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Sample records for traditional teaching methodology

  1. Active methodologies in Financial Management classes: an alternative to the traditional teaching method for awakening intrinsic motivation and developing autonomy

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    Guilherme Muniz Pereira Chaves Urias

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a pedagogical experience in Financial Management classes. The objective of this study was to investigate whether the educational activity based on active methodologies, applied in the Financial Management classes in an undergraduate course in Business Administration, can offer formative spaces that enhance the development of the students’ intrinsic motivation to the point of being relevant to the development of their autonomy and thus to be characterized as a viable manner of putting the Freirean pedagogy into practice. In order to do so, the adopted teaching strategy aimed at creating opportunities for interpretating problems that simulated real situations. A questionnaire was applied and the Bardinian content analysis was used to verify the students' impressions about the activity itself and its respective contribution to their professional and personal training. The analysis points to the fact that active methodologies are viable alternatives to the traditional method of teaching regarding the awakening of interest, motivation and the development of learning. It also points to their consonance with the Freirian pedagogy.

  2. INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES AS A MEAN OF IMPROVING OF TRADITIONAL METHODOLOGY OF UKRAINIAN LANGUAGE TEACHING (FOR PROFESSIONAL PURPOSES

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    Svitlana V. Shyyka

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article it is explained the elements of practical experience and defined the main directions of introduction of information and communication technologies in the studying university course “Ukrainian language (for professional purposes” for non-philological specialization. It is analyzed the use of modern audiovisual resources and related software during lectures, practical classes, students’ independent work, individual problem tasks and research, writing essays, extracurricular communications. It is argued that modern information and communication technologies combined with traditional methods of teaching and learning can significantly optimize the educational process and improve its quality, promote cognitive activity of students and formation of communicative competence as a part of training future professionals.

  3. Active Learning versus Traditional Teaching

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    L.A. Azzalis

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available In traditional teaching most of the class time is spent with the professor lecturing and the students watching and listening. The students work individually, and cooperation is discouraged. On the other hand,  active learning  changes the focus of activity from the teacher to the learners, in which students solve problems, answer questions, formulate questions of their own, discuss, explain, debate during class;  moreover, students work in teams on problems and projects under conditions that assure positive interdependence and individual accountability. Although student-centered methods have repeatedly been shown to be superior to the traditional teacher-centered approach to instruction, the literature regarding the efficacy of various teaching methods is inconclusive. The purpose of this study was to compare the student perceptions of course and instructor effectiveness, course difficulty, and amount learned between the active learning and lecture sections  in Health Sciences´ courses by statistical data from Anhembi Morumbi University. Results indicated significant  difference between active  learning and traditional  teaching. Our conclusions were that strategies promoting  active  learning to  traditional lectures could increase knowledge and understanding.

  4. Methodological pluralism in the teaching of Astronomy

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    de Macedo, Josué Antunes; Voelzke, Marcos Rincon

    2015-04-01

    This paper discusses the feasibility of using a teaching strategy called methodological pluralism, consisting of the use of various methodological resources in order to provide a meaningful learning. It is part of a doctoral thesis, which aims to investigate contributions to the use of traditional resources combined with digital technologies, in order to create autonomy for future teachers of Natural Sciences and Mathematics in relation to themes in Astronomy. It was offered an extension course at the "Federal Institution of Education, Science and Technology" in the North of Minas Gerais (FINMG), Campus Januaria, for thirty-two students of licentiate courses in Physics, Mathematics and Biological Sciences, involving themes of Astronomy, in order to search and contribute to improving the training of future teachers. The following aspects are used: the mixed methodology, with pre-experimental design, combined with content analysis. The results indicate the rates of students' prior knowledge in relation to Astronomy was low; meaningful learning indications of concepts related to Astronomy, and the feasibility of using digital resources Involving technologies, articulated with traditional materials in the teaching of Astronomy. This research sought to contribute to the initial teacher training, especially in relation to Astronomy Teaching, proposing new alternatives to promote the teaching of this area of knowledge, extending the methodological options of future teachers.

  5. Institutional traditions in teachers' manners of teaching

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    Lundqvist, Eva; Almqvist, Jonas; Östman, Leif

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this article is to make a close case study of one teacher's teaching in relation to established traditions within science education in Sweden. The teacher's manner of teaching is analysed with the help of an epistemological move analysis. The moves made by the teacher are then compared in a context of educational philosophy and selective tradition. In the analyses the focus is to study the process of teaching and learning in action in institutionalised and socially shared practices. The empirical material consists of video recordings of four lessons with the same group of students and the same teacher. The students are all in Year 7 in a Swedish 9-year compulsory school. During these lessons the students work with a subject area called "Properties of materials". The results show that the teacher makes a number of different moves with regard to how to proceed and come to a conclusion about what the substances are. Many of these moves are special in that they indicate that the students need to be able to handle the procedural level of school science. These moves do not deal directly with the knowledge production process, but with methodological aspects. The function of the moves turns the students' attention from one source of knowledge to another. The moves are aimed at helping the students to help themselves, since it is through their own activity and their own thinking that learning takes place. This is characteristic in the teacher's manner of teaching. When compared in a context of educational philosophy, this manner of teaching has similarities with progressentialism; a mixture of essentialism and progressivism. This educational philosophy is a central aspect of what is called the academic tradition—a selective tradition common in science education in Sweden between 1960 and 1990.

  6. A Methodology for Teaching Industrial Ecology

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    Cervantes, Gemma

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a way of teaching industrial ecology (IE) and to show some tools that may help for the IE teaching. Design/methodology/approach: In the paper, the development of lectures, practical lessons and projects on real industrial ecosystems are described. Also the teaching materials used are described. Findings: The presented…

  7. Comparison of Traditional and Constructivist Teaching Approaches ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The second section of students had 47 students and was taught using traditional teaching approach. Learning strategy inventory questionnaire which was adapted from strategy inventory for language learning (SILL) L2 students of English, (Oxford, 1990) was employed before and after students were taught using two ...

  8. Neurophysiological advantages of biorelevant methodology of teaching academic disciplines

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    Natalia A. Davidovskaya

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of technology of teaching a biorelevant lesson showed when using a traditional methodology of teaching (the sinistrocerebral one, there is a contradiction between social and biological aspects of the cerebrum functional system. It impels teachers to search for new methods of teaching on the basis of human reserves that have not been involved before. Personal development and education, as processes of forming higher mental functions, are considered in the article as complex forms of conscious activity, which are regulated by the corresponding aims and programs. It is shown that for comprehensive perception and fixing of the received information in memory, it is important that neural connections of cerebrum were maximally activated vertically (subcortex-cortex and horizontally (left and right brain. In this connection, a cerebrum is considered as a complex metasystem consisting of macro- and microsystems incorporated into a multilevel organization with multiple horizontal and vertical relations. In such a system, the code of perceiving, processing and maintaining information is highly sought in the conditions of research activity and corresponds to a person’s instinct of self-preservation at most.  On the principle that the sinistrocerebral methodology of teaching, dividing reason and feelings, leads to “robotization” of an individual, disconnection with long-term memory, teleologism and natural instincts are disjoined. Further use of the sinistrocerebral methodology of teaching in the conditions of computerization of society threatens with degradation of the succeeding generations. The traditional method of teaching violates the genetic sequence of perceiving information and results in the functional disconnection in the integrative brain activity, forming the “tunnel of reality”, limited by short-term memory, on the one hand, and by the blinkered vision, on the other hand, that worsens the quality of life, psychological

  9. Teaching Computation in Primary School without Traditional Written Algorithms

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    Hartnett, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Concerns regarding the dominance of the traditional written algorithms in schools have been raised by many mathematics educators, yet the teaching of these procedures remains a dominant focus in in primary schools. This paper reports on a project in one school where the staff agreed to put the teaching of the traditional written algorithm aside,…

  10. Carbohydrate metabolism teaching strategy for the Pharmacy course, applying active teaching methodology

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    Uderlei Donizete Silveira Covizzi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The traditional teaching method has been widely questioned on the development of skills and abilities in training healthcare professionals. In the traditional methodology the main transmitter of knowledge is the teacher while students assume passive spectator role. Some Brazilian institutions broke with this model, structuring the curriculum to student-centered learning. Some medical schools have adopted the Problem Based Learning (PBL, a methodology that presents problem questions, to be encountered by future physicians, for resolution in small tutorial groups. Our work proposes to apply an active teaching-learning methodology addressing carbohydrate metabolism during the discipline of biochemistry for under graduation students from pharmacy course. Thus, the academic content was presented through brief and objective talks. Later, learners were split into tutorial groups for the resolution of issues in context. During the activities, the teacher drove the discussion to the issues elucidation. At the end of the module learners evaluated the teaching methodology by means of an applied questionnaire and the developed content was evaluated by an usual individual test. The questionnaire analysis indicates that students believe they have actively participated in the teaching-learning process, being encouraged to discuss and understand the theme. The answers highlight closer ties between students and tutor. According to the professor, there is a greater student engagement with learning. It is concluded that an innovative methodology, where the primary responsibility for learning is centered in the student himself, besides to increase the interest in learning, facilitates learning by cases discussion in groups. The issues contextualization establishes a narrowing between theory and practice.

  11. The structuralist tradition in economics: methodological and macroeconomics aspects

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    FABRÍCIO MISSIO

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the structuralist tradition in economics, emphasizing the role that structures play in the economic growth of developing countries. Since the subject at hand is evidently too large to cover in a single article, an emphasis has been brought to bear upon the macroeconomic elements of such a tradition, while also exploring its methodological aspects. It begins by analysing some general aspects of structuralism in economics (its evolution and origins associated with ECLAC thought, in this instance focusing on the dynamics of the center-periphery relationship. Thereafter, the macroeconomic structuralism derived from the works of Taylor (1983, 1991 is presented, followed by a presentation of neo-structuralism. Centred on the concept of systemic competitiveness, this approach defines a strategy to achieve the high road of globalization, understood here as an inevitable process in spite of its engagement being dependent on the policies adopted. The conclusions show the genuine contributions of this tradition to economic theory.

  12. Learning and Teaching Traditional Music in Cambodia: Challenges and Incentives

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    Grant, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Substantial efforts have been made since the Khmer Rouge regime to revitalize traditional Cambodian music genres. While they have met with some success, local circumstances still present many difficulties for the transmission of traditional music to the younger generations. This study explores the challenges in learning and teaching traditional…

  13. A Study of Formulaic Language in Traditional Greek Tales and Its Cultural Implications in Language Teaching

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    Smaragda PAPADOPOULOU

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In our study we examine teaching mother tongue through faire and folk tales from the perspectives of recognizing clichés in fairy tales and myths, idiomatic phrases which work as morals, proverbs and very specific phrases of traditional tales’. We suggest that formulaic language can be involved in children’s language games at school and become a methodological tool for innovative approaches in Language and Teaching especially at the primary education. We search the sources from Greek traditional tales that could serve as teaching material for this option of teaching formulaic language in mother tongue. Cultural and geographical implications of the examples applied are noted as a suggestion for further discussion.

  14. Research Methodologies Explored for a Paradigm Shift in University Teaching.

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    Venter, I. M.; Blignaut, R. J.; Stoltz, D.

    2001-01-01

    Innovative teaching methods such as collaborative learning, teamwork, and mind maps were introduced to teach computer science and statistics courses at a South African university. Soft systems methodology was adapted and used to manage the research process of evaluating the effectiveness of the teaching methods. This research method provided proof…

  15. Evaluation of Team-Based Learning and Traditional Instruction in Teaching Removable Partial Denture Concepts.

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    Echeto, Luisa F; Sposetti, Venita; Childs, Gail; Aguilar, Maria L; Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Rueda, Luis; Nimmo, Arthur

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of team-based learning (TBL) methodology on dental students' retention of knowledge regarding removable partial denture (RPD) treatment. The process of learning RPD treatment requires that students first acquire foundational knowledge and then use critical thinking skills to apply that knowledge to a variety of clinical situations. The traditional approach to teaching, characterized by a reliance on lectures, is not the most effective method for learning clinical applications. To address the limitations of that approach, the teaching methodology of the RPD preclinical course at the University of Florida was changed to TBL, which has been shown to motivate student learning and improve clinical performance. A written examination was constructed to compare the impact of TBL with that of traditional teaching regarding students' retention of knowledge and their ability to evaluate, diagnose, and treatment plan a partially edentulous patient with an RPD prosthesis. Students taught using traditional and TBL methods took the same examination. The response rate (those who completed the examination) for the class of 2013 (traditional method) was 94% (79 students of 84); for the class of 2014 (TBL method), it was 95% (78 students of 82). The results showed that students who learned RPD with TBL scored higher on the examination than those who learned RPD with traditional methods. Compared to the students taught with the traditional method, the TBL students' proportion of passing grades was statistically significantly higher (p=0.002), and 23.7% more TBL students passed the examination. The mean score for the TBL class (0.758) compared to the conventional class (0.700) was statistically significant with a large effect size, also demonstrating the practical significance of the findings. The results of the study suggest that TBL methodology is a promising approach to teaching RPD with successful outcomes.

  16. Cycling the Hot CNO: A Teaching Methodology

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    Frost-Schenk, J. W.; Diget, C. Aa.; Bentley, M. A.; Tuff, A.

    2018-01-01

    An interactive activity to teach the hot Carbon, Nitrogen and Oxygen (HCNO) cycle is proposed. Justification for why the HCNO cycle is important is included via an example of x-ray bursts. The activity allows teaching and demonstration of half-life, nuclear isotopes, nuclear reactions, protons and a-particles, and catalytic processes. Whilst the…

  17. Teaching Traditions in Science Education in Switzerland, Sweden and France: A Comparative Analysis of Three Curricula

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    Marty, Laurence; Venturini, Patrice; Almqvist, Jonas

    2018-01-01

    Classroom actions rely, among other things, on teaching habits and traditions. Previous research has clarified three different teaching traditions in science education: the academic tradition builds on the idea that simply the products and methods of science are worth teaching; the applied tradition focuses on students' ability to use scientific…

  18. Cycling the hot CNO: a teaching methodology

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    Frost-Schenk, J. W.; Diget, C. Aa; Bentley, M. A.; Tuff, A.

    2018-03-01

    An interactive activity to teach the hot Carbon, Nitrogen and Oxygen (HCNO) cycle is proposed. Justification for why the HCNO cycle is important is included via an example of x-ray bursts. The activity allows teaching and demonstration of half-life, nuclear isotopes, nuclear reactions, protons and α-particles, and catalytic processes. Whilst the process example is specific to astrophysics it may be used to teach more broadly about catalytic processes. This practical is designed for use with 10-20 participants, with the intention that the exercise will convey nuclear physics principles in a fun and interactive manner.

  19. THE FUTURE OF LANGUAGE TEACHING METHODOLOGY

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    Ted Rodgers

    1998-01-01

    Abstract : This paper reviews the current state of ELT methodology, particulary in respect to a number of current views suggesting that the profession is now in a "post-methods" era in which previous attention to Methods (Total Physical Response, Silent Way, Natural Approach, etc.) has given way to a more generic approach to ELT methodology. Ten potential future courses of ELT methodology are outlines and three of these are considered in some detail. Particular consideration is given as to ho...

  20. The organization of successful education: Between traditional and modern teaching

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    Požar Hajnalka F.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of reforms by the educational system have conditioned the changes in working methods and the attitude towards students. Modern teaching in schools of the 21st century was marked by the terms of flexibility and innovation, which requires the introduction of a number of innovations. Contemporary concepts of teaching arose from the need to increase the efficiency of teaching and to provide an organizational scheme where students have more freedom of movement and more diverse models of individual work and creation. The aim of our work is the research of didactic prerequisites for improving the teaching of health care. The paper analyses the prospect of utilizing different forms of work from the aspect of successfulness of education, for the improvement of teaching, as well as to overcome the traditional way of teaching. Special emphasis is placed on collaborative work, in which students work together, in pairs or in small groups. The positive effects of collaborative learning are reflected in a much faster and more lasting acquisition of knowledge and thought activity. Furthermore, the independence of students is increased, while critical and creative thinking is developed, along with communication and social skills. It encourages students to exchange experiences and to practice collaborative problem solving; therefore, the goals of individual students connect with the common goals.

  1. MODERN OR TRADITIONAL TEACHING STRATEGY IN LEARNING ENGINEERING MATHEMATICS COURSE

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    N. RAZALI

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available First-year engineering students of the Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, UKM are in the process of transition in the way they learn mathematics from pre-university level to the undergraduate level. It is essential for good engineers to have the ability to unfold mathematical problems in an efficient way. Thus, this research is done to investigate students preference in learning KKKQ1123 Engineering Mathematics I (Vector Calculus (VC course; either individually or in a team; using modern (e-learning or traditional (cooperative-learning teaching strategy. Questionnaires are given to the first year Chemical and Process Engineering students from academic year 2015/2016 and the results were analysed. Based on the finding, the students believed that the physical educators or teachers play an important role and that they have slightest preference in the traditional teaching strategy to learn engineering mathematics course.

  2. Using functional analysis in archival appraisal a practical and effective alternative to traditional appraisal methodologies

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    Robyns, Marcus C

    2014-01-01

    In an age of scarcity and the challenge of electronic records, can archivists and records managers continue to rely upon traditional methodology essentially unchanged since the early 1950s? Using Functional Analysis in Archival Appraisal: A Practical and Effective Alternative to Traditional Appraisal Methodologies shows how archivists in other countries are already using functional analysis, which offers a better, more effective, and imminently more practical alternative to traditional appraisal methodologies that rely upon an analysis of the records themselves.

  3. Methodology in the study of teaching

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    Tomic, W.

    2008-01-01

    Looking at the field of educational psychology, one can observe that there is a variety of research programs applying quantitative as well as qualitative research approaches. Despite the predominant quantitative research tradition in educational psychology, it is important to remain open to research

  4. Methodological Approaches to Experimental Teaching of Mathematics to University Students

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    Nikolay I.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the article imparts authors’ thoughtson a new teaching methodology for mathematical education in universities. The aim of the study is to substantiate the efficiency of the comprehensive usage of mathematical electronic courses, computer tests, original textbooks and methodologies when teaching mathematics to future agrarian engineers. The authors consider this implementation a unified educational process. Materials and Methods: the synthesis of international and domestic pedagogical experience of teaching students in university and the following methods of empirical research were used: pedagogical experiment, pedagogical measurementsand experimental teaching of mathematics. The authors applied the methodology of revealing interdisciplinary links on the continuum of mathematical problems using the key examples and exercises. Results: the online course “Mathematics” was designed and developed on the platform of Learning Management System Moodle. The article presents the results of test assignments assessing students’ intellectual abilities and analysis of solutions of various types of mathematical problems by students. The pedagogical experiment substantiated the integrated selection of textbooks, online course and online tests using the methodology of determination of the key examples and exercises. Discussion and Conclusions: the analysis of the experimental work suggested that the new methodology is able to have positive effect on the learning process. The learning programme determined the problem points for each student. The findings of this study have a number of important implications for future educational practice.

  5. Computer Presentation Programs and Teaching Research Methodologies

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    Motamedi, Vahid

    2015-01-01

    Supplementing traditional chalk and board instruction with computer delivery has been viewed positively by students who have reported increased understanding and more interaction with the instructor when computer presentations are used in the classroom. Some problems contributing to student errors while taking class notes might be transcription of numbers to the board, and handwriting of the instructor can be resolved in careful construction of computer presentations. The use of computer pres...

  6. Nuevas metodologías docentes aplicadas al estudio de la fisiología y la anatomía: estudio comparativo con el método tradicional Novel methodologies applied to Physiology and Anatomy teaching: comparison with traditional teaching

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    B. Gal-Iglesias

    2009-06-01

    paradigm in Europe is a methodological challenge due to the curricular complexity and specific competencies profiles involved. Aims. To evaluate a mixed methodology in the Physiology and Anatomy teaching aimed to measure knowledge and competencies. We also propose an evaluation scale to score learning. Subjects and methods. Data were gathered from a control group (classical methodology: lectures which was compared with an experimental group (mixed methodology: problem-based learning (PBL, clinical cases, team working and lectures in the Podiatric School at the Universidad Europea de Madrid. Knowledge was measured with multiple choice exams and PBL, clinical cases and team working evaluation. Results. We show that the students gain knowledge and competences during the academic course using a new mixed methodology for teaching. In contrast to the control group, knowledge in the experimental group stabilizes over the academic course making individual differences between the students insignificant. This homogenization becomes evident as a lower variability of the average scores of the experimental group and gives support to the value of a mixed methodology for students with more difficulties. There is a strong linear regression between class attendance and exam scores, confirming the importance of face-to-face supervision for learning. Conclusions. A mixed methodology for Physiology and Anatomy teaching allows the students to acquire abilities and competencies, also helping to equilibrate individual differences during the learning process.

  7. EFL Teaching Methodological Practices in Cali

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    Chaves Orlando

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article we aim at showing partial results of a study about the profiles of English as a Foreign Language (EFL teachers in both public and private primary and secondary strata 1-4 schools in Cali, Colombia. Teachers’ methodological approaches and practices are described and analyzed from a sample of 220 teachers. Information was gathered from surveys, interviews and institutional documents. The quantitative information was processed with the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences and Excelwhile the qualitative information (from a survey and focal interviews was analyzed hermeneutically. An analysis grid was used for the examination of institutional documents (area planning, syllabi, and didactic materials. Teachers’ methodology (approaches/methods, lessons, activities, objectives, curricula, syllabi and evaluation are analyzed in the light of literature in the field. Finally, we discuss theimplications of methodological approaches.En este artículo se presentan los resultados parciales de una investigación sobre los perfiles de los profesores de inglés como lengua extranjera que enseñan en colegios de educación básica primaria y secundaria, públicos y privados, de estratos 1 a 4 en Cali, Colombia. Se describen y analizan sus enfoques y prácticas metodológicas a partir de una muestra de 220 docentes. Se obtuvo información cualitativa y cuantitativa por medio de encuestas, entrevistas y documentos institucionales. La información cuantitativa se procesó con el software Statistical Package for Social Sciences y Excel, mientras que la información cualitativa se analizó hermenéuticamente. Se usó una rejilla de análisispara el examen de los documentos institucionales (planes de área, programas, y materiales didácticos. La metodología (enfoques/métodos, clases, actividades, objetivos, currículo, programas y evaluación se analizan a partir de la literatura especializada en el campo. Finalmente, se

  8. Computer Presentation Programs and Teaching Research Methodologies

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    Vahid Motamedi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Supplementing traditional chalk and board instruction with computer delivery has been viewed positively by students who have reported increased understanding and more interaction with the instructor when computer presentations are used in the classroom. Some problems contributing to student errors while taking class notes might be transcription of numbers to the board, and handwriting of the instructor can be resolved in careful construction of computer presentations. The use of computer presentation programs promises to increase the effectiveness of learning by making content more readily available, by reducing the cost and effort of producing quality content, and by allowing content to be more easily shared. This paper describes how problems can be overcome by using presentation packages for instruction.

  9. Dental Students' Perceived Clinical Competence in Prosthodontics: Comparison of Traditional and Problem-Based Learning Methodologies.

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    Montero, Javier; Dib, Abraham; Guadilla, Yasmina; Flores, Javier; Santos, Juan Antonio; Aguilar, Rosa Anaya; Gómez-Polo, Cristina

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the perceived competence for treating prosthodontic patients of two samples of fourth-year dental students: those educated using traditional methodologies and those educated using problem-based learning (PBL). Two cohorts of fourth-year dental students at a dental school in Spain were surveyed: the traditional methods cohort (n=46) was comprised of all students in academic years 2012 and 2013, and the PBL cohort (n=57) was comprised of all students in academic years 2014 and 2015. Students in both cohorts reported the number of prosthodontic treatments they carried out per year and their perceived level of competence in performing such treatments. The results showed that the average number of treatments performed was similar for the two cohorts, except the number of metal-based removable partial dentures was significantly higher for students in the traditional (0.8±1.0) than the PBL (0.4±0.6) cohort. The level of perceived competence to treat complete denture patients for the combined cohorts was significantly higher (7.3±1.1) than that for partial acrylic dentures (6.7±1.5) and combined dentures (5.7±1.3). Students' clinical competence in prosthodontics mainly depended on number of treatments performed as the operator as well as the assistant. Students in the traditional methods cohort considered themselves to be significantly more competent at treating patients for removable partial and fixed prostheses (7.8±1.1 and 7.6±1.1, respectively) than did students in the PBL cohort (6.4±1.5 and 6.6±1.5, respectively). Overall, however, the study found that practical experiences were more important than the teaching method used to achieve students' perceived competence.

  10. Graduate students' teaching experiences improve their methodological research skills.

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    Feldon, David F; Peugh, James; Timmerman, Briana E; Maher, Michelle A; Hurst, Melissa; Strickland, Denise; Gilmore, Joanna A; Stiegelmeyer, Cindy

    2011-08-19

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) graduate students are often encouraged to maximize their engagement with supervised research and minimize teaching obligations. However, the process of teaching students engaged in inquiry provides practice in the application of important research skills. Using a performance rubric, we compared the quality of methodological skills demonstrated in written research proposals for two groups of early career graduate students (those with both teaching and research responsibilities and those with only research responsibilities) at the beginning and end of an academic year. After statistically controlling for preexisting differences between groups, students who both taught and conducted research demonstrate significantly greater improvement in their abilities to generate testable hypotheses and design valid experiments. These results indicate that teaching experience can contribute substantially to the improvement of essential research skills.

  11. Blended learning – integrating E-learning with traditional learning methods in teaching basic medical science

    OpenAIRE

    J.G. Bagi; N.K. Hashilkar

    2014-01-01

    Background: Blended learning includes an integration of face to face classroom learning with technology enhanced online material. It provides the convenience, speed and cost effectiveness of e-learning with the personal touch of traditional learning. Objective: The objective of the present study was to assess the effectiveness of a combination of e-learning module and traditional teaching (Blended learning) as compared to traditional teaching alone to teach acid base homeostasis to Phase I MB...

  12. Internet-based versus traditional teaching and learning methods.

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    Guarino, Salvatore; Leopardi, Eleonora; Sorrenti, Salvatore; De Antoni, Enrico; Catania, Antonio; Alagaratnam, Swethan

    2014-10-01

    The rapid and dramatic incursion of the Internet and social networks in everyday life has revolutionised the methods of exchanging data. Web 2.0 represents the evolution of the Internet as we know it. Internet users are no longer passive receivers, and actively participate in the delivery of information. Medical education cannot evade this process. Increasingly, students are using tablets and smartphones to instantly retrieve medical information on the web or are exchanging materials on their Facebook pages. Medical educators cannot ignore this continuing revolution, and therefore the traditional academic schedules and didactic schemes should be questioned. Analysing opinions collected from medical students regarding old and new teaching methods and tools has become mandatory, with a view towards renovating the process of medical education. A cross-sectional online survey was created with Google® docs and administrated to all students of our medical school. Students were asked to express their opinion on their favourite teaching methods, learning tools, Internet websites and Internet delivery devices. Data analysis was performed using spss. The online survey was completed by 368 students. Although textbooks remain a cornerstone for training, students also identified Internet websites, multimedia non-online material, such as the Encyclopaedia on CD-ROM, and other non-online computer resources as being useful. The Internet represented an important aid to support students' learning needs, but textbooks are still their resource of choice. Among the websites noted, Google and Wikipedia significantly surpassed the peer-reviewed medical databases, and access to the Internet was primarily through personal computers in preference to other Internet access devices, such as mobile phones and tablet computers. Increasingly, students are using tablets and smartphones to instantly retrieve medical information. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Mineralogy: a modern approach to teaching a traditional discipline

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    Cook, G. W.

    2011-12-01

    Mineralogy has traditionally been a primary component in undergraduate geoscience curriculum. In recent years, there has been a trend in which mineralogy and petrology have been combined into Earth Materials courses. This is unfortunate as these disciplines each have much to offer students, and content once considered essential is eliminated out of necessity. Mineralogy is still fundamental to students' understanding of the Earth and Earth processes. Using a modern approach to time-honored concepts, I teach a quarter-long Introductory Mineralogy class offered through the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego. Student evaluations of this course unequivocally indicate a high degree of learning and interest in the material, confirming that mineralogy continues to be a valuable class into the 21st century. While much of the content remains similar to what has been taught over the last century, my strategy involves a well-balanced approach to old and new. The first third of the course is background including the relevance of mineralogy, crystal chemistry, and crystallography; the second third of the course is systematic mineralogy using the Dana system; the last third of the course is devoted to understanding optical mineralogy, using modern analytical equipment such as XRD and SEM, and learning to use the petrographic microscope. Throughout the quarter, a strong emphasis is placed on the importance of hand-sample identification. Field work, traditionally not emphasized in mineralogy courses, has been re-introduced to the curriculum. I use modern technology to facilitate and support student learning. A lecture-based approach is employed with carefully crafted and organized PowerPoint presentations. PowerPoint lectures can be effective and highly engaging. The key is to ensure that the lectures are not overly reliant on text, instead relying on diagrams, charts, photos, and embedded media such as 3-D animations (ex. to teach

  14. The Teaching of African Traditional Religion in Primary Schools in Zimbabwe: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marashe, Joel; Ndamba, Gamuchirai Tsitsiozashe; Chireshe, Excellent

    2009-01-01

    Zimbabwe's Education Ministry recommended the teaching of African Traditional Religion in recognition of its multi-religious society. This study sought to establish the extent to which African Traditional Religion is taught in primary schools, the challenges faced by teachers, and opportunities for promoting its teaching. A descriptive survey…

  15. Motivating Change from Lecture-Tutorial Modes to Less Traditional Forms of Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Helen J.; Kenny, Paul L.

    2015-01-01

    Teaching academics are under pressure to move away from traditional lecture-tutorial teaching modes to less traditional forms. Such pressures are in addition to changes to funding arrangements and other developments that increasingly oblige universities to operate as businesses. The flow-on effects for teachers are increased student:staff ratios,…

  16. The comics as a methodological strategy for teaching History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisseth Estefanía Macas-Salinas

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The cartoon after a time of ostracism is occupying a prominent place in the pedagogical processes; however, in the Ecuadorian educational context, limitations are still observed. This study aims to update the knowledge on the inclusion of the story in the teaching-learning process of history and contribute through its disclosure to reverse this situation. The authors studied agree that the culture of the image that the current society experiences has favored its approach to the educational context, revaluing its educational potentials confirming the category of teaching medium; fulfills the functions: didactic, communicative and critical. Its use as a powerful didactic, methodological and pedagogical resource is justified in that historical ideas are easily associated with visual representations, the description and information is captured in the subconscious of the reader, which allows its subsequent analysis and learning.

  17. Teaching Climate Science in Non-traditional Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strybos, J.

    2015-12-01

    San Antonio College is the oldest, largest and centrally-located campus of Alamo Colleges, a network of five community colleges based around San Antonio, Texas with a headcount enrollment of approximately 20,000 students. The student population is diverse in ethnicity, age and income; and the Colleges understand that they play a salient role in educating its students on the foreseen impacts of climate change. This presentation will discuss the key investment Alamo Colleges has adopted to incorporate sustainability and climate science into non-traditional classrooms. The established courses that cover climate-related course material have historically had low enrollments. One of the most significant challenges is informing the student population of the value of this class both in their academic career and in their personal lives. By hosting these lessons in hands-on simulations and demonstrations that are accessible and understandable to students of any age, and pursuing any major, we have found an exciting way to teach all students about climate change and identify solutions. San Antonio College (SAC) hosts the Bill R. Sinkin Eco Centro Community Center, completed in early 2014, that serves as an environmental hub for Alamo Colleges' staff and students as well as the San Antonio community. The center actively engages staff and faculty during training days in sustainability by presenting information on Eco Centro, personal sustainability habits, and inviting faculty to bring their classes for a tour and sustainability primer for students. The Centro has hosted professors from diverse disciplines that include Architecture, Psychology, Engineering, Science, English, Fine Arts, and International Studies to bring their classes to center to learn about energy, water conservation, landscaping, and green building. Additionally, Eco Centro encourages and assists students with research projects, including a solar-hydroponic project currently under development with the support

  18. Nursing Students Perceptions about Traditional and Innovative Teaching Strategies– A Pilot Study

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    Sailaxmi Gandhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nursing education is undergoing tremendous changes with the changing needs of the rapidly changing society. A sound education system is the prerequisite for the development of any nation. Aim and Objectives: One way to enhance nursing education was to evaluate the learning perceptions of various teaching strategies in nursing education programs. The study was aimed to evaluate the student learning perception about traditional and modern teaching strategies among under graduate nursing students (N=44. Material and Methods: Post test only design was used to compare the learning perception of students about traditional and innovative teaching strategies (brain storming, concept mapping & problem based learning. One group was exposed to traditional teaching strategy and the other group was exposed to innovative teaching strategy about mental health assessment and therapeutic communication. Results: Findings indicated a statistically significant increase (p<0.006 in the learning perception among students exposed to innovative teaching strategies than those exposed to the lecture method at the end of 4 weeks. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that students perceive innovative teaching strategies in a better way compared to the traditional teaching method as it enhances their motivation for learning, learner control, and self - directed learning abilities. However further evaluation with larger sample size is needed before it can replace traditional teaching methods in nursing education.

  19. Evaluating Views of Lecturers on the Consistency of Teaching Content with Teaching Approach: Traditional versus Reform Calculus

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    Sevimli, Eyup

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the consistency of teaching content with teaching approaches in calculus on the basis of lecturers' views. In this sense, the structures of the examples given in two commonly used calculus textbooks, both in traditional and reform classrooms, are compared. The content analysis findings show that the examples in both…

  20. Methodology for teaching facial filling with hyaluronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira Ruiz, R; Laruccia, M M; Gerenutti, M

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows the importance of the methodization in teaching facial dermal filling on the training of physicians who intend to work or are already working in the area of facial aesthetics. The methodology is based on the procedures performed in Iz Clinic of Plastic Surgery from 2007 to 2010, where the results of the use of dermal filling products were observed. We chose the hyaluronic acid for the methodization of education. Even being a safe procedure, the dermal filling needs to be done by trained professionals because some complications may occur. The theoretical discussion of facial anatomy, physiology and classification of aging, rheological characteristics of products and application techniques underpin the practical part, in which the live demo or supervision of the procedure is performed. The idealization of classes, both theoretical and practical, proposed in this work proved to be of great value in teaching physicians. The success of this method can be seen from the results achieved by students and by observing the drop in reports of adverse effects. After learning the techniques of facial dermal filling with products based on hyaluronic acid, a doctor may perform this therapy with other fillers, with harmonious results.

  1. Web-based versus traditional lecture: are they equally effective as a flexible bronchoscopy teaching method?

    OpenAIRE

    Sterse Mata, Caio Augusto [UNIFESP; Ota, Luiz Hirotoshi [UNIFESP; Suzuki, Iunis [UNIFESP; Telles, Adriana [UNIFESP; Miotto, Andre [UNIFESP; Leao, Luiz Eduardo Villaca [UNIFESP

    2012-01-01

    This study compares the traditional live lecture to a web-based approach in the teaching of bronchoscopy and evaluates the positive and negative aspects of both methods. We developed a web-based bronchoscopy curriculum, which integrates texts, images and animations. It was applied to first-year interns, who were later administered a multiple-choice test. Another group of eight first-year interns received the traditional teaching method and the same test. the two groups were compared using the...

  2. Perspective for applying traditional and inovative teaching and learning methods to nurses continuing education

    OpenAIRE

    Bendinskaitė, Irmina

    2015-01-01

    Bendinskaitė I. Perspective for applying traditional and innovative teaching and learning methods to nurse’s continuing education, magister thesis / supervisor Assoc. Prof. O. Riklikienė; Departament of Nursing and Care, Faculty of Nursing, Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. – Kaunas, 2015, – p. 92 The purpose of this study was to investigate traditional and innovative teaching and learning methods perspective to nurse’s continuing education. Material and methods. In a period fro...

  3. Non-Traditional Students and Critical Pedagogy: Transformative Practice and the Teaching of Criminal Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menis, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the practical implication of adopting critical pedagogy, and more specifically critical legal pedagogy, in the teaching of non-traditional students in higher education context. It is based on the teaching of criminal law at Birkbeck School of Law, addressing learning tasks which have been designed to enhance students'…

  4. Developing Employability Skills in Information System Graduates: Traditional vs. Innovative Teaching Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmani, Mohamad; Hindi, Nitham M.; Weerakkody, Vishanth

    2018-01-01

    It is widely acknowledged that traditional teaching methods such as lectures, textbooks and case study techniques on their own are not adequate to improving the most in-demand employability skills for graduates. The aim of this article is to explore the potential impact that novel learning and teaching methods can have on improving the…

  5. Improving the Teaching of Microsoft Excel: Traditional Book versus Online Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Stoney; Taylor, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The authors explore the differences between traditional, book-based methods of teaching Excel and online, platform-supported methods by comparing teaching students in different locations, with and without online support. As Excel is a critical skill for business majors, the authors investigate which methods and locations provide the highest…

  6. Development of enterprise architecture management methodology for teaching purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry V. Kudryavtsev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterprise architecture is considered as a certain object of management, providing in business a general view of the enterprise and the mutual alignment of parts of this enterprise into a single whole, and as the discipline that arose based on this object. The architectural approach to the modeling and design of the enterprise originally arose in the field of information technology and was used to design information systems and technical infrastructure, as well as formalize business requirements. Since the early 2000’s enterprise architecture is increasingly used in organizational development and business transformation projects, especially if information technologies are involved. Enterprise architecture allows describing, analyzing and designing the company from the point of view of its structure, functioning and goal setting (motivation.In the context of this approach, the enterprise is viewed as a system of services, processes, goals and performance indicators, organizational units, information systems, data, technical facilities, etc. Enterprise architecture implements the idea of a systematic approach to managing and changing organizations in the digital economy where business is strongly dependent on information technologies.This increases the relevance of the suggested approach at the present time, when companies need to create and successfully implement a digital business strategy.Teaching enterprise architecture in higher educational institutions is a difficult task due to the interdisciplinary of this subject, its generalized nature and close connection with practical experience. In addition, modern enterprise architecture management methodologies are complex for students and contain many details that are relevant for individual situations.The paper proposes a simplified methodology for enterprise architecture management, which on the one hand will be comprehensible to students, and on the other hand, it will allow students to apply

  7. Andragogical Teaching Methods to Enhance Non-Traditional Student Classroom Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Pamela; Withey, Paul; Lawton, Deb; Aquino, Carlos Tasso

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to provide a reflection of current trends in higher education, identify some of the changes in student behavior, and potential identification of non-traditional classroom facilitation with the purpose of strengthening active learning and use of technology in the classroom. Non-traditional teaching is emerging in the form…

  8. Music and movement education as a form of motivation in teaching Greek traditional dances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likesas, G; Zachopoulou, E

    2006-04-01

    Research has shown that motivation for participating in physical education, particularly in traditional dances, has decreased dramatically. The aim of this research was to examine whether a music and movement program would increase pleasure and intrinsic motivation of students in elementary education while teaching them Greek traditional dances. 232 students were divided into two groups, a trained group of 135 participants (72 boys, 63 girls) and a control group of 97 (53 boys, 44 girls). The trained group was taught using the music and movement teaching model of traditional dances. The control group was taught using the instructional or guided teaching method of traditional Greek dances. To measure effectiveness of the two methods was accomplished by the completion of McAuley's Intrinsic Motivation Inventory. Analysis of scores showed use of music and movement education had a positive effect on intrinsic motivation for dancing and active participation of students, especially of the trained boys' group.

  9. Teaching College Microeconomics: Online vs. Traditional Classroom Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Cynthia; Bennett, Doris; Carter, Shawn

    2013-01-01

    The use of online course offerings in college has grown sharply in recent years. Previous research, while limited, is inconclusive in determining expected student performance in online versus a traditional lecture format. This paper focuses specifically on student performance in introductory microeconomics classes, analyzing learning differences…

  10. Undergraduate radiology education in private and public teaching hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan: teaching duties, methodologies, and rewards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeem, Naila; Khawaja, Ranish Deedar Ali; Beg, Madiha; Naeem, Muhammad; Majid, Zain

    2013-01-01

    Background In an integrated method of education, medical students are introduced to radiology in their preclinical years. However, no study has been conducted in Pakistan to demonstrate an academic framework of medical radiology education at an undergraduate level. Therefore, we aimed to document and compare the current level of teaching duties, teaching methodologies, and teaching rewards among radiologists and residents in private and public teaching hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan. Methods A survey was conducted among 121 radiologists and residents in two private and two public teaching hospitals in Karachi, Pakistan. Radiologists who were nationally registered with the Pakistan Medical and Dental Council either part-time or full-time were included. Radiology residents and fellows who were nationally registered with the Pakistan Medical and Dental Council were also included. Self-administered questionnaires addressing teaching duties, methods, and rewards were collected from 95 participants. Results The overall response rate was 78.51% (95/121). All of the radiologists were involved in teaching residents and medical students, but only 36% reported formal training in teaching skills. Although most of the respondents (76%) agreed that medical students appeared enthusiastic about learning radiology, the time spent on teaching medical students was less than five hours per week annually (82%). Only 37% of the respondents preferred dedicated clerkships over distributed clerkships (41%). The most common preferred teaching methodology overall was one-on-one interaction. Tutorials, teaching rounds, and problem-based learning sessions were less favored by radiologists than by residents. Teaching via radiology films (86%) was the most frequent mode of instruction. Salary (59%) was the most commonly cited teaching reward. The majority of respondents (88%) were not satisfied with their current level of teaching rewards. Conclusion All radiologists and residents working in an

  11. Puzzle based teaching versus traditional instruction in electrocardiogram interpretation for medical students--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Jack; Dhoble, Abhijeet; Ferenchick, Gary

    2009-01-13

    Most medical professionals are expected to possess basic electrocardiogram (EKG) interpretation skills. But, published data suggests that residents' and physicians' EKG interpretation skills are suboptimal. Learning styles differ among medical students; individualization of teaching methods has been shown to be viable and may result in improved learning. Puzzles have been shown to facilitate learning in a relaxed environment. The objective of this study was to assess efficacy of teaching puzzle in EKG interpretation skills among medical students. This is a reader blinded crossover trial. Third year medical students from College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University participated in this study. Two groups (n = 9) received two traditional EKG interpretation skills lectures followed by a standardized exam and two extra sessions with the teaching puzzle and a different exam. Two other groups (n = 6) received identical courses and exams with the puzzle session first followed by the traditional teaching. EKG interpretation scores on final test were used as main outcome measure. The average score after only traditional teaching was 4.07 +/- 2.08 while after only the puzzle session was 4.04 +/- 2.36 (p = 0.97). The average improvement after the traditional session was followed up with a puzzle session was 2.53 +/- 1.94 while the average improvement after the puzzle session was followed with the traditional session was 2.08 +/- 1.73 (p = 0.67). The final EKG exam score for this cohort (n = 15) was 84.1 compared to 86.6 (p = 0.22) for a comparable sample of medical students (n = 15) at a different campus. Teaching EKG interpretation with puzzles is comparable to traditional teaching and may be particularly useful for certain subgroups of students. Puzzle session are more interactive and relaxing, and warrant further investigations on larger scale.

  12. Puzzle based teaching versus traditional instruction in electrocardiogram interpretation for medical students – a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Jack; Dhoble, Abhijeet; Ferenchick, Gary

    2009-01-01

    Background Most medical professionals are expected to possess basic electrocardiogram (EKG) interpretation skills. But, published data suggests that residents' and physicians' EKG interpretation skills are suboptimal. Learning styles differ among medical students; individualization of teaching methods has been shown to be viable and may result in improved learning. Puzzles have been shown to facilitate learning in a relaxed environment. The objective of this study was to assess efficacy of teaching puzzle in EKG interpretation skills among medical students. Methods This is a reader blinded crossover trial. Third year medical students from College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University participated in this study. Two groups (n = 9) received two traditional EKG interpretation skills lectures followed by a standardized exam and two extra sessions with the teaching puzzle and a different exam. Two other groups (n = 6) received identical courses and exams with the puzzle session first followed by the traditional teaching. EKG interpretation scores on final test were used as main outcome measure. Results The average score after only traditional teaching was 4.07 ± 2.08 while after only the puzzle session was 4.04 ± 2.36 (p = 0.97). The average improvement after the traditional session was followed up with a puzzle session was 2.53 ± 1.94 while the average improvement after the puzzle session was followed with the traditional session was 2.08 ± 1.73 (p = 0.67). The final EKG exam score for this cohort (n = 15) was 84.1 compared to 86.6 (p = 0.22) for a comparable sample of medical students (n = 15) at a different campus. Conclusion Teaching EKG interpretation with puzzles is comparable to traditional teaching and may be particularly useful for certain subgroups of students. Puzzle session are more interactive and relaxing, and warrant further investigations on larger scale. PMID:19144134

  13. Puzzle based teaching versus traditional instruction in electrocardiogram interpretation for medical students – a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhoble Abhijeet

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most medical professionals are expected to possess basic electrocardiogram (EKG interpretation skills. But, published data suggests that residents' and physicians' EKG interpretation skills are suboptimal. Learning styles differ among medical students; individualization of teaching methods has been shown to be viable and may result in improved learning. Puzzles have been shown to facilitate learning in a relaxed environment. The objective of this study was to assess efficacy of teaching puzzle in EKG interpretation skills among medical students. Methods This is a reader blinded crossover trial. Third year medical students from College of Human Medicine, Michigan State University participated in this study. Two groups (n = 9 received two traditional EKG interpretation skills lectures followed by a standardized exam and two extra sessions with the teaching puzzle and a different exam. Two other groups (n = 6 received identical courses and exams with the puzzle session first followed by the traditional teaching. EKG interpretation scores on final test were used as main outcome measure. Results The average score after only traditional teaching was 4.07 ± 2.08 while after only the puzzle session was 4.04 ± 2.36 (p = 0.97. The average improvement after the traditional session was followed up with a puzzle session was 2.53 ± 1.94 while the average improvement after the puzzle session was followed with the traditional session was 2.08 ± 1.73 (p = 0.67. The final EKG exam score for this cohort (n = 15 was 84.1 compared to 86.6 (p = 0.22 for a comparable sample of medical students (n = 15 at a different campus. Conclusion Teaching EKG interpretation with puzzles is comparable to traditional teaching and may be particularly useful for certain subgroups of students. Puzzle session are more interactive and relaxing, and warrant further investigations on larger scale.

  14. A Case Study: Are Traditional Face-To-Face Lectures Still Relevant When Teaching Engineering Courses?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LillAnne Jackson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this rapidly changing age, with virtually all information available on the Internet including courses, students may not find any reason to physically attend the lectures. In spite of the many benefits the online lectures and materials bring to teaching, this drift from the traditional (norm face-to-face lectures is also creating further barriers, such as difficulty in communicating and building personal relationships, between students and instructor. In this paper we carry out a study that presents and analyzes factors that motivate students to attend a (1 face-to-face instruction in-class versus an (2 online class. This study is based on an anonymous and voluntary survey that was conducted in the School of Engineering at University of Victoria, BC, Canada. This paper presents and shares the detailed results and analysis of this survey that also includes some interesting and useful comments from the students. Based on the results, analysis and comments the paper suggests methodologies of how to improve face-to-face in-class instructions to make them more relevant to the current global information age.

  15. Comparison of traditional and interactive teaching methods in a UK emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Peter; Elliott, Tim; Ronald, Julie; Paterson, Brodie

    2009-12-01

    Didactic teaching remains a core component of undergraduate education, but developing computer assisted learning (CAL) packages may provide useful alternatives. We compared the effectiveness of interactive multimedia-based tutorials with traditional, lecture-based models for teaching arterial blood gas interpretation to fourth year medical students. Participants were randomized to complete a tutorial in either lecture or multimedia format containing identical content. Upon completion, students answered five multiple choice questions assessing post-tutorial knowledge, and provided feedback on their allocated learning method. Marks revealed no significant difference between either group. All lecture candidates rated their teaching as good, compared with 89% of the CAL group. All CAL users found multiple choice questions assessment useful, compared with 83% of lecture participants. Both groups highlighted the importance of interaction. CAL complements other teaching methods, but should be seen as an adjunct to, rather than a replacement for, traditional methods, thus offering students a blended learning environment.

  16. Performance and Perception in the Flipped Learning Model: An Initial Approach to Evaluate the Effectiveness of a New Teaching Methodology in a General Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Gómez, David; Jeong, Jin Su; Airado Rodríguez, Diego; Cañada-Cañada, Florentina

    2016-01-01

    "Flipped classroom" teaching methodology is a type of blended learning in which the traditional class setting is inverted. Lecture is shifted outside of class, while the classroom time is employed to solve problems or doing practical works through the discussion/peer collaboration of students and instructors. This relatively new…

  17. A RISK BASED METHODOLOGY TO ASSESS THE ENERGY EFFICIENCY IMPROVEMENTS IN TRADITIONALLY CONSTRUCTED BUILDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Herrera

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to achieve the CO2 reduction targets set by the Scottish government, it will be necessary to improve the energy efficiency of existing buildings. Within the total Scottish building stock, historic and traditionally constructed buildings are an important proportion, in the order of 19 % (Curtis, 2010, and represent cultural, emotional and identity values that should be protected. However, retrofit interventions could be a complex operation because of the several aspects that are involved in the hygrothermal performance of traditional buildings. Moreover, all these factors interact with each other and therefore need to be analysed as a whole. Upgrading the envelope of traditional buildings may produce severe changes to the moisture migration leading to superficial or interstitial condensation and thus fabric decay and mould growth. Retrofit projects carried out in the past have failed because of the misunderstanding, or the lack of expert prediction, of the potential consequences associated to the envelope's alteration. The evaluation of potential risks, prior to any alteration on building's physics in order to improve its energy efficiency, is critical to avoid future damage on the wall's performance or occupants' health and well being. The aim of this PhD research project is to point out the most critical aspects related to the energy efficiency improvement of traditional buildings and to develop a risk based methodology that helps owners and practitioners during the decision making process.

  18. Teaching Guatemalan traditional birth attendants about obstetrical emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Kimberly; Dowling, Donna; Mettler, Gretchen

    2018-06-01

    Guatemala's Maternal Mortality Rate is 65th highest in the world at 120 deaths per 100,000 births. Contributing to the problem is traditional birth attendants (TBAs) attend most births yet lack knowledge about obstetrical emergencies. Government trainings in existence since 1955 have not changed TBA knowledge. Government trainings are culturally insensitive because they are taught in Spanish with written material, even though most TBAs are illiterate and speak Mayan dialects. The purpose of the observational study was to evaluate the effect of an oral training, that was designed to be culturally sensitive in TBAs' native language, on TBAs' knowledge of obstetrical emergencies. one hundred ninety-one TBAs participated. The study employed a pretest-posttest design. A checklist was used to compare TBAs' knowledge of obstetrical emergencies before and after the training. the mean pretest score was 5.006±SD 0.291 compared to the mean posttest score of 8.549±SD 0.201. Change in knowledge was a P value of 0.00. results suggest an oral training that was designed to be culturally sensitive in the native language improved TBAs' knowledge of obstetrical emergencies. Future trainings should follow a similar format to meet the needs of illiterate audiences in remote settings. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Non-traditional approaches to teaching GPS online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, A.; Wolf, D. F., II

    2009-12-01

    Students are increasingly turning to the web for quality education that fits into their lives. Nonetheless, online learning brings challenges as well as a fresh opportunity for exploring pedagogical practices not present on traditional higher education programs, particularly in the sciences. A team of two dozen Empire State College-State University of New York instructional designers, faculty, and other staff are working on making science relevant to non-majors who may initially have anxiety about general education science courses. One of these courses, GPS and the New Geography, focuses on how Global Positioning System (GPS) technology provides a base for inquiry and scientific discovery from a range of environmental issues with local, regional, and global scope. GPS and the New Geography is an introductory level course developed under a grant supported by the Charitable Leadership Foundation. Taking advantage of the proliferation of tools currently available for online learning management systems, we explore current trends in Web 2.0 applications to aggregate and leverage data to create a nontraditional, interactive learning environment. Using our best practices to promote on-line discussion and interaction, these tools help engage students and foster deep learning. During the 15-week term students learn through case studies, problem-based exercises, and the use of scientific data; thus, expanding their spatial literacy and gain experience using real spatial technology tools to enhance their understanding of real-world issues. In particular, we present how the use of Mapblogs an in-house developed blogging platform that uses GIS interplaying with GPS units, interactive data presentations, intuitive visual working environments, harnessing RSS feeds, and other nontraditional Web 2.0 technology has successfully promoted active learning in the virtual learning environment.

  20. New methodological perspectives in pedagogical approach to teaching and learning processes in school education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Pérez Piña

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available For years, the methodology has been worked from a focus on teaching styles and pedagogy situations approach, which was a breakthrough, but the needs of individualization were drifting towards new methodological perspectives and teaching, being cooperative games, the willing environments, or communication processes (López, 2012, who were showing a new way to understand the methodology and teaching styles in Education, and it was not to focus on a way to understand these issues from the point of view of the teacher, but how attending to the cognitive and learning processes of students, we could better optimize our intervention.Actually, we have analyzed the latest publications in the last three years, around methodology and teaching styles, using various databases. The results of this search have been quite limited, which may make us think that they have not really relevant changes in the design of such education.

  1. A Blended Model: Simultaneously Teaching a Quantitative Course Traditionally, Online, and Remotely

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightner, Constance A.; Lightner-Laws, Carin A.

    2016-01-01

    As universities seek to bolster enrollment through distance education, faculty are tasked with maintaining comparable teaching/learning standards in traditional, blended, and online courses. Research has shown that there is an achievement gap between students taking courses exclusively offered online versus those enrolled in face-to-face classes.…

  2. Integrating Emerging Technologies in Teaching Ugandan Traditional Dances in K-12 Schools in New York City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabingo, Alfdaniels

    2015-01-01

    Schools in New York City have made attempts to embrace and support the strand of "making connections", which is laid out in the New York City Department of Dance blueprint for teaching and learning in dance for grades PreK-12. Accordingly, some schools have integrated Ugandan traditional dances into the dance curriculum, and dance…

  3. Valuing Cultural Context and Style: Strategies for Teaching Traditional Jazz Dance from the Inside Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Karen W.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents an approach to teaching that acknowledges the history and style of authentic jazz dance; also known as traditional jazz dance. Described for students on the first class-day as "...your great-grandparents' jazz..." the course is an introduction to the stylistic characteristics of an indigenous U.S. form evolved primarily from…

  4. A New Comparison of Active Learning Strategies to Traditional Lectures for Teaching College Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoPresto, Michael C.; Slater, Timothy F.

    2016-01-01

    Although traditional lectures are still the dominant form of undergraduate instruction, there have been relatively few studies comparing various learner-centered and active learning teaching strategies to one another in order to guide professors in making informed instructional decisions. To study the impact of different active learning…

  5. "The Next Level": Investigating Teaching and Learning within an Irish Traditional Music Online Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Ailbhe

    2013-01-01

    Online music communities offer a new context and culture for musical participation globally. This article, employing a socio-cultural theoretical lens, examines how the Online Academy of Irish Music (OAIM) functions as a teaching and learning online community for Irish traditional music. Findings from qualitative case study research present…

  6. A METHODOLOGY TO EVALUATE THE TRANSFORMATION OF TRADITIONAL BALINESE HOUSES AS A CONSEQUENCE OF TOURISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Dewa Gede Agung Diasana Putra

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Some traditional houses in Bali have been transformed for tourist facilities. As a cultural phenomenon, the transformation involves an interrelated complexity of aspects in the houses. There is a need for a holistic approach to contextualize the complexity of the impact of tourism on the transformation. Unfortunately, an instrument to identify the textures of the transformation, as a fundamental phase to explore the complexity, is not yet available. The objective of this study is to develop an inclusive methodology based on criteria as the fundamental stage in the multiple holistic method developed. Using visual documentations of 749 traditional houses from four villages, the findings show that the transformation has been considered in various ways, both as the additive sum of the specific changes, and as a hierarchy of cultural traditions and activities. It was a process generally found to begin at the front part of the houses, followed by the backyard and pavilions, and in the final phase at the family temple. This method was able to systematically assess the physical configuration of the transformed house.

  7. The Integration of Project-Based Methodology into Teaching in Machine Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madkour, Magda

    2016-01-01

    This quantitative-qualitative analytical research aimed at investigating the effect of integrating project-based teaching methodology into teaching machine translation on students' performance. Data was collected from the graduate students in the College of Languages and Translation, at Imam Muhammad Ibn Saud Islamic University, Riyadh, Saudi…

  8. Adopting Just-in-Time Teaching in the Context of an Elementary Science Education Methodology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmond, Pamela; Goodnough, Karen

    2011-01-01

    In this self-study, Pamela, a new science teacher educator, adopted Just-in-Time Teaching (JiTT) in the context of an elementary science education methodology course. JiTT is a teaching and learning strategy involving interaction between web-based study assignments and face-to-face class sessions. Students respond electronically to web-based…

  9. A Collaboration-Mediated Exploration of Nonnative L2 Teachers' Cognition of Language Teaching Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajeddin, Zia; Aryaeian, Nafeeseh

    2017-01-01

    The present study sought to investigate nonnative L2 teachers' cognition of teaching methodology based on their collaborative talks. Participants were 12 nonnative EFL teachers categorized into three collaborative discussion groups by their teaching experience. Collaborative discussions were aimed at exploring the participants' cognition of…

  10. Teaching Research Methodology Using a Project-Based Three Course Sequence Critical Reflections on Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braguglia, Kay H.; Jackson, Kanata A.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a reflective analysis of teaching research methodology through a three course sequence using a project-based approach. The authors reflect critically on their experiences in teaching research methods courses in an undergraduate business management program. The introduction of a range of specific techniques including student…

  11. Teaching and Learning Methodologies Supported by ICT Applied in Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capacho, Jose

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to show a set of new methodologies applied in the teaching of Computer Science using ICT. The methodologies are framed in the conceptual basis of the following sciences: Psychology, Education and Computer Science. The theoretical framework of the research is supported by Behavioral Theory, Gestalt Theory.…

  12. Postgraduate Conception of Research Methodology: Implications for Learning and Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Ben; Kumar, Vijay; Omar, Noritah

    2018-01-01

    This qualitative inquiry investigates postgraduate students' conceptions of research methodology and how it contributes to their learning. It explores factors likely to motivate student choice of research methodology and challenges in understanding research methods. The research was carried out at research-intensive universities in New Zealand and…

  13. New design methods for computer aided architecturald design methodology teaching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achten, H.H.

    2003-01-01

    Architects and architectural students are exploring new ways of design using Computer Aided Architectural Design software. This exploration is seldom backed up from a design methodological viewpoint. In this paper, a design methodological framework for reflection on innovate design processes by

  14. Gender preference between traditional and PowerPoint methods of teaching gross anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuhu, Saleh; Adamu, Lawan Hassan; Buba, Mohammed Alhaji; Garba, Sani Hyedima; Dalori, Babagana Mohammed; Yusuf, Ashiru Hassan

    2018-01-01

    Teaching and learning process is increasingly metamorphosing from the traditional chalk and talk to the modern dynamism in the information and communication technology. Medical education is no exception to this dynamism more especially in the teaching of gross anatomy, which serves as one of the bases of understanding the human structure. This study was conducted to determine the gender preference of preclinical medical students on the use of traditional (chalk and talk) and PowerPoint presentation in the teaching of gross anatomy. This was cross-sectional and prospective study, which was conducted among preclinical medical students in the University of Maiduguri, Nigeria. Using simple random techniques, a questionnaire was circulated among 280 medical students, where 247 students filled the questionnaire appropriately. The data obtained was analyzed using SPSS version 20 (IBM Corporation, Armonk, NY, USA) to find the method preferred by the students among other things. Majority of the preclinical medical students in the University of Maiduguri preferred PowerPoint method in the teaching of gross anatomy over the conventional methods. The Cronbach alpha value of 0.76 was obtained which is an acceptable level of internal consistency. A statistically significant association was found between gender and preferred method of lecture delivery on the clarity of lecture content where females prefer the conventional method of lecture delivery whereas males prefer the PowerPoint method, On the reproducibility of text and diagram, females prefer PowerPoint method of teaching gross anatomy while males prefer the conventional method of teaching gross anatomy. There are gender preferences with regard to clarity of lecture contents and reproducibility of text and diagram. It was also revealed from this study that majority of the preclinical medical students in the University of Maiduguri prefer PowerPoint presentation over the traditional chalk and talk method in most of the

  15. “Dinamic and fluid edges” between the inovation and the traditionalism of the Portuguese teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilúcia dos Santos Domingos Striquer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article, guided by the theoretical-methodological framework of the Sociodiscursive Interacionism, has as its goal to introduce the experience report of a teacher who, for more than twenty years, has taught inside classrooms and activated didactic motions directed to the normative grammar teaching derived from traditionalist conceptions. But, aiming to put into practice the official orientations (PCNS and State Guidelines, the teacher focused on transforming her language conceptions and language teaching, which as a consequence promoted modifications on her gestures and, mainly, on the creation of innovative didactic motions.

  16. The teacher-disciple tradition and secret teaching in Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solos, Ioannis; Liang, Yuan; Yue, Guang-xin

    2014-01-01

    The ancient teacher-disciple tradition is regarded as one of the most celebrated practices within the Chinese medicine world. Such traditions of secrecy, private wisdom and honor are deeply rooted in the theories of Confucianism. This paper only explores the surface of this ancient culture, by investigating relevant popular ancient texts and common Chinese proverbs, as well as utilizing personal experiences, in order to reflect on how the ancient Chinese perceived such practices within their own society and how secret teaching was passed on from teacher to student, including the revelation of secret formulas and their importance and how that tradition differs from our modern-day perspectives. Various rare manuscripts from the author's personal library are employed in order to provide relative examples of the importance of secret knowledge, and how these secrets applied in the traditional healing.

  17. Tradition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otto, Ton

    2016-01-01

    : beliefs, practices, institutions, and also things. In this sense, the meaning of the term in social research is very close to its usage in common language and is not always theoretically well developed (see Shils, 1971: 123). But the concept of tradition has also been central to major theoretical debates...... on the nature of social change, especially in connection with the notion of modernity. Here tradition is linked to various forms of agency as a factor of both stability and intentional change....

  18. Methodological Potential of Computer Experiment in Teaching Mathematics at University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kequan; Sokolova, Anna Nikolaevna; Vlasova, Vera K.

    2017-01-01

    The study is relevant due to the opportunity of increasing efficiency of teaching mathematics at university through integration of students of computer experiment conducted with the use of IT in this process. The problem of there search is defined by a contradiction between great potential opportunities of mathematics experiment for motivating and…

  19. Teaching and learning methodologies in engineering education in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The students' outcome in terms of quality of graduates as regard teaching and learning determines whether the existing methods should be reviewed or not. In the recent world ranking of Universities, only University of Ibadan came among the first hundred despite the number of Universities in Nigeria. This calls for general ...

  20. teaching and learning methodologies in engineering education in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal

    ENGINEERING EDUCATION IN NIGERIAN UNIVERSITIES. OGRI J. USHIE AND JULIE C. OGBULEZIE. (Received 20 February 2017; Revision Accepted 17 May 2016). ABSTRACT. The students' outcome in terms of quality of graduates as regard teaching and learning determines whether the existing methods should be ...

  1. Aspects of Teaching and Learning Science: What students' diaries reveal about inquiry and traditional modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawalkar, Aisha; Vijapurkar, Jyotsna

    2015-09-01

    We present an analysis of students' reflective writing (diaries) of two cohorts of Grade 8 students, one undergoing inquiry and the other traditional science teaching. Students' writing included a summary of what students had learned in class on that day and their opinions and feelings about the class. The entries were analysed qualitatively and quantitatively. This analysis of students' first-person accounts of their learning experience and their notes taken during class was useful in two ways. First, it brought out a spectrum of differences in outcomes of these two teaching modes-conceptual, affective and epistemic. Second, this analysis brought out the significance and meaning of the learning experience for students in their own words, thus adding another dimension to researchers' characterisation of the two teaching methods.

  2. A constructivist approach for teaching research methodology in construction management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartmann, Andreas; Doree, Andries G.; Martin, Ludwig

    2010-01-01

    Construction Management (CM) is an acknowledged field of expertise and profession that requires students to research real world problems. To prepare the students for this task, many CM programs contain a Research Methodology (RM) course. However, after taking part in these courses, many students

  3. TEACHING AND LEARNING METHODOLOGIES SUPPORTED BY ICT APPLIED IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose CAPACHO

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to show a set of new methodologies applied in the teaching of Computer Science using ICT. The methodologies are framed in the conceptual basis of the following sciences: Psychology, Education and Computer Science. The theoretical framework of the research is supported by Behavioral Theory, Gestalt Theory. Genetic-Cognitive Psychology Theory and Dialectics Psychology. Based on the theoretical framework the following methodologies were developed: Game Theory, Constructivist Approach, Personalized Teaching, Problem Solving, Cooperative Collaborative learning, Learning projects using ICT. These methodologies were applied to the teaching learning process during the Algorithms and Complexity – A&C course, which belongs to the area of ​​Computer Science. The course develops the concepts of Computers, Complexity and Intractability, Recurrence Equations, Divide and Conquer, Greedy Algorithms, Dynamic Programming, Shortest Path Problem and Graph Theory. The main value of the research is the theoretical support of the methodologies and their application supported by ICT using learning objects. The course aforementioned was built on the Blackboard platform evaluating the operation of methodologies. The results of the evaluation are presented for each of them, showing the learning outcomes achieved by students, which verifies that methodologies are functional.

  4. Understanding Notional Machines through Traditional Teaching with Conceptual Contraposition and Program Memory Tracing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeisson Hidalgo-Céspedes

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A correct understanding about how computers run code is mandatory in order to effectively learn to program. Lectures have historically been used in programming courses to teach how computers execute code, and students are assessed through traditional evaluation methods, such as exams. Constructivism learning theory objects to students’ passiveness during lessons, and traditional quantitative methods for evaluating a complex cognitive process such as understanding. Constructivism proposes complimentary techniques, such as conceptual contraposition and colloquies. We enriched lectures of a “Programming II” (CS2 course combining conceptual contraposition with program memory tracing, then we evaluated students’ understanding of programming concepts through colloquies. Results revealed that these techniques applied to the lecture are insufficient to help students develop satisfactory mental models of the C++ notional machine, and colloquies behaved as the most comprehensive traditional evaluations conducted in the course.

  5. Relationship between EFL In-service Teachers’ Language Learning Strategies and their Beliefs toward Teaching Methodologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Farmanlu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available By the advent of new theories and approaches toward language teaching, a lot of attention has been paid to the role of those approaches on language learners. Superiority of psychology and linguistics in the area of language teaching urged scholars to develop new theories and techniques through a defined procedure. Most of the time the role of teacher’s experience as learner has been neglected. The present study was an attempt to investigate the relationship between EFL In-service teachers’ language learning strategies and their beliefs toward teaching methodologies. To find the relationship, a questionnaire was applied. The questionnaire in the study consists of three measures: (1 the individual background; (2 strategy inventory for language learning (Version 7.0 for ESL/EFL, Oxford, 1990; and, (3 beliefs toward English teaching methodologies (Chen, 2005. It was given to 252 in-service English teachers (136 female, 116 male majoring in TEFL. To analyze the quantitative data of the present study, descriptive as well as inferential analysis including ANOVA and Pearson’s correlations were used to investigate the relationships between language learning strategies and teaching beliefs toward EFL methodologies. Based on the teachers’ answers to the questionnaire, there was a meaningful relationship between language learning strategies and teacher’s methodology. The information provided in the present research can be helpful for teachers, policy holders of institutes and material developers. This study has also some implications for the researchers interested in teacher’s education studies.

  6. Teaching-learning: stereoscopic 3D versus Traditional methods in Mexico City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza Oropeza, Laura; Ortiz Sánchez, Ricardo; Ojeda Villagómez, Raúl

    2015-01-01

    In the UNAM Faculty of Odontology, we use a stereoscopic 3D teaching method that has grown more common in the last year, which makes it important to know whether students can learn better with this strategy. The objective of the study is to know, if the 4th year students of the bachelor's degree in dentistry learn more effectively with the use of stereoscopic 3D than the traditional method in Orthodontics. first, we selected the course topics, to be used for both methods; the traditional method using projection of slides and for the stereoscopic third dimension, with the use of videos in digital stereo projection (seen through "passive" polarized 3D glasses). The main topic was supernumerary teeth, including and diverted from their guide eruption. Afterwards we performed an exam on students, containing 24 items, validated by expert judgment in Orthodontics teaching. The results of the data were compared between the two educational methods for determined effectiveness using the model before and after measurement with the statistical package SPSS 20 version. The results presented for the 9 groups of undergraduates in dentistry, were collected with a total of 218 students for 3D and traditional methods, we found in a traditional method a mean 4.91, SD 1.4752 in the pretest and X=6.96, SD 1.26622, St Error 0.12318 for the posttest. The 3D method had a mean 5.21, SD 1.996779 St Error 0.193036 for the pretest X= 7.82, SD =0.963963, St Error 0.09319 posttest; the analysis of Variance between groups F= 5.60 Prob > 0.0000 and Bartlett's test for equal variances 21.0640 Prob > chi2 = 0.007. These results show that the student's learning in 3D means a significant improvement as compared to the traditional teaching method and having a strong association between the two methods. The findings suggest that the stereoscopic 3D method lead to improved student learning compared to traditional teaching.

  7. Teaching methodology for modeling reference evapotranspiration with artificial neural networks

    OpenAIRE

    Martí, Pau; Pulido Calvo, Inmaculada; Gutiérrez Estrada, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    [EN] Artificial neural networks are a robust alternative to conventional models for estimating different targets in irrigation engineering, among others, reference evapotranspiration, a key variable for estimating crop water requirements. This paper presents a didactic methodology for introducing students in the application of artificial neural networks for reference evapotranspiration estimation using MatLab c . Apart from learning a specific application of this software wi...

  8. The Effectiveness of Traditional and 21st Century Teaching Tools on Students' Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellflower, Julie V.

    Any student seeking a high school diploma from the public school system in one U.S. state must pass the state's high school graduation test. In 2009, only 88% of students at one high school in the state met the basic proficiency requirements on the science portion of the test. Because improved science education has been identified as an explicit national goal, the purpose of this mixed methods study was to determine whether traditional teaching tools (notes, lecture, and textbook) or 21st century teaching tools (online tutorials, video games, YouTube, and virtual labs) lead to greater gains in students' science learning. Bruner's constructivist and Bandura's social cognitive theories served as the foundations for the study. Quantitative research questions were used to investigate the relationship between the type of teaching tools used and student learning gains. Quantitative data from students' pre and posttests were collected and analyzed using a dependent samples t-test. Qualitative data were collected through a focus group interview and participant journals. Analysis of the qualitative data included coding the data and writing a descriptive narrative to convey the findings. Results showed no statistically significant differences in students' science achievement: both types of teaching tools led to student learning gains. As a result, an action plan was developed to assist science educators in the implementation of traditional and 21st century teaching tools that can be used to improve students' science learning. Implications for positive social change included providing science educators with a specific plan of action that will enhance students' science learning, thereby increasing science scores on the state and other high stakes tests.

  9. Linking the Organizational Forms Teachers and Teaching Methods in a Class Instructional Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Nápoles-Quiñones

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A descriptive study was conducted to show the link between the organizational forms teachers and teaching methods, to expose the pedagogical theory, to deepen the teaching-learning process through methodological class. The main content of the work of teachers is the preparation and level rise; which requires the selection and use of working methods, ways and procedures in accordance with the real and objective conditions of staff who have received the action and conducive to teaching work. Teachers should be aware that you need to master the content they teach, be aware of the level of development of its students, the specific characteristics of the group and of each student, and competent to reciprocate the content they teach with reality.

  10. Impact of Faculty Development Workshops in Student-Centered Teaching Methodologies on Faculty Members' Teaching and Their Students' Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricio, Jorge A; Montt, Juan E; Ormeño, Andrea P; Del Real, Alberto J; Naranjo, Claudia A

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess, after one year, the impact of faculty development in teaching and learning skills focused on a learner-centered approach on faculty members' perceptions of and approaches to teaching and on their students' learning experiences and approaches. Before training (2014), all 176 faculty members at a dental school in Chile were invited to complete the Approaches to Teaching Inventory (ATI) to assess their teaching approaches (student- vs. teacher-focused). In 2015, all 496 students were invited to complete the Study Process Questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F) to assess their learning approaches (deep or surface) and the Course Experience Questionnaire (CEQ) to measure their teaching quality perceptions. Subsequently, faculty development workshops on student-centered teaching methodologies were delivered, followed by peer observation. In March 2016, all 176 faculty members and 491 students were invited to complete a second ATI (faculty) and R-SPQ-2 and CEQ (students). Before (2014) and after (2016) the training, 114 (65%) and 116 (66%) faculty members completed the ATI, respectively, and 89 (49%) of the then-181 faculty members completed the perceptions of skills development questionnaire in September 2016. In 2015, 373 students (75%) completed the R-SPQ-2F and CEQ; 412 (83%) completed both questionnaires in 2016. In 2014, the faculty results showed that student-focused teaching was significantly higher in preclinical and clinical courses than in the basic sciences. In 2016, teacher-focused teaching fell significantly; basic science teaching improved the most. Students in both the 2015 and 2016 cohorts had lower mean scores for deep learning approaches from year 1 on, while they increased their scores for surface learning. The students' perceptions of faculty members' good teaching, appropriate assessment, clear goals, and e-learning improved significantly, but perception of appropriate workload did not. Teaching and learning skills development

  11. Metrics and Methodologies for Measuring Teaching Quality in Higher Education: Developing the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    The creation of the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) represents a significant development concerning the teaching mission of the university in the UK. This paper considers the background to, and the development of, the TEF. It explains the context from which the TEF emerged and unpacks a series of rationales which illustrate the need for, and…

  12. Teaching methodology for the utilization of cinema in the teaching of medical microbiology and infectious diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María José Fresnadillo Martínez

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Cinema, since it’s beginning, has been and is a social thermometer of the first magnitude reflecting the inequities of the population, among them are infectious diseases.  The caudal of images, sounds, and feelings that appear in the field support a very valid teaching resource, capable of complementing the classic teaching method and adapting the dynamic art of teaching to the actual educational tendencies.  If the definition of objectives and the teaching design are obligatory stages that should always be realized with rigor, in a method like this, because of its characteristics and youth, the control should be more exhaustive –before, during and after its execution- to avoid the “trivialization” to gain the maximum teaching efficiency that depends no as much on the material utilized (and its fundamental selection of films to accompany every unit taught like the use that is made of it.

  13. Comparison the Students Satisfaction of Traditional and Integrated Teaching Method in Physiology Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshavarzi Z.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Different education methods play crucial roles to improve education quality and students’ satisfaction. In the recent years, medical education highly changes through new education methods. The aim of this study was to compare medical students’ satisfaction in traditional and integrated methods of teaching physiology course. Instrument and Methods: In the descriptive analysis study, fifty 4th semester medical students of Bojnourd University of Medical Sciences were studied in 2015. The subjects were randomly selected based on availability. Data was collected by two researcher-made questionnaires; their validity and reliability were confirmed. Questionnaure 1 was completed by the students after presenting renal and endocrinology topics via traditional and integrated methods. Questionnaire 2 was only completed by the students after presenting the course via integrated method. Data was analyzed by SPSS 16 software using dependent T test. Findings: Mean score of the students’ satisfaction in traditional method (24.80±3.48 was higher than integrated method (22.30±4.03; p<0.0001. In the integrated method, most of the students were agreed and completely agreed on telling stories from daily life (76%, sitting mode in the classroom (48%, an attribution of cell roles to the students (60%, showing movies and animations (76%, using models (84%, and using real animal parts (72% during teaching, as well as expressing clinical items to enhance learning motivations (76%. Conclusion: Favorable satisfaction of the students in traditional lecture method to understand the issues, as well as their acceptance of new and active methods of learning, show effectiveness and efficiency of traditional method and the requirement of its enhancement by the integrated methods. 

  14. Usefulness of an Internet-based thematic learning network: comparison of effectiveness with traditional teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coma Del Corral, María Jesús; Guevara, José Cordero; Luquin, Pedro Abáigar; Peña, Horacio J; Mateos Otero, Juan José

    2006-03-01

    UniNet is an Internet-based thematic network for a virtual community of users (VCU). It supports one multidisciplinary community of doctoral students, who receive most of the courses on the network. The evident advantages of distance learning by Internet, in terms of costs, comfort, etc., require a previous evaluation of the system, focusing on the learning outcomes of the student. The aim was to evaluate the real learning of the students of doctorate courses, by comparing the effectiveness of distance learning in UniNet with traditional classroom-based teaching. Five doctorate courses were taught simultaneously to two independent groups of students in two ways: one, through the UniNet Network, and the other in a traditional classroom. The academic knowledge of students was evaluated at the beginning and end of each course. The difference in score was considered as a knowledge increase. The comparison was made using Student's t-test for independent groups. There were no significant statistical differences in the outcomes of the two groups of students. This suggests that both teaching systems were equivalent in increasing the knowledge of the students. Both educational methods, the traditional system and the online system in a thematic network, are effective and similar for increasing knowledge.

  15. Web-based versus traditional lecture: are they equally effective as a flexible bronchoscopy teaching method?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Caio Augusto Sterse; Ota, Luiz Hirotoshi; Suzuki, Iunis; Telles, Adriana; Miotto, Andre; Leão, Luiz Eduardo Vilaça

    2012-01-01

    This study compares the traditional live lecture to a web-based approach in the teaching of bronchoscopy and evaluates the positive and negative aspects of both methods. We developed a web-based bronchoscopy curriculum, which integrates texts, images and animations. It was applied to first-year interns, who were later administered a multiple-choice test. Another group of eight first-year interns received the traditional teaching method and the same test. The two groups were compared using the Student's t-test. The mean scores (± SD) of students who used the website were 14.63 ± 1.41 (range 13-17). The test scores of the other group had the same range, with a mean score of 14.75 ± 1. The Student's t-test showed no difference between the test results. The common positive point noted was the presence of multimedia content. The web group cited as positive the ability to review the pages, and the other one the role of the teacher. Web-based bronchoscopy education showed results similar to the traditional live lecture in effectiveness.

  16. Measuring the Differences between Traditional Learning and Game-Based Learning Using Electroencephalography (EEG) Physiologically Based Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Huei

    2017-01-01

    Students' cognitive states can reflect a learning experience that results in engagement in an activity. In this study, we used electroencephalography (EEG) physiologically based methodology to evaluate students' levels of attention and relaxation, as well as their learning performance within a traditional and game-based learning context. While no…

  17. Teaching personal initiative beats traditional training in boosting small business in West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Francisco; Frese, Michael; Goldstein, Markus; Iacovone, Leonardo; Johnson, Hillary C; McKenzie, David; Mensmann, Mona

    2017-09-22

    Standard business training programs aim to boost the incomes of the millions of self-employed business owners in developing countries by teaching basic financial and marketing practices, yet the impacts of such programs are mixed. We tested whether a psychology-based personal initiative training approach, which teaches a proactive mindset and focuses on entrepreneurial behaviors, could have more success. A randomized controlled trial in Togo assigned microenterprise owners to a control group ( n = 500), a leading business training program ( n = 500), or a personal initiative training program ( n = 500). Four follow-up surveys tracked outcomes for firms over 2 years and showed that personal initiative training increased firm profits by 30%, compared with a statistically insignificant 11% for traditional training. The training is cost-effective, paying for itself within 1 year. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  18. Methodology for teaching technical pattern of lying, sport shooting. Mistakes often.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaydel Avila Gómez

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The next album we set out a summary of the key technical elements for a good development of the prone position, bearing in mind that sometimes violate some methodological steps for teaching the same in athletes who play sports Shooting sports Rifle mode, which creates bad habits in the teaching of the position are difficult to eradicate later. We proceeded to perform the following steps. Criteria for experts to determine methodological steps to be taken into account in the teaching of technical pattern prone position; query bibliographic elements of the sport, the explanation of the basic technical elements; survey a group of coaches in the form of Rifle for the determination of the most common mistakes in the process of teaching the technical pattern of the prone position. It came to the conclusion that teaching the correct technical pattern that position must be taken into account methodological steps which do not allow making any error that would create a dynamic stereotype wrong in athletes who subsequently would be difficult to resolve.

  19. Family History as Media and Methodological Inspiration for History Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KAMIL ŠTĚPÁNEK

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The text of the contribution is inspired by relationships and issues arising from communication among parents, children, grandparents and grandchildren. It ensues from such terms as generation crisis, cohesion, cultivation of common values or family topics. It deals with family history captured in a family amateur movie, which is an appropriate media of alternative school and out-of-school pupils' activities.Within its framework the pupils can become aware of their own roots and evolution of their family histories, or how their histories were influenced by „the great history”. The presentation methodology of the summary of these pupils' explorations of private family materials used in history lessons forms an inseparable part.

  20. Development of a Teaching Methodology for Undergraduate Human Development in Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Maria A.; Espinoza, José M.

    2015-01-01

    The development of a teaching methodology for the undergraduate Psychology course Human Development II in a private university in Lima, Peru is described. The theoretical framework consisted of an integration of Citizen Science and Service Learning, with the application of Information and Communications Technology (ICT), specifically Wikipedia and…

  1. ACTIVE METHODOLOGY AS A TEACHING AND PREPAREDNESS TOOL IN THE TECHNICAL COURSE OF LOGISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana ferreira de Vales

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available With the change of the profile of the student, the educational institutions are following new forms for teaching-learning; and within this scenario the Active Methodologies have a great role to provide students with autonomy. The article aims to present the use of Active Methodologies as a teaching and learning tool in the logistics technical course, using the methods Flipped Classroom and Problem-Based Learning (PBL, with the aim of showing the effectiveness of both methods in technical education. For the elaboration of this article the methods used were: bibliographic research and direct observation. The implementation of the Active Methodologies makes the students more interested in the course, besides being an excellent pedagogical resource and an additional motivation for the students.

  2. Digital and traditional slides for teaching cellular morphology: a comparative analysis of learning outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solberg, Brooke L

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in technology have brought forth an intriguing new tool for teaching hematopoietic cellular identification skills: the digital slide. Although digitized slides offer a number of appealing options for educators, little research has been done to examine how their utilization would impact learning outcomes. To fill that void, this study was designed to examine student performance, skill retention and transferability, and self-efficacy beliefs amongst undergraduate MLS students learning cellular morphology with digital versus traditional slides. Results showed that students learning with digital slides performed better on assessments containing only traditional slide specimens than students learning with traditional slides, both immediately following the learning activity and after a considerable duration of time. Students learning with digital slides also reported slightly higher levels of self-efficacy related to cellular identification. The findings of this study suggest that students learning cellular identification skills with digital slides are able to transfer that skill directly to traditional slides, and that their ability to identify cells is not negatively affected in present or future settings.

  3. Stereoscopic Three-Dimensional Neuroanatomy Lectures Enhance Neurosurgical Training: Prospective Comparison with Traditional Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Anna D; Guilfoyle, Mathew R; Candy, Nicholas G; Budohoski, Karol P; Hofmann, Riikka; Barone, Damiano G; Santarius, Thomas; Kirollos, Ramez W; Trivedi, Rikin A

    2017-12-01

    Stereoscopic three-dimensional (3D) imaging is increasingly used in the teaching of neuroanatomy and although this is mainly aimed at undergraduate medical students, it has enormous potential for enhancing the training of neurosurgeons. This study aims to assess whether 3D lecturing is an effective method of enhancing the knowledge and confidence of neurosurgeons and how it compares with traditional two-dimensional (2D) lecturing and cadaveric training. Three separate teaching sessions for neurosurgical trainees were organized: 1) 2D course (2D lecture + cadaveric session), 2) 3D lecture alone, and 3) 3D course (3D lecture + cadaveric session). Before and after each session, delegates were asked to complete questionnaires containing questions relating to surgical experience, anatomic knowledge, confidence in performing procedures, and perceived value of 3D, 2D, and cadaveric teaching. Although both 2D and 3D lectures and courses were similarly effective at improving self-rated knowledge and understanding, the 3D lecture and course were associated with significantly greater gains in confidence reported by the delegates for performing a subfrontal approach and sylvian fissure dissection. Stereoscopic 3D lectures provide neurosurgical trainees with greater confidence for performing standard operative approaches and enhances the benefit of subsequent practical experience in developing technical skills in cadaveric dissection. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Issues in Learning About and Teaching Qualitative Research Methods and Methodology in the Social Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franz Breuer

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available For many qualitative researchers in the social sciences, learning about and teaching qualitative research methods and methodology raises a number of questions. This topic was the focus of a symposium held during the Second Berlin Summer School for Qualitative Research Methods in July 2006. In this contribution, some of the issues discussed during the symposium are taken up and extended, and some basic dimensions underlying these issues are summarized. How qualitative research methods and methodology are taught is closely linked to the ways in which qualitative researchers in the social sciences conceptualize themselves and their discipline. In the following, we distinguish between a paradigmatic and a pragmatic view. From a pragmatic point of view, qualitative research methods are considered research strategies or techniques and can be taught in the sense of recipes with specific steps to be carried out. According to a paradigmatic point of view (strongly inspired by constructivism, qualitative research methods and methodology are conceptualized as a craft to be practiced together by a "master" and an "apprentice." Moreover, the teaching of qualitative research methods also depends heavily on the institutional standing of qualitative compared to quantitative research method. Based on these considerations, five basic dimensions of learning about and teaching qualitative research methods are suggested: ways of teaching (ranging from the presentation of textbook knowledge to cognitive apprenticeship and instructors' experience with these; institutional contexts, including their development and the teaching of qualitative research methods in other than university contexts; the "fit" between personality and method, including relevant personal skills and talents; and, as a special type of instructional context that increasingly has gained importance, distance learning and its implications for learning about and teaching qualitative research methods

  5. An alternative methodology for planning computer class where teaching means are used

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria del Carmen Carrillo Hernández

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Teaching subject of Informatics II, is provided in the fourth year of teaching career Informática- Labor Education, one of the objectives of it is to develop skills in students that allow plan and structure independently, original and creative, Computer class, where the use of computer media education is the guiding element from which students acquire knowledge. Professional practice have been identified limitations in this regard, with the aim of contributing to the development of these skills, the authors of this article propose an alternative methodology that will guide teachers of this subject, to lead the process learning learning so that the goals are met the program guides.

  6. Case based learning and traditional teaching strategies: where lies the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bano, N.; Arshad, F.; Khan, S.; Safdar, C.A.

    2015-01-01

    To explore the perceptions of final year medical students about efficacy of traditional teaching methods and Case based learning (CBL) and to evaluate the effect of CBL on students' performance and satisfaction level during their clinical rotation in Obstetrics and Gynaecology Department. Study Design: Sequential mixed method study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Holy Family Hospital, Rawalpindi from January 2013 to June 2013. Participants and Methods: Students expressed their perceptions on a Likert scale in a questionnaire. It was triangulated with data collected from 4 focus group discussions (FGD). Students for FGD were selected using purposive sampling. Students' performance in OSPE and long case was compared with another group who was taught with traditional methods. Quantitative data was analyzed by SPSS version 17. For qualitative data, themes and patterns were identified using content analysis technique. Results: Of 141 students, 134 returned completed forms giving a response rate of 95%.Gender distribution was similar in both the groups. There was no statistically significant difference in performance assessment. Strong preference for CBL was expressed by 97% as it improved their confidence (83%), clinical and presentation skills (91 and 80%), attitude and student teacher relationship (68 and 77%), strengthened link between theory and practice (90%), and integrated basic and clinical knowledge (92%). Seventy six percent stated that all teaching should be CBL. Qualitative data from SGD strongly supported these views. Conclusion: Although test performance was similar in both the groups, students expressed strong preference for CBL as compared to traditional methods. (author)

  7. Traditional Wooden Architecture and Landscape in Karelia. Methodological considerations for the analysis and census

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    Sandro Parinello

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The survey work on the Karelian landscape and traditional architecture, embedded within the European research project entitled "Wooden Architecture. Karelian Timber Traditional Architecture and Landscape", is intended to enable understanding of how Karelian culture and history have led, over time, unique urban landscapes. The context of transformation, in which they were involved in both the behavioral habits of local populations both traditional architectural ones, which are mixed with models and with the administrative Soviet structures, were analyzed in this scientific field in order to not compromise the conservation and enhancement of the historic, architectural and landscape of this country.

  8. Computer Class Role Playing Games, an innovative teaching methodology based on STEM and ICT: first experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraffi, S.

    2016-12-01

    Context/PurposeWe experienced a new teaching and learning technology: a Computer Class Role Playing Game (RPG) to perform educational activity in classrooms through an interactive game. This approach is new, there are some experiences on educational games, but mainly individual and not class-based. Gaming all together in a class, with a single scope for the whole class, it enhances peer collaboration, cooperative problem solving and friendship. MethodsTo perform the research we experimented the games in several classes of different degrees, acquiring specific questionnaire by teachers and pupils. Results Experimental results were outstanding: RPG, our interactive activity, exceed by 50% the overall satisfaction compared to traditional lessons or Power Point supported teaching. InterpretationThe appreciation of RPG was in agreement with the class level outcome identified by the teacher after the experimentation. Our work experience get excellent feedbacks by teachers, in terms of efficacy of this new teaching methodology and of achieved results. Using new methodology more close to the student point of view improves the innovation and creative capacities of learners, and it support the new role of teacher as learners' "coach". ConclusionThis paper presents the first experimental results on the application of this new technology based on a Computer game which project on a wall in the class an adventure lived by the students. The plots of the actual adventures are designed for deeper learning of Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics (STEM) and Social Sciences & Humanities (SSH). The participation of the pupils it's based on the interaction with the game by the use of their own tablets or smartphones. The game is based on a mixed reality learning environment, giving the students the feel "to be IN the adventure".

  9. Performance and Perception in the Flipped Learning Model: An Initial Approach to Evaluate the Effectiveness of a New Teaching Methodology in a General Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Gómez, David; Jeong, Jin Su; Airado Rodríguez, Diego; Cañada-Cañada, Florentina

    2016-06-01

    "Flipped classroom" teaching methodology is a type of blended learning in which the traditional class setting is inverted. Lecture is shifted outside of class, while the classroom time is employed to solve problems or doing practical works through the discussion/peer collaboration of students and instructors. This relatively new instructional methodology claims that flipping your classroom engages more effectively students with the learning process, achieving better teaching results. Thus, this research aimed to evaluate the effects of the flipped classroom on the students' performance and perception of this new methodology. This study was conducted in a general science course, sophomore of the Primary Education bachelor degree in the Training Teaching School of the University of Extremadura (Spain) during the course 2014/2015. In order to assess the suitability of the proposed methodology, the class was divided in two groups. For the first group, a traditional methodology was followed, and it was used as control. On the other hand, the "flipped classroom" methodology was used in the second group, where the students were given diverse materials, such as video lessons and reading materials, before the class to be revised at home by them. Online questionnaires were as well provided to assess the progress of the students before the class. Finally, the results were compared in terms of students' achievements and a post-task survey was also conducted to know the students' perceptions. A statistically significant difference was found on all assessments with the flipped class students performing higher on average. In addition, most students had a favorable perception about the flipped classroom noting the ability to pause, rewind and review lectures, as well as increased individualized learning and increased teacher availability.

  10. Epithelial cell proliferative activity of Barrett's esophagus : methodology and correlation with traditional cancer risk markers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, FTM; Ganesh, S; Kuipers, EJ; De Jager-Krikken, A; Karrenbeld, A; Harms, Geert; Sluiter, WJ; Koudstaal, J; Klinkenberg-Knol, EC; Lamers, CBHW; Kleibeuker, JH

    Barrett's esophagus (BE) is a premalignant condition, due to chronic gastroesophageal reflux. Effective antireflux therapy may diminish cancer risk. To evaluate this option an intermediate marker is needed. We developed a methodology for measurement of epithelial cell proliferative activity of

  11. Methodology for the development of teaching vocational guidance from physics classes in high school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamila García-Carrión

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pre-university education has as one of its aims to achieve the polytechnic and vocational training of students, which is why it is necessary, vocational guidance thereof, to professions requiring the country, giving priority to teaching, hence this, which is a priority in the education system. The scientific research problem is expressed in the shortcomings revealed in the conception and development of the process of teaching vocational career orientation Physics, from the classes of this subject in high school. As an object the process of learning of physics in high school is required. the development of a methodology for the development of professional orientation of physics teaching career, from the classes of this subject in high school, based on an educational model that theoretically systematize the research and pre-professional approaches are proposed.

  12. Teaching methodology of the diagnosing process on the example of the fire alarm system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paś Jacek

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a method of teaching the process of diagnosing the technical and functional condition of the fire alarm system (SSP. The fire alarm system’s laboratory model is a representation of a real fire alarm system. The lecturer has the opportunity to inflict several different independent damage. The aim of the laboratory exercise is to familiarize students with the methodology and structure of the fire alarm system diagnosing process.

  13. The development of a neuroscience-based methodology for the nuclear energy learning/teaching process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barabas, Roberta de C.; Sabundjian, Gaiane

    2015-01-01

    When compared to other energy sources such as fossil fuels, coal, oil, and gas, nuclear energy has perhaps the lowest impact on the environment. Moreover, nuclear energy has also benefited other fields such as medicine, pharmaceutical industry, and agriculture, among others. However, despite all benefits that result from the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, the theme is still addressed with prejudice. Education may be the starting point for public acceptance of nuclear energy as it provides pedagogical approaches, learning environments, and human resources, which are essential conditions for effective learning. So far nuclear energy educational researches have been conducted using only conventional assessment methods. The global educational scenario has demonstrated absence of neuroscience-based methods for the teaching of nuclear energy, and that may be an opportunity for developing new strategic teaching methods that will help demystifying the theme consequently improving public acceptance of this type of energy. This work aims to present the first step of a methodology in progress based on researches in neuroscience to be applied to Brazilian science teachers in order to contribute to an effective teaching/learning process. This research will use the Implicit Association Test (IAT) to verify implicit attitudes of science teachers concerning nuclear energy. Results will provide data for the next steps of the research. The literature has not reported a similar neuroscience-based methodology applied to the nuclear energy learning/teaching process; therefore, this has demonstrated to be an innovating methodology. The development of the methodology is in progress and the results will be presented in future works. (author)

  14. The development of a neuroscience-based methodology for the nuclear energy learning/teaching process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barabas, Roberta de C.; Sabundjian, Gaiane, E-mail: robertabarabas@usp.br, E-mail: gdjian@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    When compared to other energy sources such as fossil fuels, coal, oil, and gas, nuclear energy has perhaps the lowest impact on the environment. Moreover, nuclear energy has also benefited other fields such as medicine, pharmaceutical industry, and agriculture, among others. However, despite all benefits that result from the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, the theme is still addressed with prejudice. Education may be the starting point for public acceptance of nuclear energy as it provides pedagogical approaches, learning environments, and human resources, which are essential conditions for effective learning. So far nuclear energy educational researches have been conducted using only conventional assessment methods. The global educational scenario has demonstrated absence of neuroscience-based methods for the teaching of nuclear energy, and that may be an opportunity for developing new strategic teaching methods that will help demystifying the theme consequently improving public acceptance of this type of energy. This work aims to present the first step of a methodology in progress based on researches in neuroscience to be applied to Brazilian science teachers in order to contribute to an effective teaching/learning process. This research will use the Implicit Association Test (IAT) to verify implicit attitudes of science teachers concerning nuclear energy. Results will provide data for the next steps of the research. The literature has not reported a similar neuroscience-based methodology applied to the nuclear energy learning/teaching process; therefore, this has demonstrated to be an innovating methodology. The development of the methodology is in progress and the results will be presented in future works. (author)

  15. Teaching Research in the Traditional Classroom: Why Make Graduate Students Wait?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Lincoln D.

    2016-05-01

    Physics graduate programs tend to divide the degree into two parts: (1) theory, taught in classes, almost totally divorced from the lab setting; and (2) research, taught in a research group through hands-on lab experience and mentorship. As we come to understand from undergraduate physics education research that modifying our teaching can rather easily produce quantifiably better results, it is reasonable to ask if we can make similar improvements at the graduate level. In this talk I will present the results of beginning research instruction in the classroom in the very first semester of graduate school, in the most traditional of classes - classical mechanics. In this approach, students build their knowledge from hands-on projects. They get immediately certified and experienced in the machine shop and electronics lab. There are no formal lectures. Students develop and present their own problems, and teach and challenge each other in the classroom. In contrast to polished lectures, both the instructor and the students together learn from their many public mistakes. Students give conference-style presentations instead of exams. As a result, students not only excel in analytical skills, but they also learn to tie theory to measurement, identify statistical and systematic errors, simulate computationally and model theoretically, and design their own experiments. Funded by NSF.

  16. Comparison of Quantitative and Qualitative Research Traditions: Epistemological, Theoretical, and Methodological Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Kaya

    2013-01-01

    There has been much discussion about quantitative and qualitative approaches to research in different disciplines. In the behavioural and social sciences, these two paradigms are compared to reveal their relative strengths and weaknesses. But the debate about both traditions has commonly taken place in academic books. It is hard to find an article…

  17. Diverse and participative learning methodologies: a remedial teaching intervention for low marks dental students in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcota, Marcela; Muñoz, Andrea; González, Fermín E

    2011-10-01

    The purpose of this educational intervention was to diagnose the learning style of a group of low marks (i.e., grades) dental students in Chile and improve their academic achievement by means of remedial teaching. The intervention group was composed of ten students in endodontics and eleven in pedodontics with low marks. These two groups were mutually exclusive. The Kolb test of learning styles was applied to the low mark students group and to the rest of the class (n=72). Diverse methodologies were applied to the low marks students, such as seminars, case-based learning and problem-based learning, directed study, plenary discussions and debate, integration and questions, and web-based learning in an effort to cover all learning styles. Students' perceptions of the educational intervention were assessed by means of a questionnaire. The learning styles of the low marks group were mainly divergent (52.4 percent) and convergent (19 percent). Accommodators and assimilators were 14.3 percent each. The rest of the class showed a very distinct frequencies distribution: divergent 18 percent, convergent 20 percent, accommodators 28 percent, and assimilators 34 percent. After the educational intervention, the mean of the scores obtained by the intervention group in formal evaluations was higher than the average scores obtained before the intervention for both courses. Students' perceptions of the activities were that they were effective for their learning process (76 percent) and that the teaching methodologies were useful mainly to clarify concepts and contents from both courses (82 percent). We can conclude that the use of diverse and participative teaching methodologies in a remedial teaching intervention, to cover all the different learning styles of the students, contributes to improve their marks in formal evaluations.

  18. Traditional Japanese Kampo Medicine: Clinical Research between Modernity and Traditional Medicine—The State of Research and Methodological Suggestions for the Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Watanabe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Japanese traditional herbal medicine, Kampo, has gradually reemerged and 148 different formulations (mainly herbal extracts can be prescribed within the national health insurance system. The objective of this article is to introduce Kampo and to present information from previous clinical studies that tested Kampo formulae. In addition, suggestions on the design of future research will be stated. The literature search was based on a summary, up until January 2009, by the Japanese Society of Oriental Medicine and included only those trials which were also available in either Pubmed or ICHUSHI (Japan Medical Abstracts Society. We included 135 studies, half of these studies (n=68 used a standard control and 28 a placebo control. Thirty-seven trials were published in English [all randomized controlled trials (RCTs] and the remaining articles were in Japanese only. The sample size for most studies was small (two-third of the studies included less than 100 patients and the overall methodological quality appeared to be low. None of the studies used Kampo diagnosis as the basis for the treatment. In order to evaluate Kampo as a whole treatment system, certain aspects should be taken into account while designing studies. RCTs are the appropriate study design to test efficacy or effectiveness; however, within the trial the treatment could be individualized according to the Kampo diagnosis. Kampo is a complex and individualized treatment with a long tradition, and it would be appropriate for further research on Kampo medicine to take this into account.

  19. Learning and innovation: a methodological proposal from the teaching of Media Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Peinado-Miguel

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available After its adaptation to the EHEA, the Department of Journalism IV of the Complutense University of Madrid began a project of methodological renovation and educational innovation –linked to an R&D project– in the teaching of Media Management, with the aim of providing future communication professionals with the skills required by the new business reality. The project was developed in different stages and was structured along the following lines of action: use of ICTs and Web 2.0 tools to develop activities that put new energy into the learning process: podcasts, interviews with executive directors and managers, entrepreneurial projects 2.0, intensive use of the Virtual Campus and blogs. In addition the teaching innovation project involved collaborative work to resolve real cases, with the implementation of the Educlick system’s software and hardware. This article presents the foundations and results of the new learning methodology model, which could be extrapolated to the teaching of other subjects of journalism

  20. SPECIFICS OF ELABORATING METHODOLOGY TO TEACH INNOVATIVE COMPETENCE USING EMBEDDABLE MODULE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai I. Naumkin

    2016-12-01

    structure, the core part, invariable and variable parts. The article reveals the potential of such integration in training students in innovative engineering activities within the core teaching methodology.

  1. [Methodological study on digitalization of tongue image in traditional Chinese medical diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yue; Yang, Jie; Shen, Li

    2004-12-01

    This is a research aimed at proposing a computerized tongue analysis method based on computerized image processing for quantizing the tongue properties in traditional Chinese medical diagnosis. The chromatic algorithm and 2-D Gabor wavelet transformation are applied to segmenting tongue from original image. The statistical method is adopted in identifying the colors of each pixel, which are attributed to the tongue substance and coating respectively. Thickness of tongue coating is determined by energy of 2-D Gabor wavelet coefficients (GWTE). The distribution of GWTE and invariant moment algorithm are used to judge the tongue texture. The experiment result shows that all methods proposed in this paper are effective.

  2. Optimal methodologies for terahertz time-domain spectroscopic analysis of traditional pigments in powder form

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Taewoo; Lee, Howon; Sim, Kyung Ik; Kim, Jonghyeon; Jo, Young Chan; Kim, Jae Hoon; Baek, Na Yeon; Kang, Dai-ill; Lee, Han Hyoung

    2017-05-01

    We have established optimal methods for terahertz time-domain spectroscopic analysis of highly absorbing pigments in powder form based on our investigation of representative traditional Chinese pigments, such as azurite [blue-based color pigment], Chinese vermilion [red-based color pigment], and arsenic yellow [yellow-based color pigment]. To accurately extract the optical constants in the terahertz region of 0.1 - 3 THz, we carried out transmission measurements in such a way that intense absorption peaks did not completely suppress the transmission level. This required preparation of pellet samples with optimized thicknesses and material densities. In some cases, mixing the pigments with polyethylene powder was required to minimize absorption due to certain peak features. The resulting distortion-free terahertz spectra of the investigated set of pigment species exhibited well-defined unique spectral fingerprints. Our study will be useful to future efforts to establish non-destructive analysis methods of traditional pigments, to construct their spectral databases, and to apply these tools to restoration of cultural heritage materials.

  3. The Validation of an Interactive Videodisc as an Alternative to Traditional Teaching Techniques: Auscultation of the Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branck, Charles E.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    This study of 87 veterinary medical students at Auburn University tests the effectiveness and student acceptance of interactive videodisc as an alternative to animal experimentation and other traditional teaching methods in analyzing canine cardiovascular sounds. Results of the questionnaire used are presented, and benefits of interactive video…

  4. Multidisciplinary teaching in swimming: methodological reflection and proposal of check list

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Canossa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study proposes a new multidisciplinary approach related to teaching in swimming. Swimming is an interdisciplinary physical activity, which can be truly important at the level of the motor learning and experimentation in aquatic activities. In the present manuscript, it was compared the present reality of teaching in Swimming with a new perspective, this one with a multidisciplinary scope. Following the referred analysis, it was presented a discussion about the orientation and adequacy of the contents of the Swimming curriculum for children and youngsters, which are populations with specific characteristics and development necessities. In this sense, after stating the relevance of a multidisciplinary perspective, it was proposed a new approach for basic aquatic motor skills acquisition based on four disciplines: swimming, water polo, synchronised swimming and platform diving. This was made taking into account the initial stage of swimming teaching, i.e., aquatic readiness. This proposal aims mainly at implementing the teaching of Swimming at a multidisciplinary point of view that, in our opinion, is urgent, namely due to the small expression that the aquatic modalities traditionally considered as swimming satellites (water polo, synchronised swimming and platform diving have in the Portuguese sports context.

  5. Priorities of Dialogic Speech Teaching Methodology at Higher Non-Linguistic School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vida Asanavičienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with a number of relevant methodological issues. First of all, the author analyses psychological peculiarities of dialogic speech and states that the dialogue is the product of at least two persons. Therefore, in this view, dialogic speech, unlike monologic speech, happens impromptu and is not prepared in advance. Dialogic speech is mainly of situational character. The linguistic nature of dialogic speech, in the author’s opinion, lies in the process of exchanging replications, which are coherent in structural and functional character. The author classifies dialogue groups by the number of replications and communicative parameters. The basic goal of dialogic speech teaching is developing the abilities and skills which enable to exchange replications. The author distinguishes two basic stages of dialogic speech teaching: 1. Training of abilities to exchange replications during communicative exercises. 2. Development of skills by training the capability to perform exercises of creative nature during a group dialogue, conversation or debate.

  6. Teaching Theory of Science and Research Methodology to Nursing Students: A Practice-Developing Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sievert, Anne; Chaiklin, Seth

    , in a principled way, to select subject-matter content for a course for nursing students on theory of science and research methodology. At the same time, the practical organisation of the project was motivated by a practice-developing research perspective. The purpose of the presentation is to illustrate how...... the idea of practice-developing research was realised in this concrete project. A short introduction is first given to explain the practical situation that motivated the need and interest to select subject matter for teaching. Then, the main part of the presentation explains the considerations involved...... developed. On the basis of this presentation, it should be possible to get a concrete image of one form for practice-developing research. The presentation concludes with a discussion that problematises the sense in which general knowledge about development of nursing school teaching practice has been...

  7. Teaching medical students a clinical approach to altered mental status: simulation enhances traditional curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy D. Sperling

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Simulation-based medical education (SBME is increasingly being utilized for teaching clinical skills in undergraduate medical education. Studies have evaluated the impact of adding SBME to third- and fourth-year curriculum; however, very little research has assessed its efficacy for teaching clinical skills in pre-clerkship coursework. To measure the impact of a simulation exercise during a pre-clinical curriculum, a simulation session was added to a pre-clerkship course at our medical school where the clinical approach to altered mental status (AMS is traditionally taught using a lecture and an interactive case-based session in a small group format. The objective was to measure simulation's impact on students’ knowledge acquisition, comfort, and perceived competence with regards to the AMS patient. Methods: AMS simulation exercises were added to the lecture and small group case sessions in June 2010 and 2011. Simulation sessions consisted of two clinical cases using a high-fidelity full-body simulator followed by a faculty debriefing after each case. Student participation in a simulation session was voluntary. Students who did and did not participate in a simulation session completed a post-test to assess knowledge and a survey to understand comfort and perceived competence in their approach to AMS. Results: A total of 154 students completed the post-test and survey and 65 (42% attended a simulation session. Post-test scores were higher in students who attended a simulation session compared to those who did not (p<0.001. Students who participated in a simulation session were more comfortable in their overall approach to treating AMS patients (p=0.05. They were also more likely to state that they could articulate a differential diagnosis (p=0.03, know what initial diagnostic tests are needed (p=0.01, and understand what interventions are useful in the first few minutes (p=0.003. Students who participated in a simulation session

  8. Students' Perceptions of Teaching in Context-based and Traditional Chemistry Classrooms: Comparing content, learning activities, and interpersonal perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overman, Michelle; Vermunt, Jan D.; Meijer, Paulien C.; Bulte, Astrid M. W.; Brekelmans, Mieke

    2014-07-01

    Context-based curriculum reforms in chemistry education are thought to bring greater diversity to the ways in which chemistry teachers organize their teaching. First and foremost, students are expected to perceive this diversity. However, empirical research on how students perceive their teacher's teaching in context-based chemistry classrooms, and whether this teaching differs from traditional chemistry lessons, is scarce. This study aims to develop our understanding of what teaching looks like, according to students, in context-based chemistry classrooms compared with traditional chemistry classrooms. As such, it might also provide a better understanding of whether teachers implement and attain the intentions of curriculum developers. To study teacher behaviour we used three theoretical perspectives deemed to be important for student learning: a content perspective, a learning activities perspective, and an interpersonal perspective. Data were collected from 480 students in 24 secondary chemistry classes in the Netherlands. Our findings suggest that, according to the students, the changes in teaching in context-based chemistry classrooms imply a lessening of the emphasis on fundamental chemistry and the use of a teacher-centred approach, compared with traditional chemistry classrooms. However, teachers in context-based chemistry classrooms seem not to display more 'context-based' teaching behaviour, such as emphasizing the relation between chemistry, technology, and society and using a student-centred approach. Furthermore, students in context-based chemistry classrooms perceive their teachers as having less interpersonal control and showing less affiliation than teachers in traditional chemistry classrooms. Our findings should be interpreted in the context of former and daily experiences of both teachers and students. As only chemistry is reformed in the schools in which context-based chemistry is implemented, it is challenging for both students and teachers to

  9. An examination of the perceived teaching competencies of novice alternatively licensed and traditionally licensed high school science teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Kathleen A.

    In most states, there are two routes to teacher licensure; traditional and alternative. The alternative route provides an accelerated entry into the classroom, often without the individual engaging in education coursework or a practicum. No matter the route, teaching skills continue to be learned by novice teachers while in the classroom with the guidance of a school-based mentor. In this study, the perceptions of mentor teachers of traditionally and alternatively licensed high school science teachers were compared with respect to mentees' science teaching competency. Further, the study explored the novice teachers' self-perception of their teaching competency. A survey, consisting of 56 Likert-type questions, was completed by mentors (N = 79) and novice high school science teachers (N = 83) in six northeastern states. The results revealed a statistically significant difference in the perceptions of the mentors of traditionally and alternatively licensed novice high school science teachers in the areas of general pedagogical knowledge, pedagogical content knowledge and professional growth, with more favorable perceptions recorded by mentors of traditionally licensed science teachers. There were no differences in the perceptions of the mentors with respect to novice high school teachers' content knowledge. There was no statistical difference in the self-perceptions of competency of the novice teachers. While alternative routes to licensure in science may be a necessity, the results of this study indicate that the lack of professional preparation may need to be addressed at the school level through the agency of the mentor. This study indicates that mentors must be prepared to provide alternatively licensed novice teachers with different assistance to that given to traditionally licensed novice teachers. School districts are urged to develop mentoring programs designed to develop the teaching competency of all novice teachers regardless of the route that led them

  10. Pluralismo metodológico no ensino de ciências Methodological pluralism in science teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Laburú

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Inspirados numa leitura epistemológica feyerabendiana, este trabalho sugere uma abordagem metodológica pluralista para o ensino das ciências. Defendemos que esse estratagema didático seja potencialmente mais eficaz para a aprendizagem, na medida em que procura dar conta do espectro de questões que se apresentam na sala de aula.Inspired by an epistemological reading of Feyerabend, this paper proposes a pluralist methodological approach to science teaching. We propose that this didactic strategy is potentially more effective in the learning process because it tries to account for the spectrum of questions that are presented in the classroom.

  11. Cinema-debate like a space of philosophical approach: Towards the possibility of a teaching methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muriel Vázquez

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the relationship between philosophy and film from the film production linkages with the debate surrounding from its interpretation by a group of subjects. It explores the ways of understanding the philosophical activity to suggest a conception of it as a conscious and deliberate exercise of a way of looking that results in an individual and collective transformation. The conditions of possibility to think about a teaching methodology cinema - debate based on certain guidelines aimed at guiding a conversational exchange in both philosophical dialogue arise.

  12. Kinematic real-time feedback is more effective than traditional teaching method in learning ankle joint mobilisation: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Sánchez, Manuel; Ruiz-Muñoz, Maria; Ávila-Bolívar, Ana Belén; Cuesta-Vargas, Antonio I

    2016-10-06

    To analyse the effect of real-time kinematic feedback (KRTF) when learning two ankle joint mobilisation techniques comparing the results with the traditional teaching method. Double-blind randomized trial. Faculty of Health Sciences. undergraduate students with no experience in manual therapy. Each student practised intensely for 90 min (45 min for each mobilisation) according to the random methodology assigned (G1: traditional method group and G2: KRTF group). G1: an expert professor supervising the student's practice, the professorstudent ratio was 1:8. G2: placed in front of a station where, while they performed the manoeuvre, they received a KRTF on a laptop. total time of mobilisation, time to reach maximum amplitude, maximum angular displacement in the three axes, maximum and average velocity to reach the maximum angular displacement, average velocity during the mobilisation. Among the pre-post intervention measurements, there were significant differences within the two groups for all outcome variables, however, G2 (KRTF) achieved significantly greater improvements in kinematic parameters for the two mobilisations (significant increase in displacement, velocity and significant reduction in the mobilisations runtime) than G1. Ankle plantar flexion: G1's measurement stability (post-intervention) ranged between 0.491 and 0.687, while G2's measurement stability ranged between 0.899 and 0.984. Ankle dorsal flexion mobilisation: G1 the measurement stability (post-intervention) ranged from 0.543 and 0.684 while G2 ranged between 0.899 and 0.974. KRTF was proven to be more effective tool than traditional teaching method in the teaching - learning process of two joint mobilisation techniques. NCT02504710.

  13. Teaching writing of scientific abstracts in English: CLIL methodology in an integrated English and Medicine course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippa Mungra

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In the I Faculty at the University of Rome “La Sapienza” Medical School, one of the several methodology courses aims at developing approaches by physicians to patient queries. One such course comprises several disciplines: Pathology, Immunology, Medical Statistics, Internal Medicine and English, with the specific aim of furnishing students, all Italian speakers, with skills for searching and evaluating the medical literature for answers to patient queries regarding risks and effectiveness of therapy. This paper describes the integration of English into a Methodology Course and delineates how the language component uses a Content and Language Integrated Learning (CLIL approach to train students to write the highly specific genre of journal abstracts for medical experimental research articles. A corpus of student writing is presented and discussed with the aim of furnishing one didactic model for language teaching within the Italian Medical Curriculum.

  14. Teaching Traditions in Physical Education in France, Switzerland and Sweden: A Special Focus on Official Curricula for Gymnastics and Fitness Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, Emmanuelle; Lenzen, Benoît; Öhman, Marie

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify and discuss similarities and differences between the curricula for physical education (PE) in secondary schools in Sweden, France and the canton of Geneva (Switzerland) in the light of PE teaching traditions (PETTs). Teaching traditions concern ideas about the goals of school disciplines and therefore about the…

  15. The Effect of Laboratory Training Model of Teaching and Traditional Method on Knowledge, Comprehension, Application, Skills-Components of Achievement, Total Achievement and Retention Level in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badeleh, Alireza

    2011-01-01

    The present study aimed at finding the effectiveness of the Laboratory Training Model of Teaching (LTM) and comparing it with the traditional methods of teaching chemistry to seventh standard students. It strived to determine whether the (LTM) method in chemistry would be significantly more effective than the Traditional method in respect to the…

  16. The effectiveness of using non-traditional teaching methods to prepare student health care professionals for the delivery of mental state examination: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Huiting; Liu, Lei; Wang, Jia; Joon, Kum Eng; Parasuram, Rajni; Gunasekaran, Jamuna; Poh, Chee Lien

    2015-08-14

    With the evolution of education, there has been a shift from the use of traditional teaching methods, such as didactic or rote teaching, towards non-traditional teaching methods, such as viewing of role plays, simulation, live interviews and the use of virtual environments. Mental state examination is an essential competency for all student healthcare professionals. If mental state examination is not taught in the most effective manner so learners can comprehend its concepts and interpret the findings correctly, it could lead to serious repercussions and subsequently impact on clinical care provided for patients with mental health conditions, such as incorrect assessment of suicidal ideation. However, the methods for teaching mental state examination vary widely between countries, academic institutions and clinical settings. This systematic review aimed to identify and synthesize the best available evidence of effective teaching methods used to prepare student health care professionals for the delivery of mental state examination. This review considered evidence from primary quantitative studies which address the effectiveness of a chosen method used for the teaching of mental state examination published in English, including studies that measure learner outcomes, i.e. improved knowledge and skills, self-confidence and learners' satisfaction. A three-step search strategy was undertaken in this review to search for articles published in English from the inception of the database to December 2014. An initial search of MEDLINE and CINAHL was undertaken to identify keywords. Secondly, the keywords identified were used to search electronic databases, namely, CINAHL, Medline, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Ovid, PsycINFO and, ProQuest Dissertations & Theses. Thirdly, reference lists of the articles identified in the second stage were searched for other relevant studies. Studies selected were assessed by two independent reviewers for methodological

  17. Problem-based learning versus a traditional educational methodology: a comparison of preclinical and clinical periodontics performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Sandra K; Keim, Robert G; Shuler, Charles F

    2005-06-01

    To evaluate efficacy of a problem-based learning (PBL) pedagogy in preclinical and clinical teaching, test scores of 234 undergraduate dental students from the conventionally taught classes of 2003 and 2004 were compared with scores of 274 dental students from the PBL classes of 2005 and 2006. Although the groups' means were close together, t-test analysis of scores revealed that PBL students performed significantly better than traditional (TRAD) students on midterm (p=.0001) and final (p=.015) examinations taken on student partner/mock patients. ANOVA comparing the classes with each other showed significant differences for the midterm and final, but not for the clinical examination. Further multiple comparison tests (Tukey HSD) for the midterm and final revealed that differences specifically reflected superior performance of PBL classes against one of the TRAD classes (2004). There was no difference in performance between PBL (n=134) and TRAD (n=233) students on examinations taken with actual clinical patients who were undergoing nonsurgical periodontal treatment. Over a two-year period, PBL students rated their program instructors at a mean of 4.41 on a Likert-type scale of 1 (not helpful) to 5 (outstanding). The program provides a PBL model for teaching preclinical and clinical skills supported by a four-year evaluation of manual skills outcomes.

  18. Using traditional or flipped classrooms to teach "Geriatrics and Gerontology"? Investigating the impact of active learning on medical students' competences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granero Lucchetti, Alessandra Lamas; Ezequiel, Oscarina da Silva; Oliveira, Isabella Noceli de; Moreira-Almeida, Alexander; Lucchetti, Giancarlo

    2018-01-21

    The present study aims to investigate the effect of two educational strategies to teach geriatrics (flipped classroom-FL and traditional lectures-TR) in relation to a control group (no intervention) on students' competences. An intervention study was conducted during the third year of medicine. Two different educational strategies (flipped classroom and traditional lectures) were incorporated into a theoretical-practical discipline of geriatrics. Students were evaluated about their attitudes towards older persons (Maxwell-Sullivan, UCLA geriatric attitudes), empathy (Maxwell-Sullivan), knowledge (Palmore and cognitive knowledge), skills (standardized patient assessment), and satisfaction with the activities. A total of 243 students were assessed. The FL group demonstrated greater gains in knowledge among students and improved attitude compared to the TR. We found no differences in the skills using a standardized patient. In addition, students exposed to FL felt more prepared to treat older people, believed they had more knowledge, were more satisfied, and evaluated the discipline's format better in relation to the traditional group. Strategies in teaching geriatrics can impact students' knowledge, attitudes, and satisfaction with the course. We found that the way this teaching is delivered can influence students' learning, since there were differences between active and traditional strategies.

  19. Teaching Psychology in Medicine: The Context, Methodologies and Doctor's Professional Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouakinin, Silvia

    2016-12-30

    Teaching Psychology in medical curriculum has been the subject of numerous dissertations that focus on the relevance of this knowledge for doctors, at a general level. A non-systematic review of the relevant literature, particularly from the last decade, as well as national and international recommendations addressing the need for integration of behavioural and social sciences in medical training, was performed. The literature supports the existence of preconceptions and negative attitudes towards the role of psychology in medical education, demonstrated by research in various european and american universities. The socio-cultural context, the different methodologies and barriers experienced by teachers in medical education are listed and provide the matrix for a more comprehensive discussion of the development of the doctor's identity. Revisiting the experience of many years of teaching Medical Psychology, it is considered that the process of integration of this curricular area should occur horizontally and vertically throughout the course, stressing the need for the pedagogical training of teachers. Concepts that arise from personal reflection, adjusted to the reality of our education and the basic principles that guide it, are elaborated in order to integrate the teaching of Psychology in Medicine, emphasizing its importance and utility in the competencies and abilities of future doctors.

  20. VISUALIZATION OF DATA AND RESULTS AS А METHODOLOGICAL BASIS OF APPLIED STATISTICS TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Nuriakhmetov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional methods of teaching in medical high school of informatics as computer sciences and statistics as a section of high mathematics contradict to requirements of modern applied medicine and a medical science. A research objective is revealing of the reasons of the given discrepancy and its elimination ways. Similar discrepancy was revealed earlier by foreign researchers studying efficiency of the statistic school programs. The revealed laws appeared to be extended to a technique of teaching of statistics in a high medical school. Pursuing this aim the tests of educational achievements developed by the author were applied on the students of medical and biologic department of the Siberian State Medical Universirty that trained on specialities of “biophysics" and “biochemistry". The fundamental problem of statistical education is that symbols used by these science concern to the objects, which students still have to design. As a substantiation of this conclusion serves the ontosemiotical approach to working out of the maintenance of a course. In the article there are considered the approaches to the permission of the given contradiction, based on the experience of teaching of statistics in foreign schools and on the wor­kings out of the author. In particular the conclusion about necessity of revision the tradition of using professional statistical packages and introduction of a special educational software. To working out the maintenance of a learning course it is offered to more widely apply the historical approach which concrete definition is represented by a principle of a guided reinvention.

  1. [Methodological quality evaluation of randomized controlled trials for traditional Chinese medicines for treatment of sub-health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jun; Liao, Xing; Zhao, Hui; Li, Zhi-Geng; Wang, Nan-Yue; Wang, Li-Min

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the methodological quality of the randomized controlled trials(RCTs) for traditional Chinese medicines for treatment of sub-health, in order to provide a scientific basis for the improvement of clinical trials and systematic review. Such databases as CNKI, CBM, VIP, Wanfang, EMbase, Medline, Clinical Trials, Web of Science and Cochrane Library were searched for RCTS for traditional Chinese medicines for treatment of sub-health between the time of establishment and February 29, 2016. Cochrane Handbook 5.1 was used to screen literatures and extract data, and CONSORT statement and CONSORT for traditional Chinese medicine statement were adopted as the basis for quality evaluation. Among the 72 RCTs included in this study, 67 (93.05%) trials described the inter-group baseline data comparability, 39(54.17%) trials described the unified diagnostic criteria, 28(38.89%) trials described the unified standards of efficacy, 4 (5.55%) trials mentioned the multi-center study, 19(26.38%) trials disclosed the random distribution method, 6(8.33%) trials used the random distribution concealment, 15(20.83%) trials adopted the method of blindness, 3(4.17%) study reported the sample size estimation in details, 5 (6.94%) trials showed a sample size of more than two hundred, 19(26.38%) trials reported the number of withdrawal, defluxion cases and those lost to follow-up, but only 2 trials adopted the ITT analysis,10(13.89%) trials reported the follow-up results, none of the trial reported the test registration and the test protocol, 48(66.7%) trials reported all of the indicators of expected outcomes, 26(36.11%) trials reported the adverse reactions and adverse events, and 4(5.56%) trials reported patient compliance. The overall quality of these randomized controlled trials for traditional Chinese medicines for treatment of sub-health is low, with methodological defects in different degrees. Therefore, it is still necessary to emphasize the correct application of principles

  2. Keeping it pure – a pedagogical case study of teaching soft systems methodology in scenario and policy analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Yeoman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – Soft systems methodology (SSM is well documented in the academic and management literature. Over the last 40 years, the methodology has come to be adapted depending on the tool users’ skills and experience in order to fit the problem. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate good teaching and learning practice from a pedagogical perspective. Design/methodology/approach – Dr Ian Yeoman of Victoria University of Wellington provides a personal reflection of how the methodology is used in the teaching and learning of TOUR301 Tourism Policy and Planning as a policy and scenario analysis method. Findings – The paper articulates the seven stages of SSM from problem situation unstructured, through to Rich Pictures, vision and guiding principles, policy solutions, comparisons, feasibility and implementation stages. The paper uses a series of teaching tasks to breakdown the complexity of the methodology thus guiding students and teachers in how to deploy the methodology in the classroom. Originality/value – The value of the paper demonstrates the reflective practice of SSM in action as an exemplar of good practice. The paper clearly articulates the stages of the methodology so students and teachers can adopt this approach in classroom environments following a scaffolding learning approach. The use of teaching tasks throughout the paper helps bring clarity and order thus enabling the teacher to effectively teach the subject and the students to learn. The most significant contribution of this paper is the articulation of good teaching practice in policy and scenario analysis which articulated through four learning lessons: facilitating a learning environment; the impact of visual thinking; political theory; the importance of incremental learning; and problem-based learning and international students.

  3. Case Study Methodology: Flexibility, Rigour, and Ethical Considerations for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion L. Pearson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Individuals and teams engaging in the scholarship of teaching and learning (SoTL in multidisciplinary higher education settings must make decisions regarding choice of research methodology and methods. These decisions are guided by the research context and the goals of the inquiry. With reference to our own recent experiences investigating pedagogical and curricular practices in a pharmacy program, we outline case study methodology as one of the many options available for SoTL inquiry. Case study methodology has the benefits of flexibility in terms of the types of research questions that can be addressed and the data collection methods that can be employed. Conducted with proper attention to the context of the case(s selected, ethical treatment of participants, and data management, case studies also have the necessary rigour to be credible and generalizable. In the matter of generalization, however, we recommend that the readers of a case study draw their own conclusions about the applicability of the findings to other settings.

  4. The quest for knowledge transfer efficacy: blended teaching, online and in-class, with consideration of learning typologies for non-traditional and traditional students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Doorn, Judy R.; Van Doorn, John D.

    2014-01-01

    The pedagogical paradigm shift in higher education to 24-h learning environments composed of teaching delivery methods of online courses, blended/hybrid formats, and face-to-face (f2f) classes is increasing access to global, lifelong learning. Online degrees have been offered at 62.4% of 2800 colleges and universities. Students can now design flexible, life-balanced course schedules. Higher knowledge transfer rates may exist with blended course formats with online quizzes and valuable class time set for Socratic, quality discussions and creative team presentations. Research indicates that younger, traditional students exhibit heightened performance goal orientations and prefer entertaining professors who are funny, whereas non-traditional students exhibit mastery profiles and prefer courses taught by flexible, yet organized, professors. A 5-year study found that amongst 51,000 students taking both f2f and online courses, higher online failure rates occurred. Competing life roles for non-traditional students and reading and writing needs for at-risk students suggest that performance may be better if programs are started in f2f courses. Models on effective knowledge transfer consider the planning process, delivery methods, and workplace application, but a gap exists for identifying the diversity of learner needs. Higher education enrollments are being compromised with lower online retention rates. Therefore, the main purpose of this review is to delineate disparate learning styles and present a typology for the learning needs of traditional and non-traditional students. Secondly, psychology as a science may need more rigorous curriculum markers like mapping APA guidelines to knowledge objectives, critical assignments, and student learning outcomes (SLOs) (e.g., online rubric assessments for scoring APA style critical thinking essays on selected New York Times books). Efficacious knowledge transfer to diverse, 21st century students should be the Academy's focus. PMID

  5. The quest for knowledge transfer efficacy: blended teaching, online and in-class, with consideration of learning typologies for non-traditional and traditional students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy Rouse Van Doorn

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The pedagogical paradigm shift in higher education to 24-hour learning environments composed of teaching delivery methods of online courses, blended/hybrid formats, and face-to-face (f2f classes is increasing access to global, lifelong learning. Online degrees have been offered at 62.4% of 2,800 colleges and universities. Students can now design flexible, life-balanced course schedules. Higher knowledge transfer rates may exist with blended course formats with online quizzes and valuable class time set for Socratic, quality discussions and creative team presentations. Research indicates that younger, traditional students exhibit heightened performance goal orientations and prefer entertaining professors who are funny, whereas non-traditional students exhibit mastery profiles and prefer courses taught by flexible, yet organized, professors. A 5-year study found that amongst 51,000 students taking both f2f and online courses, higher online failure rates occurred. Competing life roles for non-traditional students and reading and writing needs for at-risk students suggest that performance may be better if programs are started in f2f courses. Models on effective knowledge transfer consider the planning process, delivery methods, and workplace application, but a gap exists for identifying the diversity of learner needs. Higher education enrollments are being compromised with lower online retention rates. Therefore, the main purpose of this review is to delineate disparate learning styles and present a typology for the learning needs of traditional and non-traditional students. Secondly, psychology as a science may need more rigorous curriculum markers like mapping APA guidelines to knowledge objectives, critical assignments, and student learning outcomes (SLOs (e.g. online rubric assessments for scoring APA style critical thinking essays on selected New York Times books. Efficacious knowledge transfer to diverse, 21st century students should be the

  6. The quest for knowledge transfer efficacy: blended teaching, online and in-class, with consideration of learning typologies for non-traditional and traditional students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Doorn, Judy R; Van Doorn, John D

    2014-01-01

    The pedagogical paradigm shift in higher education to 24-h learning environments composed of teaching delivery methods of online courses, blended/hybrid formats, and face-to-face (f2f) classes is increasing access to global, lifelong learning. Online degrees have been offered at 62.4% of 2800 colleges and universities. Students can now design flexible, life-balanced course schedules. Higher knowledge transfer rates may exist with blended course formats with online quizzes and valuable class time set for Socratic, quality discussions and creative team presentations. Research indicates that younger, traditional students exhibit heightened performance goal orientations and prefer entertaining professors who are funny, whereas non-traditional students exhibit mastery profiles and prefer courses taught by flexible, yet organized, professors. A 5-year study found that amongst 51,000 students taking both f2f and online courses, higher online failure rates occurred. Competing life roles for non-traditional students and reading and writing needs for at-risk students suggest that performance may be better if programs are started in f2f courses. Models on effective knowledge transfer consider the planning process, delivery methods, and workplace application, but a gap exists for identifying the diversity of learner needs. Higher education enrollments are being compromised with lower online retention rates. Therefore, the main purpose of this review is to delineate disparate learning styles and present a typology for the learning needs of traditional and non-traditional students. Secondly, psychology as a science may need more rigorous curriculum markers like mapping APA guidelines to knowledge objectives, critical assignments, and student learning outcomes (SLOs) (e.g., online rubric assessments for scoring APA style critical thinking essays on selected New York Times books). Efficacious knowledge transfer to diverse, 21st century students should be the Academy's focus.

  7. METHODOLOGY OF ORGANIZATION OF INTEGRATED LESSONS OF NATURAL-SCIENCE CYCLE (ON THE EXAMPLE OF TEACHING SPE STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alsou Raufovna Kamaleeva

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the process of transition of Russian organizations of secondary professional education to educational standards of the third generation educational process is reduced to formation of students’ competences. This article presents methodology of creating integrated lessons of natural-science cycle (for example, in physics and informatics. These lessons are constructed on the basis of interdisciplinary integration and focused on task solution. The main purpose is to teach students how to solve particular tasks in physics with the use of informatics, in particular on the basis of algorithmization and programming (Pascal language. Didactic conditions, which are the basis of the algorithm of designing corresponding tasks, are described in this article. Structural components of the integrated lessons created on the traditional principle are marked out. During the research we observed that realization of all stages of the corresponding lessons in practice allows the teacher to create educational process over the borders of disciplinary basis. This approach helps to form generalization of knowledge. Being one of the most optimal forms of education, an integrated lesson allows students to solve various educational and professional problems in non-standard situations and stimulates their cognitive activity and their involvement in the process of education and their responsibility for the result which promotes an intensification of educational process.

  8. How do Millennial Engineering and Technology Students Experience Learning Through Traditional Teaching Methods Employed in the University Setting?

    OpenAIRE

    Howard, Elizabeth A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to document and analyze how Millennial engineering and technology students experience learning in large lecture classrooms. To help achieve this purpose, perceptions Millennials have toward traditional teaching methods employed in large lecture classes were analyzed and discussed. Additionally, this study documented how Millennials experienced technology within large lecture classrooms. A learning model depicting how Millennials experience learning within the larg...

  9. Methodology for developing teaching activities and materials for use in fluid mechanics courses in undergraduate engineering programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Javier Gamez-Montero

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available “Mechanics” and “Fluids” are familiar concepts for any newly-registered engineering student. However, when combined into the term “Fluid Mechanics”, students are thrust into the great unknown. The present article demonstrates the process of adaptation employed by the Fluid Mechanics course in the undergraduate engineering program, along with the teaching methodology, teaching materials and results obtained, evaluating the final objective in terms of student satsfaction and level of learning.

  10. English in Education Policy Shift in Senegal: From Traditional Pedagogies to Communicative Language Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diallo, Ibrahima

    2014-01-01

    Despite its allegiance to French, language-in-education planning in Senegal has given top priority to English in its education system. In the 1980s, policy-makers shifted English language teaching pedagogy from the Centre de Linguistique Appliquée de Dakar (CLAD) [Centre for Applied Linguistics of Dakar] teaching methods to Communicative Language…

  11. Is Traditional Teaching Really All that Bad? A Within-Student Between-Subject Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerdt, Guido; Wuppermann, Amelie C.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies conclude that teachers are important for student learning but it remains uncertain what actually determines effective teaching. This study directly peers into the black box of educational production by investigating the relationship between lecture style teaching and student achievement. Based on matched student-teacher data for the…

  12. Alternative methodology for using Eureka software in the teaching-learning process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudeisy Cudina-Guerrero

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to fulfill one of the aspects that characterized the curriculum for the training of ordinary skill in the Technical and Vocational Education which states: increase student learning in mathematics in particular, where teachers use the computer effectively as a teaching, and thus eliminate academic failure, an alternative methodology was developed to use the Eureka software, which was presented to teachers and provincial methodologists of mathematics, as well as students of Accounting, it helped to further learning students at Work with Variables. The proposal was designed to achieve a formative learning accordingly to the objectives of the program it requires Mathematics. The relevance of the alternative was assessed by consulting specialists, where they corroborated that can be educational practice.

  13. Comparison of a Web-Based Teaching Tool and Traditional Didactic Learning for In Vitro Fertilization Patients: A Preliminary Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vause, Tannys Dawn Reiko; Allison, David J; Vause, Tricia; Tekok-Kilic, Ayda; Ditor, David S; Min, Jason K

    2018-05-01

    The objective of this prospective RCT was to compare the efficacy of a web-based teaching tool to traditional didactic teaching in IVF patients. Forty women undergoing their first IVF cycle were randomly allocated to an interactive web-based teaching session or a nurse-led didactic teaching session. The primary outcome measure was participant knowledge regarding the IVF process, risks, and logistics assessed before and after the respective teaching session. Secondary outcomes included patient stress, assessed before and after the respective teaching session, and patient satisfaction, assessed following the respective teaching session and on the day of embryo transfer (following implementation of the teaching protocol). Both groups demonstrated similar and significant improvements in knowledge and stress after exposure to their respective teaching sessions. The web-based group was significantly more satisfied than the didactic teaching group. Web-based teaching was also shown to be equally effective for participants of high versus low income and education status for knowledge, stress, and satisfaction. This study provides preliminary support for the use of web-based teaching as an equally effective tool for increasing knowledge and reducing stress compared to traditional didactic teaching in IVF patients, with the added benefit of increased patient satisfaction. Copyright © 2018 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Teaching methodologies to promote creativity in the professional skills related to optics knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Oliveras, Alicia; Fernandez, Paz; Peña-García, Antonio; Oliveras, Maria L.

    2014-07-01

    We present the methodologies proposed and applied in the context of a teaching-innovation project developed at the University of Granada, Spain. The main objective of the project is the implementation of teaching methodologies that promote the creativity in the learning process and, subsequently, in the acquisition of professional skills. This project involves two subjects related with optics knowledge in undergraduate students. The subjects are "Illumination Engineering" (Bachelor's degree in Civil-Engineering) and "Optical and Optometric Instrumentation" (Bachelor's degree in and Optics and Optometry). For the first subject, the activities of our project were carried out in the theoretical classes. By contrast, in the case of the second subject, such activities were designed for the laboratory sessions. For "Illumination Engineering" we applied the maieutic technique. With this method the students were encouraged to establish relationships between the main applications of the subject and concepts that apparently unrelated with the subject framework. By means of several examples, the students became aware of the importance of cross-curricular and lateral thinking. We used the technique based on protocols of control and change in "Optical and Optometric Instrumentation". The modus operandi was focused on prompting the students to adopt the role of the professionals and to pose questions to themselves concerning the practical content of the subject from that professional role. This mechanism boosted the critical capacity and the independent-learning ability of the students. In this work, we describe in detail both subject proposals and the results of their application in the 2011-2012 academic course.

  15. Didactic content and teaching methodologies on required allopathic US family medicine clerkships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwiebert, L P; Aspy, C B

    1999-02-01

    Despite the increased prominence of family medicine clerkships in required third- and fourth-year clinical rotations in US allopathic medical schools, the content of these clerkships varies markedly among institutions, and there is little in the literature concerning the current or desired content of family medicine clerkships. This study explores the didactic content of a national sample of required family medicine clerkships to assess what and how this important aspect of clerkship curriculum is taught. Using an original survey instrument, we surveyed US medical schools through mailings and follow-up phone contacts. We categorized free-form responses using a coding dictionary specific to this study and computed descriptive statistics. Of 127 medical schools contacted, 105 (83%) responded. Among respondents, 86 (82%) had a required family medicine clerkship, 80% of them in the third year. Mean clerkship length was 5.3 weeks (median = 4 weeks), and the mean number of didactic sessions was about 2 per week. Almost 80% of clerkships had sessions in the broad area of family medicine, and prevention was the most frequent individual topic, taught in 32 (37%) of clerkships. Seventy-one percent of sessions used methodologies other than lectures. The mean time devoted to teaching 24 of the top 26 topics identified in the survey was between 1.2 and 3.1 hours/rotation, although case presentations and common problems each averaged more than 7 hours on clerkships teaching these topics. This survey provided more detailed information than previously available about the didactic content of required US allopathic family medicine clerkships. The survey also documented the lack of agreement among these clerkships on didactic content. Most didactic sessions used interactive rather than lecture format. The information from this first detailed survey provides family medicine clerkship directors with national comparisons of didactic content and methodology as a foundation for further

  16. English Language Teaching in Spain: Do Textbooks Comply with the Official Methodological Regulations? A Sample Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aquilino Sánchez

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this paper is to verify up to what point ELT textbooks used in Spanish educational settings comply with the official regulations prescribed, which fully advocate the Communicative Language Teaching Method (CLT. For that purpose, seven representative coursebooks of different educational levels and modalities in Spain – secondary, upper secondary, teenager and adult textbooks – were selected to be analysed. A full unit randomly selected from each coursebook was examined through the parameters of the communicative potential of the activities – measured on a scale from 0 to 10 – and the communicative nature of the methodological strategies implemented – measured on a dichotomous scale (yes/no. Global results per educational levels point to the prevailing communicative nature of all the materials, which was shown to be above 50%. The remaining non-communicative block was covered by activities focused on the formal features of language (grammar and vocabulary. This resulting degree of dissociation between official regulations and what is really found in teaching materials may be positive, since the learning of languages is complex and results from the intervention of multiple factors and learning styles, as is evidenced by the professional experience of teachers from different backgrounds and beliefs.

  17. Preparation of guides, on mechanics of fluids, for the physics teaching based on the investigatory methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, Loreto Mora; Buzzo, Ricardo; Martinez-Mardones, Javier; Romero, Angel [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso Av. Brasil 2950, Valparaiso (Chile)], E-mail: jmartine@ucv.cl

    2008-11-01

    The challenges in the present educational reform emphasize the professional character of the teacher in the planning of classes, execution of activities and evaluation of learning. A set of planned activities is not to a class of science as a pile of thrown bricks is to a house; this is, that if it is not counted on the knowledge of the preconceptions of the students, the daily realities that they face and of the expectations that these have at the time of participating in the science classes, cannot be obtained the proposed objectives. The well-known investigatory method applied to the education of sciences approaches the conceptual contents from practical activities of easy reproduction that are guided in effective form towards the topics to teach. Guides OPPS (Operation Primary Physics Science), of Louisiana University, are excellent examples of the application of this methodology, as much in the material that corresponds to the students as in the material for the guide of the learning activities (call Leader of the class). This international experience, within the framework used of the Plans and Programs of the Ministry of Education of Chile (MINEDUC), is the main axis of this work in which the accomplishment of guides with this methodology considers, approaching contained of a unit of the common plan of physics for third grade of high school.

  18. Preparation of guides, on mechanics of fluids, for the physics teaching based on the investigatory methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, Loreto Mora; Buzzo, Ricardo; Martinez-Mardones, Javier; Romero, Angel

    2008-01-01

    The challenges in the present educational reform emphasize the professional character of the teacher in the planning of classes, execution of activities and evaluation of learning. A set of planned activities is not to a class of science as a pile of thrown bricks is to a house; this is, that if it is not counted on the knowledge of the preconceptions of the students, the daily realities that they face and of the expectations that these have at the time of participating in the science classes, cannot be obtained the proposed objectives. The well-known investigatory method applied to the education of sciences approaches the conceptual contents from practical activities of easy reproduction that are guided in effective form towards the topics to teach. Guides OPPS (Operation Primary Physics Science), of Louisiana University, are excellent examples of the application of this methodology, as much in the material that corresponds to the students as in the material for the guide of the learning activities (call Leader of the class). This international experience, within the framework used of the Plans and Programs of the Ministry of Education of Chile (MINEDUC), is the main axis of this work in which the accomplishment of guides with this methodology considers, approaching contained of a unit of the common plan of physics for third grade of high school.

  19. Active teaching-learning methodologies: medical students' views of problem-based learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto Bittencourt Costa

    Full Text Available The prevailing undergraduate medical training process still favors disconnection and professional distancing from social needs. The Brazilian Ministries of Education and Health, through the National Curriculum Guidelines, the Incentives Program for Changes in the Medical Curriculum (PROMED, and the National Program for Reorientation of Professional Training in Health (PRO-SAÚDE, promoted the stimulus for an effective connection between medical institutions and the Unified National Health System (SUS. In accordance to the new paradigm for medical training, the Centro Universitário Serra dos Órgãos (UNIFESO established a teaching plan in 2005 using active methodologies, specifically problem-based learning (PBL. Research was conducted through semi-structured interviews with third-year undergraduate students at the UNIFESO Medical School. The results were categorized as proposed by Bardin's thematic analysis, with the purpose of verifying the students' impressions of the new curriculum. Active methodologies proved to be well-accepted by students, who defined them as exciting and inclusive of theory and practice in medical education.

  20. THE SOCIETY OF MINANGKABAU IN TULIS St. SATI’S SENGSARA MEMBAWA NIKMAT: BETWEEN LOCAL TRADITIONS AND ISLAMIC TEACHINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    betty mauli

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The culture of Minangkabau is different from the ones generally existing in Indonesia, particularly compared to the Javanese culture. Therefore, the culture of Minangkabau is often considered as a contradictory or antithesis of the Javanese culture, frequently represented as the overall culture of Indonesia. The peculiarity of Minangkabau culture lays in its matrilineality which influences lineage and inheritance. The contradictory matter refers to the society of Minangkabau that is the largest Islamic followers in Indonesia, yet their ancestral traditions are not completely in line with the Islamic teachings, some even are contradictory. It is a common knowledge that a literary work is not born from an ‘empty culture’ meaning that a literary work must be influenced by its author. Even some of literary experts believe that a society described in a novel is the real society where the author lives. It is similar to the novel of Sengsara Membawa Nikmat of Sutan Sati, which is the object of this paper. The novel describes the society of Minangkabau in the early 20th century, at the end of 1920s to be exact.This research shows how the efforts of Minangkabau people in adopting the Islamic teachings completely and how Islam adapts to the Minangkabau hereditary traditions. Some of the traditions may exist in accordance with the Islamic teachings, but some do not. Even there is a need to gather all headman of the ethnic group to decide a case which is not in line with Islam, whether following pure traditions or Islam as it should be. 

  1. Traditional vs. Modern Approaches in Business English Teaching in the Economic Field

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Teodorescu

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to examine different techniques and approaches used in teaching and learning business English in the economic field. Besides applying the already well-known methods used in second language acquisition, we also tried to incorporate computer-mediated communication into the communicative approach. At all times, the choice of the methods and approaches used in teaching business English has focused on our students' needs in their vocation or job. We worked with two groups of studen...

  2. Clinical evidence of traditional vs fast track recovery methodologies after total arthroplasty for osteoarthritic knee treatment. A retrospective observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castorina, Sergio; Guglielmino, Claudia; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Szychlinska, Marta Anna; Ioppolo, Francesco; Massimino, Paolo; Leonardi, Pietro; Maci, Christian; Iannuzzi, Maurizio; Di Giunta, Angelo; Musumeci, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Summary Background During the last years, programs to enhance postoperative recovery and decrease morbidity after total knee arthroplasty, have been developed across a variety of surgical procedures and referred to as “Fast-Track Surgery”. In this study we aimed to find some answers in the management of osteoarthritic patients subjected to total knee arthroplasty, by using the Fast-Track methodology. To this purpose we evaluated parameters such as early mobilization of patients, better pain management, bleeding, possible complications, reduced hospitalization time, an overall improved recovery and patient satisfaction. Methods 132 patients were selected, of which, 95 treated with “Fast Track” method and 37 treated with traditional method (control group). All the patients were hospitalized and underwent the same rehabilitation program for the first three days after surgery. Results In both groups, the parameters of pain and deformity demonstrated the most rapid improvement, while those of function and movement were normalized as gradual and progressive improvement over the next 2 months. The different functional test used (Barthel, MRC, VAS) showed that the mean values were significantly greater in Fast Track group when compared to the control. Conclusion The results of the study confirm that the application of the Fast Track protocol in orthopaedics after total knee replacement results in rapid post-surgery recovery. Level of evidence IV. Case series, low-quality cohort or case-control studies. PMID:29387645

  3. Teaching design in the first years of a traditional mechanical engineering degree: methods, issues and future perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Arlindo; Fontul, Mihail; Henriques, Elsa

    2015-01-01

    Engineering design is known as an answer to an ill-defined problem. As any answer to an ill-defined problem, it can never be completely right or absolutely wrong. The methods that universities use to teach engineering design, as a consequence of this, suffer from the same fate. However, the accumulated experience with the 'chalk and talk' teaching tradition has led to a reality in which the employers of fresh graduates are not happy with the engineers they are getting. Part of their complaints are related with the inability of recently graduate engineers to work in problems where the boundaries are not well defined, are interdisciplinary, require the use of effective communication and integrate non-technical issues. These skills are mostly absent from traditional engineering curricula. This paper demonstrates the implementation of engineering design perspectives enhancing some of the aforementioned skills in a traditional mechanical engineering curriculum. It emphasises in particular a design project that is tackled in a sequence of conventional courses with a focus that depends on the course objectives and disciplinary domain. This transdisciplinary design project conveys the idea (and effectively implements it concurrently) that design is multidisciplinary.

  4. A randomized control trial comparing use of a novel electrocardiogram simulator with traditional teaching in the acquisition of electrocardiogram interpretation skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fent, Graham; Gosai, Jivendra; Purva, Makani

    2016-01-01

    Accurate interpretation of the electrocardiogram (ECG) remains an essential skill for medical students and junior doctors. While many techniques for teaching ECG interpretation are described, no single method has been shown to be superior. This randomized control trial is the first to investigate whether teaching ECG interpretation using a computer simulator program or traditional teaching leads to improved scores in a test of ECG interpretation among medical students and postgraduate doctors immediately after and 3months following teaching. Participants' opinions of the program were assessed using a questionnaire. There were no differences in ECG interpretation test scores immediately after or 3months after teaching in the lecture or simulator groups. At present therefore, there is insufficient evidence to suggest that ECG simulator programs are superior to traditional teaching. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The effect of non traditional teaching methods in entrepreneurship education on students entrepreneurial interest and business startups: A data article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olokundun, Maxwell; Moses, Chinonye Love; Iyiola, Oluwole; Ibidunni, Stephen; Ogbari, Mercy; Peter, Fred; Borishade, Taiye

    2018-08-01

    Traditional methods of teaching entrepreneurship in universities involves more theoretical approaches which are less effective in motivating considerations for an entrepreneurship career. This owes to the fact that such techniques essentially make students develop a dormant attitude rather than active participation. Expert views suggest that experiential entrepreneurship teaching methods in universities which involve practical activities and active participation can be considered salient to students' development of entrepreneurial interest an business startup potentials. This present study presents data on the extent to which experiential teaching methods in entrepreneurship adopted by Nigerian universities stimulate students' entrepreneurial interest and business startups. Data have been gathered following a descriptive cross-sectional quantitative survey conducted among university students ( N = 600) of four selected institutions in Nigeria offering a degree programme in entrepreneurship. Hierarchical Multiple Regression Analysis was used in confirming the hypothesis proposed in the study using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 22.The findings from the analysis showed that the adoption of experiential practical activities considered as best practices in entrepreneurship teaching in Nigerian universities can stimulate students' interest and drive for engaging in business start-up activities even as undergraduates. The field data set is made extensively available to allow for critical investigation.

  6. Evolution of teaching and evaluation methodologies: The experience in the computer programming course at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonatan Gomez Perdomo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the evolution of a computer-programming course at the Universidad Nacional de Colombia (UNAL. The teaching methodology has evolved from a linear and non-standardized methodology to a flexible, non-linear and student-centered methodology. Our methodology uses an e-learning platform that supports the learning process by offering students and professors custom navigation between the content and material in an interactive way (book chapters, exercises, videos. Moreover, the platform is open access, and approximately 900 students from the university take this course each term. However, our evaluation methodology has evolved from static evaluations based on paper tests to an online process based on computer adaptive testing (CAT that chooses the questions to ask a student and assigns the student a grade according to the student’s ability.

  7. A comparative study teaching chemistry using the 5E learning cycle and traditional teaching with a large English language population in a middle-school setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWright, Cynthia Nicole

    For decades science educators and educational institutions have been concerned with the status of science content being taught in K-12 schools and the delivery of the content. Thus, educational reformers in the United States continue to strive to solve the problem on how to best teach science for optimal success in learning. The constructivist movement has been at the forefront of this effort. With mandatory testing nationwide and an increase in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) jobs with little workforce to fulfill these needs, the question of what to teach and how to teach science remains a concern among educators and all stakeholders. The purpose of this research was to determine if students' chemistry knowledge and interest can be increased by using the 5E learning cycle in a middle school with a high population of English language learners. The participants were eighth-grade middle school students in a large metropolitan area. Students participated in a month-long chemistry unit. The study was a quantitative, quasi-experimental design with a control group using a traditional lecture-style teaching strategy and an experimental group using the 5E learning cycle. Students completed a pre-and post-student attitude in science surveys, a pretest/posttest for each mini-unit taught and completed daily exit tickets using the Expert Science Teaching Educational Evaluation Model (ESTEEM) instrument to measure daily student outcomes in main idea, student inquiry, and relevancy. Analysis of the data showed that there was no statistical difference between the two groups overall, and all students experienced a gain in content knowledge overall. All students demonstrated a statistically significant difference in their interest in science class, activities in science class, and outside of school. Data also showed that scores in writing the main idea and writing inquiry questions about the content increased over time.

  8. Between national tradition and bilateral dialogue: Teaching the First World War in France and Germany to build lasting peace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maguelone Nouvel-Kirschleger

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The communication examines the representations of war and peace making processes in French and German textbooks since 1945. It analyses continuity and change in the choice of themes and their textual and iconographic representations at the example of the First World War. It tries to determine the weight of transnational bi- and European co-operation in the “teaching about war” with the objective of peace education in comparing them with persisting national traditions of politics of remembrance, historiography and history didactics.

  9. Student Perceptions of Instructional Tools in Programming Logic: A Comparison of Traditional versus Alice Teaching Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Leah

    2011-01-01

    This research investigates the implementation of the programming language Alice to teach computer programming logic to computer information systems students. Alice has been implemented in other university settings and has been reported to have many benefits including object-oriented concepts and an engaging and fun learning environment. In this…

  10. The Use of Case Studies To Teach Educational Psychology: A Comparison with Traditional Instruction. Draft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, James D.

    The use of case studies to teach educational psychology was studied, focusing on their effectiveness in helping students become more reflective in their thinking about the roles of teachers. The effects on content learned, affect and motivation, and performance were studied for students taught through case studies and through traditional…

  11. Sustainability: Teaching an Interdisciplinary Threshold Concept through Traditional Lecture and Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levintova, Ekaterina M.; Mueller, Daniel W.

    2015-01-01

    One of the difficulties in teaching global sustainability in the introductory political science classes is the different emphases placed on this concept and the absence of the consensus on where the overall balance between environmental protection, economic development, and social justice should reside. Like many fuzzy concepts with which students…

  12. DESIGNING INSTRUCTION FOR THE TRADITIONAL, ADULT, AND DISTANCE LEARNER: A New Engine for Technology-Based Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence A. Tomei

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Adult students demand a wider variety of instructional strategies that encompass real-world, interactive, cooperative, and discovery learning experiences.Designing Instruction for the Traditional, Adult, and Distance Learner: A New Engine for Technology-Based Teaching explores how technology impacts the process of devising instructional plans as well as learning itself in adult students. Containing research from leading international experts, this publication proposes realistic and accurate archetypes to assist educators in incorporating state-of-the-art technologies into online instruction.This text proposes a new paradigm for designing, developing, implementing, and assessed technology-based instruction. It addresses three target populations of today's learner: traditional, adult, and distance education. The text proposes a new model of instructional system design (ISD for developing effective technology-based education that involves a five-step process focusing on the learner, learning theories, resources, delivery modalities, and outcomes.

  13. ABOUT THE RELEVANCE AND METHODOLOGY ASPECTS OF TEACHING THE MATHEMATICAL MODELING TO PEDAGOGICAL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. A. Perminov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper substantiates the need for profile training in mathematical modeling for pedagogical students, caused by the total penetration of mathematics into different sciences, including the humanities; fast development of the information communications technologies; and growing importance of mathematical modeling, combining the informal scientific and formal mathematical languages with the unique opportunities of computer programming. The author singles out the reasons for mastering and using the mathematical apparatus by teaches in every discipline. Indeed, among all the modern mathematical methods and ideas, mathematical modeling retains its priority in all professional spheres. Therefore, the discipline of “Mathematical Modeling” can play an important role in integrating different components of specialists training in various profiles. By mastering the basics of mathematical modeling, students acquire skills of methodological thinking; learn the principles of analysis, synthesis, generalization of ideas and methods in different disciplines and scientific spheres; and achieve general culture competences. In conclusion, the author recommends incorporating the “Methods of Profile Training in Mathematical Modeling” into the pedagogical magistracy curricula. 

  14. Critical Review of Data Evaluation in Teaching Clinics of Traditional Chinese Medicine Outside China: Implications for Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jian; Peng, Wenbo; Gu, Tieguang; King, Catherine; Yin, J Kevin

    2016-01-01

    The increasing acceptance of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) worldwide has highlighted the importance of ensuring the provision of high-quality TCM clinical education. This clinical training should be partly guided by a robust assessment of patient data outcomes in TCM teaching clinics. We undertook a comprehensive literature review to examine the data evaluation in TCM teaching clinics outside China and its implications for TCM education. Literature was retrieved via MEDLINE (from 1946 to January 2015), EMBASE (from 1980 to February 2015), and Google Scholar for studies conducted outside China. The search was restricted to English articles reporting empirical findings related to the assessments of patient data in TCM teaching clinics, with implications for TCM education in countries other than China. Only seven articles from six studies met the inclusion criteria. The characteristics and main symptoms of patients who received any TCM treatment in the context of teaching clinics among all included studies were similar. Symptom relief as well as a high level of patient satisfaction with TCM treatment were found in TCM teaching clinics. Conventional healthcare providers and other complementary practitioners were not the main source of referral to TCM practitioners but rather patients׳ friends/relatives. Patients received acupuncture treatment more frequently than treatments utilizing Chinese herbal medicine in teaching clinics. A standardized and consistent framework for patient records within TCM teaching clinics is currently lacking. There was no robust study which "translated" TCM clinic data evaluation findings into implications for TCM education and clinical training. Recognizing that TCM evolves over time and its practice varies in different settings, there is an urgent need to conduct large-scale, rigorous evaluations of TCM clinic data to address the findings of our review, with the purpose of better informing TCM education and clinical training in

  15. Traditional Lecture Versus an Activity Approach for Teaching Statistics: A Comparison of Outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    Loveland, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Many educational researchers have proposed teaching statistics with less lecture and more active learning methods. However, there are only a few comparative studies that have taught one section of statistics with lectures and one section with activity-based methods; of those studies, the results are contradictory. To address the need for more research on the actual effectiveness of active learning methods in introductory statistics, this research study was undertaken. An introductory, univ...

  16. The Structure of Research Methodology Competency in Higher Education and the Role of Teaching Teams and Course Temporal Distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Karl; Steinwascher, Merle; Moosbrugger, Helfried; Reiss, Siegbert

    2011-01-01

    The development of research methodology competency is a major aim of the psychology curriculum at universities. Usually, three courses concentrating on basic statistics, advanced statistics and experimental methods, respectively, serve the achievement of this aim. However, this traditional curriculum-based course structure gives rise to the…

  17. Living Traditions--A Teacher's Guide: Teaching Local History Using State and National Learning Standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelding, Mark; Kemple, Martin; Kiefer, Joseph

    This guide is designed to take teachers through a step-by-step process for developing an integrated, standards-based curriculum that focuses on the stories, history, folkways, and agrarian traditions of the local community. Such a place-based curriculum helps students to become culturally literate, makes learning relevant and engaging, draws on…

  18. Using Alternative Teaching Techniques To Enhance Student Performance in the Traditional Introductory Public Relations Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubbers, Charles A.

    2002-01-01

    Examines the value of two alternative tools as supplements for the traditional introduction to public relations course. Considers the usage of a study manual, usage of televised review sessions, year in school and major status. Indicates that all four variables are significantly correlated with class performance, but that the study manual explains…

  19. The Effectiveness of Teaching Traditional Grammar on Writing Composition at the High School Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeger, Gina

    2011-01-01

    Traditional grammar instruction is a challenging element of the English curriculum; both students and teachers struggle with the rules and dull nature of grammar. However, understanding grammar is important because students need to understand the language they speak in order to be effective communicators, and teachers provide grammar instruction…

  20. A Follow-up Study of Two Methods of Teaching Mathematics: Traditional versus New Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Gene A.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    When high school mathematics grades and test scores were analyzed, findings showed that high- and middle-ability students who had a modern mathematics course in the seventh grade received significantly higher grades in Algebra I, II, III, and Geometry than did students who had a traditional seventh grade mathematics course. (DT)

  1. A Comparison of Traditional Worksheet and Linear Programming Methods for Teaching Manure Application Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, M. A.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Compares traditional manure application planning techniques calculated to meet agronomic nutrient needs on a field-by-field basis with plans developed using computer-assisted linear programming optimization methods. Linear programming provided the most economical and environmentally sound manure application strategy. (Contains 15 references.) (MDH)

  2. The Ethics of Survival: Teaching the Traditional Arts to Disadvantaged Children in Post-Conflict Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallio, Alexis A.; Westerlund, Heidi

    2016-01-01

    Cambodia's recent history of conflict and political instability has resulted in a recognized need to recover, regenerate, preserve and protect the nation's cultural heritage. Many education programmes catering for disadvantaged youth have implemented traditional Khmer music and dance lessons, suggesting that these programmes share the…

  3. Teaching in Cyberspace: Online versus Traditional Instruction Using a Waiting-List Experimental Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Christopher R.; Feldman, Robert S.

    2004-01-01

    To test the effectiveness of an online introductory psychology course, we randomly assigned students to a large, traditional course or to an online course from a population of students who indicated that either course type was acceptable using a "waiting list" experimental design. Students in the online course performed better on exams and equally…

  4. Using Virtual Reality for Task-Based Exercises in Teaching Non-Traditional Students of German

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libbon, Stephanie

    2004-01-01

    Using task-based exercises that required web searches and online activities, this course introduced non-traditional students to the sights and sounds of the German culture and language and simultaneously to computer technology. Through partner work that required negotiation of the net as well as of the language, these adult beginning German…

  5. Blending online techniques with traditional face to face teaching methods to deliver final year undergraduate radiology learning content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howlett, David, E-mail: david.howlett@esht.nhs.uk [Department of Radiology, Eastbourne District General Hospital, Kings Drive, Eastbourne, East Sussex BN21 2UD (United Kingdom); Vincent, Tim [Department of IT, Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS) (United Kingdom); Watson, Gillian; Owens, Emma [Department of Radiology, Eastbourne District General Hospital, Kings Drive, Eastbourne, East Sussex BN21 2UD (United Kingdom); Webb, Richard; Gainsborough, Nicola [Department of Medicine, Royal Sussex County Hospital, Brighton (United Kingdom); Fairclough, Jil [Department of IT, Brighton and Sussex Medical School (BSMS) (United Kingdom); Taylor, Nick [Department of Medical Illustration, Eastbourne District General Hospital (United Kingdom); Miles, Ken [Department of Imaging, BSMS (United Kingdom); Cohen, Jon [Department of Infectious Diseases, BSMS (United Kingdom); Vincent, Richard [Department of Cardiology, BSMS (United Kingdom)

    2011-06-15

    Aim: To review the initial experience of blending a variety of online educational techniques with traditional face to face or contact-based teaching methods to deliver final year undergraduate radiology content at a UK Medical School. Materials and methods: The Brighton and Sussex Medical School opened in 2003 and offers a 5-year undergraduate programme, with the final 5 spent in several regional centres. Year 5 involves several core clinical specialities with onsite radiology teaching provided at regional centres in the form of small-group tutorials, imaging seminars and also a one-day course. An online educational module was introduced in 2007 to facilitate equitable delivery of the year 5 curriculum between the regional centres and to support students on placement. This module had a strong radiological emphasis, with a combination of imaging integrated into clinical cases to reflect everyday practice and also dedicated radiology cases. For the second cohort of year 5 students in 2008 two additional online media-rich initiatives were introduced, to complement the online module, comprising imaging tutorials and an online case discussion room. Results: In the first year for the 2007/2008 cohort, 490 cases were written, edited and delivered via the Medical School managed learning environment as part of the online module. 253 cases contained a form of image media, of which 195 cases had a radiological component with a total of 325 radiology images. Important aspects of radiology practice (e.g. consent, patient safety, contrast toxicity, ionising radiation) were also covered. There were 274,000 student hits on cases the first year, with students completing a mean of 169 cases each. High levels of student satisfaction were recorded in relation to the online module and also additional online radiology teaching initiatives. Conclusion: Online educational techniques can be effectively blended with other forms of teaching to allow successful undergraduate delivery of

  6. Blending online techniques with traditional face to face teaching methods to deliver final year undergraduate radiology learning content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlett, David; Vincent, Tim; Watson, Gillian; Owens, Emma; Webb, Richard; Gainsborough, Nicola; Fairclough, Jil; Taylor, Nick; Miles, Ken; Cohen, Jon; Vincent, Richard

    2011-06-01

    To review the initial experience of blending a variety of online educational techniques with traditional face to face or contact-based teaching methods to deliver final year undergraduate radiology content at a UK Medical School. The Brighton and Sussex Medical School opened in 2003 and offers a 5-year undergraduate programme, with the final 5 spent in several regional centres. Year 5 involves several core clinical specialities with onsite radiology teaching provided at regional centres in the form of small-group tutorials, imaging seminars and also a one-day course. An online educational module was introduced in 2007 to facilitate equitable delivery of the year 5 curriculum between the regional centres and to support students on placement. This module had a strong radiological emphasis, with a combination of imaging integrated into clinical cases to reflect everyday practice and also dedicated radiology cases. For the second cohort of year 5 students in 2008 two additional online media-rich initiatives were introduced, to complement the online module, comprising imaging tutorials and an online case discussion room. In the first year for the 2007/2008 cohort, 490 cases were written, edited and delivered via the Medical School managed learning environment as part of the online module. 253 cases contained a form of image media, of which 195 cases had a radiological component with a total of 325 radiology images. Important aspects of radiology practice (e.g. consent, patient safety, contrast toxicity, ionising radiation) were also covered. There were 274,000 student hits on cases the first year, with students completing a mean of 169 cases each. High levels of student satisfaction were recorded in relation to the online module and also additional online radiology teaching initiatives. Online educational techniques can be effectively blended with other forms of teaching to allow successful undergraduate delivery of radiology. Efficient IT links and good image quality

  7. Blending online techniques with traditional face to face teaching methods to deliver final year undergraduate radiology learning content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howlett, David; Vincent, Tim; Watson, Gillian; Owens, Emma; Webb, Richard; Gainsborough, Nicola; Fairclough, Jil; Taylor, Nick; Miles, Ken; Cohen, Jon; Vincent, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To review the initial experience of blending a variety of online educational techniques with traditional face to face or contact-based teaching methods to deliver final year undergraduate radiology content at a UK Medical School. Materials and methods: The Brighton and Sussex Medical School opened in 2003 and offers a 5-year undergraduate programme, with the final 5 spent in several regional centres. Year 5 involves several core clinical specialities with onsite radiology teaching provided at regional centres in the form of small-group tutorials, imaging seminars and also a one-day course. An online educational module was introduced in 2007 to facilitate equitable delivery of the year 5 curriculum between the regional centres and to support students on placement. This module had a strong radiological emphasis, with a combination of imaging integrated into clinical cases to reflect everyday practice and also dedicated radiology cases. For the second cohort of year 5 students in 2008 two additional online media-rich initiatives were introduced, to complement the online module, comprising imaging tutorials and an online case discussion room. Results: In the first year for the 2007/2008 cohort, 490 cases were written, edited and delivered via the Medical School managed learning environment as part of the online module. 253 cases contained a form of image media, of which 195 cases had a radiological component with a total of 325 radiology images. Important aspects of radiology practice (e.g. consent, patient safety, contrast toxicity, ionising radiation) were also covered. There were 274,000 student hits on cases the first year, with students completing a mean of 169 cases each. High levels of student satisfaction were recorded in relation to the online module and also additional online radiology teaching initiatives. Conclusion: Online educational techniques can be effectively blended with other forms of teaching to allow successful undergraduate delivery of

  8. A better way to teach knot tying: a randomized controlled trial comparing the kinesthetic and traditional methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Emily; Chern, Hueylan; O'Sullivan, Patricia; Cook, Brian; McDonald, Erik; Palmer, Barnard; Liu, Terrence; Kim, Edward

    2014-10-01

    Knot tying is a fundamental and crucial surgical skill. We developed a kinesthetic pedagogical approach that increases precision and economy of motion by explicitly teaching suture-handling maneuvers and studied its effects on novice performance. Seventy-four first-year medical students were randomized to learn knot tying via either the traditional or the novel "kinesthetic" method. After 1 week of independent practice, students were videotaped performing 4 tying tasks. Three raters scored deidentified videos using a validated visual analog scale. The groups were compared using analysis of covariance with practice knots as a covariate and visual analog scale score (range, 0 to 100) as the dependent variable. Partial eta-square was calculated to indicate effect size. Overall rater reliability was .92. The kinesthetic group scored significantly higher than the traditional group for individual tasks and overall, controlling for practice (all P kinesthetic overall mean was 64.15 (standard deviation = 16.72) vs traditional 46.31 (standard deviation = 16.20; P kinesthetic suture handling substantively improved performance on knot tying. We believe this effect can be extrapolated to more complex surgical skills. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The professional methodological teaching performance of the professor of Physical education. Set of parameters for its measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Pedro Suárez Pérez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This work was developed due to the need to attend to the difficulties found in the Physical Education teachers of the municipality of San Juan and Martínez during the development of the teaching-learning process of Basketball, which threaten the quality of the classes, sports results and preparation of the School for life. The objective is to propose parameters that allow measuring the professional teaching methodological performance of these teachers. The customized behavior of the research made possible the diagnosis of the 26 professors taken as a sample, expressing the traits that distinguish their efficiency, determining their potentialities and deficiencies. During the research process, theoretical, empirical and statistical methods were used, which permitted to corroborate the real existence of the problem, as well as the evaluation of its impact, which revealed a positive transformation in pedagogical practice. The results provide a concrete and viable answer for the improvement of the evaluation of the teaching-methodological component of the Physical Education teacher, which constitutes an important material of guidance for methodologists and managers related to the instrumental cognitive, procedural and attitudinal performance , In order to conduct from the precedent knowledge, the new knowledge and lead to a formative process, with a contemporary vision, offering methodological resources to control the quality of Physical Education lessons.

  10. FIELD CLASS AS PEDAGOGICAL PRACTICE IN TEACHING OF GEOGRAPHY FOR FUNDAMENTAL EDUCATION: proposed methodology and case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Michael Pinheiro Silveira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of significant change and transformation of society in recent decades at the global level, geography had to rethink its role in the condition of traditional discipline of the school curriculum. With the need for new teaching practices that apply to the daily lives of students, field classes emerge as an important activity to support the teaching of geography. At this perspective, based on recent results of the Project Expedições Geográficas (UFPR/Licenciar, this paper proposes a methodology for planning and organizing field classes at the local scale, based on three points: the pre-field (planning and organization stage, the field (realization of the activity and post-field (evaluation and discussion stage, which resulted in the case study with students from 6th grade (elementary school of Aline Picheth School, located in Curitiba/PR. Altogether six field classes were performed, with themes proposed initially, with emphasis on orientation/location, geotechnologies insertion and interpretation and recognition of landscape elements. The recorded proposals by the students during the activity denoted the fast assimilation of the contents against the reality experienced in loco, presenting satisfactory results and demonstrating the potential of the field class as an auxiliary teaching-pedagogical resource. RESUMO: No contexto das significativas mudanças e transformações da sociedade nas últimas décadas em nível global, a geografia teve de repensar sua função na condição de tradicional disciplina do currículo escolar. Com a necessidade de novas práticas pedagógicas que se apliquem ao cotidiano dos alunos, as aulas de campo surgem como importante atividade de apoio ao ensino de geografia. Nessa perspectiva, com base nos resultados recentes do Projeto Expedições Geográficas (UFPR/Licenciar, o presente trabalho propõe uma metodologia para o planejamento e organização de aulas de campo em escala local, pautada em tr

  11. Main regularities of teaching course "Non-traditional methods of recovery at physical culture and sports"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Podrigalo L.V.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available It is analysed features and conformities to the law selected teaching, cooperant forming of bases health-improvement-rehabilitation thoughts for specialists on physical education. Their realization is carried out due to complex connection of necessary theoretical knowledge with a capture practical skills and abilities. Basic conformities to the law of exposition of object are selected. From position of differentiation of spheres of activity of physician and doctor on a rehabilitation is making healthy, being measures on renewal of capacity. From point of complex approach is a construction of the health and restoration system, being based on the mode and use basic physiological hygienical factors. From position of practical orientation is a capture the algorithm of activity under various conditions due to the decision of situational tasks.

  12. Recasting a traditional laboratory practical as a "Design-your-own protocol" to teach a universal research skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitworth, David E

    2016-07-08

    Laboratory-based practical classes are a common feature of life science teaching, during which students learn how to perform experiments and generate/interpret data. Practical classes are typically instructional, concentrating on providing topic- and technique-specific skills, however to produce research-capable graduates it is also important to develop generic practical skills. To provide an opportunity for students to develop the skills needed to create bespoke protocols for experimental benchwork, a traditional practical was repurposed. Students were given a list of available resources and an experimental goal, and directed to create a bench protocol to achieve the aim (measuring the iron in hemoglobin). In a series of teaching events students received feedback from staff, and peers prototyped the protocols, before protocols were finally implemented. Graduates highlighted this exercise as one of the most important of their degrees, primarily because of the clear relevance of the skills acquired to professional practice. The exercise exemplifies a range of pedagogic principles, but arguably its most important innovation is that it repurposed a pre-existing practical. This had the benefits of automatically providing scaffolding to direct the students' thought processes, while retaining the advantages of a "discovery learning" exercise, and allowing facile adoption of the approach across the sector. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):377-380, 2016. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  13. COMPARISON OF EFFECTIVENESS OF TRADITIONAL AND INTERACTIVE LECTURE METHODS FOR TEACHING BIOCHEMISTRY AMONG FIRST YEAR MEDICAL STUDENTS IN GOVERNMENT MEDICAL COLLEGE, IDUKKI, KERALA

    OpenAIRE

    Sajeevan K. C; Lyson Lonappan; Sajna MV; Geetha Devi M

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Traditional lecture is the most common type of teaching learning method used in professional colleges of India. Interactive lecture seems to be an important and feasible teaching learning method to increase the effect of learning in medical education. MATERIALS & METHODS The study was performed from July 2015 to October 2015 among first year medical students in Government Medical College, Idukki. All fifty first year MBBS students of 2014 batch were divided into grou...

  14. Kumaravadivelu's Framework as a Basis for Improving English Language Teaching in Saudi Arabia: Opportunities and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Afnan Masaoud

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the issues with EFL teaching in Saudi Arabia, including the reliance on traditional teaching methodologies and banning use of first languages in classrooms. As a result, these traditional teaching practices produce less proficient learners who have limited knowledge about proper linguistic use. In order to overcome these…

  15. Teaching the process of science: faculty perceptions and an effective methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coil, David; Wenderoth, Mary Pat; Cunningham, Matthew; Dirks, Clarissa

    2010-01-01

    Most scientific endeavors require science process skills such as data interpretation, problem solving, experimental design, scientific writing, oral communication, collaborative work, and critical analysis of primary literature. These are the fundamental skills upon which the conceptual framework of scientific expertise is built. Unfortunately, most college science departments lack a formalized curriculum for teaching undergraduates science process skills. However, evidence strongly suggests that explicitly teaching undergraduates skills early in their education may enhance their understanding of science content. Our research reveals that faculty overwhelming support teaching undergraduates science process skills but typically do not spend enough time teaching skills due to the perceived need to cover content. To encourage faculty to address this issue, we provide our pedagogical philosophies, methods, and materials for teaching science process skills to freshman pursuing life science majors. We build upon previous work, showing student learning gains in both reading primary literature and scientific writing, and share student perspectives about a course where teaching the process of science, not content, was the focus. We recommend a wider implementation of courses that teach undergraduates science process skills early in their studies with the goals of improving student success and retention in the sciences and enhancing general science literacy.

  16. TEACHING METHODOLOGY OF THE MACHINE PARTS - REPRESENTATION AND DIMENSIONING OF FLANGES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CLINCIU Mihaela Rodica

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a teaching activity on the topic - Representation and dimensioning of flanges and is addressed to the teachers who teach technical drawing in technical university education, but also to the students. The paper represents an aid both to the professor in achieving the learning objectives, but also for the students who need to understand easily the information and knowledge required by other fields.

  17. Comparing the Effects of Simulation-Based and Traditional Teaching Methods on the Critical Thinking Abilities and Self-Confidence of Nursing Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlAmrani, Mashael-Hasan; AlAmmar, Kamila-Ahmad; AlQahtani, Sarah-Saad; Salem, Olfat A

    2017-10-10

    Critical thinking and self-confidence are imperative to success in clinical practice. Educators should use teaching strategies that will help students enhance their critical thinking and self-confidence in complex content such as electrocardiogram interpretation. Therefore, teaching electrocardiogram interpretation to students is important for nurse educators. This study compares the effect of simulation-based and traditional teaching methods on the critical thinking and self-confidence of students during electrocardiogram interpretation sessions. Thirty undergraduate nursing students volunteered to participate in this study. The participants were divided into intervention and control groups, which were taught respectively using the simulation-based and traditional teaching programs. All of the participants were asked to complete the study instrumentpretest and posttest to measure their critical thinking and self-confidence. Improvement was observed in the control and experimental groups with respect to critical thinking and self-confidence, as evidenced by the results of the paired samples t test and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test (p .05). This study evaluated an innovative simulation-based teaching method for nurses. No significant differences in outcomes were identified between the simulator-based and traditional teaching methods, indicating that well-implemented educational programs that use either teaching method effectively promote critical thinking and self-confidence in nursing students. Nurse educators are encouraged to design educational plans with clear objectives to improve the critical thinking and self-confidence of their students. Future research should compare the effects of several teaching sessions using each method in a larger sample.

  18. SU-A-BRA-02: Making the Most of a One Hour Lecture with Alternative Teaching Methodologies: Implementing Project-Based and Flipped Learning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, R.

    2016-01-01

    Vic Montemayor - No one has been more passionate about improving the quality and effectiveness of the teaching of Medical Physics than Bill Hendee. It was in August of 2008 that the first AAPM Workshop on Becoming a Better Teacher of Medical Physics was held, organized and run by Bill Hendee. This was followed up in July of 2010 with a summer school on the same topic, again organized by Bill. There has been continued interest in alternate approaches to teaching medical physics since those initial gatherings. The momentum established by these workshops is made clear each year in the annual Innovation in Medical Physics Education session, which highlights work being done in all forms of medical physics education, from one-on-one residencies or classroom presentations to large-scale program revisions and on-line resources for international audiences. This symposium, presented on behalf of the Education Council, highlights the work of three finalists from past Innovation in Education sessions. Each will be presenting their approaches to and innovations in teaching medical physics. It is hoped that audience members interested in trying something new in their teaching of medical physics will find some of these ideas and approaches readily applicable to their own classrooms. Rebecca Howell - The presentation will discuss ways to maximize classroom learning, i.e., increasing the amount of material covered while also enhancing students’ understanding of the broader implications of the course topics. Specifically, the presentation will focus on two teaching methodologies, project based learning and flip learning. These teaching methods will be illustrated using an example of graduate medical physics course where both are used in conjunction with traditional lectures. Additionally, the presentation will focus on our experience implementing these methods including challenges that were overcome. Jay Burmeister - My presentation will discuss the incorporation of active

  19. SU-A-BRA-02: Making the Most of a One Hour Lecture with Alternative Teaching Methodologies: Implementing Project-Based and Flipped Learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, R. [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Vic Montemayor - No one has been more passionate about improving the quality and effectiveness of the teaching of Medical Physics than Bill Hendee. It was in August of 2008 that the first AAPM Workshop on Becoming a Better Teacher of Medical Physics was held, organized and run by Bill Hendee. This was followed up in July of 2010 with a summer school on the same topic, again organized by Bill. There has been continued interest in alternate approaches to teaching medical physics since those initial gatherings. The momentum established by these workshops is made clear each year in the annual Innovation in Medical Physics Education session, which highlights work being done in all forms of medical physics education, from one-on-one residencies or classroom presentations to large-scale program revisions and on-line resources for international audiences. This symposium, presented on behalf of the Education Council, highlights the work of three finalists from past Innovation in Education sessions. Each will be presenting their approaches to and innovations in teaching medical physics. It is hoped that audience members interested in trying something new in their teaching of medical physics will find some of these ideas and approaches readily applicable to their own classrooms. Rebecca Howell - The presentation will discuss ways to maximize classroom learning, i.e., increasing the amount of material covered while also enhancing students’ understanding of the broader implications of the course topics. Specifically, the presentation will focus on two teaching methodologies, project based learning and flip learning. These teaching methods will be illustrated using an example of graduate medical physics course where both are used in conjunction with traditional lectures. Additionally, the presentation will focus on our experience implementing these methods including challenges that were overcome. Jay Burmeister - My presentation will discuss the incorporation of active

  20. Scrum Methodology in Higher Education: Innovation in Teaching, Learning and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado-Navas, Antonio; Munoz-Luna, Rosa

    2017-01-01

    The present paper aims to detail the experience developed in a classroom of English Studies from the Spanish University of Málaga, where an alternative project-based learning methodology has been implemented. Such methodology is inspired by scrum sessions widely extended in technological companies where staff members work in teams and are assigned…

  1. Comparison of the ESTRO formalism for monitor unit calculation with a Clarkson based algorithm of a treatment planning system and a traditional ''full-scatter'' methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirotta, M.; Aquilina, D.; Bhikha, T.; Georg, D.

    2005-01-01

    The ESTRO formalism for monitor unit (MU) calculations was evaluated and implemented to replace a previous methodology based on dosimetric data measured in a full-scatter phantom. This traditional method relies on data normalised at the depth of dose maximum (z m ), as well as on the utilisation of the BJR 25 table for the conversion of rectangular fields into equivalent square fields. The treatment planning system (TPS) was subsequently updated to reflect the new beam data normalised at a depth z R of 10 cm. Comparisons were then carried out between the ESTRO formalism, the Clarkson-based dose calculation algorithm on the TPS (with beam data normalised at z m and z R ), and the traditional ''full-scatter'' methodology. All methodologies, except for the ''full-scatter'' methodology, separated head-scatter from phantom-scatter effects and none of the methodologies; except for the ESTRO formalism, utilised wedge depth dose information for calculations. The accuracy of MU calculations was verified against measurements in a homogeneous phantom for square and rectangular open and wedged fields, as well as blocked open and wedged fields, at 5, 10, and 20 cm depths, under fixed SSD and isocentric geometries for 6 and 10 MV. Overall, the ESTRO Formalism showed the most accurate performance, with the root mean square (RMS) error with respect to measurements remaining below 1% even for the most complex beam set-ups investigated. The RMS error for the TPS deteriorated with the introduction of a wedge, with a worse RMS error for the beam data normalised at z m (4% at 6 MV and 1.6% at 10 MV) than at z R (1.9% at 6 MV and 1.1% at 10 MV). The further addition of blocking had only a marginal impact on the accuracy of this methodology. The ''full-scatter'' methodology showed a loss in accuracy for calculations involving either wedges or blocking, and performed worst for blocked wedged fields (RMS errors of 7.1% at 6 MV and 5% at 10 MV). The origins of these discrepancies were

  2. Influence of educational context in Astronomy teaching for ninth graders of elementary school under different teaching methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, D.

    2015-03-01

    This present work, carried out at E. E. Monsenhor Dr. Arthur Ricci, in the city of Itupeva-SP, aims to analyze different teaching strategies applied to Astronomy teaching, along with students from the last year of primary school. The 8th grade C was chosen as a research group and the 8th grade D as a control group. The D. P. Ausubel's Meaningful Learning Theory was the chosen theoretical referential, by being exclusively developed for the classroom environment. A questionnaire of previous knowledge about astronomy was applied to both classrooms, in which the research group obtained an index of 25.8% of right answers above 50.0%. In the control group, only 6.1% got more than 50.0%. After the questionnaire application, the interventions began. In the research group, astronomy workshops, telescopic observations and the Communication and Information Technologies. In the control group, interventions were made by conventional classes. Four months after the end of the interventions, the post-intervention questionnaire was applied, in which the research group obtained 22.5% of right answers above 50.0%, indicating a 3.3% drop in the class efficiency. The control group obtained 61.0% of right answers above 50.0%. It's concluded that, to reach Meaningful Learning it's imperative that the student is willing to learn.

  3. Teachers' Beliefs, Perceived Practice and Actual Classroom Practice in Relation to Traditional (Teacher-Centered) and Constructivist (Learner-Centered) Teaching (Note 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaymakamoglu, Sibel Ersel

    2018-01-01

    This study explored the EFL teachers' beliefs, perceived practice and actual classroom practice in relation to Traditional (teacher-centered) and Constructivist (learner-centered) teaching in Cyprus Turkish State Secondary Schools context. For this purpose, semi-structured interviews and structured observations were employed with purposively…

  4. The Effects of Brain Gym® Activities and Traditional Teaching Strategies on Students' Performance in Comprehension in a 4th Grade Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariuki, Patrick N.; Kent, Holly D.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the difference between students' scores in comprehension (English Language Arts) tests when they are led in Brain Gym® activities before class instruction and when they are taught using traditional teaching strategies. The sample for this study consisted of 11 males and 9 females. Data were collected by…

  5. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Simulation-Based Teaching versus Traditional Instruction in Medicine: A Pilot Study among Clinical Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, James A.; Shaffer, David W.; Raemer, Daniel B.; Pawlowski, John; Hurford, William E.; Cooper, Jeffrey B.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To compare simulator-based teaching with traditional instruction among clinical medical students. Methods: Randomized controlled trial with written pre-post testing. Third-year medical students (n = 38) received either a myocardial infarction (MI) simulation followed by a reactive airways disease (RAD) lecture, or a RAD simulation…

  6. Documentation of tests on particle size methodologies for laser diffraction compared to traditional sieving and sedimentation analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Charlotte; Dalsgaard, Kristian

    Sieving and sedimentation analyses by pipette or hydrometer are historically the traditional methods for determining particle size distributions (PSD). A more informative and faster alternative has for years been laser diffraction (LD). From 2003 to 2013 the authors of this paper have worked...... intensively with PSD and performed various tests and investigations, using LD, sedimentation (by pipette) and sieving. The aim was to improve and understand the relationship between these various techniques, pre-treatment effects and preferably find a unifying correlation factor. As a result, method...... comparisons of LD and sieving/sedimentation are difficult, as LD is a 3D optical volume measurement, sieving is a 2D width measurement, and sedimentation is density dependent. Platy particles like clay are generally measured to be coarser than traditional methods when LD is used. For LD the clay...

  7. Basic practical skills teaching and learning in undergraduate medical education - a review on methodological evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Daniela; Harendza, Sigrid

    2016-01-01

    Practical skills are an essential part of physicians' daily routine. Nevertheless, medical graduates' performance of basic skills is often below the expected level. This review aims to identify and summarize teaching approaches of basic practical skills in undergraduate medical education which provide evidence with respect to effective students' learning of these skills. Basic practical skills were defined as basic physical examination skills, routine skills which get better with practice, and skills which are also performed by nurses. We searched PubMed with different terms describing these basic practical skills. In total, 3467 identified publications were screened and 205 articles were eventually reviewed for eligibility. 43 studies that included at least one basic practical skill, a comparison of two groups of undergraduate medical students and effects on students' performance were analyzed. Seven basic practical skills and 15 different teaching methods could be identified. The most consistent results with respect to effective teaching and acquisition of basic practical skills were found for structured skills training, feedback, and self-directed learning. Simulation was effective with specific teaching methods and in several studies no differences in teaching effects were detected between expert or peer instructors. Multimedia instruction, when used in the right setting, also showed beneficial effects for basic practical skills learning. A combination of voluntary or obligatory self-study with multimedia applications like video clips in combination with a structured program including the possibility for individual exercise with personal feedback by peers or teachers might provide a good learning opportunity for basic practical skills.

  8. An alternative methodology for teaching English in the first cycle of primary education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nery I. Calvet Valdés

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of English language programs in the first cycle of primary education makes it necessary to implement a methodology that leads enclosed in itself the challenge imposed on us every day to create a man more prepared in communicating in foreign languages. The article proposes a methodology that has as its core concepts characterization of the school, values education, communication and culture in learning conditions that encourage interaction.

  9. A comparison of two methods of teaching. Computer managed instruction and keypad questions versus traditional classroom lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halloran, L

    1995-01-01

    Computers increasingly are being integrated into nursing education. One method of integration is through computer managed instruction (CMI). Recently, technology has become available that allows the integration of keypad questions into CMI. This brings a new type of interactivity between students and teachers into the classroom. The purpose of this study was to evaluate differences in achievement between a control group taught by traditional classroom lecture (TCL) and an experimental group taught using CMI and keypad questions. Both control and experimental groups consisted of convenience samples of junior nursing students in a baccalaureate program taking a medical/surgical nursing course. Achievement was measured by three instructor-developed multiple choice examinations. Findings demonstrated that although the experimental group demonstrated increasingly higher test scores as the semester progressed, no statistical difference was found in achievement between the two groups. One reason for this may be phenomenon of vampire video. Initially, the method of presentation overshadowed the content. As students became desensitized to the method, they were able to focus and absorb more content. This study suggests that CMI and keypads are a viable teaching option for nursing education. It is equal to TCL in student achievement and provides a new level of interaction in the classroom setting.

  10. Are We Teaching Them Anything?: A Model for Measuring Methodology Skills in the Political Science Major

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siver, Christi; Greenfest, Seth W.; Haeg, G. Claire

    2016-01-01

    While the literature emphasizes the importance of teaching political science students methods skills, there currently exists little guidance for how to assess student learning over the course of their time in the major. To address this gap, we develop a model set of assessment tools that may be adopted and adapted by political science departments…

  11. An Interview with David Rindskopf: A Leading Voice on Teaching Statistics and Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bembenutty, Hefer

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an interview with David Rindskopf, a Distinguished Professor of Educational Psychology and Psychology at the City University of New York Graduate Center, where he has taught since 1979. His research and teaching are in the area of applied statistics, measurement, and research design. He is a fellow of the American Statistical…

  12. Adobe acrobat: an alternative electronic teaching file construction methodology independent of HTML restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzman, G L

    2001-03-01

    The goal of the project was to create a method by which an in-house digital teaching file could be constructed that was simple, inexpensive, independent of hypertext markup language (HTML) restrictions, and appears identical on multiple platforms. To accomplish this, Microsoft PowerPoint and Adobe Acrobat were used in succession to assemble digital teaching files in the Acrobat portable document file format. They were then verified to appear identically on computers running Windows, Macintosh Operating Systems (OS), and the Silicon Graphics Unix-based OS as either a free-standing file using Acrobat Reader software or from within a browser window using the Acrobat browser plug-in. This latter display method yields a file viewed through a browser window, yet remains independent of underlying HTML restrictions, which may confer an advantage over simple HTML teaching file construction. Thus, a hybrid of HTML-distributed Adobe Acrobat generated WWW documents may be a viable alternative for digital teaching file construction and distribution.

  13. English Language Teaching in Spain: Do Textbooks Comply with the Official Methodological Regulations? A Sample Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criado, Raquel; Sanchez, Aquilino

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to verify up to what point ELT textbooks used in Spanish educational settings comply with the official regulations prescribed, which fully advocate the Communicative Language Teaching Method (CLT). For that purpose, seven representative coursebooks of different educational levels and modalities in Spain--secondary, upper…

  14. Integrating Ethics into International Business Teaching: Challenges and Methodologies in the Greater China Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitla, Paul

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the process of integrating ethics into the teaching of international business within the Greater China region. An example of how ethics is integrated into a required undergraduate international business course at a Hong Kong based university is presented. The contextual challenges of developing a course for use in the Greater…

  15. Engaging Future Clinical Oncology Researchers: An Initiative to Integrate Teaching of Biostatistics and Research Methodology into Specialty Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, S; Sundaresan, P; Mann, K; Pryor, D; Gebski, V; Shaw, T

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the learner's perspectives on a novel workshop programme designed to improve skills in biostatistics, research methodology and critical appraisal in oncology. Trainees were surveyed anonymously at the completion of each annual workshop from 2012 to 2015. In total, 103 trainees in years 2-4 of training in radiation oncology responded, giving a 94% survey response rate. A 1 day workshop, designed by biostatisticians and radiation oncologist facilitators, is the central component of a programme teaching skills in biostatistics, research methods and critical appraisal. This links short didactic lectures about statistical concepts to interactive trainee discussions around discipline-related publications. The workshop was run in conjunction with the major radiation oncology clinical trials group meeting with alternating programmes (A and B). Most of the participants (44-47/47 for A and 48-55/56 for B), reported that their understanding of one or more individual topics improved as a result of teaching. Refinement of the workshop over time led to a more favourable perception of the 'optimal' balance between didactic/interactive teaching: nine of 27 (33%) 'optimal' responses seen in 2013 compared with 23 of 29 (79%) in 2015 (P research to illuminate key statistical concepts. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Basic practical skills teaching and learning in undergraduate medical education – a review on methodological evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Daniela; Harendza, Sigrid

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Practical skills are an essential part of physicians’ daily routine. Nevertheless, medical graduates’ performance of basic skills is often below the expected level. This review aims to identify and summarize teaching approaches of basic practical skills in undergraduate medical education which provide evidence with respect to effective students’ learning of these skills. Methods: Basic practical skills were defined as basic physical examination skills, routine skills which get better with practice, and skills which are also performed by nurses. We searched PubMed with different terms describing these basic practical skills. In total, 3467 identified publications were screened and 205 articles were eventually reviewed for eligibility. Results: 43 studies that included at least one basic practical skill, a comparison of two groups of undergraduate medical students and effects on students’ performance were analyzed. Seven basic practical skills and 15 different teaching methods could be identified. The most consistent results with respect to effective teaching and acquisition of basic practical skills were found for structured skills training, feedback, and self-directed learning. Simulation was effective with specific teaching methods and in several studies no differences in teaching effects were detected between expert or peer instructors. Multimedia instruction, when used in the right setting, also showed beneficial effects for basic practical skills learning. Conclusion: A combination of voluntary or obligatory self-study with multimedia applications like video clips in combination with a structured program including the possibility for individual exercise with personal feedback by peers or teachers might provide a good learning opportunity for basic practical skills. PMID:27579364

  17. The Treachery in Teaching Henry James, Hayim Nachman Bialik, Walter Benjamin, and Nachman of Bratzlav's Tradition of Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutter, William

    1989-01-01

    Views teaching as a form of translation. Discusses the prospects of precise teaching and sets forth some thoughts concerning an ideal model. Delineates discussion from the literary, mystical, and philosophical dimensions in order to elucidate the instructional tasks of religious education. Points out the paradoxes of teaching. (KO)

  18. METHODOLOGICAL PECULIARITIES OF TEACHING FUTURE ECONOMISTS TO READ ENGLISH TEXTS RELATED TO PROFESSIONAL AREA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ліліана Білогорка

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The role of reading competence in the structure of English professionally oriented communicative competence has been analysed; types of economics texts which should be used in teaching future economists – scientific economics texts, texts of professional economics activity, educational economics texts, texts of non-professional economics activity have been defined; the necessity of using not only authentic, but also semi-authentic and adapted texts in teaching future economists to read English texts related to professional area has been grounded; bachelor’s level requirements for students’ knowledge and skills in skimming, scanning reading and reading for detail have been defined; direct (cognitive and compensatory and indirect (metacognitive, affective and social learning strategies to enhance the quality of text reading have been specified in the article.

  19. Bringing the field into the classroom: an innovative methodology in global health teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. M H Bryant, MBBS; J Wolff, MD

    2015-01-01

    Background: The practice of global health is difficult to teach from a US-based classroom. Students benefit from experiencing how theory becomes practice in the chaotic environments of under-resourced health programmes in developing countries. We could not take our students to the field during weekly course work, so we designed a course to bring the field to the students. We created innovative partnerships with locally based organisations that implement programmes in developing countries. Eac...

  20. 论教学理论的学术传统与创新%On the Academic Tradition and Innovation of Teaching Theories

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘旭东

    2012-01-01

    教学的价值和意义是在教学中通过积极行动开拓出来的。教学理论的学术传统以直面教学实践和积极行动为基本内涵,以服务于对教学现象的诠释、教学问题的解决为旨趣,具有实践智慧的品格,有自身特定的边界。在技术理性的制约下,这个传统一度被遏制。要复兴教学理论的学术传统,就需要采用历史的、批判的、革命的思维方式,刻意寻找教学的生活基础,重新领悟教学的诗意,揭示教学活动和教学现象的变化性和丰富多彩性,通过努力搭建教学与生活世界之间的内在联系来彰显自身存在的价值。%: For the reason that the value and meaning of teaching is to be developed and stretched through active actions in the process of teaching, the academic tradition of teaching theories should be based on teaching practice and active actions and has its own specific research area where the specific phenomena get interpreted and the teaching problems get solved with practical wisdom. To revive the academic tradition of teaching theories from the distortion, the efforts ought to be made in the pursuit of the life basis of teaching, the in-depth interpretation of the poetic romance within and phenomena and connecting teaching with life to historical, critical and revolutionary thought. teaching, revealing the diversity of teaching activities demonstrate the value of teaching theories through

  1. Decolonising Research and Teaching Methodologies: A "Ninth Moment" Symphony of Artist-Educator-Researcher Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Janice K.; Batorowicz, Beata; Ladislas Derr, Robert; Peters, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    In an era of globalisation, positivist research methodologies and voices are privileged and funded over those of qualitative researchers. This has led to narrowing beliefs about what constitutes knowledge, and about the ways in which knowledge is constructed and evaluated, impacting upon the conduct, funding and reporting of arts research, and…

  2. Using Critical Thinking Drills to Teach and Assess Proficiency in Methodological and Statistical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascio, Ted V.

    2017-01-01

    This study assesses the effectiveness of critical thinking drills (CTDs), a repetitious classroom activity designed to improve methodological and statistical thinking in relation to psychological claims embedded in popular press articles. In each of four separate CTDs, students critically analyzed a brief article reporting a recent psychological…

  3. A role-play approach for teaching research methodology in construction management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartmann, Andreas; Doree, Andries G.; Martin, Ludwig; Dainty, A

    2008-01-01

    Assignments of Construction Management (CM) graduate programmes often require students to carry out research on real-world problems. To prepare students for this task, many CM-programmes contain a research methodology course. However, after taking part in these courses, many students still lack the

  4. Methodologie, Eclectisme...et Bricolage Pedagogique (Methodology, Selective Teaching Methods... and Pedagogical Odds and Ends).

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Salins, Genevieve-Dominique

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on the contents of foreign language texts and the types of foreigners who learn French. The article notes the tone of didactic discussions in these manuals and questions the usage of two terms appearing there--"methodology" and "selection." (Author/CK)

  5. A Computer Simulation for Teaching Diagnosis of Secondary Ignition Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diedrick, Walter; Thomas, Rex

    1977-01-01

    Presents the methodology and findings of an experimental project to determine the viability of computer assisted as opposed to more traditional methods of instruction for teaching one phase of automotive troubleshooting. (Editor)

  6. Traditional Cereal Food as Container of Probiotic Bacteria “Lb. rhamnosus GG”: Optimization by Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asma Gharbi Yahyaoui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This research paper aims at optimizing three parameters involved in solid state fermentation (SSF using Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG to improve a traditional cereal food “Bsissa” in order to elaborate a new probiotic fermented breakfast cereal. A Box-Behnken experimental design was used and the optimal fermentation conditions were liquid to solid ratio: 1.2 (vw−1, fermentation time: 12 h, and sucrose concentration: 10.48 g (100 g DM−1. Under these conditions, the viable LGG cells, the free amino nitrogen content, and the total acidity were obtained to be 9.1 log10⁡(cfu g-1, 12.95 (mg g−1, and 6.46 (μmol g−1, respectively. After three weeks of refrigerated storage, the viability of LGG in the fermented Bsissa was 8.23 log10⁡(cfu g-1. This study shows a new possibility to make an acceptable nonfermented dairy product based mainly on cereals, leguminous plants, spices, and aromatic herbs, which are suitable substrates able to support the high probiotic viability.

  7. THE SCIENTIFIC-METHODOLOGICAL STUDY OF A PAPER TO OBTAIN THE FIRST TEACHING DEGREE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEON BUZILĂ

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the first part of the paper, I analyzed the content of the scientific-methodical paper for obtaining the first teaching degree with the title " The Touristic Potential of the Gersa Valley and Its Exploitation" and the presentation of pedagogical research which involved the students. The research described was conducted in the school year 2013-2014 at the "Iacob and Ioachim Mureșanu" Secondary School in Rebrișoara, Bistrița-Năsăud County, Romania. A practical quantitative pedagogical research, with an observation and an experimental phase was organized. The research paradigm was constructivism. The research strategy was action- research.

  8. Experimental activities in the early years of elementary school: a methodological tool for construction of the teaching-learning process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana de Souza Lima

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Focusing on the early years of elementary school, this study evaluated the impact of experimental activities based in the scientific method and preconceptions on the learning and memorization of concepts and phenomena associated with the fermentation process. The different activities were carried out through an experimental course (20hs, with students of elementary school from school municipal Diacono Joao Luiz Pozzobon, Santa Maria-RS. The research involved 20 students, with 6 and 7 old years. The evaluation was performed by comparing the interview responses made before the course (pre-test and after the course (post-test. The post-tests were applied at the end of the experimental course, and after 6 and 12 months. The experimental activities facilitated the acquisition and retention of new concepts. The data show that "experimental activities" can be used by teachers in early grades as a methodological tool to complement the teaching-learning process.

  9. From 1962 the teaching of Methodology of Radioisotopes is continuous in the University of Buenos Aires of the Argentine Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera, E.; Cremaschi, G.; Martin, G.; Zubillaga, M.; Cricco, G.; Davio, C.; Genaro, A.; Bianchin, A.; Mohamad, N.; Klecha, A.; Calmanovici, G.; Goldman, G.; Salgueiro, J.; Nunez, M.; Medina, V.; Gutierrez, A.; Leonardi, N.; Bergoc, R.

    2006-01-01

    In the Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry of the University of Buenos Aires the teaching of the radioisotopes began in 1960 and uninterruptedly continuous. The application of the radioisotopes and the radiations in different professional activities it is acceptable only in a context of radiological safety and with personal appropriately trained. Conscious of it, the training in grade, postgraduate and technicature, has more of 40% of the thematic one guided to the formation in radiological protection. The courses dictated at the moment in the Laboratory of Radioisotopes they include: Grade formation: to) Subject grade 'Methodology of Radioisotopes' in the Career of Biochemistry: it began to be dictated in 1960 and until the present, more of 6500 students they have gone by our classrooms. b) Grade subject 'Radiopharmacy' in the Career of Pharmacy: guided to the formation of a modern pharmacist, with necessary knowledge to be developed as professional in the Radiopharmaceutical area. Postgraduate formation: c) Postgraduate course of Methodology of Radioisotopes specially directed to biochemical, biologists, veterinarians, chemical. It is dictated uninterruptedly from 1962. d) Postgraduate course in Methodology of Radioisotopes for medical professionals, specially directed to professionals of the medicine that want to specialize in different branches of the Nuclear Medicine. Both courses have 220 present hours and it stops their approval the assistants they should surrender a final exam at open book that consists on the resolution of a practical exercise adapted to their professional practices. Until the present they have surrendered their exams satisfactorily approximately 2000 professionals coming from different areas of the Argentina and of several countries of Hispanic speech. e) Starting from 1992 the Course of Upgrade in Methodology of Radioisotopes directed to professionals that want to upgrade its knowledge in new radioisotopic methodologies is dictated

  10. Online formative MCQs to supplement traditional teaching: a very significant positive impact on student performance in the short and long run

    OpenAIRE

    Catley, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The paper builds on the research underpinning One Lecturer’s Experience of Blending E-learning with Traditional Teaching (Catley, 2005). It analyses the earlier findings in more depth and examines the longer term impact of online quizzes on student performance. Engagement with formative online MCQs is explored generally and the links between MCQ engagement and a range of student characteristics: seminar attendance, “A” level performance, age, nationality, gender and prior study of the discipl...

  11. Methodology of teaching and new challenges in the training of professionals in the area of industrial radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, C.M. Araujo; Pelegrineli, S.Q.; Lima, A.R.

    2017-01-01

    One of the main causes of radiological accidents is the lack of knowledge in radiological protection of workers. In order to meet the needs of professionals in radiology techniques in training in industrial radiology and radiological protection, the Training Course in Industrial Radiology was created in 2009 by MAXIM, in partnership with the Casa Branca Faculty. The objective is to present the structure and methodology of teaching used in this course to reach the objectives of training professionals with solid knowledge in industrial radiology, as well as to mention the challenges of this training. For the elaboration of the study, a statistical data base and theoretical analysis of the teaching structure of the course was used. Professional training in industrial radiology is subdivided into basic, specific, practical and complementary modules, totaling a workload of 360 hours. It is noted that most of the professionals trained come from the great urban centers of the country, favoring employability in the port terminals and industries that are located in these regions. It is concluded, therefore, that it is necessary and of great importance for the growing industrial market, the formation of new professionals, mainly in cities of the interior

  12. COMPARISON OF EFFECTIVENESS OF TRADITIONAL AND INTERACTIVE LECTURE METHODS FOR TEACHING BIOCHEMISTRY AMONG FIRST YEAR MEDICAL STUDENTS IN GOVERNMENT MEDICAL COLLEGE, IDUKKI, KERALA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajeevan K. C

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Traditional lecture is the most common type of teaching learning method used in professional colleges of India. Interactive lecture seems to be an important and feasible teaching learning method to increase the effect of learning in medical education. MATERIALS & METHODS The study was performed from July 2015 to October 2015 among first year medical students in Government Medical College, Idukki. All fifty first year MBBS students of 2014 batch were divided into group A and group B by simple random method. Two topics of translation were taken to both groups by two different lecture methods. The first topic was taught by interactive lecture to group A and traditional lecture to group B on the first day. Pre-test and post-test were done to assess gain in knowledge by two lecture methods. Second topic was taken to both groups on the second day by exchanging lecture methods. Their increase in knowledge was assessed by pre-test and post-test. On the second day, their feedback regarding perceptions and preferences were taken. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS Mean scores of pre and post-test were analysed by paired t test. Level of knowledge gained among two lecture methods was compared by independent t test and qualitative data on feedback was analysed using Chi square test. RESULTS The level of knowledge gained by interactive lectures was significantly higher than traditional lectures. Students agreed that interactive lectures motivated them for self-learning and increased their confidence regarding study materials. It also helped them in the recollection of lecture content and clearing doubt than traditional lectures. CONCLUSIONS Interactive lectures were accepted and considered to be more useful than traditional lectures for teaching biochemistry at Government Medical College, Idukki.

  13. Methodological issues in using sequential representations in the teaching of writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Ching Lee

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This study looks at a specific application of Ainsworth's conceptual framework for learning with multiple representations in the context of using multiple sequential graphic organizers that are student-generated for a process-writing task. Process writing refers to writing that consists of multiple drafts. It may be a process of re-writing without feedback or re-writing based on feedback where the teacher or peers will provide feedback on the original draft and then the students will revise their writing based on the feedback given. The objective was to explore how knowledge of students' cognitive processes when using multiple organizers can inform the teaching of writing. The literature review analyzes the interaction of the design, function and task components of the framework; culminating in instructional approaches for using multiple organizers for classes with students of different writing abilities. Extended implications for designers of concept mapping tools based on these approaches are provided.

  14. Comparing Multiple Intelligences Approach with Traditional Teaching on Eight Grade Students' Achievement in and Attitudes toward Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Osman Nafiz; Dogan, Alev; Gokcek, Nur; Kilic, Ziya; Kilic, Esma

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of multiple intelligences (MI) teaching approach on 8th Grade students' achievement in and attitudes toward science. This study used a pretest-posttest control group experimental design. While the experimental group (n=30) was taught a unit on acids and bases using MI teaching approach, the…

  15. Virtual Reality Anatomy: Is It Comparable with Traditional Methods in the Teaching of Human Forearm Musculoskeletal Anatomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codd, Anthony M.; Choudhury, Bipasha

    2011-01-01

    The use of cadavers to teach anatomy is well established, but limitations with this approach have led to the introduction of alternative teaching methods. One such method is the use of three-dimensional virtual reality computer models. An interactive, three-dimensional computer model of human forearm anterior compartment musculoskeletal anatomy…

  16. On Teaching the History of California Spanish to HLL using Siri: Methodology and Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Covadonga Lamar Prieto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article reports results from a study in which two groups of college level students were exposed to interactions with Apple’s Siri in order to foster dialogue about their dialectal features. In this paper, the methodology and procedural challenges behind one of the activities that the participants completed are studied. These activities had been designed to present to them the historical dimensions of the Historical California Spanish dialect, or Californio Spanish, and pursue two different outcomes for the participants: 1 to foster the interest in discovering a dialectal past, and 2 to increase linguistic self-esteem, as a result of an external validation provided by technology.

  17. A problem-based approach to teaching research methodology to medical graduates in Iran

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    Mehrdad Jalalian Hosseini

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Physicians are reticent to participate in research projects for avariety of reasons. Facilitating the active involvement ofdoctors in research projects is a high priority for the IranianBlood Transfusion Organization (IBTO. A one-month trainingcourse on research methodology was conducted for a groupof physicians in Mashhad, in northeast Iran. The participantswere divided in ten groups. They prepared a researchproposal under the guidance of a workshop leader. Thequality of the research proposals, which were prepared by allparticipants, went beyond our expectations. All of theresearch proposals were relevant to blood safety. In this briefreport we describe our approach.

  18. Can teaching research methodology influence students' attitude toward science? Cohort study and nonrandomized trial in a single medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vujaklija, Ana; Hren, Darko; Sambunjak, Dario; Vodopivec, Ivana; Ivanis, Ana; Marusić, Ana; Marusić, Matko

    2010-02-01

    Medical teaching aims to develop attitudes and behaviors underlying professional competence of future physicians. We investigated whether a mandatory course on scientific methodology in the second study year could affect students' attitudes toward science in medicine. In a longitudinal study, students (n = 241) enrolling in 2001-2002 academic year at a single medical school were followed up until graduation in 2006-2007. Each year, they filled out a Likert-type questionnaire of 18 statements evaluating attitude toward science. Direct influence of the course on students' attitudes was tested in a nonrandomized controlled trial with the 2006-2007 second year student cohort. Positive students' attitudes toward science increased during study years (mean [SD] score of the maximum score of 90): from 57.6 (6.0) in the first to 69.8 (10.4) in the sixth year. There was a significant trend of increase in attitudes with the years of study (cubic trend by polynomial contrasts analysis, P = 0.011). Attendance of a course on research methodology significantly increased positive attitudes (score, 67.0 [7.0] before and 70.8 [7.5] after course, P = 0.032 vs control group), regardless of grade point average. The intervention had an effect even when the influence of the initial attitude was accounted for (F1,140 = 9.25, P = 0.003; analysis of covariance). The attitude changes after the course was greatest in students with low initial attitude scores (Spearman rinitial score, score difference, -0.44). Medical students have positive attitudes toward science and scientific method in medicine. Attendance of a course on research methodology had positive short-term effect on students' attitudes toward science. This positive effect should be maintained by vertical integration of the course in the medical curriculum.

  19. Innovative Methodologies for 21st Century Learning, Teaching and Assessment: A Convenience Sampling Investigation into the Use of Social Media Technologies in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivunja, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The advent of the Web as a social technology has created opportunities for the creation of informal learning environments, which have potential for innovative methodologies in learning, teaching and assessment. However, as Wolfe (2001) admonishes, "contrary to the rhetoric of cheerleaders, the Web places greater demands on students than…

  20. An Analysis of the Relationship of Teaching Methodology and the Students' Level of Cognition with Student Achievement in Principles of Marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Kenneth Glenn

    A study investigated the relationship of students' cognitive level of development and teaching methodology with student achievement. The sample was composed of 79 students in two sections of the introductory marketing course at the University of Northern Colorado. The control group was taught by a lecture strategy, and the experimental group by a…

  1. A five year study of the attitudes, perceptions, and philosophies of five secondary science education teachers prepared in the constructivist teaching methodology advanced at the University of Iowa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollenbeck, James Edward

    1999-11-01

    The present study researched the attitudes, Perceptions, and philosophies of five secondary education science teachers prepared in the constructivist teaching methodology advanced at the University of Iowa. This study is a continuation of a three-year study---the Salish I Project supported by the US Department of Education. The teachers studied are five 1993 University of Iowa Science Education Center graduates who have taught for five years. The main objective of the present study was finding answers to four questions aiming at further understanding of the impact and importance of the preservice education in I the constructivist teaching methodology of new teachers, and the changes they experience in the first five years of teaching. The instruments used in the study are various as they cover a wide range of different categories of beliefs I in terms of teaching, learning, teacher performance and view of school. The following trends came out on reviewing all of the data: in the first year of teaching three of the five teachers studied taught as constructivist teachers. in the third year of teaching, the classroom practices of the teachers converged more closely to their beliefs and preservice preparation. In the fifth year, all five teachers were ranked as constructivist in their teaching methodology in the classroom. Using the Wilcoxson test, significant, positive relationships were revealed between the teacher's philosophy of teaching and learning, with their actual practice. Teacher's philosophy and teaching practice were compared with selected standards set forth by the National Science Education Standards and were found to be in close alignment in their fifth year of teaching. Teachers prepared in the constructivist methodology are concerned about their subject content and value student input and reflection. The teachers reported using student-initiated ideas, alternative assessment strategies and being receptive to alternatives. Other important factors

  2. A CAL Program to Teach the Basic Principles of Genetic Engineering--A Change from the Traditional Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhurst, D. G.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    An interactive computer-assisted learning program written for the BBC microcomputer to teach the basic principles of genetic engineering is described. Discussed are the hardware requirements software, use of the program, and assessment. (Author/CW)

  3. The methodological features of teaching subject «Fundamentals of production technologies»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olesya Kornus

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In the article are reviews the methodical features teaching of the subject "Fundamentals of production technologies" as an example of training of students in the direction of 6.040104 Geography* and specialty 014 Secondary Education (Geography in the Sumy State A.S. Makarenko Pedagogical University. The subject «Fundamentals of production technologies» was introduced into curriculum bachelor of geography for quality training of geography teachers in pedagogical universities. This subject gives students the knowledge about the technical and economic features of the main industries, main technological schemes of production processes and the impact of industrial enterprises on the environment. The subject «Fundamentals of production technologies» is taught for second year students of natural-geographical faculty of the Sumy State A.S. Makarenko Pedagogical University. The educational process provides lectures, practical classes and self-dependent work. One of the forms of organization of training activities is the excursions to industrial enterprises of Sumy city. The organization of excursions includes preparation, conduct and report about the results of the excursion. For better learn the material excursion, preferably before the start of it to divide a group of students into small teams of 3-6 people. The report documentation includes a plan for characteristic of industrial enterprises, as well as multimedia presentation. The defense of report is passes like competition by voted. The team that wins the most votes gets the highest score. This form of subject study contributes to obtaining of positive educational outcomes and lasting knowledge, reliable formation of professional competencies of students-geographers.

  4. Students perception about the clinico-anatomical conferences as a teaching methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed, K.; Baptist, M.; Mukhtar, F.

    2015-01-01

    Anatomy has always been considered as an essential basis for clinical sciences. In recent decades there has been an increased trend towards incorporation of clinical problems in the teaching of anatomy. To promote clinical knowledge clinico-anatomical conferences have been conducted in our department for the last five years. This study has been undertaken to determine perception of medical students regarding these conferences and to formulate recommendations for their improvement based on feedback obtained from students. Method: A cross-sectional study was conducted from December 2013 to January 2014 at the Lahore Medical and Dental College (LMDC), Lahore. A sample of 200 students of first and second year MBBS classes was selected for the study through convenience sampling technique. A 5-point Likert scale ranging from 1 (strongly agree) to 5 (strongly disagree) was used to determine students perception about clinic-anatomical conferences, using a self-administered questionnaire. Data was analysed using SPSS-19.0. Results: Out of total 144 (72%) students were of the opinion that clinico-anatomical conferences were a good source of clinical knowledge, 126 (63%) opined that these conferences promoted understanding rather than memorization, 122 (61%) found them interesting, and 15 (30%) found improvement in their grades in the subject of anatomy after attending the conferences. Conclusion: The clinico-anatomical conferences were found interesting and reported to be a good source of clinical knowledge. It is recommended that these conferences should be conducted frequently, made interactive and patients should be presented as case studies during the conferences. (author)

  5. [Proposed difficult airway teaching methodology. Presentation of an interactive fresh frozen cadaver model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalá Bauset, J C; de Andres Ibañez, J A; Valverde Navarro, A; Martinez Soriano, F

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a methodology based on the use of fresh-frozen cadavers for training in the management of the airway, and to evaluate the degree of satisfaction among learning physicians. About 6 fresh-frozen cadavers and 14 workstations were prepared where participants were trained in the different skills needed for airway management. The details of preparation of the cadavers are described. The level of satisfaction of the participant was determined using a Likert rating scale of 5 points, at each of the 14 stations, as well as the overall assessment and clinical usefulness of the course. The mean overall evaluation of the course and its usefulness was 4.75 and 4.9, out of 5, respectively. All parts of the course were rated above 4 out of 5. The high level of satisfaction of the course remained homogeneous in the 2 editions analysed. The overall satisfaction of the course was not finally and uniquely determined by any of its particular parts. The fresh cadaver model for training physicians in techniques of airway management is a proposal satisfactory to the participant, and with a realism that approaches the live patient. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. A meta-analysis of the effects of non-traditional teaching methods on the critical thinking abilities of nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, JuHee; Lee, Yoonju; Gong, SaeLom; Bae, Juyeon; Choi, Moonki

    2016-09-15

    Scientific framework is important in designing curricula and evaluating students in the field of education and clinical practice. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of non-traditional educational methods on critical thinking skills. A systematic review approach was applied. Studies published in peer-reviewed journals from January 2001 to December 2014 were searched using electronic databases and major education journals. A meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager 5.2. Reviewing the included studies, the California Critical Thinking Dispositions Inventory (CCTDI) and California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST) were used to assess the effectiveness of critical thinking in the meta-analysis. The eight CCTDI datasets showed that non- traditional teaching methods (i.e., no lectures) were more effective compared to control groups (standardized mean difference [SMD]: 0.42, 95 % confidence interval [CI]: 0.26-0.57, p teaching and learning methods in these studies were also had significantly more effects when compared to the control groups (SMD: 0.29, 95 % CI: 0.10-0.48, p = 0.003). This research showed that new teaching and learning methods designed to improve critical thinking were generally effective at enhancing critical thinking dispositions.

  7. Technology-based vs. traditional instruction. A comparison of two methods for teaching the skill of performing a 12-lead ECG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Pamela R; Woolf, Shirley; Linde, Beverly

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of an interactive, multimedia CD-ROM with traditional methods of teaching the skill of performing a 12-lead ECG. A randomized pre/posttest experimental design was used. Seventy-seven baccalaureate nursing students in a required, senior-level critical-care course at a large midwestern university were recruited for the study. Two teaching methods were compared. The traditional method included a self-study module, a brief lecture and demonstration by an instructor, and hands-on experience using a plastic manikin and a real 12-lead ECG machine in the learning laboratory. The second method covered the same content using an interactive, multimedia CD-ROM embedded with virtual reality and supplemented with a self-study module. There were no significant (p method, or perception of self-efficacy in performing the skill. Overall results indicated that both groups were satisfied with their instructional method and were similar in their ability to demonstrate the skill correctly on a live, simulated patient. This evaluation study is a beginning step to assess new and potentially more cost-effective teaching methods and their effects on student learning outcomes and behaviors, including the transfer of skill acquisition via a computer simulation to a real patient.

  8. Examination of Traditional Medicine and Herbal Pharmacology and the Implications for Teaching and Education: A Ghanaian Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asabere-Ameyaw, Akwasi; Sefa Dei, George J.; Raheem, Kolawole

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the preliminary findings of a pilot study of the practice, uses, and effectiveness of traditional medicine in Ghana. Based on in-depth interviews with local key practitioners and users of traditional medicine, the article points to some of the educational significance of local cultural knowledge on the environment and the…

  9. A kaleidoscopic vision about university teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo FERNÁNDEZ RODRÍGUEZ

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper tries to open a debate about teaching knowledge avai­lable today in the university, showing a plurality of learning practices developed in it, some of which have become, whereas others proposals are ignored or hidden. To account for the analysis about teaching university, our methodology take it some experts have described like traditions of teacher education: the academic tra­dition, the technological tradition, the practice tradition, the personalist-humanist tradition, the critic/poscritic tradition. From these, we use two hermeneutics propo­sals: the paradigms of teacher education from Kenneth Zeichner, the hermeneutical strategies used by Nancy Fraser to discuss social policies. At the end, this paper defended the need to thinking about our practices as teachers, so that the analysis of discourse on the university teaching, our identification with them or not, and the subsequent debate, may emerging processes of professional development and teaching innovation.

  10. Effectiveness of an adult-learning, self-directed model compared with traditional lecture-based teaching methods in out-of-hospital training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzo, Robert A; Abbott, Cynthia A

    2004-01-01

    Until recently, the U.S. Army Combat Medic School used a traditional teaching model with heavy emphasis on large group lectures. Skills were taught separately with minimal links to didactics. To evaluate whether the adult learning model improves student learning in terms of cognitive performance and perception of proficiency in military medic training. The study population was two sequential groups of randomly selected junior, enlisted, active duty soldiers with no prior formal emergency medical training who were enrolled in an experimental model of a U.S. Army Combat Medic School. The control population was a similar group of students enrolled in the traditional curriculum. Instructors were drawn from the same pool, with experimental group instructors receiving two weeks of training in adult-learning strategies. The study population was enrolled in the experimental program that emphasized the principles of adult learning, including small-group interactive approach, self-directed study, multimedia didactics, and intensive integrated practice of psychomotor skills. Instructors and students were also surveyed at the end of the course as to their confidence in performing four critical skills. The survey instrument used a five-point scale ranging from "strongly disagree" through "undecided" to "strongly agree." Proficiency for this survey was defined as the sum of the top two ratings of "agree" or "strongly agree" to questions regarding the particular skill. Both experimental and control programs lasted ten weeks and covered the same academic content and nonacademic (e.g., physical fitness) requirements, and the two groups of students had similar duty days. Evaluations included performance on internal and National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians (NREMT) written examinations and other measures of academic and nonacademic performance. One hundred fifty students (experimental n = 81, control n = 69) were enrolled in 1999-2000. The scores for internal course

  11. Student Logical Implications and Connections between Symbolic Representations of a Linear System within the Context of an Introductory Linear Algebra Course Employing Inquiry-Oriented Teaching and Traditional Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, Spencer D.

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to explore how inquiry-oriented teaching could be implemented in an introductory linear algebra course that, due to various constraints, may not lend itself to inquiry-oriented teaching. In particular, the course in question has a traditionally large class size, limited amount of class time, and is often coordinated with other…

  12. [Screening based on response surface methodology of multi-fractions traditional Chinese medicine with anti-influenza virus neuraminidase activity: take shuanghuanglian injection as an example].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Ling-Ling; Chen, Long-Hu; Yan, Dan; Zhang, Ping; Tan, Man-Rong; Li, Zheng-Ming; Xiao, Xiao-He

    2012-04-01

    This study aimed to establish a novel method to screen out the combined components of multi-fractions traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), so that the internal relationship between multi-ingredients could be objectively assessed and the proportioning ratio could be optimized. Taking antiviral effect on neuraminidase activity of influenza virus as the evaluating indicator and using Box-Behnken response surface methodology, the main effective ingredients of Shuanghuanglian injection (SHL) were screened. Meanwhile, the relationship between active ingredients was discussed. Taking SHL as a comparison, the optimum proportioning ratio was predicted. The results indicated that chlorogenic acid, cryptochlorogenic acid, caffeic acid and baicalin have comparatively strong antiviral activity against influenza virus. Moreover, antagonistic action existed between chlorogenic acid and cryptochlorogenic acid, whereas synergistic action between caffeic acid and other components. The optimum proportioning ratio resulted from fitted model is: chlorogenic acid, cryptochlorogenic acid, caffeic acid and baicalin (107 microg x mL(-1) : 279 microg x mL(-1) : 7.99 microg x mL(-1) : 92 microg x mL(-1)). The antiviral activity of the recombined components is stronger than that of SHL, which was consistent with the experiment results (P < 0.05). Box-Behnken response surface methodology has the advantages of general-screening, high-performance and accurate-prediction etc, which is appropriate for screening the combined components of multi-fractions TCM and the optimization of the proportioning ratio. The proposed method can serve as a technological support for the development of modern multi-fractions TCM.

  13. Teaching Point-of-Care Lung Ultrasound to Novice Pediatric Learners: Web-Based E-Learning Versus Traditional Classroom Didactic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soon, Aun Woon; Toney, Amanda Greene; Stidham, Timothy; Kendall, John; Roosevelt, Genie

    2018-04-24

    To assess whether Web-based teaching is at least as effective as traditional classroom didactic in improving the proficiency of pediatric novice learners in the image acquisition and interpretation of pneumothorax and pleural effusion using point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS). We conducted a randomized controlled noninferiority study comparing the effectiveness of Web-based teaching to traditional classroom didactic. The participants were randomized to either group A (live classroom lecture) or group B (Web-based lecture) and completed a survey and knowledge test. They also received hands-on training and completed an objective structured clinical examination. The participants were invited to return 2 months later to test for retention of knowledge and skills. There were no significant differences in the mean written test scores between the classroom group and Web group for the precourse test (absolute difference, -2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], -12 to 6.9), postcourse test (absolute difference, 2.0; 95% CI, -1.4, 5.3), and postcourse 2-month retention test (absolute difference, -0.8; 95% CI, -9.6 to 8.1). Similarly, no significant differences were noted in the mean objective structured clinical examination scores for both intervention groups in postcourse (absolute difference, 1.9; 95% CI, -4.7 to 8.5) and 2-month retention (absolute difference, -0.6; 95% CI, -10.7 to 9.5). Web-based teaching is at least as effective as traditional classroom didactic in improving the proficiency of novice learners in POCUS. The usage of Web-based tutorials allows a more efficient use of time and a wider dissemination of knowledge.

  14. Feminist Policy Analysis: Expanding Traditional Social Work Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanenberg, Heather

    2013-01-01

    In an effort to move the methodology of policy analysis beyond the traditional and artificial position of being objective and value-free, this article is a call to those working and teaching in social work to consider a feminist policy analysis lens. A review of standard policy analysis models is presented alongside feminist models. Such a…

  15. Students' perceptions of teaching in context-based and traditional chemistry classrooms : Comparing content, learning activities, and interpersonal perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overman, Michelle; Vermunt, Jan D.; Meijer, Paulien C.; Bulte, Astrid M W; Brekelmans, Mieke

    2014-01-01

    Context-based curriculum reforms in chemistry education are thought to bring greater diversity to the ways in which chemistry teachers organize their teaching. First and foremost, students are expected to perceive this diversity. However, empirical research on how students perceive their teacher's

  16. Teaching Vocabulary to Preschoolers with Disabilities Using Adult-Child Shared Bookreading: A Comparison of Traditional and Electronic Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodehouse, Sara Bernice

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to validate adult-child shared storybook reading as a method for teaching target vocabulary words to preschool children with disabilities. The Vocabulary Learning through Books (VLTB) instructional procedure incorporates, adult-child book reading, questioning during reading requiring the child to answer with a target word, and…

  17. Teaching Design in the First Years of a Traditional Mechanical Engineering Degree: Methods, Issues and Future Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Arlindo; Fontul, Mihail; Henriques, Elsa

    2015-01-01

    Engineering design is known as an answer to an ill-defined problem. As any answer to an ill-defined problem, it can never be completely right or absolutely wrong. The methods that universities use to teach engineering design, as a consequence of this, suffer from the same fate. However, the accumulated experience with the "chalk and…

  18. Student performance and their perception of a patient-oriented problem-solving approach with audiovisual aids in teaching pathology: a comparison with traditional lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arjun

    2011-01-01

    We use different methods to train our undergraduates. The patient-oriented problem-solving (POPS) system is an innovative teaching-learning method that imparts knowledge, enhances intrinsic motivation, promotes self learning, encourages clinical reasoning, and develops long-lasting memory. The aim of this study was to develop POPS in teaching pathology, assess its effectiveness, and assess students' preference for POPS over didactic lectures. One hundred fifty second-year MBBS students were divided into two groups: A and B. Group A was taught by POPS while group B was taught by traditional lectures. Pre- and posttest numerical scores of both groups were evaluated and compared. Students then completed a self-structured feedback questionnaire for analysis. The mean (SD) difference in pre- and post-test scores of groups A and B was 15.98 (3.18) and 7.79 (2.52), respectively. The significance of the difference between scores of group A and group B teaching methods was 16.62 (P effectiveness of POPS. Students responded that POPS facilitates self-learning, helps in understanding topics, creates interest, and is a scientific approach to teaching. Feedback response on POPS was strong in 57.52% of students, moderate in 35.67%, and negative in only 6.81%, showing that 93.19% students favored POPS over simple lectures. It is not feasible to enforce the PBL method of teaching throughout the entire curriculum; However, POPS can be incorporated along with audiovisual aids to break the monotony of dialectic lectures and as alternative to PBL.

  19. Simulation as a surgical teaching model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Gómez, José Luis; Martín-Parra, José Ignacio; González-Noriega, Mónica; Redondo-Figuero, Carlos Godofredo; Manuel-Palazuelos, José Carlos

    2018-01-01

    Teaching of surgery has been affected by many factors over the last years, such as the reduction of working hours, the optimization of the use of the operating room or patient safety. Traditional teaching methodology fails to reduce the impact of these factors on surgeońs training. Simulation as a teaching model minimizes such impact, and is more effective than traditional teaching methods for integrating knowledge and clinical-surgical skills. Simulation complements clinical assistance with training, creating a safe learning environment where patient safety is not affected, and ethical or legal conflicts are avoided. Simulation uses learning methodologies that allow teaching individualization, adapting it to the learning needs of each student. It also allows training of all kinds of technical, cognitive or behavioural skills. Copyright © 2017 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. The Use of Computer Simulation Gaming in Teaching Broadcast Economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, Louis C.

    The purpose of this study was to develop a broadcast economic computer simulation and to ascertain how a lecture-computer simulation game compared as a teaching method with a more traditional lecture and case study instructional methods. In each of three sections of a broadcast economics course, a different teaching methodology was employed: (1)…

  1. satl based lesson for teaching grignard reagents in synthetic organic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IICBA01

    Traditionally, Grignard reagent has been very vital component of such synthetic ... knowledge, the systemic methodology of teaching and learning is the key point. Chemistry is ... chosen in particular to enlighten the students about effectiveness of systemic approach to .... Lectures through Systemic Approach to Teaching and.

  2. Comparing Efficacy of Implementing Two Teaching Methods Contract Learning and Traditional Instruction on Clinical Skills of Nursing Students in Psychiatric Wards of Hospitals of Tehran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamileh Mohtashami

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: A learning contract is defined as a written agreement between teacher and student which makes explicit what a learner will do to achieve specified learning outcomes.Learning contracts have been used as a teaching and learning strategy for both undergraduate and graduate nursing students in many countries.Methods : This research is a quasi-experimental study that compares effect of two different teaching methods , Contract learning and traditional on clinical skills for a group of nursing students who were in fourth year of study in a pre-registration bachelor of nursing degree program in Tehran . A learning contract was implemented as a learning tool in the students clinical placement in psychiatric nursing .Data were connected from questionnaires , interviews and clinical evaluation papers with students .Results : The results showed that students agreed that there was an increase in students autonomy and motivation in learning with the use of learning contract . It also increased the sharing between students and clinical instructors.Conclusion : According to the findings of this study , contract learning is considered beneficial to students learning and has the potential to be used in clinical learning .Key words : NURSING STUDENTS, LEARNING CONTRACTS , TRADITIONAL METHOD , MOTIVATION , AUTONOMY, PSYCHIATRIC WARDS .

  3. COMPARISON OF THE TRADITIONAL CHALK AND BOARD LECTURE SYSTEM VERSUS POWER POINT PRESENTATION AS A TEACHING TECHNIQUE FOR TEACHING GROSS ANATOMY TO THE FIRST PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Nusrat; Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally and conventionally, gross anatomy is taught by lectures and cadaveric dissection and the lectures are taken with chalk and board (C&B) or chalk and talk method in, India. But there is always a debate over the most effective method of lecture delivery. AIM : The aim of this study was to compare the role and effecti...

  4. Effects of traditional grammar teaching on standard six learners’ performance in understanding and using simple present tense, simple past tense, pronouns, and articles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thulasimani Munohsamy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to investigate whether there is any effect of the traditional grammar teaching on Standard Six learners’ performance in understanding and using simple present tense, simple past tense, pronouns and articles in writing. The sample for the study consisted of 40 Standard Six students of SK Tansau, Putatan, Kota Kinabalu, Sabah who was divided equally into two groups which were the treatment group and the control groups. Tests of understanding and of using the simple present tense, simple past tense, pronouns and articles were used as the instruments of the study. The data was collected through the administration of the pre-test and post-test. To analyze the collected data, the SPSS (Statistical Packages for Social Sciences version 11.5 was used. T-test was used to see if there was a significant difference in the mean of gain score. The Pearson Correlation was used on both tests between treatment group and control group to establish the relationship between scores on understanding and scores on using the grammatical features investigated. The study found that there was no significant difference in the mean of gain score in simple present tense, simple past tense and pronouns of the understanding test as well as writing test between the treatment and control groups. The results also indicated that there was no correlation between scores on test of understanding and test of using simple present tense, simple past tense, pronouns and articles on writing in the treatment group. There have been research studies in the past that lend clear cut support to the teaching of grammar as a mean of improving writing, however the results of this research clearly show that the implementation of Traditional Grammar Teaching has no effects on the students’ writing.

  5. Comprehensive Revenue and Expense Data Collection Methodology for Teaching Health Centers: A Model for Accountable Graduate Medical Education Financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regenstein, Marsha; Snyder, John E; Jewers, Mariellen Malloy; Nocella, Kiki; Mullan, Fitzhugh

    2018-04-01

    Despite considerable federal investment, graduate medical education financing is neither transparent for estimating residency training costs nor accountable for effectively producing a physician workforce that matches the nation's health care needs. The Teaching Health Center Graduate Medical Education (THCGME) program's authorization in 2010 provided an opportunity to establish a more transparent financing mechanism. We developed a standardized methodology for quantifying the necessary investment to train primary care physicians in high-need communities. The THCGME Costing Instrument was designed utilizing guidance from site visits, financial documentation, and expert review. It collects educational outlays, patient service expenses and revenues from residents' ambulatory and inpatient care, and payer mix. The instrument was fielded from April to November 2015 in 43 THCGME-funded residency programs of varying specialties and organizational structures. Of the 43 programs, 36 programs (84%) submitted THCGME Costing Instruments. The THCGME Costing Instrument collected standardized, detailed cost data on residency labor (n = 36), administration and educational outlays (n = 33), ambulatory care visits and payer mix (n = 30), patient service expenses (n =  26), and revenues generated by residents (n = 26), in contrast to Medicare cost reports, which include only costs incurred by residency programs. The THCGME Costing Instrument provides a model for calculating evidence-based costs and revenues of community-based residency programs, and it enhances accountability by offering an approach that estimates residency costs and revenues in a range of settings. The instrument may have feasibility and utility for application in other residency training settings.

  6. Using participatory and visual arts-based methodologies to promote sustainable teaching and learning ecologies: through the eyes of pre- service teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathabo Khau

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The National Framework for Quality Education in Rural Areas (DoE, 2006 draws attention to education in rural ecologies and scrutinises the role of HEIs in developing teachers who understand the diverse contexts and who are able to facilitate quality teaching and learning in such contexts. Drawing from the project ‘New teachers for new times: Visual methodologies for social change in rural education in the age of AIDS’, this article explores how the use of participatory and visual arts-based methodologies at a rural school can lead to sustainable teaching and learning environments that promote transformative and emancipatory classrooms. We draw on the focus group discussions held at the end of each school day as debriefing sessions with the six Intermediate Phase pre-service teachers 4 reflecting on their experiences of professional development and what was learnt about using ‘new’ methodologies in a rural farm school. We argue that when a cohort of pre-service teachers work together with in-service teachers using emancipatory pedagogies in a rural context, classrooms can get transformed into enabling and democratic spaces conducive for teaching and learning for all.

  7. A Comparison of Case Study and Traditional Teaching Methods for Improvement of Oral Communication and Critical-Thinking Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noblitt, Lynnette; Vance, Diane E.; Smith, Michelle L. DePoy

    2010-01-01

    This study compares a traditional paper presentation approach and a case study method for the development and improvement of oral communication skills and critical-thinking skills in a class of junior forensic science majors. A rubric for rating performance in these skills was designed on the basis of the oral communication competencies developed…

  8. Estilos de aprendizaje y metodologías de enseñanza en estudiantes de obstetricia Learning styles and teaching methodologies in obstetric students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Villalobos-Alarcón

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción. Si consideramos que todos los estudiantes no son iguales y aprenden de manera diferente, es necesario identificar sus estilos de aprendizaje (EA y las metodologías que faciliten el proceso enseñanza-aprendizaje. Este estudio pretende diagnosticar los EA predominante en estudiantes de obstetricia y correlacionarlos con las metodologías educativas aplicadas. Sujetos y métodos. Se realizó un estudio observacional, correlacional y transversal, durante el período 2006-2007, en 72 estudiantes de obstetricia de la Facultad de Medicina, Universidad de Concepción, Chile. Las variables estudiadas y correlacionadas fueron estilo de aprendizaje y metodologías de enseñanza. Se utilizó el Cuestionario de EA Honey-Alonso (CHAEA, y se realizó una encuesta de satisfacción de las metodologías que facilitaron el aprendizaje. Para el análisis estadístico se utilizó la prueba chi al cuadrado, y la correlación entre ambas variables se obtuvo con el coeficiente de rho de Spearman. Resultados. Los estilos predominantes fueron el reflexivo y teórico (p Introduction. Considering that all students are not equal and learn differently, is necessary to identify their learning styles and methodologies that facilitate the teaching-learning process. This study aims to diagnose learning styles prevalent in Obstetric students and correlation with educational methodologies applied. Subjects and methods. Observational and cross-correlation study, during the period 2006-2007 in 72 Obstetric students, Faculty of Medicine, University of Concepción, Chile. The variables were learning style and teaching methodologies. The instrument used was the questionnaire learning styles Honey-Alonso (CHAEA and satisfaction survey methodologies that helped the learning. The statistical differences were conducted using chi-square test and the correlation between two variables was obtained with the coefficient of Spearman's rho. Results. The dominant were reflexive

  9. THE PROGRESS STUDY OF TRADITIONAL TURKISH MUSIC LESSONS SELF-EFFICACY PERCEPTION SCALE FOR MUSIC TEACHING PROGRAMME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koray Celenk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to develop a scale in order to determine the perspective of self-efficacy related to the course Traditional Turkish Music (Traditional Turkish Folk Music/Traditional Turkish Classical Music, which takes place in the curriculum of Faculty of Education, Department of Fine Arts Education, Division of Music Education. The working group of this research consists of 97 students who receive training in the division of Music Education in Atatürk, Niğde (Ömer Halisdemir, Uludağ and Pamukkale Universities. The research is a descriptive study. In the research, general scanning method has been used, self efficacy- scale both in and non-area have been examined, literature review has been done and a scale, as research result, has been developed in order to determine possible Music teachers’ perspective of self-efficacy related to the course Traditional Turkish Music. An item pool has been formed for the validity of the scale, having prepared an expert opinion form the items have been submitted for consideration, getting the content validity ratios (CVR of the items and the content validity index of the whole scale, taking the margin of error of 5 percent, statistical significance has been tested. To determine the construct validity of the scale the factor analysis has been made and it has been confirmed that the scale has a single factor structure and establishes construct validity. Pilot scheme has been done to check the validity of the scale. Within this scope, the reliability coefficient of the scale has been calculated as 0.842 cronbach’s alpha and the scale developed is highly reliable. As a result, the scale developed is a valid and reliable tool to determine possible Music teachers’ perspective of self-efficacy related to the course Traditional Turkish Music.

  10. The Effectiveness of Teaching Methods Used in Graphic Design Pedagogy in Both Analogue and Digital Education Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhajri, Salman

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: this paper investigates the effectiveness of teaching methods used in graphic design pedagogy in both analogue and digital education systems. Methodology and approach: the paper is based on theoretical study using a qualitative, case study approach. Comparison between the digital teaching methods and traditional teaching methods was…

  11. Student performance and their perception of a patient-oriented problem-solving approach with audiovisual aids in teaching pathology: a comparison with traditional lectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun Singh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Arjun SinghDepartment of Pathology, Sri Venkateshwara Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, Pondicherry, IndiaPurpose: We use different methods to train our undergraduates. The patient-oriented problem-solving (POPS system is an innovative teaching–learning method that imparts knowledge, enhances intrinsic motivation, promotes self learning, encourages clinical reasoning, and develops long-lasting memory. The aim of this study was to develop POPS in teaching pathology, assess its effectiveness, and assess students’ preference for POPS over didactic lectures.Method: One hundred fifty second-year MBBS students were divided into two groups: A and B. Group A was taught by POPS while group B was taught by traditional lectures. Pre- and post-test numerical scores of both groups were evaluated and compared. Students then completed a self-structured feedback questionnaire for analysis.Results: The mean (SD difference in pre- and post-test scores of groups A and B was 15.98 (3.18 and 7.79 (2.52, respectively. The significance of the difference between scores of group A and group B teaching methods was 16.62 (P < 0.0001, as determined by the z-test. Improvement in post-test performance of group A was significantly greater than of group B, demonstrating the effectiveness of POPS. Students responded that POPS facilitates self-learning, helps in understanding topics, creates interest, and is a scientific approach to teaching. Feedback response on POPS was strong in 57.52% of students, moderate in 35.67%, and negative in only 6.81%, showing that 93.19% students favored POPS over simple lectures.Conclusion: It is not feasible to enforce the PBL method of teaching throughout the entire curriculum; However, POPS can be incorporated along with audiovisual aids to break the monotony of dialectic lectures and as alternative to PBL.Keywords: medical education, problem-solving exercise, problem-based learning

  12. [Role of an educational-and-methodological complex in the optimization of teaching at the stage of additional professional education of physicians in the specialty "anesthesiology and reanimatology"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buniatian, A A; Sizova, Zh M; Vyzhigina, M A; Shikh, E V

    2010-01-01

    An educational-and-methodological complex (EMC) in the specialty 'Anesthesiology and Reanimatology", which promotes manageability, flexibility, and dynamism of an educational process, is of great importance in solving the problem in the systematization of knowledge and its best learning by physicians at a stage of additional professional education (APE). EMC is a set of educational-and-methodological materials required to organize and hold an educational process for the advanced training of anesthesiologists and resuscitation specialists at the stage of APE. EMC includes a syllabus for training in the area "Anesthesiology and Reanimatology" by the appropriate training pattern (certification cycles, topical advanced training cycles); a work program for training in the specialty "Anesthesiology and Reanimatology"; a work curriculums for training in allied specialties (surgery, traumatology and orthopedics, obstetrics and gynecology, and pediatrics); work programs on basic disciplines (pharmacology, normal and pathological physiology, normal anatomy, chemistry and biology); working programs on the area "Public health care and health care service", guidelines for the teacher; educational-and-methodological materials for the student; and quiz programs. The main point of EMC in the specialty "Anesthesiology and Reanimatology" is a work program. Thus, educational-and-methodological and teaching materials included into the EMC in the specialty 'Anesthesiology and Reanimatology" should envisage the logically successive exposition of a teaching material, the use of currently available methods and educational facilities, which facilitates the optimization of training of anesthesiologists and resuscitation specialists at the stage of APE.

  13. The effect of active learning methodologies on the teaching of pharmaceutical care in a Brazilian pharmacy faculty.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra R Mesquita

    Full Text Available In recent years, pharmacists have been involved in expanded patient care responsibilities, for example patient counseling in self-medication, medication review and pharmaceutical care, which require graduates to develop the necessary competences. Consequently, reorientation of pharmacy education has become necessary. As such, active learning strategies have been introduced into classrooms to increase problem-solving and critical thinking skills of students. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance and perceptions of competency of students in a new pharmaceutical care course that uses active learning methodologies.This pharmaceutical care course was conducted in the first semester of 2014, in the Federal University of Sergipe. In the pharmaceutical care course, active learning methods were used, consisting of dialogic classroom expository, simulation and case studies. Student learning was evaluated using classroom tests and instruments that evaluated the perception of competency in pharmaceutical care practice. Furthermore, students' satisfaction with the course was evaluated.Thirty-three students completed the four evaluations used in the course (i.e., a discursive written exam, seminars, OSCE, and virtual patient; 25 were female (75.75%, and the median age was 23.43 (SD 2.82 years. The overall mean of student scores, in all evaluation methods was 7.97 (SD 0.59 on a scale of 0 to 10 points, and student performance on the virtual patient method was statistically superior to other methods. With respect to the perception of competency in pharmaceutical care practice, a comparison of pre- and post-test scores revealed statistically significant improvement for all evaluated competences. At the end of the semester, the students presented positive opinions of the pharmaceutical care course.The results suggest that an active learning course can enhance the learning of pharmaceutical care competences. In future studies it will be

  14. The effect of active learning methodologies on the teaching of pharmaceutical care in a Brazilian pharmacy faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Alessandra R; Souza, Werlissandra M; Boaventura, Thays C; Barros, Izadora M C; Antoniolli, Angelo R; Silva, Wellington B; Lyra Júnior, Divaldo P

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, pharmacists have been involved in expanded patient care responsibilities, for example patient counseling in self-medication, medication review and pharmaceutical care, which require graduates to develop the necessary competences. Consequently, reorientation of pharmacy education has become necessary. As such, active learning strategies have been introduced into classrooms to increase problem-solving and critical thinking skills of students. The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance and perceptions of competency of students in a new pharmaceutical care course that uses active learning methodologies. This pharmaceutical care course was conducted in the first semester of 2014, in the Federal University of Sergipe. In the pharmaceutical care course, active learning methods were used, consisting of dialogic classroom expository, simulation and case studies. Student learning was evaluated using classroom tests and instruments that evaluated the perception of competency in pharmaceutical care practice. Furthermore, students' satisfaction with the course was evaluated. Thirty-three students completed the four evaluations used in the course (i.e., a discursive written exam, seminars, OSCE, and virtual patient); 25 were female (75.75%), and the median age was 23.43 (SD 2.82) years. The overall mean of student scores, in all evaluation methods was 7.97 (SD 0.59) on a scale of 0 to 10 points, and student performance on the virtual patient method was statistically superior to other methods. With respect to the perception of competency in pharmaceutical care practice, a comparison of pre- and post-test scores revealed statistically significant improvement for all evaluated competences. At the end of the semester, the students presented positive opinions of the pharmaceutical care course. The results suggest that an active learning course can enhance the learning of pharmaceutical care competences. In future studies it will be necessary to

  15. A Study of the Effect of Entrance Examination of the Universities (EEOU) on the EFL Teaching Methodology in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Hadi; Mustapha, Ramlee; Yunus, Melor Binti Md

    2012-01-01

    Researches and educators' recognition of positive and negative effects of tests on teaching and learning activities goes back at least four decades. Although educators frequently claim that they do not want to teach to a test, the reality is that every educator wants his/her students to be successful. Decision makers, teachers, and students equate…

  16. A Study on the Phenomenon of Collocations: Methodology of Teaching English and German Collocations to Russian Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlamova, Elena V.; Naciscione, Anita; Tulusina, Elena A.

    2016-01-01

    Relevance of the issue stated in the article is determined by the fact that there is a lack of research devoted to the methods of teaching English and German collocations. The aim of our work is to determine methods of teaching English and German collocations to Russian university students studying foreign languages through experimental testing.…

  17. The Attitude of Math Teachers toward Cooperative Learning and Institutional Elements that May Help or Hinder its Use as a Teaching Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Gerardo Meza-Cascante

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of research conducted in high schools in the central region of the Cartago province, Costa Rica. The goal of the research was to determine the attitude of high school math teachers toward cooperative learning in math and identify factors in secondary education institutions that can help or hinder the implementation of cooperative learning as a strategy for teaching mathematics. The research was conducted with 39 secondary education math teachers, who participated in a workshop on cooperative learning in mathematics. The attitude toward this methodology was measured by using semantic differential. This information was triangulated with data obtained from non-participant observation. A combination of in-depth interviews and non-participant observation was used to access data that identifies institutional factors helping or hindering the implementation of math cooperative learning. Findings suggest a positive attitude from teachers toward integrating cooperative work as a teaching strategy to promote math learning and toward the role played by school principals in the adoption of educational innovations. It also reveals that high schools have adequate material conditions to implement the methodology, although the need for training is considered. This finding should be taken into account by the proponents of this methodological option.

  18. Integrating the Self and the Spirit: Strategies for Aligning Qualitative Research Teaching with Indigenous Methods, Methodologies, and Epistemology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K. Knudson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Many universities internationally now make concerted efforts to promote curriculum development and classroom and campus cultures that recognize diversity in student viewpoints and life experiences. Increasingly, these efforts have involved promoting recognition and inclusion of indigenous knowledges in the university setting. If adopted in the classroom, the promotion of indigenous perspectives suggests exciting possibilities for teaching qualitative research critically. Existing educational resources, however, offer little guidance on achieving this through undergraduate qualitative methods teaching. Using examples of Canadian undergraduate teaching initiatives, I suggest that by integrating indigenous methods, perspectives, and epistemology, particularly through student opportunities for community-engaged learning and exposure to participatory action research, teaching qualitative research can promote critical recognition of multiple ways of knowing. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs150347

  19. Teaching research methodology to student midwives through a socio-constructivist educational model: The experience of the high school for science and health techniques of Tunis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherissi, Atf; Tinsa, Francine; Soussi, Sonia; Benzarti, Anis

    2016-02-01

    Since its independence in 1956, Tunisia's maternal health indicators have steadily improved as the result of the implementation of a national holistic strategy that emancipated women and developed midwifery education and maternal health services provision. The last review of the midwifery education programme, occurred in 2008, and was based on evidence based core competencies. This paper describes the implementation process of the socio-constructivist educational model used by to teach research methodology to student midwives, the changes observed among them, the challenges and the lessons learned. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Traditional eye medicine use by newly presenting ophthalmic patients to a teaching hospital in south-eastern Nigeria: socio-demographic and clinical correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uche Judith

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study set out to determine the incidence, socio-demographic, and clinical correlates of Traditional Eye Medicine (TEM use in a population of newly presenting ophthalmic outpatients attending a tertiary eye care centre in south-eastern Nigeria. Methods In a comparative cross-sectional survey at the eye clinic of the University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital (UNTH, Enugu, between August 2004 - July 2006, all newly presenting ophthalmic outpatients were recruited. Participants' socio-demographic and clinical data and profile of TEM use were obtained from history and examination of each participant and entered into a pretested questionnaire and proforma. Participants were subsequently categorized into TEM- users and non-users; intra-group analysis yielded proportions, frequencies, and percentages while chi-square test was used for inter-group comparisons at P = 0.01, df = 1. Results Of the 2,542 (males, 48.1%; females, 51.9% participants, 149 (5.9% (males, 45%; females, 55% used TEM for their current eye disease. The TEMs used were chemical substances (57.7%, plant products (37.7%, and animal products (4.7%. They were more often prescribed by non-traditional (66.4% than traditional (36.9% medicine practitioners. TEMs were used on account of vision loss (58.5%, ocular itching (25.4% and eye discharge (3.8%. Reported efficacy from previous users (67.1% and belief in potency (28.2% were the main reasons for using TEM. Civil servants (20.1%, farmers (17.7%, and traders (14.1% were the leading users of TEM. TEM use was significantly associated with younger age (p Conclusion The incidence of TEM use among new ophthalmic outpatients at UNTH is low. The reasons for TEM use are amenable to positive change through enhanced delivery of promotive, preventive, and curative public eye care services. This has implications for eye care planners and implementers. To reverse the trend, we suggest strengthening of eye care programmes, even

  1. Methodologies for estimating air emissions from three non-traditional source categories: Oil spills, petroleum vessel loading and unloading, and cooling towers. Final report, October 1991-March 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadan, W.; Sleva, S.; Dufner, K.; Snow, S.; Kersteter, S.L.

    1993-04-01

    The report discusses part of EPA's program to identify and characterize emissions sources not currently accounted for by either the existing Aerometric Information Retrieval System (AIRS) or State Implementation Plan (SIP) area source methodologies and to develop appropriate emissions estimation methodologies and emission factors for a group of these source categories. Based on the results of the identification and characterization portions of this research, three source categories were selected for methodology and emission factor development: oil spills, petroleum vessel loading and unloading, and cooling towers. The report describes the category selection process and presents emissions estimation methodologies and emission factor data for the selected source categories. The discussions for each category include general background information, emissions generation activities, pollutants emitted, sources of activity and pollutant data, emissions estimation methodologies and data issues. The information used in these discussions was derived from various sources including available literature, industrial and trade association publications and contracts, experts on the category and activity, and knowledgeable federal and state personnel

  2. Part I: Virtual laboratory versus traditional laboratory: Which is more effective for teaching electrochemistry? Part II: The green synthesis of aurones using a deep eutectic solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Ian C.

    The role of the teaching laboratory in science education has been debated over the last century. The goals and purposes of the laboratory are still debated and while most science educators consider laboratory a vital part of the education process, they differ widely on the purposes for laboratory and what methods should be used to teach laboratory. One method of instruction, virtual labs, has become popular among some as a possible way of capitalizing on the benefits of lab in a less costly and more time flexible format. The research regarding the use of virtual labs is limited and the few studies that have been done on General Chemistry labs do not use the virtual labs as a substitute for hands-on experiences, but rather as a supplement to a traditional laboratory program. This research seeks to determine the possible viability of a virtual simulation to replace a traditional hands-on electrochemistry lab in the General Chemistry II course sequence. The data indicate that for both content knowledge and the development of hands-on skills the virtual lab showed no significant difference in overall scores on the assessments, but that an individual item related to the physical set-up of a battery showed better scores for the hands-on labs over the virtual labs. Further research should be done to determine if these results are similar in other settings with the use of different virtual labs and how the virtual labs compare to other laboratories using different learning styles and learning goals. One often cited purpose of laboratory experiences in the context of preparing chemists is to simulate the experiences common in chemical research so graduate experience in a research laboratory was a necessary part of my education in the field of laboratory instruction. This research experience provided me the opportunity, to complete an organic synthesis of aurones using a deep eutectic solvent. These solvents show unique properties that make them a viable alternative to ionic

  3. Assessment of a Group Activity Based Educational Method to Teach Research Methodology to Undergraduate Medical Students of a Rural Medical College in Gujarat, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dinesh; Singh, Uday Shankar; Solanki, Rajanikant

    2015-07-01

    Early undergraduate exposure to research helps in producing physicians who are better equipped to meet their professional needs especially the analytical skills. To assess the effectiveness and acceptability of small group method in teaching research methodology. Sixth semester medical undergraduates (III MBBS-part1) of a self-financed rural medical college. The workshop was of two full days duration consisting of daily two sessions by faculty for 30 minutes, followed by group activity of about four hours and presentation by students at the end of the day. A simple 8 steps approach was used. These steps are Identify a Problem, Refine the Problem, Determine a Solution, Frame the Question, Develop a Protocol, Take Action, Write the Report and Share your Experience. A Pre-test and post-test assessment was carried out using a questionnaire followed by anonymous feedback at the end of the workshop. The responses were evaluated by blinded evaluator. There were 95 (94.8%) valid responses out of the 99 students, who attended the workshop. The mean Pre-test and post-test scores were 4.21 and 10.37 respectively and the differences were found to be significant using Wilcoxon Sign Rank test (presearch methodology workshop can play a significant role in teaching research to undergraduate students in an interesting manner. However, the long term effect of such workshops needs to be evaluated.

  4. Case-Based Learning as Pedagogy for Teaching Information Ethics Based on the Dervin Sense-Making Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, Mirah J.; Boettcher, Carrie A.; Diego, Juana F.; Karch, Marziah E.; Todd-Diaz, Ashley; Woods, Kristine M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods study is to determine the effectiveness of case-based pedagogy in teaching basic principles of information ethics and ethical decision making. Study reports results of pre- and post-assessment completed by 49 library and information science (LIS) graduate students at a Midwestern university. Using Creswell's…

  5. Teaching Groups as Foci for Evaluating Performance in Cost-Effectiveness of GCE Advanced Level Provision: Some Practical Methodological Innovations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Antony

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes subject teaching-group effectiveness in English and Welsh General Certification of Education (GCE) Advanced Level prior to a linking to resources; suggests cross-classified multilevel models with weighted random effects for disentangling student, group, and teacher effects; finds that teacher effects are considerable, but cannot find…

  6. Teaching English at Sekolah Agama Rakyat (People’s Religious Schools in Northern Peninsula Malaysia: Methodology Development and Preliminary Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurulhayati Ilias

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This research article is based on a pilot study that we carried out to gain preliminary insights into how English is taught at ‘Sekolah Agama Rakyat’ (‘SAR’ or literally translated as ‘People’s Islamic Religious Schools’ in a state in northern Peninsula Malaysia. In the process of carrying out the study, we tested data collection instruments that we developed to understand the complexities of English language teaching in this interesting educational milieu. Questionnaires were distributed to 30 English language teachers from three schools to collect data on their educational background and their teaching experience. Classroom observations were also carried out in one of the schools to examine whether the classroom adheres to the general principles of Communicative Language Teaching (CLT as required by the Malaysian Ministry of Education. Finally, interview sessions were conducted to examine how the schools’ management personnel contribute to teachers’ performance as a whole. It was found that almost all the teacher participants that we came into contact with were not certified as English as a Second Language practitioners and some never received any forms of formal teacher training. The classroom observations that we carried out generally show an unconducive climate to support English language learning. In addition, the interview sessions revealed that SAR teachers rarely attend professional development courses. We hope that these preliminary observations from our pilot study will lead to more research efforts in order to understand the realities (and complexities of teaching English within the Malaysian SAR educational context.

  7. An Analysis of Pre-Service Teachers' Attitudes and Opinions Regarding the Teaching Profession via Q-Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Servet

    2016-01-01

    One of the factors influential on teacher achievement is their attitudes towards the profession. Teacher attitude influences a teacher's satisfaction with their profession, devotion to the profession, belief in the necessity and importance of the teaching profession, and belief in professional development. General evaluation of pre-service…

  8. Use and toxicity of traditional and complementary medicine among patients seeking care at an emergency department of a teaching hospital in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatau, Abubakar Ibrahim; Aung, Myat Moe Thwe; Kamauzaman, Tuan Hairulnizam Tuan; Ab Rahman, Ab Fatah

    2018-05-01

    Traditional and Complementary Medicines (TCM) are widely used worldwide, and many of them have the potential to cause toxicity, interaction with conventional medications and non-adherence to prescribed medications due to patients' preference for the TCM use. However, information regarding their use among patients seeking care at emergency departments (ED) of a healthcare facility is limited. The study aimed to evaluate the TCM use among patients attending the ED of a teaching hospital in Malaysia. A sub-analysis of data from a prevalence study of medication-related visits among patients at the ED of Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia was conducted. The study took place over a period of six weeks from December 2014 to January 2015 involving 434 eligible patients. Data on demography, conventional medication, and TCM uses were collected from patient interview and the medical folders. Among this cohort, 66 patients (15.2%, 95%CI 12.0, 19.0) reported concurrent TCM use. Sixteen (24.2%) of the TCM users were using more than one (1) type of TCM, and 17 (25.8%) came to the ED for medication-related reasons. Traditional Malay Medicine (TMM) was the most frequently used TCM by the patients. Five patients (7.6%) sought treatment at the ED for medical problems related to use of TCM. Patients seeking medical care at the ED may be currently using TCM. ED-physicians should be aware of these therapies and should always ask patients about the TCM use. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Social Teaching: Student Perspectives on the Inclusion of Social Media in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Samantha

    2017-01-01

    The traditional teaching methodologies employed within universities, comprising of lectures and seminars, have come to be scrutinised for their impersonal approach. Recently, social media and networking sites have become increasingly popular as learning and teaching resources in higher education, providing students with increased opportunities for…

  10. [Investigation methodology and application on scientific and technological personnel of traditional Chinese medical resources based on data from Chinese scientific research paper].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai-yan; Li, Yuan-hai; Yang, Yang; Liu, Fang-zhou; Wang, Jing; Tian, Ye; Yang, Ce; Liu, Yang; Li, Meng; Sun Li-ying

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the present status of the scientific and technological personnel in the field of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) resource science. Based on the data from Chinese scientific research paper, an investigation regarding the number of the personnel, the distribution, their output of paper, their scientific research teams, high-yield authors and high-cited authors was conducted. The study covers seven subfields of traditional Chinese medicine identification, quality standard, Chinese medicine cultivation, harvest processing of TCM, market development and resource protection and resource management, as well as 82 widely used Chinese medicine species, such as Ginseng and Radix Astragali. One hundred and fifteen domain authority experts were selected based on the data of high-yield authors and high-cited authors. The database system platform "Skilled Scientific and Technological Personnel in the field of Traditional Chinese Medicine Resource Science-Chinese papers" was established. This platform successfully provided the retrieval result of the personnel, output of paper, and their core research team by input the study field, year, and Chinese medicine species. The investigation provides basic data of scientific and technological personnel in the field of traditional Chinese medicine resource science for administrative agencies and also evidence for the selection of scientific and technological personnel and construction of scientific research teams.

  11. Methodological conception for the preparation of teachers who teach to deaf and hard hearing persons in the local historical contents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeida María Montano Rivero

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The present work has as an objective: to apply a theoretical-methodological conception for the teacher's preparation in imparting the local historical contents, from an integrative approach in the development of the educational process in the special school for deaf and hard hearing in the Province of Sancti Spiritus, It is designed from the theoretical and methodological mistakes detected in the pedagogical practice. The sample is composed by the 12 teachers that represent 100% of the second cycle; It was used the technical investigative process as: interviews to teachers and observations to classes, which evidenced weaknesses in the theoretical preparation - methodological to carry out the development of these contents. The workshops were applied in the methodological preparation of the cycle community, in the space established by the Direction of the Ministry of Education, twice in every month and during the self preparation by teachers. The practical contribution is concrete in the determination of demands and didactic procedures for the use of the local historical contents with an integrative focus that constitutes the theoretical component of the conception, allowing the improvement of the preparation, in a significant way and in this way to contribute to an integral attention of the educational process.

  12. Evaluation of teaching and learning strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SK Lechner

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available With the growing awareness of the importance of teaching and learning in universities and the need to move towards evidence-based teaching, it behooves the professions to re-examine their educational research methodology. While the what, how and why of student learning have become more explicit, the professions still struggle to find valid methods of evaluating the explosion of new innovation in teaching/learning strategies. This paper discusses the problems inherent in applying traditional experimental design techniques to advances in educational practice.

  13. COMPARISON OF PROBLEM BASED LEARNING WITH TRADITIONAL LECTURES AMONG FIRST YEAR MEDICAL STUDENTS IN PHYSIOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Evelyn

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Problem based learning has emerged as an effective teaching learning method. Students taught by the problem based learning method have better problem solving skills and better long-term memory than those taught by traditional lectures. OBJECTIVE: To compare the effectiveness of problem based learning with that of traditional lecture method. METHODOLOGY: First MBBS students (n=127) were divided into two groups. One group was taught a topic from Applied Physiolog...

  14. Ortopedia: origem histórica, o ensino no Brasil e estudos metodológicos pelo mundo = Orthopedics: historical origin, teaching in Brazil, and methodological studies worldwide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karam, Francisco Consoli

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Relatar uma breve história da ortopedia, descrever como funciona o ensino no Brasil e verificar a preocupação que autores de outros países têm com a metodologia do ensino desta especialidade. Métodos: Foram realizadas pesquisas no Pubmed, nos últimos 10 anos de publicação da Revista Brasileira de Ortopedia e nos sites das sociedades Gaúcha e Brasileira de Ortopedia. Resultados: A história da ortopedia inicia com o homem primitivo, passando por egípcios, gregos, romanos e árabes. Após anos de pouca importância na idade média ressurge no século XII e chega ao século XX, contraditoriamente, ganhando desenvolvimento com as grandes guerras. No século XXI o ensino no Brasil é ancorado pela Sociedade Brasileira de Ortopedia e pelo mundo os autores mostram preocupação em identificar as falhas nos métodos de ensino para proporem soluções que acompanhem a velocidade da tecnologia e quantidade de novos conhecimentos. Conclusão: A longa história do ensino da ortopedia, que começou com o homem primitivo, prossegue atualmente com desafios crescentes, em busca de soluções. Objectives: To report a brief history of Orthopedics, describing its teaching in Brazil, and to check concerns from authors worldwide regarding teaching methodology of that specialty. Methods: A search was carried out at PubMed, from the latest 10 years of publication at Brazilian Journal of Orthopaedics [Revista Brasileira de Ortopedia], and at sites from Brazilian and regional Orthopedics societies. Results: The history of Orthopedics starts with the primitive man, passing through Egyptians, Greeks, Romans, and Arabs. After years of little importance during Middle Age, it is reborn at the 12th Century, and arrives at the 20th Century, paradoxically developing with the Great Wars. During the 21st Century, teaching in Brazil is anchored by Brazilian Society of Orthopedics; worldwide, authors show concern to identify failures in teaching methods, so

  15. Rapid methodology via mass spectrometry to quantify addition of soybean oil in extra virgin olive oil: A comparison with traditional methods adopted by food industry to identify fraud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silveira, Roberta; Vágula, Julianna Matias; de Lima Figueiredo, Ingrid; Claus, Thiago; Galuch, Marilia Bellanda; Santos Junior, Oscar Oliveira; Visentainer, Jesui Vergilio

    2017-12-01

    Fast and innovative methodology to monitors the addition of soybean oil in extra virgin olive oil was developed employing ESI-MS with ionization operating in positive mode. A certified extra virgin olive oil and refined soybean oil samples were analyzed by direct infusion, the identification of a natural lipid marker present only in soybean oil (m/z 886.68 [TAG+NH 4 ] + ) was possible. The certified extra virgin olive oil was purposely adulterated with soybean oil in different levels (1, 5, 10, 20, 50, 70, 90%) being possible to observe that the new methodology is able to detect even small fraud concentration, such as 1% (v/v). Additionally, commercial samples were analyzed and were observed the addition of soybean oil as a common fraud in this segment. This powerful analytical method proposed could be applied as routine analysis by control organization, as well as food industries, considering its pronounced advantages; simplicity, rapidity, elevated detectability and minor amounts of sample and solvent consumed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Living probabilistic safety assessment of French 1300 MWe PWR nuclear power plant unit: methodology, results and teaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubreuil Chambardel, A.; Villemeur, A.; Berger, J.P.; Moroni, J.M.

    1991-02-01

    Launched in 1986 by Electricite de France, the Probabilistic Safety Assessment of a French 1300 MWe Pressurized Water Reactor (called PSA 1300) was completed in 1989. The first objective was to assess the annual core damage frequency by identifying all the accident scenarii likely to contribute significantly to this frequency. The second objective of the study was to provide an automated computerized tool (software) for updating the assessment - in order to take new data and knowledge into account - and for performing numerous sensitivity studies easily. Its scope and characteristics render this study unique. Indeed, it required an effort amounting to 50 engineer-years. The results and the first lessons are presented in this paper. The PSA 1300 teachings will be extensively used for the design and operation of existing or future French nuclear power reactors

  17. Separation and Determination of Honokiol and Magnolol in Chinese Traditional Medicines by Capillary Electrophoresis with the Application of Response Surface Methodology and Radial Basis Function Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ping; Luan, Feng; Yan, Xizu; Gao, Yuan; Liu, Huitao

    2012-01-01

    A method for the separation and determination of honokiol and magnolol in Magnolia officinalis and its medicinal preparation is developed by capillary zone electrophoresis and response surface methodology. The concentration of borate, content of organic modifier, and applied voltage are selected as variables. The optimized conditions (i.e., 16 mmol/L sodium tetraborate at pH 10.0, 11% methanol, applied voltage of 25 kV and UV detection at 210 nm) are obtained and successfully applied to the analysis of honokiol and magnolol in Magnolia officinalis and Huoxiang Zhengqi Liquid. Good separation is achieved within 6 min. The limits of detection are 1.67 µg/mL for honokiol and 0.83 µg/mL for magnolol, respectively. In addition, an artificial neural network with “3-7-1” structure based on the ratio of peak resolution to the migration time of the later component (Rs/t) given by Box-Behnken design is also reported, and the predicted results are in good agreement with the values given by the mathematic software and the experimental results. PMID:22291059

  18. A Methodology for Cancer Therapeutics by Systems Pharmacology-Based Analysis: A Case Study on Breast Cancer-Related Traditional Chinese Medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Wang, Jinghui; Lin, Feng; Yang, Yinfeng; Chen, Su-Shing

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common carcinoma in women. Comprehensive therapy on breast cancer including surgical operation, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, endocrinotherapy, etc. could help, but still has serious side effect and resistance against anticancer drugs. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) may avoid these problems, in which traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been highlighted. In this section, to analyze the mechanism through which TCM act on breast cancer, we have built a virtual model consisting of the construction of database, oral bioavailability prediction, drug-likeness evaluation, target prediction, network construction. The 20 commonly employed herbs for the treatment of breast cancer were used as a database to carry out research. As a result, 150 ingredient compounds were screened out as active molecules for the herbs, with 33 target proteins predicted. Our analysis indicates that these herbs 1) takes a 'Jun-Chen-Zuo-Shi" as rule of prescription, 2) which function mainly through perturbing three pathways involving the epidermal growth factor receptor, estrogen receptor, and inflammatory pathways, to 3) display the breast cancer-related anti-estrogen, anti-inflammatory, regulation of cell metabolism and proliferation activities. To sum it up, by providing a novel in silico strategy for investigation of the botanical drugs, this work may be of some help for understanding the action mechanisms of herbal medicines and for discovery of new drugs from plants.

  19. A Methodology for Cancer Therapeutics by Systems Pharmacology-Based Analysis: A Case Study on Breast Cancer-Related Traditional Chinese Medicines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is the most common carcinoma in women. Comprehensive therapy on breast cancer including surgical operation, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, endocrinotherapy, etc. could help, but still has serious side effect and resistance against anticancer drugs. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM may avoid these problems, in which traditional Chinese medicine (TCM has been highlighted. In this section, to analyze the mechanism through which TCM act on breast cancer, we have built a virtual model consisting of the construction of database, oral bioavailability prediction, drug-likeness evaluation, target prediction, network construction. The 20 commonly employed herbs for the treatment of breast cancer were used as a database to carry out research. As a result, 150 ingredient compounds were screened out as active molecules for the herbs, with 33 target proteins predicted. Our analysis indicates that these herbs 1 takes a 'Jun-Chen-Zuo-Shi" as rule of prescription, 2 which function mainly through perturbing three pathways involving the epidermal growth factor receptor, estrogen receptor, and inflammatory pathways, to 3 display the breast cancer-related anti-estrogen, anti-inflammatory, regulation of cell metabolism and proliferation activities. To sum it up, by providing a novel in silico strategy for investigation of the botanical drugs, this work may be of some help for understanding the action mechanisms of herbal medicines and for discovery of new drugs from plants.

  20. Pre-Service Identification of Talented Teachers through Non-Traditional Measures: A Study of the Role of Affective Variables as Predictors of Success in Student Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basom, Margaret; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Researchers examined relationships between the SRI Gallup Pre-Professional Teacher Interview and performance-based student teaching evaluations and between SRI Interview and California Student Achievement Test (CAT) scores. A relationship between SRI Interview scores and performance-based student teaching evaluations surfaces. CAT scores did not…

  1. A new dynamic 3D virtual methodology for teaching the mechanics of atrial septation as seen in the human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleich, Jean-Marc; Dillenseger, Jean-Louis; Houyel, Lucile; Almange, Claude; Anderson, Robert H

    2009-01-01

    Learning embryology remains difficult, since it requires understanding of many complex phenomena. The temporal evolution of developmental events has classically been illustrated using cartoons, which create difficulty in linking spatial and temporal aspects, such correlation being the keystone of descriptive embryology. We synthesized the bibliographic data from recent studies of atrial septal development. On the basis of this synthesis, consensus on the stages of atrial septation as seen in the human heart has been reached by a group of experts in cardiac embryology and pediatric cardiology. This has permitted the preparation of three-dimensional (3D) computer graphic objects for the anatomical components involved in the different stages of normal human atrial septation. We have provided a virtual guide to the process of normal atrial septation, the animation providing an appreciation of the temporal and morphologic events necessary to separate the systemic and pulmonary venous returns. We have shown that our animations of normal human atrial septation increase significantly the teaching of the complex developmental processes involved, and provide a new dynamic for the process of learning.

  2. Modern vs. Traditional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhenhui, Rao

    1999-01-01

    This article discusses traditional methods, such as the grammar-translation, and modern methods, the communicative approach, for teaching English-as-a-foreign-language in China. The relationship between linguistic accuracy and communicative competence, student-centered orientation, and the role of the teacher are highlighted. (Author/VWL)

  3. Effects of traditional teaching vs a multisensory instructional package on the science achievement and attitudes of English language learners middle-school students and English-speaking middle-school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosley, Haver

    This research was designed to determine the relative effectiveness of a Multi-sensory Instructional Package (MIP) (Dunn & Dunn, 1992) versus Traditional Teaching (TT) on the science achievement- and attitude-test scores of middle-school English Language Learner (ELL) and English-speaking sixth-, seventh-, and eighth-grade middle-school students. The dependent variables were students' science- and attitude-test scores. The independent variables were the two instructional strategies, ELL and English-speaking (Non-ELL) status, and three grade levels. The sample consisted of 282 sixth-, seventh-, and eighth-grade ELL and Non-ELL middle-school students. Learning Styles: The Clue to You! (LS: CY) (Burke & Dunn, 1998) was administered to determine learning-style preferences. The control groups were taught sixth-, seventh-, and eighth-grade science lessons traditionally and the experimental groups were instructed on the same units using MIPs. The Semantic Differential Scale (SDS) (Pizzo, 1981) was administered to reveal attitudinal differences. All three groups experienced both traditional and multi-sensory instruction in all three sub-units. The data subjected to statistical analyses supported the use of an MIP rather than a traditional approach for teaching science content to both ELLs and English-speaking middle-school students. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed a positive and significant impact on achievement scores. Furthermore, the students indicated significantly more positive attitudes when instructed with an MIP approach.

  4. Korean and American Teachers' Praising Styles and Teaching Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bang, Hyeyoung; Kim, Jungsub

    2016-01-01

    Praising is a crucial part of teaching performance that greatly impacts student performance and self-esteem. South Korean teachers are traditionally known to possess authoritarian attributes, whereas U.S. teachers have contradictory beliefs in terms of why and how to use praise. We used Q methodology among 16 American and 22 Korean teachers to…

  5. Greek underpinnings to his methodology in unraveling De Motu Cordis and what Harvey has to teach us still today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasipoularides, Ares

    2013-10-09

    William Harvey's writings betray amazing insights born out of countless hours of thoughtful experimentation. Throughout his life, Harvey worked as a tireless and thoughtful researcher and a transmitter and intermediary between the ancient Greek natural philosophers and physicians and the "moderns," for whom he founded two forward-looking, interlinked sciences: modern physiology and nascent cardiology. Harvey's methodology and demonstrations were of such fundamental and standardizing nature as to secure the sure progress of these two sciences. Thus, he rendered to them such a service as Descartes's cogito ergo sum furnished to Philosophy in giving it a rational standard of certainty, for want of which the more speculative minds of that era were inundated with extraordinary conjectures. If Harvey disproved Galen, he absorbed and continued in his physiologic research many a principle from Aristotle, whose supreme disciple he remains. The guidance and authority of Aristotle were strong with him to the end. Harvey's account of the motions of the heart and blood in the circulation demonstrated that complex physiological systems can be represented in straightforward mechanical terms, a concept which has remained fundamental to the present day. The philosophical implication of William Harvey's discovery of the circulation of the blood was the resolute application of the experimental method to cardiology. In my judgment, he established today's forward-looking discipline of translational cardiovascular research. In due course, he should be widely acknowledged to have done so. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparative analysis of the results of implementation of the methodology of teaching technology development of physical fitness of students - future doctors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Radzijevsky

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The content of three stages of training of technologies of development of physical capacity is revealed. The efficiency of the solution of the set tasks of the research by means of implementation of the methodology of teaching technology development of physical fitness of students - future doctors is shown. The proposed method of teaching the technologies of the development of physical fitness of students - future doctors aimed at the introduction of differentiated tasks, methods, forms and means aimed at the development of physical fitness of students, taking into account their physical preparedness, and provided for the unity of general and special training of students - future doctors for future professional activities. The proposed author's technique envisaged three main stages of teaching technology of physical fitness development for students - future physicians. The initial stage of training was aimed at the development of general endurance, improvement of the functions of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems, strengthening the musculoskeletal system of students, which was achieved by the gradual retraction of the body into work, which was expressed in elongation of the running distance, walking while maintaining a uniform pace. At the second stage, students were offered exercises with an increase in the volume of loading in the mixed aerobic-anaerobic mode of energy supply in accordance with the state of health, physical and functional preparedness of students, while applying a continuous unified work in the form of cross-country running, paced Scandinavian walking in a wide range speeds, as well as continuous variable work, while turning to circular training. In the third stage, if students had a good level of physical fitness, we continued to increase gradually not only the amount of training loads, but also increased the intensity of exercises. But in most cases, when the increased requirements to the level of development of

  7. ACTIVE TEACHING-LEARNING METHODOLOGY TO APPROACH CARBOHYDRATE AND LIPID METABOLISM: An interdisciplinary strategy that involved the Moodle tool in the development of Problem Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M.P. Borges

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Highlight the relevance of topics studied for professional practice and associate approaches provided by different areas of knowledge are pointed as essential aspects for significant learning. Contextualize the study of metabolic pathways, linking the clinical use and expanding the vision with the approach of cellular and molecular biology discipline was the motivation for the development of the strategy described and evaluated here. In this work, starting from the concept of active methodology of teaching and learning was developed a methodological strategy to approach the carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. This strategy included: questioning the content through the clinical case study on diabetes mellitus and hypercholesterolemia, individual and collective study in the external space the classroom with the help of Moodle tool, classroom discussion accompanied by the teacher, preparation of seminar, evaluation of the content through individual written test and evaluation of the method. Analysis of student involvement with method indicates an average frequency of 98% in the practical class of Biochemistry discipline, effective participation in the preparation of seminars, an increase of 2 points in average of individual written evaluation. As for the fact that the cases were studied in two curricular components, the answers show that 92% of students feel more compression. Only 6% of students think  unnecessary to interdisciplinary approach. As for the different steps of the method, the answers show that 99% of students consider how relevant the initial self-study and discussions in class. However, only 50% of students appreciated the use of Moodle tool. Thus, student responses indicated the perception of the effectiveness of the method for their ability to: stimulate interest in learning, stimulate the search for answers through research and the building of learning.

  8. Including subjectivity in the teaching of Psychopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavio Domont de Serpa Junior

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Current psychopathology studies have often been presented in their descriptive dimension. This perspective is important for teaching because it helps the students to recognize and identify the symptomatology of each psychopathology case. However, subjectivity, the experience of suffering and interpersonal aspects are all lost in this perspective. Coming from another psychopathology tradition - existential anthropology - this paper presents practical psychopathology teaching experience which considers such dimensions as being relevant to the understanding of mental suffering. The features and limitations of such traditions are briefly reviewed to support this teaching experience. Two new modalities of practical teaching, used in the discipline of "Special Psychopathology I" offered by the Department of Psychiatry and Forensic Medicine at the medical school of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro for students of psychology, will be presented according to descriptive case study methodology. With these activities we also expect to change the practice of teaching. Traditionally, interviewing of in-patients by a large group of students who observe passively what is happening is the center of this kind of education. We intend to develop a model of teaching which is closer to the proposal of the Brazilian Psychiatric Reform which views mental illness as a complex phenomenon, always involving the relationship that the subject establishes with the world.

  9. Research on teaching methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oermann, M H

    1990-01-01

    Research on teaching methods in nursing education was categorized into studies on media, CAI, and other nontraditional instructional strategies. While the research differed, some generalizations may be made from the findings. Multimedia, whether it is used for individual or group instruction, is at least as effective as traditional instruction (lecture and lecture-discussion) in promoting cognitive learning, retention of knowledge, and performance. Further study is needed to identify variables that may influence learning and retention. While learner attitudes toward mediated instruction tended to be positive, investigators failed to control for the effect of novelty. Control over intervening variables was lacking in the majority of studies as well. Research indicated that CAI is as effective as other teaching methods in terms of knowledge gain and retention. Attitudes toward CAI tended to be favorable, with similar problems in measurement as those evidenced in studies of media. Chang (1986) also recommends that future research examine the impact of computer-video interactive instruction on students, faculty, and settings. Research is needed on experimental teaching methods, strategies for teaching problem solving and clinical judgment, and ways of improving the traditional lecture and discussion. Limited research in these areas makes generalizations impossible. There is a particular need for research on how to teach students the diagnostic reasoning process and encourage critical thinking, both in terms of appropriate teaching methods and the way in which those strategies should be used. It is interesting that few researchers studied lecture and lecture-discussion except as comparable teaching methods for research on other strategies. Additional research questions may be generated on lecture and discussion in relation to promoting concept learning, an understanding of nursing and other theories, transfer of knowledge, and development of cognitive skills. Few

  10. Science teaching in science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Brendan E.; Dopico, Eduardo

    2016-06-01

    Reading the interesting article Discerning selective traditions in science education by Per Sund , which is published in this issue of CSSE, allows us to open the discussion on procedures for teaching science today. Clearly there is overlap between the teaching of science and other areas of knowledge. However, we must constantly develop new methods to teach and differentiate between science education and teaching science in response to the changing needs of our students, and we must analyze what role teachers and teacher educators play in both. We must continually examine the methods and concepts involved in developing pedagogical content knowledge in science teachers. Otherwise, the possibility that these routines, based on subjective traditions, prevent emerging processes of educational innovation. Modern science is an enormous field of knowledge in its own right, which is made more expansive when examined within the context of its place in society. We propose the need to design educative interactions around situations that involve science and society. Science education must provide students with all four dimensions of the cognitive process: factual knowledge, conceptual knowledge, procedural knowledge, and metacognitive knowledge. We can observe in classrooms at all levels of education that students understand the concepts better when they have the opportunity to apply the scientific knowledge in a personally relevant way. When students find value in practical exercises and they are provided opportunities to reinterpret their experiences, greater learning gains are achieved. In this sense, a key aspect of educational innovation is the change in teaching methodology. We need new tools to respond to new problems. A shift in teacher education is needed to realize the rewards of situating science questions in a societal context and opening classroom doors to active methodologies in science education to promote meaningful learning through meaningful teaching.

  11. Using Web-Based Interactive Multimedia to Supplement Traditional Teaching Methods: A Pilot Program for Medical Training of Non-Medical Personnel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gellman, Gregg W

    2005-01-01

    This thesis proposes that it is possible to create an adjunct to traditional instructor-led training that will reduce training time and costs and at the same time improve performance using commercial off-the shelf (COTS) software...

  12. The Evaluation of Teaching the Nursing Process Using Traditional Lecture, Campus Laboratory, Clinical, and the Addition of High Fidelity Human Simulation (HFHS) Unfolding Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Ruth E.

    2013-01-01

    It is not sufficient to just make changes in a nursing curriculum without a plan to evaluate the impact on program outcomes. This study sought to determine the outcomes of teaching the nursing process to Foundation of Nursing students in an Associate Degree Nursing program using a factorial design study. Four groups of students were taught the…

  13. Part I: Virtual Laboratory versus Traditional Laboratory: Which Is More Effective for Teaching Electrochemistry? Part II: The Green Synthesis of Aurones Using a Deep Eutectic Solvent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Ian C.

    2013-01-01

    The role of the teaching laboratory in science education has been debated over the last century. The goals and purposes of the laboratory are still debated and while most science educators consider laboratory a vital part of the education process, they differ widely on the purposes for laboratory and what methods should be used to teach…

  14. Learning outcomes of "The Oncology Patient" study among nursing students: A comparison of teaching strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Judith; Reguant, Mercedes; Canet, Olga

    2016-11-01

    Teaching strategies are essential in order to facilitate meaningful learning and the development of high-level thinking skills in students. To compare three teaching methodologies (problem-based learning, case-based teaching and traditional methods) in terms of the learning outcomes achieved by nursing students. This quasi-experimental research was carried out in the Nursing Degree programme in a group of 74 students who explored the subject of The Oncology Patient through the aforementioned strategies. A performance test was applied based on Bloom's Revised Taxonomy. A significant correlation was found between the intragroup theoretical and theoretical-practical dimensions. Likewise, intergroup differences were related to each teaching methodology. Hence, significant differences were estimated between the traditional methodology (x-=9.13), case-based teaching (x-=12.96) and problem-based learning (x-=14.84). Problem-based learning was shown to be the most successful learning method, followed by case-based teaching and the traditional methodology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Methodological proposal to tackle the Visual Basic program in senior high schools of Pinar del Rio. (First part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Pereira Rosa

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A proposed dosage for the contents to be addressed in the teaching of traditional programming languages in the pre-university level, methodological for treatment suggestions as well as a system of exercises in correspondence with the changes that take is offered in this article out at school, which may constitute material support for the planning, execution and control of the teaching process in this subject.

  16. Research on University Network Teaching Platform (Blackboard in Teaching Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gou Zhao Xia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available With rapid development of online education; teaching platform based on the network, as a new instructional mode has become a hot topic in online teaching. In this paper, the he teaching situation and existing problems on online was analyzed by comparing the difference between network teaching platform and traditional classroom teaching. Then the strategies of network teaching management and the case, which is focusing on the characteristics of Blackboard with the application of network teaching management was presents.

  17. De la enseñanza tradicional de la gramática a la reflexión metalingüística en primeras lenguas / From traditional grammar teaching to metalinguistic reflection in First Language Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Usó Viciedo

    2014-10-01

    to Language Teaching and specifically to First Language Teaching since the introduction of the notion of communicative competence and its subsequent teaching approaches - with a new conception on the Teaching / Learning of grammar. Then, the current Primary Education Curriculum in Catalonia is reviewed, which requires students to develop their awareness on the grammatical function of the language as an objective, content and assessment criterion for both first and foreign languages. The Curriculum also establishes that students should be able to observe and compare differences and similarities between languages and to do a meta-reflection on the use of the different grammatical features of the language. Finally, results from a pilot research study carried out with a group of students from the Master’s degree in Primary Education are presented. These findings show that students adopted a traditional approach to grammar teaching in their different proposals of teaching units,; hence suggesting the need for training future primary school teachers in these concepts both from the Language Teaching and from the Teaching of specific languages perspectives.

  18. Student performance and their perception of a patient-oriented problem-solving approach with audiovisual aids in teaching pathology: a comparison with traditional lectures

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Arjun

    2010-01-01

    Arjun SinghDepartment of Pathology, Sri Venkateshwara Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, Pondicherry, IndiaPurpose: We use different methods to train our undergraduates. The patient-oriented problem-solving (POPS) system is an innovative teaching–learning method that imparts knowledge, enhances intrinsic motivation, promotes self learning, encourages clinical reasoning, and develops long-lasting memory. The aim of this study was to develop POPS in teaching pathology, asse...

  19. Reliability Centered Maintenance - Methodologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammerer, Catherine C.

    2009-01-01

    Journal article about Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) methodologies used by United Space Alliance, LLC (USA) in support of the Space Shuttle Program at Kennedy Space Center. The USA Reliability Centered Maintenance program differs from traditional RCM programs because various methodologies are utilized to take advantage of their respective strengths for each application. Based on operational experience, USA has customized the traditional RCM methodology into a streamlined lean logic path and has implemented the use of statistical tools to drive the process. USA RCM has integrated many of the L6S tools into both RCM methodologies. The tools utilized in the Measure, Analyze, and Improve phases of a Lean Six Sigma project lend themselves to application in the RCM process. All USA RCM methodologies meet the requirements defined in SAE JA 1011, Evaluation Criteria for Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) Processes. The proposed article explores these methodologies.

  20. 传统医德文化与医学伦理学教学改革探讨%Discussion on the Traditional Medical Ethics Culture and Teaching Reform of Medical Ethics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘星; 王晓敏

    2017-01-01

    Through discussing the traditional medical ethics culture and medical ethics,this paper pointed out the main problems in the teaching practice of medical ethics:it did not well handle the relationship between the inheritance of traditional culture and the absorption of foreign culture;it emphasized too much on the learning of analysis methods and tools of ethical problems but ignored the cultivation of personality and morality;the teaching curriculum of medical ethics is unreasonable.This paper discussed the similarities and differences between medical ethics and traditional ethics culture,gasped the common essence of ethics,and put forward to better improve the teaching of medical ethics through the construction of basic theory system,the settings and perfection of curriculum system,the construction and improvement of the curriculum evaluation system,and the inheritance of traditional medical ethics cultural.%通过论述传统医德文化及其医学伦理思想,指出了医学伦理学教学实践中的主要问题:没有处理好传统文化继承和外来文化吸收之间的关系;过分重视伦理问题分析方法和工具的学习,而忽视了对象人格和德性的培育;医学伦理学教学课程设置不合理.客观论证医学伦理学与传统医德文化之间的异同,把握两者共同的伦理思想精髓,并提出了通过基础理论体系的建构,课程体系的设置和完善,课程评价体系的建构和完善,传统医德文化的传承途径来更好地完善医学伦理学教学.

  1. Using Web-Based Interactive Multimedia to Supplement Traditional Teaching Methods: A Pilot Program for Medical Training of Non-Medical Personnel

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gellman, Gregg W

    2005-01-01

    .... The simulator, as part of a blended learning solution, was shown to be as effective as traditional instructor-based learning but was conceived at a fraction of the cost and with a significant reduction in total training time. Both of these factors are increasingly being valued in today's reality of increased operational tempo and reduced resources.

  2. Tradition as the genealogy of truth Hippocrates and Boerhaave between assimilation, variation and deviation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Presti, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    It is a matter of fact that rarely in the history of modern medicine has a physician gained such immediate and universal fame, and rarely has his contribution to medical knowledge and teaching been so promptly and almost unanimously recognized as a fundamental and, so to speak, a foundational one, as in the case of Boerhaave. In fact, the contribution he gave to provide medicine with a 'scientific' framework, and medical teaching with solid methodological bases, proved decisive. Otherwise, his appraisal of the Ancients (and especially of Hippocrates) and his will to refer to Hippocrates as a model for medical teaching were proverbial. Taking the corpus of his orations as a point of reference, I will thus try to elucidate 1) Boerhaave's main focus and theoretical goals; 2) the argumentative and methodological strategies he adopted in order to achieve them; 3) the position that the key-concept of 'tradition', the figure of Hippocrates, and the notion of 'Hippocratism' hold within these strategies.

  3. Changing methodologies in TESOL

    CERN Document Server

    Spiro, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Covering core topics from vocabulary and grammar to teaching, writing speaking and listening, this textbook shows you how to link research to practice in TESOL methodology. It emphasises how current understandings have impacted on the language classroom worldwide and investigates the meaning of 'methods' and 'methodology' and the importance of these for the teacher: as well as the underlying assumptions and beliefs teachers bring to bear in their practice. By introducing you to language teaching approaches, you will explore the way these are influenced by developments in our understanding of l

  4. Identfying the Needs of Pre-Service Classroom Teachers about Science Teaching Methodology Course in Terms of Parlett's Illuminative Program Evaluation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çaliskan, Ilke

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the needs of third grade classroom teaching students about science teaching course in terms of Parlett's Illuminative program evaluation model. Phenomographic research design was used in this study. Illuminative program evaluation model was chosen for this study in terms of its eclectic and process-based…

  5. Identfying the Needs of Pre-Service Classroom Teachers about Science Teaching Methodology Courses in Terms of Parlett's Illuminative Program Evaluation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çaliskan, Ilke

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the needs of third grade classroom teaching students about science teaching course in terms of Parlett's Illuminative program evaluation model. Phenomographic research design was used in this study. Illuminative program evaluation model was chosen for this study in terms of its eclectic and process-based…

  6. An Experience of Teaching of Astronomy in the 6th Year if Fundamental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, L. F.; Damasceno, L. E. F.; Nero, J. D.; Silva, S. J. S. da; Costa, M. B. C.; Aleixo, V. F. P.; Júnior, C. A. B. da S.

    2017-12-01

    This paper deals the question of astronomy teaching within the science discipline through: 1- analysis of the "Earth and Universe" axis of the National Curricular Parameters (NCPs); 2- profile of the professional who teaching the discipline; 3- analysis of the history and importance of experimentation for the teaching of Astronomy in Brazil. The main objective is to analyze the conception of students and teachers regarding the application of experimentation in the teaching of Astronomy in a hybrid class of 6º year with 14 students in the period recovery (07/2016) in an municipal public school of São Miguel of Guama-Pa. We highlight the teacher mishaps of the public school system and its difficulty in using teaching methodologies that go beyond the traditional, we emphasize, the problems with the training courses concerning the teaching of Astronomy and highlight the experimentation as tool indispensable in the construction of this teaching and learning process.

  7. Turning Teaching Upside Down

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Cathy L.

    2017-01-01

    The traditional method of teaching math--showing students how to do a procedure, then assigning problems that require them to use that exact procedure--leads to adults who don't know how to approach problems that don't look like those in their math book. Seeley describes an alternative teaching method (upside-down teaching) in which teachers give…

  8. Reflective Methodology: The Beginning Teacher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Ronald K.; Siefert, Thomas E.

    1970-01-01

    Offers a variety of specific techniques which will help the beginning teacher to implement reflective methodology and create an inquiry-centered classroom atmosphere, at the same time meeting the many more pressing demands of first-year teaching. (JES)

  9. Keeping Tradition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zenhong, C.; Buwalda, P.L.

    2011-01-01

    Chinese dumplings such as Jiao Zi and Bao Zi are two of the popular traditional foods in Asia. They are usually made from wheat flour dough (rice flour or starch is sometimes used) that contains fillings. They can be steamed, boiled and fried and are consumed either as a main meal or dessert. As

  10. Calculation methodology for economic comparison between different land uses. With focus on comparisons between energy crops and traditional crops; Kalkylmetodik foer loensamhetsjaemfoerelser mellan olika markanvaendning. Med fokus paa jaemfoerelser mellan energigroedor och traditionella groedor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenqvist, Haakan

    2010-02-15

    There are two main objectives to this report. The first is to describe a calculation method for both short- and long-term analysis of crops, as well as present the basis and reasoning around it. Another objective is to create an approach that lay-people can use to compare energy crops with traditional crops in a sufficiently straight-forward and believable manner. The report describes, discusses and develops the technical aspects to the calculation questions around the analysis of crops that are grown only on small area of land today, but have the potential to be grown on much larger areas in the future. The variable costing calculation approach is used in agriculture as decision-support for what should be produced. The present variable costing calculation approach has been reworked and redeveloped in order to be more applicable as a decision-support tool. This includes its use to decide which crop should be grown in both short- and long-term perspectives, as well as for perennial energy crops. A number of items that impact growing economy and how they can be interpreted in the growing calculations are discussed. Some of the examples are: Fertilization effects; Sales commissions/product prices; Storage/reestablishment; Fertilization of P and K; Crop insurance; Labor costs; Machine costs; Timeliness costs; New production chains and unutilized resources; Interest rates; Land costs; Over overhead costs; and Costs which not are annual. The main objective of this report is a methodological question and not to show the absolute profitability for each particular land use alternative. But even though the calculations have been improved for different land uses, there is material that that can even be used for profitability analyses. This has been performed to a smaller degree in this report. The profitability of Salix growing has been studied for a variety of different conditions. For part of the studies have used the entire growing period of 22 years, part with

  11. Active teaching methods, studying responses and learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hans Peter; Vigild, Martin Etchells; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    2010-01-01

    Students’ study strategies when exposed to activating teaching methods are measured, analysed and compared to study strategies in more traditional lecture-based teaching. The resulting learning outcome is discussed.......Students’ study strategies when exposed to activating teaching methods are measured, analysed and compared to study strategies in more traditional lecture-based teaching. The resulting learning outcome is discussed....

  12. Active teaching methods, studying responses and learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hans Peter; Vigild, Martin Etchells; Thomsen, Erik Vilain

    Students’ study strategies when exposed to activating teaching methods are measured, analysed and compared to study strategies in more traditional lecture-based teaching.......Students’ study strategies when exposed to activating teaching methods are measured, analysed and compared to study strategies in more traditional lecture-based teaching....

  13. Q methodology for post-social-turn research in SLA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay Irie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Q methodology, an approach to inquiry on the subjective views about a complex phenomenon/issue which has been increasingly employed in a wide range of social science fields has not yet been applied in language learning and teaching research. It is a unique approach that has characteristics of both qualitative and quantitative research methods. The purpose of the present paper is to introduce Q methodology as an alternative approach and demonstrate its potential to respond to the needs of the field that has been expanding in its epistemological diversity since the social turn (Block, 2003; Ortega, 2012. The relevance of the methodology for SLA research will be discussed with a particular focus on the parallels between the development of the methodology in the 1930s and current criticisms towards the traditional cognitive approach in SLA. Using a published study (Irie & Ryan, 2014, the author explains how the focus on the holistic understanding of subjectivity is built into the procedure. Suggestions for possible areas of research and teaching in which Q methodology could be applied are discussed.

  14. A comparison of student outcomes in a physical therapy neurologic rehabilitation course based on delivery mode: hybrid vs traditional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veneri, Diana A; Gannotti, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Physical therapy (PT) educators have been charged by the American Physical Therapy Association's Vision 2020 with the aim of developing critically reflective knowledge about teaching and learning using innovative teaching methods. Computer-assisted learning (CAL) affords the opportunity to supplement face-to-face teaching methods. The purpose of this study was to compare student performance and preferred instruction mode between a hybrid model using CAL modules and a traditional lecture-based model. The posttest-only control design used mixed methods to assess two successive student cohorts (2011 and 2012). Cohort 1 was instructed using only traditional teaching methods of lecture and laboratory experiences, while Cohort 2 was taught using both traditional teaching methods and the CAL modules created for 10 content areas. Students viewed each CAL module after the in-class lecture, prior to the corresponding laboratory. Student performance was assessed with weekly 10-question quizzes. One-minute papers and focus group discussions were administered to Cohort 2 to gauge satisfaction and perceptions of the CAL modules. Results revealed that the mean quiz grades for Cohort 2 were higher than those for Cohort 1, 86.1 vs 80.4. When comparing final exam grades and final grades for the course between groups, a statistically significant difference exists with the final exam grade, pInnovative, interactive, and varied teaching methodologies will serve to better engage students as lifelong learners.

  15. Learning How to Be a Research-Minded Teacher: Four Instrumental Music Education Students Investigate Good Music Teaching through Case Study Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindberg, Laura K.

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence, both in general education and music education, points to the significance of inquiry as a part of teacher preparation. The purpose of this case study was to investigate the ways in which an introductory research project would help preservice music educators understand good "music teaching" and to discover the extent…

  16. A narrative review of undergraduate peer-based healthcare ethics teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindmarch, Thomas; Allikmets, Silvia; Knights, Felicity

    2015-12-12

    This study explores the literature in establishing the value of undergraduate peer-based healthcare ethics teaching as an educational methodology. A narrative review of the literature concerning peer-based ethics teaching was conducted. MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, SCOPUS databases, and the Cochrane Library, were systematically searched for studies of peer-based ethics or professionalism teaching. Selected studies related peer-based teaching to ethics education outcomes. Ten publications were identified. Selected studies were varied in their chosen intervention methodology and analysis. Collectively, the identified studies suggest peer-based ethics education is an effective and valued educational methodology in training healthcare professionals. One paper suggests peer-based ethics teaching has advantages over traditional didactic methods. Peer-based ethics teaching also receives positive feedback from student participants. However, the limited literature base demonstrates a clear need for more evaluation of this pedagogy. The current literature base suggests that undergraduate peer based healthcare ethics teaching is valuable in terms of efficacy and student satisfaction. We conclude that the medical community should invest in further study in order to capitalise upon the potential of peer-based ethics teaching in undergraduate healthcare education.

  17. Effectiveness of teaching automated external defibrillators use using a traditional classroom instruction versus self-instruction video in non-critical care nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail M. Saiboon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness and retention of learning automated external defibrillator (AED usage taught through a traditional classroom instruction (TCI method versus a novel self instructed video (SIV technique in non-critical care nurses (NCCN. Methods: A prospective single-blind randomized study was conducted over 7 months (April-October 2014 at the Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Center, Kuala Lampur, Malaysia. Eighty nurses were randomized into either TCI or SIV instructional techniques. We assessed knowledge, skill and confidence level at baseline, immediate and 6-months post-intervention. Knowledge and confidence were assessed via questionnaire; skill was assessed by a calibrated and blinded independent assessor using an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE method. Results: Pre-test mean scores for knowledge in the TCI group was 10.87 ± 2.34, and for the SIV group was 10.37 ± 1.85 (maximum achievable score 20.00; 4.05 ± 2.87 in the TCI and 3.71 ± 2.66 in the SIV (maximum score 11.00 in the OSCE evaluation and 9.54 ± 3.65 in the TCI and 8.56 ± 3.47 in the SIV (maximum score 25.00 in the individual’s personal confidence level. Both methods increased the mean scores significantly during immediate post-intervention (0-month. At 6-months, the TCI group scored lower than the SIV group in all aspects 11.13 ± 2.70 versus 12.95 ± 2.26 (p=0.03 in knowledge, 7.27 ± 1.62 versus 7.68 ± 1.73 (p=0.47 in the OSCE, and 16.40 ± 2.72 versus 18.82 ± 3.40 (p=0.03 in confidence level. Conclusion: In NCCN’s, SIV is as good as TCI in providing the knowledge, competency, and confidence in performing AED defibrillation.

  18. [Traditional nostrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Shigeru

    2006-01-01

    The commercialization of drugs started toward the end of Heian period (794-1192) when not only aristocrats and monks who were traditional patrons to drug makers, but also local clans and landlords who became powerful as a result of the disbanding of aristocratic manors accumulated enough wealth to spend money on medicine. Although traveling around the country was still a dangerous endeavor, merchants assembled groups to bring lucrative foreign drugs (mainly Chinese) to remote areas. The spread of commercial drugs to common people, however, did not happen until the early Edo period (1603-1867), when the so-called barrier system was installed nationwide to make domestic travel safe. Commercialization started in large cities and gradually spread to other areas. Many nostrums popular until recently appeared in the Genroku period (1688-1703) or later. Many such nostrums were all-cures, often consisting of such active ingredients as Saussureae radix, Agalloch, or Gambir. Even in the Edo period, many people living in agricultural or fishing villages, as well as those in the lower tier, were still poor. Much of the medication available to those people was therefore made of various plant or animal-derived substances that were traditionally used as folk medicines.

  19. Current challenges and problems in teaching pathophysiology in Ukraine - another reaction to Churilov's paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataman, Oleksandr V

    2017-12-01

    Pathophysiology in Ukraine has rich traditions and achievements in the scientific areas, as well as in teaching academic discipline. Its history, the main Ukrainian scientific schools and their famous representatives are briefly described. The content of existing study program, the main approaches to teaching, and some methodological and organizational problems needed to be solved are characterized. The necessity and usefulness of developing and implementing the three separate courses of discipline (Essential, Clinical and Advanced Pathophysiology) are substantiated. The place of Pathophysiology in the training of physicians with different kinds of their future activity is discussed. Relation of teaching Pathophysiology to Translational and Personalized Medicine is tried to be shown.

  20. Incorporating online teaching in an introductory pharmaceutical practice course: a study of student perceptions within an Australian University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benino D

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To examine student perceptions regarding online lectures and quizzes undertaken during a pharmaceutical practice course for first year undergraduate students enrolled in the Bachelor of Pharmacy course at an Australian University.Methods: The University uses a standard instrument to collect feedback from students regarding unit satisfaction. Data were collected for three different teaching modalities: traditional face-to-face, online and partially online. Results: Descriptive statistics support that, from a student's perspective, partial online delivery is the preferred teaching methodology for an introductory pharmaceutical practice unit. Conclusion: This study has served to highlight that while there are a few points of significant difference between traditional and online teaching and learning, a combination of the two provides a reasonable avenue for teaching exploration. This result has implications for teaching practice generally, and within the pharmacy discipline, specifically.

  1. Incorporating online teaching in an introductory pharmaceutical practice course: a study of student perceptions within an Australian University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benino, Diana; Girardi, Antonia; Czarniak, Petra

    2011-10-01

    To examine student perceptions regarding online lectures and quizzes undertaken during a pharmaceutical practice course for first year undergraduate students enrolled in the Bachelor of Pharmacy course at an Australian University. The University uses a standard instrument to collect feedback from students regarding unit satisfaction. Data were collected for three different teaching modalities: traditional face-to-face, online and partially online. Descriptive statistics support that, from a student's perspective, partial online delivery is the preferred teaching methodology for an introductory pharmaceutical practice unit. This study has served to highlight that while there are a few points of significant difference between traditional and online teaching and learning, a combination of the two provides a reasonable avenue for teaching exploration. This result has implications for teaching practice generally, and within the pharmacy discipline, specifically.

  2. Creating and evaluating a new clicker methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengfei

    "Clickers", an in-class polling system, has been used by many instructors to add active learning and formative assessment to previously passive traditional lectures. While considerable research has been conducted on clicker increasing student interaction in class, less research has been reported on the effectiveness of using clicker to help students understand concepts. This thesis reported a systemic project by the OSU Physics Education group to develop and test a new clicker methodology. Clickers question sequences based on a constructivist model of learning were used to improve classroom dynamics and student learning. They also helped students and lecturers understand in real time whether a concept had been assimilated or more effort was required. Chapter 1 provided an introduction to the clicker project. Chapter 2 summarized widely-accepted teaching principles that have arisen from a long history of research and practice in psychology, cognitive science and physics education. The OSU clicker methodology described in this thesis originated partly from our years of teaching experience, but mostly was based on these teaching principles. Chapter 3 provided an overview of the history of clicker technology and different types of clickers. Also, OSU's use of clickers was summarized together with a list of common problems and corresponding solutions. These technical details may be useful for those who want to use clickers. Chapter 4 discussed examples of the type and use of question sequences based on the new clicker methodology. In several years of research, we developed a base of clicker materials for calculus-based introductory physics courses at OSU. As discussed in chapter 5, a year-long controlled quantitative study was conducted to determine whether using clickers helps students learn, how using clickers helps students learn and whether students perceive that clicker has a positive effect on their own learning process. The strategy for this test was based on

  3. “It’s just really not me”: How pre-service English teachers from a traditional teacher education program experience student-teaching in charter-school networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April S. Salerno

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Though teacher educators nationwide are considering ways to provide urban placements for pre-service teachers (PSTs, little research has examined how PSTs experience placements in schools operated by charter management organizations (CMOs. This study considers CMOs—which often hold particular instructional and classroom management philosophies—as a specific type of school-based learning environment. We draw from a Discourse analytic theoretical framework using qualitative methodology to study how three English education focal PSTs experience disconnections between student-teaching placements at CMO schools and their teacher education program. Findings suggest three ways teacher educators can support PSTs in navigating school-based learning. PSTs in this study experienced contexts and philosophies that varied greatly between their schools and teacher education program. Implications include: (1 PSTs must feel that others in their schools value their learning; (2 PSTs in cohorts must feel they belong to learning communities; and (3 PSTs need support in confronting paradoxes they face between theory and practice.

  4. A Critical Examination of the Teaching Methodologies Pertaining to Distance Learning in Geographic Education: Andragogy in an Adult Online Certificate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Richard B.

    2012-01-01

    Differences between student audiences are an important aspect not only of traditional learning in higher education, but also in the distance learning environment. Facilitators of distance learning coursework must be cognizant of the differences which adult students bring to the classroom and their varying expectations and reasons for learning.…

  5. How to teach mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Krantz, Steven G

    2015-01-01

    This third edition is a lively and provocative tract on how to teach mathematics in today's new world of online learning tools and innovative teaching devices. The author guides the reader through the joys and pitfalls of interacting with modern undergraduates-telling you very explicitly what to do and what not to do. This third edition has been streamlined from the second edition, but still includes the nuts and bolts of good teaching, discussing material related to new developments in teaching methodology and technique, as well as adding an entire new chapter on online teaching methods.

  6. Learner-centered teaching in the college science classroom: a practical guide for teaching assistants, instructors, and professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Margaret Z.; Vorndran, Shelby

    2014-09-01

    The Office of Instruction and Assessment at the University of Arizona currently offers a Certificate in College Teaching Program. The objective of this program is to develop the competencies necessary to teach effectively in higher education today, with an emphasis on learner-centered teaching. This type of teaching methodology has repeatedly shown to have superior effects compared to traditional teacher-centered approaches. The success of this approach has been proven in both short term and long term teaching scenarios. Students must actively participate in class, which allows for the development of depth of understanding, acquisition of critical thinking, and problem-solving skills. As optical science graduate students completing the teaching program certificate, we taught a recitation class for OPTI 370: Photonics and Lasers for two consecutive years. The recitation was an optional 1-hour long session to supplement the course lectures. This recitation received positive feedback and learner-centered teaching was shown to be a successful method for engaging students in science, specifically in optical sciences following an inquiry driven format. This paper is intended as a guide for interactive, multifaceted teaching, due to the fact that there are a variety of learning styles found in every classroom. The techniques outlined can be implemented in many formats: a full course, recitation session, office hours and tutoring. This guide is practical and includes only the most effective and efficient strategies learned while also addressing the challenges faced, such as formulating engaging questions, using wait time and encouraging shy students.

  7. From 1962 the teaching of Methodology of Radioisotopes is continuous in the University of Buenos Aires of the Argentine Republic; Desde 1962 la ensenanza de Metodologia de Radioisotopos es continua en la Universidad de Buenos Aires de la Republica Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, E; Cremaschi, G; Martin, G; Zubillaga, M; Cricco, G; Davio, C; Genaro, A; Bianchin, A; Mohamad, N; Klecha, A; Calmanovici, G; Goldman, G; Salgueiro, J; Nunez, M; Medina, V; Gutierrez, A; Leonardi, N; Bergoc, R [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Junin 956, 1113- Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2006-07-01

    In the Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry of the University of Buenos Aires the teaching of the radioisotopes began in 1960 and uninterruptedly continuous. The application of the radioisotopes and the radiations in different professional activities it is acceptable only in a context of radiological safety and with personal appropriately trained. Conscious of it, the training in grade, postgraduate and technicature, has more of 40% of the thematic one guided to the formation in radiological protection. The courses dictated at the moment in the Laboratory of Radioisotopes they include: Grade formation: to) Subject grade 'Methodology of Radioisotopes' in the Career of Biochemistry: it began to be dictated in 1960 and until the present, more of 6500 students they have gone by our classrooms. b) Grade subject 'Radiopharmacy' in the Career of Pharmacy: guided to the formation of a modern pharmacist, with necessary knowledge to be developed as professional in the Radiopharmaceutical area. Postgraduate formation: c) Postgraduate course of Methodology of Radioisotopes specially directed to biochemical, biologists, veterinarians, chemical. It is dictated uninterruptedly from 1962. d) Postgraduate course in Methodology of Radioisotopes for medical professionals, specially directed to professionals of the medicine that want to specialize in different branches of the Nuclear Medicine. Both courses have 220 present hours and it stops their approval the assistants they should surrender a final exam at open book that consists on the resolution of a practical exercise adapted to their professional practices. Until the present they have surrendered their exams satisfactorily approximately 2000 professionals coming from different areas of the Argentina and of several countries of Hispanic speech. e) Starting from 1992 the Course of Upgrade in Methodology of Radioisotopes directed to professionals that want to upgrade its knowledge in new radioisotopic methodologies is dictated

  8. From 1962 the teaching of Methodology of Radioisotopes is continuous in the University of Buenos Aires of the Argentine Republic; Desde 1962 la ensenanza de Metodologia de Radioisotopos es continua en la Universidad de Buenos Aires de la Republica Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, E.; Cremaschi, G.; Martin, G.; Zubillaga, M.; Cricco, G.; Davio, C.; Genaro, A.; Bianchin, A.; Mohamad, N.; Klecha, A.; Calmanovici, G.; Goldman, G.; Salgueiro, J.; Nunez, M.; Medina, V.; Gutierrez, A.; Leonardi, N.; Bergoc, R. [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Junin 956, 1113- Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. e-mail: rmbergoc@arnet.com.ar

    2006-07-01

    In the Faculty of Pharmacy and Biochemistry of the University of Buenos Aires the teaching of the radioisotopes began in 1960 and uninterruptedly continuous. The application of the radioisotopes and the radiations in different professional activities it is acceptable only in a context of radiological safety and with personal appropriately trained. Conscious of it, the training in grade, postgraduate and technicature, has more of 40% of the thematic one guided to the formation in radiological protection. The courses dictated at the moment in the Laboratory of Radioisotopes they include: Grade formation: to) Subject grade 'Methodology of Radioisotopes' in the Career of Biochemistry: it began to be dictated in 1960 and until the present, more of 6500 students they have gone by our classrooms. b) Grade subject 'Radiopharmacy' in the Career of Pharmacy: guided to the formation of a modern pharmacist, with necessary knowledge to be developed as professional in the Radiopharmaceutical area. Postgraduate formation: c) Postgraduate course of Methodology of Radioisotopes specially directed to biochemical, biologists, veterinarians, chemical. It is dictated uninterruptedly from 1962. d) Postgraduate course in Methodology of Radioisotopes for medical professionals, specially directed to professionals of the medicine that want to specialize in different branches of the Nuclear Medicine. Both courses have 220 present hours and it stops their approval the assistants they should surrender a final exam at open book that consists on the resolution of a practical exercise adapted to their professional practices. Until the present they have surrendered their exams satisfactorily approximately 2000 professionals coming from different areas of the Argentina and of several countries of Hispanic speech. e) Starting from 1992 the Course of Upgrade in Methodology of Radioisotopes directed to professionals that want to upgrade its knowledge in new radioisotopic

  9. METHODOLOGY FOR DESIGNING TEACHING DEVELOPING-TASKS OF DEPTH OF THOUGHT WHICH APPRECIATE THE QUALITY OF THE GRADUATE PROFFESIONALS OF AGRONOMY / METODOLOGÍA PARA ELABORAR TAREAS DOCENTES DESARROLLADORAS DE LA PROFUNDIDAD DEL PENSAMIENTO QUE PROPICIE LA CALIDAD DEL EGRESO DE PROFESIONALES DE LA AGRONOMÍA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamilka Sosa Oliva

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This work has as a general objective to contribute to guarantee the quality of the enrollment of the professionals of junior level in the specialty of Agronomy, from the direction of the process of thinking. As a result, a methodology is offered for the elaboration of teaching tasks which favor the development of thought from the work done to skills. This is a result of a Project of investigation: an alternative for the direction of the teaching-learning process in the Technical and Professional Level of Teaching and this constitute a pre-liminary result of a thesis in option to get a PhD.

  10. Methodology of teaching and new challenges in the training of professionals in the area of industrial radiology; Metodologia de ensino e novos desafios na formação de profissionais na área de radiologia industrial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, C.M. Araujo, E-mail: c.araujo@maximindustrial.com.br [MAXIM Industrial, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pelegrineli, S.Q. [Faculdade Casa Branca (FACAB), SP (Brazil); Lima, A.R. [Comissão Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    One of the main causes of radiological accidents is the lack of knowledge in radiological protection of workers. In order to meet the needs of professionals in radiology techniques in training in industrial radiology and radiological protection, the Training Course in Industrial Radiology was created in 2009 by MAXIM, in partnership with the Casa Branca Faculty. The objective is to present the structure and methodology of teaching used in this course to reach the objectives of training professionals with solid knowledge in industrial radiology, as well as to mention the challenges of this training. For the elaboration of the study, a statistical data base and theoretical analysis of the teaching structure of the course was used. Professional training in industrial radiology is subdivided into basic, specific, practical and complementary modules, totaling a workload of 360 hours. It is noted that most of the professionals trained come from the great urban centers of the country, favoring employability in the port terminals and industries that are located in these regions. It is concluded, therefore, that it is necessary and of great importance for the growing industrial market, the formation of new professionals, mainly in cities of the interior.

  11. Teaching the Catholic Intellectual Tradition in Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berendt, Emil B.

    2017-01-01

    While much work has been done to explicitly incorporate ethics and Catholic social thought into the business curriculum, comparatively little has been done in the field of economics. This paper attempts to fill that gap by arguing that integrating Heinrich Pesch's Solidarism into the standard economics curriculum seamlessly introduces Catholic…

  12. Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello and King Lear in the English Teaching at School: a methodological approach - doi: 10.4025/actascieduc.v34i2.15070

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdomiro Polidório

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article we will talk about the relevance of dramatic texts in schools. Therefore we will approach the tragedies Hamlet, Macbeth, Otelo e King Lear de William Shakespeare and how teachers can explore them as a help in the teaching of languages without forgetting that they are dramatic and literary texts. When we refer to languages, we want to say any language, because Shakespearean texts are ageless, may have many meanings and deal with human nature. The theatre is in our lives and in this case it is relevant to quote William Shakespeare himself that said that “life is a stage and we are actors”. Starting from this, we will consider the best ways of using the tragedies Hamlet, Macbeth, Otelo e King Lear in the classroom.  

  13. Metodologia do ensino de ginástica: novos olhares, novas perspectivas Gym teaching methodology: new approaches, new perspectives Metodología de enseñanza de la gimnasia: Nuevos horizontes, nuevas perspectivas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo busca sistematizar uma proposta metodológica para o ensino da Ginástica escolar e comunitária, que vem sendo construída a partir de experiências realizadas junto aos projetos de ensino, pesquisa e extensão vinculados ao Grupo de Estudo, Pesquisa e Experimentação em Ginástica(GEPEGIN, da Faculdade de Educação Física da UFG. A proposta indica alguns princípios, conteúdos e estratégias de ação que possam contribuir para o processo de formação humana crítica, na tentativa de apontar uma nova perspectiva para o ensino, a prática e o conhecimento da Ginástica. PALAVRAS-CHAVE: metodologia da ginástica – formação humana – linguagem corporal. This article aims at systematizing a methodological approach for the teaching of gym in schools and communities, which is being built from the experiences held with teaching, research, and extension (community-bound projects linked to GEPEGIN - the Study, Research, and Gym Experimentation Group, from the Physical Education Department at UFG - the Federal University of Goias. This approach indicates some principles, contents, and strategies for action that might contribute to the process of human education in a critical way, in an attempt to point towards a new perspective for the teaching, the practice, and the knowledge of Gymnastics. KEY-WORDS: gymnastics methodology – human education – body language. Este artículo busca sistematizar una propuesta metodológica para la enseñanza de la Gimnasia escolar y comunitaria, que viene siendo construida a partir de experiencias realizadas junto a los proyectos de enseñanza, pesquisa y extensión vinculados al Grupo de Estudio, Pesquisa y Experimentación en Gimnasia (GEPEGIN, de la Facultad de Educación Física de la UFG. La propuesta indica algunos principios, contenidos y estrategias de acción que puedan contribuir para el proceso de formación humana crítica, intenta señalar una nueva perspectiva para la ense

  14. Metodologias ativas de ensino-aprendizagem na formação profissional em saúde: debates atuais Active teaching-learning methodologies in health education: current debates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Minardi Mitre

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available As vertiginosas transformações das sociedades contemporâneas têm colocado em questão, de modo cada vez mais incisivo, os aspectos relativos à formação profissional. Este debate ganha contornos próprios no trabalho em saúde, na medida em que a indissociabilidade entre teoria e prática, o desenvolvimento de uma visão integral do homem e a ampliação da concepção de cuidado tornam-se prementes para o adequado desempenho laboral. Com base nestas considerações, o objetivo do presente artigo é discutir as principais transformações metodológicas no processo de formação dos profissionais de saúde, com ênfase na apreciação das metodologias ativas de ensino-aprendizagem.The vertiginous transformations of the contemporary societies have been raising questions concerning aspects of professional education. Such questions have been raised in a more and more incisive way. This debate gains a new shape when applied to health work, where theory and practice cannot be dissociated, and where the development of an integral vision of the human being and the amplification of the concept care are essential for a proper performance. Based on these considerations, this article aims to discuss the main methodological transformations in the education process of health professionals, with emphasis to active teaching-learning methodologies.

  15. The significance of music in teaching Turkish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feyzan Göher Vural

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The whole history of teaching foreign languages is, in a way, a search for the best methodologies of doing so. Methods of teaching can be seen as systems providing the optimal ways of getting basic knowledge of a foreign language for students. The existing wide variety of methods suggests the choice of those most efficient for particular individuals. Each of the methodologies used relies on a number of theoretical underpinnings. This article advances proposals on using music in teaching Turkish as a foreign language, based on the principles of suggestopedia — the psychology of positive teaching developed by G. Lozanov. It is claimed that suggestopedia helps students learn a foreign language 3 to 5 times faster than those who rely on traditional methods of study. Suggestopedia makes colloquial dialogues in a foreign language be pronounced and/or listened to in the same way as music, and music is used as a facilitating and motivating factor, without lyrics. However, teaching based on suggestopedia alone will not suffice, since in the classical form it is limited by adult audiences and small ones to boot. Other peculiarities of students and groups also have to be accounted for, such as their linguistic background: if their first language is a Turkic one, they can be expected to learn Turkish faster, since they are already familiar with the melodic mode of the language. It can nevertheless be postulated that the use of songs in language learning helps develop such skills as vocabulary, rules of grammar and correct pronunciation. Songs facilitate teaching new words, grammatical rules, learning direction, layout, numbers and demonstrative adjectives. This is both useful and interesting for all categories of learners, children as well as adults.

  16. The route of methodologies of the beginning of the twentieth century in the teaching of music in Spain: bibliographical and interpretative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Montoya Rubio

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the obligatory stages, the methodologies of musical education in Spain have clear characteristics, based on the observation and adaptation of some classic methods (especially the proposals of Orff, Kodály or Jaques–Dalcroze. This has generated concrete procedures and school equipment to meet the expectations and needs of these methods. The Spanish musical educational model has evolved according to these parameters. Therefore, it is essential to trawl through the files that adopted these methods and to analyze the way in which the later bibliography has approached, developed and shaped them. All this, together with the legislative changes, will serve to find interpretive keys to the pedagogical models of today.

  17. Creativity in phenomenological methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreyer, Pia; Martinsen, Bente; Norlyk, Annelise

    2014-01-01

    on the methodologies of van Manen, Dahlberg, Lindseth & Norberg, the aim of this paper is to argue that the increased focus on creativity and arts in research methodology is valuable to gain a deeper insight into lived experiences. We illustrate this point through examples from empirical nursing studies, and discuss......Nursing research is often concerned with lived experiences in human life using phenomenological and hermeneutic approaches. These empirical studies may use different creative expressions and art-forms to describe and enhance an embodied and personalised understanding of lived experiences. Drawing...... may support a respectful renewal of phenomenological research traditions in nursing research....

  18. Teaching Justice and Teaching Justly: Reflections on Teaching World Religions at a Jesuit Liberal Arts College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmalz, Mathew N.

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines how the teaching of world religions at Catholic Christians institutions can contribute to teaching justice and teaching justly. The paper compares central issues engaged by History of Religions as a discipline with those addressed within the Jesuit tradition of higher education as it developed in the wake of the Second Vatican…

  19. Creating effective environmental education: A case study utilizing an integrative teaching methodology to develop positive environmental attitudes and behaviors in the secondary general science curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Teresa M.

    Many years of teaching environmental issues years has revealed that giving students only "the facts" frequently leaves them with a sense of hopelessness about the future of life on this planet. Problems of the environment often seem large and complex, and student's feel there is nothing "they" can do. In response, a curriculum was developed that permits students to learn about action strategies they can partake in that would make a small contribution towards a solution, as well as exploring their own values and attitudes about environmental issues. The curriculum also attempts to foster positive attitudes and beliefs about the natural world. The curriculum contains three distinct units, focusing on energy, atmospheric issues, and the loss of habitat and rainforest. It was taught in sixty-one sessions over a fourteen week period in a standard level ninth grade General Science class of twenty-four students, at Harriton High School in the Lower Merion School District in the suburbs of Philadelphia. The dissertation is presented as a case study that is the author's construction of the actual experience, developed from audio tapes of the classroom sessions, personal logs, and data collected from the students. The dissertation presents an in-depth case study of the development, the actual implementation, and subsequent evaluation of this environmental curriculum, and gives an in-depth view of life in this class.

  20. How to research while teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie

    2009-01-01

     HOW TO RESEARCH WHILE TEACHING - Staging video streaming -   This paper presents a visual methodological strategy to explore what I call the reflexive positioning of the researcher in educational settings. My methodological interests are how the teacher as a researcher can deal with her....../his research position and I propose strategic approach. The methodological strategy stems from the data achieved from video streamed teaching sessions.       ...

  1. The construction and application of didactic models in Biochemistry teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximiliano de Souza Zierer

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This work describes how to build and use didactic models as a teaching resource to a more creative teaching in Biochemistry. Students are organized into groups to discuss the creation, planning and execution of models. Previously, the teacher guides the use of various materials for preparation and encourages the use of low cost materials. The day of the activity, held in the classroom, students build their models and are evaluated orally by the teacher about the functions or processes represented. At the end of class, we propose the presentation by each group, plus a general discussion about them. We find that that this methodology makes the classroom an environment highly conducive to creative expression, allowing students to develop their potential and making them effective learning, meaningful and longer lasting when compared to traditional teaching methods.

  2. Methodology of sustainability accounting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.H. Sokil

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Modern challenges of the theory and methodology of accounting are realized through the formation and implementation of new concepts, the purpose of which is to meet the needs of users in standard and unique information. The development of a methodology for sustainability accounting is a key aspect of the management of an economic entity. The purpose of the article is to form the methodological bases of accounting for sustainable development and determine its goals, objectives, object, subject, methods, functions and key aspects. The author analyzes the theoretical bases of the definition and considers the components of the traditional accounting methodology. Generalized structural diagram of the methodology for accounting for sustainable development is offered in the article. The complex of methods and principles of sustainable development accounting for systematized and non-standard provisions has been systematized. The new system of theoretical and methodological provisions of accounting for sustainable development is justified in the context of determining its purpose, objective, subject, object, methods, functions and key aspects.

  3. Activating teaching methods, studying responses and learning

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Hans Peter; Vigild, Martin E.; Thomsen, Erik; Szabo, Peter; Horsewell, Andy

    2009-01-01

    Students’ study strategies when exposed to activating teaching methods are measured, analysed and compared to study strategies in more traditional lecture-based teaching. The resulting learning outcome is discussed. Peer Reviewed

  4. Educational models in academic research on the teaching practices in science education in elementary school

    OpenAIRE

    Rebeca Chiacchio Azevedo Fernandes; Jorge Megid Neto

    2013-01-01

    We intended to identify the features and pedagogical trends of the school practices proposed and implemented in thesis and dissertations directed to science education at elementary school level from 1972 to 2005. Thirty studies were analysed regarding the teaching methodology, instructional resources, teacher-student relationships, evaluation, theoretical framework, and educational model (traditional, rediscovery, constructivist, technicist, STS, socio-cultural). We found that the constructiv...

  5. Literacy research methodologies

    CERN Document Server

    Duke, Nell K

    2012-01-01

    The definitive reference on literacy research methods, this book serves as a key resource for researchers and as a text in graduate-level courses. Distinguished scholars clearly describe established and emerging methodologies, discuss the types of questions and claims for which each is best suited, identify standards of quality, and present exemplary studies that illustrate the approaches at their best. The book demonstrates how each mode of inquiry can yield unique insights into literacy learning and teaching and how the methods can work together to move the field forward.   New to This Editi

  6. Effective methods of teaching and learning in anatomy as a basic science: A BEME systematic review: BEME guide no. 44.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losco, C Dominique; Grant, William D; Armson, Anthony; Meyer, Amanda J; Walker, Bruce F

    2017-03-01

    Anatomy is a subject essential to medical practice, yet time committed to teaching is on the decline, and resources required to teach anatomy is costly, particularly dissection. Advances in technology are a potential solution to the problem, while maintaining the quality of teaching required for eventual clinical application. To identify methods used to teach anatomy, including those demonstrated to enhance knowledge acquisition and retention. PubMed, CINAHL, ERIC, Academic OneFile, ProQuest, SAGE journals and Scopus were search from the earliest entry of each database to 31 August 2015. All included articles were assessed for methodological quality and low quality articles were excluded from the study. Studies were evaluated by assessment scores, qualitative outcomes where included as well as a modified Kirkpatrick model. A total of 17,820 articles were initially identified, with 29 included in the review. The review found a wide variety of teaching interventions represented in the range of studies, with CAI/CAL studies predominating in terms of teaching interventions, followed by simulation. In addition to this, CAI/CAL and simulation studies demonstrated better results overall compared to traditional teaching methods and there is evidence to support CAI/CAL as a partial replacement for dissection or a valuable tool in conjunction with dissection. This review provides evidence in support of the use of alternatives to traditional teaching methods in anatomy, in particular, the use of CAI/CAL with a number of high quality, low risk of bias studies supporting this.

  7. Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    "Teaching Teaching & Understanding Understanding" is a 19-minute award-winning short-film about teaching at university and higher-level educational institutions. It is based on the "Constructive Alignment" theory developed by Prof. John Biggs. The film delivers a foundation for understanding what...

  8. Construção de portfólios coletivos em currículos tradicionais: uma proposta inovadora de ensino-aprendizagem The construction of collective portfolios in traditional curriculums: an innovative approach in teaching-learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosângela Minardi Mitre Cotta

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Tradicionalmente, a educação em saúde se baseia em metodologias de transmissão de conhecimentos. Porém, agora se exige a formação de profissionais com perfil crítico-reflexivo e capazes de trabalhar em equipes. O que requer novas metodologias de ensino-aprendizagem, tendo na problematização um instrumento de transformação. É relatada experiência utilizando a construção de portfólios coletivos na aprendizagem, como mudança de atitudes e na avaliação de alunos de graduação, em contexto de estrutura curricular tradicional e por disciplinas. Estudo exploratório descritivo, com abordagem quali-quantitativa, fundamentado na análise de portfólios coletivos (n= 9, construídos pelos acadêmicos da disciplina Políticas de Saúde, complementado com a aplicação de um questionário aberto aos alunos (n=58 e com a realização de grupos focais (n=3. Os portfólios coletivos mobilizaram o pensamento crítico-reflexivo sobre a política do Sistema Único de Saúde, ampliando a concepção sobre o processo saúde-doença e as práticas relacionadas aos serviços de saúde, valorizando o trabalho em equipe e a busca ativa na construção do conhecimento, destacando-se os exercícios da alteridade, resiliência e empoderamento.Education to promote health has traditionally been based on knowledge transmission methodologies. However, the current scenario calls for the training of professionals with a critical-reflective profile, who are able to work in teams. We present the report of an innovative experience using the construction of collective portfolios as instruments of learning, changing attitudes and training of undergraduates, in a traditional subject-based curriculum structure context. It is a descriptive exploratory study, with a qualitative-quantitative approach, based on analysis of collective portfolios (n=9, built by Health Policy students, together with an open questionnaire to students who attended the course (n=58 and also

  9. The application of network teaching in applied optics teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huifu; Piao, Mingxu; Li, Lin; Liu, Dongmei

    2017-08-01

    Network technology has become a creative tool of changing human productivity, the rapid development of it has brought profound changes to our learning, working and life. Network technology has many advantages such as rich contents, various forms, convenient retrieval, timely communication and efficient combination of resources. Network information resources have become the new education resources, get more and more application in the education, has now become the teaching and learning tools. Network teaching enriches the teaching contents, changes teaching process from the traditional knowledge explanation into the new teaching process by establishing situation, independence and cooperation in the network technology platform. The teacher's role has shifted from teaching in classroom to how to guide students to learn better. Network environment only provides a good platform for the teaching, we can get a better teaching effect only by constantly improve the teaching content. Changchun university of science and technology introduced a BB teaching platform, on the platform, the whole optical classroom teaching and the classroom teaching can be improved. Teachers make assignments online, students learn independently offline or the group learned cooperatively, this expands the time and space of teaching. Teachers use hypertext form related knowledge of applied optics, rich cases and learning resources, set up the network interactive platform, homework submission system, message board, etc. The teaching platform simulated the learning interest of students and strengthens the interaction in the teaching.

  10. Tree Ordination as Invented Tradition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avery Morrow

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The symbolic ordination of trees as monks in Thailand is widely perceived in Western scholarship to be proof of the power of Buddhism to spur ecological thought. However, a closer analysis of tree ordination demonstrates that it is not primarily about Buddhist teaching, but rather is an invented tradition based on the sanctity of Thai Buddhist symbols as well as those of spirit worship and the monarchy. Tree ordinations performed by non-Buddhist minorities in Thailand do not demonstrate a religious commitment but rather a political one.

  11. On methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheesman, Robin; Faraone, Roque

    2002-01-01

    This is an English version of the methodology chapter in the authors' book "El caso Berríos: Estudio sobre información errónea, desinformación y manipulación de la opinión pública".......This is an English version of the methodology chapter in the authors' book "El caso Berríos: Estudio sobre información errónea, desinformación y manipulación de la opinión pública"....

  12. Frequency of Applying Different Teaching Strategies and Social Teaching Methods in Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivic, Sonja

    2016-01-01

    The question that every modern teacher raises in their daily work is the reflection on selecting teaching strategies and social forms of teaching. Unlike traditional teaching strategies in which knowledge transfer is mainly done by the teacher while the students are passive listeners and recipients of such knowledge, modern teaching strategies…

  13. Incorporating active-learning techniques into the photonics-related teaching in the Erasmus Mundus Master in "Color in Informatics and Media Technology"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozo, Antonio M.; Rubiño, Manuel; Hernández-Andrés, Javier; Nieves, Juan L.

    2014-07-01

    In this work, we present a teaching methodology using active-learning techniques in the course "Devices and Instrumentation" of the Erasmus Mundus Master's Degree in "Color in Informatics and Media Technology" (CIMET). A part of the course "Devices and Instrumentation" of this Master's is dedicated to the study of image sensors and methods to evaluate their image quality. The teaching methodology that we present consists of incorporating practical activities during the traditional lectures. One of the innovative aspects of this teaching methodology is that students apply the concepts and methods studied in class to real devices. For this, students use their own digital cameras, webcams, or cellphone cameras in class. These activities provide students a better understanding of the theoretical subject given in class and encourage the active participation of students.

  14. Tradition and Renewal in Contemporary Orthodox Theology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marios Begzos

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This text presents the challenges that the modern world poses for the Orthodox Church. In every historical period, the Church has struggled with internal and external problems. While preserving its traditions and historical foundations, the theology of the Orthodox Church struggles with contemporary problems by showing the current, contemporary teaching about God, man and the world.

  15. Blended learning versus traditional teaching-learning-setting: Evaluation of cognitive and affective learning outcomes for the inter-professional field of occupational medicine and prevention / Blended Learning versus traditionelles Lehr-Lernsetting: Evaluierung von kognitiven und affektiven Lernergebnissen für das interprofessionelle Arbeitsfeld Arbeitsmedizin und Prävention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eckler Ursula

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Blended learning is characterised as a combination of face-to-face teaching and e-learning in terms of knowledge transfer, students’ learning activities and reduced presence at the teaching facility. The present cohort study investigated long-term effects of blended learning regarding cognitive outcomes as well as self-indicated estimates of immediate learning effects on the affective domain in the inter-professional field of occupational medicine. Physiotherapy students (bachelor degree at FH Campus Wien – University of Applied Sciences completed the course Occupational Medicine/Prevention either in a traditional teaching-learning setting entirely taught face-to-face (control-group, n=94, or with a blended learning model (intervention-group, n=93. Long-term effects (1.5 year follow-up on the cognitive learning outcomes were assessed according to four levels of Bloom’s learning objectives. In addition, students estimated potential benefits resulting from blended learning based on four Krathwohl’s learning objectives for the affective domain by means of a six-option Likert scale (n=282. Concerning cognitive outcomes, significant results favouring both groups were found with effect sizes from small to medium. The traditional teaching-learning setting resulted in significantly better results in the upmost aspired learning objective (analysis at the long-term (p<0,01; r=-0,33. In contrast, the intervention group resulted in significantly better long-term results on learning objective levels 1 (knowledge and 2 (understanding (p=0,01; r=-0,20 and, p=0,02; r=-0,17, respectively. Hence, no general recommendation favouring either the classical setting or blending learning can be drawn regarding the cognitive domain. However, students’ self-indications on the affective domain give preference to blended learning, particularly if inter-professional teamwork is a course objective.

  16. Science Understanding through Playground Physics: Organized Recess Teaching (SUPPORT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kincaid, Russell

    2010-03-01

    From 1995-2007, U.S. science students in grade four scored higher than the scaled TIMSS average, but their scores did not improve over this time. Moreover, in the area of physical science, the U.S. scored significantly lower than several Asian countries, as well as Russia, England, and Latvia (TIMSS). Methods to enhance student achievement in science are still being sought. An approach to utilizing playground equipment as a teaching tool for a variety of physics concepts was developed as a physical science teaching method. This program established an appropriate set of experiments, coordinated the effort with local school districts, and implemented a brief pilot study to test the teaching methodology. The program assigned undergraduate middle school science education majors to teach small groups of fourth grade students. The experimental group used the newly developed ``Playground Physics'' methodology while the control group used traditional approaches. Follow up activities will include an expansion of the duration and the scope of the program.

  17. Attitude of medical and dental first year students towards teaching methods in a medical college of northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Aditya; Bansal, Ramta; Singh, Kd; Kumar, Avnish

    2014-12-01

    Teaching in most Asian countries is still dominated by teacher-centered classrooms in which students passively receive information from the teacher. Studies have shown that students' inactivity in traditional teacher-centered classes makes them bored that consequently decrease their concentration and learning. To counter these problems active learning methods are being promoted to enhance their interest in studying. This present study was done to explore effective teaching system from a student's perspective. The aim of the study was to examine the attitude of medical and dental first year students towards teaching methods. The study was undertaken at on 150 Medical and Dental first year students. The study was conducted using general questionnaires along with feedback form to know their opinion about different teaching methodology. A 94.67% of the students were unsatisfied with traditional Lecture teaching. 89.33% favoured combination of traditional lectures and active learning techniques, 74.67% students find active learning methods to be interesting, 77.33% found them as attention seekers, 89.33% are motivated for in-depth study and 85.33% students are motivated for independents learning. 100% students agreed that active learning methods provide opportunities of student interaction while 86.67% students are happy with the teacher-student interaction it provides. Audio-visual aids are the most favoured (94.67%) and test questions are most criticized active teaching method. Our study disclosed that the majority of student's positively believe in using different active learning techniques for classroom activities.

  18. Understanding traditional African healing

    OpenAIRE

    MOKGOBI, M.G.

    2014-01-01

    Traditional African healing has been in existence for many centuries yet many people still seem not to understand how it relates to God and religion/spirituality. Some people seem to believe that traditional healers worship the ancestors and not God. It is therefore the aim of this paper to clarify this relationship by discussing a chain of communication between the worshipers and the Almighty God. Other aspects of traditional healing namely types of traditional healers, training of tradition...

  19. Methodological guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halsnaes, K.; Callaway, J.M.; Meyer, H.J.

    1999-01-01

    The guideline document establishes a general overview of the main components of climate change mitigation assessment. This includes an outline of key economic concepts, scenario structure, common assumptions, modelling tools and country study assumptions. The guidelines are supported by Handbook Reports that contain more detailed specifications of calculation standards, input assumptions and available tools. The major objectives of the project have been provided a methodology, an implementing framework and a reporting system which countries can follow in meeting their future reporting obligations under the FCCC and for GEF enabling activities. The project builds upon the methodology development and application in the UNEP National Abatement Coasting Studies (UNEP, 1994a). The various elements provide countries with a road map for conducting climate change mitigation studies and submitting national reports as required by the FCCC. (au) 121 refs

  20. Methodological guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halsnaes, K.; Callaway, J.M.; Meyer, H.J.

    1999-04-01

    The guideline document establishes a general overview of the main components of climate change mitigation assessment. This includes an outline of key economic concepts, scenario structure, common assumptions, modelling tools and country study assumptions. The guidelines are supported by Handbook Reports that contain more detailed specifications of calculation standards, input assumptions and available tools. The major objectives of the project have been provided a methodology, an implementing framework and a reporting system which countries can follow in meeting their future reporting obligations under the FCCC and for GEF enabling activities. The project builds upon the methodology development and application in the UNEP National Abatement Coasting Studies (UNEP, 1994a). The various elements provide countries with a road map for conducting climate change mitigation studies and submitting national reports as required by the FCCC. (au) 121 refs.

  1. Efficacy of traditional Chinese herbal medicine in the treatment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department, 3Department of Vascular Surgery, The Teaching Hospital of Chengdu University of Traditional Chinese Medicine,. Chengdu, Sichuan ... Background: The rate of gastrointestinal adenomatous polyps, often regarded as precancerous lesions, developing ..... Ling-Bai-Zhu on promoting apoptosis of transplanted.

  2. NKWA MUSIC OF ACHINA TRADITIONAL SOCIETY IN IGBO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    imitch

    Royalty in Igbo traditional society is accorded inestimable prominence that every .... The study adopted the survey research method while data collection was ... The paper recommends the teaching and learning of Esan in institutions of higher ...

  3. Culture in Language Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovács Gabriella

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Learning a language means also the study of a different culture. This study focuses on the introduction of the topic of culture in language teaching into the curriculum of the subject Language Teaching Methodology for teacher trainees studying at Translation And Interpreting Studies, Sapientia Hungarian University of Transylvania, Faculty of Technical and Human Sciences, Târgu-Mureş. This topic has not been treated separately so far, it has only been discussed implicitly, included in other topics. But we believe that future teachers should have a more thorough theoretical and practical training in terms of what incorporating culture into language teaching implies. For this purpose, we are going to examine and discuss some of the recommendations and principles stated in the specialized literature regarding culture in foreign language teaching and reflect on what the ideal content of a course related to the teaching of this skill should be.

  4. Teaching Science Fiction by Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donawerth, Jane

    1990-01-01

    Reviews the 200-year-old tradition of women science fiction authors. Discusses the benefits of teaching science fiction written by women. Describes 5 science fiction short stories and 5 science fiction novels suitable for high school students. (RS)

  5. teaching and learning methodologies in engineering education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Global Journal

    and learning of engineering in Nigerian Universities and suggests ways of improving engineering education in ... and inadequate collaboration between industries and schools. .... can book at their convenient time without conflicting with their ...

  6. TEACHING METHODOLOGY IN THE STUDY OF BIOETHICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanna V. Chashina

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: the article discusses significance of use of new technologies in the learning process for realisation of goals of cognitive and affective domain of knowledge. The paper explores the methods of development of educational knowledge, which is achieved by information, reproductive and research means. Based on example of bioethics the paper demonstrates the use of visuals technology (charts, graphs, tables, illustrations, specification, etc., which performs the following tasks: memorising, analysis and synthesis, comparison and differentiation, categorisation and classification, identification of relationships between facts, and for the revision of the material studied, acquisition of the new knowledge, memo risation of educational material. Materials and Methods: on the basis of the dialectical approach the object of research is new technologies in the learning process, in particular the study of bioethics. By using methods of observation, survey, analysis and synthesis in the educational process the authors prove the efficiency of such technologies as the use of visualisation (diagrams, illustrations, problem-based learning (issues, tasks and situations and research tasks (case study method. Results: visual method complements the learning process. It allows a deeper understanding of the subject. This method deals with feelings, emotions and consciousness of students. It encourages creativity. In addition this method of material presentation allows reducing the amount of material of an ordinary lecture. It is underscored that in the study of bioethics it is recommended to use a technology of a problem-based learning, which is able to implement the intellectual activity of students by means of questions¸ case-studies, tasks and situations. The most vivid form of such technology is a case method. The basis for the emergence of technology of problembased learning is a certain contradiction between knowledge and practice. This method can be attributed to the simulation model of learning, the benefits of which are the development of skills of practical experience of future specialists. Discussion and Conclusions: the authors conclude that the use of technologies facilitates the solution of the following tasks: development of creative potential of students, analytical skills. It allows to classify and analyse information as well as to master the studied material and to ap ply it in practice.

  7. Curriculum, quantitative concepts and methodology of teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kofimereku

    argues that the educational reforms in Ghana did not influence curriculum development in .... the educable level could perform at sixth grade level, which raises the .... McConkey, R. and McEvoy, J. (1986) 'Games for learning to count'. British.

  8. Emphaty oriented 'creative' teaching and learning methodologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guney, A.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding learners’ minds has become one of the major issues of some methodologists in education system. The entire matter is learning. It seems obvious to me it is necessary to explain what learning is in terms of knowledge, in the widest sense. We should also try to find out what kind of

  9. Symposium 19: Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul: its Role in the Biochemistry Teaching in the Southernmost Brazilian States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clóvis M.D. Wannmacher

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available K-Education(Portuguese Chair: V. Trindade Bayardo Torres; Clovis Wannmacher; Denise Macedo  Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul: its Role in the Biochemistry Teaching in the Southernmost Brazilian States. Wannmacher, C.M.D. Departamento de Bioquímica, Instituto de Ciências Básicas da Saúde, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.   At present, most Biochemistry teaching in Rio Grande do Sul and Santa Catarina has its origin in the Department of Biochemistry of the Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul. In the 70’s, all the teachers of the Department wrote a book together: “Fundamental Biochemistry”. This book was always used in the classes by groups of students of different careers supervised by the respective teacher. At the same time, this methodology was not used by pharmaceutical teachers, but they recommended the Department’s book to their students. Along the next years, Biochemistry teaching was adapted according to the professional course and to the teacher’s personal characteristics. Today, there are two extremes strategies again: one traditional for the most basic biochemistry student’s formation (including theoretical, laboratorial, seminars and informatics classes and the other, experimental-clinical, for physician’s formation (including seminars of molecular approach to the most prevalent diseases, mainly, those leading to failure of organs/systems and the interaction with patients from HCPA by the interpretation of their biochemical data. On the other hand, the Post Graduation Program, at first, emphasized biochemistry teaching in a traditional form, but gradually changed the emphasis to investigation, and most classes changed to scientific paper reports. To stimulate the teaching formation, two activities were offered to post-graduation students: Biochemistry Teaching Methodology and Teaching Practice in Biochemistry. These activities promote opportunity for the students to

  10. Understanding traditional African healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokgobi, M G

    2014-09-01

    Traditional African healing has been in existence for many centuries yet many people still seem not to understand how it relates to God and religion/spirituality. Some people seem to believe that traditional healers worship the ancestors and not God. It is therefore the aim of this paper to clarify this relationship by discussing a chain of communication between the worshipers and the Almighty God. Other aspects of traditional healing namely types of traditional healers, training of traditional healers as well as the role of traditional healers in their communities are discussed. In conclusion, the services of traditional healers go far beyond the uses of herbs for physical illnesses. Traditional healers serve many roles which include but not limited to custodians of the traditional African religion and customs, educators about culture, counselors, social workers and psychologists.

  11. Research methodologies to assess teaching in psychiatric residency: a literature review Metodologias de pesquisa para avaliação do ensino na residência de psiquiatria: uma revisão da literatura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibiracy de Barros Camargo

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Research methodologies in psychiatry have followed both the changes in mental health care and the need of updating programs of medical residency. To identify empirical articles in the indexed literature from 1997 to 2002, with the aim of analyzing and discussing methodological aspects of research dealing with the description and assessment of residency programs in psychiatry. METHOD: The bibliographic survey was performed using MedLine, PsycLit, Web of Science, and Lilacs. Twenty-one articles were identified. RESULTS: Nineteen studies were characterized as exploratory-descriptive and two as experimental. Data collection used questionnaires in 12 of them, and combined techniques in the other seven and the two experimental studies had data collected by tests applied before and after the teaching intervention. Most of the subjects were residents and program directors. Fifteen studies used statistical analysis. CONCLUSIONS: All the articles outlined the problems based on literature reviews. Most of the studies made use of standard techniques of social research and only two used experimental procedures. Only three studies employed external measures in order to establish correlations with the collected data. Procedures to validate and assess the reliability of the instrument by means of pilot-studies were absent in 11 studies, what may indicate methodological biases.OBJETIVOS: As metodologias de pesquisa na psiquiatria têm acompanhado tanto as transformações nos sistemas de atendimento à saúde mental como a necessidade de atualização dos programas de residência médica. Identificar, analisar e avaliar na literatura indexada entre 1997 e 2002 artigos empíricos relativos à avaliação de programas de residência em psiquiatria. MÉTODO: O levantamento bibliográfico foi realizado através dos indexadores MedLine, PsycLit, Web of Science e Lilacs. Foram identificados 21 artigos. RESULTADOS: 19 estudos caracterizam-se como

  12. Science Teaching in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Brendan E.; Dopico, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Reading the interesting article "Discerning selective traditions in science education" by Per Sund, which is published in this issue of "CSSE," allows us to open the discussion on procedures for teaching science today. Clearly there is overlap between the teaching of science and other areas of knowledge. However, we must…

  13. MIRD methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo, Ana M.; Gomez Parada, Ines

    2004-01-01

    The MIRD (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) system was established by the Society of Nuclear Medicine of USA in 1960 to assist the medical community in the estimation of the dose in organs and tissues due to the incorporation of radioactive materials. Since then, 'MIRD Dose Estimate Report' (from the 1 to 12) and 'Pamphlets', of great utility for the dose calculations, were published. The MIRD system was planned essentially for the calculation of doses received by the patients during nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures. The MIRD methodology for the absorbed doses calculations in different tissues is explained

  14. PSA methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magne, L

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of this text is first to ask a certain number of questions on the methods related to PSAs. Notably we will explore the positioning of the French methodological approach - as applied in the EPS 1300{sup 1} and EPS 900{sup 2} PSAs - compared to other approaches (Part One). This reflection leads to more general reflection: what contents, for what PSA? This is why, in Part Two, we will try to offer a framework for definition of the criteria a PSA should satisfy to meet the clearly identified needs. Finally, Part Three will quickly summarize the questions approached in the first two parts, as an introduction to the debate. 15 refs.

  15. PSA methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magne, L.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this text is first to ask a certain number of questions on the methods related to PSAs. Notably we will explore the positioning of the French methodological approach - as applied in the EPS 1300 1 and EPS 900 2 PSAs - compared to other approaches (Part One). This reflection leads to more general reflection: what contents, for what PSA? This is why, in Part Two, we will try to offer a framework for definition of the criteria a PSA should satisfy to meet the clearly identified needs. Finally, Part Three will quickly summarize the questions approached in the first two parts, as an introduction to the debate. 15 refs

  16. Teamwork: Effectively Teaching an Employability Skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebe, Linda; Roepen, Dean; Santarelli, Bruno; Marchioro, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present a case study on improvements to professional teaching practice within an undergraduate university business programme to more effectively teach an employability skill and enhance the student experience of teamwork. Design/methodology/approach: A three-phase approach to teaching teamwork was…

  17. Combined Teaching Method: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikova, Iryna V.

    2016-01-01

    The search for the best approach to business education has led educators and researchers to seek many different teaching strategies, ranging from the traditional teaching methods to various experimental approaches such as active learning techniques. The aim of this experimental study was to compare the effects of the traditional and combined…

  18. GENESIS OF METHODOLOGY OF MANAGEMENT BY DEVELOPMENT OF ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z.N. Varlamova

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In clause the genesis of methodology of management of development of organizations as sets of the used methodological approaches and methods is investigated. The results of the comparative analysis of the methodological approaches to management of organizational development are submitted. The traditional methodological approaches are complemented strategic experiment and methodology case studies. The approaches to formation of new methodology and technique of research of sources of competitive advantages of organization are considered.

  19. New ideas for teaching electrocardiogram interpretation and improving classroom teaching content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Rui; Yue, Rong-Zheng; Tan, Chun-Yu; Wang, Qin; Kuang, Pu; Tian, Pan-Wen; Zuo, Chuan

    2015-01-01

    Interpreting an electrocardiogram (ECG) is not only one of the most important parts of diagnostics but also one of the most difficult areas to teach. Owing to the abstract nature of the basic theoretical knowledge of the ECG, its scattered characteristics, and tedious and difficult-to-remember subject matter, teaching how to interpret ECGs is as difficult for teachers to teach as it is for students to learn. In order to enable medical students to master basic knowledge of ECG interpretation skills in a limited teaching time, we modified the content used for traditional ECG teaching and now propose a new ECG teaching method called the "graphics-sequence memory method." A prospective randomized controlled study was designed to measure the actual effectiveness of ECG learning by students. Two hundred students were randomly placed under a traditional teaching group and an innovative teaching group, with 100 participants in each group. The teachers in the traditional teaching group utilized the traditional teaching outline, whereas the teachers in the innovative teaching group received training in line with the proposed teaching method and syllabus. All the students took an examination in the final semester by analyzing 20 ECGs from real clinical cases and submitted their ECG reports. The average ECG reading time was 32 minutes for the traditional teaching group and 18 minutes for the innovative teaching group. The average ECG accuracy results were 43% for the traditional teaching group and 77% for the innovative teaching group. Learning to accurately interpret ECGs is an important skill in the cardiac discipline, but the ECG's mechanisms are intricate and the content is scattered. Textbooks tend to make the students feel confused owing to the restrictions of the length and the format of the syllabi, apart from many other limitations. The graphics-sequence memory method was found to be a useful method for ECG teaching.

  20. INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES IN EDUCATION: THE SYNTHESIS OF TRADITIONAL FORMAT AND E-LEARNING (AN EXPERIENCE OF DEVELOPING A NEW MODEL OF A LECTURE COURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla L. Nazarenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Russian system of education is undergoing a process of modernization where ICT play a decisive role. It presupposes not only providing advanced technical equipment but also integrating technologies into a traditional teaching and learning process based on a well-developed and scholarly-proven methodology. A sound didactic solution is the introduction of an element of e-learning for structuring and monitoring students’ autonomous active study.A lecture course in a traditional format can be transformed into a mode of blended learning via combining classroom face-to-face teaching with students’ self-preparation in an interactive learning environment to enhance the efficacy the educational process. An experience of such a transformation is considered. 

  1. Design and Realization of Network Teaching System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Shan Shan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 21 century, with the wide spread in family and public, network has been applied in many new fields, and the application in classes is of no exception. In traditional education, teachers give lessons to students face to face. Hence, the teaching quality depends largely on the quality and initiative of the individual teacher. However, the serious disadvantages of this mode are that teachers completely dominate the classroom and may ignore the subjective cognition role of the students, which may be bad for the growth of creativity and the innovative thinking ability. Obviously, traditional education mode cannot meet the requirements of the this new era which leads to the booming developing tendency of the network. As a new teaching measure, scientifically combining modern information technology and teaching practice, network teaching not only changes the traditional education by the means and form, but even also gives new meanings to teaching concept, process, method as well as teacher-student role and other deep levels. With the help of network teaching system, on-line classroom learning, relevant information systematization, standardization and automation, this system provides students with an efficient online learning method with high quality. This also helps to solve the disadvantages of the traditional teaching mode and promote the teaching methods to a new stage. It improves the network teaching platform, enriches the network teaching resources, and establishes a network teaching system, so as to improve information quality of teachers and students and assist in improving teaching quality of schools.

  2. Reflections on Conventional and Traditional Methodology in Transnational Community Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farah, Abdulkadir Osman

    2017-01-01

    Cultivating Pathways of Creative Research: New Horizons of Transformative Practice and Collaborative Imagination strives to cultivate new pathways of research and engagement in social sciences and humanities where cultivation is linked to cross-fertilization of creative theorizing...... pathways of creative research. They help us go beyond formalism of method and cultivate new pathways of research in social sciences and humanities, especially in sociology, anthropology, education, art and literature. The volume, second in the trilogy of Creative Research, which follows Pathways...... of Creative Research: Towards a Festival of Dialogues and is followed by Research as Realization: Science, Spirituality and Harmony is not only a pioneering contribution to the world research but also to rethinking and regenerating self, culture, society and the human condition....

  3. Intravenous catheter training system: computer-based education versus traditional learning methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engum, Scott A; Jeffries, Pamela; Fisher, Lisa

    2003-07-01

    Virtual reality simulators allow trainees to practice techniques without consequences, reduce potential risk associated with training, minimize animal use, and help to develop standards and optimize procedures. Current intravenous (IV) catheter placement training methods utilize plastic arms, however, the lack of variability can diminish the educational stimulus for the student. This study compares the effectiveness of an interactive, multimedia, virtual reality computer IV catheter simulator with a traditional laboratory experience of teaching IV venipuncture skills to both nursing and medical students. A randomized, pretest-posttest experimental design was employed. A total of 163 participants, 70 baccalaureate nursing students and 93 third-year medical students beginning their fundamental skills training were recruited. The students ranged in age from 20 to 55 years (mean 25). Fifty-eight percent were female and 68% percent perceived themselves as having average computer skills (25% declaring excellence). The methods of IV catheter education compared included a traditional method of instruction involving a scripted self-study module which involved a 10-minute videotape, instructor demonstration, and hands-on-experience using plastic mannequin arms. The second method involved an interactive multimedia, commercially made computer catheter simulator program utilizing virtual reality (CathSim). The pretest scores were similar between the computer and the traditional laboratory group. There was a significant improvement in cognitive gains, student satisfaction, and documentation of the procedure with the traditional laboratory group compared with the computer catheter simulator group. Both groups were similar in their ability to demonstrate the skill correctly. CONCLUSIONS; This evaluation and assessment was an initial effort to assess new teaching methodologies related to intravenous catheter placement and their effects on student learning outcomes and behaviors

  4. Digital inductive teaching method of strabismus

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao-Jiang Du; Peng Li; Li Wang

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To reform the traditional teaching modes of strabismus by using digital induction to enhance logic in teaching process.METHODS: The study was performed in the group of 20 eight-year program clinical undergraduates from the class of 2009 and 198 five-year program clinical undergraduates from the class of 2010. These students were divided into two groups receiving traditional and digital induction teaching over the same period respectively. After classes, questionnaire survey and classroom...

  5. Tradition and innovation in Danish children's cookbooks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wistoft, Karen

    2017-01-01

    it was not the primary intention with MY Cooking, it is used in teaching home economics at most Danish public schools. The cookbook appeals to students as well as teachers and parents. Conclusion: For more than 150 years cooking has been taught to Danish children through cookbooks and different educational values have...... influenced traditional trends in food and taste education. Today children want to take mental and practical ownership to their own cooking. School teachers express great recognition of a new innovative children's cookbook and involve the book as a teaching tool in Home economics education....

  6. Apontamentos teórico-metodológicos sobre a prática de ensino na formação inicial Theoretical and methodological notes about teaching practices in the beginning of the educational process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia Guedes-Pinto

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Neste texto, focalizamos nosso processo de elaboração da prática de ensino a partir do lugar em que atuamos: na condição de formadoras de professores das séries iniciais do ensino fundamental. Explicitamos o modo pelo qual temos exercitado a prática de ensino no cotidiano da docência como um projeto pedagógico de formação e seu processo de construção como objeto de investigação. Assumindo a perspectiva de compreensão das práticas culturais cotidianas e a perspectiva da corrente sócio-histórica, problematizamos as opções que temos feito, junto aos nossos alunos - professores em formação, no encaminhamento do trabalho de inserção no cotidiano da escola básica. Tendo como referência a assunção de que cada escola está em um permanente movimento social de construção, temos atuado levando em conta alguns princípios que têm norteado as várias maneiras de nossos alunos inserirem-se nas dinâmicas escolares.In the present text we focus our research on the teaching practices starting from our experiences as professionals educating future teachers for elementary school. We expose the method adopted in the tuition practice in the school daily life as an educational project, and choose its construction process as our investigation subject. Adopting a perspective of understanding daily cultural experiences and the social and historical methodology, we debate the options we have next to the students - future teachers - trying to insert them in the reality of elementary school. Believing that each school is in a permanent social transformation, we have been working considering some principles guiding the several forms present in the insertion process of the students in the elementary school.

  7. Research by Design - a Research and Teaching Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauberg, Jørgen; Tamke, Martin; Ramsgaard Thomsen, Mette

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Interweaving research and design-based architectural education is an important effort in most architect schools. All good design is informed by some kind of research – research-based design. And all architect schools involve research in their teaching – research based education. Research...... by design. The paper asks how “the new” in architectural production emerges and aims to find similarities between the tradition of practice based proposals and theorisation, and our own research and teaching practice. Grounded in this practice the paper investigates how research by design contributes...... to the construction of knowledge and student’s learning outcomes through research led workshops. The paper presents research inquiries, results and methodologies of two parallel research workshops and discusses the format by which this research tool is developed. Keywords: Research by Design, practice-based research...

  8. Reverence in Classroom Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrison, Jim; Rud, A. G.

    2009-01-01

    Background/Context: Our article develops insights from Paul Woodruff's book, Reverence: Renewing a Forgotten Virtue (Oxford University Press, 2001), to discuss reverence in teaching. We show how reverence is both a cardinal and a forgotten virtue by situating it within the philosophical tradition of virtue ethics, which involves traits of…

  9. Team Teaching School Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanko, John G.; Rogina, Raymond P.

    2005-01-01

    Graduate students preparing themselves for a career in school administration are typically apprehensive about the legal issues they will face in their first administrative position. After teaching school law for the first time, the author believed that there had to be a more effective way to reach these students rather than the traditional methods…

  10. Applying a learning design methodology in the flipped classroom approach – empowering teachers to reflect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triantafyllou, Evangelia; Kofoed, Lise; Purwins, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    One of the recent developments in teaching that heavily relies on current technology is the “flipped classroom” approach. In a flipped classroom the traditional lecture and homework sessions are inverted. Students are provided with online material in order to gain necessary knowledge before class......, while class time is devoted to clarifications and application of this knowledge. The hypothesis is that there could be deep and creative discussions when teacher and students physically meet. This paper discusses how the learning design methodology can be applied to represent, share and guide educators...... and values of different stakeholders (i.e. institutions, educators, learners, and external agents), which influence the design and success of flipped classrooms. Moreover, it looks at the teaching cycle from a flipped instruction model perspective and adjusts it to cater for the reflection loops educators...

  11. Traditional Chinese Celebrations: Continuity and Change in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wendy L.

    This teaching unit is designed to introduce elementary school students to traditional Chinese celebrations in Taiwan. An introductory activity asks students to distinguish between various kinds of celebrations (traditional or modern; religious or secular), and to identify U.S. and Chinese examples of each kind. The body of the unit concerns four…

  12. [Comparative analysis of the efficacy of a playful-narrative program to teach mathematics at pre-school level].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil Llario, M D; Vicent Catalá, Consuelo

    2009-02-01

    Comparative analysis of the efficacy of a playful-narrative program to teach mathematics at pre-school level. In this paper, the effectiveness of a programme comprising several components that are meant to consolidate mathematical concepts and abilities at the pre-school level is analyzed. The instructional methodology of this programme is compared to other methodologies. One-hundred 5-6 year-old children made up the sample that was distributed in the following conditions: (1) traditional methodology; (2) methodology with perceptual and manipulative components, and (3) methodology with language and playful components. Mathematical competence was assessed with the Mathematical Criterial Pre-school Test and the subtest of quantitative-numeric concepts of BADyG. Participants were evaluated before and after the academic course during which they followed one of these methodologies. The results show that the programme with language and playful components is more effective than the traditional methodology (p<.000) and also more effective than the perceptual and manipulative methodology (p<.000). Implications of the results for instructional practices are analyzed.

  13. Evaluation of participatory teaching methods in undergraduate medical students' learning along the first academic courses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Gal

    Full Text Available The European Higher Education Area (EHEA is an opportunity to redesign medical education. Academic training is now focused on acquiring not only knowledge, but also those competencies critical to face complex professional scenarios. Together with re-evaluating traditional teaching methods, EHEA has forced a technological shift in the way we teach. By critically assessing the impact of novel teaching methodologies, we can better define biomedical education demands. Here, we address this question on a sample of medical students instructed in basic subjects along the first two academic courses. Two hundred and one medical students participated in the study (n = 128 first year, n = 73 second year. Quantitative (conventional survey statistics and qualitative (open coding approaches were combined to analyze data from surveys, confidential questionnaires, semi-structured interviews and open discussion. First year medical students rated more positively the use of participatory methodologies than second year students. A major drawback is detected in the perceived workload. Active teaching methodologies show a strong reliance on their time of implementation for medical students, a key aspect to be considered in the design of integrative participatory curricula along the first academic courses.

  14. Evaluation of participatory teaching methods in undergraduate medical students' learning along the first academic courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Beatriz; Rubio, Margarita; Iglesias, Eva; González, Purificación

    2018-01-01

    The European Higher Education Area (EHEA) is an opportunity to redesign medical education. Academic training is now focused on acquiring not only knowledge, but also those competencies critical to face complex professional scenarios. Together with re-evaluating traditional teaching methods, EHEA has forced a technological shift in the way we teach. By critically assessing the impact of novel teaching methodologies, we can better define biomedical education demands. Here, we address this question on a sample of medical students instructed in basic subjects along the first two academic courses. Two hundred and one medical students participated in the study (n = 128 first year, n = 73 second year). Quantitative (conventional survey statistics) and qualitative (open coding) approaches were combined to analyze data from surveys, confidential questionnaires, semi-structured interviews and open discussion. First year medical students rated more positively the use of participatory methodologies than second year students. A major drawback is detected in the perceived workload. Active teaching methodologies show a strong reliance on their time of implementation for medical students, a key aspect to be considered in the design of integrative participatory curricula along the first academic courses.

  15. Computer game-based and traditional learning method: a comparison regarding students’ knowledge retention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rondon Silmara

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Educational computer games are examples of computer-assisted learning objects, representing an educational strategy of growing interest. Given the changes in the digital world over the last decades, students of the current generation expect technology to be used in advancing their learning requiring a need to change traditional passive learning methodologies to an active multisensory experimental learning methodology. The objective of this study was to compare a computer game-based learning method with a traditional learning method, regarding learning gains and knowledge retention, as means of teaching head and neck Anatomy and Physiology to Speech-Language and Hearing pathology undergraduate students. Methods Students were randomized to participate to one of the learning methods and the data analyst was blinded to which method of learning the students had received. Students’ prior knowledge (i.e. before undergoing the learning method, short-term knowledge retention and long-term knowledge retention (i.e. six months after undergoing the learning method were assessed with a multiple choice questionnaire. Students’ performance was compared considering the three moments of assessment for both for the mean total score and for separated mean scores for Anatomy questions and for Physiology questions. Results Students that received the game-based method performed better in the pos-test assessment only when considering the Anatomy questions section. Students that received the traditional lecture performed better in both post-test and long-term post-test when considering the Anatomy and Physiology questions. Conclusions The game-based learning method is comparable to the traditional learning method in general and in short-term gains, while the traditional lecture still seems to be more effective to improve students’ short and long-term knowledge retention.

  16. Computer game-based and traditional learning method: a comparison regarding students' knowledge retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondon, Silmara; Sassi, Fernanda Chiarion; Furquim de Andrade, Claudia Regina

    2013-02-25

    Educational computer games are examples of computer-assisted learning objects, representing an educational strategy of growing interest. Given the changes in the digital world over the last decades, students of the current generation expect technology to be used in advancing their learning requiring a need to change traditional passive learning methodologies to an active multisensory experimental learning methodology. The objective of this study was to compare a computer game-based learning method with a traditional learning method, regarding learning gains and knowledge retention, as means of teaching head and neck Anatomy and Physiology to Speech-Language and Hearing pathology undergraduate students. Students were randomized to participate to one of the learning methods and the data analyst was blinded to which method of learning the students had received. Students' prior knowledge (i.e. before undergoing the learning method), short-term knowledge retention and long-term knowledge retention (i.e. six months after undergoing the learning method) were assessed with a multiple choice questionnaire. Students' performance was compared considering the three moments of assessment for both for the mean total score and for separated mean scores for Anatomy questions and for Physiology questions. Students that received the game-based method performed better in the pos-test assessment only when considering the Anatomy questions section. Students that received the traditional lecture performed better in both post-test and long-term post-test when considering the Anatomy and Physiology questions. The game-based learning method is comparable to the traditional learning method in general and in short-term gains, while the traditional lecture still seems to be more effective to improve students' short and long-term knowledge retention.

  17. REFLECTIVE APPROACH IN TEACHING PRE-DEGREE CHEMISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Venkateswara RAO

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The study is a component of a larger investigation that focuses on exemplary practice in chemistry education. This case study involves an investigation of a chemistry teacher in two years intermediate education in Vijayawada, Andhra Pradesh, India. The study utilized an interpretive methodology in which the questions emerged from intensive observations of chemistry lessons in classes taught by a teacher. The principal finding was that a teacher focused on teaching for understanding. Once teacher tended to emphasize whole-class activities while the other times he utilized more small-group and individualized activities. The teacher was successful in his goal of teaching for understanding because he was effective classroom manager and he had strong science content knowledge that enabled him to focus on instructional strategies that facilitated student understanding. He asked appropriate questions, responded to student questions, and used effective cognitive monitoring strategies. The teacher was able to teach effectively because he had adequate content knowledge and pedagogical content knowledge. Researcher adopted the method of action research to class room teaching where a classroom event triggers the process of reflection followed by critical analysis of the event which leads to change and subsequent reflection to observe that change and so on. He has taken two different texts to teach students. Out of two texts, one is explaining the metallurgy of Magnesium. In that case, he was successful as a teacher when he adopted comparative method of teaching metallurgy of Magnesium rather than the traditional method of teaching. The other one is explaining the properties of Hydrogen peroxide. In this case he was successful as a teacher by adopting discussion, interaction and discussion method.

  18. Testing methodologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    Several methodologies are available for screening human populations for exposure to ionizing radiation. Of these, aberration frequency determined in peripheral blood lymphocytes is the best developed. Individual exposures to large doses can easily be quantitated, and population exposures to occupational levels can be detected. However, determination of exposures to the very low doses anticipated from a low-level radioactive waste disposal site is more problematical. Aberrations occur spontaneously, without known cause. Exposure to radiation induces no new or novel types, but only increases their frequency. The limitations of chromosomal aberration dosimetry for detecting low level radiation exposures lie mainly in the statistical signal to noise'' problem, the distribution of aberrations among cells and among individuals, and the possible induction of aberrations by other environmental occupational or medical exposures. However, certain features of the human peripheral lymphocyte-chromosomal aberration system make it useful in screening for certain types of exposures. Future technical developments may make chromosomal aberration dosimetry more useful for low-level radiation exposures. Other methods, measuring gene mutations or even minute changes on the DNA level, while presently less will developed techniques, may eventually become even more practical and sensitive assays for human radiation exposure. 15 refs.

  19. Testing methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bender, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    Several methodologies are available for screening human populations for exposure to ionizing radiation. Of these, aberration frequency determined in peripheral blood lymphocytes is the best developed. Individual exposures to large doses can easily be quantitated, and population exposures to occupational levels can be detected. However, determination of exposures to the very low doses anticipated from a low-level radioactive waste disposal site is more problematical. Aberrations occur spontaneously, without known cause. Exposure to radiation induces no new or novel types, but only increases their frequency. The limitations of chromosomal aberration dosimetry for detecting low level radiation exposures lie mainly in the statistical ''signal to noise'' problem, the distribution of aberrations among cells and among individuals, and the possible induction of aberrations by other environmental occupational or medical exposures. However, certain features of the human peripheral lymphocyte-chromosomal aberration system make it useful in screening for certain types of exposures. Future technical developments may make chromosomal aberration dosimetry more useful for low-level radiation exposures. Other methods, measuring gene mutations or even minute changes on the DNA level, while presently less will developed techniques, may eventually become even more practical and sensitive assays for human radiation exposure. 15 refs

  20. Implementation of the systemic approach in teaching and learning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The teachers who keep teaching by employing traditional methods find it difficult to promote the active role of the students in the classroom, see the relationship of their subject they are teaching with others, and perceive the prospective of their teaching. The philosophy of global teaching integrates exactly those elements ...

  1. TEACHING INTERPERSONAL SKILLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Niclas

    2009-01-01

    of the examination. This study aims at presenting and reviewing a practical approach to teaching of interpersonal skills, referred to as the Social Risk Analysis, which has been applied and integrated into the curriculum of two engineering courses. The Social Risk Analysis encourages and imposes a critical review......In addition to the traditional learning outcomes for technical disciplinary knowledge, the CDIO-syllabus also specifies personal and interpersonal learning outcomes. The argument for teaching interpersonal skills rest upon the team-based working environment that is typical for engineers, where...... knowledge and skills in teamwork, leadership, and communications are highly required. Thus, the practice of interpersonal skills need to be implemented in engineering teaching, not only in terms of learning objectives, but realised in practical teaching activities and as an integrated part...

  2. How can activity-based costing methodology be performed as a powerful tool to calculate costs and secure appropriate patient care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Blossom Yen-Ju; Chao, Te-Hsin; Yao, Yuh; Tu, Shu-Min; Wu, Chun-Ching; Chern, Jin-Yuan; Chao, Shiu-Hsiung; Shaw, Keh-Yuong

    2007-04-01

    Previous studies have shown the advantages of using activity-based costing (ABC) methodology in the health care industry. The potential values of ABC methodology in health care are derived from the more accurate cost calculation compared to the traditional step-down costing, and the potentials to evaluate quality or effectiveness of health care based on health care activities. This project used ABC methodology to profile the cost structure of inpatients with surgical procedures at the Department of Colorectal Surgery in a public teaching hospital, and to identify the missing or inappropriate clinical procedures. We found that ABC methodology was able to accurately calculate costs and to identify several missing pre- and post-surgical nursing education activities in the course of treatment.

  3. Evaluation of the Grammar Teaching Process by Using the Methods Used in Turkish Language Teaching as a Foreign Language: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Basak Karakoç

    2018-01-01

    The preferred methods for the success of foreign language teaching and the reflection of these methods on the teaching process are very important. Since approaches and methods in language teaching enable the teacher to use different techniques in his/her lectures, they provide a more effective teaching process. The methodology in teaching the…

  4. Teaching Formulaic Sequences: The Same as or Different from Teaching Single Words?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alali, Fatima A.; Schmitt, Norbert

    2012-01-01

    Formulaic language is an important component of discourse and needs to be addressed in teaching pedagogy. Unfortunately, there has been little research into the most effective ways of teaching formulaic language. In this study, Kuwaiti students were taught words and idioms using the same teaching methodologies, and their learning was measured. The…

  5. Interactive Methods for Teaching Action Potentials, an Example of Teaching Innovation from Neuroscience Postdoctoral Fellows in the Fellowships in Research and Science Teaching (FIRST) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keen-Rhinehart, E.; Eisen, A.; Eaton, D.; McCormack, K.

    2009-01-01

    Acquiring a faculty position in academia is extremely competitive and now typically requires more than just solid research skills and knowledge of one’s field. Recruiting institutions currently desire new faculty that can teach effectively, but few postdoctoral positions provide any training in teaching methods. Fellowships in Research and Science Teaching (FIRST) is a successful postdoctoral training program funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) providing training in both research and teaching methodology. The FIRST program provides fellows with outstanding interdisciplinary biomedical research training in fields such as neuroscience. The postdoctoral research experience is integrated with a teaching program which includes a How to Teach course, instruction in classroom technology and course development and mentored teaching. During their mentored teaching experiences, fellows are encouraged to explore innovative teaching methodologies and to perform science teaching research to improve classroom learning. FIRST fellows teaching neuroscience to undergraduates have observed that many of these students have difficulty with the topic of neuroscience. Therefore, we investigated the effects of interactive teaching methods for this topic. We tested two interactive teaching methodologies to determine if they would improve learning and retention of this information when compared with standard lectures. The interactive methods for teaching action potentials increased understanding and retention. Therefore, FIRST provides excellent teaching training, partly by enhancing the ability of fellows to integrate innovative teaching methods into their instruction. This training in turn provides fellows that matriculate from this program more of the characteristics that hiring institutions desire in their new faculty. PMID:23493377

  6. [Teamwork in teaching mental health in medical training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier de Benedetti, Cristina; Beker, Ester; Cimadoro, Ana; Pausa, Cristina; Quintana, Irene

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we describe the methodology of teaching learning process that permits integration of theory and practice for the transmission of the three fundamental pillars of Mental Health Programme: learning doctor patient relationship, situational diagnosis and team work. The number and diversity of students in each course is a challenge for the teacher, who sustains the idea that the doctor patient relationship is learned starting from the teacher student relationship. Like patients, each student is unique. We describe the method used: to divide students into groups, that throughout the year become working-teams with the intention of practicing Medicine with an interpersonal relationship concept (with the patient, his or her family, his social circle, with colleagues, nursery, assistants and institutions). Each unit is coordinated by a group teacher. They have periodic meetings with the students (in the Balint Junior groups' method). The students have to create the contents and participate in the dynamics of the classes. This methodology changes the traditional vision and the teacher has the function of an organizer and facilitator of learning. It includes: a. Group division, b. Preparation of a file, c. Workshop, d. Teaching and e. Evaluation Teaching learning is conducive to a facilitating atmosphere through different resources like story telling, diagrams, drawings, movies, literature, use of plastic, role playing, elaborating scenes, characters and the file, evidence of all the activities.

  7. Perceptions and preferences of medical students regarding teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... medical students regarding teaching methods in a Medical College, Mangalore India. ... of traditional methods with other methods such as PBL, video lectures and mannequins could be an effective way of teaching theory and clinical skills.

  8. Perceptions and preferences of medical students regarding teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    2013-09-03

    Sep 3, 2013 ... to preferences and perceptions regarding teaching methods utilized for ... a combination of traditional methods with other methods such as. PBL, video lectures and mannequins could be an effective way of teaching theory ...

  9. TEACHING MATHEMATICAL DISCIPLINES AT THE MEDICAL UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ya. Gelman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction.In programs of training of students of medical specialties, Mathematics is a subject of basic education, i.e. non-core discipline. However, studying Mathematics is extremely important for future physicians, as recently there has been an impetuous development of mathematization in the field of health care. Today, a set of the new medical devices, the equipment and high technologies are being developed based on the mathematical modeling, analysis and forecasting. Mathematical methods are widely applied to diagnostics, development of life-support systems and the description of various biological processes both at the molecular level,  and at the level of a whole organism, its systems, bodies and tissues. The solution of many medical tasks in the field of taxonomy, genetics, and organization of medical service is impossible without knowledge of mathematics. Unfortunately, along with the evident importance of mathematical preparation for a medical profession, its need is poorly realized not only by junior students, but even by some teachers of specialized departments of medical schools.The aim of the publication is to discuss the problems that arise in the teaching of mathematical disciplines to students at a medical school and to suggest possible solutions to these problems.Methodology and research methods. The study is based on the use of modeling of the educational process. The methods of analysis, generalization and the method of expert assessments were applied in the course of the research.Results and scientific novelty. The aspects of mathematical preparation at the university are considered on the basis of the application of the multiplicative model of training quality. It is shown that the main students’ learning difficulties in Mathematics are connected with the following factors: the initial level of mathematical preparation of students and their motivation; outdated methods of Mathematics teaching and academic content

  10. TRADITIONAL CHINESE HERBAL MEDICINE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ZHU, YP; WOERDENBAG, HJ

    1995-01-01

    Herbal medicine, acupuncture and moxibustion, and massage and the three major constituent parts of traditional Chinese medicine. Although acupuncture is well known in many Western countries, Chinese herbal medicine, the mos important part of traditional Chinese medicine, is less well known in the

  11. Traditional timber frames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorissen, A.J.M.; Hamer, den J.; Leijten, A.J.M.; Salenikovich, A.

    2014-01-01

    Due to new possibilities traditional timber framing has become increasingly popular since the beginning of the 21e century. Although traditional timber framing has been used for centuries, the expected mechanical behaviour is not dealt with in great detail in building codes, guidelines or text

  12. Analysis of traditional versus three-dimensional augmented curriculum on anatomical learning outcome measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Diana Coomes; Mlynarczyk, Gregory S A

    2016-11-01

    This study examined whether student learning outcome measures are influenced by the addition of three-dimensional and digital teaching tools to a traditional dissection and lecture learning format curricula. The study was performed in a semester long graduate level course that incorporated both gross anatomy and neuroanatomy curricula. Methods compared student examination performance on material taught using lecture and cadaveric dissection teaching tools alone or lecture and cadaveric dissection augmented with computerized three-dimensional teaching tools. Additional analyses were performed to examine potential correlations between question difficulty and format, previous student performance (i.e., undergraduate grade point average), and a student perception survey. The results indicated that students performed better on material in which three-dimensional (3D) technologies are utilized in conjunction with lecture and dissection methodologies. The improvement in performance was observed across the student population primarily on laboratory examinations. Although, student performance was increased, students did not perceive that the use of the additional 3D technology significantly influenced their learning. The results indicate that the addition of 3D learning tools can influence long-term retention of gross anatomy material and should be considered as a beneficial supplement for anatomy courses. Anat Sci Educ 9: 529-536. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists. © 2016 American Association of Anatomists.

  13. Methodological remarks on contraction theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jouffroy, Jerome; Slotine, Jean-Jacques E.

    Because contraction analysis stems from a differential and incremental framework, the nature and methodology of contraction-based proofs are significantly different from those of their Lyapunov-based counterparts. This paper specifically studies this issue, and illustrates it by revisiting some c...... classical examples traditionally addressed using Lyapunov theory. Even in these cases, contraction tools can often yield significantly simplified analysis. The examples include adaptive control, robotics, and a proof of convergence of the deterministic Extended Kalman Filter....

  14. Between tradition and renewal: Some considerations about the use of tradition in reformed theology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem van Vlastuin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In the theology and practice of the Christian church a tension between tradition and renewal exists. This essay focuses on this tension to provide a first step of methodological reflection to deal with it. Firstly, this tension is illustrated from the reformed perspective of sola scripturathat led to criticism of the tradition on the one hand, whilst understanding the reformed movement as part of the tradition on the other hand. A danger of unqualified sola scriptura is subjectivity. Subsequently, the importance of tradition is elaborated from the perspective of the church as the body of Christ across all ages. This implies that Christians should study and love the traditional theology because of the fundamental unity of the church that transcends cultural diversity. Rejecting tradition will cut the church from its historical and spiritual roots. Thirdly, this raises the question whether the church is imprisoned by tradition, as well as the problem of the relation between tradition and renewal. In response, it is argued that the doctrine of incarnation guarantees openness to history. With the help of the philosophical and Christian view on structural contingency, the belief that tradition is principally open to renewal is defended. Some examples are given as illustrations of how classic theological concepts can be reframed in our postmodern context. The last part of this essay concludes with the insight of Cyprian that only the conveyed tradition can be renewed, implying that renewal is in essence not a new theology, but a new application of apostolic theology.

  15. Eastern Spiritual Traditions Through the Lens of Modern Scientific Worldview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana V. Danylova

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This paper aims to analyze Eastern spiritual traditions in the context of modern scientific worldview. Methodology. The author has used hermeneutical methodology, along with integrative approach. Theoretical basis and results. Modern perception of the world is undergoing drastic changes: it shifts towards plurality, temporality, and complexity. Increasingly, people feel that their familiar world of order and stability gives way to chaotic, unpredictable world, which exists under its own rules. Old scientific theories, ideologies, and values are destroyed. This leads to awareness of imbalance, ambiguity of human existence and, thus, to the new explanation and understanding of reality. Today the universe is perceived through the lens of syncretism: it is impossible to separate human from nature, consciousness from matter, subject from object. Humanity faces such a chaotic, uncertain worldview not for the first time. Duality and attempts to overcome it permeate the entire history: from traditional archaic cultures to modern civilized societies. M. Foucault, J. Derrida, R. Barthes, U. Eco, G. Deleuze, J.-F.Lyotard urged to abandon dogmatism, monologue perception and explanation, interpretation based on binary oppositions. The world, which is necessary to reach, occurs to be Nothing, Nothingness. In this world, people are seeking for reality regardless of any rules, regulations, notions, and concepts. Here artificial constructs of the human mind, such as Material – Ideal, Determinism - Indeterminism, Finiteness - Infinity, Necessity – Randomness, are united. Trying to reconcile continuity of being with discreteness of consciousness, they appeal to Eastern mystical teachings, in particular, to Zen Buddhism. The core concept of this school is also based on the unity of all things and the idea of the singularity of the world. The main goal of Eastern mystical traditions is to achieve the state of absolute unity through meditative techniques

  16. EASTERN SPIRITUAL TRADITIONS THROUGH THE LENS OF MODERN SCIENTIFIC WORLDVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetiana V. Danylova

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This paper aims to analyze Eastern spiritual traditions in the context of modern scientific worldview. Methodology. The author has used hermeneutical methodology, along with integrative approach. Theoretical basis and results. Modern perception of the world is undergoing drastic changes: it shifts towards plurality, temporality, and complexity. Increasingly, people feel that their familiar world of order and stability gives way to chaotic, unpredictable world, which exists under its own rules. Old scientific theories, ideologies, and values are destroyed. This leads to awareness of imbalance, ambiguity of human existence and, thus, to the new explanation and understanding of reality. Today the universe is perceived through the lens of syncretism: it is impossible to separate human from nature, consciousness from matter, subject from object. Humanity faces such a chaotic, uncertain worldview not for the first time. Duality and attempts to overcome it permeate the entire history: from traditional archaic cultures to modern civilized societies. M. Foucault, J. Derrida, R. Barthes, U. Eco, G. Deleuze, J.-F.Lyotard urged to abandon dogmatism, monologue perception and explanation, interpretation based on binary oppositions. The world, which is necessary to reach, occurs to be Nothing, Nothingness. In this world, people are seeking for reality regardless of any rules, regulations, notions, and concepts. Here artificial constructs of the human mind, such as Material – Ideal, Determinism - Indeterminism, Finiteness - Infinity, Necessity – Randomness, are united. Trying to reconcile continuity of being with discreteness of consciousness, they appeal to Eastern mystical teachings, in particular, to Zen Buddhism. The core concept of this school is also based on the unity of all things and the idea of the singularity of the world. The main goal of Eastern mystical traditions is to achieve the state of absolute unity through meditative techniques

  17. Traditional medicine and genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalpana Joshi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available ′Omics′ developments in the form of genomics, proteomics and metabolomics have increased the impetus of traditional medicine research. Studies exploring the genomic, proteomic and metabolomic basis of human constitutional types based on Ayurveda and other systems of oriental medicine are becoming popular. Such studies remain important to developing better understanding of human variations and individual differences. Countries like India, Korea, China and Japan are investing in research on evidence-based traditional medicines and scientific validation of fundamental principles. This review provides an account of studies addressing relationships between traditional medicine and genomics.

  18. Traditional medicine and genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Kalpana; Ghodke, Yogita; Shintre, Pooja

    2010-01-01

    'Omics' developments in the form of genomics, proteomics and metabolomics have increased the impetus of traditional medicine research. Studies exploring the genomic, proteomic and metabolomic basis of human constitutional types based on Ayurveda and other systems of oriental medicine are becoming popular. Such studies remain important to developing better understanding of human variations and individual differences. Countries like India, Korea, China and Japan are investing in research on evidence-based traditional medicines and scientific validation of fundamental principles. This review provides an account of studies addressing relationships between traditional medicine and genomics.

  19. Oral genres, argumentation and teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zilda G. O. Aquino

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at dealing with issues related to language spoken in the classroom, focusing on discursive practices that highlight argumentation. We believe that the discussions that were made around genres, especially guided by the studies of Bakhtin and Text Linguistics, have been providing a breakthrough towards the necessity for the school to promote language teaching through the discursive genre approach. That is what we expect to be happening since both writing and spoken modalities deserve space in learning. We believe that oral genres demand that teachers acquire specific knowledge of the features of spoken language interaction that arise from its use in practical situations. Because these studies are recent among our researchers (not longer than three decades, they should still be very present in our discussions. In this paper, we focus on a specific genre of oral tradition – the debate. It is ideal for knowledge building and taking a stand at issues that arise in society, all of which is particularly important to the school. Besides contributing to the development of skills required by certain sociodiscursive practices, it is proposed that the teaching of argumentation in oral genres concentrate on the observation of selected strategies in interactions. We are particularly interested in interactions that emerge when one interaction party is trying to persuade the other. The corpus consists of the transcriptions of debates which occurred both in the classroom and in other contexts, such as the media. The methodological approach is done by identifying the arguments and their strategic use in specific situations. The theoretical discussion rests on the works of Orecchioni (2010, Marcuschi (2004, Dolz and Schneuwly (2004, Perelman and Olbrechts-Tyteca (1996 [1958], among others.

  20. Radioisotope methodology course radioprotection aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergoc, R.M.; Caro, R.A.; Menossi, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    The advancement knowledge in molecular and cell biology, biochemistry, medicine and pharmacology, which has taken place during the last 50 years, after World War II finalization, is really outstanding. It can be safely said that this fact is principally due to the application of radioisotope techniques. The research on metabolisms, biodistribution of pharmaceuticals, pharmacodynamics, etc., is mostly carried out by means of techniques employing radioactive materials. Radioisotopes and radiation are frequently used in medicine both as diagnostic and therapeutic tools. The radioimmunoanalysis is today a routine method in endocrinology and in general clinical medicine. The receptor determination and characterization is a steadily growing methodology used in clinical biochemistry, pharmacology and medicine. The use of radiopharmaceuticals and radiation of different origins, for therapeutic purposes, should not be overlooked. For these reasons, the importance to teach radioisotope methodology is steadily growing. This is principally the case for specialization at the post-graduate level but at the pre graduate curriculum it is worthwhile to give some elementary theoretical and practical notions on this subject. These observations are justified by a more than 30 years teaching experience at both levels at the School of Pharmacy and Biochemistry of the University of Buenos Aires, Argentina. In 1960 we began to teach Physics III, an obligatory pregraduate course for biochemistry students, in which some elementary notions of radioactivity and measurement techniques were given. Successive modifications of the biochemistry pregraduate curriculum incorporated radiochemistry as an elective subject and since 1978, radioisotope methodology, as obligatory subject for biochemistry students. This subject is given at the radioisotope laboratory during the first semester of each year and its objective is to provide theoretical and practical knowledge to the biochemistry students, even

  1. Do You Need a Textbook to Teach Astro 101?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, Alexander L.; Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars CATS

    2011-01-01

    During educational sessions at astronomy meetings, especially during Center for Astronomy Education (CAE) Teaching Excellence workshops, which I have attended and now help present, one of the questions everyone wants to discuss is which textbook to use to teach Astro 101 classes (general education astronomy courses for non-science majors). Some instructors have a favorite. Others will claim that they are all the same and that it doesn't matter. Increasingly, however, the discussions turn to the question of whether any textbook is needed at all. Some of this discussion has been driven by the increase in the use of interactive learning strategies such as Think-Pair-Share questions, Lecture-Tutorials, and Ranking Tasks. These activities provide students a learning modality very different from the traditional lecture supplemented by homework, and raises the question of whether the learning that takes place during such interactive activities is enough to teach students what we wish them to know about astronomy. I had been teaching an Astro 101 class for almost three years using a full suite of interactive learning strategies, when I decided to teach it without requiring the students to purchase a textbook. Comparison of test scores before and after this change shows that there is no statistical difference in student achievement whether a textbook is required or not. Details on the course and methodology used to reach this conclusion will be presented. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 0847170, a PAARE Grant for the Calfornia-Arizona Minority Partnership for Astronomy Research and Education (CAMPARE), and Grant No. 0715517, a CCLI Phase III Grant for the Collaboration of Astronomy Teaching Scholars (CATS). Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

  2. A Survey of tooth morphology teaching methods employed in the United Kingdom and Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lone, M; McKenna, J P; Cryan, J F; Downer, E J; Toulouse, A

    2018-01-15

    Tooth morphology is a central component of the dental curriculum and is applicable to all dental specialities. Traditional teaching methods are being supplemented with innovative strategies to tailor teaching and accommodate the learning styles of the recent generation of students. An online survey was compiled and distributed to the staff involved in teaching tooth morphology in the United Kingdom and Ireland to assess the importance of tooth morphology in the dentistry curriculum and the methodologies employed in teaching. The results of the survey show that tooth morphology constitutes a small module in the dental curriculum. It is taught in the first 2 years of the dental curriculum but is applicable in the clinical years and throughout the dental career. Traditional teaching methods, lecture and practical, are being augmented with innovative teaching including e-learning via virtual learning environment, tooth atlas and e-books leading to blended learning. The majority of the schools teach both normal dental anatomy and morphologic variations of dental anatomy and utilise plastic teeth for practical and examination purposes. Learning the 3D aspects of tooth morphology was deemed important by most of the respondents who also agreed that tooth morphology is a difficult topic for the students. Despite being core to the dental curriculum, overall minimal time is dedicated to the delivery of tooth morphology, creating a reliance on the student to learn the material. New forms of delivery including computer-assisted learning tools should help sustain learning and previously acquired knowledge. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Traditional medicines and alternative practice in the management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study was aimed at identifying Ghanaian traditional medicines used for the management of prostate diseases and their constituents. Reviews of studies conducted on them are also presented. Methodology: This was a prospective study. Traditional Medicine samples from consecutive patients with either ...

  4. Mechatronics methodology: 15 years of experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efren Gorrostieta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a methodology to teach students to develop mechatronic projects. It was taught in higher education schools, in different universities in Mexico, in courses such as: Robotics, Control Systems, Mechatronic Systems, Artificial Intelligence, etc. The intention of this methodology is not only to achieve the integration of different subjects but also to accomplish synergy between them so that the final result may be the best possible in quality, time and robustness. Since its introduction into the educational area, this methodology was evaluated and modified for approximately five years, were substantial characteristics were adopted. For the next ten years, only minor alterations were carried out. Fifteen years of experience have proven that the methodology is useful not only for training but also for real projects. In this article, we first explain the methodology and its main characteristics, as well as a brief history of its teaching in different educational programs. Then, we present two cases were the methodology was successfully applied. The first project consisted in the design, construction and evaluation of a mobile robotic manipulator which aims to be used as an explosives ordnance device. In the second case, we document the results of a project assignment for robotics tasks carried out by students which were formerly taught with the methodology.

  5. Evaluation of flipped teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Henderson, K.; Hobbs, C.; Last, K.

    2017-01-01

    We report on our evaluation of flipping the classroom for two modules: a compulsory first year calculus module and an optional second year coding theory module taken by Mathe-matics students at the University of the West of England, Bristol (UWE). Flipped teaching is a change to the traditional lecture model used in universities for hundreds of years. In the traditional model the lecturer is in charge of the class and largely dictates the content and pace at which this is delivered. The idea ...

  6. Workshops as a Research Methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Levinsen, Karin Tweddell

    2017-01-01

    , and workshops as a research methodology. Focusing primarily on the latter, this paper presents five studies on upper secondary and higher education teachers’ professional development and on teaching and learning through video conferencing. Through analysis and discussion of these studies’ findings, we argue......This paper contributes to knowledge on workshops as a research methodology, and specifically on how such workshops pertain to e-learning. A literature review illustrated that workshops are discussed according to three different perspectives: workshops as a means, workshops as practice...... that workshops provide a platform that can aid researchers in identifying and exploring relevant factors in a given domain by providing means for understanding complex work and knowledge processes that are supported by technology (for example, e-learning). The approach supports identifying factors...

  7. Towards methodological improvement in the Spanish studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Amante García

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The European Higher Education Area (EHEA has triggered many changes in the new degrees in Spanish universities, mainly in terms of methodology and assessment. However, in order to make such changes a success it is essential to have coordination within the teaching staff as well as active methodologies in use, which enhance and encourage students’ participation in all the activities carried out in the classroom. Most of all, when dealing with formative and summative evaluation, in which students become the ones responsible for their own learning process (López-Pastor, 2009; Torre, 2008. In this second issue of JOTSE we have included several teaching innovation experiences related to the above mentioned methodological and assessment changes.

  8. Insertion of Contemporary and Modern Physics in classroom: a teaching learning sequence on radioactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alexandre dos Santos Batista

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available After more than two decades of justifications on the insertion of Modern and Contemporary Physics in the high school Education, the current challenge regards to how this content can be inserted in the classroom in an interesting and innovative way. Recent research reveals that despite a significant accumulation of recent academic research, whose purpose is to assist teachers pedagogically, few are grounded and proposed theoretically seeking to investigate how this integration happens. In this sense, we present a teaching-learning sequence on the topic of radioactivity, forged in the theoretical and methodological assumptions of Design-Based Research and a Teaching-Learning Sequence that, when implemented in public schools in the south of Bahia, produced the relevant knowledge to be shared with the community on teaching physics. Forged in our assumptions, the proposal allows teachers and researchers to understand questions about how, when and why, in fact, the inclusion of Modern and Contemporary Physics can occur in a non-traditional way. Therefore, the importance of this proposal is revealed to the high school of physics as it translates its ability to transform the theoretical demands on the curriculum and methodological innovation in the practical interventions in the classroom. We add that the availability of the necessary sources to find lesson plans, quizzes, texts, videos of teaching-learning sequence, shows the contribution of this work for teachers and researchers, in particular, to improve the scientific learning of students in the Basic Education.

  9. Integrating Radiology and Anatomy Teaching in Medical Education in the UK--The Evidence, Current Trends, and Future Scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heptonstall, N B; Ali, T; Mankad, K

    2016-04-01

    This review article presents the current evidence of the importance of integrating radiology and anatomy in medical education in the UK, a recommendation by a number of key anatomy, education, and radiology organizations. Current evidence highlights that on average only 5% of total teaching time in medical education is dedicated to radiology. Often, radiology teaching does not adequately fulfill students' learning needs and potentially leaves them underprepared for medical practice. Benefits of integrating radiology and anatomy include improved clinical application of anatomy, an increase in student's interest in anatomy, and ultimately improved radiological interpretation. Various modalities exist for the integration of radiology and anatomy, facilitated by the vast portability of radiological images. It appears that combining radiological resources with traditional anatomy teaching methodology in a blended approach is most beneficial. Copyright © 2016 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. KASTAMONU TRADITIONAL WOMEN CLOTHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.Elhan ÖZUS

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Clothing is a unique dressing style of a community, a period or a profession. In clothing there is social status and difference principle rather than fashion. In this context, the society created a clothing style in line with its own customs, traditions and social structure. One of the features separating societies from each other and indicating their cultural and social classes is the clothing style. As it is known, traditional Turkish clothes reflecting the characteristics of Turkish society is our most beautiful heritage from past to present. From this heritage there are several examples of women's clothes c arried to present. When these examples are examined, it is possible to see the taste, the way of understanding art, joy and the lifestyle of the history. These garments are also the documents outlining the taste and grace of Turkish people. In the present study, traditional Kastamonu women's clothing, that has an important place in traditional cultural clothes of Anatolia, is investigated . The method of the present research is primarily defined as the examination of the written sources. The study is complet ed with the observations and examinations made in Kastamonu. According to the findings of the study, traditional Kastamonu women's clothing are examined and adapted to todays’ clothing.

  11. Internet-based instruction in college teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flickinger, Kathleen Anne

    Distance education and Internet instruction are increasingly being used in college science teaching. In an effort to reach more students, Iowa State University's Human Anatomy and Physiology course was offered via Internet as well as via traditional lecture format. To assess the educational ramifications of this offering, three studies were conducted. In the first study, a collective case study approach was utilized to describe the learning environment created by an Internet-based college science course. In this study, three students were followed as they worked their way through the course. Collective case study methodologies were used to provide a rich description of the learning environment experienced by these students. Motivation, computer savvy, and academic and personal self-confidence appeared to impact the satisfaction level of the students enrolled in the class. To evaluate the effectiveness of the learning environment offered through the Internet-based science course, a quantitative comparison study was undertaken. In this study a comparison of achievement scores and study habits between students enrolled in the Internet-based class and those enrolled in the traditional section was made. Results from this study indicated that content understanding and retention did not appear to be effected by the type of instruction. Desirable study habits were reportedly used more frequently in the Internet section of the class than in the traditional class. To complete the description of the Internet course experience, a qualitative examination of Internet instructors' time commitment and level of teaching satisfaction was conducted. Data for this study consisted of interviews and researcher observations. Instructor time-on-task was initially quite high, and remained above the average spent on average face-to-face instruction in subsequent semesters. Additionally the role of the faculty member changed dramatically, causing some lessening of job satisfaction. Taken as

  12. Cómo trabajar más contenidos en Enfermería Geriátrica siguiendo las indicaciones de Bolonia y transformando la metodología docente How to work more content Geriatric Nursing following indications of Bologna and transforming the methodology teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Quintanilla Martínez

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available La queja más frecuente de los profesores de una materia suele ser, "no tengo bastante tiempo para impartir la asignatura, ya que el nuevo plan de estudios me recorta los créditos de la asignatura". Siguiendo con la actual conceptualización del proceso de enseñanza/aprendizaje que conlleva un cambio/modificación del rol docente del profesor universitario, éste ha de sustituir su función de transmisor del conocimiento, por la de orientador/facilitador del aprendizaje, asesor y tutor de los alumnos en la búsqueda y construcción de forma autónoma del conocimiento. Es decir, el profesor pasa de transmisor a facilitador; ha de pasar por una fase de desaprendizaje del ser profesor y aprendizaje del ser tutor facilitador. La estrategia docente, aprovechando la coyuntura de la implementación del cambio promovido por los acuerdos de Bolonia, puede ser cambiar de metodología y utilizar el ABP/PBL (1.The most frequent complaint of teachers is often a matter, I have enough time to teach the subject, since the new curriculum I cut out the credits of the subject. Continuing with the current conceptualization of the teaching / learning that involves a change/modification of the teaching role of the university professor, who has to replace its role as transmitter of knowledge, by the counselor / facilitator of learning, assessor and tutor students in the search and construction of knowledge autonomously, ie the teacher moves from transmitter to facilitator, has to pass through a phase of unlearning of being a teacher and tutor learning to be a facilitator. The teaching strategy, taking advantage of the situation of the implementation of changes promoted by the Bologna agreement, may be the change of methodology and use the PBL (1.

  13. Teaching skills to resolve conflicts with acute confusional syndrome patients in nursing using the Case Method (CM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrue, Marta; Caballero, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    This study sets out to design and implement a teaching sequence that offers students the opportunity to acquire the necessary knowledge, skills, attitudes and values to deal with a confrontational patient. When designing the teaching methodology, we chose an active teaching strategy, commonly entitled the Case Method. The case was developed during the 2011-2012 academic year and implemented across the curriculum in the 2012-2013 academic year, in the "Relations and Communications in Nursing Care" and "Geriatric Nursing" subject modules, in the second year undergraduate nursing course at the University of the Basque Country. Implementation results indicate that the Case Method is a satisfactory tool to facilitate acquisition of the chosen skills, as well as being a learning method that is well received by students. At the end of the process, 72.8% of them shared the opinion that "this methodology has helped me more or much more than traditional 'chalk and talk' expository methodology". Moreover, 93% of the students successfully achieved at least the minimum learning results required. Nevertheless, students said that they felt overwhelmed on more than one occasion. The study has provided evidence that the Case Method contributes to acquiring skills that every nurse will need during their career. This should spur us on to continue extending the range of possibilities offered by active methodologies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Methodology and Mao

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duncan, Russell

    2010-01-01

    A personal narrative is presented that reflects on the author's experience teaching United States history in China......A personal narrative is presented that reflects on the author's experience teaching United States history in China...

  15. Traditional Chinese Biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Wang, Dong; Fan, Wen Lai; Mu, Xiao Qing; Chen, Jian

    The earliest industrial biotechnology originated in ancient China and developed into a vibrant industry in traditional Chinese liquor, rice wine, soy sauce, and vinegar. It is now a significant component of the Chinese economy valued annually at about 150 billion RMB. Although the production methods had existed and remained basically unchanged for centuries, modern developments in biotechnology and related fields in the last decades have greatly impacted on these industries and led to numerous technological innovations. In this chapter, the main biochemical processes and related technological innovations in traditional Chinese biotechnology are illustrated with recent advances in functional microbiology, microbial ecology, solid-state fermentation, enzymology, chemistry of impact flavor compounds, and improvements made to relevant traditional industrial facilities. Recent biotechnological advances in making Chinese liquor, rice wine, soy sauce, and vinegar are reviewed.

  16. Teaching Listening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtchinova, Ekaterina

    2013-01-01

    Ekaterina Nemtchinova's book "Teaching Listening" explores different approaches to teaching listening in second language classrooms. Presenting up-to-date research and theoretical issues associated with second language listening, Nemtchinova explains how these new findings inform everyday teaching and offers practical suggestions…

  17. A New Look at Teaching Music History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borroff, Edith

    1992-01-01

    Contends that teaching music history has traditionally focused on five eras of Western music. Relates these periods to concepts of form, space, and understanding. Acknowledges that music education has been ethnocentric and recommends a more universal music education. (CFR)

  18. Clinical trial methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peace, Karl E; Chen, Ding-Geng

    2011-01-01

    ... in the pharmaceutical industry, Clinical trial methodology emphasizes the importance of statistical thinking in clinical research and presents the methodology as a key component of clinical research...

  19. Healthier Traditional Food

    OpenAIRE

    Edward F. Millen

    2017-01-01

    The study of traditional food and healthy eating habits has been one of the fast growing areas. All humans, both men and women, require food for their survival. However, both men and women indulge in food as if it were their sole purpose of existence. Hence, eating disorders are common among men and women. Then media has played an effective role not only in establishing faulty standards for traditional healthy food but also it has highlighted the importance of healthy eating. It has brought t...

  20. Teaching undergraduate astrophysics with PIRATE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodeur, M. S.; Kolb, U.; Minocha, S.; Braithwaite, N.

    2014-12-01

    PIRATE is a 0.43m semi-autonomous research and teaching observatory owned by The Open University, UK. Since 2010, it has been reserved for several months of each year for teaching astronomy in the OU's undergraduate programme. As students in these courses operate PIRATE remotely rather than travelling to the observatory itself, we chose to investigate whether effective learning was adversely affected by the absence of a more traditional `hands on' experience. We discuss student perspectives on the technologies employed (i.e., remote and virtual investigations), the impact these had on perceived course outcomes, and consider implications for future teaching and outreach.

  1. Utilizing the Design Charrette for Teaching Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Jason B.; Seymour, Michael W.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to investigate the design charrette as a method for teaching sustainability. Design/methodology/approach: The paper utilizes a student-based design charrette for the Mississippi Gulf Coast comprising a framework for teaching sustainability. An assessment of the charrette's role in promoting sustainability in higher…

  2. Tasks for Integrating Language and Culture Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neff, Peter; Rucynski, John, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the role of culture in language teaching and provides activities for introducing culture in the classroom, focusing on teaching context and methodology to integrate culture. The authors outline five activities that can be adapted to the language level and interests of students. Instructions for each activity include language…

  3. Teaching Agile Software Development: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devedzic, V.; Milenkovic, S. R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the authors' experience of teaching agile software development to students of computer science, software engineering, and other related disciplines, and comments on the implications of this and the lessons learned. It is based on the authors' eight years of experience in teaching agile software methodologies to various groups…

  4. Modern teaching methods in economic subjects.

    OpenAIRE

    Maxa, Radek

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is a comprehensive assessment of the practical usability and effectiveness of modern activating teaching methods in economic subjects in fulfilling the RVP economics and business and RVP Business Academy in comparison with traditional (standard) methods. To achieve this goal, a systematic clarification and evaluation of key elements of the choice of adequate methods of teaching, presentation and comparison of traditional, modern activating and comprehensive t...

  5. Noodles, traditionally and today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Zhang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chinese noodles originated in the Han dynasty, which has more than 4,000 years of history. There are many stories about the origin of noodles. To a certain extent, noodles also reflect the cultural traditions and customs of China, which essentially means “human nature” and “worldly common sense”. There are thousands of varieties of noodles in China, according to the classification of the shape of noodles, seasoning gravy, cooking craft, and so on. Many noodles have local characteristics. Noodles are accepted by people from all over the world. The industrial revolution and the development of the food industry realized the transition from a traditional handicraft industry to mass production using machinery. In addition, the invention of instant noodles and their mass production also greatly changed the noodle industry. In essence, noodles are a kind of cereal food, which is the main body of the traditional Chinese diet. It is the main source of energy for Chinese people and the most economical energy food. Adhering to the principle of “making cereal food the main food”, is to maintain our Chinese good diet tradition, which can avoid the disadvantages of a high energy, high fat, and low carbohydrate diet, and promote health. The importance of the status of noodles in the dietary structure of residents in our country and the health impact should not be ignored.

  6. Traditional Cherokee Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrix, Janey B.

    A collection for children and teachers of traditional Cherokee recipes emphasizes the art, rather than the science, of cooking. The hand-printed, illustrated format is designed to communicate the feeling of Cherokee history and culture and to encourage readers to collect and add family recipes. The cookbook could be used as a starting point for…

  7. Non-Traditional Wraps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Buffy

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a recipe for non-traditional wraps. In this article, the author describes how adults and children can help with the recipe and the skills involved with this recipe. The bigger role that children can play in the making of the item the more they are apt to try new things and appreciate the texture and taste.

  8. Making Tradition Healthy

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-11-01

    In this podcast, a Latina nutrition educator shows how a community worked with local farmers to grow produce traditionally enjoyed by Hispanic/Latinos.  Created: 11/1/2007 by National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP), a joint program of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.   Date Released: 11/10/2007.

  9. The Use of Information and CommunicationTechnologies in Biochemistry Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Munford

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The gap between traditional tools for teaching and the modern multimedia languages leads us to search for new methodologies of teaching. Using the Moodlesoftware as a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE, we give the students the opportunity to exchange experiences and research results, participate on debates and see animations. This work  was meant to createa VLE and investigate its impact  on the Biochemistry teaching-learning process. Besides observing students’ perception and attitude towards the VLE with questionnaires and Moodle’s statistical data, quantitative and qualitative studies were developed to understand the contribution of animations available in the VLE for the understanding of Biochemistry topics. The results showed that undergraduate students improved their academic results. Students mentioned that the biggest contribution of the VLE and animations was to make the study content more interesting and dynamic, motivating them tostudy harder. Moreover, students using only animations to study can achieve levels of knowledge similar to the ones obtained in traditional classes. Interestingly, our analysis also showed that watching animations and then attending to a traditional class makes students reach a level of knowledge that is impossible to reach only in classroom. This work demonstrates that the use of Information andCommunication Technologies (ICTs can be positive in the pedagogical processesinvolved in Biochemistry teaching, and they should be better spread amongst teaching institutions.

  10. Teaching Chemical Engineers about Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Daniel E.; Hoy, Mary; Rathman, James F.; Rohdieck, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    The Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department at The Ohio State University in collaboration with the University Center for the Advancement of Teaching developed the Chemical Engineering Mentored Teaching Experience. The Mentored Teaching Experience is an elective for Ph.D. students interested in pursuing faculty careers. Participants are…

  11. Teaching Morally and Teaching Morality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenstermacher, Gary D.; Osguthorpe, Richard D.; Sanger, Matthew N.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors introduce what they believe is an important distinction between teaching morality and teaching morally. In P-12 schools, the moral education debate often focuses on character education programs or other moral curricula. Such programs and curricula are championed as a means of teaching morality and transmitting moral…

  12. Relação entre formação docente, metodologias de ensino e resultados do Exame Nacional de Desempenho dos Estudantes de Ciências Contábeis = Relationship between teacher training, teaching methodologies and exam results of the national financial performance of accountancy graduate students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mara Vogt

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available O estudo objetiva analisar a relação entre formação docente, metodologias de ensino e resultados do Exame Nacional de Desempenho dos Estudantes de Ciências Contábeis (ENADE. Realizou-se uma pesquisa descritiva, de levantamento e quantitativa. Utilizou-se a análise discriminante por meio do LhStat®. A população do estudo compreendeu as 16 Instituições de Ensino Superior (IES da Associação Catarinense das Fundações Educacionais (ACAFE. A amostra constituiu-se de 10 IES. Os resultados do estudo indicaram que há relação entre a formação dos docentes dos cursos de Ciências Contábeis e as metodologias de ensino-aprendizagem utilizadas com o resultado do ENADE do ano de 2012. Destaca-se que a formação docente que mais influencia no conceito do ENADE é o Doutorado. Já no que tange às metodologias de ensino, a discussão de casos, os estudos baseados em problemas e as aulas práticas de campo, respectivamente, são as que mais influenciam no conceito. The study aims at examining the relationship between teacher education, teaching methodologies and exam results of the National Examination Performance of Accounting Students (ENADE. A descriptive research with finding and quantitative results was carried out. A discriminant analysis using the LhStat® was used. The study population comprised the 16 higher education institutions (HEI of Santa Catarina Association of Educational Foundations (ACAFE. The sample consisted of 10 IES. The study results indicated that there is a relationship between teacher training in Accounting courses and teaching-learning methodologies displayed in the result of ENADE 2012. Noteworthy is that teacher training that most influences the concept of ENADE is the Doctorate. Already regarding the teaching methodologies, discussion of cases, problem-based studies and field practical classes respectively, are the ones that most influence the concept.

  13. Teaching Physics Using Virtual Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, C.; McGrath, D.; McIntyre, T.; Wegener, M.; Williamson, M.

    2010-07-01

    We present an investigation of game-like simulations for physics teaching. We report on the effectiveness of the interactive simulation "Real Time Relativity" for learning special relativity. We argue that the simulation not only enhances traditional learning, but also enables new types of learning that challenge the traditional curriculum. The lessons drawn from this work are being applied to the development of a simulation for enhancing the learning of quantum mechanics.

  14. Challenging tradition in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supriya, K E

    1991-01-01

    In Nigeria since 1987, the National Association of Nigeria Nurses and Midwives (NSNNM) has used traditional medial and traditional health care workers to curtail the practice of female circumcision. Other harmful traditions are being changed also, such as early marriage, taboos of pregnancy and childbirth, and scarification. 30,000 member of NANNM are involved in this effort to halt the harmful practices themselves and to change community opinion. The program involved national and state level workshops on harmful health consequences of traditional practices and instruction on how to conduct focus group discussions to assess women's beliefs and practices. The focus groups were found to be a particularly successful method of opening up discussion of taboo topics and expressing deep emotions. The response to the knowledge that circumcision was not necessary was rage and anger, which was channeled into advocacy roles or change in the practice. The result was the channeled into advocacy roles for change in the practice. The result was the development of books, leaflets and videos. One community group designed a dress with a decorative motif of tatoos and bodily cuts to symbolize circumcision and scarring. Plays and songs were written and performed. Artists provided models of female genitalia both before and after circumcision. The campaign has been successful in bringing this issue to the public attention in prominent ways, such a national television, health talk shows, and women;s magazines. One of the most important results of the effort has been the demonstration that culture and tradition can be changed from within, rather than from outside imposition of values and beliefs.

  15. Cultural Consciousness in Teaching General Music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Patricia Shehan; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Addresses the need to present a multiculturalist approach in elementary and secondary school general music classes. Suggests connections between particular music teaching methods and ethnic musical traditions. Includes lesson plans concerning the teaching of Native American, African-American, Filipino, and Latin American music. (SG)

  16. Innovation of University Teaching Faculty Management Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yuzheng; Wang, Boyu

    2015-01-01

    With the deepening of university reform in China, the traditional teaching faculty management mode has been exposed more and more defects. To make innovation of the university teaching faculty management mode becomes the voice of the times. Universities should conduct careful research on this issue in the development. Starting from the…

  17. Teaching Pop Songs: Reflections and Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Richard E.

    This paper presents a rationale for using popular music in the classroom and provides suggestions for teaching popular music lyrics in the poetry class. The question of whether pop music is an end in itself or a means to understanding traditional literature is also addressed. It is suggested that the teaching of the poetry of rock can be…

  18. On English Teaching in Maritime Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jiang; Wang, Honggui

    2011-01-01

    According to English level of Chinese ocean sailors at present, we analyze the characteristics and instruction needs of navigation English and point out current English teaching in maritime specialty has many problems. Traditional teaching modes are not suitable for modern maritime needs any longer. So we propose feasible methods and…

  19. Cultures of Undergraduate Teaching at Research Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serow, Robert C.; Van Dyk, Pamela B.; McComb, Errin M.; Harrold, Adrian T.

    2002-01-01

    Data from five campuses revealed an explicitly oppositional culture among faculty committed to undergraduate teaching, which questions both the Scholarship of Teaching model and the ethos of competitive achievement. The views echo the longstanding populist tradition within U.S. higher education and represent a potential counterforce to the recent…

  20. Teaching Elementary School Children about Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Decar, Patricia

    1988-01-01

    Presents ideas for teaching elementary school students about Korea by introducing them to the country's folktales, clothing, art, music, and food. Includes a folktale adapted as a play and suggestions for teaching about traditional costumes, folk dances, music, and masks, as well as Korean mealtime and table manners. (GEA)

  1. The reform of the teaching mode of Applied Optics curriculum and analysis of teaching effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Yu; Xu, Zhongjie; Li, Dun; Chen, Zilun; Cheng, Xiangai; Zhong, Hairong

    2017-08-01

    Military academies have two distinctive characteristics on talent training: Firstly, we must teach facing actual combat and connecting with academic frontier. Secondly, the bachelor's degree education and the military education should be balanced. The teaching mode of basic curriculum in military academies must be reformed and optimized on the basis of the traditional teaching mode, so as to ensure the high quality of teaching and provide enough guidance and help for students to support their academic burden. In this paper, our main work on "Applied Optics" teaching mode reform is introduced: First of all, we research extensively and learn fully from advanced teaching modes of the well-known universities at home and abroad, a whole design is made for the teaching mode of the core curriculum of optical engineering in our school "Applied Optics", building a new teaching mode which takes the methods of teaching basic parts as details, teaching application parts as emphases, teaching frontier parts as topics and teaching actual combat parts on site. Then combining with the questionnaire survey of students and opinions proposed by relevant experts in the teaching seminar, teaching effect and generalizability of the new teaching mode are analyzed and evaluated.

  2. New ideas for teaching electrocardiogram interpretation and improving classroom teaching content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng R

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Rui Zeng,1 Rong-Zheng Yue,2 Chun-Yu Tan,3 Qin Wang,4 Pu Kuang,5 Pan-Wen Tian,6 Chuan Zuo3 1Department of Cardiovascular Diseases, 2Department of Nephrology, 3Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, 4Department of Endocrinology, 5Department of Hematology, 6Department of Respiratory Diseases, West China Hospital, School of Clinic Medicine, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People’s Republic of China Background: Interpreting an electrocardiogram (ECG is not only one of the most important parts of diagnostics but also one of the most difficult areas to teach. Owing to the abstract nature of the basic theoretical knowledge of the ECG, its scattered characteristics, and tedious and difficult-to-remember subject matter, teaching how to interpret ECGs is as difficult for teachers to teach as it is for students to learn. In order to enable medical students to master basic knowledge of ECG interpretation skills in a limited teaching time, we modified the content used for traditional ECG teaching and now propose a new ECG teaching method called the “graphics-sequence memory method.” Methods: A prospective randomized controlled study was designed to measure the actual effectiveness of ECG learning by students. Two hundred students were randomly placed under a traditional teaching group and an innovative teaching group, with 100 participants in each group. The teachers in the traditional teaching group utilized the traditional teaching outline, whereas the teachers in the innovative teaching group received training in line with the proposed teaching method and syllabus. All the students took an examination in the final semester by analyzing 20 ECGs from real clinical cases and submitted their ECG reports. Results: The average ECG reading time was 32 minutes for the traditional teaching group and 18 minutes for the innovative teaching group. The average ECG accuracy results were 43% for the traditional teaching group and 77% for the innovative teaching

  3. Teaching in Medical Education | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many postdoctoral fellows are considering an academic career at a medical school. In addition to conducting research, new faculty members must learn effective teaching methodologies. This course will focus on good teaching practices, including basic strategies for developing and organizing a course. The purpose of the "Teaching in Medical Education (TIME)" course is to

  4. Implementation of an active instructional design for teaching the concepts of current, voltage and resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlaineta-Agüero, S.; Del Sol-Fernández, S.; Sánchez-Guzmán, D.; García-Salcedo, R.

    2017-01-01

    In the present work we show the implementation of a learning sequence based on an active learning methodology for teaching Physics, this proposal tends to promote a better learning in high school students with the use of a comic book and it combines the use of different low-cost experimental activities for teaching the electrical concepts of Current, Resistance and Voltage. We consider that this kind of strategy can be easily extrapolated to higher-education levels like Engineering-college/university level and other disciplines of Science. To evaluate this proposal, we used some conceptual questions from the Electric Circuits Concept Evaluation survey developed by Sokoloff and the results from this survey was analysed with the Normalized Conceptual Gain proposed by Hake and the Concentration Factor that was proposed by Bao and Redish, to identify the effectiveness of the methodology and the models that the students presented after and before the instruction, respectively. We found that this methodology was more effective than only the implementation of traditional lectures, we consider that these results cannot be generalized but gave us the opportunity to view many important approaches in Physics Education; finally, we will continue to apply the same experiment with more students, in the same and upper levels of education, to confirm and validate the effectiveness of this methodology proposal.

  5. Human Anatomy: Let the Students Tell Us How to Teach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Christopher R.; Bates, Anthony S.; Ellis, Harold; Roberts, Alice M.

    2014-01-01

    Anatomy teaching methods have evolved as the medical undergraduate curriculum has modernized. Traditional teaching methods of dissection, prosection, tutorials and lectures are now supplemented by anatomical models and e-learning. Despite these changes, the preferences of medical students and anatomy faculty towards both traditional and…

  6. Integration of Histology Lectures and Practical Teaching in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaoye; Cheng, Xin; Li, Ke; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; Yang, Xuesong

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Human histology is a discipline concerning the study of microscopic structures of human tissues and organs--with the aid of light or electron microscopes. Traditional teaching of histology is composed of two separated components, theory and practice. The main disadvantage with traditional histology teaching is the detachment of theory…

  7. Teaching neurology to medical students with a simplified version of team-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brich, Jochen; Jost, Meike; Brüstle, Peter; Giesler, Marianne; Rijntjes, Michel

    2017-08-08

    To compare the effect of a simplified version of team-based learning (sTBL), an active learning/small group instructional strategy, with that of the traditionally used small group interactive seminars on the acquisition of knowledge and clinical reasoning (CR) skills. Third- and fourth-year medical students (n = 122) were randomly distributed into 2 groups. A crossover design was used in which 2 neurologic topics were taught by sTBL and 2 by small group interactive seminars. Knowledge was assessed with a multiple-choice question examination (MCQE), CR skills with a key feature problem examination (KFPE). Questionnaires were used for further methodologic evaluation. No group differences were found in the MCQE results. sTBL instruction of the topic "acute altered mental status" was associated with a significantly better student performance in the KFPE ( p = 0.008), with no differences in the other 3 topics covered. Although both teaching methods were highly rated by the students, a clear majority voted for sTBL as their preferred future teaching method. sTBL served as an equivalent alternative to small group interactive seminars for imparting knowledge and teaching CR skills, and was particularly advantageous for teaching CR in the setting of a complex neurologic topic. Furthermore, students reported a strong preference for the sTBL approach, making it a promising tool for effectively teaching neurology. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  8. Resistance to change in language teaching: some African case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The conviction with which teachers justify their traditional styles of teaching suggests that they do not teach without deliberation. This presentation looks in some detail at two investigations that serve as case studies for this phenomenon. Is resistance to change in language teaching unique to the African continent? It appears ...

  9. The scientific research methods applied from Physical Education Theory and Methodology contents at physical skills treatment and its relationship with the sport motor skills connected with the Teaching and Learning Process

    OpenAIRE

    Naivy Lanza-Escobar; Yudelquis Martínez-León; Luís Guillermo Pimienta-Miranda

    2015-01-01

    Within the current theoretical and methodological conceptions that approach the educational processes and phenomena of Physical Education in the Physical capabilities topic there are several levels that, with a systemic character, offer coherence and unity from their more general argumentation to the description of how they should be studied. However, this reality, that is implicit in the different theories, is usually unnoticed by the researchers and thus it brings about theoretical and meth...

  10. Persisting mathematics and science high school teachers: A Q-methodology study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins-Lavicka, Michelle M.

    There is a lack of qualified mathematics and science teachers at all levels of education in Arkansas. Lasting teaching initiative programs are needed to address retention so qualified teachers remain in the classroom. The dearth of studies regarding why mathematics and science teachers persist in the classroom beyond the traditional 5-year attrition period led this Q-methodological study to evaluate the subjective perceptions of persistent mathematics and science teachers to determine what makes them stay. This study sought to understand what factors persisting mathematics and science teachers used to explain their persistence in the classroom beyond 5 years and what educational factors contributed to persisting mathematics and science teachers. Q-methodology combines qualitative and quantitative techniques and provided a systematic means to investigate personal beliefs by collecting a concourse, developing a Q-sample and a person-sample, conducting a Q-sorting process, and analyzing the data. The results indicated that to encourage longevity within mathematics and science classrooms (a) teachers should remain cognizant of their ability to influence student attitudes toward teaching; (b) administrators should provide support for teachers and emphasize the role and importance of professional development; and (c) policy makers should focus their efforts and resources on developing recruitment plans, including mentorship programs, while providing and improving financial compensation. Significantly, the findings indicate that providing mentorship and role models at every level of mathematics and science education will likely encourage qualified teachers to remain in the mathematics and science classrooms, thus increasing the chance of positive social change.

  11. Green Urine in Traditional Persian Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolouri, Sepideh; Daneshfard, Babak; Jaladat, Amir-Mohammad; Tafazoli, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    The color of urine is an important factor in urine examination, which can help physicians differentiate various diseases. Today, it is known that certain dyes, drug intoxications, and diseases can induce green urine discoloration. In the view of traditional Persian medicine, which is based on humoral medicine, green urine discoloration is generally referred to the dominance of coldness in the body. In fact, it is considered to be a result of a special kind of humoral imbalance and fluid depletion or retention in the human body. Persian scholars believed that green urine could be an indicator of intoxication or a predictor of an imminent spasm or convulsion in pediatric patients. Further investigations could result in finding new diagnostic scales of urine color based on the teachings of traditional Persian medicine. PMID:27103627

  12. The Danish free school tradition under pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tore Vincents

    2015-01-01

    and students according to their own value base, and were given a large state subsidy. From the late 1990s a number of legislative changes were introduced demanding that non-governmental schools provide civic education and document the academic value of their teaching programs. The rules concerning......The Danish free school tradition has entailed a large degree of associational freedom for non-governmental schools, religious as well as non-religious. Until the late 1990s, the non-governmental schools were under no strict ideological or pedagogical limitations, they could recruit teachers...... the monitoring of schools were also changed. This article analyses the political justification for these changes and asks to what extent the changes have altered the Danish free school tradition....

  13. Teaching to the Test: A Pragmatic Approach to Teaching Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannatta, Seth C.

    2014-01-01

    The proper goal of an introductory logic course, teaching critical thinking, is best achieved by maintaining the principle of continuity between student experiences and the curriculum. To demonstrate this I explain Dewey's naturalistic approach to logic and the process of inquiry, one which presents the elements of traditional logic in the…

  14. EVALUATION OF TRAINING AND‐METHODOLOGICAL SUPPORT OF UNIVERSITY COURSES (in Russian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia BELKINA

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Quality of teaching at a Higher Education Institution certainly depends on the integrity and quality of its training and methodological support. However, in order to improve this quality it is necessary to have a sound methodology for evaluation of such support. This article contains a list of recommended university teaching course materials, criteria of their separate components evaluation and an approach to calculating the quality levels of separate components and teaching course materials as a whole.

  15. Sadum: Traditional and Contemporary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Panggabean

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Sadum is one of the traditional cloths of the Batak people in North Sumatra. It is woven on a back strap loom with supplementary weft technique. Sadum is a warp faced weaving made of cotton and beads woven into the cloth. Ritually it is used as a shoulder cloth, gifts exchanges, and in dances. It also bears the symbol of good tidings and blessings for the receiver. The cloth has change during times in technique, color, patterns, as well as in functions. But the use as a ritual cloth stays the same. The basic weaving techniques and equipments used to create it hasn’t change, but its material and added techniques has made this cloth become more rich in color, pattern, and texture. Most changes began when the Europeans came to Indonesia and introduced new material such as synthetic fibers and colors. In the 70s traditional cloth of Indonesia got its boost when the government declared batik as Indonesian national attire. This encourages other traditional weavings to develop into contemporary clothing. Later, new techniques and material were introduced to the Sadum weavings including embroidery, silk and golden threads which were never used before.

  16. Teaching of anatomical sciences: A blended learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohammed K; Abdel Meguid, Eiman M; Elkhider, Ihsan A

    2018-04-01

    Blended learning is the integration of different learning approaches, new technologies, and activities that combine traditional face-to-face teaching methods with authentic online methodologies. Although advances in educational technology have helped to expand the selection of different pedagogies, the teaching of anatomical sciences has been challenged by implementation difficulties and other limitations. These challenges are reported to include lack of time, costs, and lack of qualified teachers. Easy access to online information and advances in technology make it possible to resolve these limitations by adopting blended learning approaches. Blended learning strategies have been shown to improve students' academic performance, motivation, attitude, and satisfaction, and to provide convenient and flexible learning. Implementation of blended learning strategies has also proved cost effective. This article provides a theoretical foundation for blended learning and proposes a validated framework for the design of blended learning activities in the teaching and learning of anatomical sciences. Clin. Anat. 31:323-329, 2018. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Using the Humanities to Teach Neuroscience to Non-majors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Hewlet G; Richeimer, Joel

    2015-01-01

    We developed and offered a sequence of neuroscience courses geared toward changing the way non-science students interact with the sciences. Although we accepted students from all majors and at all class levels, our target population was first and second year students who were majoring in the fine arts or the humanities, or who had not yet declared a major. Our goal was to engage these students in science in general and neuroscience in particular by teaching science in a way that was accessible and relevant to their intellectual experiences. Our methodology was to teach scientific principles through the humanities by using course material that is at the intersection of the sciences and the humanities and by changing the classroom experience for both faculty and students. Examples of our course materials included the works of Oliver Sacks, V.S. Ramachandran, Martha Nussbaum, Virginia Woolf and Karl Popper, among others. To change the classroom experience we used a model of team-teaching, which required the simultaneous presence of two faculty members in the classroom for all classes. We changed the structure of the classroom experience from the traditional authority model to a model in which inquiry, debate, and intellectual responsibility were central. We wanted the students to have an appreciation of science not only as an endeavor guided by evidence and experimentation, but also a public discourse driven by creativity and controversy. The courses attracted a significant number of humanities and fine arts students, many of whom had already completed their basic science requirement.

  18. COMPARISON OF YOUNG CONSUMERS' BRAND EQUITY PERCEPTIONS FOR TRADITIONAL AND NONTRADITIONAL BRANDS ACROSS VARIOUS PRODUCT CATEGORIES

    OpenAIRE

    Catli, Ozlem; Ermec Sertoglu, Aysegul; Ors, Husniye

    2017-01-01

    Purpose - Thisstudy aims to compare consumers' brand perception of traditional andnon-traditional brands. Methodology -  Consumerswho live in Ankara constitute the universe of the study. The data werecollected using the face-to-face survey method. The questionnaire containsstatements measuring brand value of both traditional and non-traditional brandsfor soup and sport shoes . Findings- According to the results obtained in the study, brandperceptions of traditional brands were found high...

  19. Blending Online Learning with Traditional Approaches: Changing Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condie, Rae; Livingston, Kay

    2007-01-01

    Considerable claims have been made for the development of e-learning, either as stand-alone programmes or alongside more traditional approaches to teaching and learning, for students across school and tertiary education. National initiatives have improved the position of schools in terms of access to hardware and electronic networking, software…

  20. The American Indian: Tradition and Transition through Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zastrow, Leona M.

    The purpose of this teaching guide is to educate middle school students about American Indian culture reflected through Indian art forms. Ten contemporary Native American artists are featured with works representing both traditional and transitional techniques and materials. Represented art forms include beadwork, carvings, basketry, jewelry,…