 years; mass 69.2 ± 11.3 kg; stature 172.8 ± 9.1 cm), with a marathon finish time of 229.1 ± 48.7 min, of whom n = 34 were female and n = 63 were male, completed an incremental treadmill test for the determination of lactate threshold (LT1), lactate turn point (LT2) and running economy (RE). Following a 7-min recovery, they completed a test to volitional exhaustion starting at LT2 for the assessment of [Formula: see text]. In addition, all participants completed a questionnaire gathering information on their current training regimes exploring weekly distances, training frequencies, types of sessions, longest run in a week, with estimations of training speed, and load and volume derived from these data. Training frequency was shown to be significantly greater for the 2.5-3 h group compared to the 3.5-4 h runners ( P 4.5 h group ( P = 0.004), while distance per session (km·session -1 ) was significantly greater for the 2.5-3 h group (16.1 ± 4.2) compared to the 3.5-4 h group (15.5 ± 5.2; P = 0.01) and >4.5 h group (10.3 ± 2.6; P = 0.001). Race speed correlated with LT1 ( r = 0.791), LT2 ( r = 0.721) and distance per session ( r = 0.563). The data highlight profound differences for key components of marathon running ([Formula: see text], LT1, LT2, RE and % [Formula: see text]) within a group of recreational runners with the discriminating training variables being training frequency and the absolute training speed.

  20. Relationship between Achilles tendon properties and foot strike patterns in long-distance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Keitaro; Miyazaki, Daisuke; Tanaka, Shigeharu; Shimoju, Shozo; Tsunoda, Naoya

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between Achilles tendon properties and foot strike patterns in long-distance runners. Forty-one highly trained male long-distance runners participated in this study. Elongation of the Achilles tendon and aponeurosis of the medial gastrocnemius muscle were measured using ultrasonography, while the participants performed ramp isometric plantar flexion up to the voluntary maximum. The relationship between the estimated muscle force and tendon elongation during the ascending phase was fit to a linear regression, the slope of which was defined as stiffness. In addition, the cross-sectional area of the Achilles tendon was measured using ultrasonography. Foot strike patterns (forefoot, midfoot and rearfoot) during running were determined at submaximal velocity (18 km · h(-1)) on a treadmill. The number of each foot strike runner was 12 for the forefoot (29.3%), 12 for the midfoot (29.3%) and 17 for the rearfoot (41.5%). No significant differences were observed in the variables measured for the Achilles tendon among the three groups. These results suggested that the foot strike pattern during running did not affect the morphological or mechanical properties of the Achilles tendon in long-distance runners.

  1. Oxygen consumption of elite distance runners on an anti-gravity treadmill®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeill, David K P; Kline, John R; de Heer, Hendrick D; Coast, J Richard

    2015-06-01

    Lower body positive pressure (LBPP), or 'anti-gravity' treadmills® have become increasingly popular among elite distance runners. However, to date, few studies have assessed the effect of body weight support (BWS) on the metabolic cost of running among elite runners. This study evaluated how BWS influenced the relationship between velocity and metabolic cost among 6 elite male distance runners. Participants ran three- 16 minute tests consisting of 4 stages of 4 minutes at 8, 7, 6 and 5 min·mile(-1) pace (3.35, 3.84, 4.47 and 5.36 m·s(-1)), while maintaining an aerobic effort (Respiratory Exchange Ratio ≤1.00). One test was run on a regular treadmill, one on an anti-gravity treadmill with 40% BWS and one with 20% BWS being provided. Expired gas data were collected and regression equations used to determine and compare slopes. Significant decreases in oxygen uptake (V̇O2) were found with each increase in BWS (p rate, perceived exertion or directly measured oxygen uptake) should be used to guide training intensity when training on the LBPP treadmill. Key pointsWith increasing amounts of body weight-support (BWS), the slope of the relationship between velocity and oxygen consumption (ΔVO2/Δv) decreases significantly. This means the change in oxygen consumption (VO2) is significantly smaller over a given change in velocity at higher amounts of BWS.There is a non-linear decrease in VO2 with increasing BWS. As such, with each increment in the amount of BWS provided, the reduction in VO2 becomes increasingly smaller.This paper provides first of its kind data on the effects of BWS on the cost of running among highly trained, elite runners. The outcomes of this study are in line with previous findings among non-elite runners.

  2. Cardiovascular responses to static exercise in distance runners and weight lifters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhurst, J. C.; Kelly, A. R.; Gonyea, W. J.; Mitchell, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    Three groups of athletes including long-distance runners, competitive and amateur weight lifters, and age- and sex-matched control subjects have been studied by hemodynamic and echocardiographic methods in order to determine the effect of the training programs on the cardiovascular response to static exercise. Blood pressure, heart rate, and double product data at rest and at fatigue suggest that competitive endurance (dynamic exercise) training alters the cardiovascular response to static exercise. In contrast to endurance exercise, weight lifting (static exercise) training does not alter the cardiovascular response to static exercise: weight lifters responded to static exercise in a manner very similar to that of the control subjects.

  3. Anthropometric and functional characteristics of Colombian elite long-distance runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramírez-Vélez, Robinson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the anthropometric and physical performance characteristics of elite long-distance runners. Methods: A cross-sectional study in 19 male competitive long-distance runners of national level (age 28.2 ± 6.9 years. A total of 24 anthropometric variables were measured according to the International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry (ISAK statements. The Heath-Carter method and the formula proposed by Siri, Matiegka, Jackson and Pollock were used to calculate the somatotype and the body composition, respectively. Ergospirometry VO (2 max, Vertical Jump Test and the Wingate Test were used as functional indicators. Results: Regarding body composition, we found fat mass percentage 13.3 ± 3.2; muscle mass 47.3 ± 2.5%, and body adiposity index 24.1 ± 3.3. Somatotype profile was the mesomorphic-balanced (3.6-4.0-2.1. Mean values of functional tests with their standard deviations were: VO(2 máx (mL•kg-1•min-1 42.6 ± 8.1; anaerobic power 106.0 ± 31.8 kg•s-1, and anaerobic capacity 6501.0 ± 1831.6 K/jul. Conclusion: These results may provide a profile of long-distance runners that can be used as training targets for developing athletes. The results may also provide information for training and tactical emphasis.

  4. Recreational road runners: injuries, training, demographics and physical characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joris Pazin

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2008v10n3p277 The purpose of this study was to study recreational road runners in order to identify: their physical characteristics, demographics, running profile (training distance, frequency, duration, and experience and the prevalence of injuries and their association with age, running profile, and other sports practiced. Body mass, height (from which BMI was calculated and waist circumference were also measured. The sample of runners was composed of 115 men who participated in two events organized in Santa Catarina State, Brazil, in 2006: 22nd Maratona de Blumenau and 5th Desafio Praias e Trilhas (Florianópolis. The data were analyzed with descriptive statistics and the chi-square test to identify associations between injury prevalence and other variables (p<.05. The majority of the runners were aged between 18 and 50 years (63.2%, with 36.8% older than 50 years. In terms of educational level 24.3% had attended only elementary school, 35.4% high school, and 40% degree courses. Monthly family income (based on Brazilian minimum wage in Reais - R$ 380.00 varied between R$ 300 and R$ 999 for 23.3% of the runners, between R$ 1000 and R$ 2900 for 45.2%, and above R$ 3000 for 31.3% of them. Seventy two percent of them have been running regularly for more than 6 years, and 57% had received specialist guidance for running; 56.5% run more than 64 km/week. The injury prevalence for one year was 37.7%; BMI and waist circumference were within healthy limits. No associations were found between injury prevalence and other variables studied.

  5. Physiological and training characteristics of recreational marathon runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon D

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Dan Gordon,1 Sarah Wightman,2 Itay Basevitch,1 James Johnstone,1 Carolina Espejo-Sanchez,1 Chelsea Beckford,1 Mariette Boal,1 Adrian Scruton,1 Mike Ferrandino,1 Viviane Merzbach1 1Cambridge Centre for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, 2The Flying Runner, Cambridge, UK Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the physical and training characteristics of recreational marathon runners within finish time bandings (2.5–3 h, 3–3.5 h, 3.5–4 h, 4–4.5 h and >4.5 h.Materials and methods: A total of 97 recreational marathon runners (age 42.4 ± 9.9 years; mass 69.2 ± 11.3 kg; stature 172.8 ± 9.1 cm, with a marathon finish time of 229.1 ± 48.7 min, of whom n = 34 were female and n = 63 were male, completed an incremental treadmill test for the determination of lactate threshold (LT1, lactate turn point (LT2 and running economy (RE. Following a 7-min recovery, they completed a test to volitional exhaustion starting at LT2 for the assessment of VO2max. In addition, all participants completed a questionnaire gathering information on their current training regimes exploring weekly distances, training frequencies, types of sessions, longest run in a week, with estimations of training speed, and load and volume derived from these data.Results: Training frequency was shown to be significantly greater for the 2.5–3 h group compared to the 3.5–4 h runners (P < 0.001 and >4.5 h group (P = 0.004, while distance per session (km⋅session–1 was significantly greater for the 2.5–3 h group (16.1 ± 4.2 compared to the 3.5–4 h group (15.5 ± 5.2; P = 0.01 and >4.5 h group (10.3 ± 2.6; P = 0.001. Race speed correlated with LT1 (r = 0.791, LT2 (r = 0.721 and distance per session (r = 0.563.Conclusion: The data highlight profound differences for key components of marathon running (VO2max, LT1, LT2, RE and % VO2max within a group of recreational runners with the discriminating training variables being training

  6. Narratives of Psychosocial Response to Microtrauma Injury among Long-Distance Runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayley C. Russell

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Athletes with microtrauma or overuse injuries resulting from an accumulation of repeated small forces may differ from athletes with macrotrauma or acute injuries in their psychosocial responses because of the unique challenges presented by these insidious-onset and often chronic injuries. Our purpose was to use narrative inquiry to examine the psychosocial experiences and responses of 10 long-distance runners who had experienced microtrauma injuries. Qualitative data analysis of interview data led to a chronological timeline of the injury experience and an assessment of the meaning attributed to these injury experiences using a variation of Mishler’s core-narrative approach. Participants reported distinct thoughts, feelings, and behaviors during each phase of the injury—pre-injury, injury onset, and outcome. In the pre-injury period, participants indicated specific running-related goals and attributed their injuries to overtraining or a change in training. During the injury onset phase, participants consistently indicated two themes: self-diagnosis and treatment, and not taking time off. Within the outcome phase of injury, participants acknowledged changed training because of the injury, and lessons learned from their injury experiences. The narratives of microtrauma-injured runners revealed psychosocial distress and behavioral tendencies post-injury that have important implications for runners, coaches, and healthcare professionals.

  7. Reliability and accuracy of Cooper's test in male long distance runners

    OpenAIRE

    J.R. Alvero-Cruz; M.A. Giráldez García; E.A. Carnero

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Endurance capacity can be assessed by field test such as Cooper's test; however, reliability and accuracy are rarely reported in the literature. It was our aims to describe reliability and accuracy of Cooper's test in long distance runners. Method: Fifteen male long distance runners performed twice all-out Cooper's test in a 400 m track. Total distance covered, maximum heart rate (HR) and rate of perceived exertion were recorded. Bias correction factor (Bc) was used to describe ...

  8. Pre- and postmarathon training habits of nonelite runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M Voight

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Angela M Voight1, William O Roberts1, Scott Lunos2, Lisa S Chow31Department of Family Medicine and Community Health; 2Biostatistical Design and Analysis Center, Clinical and Translational Science Institute; 3Department of Medicine, Division of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USABackground: Despite the increasing popularity of marathons, little research has examined the training habits of nonelite marathon runners. Given that nonelite runners, particularly those with a competitive motive, have a higher risk for injury than experienced elite runners, it is important for physicians to understand the training program and features that might distinguish running performance and injury rates in this population.Hypothesis: We hypothesized that nonelite runners who qualify for the Boston Marathon (“qualifiers” would have higher running volumes, more running sessions per week, lower injury rates, and lower body mass index (BMI than nonqualifying runners.Study design: A cross-sectional Web-based survey of runners (convenience sample at 1 month (n = 50 and 6 months (n = 41 after participation in the 2008 Twin Cities Marathon (TCM that acquired data on anthropometric measures, demographic data, finishing time, premarathon/current training program, and self-reported injury.Results: Thirteen of 50 initial survey respondents were classified as a “qualifier” based on their finishing time. Mean BMI was significantly lower in the qualifiers at 1 month (22.0 versus 23.9 kg/m2, P = 0.0267 but not 6 months postmarathon. There were no significant differences in training volume (running frequency, run length, or cross-training volume or injury rates between qualifiers and nonqualifiers. Prior to the 2008 TCM, 54% of runners included cross-training in their exercise program, which increased significantly to 74% 1 month postmarathon (P = 0.0039 and 71% 6 months postmarathon (P = 0.0325. There was no association

  9. Oxygen Consumption of Elite Distance Runners on an Anti-Gravity Treadmill®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David K.P. McNeill, John R. Kline, Hendrick D. de Heer, J. Richard Coast

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Lower body positive pressure (LBPP, or ‘anti-gravity’ treadmills® have become increasingly popular among elite distance runners. However, to date, few studies have assessed the effect of body weight support (BWS on the metabolic cost of running among elite runners. This study evaluated how BWS influenced the relationship between velocity and metabolic cost among 6 elite male distance runners. Participants ran three- 16 minute tests consisting of 4 stages of 4 minutes at 8, 7, 6 and 5 min·mile−1 pace (3.35, 3.84, 4.47 and 5.36 m·s−1, while maintaining an aerobic effort (Respiratory Exchange Ratio ≤1.00. One test was run on a regular treadmill, one on an anti-gravity treadmill with 40% BWS and one with 20% BWS being provided. Expired gas data were collected and regression equations used to determine and compare slopes. Significant decreases in oxygen uptake (V̇O2 were found with each increase in BWS (p < 0.001. At 20% BWS, the average decrease in net VO2 was greater than proportional (34%, while at 40% BWS, the average net reduction in VO2 was close to proportional (38%. Across velocities, the slope of the relationship between VO2 and velocity (ΔV̇O2/Δv was steeper with less support. The slopes at both the 20% and 40% BWS conditions were similar, especially when compared to the regular treadmill. Variability in VO2 between athletes was much greater on the LBPP treadmill and was greater with increased levels of BWS. In this study we evaluated the effect of body weight support on V̇O2 among elite distance runners. We have shown that oxygen uptake decreased with support, but not in direct proportion to that support. Further, because of the high variability in oxygen uptake between athletes on the LBPP treadmill, prediction equations may not be reliable and other indicators (heart rate, perceived exertion or directly measured oxygen uptake should be used to guide training intensity when training on the LBPP treadmill.

  10. Physiological and training characteristics of recreational marathon runners

    OpenAIRE

    Gordon, Dan; Wightman, Sarah; Basevitch, Itay; Johnstone, James; Espejo-Sanchez, Carolina; Beckford, Chelsea; Boal, Mariette; Scruton, Adrian; Ferrandino, Mike; Merzbach, Viviane

    2017-01-01

    Dan Gordon,1 Sarah Wightman,2 Itay Basevitch,1 James Johnstone,1 Carolina Espejo-Sanchez,1 Chelsea Beckford,1 Mariette Boal,1 Adrian Scruton,1 Mike Ferrandino,1 Viviane Merzbach1 1Cambridge Centre for Sport and Exercise Sciences, Anglia Ruskin University, 2The Flying Runner, Cambridge, UK Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the physical and training characteristics of recreational marathon runners within finish time bandings (2.5–3 h, 3–3.5 h, 3...

  11. Preparticipation evaluation of novice, middle-age, long-distance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aagaard, Philip; Sahlén, Anders; Bergfeldt, Lennart; Braunschweig, Frieder

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the cardiovascular health and risk profile in middle-age men making an entry to participate for their first time in a long-distance race. Male first-time participants, 45 yr and older, in the world's largest cross-country running race, the Lidingöloppet, were evaluated with a medical history and physical examination, European systematic coronary risk evaluation (SCORE), 12-lead ECG, echocardiography, and blood tests. Further diagnostic workup was performed when clinically indicated. Of 265 eligible runners, 153 (58%, age 51 ± 5 yr) completed the study. Although the 10-yr fatal cardiovascular event risk was low (SCORE, 1%; interquartile range, 0%-1%), mild abnormalities were common, for example, elevated blood pressure (19%), left ventricular hypertrophy (6%), and elevated LDL cholesterol (5%). ECG changes compatible with the "athlete's heart" were present in 82%, for example, sinus bradycardia (61%) and/or early repolarization (32%). ECG changes considered training unrelated were found in 24%, for example, prolonged QTc-interval (13%), left axis deviation (5.3%), and left atrial enlargement (4%). In 14 runners (9%), additional diagnostic workup was clinically motivated, and 4 runners (2%) were ultimately discouraged from vigorous exercise because of QTc intervals >500 ms (n = 2), symptomatic atrioventricular block (n = 1), and cardiac tumor (n = 1). The physician examination and the ECG identified 12 of the 14 participants requiring further evaluation. Cardiovascular evaluation of middle-age men, including a physician examination and a 12-lead ECG, appears useful to identify individuals requiring further testing before vigorous exercise. The additional yield of routine echocardiography was small.

  12. The influence of training and mental skills preparation on injury incidence and performance in marathon runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamstra-Wright, Karrie L; Coumbe-Lilley, John E; Kim, Hajwa; McFarland, Jose A; Huxel Bliven, Kellie C

    2013-10-01

    There has been a considerable increase in the number of participants running marathons over the past several years. The 26.2-mile race requires physical and mental stamina to successfully complete it. However, studies have not investigated how running and mental skills preparation influence injury and performance. The purpose of our study was to describe the training and mental skills preparation of a typical group of runners as they began a marathon training program, assess the influence of training and mental skills preparation on injury incidence, and examine how training and mental skills preparation influence marathon performance. Healthy adults (N = 1,957) participating in an 18-week training program for a fall 2011 marathon were recruited for the study. One hundred twenty-five runners enrolled and received 4 surveys: pretraining, 6 weeks, 12 weeks, posttraining. The pretraining survey asked training and mental skills preparation questions. The 6- and 12-week surveys asked about injury incidence. The posttraining survey asked about injury incidence and marathon performance. Tempo runs during training preparation had a significant positive relationship to injury incidence in the 6-week survey (ρ[93] = 0.26, p = 0.01). The runners who reported incorporating tempo and interval runs, running more miles per week, and running more days per week in their training preparation ran significantly faster than did those reporting less tempo and interval runs, miles per week, and days per week (p ≤ 0.05). Mental skills preparation did not influence injury incidence or marathon performance. To prevent injury, and maximize performance, while marathon training, it is important that coaches and runners ensure that a solid foundation of running fitness and experience exists, followed by gradually building volume, and then strategically incorporating runs of various speeds and distances.

  13. [Diseases and overuse injuries of the lower extremities in long distance runners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschopp, M; Brunner, F

    2017-06-01

    Running is one of the most popular sports worldwide, with running events attracting hundreds of thousands of runners of all age groups. Running is an effective way to improve health but is also associated with a high risk of injuries. Up to 50% of regular runners report having more than one injury each year. Some injuries are caused by an accident but most are caused by overuse. The most frequent diagnoses are patellofemoral pain syndrome, tibial stress syndrome (shin splint), Achilles tendinopathy, iliotibial band friction syndrome (runner's knee), plantar fasciitis and stress fractures of the metatarsals and tibia. The knee is the most frequently injured joint in runners at all distances. Hamstring injuries are typically acute resulting in a sudden, sharp pain in the posterior thigh. Hip injuries are less common but it can be more difficult to make the correct diagnosis and treatment is more complex. Clinicians confronted by runners with shin pain must distinguish between stress fractures of the tibia, tibial stress syndrome (shin splints) and chronic exertional compartment syndrome. Foot and ankle injuries are the most common injuries reported by long distance and marathon runners. Excess body weight and the number of kilometers run per week are high risk factors for injuries. The roles of other factors, such as shoes, stretching and biomechanics are less clear. A detailed anamnesis and physical examination are important for the correct diagnosis or the necessity for further diagnostic imaging and subsequent therapy.

  14. Effect of Maximal Versus Supra-Maximal Exhausting Race on Lipid Peroxidation, Antioxidant Activity and Muscle-Damage Biomarkers in Long-Distance and Middle-Distance Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Said; Lamya, Ncir; Hamda, Mansour

    2016-03-01

    Exhausting physical exercise increases lipid peroxidation and causes important muscle damages. The human body tries to mitigate these adverse effects by mobilizing its antioxidant defenses. This study aims to investigate the effect of a maximal versus supra-maximal race sustained until exhaustion on lipid peroxidation, antioxidant activity and muscle-damage biomarkers in trained (i.e. long-distance and middle-distance runners) and sedentary subjects. The study has been carried out on 8 middle-distance runners (MDR), 9 long-distance runners (LDR), and 8 sedentary subjects (SS). Each subject has undergone two exhaustive running tests, the first one is an incremental event (VAMEVAL test), the second one is a constant supra-maximal intensity test (limited-time test). Blood samples were collected at rest and immediately after each test. A significant increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) concentrations was observed in SS and MDR after the VAMEVAL test and in LDR after the Limited-Time test. A significant difference was also observed between LDR and the other two groups after the VAMEVAL test, and between LDR and MDR after the Limited-Time test. Significant modifications, notably, in myoglobin, CK, LDH, IL-6, TNF-α, and TAS were likewise noted but depending on the race-type and the sportive specialty. Maximal and supra-maximal races induce a significant increase in lipid peroxidation and cause non-negligible inflammation and muscle damage. These effects were relatively related to the physical exercise type and the sportive specialty.

  15. Biochemical adaptations in middle-distance runners: an assessment of blood and anthropometric parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danila Di Majo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand the mechanism underlying the physiological adaptation of purely aerobic workout, we investigated the effect of 2 months of training on nine males (17-22 year-old middle distance running agonistic athletes. Blood sample was collected in the morning to analyze: hematological parameters, lipid profile, liver function enzymes [glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase, glutamate pyruvate transaminase, gamma-glutamyl transferase (γ-GT] and skeletal and myocardial markers of muscle damage [creatin kinase (CK and creatin kinase MB (CK-MB]. Endurance training, as it implies high oxygen consumption, should increase reactive oxygen species, but it has been shown that exercise leads to increased activation of antioxidant defenses. In fact, serum levels of γ-GT enzyme and total CK were not increased. On the other hand, a statistical significant reduction of CKMB has been observed. There were not variations in hematological parameters. As far as the anthropometric value is concerned, after two months of training there was a change in weight (P<0.0001. Finally, any oxidative and biological stress was highlighted in the middle distance runners but, since this is a preliminary study, it would be of interest to replicate the study on a larger sample.

  16. Skeletal muscle plasticity with marathon training in novice runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luden, N; Hayes, E; Minchev, K; Louis, E; Raue, U; Conley, T; Trappe, S

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate leg muscle adaptation in runners preparing for their first marathon. Soleus and vastus lateralis (VL) biopsies were obtained from six recreational runners (23 ± 1 years, 61 ± 3 kg) before (T1), after 13 weeks of run training (T2), and after 3 weeks of taper and marathon (T3). Single muscle fiber size, contractile function (strength, speed, and power) and oxidative enzyme activity [citrate synthase (CS)] were measured at all three time points, and fiber type distribution was determined before and after the 16-week intervention. Training increased VO(2max) ∼9% (Pmarathon training elicits very specific skeletal muscle adaptations that likely support the ability to perform 42.2 km of continuous running - further strengthening the existing body of evidence for skeletal muscle specificity. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  17. Running Economy: Neuromuscular and Joint Stiffness Contributions in Trained Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Nicholas; Tucker, Ross; Santos-Concejero, Jordan; Prins, Danielle; Lamberts, Robert P

    2018-05-29

    It is debated whether running biomechanics make good predictors of running economy, with little known information about the neuromuscular and joint stiffness contributions to economical running gait. The aim of this study was to understand the relationship between certain neuromuscular and spatiotemporal biomechanical factors associated with running economy. Thirty trained runners performed a 6-minute constant-speed running set at 3.3 m∙s -1 , where oxygen consumption was assessed. Overground running trials were also performed at 3.3 m∙s -1 to assess kinematics, kinetics and muscle activity. Spatiotemporal gait variables, joint stiffness, pre-activation and stance phase muscle activity (gluteus medius; rectus femoris (RF); biceps femoris(BF); peroneus longus (PL); tibialis anterior (TA); gastrocnemius lateralis and medius (LG and MG) were variables of specific interest and thus determined. Additionally, pre-activation and ground contact of agonist:antagonist co-activation were calculated. More economical runners presented with short ground contact times (r=0.639, p<0.001) and greater strides frequencies (r=-0.630, p<0.001). Lower ankle and greater knee stiffness were associated with lower oxygen consumption (r=0.527, p=0.007 & r=0.384, p=0.043, respectively). Only LG:TA co-activation during stance were associated with lower oxygen cost of transport (r=0.672, p<0.0001). Greater muscle pre-activation and bi-articular muscle activity during stance were associated with more economical runners. Consequently, trained runners who exhibit greater neuromuscular activation prior to and during ground contact, in turn optimise spatiotemporal variables and joint stiffness, will be the most economical runners.

  18. Does the sex difference in competitiveness decrease in selective sub-populations? A test with intercollegiate distance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deaner, Robert O; Lowen, Aaron; Rogers, William; Saksa, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Sex differences in some preferences and motivations are well established, but it is unclear whether they persist in selective sub-populations, such as expert financial decision makers, top scientists, or elite athletes. We addressed this issue by studying competitiveness in 1,147 varsity intercollegiate distance runners. As expected, across all runners, men reported greater competitiveness with two previously validated instruments, greater competitiveness on a new elite competitiveness scale, and greater training volume, a known correlate of competitiveness. Among faster runners, the sex difference decreased for one measure of competitiveness but did not decrease for the two other competitiveness measures or either measure of training volume. Across NCAA athletic divisions (DI, DII, DIII), the sex difference did not decrease for any competitiveness or training measure. Further analyses showed that these sex differences could not be attributed to women suffering more injuries or facing greater childcare responsibilities. However, women did report greater commitment than men to their academic studies, suggesting a sex difference in priorities. Therefore, policies aiming to provide men and women with equal opportunities to flourish should acknowledge that sex differences in some kinds of preferences and motivation may persist even in selective sub-populations.

  19. Is the rearfoot pattern the most frequently foot strike pattern among recreational shod distance runners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Matheus Oliveira; Saragiotto, Bruno Tirotti; Yamato, Tiê Parma; Lopes, Alexandre Dias

    2015-02-01

    To determine the distribution of the foot strike patterns among recreational shod runners and to compare the personal and training characteristics between runners with different foot strike patterns. Cross-sectional study. Areas of running practice in São Paulo, Brazil. 514 recreational shod runners older than 18 years and free of injury. Foot strike patterns were evaluated with a high-speed camera (250 Hz) and photocells to assess the running speed of participants. Personal and training characteristics were collected through a questionnaire. The inter-rater reliability of the visual foot strike pattern classification method was 96.7% and intra-rater reliability was 98.9%. 95.1% (n = 489) of the participants were rearfoot strikers, 4.1% (n = 21) were midfoot strikers, and four runners (0.8%) were forefoot strikers. There were no significant differences between strike patterns for personal and training characteristics. This is the first study to demonstrate that almost all recreational shod runners were rearfoot strikers. The visual method of evaluation seems to be a reliable and feasible option to classify foot strike pattern. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Relationship between Running Economy and Biomechanical Variables in Distance Runners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaruga, Marcus Peikriszwili; Brisswalter, Jeanick; Peyre-Tartaruga, Leonardo Alexandre; Avila, Aluisio Otavio Vargas; Alberton, Cristine Lima; Coertjens, Marcelo; Cadore, Eduardo Lusa; Tiggemann, Carlos Leandro; Silva, Eduardo Marczwski; Kruel, Luiz Fernando Martins

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the relationship between running economy (RE) and biomechanical parameters in a group running at the same relative intensity and same absolute velocity. Sixteen homogeneous male long-distance runners performed a test to determine RE at 4.4 m.s[superscript -1], corresponding to 11.1% below velocity at the ventilatory…

  1. Risk models for lower extremity injuries among short- and long distance runners : A prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Poppel, Dennis; Scholten-Peeters, Gwendolijne G.M.; van Middelkoop, Marienke; Koes, Bart W.; Verhagen, Arianne P.

    2018-01-01

    Background: Running injuries are very common. Risk factors for running injuries are not consistently described across studies and do not differentiate between runners of long- and short distances within one cohort. Objectives: The aim of this study is to determine risk factors for running injuries

  2. Marathon performance in relation to body fat percentage and training indices in recreational male runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanda G

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Giovanni Tanda,1 Beat Knechtle2,31DIME, Università degli Studi di Genova, Genova, Italy; 2Gesundheitszentrum St Gallen, St Gallen, Switzerland; 3Institute of General Practice and Health Services Research, University of Zurich, Zurich, SwitzerlandBackground: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of anthropometric characteristics and training indices on marathon race times in recreational male marathoners.Methods: Training and anthropometric characteristics were collected for a large cohort of recreational male runners (n = 126 participating in the Basel marathon in Switzerland between 2010 and 2011.Results: Among the parameters investigated, marathon performance time was found to be affected by mean running speed and the mean weekly distance run during the training period prior to the race and by body fat percentage. The effect of body fat percentage became significant as it exceeded a certain limiting value; for a relatively low body fat percentage, marathon performance time correlated only with training indices.Conclusion: Marathon race time may be predicted (r = 0.81 for recreational male runners by the following equation: marathon race time (minutes = 11.03 + 98.46 exp(−0.0053 mean weekly training distance [km/week] + 0.387 mean training pace (sec/km + 0.1 exp(0.23 body fat percentage [%]. The marathon race time results were valid over a range of 165–266 minutes.Keywords: endurance, exercise, anthropometry

  3. Marathon performance in relation to body fat percentage and training indices in recreational male runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanda, Giovanni; Knechtle, Beat

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of anthropometric characteristics and training indices on marathon race times in recreational male marathoners. Training and anthropometric characteristics were collected for a large cohort of recreational male runners (n = 126) participating in the Basel marathon in Switzerland between 2010 and 2011. Among the parameters investigated, marathon performance time was found to be affected by mean running speed and the mean weekly distance run during the training period prior to the race and by body fat percentage. The effect of body fat percentage became significant as it exceeded a certain limiting value; for a relatively low body fat percentage, marathon performance time correlated only with training indices. Marathon race time may be predicted (r = 0.81) for recreational male runners by the following equation: marathon race time (minutes) = 11.03 + 98.46 exp(-0.0053 mean weekly training distance [km/week]) + 0.387 mean training pace (sec/km) + 0.1 exp(0.23 body fat percentage [%]). The marathon race time results were valid over a range of 165-266 minutes.

  4. Adolescent runners: the effect of training shoes on running kinematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Scott; Toby, E Bruce

    2013-06-01

    The modern running shoe typically features a large cushioned heel intended to dissipate the energy at heel strike to the knees and hips. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect that shoes have upon the running biomechanics among competitive adolescent runners. We wish to answer the question of whether running style is altered in these athletes because of footwear. Twelve competitive adolescent athletes were recruited from local track teams. Each ran on a treadmill in large heel trainers, track flats, and barefoot. Four different speeds were used to test each athlete. The biomechanics were assessed with a motion capture system. Stride length, heel height during posterior swing phase, and foot/ground contact were recorded. Shoe type markedly altered the running biomechanics. The foot/ground contact point showed differences in terms of footwear (Ptrainers, the athletes landed on their heels 69.79% of the time at all speeds (Ptrainers promote a heel strike pattern, whereas track flats and barefoot promote a forefoot or midfoot strike pattern. Training in heavily cushioned trainers by the competitive runner has not been clearly shown to be detrimental to performance, but it does change the gait pattern. It is not known whether the altered biomechanics of the heavily heeled cushioned trainer may be detrimental to the adolescent runner who is still developing a running style.

  5. Mixed maximal and explosive strength training in recreational endurance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taipale, Ritva S; Mikkola, Jussi; Salo, Tiina; Hokka, Laura; Vesterinen, Ville; Kraemer, William J; Nummela, Ari; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2014-03-01

    Supervised periodized mixed maximal and explosive strength training added to endurance training in recreational endurance runners was examined during an 8-week intervention preceded by an 8-week preparatory strength training period. Thirty-four subjects (21-45 years) were divided into experimental groups: men (M, n = 9), women (W, n = 9), and control groups: men (MC, n = 7), women (WC, n = 9). The experimental groups performed mixed maximal and explosive exercises, whereas control subjects performed circuit training with body weight. Endurance training included running at an intensity below lactate threshold. Strength, power, endurance performance characteristics, and hormones were monitored throughout the study. Significance was set at p ≤ 0.05. Increases were observed in both experimental groups that were more systematic than in the control groups in explosive strength (12 and 13% in men and women, respectively), muscle activation, maximal strength (6 and 13%), and peak running speed (14.9 ± 1.2 to 15.6 ± 1.2 and 12.9 ± 0.9 to 13.5 ± 0.8 km Ł h). The control groups showed significant improvements in maximal and explosive strength, but Speak increased only in MC. Submaximal running characteristics (blood lactate and heart rate) improved in all groups. Serum hormones fluctuated significantly in men (testosterone) and in women (thyroid stimulating hormone) but returned to baseline by the end of the study. Mixed strength training combined with endurance training may be more effective than circuit training in recreational endurance runners to benefit overall fitness that may be important for other adaptive processes and larger training loads associated with, e.g., marathon training.

  6. Foot strike patterns of recreational and sub-elite runners in a long-distance road race.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Peter; Higgins, Erin; Kaminski, Justin; Decker, Tamara; Preble, Janine; Lyons, Daniela; McIntyre, Kevin; Normile, Adam

    2011-12-01

    Although the biomechanical properties of the various types of running foot strike (rearfoot, midfoot, and forefoot) have been studied extensively in the laboratory, only a few studies have attempted to quantify the frequency of running foot strike variants among runners in competitive road races. We classified the left and right foot strike patterns of 936 distance runners, most of whom would be considered of recreational or sub-elite ability, at the 10 km point of a half-marathon/marathon road race. We classified 88.9% of runners at the 10 km point as rearfoot strikers, 3.4% as midfoot strikers, 1.8% as forefoot strikers, and 5.9% of runners exhibited discrete foot strike asymmetry. Rearfoot striking was more common among our sample of mostly recreational distance runners than has been previously reported for samples of faster runners. We also compared foot strike patterns of 286 individual marathon runners between the 10 km and 32 km race locations and observed increased frequency of rearfoot striking at 32 km. A large percentage of runners switched from midfoot and forefoot foot strikes at 10 km to rearfoot strikes at 32 km. The frequency of discrete foot strike asymmetry declined from the 10 km to the 32 km location. Among marathon runners, we found no significant relationship between foot strike patterns and race times.

  7. Impact of Short-Term Training Camp on Aortic Blood Pressure in Collegiate Endurance Runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsubasa Tomoto

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the influence of short-term vigorous endurance training on aortic blood pressure (BP, pulse wave analysis was performed in 36 highly trained elite collegiate endurance runners before and after a 7-day intense training camp. Subjects participated three training sessions per day, which mainly consisted of long distance running and sprint training to reach the daily target distance of 26 km. After the camp, they were divided into two groups based on whether the target training was achieved. Aortic systolic BP, pulse pressure, and tension-time index (TTI, a surrogate index of the myocardial oxygen demand were significantly elevated after the camp in the accomplished group but not in the unaccomplished group, whereas the brachial BP remained unchanged in both groups. The average daily training distance was significantly correlated with the changes in aortic systolic BP (r = 0.608, p = 0.0002, pulse pressure (r = 0.415, p = 0.016, and TTI (r = 0.438, p = 0.011. These results suggest that aortic BP is affected by a short-term vigorous training camp even in highly trained elite endurance athletes presumably due to a greater training volume compared to usual.

  8. Anthropometric and training variables related to half-marathon running performance in recreational female runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Barandun, Ursula; Rosemann, Thomas

    2011-05-01

    The relationship between skin-fold thickness and running has been investigated in distances ranging from 100 m to the marathon distance (42.195 km), with the exclusion of the half-marathon distance (21.0975 km). We investigated the association between anthropometric variables, prerace experience, and training variables with race time in 42 recreational, nonprofessional, female half-marathon runners using bi- and multivariate analysis. Body weight (r, 0.60); body mass index (r, 0.48); body fat percentage (r, 0.56); pectoral (r, 0.61), mid-axilla (r, 0.69), triceps (r, 0.49), subscapular (r, 0.61), abdominal (r, 0.59), suprailiac (r, 0.55), and medial calf (r, 0.53) skin-fold thickness; mean speed of the training sessions (r, -0.68); and personal best time in a half-marathon (r, 0.69) correlated with race time after bivariate analysis. Body weight (P = 0.0054), pectoral skin-fold thickness (P = 0.0068), and mean speed of the training sessions (P = 0.0041) remained significant after multivariate analysis. Mean running speed during training was related to mid-axilla (r, -0.31), subscapular (r, -0.38), abdominal (r, -0.44), and suprailiac (r, -0.41) skin-fold thickness, the sum of 8 skin-fold thicknesses (r, -0.36); and percent body fat (r, -0.31). It was determined that variables of both anthropometry and training were related to half-marathon race time, and that skin-fold thicknesses were associated with running speed during training. For practical applications, high running speed during training (as opposed to extensive training) may both reduce upper-body skin-fold thicknesses and improve race performance in recreational female half-marathon runners.

  9. Tapering strategies in elite British endurance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilsbury, Kate L; Fudge, Barry W; Ingham, Stephen A; Faulkner, Steve H; Nimmo, Myra A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to explore pre-competition training practices of elite endurance runners. Training details from elite British middle distance (MD; 800 m and 1500 m), long distance (LD; 3000 m steeplechase to 10,000 m) and marathon (MAR) runners were collected by survey for 7 days in a regular training (RT) phase and throughout a pre-competition taper. Taper duration was [median (interquartile range)] 6 (3) days in MD, 6 (1) days in LD and 14 (8) days in MAR runners. Continuous running volume was reduced to 70 (16)%, 71 (24)% and 53 (12)% of regular levels in MD, LD and MAR runners, respectively (P training (MD; 53 (45)%, LD; 67 (23)%, MAR; 64 (34)%, P training intensity was above race speed in LD and MAR runners (112 (27)% and 114 (3)%, respectively, P training undertaken prior to the taper in elite endurance runners is predictive of the tapering strategy implemented before competition.

  10. Differences in Strike Index Between Treadmill and Aquatic Treadmill Running in Experienced Distance Runners

    OpenAIRE

    Hoover, James Paul, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    Strike index (SI) quantifies how one’s foot contacts the ground at the beginning of the stance phase of gait. SI is reported as a percentage of the total foot length, with lower percentages indicating a more posterior point of contact, while greater percentages indicate a more anterior point of contact along the foot. Differences in SI may be related to running-related injuries, such that experienced distance runners who are rearfoot (posterior) strikers may have approximately twice the rate ...

  11. Relationship between Achilles tendon length and running performance in well-trained male endurance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Hiromasa; Suga, Tadashi; Takao, Kenji; Tanaka, Takahiro; Misaki, Jun; Miyake, Yuto; Nagano, Akinori; Isaka, Tadao

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to determine the relationship between Achilles tendon (AT) length and running performance, including running economy, in well-trained endurance runners. We also examined the reasonable portion of the AT related to running performance among AT lengths measured in three different portions. The AT lengths at three portions and cross-sectional area (CSA) of 30 endurance runners were measured using magnetic resonance imaging. Each AT length was calculated as the distance from the calcaneal tuberosity to the muscle-tendon junction of the soleus, gastrocnemius medialis (GM AT ), and gastrocnemius lateralis, respectively. These AT lengths were normalized with shank length. The AT CSA was calculated as the average of 10, 20, and 30 mm above the distal insertion of the AT and normalized with body mass. Running economy was evaluated by measuring energy cost during three 4-minutes submaximal treadmill running trials at 14, 16, and 18 km/h, respectively. Among three AT lengths, only a GM AT correlated significantly with personal best 5000-m race time (r=-.376, P=.046). Furthermore, GM AT correlated significantly with energy cost during submaximal treadmill running trials at 14 km/h and 18 km/h (r=-.446 and -.429, respectively, Prunning performance. These findings suggest that longer AT, especially GM AT , may be advantageous to achieve superior running performance, with better running economy, in endurance runners. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Glucose uptake patterns in exercised skeletal muscles of elite male long-distance and short-distance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Suh-Jun; Liu, Ren-Shyan; Kuo, Ya-Chen; Hsu, Chi-Yang; Chen, Chi-Hsien

    2010-04-30

    The aim of this study was to determine glucose uptake patterns in exercised skeletal muscles of elite male long-distance and short-distance runners. Positron emission tomography (PET) using 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG) was performed to determine the patterns of glucose uptake in lower limbs of short-distance (SD group, n=8) and long-distance (LD group, n=8) male runners after a modified 20 min Bruce treadmill test. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to delineate the muscle groups in lower limbs. Muscle groups from hip, knee, and ankle movers were measured. The total FDG uptake and the standard uptake value (SUV) for each muscle group were compared between the 2 groups. For the SD and LD runners, the 2 major muscle groups utilizing glucose during running were knee extensors and ankle plantarflexors, which accounted for 49.3 +/- 8.1% (25.1 +/- 4.7% and 24.2 +/- 6.0%) of overall lower extremity glucose uptake for SD group, and 51.3 +/- 8.0% (27.2 +/- 2.7% and 24.0 +/- 8.1%) for LD group. No difference in muscle glucose uptake was noted for other muscle groups. For SD runners, the SUVs for the muscle groups varied from 0.49 +/- 0.27 for the ankle plantarflexors, to 0.20 +/- 0.08 for the hip flexor. For the LD runners, the highest and lowest SUVs were 0.43 +/- 0.15 for the ankle dorsiflexors and 0.21 +/- 0.19 for the hip. For SD and LD groups, no difference in muscle SUV was noted for the muscle groups. However, the SUV ratio between the ankle dorsiflexors and plantarflexors in the LD group was significantly greater than that in the SD group. We thus conclude that the major propelling muscle groups account for approximately 50% of lower limb glucose utilization during running. Thus, the other muscle groups involving maintenance of balance, limb deceleration, and shock absorption utilize an equal amount. This result provides a new insight into glucose distribution in skeletal muscle, suggesting that propellers and supporters are both energetically important

  13. Seasonal Strength Performance and Its Relationship with Training Load on Elite Runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Balsalobre-Fernández

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the time-course of force production of elite middle and long-distance runners throughout an entire season and at the end of the off-season, as well as its relationships with training load and hormonal responses. Training load was recorded daily throughout an entire season by measuring and evaluating the session distance (km, training zone and session-RPE in a group of 15 elite middle and long-distance runners (12 men, 3 women; age = 26.3 ± 5.1yrs, BMI = 19.7 ± 1.1. Also, basal salivary-free cortisol levels were measured weekly, and 50-metre sprints, mean propulsive velocity (MPV, mean propulsive power (MPP, repetition maximum (RM and peak rate of force development (RFD of half-squats were measured 4 times during the season, and once more after the off-season break. There were no significant variations in force production during the season or after the off-season break, except for the RFD (-30.2%, p = 0.005 values, which changed significantly from the beginning to the end of the season. Significant correlations were found between session-RPE and MPV (r = -0.650, p = 0.004, MPP (r = -0.602, p = 0.009, RM (r = -0.650, p = 0.004, and the 50-metre sprint (r = 0.560, p = 0.015. Meanwhile, salivary-free cortisol correlated significantly with the 50-metre sprint (r = 0.737, p < 0.001 and the RM ( r = -0.514, p = 0.025. Finally, the training zone correlated with the 50-metre sprint (r = -0.463, p = 0.041. Session-RPE, training zone and salivary-free cortisol levels are related to force production in elite middle and long-distance runners. Monitoring these variables could be a useful tool in controlling the training programs of elite athletes.

  14. Firm insoles effectively reduce hemolysis in runners during long distance running - a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janakiraman, Kamal; Shenoy, Shweta; Sandhu, Jaspal Singh

    2011-06-09

    Shock absorbing insoles are effective in reducing the magnitude and rate of loading of peak impact forces generated at foot strike during running, whereas the foot impact force during running has been considered to be an important cause of intravascular hemolysis in long distance runners. Objective of this study was to evaluate the intravascular hemolysis during running and compare the effect of two different types of insoles (Soft and Firm) on hemolysis. Twenty male long and middle distance runners volunteered to participate in this study. We selected two insoles (Soft and Firm) according to their hardness level (SHORE 'A' scale). Participants were randomly assigned to the soft insole (group 1) and firm insole (group 2) group with ten athletes in each group. Each athlete completed one hour of running at the calculated target heart rate (60-70%). Venous blood samples were collected before and immediately after running. We measured unconjucated bilirubin (mg/dl), lactate dehydrogenase (μ/ml), hemoglobin (g/l) and serum ferritin (ng/ml) as indicators of hemolysis. Our study revealed a significant increase in the mean values of unconjucated bilirubin (P firm insoles effectively reduces the amount of hemolysis in runners compared to soft insoles.

  15. Acute Effects of Plyometric and Resistance Training on Running Economy in Trained Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcello, Richard T; Greer, Beau K; Greer, Anna E

    2017-09-01

    Marcello, RT, Greer, BK, and Greer, AE. Acute effects of plyometric and resistance training on running economy in trained runners. J Strength Cond Res 31(9): 2432-2437, 2017-Results regarding the acute effects of plyometrics and resistance training (PRT) on running economy (RE) are conflicting. Eight male collegiate distance runners (21 ± 1 years, 62.5 ± 7.8 ml·kg·min V[Combining Dot Above]O2 peak) completed V[Combining Dot Above]O2 peak and 1 repetition maximum (1RM) testing. Seven days later, subjects completed a 12 minutes RE test at 60 and 80% V[Combining Dot Above]O2 peak, followed by a PRT protocol or a rested condition of equal duration (CON). The PRT protocol consisted of 3 sets of 5 repetitions at 85% 1RM for barbell squats, Romanian deadlifts, and barbell lunges; the same volume was used for resisted lateral lunges, box jumps, and depth jumps. Subjects completed another RE test immediately after the treatments and 24 hours later. Subjects followed an identical protocol 6 days later with condition assignment reversed. Running economy was determined by both relative V[Combining Dot Above]O2 (ml·kg·min) and energy expenditure (EE) (kcal·min). There was a significant (p ≤ 0.05) between-trial increase in V[Combining Dot Above]O2 (37.1 ± 4.2 ml·kg·min PRT vs. 35.5 ± 3.9 ml·kg·min CON) and EE (11.4 ± 1.3 kcal·min PRT vs. 11.0 ± 1.4 kcal·min CON) immediately after PRT at 60% V[Combining Dot Above]O2 peak, but no significant changes were observed at 80% V[Combining Dot Above]O2 peak. Respiratory exchange ratio was significantly (p ≤ 0.05) reduced 24 hours after PRT (0.93 ± 0.0) as compared to the CON trial (0.96 ± 0.0) at 80% V[Combining Dot Above]O2 peak. Results indicate that high-intensity PRT may acutely impair RE in aerobically trained individuals at a moderate running intensity, but that the attenuation lasts less than 24 hours in duration.

  16. Protocol for evaluating the effects of a therapeutic foot exercise program on injury incidence, foot functionality and biomechanics in long-distance runners: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, Alessandra B; Taddei, Ulisses T; Duarte, Marcos; Sacco, Isabel C N

    2016-04-14

    Overall performance, particularly in a very popular sports activity such as running, is typically influenced by the status of the musculoskeletal system and the level of training and conditioning of the biological structures. Any change in the musculoskeletal system's biomechanics, especially in the feet and ankles, will strongly influence the biomechanics of runners, possibly predisposing them to injuries. A thorough understanding of the effects of a therapeutic approach focused on feet biomechanics, on strength and functionality of lower limb muscles will contribute to the adoption of more effective therapeutic and preventive strategies for runners. A randomized, prospective controlled and parallel trial with blind assessment is designed to study the effects of a "ground-up" therapeutic approach focused on the foot-ankle complex as it relates to the incidence of running-related injuries in the lower limbs. One hundred and eleven (111) healthy long-distance runners will be randomly assigned to either a control (CG) or intervention (IG) group. IG runners will participate in a therapeutic exercise protocol for the foot-ankle for 8 weeks, with 1 directly supervised session and 3 remotely supervised sessions per week. After the 8-week period, IG runners will keep exercising for the remaining 10 months of the study, supervised only by web-enabled software three times a week. At baseline, 2 months, 4 months and 12 months, all runners will be assessed for running-related injuries (primary outcome), time for the occurrence of the first injury, foot health and functionality, muscle trophism, intrinsic foot muscle strength, dynamic foot arch strain and lower-limb biomechanics during walking and running (secondary outcomes). This is the first randomized clinical trial protocol to assess the effect of an exercise protocol that was designed specifically for the foot-and-ankle complex on running-related injuries to the lower limbs of long-distance runners. We intend to show

  17. The effect of footwear on running performance and running economy in distance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Joel T; Bellenger, Clint R; Thewlis, Dominic; Tsiros, Margarita D; Buckley, Jonathan D

    2015-03-01

    The effect of footwear on running economy has been investigated in numerous studies. However, no systematic review and meta-analysis has synthesised the available literature and the effect of footwear on running performance is not known. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to investigate the effect of footwear on running performance and running economy in distance runners, by reviewing controlled trials that compare different footwear conditions or compare footwear with barefoot. The Web of Science, Scopus, MEDLINE, CENTRAL (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials), EMBASE, AMED (Allied and Complementary Medicine), CINAHL and SPORTDiscus databases were searched from inception up until April 2014. Included articles reported on controlled trials that examined the effects of footwear or footwear characteristics (including shoe mass, cushioning, motion control, longitudinal bending stiffness, midsole viscoelasticity, drop height and comfort) on running performance or running economy and were published in a peer-reviewed journal. Of the 1,044 records retrieved, 19 studies were included in the systematic review and 14 studies were included in the meta-analysis. No studies were identified that reported effects on running performance. Individual studies reported significant, but trivial, beneficial effects on running economy for comfortable and stiff-soled shoes [standardised mean difference (SMD) beneficial effect on running economy for cushioned shoes (SMD = 0.37; P beneficial effect on running economy for training in minimalist shoes (SMD = 0.79; P beneficial effects on running economy for light shoes and barefoot compared with heavy shoes (SMD running was identified (P running economy. Certain models of footwear and footwear characteristics can improve running economy. Future research in footwear performance should include measures of running performance.

  18. Pilates training improves 5-km run performance by changing metabolic cost and muscle activity in trained runners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finatto, Paula; Silva, Edson Soares Da; Okamura, Alexandre B.; Almada, Bruna P.; Oliveira, Henrique B.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose Strength training improves distance running economy and performance. This finding is based predominantly on maximal and explosive strength programmes applied to locomotor muscles, particularly on the lower limbs. It is not certain whether a minimization of metabolic cost (Cmet) and an improvement in running performance is feasible with strength training of the postural and trunk muscles. Methods Using kinematic, neuromuscular and metabolic measurements of running at two different speeds before and after a 12-week Pilates training programme, we tested the hypothesis that core training might improve the running Cmet and performance of trained runners. Thirty-two individuals were randomly assigned to the control group (CG, n = 16) or the Pilates group (PG, n = 16). Results Confirming our hypothesis, a significant improvement (p<0.05) was observed for running performance in the PG (pre: 25.65±0.4 min; post: 23.23±0.4 min) compared to the CG (pre: 25.33±0.58 min; post: 24.61±0.52 min). Similarly, the PG (4.33±0.07 J.kg-1.m-1) had better responses than the CG (4.71±0.11 J.kg-1.m-1) during post-training for Cmet. These findings were accompanied by decreased electromyographic activity of the postural muscles at submaximal running intensities in the PG. Conclusions Overall, these results provide a rationale for selecting strength training strategies that target adaptations on specific postural and locomotor muscles for trained distance runners. PMID:29561907

  19. Pilates training improves 5-km run performance by changing metabolic cost and muscle activity in trained runners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Finatto

    Full Text Available Strength training improves distance running economy and performance. This finding is based predominantly on maximal and explosive strength programmes applied to locomotor muscles, particularly on the lower limbs. It is not certain whether a minimization of metabolic cost (Cmet and an improvement in running performance is feasible with strength training of the postural and trunk muscles.Using kinematic, neuromuscular and metabolic measurements of running at two different speeds before and after a 12-week Pilates training programme, we tested the hypothesis that core training might improve the running Cmet and performance of trained runners. Thirty-two individuals were randomly assigned to the control group (CG, n = 16 or the Pilates group (PG, n = 16.Confirming our hypothesis, a significant improvement (p<0.05 was observed for running performance in the PG (pre: 25.65±0.4 min; post: 23.23±0.4 min compared to the CG (pre: 25.33±0.58 min; post: 24.61±0.52 min. Similarly, the PG (4.33±0.07 J.kg-1.m-1 had better responses than the CG (4.71±0.11 J.kg-1.m-1 during post-training for Cmet. These findings were accompanied by decreased electromyographic activity of the postural muscles at submaximal running intensities in the PG.Overall, these results provide a rationale for selecting strength training strategies that target adaptations on specific postural and locomotor muscles for trained distance runners.

  20. Plantar Pressures During Long Distance Running: An Investigation of 10 Marathon Runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik Hohmann, Peter Reaburn, Kevin Tetsworth, Andreas Imhoff

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to record plantar pressures using an in-shoe measuring system before, during, and after a marathon run in ten experienced long-distance runners with a mean age of 37.7 ± 11.5 years. Peak and mean plantar pressures were recorded before, after, and every three km during a marathon race. There were no significant changes over time in peak and mean plantar pressures for either the dominant or non-dominant foot. There were significant between foot peak and mean plantar pressure differences for the total foot (p = 0.0001, forefoot (p = 0.0001, midfoot (p = 0.02 resp. p = 0.006, hindfoot (p = 0.0001, first ray (p = 0.01 resp. p = 0.0001 and MTP (p = 0.05 resp. p = 0.0001. Long-distance runners do not demonstrate significant changes in mean or peak plantar foot pressures over the distance of a marathon race. However, athletes consistently favoured their dominant extremity, applying significantly higher plantar pressures through their dominant foot over the entire marathon distance.

  1. Proximal tibia volumetric bone mineral density is correlated to the magnitude of local acceleration in male long-distance runners

    OpenAIRE

    Dériaz, Olivier; Najafi, Bijan; Ballabeni, Pierluigi; Crettenand, Antoinette; Gobelet, Charles; Aminian, Kamiar; Rizzoli, René; Gremion, Gerald

    2010-01-01

    The beneficial effect of physical exercise on bone mineral density (BMD) is at least partly explained by the forces exerted directly on the bones. Male runners present generally higher BMD than sedentary individuals. We postulated that the proximal tibia BMD is related to the running distance, as well as to the magnitude of the shocks (while running) in male runners. A prospective study (three yearly measurements) included 81 healthy male subjects: 16 sedentary lean subjects, and 3 groups of ...

  2. THE EFFECT OF STEP RATE MANIPULATION ON FOOT STRIKE PATTERN OF LONG DISTANCE RUNNERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Darrell J; Heisler, Hollie; Mooney, Jennifer; Kring, Richard

    2016-02-01

    running shoes. If changing the foot strike pattern is the main goal, other gait re-training methods may be needed to make a change from a heel strike to a non-heel strike pattern. Step rate manipulation shows a progressive reduction of foot inclination angle at 5%, 10%, and 15% above preferred step rate which reduces the severity of the heel strike at initial contact. Step rate manipulation of at least +10% above preferred may be an effective running gait retraining method for clinicians to decrease the severity of heel strike and possibly assist a runner to change to a non-heel strike pattern. 3.

  3. Biomechanical factors associated with running economy and performance of elite Kenyan distance runners: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawa, Nassib; Louw, Quinette

    2018-01-01

    Running economy (RE) is a determinant of performance in endurance sports and is a complex multi-factorial measure which reflects the combined functioning of bio-mechanical, neuro-muscular, metabolic and cardio-respiratory factors some of which are hereditary or adapt to coaching. Kenyan distance runners have dominated major global events with their unmatched performance for decades and this phenomenon has prompted several investigations aimed at establishing possible factors associated with their performance. This systematic review was aimed at establishing up-to date quantitative synthesis of evidence on biomechanical factors associated with running economy and performance of elite Kenyan distance runners and to provide an algorithm for future research and coaching strategies. A comprehensive electronic search was conducted through June 2017. Quality appraisal was independently done by both reviewers using the STROBE checklist. Descriptive summaries and tables were used to illustrate biomechanical outcomes, mean differences and confidence intervals. Evidence from reviewed studies was graded according to the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) hierarchy for aetiological factors and meta-analysis was performed where applicable. Eight cross-sectional studies were included. The overall methodological score was moderate (58%). Elite Kenyan distance runners have significant longer gastroc-Achilles tendons compared to their counterparts while their shank length is not significantly longer. There is no certainty of evidence regarding the association between their characteristic unique profile of tall and slender bodies, low BMI and low body mass, short ground contact and flight times, greater forward lean torso and faster and greater forward leg swing with RE and performance. Our findings presents evidence on biomechanical factors associated with RE and performance of elite Kenyan distance runners. Despite these findings, there are a number of

  4. Effect of speed endurance and strength training on performance, running economy and muscular adaptations in endurance-trained runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorup Petersen, Jacob; Tybirk, Jonas; Gunnarsson, Thomas Petursson

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of combined strength and speed endurance (SE) training along with a reduced training volume on performance, running economy and muscular adaptations in endurance-trained runners. METHODS: Sixteen male endurance runners (VO2-max: ~60 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) were rand...... and speed endurance training, along with a reduced training volume, can improve short-term exercise capacity and induce muscular adaptations related to anaerobic capacity in endurance-trained runners.......PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of combined strength and speed endurance (SE) training along with a reduced training volume on performance, running economy and muscular adaptations in endurance-trained runners. METHODS: Sixteen male endurance runners (VO2-max: ~60 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) were...... randomly assigned to either a combined strength and SE training (CSS; n = 9) or a control (CON; n = 7) group. For 8 weeks, CSS replaced their normal moderate-intensity training (~63 km week(-1)) with SE (2 × week(-1)) and strength training (2 × week(-1)) as well as aerobic high (1 × week(-1)) and moderate...

  5. Higher Precision of Heart Rate Compared with VO2 to Predict Exercise Intensity in Endurance-Trained Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Victor M; den Tillaar, Roland Van; Marques, Mario C

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the precision of oxygen uptake with heart rate regression during track running in highly-trained runners. Twelve national and international level male long-distance road runners (age 30.7 ± 5.5 yrs, height 1.71 ± 0.04 m and mass 61.2 ± 5.8 kg) with a personal best on the half marathon of 62 min 37 s ± 1 min 22 s participated in the study. Each participant performed, in an all-weather synthetic track five, six min bouts at constant velocity with each bout at an increased running velocity. The starting velocity was 3.33 m·s(-1) with a 0.56 m·s(-1) increase on each subsequent bout. VO2 and heart rate were measured during the runs and blood lactate was assessed immediately after each run. Mean peak VO2 and mean peak heart rate were, respectively, 76.2 ± 9.7 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1) and 181 ± 13 beats·min(-1). The linearity of the regressions between heart rate, running velocity and VO2 were all very high (r > 0.99) with small standard errors of regression (i.e. Sy.x at the velocity associated with the 2 and 4 mmol·L(-1) lactate thresholds). The strong relationships between heart rate, running velocity and VO2 found in this study show that, in highly trained runners, it is possible to have heart rate as an accurate indicator of energy demand and of the running speed. Therefore, in this subject cohort it may be unnecessary to use VO2 to track changes in the subjects' running economy during training periods. Key pointsHeart rate is used in the control of exercise intensity in endurance sports.However, few studies have quantified the precision of its relationship with oxygen uptake in highly trained runners.We evaluated twelve elite half-marathon runners during track running at various intensities and established three regressions: oxygen uptake / heart rate; heart rate / running velocity and oxygen uptake / running velocity.The three regressions presented, respectively, imprecision of 4,2%, 2,75% and 4,5% at the velocity

  6. Examination of “Pre-competition” anxiety levels, of mid-distance runners: A quantitative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bebetsos Evangelos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Mid-distance runners are subject to intense cognitive and somatic anxiety, not only during competition but also during practice. An important variable which may influence athletes’ performance is perceived behavioral control on anxiety. The aim of the present study was to examine whether aspects such as sex, sport/competition experience and weekly practices, differentiated the participants respectively. The participants consisted of 110 athletes, 61 male and 49 female athletes, between the ages of 15 and 28 (Μ=20.05, SD=2.82.They all completed the Greek version of the “Pre- Race Questionnaire”. Results indicated differences between the less experienced and more experienced athletes in almost all factors of the questionnaire, for both sport/competition experience, and weekly practices. No gender differences were shown. Overall, results could help sport professionals such as coaches and the athletes themselves, become more familiar with the sport-specific psychological aspects involved in their unique sport.

  7. How does high-intensity intermittent training affect recreational endurance runners? Acute and chronic adaptations: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe García-Pinillos

    2017-03-01

    Conclusion: HIIT-based running plans (2 to 3 HIIT sessions per week, combining HIIT and CR runs show athletic performance improvements in endurance runners by improving maximal oxygen uptake and running economy along with muscular and metabolic adaptations. To maximize the adaptations to training, both HIIT and CR must be part of training programs for endurance runners.

  8. Training for Distance Teaching through Distance Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadorath, Jill; Harris, Simon; Encinas, Fatima

    2002-01-01

    Describes a mixed-mode bachelor degree course in English language teaching at the Universidad Autonoma de Puebla (Mexico) that was designed to help practicing teachers write appropriate distance education materials by giving them the experience of being distance students. Includes a course outline and results of a course evaluation. (Author/LRW)

  9. Heart rate variability in prediction of individual adaptation to endurance training in recreational endurance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vesterinen, V; Häkkinen, K; Hynynen, E; Mikkola, J; Hokka, L; Nummela, A

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether nocturnal heart rate variability (HRV) can be used to predict changes in endurance performance during 28 weeks of endurance training. The training was divided into 14 weeks of basic training (BTP) and 14 weeks of intensive training periods (ITP). Endurance performance characteristics, nocturnal HRV, and serum hormone concentrations were measured before and after both training periods in 28 recreational endurance runners. During the study peak treadmill running speed (Vpeak ) improved by 7.5 ± 4.5%. No changes were observed in HRV indices after BTP, but after ITP, these indices increased significantly (HFP: 1.9%, P=0.026; TP: 1.7%, P=0.007). Significant correlations were observed between the change of Vpeak and HRV indices (TP: r=0.75, PHRV among recreational endurance runners, it seems that moderate- and high-intensity training are needed. This study showed that recreational endurance runners with a high HRV at baseline improved their endurance running performance after ITP more than runners with low baseline HRV. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  10. Effect of speed endurance training and reduced training volume on running economy and single muscle fiber adaptations in trained runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Casper; Christiansen, Danny; Christensen, Peter Møller

    2018-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether improved running economy with a period of speed endurance training and reduced training volume could be related to adaptations in specific muscle fibers. Twenty trained male (n = 14) and female (n = 6) runners (maximum oxygen consumption (VO2 -m.......3 ± 0.3 vs. 18.9 ± 0.3 km/h) after than before the intervention. Thus, improved running economy with intense training may be related to changes in expression of proteins linked to energy consuming processes in primarily ST muscle fibers....

  11. Sports injuries in Finnish elite cross-country skiers, swimmers, long-distance runners and soccer players

    OpenAIRE

    Ristolainen, Leena

    2011-01-01

    In sports with different exercise-loading characteristics, acute and overuse injury profiles and gender differences in injuries were investigated. In addition, trainingrelated risk factors for overuse injuries in endurance athletes were studied. This twelve-month retrospective questionnaire study comprised Finnish elite crosscountry skiers (n=149), swimmers (n=154), long-distance runners (n=143) and soccer players (n=128) aged 15–35 years. Questionnaires were sent to the athlet...

  12. Relationship between foot strike pattern, running speed, and footwear condition in recreational distance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Roy T H; Wong, Rodney Y L; Chung, Tim K W; Choi, R T; Leung, Wendy W Y; Shek, Diana H Y

    2017-06-01

    Compared to competitive runners, recreational runners appear to be more prone to injuries, which have been associated with foot strike patterns. Surprisingly, only few studies had examined the foot strike patterns outside laboratories. Therefore, this study compared the foot strike patterns in recreational runners at outdoor tracks with previously reported data. We also investigated the relationship between foot strike pattern, speed, and footwear in this cohort. Among 434 recreational runners analysed, 89.6% of them landed with rearfoot strike (RFS). Only 6.9 and 3.5% landed with midfoot and forefoot, respectively. A significant shift towards non-RFS was observed in our cohort, when compared with previously reported data. When speed increased by 1 m/s, the odds of having forefoot strike and midfoot strike relative to RFS increased by 2.3 times and 2.6 times, respectively. Runners were 9.2 times more likely to run with a forefoot strike in minimalists compared to regular running shoes, although 70% of runners in minimalists continued to use a RFS. These findings suggest that foot strike pattern may differ across running conditions and runners should consider these factors in order to mitigate potential injury.

  13. Effect of increased and maintained frequency of speed endurance training on performance and muscle adaptations in runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Casper; Almquist, Nicki Winfield; Bangsbo, Jens

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was, in runners accustomed to speed endurance training (SET), to examine the effect of increased and maintained frequency of SET on performance and muscular adaptations. After familiarization (FAM) to SET, eighteen male (n=14) and female (n=4) runners (VO2-max: 57.3±3.4 ml·mi...

  14. No effect of a graded training program on the number of running-related injuries in novice runners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist, Ida; Bredeweg, Steef W.; van Mechelen, Willem; Lemmink, Koen A. P. M.; Pepping, Gert-Jan; Diercks, Ron L.

    Background: Although running has positive effects on health and fitness, the incidence of a running-related injury (RRI) is high. Research on prevention of RRI is scarce; to date, no studies have involved novice runners. Hypothesis: A graded training program for novice runners will lead to a

  15. HIGHER PRECISION OF HEART RATE COMPARED WITH VO2 TO PREDICT EXERCISE INTENSITY IN ENDURANCE-TRAINED RUNNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor M. Reis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to assess the precision of oxygen uptake with heart rate regression during track running in highly-trained runners. Twelve national and international level male long-distance road runners (age 30.7 ± 5.5 yrs, height 1.71 ± 0.04 m and mass 61.2 ± 5.8 kg with a personal best on the half marathon of 62 min 37 s ± 1 min 22 s participated in the study. Each participant performed, in an all-weather synthetic track five, six min bouts at constant velocity with each bout at an increased running velocity. The starting velocity was 3.33 m·s-1 with a 0.56 m·s-1 increase on each subsequent bout. VO2 and heart rate were measured during the runs and blood lactate was assessed immediately after each run. Mean peak VO2 and mean peak heart rate were, respectively, 76.2 ± 9.7 mL·kg-1·min-1 and 181 ± 13 beats·min-1. The linearity of the regressions between heart rate, running velocity and VO2 were all very high (r > 0.99 with small standard errors of regression (i.e. Sy.x < 5% at the velocity associated with the 2 and 4 mmol·L-1 lactate thresholds. The strong relationships between heart rate, running velocity and VO2 found in this study show that, in highly trained runners, it is possible to have heart rate as an accurate indicator of energy demand and of the running speed. Therefore, in this subject cohort it may be unnecessary to use VO2 to track changes in the subjects' running economy during training periods.

  16. Can GPS be used to detect deleterious progression in training volume among runners?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Oestergaard; Cederholm, Jens Peter; Buist, Ida

    2013-01-01

    There is a need to ascertain if an association exists between excessive progression in weekly volume and development of running-related injuries (RRI). The purpose of this study was to investigate if GPS can be used to detect deleterious progression in weekly training volume among 60 novice runners...... included in a 10-week prospective study. All participants used GPS to quantify training volume while running. In case of injury, participants attended a clinical examination. The 13 runners who sustained injuries during follow-up had a significantly higher weekly progression in total training volume...... in the week before the injury origin (86% [95% confidence interval: 12.9-159.9], p = 0.026) compared with other weeks. Although not significant, participants with injuries had an increase in weekly training volume of 31.6% compared with a 22.1% increase among the healthy participants. The error of the GPS...

  17. Sex differences in association of race performance, skin-fold thicknesses, and training variables for recreational half-marathon runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rosemann, Thomas; Senn, Oliver

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between selected skin-fold thicknesses and training variables with a half-marathon race time, for both male and female recreational runners, using bi- and multivariate analysis. In 52 men, two skin-fold thicknesses (abdominal and calf) were significantly and positively correlated with race time; whereas in 15 women, five (pectoral, mid-axilla, subscapular, abdominal, and suprailiac) showed positive and significant relations with total race time. In men, the mean weekly running distance, minimum distance run per week, maximum distance run per week, mean weekly hours of running, number of running training sessions per week, and mean speed of the training sessions were significantly and negatively related to total race time, but not in women. Interaction analyses suggested that race time was more strongly associated with anthropometry in women than men. Race time for the women was independently associated with the sum of eight skin-folds; but for the men, only the mean speed during training sessions was independently associated. Skin-fold thicknesses and training variables in these groups were differently related to race time according to their sex.

  18. Increased Circulating Anti-inflammatory Cells in Marathon-trained Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehm, K; Sunesara, I; Marshall, G D

    2015-10-01

    Exercise training can alter immune function. Marathon training has been associated with an increased susceptibility to infectious diseases and an increased activity of inflammatory-based diseases, but the precise mechanisms are unknown. The purpose of this study was to compare levels of circulating CD4+  T cell subsets in the periphery of marathon-trained runners and matched non-marathon controls. 19 recreational marathoners that were 4 weeks from running a marathon and 19 demographically-matched healthy control subjects had the percentage of CD4+ T cell subpopulations (T helper 1, T helper 2, T helper 1/T helper 2 ratio, regulatory T cells, CD4+ IL10+, and CD4+ TGFβ+ (Transforming Growth Factor-beta) measured by flow cytometry. Marathon-trained runners had significantly less T helper 1 and regulatory T cells and significantly more T helper 2, CD4+ IL10+, and TGFβ+ cells than the control subjects. The alterations in the percentage of T helper 1 and T helper 2 cells led to a significantly lower T helper 1/T helper 2 ratio in the marathon-trained runners. These data suggest that endurance-based training can increase the number of anti-inflammatory cells. This may be a potential mechanism for the increased incidence of both infectious and inflammatory diseases observed in endurance athletes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Running injuries in novice runners enrolled in different training interventions: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltich, J; Emery, C A; Whittaker, J L; Nigg, B M

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this trial was to evaluate injury risk in novice runners participating in different strength training interventions. This was a pilot randomized controlled trial. Novice runners (n = 129, 18-60 years old, running experience) were block randomized to one of three groups: a "resistance" strength training group, a "functional" strength training group, or a stretching "control" group. The primary outcome was running related injury. The number of participants with complaints and the injury rate (IR = no. injuries/1000 running hours) were quantified for each intervention group. For the first 8 weeks, participants were instructed to complete their training intervention three to five times a week. The remaining 4 months was a maintenance period. NCT01900262. A total of 52 of the 129 (40%) novice runners experienced at least one running related injury: 21 in the functional strength training program, 16 in the resistance strength training program and 15 in the control stretching program. Injury rates did not differ between study groups [IR = 32.9 (95% CI 20.8, 49.3) in the functional group, IR = 31.6 (95% CI 18.4, 50.5) in the resistance group, and IR = 26.7 (95% CI 15.2, 43.2)] in the control group. Although this was a pilot assessment, home-based strength training did not appear to alter injury rates compared to stretching. Future studies should consider methods to minimize participant drop out to allow for the assessment of injury risk. Injury risk in novice runners based on this pilot study will inform the development of future larger studies investigating the impact of injury prevention interventions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Case Study: Body Composition Periodization in an Olympic-Level Female Middle-Distance Runner Over a 9-Year Career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellingwerff, Trent

    2018-05-25

    This case study features an Olympic-level female middle-distance runner implementing a science-based approach to body composition periodization. Data are emerging to suggest that it is not sustainable from a health and/or performance perspective to be at peak body composition year-round, so body composition needs to be strategically periodized. Anthropometric (n = 44), hematological, other health measures, and 1,500-m race performances (n = 83) were periodically assessed throughout a 9-year career. General preparation phase (September to April) featured the athlete at ∼2-4% over ideal competition phase body weight (BW) and body fat (%), with optimal energy availability being prioritized. The competition body composition optimization phase (May to August) included creating an individualized time frame and caloric deficit with various feedback metrics (BW, performance, and hunger) to guide the process. There were significant seasonal fluctuations in anthropometric outcomes between phases (47.3 ± 0.8 vs. 48.3 ± 0.9 kg BW; 53.6 ± 7.8 vs. 61.6 ± 9.7 mm International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry sum of 8 [So8] skinfolds; p career (r = -.838; p = .018). The range of body composition during the competition period was 46.0-48.0 kg BW and a So8 range was 42.0-55.9 mm. There were also significant positive correlations between slower 1,500-m race times and increasing So8 (r = .437; p career injuries. This case study demonstrates a body composition periodization approach that allowed for targeted peak yearly performances, which improved throughout her career, while maximizing training adaptation and long-term athlete health through optimal energy availability.

  1. Effects of repetitive training at low altitude on erythropoiesis in 400 and 800 m runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frese, F; Friedmann-Bette, B

    2010-06-01

    Classical altitude training can cause an increase in total hemoglobin mass (THM) if a minimum "dose of hypoxia" is reached (altitude >or=2,000 m, >or=3 weeks). We wanted to find out if repetitive exposure to mild hypoxia during living and training at low altitude (training camps at low altitude interspersed by 3 weeks of sea-level training and at the same time points in a control group (CG) of 5 well-trained runners. EPO, sTfR and ferritin were also repeatedly measured during the altitude training camps. Repeated measures ANOVA revealed significant increases in EPO- and sTfR-levels during both training camps and a significant decrease in ferritin indicating enhanced erythropoietic stimulation during living and training at low altitude. Furthermore, significant augmentation of THM by 5.1% occurred in the course of the 2 altitude training camps. In conclusion, repetitive living and training at low altitude leads to a hypoxia-induced increase in erythropoietic stimulation in elite 400 m and 800 m runners and, apparently, might also cause a consecutive augmentation of THM.

  2. Different Training Modalities Improve Energy Cost and Performance in Master Runners

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    Lorenzo Pugliese

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of continuous moderate-intensity and discontinuous high-intensity training on running performance in master runners.Methods: Thirty-four male master runners (47.2 ± 7.4 years were assigned to three different groups: continuous moderate-intensity training (CMIT, discontinuous high-intensity training (DHIT, and control group (CON. CMIT and DHIT performed 8-week of supervised training (3 session·wk−1; ~35 km·wk−1 while CON maintained their normal training habits (3–4 session·wk−1; ~50 km·wk−1. Peak oxygen consumption (V˙O2peak and peak running speed (vpeak during incremental treadmill exercise, gas exchange threshold (GET, speed at GET, energy cost of running (Cr, and 5-km performance were evaluated before and after training.Results: Following the training period, both CMIT and DHIT significantly reduced Cr (−4.4 and −4.9%, respectively, P < 0.05, increased speed at GET (3.4 and 5.7%, P < 0.05 and improved 5-km time-trial performance (3.1 and 2.2%, P < 0.05 whereas no differences were found for V˙O2peak and GET (as %V˙O2peak. After training, vpeak improved only for DHIT (6%, P < 0.05. No differences were found in any variable for CON.Conclusions: This study indicates that both CMIT and DHIT may positively affect running performance in middle-aged master runners. This improvement was achieved despite a significant reduction of the amount of weekly training volume.

  3. 10-20-30 training increases performance and lowers blood pressure and VEGF in runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliemann, Lasse; Gunnarsson, Thomas P; Hellsten, Ylva; Bangsbo, Jens

    2015-10-01

    The present study examined the effect of training by the 10-20-30 concept on performance, blood pressure (BP), and skeletal muscle angiogenesis as well as the feasibility of completing high-intensity interval training in local running communities. One hundred sixty recreational runners were divided into either a control group (CON; n = 28), or a 10-20-30 training group (10-20-30; n = 132) replacing two of three weekly training sessions with 10-20-30 training for 8 weeks and performance of a 5-km run (5-K) and BP was measured. VO2max was measured and resting muscle biopsies were taken in a subgroup of runners (n = 18). 10-20-30 improved 5-K time (38 s) and lowered systolic BP (2 ± 1 mmHg). For hypertensive subjects in 10-20-30 (n = 30), systolic and diastolic BP was lowered by 5 ± 4 and 3 ± 2 mmHg, respectively, which was a greater reduction than in the non-hypertensive subjects (n = 102). 10-20-30 increased VO2max but did not influence muscle fiber area, distribution or capillarization, whereas the expression of the pro-angiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was lowered by 22%. No changes were observed in CON. These results suggest that 10-20-30 training is an effective and easily implemented training intervention improving endurance performance, VO2max and lowering BP in recreational runners, but does not affect muscle morphology and reduces muscle VEGF. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Solar Ultraviolet Radiation Exposure of South African Marathon Runners During Competition Marathon Runs and Training Sessions: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurse, Victoria; Wright, Caradee Y; Allen, Martin; McKenzie, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    Marathon runners spend considerable time in outdoor training for and participating in marathons. Outdoor runners may experience high solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure. South Africa, where running is popular, experiences high ambient solar UVR levels that may be associated with adverse health effects. This feasibility study explores the use of personal dosimeters to determine solar UVR exposure patterns and possible related acute health risks of four marathon runners during marathons and training sessions in Cape Town and Pretoria. Runners running marathons that started early in the day, and that did not exceed 4 hours, yielded low total solar UVR exposure doses (mean 0.093 SED per exposure period run, median 0.088 SED, range 0.062-0.136 SED; average of 16.54% of ambient solar UVR). Training sessions run during early morning and late afternoon presented similar results. Several challenges hindered analysis including accounting for anatomical position of personal dosimeter and natural shade. To assess health risks, hazard quotients (HQs) were calculated using a hypothetical runner's schedule. Cumulative, annual solar UVR exposure-calculated acute health risks were low (HQ = 0.024) for training sessions and moderate (HQ = 4.922) for marathon runs. While these data and calculations are based on 18 person-days, one can measure marathon runners' personal solar UVR exposure although several challenges must be overcome. © 2015 The American Society of Photobiology.

  5. S-06: Effect of Increased Cadence on Neuromuscular Response and Lower Limb Kinematics in Middle Distance Runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrinder Singh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To examine the differences in the neuromuscular and kinematic response in middle distance runners when the step rate was increased to 5% and 10% respectively of the preferred step rate.MATERIALS AND METHODOLOGY: 80 middle distance runners (40 males and 40 females participated in the study. EMG of 8 muscles (rectus femoris, medial and lateral hamstrings, medial gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, gluteus medius and maximus, kinematic changes at the lower limb joints during stance and swing phase of running, foot pressure readings and spatiotemporal gait pa-rameters were recorded as each participant ran at their preferred speed, 5% increase in preferred speed and 10% increase in their preferred speed while keeping the treadmill speed constant.RESULTS: Kinematic analysis showed an increased knee flexion angle at initial contact (p < 0.001 and decreased knee flexion angle during swing phase (p < 0.001, Ankle showed reduced dorsiflex-ion angle at initial contact (p<0.001 and the hip showed less peak flexion (p < 0.001 across step rate conditions.With an increase in step rate, a fore foot strike running pattern was seen. Muscle activity was signif-icantly increased during the late swing and pre-swing at 10% of the preferred speed (p<0.001, with less significant changes during 5% of the preferred speed. During loading response, significant de-crease in muscle activity (p<0.05 was found between 5% and 10% increase of preferred speed.CONCLUSION: Increased cadence showed increased muscle activation and a forefoot strike run-ning pattern. The kinematic changes documented along with the neuromuscular response across the step rate conditions could be beneficial to runners for rehabilitation and injury prevention.

  6. Hydration status in adolescent runners: pre and post training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashadi, K.; Mirza, D. N.; Siantoro, G.

    2018-01-01

    The adequacy of body fluids is important for athletes in supporting performance. The purpose of this research was to determine the hydration status of athletes before and after training. The study was a qualitative descriptive by using random sampling. All athletes were trained for approximately 60 minutes. And they were asked to analyze their body fluid pattern routinely. Data were obtained through urine color measurement. The urinary was taken at pre and post training and was immediately assessed in the afternoon. Based on pre-training urine samples, a mean of urine color scale was 3.1 point. It meant that only 31.2% of the athletes were in dehydrated condition. However, after exercising, urine color index showed scale 4.1. And 62.5% of the athletes experienced dehydration. The results showed that there was a significant change in hydration level before and after training. It can be concluded that training for a long time increases the risk of dehydration. It is important for athletes to meet the needs of body fluids in order to avoid functional impairment in the body during sports activities.

  7. Previous injuries and some training characteristics predict running-related injuries in recreational runners: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hespanhol Junior, Luiz Carlos; Pena Costa, Leonardo Oliveira; Lopes, Alexandre Dias

    2013-12-01

    What is the incidence of running-related injuries (RRIs) in recreational runners? Which personal and training characteristics predict RRIs in recreational runners? Prospective cohort study. A total of 200 recreational runners answered a fortnightly online survey containing questions about their running routine, races, and presence of RRI. These runners were followed-up for a period of 12 weeks. The primary outcome of this study was running-related injury. The incidence of injuries was calculated taking into account the exposure to running and was expressed by RRI/1000 hours. The association between potential predictive factors and RRIs was estimated using generalised estimating equation models. A total of 84 RRIs were registered in 60 (31%) of the 191 recreational runners who completed all follow-up surveys. Of the injured runners 30% (n=18/60) developed two or more RRIs, with 5/18 (28%) being recurrences. The incidence of RRI was 10 RRI/1000 hours of running exposure. The main type of RRI observed was muscle injuries (30%, n=25/84). The knee was the most commonly affected anatomical region (19%, n=16/84). The variables associated with RRI were: previous RRI (OR 1.88, 95% CI 1.01 to 3.51), duration of training although the effect was very small (OR 1.01, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.02), speed training (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.02 to 2.10), and interval training (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.43 to 0.88). Physiotherapists should be aware and advise runners that past RRI and speed training are associated with increased risk of further RRI, while interval training is associated with lower risk, although these associations may not be causative. Copyright © 2013 Australian Physiotherapy Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of resistance training regimens on treadmill running and neuromuscular performance in recreational endurance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkola, Jussi; Vesterinen, Ville; Taipale, Ritva; Capostagno, Benoit; Häkkinen, Keijo; Nummela, Ari

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effects of heavy resistance, explosive resistance, and muscle endurance training on neuromuscular, endurance, and high-intensity running performance in recreational endurance runners. Twenty-seven male runners were divided into one of three groups: heavy resistance, explosive resistance or muscle endurance training. After 6 weeks of preparatory training, the groups underwent an 8-week resistance training programme as a supplement to endurance training. Before and after the 8-week training period, maximal strength (one-repetition maximum), electromyographic activity of the leg extensors, countermovement jump height, maximal speed in the maximal anaerobic running test, maximal endurance performance, maximal oxygen uptake ([V·]O(₂max)), and running economy were assessed. Maximal strength improved in the heavy (P = 0.034, effect size ES = 0.38) and explosive resistance training groups (P = 0.003, ES = 0.67) with increases in leg muscle activation (heavy: P = 0.032, ES = 0.38; explosive: P = 0.002, ES = 0.77). Only the heavy resistance training group improved maximal running speed in the maximal anaerobic running test (P = 0.012, ES = 0.52) and jump height (P = 0.006, ES = 0.59). Maximal endurance running performance was improved in all groups (heavy: P = 0.005, ES = 0.56; explosive: P = 0.034, ES = 0.39; muscle endurance: P = 0.001, ES = 0.94), with small though not statistically significant improvements in [V·]O(₂max) (heavy: ES = 0.08; explosive: ES = 0.29; muscle endurance: ES = 0.65) and running economy (ES in all groups running endurance performance. However, both heavy and explosive strength training were beneficial in improving neuromuscular characteristics, and heavy resistance training in particular contributed to improvements in high-intensity running characteristics. Thus, endurance runners should include heavy resistance training in their training programmes to enhance endurance performance, such as

  9. Ankle and knee kinetics between strike patterns at common training speeds in competitive male runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhman, Daniel; Melcher, Daniel; Paquette, Max R

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the interaction of foot strike and common speeds on sagittal plane ankle and knee joint kinetics in competitive rear foot strike (RFS) runners when running with a RFS pattern and an imposed forefoot strike (FFS) pattern. Sixteen competitive habitual male RFS runners ran at two different speeds (i.e. 8 and 6 min mile(-1)) using their habitual RFS and an imposed FFS pattern. A repeated measures analysis of variance was used to assess a potential interaction between strike pattern and speed for selected ground reaction force (GRF) variables and, sagittal plane ankle and knee kinematic and kinetic variables. No foot strike and speed interaction was observed for any of the kinetic variables. Habitual RFS yielded a greater loading rate of the vertical GRF, peak ankle dorsiflexor moment, peak knee extensor moment, peak knee eccentric extensor power, peak dorsiflexion and sagittal plane knee range of motion compared to imposed FFS. Imposed FFS yielded greater maximum vertical GRF, peak ankle plantarflexor moment, peak ankle eccentric plantarflexor power and sagittal plane ankle ROM compared to habitual RFS. Consistent with previous literature, imposed FFS in habitual RFS reduces eccentric knee extensor and ankle dorsiflexor involvement but produce greater eccentric ankle plantarflexor action compared to RFS. These acute differences between strike patterns were independent of running speeds equivalent to typical easy and hard training runs in competitive male runners. Current findings along with previous literature suggest differences in lower extremity kinetics between habitual RFS and imposed FFS running are consistent among a variety of runner populations.

  10. The NLstart2run study : Training-related factors associated with running-related injuries in novice runners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluitenberg, Bas; van der Worp, Henk; Huisstede, Bionka M A; Hartgens, Fred; Diercks, Ron; Verhagen, Evert; van Middelkoop, Marienke

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The incidence of running-related injuries is high. Some risk factors for injury were identified in novice runners, however, not much is known about the effect of training factors on injury risk. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the associations between training factors

  11. The NLstart2run study: Training-related factors associated with running-related injuries in novice runners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluitenberg, Bas; van der Worp, Henk; Huisstede, Bionka M. A.; Hartgens, Fred; Diercks, Ronald; Verhagen, Evert; van Middelkoop, Marienke

    Objectives: The incidence of running-related injuries is high. Some risk factors for injury were identified in novice runners, however, not much is known about the effect of training factors on injury risk. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the associations between training factors

  12. Effects of dietary antioxidants on training and performance in female runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braakhuis, Andrea J; Hopkins, Will G; Lowe, Tim E

    2014-01-01

    Exercise-induced oxidative stress is implicated in muscle damage and fatigue which has led athletes to embark on antioxidant supplementation regimes to negate these effects. This study investigated the intake of vitamin C (VC) (1 g), blackcurrant (BC) juice (15 mg VC, 300 mg anthocyanins) and placebo in isocaloric drink form on training progression, incremental running test and 5-km time-trial performance. Twenty-three trained female runners (age, 31 ± 8 y; mean ± SD) completed three blocks of high-intensity training for 3 wks and 3 days, separated by a washout (~3.7 wks). Changes in training and performance with each treatment were analysed with a mixed linear model, adjusting for performance at the beginning of each training block. Markers of oxidative status included protein carbonyl, malondialdehyde (in plasma and in vitro erythrocytes), ascorbic acid, uric acid and erythrocyte enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase were analysed. There was a likely harmful effect on mean running speed during training when taking VC (1.3%; 90% confidence limits ±1.3%). Effects of the two treatments relative to placebo on mean performance in the incremental test and time trial were unclear, but runners faster by 1 SD of peak speed demonstrated a possible improvement on peak running speed with BC juice (1.9%; ±2.5%). Following VC, certain oxidative markers were elevated: catalase at rest (23%; ±21%), protein carbonyls at rest (27%; ±38%) and superoxide dismutase post-exercise (8.3%; ±9.3%). In conclusion, athletes should be cautioned about taking VC chronically, however, BC may improve performance in the elite.

  13. Intensity related changes of running economy in recreational level distance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engeroff, Tobias; Bernardi, Andreas; Niederer, Daniel; Wilke, Jan; Vogt, Lutz; Banzer, Winfried

    2017-09-01

    Running economy (RE) is often described as a key demand of running performance. The variety of currently used assessment methods with different running intensities and outcomes restricts interindividual comparability of RE in recreational level runners. The purpose of this study was to compare the influence of RE, assessed as oxygen cost (OC) and caloric unit cost (CUC), on running speed at individual physiological thresholds. Eighteen recreational runners performed: 1) a graded exercise test to estimate first ventilatory threshold (VT1), respiratory compensation point (RCP) and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max); 2) discontinuous RE assessment to determine relative OC in milliliters per kilogram per kilometer (mL/kg/km) and CUC in kilocalories per kilogram per kilometer (kcal/kg/km) at three different running intensities: VT1, RCP and at a third standardized reference point (TP) in between. OC (mL/kg/km; at VT1: 235.4±26.2; at TP: 227.8±23.4; at RCP: 224.9±21.9) and CUC (kcal/kg/km at VT1: 1.18±0.13; at TP: 1.14±0.12; at RCP: 1.13±0.11) decreased with increasing intensities (P≤0.01). Controlling for the influence of sex OC and CUC linearly correlated with running speed at RCP and VO2max (P≤0.01). RE, even assessed at low intensity, is strongly related to running performance in recreational athletes. Both calculation methods used (OC and CUC) are sensitive for monitoring intensity related changes of substrate utilization. RE values decreased with higher running intensity indicating an increase of anaerobic and subsequent decrease of aerobic substrate utilization.

  14. Effect of speed endurance training and reduced training volume on running economy and single muscle fiber adaptations in trained runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovgaard, Casper; Christiansen, Danny; Christensen, Peter M; Almquist, Nicki W; Thomassen, Martin; Bangsbo, Jens

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine whether improved running economy with a period of speed endurance training and reduced training volume could be related to adaptations in specific muscle fibers. Twenty trained male (n = 14) and female (n = 6) runners (maximum oxygen consumption (VO 2 -max): 56.4 ± 4.6 mL/min/kg) completed a 40-day intervention with 10 sessions of speed endurance training (5-10 × 30-sec maximal running) and a reduced (36%) volume of training. Before and after the intervention, a muscle biopsy was obtained at rest, and an incremental running test to exhaustion was performed. In addition, running at 60% vVO 2 -max, and a 10-km run was performed in a normal and a muscle slow twitch (ST) glycogen-depleted condition. After compared to before the intervention, expression of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) was lower (P economy at 60% vVO 2 -max (11.6 ± 0.2 km/h) and at v10-km (13.7 ± 0.3 km/h) was ~2% better (P economy with intense training may be related to changes in expression of proteins linked to energy consuming processes in primarily ST muscle fibers. © 2018 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  15. The Effect of Step Frequency Training on a Male Runner with Patellofemoral Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelley Payne

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Running is a very popular form of exercise. The most common site of injury for runners is the knee with patellofemoral pain being the most common complaint. Patellofemoral pain is described as pain around the patella that is worse with activities such as running, squatting, ascending or descending stairs, or sitting for long periods. Much of the recent work with the treatment of patellofemoral pain has involved strengthening of the hip musculature to reduce pain about the knee. However, the ability of these strengthening programs to change lower extremity mechanics or sustain long-term pain reduction has been unproven. More recently, researchers have started to examine the impact of step frequency modification on the forces encountered in the lower extremity, and specifically about the patellofemoral joint. The purpose of this study was to examine the short term effects of step frequency training in a recreational runner with PFP. Methods: This was a single-subject case study design. The subject completed a pre- and post-training assessment to determine the preferred step frequency. The subject also completed a Visual Analog Scale (VAS and a Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS. Results: After the initial evaluation, the subject completed training 2 times per week for 4 weeks using auditory feedback to increase their step frequency by 5% above their preferred step frequency. The subject experienced a decrease in pain as measured by the VAS and an increase in function as measured by the LEFS across the 4 week training. Discussion: Although the results of this case study may not be generalized, the positive findings support additional research to determine both the short and long-term effects of step frequency training on PFP.

  16. Effects of high intensity training and continuous endurance training on aerobic capacity and body composition in recreationally active runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hottenrott, Kuno; Ludyga, Sebastian; Schulze, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effects of two different training programs (high-intensity-training vs. continuous endurance training) on aerobic power and body composition in recreationally active men and women and to test whether or not participants were able to complete a half marathon after the intervention period. Thirty-four recreational endurance runners were randomly assigned either to a Weekend-Group (WE, n = 17) or an After-Work- Group (AW, n = 17) for a 12 week-intervention period. WE weekly completed 2 h 30 min of continuous endurance running composed of 2 sessions on the weekend. In contrast, AW performed 4 30 min sessions of high intensity training and an additional 30 min endurance run weekly, always after work. During an exhaustive treadmill test aerobic power was measured and heart rate was continuously recorded. Body composition was assessed using bio-impedance. Following the intervention period all subjects took part in a half-marathon. AW significantly improved peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak) from 36.8 ± 4.5 to 43.6 ± 6.5 [mL.min(-1).kg(-1)], velocity at lactate threshold (VLT) from 9.7 ± 2.2 to 11.7 ± 1.8 [km.h(-1)] and visceral fat from 5.6 ± 2.2 to 4.7 ± 1.9 In WE VO2 peak signifi-cantly increased from 38.8 ± 5.0 to 41.5 ± 6.0 [mL.min(-1).kg(-1)], VLT from 9.9 ± 1.3 to 11.2 ± 1.7 [km.h(-1)] and visceral fat was reduced from 5.7 ± 2.1 to 5.4 ± 1.9 (p marathon with no significant differences in performance (p = 0.63). Short, intensive endurance training sessions of about 30 min are effective in improving aerobic fitness in recreationally active runners. Key pointsContinuous endurance training and high intensity training lead to significant improvements of aerobic capacity and body compositionBoth training methods enable recreationally active runners to finish a half-marathonHigh intensity training is favorable to improve VO2 peak.

  17. BladeRunners and Picasso Cafe: A Case Study Evaluation of Two Work-Based Training Programs for Disadvantaged Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Sheila; Foley, Kelly; Schwartz, Saul; Taylor-Lewis, Musu

    In 1998, Canada's Social Research and Demonstration Corporation (SRDC) conducted case studies of two work-based training and skill development programs for street youth in Vancouver, British Columbia. The BladeRunners program places youth on construction sites while encouraging them to work toward an apprenticeship in the building trades. The…

  18. Time-course changes of oxidative stress response to high-intensity discontinuous training versus moderate-intensity continuous training in masters runners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Vezzoli

    Full Text Available Beneficial systemic effects of regular physical exercise have been demonstrated to reduce risks of a number of age-related disorders. Antioxidant capacity adaptations are amongst these fundamental changes in response to exercise training. However, it has been claimed that acute physical exercise performed at high intensity (>60% of maximal oxygen uptake may result in oxidative stress, due to reactive oxygen species being generated excessively by enhanced oxygen consumption. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of high-intensity discontinuous training (HIDT, characterized by repeated variations of intensity and changes of redox potential, on oxidative damage. Twenty long-distance masters runners (age 47.8 ± 7.8 yr on the basis of the individual values of gas exchange threshold were assigned to a different 8-weeks training program: continuous moderate-intensity training (MOD, n = 10 or HIDT (n = 10. In both groups before (PRE and after (POST training we examined the following oxidative damage markers: thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS as marker of lipid peroxidation; protein carbonyls (PC as marker of protein oxidation; 8-hydroxy-2-deoxy-guanosine (8-OH-dG as a biomarker of DNA base modifications; and total antioxidant capacity (TAC as indicator of the overall antioxidant system. Training induced a significant (p<0.05 decrease in resting plasma TBARS concentration in both MOD (7.53 ± 0.30 and 6.46 ± 0.27 µM, PRE and POST respectively and HIDT (7.21 ± 0.32 and 5.85 ± 0.46 µM, PRE and POST respectively. Resting urinary 8-OH-dG levels were significantly decreased in both MOD (5.50 ± 0.66 and 4.16 ± 0.40 ng mg(-1creatinine, PRE and POST respectively and HIDT (4.52 ± 0.50 and 3.18 ± 0.34 ng mg(-1creatinine, PRE and POST respectively. Training both in MOD and HIDT did not significantly modify plasma levels of PC. Resting plasma TAC was reduced in MOD while no significant changes were observed in HIDT. In conclusion

  19. Effect of tapering after a period of high-volume sprint interval training on running performance and muscular adaptations in moderately trained runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Casper; Almquist, Nicki Winfield; Kvorning, Thue

    2018-01-01

    The effect of tapering following a period of high-volume sprint interval training (SIT) and a basic volume of aerobic training on performance and muscle adaptations in moderately trained runners was examined. Eleven (8 males, 3 females) runners (maximum oxygen uptake (VO2-max): 56.8±2.9 mL·min(-1...... running test at 90% of vVO2-max to exhaustion (RRT). In addition, a biopsy from m. vastus lateralis was obtained at rest. Performance during RRT was better (P... at 60% of vVO2-max was lower (P

  20. 10-20-30 training increases performance and lowers blood pressure and VEGF in runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gliemann, Lasse; Gunnarsson, Thomas Gunnar Petursson; Hellsten, Ylva

    2015-01-01

    into either a control group (CON; n = 28), or a 10-20-30 training group (10-20-30; n = 132) replacing two of three weekly training sessions with 10-20-30 training for 8 weeks and performance of a 5-km run (5-K) and BP was measured. VO2max was measured and resting muscle biopsies were taken in a subgroup......The present study examined the effect of training by the 10-20-30 concept on performance, blood pressure (BP), and skeletal muscle angiogenesis as well as the feasibility of completing high-intensity interval training in local running communities. One hundred sixty recreational runners were divided......-20-30 increased VO2max but did not influence muscle fiber area, distribution or capillarization, whereas the expression of the pro-angiogenic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) was lowered by 22%. No changes were observed in CON. These results suggest that 10-20-30 training is an effective and easily...

  1. A statistical approach to the use of control entropy identifies differences in constraints of gait in highly trained versus untrained runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshad, Rana D; McGregor, Stephen J; Busa, Michael A; Skufca, Joseph D; Bollt, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Control entropy (CE) is a complexity analysis suitable for dynamic, non-stationary conditions which allows the inference of the control effort of a dynamical system generating the signal. These characteristics make CE a highly relevant time varying quantity relevant to the dynamic physiological responses associated with running. Using High Resolution Accelerometry (HRA) signals we evaluate here constraints of running gait, from two different groups of runners, highly trained collegiate and untrained runners. To this end,we further develop the control entropy (CE) statistic to allow for group analysis to examine the non-linear characteristics of movement patterns in highly trained runners with those of untrained runners, to gain insight regarding gaits that are optimal for running. Specifically, CE develops response time series of individuals descriptive of the control effort; a group analysis of these shapes developed here uses Karhunen Loeve Analysis (KL) modes of these time series which are compared between groups by application of a Hotelling T² test to these group response shapes. We find that differences in the shape of the CE response exist within groups, between axes for untrained runners (vertical vs anterior-posterior and mediolateral vs anterior-posterior) and trained runners (mediolateral vs anterior-posterior). Also shape differences exist between groups by axes (vertical vs mediolateral). Further, the CE, as a whole, was higher in each axis in trained vs untrained runners. These results indicate that the approach can provide unique insight regarding the differing constraints on running gait in highly trained and untrained runners when running under dynamic conditions. Further, the final point indicates trained runners are less constrained than untrained runners across all running speeds.

  2. THE EFFECTS OF SODIUM CITRATE INGESTION ON METABOLISM AND 1500-M RACING TIME IN TRAINED FEMALE RUNNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahur Ööpik

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to assess the effects of sodium citrate ingestion on the metabolic response to exercise and performance in a 1500-m competitive run in trained female middle-distance runners in field conditions. Seventeen athletes (mean (± SD aged 18.6 ± 2.5 years, VO2max 55.2 ± 7.6 ml·kg-1·min-1 competed in two 1500-m races following ingestion of 0.4 g·kg-1 body mass of sodium citrate (CIT and placebo (PLC - 1.0% solution of NaCl. The two substances, CIT and PLC were administered in 800 ml of solution in a randomly assigned double-blind crossover manner. Capillary blood samples were analysed for lactate, glucose, haemoglobin and haematocrit before administering the solutions (baseline as well as before and after both 1500-m races. The athletes' times for trials CIT and PLC were 321.4 ± 26.4 and 317.4 ± 22.5 s, respectively (p > 0.05. A greater relative increase in plasma volume after administering the experimental solution, an increased body mass (by 0.4 kg; p = 0.006 immediately before the race and a restrained increase in blood glucose concentration (by 2.5 ± 1.2 mmol·l-1 vs 3.4 ± 0.8 mmol·l-1; p = 0.002 during the race were observed in the CIT trial compared to the PLC. A significant relationship was observed between body mass of the subjects immediately before the race and performance time (r = 0.374; p = 0.029. There were no between-treatment differences in heart rate in any stage of the run or in blood lactate accumulation during the race (final concentration of lactate was 14.4 ± 3.0 mmol·l-1 and 13.4 ± 2.5 mmol·l-1 (p > 0.05 in the CIT and PLC trials, respectively. The results suggest that sodium citrate induces an increase in water retention before exercise and may modify carbohydrate metabolism in high intensity running, but does not improve performance in 1500-m competitive run in female middle-distance runners

  3. Predictors of running-related injuries in novice runners enrolled in a systematic training program: a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buist, Ida; Bredeweg, Steef W; Lemmink, Koen A P M; van Mechelen, Willem; Diercks, Ron L

    2010-02-01

    The popularity of running is still growing. As participation increases, running-related injuries also increase. Until now, little is known about the predictors for injuries in novice runners. Predictors for running-related injuries (RRIs) will differ between male and female novice runners. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Participants were 532 novice runners (226 men, 306 women) preparing for a recreational 4-mile (6.7-km) running event. After completing a baseline questionnaire and undergoing an orthopaedic examination, they were followed during the training period of 13 weeks. An RRI was defined as any self-reported running-related musculoskeletal pain of the lower extremity or back causing a restriction of running for at least 1 week. Twenty-one percent of the novice runners had at least one RRI during follow-up. The multivariate adjusted Cox regression model for male participants showed that body mass index (BMI) (hazard ratio [HR], 1.15; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-1.26), previous injury in the past year (HR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.36-5.55), and previous participation in sports without axial load (HR, 2.05; 95% CI, 1.03-4.11) were associated with RRI. In female participants, only navicular drop (HR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.75-0.97) remained a significant predictor for RRI in the multivariate Cox regression modeling. Type A behavior and range of motion (ROM) of the hip and ankle did not affect risk. Male and female novice runners have different risk profiles. Higher BMI, previous injury, and previous sports participation without axial loading are important predictors for RRI in male participants. Further research is needed to detect more predictors for female novice runners.

  4. Distance Learning for Teacher Training in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvana Maria Bof

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Proformação is a distance teacher certification course aimed at providing training to 27,000 uncertified teachers in 15 Brazilian states. This innovative program organizes human and technical resources for delivering distance education in a cost-effective manner. Different from other institutional systems – which typically employ their own dedicated content, design, and instructional resource personnel, and accompanied by a large pool of administrative staff – Proformação leverages pre-existing learning resources such as content experts, technology specialists, instruction, and student support systems from several institutions. Proformação goal is to create a viable teacher certification course to upgrade thousands of non-certified teachers working in the field. Proformação is coordinated by an administrative unit of the Brazilian Ministry of Education. To support the program, an information system was implemented to continuously and consistently monitor the program’s activities and results. Results of an external evaluation have been positive; Proformação is regarded by some as an innovative model for delivering decentralized training opportunities to large student numbers. Therefore, the findings in this article may prove interesting to those charged with implementing distance learning initiatives in developing countries, in that the lessons learned in Brazil may help others interested in implementing similar distance training programs.

  5. Post-analysis methods for lactate threshold depend on training intensity and aerobic capacity in runners. An experimental laboratory study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Lazzaretti Fernandes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to evaluate different mathematical post-analysis methods of determining lactate threshold in highly and lowly trained endurance runners. DESIGN AND SETTING: Experimental laboratory study, in a tertiary-level public university hospital. METHOD: Twenty-seven male endurance runners were divided into two training load groups: lowly trained (frequency < 4 times per week, < 6 consecutive months, training velocity ≥ 5.0 min/km and highly trained (frequency ≥ 4 times per week, ≥ 6 consecutive months, training velocity < 5.0 min/km. The subjects performed an incremental treadmill protocol, with 1 km/h increases at each subsequent 4-minute stage. Fingerprint blood-lactate analysis was performed at the end of each stage. The lactate threshold (i.e. the running velocity at which blood lactate levels began to exponentially increase was measured using three different methods: increase in blood lactate of 1 mmol/l at stages (DT1, absolute 4 mmol/l blood lactate concentration (4 mmol, and the semi-log method (semi-log. ANOVA was used to compare different lactate threshold methods and training groups. RESULTS: Highly trained athletes showed significantly greater lactate thresholds than lowly trained runners, regardless of the calculation method used. When all the subject data were combined, DT1 and semi-log were not different, while 4 mmol was significantly lower than the other two methods. These same trends were observed when comparing lactate threshold methods in the lowly trained group. However, 4 mmol was only significantly lower than DT1 in the highly trained group. CONCLUSION: The 4 mmol protocol did not show lactate threshold measurements comparable with DT1 and semi-log protocols among lowly trained athletes.

  6. The GRONORUN study: is a graded training program for novice runners effective in preventing running related injuries? Design of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pepping Gert-Jan

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Running is a popular form of recreational exercise. Beside the positive effects of running on health and fitness, the risk of a running related injury has to be considered. The incidence of injuries in runners is high and varies from 30–79%. However, few intervention studies on prevention of running related injuries have been performed and none of these studies involved novice runners. Methods GRONORUN (Groningen Novice Running is a two armed randomized controlled trial, comparing the effects of two different training programs for novice runners on the incidence of running related injuries. Participants are novice runners, who want to train for a four mile running event. The control group will train according a standard 8 week training program. The intervention group will use a more gradual, 13 week training program which is based on "the ten percent training rule". During the thirteen week follow up participants register information on running and RRI's in an internet based running log. The primary outcome measure is RRI. An injury is defined as a musculoskeletal ailment of the lower extremity or back, causing a restriction of running for at least one week. Discussion The GRONORUN trial is the first randomized controlled trial to study a preventive intervention in novice runners. Many different training programs for novice runners are offered, but none are evidence based.

  7. Health and economic burden of running-related injuries in runners training for an event: A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hespanhol Junior, L C; van Mechelen, W; Postuma, E; Verhagen, E

    2016-09-01

    Prospective running-related injury (RRI) data from runners training for an event are scarce, especially with regard to RRI-associated costs. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence and economic burden of RRIs in runners participating in an organized training program preparing them for an event. This was a prospective cohort study with 18 weeks of follow-up. Individuals aged 18 or older and registered to participate in an organized running program were eligible. Follow-up surveys were sent every 2 weeks to collect data about running exposure, RRIs, and costs. Of the 161 potential participants, 53 (32.9%) were included in this study. A total of 32 participants reported 41 RRIs. The mean prevalence during follow-up was 30.8% [95% confidence interval (CI) 25.6-36.0%]. Overuse was the main mechanism of RRI (85.4%, n = 35). An RRI was estimated to have an economic burden of €57.97 (95% CI €26.17-94.00) due to healthcare utilization (direct costs) and €115.75 (95% CI €10.37-253.73) due to absenteeism from paid work (indirect costs). These results indicate that the health and economic burden of RRIs may be considered significant for public health. Therefore, prevention programs are needed for runners participating in organized training programs. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. EFFECTS OF HIGH INTENSITY TRAINING AND CONTINUOUS ENDURANCE TRAINING ON AEROBIC CAPACITY AND BODY COMPOSITION IN RECREATIONALLY ACTIVE RUNNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuno Hottenrott

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to examine the effects of two different training programs (high-intensity-training vs. continuous endurance training on aerobic power and body composition in recreationally active men and women and to test whether or not participants were able to complete a half marathon after the intervention period. Thirty-four recreational endurance runners were randomly assigned either to a Weekend-Group (WE, n = 17 or an After-Work- Group (AW, n = 17 for a 12 week-intervention period. WE weekly completed 2 h 30 min of continuous endurance running composed of 2 sessions on the weekend. In contrast, AW performed 4 30 min sessions of high intensity training and an additional 30 min endurance run weekly, always after work. During an exhaustive treadmill test aerobic power was measured and heart rate was continuously recorded. Body composition was assessed using bio-impedance. Following the intervention period all subjects took part in a half-marathon. AW significantly improved peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak from 36.8 ± 4.5 to 43.6 ± 6.5 [mL.min-1.kg-1], velocity at lactate threshold (VLT from 9.7 ± 2.2 to 11.7 ± 1.8 [km.h-1] and visceral fat from 5.6 ± 2.2 to 4.7 ± 1.9 In WE VO2 peak signifi-cantly increased from 38.8 ± 5.0 to 41.5 ± 6.0 [mL.min-1.kg-1], VLT from 9.9 ± 1.3 to 11.2 ± 1.7 [km.h-1] and visceral fat was reduced from 5.7 ± 2.1 to 5.4 ± 1.9 (p < 0.01. Only the improvements of VO2 peak were significantly greater in AW compared with WE (pre/post group interaction: F=15.4, p = 0.01, η2 = 0.36. Both groups completed a half marathon with no significant differences in performance (p = 0.63. Short, intensive endurance training sessions of about 30 min are effective in improving aerobic fitness in recreationally active runners

  9. Dose-response relationship of autonomic nervous system responses to individualized training impulse in marathon runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzi, Vincenzo; Castagna, Carlo; Padua, Elvira; Lombardo, Mauro; D'Ottavio, Stefano; Massaro, Michele; Volterrani, Maurizio; Iellamo, Ferdinando

    2009-06-01

    In athletes, exercise training induces autonomic nervous system (ANS) adaptations that could be used to monitor training status. However, the relationship between training and ANS in athletes has been investigated without regard for individual training loads. We tested the hypothesis that in long-distance athletes, changes in ANS parameters are dose-response related to individual volume/intensity training load and could predict athletic performance. A spectral analysis of heart rate (HR), systolic arterial pressure variability, and baroreflex sensitivity by the sequences technique was investigated in eight recreational athletes during a 6-mo training period culminating with a marathon. Individualized training load responses were monitored by a modified training impulse (TRIMP(i)) method, which was determined in each athlete using the individual HR and lactate profiling determined during a treadmill test. Monthly TRIMP(i) steadily increased during the training period. All the ANS parameters were significantly and very highly correlated to the dose of exercise with a second-order regression model (r(2) ranged from 0.90 to 0.99; P marathon. These results suggest that in recreational athletes, ANS adaptations to exercise training are dose related on an individual basis, showing a progressive shift toward a sympathetic predominance, and that LF oscillations in HRV at peak training load could predict athletic achievement in this athlete population.

  10. Distance Training in the European Union. ZIFF Papiere 96.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Desmond

    A study examined distance training in the European Union (EU) countries. First, recent literature on the following topics was reviewed: technology-supported learning, flexible and distance learning, development of open distance learning, and teleconferencing and distance learning. Next, enrollments and trends in distance learning in the EU as a…

  11. The NLstart2run study: Training-related factors associated with running-related injuries in novice runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluitenberg, Bas; van der Worp, Henk; Huisstede, Bionka M A; Hartgens, Fred; Diercks, Ron; Verhagen, Evert; van Middelkoop, Marienke

    2016-08-01

    The incidence of running-related injuries is high. Some risk factors for injury were identified in novice runners, however, not much is known about the effect of training factors on injury risk. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the associations between training factors and running-related injuries in novice runners, taking the time varying nature of these training-related factors into account. Prospective cohort study. 1696 participants completed weekly diaries on running exposure and injuries during a 6-week running program for novice runners. Total running volume (min), frequency and mean intensity (Rate of Perceived Exertion) were calculated for the seven days prior to each training session. The association of these time-varying variables with injury was determined in an extended Cox regression analysis. The results of the multivariable analysis showed that running with a higher intensity in the previous week was associated with a higher injury risk. Running frequency was not significantly associated with injury, however a trend towards running three times per week being more hazardous than two times could be observed. Finally, lower running volume was associated with a higher risk of sustaining an injury. These results suggest that running more than 60min at a lower intensity is least injurious. This finding is contrary to our expectations and is presumably the result of other factors. Therefore, the findings should not be used plainly as a guideline for novices. More research is needed to establish the person-specific training patterns that are associated with injury. Copyright © 2015 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A displaced stress fracture of the femoral neck in an adolescent female distance runner with female athlete triad: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okamoto Shinichi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This report presents a case of a displaced stress fracture of the femoral neck in an adolescent female distance runner with amenorrhea. Both reduction and internal fixation were performed early after the injury. At 24 months postoperatively, magnetic resonance imaging and bone scintigraphy showed no positive signs of femoral head necrosis and bone union was confirmed on plain X-ray. A medical examination for the presence of the signs of the female athlete triad by checking weight, calorie intake and menstrual cycles is most important to prevent such stress fractures. Athletes as well as their coaches or parents therefore need to understand female athlete triad.

  13. The 10-20-30 training concept improves performance and health profile in moderately trained runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunnarsson, Thomas Gunnar Petursson; Bangsbo, Jens

    2012-01-01

    % of maximal intensity] for 30, 20 and 10 s, respectively, in 3-4 5-min intervals interspersed by 2 min of recovery, reducing training volume by 54% (14±0.9 vs. 30.4±2.3 km(.)week(-1)) while CON continued the normal training. After the intervention period VO(2)-max in 10-20-30 was 4% higher, and performance...

  14. Training-Load Distribution in Endurance Runners: Objective Versus Subjective Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzi, Vincenzo; Bovenzi, Antonio; Castagna, Carlo; Sinibaldi Salimei, Paola; Volterrani, Maurizio; Iellamo, Ferdinando

    2015-11-01

    To assess the distribution of exercise intensity in long-distance recreational athletes (LDRs) preparing for a marathon and to test the hypothesis that individual perception of effort could provide training responses similar to those provided by standardized training methodologies. Seven LDRs (age 36.5 ± 3.8 y) were followed during a 5-mo training period culminating with a city marathon. Heart rate at 2.0 and 4.0 mmol/L and maximal heart rate were used to establish 3 intensity training zones. Internal training load (TL) was assessed by training zones and TRIMPi methods. These were compared with the session-rating-of-perceived-exertion (RPE) method. Total time spent in zone 1 was higher than in zones 2 and 3 (76.3% ± 6.4%, 17.3% ± 5.8%, and 6.3% ± 0.9%, respectively; P = .000 for both, ES = 0.98, ES = 0.99). TL quantified by session-RPE provided the same result. The comparison between session-RPE and training-zones-based methods showed no significant difference at the lowest intensity (P = .07, ES = 0.25). A significant correlation was observed between TL RPE and TL TRIMPi at both individual and group levels (r = .79, P marathon (r = -.83, P recreational LDRs most of the training time is spent at low intensity and that this is associated with improved performances. Session-RPE is an easy-to-use training method that provides responses similar to those obtained with standardized training methodologies.

  15. Distance learning for training business game tutors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana de Toledo Marinho

    Full Text Available Abstract This work is the result of research that proposes the incorporation of Distance Learning into a Business Game as a strategy to enhance tutor training, considering entrepreneurship difficulties faced by public school teachers. Part of the problem could be attributed to subject type, because, in general, it is not common to find entrepreneurship on school curricula. The Distance Learning (DL activities were developed using the Moodle platform and structured by topic to increase educational flexibility and achieve a better balance between individual reflection and online discussion. It was developed in four steps: course content development; course evaluation by computer technicians; restructuring the course based on course evaluation done by computer technicians and course evaluation by teachers from the public school system. A preliminary test was performed with informatics technicians to technically evaluate the learning environment. Based on this, the course was restructured, applying corrections and adjustments to improve environment usability. After corrections, a final test was conducted with public school system teachers to analyze user perception, which gave a positive result. Virtual learning environment evaluation is complex and multidisciplinary, requiring the technical knowledge of internet programming and a conceptual knowledge of education, especially in the field of learning. When the evaluation done by teachers was examined, it was found that deficiencies pointed out by computer technicians had been resolved, giving a positive rating. This current research concludes that DL can improve the use of games, because it is possible to structure the content related to the learning gaps of specific groups of students. In this respect the use of games results can guide the development of content.

  16. Effects of a concurrent strength and endurance training on running performance and running economy in recreational marathon runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrauti, Alexander; Bergermann, Matthias; Fernandez-Fernandez, Jaime

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a concurrent strength and endurance training program on running performance and running economy of middle-aged runners during their marathon preparation. Twenty-two (8 women and 14 men) recreational runners (mean ± SD: age 40.0 ± 11.7 years; body mass index 22.6 ± 2.1 kg·m⁻²) were separated into 2 groups (n = 11; combined endurance running and strength training program [ES]: 9 men, 2 women and endurance running [E]: 7 men, and 4 women). Both completed an 8-week intervention period that consisted of either endurance training (E: 276 ± 108 minute running per week) or a combined endurance and strength training program (ES: 240 ± 121-minute running plus 2 strength training sessions per week [120 minutes]). Strength training was focused on trunk (strength endurance program) and leg muscles (high-intensity program). Before and after the intervention, subjects completed an incremental treadmill run and maximal isometric strength tests. The initial values for VO2peak (ES: 52.0 ± 6.1 vs. E: 51.1 ± 7.5 ml·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹) and anaerobic threshold (ES: 3.5 ± 0.4 vs. E: 3.4 ± 0.5 m·s⁻¹) were identical in both groups. A significant time × intervention effect was found for maximal isometric force of knee extension (ES: from 4.6 ± 1.4 to 6.2 ± 1.0 N·kg⁻¹, p marathon running velocities (2.4 and 2.8 m·s⁻¹) and submaximal blood lactate thresholds (2.0, 3.0, and 4.0 mmol·L⁻¹). Stride length and stride frequency also remained unchanged. The results suggest no benefits of an 8-week concurrent strength training for running economy and coordination of recreational marathon runners despite a clear improvement in leg strength, maybe because of an insufficient sample size or a short intervention period.

  17. Effect of 8 weeks of concurrent plyometric and running training on spatiotemporal and physiological variables of novice runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Molina, Josué; Ogueta-Alday, Ana; Camara, Jesus; Stickley, Christopher; García-López, Juan

    2018-03-01

    Concurrent plyometric and running training has the potential to improve running economy (RE) and performance through increasing muscle strength and power, but the possible effect on spatiotemporal parameters of running has not been studied yet. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of 8 weeks of concurrent plyometric and running training on spatiotemporal parameters and physiological variables of novice runners. Twenty-five male participants were randomly assigned into two training groups; running group (RG) (n = 11) and running + plyometric group (RPG) (n = 14). Both groups performed 8 weeks of running training programme, and only the RPG performed a concurrent plyometric training programme (two sessions per week). Anthropometric, physiological (VO 2max , heart rate and RE) and spatiotemporal variables (contact and flight times, step rate and length) were registered before and after the intervention. In comparison to RG, the RPG reduced step rate and increased flight times at the same running speeds (P running training entails a reduction in step rate, as well as increases in VT speed, RCT speed, peak speed and VO 2max . Athletes could benefit from plyometric training in order to improve their strength, which would contribute to them attaining higher running speeds.

  18. The Effects of a 10-day Altitude Training Camp at 1828 Meters on Varsity Cross-Country Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diebel, Sebastian R; Newhouse, Ian; Thompson, David S; Johnson, Vineet B K

    2017-01-01

    Altitude training has been shown to alter blood lactate (BL) levels due to alterations resulting from acclimatization. This study aims to estimate the impact of altitude training on BL changes immediately following an incremental treadmill test and during recovery before and after 10-day altitude training at approximately 1828 meters. Eight varsity cross-country runners performed an incremental treadmill test (ITT), pre and post-altitude training. Resting and post-warm-up BL values were recorded. During ITT, heart rate (HR), oxygen saturation (SpO2), and time to exhaustion were monitored. BL was also measured post-ITT at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 minutes. The average of all BL values was higher following altitude intervention (8.8 ± 4.6 mmol/L) compared to pre-intervention (7.4 ± 3.3 mmol/L). These differences were statistically significant ( t (6) = -2.40, p = .026). BL immediately (0 minutes) after the ITT was higher following the altitude intervention (13.6 ± 3.6 mmol/L) compared to pre-intervention (9.7 ± 3.8 mmol/L) and was statistically significant ( t (7) = -3.30, p = .006). Average HR during the ITT was lower following the altitude intervention (176.9 ± 11.1 bpm) compared to pre (187 ± 9.5 bpm), these differences were statistically significant ( t (28)= 18.07, p= altitude intervention at 1828 meters may benefit varsity cross-country runners. The higher post-exercise BL may be attributed to more anaerobic contributions. Lower HR may suggest a larger stroke volume and/or more efficient O2 carrying capacity.

  19. Bone mass and geometry of the tibia and the radius of master sprinters, middle and long distance runners, race-walkers and sedentary control participants: a pQCT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilks, D.C.; Winwood, K.; Gilliver, S.F.; Kwiet, A.; Chatfield, M; Michaelis, I.; Sun, L.W.; Ferretti, J.L.; Sargeant, A.J.; Felsenberg, D.; Rittweger, J.

    2009-01-01

    Mechanical loading is thought to be a determinant of bone mass and geometry. Both ground reaction forces and tibial strains increase with running speed. This study investigates the hypothesis that surrogates of bone strength in male and female master sprinters, middle and long distance runners and

  20. Champions are racers, not pacers: an analysis of qualification patterns of Olympic and IAAF World Championship middle distance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Brian; Hettinga, Florentina J

    2018-05-03

    The aim of this study was to analyse qualification patterns in middle distance running and identify whether athletes adopt theoretically optimal tactics, or whether the will to win overrides these. The performances of 295 men and 258 women finalists in the Olympic and IAAF World Championship 800 m and 1500 m events from 1999 to 2017 were analysed across all three rounds of competition. Finishing position, time and ranking amongst all competitors were found for each athlete. Position in the final was correlated with finishing position in the heats and semi-finals (all P < 0.001), but not with finishing times in those rounds. Of the 57 champions, 40 won both their heat and semi-final, even though a lower automatic qualification position would have been sufficient, and only 18 achieved a season's best time in the final. The will to win amongst the eventual champions (and other medallists) suggests predominantly ego oriented behaviour that is encouraged by a performance climate, and which did not appear to differ between men and women. Coaches and athletes are recommended to note that championship-specific physiological and psychological factors are important to develop in training and prior competition to improve both short- and long-term championship strategies.

  1. An empirical study of race times in recreational endurance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Andrew J; Vertosick, Emily A

    2016-01-01

    Studies of endurance running have typically involved elite athletes, small sample sizes and measures that require special expertise or equipment. We examined factors associated with race performance and explored methods for race time prediction using information routinely available to a recreational runner. An Internet survey was used to collect data from recreational endurance runners (N = 2303). The cohort was split 2:1 into a training set and validation set to create models to predict race time. Sex, age, BMI and race training were associated with mean race velocity for all race distances. The difference in velocity between males and females decreased with increasing distance. Tempo runs were more strongly associated with velocity for shorter distances, while typical weekly training mileage and interval training had similar associations with velocity for all race distances. The commonly used Riegel formula for race time prediction was well-calibrated for races up to a half-marathon, but dramatically underestimated marathon time, giving times at least 10 min too fast for half of runners. We built two models to predict marathon time. The mean squared error for Riegel was 381 compared to 228 (model based on one prior race) and 208 (model based on two prior races). Our findings can be used to inform race training and to provide more accurate race time predictions for better pacing.

  2. Gender differences in sport injury risk and types of inju-ries: a retrospective twelve-month study on cross-country skiers, swimmers, long-distance runners and soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristolainen, Leena; Heinonen, Ari; Waller, Benjamin; Kujala, Urho M; Kettunen, Jyrki A

    2009-01-01

    This twelve months survey compared injury risk and injury types by genders (312 females, 262 males) in 15- to 35-year-old cross-country skiers, swimmers, long- distance runners and soccer players. More male than female athletes reported at least one acute injury (44% vs. 35%, p gender differences in either of these comparisons. After adjustment for sport event males were at increased risk for posterior thigh overuse injuries compared to females (relative risk (RR) 5.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3 to 26.4, p difference between the sexes in overuse injury to the ankle persisted (female 0.11 vs. male 0.02 injuries/1000 exposure hours, p difference was found in such injuries when calculated per 1000 exposure hours. In conclusion, we found some gender differences in sport-related injuries, but most of these differences seemed to be explained at least in part by differences in the amount of training. Key pointsOnly a few sport injury studies have compared in-jury rates between the sexesOverall gender-related risk for acute and overuse injuries in top-level athletes between the sexes was smallSome gender differences in the specific anatomical locations of injuries as well as in specific injuries in sports were foundSome of these differences seem to be explained by the differences in the amount of training.

  3. Runner's Knee

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... require a lot of knee bending, such as biking, jumping, or skiing. Runner's knee happens when the ... is out of alignment, activities like running or biking can wear down the cartilage of the kneecap ( ...

  4. Comparison of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF and Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 (IGF-1 Responses to Different Endurance Training Intensities in Runner Men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Habibian

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Blood neurotrophins, such as Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF and Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 (IGF-1, mediate exercise- induced health benefits in humans. The purpose of this study was to compare the response of BDNF and IGF-1 to different endurance training intensities in runner men. Materials & Methods: In this semi-experimental study with pre-test-posttest design in 2015, 10 people of male runners from Gorgan were selected through purposeful and accessible sampling. The endurance training protocol was 6 km running with moderate (70-75% of heart rate reserve or severe (80-85% of heart rate reserve intensity, which was performed within a week's interval. Fasting blood samples were collected before and immediately after both acute training sessions and serum levels of BDNF and IGF-1 were measured by ELISA and radioimmunoassay enzyme. Data were analyzed by SPSS 20 software using independent t-test and paired t-test. Findings: Both acute endurance training significantly increased serum levels of BDNF and IGF-1 in runners, but high intensity endurance exercises increased BDNF levels in comparison with moderate intensity (p0.05. Conclusion: Serum BDNF response in endurance athletes is affected by the intensity of exercise, so that the effect of high intensity endurance training on BDNF levels is greater than moderate intensity exercise, but the response of IGF-1 to acute endurance training is independent of the intensity of exercise.

  5. Influence of yearlong training on the state of cardiovascular, autonomic nervous system and physical performance in female 400 meters runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. L. Mikhalyuk

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the research – identification and comparison of heart rate variability, central hemodynamics and physical performance in 400 meters runners from the III category to masters of sports of international class (MSIC in the annual cycle of the training process. Materials and methods. The study included 22 female athletes, 400 meters runners between the ages of 14 and 27 years (mean age – 16.8 ± 0.67 years, running experience – from 2 to 13 years (average – 4.4 ± 0.68 years in the preparatory and competitive periods. Body length and weight of athletes were 167.9 ± 0.91 cm and 52.5 ± 0.98 kg, respectively. For the analysis of the autonomic regulation of cardiac activity mathematical methods of HRV analysis were used. Analysis and evaluation of periodic components of heart rate were carried out by means of the research of spectral parameters of autocorrelation functions. Determination of physical performance was carried out under the practical standard on the cycle ergometer. It was established that in high class sportswomen (n=12 and ones with qualifications of the II–III category (n=10 in the competitive period there were strengthening of parasympathetic effects of ANS, transformation of eukinetic circulation type (CT into hypokinetic CT and absence of sportswomen with hyperkinetic CT. In high class sportswomen there were significant increase of the relative value of physical working capacity (PWC170/kg by 12.33% and tendency to increase of index of functional state (IFS by 9.46%, in sportswomen with qualifications of II–III category PWC170/kg significantly increased by 19.26%, and IFS by 17.87%. Correlation analysis conducted in both periods in the group and separately in high class sportswomen and ones with qualifications of II–III category found the relationship indicating that the increase of PWC170/kg and IFS is associated with the prevalence of hypokinetic CT and parasympathetic ANS influences. In the competitive period

  6. The influence of the allometric scale on the relationship between running economy and biomechanical variables in distance runners

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    MP Tartaruga

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies have demonstrated the need for the use of parameters that diminish the effect of body mass, for intra and inter group comparison, in individuals with different masses in order to provide a different analysis on the behaviour of the relation between running economy (RE and biomechanical variables (BVs. The allometric scale is represented by a regression equation that indicates the behaviour of a physiological variable in relation to the variable mass (RE=a.xb, where x is body mass in (kg and the dimensionless coefficient a is characteristic of the species analysed, and the dimensionless exponent b determines the percentage of mass to be associated with the physiological variable. The influence of the allometric scale (b=-1; -0.75; -0.73; -0.67 on the relationship between RE and BVs - stride length (SL, relative stride length (RSL, stride rate (SR, stride time (ST, support time (SUPT and balance time (BALT - at 12 km.h-1, was analysed in nine elite runners. Factorial analysis and Pearson's Correlation Coefficient test (r with P<0.05 were used. A decrease in the explanation power of the RE was observed, with the use of the allometric exponent, due to the BVs, as well as a reduction of the correlation coefficients between SL versus RE, ST versus RE and SR versus RE. The BALT presented a higher correlation where b=-0.75. The RSL and SUPT presented non-significant correlations. The variables SL, ST, SR and BALT were the most effective predictors of the RE, Where: b=-1, the allometric scale was most efficient to predict the running performance.

  7. The impact of different cross-training modalities on performance and injury-related variables in high school cross country runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Max R; Peel, Shelby A; Smith, Ross E; Temme, Mark; Dwyer, Jeffrey N

    2017-11-29

    There are many different types of aerobic cross-training modalities currently available. It is important to consider the effects that these different modalities have on running performance and injury risks. The purpose of this study was to compare movement quality, running economy and performance, injury-related biomechanical variables and, hip muscle strength before and after training with different cross-training modalities in high school runners. Thirty-one high school male runners trained for four weeks in one of three cross-training modalities, in addition to a running-only (RUN, n=9) group, for which training sessions replaced two easy runs per week: cycling (CYCLE; n=6), indoor elliptical (ELLIP; n=7) and, outdoor elliptical bike (EBIKE; n=9). Functional movement screen (FMS), running economy (RE), 3,000m performance, hip kinematics, hip muscle strength were assessed. Paired t-tests and Cohen's d effect sizes were used to assess mean differences for each variable before and after training within each group. EBIKE training was the only modality that improved FMS scores (d = 1.36) and RE before and after training (d = 0.48). All groups showed improvements in 3,000m performance but large effects were only found for the CYCLE (d = 1.50) and EBIKE (d = 1.41) groups. RUN (d = 1.25), CYCLE (d = 1.17) and, EBIKE (d = 0.82) groups showed improvements in maximal hip extensor strength. Outdoor cycling and elliptical bike cross-training may be the most effective cross-training modalities to incorporate in early season training to improve running performance in high school runners.

  8. The Study of the Impacts of "Running" on the Contact Area of Soles and Maximal Strength among Elite Middle Distance Runners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzun, Ahmet; Aydos, Latif; Kaya, Metin; Yuksel, Mehmet Fatih; Pekel, Haci Ahmet

    2017-01-01

    It is possible that running training for many years in athletics affects athletes' running patterns and sole structure. The main aim of this study is to examine the effect of maximal force applied to the floor area and contact area of the athletes with related to mid-distance training for athletics. 18 male athletes who represent Turkey on the…

  9. Gastrointestinal disturbances in marathon runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddoch, C; Trinick, T

    1988-06-01

    The purpose of this survey was to investigate the prevalence of running-induced gastrointestinal (GI) disturbances in marathon runners. A questionnaire was completed by 471 of the estimated 1,750 competitors in the 1986 Belfast City Marathon. Eighty-three per cent of respondents indicated that they occasionally or frequently suffered one or more GI disturbances during or immediately after running. The urge to have a bowel movement (53%) and diarrhoea (38%) were the most common symptoms, especially among female runners (74% and 68% respectively). Upper GI tract symptoms were experienced more by women than men (p less than 0.05) and more by younger runners than older runners (p less than 0.01). Women also suffered more lower GI tract symptoms than men (p less than 0.05) with younger runners showing a similar trend. Both upper and lower tract symptoms were more common during a "hard" run than an "easy" run (p less than 0.01) and were equally as common both during and after running. Of those runners who suffered GI disturbances, 72% thought that running was the cause and 29% believed their performance to be adversely affected. There was no consensus among sufferers as to the causes of symptoms and a wide variety of "remedies" were suggested. GI disturbances are common amongst long-distance runners and their aetiology is unknown. Medical practitioners should be aware of this when dealing with patients who run.

  10. The effects of creatine and glycerol hyperhydration on running economy in well trained endurance runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beis Lukas Y

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ingestion of creatine (Cr and glycerol (Gly has been reported to be an effective method in expanding water compartments within the human body, attenuating the rise in heart rate (HR and core temperature (Tcore during exercise in the heat. Despite these positive effects, a substantial water retention could potentially impair endurance performance through increasing body mass (BM and consequently impacting negatively on running economy (RE. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of a combined Cr and Gly supplementation on thermoregulatory and cardiovascular responses and RE during running for 30 min at speed corresponding to 60% of maximal oxygen uptake (V˙O2max in hot and cool conditions. Methods Cr·H2O (11.4 g, Gly (1 g·kg-1 BM and Glucose polymer (75 g were administered twice daily to 15 male endurance runners during a 7-day period. Exercise trials were conducted pre- and post-supplementation at 10 and 35°C and 70% relative humidity. Results BM and total body water increased by 0.90 ± 0.40 kg (P P V˙O2 and therefore RE. Both HR and Tcore were attenuated significantly after supplementation (P Conclusions Combining Cr and Gly is effective in reducing thermal and cardiovascular strain during exercise in the heat without negatively impacting on RE.

  11. Comparative analysis between two models of active aging and its influence on body composition, strength levels and quality of life: long-distance runners versus bodybuilders practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre-Román, Pedro Ángel; Izquierdo-Sánchez, Jose Manuel; Salas-Sánchez, Jesús; García-Pinillos, Felipe

    2015-04-01

    To analyze the body composition, strength level, and the quality of life related to the health (QoL) in veteran sportsmen (>35 years old) in relation to sedentary ones (S), and to compare the result in the mentioned variables between two models of sports practice, long-distance runners (LDR) and bodybuilding practitioners (BBP). One hundred forty-eight male participants took part and were distributed into three groups: 47 LDR (age=42.01±6.96 years), 49 BBP (age=45.14±7.04 years), and 47 S (age=43.71±8.75 years). Body composition, upper- and lower-limb strength level, and QoL were assessed. The LDR and BBP obtained better performance in countermovement jump (CMJ) than the S ones (+0.06 m, paging on body composition, the muscle mass is reduced in all groups controlled (LDR, BBP, and S). Additionally, the %fat mass is increased only in S group (pactive aging showed healthier values in BMI and %fat mass as well as greater results in QoL than BBP and S groups. Nevertheless, the LDR group showed similar values to S ones in muscle mass. The regression analysis performed showed that the sedentary habit predicts the %fat mass and CMJ performance. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  12. Changes in Running Economy, Respiratory Exchange Ratio and VO2max in Runners following a 10-day Altitude Training Camp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diebel, Sebastian R; Newhouse, Ian; Thompson, David S; Johnson, Vineet B K

    2017-01-01

    Running economy (RE) and VO 2 max are important predictors of endurance performance for elite and semi-elite endurance athletes, with RE being an appropriate predictor in a homogenous running population. Altitude training has been observed to change RE (mL.kg -1 .min -1 ), and VO 2 max due to alterations resulting from acclimatization. This study tracked changes in RE and VO 2 max before and after a 10-day altitude training camp at 1828 meters. VO 2 max, RE expressed calorically, and respiratory exchange ratio (RER), were measured below anaerobic threshold (AT) to observe differences between pre-and post-altitude training. Eight varsity cross-country runners between the ages of 18 and 22 years performed an incremental treadmill test, pre- and post-10-day altitude training. Paired samples t-tests were used to statistically analyze the data. Average RE (VO 2 mL.kg -1 .min -1 ) improved following altitude intervention ( M = 56.44 ± 4.28) compared to pre-altitude training (61.30 ± 7.56). These differences were statistically significant t ( 7 )= 2.71, p =.014. RE expressed as kcals.kg -1 .km -1 improved following altitude training (16.73 ± 2.96) compared to (18.44 ± 4.04) pre-altitude training and was statistically significant t( 7 ) =3.08, p = .008. RER taken during the last minute of steady-state was higher (0.97, ± .019) post-altitude training, compared to (0.90 ± .043) pre-altitude. These differences were statistically significant t ( 7 ) -3.62, p =.008. VO 2 max (mL.kg -1 .min -1 ) was lower in 6 out of 8 participants (63.91, ± 8.65) post-altitude compared to (69.90, ± 10.80) pre-altitude and was statistically significant t( 7 ) = 2.33, p =.026. The observed improvements in RE may be beneficial for endurance athletes competing and/or training at moderate altitudes near 1828 meters.

  13. Transient myocardial tissue and function changes during a marathon in less fit marathon runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreault, Valerie; Tizon-Marcos, Helena; Poirier, Paul; Pibarot, Philippe; Gilbert, Philippe; Amyot, Marc; Rodés-Cabau, Josep; Després, Jean-Pierre; Bertrand, Olivier; Larose, Eric

    2013-10-01

    Although regular physical activity improves health, strenuous exercise might transiently increase cardiac risk. Training and fitness might provide protection. We prospectively studied 20 recreational marathon runners without known cardiovascular disease or symptoms: at peak training before, immediately after, and 3 months after a 42.2-km marathon. Changes in global/segmental myocardial function, edema, resting perfusion, and fibrosis were measured. At peak training, runners exercised 8.1 ± 2.3 hours and 62 ± 18 km per week with mean maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) of 53.2 ± 8.3 mL/kg/min. In response to the marathon, global left ventricular and right ventricular ejection fraction decreased in half of the runners; these runners had poorer peak training distance, training time, and fitness level. Change in global left ventricular ejection fraction was associated with VO2max. Overall, 36% of segments developed edema, 53% decreased function, and 59% decreased perfusion. Significant agreement was observed between segment decreasing function, decreasing perfusion, and developing edema. Myocardial changes were reversible at 3 months. Completing a marathon leads to localized myocardial edema, diminished perfusion, and decreased function occurring more extensively in less trained and fit runners. Although reversible, these changes might contribute to the transient increase in cardiac risk reported during sustained vigorous exercise. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The effect of gluteus medius training on hip kinematics in a runner with iliotibial band syndrome

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    R. Schreiber

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Iliotibial  band  syndrome  (ITBS  is  a  common  clinical  presentation in  runners.  There  are  several  hypotheses  to  explain  this  condition  including  faulty  control of the hip joint in the frontal plane during the stance phase of running. It is postulated that improving activity in the gluteus medius muscle may assist in produc-ing  more  appropriate  stabilization and  therefore  reduce  the  stress  on  the  Iliotibial band  (ITB.  This  single  case  study  provides  an  interesting  clinical  scenario  where a single-subject with ITBS was measured for hip kinematics during running, before and after a trial period of classic gluteus medius exercises. The biomechanical data show an initial (pre-intervention increase in adduction position during the stance phase of running on the affected side (in contrast to the unaffected side. This was measured using a Moven motion analysis suit. After the trial intervention period, the relative position of the affected hip had reduced in adduction at both heel strike and at 30° knee flexion. This study provides support  for the theory that hip control in the frontal plane may be a contributing factor in ITBS. Clinicians are encouraged to monitor hip control as well as ITBS symptoms when they utilise this gluteus medius protocol. Further research to establish whether change in pelvic control results in decrease in ITBS symptoms is warranted.

  15. Case study: Nutrition and training periodization in three elite marathon runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellingwerf, Trent

    2012-10-01

    Laboratory-based studies demonstrate that fueling (carbohydrate; CHO) and fluid strategies can enhance training adaptations and race-day performance in endurance athletes. Thus, the aim of this case study was to characterize several periodized training and nutrition approaches leading to individualized race-day fluid and fueling plans for 3 elite male marathoners. The athletes kept detailed training logs on training volume, pace, and subjective ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) for each training session over 16 wk before race day. Training impulse/load calculations (TRIMP; min × RPE = load [arbitrary units; AU]) and 2 central nutritional techniques were implemented: periodic low-CHO-availability training and individualized CHO- and fluid-intake assessments. Athletes averaged ~13 training sessions per week for a total average training volume of 182 km/wk and peak volume of 231 km/wk. Weekly TRIMP peaked at 4,437 AU (Wk 9), with a low of 1,887 AU (Wk 16) and an average of 3,082 ± 646 AU. Of the 606 total training sessions, ~74%, 11%, and 15% were completed at an intensity in Zone 1 (very easy to somewhat hard), Zone 2 (at lactate threshold) and Zone 3 (very hard to maximal), respectively. There were 2.5 ± 2.3 low-CHO-availability training bouts per week. On race day athletes consumed 61 ± 15 g CHO in 604 ± 156 ml/hr (10.1% ± 0.3% CHO solution) in the following format: ~15 g CHO in ~150 ml every ~15 min of racing. Their resultant marathon times were 2:11:23, 2:12:39 (both personal bests), and 2:16:17 (a marathon debut). Taken together, these periodized training and nutrition approaches were successfully applied to elite marathoners in training and competition.

  16. Determination of Br in blood of amateur runners using NAA and ITS correlation with adopted physical training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovacs, Luciana; Zamboni, Cibele B.; Nunes, Lazaro A.S.; Lourenco, Thiago F.; Macedo, Denise V.

    2013-01-01

    Bromine (Br) is one of the most abundant trace elements in the biosphere, in the human body is present in blood (as bromide), lungs, liver and hair. There is no evidence in humans of bromide concentration in any particular organ that might indicate a specific physiological function and not enough information is available on bromine metabolism but, some studies report its use by eosinophilic leukocytes for immune defense and electrolytic balance. In this study the Br levels were determined in Brazilian amateur athlete's blood that performing physical exercise at (Laboratorio de Bioquimica do Exercicio (LABEX/UNICAMP-Brazil). The samples were collected from twenty six male athletes, ranging from 18 to 26 years old, at rest. The blood samples were irradiated in the nuclear reactor (IEA-R1, 3-4.5MW, pool type) at IPEN/Sao Paulo - Brazil and were analyzed using Neutron Activation Analyses (NAA) technique. These results were compared with the control group (subjects of same age but not involved with physical activities). The range established at rest for amateur runner (0.0040 - 0.0096 gL -1 ) when compared with control group (0.0074 - 0.0306 gL -1 ) suggests that there is a dependency of these limits in the function of the adopted physical training. (author)

  17. Control entropy identifies differential changes in complexity of walking and running gait patterns with increasing speed in highly trained runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Stephen J; Busa, Michael A; Skufca, Joseph; Yaggie, James A; Bollt, Erik M

    2009-06-01

    Regularity statistics have been previously applied to walking gait measures in the hope of gaining insight into the complexity of gait under different conditions and in different populations. Traditional regularity statistics are subject to the requirement of stationarity, a limitation for examining changes in complexity under dynamic conditions such as exhaustive exercise. Using a novel measure, control entropy (CE), applied to triaxial continuous accelerometry, we report changes in complexity of walking and running during increasing speeds up to exhaustion in highly trained runners. We further apply Karhunen-Loeve analysis in a new and novel way to the patterns of CE responses in each of the three axes to identify dominant modes of CE responses in the vertical, mediolateral, and anterior/posterior planes. The differential CE responses observed between the different axes in this select population provide insight into the constraints of walking and running in those who may have optimized locomotion. Future comparisons between athletes, healthy untrained, and clinical populations using this approach may help elucidate differences between optimized and diseased locomotor control.

  18. Determination of Br in blood of amateur runners using NAA and ITS correlation with adopted physical training

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacs, Luciana; Zamboni, Cibele B., E-mail: lukovacs@gmail.com, E-mail: czamboni@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Nunes, Lazaro A.S.; Lourenco, Thiago F.; Macedo, Denise V., E-mail: lazaroalessandro@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: thiago_fl@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: denivevm@unicamp.br [Universidade de Campinas (LABEX/UNICAMP), Campinas, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Bioquimica do Exercicio

    2013-07-01

    Bromine (Br) is one of the most abundant trace elements in the biosphere, in the human body is present in blood (as bromide), lungs, liver and hair. There is no evidence in humans of bromide concentration in any particular organ that might indicate a specific physiological function and not enough information is available on bromine metabolism but, some studies report its use by eosinophilic leukocytes for immune defense and electrolytic balance. In this study the Br levels were determined in Brazilian amateur athlete's blood that performing physical exercise at (Laboratorio de Bioquimica do Exercicio (LABEX/UNICAMP-Brazil). The samples were collected from twenty six male athletes, ranging from 18 to 26 years old, at rest. The blood samples were irradiated in the nuclear reactor (IEA-R1, 3-4.5MW, pool type) at IPEN/Sao Paulo - Brazil and were analyzed using Neutron Activation Analyses (NAA) technique. These results were compared with the control group (subjects of same age but not involved with physical activities). The range established at rest for amateur runner (0.0040 - 0.0096 gL{sup -1}) when compared with control group (0.0074 - 0.0306 gL{sup -1}) suggests that there is a dependency of these limits in the function of the adopted physical training. (author)

  19. Influence of Sahour Meal on Exercise Performance and Physiological Responses in Well-trained Muslim Runners during Ramadan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goh Kok Wei

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of this study was to examine the influence of sahour meal on exercise performance, and physiological responses to a 10Km Time-Trial (10KTT at two different times of the day during Ramadan. Method: Three well-trained Muslim runners participated (age, 25±0.8years; maximal oxygen uptake, 54.87±3.45 ml.kg-1.min-1; body weight, 52.4±1.99 kg; height, 162.7±3.55 cm. Subjects ran a 10KTT on four occasions: 8.00am (Am, and 5.00pm (Pm, separated by one day rest two weeks before Ramadan (BRam and during the second week of Ramadan (DRam. BRam, subjects consumed their usual diet. DRam, subjects consumed a standardized sahour meal containing 15.6±0.6kcal/kgBW; 2.3±0.1gCHO/kgBW; 0.6±0.0g Protein/kgBW; 0.5±0.0gFat/kgBW. During each 10KTT, the subject ran at 85%VO2max for the first two Km, and then at a self-selected speed then onwards. Blood samples were collected before the run, and at 2, and the end of 10 Km. Time to complete 10KTT were recorded. Urine specific gravity was measured before each run. Results: There was no difference in hydration status for the Am and Pm runs BRam and DRam. Running performance DRamAM, was better compared to the DRamPm. There were also no changes in blood glucose BRam and DRam. Serum Testosterone was highest at the end of 10KTT DRamPm when compared to the DRamAm, and was generally higher than BRam. Serum Cortisol showed no differences between the trials. All runners did not experience dehydration, lack of energy nor drop in performance DRam. Conclusion: The results from this study suggest that when athletes are provided with a balanced sahour meal, during Ramadan, they can maintain their performance.

  20. Influence of Sahour meal on exercise performance and physiological responses in well-trained Muslim runners during Ramadan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goh Kok Wei

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The objective of this study was to examine the influence of sahour meal on exercise performance, and physiological responses to a 10Km Time-Trial (10KTT at two different times of the day during Ramadan. Method: Three well-trained Muslim runners participated (age, 25±0.8years; maximal oxygen uptake, 54.87±3.45 ml.kg-1.min-1; body weight, 52.4±1.99 kg; height, 162.7±3.55 cm.  Subjects ran a 10KTT on four occasions: 8.00am (Am, and 5.00pm (Pm, separated by one day rest two weeks before Ramadan (BRam and during the second week of Ramadan (DRam. BRam, subjects consumed their usual diet. DRam, subjects consumed a standardized sahour meal containing 15.6±0.6kcal/kgBW; 2.3±0.1gCHO/kgBW; 0.6±0.0g Protein/kgBW; 0.5±0.0gFat/kgBW. During each 10KTT, the subject ran at 85%VO2max for the first two Km, and then at a self-selected speed then onwards. Blood samples were collected before the run, and at 2, and the end of 10 Km. Time to complete 10KTT were recorded. Urine specific gravity was measured before each run. Results: There was no difference in hydration status for the Am and Pm runs BRam and DRam. Running performance DRamAM, was better compared to the DRamPm. There were also no changes in blood glucose BRam and DRam. Serum Testosterone was highest at the end of 10KTT DRamPm when compared to the DRamAm, and was generally higher than BRam. Serum Cortisol showed no differences between the trials. All runners did not experience dehydration, lack of energy nor drop in performance DRam. Conclusion: The results from this study suggest that when athletes are provided with a balanced sahour meal, during Ramadan, they can maintain their performance.

  1. Distance Education and Corporate Training in Brazil: Regulations and interrelationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella C. S. Porto

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Distance education in Brazil has evolved more slowly than distance education offerings in other developing countries. This is because all aspects of Brazil’s publicly-funded educational system are excessively regulated, highly bureaucratic, and tightly centralized. Such highly centralized bureaucracy and strict control has resulted in tremendous hurdles that work to thwart the adoption, provision, and diffusion of distance education. This is not good news: Like many developing countries, Brazil is also characterized by wide gaps in wealth distribution, with 20 percent of its population functionally illiterate and living below the poverty line. Distance education, therefore, could be used to help train Brazil’s citizens. Brazil’s emerging status in the global economy, however, is generating enormous opportunities that are fueling demand for change. For example, in their quest to be competitive in the emerging global economy, Brazil’s corporate sector has addressed this challenge by establishing corporate universities to train and educate their employees; much of this corporate training and education takes place online and at a distance. The established and emerging educational opportunities provided by Brazil’s corporate sector, in turn, is fuelling the demand for the provision of distance education throughout Brazil. Indeed, most Brazilians are ready for distance education. Many Brazilian households own television sets and cellular telephones, and its expanding communication infrastructure has capacity to support distance and continuing education models. Moreover, this capacity is currently being used by Brazil’s rapidly expanding corporate university sector. In spite of Brazil’s emergence in the global marketplace and its private-sector educational success stories, Brazil’s public educational institutions have not kept pace. This is due to Brazil’s long-standing stringent regulation of its public education sector. Recent

  2. Marathon performance in relation to body fat percentage and training indices in recreational male runners

    OpenAIRE

    Tanda G; Knechtle B

    2013-01-01

    Giovanni Tanda,1 Beat Knechtle2,31DIME, Università degli Studi di Genova, Genova, Italy; 2Gesundheitszentrum St Gallen, St Gallen, Switzerland; 3Institute of General Practice and Health Services Research, University of Zurich, Zurich, SwitzerlandBackground: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of anthropometric characteristics and training indices on marathon race times in recreational male marathoners.Methods: Training and anthropometric characteristics were col...

  3. [MRI changes of Achilles tendon and hindfoot in experienced runners and beginners during training and after a (half)-marathon competition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, W; Billich, C; Brambs, H-J; Weber, F; Schütz, U H

    2011-08-01

    Marathon running is gaining in popularity. Its benefits regarding the cardiovascular system as well as the metabolism are beyond doubt. However, whether or not there are detrimental side effects to the musculoskeletal system such as wear and tear is an unsolved question. We therefore prospectively looked at beginners and experienced runners at a city marathon during training and after the competition for lesions to the Achilles tendon (AT) or hindfoot. 73 healthy subjects were prospectively included in our study. They were recruited from the applicants of the city marathon or half-marathon. They underwent an initial clinical orthopaedic as well as three magnetic resonance (MRI) examinations. The MRI were conducted at the time point of study enrolment, near the end of training and directly (up to 72 hours) after the run. MRI evaluation (fat saturated T (2)-weighted sagittal STIR sequence) was performed by two independent experienced radiologists blinded to the clinical context. The results were compared for subgroups of runners, also a factorial analysis was performed. Statistical results were deemed significant for p ≤ 0.05. 32 women and 41 men were included. In the end there were 53 finishers and 20 non-finishers; 28 seasoned runners and 25 novices. 57 runners had no foot complaints, while 14 had foot pain during training and 13 during the marathon. Mean body weight was 71.6 kg, height was 173 cm, age was 40.2 years. Mean AT diameter was 7.0 mm and showed no change during training or after the marathon. There was no significant influence of gender on other variables investigated. There was a significant and positive correlation between AT diameter and weight (r = 0.37), also AT and height (r = 0.34), while there was negative correlation between height and signal intensity of calcaneus (r = -0.50). The signal intensity of the AT decreased during training. The signal intensity of the calcaneus decreased from inclusion until after the marathon

  4. Long-term success and risk for marathon runners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schueller-Weidekamm, C.

    2010-01-01

    The popularity of marathon running has increased during recent years, which is reflected by the dramatic increase in the number of competitions and participants. Running a marathon itself does not usually cause any severe lesions of the joints but the problems mostly occur during training prior to the marathon. Before the event runners often question whether they can successfully take part in the competition and cope with the pain that might occur during running. In addition to the rare acute trauma, which is in general caused by falls or slipping, chronic injuries are of particular relevance for long distance running. This article describes the typical patterns of injuries to long distance runners, the positive effects of running a marathon and the risk factors for injuries. (orig.) [de

  5. Digital control systems training on a distance learning platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan PIECHA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with new training technologies development based on approach to distance learning website, implemented in the laboratory of a Traffic Engineering study branch at Faculty of Transport. The discussed computing interface allows students complete knowledge of traffic controllers’ architecture and machine language programming fundamentals. These training facilities are available at home; at their remote terminal. The training resources consist of electronic / computer based training; guidebooks and software units. The laboratory provides the students with an interface entering into simulation packages and programming interfaces, supporting the web training facilities. The courseware complexity selection is one of the most difficult factors in intelligent training unit’s development. The dynamically configured application provides the user with his individually set structure of the training resources. The trainee controls the application structure and complexity, from the time he started. For simplifying the training process and studying activities, several unifications were provided. The introduced ideas need various standardisations, simplifying the e-learning units’ development and application control processes [8], [9]. Further training facilities development concerns virtual laboratory environment organisation in laboratories of Transport Faculty.

  6. Dietary supplement usage and motivation in Brazilian road runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, José Vítor Vieira; Lollo, Pablo Christiano Barboza; Amaya-Farfan, Jaime; Chacon-Mikahil, Mara PatríciaTraina

    2014-01-01

    The consumption of dietary supplements is highest among athletes and it can represent potential a health risk for consumers. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of consumption of dietary supplements by road runners. We interviewed 817 volunteers from four road races in the Brazilian running calendar. The sample consisted of 671 male and 146 female runners with a mean age of 37.9 ± 12.4 years. Of the sample, 28.33% reported having used some type of dietary supplement. The main motivation for this consumption is to increase in stamina and improve performance. The probability of consuming dietary supplements increased 4.67 times when the runners were guided by coaches. The consumption of supplements was strongly correlated (r = 0.97) with weekly running distance, and also highly correlated (r = 0.86) with the number of years the sport had been practiced. The longer the runner had practiced the sport, the higher the training volume and the greater the intake of supplements. The five most frequently cited reasons for consumption were: energy enhancement (29.5%), performance improvement (17.1%), increased level of endurance (10.3%), nutrient replacement (11.1%), and avoidance of fatigue (10.3%). About 30% of the consumers declared more than one reason for taking dietary supplements. The most consumed supplements were: carbohydrates (52.17%), vitamins (28.70%), and proteins (13.48%). Supplement consumption by road runners in Brazil appeared to be guided by the energy boosting properties of the supplement, the influence of coaches, and the experience of the user. The amount of supplement intake seemed to be lower among road runners than for athletes of other sports. We recommend that coaches and nutritionists emphasise that a balanced diet can meet the needs of physically active people.

  7. Intense Training as a Means to Improve Running Performance in Trained Runners and the Adaptation of Muscle Tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Casper

    compositions of intense training on performance, movement economy and muscular adaptations. The findings from the present PhD study suggest that performing intense training, in the form of speed endurance training (SET), for a relatively short period improves short and long-term performance. Both a prolonged...... period of SET as well as a period with increased frequency of SET improves short-term performance further, but a prolonged period does not extrapolate to further improved long-term performance not even if SET frequency is doubled. Short-term performance was better after 16 days of reduced training volume...... the period of increased frequency of SET, the value of combining an overload phase with tapering to improve 10-km performance is low. In line with the literature on "muscle memory", performing a second intervention of SET and a basic volume of aerobic training might have a greater impact on short-term...

  8. Genetic aspects of athletic performance: the African runners phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vancini RL

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Rodrigo Luiz Vancini,1 João Bosco Pesquero,2 Rafael Júlio Fachina,3,4 Marília dos Santos Andrade,1 João Paulo Borin,3 Paulo César Montagner,3 Claudio Andre Barbosa de Lira51Centro de Educação Física e Desportos, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Vitória, Espírito Santo, Brazil; 2Departamento de Biofísica, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 3Departamento de Ciência do Esporte, Faculdade de Educação Física, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, Brazil; 4Confederação Brasileira de Basquetebol, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 5Setor de Fisiologia Humana e do Exercício, Faculdade de Educação Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, BrazilAbstract: The current dominance of African runners in long-distance running is an intriguing phenomenon that highlights the close relationship between genetics and physical performance. Many factors in the interesting interaction between genotype and phenotype (eg, high cardiorespiratory fitness, higher hemoglobin concentration, good metabolic efficiency, muscle fiber composition, enzyme profile, diet, altitude training, and psychological aspects have been proposed in the attempt to explain the extraordinary success of these runners. Increasing evidence shows that genetics may be a determining factor in physical and athletic performance. But, could this also be true for African long-distance runners? Based on this question, this brief review proposed the role of genetic factors (mitochondrial deoxyribonucleic acid, the Y chromosome, and the angiotensin-converting enzyme and the alpha-actinin-3 genes in the amazing athletic performance observed in African runners, especially the Kenyans and Ethiopians, despite their environmental constraints.Keywords: genes, genotype, physical exercise, endurance runners

  9. The effect of shoe type on gait in forefoot strike runners during a 50-km run

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark E. Kasmer

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: More runners adopted a more posterior initial contact area after the 50-km run in the traditional shoe type than in the minimalist shoe type. The runners who adopted a more posterior initial contact area were more closely associated with an increased median frequency of the medial gastrocnemius, which suggests there may be a change in motor unit recruitment pattern during long-distance, sustained velocity running. The increased peak pressures observed in the medial forefoot in the minimalist shoe type may predispose to metatarsal stress fractures in the setting of improper training.

  10. Predictors of Running-Related Injuries in Novice Runners Enrolled in a Systematic Training Program A Prospective Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist, Ida; Bredeweg, Steef W.; Lemmink, Koen A. P. M.; van Mechelen, Willem; Diercks, Ron L.

    Background: The popularity of running is still growing. As participation increases, running-related injuries also increase. Until now, little is known about the predictors for injuries in novice runners. Hypothesis: Predictors for running-related injuries (RRIs) will differ between male and female

  11. Comparisons of Perceived Training Doses in Champion Collegiate-Level Male and Female Cross-country Runners and Coaches over the Course of a Competitive Season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Kyle R

    2017-10-17

    Session rating of perceived exertion (sRPE) is a practical tool for coaches to assess internal training load of their athletes. In a sport like cross-country running, that is individual in nature, but has a team training and competition component, information about the association between external and internal load is lacking. Furthermore, there is a need for studies that examine perception of training doses across multiple training cycles including the competitive season as well as between male and female athletes. Session RPE, duration, and training load (TL RPE  = sRPE × duration) of 25 highly trained male and female cross-country runners and their coaches were recorded for every training session (110 days) throughout a collegiate cross-country season. Intensity (sRPE), duration, and TL RPE were compared between coaches and runners by gender separately. Training sessions were also analyzed by those intended by the coaches to be easy, moderate, and hard as well as by training period. Data from 3024 training sessions were collected, 62% of which were considered "easy," 18% "moderate," and 20% "hard." Men and women rated coach-intended easy sessions significantly harder during each month of the season (effect size (ES) > 2.9, p sessions significantly higher than coaches (ES ≥ 1.0, p ≤ 0.002), whereas females rated hard intensity sessions significantly lower than coaches (ES > 0.5, p sessions (ES  0.05) or females and coach's moderate sessions (ES  0.05). Training intensity and TL RPE tended to increase throughout the season (p > 0.05), with a significant increase in moderate and hard intensity sessions in the last training period (p training throughout the cross-country season. Given the success of the athletes in this study, these results show how a simple system for monitoring training such as the sRPE method may improve control of training variables and provide a useful tool for coaches to evaluate training load placed on

  12. Ultramarathon runners: nature or nurture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knechtle, Beat

    2012-12-01

    Ultramarathon running is increasingly popular. An ultramarathon is defined as a running event involving distances longer than the length of a traditional marathon of 42.195 km. In ultramarathon races, ~80% of the finishers are men. Ultramarathoners are typically ~45 y old and achieve their fastest running times between 30 and 49 y for men, and between 30 and 54 y for women. Most probably, ultrarunners start with a marathon before competing in an ultramarathon. In ultramarathoners, the number of previously completed marathons is significantly higher than the number of completed marathons in marathoners. However, recreational marathoners have a faster personal-best marathon time than ultramarathoners. Successful ultramarathoners have 7.6 ± 6.3 y of experience in ultrarunning. Ultramarathoners complete more running kilometers in training than marathoners do, but they run more slowly during training than marathoners. To summarize, ultramarathoners are master runners, have a broad experience in running, and prepare differently for an ultramarathon than marathoners do. However, it is not known what motivates male ultramarathoners and where ultramarathoners mainly originate. Future studies need to investigate the motivation of male ultramarathoners, where the best ultramarathoners originate, and whether they prepare by competing in marathons before entering ultramarathons.

  13. Risk factors for lower extremity injuries among male marathon runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Middelkoop, M; Kolkman, J; Van Ochten, J; Bierma-Zeinstra, S M A; Koes, B W

    2008-12-01

    The aim of this study is to identify risk factors for lower extremity injuries in male marathon runners. A random sample of 1500 recreational male marathon runners was drawn. Possible risk factors were obtained from a baseline questionnaire 1 month before the start of the marathon. Information on injuries sustained shortly before or during the marathon was obtained using a post-race questionnaire. Of the 694 male runners who responded to the baseline and post-race questionnaire, 28% suffered a self-reported running injury on the lower extremities in the month before or during the marathon run. More than six times race participation in the previous 12 months [odds ratio (OR) 1.66; confidence interval (CI) 1.08-2.56], a history of running injuries (OR 2.62; CI 1.82-3.78), high education level (OR 0.73; CI 0.51-1.04) and daily smoking (OR 0.23; CI 0.05-1.01) were associated with the occurrence of lower extremity injuries. Among the modifiable risk factor studies, a training distance training is a strong protective factor for knee injuries. Other training characteristics appear to have little or no effect on future injuries.

  14. Improvement in Running Economy after 6 Weeks of Plyometric Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Amanda M.; Owings, Matt; Schwane, James A.

    2003-01-01

    Investigated whether a 6-week regimen of plyometric training would improve running economy. Data were collected on 18 regular but not highly trained distance runners who participated in either regular running training or plyometric training. Results indicated that 6 weeks of plyometric training improved running economy at selected speeds in this…

  15. Mechanisms of adaptation to intensive loads of 400 meters’ hurdles runners at stage of initial basic training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Rovniy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: is study of adaptation mechanisms of 400 meter’ hurdles-runners to intensive physical loads. Material: in the research 13 - 400 meters’ hurdles-runners and 13 - 400 meters’ runners participated. Results: it was found that physiological cost of sportsmen’s special workability has fragmentary character. We presented results of physiological and bio-chemical adaptation mechanisms to dozed work. The received results have no confident distinctions and can not objectively characterize mechanisms of sportsmen’s special workability. We did not detect definite differences in indicators of mechanisms, ensuring sportsmen’s special workability under dozed loads. We found, that level of anaerobic glycolysis is an objective criterion of 400 meter’ hurdles-runners’ special workability. It was shown that for determination of functional potentials for such kind of functioning it is necessary to apply special loads. Conclusions: the received results deepen information about mechanisms of adaptation to specific competition functioning. Correct approaches to processing and analysis of the research’s results permit to more specifically determine sportsmen’s functional potentials in different kinds of competition functioning.

  16. Predictor variables for marathon race time in recreational female runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Wiebke; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Barandun, Ursula; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2012-06-01

    We intended to determine predictor variables of anthropometry and training for marathon race time in recreational female runners in order to predict marathon race time for future novice female runners. Anthropometric characteristics such as body mass, body height, body mass index, circumferences of limbs, thicknesses of skin-folds and body fat as well as training variables such as volume and speed in running training were related to marathon race time using bi- and multi-variate analysis in 29 female runners. The marathoners completed the marathon distance within 251 (26) min, running at a speed of 10.2 (1.1) km/h. Body mass (r=0.37), body mass index (r=0.46), the circumferences of thigh (r=0.51) and calf (r=0.41), the skin-fold thicknesses of front thigh (r=0.38) and of medial calf (r=0.40), the sum of eight skin-folds (r=0.44) and body fat percentage (r=0.41) were related to marathon race time. For the variables of training, maximal distance ran per week (r=- 0.38), number of running training sessions per week (r=- 0.46) and the speed of the training sessions (r= - 0.60) were related to marathon race time. In the multi-variate analysis, the circumference of calf (P=0.02) and the speed of the training sessions (P=0.0014) were related to marathon race time. Marathon race time might be partially (r(2)=0.50) predicted by the following equation: Race time (min)=184.4 + 5.0 x (circumference calf, cm) -11.9 x (speed in running during training, km/h) for recreational female marathoners. Variables of both anthropometry and training were related to marathon race time in recreational female marathoners and cannot be reduced to one single predictor variable. For practical applications, a low circumference of calf and a high running speed in training are associated with a fast marathon race time in recreational female runners.

  17. FLIPPED CLASSROOM TECHNOLOGY IN DISTANCE AND FULL-TIME TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleksandr I. Volnevych

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper there are considered some aspects of the application of new technology of learning process «flipped classroom» formation on the basis of dynamic video lectures in full-time and distance learning. The considered technology is aimed at enhancing the value of students’ independent work, primarily — through creative approach to creation of the lecture material conspectus. Reallocation of learning hours in the direction of increasing time of practical work contributes to the development of students' skills in applying the acquired knowledge. It is presented brief information about the implementation of this technology: definition of screencast, which is actually the base for creation of dynamic video lectures, the main characteristics of the existing software designed for the implementation of training video courses.

  18. Trabecular bone in the calcaneus of runners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Best

    Full Text Available Trabecular bone of the human calcaneus is subjected to extreme repetitive forces during endurance running and should adapt in response to this strain. To assess possible bone functional adaptation in the posterior region of the calcaneus, we recruited forefoot-striking runners (n = 6, rearfoot-striking runners (n = 6, and non-runners (n = 6, all males aged 20-41 for this institutionally approved study. Foot strike pattern was confirmed for each runner using a motion capture system. We obtained high resolution peripheral computed tomography scans of the posterior calcaneus for both runners and non-runners. No statistically significant differences were found between runners and nonrunners or forefoot strikers and rearfoot strikers. Mean trabecular thickness and mineral density were greatest in forefoot runners with strong effect sizes (<0.80. Trabecular thickness was positively correlated with weekly running distance (r2 = 0.417, p<0.05 and years running (r2 = 0.339, p<0.05 and negatively correlated with age at onset of running (r2 = 0.515, p<0.01 Trabecular thickness, mineral density and bone volume ratio of nonrunners were highly correlated with body mass (r2 = 0.824, p<0.05 and nonrunners were significantly heavier than runners (p<0.05. Adjusting for body mass revealed significantly thicker trabeculae in the posterior calcaneus of forefoot strikers, likely an artifact of greater running volume and earlier onset of running in this subgroup; thus, individuals with the greatest summative loading stimulus had, after body mass adjustment, the thickest trabeculae. Further study with larger sample sizes is necessary to elucidate the role of footstrike on calcaneal trabecular structure. To our knowledge, intraspecific body mass correlations with measures of trabecular robusticity have not been reported elsewhere. We hypothesize that early adoption of running and years of sustained moderate volume running stimulate bone modeling in trabeculae of the

  19. Relationship between cytokines and running economy in marathon runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luna Junior Luiz Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Running economy (RE, expresses the relationship between the energy cost of running (Cr and the work performed by a runner and is an predictor of performance. Given the intense effort of marathon runners during training and competition and the dearth of studies that address performance and cytokines in this population, the objective of the current study was to investigate the relationship between RE and cytokines in marathon runners.

  20. Comparison of foot strike patterns of barefoot and minimally shod runners in a recreational road race

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Larson

    2014-01-01

    Background: Previous studies of foot strike patterns of distance runners in road races have typically found that the overwhelming majority of shod runners initially contact the ground on the rearfoot. However, none of these studies has attempted to quantify foot strike patterns of barefoot or minimally shod runners. This study classifies foot strike patterns of barefoot and minimally shod runners in a recreational road race. Methods: High-speed video footage was obtained of 169 barefoot an...

  1. Lower extremity injuries in runners. Advances in prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macera, C A

    1992-01-01

    Recreational and competitive running is practised by many individuals to improve cardiorespiratory function and general well-being. The major negative aspect of running is the high rate of injuries to the lower extremities. Several well-designed population-based studies have found no major differences in injury rates between men and women; no increasing effect of age on injuries; a declining injury rate with more years of running experience; no substantial effect of weight or height; an uncertain effect of psychological factors; and a strong effect of previous injury on future injuries. Among the modifiable risk factors studied, weekly distance is the strongest predictor of future injuries. Other training characteristics (speed, frequency, surface, timing) have little or no effect on future injuries after accounting for distance run. More studies are needed to address the effects of appropriate stretching practices and abrupt change in training patterns. For recreational runners who have sustained injuries, especially within the past year, a reduction in running to below 32 km per week is recommended. For those about to begin a running programme, moderation is the best advice. For competitive runners, great care should be taken to ensure that prior injuries are sufficiently healed before attempting any racing event, particularly a marathon.

  2. [Osteoarthritis from long-distance running?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohmann, E; Wörtler, K; Imhoff, A

    2005-06-01

    Long distance running has become a fashionable recreational activity. This study investigated the effects of external impact loading on bone and cartilage introduced by performing a marathon race. Seven beginners were compared to six experienced recreational long distance runners and two professional athletes. All participants underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the hip and knee before and after a marathon run. Coronal T1 weighted and STIR sequences were used. The pre MRI served as a baseline investigation and monitored the training effect. All athletes demonstrated normal findings in the pre run scan. All but one athlete in the beginner group demonstrated joint effusions after the race. The experienced and professional runners failed to demonstrate pathology in the post run scans. Recreational and professional long distance runners tolerate high impact forces well. Beginners demonstrate significant changes on the post run scans. Whether those findings are a result of inadequate training (miles and duration) warrant further studies. We conclude that adequate endurance training results in adaptation mechanisms that allow the athlete to compensate for the stresses introduced by long distance running and do not predispose to the onset of osteoarthritis. Significant malalignment of the lower extremity may cause increased focal loading of joint and cartilage.

  3. Infectious episodes in runners before and after a roadrace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieman, D C; Johanssen, L M; Lee, J W

    1989-09-01

    Various researchers have implied that regular and moderate exercise training may improve the ability of the immune system to protect the host from infection. In contrast, acute, maximal, and exhaustive exercise may have negative effects of the immune system. This study compared the incidence of infectious episodes in 273 runners during a two month training period prior to a 5 K, 10 K, or half-marathon race. In addition, the effect of the race experience on infectious episodes was studied. Twenty-five percent of the runners training more than 15 miles per week reported at least one infectious episode as compared with 34.3% of runners training less than 15 miles per week (p = 0.09). Only 6.8% of the runners preparing for the half-marathon race reported becoming sick with the flu versus 17.9% of the 5 K and 10 K runners (p = 0.067). During the week following the roadrace, runners did not report an increase in infectious episodes as compared to the week prior to the race. These trends suggest that runners with a more serious commitment to regular exercise may experience less infectious episodes than recreational runners because of both direct and indirect affects on immunosurveillance. In addition, the stressful race experience does not appear to increase risk of acquiring an acute respiratory infection.

  4. Oral Contraceptives and Bone Health in Female Runners

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kelsey, Jennifer

    2000-01-01

    .... This study is a two-year randomized trial of the effects of oral contraceptives on bone mass and stress fracture incidence among 150 female competitive distance runners in the age range 18-25 years...

  5. CERN runners scale new heights

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Part of the field in the men's over-50 categories. Gordon Lee (IT) is in the white top, just behind the runner in yellow in the centre of the photo. On a bright and sunny 1 December last, a team from CERN lifted the honours for the company team event of Switzerland's most popular running race. The occasion was the 24th 'Course de l'Escalade'. The Escalade races wind through the narrow streets of Geneva's Old Town, lined with friends and well-wishers for the event. Since they began in 1978, they have become so popular that the Escalade now ranks among the largest popular running events in Europe. Some 19000 people aged from 5 to 85 donned running shoes to brave the crowds last December. Clearly, not all could run at once, so races by category started at 11am and continued until after 7pm. Distances ranged from about 2 km for the youngest children to 7.5 km for the men's categories. 100 or so runners, men and women, from the top international elite were invited for the race. CERN runners had a double reason t...

  6. The impact of self-reported psychological stress levels on changes to peripheral blood immune biomarkers in recreational marathon runners during training and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehm, Kristina E; Elci, Okan U; Hahn, Kathryn; Marshall, Gailen D

    2013-01-01

    Marathon training is both physically and psychologically stressful, both of which can lead to altered immunity. The purpose of this study was to determine if the overall immunoregulatory changes associated with the physical stress of marathon training are affected by psychological stress. Nineteen recreational marathoners completed the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and Penn State Worry Questionnaire (PSWQ), and had levels of T cell subpopulations and cytokine (IFNγ, IL4 and IL10) production determined 4 weeks before (baseline), 24-48 h before (prerace) and 1 week after (recovery) participation in a marathon. PSS scores decreased at the prerace visit compared to baseline and remained low at recovery. Compared to baseline, there were significant changes to numerous immune measures at the prerace visit, including decreases in Th1/Th2 ratio, Tc1/Tc2 ratio, Tr1 and Th3 cell populations as well as decreases in IFNγ/IL4 cytokine ratio and IL10 production. Most immune parameters had returned to near baseline values at the recovery visit. Higher levels of perceived stress, anxiety and worry exacerbated many of the alterations in immunity that were observed at the prerace visit. Higher levels of perceived stress and worry had significant effects on changes to Treg, IL4 production and the IFNγ/IL4 cytokine ratio. Stress had an additional impact on changes in IL10 production. High anxiety levels resulted in significant changes to Treg, Tr1 and Th3. These data suggest that recreational marathon runners with higher levels of psychological stress may be more at risk for the immune alterations that are common during periods of prolonged physical training. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Predictor Variables for Marathon Race Time in Recreational Female Runners

    OpenAIRE

    Schmid, Wiebke; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Barandun, Ursula; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We intended to determine predictor variables of anthropometry and training for marathon race time in recreational female runners in order to predict marathon race time for future novice female runners. Methods Anthropometric characteristics such as body mass, body height, body mass index, circumferences of limbs, thicknesses of skin-folds and body fat as well as training variables such as volume and speed in running training were related to marathon race time using bi- and multi-varia...

  8. The impact of hepatitis B carrier on cardiac troponin I in 100-km ultramarathon runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li-Hua; How, Chorng-Kuang; Kao, Wei-Fong; Chiu, Yu-Hui; Meng, Chen; Hsu, Cheng-Chin; Tsay, Yeou-Guang

    2017-06-01

    Prolonged endurance exercise is known to cause elevation of cardiac troponin I (cTnI). Previous studies have reported the correlation of several factors with exercise-induced cTnI release. However, the investigation of the predictors for elevated cTnI and postrace kinetics of cTnI after ultramarathon running is lacking, especially in an Oriental population. Twenty-six participants, including eight hepatitis B virus carrier (HBVc) runners, who finished a 100-km ultramarathon in Taiwan were enrolled. For each participant, blood samples were collected 1 week before the race, as well as immediately and 24 hours after the finish. The results showed that 19 runners (73.1%) had postrace elevated cTnI levels and eight (30.8%) had elevated cTnI values lasting more than 24 hours after the run. A multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that the HBV status was a factor related to the high level of cTnI after 24 hours of running (β=0.03, p=0.08). The recovery of plasma cTnI levels was delayed in ultramarathon runners with latent HBV infection. Among HBVc runners, multiple linear regression analyses showed age (β=-0.01), previous running experience (β=-0.06), training distance (β=0.37), and 4 hours of running distance (β=-0.04) as significant predictors of higher postrace cTnI levels. For most athletes, cTnI values significantly increased immediately following the race in the absence of adverse clinical sequelae, and HBVc runners had higher and prolonged cTnI levels. While several factors are identified for such HBV effects, the specific causes need further elucidation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  9. Physiological characteristics of the best Eritrean runners-exceptional running economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucia, Alejandro; Esteve-Lanao, Jonathan; Oliván, Jesús; Gómez-Gallego, Félix; San Juan, Alejandro F; Santiago, Catalina; Pérez, Margarita; Chamorro-Viña, Carolina; Foster, Carl

    2006-10-01

    Despite their young age, limited training history, and lack of running tradition compared with other East African endurance athletes (e.g., Kenyans and Ethiopians), male endurance runners from Eritrea have recently attained important running successes. The purposes of our study were (i) to document the main physical and physiological characteristics of elite black Eritrean distance runners (n = 7; age: 22 +/- 3 years) and (ii) to compare them with those of their elite white Spanish counterparts. For this second purpose we selected a control group of elite Spanish runners (n = 9; 24 +/- 2 years), owing to the traditionally high success of Spanish athletes in long-distance running compared with other white runners, especially in cross-country competitions. The subjects' main anthropometric characteristics were determined, together with their maximum oxygen uptake (VO2 max) and VO2 (mL.kg(-1).min(-1)), blood lactate, and ammonia concentrations while running at 17, 19, or 21 km.h(-1). The body mass index (18.9 +/- 1.5 kg.m(-2)) and maximal calf circumference (30.9 +/- 1.5 cm) was lower in Eritreans than in Spaniards (20.5 +/- 1.7 kg.m(-2) and 33.9 +/- 2.0 cm, respectively) (p economy of Eritreans is associated, at least partly, with anthropometric variables. Comparison of their submaximal running cost with other published data suggests that superior running economy, rather than enhanced aerobic capacity, may be the common denominator in the success of black endurance runners of East African origin.

  10. Risk factors for stress fracture among young female cross-country runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsey, Jennifer L; Bachrach, Laura K; Procter-Gray, Elizabeth; Nieves, Jeri; Greendale, Gail A; Sowers, Maryfran; Brown, Byron W; Matheson, Kim A; Crawford, Sybil L; Cobb, Kristin L

    2007-09-01

    To identify risk factors for stress fracture among young female distance runners. Participants were 127 competitive female distance runners, aged 18-26, who provided at least some follow-up data in a randomized trial among 150 runners of the effects of oral contraceptives on bone health. After completing a baseline questionnaire and undergoing bone densitometry, they were followed an average of 1.85 yr. Eighteen participants had at least one stress fracture during follow-up. Baseline characteristics associated (Pstress fracture occurrence were one or more previous stress fractures (rate ratio [RR] [95% confidence interval]=6.42 (1.80-22.87), lower whole-body bone mineral content (RR=2.70 [1.26-5.88] per 1-SD [293.2 g] decrease), younger chronologic age (RR=1.42 [1.05-1.92] per 1-yr decrease), lower dietary calcium intake (RR=1.11 [0.98-1.25] per 100-mg decrease), and younger age at menarche (RR=1.92 [1.15-3.23] per 1-yr decrease). Although not statistically significant, a history of irregular menstrual periods was also associated with increased risk (RR=3.41 [0.69-16.91]). Training-related factors did not affect risk. The results of this and other studies indicate that risk factors for stress fracture among young female runners include previous stress fractures, lower bone mass, and, although not statistically significant in this study, menstrual irregularity. More study is needed of the associations between stress fracture and age, calcium intake, and age at menarche. Given the importance of stress fractures to runners, identifying preventive measures is of high priority.

  11. Dynamic observation of vegetative support of central hemodynamics and physical performance in 400-m runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. L. Mikhalyuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available At the present time problem of human physical performance is relevant, especially in sports, because athletes can achieve good results mostly due to the high level of physical performance. Aim. To determine and compare heart rate variability, central hemodynamics and physical performance in runners at a distance of 400 m, obtained in the preparatory and competitive periods of training process. Results. The study of the functional state of the 400 m runners showed strengthening of parasympathetic effects of the autonomic nervous system (ANS in the competitive period. Also eukinetic circulation type transformation into hypokinetic occurred. Significant increase in physical performance by 8.5% and the IFS by 17.9% was detected. High class runners separate study showed the prevalence of parasympathetic effects of the ANS, hypokinetic circulation type (CT and lack of athletes with hyperkinetic CT. Significant increase in physical performance at 7.95% and the IFS by 20.2% was detected in them. Athletes with II–III level of qualification in the preparatory period had sighs of the increased parasympathetic ANS similar with eukinetic CT. Nobody had hyperkinetic CT. Conclusions. Correlation analysis between the integrated parameters in the whole group of runners in the competitive period found no significant correlations between the studied parameters.

  12. Ground reaction forces and kinematics in distance running in older-aged men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, Sicco A

    2003-07-01

    The biomechanics of distance running has not been studied before in older-aged runners but may be different than in younger-aged runners because of musculoskeletal degeneration at older age. This study aimed at determining whether the stance phase kinematics and ground reaction forces in running are different between younger- and older-aged men. Lower-extremity kinematics using three-dimensional motion analysis and ground reaction forces (GRF) using a force plate were assessed in 16 older-aged (55-65 yr) and 13 younger-aged (20-35 yr) well-trained male distance runners running at a self-selected (SRS) and a controlled (CRS) speed of 3.3 m.s-1. The older subjects ran at significantly lower self-selected speeds than the younger subjects (mean 3.34 vs 3.77 m.s-1). In both speed conditions, the older runners exhibited significantly more knee flexion at heel strike and significantly less knee flexion and extension range of motion. No age group differences were present in subtalar joint motion. Impact peak force (1.91 vs 1.70 BW) and maximal initial loading rate (107.5 vs 85.5 BW.s-1) were significantly higher in the older runners at the CRS. Maximal peak vertical and anteroposterior forces and impulses were significantly lower in the older runners at the SRS. The biomechanics of running is different between older- and younger-aged runners on several relevant parameters. The larger impact peak force and initial loading rate indicate a loss of shock-absorbing capacity in the older runners. This may increase their susceptibility to lower-extremity overuse injuries. Moreover, it emphasizes the focus on optimizing cushioning properties in the design and prescription of running shoes and suggests that older-aged runners should be cautious with running under conditions of high impact.

  13. Impact of Center-of-Mass Acceleration on the Performance of Ultramarathon Runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Shun-Ping

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultramarathon races are rapidly gaining popularity in several countries, raising interest for the improvement of training programs. The aim of this study was to use a triaxial accelerometer to compare the three-dimensional centerof- mass accelerations of two groups of ultramarathon runners with distinct performances during different running speeds and distances. Ten runners who participated in the 12-h Taipei International Ultramarathon Race underwent laboratory treadmill testing one month later. They were divided into an elite group (EG; n = 5 and a sub-elite group (SG; n = 5. The triaxial center-of-mass acceleration recorded during a level-surface progressive intensity running protocol (3, 6, 8, 9, 10, and 12 km/h; 5 min each was used for correlation analyses with running distance during the ultramarathon. The EG showed negative correlations between mediolateral (ML acceleration (r = −0.83 to −0.93, p < 0.05, and between anterior-posterior (AP acceleration and running distance (r = −0.8953 to −0.9653, p < 0.05, but not for vertical control of the center of mass. This study suggests that runners reduce stride length to minimize mediolateral sway and the effects of braking on the trunk; moreover, cadence must be increased to reduce braking effects and enhance impetus. Consequently, the competition level of ultramarathons can be elevated.

  14. Shorter Ground Contact Time and Better Running Economy: Evidence From Female Kenyan Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooses, Martin; Haile, Diresibachew W; Ojiambo, Robert; Sang, Meshack; Mooses, Kerli; Lane, Amy R; Hackney, Anthony C

    2018-06-25

    Mooses, M, Haile, DW, Ojiambo, R, Sang, M, Mooses, K, Lane, AR, and Hackney, AC. Shorter ground contact time and better running economy: evidence from female Kenyan runners. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2018-Previously, it has been concluded that the improvement in running economy (RE) might be considered as a key to the continued improvement in performance when no further increase in V[Combining Dot Above]O2max is observed. To date, RE has been extensively studied among male East African distance runners. By contrast, there is a paucity of data on the RE of female East African runners. A total of 10 female Kenyan runners performed 3 × 1,600-m steady-state run trials on a flat outdoor clay track (400-m lap) at the intensities that corresponded to their everyday training intensities for easy, moderate, and fast running. Running economy together with gait characteristics was determined. Participants showed moderate to very good RE at the first (202 ± 26 ml·kg·km) and second (188 ± 12 ml·kg·km) run trials, respectively. Correlation analysis revealed significant relationship between ground contact time (GCT) and RE at the second run (r = 0.782; p = 0.022), which represented the intensity of anaerobic threshold. This study is the first to report the RE and gait characteristics of East African female athletes measured under everyday training settings. We provided the evidence that GCT is associated with the superior RE of the female Kenyan runners.

  15. Effects of Continuous and Interval Training on Running Economy, Maximal Aerobic Speed and Gait Kinematics in Recreational Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Mohíno, Fernando; González-Ravé, José M; Juárez, Daniel; Fernández, Francisco A; Barragán Castellanos, Rubén; Newton, Robert U

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects on running economy (RE), V[Combining Dot Above]O2max, maximal aerobic speed (MAS), and gait kinematics (step length [SL] and frequency, flight and contact time [CT]) in recreational athletes, with 2 different training methods, Interval and Continuous (CON). Eleven participants were randomly distributed in an interval training group (INT; n = 6) or CON training group (CON; n = 5). Interval training and CON performed 2 different training programs (95-110% and 70-75% of MAS, respectively), which consisted of 3 sessions per week during 6 weeks with the same external workload (%MAS × duration). An incremental test to exhaustion was performed to obtain V[Combining Dot Above]O2max, MAS, RE, and gait variables (high speed camera) before and after the training intervention. There was a significant improvement (p ≤ 0.05) in RE at 60 and 90% of MAS by the CON group; without changes in gait. The INT group significantly increased MAS and higher stride length at 80, 90, and 100% of MAS and lower CT at 100% of MAS. As expected, training adaptations are highly specific to the overload applied with CON producing improvements in RE at lower percentage of MAS whereas INT produces improvements in MAS. The significantly increased stride length and decreased CT for the INT group are an important outcome of favorable changes in running gait.

  16. Online Distance Learning and Music Training: Benefits, Drawbacks and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsoupidou, Theano

    2014-01-01

    This study examines online distance learning (ODL) as applied in music and music education programmes at different educational levels with a special focus on the digital tools employed in such programmes. It aims to provide an up-to-date snapshot of the current online courses focusing on the potential benefits and drawbacks of ODL from the…

  17. The effects of isolated ankle strengthening and functional balance training on strength, running mechanics, postural control and injury prevention in novice runners: design of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltich, Jennifer; Emery, Carolyn A; Stefanyshyn, Darren; Nigg, Benno M

    2014-12-04

    Risk factors have been proposed for running injuries including (a) reduced muscular strength, (b) excessive joint movements and (c) excessive joint moments in the frontal and transverse planes. To date, many running injury prevention programs have focused on a "top down" approach to strengthen the hip musculature in the attempt to reduce movements and moments at the hip, knee, and/or ankle joints. However, running mechanics did not change when hip muscle strength increased. It could be speculated that emphasis should be placed on increasing the strength of the ankle joint for a "ground up" approach. Strengthening of the large and small muscles crossing the ankle joint is assumed to change the force distribution for these muscles and to increase the use of smaller muscles. This would be associated with a reduction of joint and insertion forces, which could have a beneficial effect on injury prevention. However, training of the ankle joint as an injury prevention strategy has not been studied. Ankle strengthening techniques include isolated strengthening or movement-related strengthening such as functional balance training. There is little knowledge about the efficacy of such training programs on strength alteration, gait or injury reduction. Novice runners will be randomly assigned to one of three groups: an isolated ankle strengthening group (strength, n = 40), a functional balance training group (balance, n = 40) or an activity-matched control group (control, n = 40). Isokinetic strength will be measured using a Biodex System 3 dynamometer. Running kinematics and kinetics will be assessed using 3D motion analysis and a force platform. Postural control will be assessed by quantifying the magnitude and temporal structure of the center of pressure trace during single leg stance on a force platform. The change pre- and post-training in isokinetic strength, running mechanics, and postural control variables will be compared following the interventions

  18. The teacher training process through distance education: a pioneer experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Massaru Fujita

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents briefly the actions conducted in the formation process and established partnerships to achieve the pioneering educational process of Distance Education (DE courses of the State University of Londrina (UEL-PR. The methodological design was developed according to the Qualitative Approach of Action-Research type that prioritizes the development and analysis of the process along with the "meaning" that people give to things and your life than actually the product itself. The data collected through questionnaires at the end of the course signal impressions (positive and constructive criticism we received and the meanings experienced teacher students (testimonials, chats, discussion forums, projects in the courses offered. The experience lived in these three courses: Virtual Learning Environment (60 hours; Tutoring in distance education (60 hours and Teaching Materials in Distance Education (60 hours, from its conception to its actual conclusion, make us think that we are on the right way and by TDIC, new horizons may open up to the institution in short- and medium-term.

  19. Radiation protection education and training infrastructure. Open and distance learning tools for training in radiation protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marco, M.; Rodriguez, M.; Gonzalez Giralda, C.G.; Bailador Ferreras, A.B. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Coeck, M.C. [Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie - Centre d' Etude de l' Energie Nucleaire, Mol (Belgium); Etard, C.E. [CEA Saclay, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France). INSTN, Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires; Moebius, S.M. [FZK -FTU, Munich (Germany); Schmitt-Hanning, A.S. [BfS, Karlsruhe (Germany); Luciani, A.I. [ENEA, Bologna (Italy); Van Der Steen, J.V. [NRG, Petten (Netherlands)

    2006-07-01

    Full text: A sustainable Education and Training (E.T.) infrastructure for Radiation Protection is an essential component to combat the decline in expertise and to ensure the continuation of the high level of radiation protection knowledge in the future. Such infrastructure has to be built in such a way that both the initial training (Education) and the unceasing maintenance of the level of competencies (referred to as 'Training') are available. The E.N.E.T.R.A.P. project intends to develop the E.T. infrastructure mentioned. To achieve the aims of the different tasks and activities, the work programme for the E.N.E.T.R.A.P. Network is divided in eight work packages developed by 11 partners: Each partner will assume responsibility for the W.P.s. C.I.E.M.A.T. is involved in the W.P.-5 'New concepts and new tools for an E.R.P.C.'. The tasks of the W.P.-5 are focussed in the investigation of the electronic tools used in R.P. training and education. This paper presents the first results of this working group. The first task is an approach to the development and usage of learning resources. A review on the e-learning methodologies, the present state of art and its evolution, are being carried out. Results will be used to select the best way to host learning activities in the framework of the E.N.E.T.R.A.P. project. Another important task is to identify, analyse and evaluate the Open and Distance learning tools and material existing for train ing in Radiation Protection. A review on the evolutions, approaches and methodologies aiming to provide education and training in radiation protection, will be carried out. The results of this task will be a summary of links referred to the most interesting R.P. e-learning. Finally, taking in account the previous results a pilot R.P. module of E.R.P.C. should be prepared. (authors)

  20. Radiation protection education and training infrastructure. Open and distance learning tools for training in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marco, M.; Rodriguez, M.; Gonzalez Giralda, C.G.; Bailador Ferreras, A.B.; Coeck, M.C.; Etard, C.E.; Schmitt-Hanning, A.S.; Luciani, A.I.; Van Der Steen, J.V.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: A sustainable Education and Training (E.T.) infrastructure for Radiation Protection is an essential component to combat the decline in expertise and to ensure the continuation of the high level of radiation protection knowledge in the future. Such infrastructure has to be built in such a way that both the initial training (Education) and the unceasing maintenance of the level of competencies (referred to as 'Training') are available. The E.N.E.T.R.A.P. project intends to develop the E.T. infrastructure mentioned. To achieve the aims of the different tasks and activities, the work programme for the E.N.E.T.R.A.P. Network is divided in eight work packages developed by 11 partners: Each partner will assume responsibility for the W.P.s. C.I.E.M.A.T. is involved in the W.P.-5 'New concepts and new tools for an E.R.P.C.'. The tasks of the W.P.-5 are focussed in the investigation of the electronic tools used in R.P. training and education. This paper presents the first results of this working group. The first task is an approach to the development and usage of learning resources. A review on the e-learning methodologies, the present state of art and its evolution, are being carried out. Results will be used to select the best way to host learning activities in the framework of the E.N.E.T.R.A.P. project. Another important task is to identify, analyse and evaluate the Open and Distance learning tools and material existing for train ing in Radiation Protection. A review on the evolutions, approaches and methodologies aiming to provide education and training in radiation protection, will be carried out. The results of this task will be a summary of links referred to the most interesting R.P. e-learning. Finally, taking in account the previous results a pilot R.P. module of E.R.P.C. should be prepared. (authors)

  1. The occurrence of injuries in recreational runners in Wroclaw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Michalik

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Practicing sports activities e.g. running exposes individuals to physical injuries. Aim. Aim of the study was to determine the occurrence of injuries in runners training long running in Wrocław. The second aim was to investigate injury risk factors in runners. Materials and methods. In the study participated 255 subjects (157 man and 98 woman. The subjects were members in a running association WKB PIAST Wrocław, PRO-RUN Wrocław as well as non associated runners. In the study a diagnostic survey was used. Results. In this study 61% (n=156 of participants were injured, while 39% (n=100 trained without any injuries. Conclusions. The runners suffered from overloads in plantar fascia, cuff muscles and quadriceps muscles. The main injury factors were improper training loads and training surface.

  2. Distance learning approach to train health sciences students at the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The University of Nairobi (UoN) College of Health Sciences (CHS) established Partnership for Innovative Medical Education in Kenya (PRIME-K) programmeme to enhance health outcomes in Kenya through extending the reach of medical training outside Nairobi to help health sciences students enhance their ...

  3. The effect of plyometric training on power and kicking distance in female adolescent soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubley, Mack D; Haase, Amaris C; Holcomb, William R; Girouard, Tedd J; Tandy, Richard D

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of low-frequency, low-impact plyometric training on vertical jump (VJ) and kicking distance in female adolescent soccer players. Sixteen adolescent soccer players were studied (age 13.4 ± 0.5 years) across 14 weeks. The control group (general soccer training only) had 6 subjects, and the plyometric training (general soccer training plus plyometric exercise) group had 10 subjects. All subjects were tested for VJ and kicking distance on 3 occasions: pre-test, 7 weeks, and 14 weeks. Data were analyzed using a 2 (Training) × 3 (Test) analysis of variance (ANOVA) with repeated measures on the factor test. No significant difference in kicking distance was found between groups at pre-test (p = 0.688) or 7 weeks (p = 0.117). The plyometric group had significantly greater kicking distance after 14 weeks (p plyometric group had a significantly higher VJ after 14 weeks (p = 0.014). These results provide strength coaches with a safe and effective alternative to high-intensity plyometric training. Based on these findings, to increase lower-body power resulting in increased VJ and kicking distance, strength coaches should implement once-weekly, low-impact plyometric training programs with their adolescent athletes.

  4. Effects of whole-body cryotherapy vs. far-infrared vs. passive modalities on recovery from exercise-induced muscle damage in highly-trained runners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Hausswirth

    Full Text Available Enhanced recovery following physical activity and exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD has become a priority for athletes. Consequently, a number of post-exercise recovery strategies are used, often without scientific evidence of their benefits. Within this framework, the purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of whole body cryotherapy (WBC, far infrared (FIR or passive (PAS modalities in hastening muscular recovery within the 48 hours after a simulated trail running race. In 3 non-adjoining weeks, 9 well-trained runners performed 3 repetitions of a simulated trail run on a motorized treadmill, designed to induce muscle damage. Immediately (post, post 24 h, and post 48 h after exercise, all participants tested three different recovery modalities (WBC, FIR, PAS in a random order over the three separate weeks. Markers of muscle damage (maximal isometric muscle strength, plasma creatine kinase [CK] activity and perceived sensations [i.e. pain, tiredness, well-being] were recorded before, immediately after (post, post 1 h, post 24 h, and post 48 h after exercise. In all testing sessions, the simulated 48 min trail run induced a similar, significant amount of muscle damage. Maximal muscle strength and perceived sensations were recovered after the first WBC session (post 1 h, while recovery took 24 h with FIR, and was not attained through the PAS recovery modality. No differences in plasma CK activity were recorded between conditions. Three WBC sessions performed within the 48 hours after a damaging running exercise accelerate recovery from EIMD to a greater extent than FIR or PAS modalities.

  5. Effects of Whole-Body Cryotherapy vs. Far-Infrared vs. Passive Modalities on Recovery from Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage in Highly-Trained Runners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausswirth, Christophe; Louis, Julien; Bieuzen, François; Pournot, Hervé; Fournier, Jean; Filliard, Jean-Robert; Brisswalter, Jeanick

    2011-01-01

    Enhanced recovery following physical activity and exercise-induced muscle damage (EIMD) has become a priority for athletes. Consequently, a number of post-exercise recovery strategies are used, often without scientific evidence of their benefits. Within this framework, the purpose of this study was to test the efficacy of whole body cryotherapy (WBC), far infrared (FIR) or passive (PAS) modalities in hastening muscular recovery within the 48 hours after a simulated trail running race. In 3 non-adjoining weeks, 9 well-trained runners performed 3 repetitions of a simulated trail run on a motorized treadmill, designed to induce muscle damage. Immediately (post), post 24 h, and post 48 h after exercise, all participants tested three different recovery modalities (WBC, FIR, PAS) in a random order over the three separate weeks. Markers of muscle damage (maximal isometric muscle strength, plasma creatine kinase [CK] activity and perceived sensations [i.e. pain, tiredness, well-being]) were recorded before, immediately after (post), post 1 h, post 24 h, and post 48 h after exercise. In all testing sessions, the simulated 48 min trail run induced a similar, significant amount of muscle damage. Maximal muscle strength and perceived sensations were recovered after the first WBC session (post 1 h), while recovery took 24 h with FIR, and was not attained through the PAS recovery modality. No differences in plasma CK activity were recorded between conditions. Three WBC sessions performed within the 48 hours after a damaging running exercise accelerate recovery from EIMD to a greater extent than FIR or PAS modalities. PMID:22163272

  6. Distance exercised during submaximal training on race winnings for Thoroughbred racehorses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Berkman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Evaluations of the physical fitness of Thoroughbred racehorses have been correlated with race earnings, but few reports exist about the influence of the distance exercised during training on both physical conditioning indices and financial productivity. During one training season sixteen claiming Thoroughbred horses were subjected to submaximal training and monitored by a global positioning system (GPS coupled to a heart rate monitor. After initial and single monitoring, the horses were distributed into two groups of eight individuals each; one group exercised short distances (SD between 1600 and 1900m, while the other exercised long distances (LD between 2000 and 2350m. The duration (min and mean and maximal velocities (ms-1attained during each session were determined, as well as the difference in distances exercised (m between official races and each training session. Blood lactate concentration ([LA] during recovery was also determined. Student's t-test was used for a non-paired analysis, with P≤0.05 considered significant. The winnings (USD of each horse were correlated with the peak heart rate (HRpeak attained during the training session. The distances exercised in the training sessions were greater in relation to the official races distances by 24.7% and 40% for SD and LD, respectively. Lactatemia did not differ between the groups. The HRpeak obtained during the training session was lower in LD group. The velocity at which the heart rate reached 200 bpm (V200 was higher in LD group. There was a moderate correlation (r= 0.42 between the highest winnings and lowest HRpeak. The horses that ran longer distances during their submaximal training session had better cardiac conditioning and tendency to increase financial productivity

  7. Face-to-Face or Distance Training: Two Different Approaches To Motivate SMEs to Learn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, Naomi; Allan, John; O'Dwyer, Michele

    2000-01-01

    Two approaches to training for small/medium-sized enterprises were compared: a British distance learning program and an Irish program offering face-to-face training for micro-enterprises. Both used constructivist, collaborative, and reflective methods. Advantages and disadvantages of each approach were identified. (SK)

  8. A Distance Education Model for Training Substance Abuse Treatment Providers in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Donnie W.; Rawson, Richard R.; Rataemane, Solomon; Shafer, Michael S.; Obert, Jeanne; Bisesi, Lorrie; Tanamly, Susie

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a rationale for the use of a distance education approach in the clinical training of community substance abuse treatment providers. Developing and testing new approaches to the clinical training and supervision of providers is important in the substance abuse treatment field where new information is always available. A…

  9. Going beyond Kirkpatrick's Training Evaluation Model: The Role of Workplace Factors in Distance Learning Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aluko, F. R.; Shonubi, O. K.

    2014-01-01

    This article emanates from a longitudinal study of the impact of a distance education programme for teacher training on graduates' job performance, in which the authors built on the findings of a previous pilot study. After using Kirkpatrick's Training Evaluation Model in a previous study, one of the authors found there to be a strong relationship…

  10. TRAINING TEACHERS AT A DISTANCE: Perceptions ad Challenges Of Open And Distance Learning (ODL IN TEACHER EDUCATION The Zimbabwean Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wellington SAMKANGE

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Zimbabwe like most developing countries continues to experience shortages in skills. One such area that has experienced skills shortages is education. This has resulted in governments and education institutions coming up with innovative ways to improve the training of of teachers. Such innovative models include the Open & Distance Learning (ODL model in the development of skills. In some instances, there has been a combination of the conventional model and the ODL model. The purpose of the study was to examine the different methods used in the training of teachers and the role of ODL in addressing skills shortages. The study used the qualitative methodology and the case study design. The respondents were purposively selected. Data was collected through lesson observations, document analysis and open-ended questionnaires that were administered to senior teachers, deputy school heads and school heads. These gave a total of twenty respondents from different schools. At the same time twenty trainee teachers in different programmes with the Zimbabwe Open University (ZOU were observed teaching and were assessed. The study also examined views, attitudes and perceptions about the training of teachers. From the data it could be concluded that the model being used by teachers’ colleges (2-5-2 was more inclined to ODL than the ‘conventional’ model, thus demonstrating that indeed teachers can be trained through ODL. Whilst there were mixed feelings about the role of universities in the training of pre-service teachers, it could be concluded that universities had a role in the training of teachers regardless of the mode of delivery they used. The study noted that the lack of resources and lack of understanding between different stakeholders was negatively affecting the success of the ODL model of training teachers at the Zimbabwe Open University (ZOU.

  11. The impact of intermittent exercise in a hypoxic environment on redox status and cardiac troponin release in the serum of well-trained marathon runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feifei; Nie, Jinlei; Lu, Yifan; Tong, Tom Kwok Keung; Yi, Longyan; Yan, Huiping; Fu, Frank Hoo Kin; Ma, Shengxia

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the effects of hypoxic training on redox status and cardiac troponin (cTn) release after intermittent exercise. Nine well-trained male marathon runners (age, 21.7 ± 2.3 year; body mass, 64.7 ± 4.8 kg; height, 177.9 ± 3.8 cm; and VO2max, 64.3 ± 6.7 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) completed intermittent exercise under normoxic [trial N; fraction of inspiration oxygen (FIO2), 21.0 %] and hypoxic (trial H; FIO2, 14.4 %) conditions in random order. Each bout of intermittent exercise included hard run (16.2 ± 0.8 km h(-1)) at 90 % VO2max for 2 min followed by easy run (9.0 ± 0.4 km h(-1)) at 50 % VO2max for 2 min and 23 bouts in 92 min totally. Malondialdehyde, reduced glutathione (GSH), superoxide dismutase, an estimate of total antioxidant capacity (T-AOC), high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hs-cTnT), and cardiac troponin I (cTnI) were measured before, immediately after (0 h), and 2, 4, and 24 h after the completion of trials N and H. GSH was increased immediately after trial N. T-AOC was lower 4 h after trial H than trial N. Hs-cTnT was elevated from 0 to 4 h and returned to baseline 24 h after both trials. CTnI was increased after trial H; peaked at 2-4 h and returned to below the detection by 24 h. The overall redox status was balanced under normoxic conditions, and exercise-induced cTn release did not deviate. However, the protective effects of antioxidant were weaker in the hypoxic state than normoxic, and the stress on the myocardium induced by intermittent exercise was transiently aggravated.

  12. Risk factors for lower extremity injuries among half marathon and marathon runners of the Lage Landen Marathon Eindhoven 2012: A prospective cohort study in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Poppel, D; de Koning, J; Verhagen, A P; Scholten-Peeters, G G M

    2016-02-01

    To determine risk factors for running injuries during the Lage Landen Marathon Eindhoven 2012. Prospective cohort study. Population-based study. This study included 943 runners. Running injuries after the Lage Landen Marathon. Sociodemographic and training-related factors as well as lifestyle factors were considered as potential risk factors and assessed in a questionnaire 1 month before the running event. The association between potential risk factors and injuries was determined, per running distance separately, using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. In total, 154 respondents sustained a running injury. Among the marathon runners, in the univariate model, body mass index ≥ 26 kg/m(2), ≤ 5 years of running experience, and often performing interval training, were significantly associated with running injuries, whereas in the multivariate model only ≤ 5 years of running experience and not performing interval training on a regular basis were significantly associated with running injuries. Among marathon runners, no multivariate model could be created because of the low number of injuries and participants. This study indicates that interval training on a regular basis may be recommended to marathon runners to reduce the risk of injury. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The comparison of quadriceps muscle strength between sprint runner and normal un-trained individuals (Determined by Kin-Com

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talebian Moghaddam S "

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: It is suggested that quadriceps muscle has an important role in stability & mobility of Knee joint in athletics and normal individuals; therefore, the purpose of this study was evaluation of the strength in Power Athletics (PA and Normal Un-trained Individuals (NUI groups. Methods and Materials: 31 Females (20 NUI & 11 PA participated in this study. For measuring the strength, each individual performed 5 continuous concentric-eccentric maximal contraction at angular velocities of 90°/s, 135°/s. Twenty five percent of each individual (Maximum Voluntary Isometric Contraction MVIC was determined and used as Pre-load force. Results: Averages concentric & eccentric torques were greater in PA group in comparison with NUI group. The significant difference (P<0.02 existed between PA and NUI groups. Average concentric torques of quadriceps muscle decreased (with increasing of speed from 90°/s to 135°/s and average eccentric torques increased. Average eccentric torques were greater (P<0.01 in PA & NUI groups in comparison with average concentric torques. Conclusion: PA group strength was greater in comparison with NUI group. This is possibly due to the type of muscle fibers in this group have (greater type II fibers. Accordingly, it is critical to consider the role of eccentric exercise in PA group for preventing sport injury.

  14. Effects of endurance training only versus same-session combined endurance and strength training on physical performance and serum hormone concentrations in recreational endurance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Moritz; Mykkänen, Olli-Pekka; Doma, Kenji; Mazzolari, Raffaele; Nyman, Kai; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of endurance training only (E, n = 14) and same-session combined training, when strength training is repeatedly preceded by endurance loading (endurance and strength training (E+S), n = 13) on endurance (1000-m running time during incremental field test) and strength performance (1-repetition maximum (1RM) in dynamic leg press), basal serum hormone concentrations, and endurance loading-induced force and hormone responses in recreationally endurance-trained men. E was identical in the 2 groups and consisted of steady-state and interval running, 4-6 times per week for 24 weeks. E+S performed additional mixed-maximal and explosive-strength training (2 times per week) immediately following an incremental running session (35-45 min, 65%-85% maximal heart rate). E and E+S decreased running time at week 12 (-8% ± 5%, p = 0.001 and -7% ± 3%, p force (-5% to -9%, p = 0.032 to 0.001) and testosterone and cortisol responses (18%-47%, p = 0.013 to p benefits when strength training was performed repeatedly after endurance training compared with endurance training only. This was supported by similar acute responses in force and hormonal measures immediately post-endurance loading after the training with sustained 1RM strength in E+S.

  15. Metabolic factors limiting performance in marathon runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoport, Benjamin I

    2010-10-21

    Each year in the past three decades has seen hundreds of thousands of runners register to run a major marathon. Of those who attempt to race over the marathon distance of 26 miles and 385 yards (42.195 kilometers), more than two-fifths experience severe and performance-limiting depletion of physiologic carbohydrate reserves (a phenomenon known as 'hitting the wall'), and thousands drop out before reaching the finish lines (approximately 1-2% of those who start). Analyses of endurance physiology have often either used coarse approximations to suggest that human glycogen reserves are insufficient to fuel a marathon (making 'hitting the wall' seem inevitable), or implied that maximal glycogen loading is required in order to complete a marathon without 'hitting the wall.' The present computational study demonstrates that the energetic constraints on endurance runners are more subtle, and depend on several physiologic variables including the muscle mass distribution, liver and muscle glycogen densities, and running speed (exercise intensity as a fraction of aerobic capacity) of individual runners, in personalized but nevertheless quantifiable and predictable ways. The analytic approach presented here is used to estimate the distance at which runners will exhaust their glycogen stores as a function of running intensity. In so doing it also provides a basis for guidelines ensuring the safety and optimizing the performance of endurance runners, both by setting personally appropriate paces and by prescribing midrace fueling requirements for avoiding 'the wall.' The present analysis also sheds physiologically principled light on important standards in marathon running that until now have remained empirically defined: The qualifying times for the Boston Marathon.

  16. Metabolic factors limiting performance in marathon runners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin I Rapoport

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Each year in the past three decades has seen hundreds of thousands of runners register to run a major marathon. Of those who attempt to race over the marathon distance of 26 miles and 385 yards (42.195 kilometers, more than two-fifths experience severe and performance-limiting depletion of physiologic carbohydrate reserves (a phenomenon known as 'hitting the wall', and thousands drop out before reaching the finish lines (approximately 1-2% of those who start. Analyses of endurance physiology have often either used coarse approximations to suggest that human glycogen reserves are insufficient to fuel a marathon (making 'hitting the wall' seem inevitable, or implied that maximal glycogen loading is required in order to complete a marathon without 'hitting the wall.' The present computational study demonstrates that the energetic constraints on endurance runners are more subtle, and depend on several physiologic variables including the muscle mass distribution, liver and muscle glycogen densities, and running speed (exercise intensity as a fraction of aerobic capacity of individual runners, in personalized but nevertheless quantifiable and predictable ways. The analytic approach presented here is used to estimate the distance at which runners will exhaust their glycogen stores as a function of running intensity. In so doing it also provides a basis for guidelines ensuring the safety and optimizing the performance of endurance runners, both by setting personally appropriate paces and by prescribing midrace fueling requirements for avoiding 'the wall.' The present analysis also sheds physiologically principled light on important standards in marathon running that until now have remained empirically defined: The qualifying times for the Boston Marathon.

  17. Which spike train distance is most suitable for distinguishing rate and temporal coding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satuvuori, Eero; Kreuz, Thomas

    2018-04-01

    It is commonly assumed in neuronal coding that repeated presentations of a stimulus to a coding neuron elicit similar responses. One common way to assess similarity are spike train distances. These can be divided into spike-resolved, such as the Victor-Purpura and the van Rossum distance, and time-resolved, e.g. the ISI-, the SPIKE- and the RI-SPIKE-distance. We use independent steady-rate Poisson processes as surrogates for spike trains with fixed rate and no timing information to address two basic questions: How does the sensitivity of the different spike train distances to temporal coding depend on the rates of the two processes and how do the distances deal with very low rates? Spike-resolved distances always contain rate information even for parameters indicating time coding. This is an issue for reasonably high rates but beneficial for very low rates. In contrast, the operational range for detecting time coding of time-resolved distances is superior at normal rates, but these measures produce artefacts at very low rates. The RI-SPIKE-distance is the only measure that is sensitive to timing information only. While our results on rate-dependent expectation values for the spike-resolved distances agree with Chicharro et al. (2011), we here go one step further and specifically investigate applicability for very low rates. The most appropriate measure depends on the rates of the data being analysed. Accordingly, we summarize our results in one table that allows an easy selection of the preferred measure for any kind of data. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A comparative study of classroom and online distance modes of official vocational education and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Soblechero, Miguel Vicente; González Gaya, Cristina; Hernández Ramírez, Juan José

    2014-01-01

    The study discussed in this paper had two principal objectives. The first was to evaluate the distance model of official vocational education and training offered by means of a virtual learning platform. The second was to establish that both on-site classroom and online distance modes of vocational education and training can be seen as complementary in terms of responding to the majority of modern educational needs. We performed a comparative study using data and results gathered over the course of eleven academic years for 1,133 of our students enrolled in an official vocational education and training program, leading to the awarding of a certificate as an Administrative Management Expert. The classes were offered by the Alfonso de Avellaneda Vocational Education and Training School, located in the city of Alcalá de Henares near Madrid, Spain. We offered classes both in traditional classroom mode and through online distance learning. This paper begins with a descriptive analysis of the variables we studied; inferential statistical techniques are subsequently applied in order to study the relationships that help form the basis for the conclusions reached. This study's results provide evidence that a broad offering of vocational education and training opportunities will facilitate access to such learning for students who require it, regardless of their age, employment status, or personal circumstances, with the online distance mode playing a fundamental role while also yielding results equivalent to those observed for classroom instruction.

  19. A comparative study of classroom and online distance modes of official vocational education and training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Vicente López Soblechero

    Full Text Available The study discussed in this paper had two principal objectives. The first was to evaluate the distance model of official vocational education and training offered by means of a virtual learning platform. The second was to establish that both on-site classroom and online distance modes of vocational education and training can be seen as complementary in terms of responding to the majority of modern educational needs. We performed a comparative study using data and results gathered over the course of eleven academic years for 1,133 of our students enrolled in an official vocational education and training program, leading to the awarding of a certificate as an Administrative Management Expert. The classes were offered by the Alfonso de Avellaneda Vocational Education and Training School, located in the city of Alcalá de Henares near Madrid, Spain. We offered classes both in traditional classroom mode and through online distance learning. This paper begins with a descriptive analysis of the variables we studied; inferential statistical techniques are subsequently applied in order to study the relationships that help form the basis for the conclusions reached. This study's results provide evidence that a broad offering of vocational education and training opportunities will facilitate access to such learning for students who require it, regardless of their age, employment status, or personal circumstances, with the online distance mode playing a fundamental role while also yielding results equivalent to those observed for classroom instruction.

  20. New approaches to training specialists of preschool education in the transition to distance learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadiia Lazarovych

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the features of professional training of pre-school education indistance learning. The efficiency of the use of a mixed form of education for students of “earlychildhood education”. Describes the main conditions for successful use ofdistance learningfor the training of future teachers.Key words: information space, distance learning, information technology (IT, earlychildhood education, personal and psychological characteristics, educational features

  1. Age, training, and previous experience predict race performance in long-distance inline skaters, not anthropometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2012-02-01

    The association of characteristics of anthropometry, training, and previous experience with race time in 84 recreational, long-distance, inline skaters at the longest inline marathon in Europe (111 km), the Inline One-eleven in Switzerland, was investigated to identify predictor variables for performance. Age, duration per training unit, and personal best time were the only three variables related to race time in a multiple regression, while none of the 16 anthropometric variables were related. Anthropometric characteristics seem to be of no importance for a fast race time in a long-distance inline skating race in contrast to training volume and previous experience, when controlled with covariates. Improving performance in a long-distance inline skating race might be related to a high training volume and previous race experience. Also, doing such a race requires a parallel psychological effort, mental stamina, focus, and persistence. This may be reflected in the preparation and training for the event. Future studies should investigate what motivates these athletes to train and compete.

  2. Strength Training for Middle- and Long-Distance Performance: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Nicolas; Mujika, Inigo; Arvisais, Denis; Roubeix, Marie; Binet, Carl; Bosquet, Laurent

    2018-01-01

    To assess the net effects of strength training on middle- and long-distance performance through a meta-analysis of the available literature. Three databases were searched, from which 28 of 554 potential studies met all inclusion criteria. Standardized mean differences (SMDs) were calculated and weighted by the inverse of variance to calculate an overall effect and its 95% confidence interval (CI). Subgroup analyses were conducted to determine whether the strength-training intensity, duration, and frequency and population performance level, age, sex, and sport were outcomes that might influence the magnitude of the effect. The implementation of a strength-training mesocycle in running, cycling, cross-country skiing, and swimming was associated with moderate improvements in middle- and long-distance performance (net SMD [95%CI] = 0.52 [0.33-0.70]). These results were associated with improvements in the energy cost of locomotion (0.65 [0.32-0.98]), maximal force (0.99 [0.80-1.18]), and maximal power (0.50 [0.34-0.67]). Maximal-force training led to greater improvements than other intensities. Subgroup analyses also revealed that beneficial effects on performance were consistent irrespective of the athletes' level. Taken together, these results provide a framework that supports the implementation of strength training in addition to traditional sport-specific training to improve middle- and long-distance performance, mainly through improvements in the energy cost of locomotion, maximal power, and maximal strength.

  3. Cracking the code for maintaining quality training in Olympic distance triathlon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myburgh, Corrie; Hansen, Tobias; Holm Beck, Anders

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: High-quality training is a key determinant of performance in the Olympic distance triathlon and is potentially influenced by a unique array of context-specific biopsychosocial factors. Our objective was to explore and describe these factors among squad members of a university-based, el...

  4. Changes in blood morphology and chosen biochemical parameters in ultra-marathon runners during a 100-km run in relation to the age and speed of runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Jastrzębski

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of the study was to reveal morphology, electrolyte and chosen biochemical parameters in terms of health risk in runners in reference to their age and running speed in the case of running a distance of 100 km, which occur after 12 h or 24 h of recovery. Material and Methods: Fourteen experienced, male, amateur, ultra-marathon runners, divided into two age and two speed groups took part in the 100-km run. Blood samples for analyses indexes were collected from the ulnar vein just before the run, after 25 km, 50 km, 75 km and 100 km, as well as 12 h and 24 h after termination of the run. Results: The sustained ultramarathon run along with the distance covered (p < 0.05 caused an increase in myoglobin (max 90-fold, bilirubin (max 2.8-fold and total antioxidant status (max 1.15-fold, which also continued during the recovery. Significant changes in the number of white blood cells were observed with each sequential course and could be associated with muscle damage. The electrolyte showed changes towards slight hyperkalemia, but no changes in natrium and calcium concentrations. There were no significant differences between the age and speed groups for all the parameters after completing the 100-km run as well as after 12 h and 24 h of recovery. Conclusions: Considering changes in blood morphology and chosen biochemical parameters in ultra-marathon runners during a 100-km run it can be stated that such an exhausting effort may be dangerous for human health due to metabolic changes and large damage to the organs. Negative metabolic changes are independent of age of an ultramarathon runner and occur both in younger (32±5.33 years and older participants (50.56±9.7 years. It can be concluded that organ damage and negative metabolic changes during a 100-km run occur similarly in participants less experienced as well as in well trained runners. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2016;29(5:801–814

  5. Validation, verification and evaluation of a Train to Train Distance Measurement System by means of Colored Petri Nets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Haifeng; Liu, Jieyu; Schnieder, Eckehard

    2017-01-01

    Validation, verification and evaluation are necessary processes to assure the safety and functionality of a system before its application in practice. This paper presents a Train to Train Distance Measurement System (TTDMS), which can provide distance information independently from existing onboard equipment. Afterwards, we proposed a new process using Colored Petri Nets to verify the TTDMS system functional safety, as well as to evaluate the system performance. Three main contributions are carried out in the paper: Firstly, this paper proposes a formalized TTDMS model, and the model correctness is validated using state space analysis and simulation-based verification. Secondly, corresponding checking queries are proposed for the purpose of functional safety verification. Further, the TTDMS performance is evaluated by applying parameters in the formal model. Thirdly, the reliability of a functional prototype TTDMS is estimated. It is found that the procedure can cooperate with the system development, and both formal and simulation-based verifications are performed. Using our process to evaluate and verify a system is easier to read and more reliable compared to executable code and mathematical methods. - Highlights: • A new Train to Train Distance Measurement System. • New approach verifying system functional safety and evaluating system performance by means of CPN. • System formalization using the system property concept. • Verification of system functional safety using state space analysis. • Evaluation of system performance applying simulation-based analysis.

  6. ANALYSIS OF EFFICIENCY OF THE DISTANCE TRAINING SYSTEM IN THE PROCESS OF COMPETENCY VERIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kravtsovа L.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Kherson State Maritime Academy conducts experimental research on the integration of the educational process on the basis of a competence approach to the state educational policy of Ukraine. One of the directions of this work is the creation and implementation of a distance education platform to support the educational process in the Kherson Maritime Academy. The distance learning system of KSMA is built on the basis of the open Moodle platform, which offers a wide range of opportunities to fully support the learning process in the remote environment, namely, a variety of ways of presenting the training material, testing knowledge and monitoring progress. The peculiarity of the developed system is that the effectiveness of the training strategy is provided by taking into account the psychological characteristics of the user contingent, the ultimate goal of training, the motivation of the whole process of education, namely, the specifics of the seaman's profession. One of the main directions of the work was a complete replacement of the classical methodology for conducting the examination session for complex testing, which covers all disciplines from 1 to 5 courses of study and is conducted on the basis of a distance education platform. The results of the experiment showed that own site of distance learning is an effective tool for studying the teaching material and for testing the quality of its learning.

  7. Predisposing factors to lateral ankle injury in male comrades marathon runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hiemstra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: More than two million people experience ankle ligament traumaeach year in the United States. Half of these are severe ligament sprains, however verylittle is known about the factors that predispose individuals to these injuries. The purpose of this study, (which was conducted as an undergraduate research project,was to find a correlation between the characteristics of height, weight and limbdominance and lateral ankle ligament injuries. Method: A  retrospective study was conducted on 114 ultra distance runners whoparticipated in the 2006 Comrades Marathon. During race registration, the runners’ height and weight were measuredafter answering a questionnaire regarding their training. Results: 114 runners responded to the questionnaire. From this cohort, 38 (33.3% had sustained previous lateral ankle injuries. Of these 38 injuries, 47.4% of the injuries occurred on the runner’s dominant limb and 36.8% occurred on thenon-dominant side. 15.8% of the runners sustained previous ankle injuries to both ankles. There was a low negative correlation coefficient of 0.24 with regards to weight as a risk factor. This indicated that the power of the correlationwas 5.93%. The study demonstrates that there is no correlation between an increase in weight and an increase in theincidence of ankle injury. The correlation coefficient indicated a low correlation between an increase in height and the incidence of ankle injury. However, the power of the correlation at 18.37% makes inaccurate any attempt to predict the height at which a runner would be at most risk for lateral ankle injury. Conclusion: Height and weight are not risk factors predisposing subjects to lateral ankle injury. In addition, the studyillustrated that there was no effect of limb dominance on the incidence of lateral ankle injury.

  8. The essence of training trainers in the context of distance education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudy Alexandra Molina-Hurtado

    2016-12-01

    mobilization of knowledge in concrete situations and different scenarios. The objective of the article focuses on the importance of the training of trainers in the context of distance education so characterized, on the one hand, the trainer as a person who refines and contemplates his practice from a surrounding reality that impels the formation of values ethical, human, political, economic, social and immersed cultic in the role of teachers in the twenty-first century, and on the other hand, teachers in training as critical beings, advocates and peacemakers to think as teachers for life. Under this, a reflection between teacher training and professional development to the challenges that teachers face in training regarding their teaching practices supported from teaching and affirmed in the classroom through the teaching process is presented under the staging of competitions and performances from processes that generate autonomy to face the complex world in which we live.

  9. Distance learning in english teacher's training: Reflexion activities in discussion forums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Costa Ribas

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article we problematize the issues related to teacher’s training in the English language amidst the emersion of new literacies, especially those mediated by digital technologies, based in my experience both as a teacher and a researcher in Degree Courses in Languages, both classroom based and distance learning. Based in referential about teachers’ beliefs, reflexive practices, new literacies, and teachers’ training for the use of technologies, we focus our experience in the development of institutional material for a distance learning teaching degree course, describing some of the activities developed as discussion forums. With that, our aim is to discuss ways to promote the reflection of future teachers about their beliefs and experiences, and the interaction of these with teaching concepts and theories, allowing them to establish connections between theory and practice during practice - in other words, through their engagement in online activities of a subject in a Supervised Internship in English.

  10. [Problem based learning by distance education and analysis of a training system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dury, Cécile

    2004-12-01

    This article presents and analyses a training system aiming at acquiring skills in nursing cares. The aims followed are the development: --of an active pedagogic method: learning through problems (LTP); --of the interdisciplinary and intercultural approach, the same problems being solves by students from different disciplines and cultures; --of the use of the new technologies of information and communication (NTIC) so as to enable a maximal "distance" cooperation between the various partners of the project. The analysis of the system shows that the pedagogic aims followed by LTP are reached. The pluridisciplinary and pluricultural approach, to be optimal, requires great coordination between the partners, balance between the groups of students from different countries and disciplines, training and support from the tutors in the use of the distance teaching platform.

  11. Ultra-obligatory running among ultramarathon runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Martin D; Krouse, Rhonna

    2018-01-01

    Participants in the Ultrarunners Longitudinal TRAcking (ULTRA) Study were asked to answer "yes" or "no" to the question "If you were to learn, with absolute certainty, that ultramarathon running is bad for your health, would you stop your ultramarathon training and participation?" Among the 1349 runners, 74.1% answered "no". Compared with those answering "yes", they were younger (p life meaning (p = 0.0002) scores on the Motivations of Marathoners Scales. Despite a high health orientation, most ultramarathon runners would not stop running if they learned it was bad for their health as it appears to serve their psychological and personal achievement motivations and their task orientation such that they must perceive enhanced benefits that are worth retaining at the risk of their health.

  12. Improved training for target detection using Fukunaga-Koontz transform and distance classifier correlation filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbakary, M. I.; Alam, M. S.; Aslan, M. S.

    2008-03-01

    In a FLIR image sequence, a target may disappear permanently or may reappear after some frames and crucial information such as direction, position and size related to the target are lost. If the target reappears at a later frame, it may not be tracked again because the 3D orientation, size and location of the target might be changed. To obtain information about the target before disappearing and to detect the target after reappearing, distance classifier correlation filter (DCCF) is trained manualy by selecting a number of chips randomly. This paper introduces a novel idea to eliminates the manual intervention in training phase of DCCF. Instead of selecting the training chips manually and selecting the number of the training chips randomly, we adopted the K-means algorithm to cluster the training frames and based on the number of clusters we select the training chips such that a training chip for each cluster. To detect and track the target after reappearing in the field-ofview ,TBF and DCCF are employed. The contduced experiemnts using real FLIR sequences show results similar to the traditional agorithm but eleminating the manual intervention is the advantage of the proposed algorithm.

  13. The GRONORUN 2 study: effectiveness of a preconditioning program on preventing running related injuries in novice runners. The design of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredeweg, Steef W; Zijlstra, Sjouke; Buist, Ida

    2010-09-01

    Distance running is a popular recreational exercise. It is a beneficial activity for health and well being. However, running may also cause injuries, especially of the lower extremities. In literature there is no agreement what intrinsic and extrinsic factors cause running related injuries (RRIs). In theory, most RRIs are elicited by training errors, this too much, too soon. In a preconditioning program runners can adapt more gradually to the high mechanical loads of running and will be less susceptible to RRIs. In this study the effectiveness of a 4-week preconditioning program on the incidence of RRIs in novice runners prior to a training program will be studied. The GRONORUN 2 (Groningen Novice Running) study is a two arm randomized controlled trial studying the effect of a 4-week preconditioning (PRECON) program in a group of novice runners. All participants wanted to train for the recreational Groningen 4-Mile running event. The PRECON group started a 4-week preconditioning program with walking and hopping exercises 4 weeks before the start of the training program. The control (CON) and PRECON group started a frequently used 9-week training program in preparation for the Groningen 4-Mile running event.During the follow up period participants registered their running exposure, other sporting activities and running related injuries in an Internet based running log. The primary outcome measure was the number of RRIs. RRI was defined as a musculoskeletal ailment or complaint of the lower extremities or back causing a restriction on running for at least three training sessions. The GRONORUN 2 study will add important information to the existing running science. The concept of preconditioning is easy to implement in existing training programs and will hopefully prevent RRIs especially in novice runners. The Netherlands National Trial Register NTR1906. The NTR is part of the WHO Primary Registries.

  14. The GRONORUN 2 study: effectiveness of a preconditioning program on preventing running related injuries in novice runners. The design of a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bredeweg Steef W

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Distance running is a popular recreational exercise. It is a beneficial activity for health and well being. However, running may also cause injuries, especially of the lower extremities. In literature there is no agreement what intrinsic and extrinsic factors cause running related injuries (RRIs. In theory, most RRIs are elicited by training errors, this too much, too soon. In a preconditioning program runners can adapt more gradually to the high mechanical loads of running and will be less susceptible to RRIs. In this study the effectiveness of a 4-week preconditioning program on the incidence of RRIs in novice runners prior to a training program will be studied. Methods/Design The GRONORUN 2 (Groningen Novice Running study is a two arm randomized controlled trial studying the effect of a 4-week preconditioning (PRECON program in a group of novice runners. All participants wanted to train for the recreational Groningen 4-Mile running event. The PRECON group started a 4-week preconditioning program with walking and hopping exercises 4 weeks before the start of the training program. The control (CON and PRECON group started a frequently used 9-week training program in preparation for the Groningen 4-Mile running event. During the follow up period participants registered their running exposure, other sporting activities and running related injuries in an Internet based running log. The primary outcome measure was the number of RRIs. RRI was defined as a musculoskeletal ailment or complaint of the lower extremities or back causing a restriction on running for at least three training sessions. Discussion The GRONORUN 2 study will add important information to the existing running science. The concept of preconditioning is easy to implement in existing training programs and will hopefully prevent RRIs especially in novice runners. Trial registration The Netherlands National Trial Register NTR1906. The NTR is part of the WHO Primary

  15. Distance Learning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Braddock, Joseph

    1997-01-01

    A study reviewing the existing Army Distance Learning Plan (ADLP) and current Distance Learning practices, with a focus on the Army's training and educational challenges and the benefits of applying Distance Learning techniques...

  16. Transcontinental Training: The IAEA Launches its Distance Assisted Training Online Learning Platform — DATOL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusuf, Omar

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed remarkable developments in the field of nuclear medicine; hybrid imaging techniques, novel analytical methods and computed tomography procedures have been broadly adopted by medical facilities around the world. Similarly, there has been a growing awareness that the safe management and use of radiation in medicine depends on the presence of welltrained medical professionals. While IAEA Member States have made noteworthy investments in nuclear medicine, gaps in expertise remain, especially in low and middle income countries. In some regions, the nuclear medicine discipline has not yet reached the critical mass necessary to justify targeted training programmes. In other regions, the available training programmes do not satisfy the evolving requirements of the field

  17. Transcontinental Training: The IAEA Launches its Distance Assisted Training Online Learning Platform — DATO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yusuf, Omar

    2014-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed remarkable developments in the field of nuclear medicine; hybrid imaging techniques, novel analytical methods and computed tomography procedures have been broadly adopted by medical facilities around the world. Similarly, there has been a growing awareness that the safe management and use of radiation in medicine depends on the presence of welltrained medical professionals. While IAEA Member States have made noteworthy investments in nuclear medicine, gaps in expertise remain, especially in low and middle income countries. In some regions, the nuclear medicine discipline has not yet reached the critical mass necessary to justify targeted training programmes. In other regions, the available training programmes do not satisfy the evolving requirements of the field

  18. Increased Vertebral Bone Mineral in Response to Reduced Exercise in Amenorrheic Runners

    OpenAIRE

    Lindberg, Jill S.; Hunt, Marjorie M.; Wade, Charles E.; Powell, Malcolm R.; Ducey, Diane E.

    1987-01-01

    Seven female runners found to have exercise-induced amenorrhea and decreased bone mineral were reevaluated after 15 months. During the 15-month period, four runners took supplemental calcium and reduced their weekly running distance by 43%, resulting in an average 5% increase in body weight, increased estradiol levels and eumenorrhea. Bone mineral content increased from 1.003±0.097 to 1.070±0.089 grams per cm.2 Three runners continued to have amenorrhea, with no change in running distance or ...

  19. NSAID and other analgesic use by endurance runners during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. An increasing popularity of ultra-endurance events coupled with excessive or inappropriate non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use during such events could pose considerable potential risks to runners' health. Objective. To evaluate the incidence of NSAID and other analgesic use in distance ...

  20. Improving Distance Courses: Understanding Teacher Trainees and their Learning Styles for the design of Teacher Training Courses and Materials at a Distance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisham DZAKIRIA

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Literature on distance education and teacher education seems to show that what we do not know about Distance Teacher Trainees (DTT and their learning process involved exceeds what we know about it. As more DTT enroll in distance education programmes globally, distance education providers and institutions will witness trainees coming with different backgrounds and experiences begin to take advantage of this learning opportunities. One important variable in the effectiveness of distance learning is the preference of the distance learner for a particular learning mode. A key to maintaining distance learners participation in learning lies in understanding the Learning Styles Preferences (LSP and the processes involved.This is also true for teacher training. There is much greater variation in the range of LSP and how to address them when preparing distance training materials and courses. The primary purpose of this paper is to propose ways in which individual learning differences should be accommodated when designing instructional learning materials in print for DTTs. Kolb’s (1984 model on learning cycle and styles are discussed to provide instructional design guidelines which accommodate each stage of the learning cycles and individual differences between DTT in processing and presenting information and knowledge. In addition, issues on teacher education, distance learning, individual differences, and ways in which the ‘differences’ can be accommodated when designing learning materials for DTT are also discussed. This paper resonates the idea and belief that if attempts are made to match learning styles of DTTs and andragogy with content to be learned, distance teacher educators (DTEs and instructors can develop better instructional materials with greater prospects of success. Getting to know and understand the teacher trainees and their learning process involved must first be addressed to facilitate the diverse needs of the Malaysian teacher

  1. INFLUENCE OF INJURY ON DYNAMIC POSTURAL CONTROL IN RUNNERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meardon, Stacey; Klusendorf, Anna; Kernozek, Thomas

    2016-06-01

    Injury has been linked with altered postural control in active populations. The association between running injury and dynamic postural control has not been examined. The purpose of this study was to examine dynamic postural control in injured and uninjured runners using the Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT), Time to Stabilization (TTS) of ground reaction forces following a single-leg landing, and postural stability indices reflecting the fluctuations in GRFs during single-leg landing and stabilization tasks (forward and lateral hop). It was hypothesized that dynamic postural control differences would exist between runners with a history of injury that interrupted training for ≥7 days (INJ) when compared to runners without injury (CON). Case-control study. Twenty-two INJ (14 F, 8 M; 23.7 ± 2.1 y; 22.3 ± 2.8 kg/m2; 29.5 ± 16.3 mi/wk) currently running > 50% pre-injury mileage without pain were compared with twenty-two matched CON (14F, 8M; 22.7 ± 1.2 y; 22.7 ± 2.7 kg/m2; 31.2 ± 19.6 mi/wk). INJ group was stratified by site of injury into two groups (Hip/Thigh/Knee and Lower Leg/Ankle/Foot) for secondary analysis. Leg length-normalized anterior, posterolateral, and posteromedial reach distances on the SEBT, medial/lateral and anterior/posterior ground reaction force TTS, directional postural stability indices, and a composite dynamic postural stability index (DPSI), were assessed using mixed model ANOVA (α=0.05) and effect sizes (d). No group X direction interaction or group differences were observed for the SEBT (p=0.51, 0.71) or TTS (p=0.83, 0.72) measures. A group X direction interaction was found for postural stability indices during the forward landing task (ppostural stability index (VPSI) (p=0.01 for both, d=0.80, 0.95) and DPSI (p=0.01, 0.02, d=0.75, 0.93) when compared to CON suggesting impaired balance control. A group X direction interaction was also found for postural stability indices during the lateral landing

  2. Relay Runners Catch The Rays

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Athletes sizzled around CERN on Wednesday 19 May at the 34th annual relay race. On one of the warmest days of the year so far, sunkissed competitors ran for the finish line and then straight for the drinks table. The Shabbys were on fire again, hurtling across the line first in a time of 10 min. 42.6 sec. and making an even stronger claim to being hailed as the traditional winners of the race with their fourth triumph in a row. Also on form were the Lynx Runners who won the Veteran's trophy, continuing their winning ways since 2002 and placing 29th overall. Ildefons Magrans of the ALICE Quarks on the Loose team ran the fastest 1000m in a time of 2 min. 47 sec. Second-placed Charmilles Technologies won the Open category in a time of 11 min. 03 sec., taking the prize for teams whose members work in different departments or who come from outside CERN. The OPALadies won the women's trophy and placed 48th. With 9 trophies up for grabs, more than 300 people in 55 teams ran the fun run, covering distances of 1000m ...

  3. The running pattern and its importance in running long-distance gears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarosław Hoffman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The running pattern is individual for each runner, regardless of distance. We can characterize it as the sum of the data of the runner (age, height, training time, etc. and the parameters of his run. Building the proper technique should focus first and foremost on the work of movement coordination and the power of the runner. In training the correct running steps we can use similar tools as working on deep feeling. The aim of this paper was to define what we can call a running pattern, what is its influence in long-distance running, and the relationship between the training technique and the running pattern. The importance of a running pattern in long-distance racing is immense, as the more distracted and departed from the norm, the greater the harm to the body will cause it to repetition in long run. Putting on training exercises that shape the technique is very important and affects the running pattern significantly.

  4. Long-term success and risk for marathon runners; Langzeiterfolg und Risiko der Marathonlaeufer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schueller-Weidekamm, C. [Medizinische Universitaet Wien (Austria). AKH, Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie und Muskuloskelettale Radiologie, Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik

    2010-05-15

    The popularity of marathon running has increased during recent years, which is reflected by the dramatic increase in the number of competitions and participants. Running a marathon itself does not usually cause any severe lesions of the joints but the problems mostly occur during training prior to the marathon. Before the event runners often question whether they can successfully take part in the competition and cope with the pain that might occur during running. In addition to the rare acute trauma, which is in general caused by falls or slipping, chronic injuries are of particular relevance for long distance running. This article describes the typical patterns of injuries to long distance runners, the positive effects of running a marathon and the risk factors for injuries. (orig.) [German] Die Popularitaet des Marathonlaufens ist in den letzten Jahren gestiegen, was an der rasch zunehmenden Anzahl von Wettbewerben und Teilnehmern erkennbar ist. Nicht der Marathonlauf an sich ist belastend fuer die Gelenke, sondern meistens spielen sich die Probleme schon im Vorfeld waehrend der Trainingsvorbereitung ab. Eine der wichtigsten Fragen fuer jeden Laeufer vor dem grossen Ereignis ist, ob es trotz der haeufig auftretenden Gelenkschmerzen waehrend des Laufens moeglich ist, am Marathonlauf erfolgreich teilzunehmen. Neben den seltenen akuten Verletzungen, die durch Stuerze oder Fehltritte zu Stande kommen, stehen bei den Langstreckenlaeufern eher die chronischen Verletzungen im Vordergrund. Dieser Artikel beschreibt die typischen Verletzungsmuster bei Langstreckenlaeufern, die positiven Effekte des Marathonlaufens sowie die Risikofaktoren fuer eine erhoehte Verletzungsgefahr. (orig.)

  5. Increased vertebral bone mineral in response to reduced exercise in amenorrheic runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindberg, J S; Powell, M R; Hunt, M M; Ducey, D E; Wade, C E

    1987-01-01

    Seven female runners found to have exercise-induced amenorrhea and decreased bone mineral were reevaluated after 15 months. During the 15-month period, four runners took supplemental calcium and reduced their weekly running distance by 43%, resulting in an average 5% increase in body weight, increased estradiol levels and eumenorrhea. Bone mineral content increased from 1.003+/-0.097 to 1.070+/-0.089 grams per cm.(2) Three runners continued to have amenorrhea, with no change in running distance or body weight. Estradiol levels remained abnormally low and there was no significant change in the bone mineral content, although all three took supplemental calcium. We found that early osteopenia associated with exercise-induced menstrual dysfunction improved when runners reduced their running distance, gained weight and became eumenorrheic.

  6. Foot-strike haemolysis in an ultramarathon runner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazal, Abid A; Whittemore, Mary S; DeGeorge, Katharine C

    2017-12-13

    This case report describes mild anaemia and intravascular haemolysis in an otherwise healthy 41-year-old ultramarathon runner. In long-distance endurance athletes, trace gastrointestinal bleeding and plasma volume expansion are recognised sources of mild anaemia, often found incidentally. However, repetitive forceful foot striking can lead to blood cell lysis in the feet, resulting in a mild macrocytic anaemia and intravascular haemolysis, as was demonstrated in the patient described herein. Mild anaemia in runners, often called 'runner's pseudoanaemia', is typically clinically insignificant and does not require intervention. However, an unexplained anaemia can cause undue worry for otherwise healthy patients and lead to costly further testing, providing an argument against routine testing with complete blood counts in healthy, asymptomatic patients. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  7. A distance assisted training programme for nuclear medicine technologists methodology and international experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, Heather

    2002-01-01

    The Distance Assisted Training Programme for Nuclear Medicine Technologists (DAT) has been developed and coordinated through West mead Hospital, Sydney and directed under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The objective of the program is to provide primarily developing countries with teaching resources for development of technologist education and a framework for the delivery of training courses that can be adapted to best suit local need. Careful planning and development of learning materials, translation to several languages and program implementation have resulted in >400 technologists in 24 countries currently participating in the course of study within Asia, Latin America and Africa. The development and implementation of suitable assessment techniques has provided a structure for technologists to attain a common basic standard in competencies across the regions. Graduates have better opportunities to further their education as well as contribute to improved use of advancing technologies in nuclear medicine (Au)

  8. Distributed interactive virtual environments for collaborative experiential learning and training independent of distance over Internet2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alverson, Dale C; Saiki, Stanley M; Jacobs, Joshua; Saland, Linda; Keep, Marcus F; Norenberg, Jeffrey; Baker, Rex; Nakatsu, Curtis; Kalishman, Summers; Lindberg, Marlene; Wax, Diane; Mowafi, Moad; Summers, Kenneth L; Holten, James R; Greenfield, John A; Aalseth, Edward; Nickles, David; Sherstyuk, Andrei; Haines, Karen; Caudell, Thomas P

    2004-01-01

    Medical knowledge and skills essential for tomorrow's healthcare professionals continue to change faster than ever before creating new demands in medical education. Project TOUCH (Telehealth Outreach for Unified Community Health) has been developing methods to enhance learning by coupling innovations in medical education with advanced technology in high performance computing and next generation Internet2 embedded in virtual reality environments (VRE), artificial intelligence and experiential active learning. Simulations have been used in education and training to allow learners to make mistakes safely in lieu of real-life situations, learn from those mistakes and ultimately improve performance by subsequent avoidance of those mistakes. Distributed virtual interactive environments are used over distance to enable learning and participation in dynamic, problem-based, clinical, artificial intelligence rules-based, virtual simulations. The virtual reality patient is programmed to dynamically change over time and respond to the manipulations by the learner. Participants are fully immersed within the VRE platform using a head-mounted display and tracker system. Navigation, locomotion and handling of objects are accomplished using a joy-wand. Distribution is managed via the Internet2 Access Grid using point-to-point or multi-casting connectivity through which the participants can interact. Medical students in Hawaii and New Mexico (NM) participated collaboratively in problem solving and managing of a simulated patient with a closed head injury in VRE; dividing tasks, handing off objects, and functioning as a team. Students stated that opportunities to make mistakes and repeat actions in the VRE were extremely helpful in learning specific principles. VRE created higher performance expectations and some anxiety among VRE users. VRE orientation was adequate but students needed time to adapt and practice in order to improve efficiency. This was also demonstrated successfully

  9. Development of a more fish-tolerant turbine runner, advanced hydropower turbine project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, T.C.; Hecker, G.E.

    1997-02-01

    Alden Research Laboratory, Inc. (ARL) and Northern Research and Engineering Corporation (NREC) conducted a research program to develop a turbine runner which will minimize fish injury and mortality at hydroelectric projects. ARL?NREC have developed a runner shape which minimizes the number of blade leading edges, reduces the pressure versus time and the velocity versus distance gradients within the runner, minimizes or eliminates the clearance between the runner and runner housing, and maximizes the size of the flow passages, all with minimal penalty on turbine efficiency. An existing pump impeller provided the starting point for developing the fish tolerant turbine runner. The Hidrostal pump is a single bladed combined screw/centrifugal pump which has been proven to transport fish with minimal injury. The focus of the ARL/NREC research project was to develop a new runner geometry which is effective in downstream fish passage and hydroelectric power generation. A flow of 1,000 cfs and a head in the range of 75 ft to 100 ft were selected for conceptual design of the new runner. Conceptual design of the new runner began with a re-evaluation of studies which have been previously conducted to identify probable sources of injury to fish passing through hydraulic turbines. Criteria relative to hydraulic characteristics which are favorable for fish passage were prepared based on a reassessment of the available information. Important criteria used to develop the new runner design included low pressure change rates, minimum absolute pressures, and minimum shear. Other criteria which are reflected in the runner design are a minimum number of blades (only two), minimum total length of leading edges, and large flow passages. 86 figs., 5 tabs

  10. Six Weeks Habituation of Simulated Barefoot Running Induces Neuromuscular Adaptations and Changes in Foot Strike Patterns in Female Runners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khowailed, Iman Akef; Petrofsky, Jerrold; Lohman, Everett; Daher, Noha

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to examine the effects of a 6-week training program of simulated barefoot running (SBR) on running kinetics in habitually shod (wearing shoes) female recreational runners. Material/Methods Twelve female runners age 25.7±3.4 years gradually increased running distance in Vibram FiveFingers minimal shoes over a 6-week period. The kinetic analysis of treadmill running at 10 Km/h was performed pre- and post-intervention in shod running, non-habituated SBR, and habituated SBR conditions. Spatiotemporal parameters, ground reaction force components, and electromyography (EMG) were measured in all conditions. Results Post-intervention data indicated a significant decrease across time in the habituation SBR for EMG activity of the tibialis anterior (TA) in the pre-activation and absorptive phase of running (Prunning, unhabituated SBR, and habituated SBR. Six weeks of SBR was associated with a significant decrease in the loading rates and impact forces. Additionally, SBR significantly decrease the stride length, step duration, and flight time, and stride frequency was significantly higher compared to shod running. Conclusions The findings of this study indicate that changes in motor patterns in previously habitually shod runners are possible and can be accomplished within 6 weeks. Non-habituation SBR did not show a significant neuromuscular adaptation in the EMG activity of TA and GAS as manifested after 6 weeks of habituated SBR. PMID:26166443

  11. Nutrient Intake by Ultramarathon Runners: Can They Meet Recommendations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wardenaar, F.C.; Vries, de J.H.M.; Witkamp, R.F.; Mensink, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to investigate whether ultramarathon runners were able to meet nutrition recommendations during a training period and on a competition day. Methods: In preparation for a 60 or 120 km ultramarathon covering a varied terrain, male and female ultramarathon

  12. Exploring Experience of Runners with Sports Tracking Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuru, Armagan

    2016-01-01

    Running has been perceived as an easy way of becoming physically active. Over time, amateur runners start to use technology to keep track of their training and be aware of their improvement. In that sense, this article explores runners’ experience with activity tracking technology. After giving a

  13. Diet intake and endurance performance in Kenyan runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Dirk Lund

    2004-01-01

    Training and competing at elite as well as sub-elite level requires an optimal functioning of the body. This review looks at the case of the Kenyan runners, who consume a relatively high-quality diet based on vegetable sources with maize and kidney beans as the staple foods. The diet is high in c...

  14. Sports drink consumption and dental erosion among amateur runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Leonardo S; Veiga, Lais; Nery, Victor S; Nery, Caio C; Antunes, Lívia A

    2017-01-01

    This cross-sectional study assessed the prevalence and potential risk factors for dental erosion in amateur athletes at running events. After a sample calculation, 108 runners from the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, were selected and examined for dental wear by a single trained and calibrated evaluator (kappa = 1.00). To identify risk factors, the runners were interviewed by using a standardized, semi-structured questionnaire. The average (SD) age of the runners was 34.2 (11.45), and the prevalence of dental erosion was 19.4%. Gastroesophageal reflux, running frequency per week, and time expended during competition were associated with dental erosion (P dental erosion was not significant (P > 0.05). In conclusion, dental erosion was not associated with use of isotonic drinks. However, frequency of exercise per week and gastroesophageal reflux were risk factors for dental erosion.

  15. EFFECT OF WOBBLE BOARD BALANCE TRAINING PROGRAM ON STATIC BALANCE, DYNAMIC BALANCE & TRIPLE HOP DISTANCE IN MALE COLLEGIATE BASKETBALL ATHLETE

    OpenAIRE

    Neeraj Panwar, MPT (Sports); Gaurav Kadyan, MPT (Sports); Aseem Gupta, MPT (Sports); Ravinder Narwal, MPT (Ortho,Cardiopulmonary)

    2014-01-01

    Aim & Objective: The aim of the study was to determine the effect of wobble board balance training program on static & dynamic balance & on triple hop distance in male collegiate basketball athletes. Methodology: Fifty healthy basketball players within a age group of 18-22 yrs. were randomly selected with a baseline BESS score between 6 to 14 & modified SEBT score equal to or greater than 94 (till 100) and they randomly divided into control (n-25) & training group (n-25).The training grou...

  16. Melanoma markers in marathon runners: increase with sun exposure and physical strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richtig, Erika; Ambros-Rudolph, Christina M; Trapp, Michael; Lackner, Helmut K; Hofmann-Wellenhof, Rainer; Kerl, Helmut; Schwaberger, Guenther

    2008-01-01

    Marathon runners seem to have an increased melanoma risk. To identify potential melanoma markers. 150 marathon runners volunteered to take part in the skin cancer screening campaign. After the runners completed a questionnaire about melanoma risk factors, types of sportswear and training programs, they received a total skin examination. The number of lentigines and nevi on the left shoulder and the left buttock were counted in each participant using templates in standardized positions. The potential association of training sportswear and training parameters with the number of lentigines and nevi on the left shoulder was evaluated. The mean number of lentigines on the left shoulder was 19.6 +/- 18.2 (SD), whereas no lentigines were found on the left buttock (p = 0.000). The number of nevi also differed significantly between the 2 localizations with higher numbers on the left shoulder (p = 0.000). While lifetime sunburn history and type of sportswear correlated with the number of lentigines, training parameters had an impact on the number of nevi. Independent of their mean weekly running time, runners with higher heart rates while training, higher training velocities and higher physical strain indexes showed more nevi on the shoulder than the other runners (p = 0.029, 0.046, 0.038, respectively). Sun exposure and high physical strain lead to an increase in melanoma markers such as lentigines and nevi in marathon runners. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. TEACHERS TRAINING THROUGH DISTANCE MODE IN ALLAMA IQBAL OPEN UNIVERSITY (AIOU PAKISTAN: A case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabi Bux JUMANI

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Allama Iqbal Open University (AIOU is the first Open University in Asia and established in 1974 on the model of UKOU. AIOU uses different media for the delivery of instruction. It has a well established Institute of Educational Technology which has radio and TV production facilities and advance level of work in computer technology. AOU offers diversified courses and programs ranging from literacy to PhD level in its four faculties. The Faculty of Education established in 1984 is the largest faculties of the university with 47% enrolment of the university and contributor of 53% to the total annual university exchequer.At present 30 programs and 135 courses in its eight department/Institutes being run by the faculty. The Faculty offers variety of programs in education and training of teachers and educational professionals. These academic programs range from primary teachers training to M.S/M.Phil and Ph.D. levels in various areas of specializations by its following departments: Secondary Teacher Education, Distance Non Formal and Continuing Education, Educational Planning, Policy studies and leadership, Early Childhood Education and Elementary Education, Special Education and Science Education. The faculty has also chalked out B.Ed (Honors 4 year degree programme in various specializations. The mode of delivery is absolutely a distance learning mode and various components are devised as teaching methodology which is based on; Study centers and information technology, Radio and TV programs, tutorials, assignments/formative evaluation, workshops/practical, face to face teaching, internship and final examination. The university employs non-formal method of correspondence, radio and television broadcasts, special textbooks and reading materials prepared on self-learning basis, part-time teachers (tutors engaged nearest to the student's residences. And a system of study centers for applied training is spread throughout Pakistan.There is an effective

  18. Predictor variables for a half marathon race time in recreational male runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Barandun, Ursula; Lepers, Romuald; Rosemann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate predictor variables of anthropometry, training, and previous experience in order to predict a half marathon race time for future novice recreational male half marathoners. Eighty-four male finishers in the 'Half Marathon Basel' completed the race distance within (mean and standard deviation, SD) 103.9 (16.5) min, running at a speed of 12.7 (1.9) km/h. After multivariate analysis of the anthropometric characteristics, body mass index (r = 0.56), suprailiacal (r = 0.36) and medial calf skin fold (r = 0.53) were related to race time. For the variables of training and previous experience, speed in running of the training sessions (r = -0.54) were associated with race time. After multivariate analysis of both the significant anthropometric and training variables, body mass index (P = 0.0150) and speed in running during training (P = 0.0045) were related to race time. Race time in a half marathon might be partially predicted by the following equation (r(2) = 0.44): Race time (min) = 72.91 + 3.045 * (body mass index, kg/m(2)) -3.884 * (speed in running during training, km/h) for recreational male runners. To conclude, variables of both anthropometry and training were related to half marathon race time in recreational male half marathoners and cannot be reduced to one single predictor variable.

  19. Exercise training in transgenic mice is associated with attenuation of early breast cancer growth in a dose-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorming Goh

    Full Text Available Epidemiological research suggests that regular physical activity confers beneficial effects that mediate an anti-tumor response and may reduce cancer recurrence. It is unclear what amount of physical activity is necessary to exert such a protective effect and what mechanisms are involved. We investigated the effects of voluntary wheel running on tumor progression and cytokine gene expression in the transgenic polyoma middle T oncoprotein (PyMT mouse model of invasive breast cancer. Runners showed significantly reduced tumor sizes compared with non-runners after 3 weeks of running (p ≤ 0.01, and the greater the running distance the smaller the tumor size (Pearson's r = -0.61, p ≤ 0.04, R(2 = 0.38. Mice running greater than 150 km per week had a significantly attenuated tumor size compared with non-runners (p ≤ 0.05. Adipose tissue mass was inversely correlated with tumor size in runners (Pearson's r = -0.77, p = 0.014 but not non-runners. Gene expression of CCL22, a cytokine associated with recruitment of immunosuppressive T regulatory cells, was decreased in tumors of runners compared to non-runners (p ≤ 0.005. No differences in tumor burden or metastatic burden were observed between runners and non-runners after ten weeks of running when the study was completed. We conclude that voluntary wheel running in PyMT mice correlates with an attenuation in tumor progression early during the course of invasive breast cancer. This effect is absent in the later stages of overwhelming tumor burden even though cytokine signaling for immunosuppressive regulatory T cells was down regulated. These observations suggest that the initiation of moderate exercise training for adjunctive therapeutic benefit early in the course of invasive breast cancer should be considered for further investigation.

  20. On the importance of the distance measures used to train and test knowledge-based potentials for proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Martin; Koehl, Patrice; Røgen, Peter

    2014-01-01

    (PPD), while the other had the set of all distances filtered to reflect consistency in an ensemble of decoys (PPE). We tested four types of metric to characterize the distance between the decoy and the native structure, two based on extrinsic geometry (RMSD and GTD-TS*), and two based on intrinsic...... geometry (Q* and MT). The corresponding eight potentials were tested on a large collection of decoy sets. We found that it is usually better to train a potential using an intrinsic distance measure. We also found that PPE outperforms PPD, emphasizing the benefits of capturing consistent information...

  1. Predictive importance of anthropometric and training data in recreational male Ironman triathletes and marathon runners: comment on the study by Gianoli, et al. (2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burtscher, Martin; Gatterer, Hannes

    2013-04-01

    Anthropometric and training data have been reported as statistically significant predictors of race performance in endurance events. However, it is well established that physiological characteristics, i.e., maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), the use of a high percentage of VO2max during sustained exercise, and work efficiency are predominant predictors of performance in those events. Thus, the essential issue is whether the anthropometric and training data give additional predictive power beyond these other measures.

  2. Time Evolution of Sublingual Microcirculatory Changes in Recreational Marathon Runners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arstikyte, Justina; Vaitkaitiene, Egle; Vaitkaitis, Dinas

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate changes in sublingual microcirculation induced by a marathon race. Thirteen healthy male controls and 13 male marathon runners volunteered for the study. We performed sublingual microcirculation, using a Cytocam-IDF device (Braedius Medical, Huizen, Netherlands), and systemic hemodynamic measurements four times: 24 hours prior to their participation in the Kaunas Marathon (distance: 41.2 km), directly after finishing the marathon, 24 hours after the marathon, and one week after the marathon. The marathon runners exhibited a higher functional capillary density (FCD) and total vascular density of small vessels at the first visit compared with the controls. Overall, we did not find any changes in sublingual microcirculation of the marathon runners at any of the other visits. However, in a subgroup of marathon runners with a decreased FCD compared to the subgroup with increased FCD, the subgroup with decreased FCD had shorter running time (190.37 ± 30.2 versus 221.80 ± 23.4 min, p = 0.045), ingested less fluids (907 ± 615 versus 1950 ± 488 mL, p = 0.007) during the race, and lost much more weight (−2.4 ± 1.3 versus −1.0 ± 0.8 kg, p = 0.041). Recreational marathon running is not associated with an alteration of sublingual microcirculation. However, faster running and dehydration may be crucial for further impairing microcirculation. PMID:28828386

  3. Time Evolution of Sublingual Microcirculatory Changes in Recreational Marathon Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pranskunas, Andrius; Arstikyte, Justina; Pranskuniene, Zivile; Bernatoniene, Jurga; Kiudulaite, Inga; Vaitkaitiene, Egle; Vaitkaitis, Dinas; Brazaitis, Marius

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to evaluate changes in sublingual microcirculation induced by a marathon race. Thirteen healthy male controls and 13 male marathon runners volunteered for the study. We performed sublingual microcirculation, using a Cytocam-IDF device (Braedius Medical, Huizen, Netherlands), and systemic hemodynamic measurements four times: 24 hours prior to their participation in the Kaunas Marathon (distance: 41.2 km), directly after finishing the marathon, 24 hours after the marathon, and one week after the marathon. The marathon runners exhibited a higher functional capillary density (FCD) and total vascular density of small vessels at the first visit compared with the controls. Overall, we did not find any changes in sublingual microcirculation of the marathon runners at any of the other visits. However, in a subgroup of marathon runners with a decreased FCD compared to the subgroup with increased FCD, the subgroup with decreased FCD had shorter running time (190.37 ± 30.2 versus 221.80 ± 23.4 min, p = 0.045), ingested less fluids (907 ± 615 versus 1950 ± 488 mL, p = 0.007) during the race, and lost much more weight (-2.4 ± 1.3 versus -1.0 ± 0.8 kg, p = 0.041). Recreational marathon running is not associated with an alteration of sublingual microcirculation. However, faster running and dehydration may be crucial for further impairing microcirculation.

  4. Time Evolution of Sublingual Microcirculatory Changes in Recreational Marathon Runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrius Pranskunas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to evaluate changes in sublingual microcirculation induced by a marathon race. Thirteen healthy male controls and 13 male marathon runners volunteered for the study. We performed sublingual microcirculation, using a Cytocam-IDF device (Braedius Medical, Huizen, Netherlands, and systemic hemodynamic measurements four times: 24 hours prior to their participation in the Kaunas Marathon (distance: 41.2 km, directly after finishing the marathon, 24 hours after the marathon, and one week after the marathon. The marathon runners exhibited a higher functional capillary density (FCD and total vascular density of small vessels at the first visit compared with the controls. Overall, we did not find any changes in sublingual microcirculation of the marathon runners at any of the other visits. However, in a subgroup of marathon runners with a decreased FCD compared to the subgroup with increased FCD, the subgroup with decreased FCD had shorter running time (190.37±30.2 versus 221.80±23.4 min, p=0.045, ingested less fluids (907±615 versus 1950±488 mL, p=0.007 during the race, and lost much more weight (-2.4±1.3 versus -1.0±0.8 kg, p=0.041. Recreational marathon running is not associated with an alteration of sublingual microcirculation. However, faster running and dehydration may be crucial for further impairing microcirculation.

  5. Relação entre incontinência urinária em mulheres atletas corredoras de longa distância e distúrbio alimentar The relationship between urinary incontinence and eating disorders in female long-distance runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maíta Poli de Araújo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a ocorrência de incontinência urinária (IU em atletas corredoras de longa distância e associá-la a presença ou não de distúrbios alimentares. MÉTODOS: Um total de 37 corredoras de longa distância completaram os questionários ¨International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form¨ (ICIQ-SF e o ¨Eating Attitudes Test¨ (EAT-26. O teste do absorvente de uma hora foi realizado para quantificar a perda de urina. A análise estatística das variáveis contínuas foi feita pelo teste t pareado, ou teste de Mann-Whitney. RESULTADOS: 23 atletas (62,2% tinham queixa de perda de urina. A média dos escores do ICIQ-SF neste grupo foi de 4,03 ± 5,06. Houve diferença estatisticamente significante entre o valor do teste do absorvente (p=0,02 e o resultado do questionário EAT-26 (p=0,03 no grupo de atletas incontinentes. CONCLUSÃO: Encontramos IU em atletas corredoras de longa distância e houve correlação com distúrbios alimentar. Técnicos devem estar atentos para a ocorrência de eventuais distúrbios e encaminhar tais atletas para uma equipe multidisciplinar.BACKGROUND: To determine the prevalence of urinary incontinence in female long-distance runners and to compare it with the presence or not of eating disorders. Methods - A total of 37 women have completed the International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire-Short Form (ICIQ-SF and the short version of the Eating Attitudes Test (EAT-26. A one-hour pad test was performed to determine urine loss. Mean values of continuous variables were compared using an independent sample t-test or the Mann-Whitney U test. RESULTS: 23 athletes (62.2% reported urine loss. The mean of the ICIQ-SF was 4.03 ± 5.06. There was a significant relation between the 1-hour pad test (p=0.02 and eating disorders (p=0.03. CONCLUSIONS: There was urinary incontinence in female long-distance runners and a correlation with eating disorders. Coaches should improve their knowledge

  6. What do recreational runners think about risk factors for running injuries? A descriptive study of their beliefs and opinions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saragiotto, Bruno Tirotti; Yamato, Tiê Parma; Lopes, Alexandre Dias

    2014-10-01

    Qualitative study based on semi-structured interviews. To describe the beliefs and opinions of runners about risk factors associated with running injuries. Despite the health benefits of running, a high prevalence of injury has been reported in runners. Preventive strategies for running injuries may be more successful with a better knowledge of runners' beliefs. A semi-structured interview of recreational runners was based on the question, "What do you think can cause injuries in runners?" Analysis of the interviews was performed in 3 steps: (1) organizing the data into thematic units, (2) reading and reorganizing the data according to frequency of citation, and (3) interpreting and summarizing the data. The runner interviews were continued until no new beliefs and opinions of runners regarding injuries were being added to the data, indicating saturation of the topic. A total of 95 recreational runners (65 men, 30 women) between the ages of 19 and 71 years were interviewed. Of those interviewed, the average running experience was 5.5 years and approximately 45% had experienced a running-related injury in the past. The factors suggested by the runners were divided into extrinsic and intrinsic factors. The most cited extrinsic factors were "not stretching," "excess of training," "not warming up," "lack of strength," and "wearing the wrong shoes." For the intrinsic factors, the main terms cited were "not respecting the body's limitations" and "foot-type changes." Recreational runners mainly attributed injury to factors related to training, running shoes, and exceeding the body's limits. Knowing the factors identified in this study may contribute to the development of better educational strategies to prevent running injuries, as some of the runners' beliefs are not supported by the research literature.

  7. Isokinetic analysis of ankle and ground reaction forces in runners and triathletes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Mariana Silva Luna

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze and compare the vertical component of ground reaction forces and isokinetic muscle parameters for plantar flexion and dorsiflexion of the ankle between long-distance runners, triathletes, and nonathletes. METHODS: Seventy-five males with a mean age of 30.26 (±6.5 years were divided into three groups: a triathlete group (n=26, a long-distance runner group (n = 23, and a non-athlete control group. The kinetic parameters were measured during running using a force platform, and the isokinetic parameters were measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. RESULTS: The non-athlete control group and the triathlete group exhibited smaller vertical forces, a greater ground contact time, and a greater application of force during maximum vertical acceleration than the long-distance runner group. The total work (180º/s was greater in eccentric dorsiflexion and concentric plantar flexion for the non-athlete control group and the triathlete group than the long-distance runner group. The peak torque (60º/s was greater in eccentric plantar flexion and concentric dorsiflexion for the control group than the athlete groups. CONCLUSIONS: The athlete groups exhibited less muscle strength and resistance than the control group, and the triathletes exhibited less impact and better endurance performance than the runners.

  8. Dosimetric characteristics of the Novoste Beta-Cath 90Sr/Y source trains at submillimeter distances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roa, Dante E.; Song Haijun; Yue Ning; D'Errico, Francesco; Nath, Ravinder

    2004-01-01

    Measurements were performed on the 30, 40, and 60 mm 90 Sr/Y β-emitter source trains used in the Novoste Beta-Cath system to determine their dosimetric characteristics at submillimeter distances and provide the necessary TG-60 parameters for mapping their dose distributions. These measurements were carried out in a Solid Water TM phantom where MD55-2 Gafchromic TM films were placed in direct contact with a 5 French (F) catheter used for the 30 and 60 mm source trains and a 3.5F catheter used for thinner 30 and 40 mm source trains. A data set consisted of three pieces of Gafchromic film irradiated for periods of 1.5, 5, and 10 minutes, respectively. This 3-film irradiation technique provided reliable dose data at short, intermediate and long distances from a source train. Three data sets per source train were collected in this study. For the 30 mm source train with a 5F catheter, data were collected with the source axis at proximal (0.41 mm) and distal (1.19 mm) positions to the film surface in order to investigate dosimetric effects due to the off centering of the source train lumen within the catheter. Absolute doses were determined by calibrating the Gafchromic film in a high-energy electron beam from a radiotherapy accelerator. The absolute dose rates at a distance of 2 mm along the source trains transverse axis were found to be within 13.7% of the values provided by Novoste. Radial dose functions were within 13% compared to 90 Sr/Y source train data constructed from Soares' 90 Sr/Y single seed data and within 17% and 25% compared to Monte Carlo data by Ye et al., and Wang et al., respectively. Discrepancies of 33% and 19% were observed at short radial distances (≤1 mm) between the Novoste Monte Carlo and the 3.5F and 5F catheter measured data, respectively. The source off centering data showed higher dose contribution from the source train at its distal rather than proximal position. Radial dose function comparisons between the Novoste Monte Carlo and the

  9. USE OF DISTANCE EDUCATION BY CHRISTIAN RELIGION TO TRAIN, EDIFY AND EDUCATE ADHERENTS

    OpenAIRE

    P. SATYANARAYANA; Emmanuel DK MEDURI

    2013-01-01

    Distance Education has been growing fast, in a marvelously diverse fashion. The efficiency, effectiveness, validity and utility of distance teaching-learning are on increase. All communities and religious groups are making use of distance learning methodology to upgrade their knowledge, skills and attitudes. Christina educational institutions in all the parts of the world are being benefitted by the Christian distance education programme. Christian websites make up more than 80 percent of...

  10. On the importance of the distance measures used to train and test knowledge-based potentials for proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Carlsen

    Full Text Available Knowledge-based potentials are energy functions derived from the analysis of databases of protein structures and sequences. They can be divided into two classes. Potentials from the first class are based on a direct conversion of the distributions of some geometric properties observed in native protein structures into energy values, while potentials from the second class are trained to mimic quantitatively the geometric differences between incorrectly folded models and native structures. In this paper, we focus on the relationship between energy and geometry when training the second class of knowledge-based potentials. We assume that the difference in energy between a decoy structure and the corresponding native structure is linearly related to the distance between the two structures. We trained two distance-based knowledge-based potentials accordingly, one based on all inter-residue distances (PPD, while the other had the set of all distances filtered to reflect consistency in an ensemble of decoys (PPE. We tested four types of metric to characterize the distance between the decoy and the native structure, two based on extrinsic geometry (RMSD and GTD-TS*, and two based on intrinsic geometry (Q* and MT. The corresponding eight potentials were tested on a large collection of decoy sets. We found that it is usually better to train a potential using an intrinsic distance measure. We also found that PPE outperforms PPD, emphasizing the benefits of capturing consistent information in an ensemble. The relevance of these results for the design of knowledge-based potentials is discussed.

  11. Does running with or without changes in diet reduce fat mass in novice runners?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus O.; Videbæk, Solvej; Hansen, Mette

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to explore how average weekly running distance, combined with changes in diet habits and reasons to take up running, influence fat mass. METHODS: Fat mass was assessed by bioelectrical impedance at baseline and after 12 months in 538 novice runners included...... in a 1-year observational prospective follow-up study. During follow-up, running distance for each participant was continuously measured by GPS while reasons to take up running and diet changes were assessed trough web-based questionnaires. Loss of fat mass was compared between runners covering...... an average of 5 km or more per week and those running shorter distances. RESULTS: Runners who took up running to lose weight and ran over 5 km per week in average over a one-year period combined with a diet change reduced fat mass by -5.58 kg (95% CI: -8.69; -2.46; P

  12. Risk factors and most common traumatic injuries in people who practice long-distance running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lewandowska

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Undoubtedly, the fashion of running comes. Initially people used to run for fun, pleasure, to forget about worries or problems. With time, however, was no longer just about the idea itself, people more and more fascinated with jogging went one step further. At the same time, not realizing how important changes may occur in their body. These are usually overload or inflammatory changes. The aim of this paper is to present the most frequent injuries of long distance runners and the main predisposing factors for their trauma. The work will also cover the possibility of prevention of these injuries. The most important factors predisposing to injury include: the awareness of running people, the overweight and obesity, the incorrect running pattern and the inappropriate training plan. The consequences of these factors may be: runner's knee, leg overload syndrome, Achilles tendonitis, plantar fasciitis, fatigue fractures, and iliotibial-band syndrome. The injuries are, unfortunately, inscribed into the life of every runner, regardless of the level of advancement. However, it is worth remembering that they can be effectively prevented, and at the moment of their appearance, effectively heal. The injuries of runners depend primarily on their approach to practicing this form of physical activity, to a lesser extent from genetic or mechanical factors.

  13. Effects of Low Versus Moderate Glycemic Index Diets on Aerobic Capacity in Endurance Runners: Three-Week Randomized Controlled Crossover Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Durkalec-Michalski

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The glycemic index (GI of ingested carbohydrates may influence substrate oxidation during exercise and athletic performance. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effect of low- and moderate-GI three-week diets on aerobic capacity and endurance performance in runners. We conducted a randomized crossover feeding study of matched diets differing only in GI (low vs. moderate in 21 endurance-trained runners. Each participant consumed both, low- (LGI and moderate-GI (MGI high-carbohydrate (~60% and nutrient-balanced diets for three weeks each. At the beginning and end of each diet, participants had their aerobic capacity and body composition measured and performed a 12-min running test. After LGI, time to exhaustion during incremental cycling test (ICT and distance covered in the 12-min run were significantly increased. The MGI diet led to an increase in maximal oxygen uptake ( V ˙ O2max, but no performance benefits were found after the MGI diet. The LGI and MGI diets improved time and workload at gas exchange threshold (GET during ICT. The results indicate that a three-week high-carbohydrate LGI diet resulted in a small but significant improvement in athletic performance in endurance runners. Observed increase in V ˙ O2max on MGI diet did not affect performance.

  14. Foot pronation is not associated with increased injury risk in novice runners wearing a neutral shoe : a 1-year prospective cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Oestergaard; Buist, Ida; Parner, Erik Thorlund; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard; Sorensen, Henrik; Lind, Martin; Rasmussen, Sten

    Objective To investigate if running distance to first running-related injury varies between foot postures in novice runners wearing neutral shoes. Design A 1-year epidemiological observational prospective cohort study. Setting Denmark. Participants A total of 927 novice runners equivalent to 1854

  15. Concentration of Ca in blood of amateur runners using NAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovacs, L.; Zamboni, C. B.; Metairon, S. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN / CNEN - SP) - Centro do Reator de Pesquisas Av. Professor Lineu Prestes, 2242 - 05508-000 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Nunes, L. A. S.; Lourenco, T. F.; Macedo, D. V. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas - UNICAMP - Laboratorio de Bioquimica do Exercicio - LABEX Cidade Universitaria 13083-970 - Campinas, SP Brazil - Caixa-Postal: 6109 (Brazil)

    2013-05-06

    In this study the Ca levels were determined in amateur runners blood at LABEX (Laboratorio de Bioquimica do Exercicio - UNICAMP, Brazil), using Neutron Activation Analyses (NAA) technique. The range established at rest (162 - 410 mgL{sup -1}) when compared with control group (51 - 439 mgL{sup -1}) suggests that there is a dependency of these limits in the function of the adopted physical training.

  16. USE OF DISTANCE EDUCATION BY CHRISTIAN RELIGION TO TRAIN, EDIFY AND EDUCATE ADHERENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. SATYANARAYANA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Distance Education has been growing fast, in a marvelously diverse fashion. The efficiency, effectiveness, validity and utility of distance teaching-learning are on increase. All communities and religious groups are making use of distance learning methodology to upgrade their knowledge, skills and attitudes. Christina educational institutions in all the parts of the world are being benefitted by the Christian distance education programme. Christian websites make up more than 80 percent of the websites of the world’s five major religions. Globalisation is facilitating many Christian pioneers of multiple denominations to adopt distance teaching-learning beyond all frontiers and barriers. Baker’s guide to Christian Distance Education profiles upto 150 Christian degree programmes. Some of the popular programmes are indicated here. Christians who constitute 2.33 percent of Indian population are educationally benefitted by Christian distance education programmes. A major Christian distance education programme is offered by Andhra Christian Theological College. Its four distance courses attract students all over the country. How quality is important in distance teaching and learning is highlighted here.

  17. Technical and tactical action modeling of highly trained athletes specializing in breaststroke swimming at various length distances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Pilipko

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: definition of model parameters of technical and tactical actions of highly trained athletes specializing in breaststroke swimming at various length distances. Material & Methods: analysis of literary sources, video shooting, timing, methods of mathematical data processing. The contingent of the surveyed was made up of athletes who specialized in distances of 50, 100 and 200 meters in breaststroke swimming and had the level of sports qualification of master of sports of Ukraine, Master of Sports of International grade. Result: authors found that the technical and tactical actions of highly trained athletes during the swim of distances of 50, 100 and 200 meters by the breaststroke have their own characteristics; degree of influence of speed, pace and "step" of the strokes cycle on the result of swim distances of 50, 100 and 200 meters is determined; developed their model characteristics. Conclusion: the definition of distance specialization in breaststroke swimming should be carried out taking into account the compliance of individual indicators of technical and tactical actions of athletes to model parameters.

  18. Examining injury risk and pain perception in runners using minimalist footwear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Michael; Elashi, Maha; Newsham-West, Richard; Taunton, Jack

    2014-08-01

    This study examines the effect of progressive increases in footwear minimalism on injury incidence and pain perception in recreational runners. One hundred and three runners with neutral or mild pronation were randomly assigned a neutral (Nike Pegasus 28), partial minimalist (Nike Free 3.0 V2) or full minimalist shoe (Vibram 5-Finger Bikila). Runners underwent baseline testing to record training and injury history, as well as selected anthropometric measurements, before starting a 12-week training programme in preparation for a 10 km event. Outcome measures included number of injury events, Foot and Ankle Disability (FADI) scores and visual analogue scale pain rating scales for regional and overall pain with running. 99 runners were included in final analysis with 23 injuries reported; the neutral shoe reporting the fewest injuries (4) and the partial minimalist shoe (12) the most. The partial minimalist shoe reported a significantly higher rate of injury incidence throughout the 12-week period. Runners in the full minimalist group reported greater shin and calf pain. Running in minimalist footwear appears to increase the likelihood of experiencing an injury, with full minimalist designs specifically increasing pain at the shin and calf. Clinicians should exercise caution when recommending minimalist footwear to runners otherwise new to this footwear category who are preparing for a 10 km event. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  19. THE TECHNOLOGIES OF DESIGNING THE DISTANCE COURSE FOR PRIMARY SCHOOL TEACHERS’ TRAINING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliia Katasonova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays distance education became one of the main forms of studying and became popular in many countries of the world. The rash development of technologies, increasing of the education significance and global informatization makes distance learning one of the foreground directions of the modern education. Nowadays distance learning became an essential part of Primary school teachers professional preparation. There is an actual question of the creation and the implementation of distance courses to the preparation of the future primary school teachers, that will significantly increase the quality of studying. During the process of analyzing the literature, it was identified, that distance learning – is a pedagogical technology. That`s why, before beginning the designing of a distance course, you should remember the main components of a pedagogical technology. In the work «The components of the pedagogical technology», written by V. Bespalko, the foundation of the pedagogical techoogy is considered to be didactics. Modern scientists (V. Kremen, Ye. Rybalko, S. Sysoieva, A. Khutorskyi support the position of V.Bespalko and connect didactic principles with the organization of distance learning.The closest to our understanding appeared some theoretical positions of the work by V. Bikov, V. Kuharenko e.tc., that is called «The technologies of developing of the distance course:tutorial»,in which they offer five stages of designing of the online course: analysis, designing, development, implementation, valuation. During designing of a course, you also should remember about technical methods of realization of the distance education. V. Vishnivsky mentions, that a choice of the e-learning platform is a very important step. Modern platforms divide into two big categories: commercial and free. Try to determine basic steps of designing and creating of a distance course for the future Primary school teachers and use the result during the creation of the

  20. General Operational Review of Distance Education. Discussion Paper, Education and Training Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkridge, David

    In fiscal years 1963-1985, the World Bank had experience with 32 investments in distance education projects in developing nations, including Malaysia, the Ivory Coast, Thailand, the Philippines, Malawi, and China. (Distance education is an educational delivery system that uses a variety of media and a system of feedback to provide education to…

  1. Excellent results for CERN runners

    CERN Multimedia

    Hervé Cornet, CERN Running club

    2015-01-01

    As in previous years, thirty or so runners from CERN took part in the Tour du Canton de Genève (more information here, in French only).   The men’s team that won the corporate challenge prize in the Tour du Canton de Genève: (standing, left to right) Patrick Villeton, Phil Hebda, Mika Vesterinen, Steffen Doebert; (sitting, left to right) Guillaume Michet and Camille Ruiz-Llamas. The Laboratory was represented in the corporate challenge by five teams, one of which came first in the men’s category. CERN’s other teams also put in good performances, with one finishing fourth in the men's category and another seventh in the mixed category. Runners from CERN did well in the individual classifications too. All the results can be found here. The Maxi Race team: (left to right) Sebastien Ponce, Alain Cauphy, Klaus Hanke and Christophe Biot. Elsewhere, four CERN runners competed in the finals of the Annecy Maxi Race (site in French only...

  2. COMPARATIVE KINEMATIC MEASURES OF TREADMILL RUNNING WITH OR WITHOUT BODY WEIGHT SUPPORT IN RUNNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duane Millslagle

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Treadmill walking and running using a supportive harness has been used as a training method to rehabilitate injured patients' walking or running gait. Comparison of full weight support (FWS and body weight support (BWS kinematic measures in competitive runners has received little attention. The purpose of this study was to compare selected FWS to BWS kinematic measures in healthy competitive runners. Ten male runners (age = 21.4 ± 1.5 years with a training regimen averaging 64 km per week at 3.8 m·s-1 participated. All participants ran three 3-minute trials. The randomized trial conditions were: FWS, 20% BWS, and 40% BWS. All conditions were videotaped with 2 cameras and a 21-point, 3-D model was generated for analysis. From the position-time data, cycle length (CL, cycle frequency (CF, time of contact (TC, hip-, knee-, ankle- range of motion in degrees (H-ROM, K-ROM, and A-ROM, respectively, and vertical displacement of the center of mass (COM were derived and compared. With increasing support conditions, cycle length increased. Cycle frequency, hip and ankle angle ranges, and COM vertical displacement decreased (p 0.05. BWS running produced significant changes in selected kinematic measures. These changes may provide insight into runners' behavior when using BWS in training or recovery from competition. Additional investigation of BWS training affect with competitive runners would be recommended

  3. Multimedia Exercise Training Program Improves Distance Walked, Heart Rate Recovery, and Self-efficacy in Cardiac Surgery Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Wei; Ou, Shu-Hua; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Chang, Yue-Cune; Kao, Chi-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Patient education has been shown to be more effective when delivered using multimedia than written materials. However, the effects of using multimedia to assist patients in cardiac rehabilitation have not been investigated. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of an inpatient multimedia exercise training program on distance walked in the 6-minute walking test (6MWT), heart rate recovery, and walking self-efficacy of patients who had undergone heart surgery. For this longitudinal quasi-experimental study, 60 consecutive patients were assigned to an experimental (n = 20; inpatient multimedia exercise training program) or control (n = 40; routine care) group. Data were collected at 3 times (before surgery, 1 to 2 days before hospital discharge, and 1 month after hospital discharge) and analyzed with the generalized estimating equation approach. Most subjects were men (66.7%), had a mean age of 61.32 ± 13.4 years and left ventricular ejection fraction of 56.96% ± 13.28%, and underwent coronary artery bypass graft surgery (n = 34, 56.7%). Subjects receiving the exercise training program showed significantly greater improvement than those in the control group in the 6MWT walking distance (P self-efficacy (P = .002) at hospital discharge. Furthermore, the intervention effects on 6MWT distance (P self-efficacy (P exercise training program safely improved distance walked in the 6MWT, heart rate recovery, and self-efficacy at hospital discharge in patients after heart surgery and maintained their improvement in 6MWT and self-efficacy 1 month later.

  4. Bioenergetic constraints on tactical decision making in middle distance running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A M; Whipp, B J

    2002-04-01

    The highest velocity that a runner can sustain during middle distance races is defined by the intersection of the runner's individual velocity-time curve and the distance-time curve. The velocity-time curve is presumably fixed at the onset of a race; however, whereas the race distance is ostensibly fixed, the actual distance-time curve is not. That is, it is possible for a runner to run further than the race distance if he or she runs wide on bends in track races. In this instance, the point of intersection of the individual velocity-time curve and the distance-time curve will move downwards and to the right, reducing the best average velocity that can be sustained for the distance. To illustrate this point, the race tactics used by the gold and silver medallists at 800 m and 5000 m in the Sydney Olympics were analysed. The paths taken by the runners were carefully tracked and the total distance they covered during the races and the average velocity they sustained over the distances they actually covered were calculated. In both the Olympic 800 m and 5000 m finals, for example, the winner was not the runner who ran at the highest average velocity in the race. Rather, the winners of these races were able to husband their metabolic resources to better effect by running closer to the actual race distance. Race results in middle distance running events are dependent not just on the energetic potential of the runners at the start of the race and their strategy for pace allocation, but also on the effect of their tactical approach to positioning on the total distance covered in the race. Middle distance runners should be conscious of minimising the distance covered in races if they wish to optimise their performance.

  5. Predictor variables for a half marathon race time in recreational male runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rüst CA

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Christoph Alexander Rüst1, Beat Knechtle1,2, Patrizia Knechtle2, Ursula Barandun1, Romuald Lepers3, Thomas Rosemann11Institute of General Practice and Health Services Research, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland; 2Gesundheitszentrum St Gallen, St Gallen, Switzerland; 3INSERM U887, University of Burgundy, Faculty of Sport Sciences, Dijon, FranceAbstract: The aim of this study was to investigate predictor variables of anthropometry, training, and previous experience in order to predict a half marathon race time for future novice recreational male half marathoners. Eighty-four male finishers in the ‘Half Marathon Basel’ completed the race distance within (mean and standard deviation, SD 103.9 (16.5 min, running at a speed of 12.7 (1.9 km/h. After multivariate analysis of the anthropometric characteristics, body mass index (r = 0.56, suprailiacal (r = 0.36 and medial calf skin fold (r = 0.53 were related to race time. For the variables of training and previous experience, speed in running of the training sessions (r = –0.54 were associated with race time. After multivariate analysis of both the significant anthropometric and training variables, body mass index (P = 0.0150 and speed in running during training (P = 0.0045 were related to race time. Race time in a half marathon might be partially predicted by the following equation (r2 = 0.44: Race time (min = 72.91 + 3.045 * (body mass index, kg/m2 –3.884 * (speed in running during training, km/h for recreational male runners. To conclude, variables of both anthropometry and training were related to half marathon race time in recreational male half marathoners and cannot be reduced to one single predictor variable.Keywords: anthropometry, body fat, skin-folds, training, endurance

  6. Exaggerated gonadotropin response to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone in amenorrheic runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahiro, J; Glass, A R; Fears, W B; Ferguson, E W; Vigersky, R A

    1987-03-01

    Most studies of exercise-induced amenorrhea have compared amenorrheic athletes (usually runners) with sedentary control subjects. Such comparisons will identify hormonal changes that develop as a result of exercise training but cannot determine which of these changes play a role in causing amenorrhea. To obviate this problem, we assessed reproductive hormone status in a group of five amenorrheic runners and compared them to a group of six eumenorrheic runners matched for body fatness, training intensity, and exercise performance. Compared to the eumenorrheic runners, the amenorrheic runners had lower serum estradiol concentrations, similar basal serum luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone concentrations, and exaggerated responses of serum gonadotropins after administration of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (100 micrograms intravenous bolus). Serum prolactin levels, both basally and after thyrotropin-releasing hormone administration (500 micrograms intravenous bolus) or treadmill exercise, was similar in the two groups, as were serum thyroid function tests (including thyrotropin response to thyrotropin-releasing hormone). Changes in serum cortisol levels after short-term treadmill exercise were similar in both groups, and serum testosterone levels increased after exercise only in the eumenorrheic group. In neither group did such exercise change serum luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, or thyrotropin levels. We concluded that exercise-induced amenorrhea is not solely related to the development of increased prolactin output after exercise training. The exaggerated gonadotropin response to luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone seen in amenorrheic runners in comparison with matched eumenorrheic runners is consistent with a hypothalamic etiology for the menstrual dysfunction, analogous to that previously described in "stress-induced" or "psychogenic" amenorrhea.

  7. Half-marathon and full-marathon runners' hydration practices and perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neal, Eric K; Wingo, Jonathan E; Richardson, Mark T; Leeper, James D; Neggers, Yasmine H; Bishop, Phil A

    2011-01-01

    The behaviors and beliefs of recreational runners with regard to hydration maintenance are not well elucidated. To examine which beverages runners choose to drink and why, negative performance and health experiences related to dehydration, and methods used to assess hydration status. Cross-sectional study. Marathon registration site. Men (n = 146) and women (n = 130) (age = 38.3 ± 11.3 years) registered for the 2010 Little Rock Half-Marathon or Full Marathon. A 23-item questionnaire was administered to runners when they picked up their race timing chips. Runners were separated into tertiles (Low, Mod, High) based on z scores derived from training volume, expected performance, and running experience. We used a 100-mm visual analog scale with anchors of 0 (never) and 100 (always). Total sample responses and comparisons between tertile groups for questionnaire items are presented. The High group (58±31) reported greater consumption of sport beverages in exercise environments than the Low (42 ± 35 mm) and Mod (39 ± 32 mm) groups (P performance during runs greater than 1 hour (P performance decrement, and 45% perceived dehydration to have resulted in adverse health effects. Twenty percent of runners reported monitoring their hydration status. Urine color was the method most often reported (7%), whereas only 2% reported measuring changes in body weight. Greater attention should be paid to informing runners of valid techniques to monitor hydration status and developing an appropriate individualized hydration strategy.

  8. Foot strike and injury rates in endurance runners: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoud, Adam I; Geissler, Gary J; Wang, Frank; Saretsky, Jason; Daoud, Yahya A; Lieberman, Daniel E

    2012-07-01

    This retrospective study tests if runners who habitually forefoot strike have different rates of injury than runners who habitually rearfoot strike. We measured the strike characteristics of middle- and long-distance runners from a collegiate cross-country team and quantified their history of injury, including the incidence and rate of specific injuries, the severity of each injury, and the rate of mild, moderate, and severe injuries per mile run. Of the 52 runners studied, 36 (69%) primarily used a rearfoot strike and 16 (31%) primarily used a forefoot strike. Approximately 74% of runners experienced a moderate or severe injury each year, but those who habitually rearfoot strike had approximately twice the rate of repetitive stress injuries than individuals who habitually forefoot strike. Traumatic injury rates were not significantly different between the two groups. A generalized linear model showed that strike type, sex, race distance, and average miles per week each correlate significantly (P strike have significantly higher rates of repetitive stress injury than those who mostly forefoot strike. This study does not test the causal bases for this general difference. One hypothesis, which requires further research, is that the absence of a marked impact peak in the ground reaction force during a forefoot strike compared with a rearfoot strike may contribute to lower rates of injuries in habitual forefoot strikers.

  9. Setting-up of remote reactor LAB and tapping into CARRN for distance education and training in nuclear field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Eugene [The Nelson Mandeal African Institute of Science and Technology, Arusha (Tanzania, United Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    For a developing country embarking on a research reactor project, building adequate human resource capacity is one of the biggest challenges. Tanzania has been considering a research reactor for some time. The success of future research reactor project impinges on vigorous education and training of necessary personnel to operate and fully utilize the facility. In Africa, underutilization of research reactors is a chronic issue. It is not only misuse of valuable resources but also poses potential safety and security concerns. To mitigate such concerns and to promote education and training, Central African Research Reactor Network (CARRN) was formed in June of 2011. Borrowing from Jordan's success, this paper presents customised curricula to take advantage of CARRN for distance education and training in nuclear field.

  10. Setting-up of remote reactor LAB and tapping into CARRN for distance education and training in nuclear field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Eugene

    2013-01-01

    For a developing country embarking on a research reactor project, building adequate human resource capacity is one of the biggest challenges. Tanzania has been considering a research reactor for some time. The success of future research reactor project impinges on vigorous education and training of necessary personnel to operate and fully utilize the facility. In Africa, underutilization of research reactors is a chronic issue. It is not only misuse of valuable resources but also poses potential safety and security concerns. To mitigate such concerns and to promote education and training, Central African Research Reactor Network (CARRN) was formed in June of 2011. Borrowing from Jordan's success, this paper presents customised curricula to take advantage of CARRN for distance education and training in nuclear field

  11. The Energy-Efficient Operation Problem of a Freight Train Considering Long-Distance Steep Downhill Sections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Lin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available With the energy consumption rising in rail transport, the railway sector is showing increasing interest in the energy-efficient operation of freight trains. Freight trains require more complicated driving strategies than ordinary passenger trains do due to their heavy loads, especially in the long-distance steep downhill (LDSD sections that are very common in freight rail lines in China. This paper studies the energy-efficient operation of a freight train considering LDSD sections. An optimal control model including regenerative and pneumatic braking is developed for the freight train. Then, when a train leaves/enters the LDSD section, we verify the uniqueness of control transitions and discuss the speed profile linkage between LDSD and its adjacent sections, which indicates that the periodic braking should be applied on LDSD sections for optimality. Additionally, given the same running time for the entire journey, our analysis shows that electrical braking-full braking strategy is more energy-efficient than coasting-full braking strategy on LDSD sections. Finally, a numerical algorithm for the optimal driving solution is proposed. The simulation results demonstrate that the driving strategies generated by the proposed algorithm performs better than those from fuzzy predictive control and field operation regarding energy saving.

  12. Trabecular bone in the calcaneus of runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Andrew; Holt, Brigitte; Troy, Karen; Hamill, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Trabecular bone of the human calcaneus is subjected to extreme repetitive forces during endurance running and should adapt in response to this strain. To assess possible bone functional adaptation in the posterior region of the calcaneus, we recruited forefoot-striking runners (n = 6), rearfoot-striking runners (n = 6), and non-runners (n = 6), all males aged 20-41 for this institutionally approved study. Foot strike pattern was confirmed for each runner using a motion capture system. We obtained high resolution peripheral computed tomography scans of the posterior calcaneus for both runners and non-runners. No statistically significant differences were found between runners and nonrunners or forefoot strikers and rearfoot strikers. Mean trabecular thickness and mineral density were greatest in forefoot runners with strong effect sizes (forefoot strikers, likely an artifact of greater running volume and earlier onset of running in this subgroup; thus, individuals with the greatest summative loading stimulus had, after body mass adjustment, the thickest trabeculae. Further study with larger sample sizes is necessary to elucidate the role of footstrike on calcaneal trabecular structure. To our knowledge, intraspecific body mass correlations with measures of trabecular robusticity have not been reported elsewhere. We hypothesize that early adoption of running and years of sustained moderate volume running stimulate bone modeling in trabeculae of the posterior calcaneus.

  13. Enhanced Right-Chamber Remodeling in Endurance Ultra-Trail Athletes Compared to Marathon Runners Detected by Standard and Speckle-Tracking Echocardiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Ujka

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Strenuous and endurance exercise training have been associated with morphological and functional heart remodeling. Two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography (STE is a novel technique that allows an accurate quantification of global myocardium deformation. Our aim was to evaluate together left and right cardiac remodeling in different long-distance running athletes: marathon runners (42 km (M and endurance mountain runners (>300 Km (UT.Methods: A total of 92 athletes (70 males, 76% including 47 M [age 45 ± 7 years; training: 18 (9–53 years*days/week], 45 UT [age 42 ± 9, training: 30 (15–66 years*days/week] underwent conventional echocardiography and STE (Beyond Diogenes 2.0, AMID during the agonistic season.Results: Right ventricle (RV end-diastolic area (p = 0.026, fractional area changing (FAC (p = 0.008 and RV global longitudinal strain (GLS were significantly increasedin UT athletes. Furthermore, UT showed larger right atrium (RA volume (p = 0.03, reduced RA GLS and significantly increased RA global circumferential strain (GCS compared to M. After adjustment for age, sex, and HR as covariates, UT showed a reduced RA GLS (OR 0.907; CI 0.856–0.961 and increased RV FAC (OR 1.172; CI: 1.044–1.317 compared to M.Conclusion: Athletes enrolled in UT endurance activities showed RV and RA morphological and functional remodeling to increased preload in comparison with M runners characterized by increased RV FAC and reduced RA GLS. Follow-up studies are needed to better assess the long-term clinical impact of these modifications. 2D STE is a useful tool for investigating the deformation dynamic in different sports specialties.

  14. Efeito do tratamento clínico de um corredor de longa distância com broncoespasmo induzido pelo exercício: relato de caso Effect of clinical treatment of a long distance runner presenting exercise-induced bronchoespasm: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Nakata Teixeira

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available O broncoespasmo induzido pelo exercício (BIE é uma condição que se caracteriza pelo estreitamento transitório das vias aéreas durante ou após o esforço físico e afeta principalmente portadores de asma. Em atletas profissionais que praticam esportes de alta intensidade, a prevalência também é alta; no entanto, seu diagnóstico permanece subestimado. O presente estudo descreve o caso de um atleta do sexo masculino, 23 anos, corredor de longa distância sem histórico de asma, que após um teste gradual de exercício apresentou chiado no peito e queda da função pulmonar. Após um teste específico, o atleta foi diagnosticado como BIE positivo. Iniciou-se, então, um tratamento clínico com broncodilatador e após 30 dias verificou-se melhora importante em seu consumo máximo de oxigênio, obtido no pico do esforço (VO2 pico.Exercise induced bronchoconstriction (EIB is characterized by a transient airway constriction during or after vigorous physical activity. This clinical condition is more prevalent in asthmatic patients. The prevalence of EIB in competitive athletes is high; however, EIB is under-diagnosed in this specific athlete population. The present study described a case report of a male 23 year-old long distance runner who, despite not presenting previous asthma history, presented chest squeak and decline on spirometric performance after a cardiopulmonary exercise testing. After specific testing, the athlete was diagnosed as positive EIB. A clinical treatment with bronchodilator was then initiated and after 30 days an important increase in his oxygen uptake peak (VO2peak was observed.

  15. Bone Stress Injuries in Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenforde, Adam S; Kraus, Emily; Fredericson, Michael

    2016-02-01

    Bone stress injuries (BSIs) are common running injuries and may occur at a rate of 20% annually. Both biological and biomechanical risk factors contribute to BSI. Evaluation of a runner with suspected BSI includes completing an appropriate history and physical examination. MRI grading classification for BSI has been proposed and may guide return to play. Management includes activity modification, optimizing nutrition, and addressing risk factors, including the female athlete triad. BSI prevention strategies include screening for risk factors during preparticipation evaluations, optimizing nutrition (including adequate caloric intake, calcium, and vitamin D), and promoting ball sports during childhood and adolescence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Muscular Calf Injuries in Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Karl B; Rigby, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Calf pain is a common complaint among runners of all ages but is most frequent in masters athletes. This article focuses on injuries to the triceps surae or true 'calf muscles.' The most common calf injury is a tear of the medial gastrocnemius muscle (Tennis Leg) but other structures including the lateral gastrocnemius, plantaris and soleus also may be the cause of muscular pain. This article looks at the presentation, evaluation, and treatment of these injuries. We also highlight some examples of musculoskeletal ultrasound which is a valuable tool for rapid diagnosis of the cause and extent of injury.

  17. Estimated VO2max and its corresponding velocity predict performance of amateur runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Ribeiro Ramalho Oliveira

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, there has been a substantial increase in the number of runners, with a proportional increase in their involvement in amateur street competition. Identification of the determinants of performance in this population appears necessary for optimization of time devoted to training. The objective of this study was to ascertain the association between estimated maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max, critical velocity (CV and VO2max velocity (VVO2max and athletic performance in the 3.6 km (uphill and 10 and 21.1 km (flatland events. Twelve amateur runners (nine male, mean age 36 ± 5 years underwent five tests: 1 and 5 km race on level ground, 3.6 km race with slope (≈8%, and indirect VO2max measurement. CV was determined from the linear relationship between distance and run time on the first two tests. The subjects then took part in two official 10 km and 21.1 km (half marathon races. VVO2max was calculated from the VO2max through a metabolic equation. VO2max showed the best association with running performance in the 10 and 21.1 km events. For the uphill race, VVO2max showed a better association. Overall, the variable with the highest average association was VO2max (0.91±0.07, followed by VVO2max (0.90±0.04 and VC (0.87±0.06. This study showed strong associations between physiological variables established by low-cost, user-friendly indirect methods and running performance in the 10 and 21.1 km (flatland and 3.6 km (uphill running events.

  18. Bilateral Anterior Knee Pain in a High School Cross-Country Runner: An Atypical Etiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, James

    2017-09-01

    Anterior knee pain is a common complaint found in distance runners, and can be the end result of a variety of benign processes. A 17-year-old female cross-country runner presented to a sports medicine clinic with insidious onset of bilateral patellofemoral pain (PFP). In the workup of the significant quadriceps weakness discovered on her initial examination, a principal contributing cause of her PFP, she was found to have a form of spinal muscular atrophy, an uncommon neurodegenerative disease that typically requires multidisciplinary medical care. Her case provides a good example for clinicians to consider, at times, an in-depth assessment of the root causes of benign conditions.

  19. Radiation Protection training WEB site to hold pedagogical material for developing courses a distance way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marco, M.; Rodriguez, M.; Hernando, E.; Falcon, S.; Rodriguez, M.; Villarroel, R.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation Protection Training (RPT) System in Spain are is well defined in the local local regulations related to radioactive facilities licensing and radiation protection. A system of personnel licenses is established considering two levels of required radiation protection training-supervisor and operator according to responsibilities assigned during the operation of the radioactive facilities. This paper present the major advances already done in the educational web site maintained on the CIEMAT server and accessible through the CSN web. The project includes training material for sixteen applied courses and the design of a educational web site to hold pedagogical material for developing distant learning courses. The main objective of this project is to provide training materials for course organisers, trainers and for professional participants and to promote the exchange of expertise between workers involved in all activities using radiation sources. The project also aims to provide necessary mechanism for standardisation of the radiation protection knowledge made available to the exposed workers, including theoretical and practical training. The developed training material included in the project will cover all uses of radioactive sources including medical diagnosis. The web site is being developed of provide educational material on a modular design and in Spanish. The paper presents the initial results of this useful tool for practitioners. Courses are based on core modules with basic and specific modules involving different targets groups, and the contents can be easily adapted for other target groups. For each one of the modules should be included in the web site: objectives, syllabus, lessons and practical sessions, demo and lab exercises, etc. The project includes training tools for sixteen courses based in the standard syllabus content in the Spanish legal framework. In the next future complete materials for trainers will be available to case courses

  20. Clinical Impact of Speed Variability to Identify Ultramarathon Runners at Risk for Acute Kidney Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen-Kuang Hou

    Full Text Available Ultramarathon is a high endurance exercise associated with a wide range of exercise-related problems, such as acute kidney injury (AKI. Early recognition of individuals at risk of AKI during ultramarathon event is critical for implementing preventative strategies.To investigate the impact of speed variability to identify the exercise-related acute kidney injury anticipatively in ultramarathon event.This is a prospective, observational study using data from a 100 km ultramarathon in Taipei, Taiwan. The distance of entire ultramarathon race was divided into 10 splits. The mean and variability of speed, which was determined by the coefficient of variation (CV in each 10 km-split (25 laps of 400 m oval track were calculated for enrolled runners. Baseline characteristics and biochemical data were collected completely 1 week before, immediately post-race, and one day after race. The main outcome was the development of AKI, defined as Stage II or III according to the Acute Kidney Injury Network (AKIN criteria. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine the independent association between variables and AKI development.26 ultramarathon runners were analyzed in the study. The overall incidence of AKI (in all Stages was 84.6% (22 in 26 runners. Among these 22 runners, 18 runners were determined as Stage I, 4 runners (15.4% were determined as Stage II, and none was in Stage III. The covariates of BMI (25.22 ± 2.02 vs. 22.55 ± 1.96, p = 0.02, uric acid (6.88 ± 1.47 vs. 5.62 ± 0.86, p = 0.024, and CV of speed in specific 10-km splits (from secondary 10 km-split (10th - 20th km-split to 60th - 70th km-split were significantly different between runners with or without AKI (Stage II in univariate analysis and showed discrimination ability in ROC curve. In the following multivariate analysis, only CV of speed in 40th - 50th km-split continued to show a significant association to the development of AKI (Stage II (p = 0.032.The development of exercise

  1. Computer-Mediated Communications for Distance Education and Training: Literature Review and International Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Educacion a Distancia (UNED) Sri Lanka Sri Lanka Institute of Distance Education (SLIDE) Sweden Hermods UmeS University University of Uppsala Tasmania...de Bercy, 75585 Paris Cedex 12, France. Asociacion Argentina de Educacion a Distancia Carta Informativa, AAED Callao 569, 2p., Of. 19, 1022 Buenos...Aires, Argentina. Asociacion Iberoamericana de Educacion Superior a Distancia Boletin, Informativo, AIESAD, Apartado de Correos 50487, Madrid, Spain

  2. Hypoxanthine as a predictor of performance in highly trained athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieliński, J; Krasińska, B; Kusy, K

    2013-12-01

    Purine metabolism reflects the exercise-induced muscle adaptations and training status. This study evaluated the utility of plasma hypoxanthine in the prediction of actual sport performance. We studied male athletes: 28 triathletes (21.4±2.9 years), 12 long-distance runners (23.2±1.9 years), 13 middle-distance runners (22.9±1.8 years) and 18 sprinters (22.0±2.7 years). Season-best race times were considered, achieved over standard triathlon, 5 000 m, 1 500 m and 100 m, respectively. Incremental treadmill test was administered to determine maximum and "threshold" oxygen uptake. Resting and post-exercise plasma concentrations of hypoxanthine, xanthine, uric acid and lactate were measured as well as resting erythrocyte hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase activity. Simple and multiple regression analyses were used to identify significant contributors to the variance in performance. Hypoxanthine considered alone explained more variance in triathletes, long-distance runners, middle-distance runners and sprinters (r 2=0.81, 0.81, 0.88 and 0.78, respectively) than models based on aerobic capacity and lactate (R 2=0.51, 0.37, 0.59 and 0.31, respectively). Combining purine metabolites and cardiorespiratory variables resulted in the best prediction (R 2=0.86, 0.93, 0.93 and 0.91; r=0.93, 0.96, 0.96 and 0.95, respectively). In summary, hypoxanthine is a strong predictor of performance in highly trained athletes and its prediction ability is very high regardless of sport specialization, spanning the continuum from speed-power to endurance disciplines. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Running more than three kilometers during the first week of a running regimen may be associated with increased risk of injury in obese novice runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, R.O.; Bertelsen, Michael Lejbach; Parner, Erik Thorlund

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Training guidelines for novice runners are needed to reduce the risk of injury. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the risk of injury varied in obese and non-obese individuals initiating a running program at different weekly distances. METHODS: A volunteer sample...... = high). Data was collected for three weeks for the six strata. The main outcome measure was running-related injury. RESULTS: Fifty-six runners sustained a running-related injury during the 3-week data collection. A significantly greater number of individuals with BMI>30 sustained injuries if they ran...... and BMI on additive scale was positive (11.7% [-3.6% to 27.0%], p=0.13). The number of obese individuals needed to change their running distance from high to low to avoid one injury was 8.5 [95%CI: 4.6 to 52]. CONCLUSIONS: Obese individuals were at greater risk of injury if they exceeded 3 km during...

  4. Does running with or without diet changes reduce fat mass in novice runners? A 1-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Rasmus O; Videbaek, Solvej; Hansen, Mette; Parner, Erik T; Rasmussen, Sten; Langberg, Henning

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore how average weekly running distance, combined with changes in diet habits and reasons to take up running, influence fat mass. Fat mass was assessed by bioelectrical impedance at baseline and after 12 months in 538 novice runners included in a 1-year observational prospective follow-up study. During follow-up, running distance for each participant was continuously measured by GPS while reasons to take up running and diet changes were assessed trough web-based questionnaires. Loss of fat mass was compared between runners covering an average of 5 km or more per week and those running shorter distances. Runners who took up running to lose weight and ran over 5 km per week in average over a one-year period combined with a diet change reduced fat mass by -5.58 kg (95% CI: -8.69; -2.46; Pdiet changes, the mean difference in fat mass between groups was 3.81 kg (95% CI: -5.96; -1.66; Pdiet. An average running distance of more than 5 km per week in runners who took up running to lose weight combined with a targeted diet change seems effective in reducing fat mass over a one-year period among novice runners. Still, randomized controlled trials are needed to better document the effects of self-selected diet changes.

  5. Teach beyond Your Reach: An Instructor's Guide to Developing and Running Successful Distance Learning Classes, Workshops, Training Sessions, and More. Second Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neidorf, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Distance education is enabling individuals to earn college and graduate degrees, professional certificates, and a wide range of skills and credentials. In addition to the expanding role of distance learning in higher education, all types of organizations now offer web-based training courses to employees, clients, and other associates. In this…

  6. MR imaging of the knee in marathon runners before and after competition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krampla, W.; Mayrhofer, R.; Malcher, J.; Urban, M.; Hruby, W.; Kristen, K.H.

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the findings in MRI-studies of the knee in recreational long-distance runners after competition and to assess the reversibility of the findings.Design and patients. Eight recreational long-distance runners underwent MRI studies of the knee before, immediately after and 6-8 weeks after taking part in the Vienna City Marathon. The studies were evaluated regarding alterations of pre-existing lesions and new pathological findings.Results. In six runners without major pre-existing alterations no negative effects were experienced. In one runner with pre-existing grade III alterations of the menisci, signs of progressive osteoarthritis were experienced 2 months after the competition. In all other cases increased meniscal signal alterations and minor signal changes in the bone marrow after the race were transitory.Conclusion. In healthy individuals no negative long-term-effects were experienced. Pre-existing high-grade lesions of the menisci might be a predisposing risk for osteoarthritis, triggered by the stress of long-distance running. (orig.)

  7. Incidence of Running-Related Injuries Per 1000 h of running in Different Types of Runners: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videbæk, Solvej; Bueno, Andreas Moeballe; Nielsen, Rasmus Oestergaard; Rasmussen, Sten

    2015-07-01

    No systematic review has identified the incidence of running-related injuries per 1000 h of running in different types of runners. The purpose of the present review was to systematically search the literature for the incidence of running-related injuries per 1000 h of running in different types of runners, and to include the data in meta-analyses. A search of the PubMed, Scopus, SPORTDiscus, PEDro and Web of Science databases was conducted. Titles, abstracts, and full-text articles were screened by two blinded reviewers to identify prospective cohort studies and randomized controlled trials reporting the incidence of running-related injuries in novice runners, recreational runners, ultra-marathon runners, and track and field athletes. Data were extracted from all studies and comprised for further analysis. An adapted scale was applied to assess the risk of bias. After screening 815 abstracts, 13 original articles were included in the main analysis. Running-related injuries per 1000 h of running ranged from a minimum of 2.5 in a study of long-distance track and field athletes to a maximum of 33.0 in a study of novice runners. The meta-analyses revealed a weighted injury incidence of 17.8 (95% confidence interval [CI] 16.7-19.1) in novice runners and 7.7 (95% CI 6.9-8.7) in recreational runners. Heterogeneity in definitions of injury, definition of type of runner, and outcome measures in the included full-text articles challenged comparison across studies. Novice runners seem to face a significantly greater risk of injury per 1000 h of running than recreational runners.

  8. Prediction of half-marathon race time in recreational female and male runners

    OpenAIRE

    Knechtle, Beat; Barandun, Ursula; Knechtle, Patrizia; Zingg, Matthias A; Rosemann, Thomas; Rüst, Christoph A

    2014-01-01

    Half-marathon running is of high popularity. Recent studies tried to find predictor variables for half-marathon race time for recreational female and male runners and to present equations to predict race time. The actual equations included running speed during training for both women and men as training variable but midaxillary skinfold for women and body mass index for men as anthropometric variable. An actual study found that percent body fat and running speed during training sessions were ...

  9. Pilot program on distance training in spirometry testing - the technology feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowiński, Adam; Romański, Emil; Bieleń, Przemysław; Bednarek, Michał; Puścińska, Elżbieta; Goljan-Geremek, Anna; Pływaczewski, Robert; Śliwinski, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    Office spirometry has been widely used in recent years by general practitioners in primary care setting, thus the need for stricter monitoring of the quality of spirometry has been recognized. A spirometry counseling network of outpatients clinics was created in Poland using portable spirometer Spirotel. The spirometry data were transferred to counseling centre once a week. The tests sent to the counseling centre were analyzed by doctors experienced in the analysis of spirometric data. In justified cases they sent their remarks concerning performed tests to the centres via e-mail. We received 878 records of spirometry tests in total. Data transmission via the telephone was 100% effective. The quality of spirometry tests performed by outpatients clinics was variable. The use of spirometers with data transfer for training purposes seems to be advisable. There is a need to proper face-to-face training of spirometry operators before an implementation of any telemedicine technology.

  10. Do Running Kinematic Characteristics Change over a Typical HIIT for Endurance Runners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Pinillos, Felipe; Soto-Hermoso, Víctor M; Latorre-Román, Pedro Á

    2016-10-01

    García-Pinillos, F, Soto-Hermoso, VM, and Latorre-Román, PÁ. Do running kinematic characteristics change over a typical HIIT for endurance runners?. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2907-2917, 2016-The purpose of this study was to describe kinematic changes that occur during a common high-intensity intermittent training (HIIT) session for endurance runners. Twenty-eight male endurance runners participated in this study. A high-speed camera was used to measure sagittal-plane kinematics at the first and the last run during a HIIT (4 × 3 × 400 m). The dependent variables were spatial-temporal variables, joint angles during support and swing, and foot strike pattern. Physiological variables, rate of perceived exertion, and athletic performance were also recorded. No significant changes (p ≥ 0.05) in kinematic variables were found during the HIIT session. Two cluster analyses were performed, according to the average running pace-faster vs. slower, and according to exhaustion level reached-exhausted group vs. nonexhausted group (NEG). At first run, no significant differences were found between groups. As for the changes induced by the running protocol, significant differences (p ≤ 0.05) were found between faster and slower athletes at toe-off in θhip and θknee, whereas some changes were found in NEG in θhip during toe-off (+4.3°) and θknee at toe-off (-5.2°) during swing. The results show that a common HIIT session for endurance runners did not consistently or substantially perturb the running kinematics of trained male runners. Additionally, although some differences between groups have been found, neither athletic performance nor exhaustion level reached seems to be determinant in the kinematic response during a HIIT, at least for this group of moderately trained endurance runners.

  11. The course “Virtual Learning Environment” and the teacher training: differentiated didactic strategies for a distance training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Massaru Fujita

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to describe the methodological process and the teaching strategies adopted in the course of Virtual Learning Environment (VLE offered by the State University of Londrina (UEL-PR. This course was offered through Distance Education (DE between August and December of 2014, with a workload of 60 hours, and was developed for graduation and postgraduation students, staff and teachers from differente areas of knowledge from this institution. The course aimed to promote reflections on the insertion of DTIC (Digital Technologies of Information and Communication in the school enviroment, provide theoritical support on DE and create teaching strategies for its development. The VLE course stands out for being the first course of University Extension offered by UEL destined specifically for DE and Teacher Education. The study had a qualitative approach of research-action type. The data was collected by observations, perceptions and especially by the testimonies of the participants. The methodology adopted in the course was the Active Learning Methodology and the teaching strategies based on the PBL (Problem Based Learning. The results, with regard to learning, development and exploitation of students, were considered satisfactory.

  12. Comparison of running and cycling economy in runners, cyclists, and triathletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinnen, Wannes; Kipp, Shalaya; Kram, Rodger

    2018-07-01

    Exercise economy is one of the main physiological factors determining performance in endurance sports. Running economy (RE) can be improved with running-specific training, while the improvement of cycling economy (CE) with cycling-specific training is controversial. We investigated whether exercise economy reflects sport-specific skills/adaptations or is determined by overall physiological factors. We compared RE and CE in 10 runners, 9 cyclists and 9 triathletes for running at 12 km/h and cycling at 200 W. Gross rates of oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production were collected and used to calculate gross metabolic rate in watts for both running and cycling. Runners had better RE than cyclists (917 ± 107 W vs. 1111 ± 159 W) (p < 0.01). Triathletes had intermediate RE values (1004 ± 98 W) not different from runners or cyclists. CE was not different (p = 0.20) between the three groups (runners: 945 ± 60 W; cyclists: 982 ± 44 W; triathletes: 979 ± 54 W). RE can be enhanced with running-specific training, but CE is independent of cycling-specific training.

  13. A Negative Life Event Impairs Psychosocial Stress, Recovery and Running Economy of Runners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otter, R. T. A.; Brink, M. S.; Diercks, R. L.; Lemmink, K. A. P. M.

    The purpose was to investigate how a negative life event (NLE) affects perceived psychosocial stress, recovery and running economy (RE). Competitive runners were monitored in a prospective non-experimental cohort study over one full training season in which they experienced the same unplanned severe

  14. Differences in MCT1 A1470T polymorphism prevalence between runners and swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zaken, S; Eliakim, A; Nemet, D; Rabinovich, M; Kassem, E; Meckel, Y

    2015-06-01

    Skeletal muscle is the major producer and user of lactate in the body. Therefore, transport of lactate across cells' membrane is of considerable importance. Lactate transport is mediated by proton-linked monocarboxylate transporter (MCT1). The A1470T polymorphism (rs1049434) in MCT1 gene influences lactate transport, with T allele associated with reduction of lactate transport rate and elevation in blood lactate levels. The aim of the current study was to compare allelic and genotype frequencies of MCT1 A1470T polymorphism among Israeli track-and-field athletes, swimmers, and non-athletes. Genomic DNA was extracted from 173 track-and-field athletes (age 17-50), 80 swimmers (age 16-49), and 128 non-athletes (age 19-29). Track-and-field athletes were assigned to three subgroups: long-distance runners, middle-distance runners, and power event athletes. Swimmers were assigned to two subgroups: long-distance swimmers and short-distance swimmers. Genotyping was performed using polymerase chain reaction. T-allele frequency was significantly higher among long-distance swimmers (45%) compared with long- and middle-distance runners (27% and 30%, respectively; P < 0.01). In addition, T-allele frequency was significantly higher among short-distance swimmers (40%) compared with power event athletes (25%, P < 0.01). Overall, T-allele frequency was significantly higher among swimmers (42%) compared with runners (27%, P < 0.001). More research is needed to clarify whether this polymorphism displays advantage for swimming performance. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. New Ways of Learning to Fight Fires? Learning Processes and Contradictions in Distance and On-Campus Firefighter Training in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on findings from a comparative study on firefighter students' learning processes in a technology-supported distance training course and a traditional campus training course in Sweden. Based on student interviews and observations of exercises, the article aims to describe and analyse the impact on learning processes when…

  16. Arming and firing system for DISTANT RUNNER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skenandore, L.H.; Johnson, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    Sandia A and F systems Division 1132 provided arming and firing support for the DISTANT RUNNER Test Program at White Sands Missile Range. This report describes the field support and the firing system that was used

  17. New parameters influencing hydraulic runner lifetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabourin, M; Bouffard, D A; Thibault, D; Levesque, M

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally, hydraulic runner mechanical design is based on calculation of static stresses. Today, validation of hydraulic runner design in terms of reliability requires taking into account the fatigue effect of dynamics loads. A damage tolerant approach based on fracture mechanics is the method chosen by Alstom and Hydro-Quebec to study fatigue damage in runners. This requires a careful examination of all factors influencing material fatigue behavior. Such material behavior depends mainly on the chemical composition, microstructure and thermal history of the component, and on the resulting residual stresses. Measurement of fracture mechanics properties of various steels have demonstrated that runner lifetime can be significantly altered by differences in the manufacturing process, although remaining in accordance with agreed practices and standards such as ASTM. Carbon content and heat treatment are suspected to influence fatigue lifetime. This will have to be investigated by continuing the current research.

  18. New parameters influencing hydraulic runner lifetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabourin, M; Bouffard, D A [Alstom Hydro Canada Inc, Hydraulic Engineering, 1350 chemin St-Roch, Sorel-Tracy (Quebec), J3P 5P9 (Canada); Thibault, D [Hydro-Quebec, Institut de Recherche d' Hydro-Quebec 1800 boul. Lionel-Boulet, Varennes (Quebec), J3X 1S1 (Canada); Levesque, M, E-mail: michel.sabourin@power.alstom.co [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Departement de genie mecanique C.P.6079, succ. Centre-ville, Montreal (Quebec), H3C 3A7 (Canada)

    2010-08-15

    Traditionally, hydraulic runner mechanical design is based on calculation of static stresses. Today, validation of hydraulic runner design in terms of reliability requires taking into account the fatigue effect of dynamics loads. A damage tolerant approach based on fracture mechanics is the method chosen by Alstom and Hydro-Quebec to study fatigue damage in runners. This requires a careful examination of all factors influencing material fatigue behavior. Such material behavior depends mainly on the chemical composition, microstructure and thermal history of the component, and on the resulting residual stresses. Measurement of fracture mechanics properties of various steels have demonstrated that runner lifetime can be significantly altered by differences in the manufacturing process, although remaining in accordance with agreed practices and standards such as ASTM. Carbon content and heat treatment are suspected to influence fatigue lifetime. This will have to be investigated by continuing the current research.

  19. Predictor variables for half marathon race time in recreational female runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beat Knechtle

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The relationship between skin-fold thickness and running performance has been investigated from 100 m to the marathon distance, except the half marathon distance. OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether anthropometry characteristics or training practices were related to race time in 42 recreational female half marathoners to determine the predictor variables of half-marathon race time and to inform future novice female half marathoners. METHODS: Observational field study at the 'Half Marathon Basel' in Switzerland. RESULTS: In the bivariate analysis, body mass (r = 0.60, body mass index (r = 0.48, body fat (r = 0.56, skin-fold at pectoral (r = 0.61, mid-axilla (r = 0.69, triceps (r = 0.49, subscapular (r = 0.61, abdominal (r = 0.59, suprailiac (r = 0.55 medial calf (r = 0.53 site, and speed of the training sessions (r = -0.68 correlated to race time. Mid-axilla skin-fold (p = 0.04 and speed of the training sessions (p = 0.0001 remained significant after multi-variate analysis. Race time in a half marathon might be predicted by the following equation (r² = 0.71: Race time (min = 166.7 + 1.7x (mid-axilla skin-fold, mm - 6.4x (speed in training, km/h. Running speed during training was related to skinfold thickness at mid-axilla (r = -0.31, subscapular (r = -0.38, abdominal (r = -0.44, suprailiacal (r = -0.41, the sum of eight skin-folds (r = -0.36 and percent body fat (r = -0.31. CONCLUSION: Anthropometric and training variables were related to half-marathon race time in recreational female runners. Skin-fold thicknesses at various upper body locations were related to training intensity. High running speed in training appears to be important for fast half-marathon race times and may reduce upper body skin-fold thicknesses in recreational female half marathoners.

  20. Predictor variables for half marathon race time in recreational female runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Barandun, Ursula; Rosemann, Thomas; Lepers, Romuald

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between skin-fold thickness and running performance has been investigated from 100 m to the marathon distance, except the half marathon distance. To investigate whether anthropometry characteristics or training practices were related to race time in 42 recreational female half marathoners to determine the predictor variables of half-marathon race time and to inform future novice female half marathoners. Observational field study at the 'Half Marathon Basel' in Switzerland. In the bivariate analysis, body mass (r = 0.60), body mass index (r = 0.48), body fat (r = 0.56), skin-fold at pectoral (r = 0.61), mid-axilla (r = 0.69), triceps (r = 0.49), subscapular (r = 0.61), abdominal (r = 0.59), suprailiac (r = 0.55) medial calf (r = 0.53) site, and speed of the training sessions (r = -0.68) correlated to race time. Mid-axilla skin-fold (p = 0.04) and speed of the training sessions (p = 0.0001) remained significant after multi-variate analysis. Race time in a half marathon might be predicted by the following equation (r² = 0.71): Race time (min) = 166.7 + 1.7x (mid-axilla skin-fold, mm) - 6.4x (speed in training, km/h). Running speed during training was related to skinfold thickness at mid-axilla (r = -0.31), subscapular (r = -0.38), abdominal (r = -0.44), suprailiacal (r = -0.41), the sum of eight skin-folds (r = -0.36) and percent body fat (r = -0.31). Anthropometric and training variables were related to half-marathon race time in recreational female runners. Skin-fold thicknesses at various upper body locations were related to training intensity. High running speed in training appears to be important for fast half-marathon race times and may reduce upper body skin-fold thicknesses in recreational female half marathoners.

  1. Design optimization of axial flow hydraulic turbine runner: Part II - multi-objective constrained optimization method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Guoyi; Cao, Shuliang; Ishizuka, Masaru; Hayama, Shinji

    2002-06-01

    This paper is concerned with the design optimization of axial flow hydraulic turbine runner blade geometry. In order to obtain a better design plan with good performance, a new comprehensive performance optimization procedure has been presented by combining a multi-variable multi-objective constrained optimization model with a Q3D inverse computation and a performance prediction procedure. With careful analysis of the inverse design of axial hydraulic turbine runner, the total hydraulic loss and the cavitation coefficient are taken as optimization objectives and a comprehensive objective function is defined using the weight factors. Parameters of a newly proposed blade bound circulation distribution function and parameters describing positions of blade leading and training edges in the meridional flow passage are taken as optimization variables.The optimization procedure has been applied to the design optimization of a Kaplan runner with specific speed of 440 kW. Numerical results show that the performance of designed runner is successfully improved through optimization computation. The optimization model is found to be validated and it has the feature of good convergence. With the multi-objective optimization model, it is possible to control the performance of designed runner by adjusting the value of weight factors defining the comprehensive objective function. Copyright

  2. Ankle plantarflexion strength in rearfoot and forefoot runners: a novel clusteranalytic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebl, Dominik; Willwacher, Steffen; Hamill, Joseph; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to test for differences in ankle plantarflexion strengths of habitually rearfoot and forefoot runners. In order to approach this issue, we revisit the problem of classifying different footfall patterns in human runners. A dataset of 119 subjects running shod and barefoot (speed 3.5m/s) was analyzed. The footfall patterns were clustered by a novel statistical approach, which is motivated by advances in the statistical literature on functional data analysis. We explain the novel statistical approach in detail and compare it to the classically used strike index of Cavanagh and Lafortune (1980). The two groups found by the new cluster approach are well interpretable as a forefoot and a rearfoot footfall groups. The subsequent comparison study of the clustered subjects reveals that runners with a forefoot footfall pattern are capable of producing significantly higher joint moments in a maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) of their ankle plantarflexor muscles tendon units; difference in means: 0.28Nm/kg. This effect remains significant after controlling for an additional gender effect and for differences in training levels. Our analysis confirms the hypothesis that forefoot runners have a higher mean MVC plantarflexion strength than rearfoot runners. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our proposed stochastic cluster analysis provides a robust and useful framework for clustering foot strikes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Fat intake and injury in female runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, Kristen E; Burton, Harold W; Dorn, Joan M; Leddy, John J; Horvath, Peter J

    2008-01-03

    Our purpose was to determine the relationship between energy intake, energy availability, dietary fat and lower extremity injury in adult female runners. We hypothesized that runners who develop overuse running-related injuries have lower energy intakes, lower energy availability and lower fat intake compared to non-injured runners. Eighty-six female subjects, running a minimum of 20 miles/week, completed a food frequency questionnaire and informed us about injury incidence over the next year. Injured runners had significantly lower intakes of total fat (63 +/- 20 vs. 80 +/- 50 g/d) and percentage of kilocalories from fat (27 +/- 5 vs. 30 +/- 8 %) compared with non-injured runners. A logistic regression analysis found that fat intake was the best dietary predictor, correctly identifying 64% of future injuries. Lower energy intake and lower energy availability approached, but did not reach, a significant association with overuse injury in this study. Fat intake is likely associated with injury risk in female runners. By documenting these associations, better strategies can be developed to reduce running injuries in women.

  4. Fat intake and injury in female runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leddy John J

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our purpose was to determine the relationship between energy intake, energy availability, dietary fat and lower extremity injury in adult female runners. We hypothesized that runners who develop overuse running-related injuries have lower energy intakes, lower energy availability and lower fat intake compared to non-injured runners. Methods Eighty-six female subjects, running a minimum of 20 miles/week, completed a food frequency questionnaire and informed us about injury incidence over the next year. Results Injured runners had significantly lower intakes of total fat (63 ± 20 vs. 80 ± 50 g/d and percentage of kilocalories from fat (27 ± 5 vs. 30 ± 8 % compared with non-injured runners. A logistic regression analysis found that fat intake was the best dietary predictor, correctly identifying 64% of future injuries. Lower energy intake and lower energy availability approached, but did not reach, a significant association with overuse injury in this study. Conclusion Fat intake is likely associated with injury risk in female runners. By documenting these associations, better strategies can be developed to reduce running injuries in women.

  5. Distinct hip and rearfoot kinematics in female runners with a history of tibial stress fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Clare E; Hamill, Joseph; Davis, Irene S

    2010-02-01

    Cross-sectional controlled laboratory study. To investigate the kinematics of the hip, knee, and rearfoot in the frontal and transverse planes in female distance runners with a history of tibial stress fracture. Tibial stress fractures are a common overuse injury in runners, accounting for up to half of all stress fractures. Abnormal kinematics of the lower extremity may contribute to abnormal musculoskeletal load distributions, leading to an increased risk of stress fractures. Thirty female runners with a history of tibial stress fracture were compared to 30 age-matched and weekly-running-distance-matched control subjects with no previous lower extremity bony injuries. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected using a motion capture system and a force platform, respectively, as subjects ran in the laboratory. Selected variables of interest were compared between the groups using a multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). Peak hip adduction and peak rearfoot eversion angles were greater in the stress fracture group compared to the control group. Peak knee adduction and knee internal rotation angles and all joint angles at impact peak were similar between the groups. Runners with a previous tibial stress fracture exhibited greater peak hip adduction and rearfoot eversion angles during the stance phase of running compared to healthy controls. A consequence of these mechanics may be altered load distribution within the lower extremity, predisposing individuals to stress fracture.

  6. The Influence of runner system on production of injection molds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janostik Vaclav

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This experimental study describes the influence of runner system on rheological properties during the injection molding process. Economic effects on the amount of production are discussed as well. Autodesk Moldflow Synergy 2016 (Moldflow was used for the study of the injection process. Three suggestions of the runner system, cold runner system, hot runner system and the combination of cold–hot runner system have been promoted. These three variants underwent the rheological and economic analysis. As a result, recommendations for the application of the runner system for the required amount of production have been suggested

  7. Ground reaction forces and kinematics in distance running in older-aged men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, Sicco A.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The biomechanics of distance running has not been studied before in older-aged runners but may be different than in younger-aged runners because of musculoskeletal degeneration at older age. This study aimed at determining whether the stance phase kinematics and ground reaction forces in

  8. Mean platelet volume (MPV) predicts middle distance running performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Danese, Elisa; Skafidas, Spyros; Tarperi, Cantor; Guidi, Gian Cesare; Schena, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Running economy and performance in middle distance running depend on several physiological factors, which include anthropometric variables, functional characteristics, training volume and intensity. Since little information is available about hematological predictors of middle distance running time, we investigated whether some hematological parameters may be associated with middle distance running performance in a large sample of recreational runners. The study population consisted in 43 amateur runners (15 females, 28 males; median age 47 years), who successfully concluded a 21.1 km half-marathon at 75-85% of their maximal aerobic power (VO2max). Whole blood was collected 10 min before the run started and immediately thereafter, and hematological testing was completed within 2 hours after sample collection. The values of lymphocytes and eosinophils exhibited a significant decrease compared to pre-run values, whereas those of mean corpuscular volume (MCV), platelets, mean platelet volume (MPV), white blood cells (WBCs), neutrophils and monocytes were significantly increased after the run. In univariate analysis, significant associations with running time were found for pre-run values of hematocrit, hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH), red blood cell distribution width (RDW), MPV, reticulocyte hemoglobin concentration (RetCHR), and post-run values of MCH, RDW, MPV, monocytes and RetCHR. In multivariate analysis, in which running time was entered as dependent variable whereas age, sex, blood lactate, body mass index, VO2max, mean training regimen and the hematological parameters significantly associated with running performance in univariate analysis were entered as independent variables, only MPV values before and after the trial remained significantly associated with running time. After adjustment for platelet count, the MPV value before the run (p = 0.042), but not thereafter (p = 0.247), remained significantly associated with running

  9. Mean platelet volume (MPV predicts middle distance running performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Lippi

    Full Text Available Running economy and performance in middle distance running depend on several physiological factors, which include anthropometric variables, functional characteristics, training volume and intensity. Since little information is available about hematological predictors of middle distance running time, we investigated whether some hematological parameters may be associated with middle distance running performance in a large sample of recreational runners.The study population consisted in 43 amateur runners (15 females, 28 males; median age 47 years, who successfully concluded a 21.1 km half-marathon at 75-85% of their maximal aerobic power (VO2max. Whole blood was collected 10 min before the run started and immediately thereafter, and hematological testing was completed within 2 hours after sample collection.The values of lymphocytes and eosinophils exhibited a significant decrease compared to pre-run values, whereas those of mean corpuscular volume (MCV, platelets, mean platelet volume (MPV, white blood cells (WBCs, neutrophils and monocytes were significantly increased after the run. In univariate analysis, significant associations with running time were found for pre-run values of hematocrit, hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH, red blood cell distribution width (RDW, MPV, reticulocyte hemoglobin concentration (RetCHR, and post-run values of MCH, RDW, MPV, monocytes and RetCHR. In multivariate analysis, in which running time was entered as dependent variable whereas age, sex, blood lactate, body mass index, VO2max, mean training regimen and the hematological parameters significantly associated with running performance in univariate analysis were entered as independent variables, only MPV values before and after the trial remained significantly associated with running time. After adjustment for platelet count, the MPV value before the run (p = 0.042, but not thereafter (p = 0.247, remained significantly associated with running

  10. Outrunning major weight gain: a prospective study of 8,340consistent runners during 7 years of follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Paul T.

    2006-01-06

    Background: Body weight increases with aging. Short-term,longitudinal exercise training studies suggest that increasing exerciseproduces acute weight loss, but it is not clear if the maintenance oflong-term, vigorous exercise attenuates age-related weight gain inproportion to the exercise dose. Methods: Prospective study of 6,119 maleand 2,221 female runners whose running distance changed less than 5 km/wkbetween their baseline and follow-up survey 7 years later. Results: Onaverage, men who ran modest (0-24 km/wk), intermediate (24-48 km/wk) orprolonged distances (>_48 km/wk) all gained weight throughage 64,however, those who ran ?48 km/wk had one-half the average annual weightgain of those who ran<24 km/wk. Age-related weight gain, and itsreduction by running, were both greater in younger than older men. Incontrast, men s gain in waist circumference with age, and its reductionby running, were the same in older and younger men. Women increased theirbody weight and waist and hip circumferences over time, regardless ofage, which was also reduced in proportion to running distance. In bothsexes, running did not attenuate weight gain uniformly, but ratherdisproportionately prevented more extreme increases. Conclusion: Men andwomen who remain vigorously active gain less weight as they age and thereduction is in proportion to the exercise dose.

  11. Increases in .VO2max with "live high-train low" altitude training: role of ventilatory acclimatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhite, Daniel P; Mickleborough, Timothy D; Laymon, Abigail S; Chapman, Robert F

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the percentage of the increase in whole body maximal oxygen consumption (.VO(2max)) that is accounted for by increased respiratory muscle oxygen uptake after altitude training. Six elite male distance runners (.VO(2max) = 70.6 ± 4.5 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) and one elite female distance runner (.VO(2max)) = 64.7 ml kg(-1) min(-1)) completed a 28-day "live high-train low" training intervention (living elevation, 2,150 m). Before and after altitude training, subjects ran at three submaximal speeds, and during a separate session, performed a graded exercise test to exhaustion. A regression equation derived from published data was used to estimate respiratory muscle .VO(2) (.VO(2RM)) using our ventilation (.VE) values. .VO(2RM) was also estimated retrospectively from a larger group of distance runners (n = 22). .VO(2max) significantly (p altitude (196 ± 59 ml min(-1)), while (.VE) at .VO(2max) also significantly (p altitude (201 ± 36 ml min(-1)), along with a 10.8 ± 2.1 l min(-1) increase in (.VE), thus requiring an estimated 27 % of Δ .VO(2max) Our data suggest that a substantial portion of the improvement in .VO(2max) with chronic altitude training goes to fuel the respiratory muscles as opposed to the musculature which directly contributes to locomotion. Consequently, the time-course of decay in ventilatory acclimatization following return to sea-level may have an impact on competitive performance.

  12. Runners maintain locomotor-respiratory coupling following isocapnic voluntary hyperpnea to task failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickford, Abigail S L; Stickford, Jonathon L; Tanner, David A; Stager, Joel M; Chapman, Robert F

    2015-11-01

    Evidence has long suggested that mammalian ventilatory and locomotor rhythms are linked, yet determinants and implications of locomotor-respiratory coupling (LRC) continue to be investigated. Anecdotally, respiratory muscle fatigue seen at the end of heavy exercise may result in an uncoupling of movement-ventilation rhythms; however, there is no scientific evidence to substantiate this claim. We sought to determine whether or not fatigue of the respiratory muscles alters locomotor-respiratory coupling patterns typically observed in highly trained individuals while running. A related query was to examine the relationship between the potential changes in LRC and measures of running economy. Twelve male distance runners ran at four submaximal workloads (68-89 % VO2peak) on two separate days while LRC was quantified. One LRC trial served as a control (CON), while the other was performed following an isocapnic voluntary hyperpnea to task failure to induce respiratory muscle fatigue (FT+). LRC was assessed as stride-to-breathing frequency ratios (SF/fB) and degree of LRC (percentage of breaths occurring during the same decile of the step cycle). Hyperpnea resulted in significant declines in maximal voluntary inspiratory (MIP) and expiratory (MEP) mouth pressures (ΔMIP = -10 ± 12 cm H2O; ΔMEP = -6 ± 9 cm H2O). There were no differences in minute ventilation between CON and FT+ (CON, all speeds pooled = 104 ± 25 L min(-1); FT+ pooled = 106 ± 23 L min(-1)). Stride frequency was not different between trials; however, breathing frequency was significantly greater during FT+ compared to CON at all speeds (CON pooled = 47 ± 10 br min(-1); FT+ pooled = 52 ± 9 br min(-1)), resulting in smaller corresponding SF/fB. Yet, the degree of LRC was the same during CON and FT+ (CON pooled = 63 ± 15 %; FT+ pooled = 64 ± 18 %). The results indicate that trained runners are able to continue entraining breath and step cycles, despite marked changes in exercise breathing frequency

  13. Rearfoot striking runners are more economical than midfoot strikers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogueta-Alday, Ana; Rodríguez-Marroyo, José Antonio; García-López, Juan

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to analyze the influence of foot strike pattern on running economy and biomechanical characteristics in subelite runners with a similar performance level. Twenty subelite long-distance runners participated and were divided into two groups according to their foot strike pattern: rearfoot (RF, n = 10) and midfoot (MF, n = 10) strikers. Anthropometric characteristics were measured (height, body mass, body mass index, skinfolds, circumferences, and lengths); physiological (VO2max, anaerobic threshold, and running economy) and biomechanical characteristics (contact and flight times, step rate, and step length) were registered during both incremental and submaximal tests on a treadmill. There were no significant intergroup differences in anthropometrics, VO2max, or anaerobic threshold measures. RF strikers were 5.4%, 9.3%, and 5.0% more economical than MF at submaximal speeds (11, 13, and 15 km·h respectively, although the difference was not significant at 15 km·h, P = 0.07). Step rate and step length were not different between groups, but RF showed longer contact time (P Foot strike pattern affected both contact and flight times, which may explain the differences in running economy.

  14. Hydrodynamics automatic optimization of runner blades for reaction hydraulic turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balint, D.; Câmpian, V.; Nedelcu, D.; Megheles, O.

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to optimize the hydrodynamics of the runner blades of hydraulic turbines. The runner presented is an axial Kaplan one, but the methodology is common also to Francis runners. The whole methodology is implemented in the in-house software QTurbo3D. The effect of the runner blades geometry modification upon its hydrodynamics is shown both from energetic and cavitation points of view.

  15. Hydrodynamics automatic optimization of runner blades for reaction hydraulic turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balint, D; Câmpian, V; Nedelcu, D; Megheles, O

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to optimize the hydrodynamics of the runner blades of hydraulic turbines. The runner presented is an axial Kaplan one, but the methodology is common also to Francis runners. The whole methodology is implemented in the in-house software QTurbo3D. The effect of the runner blades geometry modification upon its hydrodynamics is shown both from energetic and cavitation points of view.

  16. Competition Nutrition Practices of Elite Ultramarathon Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellingwerff, Trent

    2016-02-01

    Anecdotal claims have suggested that an increasing number of ultramarathoners purposely undertake chronic low-carbohydrate (CHO) ketogenic diets while training, and race with very low CHO intakes, as a way to maximize fat oxidation and improve performance. However, very little empirical evidence exists on specific fueling strategies that elite ultramarathoners undertake to maximize race performance. The study's purpose was to characterize race nutrition habits of elite ultramarathon runners. Three veteran male ultrarunners (M ± SD; age 35 ± 2 years; mass 59.5 ± 1.7 kg; 16.7 ± 2.5 hr 100-mi. best times) agreed to complete a competition- specific nutrition intake questionnaire for 100-mi. races. Verbal and visual instructions were used to instruct the athletes on portion sizes and confirm dietary intake. Throughout 2014, the athletes competed in 16 ultramarathons with a total of 8 wins, including the prestigious Western States Endurance Run 100-miler (14.9 hr). The average prerace breakfast contained 70 ± 16 g CHO, 29 ± 20 g protein, and 21 ± 8 g fat. Athletes consumed an average of 1,162 ± 250 g of CHO (71 ± 20g/hr), with minor fat and protein intakes, resulting in caloric intakes totaling 5,530 ± 1,673 kcals (333 ± 105 kcals/hr) with 93% of calories coming from commercial products. Athletes also reported consuming 912 ± 322 mg of caffeine and 6.9 ± 2.4 g of sodium. Despite having limited professional nutritional input into their fueling approaches, all athletes practiced fueling strategies that maximize CHO intake and are congruent with contemporary evidence-based recommendations.

  17. Excessive exercise habits of runners as new signs of hypertension and arrhythmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Joo; Kim, Chul-Hyun; Park, Kyoung-Min

    2016-08-15

    Excessive exercise may induce arrhythmia, and this risk is higher in middle-aged people. The study aim was to compare the exercise characteristics of middle-aged runners participating in excessive endurance exercise. The subjects of this study were 552 runners (mean age; 49.0±7.4years) without structural heart disease who performed exercise at least twice per week, had consistently exercised for at least three years, and had finished at least five marathons. The arrhythmia runner group (ARG, n=14) and normal runner group (NRG, n=538) were compared with regard to hemodynamic response, cardiorespiratory fitness level, training history, number of finished races, finishing times, and exercise habits. The mean resting systolic (134.0±15.8mmHg) and diastolic (85.8±10.9mmHg) blood pressure values indicated pre-hypertension, while the mean maximal SBP (213.7±27.4mmHg) values indicated exercise-induced hypertension. The VO2max was significantly higher and the maximal DBP was significantly lower in the ARG than in the NRG (phypertension and exercise-induced hypertension, and the ARG had higher VO2max values, greater exercise intensities, and longer training histories than the NRG. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. An interconnection between morphological and functional development of highly trained swimmers and a result of overcoming different length distances by means of the butterfly stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Pilipko

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to investigate the influence of indicators of morpho-functional development of highly trained swimmers on the result of overcoming different length distances by means of the butterfly stroke. Material & Methods: analysis of scientific and methodical literature, timing, measurement of morphological and functional indicators using individual techniques, methods of mathematical statistics. Contingent surveyed accounted for athletes who specialize in the distances of 50, 100 and 200 meters by means of the butterfly stroke and had a level of sports qualification: master of sports, international class master of sports. Results: the authors determined the relationship between the degree of correlation of morphological and functional performance highly trained swimmers and sports results at distances of 50, 100 and 200 meters by means butterfly stroke; investigated the significance of morpho-functional indicators, depending on the length of the competitive distance. Conclusion: significance of the indicators of anthropometric development and the functional state of athletes who specialize in swimming by means butterfly stroke differs depending on the length of the competitive distance. The definition of distance specialization of athletes by means butterfly stroke should be carried out taking into account the indicators of morpho-functional development, which most significantly affect the result of overcoming the distances of 50, 100 and 200 meters.

  19. Understanding Trail Runners' Activity on Online Community Forums: An Inductive Analysis of Discussion Topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochat, Nadège; Hauw, Denis; Gür, Gaëlle; Seifert, Ludovic

    2018-03-01

    Recreational trail runners often participate in online community forums where they can freely read posted messages, join discussions and/or introduce new discussion topics. This tool can enhance learning as runners connect with other trail runners and reflect on how they can better organize their own practice. Studying forum activity would provide greater insight into the relationship between field practice and dedicated forums. The aim of this study was therefore to detect the topics discussed online by trail runners in order to understand how they collectively look for solutions that help them adapt to issues that emerge during actual practice. The discussion topics (n = 171) on the forum hosted by the Raidlight brand were examined using inductive content analysis, which distinguished two general dimensions. The first dimension was training and had four first-order themes (i.e., "specific trail running sessions", "complementary trail running sessions". "training plans" and "specific questions about races") grouped into two second-order themes (i.e., "training session contents" and "structure and schedule"). The second dimension was health and had seven first-order themes (i.e., "tendinitis", "muscle issues", "foot issues", "sprains and fractures", "pain", "physiology" and "substances and practitioners") grouped into two second-order themes (i.e., "pain and injury" and "prevention"). The results indicate that the issues that trail runners discuss on forums are significant and that the successions of questions and solutions are a fruitful means for building, enriching and adjusting their activity as they cope with constraints. As a practical consequence, suggestions for improving such online platforms are made.

  20. Representing distance, consuming distance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Gunvor Riber

    Title: Representing Distance, Consuming Distance Abstract: Distance is a condition for corporeal and virtual mobilities, for desired and actual travel, but yet it has received relatively little attention as a theoretical entity in its own right. Understandings of and assumptions about distance...... are being consumed in the contemporary society, in the same way as places, media, cultures and status are being consumed (Urry 1995, Featherstone 2007). An exploration of distance and its representations through contemporary consumption theory could expose what role distance plays in forming...

  1. Fostering Distance Training Programme (DTP) Students' Access to Semester Examination Results via SMS at University of Rwanda-College of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizeyimana, Gerard; Yonah, Zaipuna O.; Nduwingoma, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a situation analysis and implementation of Distance Training Programme (DTP) Semester Examination Results Access (SERA) through Short Message Service (SMS) available anytime and anywhere. "Texting" or SMS mobile phone messaging is rapidly increasing communication in business and community service. The prompting…

  2. Foot strike patterns of runners at the 15-km point during an elite-level half marathon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Yamauchi, Takeshi; Kraemer, William J

    2007-08-01

    There are various recommendations by many coaches regarding foot landing techniques in distance running that are meant to improve running performance and prevent injuries. Several studies have investigated the kinematic and kinetic differences between rearfoot strike (RFS), midfoot strike (MFS), and forefoot strike (FFS) patterns at foot landing and their effects on running efficiency on a treadmill and over ground conditions. However, little is known about the actual condition of the foot strike pattern during an actual road race at the elite level of competition. The purpose of the present study was to document actual foot strike patterns during a half marathon in which elite international level runners, including Olympians, compete. Four hundred fifteen runners were filmed by 2 120-Hz video cameras in the height of 0.15 m placed at the 15.0-km point and obtained sagittal foot landing and taking off images for 283 runners. Rearfoot strike was observed in 74.9% of all analyzed runners, MFS in 23.7%, and FFS in 1.4%. The percentage of MFS was higher in the faster runners group, when all runners were ranked and divided into 50 runner groups at the 15.0-km point of the competition. In the top 50, which included up to the 69th place runner in actual order who passed the 15-km point at 45 minutes, 53 second (this speed represents 5.45 m x s(-1), or 15 minutes, 17 seconds per 5 km), RFS, MFS, and FFS were 62.0, 36.0, and 2.0%, respectively. Contact time (CT) clearly increased for the slower runners, or the placement order increased (r = 0.71, p strike was observed in 42% of all runners. The percentage of INV for MFS was higher than for RFS and FFS (62.5, 32.0, and 50%, respectively). The CT with INV for MFS + FFS was significantly shorter than the CT with and without INV for RFS. Furthermore, the CT with INV was significantly shorter than push-off time without INV for RFS. The findings of this study indicate that foot strike patterns are related to running speed. The

  3. Perfil das características do treinamento e associação com lesões musculoesqueléticas prévias em corredores recreacionais: um estudo transversal A description of training characteristics and its association with previous musculoskeletal injuries in recreational runners: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz C. Hespanhol Junior

    2012-02-01

    the routines, training characteristics and history of injury in recreational runners and to evaluate possible associations between the routines and training characteristics with previous musculoskeletal running-related injuries. METHODS: A total of 200 runners participated in this study. The participants completed an electronic form containing questions about personal characteristics, running experience, training characteristics, type of running shoes, foot type and previous injuries history over the last 12 months. The data were analyzed descriptively as well as by using logistic regression models. RESULTS: The majority of the runners was male, aged 43.0 (SD=10.5 years-old, have a body mass index of 24.2 (IQR=4.3 kg/m², and had training volume of 35.0 (IQR=28.0 kilometers per week. Fifty-five percent of runners had injuries over the last 12 months. The most prevalent injuries observed were tendinopathies and muscle injuries. The variable that showed an association with previous running-related injuries was running experience from 5 to 15 years (Odds Ratio (OR=0.2; 95%CI=0.1 to 0.9. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of running-related injuries over the last 12 months was 55%. The variable running experience was associated with the absence of previous musculoskeletal running-related injuries.

  4. Foot Morphological Difference between Habitually Shod and Unshod Runners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Shu

    Full Text Available Foot morphology and function has received increasing attention from both biomechanics researchers and footwear manufacturers. In this study, 168 habitually unshod runners (90 males whose age, weight & height were 23±2.4 years, 66±7.1 kg & 1.68±0.13 m and 78 females whose age, weight & height were 22±1.8 years, 55±4.7 kg & 1.6±0.11 m (Indians and 196 shod runners (130 males whose age, weight & height were 24±2.6 years, 66±8.2 kg & 1.72±0.18 m and 66 females whose age, weight & height were 23±1.5 years, 54±5.6 kg & 1.62±0.15 m (Chinese participated in a foot scanning test using the easy-foot-scan (a three-dimensional foot scanning system to obtain 3D foot surface data and 2D footprint imaging. Foot length, foot width, hallux angle and minimal distance from hallux to second toe were calculated to analyze foot morphological differences. This study found that significant differences exist between groups (shod Chinese and unshod Indians for foot length (female p = 0.001, width (female p = 0.001, hallux angle (male and female p = 0.001 and the minimal distance (male and female p = 0.001 from hallux to second toe. This study suggests that significant differences in morphology between different ethnicities could be considered for future investigation of locomotion biomechanics characteristics between ethnicities and inform last shape and design so as to reduce injury risks and poor performance from mal-fit shoes.

  5. Monitoring of total body water to examine the progress of acclimatization of runners at varying altitudes

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    Miroslav Semerád

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of our pilot study was to find out if total body water (TBW changes could objectively modify the course of adaptation during training for elite runners at different altitudes. The aim of this pilot study is to summarize the indication of the progress of acclimatization at high altitudes (1000–2700 meters above sea level during alpine conditioning. In three training camps at various altitudes the TBW of elite runners (F = 3, M = 1; n = 4; age 23 } 0.9 was monitored, in order to check the progress of acclimatization. We used BIA measurement methods (Bodystat 1500 at different high altitude running camps at the Czech Republic, Morocco and Ethiopia. Changes in TBW were used to check the progress of acclimatization. We discovered that the retention peaks of TBW corresponded with critical days (p ≤ 0.04; Cohen’s d. The highest measured increases of TBW at an altitude of 1000 m were for runner 1, 1.7 litres and for runner 2, 2.1 litres with retention peaks for both occurring on the 5th day. At an altitude of 1770 m runner 1 reached an increase of TBW of 6.3 litres, with a retention peak on the 11th day, and runner 3 had an increase of 5.1 litres with a peak on the 8th day. In the acclimatization phase we found two critical periods, from the 4th–6th day, and after the 10th–12th day. For runner 4 in altitude 2700m who completed the camp at a higher altitude, the situation is more complicated because there were fluctuations of the content of TBW in the range of 1.25 litres, with the highest depression on the 5th and then again an unsettled rise and reaching a maximum on the 12th, when she nearly returned to the initial value. Detected retention peaks reflected different levels of altitude (5th–12th days.We can conclude that the measuring of changes in TBW during camps at higher altitudes may be one of the biomarkers during acclimatization to altitude.

  6. Predisposing Risk Factors and Stress Fractures in Division I Cross Country Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giffin, Kaci L; Knight, Kathy B; Bass, Martha A; Valliant, Melinda W

    2017-11-11

    The purpose of this study was to explore factors associated with increased stress fractures in collegiate cross country runners. Participants in this study were 42 male and female cross country runners at a Division I university. Each athlete completed a questionnaire regarding smoking status, vitamin/mineral intake, previous stress fracture history, birth control usage, menstrual status, and demographic information. Nutritional assessment via a 3-day food record and measurements of whole body, lumbar spine, and hip bone mineral densities (BMD) were also conducted on each athlete. Results indicated that 40% of the female and 35% of the male runners reported a history of stress fracture, and that all of these did not meet the recommended daily energy intake or adequate intakes for calcium or Vitamin D required for their amount of training. Two-tailed t-test found statistically higher incidences of lumbar spine BMD in males and females whose daily calcium and Vitamin D intakes were below minimum requirements as well as for women whose caloric intake was below the required level. When data on the lumbar spine was evaluated, 31% of participants (31.8% of the male and 30% of the female runners) were identified as having osteopenia and 4.8% with osteoporosis. Results warrant a need for future longitudinal studies.

  7. Distance training for teachers: an inter-institutional cooperation strategy for the public acceptance of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Matzen, Claudio

    2003-01-01

    Two experiences of teacher distance training using new information and communication technologies are described. These experiences were developed in 2000-2002 to promote the public acceptance of nuclear energy, including efforts from the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN, http://www.cchen.cl) , the Metropolitan University of Sciences of Education (UMCE, http://www.umce.cl) , the Center for Improvement, Experimentation and Pedagogical Research (CPEIP, http://cpeip.mineduc.cl) and the National University Network (REUNA, http://www.reuna.cl). The experiences described consist of improving courses for teachers working at the basic and intermediate levels in the Chilean educational system. Both courses focused on methods and resources that support constructive teaching and meaningful learning of both basic concepts and peaceful applications of nuclear energy, in line with contemporary theories and practice in the teaching of sciences, technology and society. In the first of these experiences, developed in 2000 and entitled T eacher's Workshop: Nuclear Energy in Education. A Didactic Approach , the course received support from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Five interactive video conference sessions were implemented to cover a wide area of the country, thanks to the Virtual University Network at REUNA (http://www.uvirtual.cl). Another component of the instructional system was a web site to help with matters like the delivery of learning materials and communications among the participants. In the second experience, developed in 2001-2002 and entitled E ducational Debate: Man, Society and Nuclear Energy , the authors received support and funding from the InterAmerican Virtual Center of Cooperation for Teacher Formation (CIDI-OEA). The participants in the distance course were from several countries, including Chile, Argentina, Colombia, Brazil and the Dominican Republic. Instructional resources included a virtual learning environment via Internet and

  8. Long-distance running, bone density, and osteoarthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, N.E.; Bloch, D.A.; Jones, H.H.; Marshall, W.H. Jr.; Wood, P.D.; Fries, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    Forty-one long-distance runners aged 50 to 72 years were compared with 41 matched community controls to examine associations of repetitive, long-term physical impact (running) with osteoarthritis and osteoporosis. Roentgenograms of hands, lateral lumbar spine, and knees were assessed without knowledge of running status. A computed tomographic scan of the first lumbar vertebra was performed to quantitate bone mineral content. Runners, both male and female, have approximately 40% more bone mineral than matched controls. Female runners, but not male runners, appear to have somewhat more sclerosis and spur formation in spine and weight-bearing knee x-ray films, but not in hand x-ray films. There were no differences between groups in joint space narrowing, crepitation, joint stability, or symptomatic osteoarthritis. Running is associated with increased bone mineral but not, in this cross-sectional study, with clinical osteoarthritis

  9. A CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK OF VIRTUAL INTERACTIVE TEACHER TRAINING THROUGH OPEN AND DISTANCE LEARNING FOR THE REMOTE AREAS ENGLISH TEACHERS OF BANGLADESH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene PARVIN

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Since we are living in the information age and the importance of the need for communication among people of different cultures is increasing day by day in the globalizing world, people need to learn the languages of different cultures, particularly English, which is the common language of this global communication. This need for learning English requires trained qualified teachers of English. A scan of those who are teaching English in schools of Bangladesh reveals that most of them are very limited in both English skills and teaching methodologies for English. This situation is exacerbated when one moves into the rural areas. Most of the teachers are staying far away from the teachers’ training colleges and also for different constraint like administrative, financial, time constraint and were also unable to receive any training due to family problems. So Distance Education has a great demand to them. ICT is an effective media of distance education. For many years, universities with a significant commitment to distance and open education institutions have been at the forefront of adopting new technologies to increase access to education and training opportunities. Information and Communications Technology (ICT is an umbrella term that includes all technologies for the manipulation and communication of information. Bangladesh Open University (BOU is till now belonging to the second generation of distance education model but due to the enhancement of technology in Bangladesh, BOU can proceed further. The main purpose of this study is to identify a suitable technology for developing a virtual interactive teachers’ training program for the disadvantaged English teachers of Bangladesh. Respondents were selected through random sampling and data were analyzed using both descriptive statistics and quantitative themes. From the opinion of the secondary English teachers their access and acceptability on ICT was identified and also a need analysis was

  10. Presença de fatores de risco de doenças cardiovasculares e de lesões em praticantes de corrida de rua Presence of cardiovascular risck factors and injuries in road runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline de Castro Ishida

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo descreveu as características antropométricas e presença de fatores de riscos cardiovasculares (Parte1 bem como a ocorrência de lesões (Parte 2 em corredores de rua. Índice de massa corporal, pressão arterial (PA, circunferência abdominal (CA e presença de lesões foram avaliadas em 94 corredores. Destes, 38,5% eram hipertensos auto-referidos, mas 41,9% estavam com a PA alterada no dia. Dentre os auto-referidos sem problemas de saúde, foram encontradas alterações na PA (42%, na CA (9,8% e 6% apresentaram risco cardiovascular moderado. Verificou-se que 34% já sofreram lesão, sendo que 67,7% foram derivadas de treinos ou competições. Idade, distância da prova e realização de outras atividades foram associados com a ocorrência de lesão. Os resultados do presente estudo nos permitem concluir que os praticantes de pedestrianismo apresentam uma condição física propícia ao comprometimento cardiovascular durante uma prova e ao surgimento de lesões, sugerindo campanhas de conscientização sobre a condição de saúde neste público.This study investigated the anthropometric characteristics and the presence of cardiovascular risk factors (Part 1 as well as occurrence of injuries (Part 2 in road runners. Body mass index, blood pressure (BP, abdominal circumference (AC and incidence of injuries were evaluated in 94 road runners. Among the participants, 38,5% self-reported as hypertensive, but 41,7% from total had altered BP. Among healthy runners, it was found alterations on BP (42%, AC (9.8% and 6% presented moderated cardiovascular risk. It was observed that 34% already suffered some injuries and 67.7% derived from training and competition. Age, distance of the running and practice of other activities were associated with presence of injury. The results of the present study allow us to conclude that road runners have a physical condition that facilitates the cardiovascular event during the competition and that

  11. Vulnerability to exercise addiction, socio-demographic, behavioral and psychological characteristics of runners at risk for eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Lodovico, Laura; Dubertret, Caroline; Ameller, Aurely

    2018-02-01

    Excessive exercise is frequently associated with eating disorders and may degenerate into exercise addiction. We still don't know whether runners at risk for eating disorders are at risk for exercise addiction. Our aim is to assess: 1) risk for exercise addiction in runners at risk for eating disorders and 2) socio-demographic, behavioral and psychological characteristics distinguishing runners at-risk from not-at-risk for eating disorders. We assessed risk for eating disorders and exercise addiction using the SCOFF questionnaire and the Exercise Addiction Inventory personality traits with the Big-Five Inventory Test, socio-demographic data, eating and training habits in a sample of 154 healthy runners. Twenty five subjects had a score of ≥2 at the SCOFF and were included in the group "at risk for eating disorders". In this group, we found a higher percentage of subjects at risk for exercise addiction (p=0.01) and higher average scores at the Exercise Addiction Inventory (p=0.01) than runners not at risk (N=136). Runners at risk were statistically younger (p=0.03), women (p=0.001), started running to lose weight more often (p=0.03), lost more kilos since affiliation in their running club (p=0.04), and were characterized by neurotic traits using the Big-Five-Inventory Test (p=3.10 -6 ). Screening for exercise addiction and mood disorders could lead to a more accurate management of runners at risk for eating disorders. Identifying vulnerable individuals will facilitate the prevention of eating disorders and preserve the benefits of sport practice. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Short-Term Absenteeism and Health Care Utilization Due to Lower Extremity Injuries Among Novice Runners: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Dirk-Wouter; Huisstede, Bionka; Verhagen, Evert; van der Worp, Henk; Kluitenberg, Bas; van Middelkoop, Marienke; Hartgens, Fred; Backx, Frank

    2016-11-01

    To describe absenteeism and health care utilization (HCU) within 6 weeks after occurrence of running-related injuries (RRIs) among novice runners and to explore differences relating to injury and personal characteristics. Prospective cohort study. Primary care. One thousand six hundred ninety-six novice runners (18-65 years) participating in a 6-week running program ("Start-to-Run"). Injury characteristics were assessed by weekly training logs and personal characteristics by a baseline questionnaire. Data on absenteeism and HCU were collected using questionnaires at 2 and 6 weeks after the RRI occurred. A total of 185 novice runners (11%) reported an RRI during the 6-week program. Of these injured novice runners, 78% reported absence from sports, whereas only 4% reported absence from work. Fifty-one percent of the injured novice runners visited a health care professional, mostly physical therapists (PTs) rather than physicians. Absenteeism was more common among women than men and was also more common with acute RRIs than gradual-onset RRIs. As regards HCU, both the variety of professionals visited and the number of PT visits were higher among runners with muscle-tendon injuries in the ankle/foot region than among those with other RRIs. Among novice runners sustaining an RRI during a 6-week running program, over three quarters reported short-term absence from sports, whereas absence from work was very limited, and over half used professional health care. Both absence and HCU are associated with injury characteristics. In future running promotion programs (eg in Start-to-Run programs), specific attention should be paid to acute injuries and to muscle-tendon injuries in the ankle/foot region.

  13. Effect of Peer Influence on Exercise Behavior and Enjoyment in Recreational Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnes, Andrew J; Petersen, Jennifer L; Barkley, Jacob E

    2016-02-01

    Fitness professionals and popular media sources often recommend exercising with a partner to increase exercise motivation, adherence, intensity, and/or duration. Although competition with peers has been shown to enhance maximal athletic performance, experimental research examining the impact of peer influence on submaximal exercise behavior in adults is limited. The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the presence of familiar and unfamiliar peers, vs. running alone, on recreational runners' voluntary running duration, distance, intensity, liking (i.e., enjoyment), and ratings of perceived exertion (RPEs). Recreational runners (n = 12 males, n = 12 females) completed 3 experimental trials, each under a different social condition, in a randomized order. Each trial consisted of self-paced running for a duration voluntarily determined by the participant. The 3 social conditions were running alone, with a sex- and fitness-matched familiar peer, or with a sex- and fitness-matched unfamiliar peer. A wrist-worn global positioning system was used to record running duration, distance, and average speed. Liking and RPE were assessed at the end of each trial. Mixed model regression analysis showed no significant effects of social condition (p ≥ 0.40) for any of the dependent variables. The presence of a familiar or unfamiliar peer did not alter recreational runners' running behavior, liking, or perceived exertion during submaximal exercise. However, exercising with others may have other benefits (e.g., reduced attrition) not examined herein.

  14. Prevalence in running events and running performance of endurance runners following a vegetarian or vegan diet compared to non-vegetarian endurance runners: the NURMI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirnitzer, Katharina; Seyfart, Tom; Leitzmann, Claus; Keller, Markus; Wirnitzer, Gerold; Lechleitner, Christoph; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas; Knechtle, Beat

    2016-01-01

    Beneficial and detrimental effects of various vegetarian and vegan diets on the health status are well known. Considering the growing background numbers of vegetarians and vegans, the number of vegetarian and vegan runners is likely to rise, too. Therefore, the Nutrition and Running High Mileage (NURMI) Study was designed as a comparative study to investigate the prevalence of omnivores, vegetarians, and vegans in running events and to detect potential differences in running performance comparing these three subgroups. The NURMI Study will be conducted in three steps following a cross-sectional design. Step 1 will determine epidemiological aspects of endurance runners (any distance) using a short standardized questionnaire. Step 2 will investigate dietary habits and running history from eligible participants (capable of running a half-marathon at least) using an extended standardized questionnaire. Step 3 will collect data after a running event on finishing time and final ranking as well as a post-race rating of perceived exertion, mood status, nutrient and fluid intake during the race. Our study will provide a major contribution to overcome the lack of data on the prevalence and running performance of vegetarian and vegan runners in endurance running events. We estimate the prevalence of vegetarians and vegans participating in a running event to be less compared to the respective proportion of vegetarians and vegans to the general population. Furthermore we will validate the subject's self-assessment of their respective diet. This comparative study may identify possible effects of dietary behavior on running performance und may detect possible differences between the respective subgroups: omnivorous, vegetarian and vegan runners. Trial registration Current controlled trials, ISRCTN73074080.

  15. Joint stiffness and running economy during imposed forefoot strike before and after a long run in rearfoot strike runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, Daniel A; Paquette, Max R; Schilling, Brian K; Bloomer, Richard J

    2017-12-01

    Research has focused on the effects of acute strike pattern modifications on lower extremity joint stiffness and running economy (RE). Strike pattern modifications on running biomechanics have mostly been studied while runners complete short running bouts. This study examined the effects of an imposed forefoot strike (FFS) on RE and ankle and knee joint stiffness before and after a long run in habitual rearfoot strike (RFS) runners. Joint kinetics and RE were collected before and after a long run. Sagittal joint kinetics were computed from kinematic and ground reaction force data that were collected during over-ground running trials in 13 male runners. RE was measured during treadmill running. Knee flexion range of motion, knee extensor moment and ankle joint stiffness were lower while plantarflexor moment and knee joint stiffness were greater during imposed FFS compared with RFS. The long run did not influence the difference in ankle and knee joint stiffness between strike patterns. Runners were more economical during RFS than imposed FFS and RE was not influenced by the long run. These findings suggest that using a FFS pattern towards the end of a long run may not be mechanically or metabolically beneficial for well-trained male RFS runners.

  16. The effectiveness of a preconditioning programme on preventing running-related injuries in novice runners: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredeweg, Steef W; Zijlstra, Sjouke; Bessem, Bram; Buist, Ida

    2012-09-01

    There is no consensus on the aetiology and prevention of running-related injuries in runners. Preconditioning studies among different athlete populations show positive effects on the incidence of sports injuries. A 4-week preconditioning programme in novice runners will reduce the incidence of running-related injuries. Randomised controlled clinical trial; level of evidence, 1. Novice runners (N=432) prepared for a four-mile recreational running event. Participants were allocated to the 4-week preconditioning (PRECON) group (N=211) or the control group (N=221). The PRECON group started a 4-week training programme, prior to the running programme, with walking and hopping exercises. After the 4-week period both groups started a 9-week running programme. In both groups information was registered on running exposure and running-related injuries (RRIs) using an internet-based running log. Primary outcome measure was RRIs per 100 runners. An RRI was defined as any musculoskeletal complaint of the lower extremity or lower back causing restriction of running for at least a week. The incidence of RRIs was 15.2% in the PRECON group and 16.8% in the control group. The difference in RRIs between the groups was not significant (χ(2)=0.161, df=1, p=0.69). This prospective study demonstrated that a 4-week PRECON programme with walking and hopping exercises had no influence on the incidence of RRIs in novice runners.

  17. Future and Changing Roles of Staff in Distance Education: A Study to Identify Training and Professional Development Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jennifer

    2018-01-01

    The roles of distance education teaching staff are changing, necessitating role clarity and the development of appropriate competency frameworks. This article investigates the perceptions of the teaching and research staff at the University of South Africa, regarding the current and future roles of distance educators, their own competencies in…

  18. Classroom-based and distance learning education and training courses in end-of-life care for health and social care staff: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulsford, David; Jackson, Georgina; O'Brien, Terri; Yates, Sue; Duxbury, Joy

    2013-03-01

    Staff from a range of health and social care professions report deficits in their knowledge and skills when providing end-of-life and palliative care, and education and training has been advocated at a range of levels. To review the literature related to classroom-based and distance learning education and training initiatives for health and social care staff in end-of-life and palliative care, in terms of their target audience, extent, modes of delivery, content and teaching and learning strategies, and to identify the most effective educational strategies for enhancing care. A systematic review of the literature evaluating classroom-based and distance learning education and training courses for health and social care staff in end-of-life and palliative care. Online databases CINAHL, MEDLINE, EMBASE and PSYCHINFO between January 2000 and July 2010. Studies were selected that discussed specific education and training initiatives and included pre-and post-test evaluation of participants' learning. 30 studies met eligibility criteria. The majority reported successful outcomes, though there were some exceptions. Level of prior experience and availability of practice reinforcement influenced learning. Participative and interactive learning strategies were predominantly used along with discussion of case scenarios. Multi-professional learning was infrequently reported and service user and carer input to curriculum development and delivery was reported in only one study. Classroom-based education and training is useful for enhancing professionals' skills and perceived preparedness for delivering end-of-life care but should be reinforced by actual practice experience.

  19. Catharsis – Philosophical and Spiritual Aspects of Long-Distance Running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemec Marcel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to identify and analyze the occurrence of cathartic states in a sample of long-distance runners. Data collected via questionnaires were used to evaluate quantitative variables complemented by heuristics while aiming at qualitatively categorize the areas of cathartic states in the context of philosophical and spiritual aspects of long-distance running. The study findings objectify philosophical and spiritual aspects affecting personalities of long-distance runners. The study findings have shown that catharsis represents a relevant philosophical and spiritual aspect affecting long-distance running. We assume that authentic experience of catharsis and its effects motivates runners to perform regular physical activity. The analysis of philosophical and spiritual aspects of long-distance running has revealed a multi-spectral holistic relevance based on the transfer affecting a specific way of life, spectrum of values, ethical personality traits, and also the quality of long-distance runners’ lives.

  20. Is changing footstrike pattern beneficial to runners?

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph Hamill; Allison H. Gruber

    2017-01-01

    Some researchers, running instructors, and coaches have suggested that the “optimal” footstrike pattern to improve performance and reduce running injuries is to land using a mid- or forefoot strike. Thus, it has been recommended that runners who use a rearfoot strike would benefit by changing their footstrike although there is little scientific evidence for suggesting such a change. The rearfoot strike is clearly more prevalent. The major reasons often given for changing to a mid- or forefoot...

  1. Iron excess in recreational marathon runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettler, S; Zimmermann, M B

    2010-05-01

    Iron deficiency and anemia may impair athletic performance, and iron supplements are commonly consumed by athletes. However, iron overload should be avoided because of the possible long-term adverse health effects. We investigated the iron status of 170 male and female recreational runners participating in the Zürich marathon. Iron deficiency was defined either as a plasma ferritin (PF) concentration or =4.5 (functional iron deficiency). After excluding subjects with elevated C-reactive protein concentrations, iron overload was defined as PF >200 microg/l. Iron depletion was found in only 2 out of 127 men (1.6% of the male study population) and in 12 out of 43 (28.0%) women. Functional iron deficiency was found in 5 (3.9%) and 11 (25.5%) male and female athletes, respectively. Body iron stores, calculated from the sTfR/PF ratio, were significantly higher (Pmarathon runners. Median PF among males was 104 microg/l, and the upper limit of the PF distribution in males was 628 microg/l. Iron overload was found in 19 out of 127 (15.0%) men but only 2 out of 43 in women (4.7%). Gender (male sex), but not age, was a predictor of higher PF (Pperformance, our findings indicate excess body iron may be common in male recreational runners and suggest supplements should only be used if tests of iron status indicate deficiency.

  2. Studies on water turbine runner which fish can pass through: In case of single stage axial runner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Yukimari; Maeda, Takao; Nagoshi, Osamu; Ieda, Kazuma; Shinma, Hisako; Hagimoto, Michiko

    1994-01-01

    The relationship between water turbine runner design and operation and the safe passage of fish through the turbine is studied. The kinds of fish used in the tests are a dace, a sweet fish and a small salmon. A single stage axial runner is used. The velocity and pressure distributions were measured inside the turbine casing and along the casing wall. Many pictures showing fish passing through the rotating runner were taken and analyzed. The swimming speed of the fish was examined from video recordings. Fish pass through the runner more rapidly when they can determine and choose the easier path. Injury and mortality of fish are affected by the runner speed and the location of impact of the runner on the fish body

  3. Teach Beyond Your Reach: An instructor’s guide to developing and running successful distance learning classes, workshops, training sessions and more

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reviewed by Yavuz AKBULUT

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available 237―Teach Beyond Your Reach: An instructor‘s guide to developing and running successful distance learning classes, workshops, training sessions and more‖ serves as a guide for novice andexperienced distance educators to develop anddeliver their own training sessions. The book isconsisted of 234 pages (+xi covering eightinterdependent chapters followed by a usefulappendix of further reading resources, sampleintroductory materials for distance learning and asample lecture. The author, Robin Neidorf,teaches communications and writing through theonline campus of the Univeristy of Phoenix andco-teaches a creative writing course through theUniversity of Gävle in Sweden in addition to herThe book serves as a terrific resource for bothnovice distance educators and as a reference forthose who are more experienced. It lays out mostof the things needed to teach online throughcoaching the readers to understand the currentsituation and pass onto next levels of sophistication in e-learning practices. Two critical things that are emphasized in thebook are interaction as the core of learning, and collaboration among the distance education practitioners. The focus is not on developing Web pages, troubleshooting specific software or providing student support services. Rather, it focuses on therequirements for instruction and underlines where we might need to collaborate with Chapter 1 discusses the tools available for distance learning along with suggestions on how they may be used. Chapter 2 describes the distance population addressingdifferent learning styles, attitudes and generational differences all of which might affect the way students enter the class, and work with the teacher and materials.Chapter 3 and 4 focus on instructional design and development with a particular emphasis on creating content, which is both interactive and in line with learning objectives. Chapter 5 provides ideas on managing the distance classroom with conciseand thoughtful

  4. RESEARCH OF INFLUENCE OF QUALITY OF ELECTRONIC EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES ON QUALITY OF TRAINING WITH USE OF DISTANCE TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. M. Kravtsov

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Communication improving of educational processes requires today new approaches to the management arrangements and forming of educational policy in the field of distance learning, which is based on the use of modern information and communication technologies. An important step in this process is the continuous monitoring of the development and implementation of information technology and, in particular, the distance learning systems in higher educational establishments. The main objective of the monitoring is the impact assessment on the development of distance learning following the state educational standards, curricula, methodical and technical equipment and other factors; factors revelation that influence the implementation and outcomes of distance learning; results comparison of educational institution functioning and distance education systems in order to determine the most efficient ways of its development. The paper presents the analysis results of the dependence of the quality of educational services on the electronic educational resources. Trends in educational services development was studied by comparing the quality influence of electronic educational resources on the quality of educational services of higher pedagogical educational institutions of Ukraine as of 2009-2010 and 2012-2013. Generally, the analysis of the survey results allows evaluating quality of the modern education services as satisfactory and it can be said that almost 70% of the success of their future development depends on the quality of the used electronic educational resources and distance learning systems in particular.

  5. Control of impact loading during distracted running before and after gait retraining in runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Roy T H; An, Winko W; Au, Ivan P H; Zhang, Janet H; Chan, Zoe Y S; MacPhail, Aislinn J

    2018-07-01

    Gait retraining using visual biofeedback has been reported to reduce impact loading in runners. However, most of the previous studies did not adequately examine the level of motor learning after training, as the modified gait pattern was not tested in a dual-task condition. Hence, this study sought to compare the landing peak positive acceleration (PPA) and vertical loading rates during distracted running before and after gait retraining. Sixteen recreational runners underwent a two-week visual biofeedback gait retraining program for impact loading reduction, with feedback on the PPA measured at heel. In the evaluation of PPA and vertical loading rates before and after the retraining, the participants performed a cognitive and verbal counting task while running. Repeated measures ANOVA indicated a significant interaction between feedback and training on PPA (F = 4.642; P = 0.048) but not vertical loading rates (F > 1.953; P > 0.067). Pairwise comparisons indicated a significantly lower PPA and vertical loading rates after gait retraining (P  0.68). Visual feedback after gait retraining reduced PPA and vertical loading rates during distracted running (P  0.36). Gait retraining is effective in lowering impact loading even when the runners are distracted. In dual-task situation, visual biofeedback provided beneficial influence on kinetics control after gait retraining.

  6. Prevalence, Severity and Potential Nutritional Causes of Gastrointestinal Symptoms during a Marathon in Recreational Runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie N. Pugh

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms (GIS amongst recreational runners during a marathon race, and potential nutritional factors that may contribute. Recreational runners of the 2017 Liverpool (n = 66 and Dublin (n = 30 marathons were recruited. GIS were reported post-marathon and we considered GIS in the 7 days prior to the marathon and during the marathon using the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS. Nutritional intake was recorded using food diaries for the day before the race, morning of the race, and during the race; 43% of participants reported moderate (≥4 GIS in the 7 days prior to the marathon and 27% reported moderate symptoms during the marathon with most common symptoms being flatulence (16% during training, and nausea (8% during the marathon race. Correlations between all nutritional intake and GIS were not statistically significant (p > 0.05. There were significant correlations between total GIS score (r = 0.510, p < 0.001, upper GIS score (r = 0.346, p = 0.001 and lower GIS score (r = 0.483, p < 0.001 in training and during the marathon. There appears to be a modest prevalence of GIS in recreational runners, in the week prior to a marathon and during marathon running, although there was no association with nutritional intake before or during the race.

  7. Prevalence, Severity and Potential Nutritional Causes of Gastrointestinal Symptoms during a Marathon in Recreational Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Jamie N; Kirk, Ben; Fearn, Robert; Morton, James P; Close, Graeme L

    2018-06-24

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of gastrointestinal symptoms (GIS) amongst recreational runners during a marathon race, and potential nutritional factors that may contribute. Recreational runners of the 2017 Liverpool ( n = 66) and Dublin ( n = 30) marathons were recruited. GIS were reported post-marathon and we considered GIS in the 7 days prior to the marathon and during the marathon using the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS). Nutritional intake was recorded using food diaries for the day before the race, morning of the race, and during the race; 43% of participants reported moderate (≥4) GIS in the 7 days prior to the marathon and 27% reported moderate symptoms during the marathon with most common symptoms being flatulence (16%) during training, and nausea (8%) during the marathon race. Correlations between all nutritional intake and GIS were not statistically significant ( p > 0.05). There were significant correlations between total GIS score ( r = 0.510, p training and during the marathon. There appears to be a modest prevalence of GIS in recreational runners, in the week prior to a marathon and during marathon running, although there was no association with nutritional intake before or during the race.

  8. Experiences with environmentally adapted Kaplan runners; Erfarenheter med miljoeanpassade Kaplanloephjul

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ukonsaari; Jan

    2012-08-15

    This study concerns environmentally adapted Kaplan runners, which have no oil for lubricating the blade regulation mechanisms and bearings. The runners are water or air filled with self lubricated bearings. Recent design also includes regulation system pressure increase and servo motor placement below runner centre and environmentally adapted synthetic ester as hydraulic fluid. These together with power output increase and efficiency optimization are suspected sources of poor runner function. Of 37 runners 43 % have had some kind of problem and 30 % bearing or mechanism related ones. When the axial blade bearing problems are excluded the problems occurred at 16 %. Deeper look into the design of newer runners shows that only bronze based runner hubs is significantly more problem dense regarding regulation mechanisms (50 %). Hidden figures of increased runner regulation forces are suspected. All problems cannot be explained and the young machines limit the experiences. The working group's opinion and bring ups of historical and present examples during the work show evidence that the old oil filled runners function is far from perfect, nor the life length. The future is not with oil filled runner hubs. Main parts of the discovered problems have been solved and can be resolved by thorough design analysis. One future concern is what effects the recent design changes will cause due to increase demand for power output changes including the number of starts and stops. That is why the working group's recommendation is to put joint effort into material fatigue and in which a first step is to identify the real forces the runners are exposed to.

  9. Changes on magnetic resonance tomography in the knee joints of marathon runners: a 10-year longitudinal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krampla, Wolfgang W.; Newrkla, Stephan P.; Hruby, Walter F.; Kroener, Andreas H.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate long-term damage in the internal structures of the knee joints of recreational long-distance runners. Ten years after their participation in a baseline study concerning their knee joints, seven long-distance runners and one who had given up long-distance running were invited to participate in a repeat magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) investigation. The same evaluation criteria and the same technical equipment were used, and the results of the two investigations were compared. No adverse long-term consequences were observed in six of the seven active runners, regardless of pre-existing damage at the baseline investigation. In one case the arthrotic changes were progressive in nature. The person who had given up running presented with severe deterioration of the internal structures of the knee joint. Non-physiological maximal loads secondary to the marathon race do not cause any permanent damage in the internal structures of the knee joint in individuals without significant pre-existing damage. A disposition for premature arthrosis was not registered in the population investigated. A protective value of long distance running on the internal structures of the knee joint is discussed. (orig.)

  10. Changes on magnetic resonance tomography in the knee joints of marathon runners: a 10-year longitudinal study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krampla, Wolfgang W.; Newrkla, Stephan P.; Hruby, Walter F. [Danube Hospital, Radiology Department, Vienna (Austria); Kroener, Andreas H. [Danube Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Vienna (Austria)

    2008-07-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate long-term damage in the internal structures of the knee joints of recreational long-distance runners. Ten years after their participation in a baseline study concerning their knee joints, seven long-distance runners and one who had given up long-distance running were invited to participate in a repeat magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) investigation. The same evaluation criteria and the same technical equipment were used, and the results of the two investigations were compared. No adverse long-term consequences were observed in six of the seven active runners, regardless of pre-existing damage at the baseline investigation. In one case the arthrotic changes were progressive in nature. The person who had given up running presented with severe deterioration of the internal structures of the knee joint. Non-physiological maximal loads secondary to the marathon race do not cause any permanent damage in the internal structures of the knee joint in individuals without significant pre-existing damage. A disposition for premature arthrosis was not registered in the population investigated. A protective value of long distance running on the internal structures of the knee joint is discussed. (orig.)

  11. Increased Prevalence of the IL-6-174C Genetic Polymorphism in Long Distance Swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zaken, Sigal; Meckel, Yoav; Nemet, Dan; Kassem, Eias; Eliakim, Alon

    2017-09-01

    The IL-6 -174G/C single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) functionally affects IL-6 activity, with the G-allele associated with increased IL-6 levels. The C-allele was found to be associated with exercise-induced skeletal muscle damage. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between the IL-6 -174G/C polymorphism and athletic performance among elite swimmers and runners. The study sample included 180 track and field athletes and 80 swimmers. Track and field athletes were assigned to three sub-groups: long-distance runners, middle-distance runners and short-distance runners. Swimmers were assigned to two subgroups: long-distance swimmers and short-distance swimmers. The control group consisted of 123 non-athletic healthy individuals. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood following a standard protocol. Genotyping was performed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The CC genotype and C-allele frequency were significantly higher in the long-distance swimmers (18 and 43%, respectively) compared to the long-distance runners (3 and 14%, respectively, p < 0.001); middle-distance runners (4 and 22%, respectively, p < 0.001); and controls (5 and 19%, respectively, p < 0.001). In addition, the CC genotype and C-allele frequency were significantly higher (p < 0.001) in long-distance swimmers compared to short-distance swimmers (18 versus 5% and 43 versus 29% for the CC genotype and C-allele frequency, respectively). The higher frequency of the C-allele and CC genotype among long-distance swimmers suggests that the rarity of exercise-associated rhabdomyolysis among swimmers is probably related to other sports-specific or water-related protective mechanisms. It is possible that swimming selection in talented endurance athletes who are C-allele carriers represents an example of genetically-dependent sports selection.

  12. Increased Prevalence of the IL-6 -174C Genetic Polymorphism in Long Distance Swimmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben-Zaken Sigal

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The IL-6 -174G/C single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP functionally affects IL-6 activity, with the G-allele associated with increased IL-6 levels. The C-allele was found to be associated with exercise-induced skeletal muscle damage. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between the IL-6 -174G/C polymorphism and athletic performance among elite swimmers and runners. The study sample included 180 track and field athletes and 80 swimmers. Track and field athletes were assigned to three sub-groups: long-distance runners, middle-distance runners and short-distance runners. Swimmers were assigned to two subgroups: long-distance swimmers and short-distance swimmers. The control group consisted of 123 non-athletic healthy individuals. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood following a standard protocol. Genotyping was performed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. The CC genotype and C-allele frequency were significantly higher in the long-distance swimmers (18 and 43%, respectively compared to the long-distance runners (3 and 14%, respectively, p < 0.001; middle-distance runners (4 and 22%, respectively, p < 0.001; and controls (5 and 19%, respectively, p < 0.001. In addition, the CC genotype and C-allele frequency were significantly higher (p < 0.001 in long-distance swimmers compared to short-distance swimmers (18 versus 5% and 43 versus 29% for the CC genotype and C-allele frequency, respectively. The higher frequency of the C-allele and CC genotype among long-distance swimmers suggests that the rarity of exercise-associated rhabdomyolysis among swimmers is probably related to other sports-specific or water-related protective mechanisms. It is possible that swimming selection in talented endurance athletes who are C-allele carriers represents an example of genetically-dependent sports selection.

  13. Injuries in Runners; A Systematic Review on Risk Factors and Sex Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Worp, Maarten P.; ten Haaf, Dominique S. M.; van Cingel, Robert; de Wijer, Anton; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W. G.; Staal, J. Bart

    2015-01-01

    Background The popularity of running continues to increase, which means that the incidence of running-related injuries will probably also continue to increase. Little is known about risk factors for running injuries and whether they are sex-specific. Objectives The aim of this study was to review information about risk factors and sex-specific differences for running-induced injuries in adults. Search Strategy The databases PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL and Psych-INFO were searched for relevant articles. Selection Criteria Longitudinal cohort studies with a minimal follow-up of 1 month that investigated the association between risk factors (personal factors, running/training factors and/or health and lifestyle factors) and the occurrence of lower limb injuries in runners were included. Data Collection and Analysis Two reviewers’ independently selected relevant articles from those identified by the systematic search and assessed the risk of bias of the included studies. The strength of the evidence was determined using a best-evidence rating system. Sex differences in risk were determined by calculating the sex ratio for risk factors (the risk factor for women divided by the risk factor for men). Main Results Of 400 articles retrieved, 15 longitudinal studies were included, of which 11 were considered high-quality studies and 4 moderate-quality studies. Overall, women were at lower risk than men for sustaining running-related injuries. Strong and moderate evidence was found that a history of previous injury and of having used orthotics/inserts was associated with an increased risk of running injuries. Age, previous sports activity, running on a concrete surface, participating in a marathon, weekly running distance (30–39 miles) and wearing running shoes for 4 to 6 months were associated with a greater risk of injury in women than in men. A history of previous injuries, having a running experience of 0–2 years, restarting running, weekly running distance (20–29

  14. GENETIC IDENTIFICATION FOR TUNA AND RAINBOW RUNNER CAPTURE IN NORTH BALI WATERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gusti Ngurah Permana

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Gondol Research Institute for Mariculture identification of tuna and rainbow runner was an objective in this current study. Samples of five species were collected from territorial water of North Bali. The method used in this study was allozyme electrophoresis. The results showed that buffer of CAPM-6 (citric acid aminoprophylmorpholine resulted in a sharp and clear banding pattern. The species could be differentiated in six diagnostic isozyme patterns Idh* (isocitrate dehydrogenase, 6Pgd* (6 phosphogluconate dehydrogenase, Gpi* (glucose phosphate isomerase, Mdh* (malate dehydrogenase, Est* (esterase, and Sp* (sarcoplasmic protein. All species were in Hardy-weinberg equilibrium. Heterozygosities of species were ranged from 0.00 to 0.099. Yellowfin tuna has the highest heterozigosity compared with the other species. Clustering samples according to pairs revealed that genetic distance of Bullet tuna (A. rochei and Eastern little tuna (E. affinis had small value (0.001. By contrast, the largest value was observed between yellowfin tuna, T. albacares and rainbow runner, E. bipunnulata (0.007. This value indicated that Bullet tuna (A. rochei and Eastern little tuna (E. affinis closed relation, while among yellowfin tuna, skipjack tuna, and rainbow runner, were separated phylogenically.

  15. Shin Splints 101: Explaining Shin Splints to Young Runners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newlin, Dana; Smith, Darla S.

    2011-01-01

    Shin splints are a common but often confusing injury. Sources disagree on both the cause of the injury and the anatomical source of the pain. Some blame shin splints on foot pronation, footstrike pattern, or arch height. Regardless of what causes the condition, it affects many runners, beginning in some at a young age. Young runners often have…

  16. Acute renal failure in four Comrades Marathon runners ingesting the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To evaluate common factors associated with the development of acute renal failure (ARF) in Comrades Marathon runners. Methods. This was a retrospective case series of 4 runners hospitalised post-race with ARF in the 89 km 2010 Comrades Marathon. The outcome measures were incidence of analgesic use, ...

  17. Development of a 5kw Francis Turbine Runner Using Computation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A small scale Francis turbine runner for a turbine located at Awba dam in the University of Ibadan with designed head and flow rate of 6m and 0.244m3/s is designed. The basic design of the Francis turbine runner is completed based on basic fluid dynamics turbo machinery principles. A 2-D and 3-D steady state, ...

  18. Skeletal muscle architectural adaptations to marathon run training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murach, Kevin; Greever, Cory; Luden, Nicholas D

    2015-01-01

    We assessed lateral gastrocnemius (LG) and vastus lateralis (VL) architecture in 16 recreational runners before and after 12 weeks of marathon training. LG fascicle length decreased 10% while pennation angle increased 17% (p training can modify skeletal muscle architectural features.

  19. Comparação do ponto de deflexão da frequência cardíaca com a máxima fase estável de lactato em corredores de fundo Comparison between heart rate deflection point and maximal lactate steady state in distance runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Honorato da Silveira

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do estudo foi comparar o ponto de deflexão da freqüência cardíaca (PDFC visual e método DMAX com a máxima fase estável de lactato (MFEL. Treze corredores executaram teste incremental Vameval e testes de cargas retangulares (TCR. A velocidade do PDFC visual (14,3 ± 1,13km.h-1 foi significantemente maior que o DMAX (13,2 ± 1,35km.h-1 além de apresentarem correlação não significante. Entretanto, nenhuma dessas velocidades foram diferentes da MFEL (13,8 ± 0,90km.h-1 embora somente o PDFC visual tenha apresentado correlação significante com a MFEL (r = 0,75. A concentração de lactato sanguíneo não apresentou estabilidade em oito sujeitos no TCR na intensidade do PDFC visual o qual nos leva a concluir que este não é um índice confiável para estimativa da MFEL. No entanto, este índice pode ser usado como um indicador de capacidade aeróbia.The aim of study was to compare heart rate deflection point (HRDP determined by visual and DMAX methods to Maximal lactate steady state (MLSS. Thirteen runners carried out incremental test Vameval and constant load tests (CLT. Velocity of HRDP (14,3 ± 1,13km.h-1 was significantly higher compared to DMAX (13,2 ± 1,35km.h-1 but they were not significantly correlated. However, both velocities, HRDP and DMAX, were not different from MLSS (13,8 ± 0,90km.h-1 while only HRDP has been significant correlated with MLSS (r = 0,75. On eight runners during CLT the blood lactate concentration did not show stability at HRDP velocity which to let us to conclude that HRPD is not appropriated to estimate MLSS. However, it may be used as aerobic capacity index.

  20. Runners with Patellofemoral Pain Exhibit Greater Peak Patella Cartilage Stress Compared to Pain-Free Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Tzu-Chieh; Keyak, Joyce H; Powers, Christopher M

    2018-02-27

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether recreational runners with patellofemoral pain (PFP) exhibit greater peak patella cartilage stress compared to pain-free runners. A secondary purpose was to determine the kinematic and/or kinetic predictors of peak patella cartilage stress during running. Twenty-two female recreational runners participated (12 with PFP and 10 pain-free controls). Patella cartilage stress profiles were quantified using subject-specific finite element models simulating the maximum knee flexion angle during stance phase of running. Input parameters to the finite element model included subject-specific patellofemoral joint geometry, quadriceps muscle forces, and lower extremity kinematics in the frontal and transverse planes. Tibiofemoral joint kinematics and kinetics were quantified to determine the best predictor of stress using stepwise regression analysis. Compared to the pain-free runners, those with PFP exhibited greater peak hydrostatic pressure (PFP vs. control, 21.2 ± 5.6 MPa vs. 16.5 ± 4.6 MPa) and maximum shear stress (11.3 ± 4.6 MPa vs. 8.7 ± 2.3 MPa). Knee external rotation was the best predictor of peak hydrostatic pressure and peak maximum shear stress (38% and 25% of variances, respectively) followed by the knee extensor moment (21% and 25% of variances, respectively). Runners with PFP exhibit greater peak patella cartilage stress during running compared to pain-free individuals. The combination of knee external rotation and a high knee extensor moment best predicted elevated peak stress during running.

  1. Thoracic pain in a collegiate runner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, G P; Benesky, W T

    2002-08-01

    This case study describes the process of examination, re-examination, and intervention for a collegiate runner with mechanical thoracic pain preventing athletic participation and limiting daily function. Unimpaired function fully returned in less than 3 weeks with biweekly sessions to re-establish normal and painfree thoracic mechanics via postural hygiene, exercise, mobilization, and manipulation. The outcome of this case study supports the original hypothesis that the pattern of impairments was in fact responsible for the functional limitations and disability in this athlete. At the time of publication the athlete was without functional limitations and had fully returned to competitive sprinting for the university track team.

  2. DO GENERAL MEDICAL PRACTITIONERS EXAMINE INJURED RUNNERS?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Videbæk, Solvej; Jensen, A V; Rasmussen, S

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: General Medical Practitioners (GMP) in Denmark perform clinical examinations of patients with musculoskeletal pain. However, the prevalence proportion of examinations caused by running-related injuries remains unknown. PURPOSE: The primary purpose of the present study was to estimate...... the prevalence proportion of consultations in general medical practice caused by running-related injuries. The secondary purpose was to estimate the prevalence proportion of injured runners, who consult their GMP, that are referred to additional examinations or treatments. STUDY DESIGN: A survey-based study...

  3. Cost of enlarged operating zone for an existing Francis runner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monette, Christine; Marmont, Hugues; Chamberland-Lauzon, Joël; Skagerstrand, Anders; Coutu, André; Carlevi, Jens

    2016-11-01

    Traditionally, hydro power plants have been operated close to best efficiency point, the more stable operating condition for which they have been designed. However, because of changes in the electricity market, many hydro power plants operators wish to operate their machines differently to fulfil those new market needs. New operating conditions can include whole range operation, many start/stops, extensive low load operation, synchronous condenser mode and power/frequency regulation. Many of these new operating conditions may impose more severe fatigue damage than the traditional base load operation close to best efficiency point. Under these conditions, the fatigue life of the runner may be significantly reduced and reparation or replacement cost might occur sooner than expected. In order to design reliable Francis runners for those new challenging operating scenarios, Andritz Hydro has developed various proprietary tools and design rules. These are used within Andritz Hydro to design mechanically robust Francis runners for the operating scenarios fulfilling customer's specifications. To estimate residual life under different operating scenarios of an existing runner designed years ago for best efficiency base load operation, Andritz Hydro's design rules and tools would necessarily lead to conservative results. While the geometry of a new runner can be modified to fulfil all conservative mechanical design rules, the predicted fatigue life of an existing runner under off-design operating conditions may appear rather short because of the conservative safety factor included in the calculations. The most precise and reliable way to calculate residual life of an existing runner under different operating scenarios is to perform a strain gauge measurement campaign on the runner. This paper presents the runner strain gage measurement campaign of a mid-head Francis turbine over all the operating conditions available during the test, the analysis of the measurement signals

  4. KINEMATIC CHANGES DURING A MARATHON FOR FAST AND SLOW RUNNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie Chan-Roper

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to describe kinematic changes that occur during an actual marathon. We hypothesized that (1 certain running kinematic measures would change between kilometres 8 and 40 (miles 5 and 25 of a marathon and (2 fast runners would demonstrate smaller changes than slow runners. Subjects (n = 179 were selected according to finish time (Range = 2:20:47 to 5:30:10. Two high-speed cameras were used to measure sagittal-plane kinematics at kilometres 8 and 40 of the marathon. The dependent variables were stride length, contact time, peak knee flexion during support and swing, and peak hip flexion and extension during swing. Two-tailed paired t-tests were used to compare dependent variables between kilometres 8 and 40 for all subjects, and regression analyses were used to determine whether faster runners exhibited smaller changes (between miles 5 and 25 than slower runners. For all runners, every dependent variable changed significantly between kilometres 8 and 40 (p < 0.001. Stride length increased 1.3%, contact time increased 13.1%, peak knee flexion during support decreased 3.2%, and peak hip extension, knee flexion, and hip flexion during swing decreased 27.9%, increased 4.3%, and increased 7.4%, respectively (p < 0.001. Among these significant changes, all runners generally changed the same from kilometres 8 and 40 except that fast runners decreased peak knee flexion during support less than the slow runners (p < 0.002. We believe that these changes, for all runners (fast and slow, were due to fatigue. The fact that fast runners maintained knee flexion during support more consistently might be due to their condition on the race day. Strengthening of knee extensor muscles may facilitate increased knee flexion during support throughout a marathon

  5. Prospective comparison of running injuries between shod and barefoot runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Allison R; Davis, Irene S

    2016-04-01

    Advocates of barefoot running suggest that it is more natural and may be a way to minimise injury risk. In contrast, opponents believe shoes are needed to adequately cushion and support the foot. However, to date, there have been no prospective studies of injury patterns in barefoot and shod runners. The purpose of this study was to compare the incidence and rate of injuries between shod and barefoot runners. A prospective survey was conducted over the course of a year among 201 (107 barefoot and 94 shod) adult runners. Information regarding injuries and mileage was logged monthly using a custom, web-based database program. The number of injured runners, number of injuries per runner and injury rates were compared between habitual barefoot and habitual shod runners. Both musculoskeletal and plantar surface injuries were assessed. Statistically fewer overall, diagnosed, musculoskeletal injuries/runner were noted in the barefoot group. However, injury rates were not statistically different between groups due to significantly less mileage run in the barefoot group. As expected, barefoot runners sustained a statistically greater number of injuries to the plantar surface of the foot. The descriptive analysis suggests a greater number of calf injuries, but lower number of knee and hip injuries in the barefoot group. Additionally barefoot runners reported less plantar fasciitis than the shod group. Barefoot running is associated with fewer overall musculoskeletal injuries/runner, but similar injury rates. A larger scale cohort is needed to more accurately assess differences in individual injuries between these two groups. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Kinetic Risk Factors of Running-Related Injuries in Female Recreational Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napier, Christopher; MacLean, Christopher L; Maurer, Jessica; Taunton, Jack E; Hunt, Michael A

    2018-05-30

    Our objective was to prospectively investigate the association of kinetic variables with running-related injury (RRI) risk. Seventy-four healthy female recreational runners ran on an instrumented treadmill while 3D kinetic and kinematic data were collected. Kinetic outcomes were vertical impact transient, average vertical loading rate, instantaneous vertical loading rate, active peak, vertical impulse, and peak braking force (PBF). Participants followed a 15-week half-marathon training program. Exposure time (hours of running) was calculated from start of program until onset of injury, loss to follow-up, or end of program. After converting kinetic variables from continuous to ordinal variables based on tertiles, Cox proportional hazard models with competing risks were fit for each variable independently, before analysis in a forward stepwise multivariable model. Sixty-five participants were included in the final analysis, with a 33.8% injury rate. PBF was the only kinetic variable that was a significant predictor of RRI. Runners in the highest tertile (PBF recreational runners and should be considered as a target for gait retraining interventions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Sleep habits and strategies of ultramarathon runners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Tristan; Arnal, Pierrick J.; Hoffman, Martin D.; Millet, Guillaume Y.

    2018-01-01

    Among factors impacting performance during an ultramarathon, sleep is an underappreciated factor that has received little attention. The aims of this study were to characterize habitual sleep behaviors in ultramarathon runners and to examine strategies they use to manage sleep before and during ultramarathons. Responses from 636 participants to a questionnaire were considered. This population was found to sleep more on weekends and holidays (7–8 h to 8–9 h) than during weekdays (6–7 h to 7–8 h; p sleep disorders, with more women (38.9%) reporting sleep problems than men (22.0%; p sleep preceding an ultramarathon, with 54.7% trying to increase their opportunities for sleep. Only 21% of participants reported that they had a strategy to manage sleep during ultramarathons, with micronaps being the most common strategy specified. Sub-analyses from 221 responses indicated that sleep duration during an ultramarathon was correlated with finish time for races lasting 36–60 h (r = 0.48; p 60 h (r = 0.44; p sleep duration among ultramarathon runners was comparable to the general population and other athletic populations, yet they reported a lower prevalence of sleep disorders. Daytime sleepiness was among the lowest rates encountered in athletic populations, which may be related to the high percentage of nappers in our population. Sleep extension, by increasing sleep time at night and daytime napping, was the main sleep strategy to prepare for ultramarathons. PMID:29742118

  8. Failure analysis of a Francis turbine runner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frunzaverde, D; Campian, V [Research Center in Hydraulics, Automation and Heat Transfer, ' Eftimie Murgu' University of Resita P-ta Traian Vuia 1-4, RO-320085, Resita (Romania); Muntean, S [Centre of Advanced Research in Engineering Sciences, Romanian Academy - Timisoara Branch Bv. Mihai Viteazu 24, RO-300223, Timisoara (Romania); Marginean, G [University of Applied Sciences Gelsenkirchen, Neidenburger Str. 10, 45877 Gelsenkirchen (Germany); Marsavina, L [Department of Strength, ' Politehnica' University of Timisoara, Bv. Mihai Viteazu 1, RO-300222, Timisoara (Romania); Terzi, R; Serban, V, E-mail: gabriela.marginean@fh-gelsenkirchen.d, E-mail: d.frunzaverde@uem.r [Ramnicu Valcea Subsidiary, S.C. Hidroelectrica S.A., Str. Decebal 11, RO-240255, Ramnicu Valcea (Romania)

    2010-08-15

    The variable demand on the energy market requires great flexibility in operating hydraulic turbines. Therefore, turbines are frequently operated over an extended range of regimes. Francis turbines operating at partial load present pressure fluctuations due to the vortex rope in the draft tube cone. This phenomenon generates strong vibrations and noise that may produce failures on the mechanical elements of the machine. This paper presents the failure analysis of a broken Francis turbine runner blade. The failure appeared some months after the welding repair work realized in situ on fatigue cracks initiated near to the trailing edge at the junction with the crown, where stress concentration occurs. In order to determine the causes that led to the fracture of the runner blade, the metallographic investigations on a sample obtained from the blade is carried out. The metallographic investigations included macroscopic and microscopic examinations, both performed with light and scanning electron microscopy, as well as EDX - analyses. These investigations led to the conclusion, that the cracking of the blade was caused by fatigue, initiated by the surface unevenness of the welding seam. The failure was accelerated by the hydrogen embrittlement of the filling material, which appeared as a consequence of improper welding conditions. In addition to the metallographic investigations, numerical computations with finite element analysis are performed in order to evaluate the deformation and stress distribution on blade.

  9. Failure analysis of a Francis turbine runner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frunzaverde, D; Campian, V; Muntean, S; Marginean, G; Marsavina, L; Terzi, R; Serban, V

    2010-01-01

    The variable demand on the energy market requires great flexibility in operating hydraulic turbines. Therefore, turbines are frequently operated over an extended range of regimes. Francis turbines operating at partial load present pressure fluctuations due to the vortex rope in the draft tube cone. This phenomenon generates strong vibrations and noise that may produce failures on the mechanical elements of the machine. This paper presents the failure analysis of a broken Francis turbine runner blade. The failure appeared some months after the welding repair work realized in situ on fatigue cracks initiated near to the trailing edge at the junction with the crown, where stress concentration occurs. In order to determine the causes that led to the fracture of the runner blade, the metallographic investigations on a sample obtained from the blade is carried out. The metallographic investigations included macroscopic and microscopic examinations, both performed with light and scanning electron microscopy, as well as EDX - analyses. These investigations led to the conclusion, that the cracking of the blade was caused by fatigue, initiated by the surface unevenness of the welding seam. The failure was accelerated by the hydrogen embrittlement of the filling material, which appeared as a consequence of improper welding conditions. In addition to the metallographic investigations, numerical computations with finite element analysis are performed in order to evaluate the deformation and stress distribution on blade.

  10. Overcoming the Barriers of Distance: Using Mobile Technology to Facilitate Moderation and Best Practice in Initial Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggatt, Simon

    2016-01-01

    This case study describes the development process of a model using readily-available technology to facilitate collaboration, moderation and the dissemination of best practice in initial teacher training in the UK. Students, mentors, tutors and external examiners from a number of educational institutions in a UK, higher education-led Lifelong…

  11. Effects of training distance on feed intake, growth, body condition and muscle glycogen content in young Standardbred horses fed a forage-only diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringmark, S; Revold, T; Jansson, A

    2017-10-01

    This study examined feed intake, growth, body condition, muscle glycogen content and nutrition-related health in 16 Standardbred horses fed a high-energy, forage-only diet ad libitum and allocated to either a control training programme (C-group) or a training programme with the high-intensity training distance reduced by 30% (R-group), from January as 2-year olds until December as 3-year olds. Feed intake was recorded on 10 occasions during 3 consecutive days. Body weight was recorded once in a week and height, body condition score (BCS), rump fat thickness and thickness of the m. longissimus dorsi were measured at 7±3-week intervals throughout the study. Muscle biopsies of the m. gluteus medius were taken in December as 2-year olds and in November as 3-year olds and analysed for glycogen content. Nutrition-related health disorders were noted when they occurred. Horses consumed 1.7% to 2.6% dry matter of BW, corresponding to 19 to 28 MJ metabolisable energy/100 kg BW. There were no differences between training groups in feed intake or any of the body measurements. The pooled weekly BCS was maintained between 4.8 and 5.1 (root mean square error (RMSE)=0.4). Muscle glycogen content was 587 and 623 mmol/kg dry weight (RMSE=68) as 2- and 3-year olds, respectively, and there was no difference between training groups. When managed under normal conditions, no nutrition-related health disorders or stereotypic behaviours were observed. It was concluded that the training programme did not affect feed intake, growth, BCS or muscle glycogen content. In addition, the forage-only diet did not appear to prohibit muscle glycogen storage, growth or maintenance of body condition, and seemed to promote good nutrition-related health.

  12. The experience of breast pain (mastalgia) in female runners of the 2012 London Marathon and its effect on exercise behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Nicola; White, Jennifer; Brasher, Amanda; Scurr, Joanna

    2014-02-01

    For female marathon runners, breast pain (mastalgia) may be an important issue which has yet to be considered. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and severity of mastalgia in female marathon runners, identify factors that increase mastalgia and methods used to overcome mastalgia, and explore the impact that mastalgia may have on marathon training. 1397 female marathon runners were surveyed at the 2012 London Marathon Registration. All participants who completed the four-part, 30-question survey in its entirety have been included in the analysis (n=1285). 32% of participants experienced mastalgia. This was significantly related to cup size and was greater during vigorous compared with moderate physical activity. Exercise-related factors were the primary factors reported to increase mastalgia participation. Seventeen per cent of symptomatic participants reported that mastalgia affected their exercise behaviour. Methods reportedly used to overcome mastalgia included pain medication and firm breast support; however, 44% of participants took no measures to relieve symptoms despite over half describing their mastalgia as discomforting. Mastalgia was experienced by a third of marathon runners and was found to be related to breast size which has previously been unreported. The link between exercise and mastalgia has yet to be established; however, this study identified that exercise was the most prevalent factor in mastalgia occurrence which may have implications for its management. The number of participants who took no measures to relieve their mastalgia, or resorted to pain medication, highlights the importance and significance of research into exercise-related mastalgia.

  13. The NLstart2run study: Incidence and risk factors of running-related injuries in novice runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluitenberg, B; van Middelkoop, M; Smits, D W; Verhagen, E; Hartgens, F; Diercks, R; van der Worp, H

    2015-10-01

    Running is a popular form of physical activity, despite of the high incidence of running-related injuries (RRIs). Because of methodological issues, the etiology of RRIs remains unclear. Therefore, the purposes of the study were to assess the incidence of RRIs and to identify risk factors for RRIs in a large group of novice runners. In total, 1696 runners of a 6-week supervised "Start to Run" program were included in the NLstart2run study. All participants were aged between 18 and 65, completed a baseline questionnaire that covered potential risk factors, and completed at least one running diary. RRIs were registered during the program with a weekly running log. An RRI was defined as a musculo-skeletal complaint of the lower extremity or back attributed to running and hampering running ability for three consecutive training sessions. During the running program, 10.9% of the runners sustained an RRI. The multivariable Cox regression analysis showed that a higher age, higher BMI, previous musculo-skeletal complaints not attributed to sports and no previous running experience were related to RRI. These findings indicate that many novice runners participating in a short-term running program suffer from RRIs. Therefore, the identified risk factors should be considered for screening and prevention purposes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSIS OF DEEP GLUTEAL PAIN IN A FEMALE RUNNER WITH PELVIC INVOLVEMENT: A CASE REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podschun, Laura; Kolber, Morey J.; Garcia, Ashley; Rothschild, Carey E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Gluteal injuries, proximal hamstring injuries, and pelvic floor disorders have been reported in the literature among runners. Some suggest that hip, pelvis, and/or groin injuries occur in 3.3% to 11.5% of long distance runners. The purpose of this case report is to describe the differential diagnosis and treatment approach for a patient presenting with combined hip and pelvic pain. Case description: A 45-year-old female distance runner was referred to physical therapy for proximal hamstring pain that had been present for several months. This pain limited her ability to tolerate sitting and caused her to cease running. Examination of the patient's lumbar spine, pelvis, and lower extremity led to the initial differential diagnosis of hamstring syndrome and ischiogluteal bursitis. The patient's primary symptoms improved during the initial four visits, which focused on education, pain management, trunk stabilization and gluteus maximus strengthening, however pelvic pain persisted. Further examination led to a secondary diagnosis of pelvic floor hypertonic disorder. Interventions to address the pelvic floor led to resolution of symptoms and return to running. Outcomes: Pain level on the Visual Analog Scale decreased from 7/10 to 1/10 over the course of treatment. The patient was able to return to full sport activity and improved sitting tolerance to greater then two hours without significant discomfort. Discussion: This case suggests the interdependence of lumbopelvic and lower extremity kinematics in complaints of hamstring, posterior thigh and pelvic floor disorders. This case highlights the importance of a thorough examination as well as the need to consider a regional interdependence of the pelvic floor and lower quarter when treating individuals with proximal hamstring pain. Level of Evidence: Level 4 PMID:24175132

  15. Dynamic behaviour of pump-turbine runner: From disk to prototype runner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, X X; Egusquiza, E; Valero, C; Presas, A

    2013-01-01

    In recent decades, in order to increase output power of hydroelectric turbomachinery, the design head and the flow rate of the hydraulic turbines have been increased greatly. This has led to serious vibratory problems. The pump-turbines have to work at various operation conditions to satisfy the requirements of the power grid. However, larger hydraulic forces will result in high vibration levels on the turbines, especially, when the machines operate at off-design conditions. Due to the economic considerations, the pump-turbines are built as light as possible, which will change the dynamic response of the structures. According to industrial cases, the fatigue damage of the pump-turbine runner induced by hydraulic dynamic forces usually happens on the outer edge of the crown, which is near the leading edges of blades. To better understand the reasons for this kind of fatigue, it is extremely important to investigate the dynamic response behaviour of the hydraulic turbine, especially the runner, by experimental measurement and numerical simulation. The pump-turbine runner has a similar dynamic response behaviour of the circular disk. Therefore, in this paper the dynamic response analyses for circular disks with different dimensions and disk-blades-disk structures were carried out to better understand the fundamental dynamic behaviour for the complex turbomachinery. The influences of the pattern and number of blades were discussed in detail

  16. Examining the effects of a mindfulness-based distance learning professional training module on personal and professional functioning: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Whitesman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Training people to deliver mindfulness-based interventions (MBI is becoming an important activity as mindfulness has been shown to have clinical benefits across a variety of conditions. Training courses must not only address the principles, skills and theory of mindfulness, but the trainers themselves must be able to embody the practice. There is limited research on the ability of teachers-in-training to embody the practice as a result of teacher training programmes. This study explored the extent to which a short course enabled future teachers to embody mindfulness practice. This first module was part of a larger course of four modules to prepare future teachers of MBIs. Methods Qualitative data was obtained from 10 out of 35 end of course written assignments that asked respondents to reflect on their experience of mindfulness practice during the course. These were systematically selected and a focus group interview was also conducted with local participants. Data was analysed by means of the framework method and key themes identified. Results The combination of a retreat and on-line learning was perceived to be effective. Students reported significant changes in personal functioning as a result of daily mindfulness practice: self-awareness, improved relationships, enhanced connectedness, better self-regulation, enhanced compassion and curiosity towards self and others and self-acceptance. Participants began to introduce elements of mindfulness into their professional practice. Conclusions The first module of a post-graduate training programme for health professionals who want to teach MBIs successfully supported students to embody, explore and apply mindfulness in their lives. The integrated teaching modalities of residential retreat and distance-based on-line learning appeared effective.

  17. Effect of maximal oxygen uptake and different forms of physical training on serum lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, A; Kindermann, W

    1982-01-01

    260 well trained male sportsmen between 17 and 30 years of age participating in a variety of events were examined for total serum cholesterol and lipoprotein cholesterol and compared with 37 moderately active leisure-time sportsmen and 20 sedentary controls of similar ages and sex. Lipoprotein cholesterol distribution was determined by quantitative electrophoresis. Mean HDL-cholesterol increased progressively from the mean of the sedentary control to the mean of the long-distance runners, indicating a graded effect of physical activity on HDL-cholesterol. In all sporting groups mean LDL-cholesterol tended to be lower than in the controls, no association between LDL-cholesterol and form of training being apparent. Except for the long-distance runners, all sporting groups tended to be lower in total cholesterol than the controls. The HDL-/total cholesterol and LDL/HDL ratios yielded a better discrimination between the physically active and inactive than the HDL-cholesterol alone. Significant positive correlations with maximal oxygen uptake and roentgenologically determined heart volume were found for HDL-cholesterol and HDL-/total cholesterol, and negative ones for LDL/HDL. Differences in the regressions among subsets made up of sporting groups under different physical demands suggest a positive relationship between lipoprotein distribution and the magnitude of the trained muscle mass.

  18. Bilateral femoral supracondylar stress fractures in a cross country runner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kate; Fahey, Mark

    2008-08-01

    Several high-risk factors lead to stress fractures. They include excessive training in athletes leading to overuse injuries, nutritional deficiencies, and endocrine disorders. While stress fractures are common, bilateral stress fractures are rarely seen. Few cases have been reported of bilateral femoral stress fractures in young athletes. This article presents a case of a 14-year-old cross country runner with a bilateral femoral supracondylar stress fracture. He presented with bilateral supracondylar stress fractures from running. The patient followed a strict vegan diet, but his parents stated that, to their knowledge, he was getting adequate protein and calcium. Treatment consisted of decreased activity to pain-free levels with acetaminophen for pain. Low-impact conditioning such as swimming and bicycling was allowed. Hamstring and quadricep stretching was suggested. Nutritional consultation was obtained to ensure appropriate nutrition on a vegan diet. At 1-month follow-up, he was pain free and allowed to proceed with a gradual return to running activities. In this case, the onset of a new workout routine was intolerable for this patient's low bone density, causing insufficiency fractures. Appropriate vegan diets were not associated with stress fracture in our literature review. He may have had an inadequate diet prior to this injury. As in this case, full recovery can be made after this rest period, and the patient may return to his or her original activity safely. In young athletes, diet and nutrition must be kept in mind.

  19. Effects of a 4-week high-intensity interval training on pacing during 5-km running trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Silva

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the influence of a 4-week high-intensity interval training on the pacing strategy adopted by runners during a 5-km running trial. Sixteen male recreational long-distance runners were randomly assigned to a control group (CON, n=8 or a high-intensity interval training group (HIIT, n=8. The HIIT group performed high-intensity interval-training twice per week, while the CON group maintained their regular training program. Before and after the training period, the runners performed an incremental exercise test to exhaustion to measure the onset of blood lactate accumulation, maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max, and peak treadmill speed (PTS. A submaximal constant-speed test to measure the running economy (RE and a 5-km running trial on an outdoor track to establish pacing strategy and performance were also done. During the 5-km running trial, the rating of perceived exertion (RPE and time to cover the 5-km trial (T5 were registered. After the training period, there were significant improvements in the HIIT group of ∼7 and 5% for RE (P=0.012 and PTS (P=0.019, respectively. There was no significant difference between the groups for VO2max (P=0.495 or onset of blood lactate accumulation (P=0.101. No difference was found in the parameters measured during the 5-km trial before the training period between HIIT and CON (P>0.05. These findings suggest that 4 weeks of HIIT can improve some traditional physiological variables related to endurance performance (RE and PTS, but it does not alter the perception of effort, pacing strategy, or overall performance during a 5-km running trial.

  20. Risk factors for lower extremity injuries among half marathon and marathon runners of the Lage Landen Marathon Eindhoven 2012 : A prospective cohort study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poppel van, D.; de Koning, J; Verhagen, Arianne P; Scholten-Peeters, G G M

    To determine risk factors for running injuries during the Lage Landen Marathon Eindhoven 2012. Prospective cohort study. Population-based study. This study included 943 runners. Running injuries after the Lage Landen Marathon. Sociodemographic and training-related factors as well as lifestyle

  1. Designing a course model for distance-based online bioinformatics training in Africa: The H3ABioNet experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panji, Sumir; Fernandes, Pedro L.; Judge, David P.; Ghouila, Amel; Salifu, Samson P.; Ahmed, Rehab; Kayondo, Jonathan; Ssemwanga, Deogratius

    2017-01-01

    Africa is not unique in its need for basic bioinformatics training for individuals from a diverse range of academic backgrounds. However, particular logistical challenges in Africa, most notably access to bioinformatics expertise and internet stability, must be addressed in order to meet this need on the continent. H3ABioNet (www.h3abionet.org), the Pan African Bioinformatics Network for H3Africa, has therefore developed an innovative, free-of-charge “Introduction to Bioinformatics” course, taking these challenges into account as part of its educational efforts to provide on-site training and develop local expertise inside its network. A multiple-delivery–mode learning model was selected for this 3-month course in order to increase access to (mostly) African, expert bioinformatics trainers. The content of the course was developed to include a range of fundamental bioinformatics topics at the introductory level. For the first iteration of the course (2016), classrooms with a total of 364 enrolled participants were hosted at 20 institutions across 10 African countries. To ensure that classroom success did not depend on stable internet, trainers pre-recorded their lectures, and classrooms downloaded and watched these locally during biweekly contact sessions. The trainers were available via video conferencing to take questions during contact sessions, as well as via online “question and discussion” forums outside of contact session time. This learning model, developed for a resource-limited setting, could easily be adapted to other settings. PMID:28981516

  2. Do general medical practitioners examine injured runners?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Solvej Videbæk; Jensen, A V; Rasmussen, Sten

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: General Medical Practitioners (GMP) in Denmark perform clinical examinations of patients with musculoskeletal pain. However, the prevalence proportion of examinations caused by running-related injuries remains unknown. PURPOSE: The primary purpose of the present study was to estimate...... the prevalence proportion of consultations in general medical practice caused by running-related injuries. The secondary purpose was to estimate the prevalence proportion of injured runners, who consult their GMP, that are referred to additional examinations or treatments. STUDY DESIGN: A survey-based study....... METHODS: An online survey was distributed in October and November 2015 to more than 370 GMPs in Denmark and completed by 27. RESULTS: The median prevalence proportion of consultations caused by running-related injuries in the prior two weeks was 0.80% [25th percentile = 0.00%; 75th percentile = 1...

  3. Exercise-induced stress responses of amenorrheic and eumenorrheic runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucks, A B; Horvath, S M

    1984-12-01

    The role of stress in exercise-associated amenorrhea was investigated. Sex hormones [FSH, LH, androstenedione (A), testosterone, estrone, and 17 beta-estradiol (E2)], stress hormones [dehydroepiandrosterone, cortisol (F), PRL, norepinephrine, and epinephrine] and psychological status (Profile of Mood States and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory) were measured at rest and in response to a 40-min 80% of maximal aerobic power (VO2max) run in highly trained eumenorrheic (n = 8) and amenorrheic (n = 7) women runners matched for fatness [eumenorrheic, 16.5 +/- 2.3% (+/- SD); amenorrheic, 14.9 +/- 4.8] and maximal aerobic power (eumenorrheic, 58.9 +/- 5.7 ml/kg X min; amenorrheic, 59.8 +/- 4.6). Eumenorrheic runners were tested between days 3 and 8 of the follicular phase. At rest, decreased plasma FSH, LH, and E2 concentrations were found in amenorrheic women [eumenorrheic FSH, 10.5 +/- 4.1 mIU/ml; amenorrheic FSH, 4.9 +/- 1.6 (P less than 0.01); eumenorrheic LH, 14.1 +/- 6.1 mIU/ml; amenorrheic LH, 5.1 +/- 1.7 (P less than 0.01); eumenorrheic E2, 20 +/- 9 pg/ml; amenorrheic E2, 7 +/- 6 (P less than 0.05)]. Other sex and stress hormones and psychological measurements were similar in the two groups and were within the normal range. Ventilatory, cardiovascular, thermoregulatory, and psychological responses to the submaximal run were identical. Among eumenorrheic women, all stress hormones and A increased after exercise, but PRL, F, and A were unchanged among amenorrheic women. Estrone, E2, and testosterone did not change in either group. These observations are inconsistent with a general stress hypothesis of exercise-associated amenorrhea as well as with more specific hyperprolactinemic and hyperandrogenic hypotheses. In amenorrheic women, failure of PRL to increase in response to exercise may be due to their lack of E2, while failure of F and A to increase may indicate reduced adrenal 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/isomerase activity.

  4. Experimental Pressure Measurements on Hydropower Turbine Runners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, Samuel F.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2017-04-28

    The range of hydrodynamic operating conditions to which the turbine is exposed results in significant pressure fluctuations on both the pressure and suction sides of the blades. Understanding these dynamic pressures has a range of applications. Structurally, the resulting dynamic loads are significant in understanding the design life and maintenance schedule of the bearing, shafts and runner components. The pulsing pressures have also been seen to have a detrimental effect on the surface condition of the blades. Biologically, the pressure gradients and pressure extremes are the primary driver of barotrauma for fish passing through hydroturbines. Improvements in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be used to simulate such unsteady pressures in the regions of concern. High frequency model scale and prototype measurements of pressures at the blade are important in the validation of these models. Experimental characterization of pressure fields over hydroturbine blades has been demonstrated by a number of studies which using multiple pressure transducers to map the pressure contours on the runner blades. These have been performed at both model and prototype scales, often to validate computational models of the pressure and flow fields over the blades. This report provides a review of existing studies in which the blade pressure was measured in situ. The report assesses the technology for both model and prototype scale testing. The details of the primary studies in this field are reported and used to inform the types of hardware required for similar experiments based on the Ice Harbor Dam owned by the US Corps of Engineers on the Snake River, WA, USA. Such a study would be used to validate the CFD performed for the BioPA.

  5. Oral Contraceptives and Bone Health in Female Runners

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kelsey, Jennifer

    1999-01-01

    .... This study is a two-year randomized trial of the effects of oral contraceptives on bone mass and stress fracture incidence among 150 female competitive cross country runners in the age range 18-25 years...

  6. Changes in vigorous physical activity and incident diabetes inmale runners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Paul T.

    2007-04-30

    We examined the dose-response relationship between changes in reported vigorous exercise (running distance, {Delta}km/wk) and self-reported physician diagnosed diabetes in 25,988 men followed prospectively for (mean {+-} SD) 7.8 {+-} 1.8 years. Logistic regression analyses showed that the log odds for diabetes declined significantly in relation to men's {Delta}km/wk (coefficient {+-} SE: -0.012 {+-} 0.004, P < 0.01), which remained significant when adjusted for BMI (-0.018 {+-} 0.003, P < 0.0001). The decline in the log odds for diabetes was related to the distance run at the end of follow-up when adjusted for baseline distance, with (-0.024 {+-} 0.005, P < 0.0001) or without (-0.027 {+-} 0.005, P < 0.0001) adjustment for BMI. Baseline distance was unrelated to diabetes incidence when adjusted for the distance at the end of follow-up. Compared to men who ran <8 km/wk at the end of follow-up, incidence rates in those who ran {ge} 8 km/wk were 95% lower between 35-44 yrs old (P < 0.0001), 92% lower between 45-54 yrs old (P < 0.0001), 87% lower between 55 and 64 years old (P < 0.0001), and 46% lower between 65-75 yrs old (P = 0.30). For the subset of 6,208 men who maintained the same running distance during follow-up ({+-}5 km/wk), the log odds for diabetes declined with weekly distance run (-0.024 {+-} 0.010, P = 0.02) but not when adjusted for BMI (-0.005 {+-} 0.010, P = 0.65). Conclusion: Vigorous exercise significantly reduces diabetes incidence, due in part to the prevention of age-related weight gain and in part to other exercise effects. Physical activity decreases the risk of type 2 diabetes [1-10]. Moderate and vigorous exercise are purported to produce comparable reductions in diabetes risk if the energy expenditure is the same [3,10]. The optimal physical activity dose remains unclear, however, with some [4-7] but not all studies [1,8,9] showing continued reduction in diabetes for high versus intermediate energy expenditures. The National Runners

  7. Excessive Progression in Weekly Running Distance and Risk of Running-related Injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, R.O.; Parner, Erik Thorlund; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard

    2014-01-01

    Study Design An explorative, 1-year prospective cohort study. Objective To examine whether an association between a sudden change in weekly running distance and running-related injury varies according to injury type. Background It is widely accepted that a sudden increase in running distance...... is strongly related to injury in runners. But the scientific knowledge supporting this assumption is limited. Methods A volunteer sample of 874 healthy novice runners who started a self-structured running regimen were provided a global-positioning-system watch. After each running session during the study...... period, participants were categorized into 1 of the following exposure groups, based on the progression of their weekly running distance: less than 10% or regression, 10% to 30%, or more than 30%. The primary outcome was running-related injury. Results A total of 202 runners sustained a running...

  8. Mucosal immunity and upper respiratory tract symptoms in recreational endurance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihalainen, Johanna K; Schumann, Moritz; Häkkinen, Keijo; Mero, Antti A

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of a 12-week endurance-training intervention on salivary proteins and upper respiratory tract symptoms (URS) in 25 young men. Saliva samples of 25 recreational male endurance runners (age 34.6 years, body mass index = 23.8 kg·m(-2), peak aerobic capacity = 47.2 mL·kg(-1)·min(-1)) were collected before (PRE) and after (POST) the training intervention, in a fasting state, as well as both before and after a maximal incremental treadmill run. The training consisted of both continuous and interval training sessions, 4-6 times per week based on the polarized training approach. Participants filled in Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey-21 and were retrospectively divided into 2 groups according to whether they reported URS (URS group, n = 13) or not (HEALTHY group, n = 12). Basal salivary immunoglobulin A (sa-sIgA) levels were significantly higher (+70%, p < 0.05) in the HEALTHY group both at PRE and POST whereas no significant differences were observed in salivary immunoglobulin M, salivary immunoglobulin G, lysozyme, or salivary α-amylase activity (sAA). Sa-sIgA concentration at PRE significantly correlated with the number of sick-days (R = -0.755, p < 0.001) in all subjects. The incremental treadmill run acutely increased sAA significantly (p < 0.05) at PRE (200%) and POST (166%) in the HEALTHY group but not in the URS group. This study demonstrated that subjects, who experienced URS during the 12 weeks of progressive endurance training intervention, had significantly lower basal sa-sIgA levels both before and after the experimental endurance training period. In addition to sa-sIgA, acute sAA response to exercise might be a possible determinant of susceptibility to URS in endurance runners.

  9. Who uses running apps and sports watches? Determinants and consumer profiles of event runners' usage of running-related smartphone applications and sports watches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Janssen

    Full Text Available Individual and unorganized sports with a health-related focus, such as recreational running, have grown extensively in the last decade. Consistent with this development, there has been an exponential increase in the availability and use of electronic monitoring devices such as smartphone applications (apps and sports watches. These electronic devices could provide support and monitoring for unorganized runners, who have no access to professional trainers and coaches. The purpose of this paper is to gain insight into the characteristics of event runners who use running-related apps and sports watches. This knowledge is useful from research, design, and marketing perspectives to adequately address unorganized runners' needs, and to support them in healthy and sustainable running through personalized technology. Data used in this study are drawn from the standardized online Eindhoven Running Survey 2014 (ERS14. In total, 2,172 participants in the Half Marathon Eindhoven 2014 completed the questionnaire (a response rate of 40.0%. Binary logistic regressions were used to analyze the impact of socio-demographic variables, running-related variables, and psychographic characteristics on the use of running-related apps and sports watches. Next, consumer profiles were identified. The results indicate that the use of monitoring devices is affected by socio-demographics as well as sports-related and psychographic variables, and this relationship depends on the type of monitoring device. Therefore, distinctive consumer profiles have been developed to provide a tool for designers and manufacturers of electronic running-related devices to better target (unorganized runners' needs through personalized and differentiated approaches. Apps are more likely to be used by younger, less experienced and involved runners. Hence, apps have the potential to target this group of novice, less trained, and unorganized runners. In contrast, sports watches are more likely to

  10. Maximum Power Training and Plyometrics for Cross-Country Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebben, William P.

    2001-01-01

    Provides a rationale for maximum power training and plyometrics as conditioning strategies for cross-country runners, examining: an evaluation of training methods (strength training and maximum power training and plyometrics); biomechanic and velocity specificity (role in preventing injury); and practical application of maximum power training and…

  11. The baseline serum value of α-amylase is a significant predictor of distance running performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Danese, Elisa; Tarperi, Cantor; La Torre, Antonio; Guidi, Gian Cesare; Schena, Federico

    2015-02-01

    This study was planned to investigate whether serum α-amylase concentration may be associated with running performance, physiological characteristics and other clinical chemistry analytes in a large sample of recreational athletes undergoing distance running. Forty-three amateur runners successfully concluded a 21.1 km half-marathon at 75%-85% of their maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). Blood was drawn during warm up and 15 min after conclusion of the run. After correction for body weight change, significant post-run increases were observed for serum values of alkaline phosphatase, alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, bilirubin, creatine kinase (CK), iron, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), triglycerides, urea and uric acid, whereas the values of body weight, glomerular filtration rate, total and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol were significantly decreased. The concentration of serum α-amylase was unchanged. In univariate analysis, significant associations with running performance were found for gender, VO2max, training regimen and pre-run serum values of α-amylase, CK, glucose, high density lipoprotein-cholesterol, LDH, urea and uric acid. In multivariate analysis, only VO2max (p=0.042) and baseline α-amylase (p=0.021) remained significant predictors of running performance. The combination of these two variables predicted 71% of variance in running performance. The baseline concentration of serum α-amylase was positively correlated with variation of serum glucose during the trial (r=0.345; p=0.025) and negatively with capillary blood lactate at the end of the run (r=-0.352; p=0.021). We showed that the baseline serum α-amylase concentration significantly and independently predicts distance running performance in recreational runners.

  12. Age-Predicted Maximal Heart Rate in Recreational Marathon Runners: A Cross-Sectional Study on Fox's and Tanaka's Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaidis, Pantelis T.; Rosemann, Thomas; Knechtle, Beat

    2018-01-01

    Age-based prediction equations of maximal heart rate (HRmax), such as the popular formulas Fox's 220-age, or Tanaka's 208-0.7 × age, have been widely used in various populations. Surprisingly, so far these equations have not been validated in marathon runners, despite the importance of the role of HRmax for training purposes in endurance running. The aim of the present study was to examine the validity of Fox and Tanaka equations in a large sample of women and men recreational marathon runners. Participants (n = 180, age 43.2 ± 8.5 years, VO2max 46.8 mL/min/kg, finishers in at least one marathon during the last year) performed a graded exercise test on a treadmill, where HRmax was measured. Measured HRmax correlated largely with age in the total sample (r = −0.50, p marathon runners. In addition, exercise physiologists and sport scientists should consider the observed differences among various assessment methods when performing exercise testing or prescribing training program relying on HR. PMID:29599724

  13. Age-Predicted Maximal Heart Rate in Recreational Marathon Runners: A Cross-Sectional Study on Fox's and Tanaka's Equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaidis, Pantelis T; Rosemann, Thomas; Knechtle, Beat

    2018-01-01

    Age-based prediction equations of maximal heart rate (HR max ), such as the popular formulas Fox's 220-age, or Tanaka's 208-0.7 × age, have been widely used in various populations. Surprisingly, so far these equations have not been validated in marathon runners, despite the importance of the role of HR max for training purposes in endurance running. The aim of the present study was to examine the validity of Fox and Tanaka equations in a large sample of women and men recreational marathon runners. Participants ( n = 180, age 43.2 ± 8.5 years, VO 2max 46.8 mL/min/kg, finishers in at least one marathon during the last year) performed a graded exercise test on a treadmill, where HR max was measured. Measured HR max correlated largely with age in the total sample ( r = -0.50, p marathon runners. In addition, exercise physiologists and sport scientists should consider the observed differences among various assessment methods when performing exercise testing or prescribing training program relying on HR.

  14. The Effects of a 6-Week Strength Training on Critical Velocity, Anaerobic Running Distance, 30-M Sprint and Yo-Yo Intermittent Running Test Performances in Male Soccer Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsten, Bettina; Larumbe-Zabala, Eneko; Kandemir, Gokhan; Hazir, Tahir; Klose, Andreas; Naclerio, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine the effects of a moderate intensity strength training on changes in critical velocity (CV), anaerobic running distance (D'), sprint performance and Yo-Yo intermittent running test (Yo-Yo IR1) performances. two recreational soccer teams were divided in a soccer training only group (SO; n = 13) and a strength and soccer training group (ST; n = 13). Both groups were tested for values of CV, D', Yo-Yo IR1 distance and 30-m sprint time on two separate occasions (pre and post intervention). The ST group performed a concurrent 6-week upper and lower body strength and soccer training, whilst the SO group performed a soccer only training. after the re-test of all variables, the ST demonstrated significant improvements for both, YoYo IR1 distance (p = 0.002) and CV values (psoccer training significantly improves CV, Yo-Yo IR1 whilst moderately improving 30-m sprint performances in non-previously resistance trained male soccer players. Critical Velocity can be recommended to coaches as an additional valid testing tool in soccer.

  15. Is changing footstrike pattern beneficial to runners?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Hamill

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Some researchers, running instructors, and coaches have suggested that the “optimal” footstrike pattern to improve performance and reduce running injuries is to land using a mid- or forefoot strike. Thus, it has been recommended that runners who use a rearfoot strike would benefit by changing their footstrike although there is little scientific evidence for suggesting such a change. The rearfoot strike is clearly more prevalent. The major reasons often given for changing to a mid- or forefoot strike are (1 it is more economical; (2 there is a reduction in the impact peak and loading rate of the vertical component of the ground reaction force; and (3 there is a reduction in the risk of a running-related injuries. In this paper, we critique these 3 suggestions and provide alternate explanations that may provide contradictory evidence for altering one's footstrike pattern. We have concluded, based on examining the research literature, that changing to a mid- or forefoot strike does not improve running economy, does not eliminate an impact at the foot-ground contact, and does not reduce the risk of running-related injuries.

  16. Endocrine Changes In Egyptian Female Olympic Runners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayad, M.A.; Fahmy, N.M.

    2002-01-01

    Circulating levels of testosterone (T), free testosterone (FT), and rostenedione (A) estradial 17-B (E 2 ), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S), sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), luteninzing hormone (LH) and cortisol (C) were estimated by RIA proccdures in the serum of two groups of athletic female runners. An eumenorrheic group (n=10), and an oligomenorrheic group (n=10), and in a healthy regularly menstruating group as control(n=20). The athletes were subjected to a stadardized Ergometer testing aiming at achieving maximal O 2 consumption. Blood samples were with drawn at rest and immediately after exercise in the eumenorrheic and oligomenorrheic groups. Samples from eumenorrheic athletes and control group were at midfollicular phase of the cycle; and randomly in the oligomenorrheicat athlets. Results revealed a state of hypercortisolism in resting eumenorrheic athletes in comparison with control, whereas the oligomenorrheic athletes showed a state of hypercortisolism, hyperandrogenism and hyperestrogenism. The estimated perameters showed remrakable significant increase after the bicycle Ergometer testing, with the exception of SHBG and DHEA-S in the athletic groups

  17. Running, Being, and Beijing—An Existential Exploration of a Runner Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronkainen, Noora; Harrison, Marlen Elliot; Ryba, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    In this research, we explore the negotiation of a conflicted runner identity in a Finnish runner's short-term migration to Beijing, China. We examine the historical and cultural construction of the runner identity and discuss the current discourses that constitute the modern runner subjectivities...... and migration studies as well as practical considerations for the use of autoethnography in psychological research and practice.......In this research, we explore the negotiation of a conflicted runner identity in a Finnish runner's short-term migration to Beijing, China. We examine the historical and cultural construction of the runner identity and discuss the current discourses that constitute the modern runner subjectivities....... From there, we continue with a Heideggerian existential-phenomenological analysis of the ‘boundary situation’ when the project of competitive running is challenged due to environmental and cultural barriers in the migration. Our empirical inquiry is based on the first author's autoethnographic account...

  18. Sex Differences in Limb and Joint Stiffness in Recreational Runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinclair Jonathan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Female runners are known to be at greater risk from chronic running injuries than age-matched males, although the exact mechanisms are often poorly understood. The aim of the current investigation was to determine if female recreational runners exhibit distinct limb and joint stiffness characteristics in relation to their male counterparts. Methods. Fourteen male and fourteen female runners ran over a force platform at 4.0 m · s-1. Lower limb kinematics were collected using an eight-camera optoelectric motion capture system operating at 250 Hz. Measures of limb and joint stiffness were calculated as a function of limb length and joint moments divided by the extent of limb and joint excursion. All stiffness and joint moment parameters were normalized to body mass. Sex differences in normalized limb and knee and ankle joint stiffness were examined statistically using independent samples t tests. Results. The results indicate that normalized limb (male = 0.18 ± 0.07, female = 0.37 ± 0.10 kN · kg · m-1 and knee stiffness (male = 5.59 ± 2.02, female = 7.34 ± 1.78 Nm · kg · rad-1 were significantly greater in female runners. Conclusions. On the basis that normalized knee and limb stiffness were shown to be significantly greater in female runners, the findings from the current investigation may provide further insight into the aetiology of the distinct injury patterns observed between sexes.

  19. Bone geometry, strength, and muscle size in runners with a history of stress fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Kristin L; Hughes, Julie M; Smock, Amanda J; Novotny, Susan A; Stovitz, Steven D; Koehler, Scott M; Petit, Moira A

    2009-12-01

    Our primary aim was to explore differences in estimates of tibial bone strength, in female runners with and without a history of stress fractures. Our secondary aim was to explore differences in bone geometry, volumetric density, and muscle size that may explain bone strength outcomes. A total of 39 competitive distance runners aged 18-35 yr, with (SFX, n = 19) or without (NSFX, n = 20) a history of stress fracture were recruited for this cross-sectional study. Peripheral quantitative computed tomography (XCT 3000; Orthometrix, White Plains, NY) was used to assess volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD, mg x mm(-3)), bone area (ToA, mm(2)), and estimated compressive bone strength (bone strength index (BSI) = ToA x total volumetric density (ToD(2))) at the distal tibia (4%). Total (ToA, mm(2)) and cortical (CoA, mm(2)) bone area, cortical vBMD, and estimated bending strength (strength-strain index (SSIp), mm(3)) were measured at the 15%, 25%, 33%, 45%, 50%, and 66% sites. Muscle cross-sectional area (MCSA) was measured at the 50% and 66% sites. Participants in the SFX group had significantly smaller (7%-8%) CoA at the 45%, 50%, and 66% sites (P stress fracture. However, the lower strength was appropriate for the smaller muscle size, suggesting that interventions to reduce stress fracture risk might be aimed at improving muscle size and strength.

  20. Primary and secondary exercise dependence in a community-based sample of road race runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Brian; Karr, Trisha M; Zunker, Christie; Mitchell, James E; Thompson, Ron; Sherman, Roberta; Crosby, Ross D; Cao, Li; Erickson, Ann; Wonderlich, Stephen A

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of our study was to examine exercise dependence (EXD) in a large community-based sample of runners. The secondary purpose of this study was to examine differences in EXD symptoms between primary and secondary EXD. Our sample included 2660 runners recruited from a local road race (M age = 38.78 years, SD = 10.80; 66.39% women; 91.62% Caucasian) who completed all study measures online within 3 weeks of the race. In this study, EXD prevalence was lower than most previously reported rates (gamma = .248, p < .001) and individuals in the at-risk for EXD category participated in longer distance races, F(8,1) = 14.13, p = .01, partial eta squared = .05. Group differences were found for gender, F(1,1921) 8.08, p = .01, partial eta squared = .004, and primary or secondary group status, F(1,1921) 159.53, p = .01, partial eta squared = .077. Implications of primary and secondary EXD differences and future research are discussed.

  1. HEART RATE RECOVERY AFTER EXERCISE AND NEURAL REGULATION OF HEART RATE VARIABILITY IN 30-40 YEAR OLD FEMALE MARATHON RUNNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Matsuoka

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of endurance training on heart rate (HR recovery after exercise and cardiac autonomic nervous system (ANS modulation in female marathon runners by comparing with untrained controls. Six female marathon runners (M group aged 32-40 years and eight age-matched untrained females (C group performed a maximum-effort treadmill running exercise. Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max was measured during the exercise with a gas analyzer connected to subjects through a face mask. Heart rate, blood pressure and blood lactate were measured before and after the exercise. Rating of perceived exertion (RPE to the exercise was obtained immediately after the exercise. Holter ECG was recorded and analyzed with power spectral analysis of heart rate variability (HRV to investigate the cardiac ANS modulation. The M group had significantly higher VO2max, faster HR recovery after exercise, higher Mean RR, SDRR, HF power and lower LF/HF ratio at rest compared with the C group. The M group also presented greater percent decrease of blood pressure after exercise, although their blood pressure after exercise was higher than the C group. It is suggested that endurance training induced significant alterations in cardiac ANS modulation at rest and significant acceleration of HR recovery after exercise in female marathon runners. Faster HR recovery after exercise in the female marathon runners should result from their higher levels of HRV, higher aerobic capacity and exaggerated blood pressure response to exercise compared with untrained controls.

  2. Prediction of Running Injuries from Training Load: a Machine Learning Approach.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkhuis, Talko; Otter, Ruby; Velthuijsen, H.; Lemmink, Koen A.P.M.

    2017-01-01

    The prediction of the running injuries based on selfreported training data on load is difficult. At present, coaches and researchers have no validated system to predict if a runner has an increased risk of injuries. We aim to develop an algorithm to predict the increase of the risk of a runner to

  3. The Influence of Matching Populations on Kinematic and Kinetic Variables in Runners with Iliotibial Band Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Stefan; Maiwald, Christian; Krauss, Inga; Axmann, Detlef; Horstmann, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess how participant matching influences biomechanical variables when comparing healthy runners and runners with iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS). We examined 52 healthy runners (CO) and 18 with ITBS, using three-dimensional kinematics and pressure distribution. The study population was matched in three ways and…

  4. Normative values of eccentric hip abduction strength in novice runners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramskov, D; Pedersen, M B; Kastrup, K

    2014-01-01

    normative values of maximal eccentric hip abduction strength in novice runners. METHODS: Novice healthy runners (n = 831) were recruited through advertisements at a hospital and a university. Maximal eccentric hip abduction strength was measured with a hand-held dynamometer. The demographic variables...... was found, p values were identified using a regression equation adjusting for age and gender. Based on this, the equation to calculate normative values for relative eccentric hip abduction strength became: (1.600 + (age * -0.005) + (gender (1 = male / 0 = female) * 0.215) ± 1 or 2 * 0......PURPOSE: Low eccentric strength of the hip abductors, might increase the risk of patellofemoral pain syndrome and iliotibial band syndrome in runners. No normative values for maximal eccentric hip abduction strength have been established. Therefore the purpose of this study was to establish...

  5. Changes in Foot Shape after Long-Distance Running

    OpenAIRE

    Fukano, Mako; Iso, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Changes in foot shape during long-distance running may lead to alteration in shoe fit. However, little information is available on changes in foot shape following long-distance running. The purpose of this study was to assess changes in foot shape in experienced runners after a single long-distance run. Data from the right feet of 21 subjects were obtained using a foot scanner before and after running 35 km on an asphalt road. After the run, the dorsal height, navicular height, and arch heigh...

  6. [Physiological characteristics and the level of risk factors for ischemic heart disease in marathon runners between 30 and 59 years of age].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostka, T; Drygas, W; Mrozek, P

    1989-02-06

    The results of anthropometric, biochemical, cardiological and performance capacity studies in the 37 marathon runners, 113 men systematically practising recreational training programme with a domination of endurance exercises and 44 healthy men with little leisure time physical activity have been compared. In comparison with a group of physically non-active persons, the marathon runners are characterized by considerably higher physical working capacity, slimmer figure, lower resting heart rate, lower diastolic blood pressure, high concentration of HDL cholesterol and lower cholesterol: HDL cholesterol index. However, these differences are minimal in comparison with other systematically training persons, and with regard to the majority of factors statistically insignificant. It seems that for reaching the physiological effects desired from the point of view of ischemic heart disease prevention the endurance training of lower capacity and intensity would be sufficient.

  7. modelling distances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert F. Love

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Distance predicting functions may be used in a variety of applications for estimating travel distances between points. To evaluate the accuracy of a distance predicting function and to determine its parameters, a goodness-of-fit criteria is employed. AD (Absolute Deviations, SD (Squared Deviations and NAD (Normalized Absolute Deviations are the three criteria that are mostly employed in practice. In the literature some assumptions have been made about the properties of each criterion. In this paper, we present statistical analyses performed to compare the three criteria from different perspectives. For this purpose, we employ the ℓkpθ-norm as the distance predicting function, and statistically compare the three criteria by using normalized absolute prediction error distributions in seventeen geographical regions. We find that there exist no significant differences between the criteria. However, since the criterion SD has desirable properties in terms of distance modelling procedures, we suggest its use in practice.

  8. Using Augmented Feedback to Decrease Patellofemoral Pain in Runners: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren M. Cornwell

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Patellofemoral pain (PFP is a common injury in running. The cause of patellofemoral pain is multifactorial in nature, which results varied treatment approaches for this disorder. Many studies have examined the effect of using strengthening protocols targeted at subjects’ hip and quadriceps strength. Although these studies have resulted in a reduction in short-term PFP for runners, many continue to experience PFP after undergoing these treatment strategies. A more recent theory regarding the treatment of PFP in runners involves the use of augmented verbal and visual feedback. This treatment strategy involves giving the runner scheduled visual feedback to adapt their running strategies in hopes of reducing their PFP. Much of this research has been done with experienced runners in the age range of 18-22 years old. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of augmented verbal and real-time visual feedback on patellofemoral pain. The hypothesis was that training with the use of auditory and visual feedback would improve patellofemoral pain in this runner. In clinical practice, auditory and visual feedback to change hip and knee mechanics while running may be used as a treatment strategy for patellofemoral pain. Design and Setting: The study was conducted in a controlled laboratory setting and was an experimental design including a single-subject. Participants: The subject was a recreational female runner that was 22 years of age. The subject was recruited via a flyer distributed on campus. Once the individual agreed to participate, they were given a date to begin the study. This study was approved by the Institutional Review Board at the institution. When the subject arrived at the first meeting, the informed consent was reviewed and signed by the subject. Intervention: At the first visit, the subject was given a PFP questionnaire to determine if they were eligible for the study. For this study, the subject was classified as

  9. Maximal respiratory pressures and pulmonary function in male runners.

    OpenAIRE

    Cordain, L; Glisan, B J; Latin, R W; Tucker, A; Stager, J M

    1987-01-01

    To determine the effects of long term exercise on respiratory muscle strength, maximal inspiratory (Pl max) and expiratory (PE max) pressures, pulmonary volumes and capacities and anthropometric parameters were measured in a group of 101 male runners aged 16 to 58 years. The runners exhibited significantly (p less than 0.05) lower PE max (202 +/- 41 cm H2O and significantly greater residual lung volumes (RV) (2.08 +/- 0.49 L) than predicted values for normal subjects of similar height and age...

  10. Iliotibial band syndrome in runners: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Worp, Maarten P; van der Horst, Nick; de Wijer, Anton; Backx, Frank J G; Nijhuis-van der Sanden, Maria W G

    2012-11-01

    The popularity of running is still growing and, as participation increases, the incidence of running-related injuries will also rise. Iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS) is the most common injury of the lateral side of the knee in runners, with an incidence estimated to be between 5% and 14%. In order to facilitate the evidence-based management of ITBS in runners, more needs to be learned about the aetiology, diagnosis and treatment of this injury. This article provides a systematic review of the literature on the aetiology, diagnosis and treatment of ITBS in runners. The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Web of Science, and reference lists were searched for relevant articles. Systematic reviews, clinical trials or observational studies involving adult runners (>18 years) that focused on the aetiology, diagnosis and/or treatment of ITBS were included and articles not written in English, French, German or Dutch were excluded. Two reviewers independently screened search results, assessed methodological quality and extracted data. The sum of all positive ratings divided by the maximum score was the percentage quality score (QS). Only studies with a QS higher than 60% were included in the analysis. The following data were extracted: study design; number and characteristics of participants; diagnostic criteria for ITBS; exposure/treatment characteristics; analyses/outcome variables of the study; and setting and theoretical perspective on ITBS. The studies of the aetiology of ITBS in runners provide limited or conflicting evidence and it is not clear whether hip abductor weakness has a major role in ITBS. The kinetics and kinematics of the hip, knee and/or ankle/foot appear to be considerably different in runners with ITBS to those without. The biomechanical studies involved small samples, and data seem to have been influenced by sex, height and weight of participants. Although most studies monitored the management of ITBS using clinical tests, these tests have not

  11. Achilles tendon adaptation in cross-country runners across a competitive season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, L E; Lucero, A; Mauntel, T C; Kennedy, M; Walker, N; Marshall, S W; Padua, D A; Berkoff, D J

    2018-01-01

    Ultrasound tissue characterization (UTC) is an imaging tool used to quantify tendon structural integrity. UTC has quantified Achilles tendon (AT) acute response to load in athletes; however, AT response to cumulative load over a season is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate AT response across a four-month competitive season in collegiate cross-country (XC) runners. Participants (n=21; male=9, female=12; age=19.8±1.2 years; height=171.9±8.9 cm; weight=60.2±8.5 kg) were imaged using the UTC device with a 10-MHz linear-array transducer mounted in a tracking device. The device captures images at 0.2 mm intervals along the AT. UTC algorithms quantified the stability of pixel brightness over every 17 contiguous transverse images into four echo types (I-IV). A total of 168 scans (n=21, bilateral limbs) were performed monthly across the four-month season (Aug=M1, Sep=M2, Oct=M3, Nov=M4). Echo-type percentages (%) were calculated from each scan. Generalized estimating equations (GEE) linear regression models evaluated echo-type % change (β) over the season (M1=reference). Type I increased from M1 to M4 (β=9.10, Presilience to a competitive season of repetitive loading in highly trained runners. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Whey Protein Improves Marathon-Induced Injury and Exercise Performance in Elite Track Runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen-Ching; Chang, Yung-Cheng; Chen, Yi-Ming; Hsu, Yi-Ju; Huang, Chi-Chang; Kan, Nai-Wen; Chen, Sheng-Shih

    2017-01-01

    Whey protein has been widely applied to athletes and the fitness field for muscle growth and performance improvement. Limited studies focused on the beneficial effects of whey on aerobic exercise according to biochemical assessments. In the current study, 12 elite male track runners were randomly assigned to whey and maltodextrin groups for 5 weeks' supplementation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of whey protein on physiological adaptions and exercise performance. During this period, three time points (pre-, post-, and end-test) were used to evaluate related biochemical parameters, body composition, and performance. The post-test was set 1 day after a marathon for injury status evaluation and the end-test was also assessed after 1-week recovery from endurance test. The results showed that the whey group exhibited significantly lower aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, lactate dehydrogenase, and creatine kinase indicators after the marathon (post-test), as well as at the end-test ( p <0.016). The endurance performance in twelve-minute walk/run was also significantly elevated ( p <0.012) possibly due to an increase in the muscle mass and amelioration of exercise injuries. In the current study, we demonstrated that whey protein can also be used for aerobic exercise for better physiological adaptation, in addition to resistance training. Whey protein could be also a potential nutrient supplement with a variety of benefits for amateur runners.

  13. Cross-sectional relationships of exercise and age to adiposity in60,617 male runners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Paul T.; Pate, Russell R.

    2004-06-01

    The objective of this report is to assess in men whether exercise affects the estimated age-related increase in adiposity, and contrariwise, whether age affects the estimated exercise-related decrease in adiposity. Cross-sectional analyses of 64,911 male runners who provided data on their body mass index (97.6 percent), waist (91.1 percent), hip (47.1 percent), and chest circumferences (77.9 percent). Between 18 to 55 years old, the decline in BMI with weekly distance run (slope+-SE) was significantly greater in men 25-55 years old (slope+-:-0.036+-0.001 kg/m2 per km/wk) than in younger men (-0.020+-0.002 kg/m 2 per km/wk). Declines in waist circumference with running distance were also significantly greater in older than younger men (P<10-9 for trend),i.e., the slopes decreased progressively from -0.035+-0.004 cm per km/wk in 18-25 year old men to -0.097+-0.003 cm per km/wk in 50-55 year old men. Increases in BMI with age were greater for men who ran under 16km/wk than for longer distance runners. Waist circumference increased with age at all running levels, but the increase appeared to diminish by running further (0.259+-0.015 cm per year if running<8 km/wk and 0.154+-0.003 cm per year for>16 km/wk). In men over 50 years old, BMI declined -0.038+-0.001 kg/m2 per km/wk run when adjusted for age and declined -0.054+-0.003 kg/m2 (increased 0.021+-0.007 cm) per year of age when adjusted for running distance. Their waist circumference declined-0.096+-0.002 cm per km/wk run when adjusted for age and increased 0.021+-0.007 cm per year of age when adjusted for running distance. These cross-sectional data suggest that age and vigorous exercise interact with each other in affecting mens adiposity, and support the proposition that vigorous physical activity must increase with age to prevent middle-age weight gain. We estimate that a man who ran 16 km/wk at age 25 would need to increase their weekly running distance by 65.7 km/wk by age 50 in order to maintain his same waist

  14. Vitamin D status and biomarkers of inflammation in runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willis KS

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Kentz S Willis1, Derek T Smith2, Kenneth S Broughton3, D Enette Larson-Meyer2,31Extension, 2Division of Kinesiology and Health, 3Department of Family and Consumer Sciences (Human Nutrition, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY, USABackground and purpose: The extra-skeletal functions of vitamin D – including its role in inflammatory modulation – are now well recognized but have not yet been investigated in an athletic population. Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between vitamin D status and pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines (as markers of inflammation and immune system function in endurance athletes.Patients and methods: We analyzed fasting blood samples from 19 healthy, endurance-trained male and female runners (following a standardized diet and exercise regimen for vitamin D status (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OHD] and specific plasma cytokine concentrations (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interferon-gamma [IFN-γ], interleukin [IL]-4, and IL-10. Serum/plasma concentrations were log-transformed and simple regression analysis was used to determine significant associations between 25(OHD and cytokine concentrations.Results: Forty-two percent of participants had insufficient vitamin D status [25(OHD < 32 ng/mL], whereas 11% were deficient [25(OHD , 20 ng/mL]. TNF-α and IL-4 were variable, ranging from 2.9 to 36.4 pg/mL and 0 to 252.1 pg/mL, respectively. Concentrations of IFN-γ and IL-10 were minimal, with means of 6.7 ± 7.0 pg/mL and 4.8 ± 5.1 pg/mL, respectively. Regression analysis revealed a significant inverse association between 25(OHD and TNF-α concentrations (R2 = 56.5, P < 0.001 but not between 25(OHD and the remaining cytokines, IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-10 (P = 0.477, 0.694, and 0.673, respectively.Conclusion: These results call further attention to the epidemic of vitamin D insufficiency, even in outdoor athletes, and support a possible link between decreased vitamin D status and one

  15. Breath acidification in adolescent runners exposed to atmospheric pollution: A prospective, repeated measures observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Sickle David

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vigorous outdoors exercise during an episode of air pollution might cause airway inflammation. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of vigorous outdoor exercise during peak smog season on breath pH, a biomarker of airway inflammation, in adolescent athletes. Methods We measured breath pH both pre- and post-exercise on ten days during peak smog season in 16 high school athletes engaged in daily long-distance running in a downwind suburb of Atlanta. The association of post-exercise breath pH with ambient ozone and particulate matter concentrations was tested with linear regression. Results We collected 144 pre-exercise and 146 post-exercise breath samples from 16 runners (mean age 14.9 years, 56% male. Median pre-exercise breath pH was 7.58 (interquartile range: 6.90 to 7.86 and did not change significantly after exercise. We observed no significant association between ambient ozone or particulate matter and post-exercise breath pH. However both pre- and post-exercise breath pH were strikingly low in these athletes when compared to a control sample of 14 relatively sedentary healthy adults and to published values of breath pH in healthy subjects. Conclusion Although we did not observe an acute effect of air pollution exposure during exercise on breath pH, breath pH was surprisingly low in this sample of otherwise healthy long-distance runners. We speculate that repetitive vigorous exercise may induce airway acidification.

  16. Unchanged Erythrocyte Profile After Exposure to Cryogenic Temperatures in Elder Marathon Runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadwiga Szymura

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Endurance runners may experience “sports anemia” resulting from intravascular hemolysis. In addition, aging has negative impact on hematopoiesis and rheological properties of blood, and erythrocyte membranes in older people are more vulnerable to oxidative damage, which together can lead to anemia. Whole-body cryostimulation (WBCST is increasingly used in the elderly as a method of biological regeneration of athletes or therapy and preventive treatment. That is why the aim of the study was to determine whether repeated WBCST had an effect on the erythrocyte system in master marathon runners, compared to non-training men.Methods: Ten marathon runners (men aged 55.9 ± 5.5 years, training experience 6.71 ± 5.79 years and 10 non-training (men aged 62.0 ± 5.8 years were subjected to a series of 24 WBCST (3 min, -130°C performed every other day. Erythrocyte levels, interleukin-3 (IL-3, erythropoietin (EPO, haptoglobin, bilirubin, and extracellular hemoglobin (HGBecf concentrations were determined in the blood before and after 12, 24 WBCST, as well as 7 days after their completion.Results: The concentrations of EPO and IL-3 were significantly increased 7 days after the completion of WBCST in both groups (P < 0.05. The erythrocyte content and indicators, the bilirubin, haptoglobin, and HGBecf levels in each group did not change as a result of WBCST. In order to document hemolytic changes and/or factors affecting the severity of erythropoiesis, correlations between growth erythropoietic factors, erythrocyte and hemolytic factors as well as mutual correlations between hemolytic indexes were calculated. There was a positive correlation (P < 0.05 between the EPO and IL-3, bilirubin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, and red blood cell distribution width – standard deviation. There was also a positive correlation between the concentrations of bilirubin and HGBecf, and a negative correlation between haptoglobin and HGBecf as well as bilirubin

  17. Iliotibial band syndrome in runners: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Worp, M.P.; van der Horst, N.; de Wijer, A.; Backx, F.J.; Nijhuis-Van der Sanden, M.W.G.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The popularity of running is still growing and, as participation increases, the incidence of running-related injuries will also rise. Iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS) is the most common injury of the lateral side of the knee in runners, with an incidence estimated to be between 5% and

  18. Kinematic classification of iliotibial band syndrome in runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, S; Krauss, I; Maiwald, C; Axmann, D; Horstmann, T; Best, R

    2011-04-01

    Several inconsistent causative biomechanical factors are considered to be crucial in the occurrence of iliotibial band syndrome (ITBS). The focus of this study was on assessing differences in the kinematic characteristics between healthy runners [control group (CO)] and runners with ITBS in order to recommend treatment strategies to deal with this injury. Three-dimensional kinematics of barefoot running was used in the biomechanical setup. Both groups were matched with respect to gender, height and weight. After determining drop outs, the final population comprised 36 subjects (26 male and 10 female): 18 CO and 18 ITBS (13 male and five female, each). Kinematic evaluations indicate less hip adduction and frontal range of motion at the hip joint in runners with ITBS. Furthermore, maximum hip flexion velocity and maximum knee flexion velocity were lower in runners with ITBS. Lack of joint coordination, expressed as earlier hip flexion and a tendency toward earlier knee flexion, was found to be another discriminating variable in subjects with ITBS compared with CO subjects. We assume that an increase in range of motion at the hip joint, stretching of the hip abductors, as well as stretching the hamstrings, calf muscles and hip flexors will help treat ITBS. © 2009 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Development of a 5kw Francis Turbine Runner Using Computation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    First Lady

    energy obtained is known as hydro-electric power which is one of the cheapest forms ... Turgo) used for hydropower generation (Sabourin et al., 1996). The Awba ... Function of draft tube is to convert unused kinetic energy at the exit of runner.

  20. Physiological demands of running during long distance runs and triathlons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausswirth, C; Lehénaff, D

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this review article is to identify the main metabolic factors which have an influence on the energy cost of running (Cr) during prolonged exercise runs and triathlons. This article proposes a physiological comparison of these 2 exercises and the relationship between running economy and performance. Many terms are used as the equivalent of 'running economy' such as 'oxygen cost', 'metabolic cost', 'energy cost of running', and 'oxygen consumption'. It has been suggested that these expressions may be defined by the rate of oxygen uptake (VO2) at a steady state (i.e. between 60 to 90% of maximal VO2) at a submaximal running speed. Endurance events such as triathlon or marathon running are known to modify biological constants of athletes and should have an influence on their running efficiency. The Cr appears to contribute to the variation found in distance running performance among runners of homogeneous level. This has been shown to be important in sports performance, especially in events like long distance running. In addition, many factors are known or hypothesised to influence Cr such as environmental conditions, participant specificity, and metabolic modifications (e.g. training status, fatigue). The decrease in running economy during a triathlon and/or a marathon could be largely linked to physiological factors such as the enhancement of core temperature and a lack of fluid balance. Moreover, the increase in circulating free fatty acids and glycerol at the end of these long exercise durations bear witness to the decrease in Cr values. The combination of these factors alters the Cr during exercise and hence could modify the athlete's performance in triathlons or a prolonged run.

  1. Stress reactivity to and recovery from a standardised exercise bout: a study of 31 runners practising relaxation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solberg, E E; Ingjer, F; Holen, A; Sundgot-Borgen, J; Nilsson, S; Holme, I

    2000-08-01

    To compare the efficacy in runners of two relaxation techniques with regard to exercise reactivity and recovery after exercise. Thirty one adult male runners were studied prospectively for six months in three groups practising either meditation (n = 11) or autogenic training (n = 11) or serving as controls (n = 10). Before and after the six months relaxation intervention, indicators of reactivity to exercise and metabolism after exercise (blood lactate concentration, heart rate (HR), and oxygen consumption (VO2)), were tested immediately after and 10 minutes after exercise. Resting HR was also assessed weekly at home during the trial. State anxiety was measured before and after the intervention. After the relaxation training, blood lactate concentration after exercise was significantly (pmeditation group compared with the control group. No difference was observed in lactate responses between the autogenic training group and the control group. There were no significant differences among the groups with regard to HR, VO2, or levels of anxiety. Meditation training may reduce the lactate response to a standardised exercise bout.

  2. Comparison between recreational male Ironman triathletes and marathon runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianoli, Daniele; Knechtle, Beat; Knechtle, Patrizia; Barandun, Ursula; Rüst, Christoph Alexander; Rosemann, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    Recent investigations described a personal best marathon time as a predictor variable for an Ironman race time in recreational male Ironman triathletes. Similarities and differences in anthropometry and training were investigated between 83 recreational male Ironman triathletes and 81 recreational male marathoners. Ironman triathletes were significantly taller and had a higher body mass and a higher skin-fold thickness of the calf compared to the marathoners. Weekly training volume in hours was higher in Ironman triathletes. In the Ironman triathletes, percent body fat was related to overall race time and both the split time in cycling and running. The weekly swim kilometres were related to the split time in swimming, and the speed in cycling was related to the bike split time. For the marathoners, the calf skin-fold thickness and running speed during training were related to marathon race time. Although personal best marathon time was a predictor of Ironman race time in male triathletes, anthropometric and training characteristics of male marathoners were different from those of male Ironman triathletes, probably due to training of different muscle groups and metabolic endurance beyond marathon running, as the triathletes are also training for high-level performance in swimming and cycling. Future studies should compare Olympic distance triathletes and road cyclists with Ironman triathletes.

  3. Prevalence of pathologic findings in asymptomatic knees of marathon runners before and after a competition in comparison with physically active subjects - a 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahl, Robert; Luke, Anthony; Ma, C.B.; Krug, Roland; Steinbach, Lynne; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of pathologic findings in asymptomatic knees of marathon runners before and after a competition in comparison with physically active subjects. To compare the diagnostic performance of cartilage-dedicated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences at 3.0 T. Ten marathon runners underwent 3.0 T MRI 2-3 days before and after competition. Twelve physically active asymptomatic subjects not performing long-distance running were examined as controls. Pathologic condition was assessed with the whole-organ magnetic resonance imaging score (WORMS). Cartilage abnormalities and bone marrow edema pattern (BMEP) were quantified. Visualization of cartilage pathology was assessed with intermediate-weighted fast spin-echo (IM-w FSE), fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) and T1-weighted three-dimensional (3D) high-spatial-resolution volumetric fat-suppressed spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) MRI sequences. Eight of ten marathon runners and 7/12 controls showed knee abnormality. Slightly more and larger cartilage abnormalities, and BMEP, in marathon runners yielded higher but not significantly different WORMS (P > 0.05) than in controls. Running a single marathon did not alter MR findings substantially. Cartilage abnormalities were best visualized with IM-w FSE images (P < 0.05). A high prevalence of knee abnormalities was found in marathon runners and also in active subjects participating in other recreational sports. IM-w FSE sequences delineated more cartilage MR imaging abnormalities than did FIESTA and SPGR sequences. (orig.)

  4. Prevalence of pathologic findings in asymptomatic knees of marathon runners before and after a competition in comparison with physically active subjects-a 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Robert; Luke, Anthony; Ma, C Benjamin; Krug, Roland; Steinbach, Lynne; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M

    2008-07-01

    To determine the prevalence of pathologic findings in asymptomatic knees of marathon runners before and after a competition in comparison with physically active subjects. To compare the diagnostic performance of cartilage-dedicated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences at 3.0 T. Ten marathon runners underwent 3.0 T MRI 2-3 days before and after competition. Twelve physically active asymptomatic subjects not performing long-distance running were examined as controls. Pathologic condition was assessed with the whole-organ magnetic resonance imaging score (WORMS). Cartilage abnormalities and bone marrow edema pattern (BMEP) were quantified. Visualization of cartilage pathology was assessed with intermediate-weighted fast spin-echo (IM-w FSE), fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) and T1-weighted three-dimensional (3D) high-spatial-resolution volumetric fat-suppressed spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) MRI sequences. Eight of ten marathon runners and 7/12 controls showed knee abnormality. Slightly more and larger cartilage abnormalities, and BMEP, in marathon runners yielded higher but not significantly different WORMS (P > 0.05) than in controls. Running a single marathon did not alter MR findings substantially. Cartilage abnormalities were best visualized with IM-w FSE images (P marathon runners and also in active subjects participating in other recreational sports. IM-w FSE sequences delineated more cartilage MR imaging abnormalities than did FIESTA and SPGR sequences.

  5. Prevalence of pathologic findings in asymptomatic knees of marathon runners before and after a competition in comparison with physically active subjects - a 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, Robert [University of California, San Francisco, Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Group, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Department of Clinical Radiology, University Hospitals-Campus Grosshadern, Munich (Germany); Luke, Anthony [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA (United States); University of California, San Francisco, Department of Family and Community Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States); Ma, C.B. [University of California, San Francisco, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA (United States); Krug, Roland; Steinbach, Lynne; Majumdar, Sharmila; Link, Thomas M. [University of California, San Francisco, Musculoskeletal and Quantitative Imaging Group, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    2008-07-15

    To determine the prevalence of pathologic findings in asymptomatic knees of marathon runners before and after a competition in comparison with physically active subjects. To compare the diagnostic performance of cartilage-dedicated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences at 3.0 T. Ten marathon runners underwent 3.0 T MRI 2-3 days before and after competition. Twelve physically active asymptomatic subjects not performing long-distance running were examined as controls. Pathologic condition was assessed with the whole-organ magnetic resonance imaging score (WORMS). Cartilage abnormalities and bone marrow edema pattern (BMEP) were quantified. Visualization of cartilage pathology was assessed with intermediate-weighted fast spin-echo (IM-w FSE), fast imaging employing steady-state acquisition (FIESTA) and T1-weighted three-dimensional (3D) high-spatial-resolution volumetric fat-suppressed spoiled gradient-echo (SPGR) MRI sequences. Eight of ten marathon runners and 7/12 controls showed knee abnormality. Slightly more and larger cartilage abnormalities, and BMEP, in marathon runners yielded higher but not significantly different WORMS (P > 0.05) than in controls. Running a single marathon did not alter MR findings substantially. Cartilage abnormalities were best visualized with IM-w FSE images (P < 0.05). A high prevalence of knee abnormalities was found in marathon runners and also in active subjects participating in other recreational sports. IM-w FSE sequences delineated more cartilage MR imaging abnormalities than did FIESTA and SPGR sequences. (orig.)

  6. Excessive progression in weekly running distance and risk of running-related injuries: an association which varies according to type of injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Østergaard; Parner, Erik Thorlund; Nohr, Ellen Aagaard; Sørensen, Henrik; Lind, Martin; Rasmussen, Sten

    2014-10-01

    An explorative, 1-year prospective cohort study. Objective To examine whether an association between a sudden change in weekly running distance and running-related injury varies according to injury type. It is widely accepted that a sudden increase in running distance is strongly related to injury in runners. But the scientific knowledge supporting this assumption is limited. A volunteer sample of 874 healthy novice runners who started a self-structured running regimen were provided a global-positioning-system watch. After each running session during the study period, participants were categorized into 1 of the following exposure groups, based on the progression of their weekly running distance: less than 10% or regression, 10% to 30%, or more than 30%. The primary outcome was running-related injury. A total of 202 runners sustained a running-related injury. Using Cox regression analysis, no statistically significant differences in injury rates were found across the 3 exposure groups. An increased rate of distance-related injuries (patellofemoral pain, iliotibial band syndrome, medial tibial stress syndrome, gluteus medius injury, greater trochanteric bursitis, injury to the tensor fascia latae, and patellar tendinopathy) existed in those who progressed their weekly running distance by more than 30% compared with those who progressed less than 10% (hazard ratio = 1.59; 95% confidence interval: 0.96, 2.66; P = .07). Novice runners who progressed their running distance by more than 30% over a 2-week period seem to be more vulnerable to distance-related injuries than runners who increase their running distance by less than 10%. Owing to the exploratory nature of the present study, randomized controlled trials are needed to verify these results, and more experimental studies are needed to validate the assumptions. Still, novice runners may be well advised to progress their weekly distances by less than 30% per week over a 2-week period.

  7. Serum creatine kinase elevations in ultramarathon runners at high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magrini, Danielle; Khodaee, Morteza; San-Millán, Iñigo; Hew-Butler, Tamara; Provance, Aaron J

    2017-05-01

    Creatine kinase (CK) is a sensitive enzyme marker for muscle damage in athletes. Elevated CK levels have been reported in many endurance physical activities. The consequence and possible long-term sequela of the CK elevation in athletes is unknown. There is a paucity of literature stating actual numerical values of CK associated with competing in an ultramarathon with extreme environmental conditions. Our hypothesis was that the serum CK levels increase significantly as a result of running a 161 km ultramarathon at high altitude. This was a prospective observational study of participants of the Leadville 100 ultramarathon race in Leadville, Colorado at high altitude (2800-3840 m) in August 2014. We collected blood samples from sixty-four volunteer runners before and eighty-three runners immediately after the race. Out of 669 athletes who started the race, 352 successfully completed the race in less than the 30-hour cut-off time (52%). The majority of runners were male (84%). We were able to collect both pre- and post-race blood samples from 36 runners. Out of these 36 runners, the mean pre-race CK was increased from 126 ± 64 U/L to 14,569 ± 14,729 U/L (p athletes' age, BMI, or finishing time. Significant elevation of CK level occurs as a result of running ultramarathons. The majority of athletes with significantly elevated CK levels were asymptomatic and required no major medical attention.

  8. Bone stress in runners with tibial stress fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meardon, Stacey A; Willson, John D; Gries, Samantha R; Kernozek, Thomas W; Derrick, Timothy R

    2015-11-01

    Combinations of smaller bone geometry and greater applied loads may contribute to tibial stress fracture. We examined tibial bone stress, accounting for geometry and applied loads, in runners with stress fracture. 23 runners with a history of tibial stress fracture & 23 matched controls ran over a force platform while 3-D kinematic and kinetic data were collected. An elliptical model of the distal 1/3 tibia cross section was used to estimate stress at 4 locations (anterior, posterior, medial and lateral). Inner and outer radii for the model were obtained from 2 planar x-ray images. Bone stress differences were assessed using two-factor ANOVA (α=0.05). Key contributors to observed stress differences between groups were examined using stepwise regression. Runners with tibial stress fracture experienced greater anterior tension and posterior compression at the distal tibia. Location, but not group, differences in shear stress were observed. Stepwise regression revealed that anterior-posterior outer diameter of the tibia and the sagittal plane bending moment explained >80% of the variance in anterior and posterior bone stress. Runners with tibial stress fracture displayed greater stress anteriorly and posteriorly at the distal tibia. Elevated tibial stress was associated with smaller bone geometry and greater bending moments about the medial-lateral axis of the tibia. Future research needs to identify key running mechanics associated with the sagittal plane bending moment at the distal tibia as well as to identify ways to improve bone geometry in runners in order to better guide preventative and rehabilitative efforts. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of whey protein hydrolysate on performance and recovery of top-class orienteering runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Mette; Bangsbo, Jens; Jensen, Jørgen; Bibby, Bo Martin; Madsen, Klavs

    2015-04-01

    This trial aimed to examine the effect of whey protein hydrolysate intake before and after exercise sessions on endurance performance and recovery in elite orienteers during a training camp. Eighteen elite orienteers participated in a randomized controlled intervention trial during a 1-week training camp (13 exercise sessions). Half of the runners (PRO-CHO) ingested a protein drink before (0.3 g kg(-1)) and a protein-carbohydrate drink after (0.3 g protein kg(-1) and 1 g carbohydrate kg(-1)) each exercise session. The others ingested energy and time-matched carbohydrate drinks (CHO). A 4-km run-test with 20 control points was performed before and on the last day of the intervention. Blood and saliva were obtained in the mornings, before and after run-tests, and after the last training session. During the intervention, questionnaires were fulfilled regarding psychological sense of performance capacity and motivation. PRO-CHO and not CHO improved performance in the 4-km run-test (interaction p performance capacity during the intervention was greater in CHO (p performance and reduces markers of muscle damage during a strenuous 1-week training camp. The results indicate that protein supplementation in conjunction with each exercise session facilitates the recovery from strenuous training in elite orienteers.

  10. Vascular volumes and hematology in male and female runners and cyclists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, H J; Carter, S; Grant, S; Tupling, R; Coates, G; Ali, M

    1999-02-01

    To examine the hypothesis that foot-strike hemolysis alters vascular volumes and selected hematological properties is trained athletes, we have measured total blood volume (TBV), red cell volume (RCV) and plasma volume (PV) in cyclists (n = 21) and runners (n = 17) and compared them to those of untrained controls (n = 20). TBV (ml x kg(-1)) was calculated as the sum of RCV (ml x kg(-1)) and PV (ml x kg(-1)) obtained using 51Cr and 125I-labelled albumin, respectively. Hematological assessment was carried out using a Coulter counter. Peak aerobic power (VO2peak) was measured during progressive exercise to fatigue using both cycle and treadmill ergometry. RCV was 15% higher (P strike hemolysis would not appear to have an effect on that parameter. The significant correlations (P role for the vascular system in realizing a high aerobic power.

  11. A comparative biomechanical analysis of habitually unshod and shod runners based on a foot morphological difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Qichang; Fernandez, Justin; Fu, Weijie; Feng, Neng; Gu, Yaodong

    2015-08-01

    Running is one of the most accessible physical activities and running with and without footwear has attracted extensive attention in the past several years. In this study 18 habitually male unshod runners and 20 habitually male shod runners (all with dominant right feet) participated in a running test. A Vicon motion analysis system was used to capture the kinematics of each participant's lower limb. The in-shoe plantar pressure measurement system was employed to measure the pressure and force exerted on the pressure sensors of the insole. The function of a separate hallux in unshod runners is analyzed through the comparison of plantar pressure parameters. Owing to the different strike patterns in shod and unshod runners, peak dorsiflexion and plantarflexion angle were significantly different. Habitually shod runners exhibited a decreased foot strike angle (FSA) under unshod conditions; and the vertical average loading rate (VALR) of shod runners under unshod conditions was larger than that under shod conditions. This suggests that the foot strike pattern is more important than the shod or unshod running style and runners need to acquire the technique. It can be concluded that for habitually unshod runners the separate hallux takes part of the foot loading and reduces loading to the forefoot under shod conditions. The remaining toes of rearfoot strike (RFS) runners function similarly under unshod conditions. These morphological features of shod and unshod runners should be considered in footwear design to improve sport performance and reduce injury. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. De waarde van preventieve adviezen en keuringen bij beginnende hardlopers met het oog op cardiovasculaire gebeurtenissen en blessures : The value of preventive advice and examination focusing on cardiovascular events and injury for novice runners

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwerver, J.; Bessem, B.; Buist, I.; Diercks, R.L.

    2008-01-01

    - Novice runners often seek advice from a physician about training responsibly. Common concerns include sudden cardiac arrest, advice on running injuries and how to avoid these events. - Cardiologic screening and ergometry are only beneficial if the athlete has a high-risk profile. - In the world of

  13. Acute and chronic effects of aquatic treadmill training on land treadmill running kinematics: A cross-over and single-subject design approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressel, Eadric; Louder, Talin J; Hoover, James P; Roberts, Luke C; Dolny, Dennis G

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if selected kinematic measures (foot strike index [SI], knee contact angle and overstride angle) were different between aquatic treadmill (ATM) and land treadmill (LTM) running, and to determine if these measures were altered during LTM running as a result of 6 weeks of ATM training. Acute effects were tested using 15 competitive distance runners who completed 1 session of running on each treadmill type at 5 different running speeds. Subsequently, three recreational runners completed 6 weeks of ATM training following a single-subject baseline, intervention and withdrawal experiment. Kinematic measures were quantified from digitisation of video. Regardless of speed, SI values during ATM running (61.3 ± 17%) were significantly greater (P = 0.002) than LTM running (42.7 ± 23%). Training on the ATM did not change (pre/post) the SI (26 ± 3.2/27 ± 3.1), knee contact angle (165 ± 0.3/164 ± 0.8) or overstride angle (89 ± 0.4/89 ± 0.1) during LTM running. Although SI values were different between acute ATM and LTM running, 6 weeks of ATM training did not appear to alter LTM running kinematics as evidenced by no change in kinematic values from baseline to post intervention assessments.

  14. Nutritional factors that influence change in bone density and stress fracture risk among young female cross-country runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieves, Jeri W; Melsop, Kathryn; Curtis, Meredith; Kelsey, Jennifer L; Bachrach, Laura K; Greendale, Gail; Sowers, Mary Fran; Sainani, Kristin L

    2010-08-01

    To identify nutrients, foods, and dietary patterns associated with stress fracture risk and changes in bone density among young female distance runners. Two-year, prospective cohort study. Observational data were collected in the course of a multicenter randomized trial of the effect of oral contraceptives on bone health. One hundred and twenty-five female competitive distance runners ages 18-26 years. Dietary variables were assessed with a food frequency questionnaire. Bone mineral density and content (BMD/BMC) of the spine, hip, and total body were measured annually by dual x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA). Stress fractures were recorded on monthly calendars, and had to be confirmed by radiograph, bone scan, or magnetic resonance imaging. Seventeen participants had at least one stress fracture during follow-up. Higher intakes of calcium, skim milk, and dairy products were associated with lower rates of stress fracture. Each additional cup of skim milk consumed per day was associated with a 62% reduction in stress fracture incidence (P stress fracture rate. Potassium intake was also associated with greater gains in hip and whole-body BMD. Copyright © 2010 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A 2-Year Prospective Cohort Study of Overuse Running Injuries: The Runners and Injury Longitudinal Study (TRAILS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messier, Stephen P; Martin, David F; Mihalko, Shannon L; Ip, Edward; DeVita, Paul; Cannon, D Wayne; Love, Monica; Beringer, Danielle; Saldana, Santiago; Fellin, Rebecca E; Seay, Joseph F

    2018-05-01

    The National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, noting flaws in previous running injury research, called for more rigorous prospective designs and comprehensive analyses to define the origin of running injuries. To determine the risk factors that differentiate recreational runners who remain uninjured from those diagnosed with an overuse running injury during a 2-year observational period. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Inclusion criteria were running a minimum of 5 miles per week and being injury free for at least the past 6 months. Data were collected at baseline on training, medical and injury histories, demographics, anthropometrics, strength, gait biomechanics, and psychosocial variables. Injuries occurring over the 2-year observation period were diagnosed by an orthopaedic surgeon on the basis of predetermined definitions. Of the 300 runners who entered the study, 199 (66%) sustained at least 1 injury, including 73% of women and 62% of men. Of the injured runners, 111 (56%) sustained injuries more than once. In bivariate analyses, significant ( P ≤ .05) factors at baseline that predicted injury were as follows: Short Form Health Survey-12 mental component score (lower mental health-related quality of life), Positive and Negative Affect Scale negative affect score (more negative emotions), sex (higher percentage of women were injured), and knee stiffness (greater stiffness was associated with injury); subsequently, knee stiffness was the lone significant predictor of injury (odds ratio = 1.18) in a multivariable analysis. Flexibility, quadriceps angle, arch height, rearfoot motion, strength, footwear, and previous injury were not significant risk factors for injury. The results of this study indicate the following: (1) among recreational runners, women sustain injuries at a higher rate than men; (2) greater knee stiffness, more common in runners with higher body weights (≥80 kg), significantly increases the odds of sustaining an overuse running

  16. Effect of age and performance on pacing of marathon runners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaidis PT

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pantelis Theodoros Nikolaidis,1 Beat Knechtle2,3 1Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Attiki, Greece; 2Gesundheitszentrum St. Gallen, St. Gallen, 3Institute of Primary Care, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland Abstract: Pacing strategies in marathon runners have previously been examined, especially with regard to age and performance level separately. However, less information about the age × performance interaction on pacing in age-group runners exists. The aim of the present study was to examine whether runners with similar race time and at different age differ for pacing. Data (women, n=117,595; men, n=180,487 from the “New York City Marathon” between 2006 and 2016 were analyzed. A between–within subjects analysis of variance showed a large main effect of split on race speed (p<0.001, η2=0.538 with the fastest speed in the 5–10 km split and the slowest in the 35–40 km. A small sex × split interaction on race speed was found (p<0.001, η2=0.035 with men showing larger increase in speed at 5 km and women at 25 km and 40 km (end spurt. An age-group × performance group interaction on Δspeed was shown for both sexes at 5 km, 10 km, 15 km, 20 km, 25 km, 30 km, 35 km, and 40 km (p<0.001, 0.001≤η2≤0.004, where athletes in older age-groups presented a relatively more even pace compared with athletes in younger age-groups, a trend that was more remarkable in the relatively slow performance groups. So far, the present study is the first one to observe an age × performance interaction on pacing; ie, older runners pace differently (smaller changes than younger runners with similar race time. These findings are of great practical interest for coaches working with marathon runners of different age, but similar race time. Keywords: running, master athlete, endurance, aerobic capacity, fatigue, gender, race time

  17. Bone strength estimates relative to vertical ground reaction force discriminates women runners with stress fracture history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popp, Kristin L; McDermott, William; Hughes, Julie M; Baxter, Stephanie A; Stovitz, Steven D; Petit, Moira A

    2017-01-01

    To determine differences in bone geometry, estimates of bone strength, muscle size and bone strength relative to load, in women runners with and without a history of stress fracture. We recruited 32 competitive distance runners aged 18-35, with (SFX, n=16) or without (NSFX, n=16) a history of stress fracture for this case-control study. Peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) was used to assess volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD, mg/mm 3 ), total (ToA) and cortical (CtA) bone areas (mm 2 ), and estimated compressive bone strength (bone strength index; BSI, mg/mm 4 ) at the distal tibia. ToA, CtA, cortical vBMD, and estimated strength (section modulus; Zp, mm 3 and strength strain index; SSIp, mm 3 ) were measured at six cortical sites along the tibia. Mean active peak vertical (pkZ) ground reaction forces (GRFs), assessed from a fatigue run on an instrumented treadmill, were used in conjunction with pQCT measurements to estimate bone strength relative to load (mm 2 /N∗kg -1 ) at all cortical sites. SSIp and Zp were 9-11% lower in the SFX group at mid-shaft of the tibia, while ToA and vBMD did not differ between groups at any measurement site. The SFX group had 11-17% lower bone strength relative to mean pkZ GRFs (phistory of stress fracture. Bone strength relative to load is also lower in this same region suggesting that strength deficits in the middle 1/3 of the tibia and altered gait biomechanics may predispose an individual to stress fracture. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Surrogate runner model for draft tube losses computation within a wide range of operating points

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Susan-Resiga, R; Ciocan, T; Muntean, S; De Colombel, T; Leroy, P

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a quasi two-dimensional (Q2D) methodology for assessing the swirling flow exiting the runner of hydraulic turbines at arbitrary operating points, within a wide operating range. The Q2D model does not need actual runner computations, and as a result it represents a surrogate runner model for a-priori assessment of the swirling flow ingested by the draft tube. The axial, radial and circumferential velocity components are computed on a conical section located immediately downstream the runner blades trailing edge, then used as inlet conditions for regular draft tube computations. The main advantage of our model is that it allows the determination of the draft tube losses within the intended turbine operating range in the early design stages of a new or refurbished runner, thus providing a robust and systematic methodology to meet the optimal requirements for the flow at the runner outlet

  19. Distance learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina Pucelj

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available I would like to underline the role and importance of knowledge, which is acquired by individuals as a result of a learning process and experience. I have established that a form of learning, such as distance learning definitely contributes to a higher learning quality and leads to innovative, dynamic and knowledgebased society. Knowledge and skills enable individuals to cope with and manage changes, solve problems and also create new knowledge. Traditional learning practices face new circumstances, new and modern technologies appear, which enable quick and quality-oriented knowledge implementation. The centre of learning process at distance learning is to increase the quality of life of citizens, their competitiveness on the workforce market and ensure higher economic growth. Intellectual capital is the one, which represents the biggest capital of each society and knowledge is the key factor for succes of everybody, who are fully aware of this. Flexibility, openness and willingness of people to follow new IT solutions form suitable environment for developing and deciding to take up distance learning.

  20. Multiple stress fractures in a young female runner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, T; Pećina, M; Loncar-Dusek, M; Bojanic, I

    2004-01-01

    The effect of exercise on female's bone metabolism has received much attention in recent years. We report on unusual case of a female runner with low body mass and amenorrhea, who suffered 4 stress fractures. Three of the stress fractures occurred during her sports career, and the fourth occurred 7 years after the cessation of sports activities. It seems that exercise-induced amenorrhea together with food restriction in the young age may cause long-term consequences on bone metabolism.

  1. Digital Physical Activity Data Collection and Use by Endurance Runners and Distance Cyclists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Victor R.; Drake, Joel

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of sensor technologies to sports has allowed athletes to quantify and track their performance, adding an information-based layer to athletic practices. This information layer is particularly prevalent in practices involving formal competition and high levels of physical endurance, such as biking and running. We interviewed 20…

  2. Myocardial function in long distance runners: Assessment by echocardiography, tissue Doppler and speckle tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Pons, Jaume; Forteza, Josep Francesc; Riverso, Daniel; Aceña, Marta; Rodriguez, Antonio; Gómez, Alfredo; Fernández-Palomeque, Carlos; Bethencourt, Armando

    2014-01-01

    Introducción y objetivos: El ejercicio físico provoca respuestas adaptativas y cambios morfológico-funcionales en el corazón del atleta. El objetivo del presente estudio es caracterizar dichos cambios mediante ecocardiografía convencional y las nuevas técnicas de deformación miocárdica mediante speckle tracking. Material y métodos: Se estudiaron prospectivamente a 68 varones, 38 corredores de fondo (42±8 años), y 30 controles (40±7 años). Se les realizó estudio ecocardiográfico convencional m...

  3. Emotions and trait emotional intelligence among ultra-endurance runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Andrew M; Wilson, Mathew

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate relationships between trait emotional intelligence and emotional state changes over the course of an ultra-endurance foot race covering a route of approximately 175 miles (282 km) and held in set stages over six days. A repeated measures field design that sought to maintain ecological validity was used. Trait emotional intelligence was defined as a relatively stable concept that should predict adaptive emotional states experienced over the duration of the race and therefore associate with pleasant emotions during a 6-stage endurance event. Thirty-four runners completed a self-report measure of trait emotional intelligence before the event started. Participants reported emotional states before and after each of the six races. Repeated measures ANOVA results showed significant variations in emotions over time and a main effect for trait emotional intelligence. Runners high in self-report trait emotional intelligence also reported higher pleasant and lower unpleasant emotions than runners low in trait emotional intelligence. Findings lend support to the notion that trait emotional intelligence associates with adaptive psychological states, suggesting that it may be a key individual difference that explains why some athletes respond to repeated bouts of hard exercise better than others. Future research should test the effectiveness of interventions designed to enhance trait emotional intelligence and examine the attendant impact on emotional responses to intense exercise during multi-stage events. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. CERN runners on the podium for the Escalade race

    CERN Multimedia

    Caroline Duc

    2012-01-01

    For the last race of the season, CERN runners distinguished themselves by notching up third place in the inter-entreprises category of the Escalade, Geneva’s famous running race across the city.   Some of the runners from the CERN team. On Friday 30 November and Saturday 1 December, 35 runners from CERN braved the chilly Geneva weather to take part in the 35th Escalade race. With 81 teams competing in the race, the group representing the Laboratory took third place in the inter-entreprises category, behind the Hôpitaux Universitaires de Genève and the Panards Migros teams.   CERN’s Helenka Przysiezniak, Steffen Doebert and Camille Ruiz Llamas also distinguished themselves individually by finishing eighth, sixth and fourth in their respective categories and Patrick Villeton achieved a very good ranking in the DUC race on Friday evening and in the classic race on Saturday. Congratulations to everyone who participated and see you next ...

  5. Unsteady load on an oscillating Kaplan turbine runner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puolakka, O.; Keto-Tokoi, J.; Matusiak, J.

    2013-02-01

    A Kaplan turbine runner oscillating in turbine waterways is subjected to a varying hydrodynamic load. Numerical simulation of the related unsteady flow is time-consuming and research is very limited. In this study, a simplified method based on unsteady airfoil theory is presented for evaluation of the unsteady load for vibration analyses of the turbine shaft line. The runner is assumed to oscillate as a rigid body in spin and axial heave, and the reaction force is resolved into added masses and dampings. The method is applied on three Kaplan runners at nominal operating conditions. Estimates for added masses and dampings are considered to be of a magnitude significant for shaft line vibration. Moderate variation in the added masses and minor variation in the added dampings is found in the frequency range of interest. Reference results for added masses are derived by solving the boundary value problem for small motions of inviscid fluid using the finite element method. Good correspondence is found in the added mass estimates of the two methods. The unsteady airfoil method is considered accurate enough for design purposes. Experimental results are needed for validation of unsteady load analyses.

  6. Hot Runner Mold Design of Fan Diverter Parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, D. J.; Cheng, Y. L.

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we discuss the case of plastic parts for the production of fan steering gear shaft parts injection molding, and use POM plastic steel to produce plastic parts from traditional cold runners. Because of the parts have a hole, which need side slide. The runner produce more waste after plastic parts injection make the runner waste account for the cost is relatively high, the cost of stock preparation is relatively increased when the product quantity demanded is great. After the crushing treatment of the waste, the backfill will affect the quality, and in the crushing process, the volume generated will make the operator to withstand up to 130 dB of noise. The actual test results show that the production cycle reduce 6.25%, while the production yield increase by about 5% and material costs reduced by 2% . It can be recovered within a year, not to mention the increase of the quality and reduction the noise on the staff of the benefit is impossible to estimate.

  7. Validations of CFD against detailed velocity and pressure measurements in water turbine runner flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, H.; Davidson, L.

    2003-03-01

    This work compares CFD results with experimental results of the flow in two different kinds of water turbine runners. The runners studied are the GAMM Francis runner and the Hölleforsen Kaplan runner. The GAMM Francis runner was used as a test case in the 1989 GAMM Workshop on 3D Computation of Incompressible Internal Flows where the geometry and detailed best efficiency measurements were made available. In addition to the best efficiency measurements, four off-design operating condition measurements are used for the comparisons in this work. The Hölleforsen Kaplan runner was used at the 1999 Turbine 99 and 2001 Turbine 99 - II workshops on draft tube flow, where detailed measurements made after the runner were used as inlet boundary conditions for the draft tube computations. The measurements are used here to validate computations of the flow in the runner.The computations are made in a single runner blade passage where the inlet boundary conditions are obtained from an extrapolation of detailed measurements (GAMM) or from separate guide vane computations (Hölleforsen). The steady flow in a rotating co-ordinate system is computed. The effects of turbulence are modelled by a low-Reynolds number k- turbulence model, which removes some of the assumptions of the commonly used wall function approach and brings the computations one step further.

  8. Serum biochemistry and morbidity among runners presenting for medical care after an Australian mountain ultramarathon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Stephen A; King, M Jonathan

    2007-07-01

    To determine if exercise-associated hyponatremia (EAH) was a cause of morbidity among runners requiring medical care at an Australian mountain ultramarathon. Case series. Six Foot Track mountain ultramarathon, New South Wales, Australia, March 2006. Runners presenting to the medical facility. Serum biochemistry. No cases of exercise-associated hyponatremia were identified among 9 athletes (from 775 starters) who were treated with intravenous fluid therapy. Unwell runners had a mean serum (Na) of 143 mmol/L (range 138-147 mmol/L). All