WorldWideScience

Sample records for traditional genetic approaches

  1. Genetic programming based models in plant tissue culture: An addendum to traditional statistical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mridula, Meenu R; Nair, Ashalatha S; Kumar, K Satheesh

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we compared the efficacy of observation based modeling approach using a genetic algorithm with the regular statistical analysis as an alternative methodology in plant research. Preliminary experimental data on in vitro rooting was taken for this study with an aim to understand the effect of charcoal and naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) on successful rooting and also to optimize the two variables for maximum result. Observation-based modelling, as well as traditional approach, could identify NAA as a critical factor in rooting of the plantlets under the experimental conditions employed. Symbolic regression analysis using the software deployed here optimised the treatments studied and was successful in identifying the complex non-linear interaction among the variables, with minimalistic preliminary data. The presence of charcoal in the culture medium has a significant impact on root generation by reducing basal callus mass formation. Such an approach is advantageous for establishing in vitro culture protocols as these models will have significant potential for saving time and expenditure in plant tissue culture laboratories, and it further reduces the need for specialised background.

  2. Evolution and population genetics of exotic and reemerging pathogens: traditional and novel tools and approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    N.J. Grünwald; E.M. Goss

    2011-01-01

    Given human population growth and accelerated global trade, the rate of emergence of exotic plant pathogens is bound to increase. Understanding the processes that lead to the emergence of new pathogens can help manage emerging epidemics. Novel tools for analyzing population genetic variation can be used to infer the evolutionary history of populations or species,...

  3. A CAL Program to Teach the Basic Principles of Genetic Engineering--A Change from the Traditional Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhurst, D. G.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    An interactive computer-assisted learning program written for the BBC microcomputer to teach the basic principles of genetic engineering is described. Discussed are the hardware requirements software, use of the program, and assessment. (Author/CW)

  4. Genetic Bases of Bicuspid Aortic Valve: The Contribution of Traditional and High-Throughput Sequencing Approaches on Research and Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusti, Betti; Sticchi, Elena; De Cario, Rosina; Magi, Alberto; Nistri, Stefano; Pepe, Guglielmina

    2017-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is a common (0.5-2.0% of general population) congenital heart defect with increased prevalence of aortic dilatation and dissection. BAV has an autosomal dominant inheritance with reduced penetrance and variable expressivity. BAV has been described as an isolated trait or associated with syndromic conditions [e.g., Marfan Marfan syndrome or Loeys-Dietz syndrome (MFS, LDS)]. Identification of a syndromic condition in a BAV patient is clinically relevant to personalize aortic surgery indication. A 4-fold increase in BAV prevalence in a large cohort of unrelated MFS patients with respect to general population was reported, as well as in LDS patients (8-fold). It is also known that BAV is more frequent in patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) related to mutations in ACTA2, FBN1 , and TGFBR2 genes. Moreover, in 8 patients with BAV and thoracic aortic dilation, not fulfilling the clinical criteria for MFS, FBN1 mutations in 2/8 patients were identified suggesting that FBN1 or other genes involved in syndromic conditions correlated to aortopathy could be involved in BAV. Beyond loci associated to syndromic disorders, studies in humans and animal models evidenced/suggested the role of further genes in non-syndromic BAV. The transcriptional regulator NOTCH1 has been associated with the development and acceleration of calcium deposition. Genome wide marker-based linkage analysis demonstrated a linkage of BAV to loci on chromosomes 18, 5, and 13q. Recently, a role for GATA4 / 5 in aortic valve morphogenesis and endocardial cell differentiation has been reported. BAV has also been associated with a reduced UFD1L gene expression or involvement of a locus containing AXIN1 / PDIA2 . Much remains to be understood about the genetics of BAV. In the last years, high-throughput sequencing technologies, allowing the analysis of large number of genes or entire exomes or genomes, progressively became available. The latter issue together with the

  5. Genetic Bases of Bicuspid Aortic Valve: The Contribution of Traditional and High-Throughput Sequencing Approaches on Research and Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betti Giusti

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV is a common (0.5–2.0% of general population congenital heart defect with increased prevalence of aortic dilatation and dissection. BAV has an autosomal dominant inheritance with reduced penetrance and variable expressivity. BAV has been described as an isolated trait or associated with syndromic conditions [e.g., Marfan Marfan syndrome or Loeys-Dietz syndrome (MFS, LDS]. Identification of a syndromic condition in a BAV patient is clinically relevant to personalize aortic surgery indication. A 4-fold increase in BAV prevalence in a large cohort of unrelated MFS patients with respect to general population was reported, as well as in LDS patients (8-fold. It is also known that BAV is more frequent in patients with thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA related to mutations in ACTA2, FBN1, and TGFBR2 genes. Moreover, in 8 patients with BAV and thoracic aortic dilation, not fulfilling the clinical criteria for MFS, FBN1 mutations in 2/8 patients were identified suggesting that FBN1 or other genes involved in syndromic conditions correlated to aortopathy could be involved in BAV. Beyond loci associated to syndromic disorders, studies in humans and animal models evidenced/suggested the role of further genes in non-syndromic BAV. The transcriptional regulator NOTCH1 has been associated with the development and acceleration of calcium deposition. Genome wide marker-based linkage analysis demonstrated a linkage of BAV to loci on chromosomes 18, 5, and 13q. Recently, a role for GATA4/5 in aortic valve morphogenesis and endocardial cell differentiation has been reported. BAV has also been associated with a reduced UFD1L gene expression or involvement of a locus containing AXIN1/PDIA2. Much remains to be understood about the genetics of BAV. In the last years, high-throughput sequencing technologies, allowing the analysis of large number of genes or entire exomes or genomes, progressively became available. The latter issue together with

  6. Genetic characterization of two traditional leafy vegetables ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic characterization of two traditional leafy vegetables (Sesamum radiatum Thonn. ex Hornem and Ceratotheca sesamoides Endl.) of Benin, using flow cytometry and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. K Adéoti, A Rival, A Dansi, S Santoni, S Brown, T Beule, A Nato, Y Henry, R Vodouhe, L Loko, ...

  7. A systems approach to traditional oriental medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Hyun Uk; Ryu, Jae Yong; Lee, Jong Ok

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing structural similarities between compounds derived from traditional oriental medicine and human metabolites is a systems-based approach that can help identify mechanisms of action and suggest approaches to reduce toxicity.......Analyzing structural similarities between compounds derived from traditional oriental medicine and human metabolites is a systems-based approach that can help identify mechanisms of action and suggest approaches to reduce toxicity....

  8. Staff competence in dealing with traditional approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastrup, M.

    2008-01-01

    backgrounds of patients there is a need for mental health professionals to recognize the existence of traditional approaches and be aware of the parallel systems of care. Competent treatment of such patients requires that mental health professionals are aware of this and exhibit a willingness and ability...... to bridge between the more traditional and the Western approaches to treatment. The delineations and various aspects of the concept cultural competence and its dimensions will be discussed from a clinical perspective. Comparative studies of the various Western and the traditional approaches respectively...

  9. Genetic diversity, population structure, and traditional culture of Camellia reticulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Tong; Huang, Weijuan; De Riek, Jan; Zhang, Shuang; Ahmed, Selena; Van Huylenbroeck, Johan; Long, Chunlin

    2017-11-01

    Camellia reticulata is an arbor tree that has been cultivated in southwestern China by various sociolinguistic groups for esthetic purposes as well as to derive an edible seed oil. This study examined the influence of management, socio-economic factors, and religion on the genetic diversity patterns of Camellia reticulata utilizing a combination of ethnobotanical and molecular genetic approaches. Semi-structured interviews and key informant interviews were carried out with local communities in China's Yunnan Province. We collected plant material ( n  = 190 individuals) from five populations at study sites using single-dose AFLP markers in order to access the genetic diversity within and between populations. A total of 387 DNA fragments were produced by four AFLP primer sets. All DNA fragments were found to be polymorphic (100%). A relatively high level of genetic diversity was revealed in C. reticulata samples at both the species ( H sp  = 0.3397, I sp  = 0.5236) and population (percentage of polymorphic loci = 85.63%, H pop  = 0.2937, I pop  = 0.4421) levels. Findings further revealed a relatively high degree of genetic diversity within C. reticulata populations (Analysis of Molecular Variance = 96.31%). The higher genetic diversity within populations than among populations of C. reticulata from different geographies is likely due to the cultural and social influences associated with its long cultivation history for esthetic and culinary purposes by diverse sociolinguistic groups. This study highlights the influence of human management, socio-economic factors, and other cultural variables on the genetic and morphological diversity of C. reticulata at a regional level. Findings emphasize the important role of traditional culture on the conservation and utilization of plant genetic diversity.

  10. Determination of genetic structure of germplasm collections: are traditional hierarchical clustering methods appropriate for molecular marker data?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odong, T.L.; Heerwaarden, van J.; Jansen, J.; Hintum, van T.J.L.; Eeuwijk, van F.A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the availability of newer approaches, traditional hierarchical clustering remains very popular in genetic diversity studies in plants. However, little is known about its suitability for molecular marker data. We studied the performance of traditional hierarchical clustering techniques using

  11. Comparison of Traditional and Constructivist Teaching Approaches ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The second section of students had 47 students and was taught using traditional teaching approach. Learning strategy inventory questionnaire which was adapted from strategy inventory for language learning (SILL) L2 students of English, (Oxford, 1990) was employed before and after students were taught using two ...

  12. Assessment of genetic diversity among accessions of two traditional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of genetic diversity among accessions of two traditional leafy vegetables (Acmella uliginosa (L.) and Justicia tenella (Nees) T.) consumed in Benin using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. K Adéoti, A Rival, A Dansi, BS Ahohuendo, S Santoni, T Beule, A Nato, Y Henry, A Ahanchédé, ...

  13. Demystifying traditional herbal medicine with modern approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fu-Shuang; Weng, Jing-Ke

    2017-07-31

    Plants have long been recognized for their therapeutic properties. For centuries, indigenous cultures around the world have used traditional herbal medicine to treat a myriad of maladies. By contrast, the rise of the modern pharmaceutical industry in the past century has been based on exploiting individual active compounds with precise modes of action. This surge has yielded highly effective drugs that are widely used in the clinic, including many plant natural products and analogues derived from these products, but has fallen short of delivering effective cures for complex human diseases with complicated causes, such as cancer, diabetes, autoimmune disorders and degenerative diseases. While the plant kingdom continues to serve as an important source for chemical entities supporting drug discovery, the rich traditions of herbal medicine developed by trial and error on human subjects over thousands of years contain invaluable biomedical information just waiting to be uncovered using modern scientific approaches. Here we provide an evolutionary and historical perspective on why plants are of particular significance as medicines for humans. We highlight several plant natural products that are either in the clinic or currently under active research and clinical development, with particular emphasis on their mechanisms of action. Recent efforts in developing modern multi-herb prescriptions through rigorous molecular-level investigations and standardized clinical trials are also discussed. Emerging technologies, such as genomics and synthetic biology, are enabling new ways for discovering and utilizing the medicinal properties of plants. We are entering an exciting era where the ancient wisdom distilled into the world's traditional herbal medicines can be reinterpreted and exploited through the lens of modern science.

  14. Property regime concerning genetic resources and traditional knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel R. Nemogá Soto

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This article provides an historical account of the changes that have taken place regarding ownership, control and access over genetic resources. Once considered the common heritage of humanity, rights over genetic resources, it is argued, have undergone radical transformations. The global legal framework regarding genetic resources has shifted to legitimize and promote their appropriation and monopolization. This transformation embraced the expansion of intellectual property rights over genetic material and information, including living organisms, through the World Trade Organization´s Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property (TRIPs. This was coupled by the adoption of the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity, which recognizes sovereign rights of the countries of origin over their genetic resources and, at the same time, obligates them to permit access to those resources. The Colombian Constitution of 1991 and unparalleled judicial decisions during the last decade reaffirmed sovereign rights over genetic resources in Colombia. Conversely, the genetic resources and the traditional knowledge of Indigenous peoples and local communities continue to be freely accessible resources within the current Colombian legal framework.

  15. Therapeutic approaches to genetic disorders

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    salah

    Although prevention is the ideal goal for genetic disorders, various types of therapeutic ... The patient being ... pirical or aimed at controlling or mediating signs and symptoms without care. ... plications and gene therapy approaches .... genes family, have opened a wide and .... cancer where nanoparticles are used to.

  16. Feminist Critiques Against Traditional Approaches to Security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrus Kanisius Farneubun, P.

    Feminists claim that national security is a model of masculinity domination, which hardly disputed This essay addresses feminists critique on notion of conventional security and provides feminists own definition. It shows that feminists adopt comprehensive approach in relation to security. They tend

  17. Basic Genetics: A Human Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biological Sciences Curriculum Study, Colorado Springs, CO. Center for Education in Human and Medical Genetics.

    This document (which has the form of a magazine) provides a variety of articles, stories, editorials, letters, interviews, and other types of magazine features (such as book reviews) which focus on human genetics. In addition to providing information about the principles of genetics, nearly all of the sections in the "magazine" address moral,…

  18. Grandmothers as gems of genetic wisdom: exploring South African traditional beliefs about the causes of childhood genetic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Claire; Watermeyer, Jennifer; MacDonald, Carol; Moabelo, Colleen

    2010-02-01

    With its diverse cultural and linguistic profile, South Africa provides a unique context to explore contextual influences on the process of genetic counseling. Prior research suggests intergenerational differences regarding models of causation which influence treatment-seeking paths. This pilot study therefore aimed to explore South African traditional beliefs regarding common childhood genetic disorders. Three focus groups were conducted with fifteen grandmothers from different cultural backgrounds in an urban community. Questions pertained to the role of the grandmother, traditional beliefs regarding causes of genetic disorders, explanations of heredity, and prevention and management of genetic disorders. Results indicate a variety of cultural explanations for causes of childhood genetic disorders. These causes can be classified into categories related to lifestyle, behavior, social issues, culture, religion, genetic, and familial causes. Prevention and treatment issues are also highlighted. These findings have implications for genetic counseling practice, which needs to include a greater focus on cultural issues.

  19. A statistical approach to traditional Vietnamese medical diagnoses standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Hoang Phuong; Nguyen Quang Hoa; Le Dinh Long

    1990-12-01

    In this paper the first results of the statistical approach for Cold-Heat diagnosis standardization as a first work in the ''eight rules diagnoses'' standardization of Traditional Vietnamese Medicine are briefly described. Some conclusions and suggestions for further work are given. 3 refs, 2 tabs

  20. Blending Online Learning with Traditional Approaches: Changing Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condie, Rae; Livingston, Kay

    2007-01-01

    Considerable claims have been made for the development of e-learning, either as stand-alone programmes or alongside more traditional approaches to teaching and learning, for students across school and tertiary education. National initiatives have improved the position of schools in terms of access to hardware and electronic networking, software…

  1. A Comparison of HPT and Traditional Training Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretz, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the comparative use of training from human performance technology (HPT) and traditional training perspectives, based on taxonomy. Concludes that the primary difference is a holistic systems performance improvement approach by eliminating barriers with HPT versus reaction or response to a set of business objectives in traditional…

  2. Ethnobotanical approaches of traditional medicine studies: some experiences from Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng-Ji, P

    2001-01-01

    Ethnobotany, as a research field of science, has been widely used for the documentation of indigenous knowledge on the use of plants and for providing an inventory of useful plants from local flora in Asian countries. Plants that are used for traditional herbal medicine in different countries are an important part of these studies. However, in some countries in recent years, ethnobotanical studies have been used for the discovery of new drugs and new drug development. In general, experiences gained from ethnobotanical approaches of traditional medicinal studies in China and Himalayan countries have helped drug production and new drug development. At the same time, in many cases, over-harvesting, degradation of medical plants, and loss of traditional medical knowledge in local communities are common problems in these resource areas. Issues of indigenous knowledge, intellectual property rights, and uncontrolled transboundary trade in medicinal plants occur frequently in the region. This paper discusses ethnobotanical approaches of traditional medicinal studies, in reference to experiences from China and Himalayan countries, with an emphasis on the conservation of traditional medical knowledge and medical plant resources.

  3. Comparative Approaches to Genetic Discrimination: Chasing Shadows?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joly, Yann; Feze, Ida Ngueng; Song, Lingqiao; Knoppers, Bartha M

    2017-05-01

    Genetic discrimination (GD) is one of the most pervasive issues associated with genetic research and its large-scale implementation. An increasing number of countries have adopted public policies to address this issue. Our research presents a worldwide comparative review and typology of these approaches. We conclude with suggestions for public policy development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Facilities upgrade for natural forces: traditional vs. realistic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terkun, V.

    1985-01-01

    The traditional method utilized for upgrading existing buildings and equipment involves the following steps: performs structural study using finite element analysis and some in situ testing; compare predicted member forces/stresses to material code allowables; determine strengthening schemes for those structural members judged to be weak; estimate cost for required upgrades. This approach will result in structural modifications that are not only conservative but very expensive as well. The realistic structural evaluation approach uses traditional data to predict structural weaknesses as a final step. Next, using considerable information now available for buildings and equipment exposed to natural hazards, engineering judgments about structures being evaluated can be made with a great deal of confidence. This approach does not eliminate conservatism entirely, but it does reduce it to a reasonable and realistic level. As a result, the upgrade cost goes down without compromising the low risk necessary for vital facilities

  5. Dynamic traffic assignment : genetic algorithms approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Real-time route guidance is a promising approach to alleviating congestion on the nations highways. A dynamic traffic assignment model is central to the development of guidance strategies. The artificial intelligence technique of genetic algorithm...

  6. Genetic diversity analysis of Cuban traditional rice (Oryza sativa L. varieties based on microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Alvarez

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Microsatellite polymorphism was studied in a sample of 39 traditional rice (Oryza sativa L. varieties and 11 improved varieties widely planted in Cuba. The study was aimed at assessing the extent of genetic variation in traditional and improved varieties and to establish their genetic relationship for breeding purposes. Heterozygosity was analyzed at each microsatellite loci and for each genotype using 10 microsatellite primer pairs. Between varieties genetic relationship was estimated. The number of alleles per microsatellite loci was 4 to 8, averaging 6.6 alleles per locus. Higher heterozygosity (H was found in traditional varieties (H TV = 0.72 than in improved varieties (H IV = 0.42, and 68% of the total microsatellite alleles were found exclusively in the traditional varieties. Genetic diversity, represented by cluster analysis, indicated three different genetic groups based on their origin. Genetic relationship estimates based on the proportion of microsatellite loci with shared alleles indicated that the majority of traditional varieties were poorly related to the improved varieties. We also discuss the more efficient use of the available genetic diversity in future programs involving genetic crosses.

  7. The calculus a genetic approach

    CERN Document Server

    Toeplitz, Otto

    2007-01-01

    When first published posthumously in 1963, this book presented a radically different approach to the teaching of calculus.  In sharp contrast to the methods of his time, Otto Toeplitz did not teach calculus as a static system of techniques and facts to be memorized. Instead, he drew on his knowledge of the history of mathematics and presented calculus as an organic evolution of ideas beginning with the discoveries of Greek scholars, such as Archimedes, Pythagoras, and Euclid, and developing through the centuries in the work of Kepler, Galileo, Fermat, Newton, and Leibniz. Through this unique a

  8. A non-traditional multinational approach to construction inspection program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ram, Srinivasan; Smith, M.E.; Walker, T.F.

    2007-01-01

    The next generation of nuclear plants would be fabricated, constructed and licensed in markedly different ways than the present light water reactors. Non-traditional commercial nuclear industry suppliers, shipyards in Usa and international fabricators, would be a source to supply major components and subsystems. The codes of construction may vary depending upon the prevailing codes and standards used by the respective supplier. Such codes and standards need to be reconciled with the applicable regulations (e.g., 10 CFR 52). A Construction Inspection Program is an integral part of the Quality Assurance Measures required during the Construction Phase of the power plant. In order to achieve the stated cost and schedule goals of the new build plants, a nontraditional multi-national approach would be required. In lieu of the traditional approach of individual utility inspecting the quality of fabrication and construction, a multi-utility team approach is a method that will be discussed. Likewise, a multinational cooperative licensing approach is suggested taking advantage of inspectors of the regulatory authority where the component would be built. The multi-national approach proposed here is based on the principle of forming teaming agreements between the utilities, vendors and the regulators. For instance, rather than sending Country A's inspectors all over the world, inspectors of the regulator in Country B where a particular component is being fabricated would in fact be performing the required inspections for Country A's regulator. Similarly teaming arrangements could be set up between utilities and vendors in different countries. The required oversight for the utility or the vendor could be performed by their counterparts in the country where a particular item is being fabricated

  9. Tradition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otto, Ton

    2016-01-01

    : beliefs, practices, institutions, and also things. In this sense, the meaning of the term in social research is very close to its usage in common language and is not always theoretically well developed (see Shils, 1971: 123). But the concept of tradition has also been central to major theoretical debates...... on the nature of social change, especially in connection with the notion of modernity. Here tradition is linked to various forms of agency as a factor of both stability and intentional change....

  10. Genetic approaches in comparative and evolutionary physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgham, Jamie T.; Kelly, Scott A.; Garland, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    Whole animal physiological performance is highly polygenic and highly plastic, and the same is generally true for the many subordinate traits that underlie performance capacities. Quantitative genetics, therefore, provides an appropriate framework for the analysis of physiological phenotypes and can be used to infer the microevolutionary processes that have shaped patterns of trait variation within and among species. In cases where specific genes are known to contribute to variation in physiological traits, analyses of intraspecific polymorphism and interspecific divergence can reveal molecular mechanisms of functional evolution and can provide insights into the possible adaptive significance of observed sequence changes. In this review, we explain how the tools and theory of quantitative genetics, population genetics, and molecular evolution can inform our understanding of mechanism and process in physiological evolution. For example, lab-based studies of polygenic inheritance can be integrated with field-based studies of trait variation and survivorship to measure selection in the wild, thereby providing direct insights into the adaptive significance of physiological variation. Analyses of quantitative genetic variation in selection experiments can be used to probe interrelationships among traits and the genetic basis of physiological trade-offs and constraints. We review approaches for characterizing the genetic architecture of physiological traits, including linkage mapping and association mapping, and systems approaches for dissecting intermediary steps in the chain of causation between genotype and phenotype. We also discuss the promise and limitations of population genomic approaches for inferring adaptation at specific loci. We end by highlighting the role of organismal physiology in the functional synthesis of evolutionary biology. PMID:26041111

  11. Antioxidant Capacity of Beetroot: Traditional vs Novel Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Celia; Rey, Raquel; Hendrickx, Marc; Del Mar Cavia, María; Alonso-Torre, Sara

    2017-09-01

    Red beetroot has been ranked among the 10 most potent antioxidant vegetables, although only extraction-based methods have been used to evaluate its total antioxidant capacity. Therefore, the present study aims at comparing the traditional extraction-based method with two more recent approaches (QUENCHER -QUick, Easy, New, CHEap and Reproducible- and GAR -global antioxidant response method), in order to establish their suitability in the case of beetroot. Our results indicate that the total antioxidant capacity of beetroot would be underestimated when using extraction-based procedures, since both QUENCHER and GAR methods resulted in a higher total antioxidant capacity. The effect of a thermal treatment on the total antioxidant capacity of beetroot varies among the methods evaluated and our findings suggest different compounds responsible for the total antioxidant capacity detected in each pre-processing method. Remarkably, the present study demonstrates that the traditional extraction-based method seems useful to screen for (changes in) the "bioavailable" antioxidant potential of the root.

  12. Herbal Medicines: from Traditional Medicine to Modern Experimental Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Rasoulian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Academic writings indicate that the medicinal use of plants dates back to 4000 - 5000 B.C. (1. Utilization of medicinal herbs has indeed a long history not only in human's life, but also in animals and there are some interesting evidences about the animals' self-medication, in both the prevention and treatment of diseases (2-5. The World Health Organization (WHO has recognized the importance of traditional medicines and created strategies, guidelines and standards for botanical medicines (6, 7. A significant part of those traditional text dealing with medicine, which were appreciated by ancient scientific communities worldwide, such as The Canon of Medicine by Persian physician–philosopher Ibn Sina (or Avicenna, 980 to 1032 AD, is allocated to herbal medicines. The Canon explores nearly 500 medicinal plants and herbal drugs. It should be noted that this book was used as a medical textbook in Europe until the 17th century AD (8, 9. Although there are important evidences about using some kinds of experimental approaches in traditional medicine (8, the efficacy of such approaches is in doubt because it is generally agreed that they might have been part of physicians' personal experiences. Not only the demand for herbal drugs is growing in developing countries, but also there are some evidences that consumers in developed countries are becoming disillusioned with modern healthcare; hence, the demand for traditional alternatives including herbal medicines is increasing in developing countries (10. On the one hand, the increased interest in herbal medicines throughout the world (10, 11, on the other hand, the need for direct empirical evidence about the effectiveness of herbal medicines in the proper statistical society with the appropriate number and method, denote the significance of new studies about medicinal plants and publishing their results. Herbal Medicines Journal (eISSN: 2538-2144 reports valuable research results for researchers all

  13. Mineralogy: a modern approach to teaching a traditional discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, G. W.

    2011-12-01

    Mineralogy has traditionally been a primary component in undergraduate geoscience curriculum. In recent years, there has been a trend in which mineralogy and petrology have been combined into Earth Materials courses. This is unfortunate as these disciplines each have much to offer students, and content once considered essential is eliminated out of necessity. Mineralogy is still fundamental to students' understanding of the Earth and Earth processes. Using a modern approach to time-honored concepts, I teach a quarter-long Introductory Mineralogy class offered through the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego. Student evaluations of this course unequivocally indicate a high degree of learning and interest in the material, confirming that mineralogy continues to be a valuable class into the 21st century. While much of the content remains similar to what has been taught over the last century, my strategy involves a well-balanced approach to old and new. The first third of the course is background including the relevance of mineralogy, crystal chemistry, and crystallography; the second third of the course is systematic mineralogy using the Dana system; the last third of the course is devoted to understanding optical mineralogy, using modern analytical equipment such as XRD and SEM, and learning to use the petrographic microscope. Throughout the quarter, a strong emphasis is placed on the importance of hand-sample identification. Field work, traditionally not emphasized in mineralogy courses, has been re-introduced to the curriculum. I use modern technology to facilitate and support student learning. A lecture-based approach is employed with carefully crafted and organized PowerPoint presentations. PowerPoint lectures can be effective and highly engaging. The key is to ensure that the lectures are not overly reliant on text, instead relying on diagrams, charts, photos, and embedded media such as 3-D animations (ex. to teach

  14. A Genetic-Algorithms-Based Approach for Programming Linear and Quadratic Optimization Problems with Uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Jin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a genetic-algorithms-based approach as an all-purpose problem-solving method for operation programming problems under uncertainty. The proposed method was applied for management of a municipal solid waste treatment system. Compared to the traditional interactive binary analysis, this approach has fewer limitations and is able to reduce the complexity in solving the inexact linear programming problems and inexact quadratic programming problems. The implementation of this approach was performed using the Genetic Algorithm Solver of MATLAB (trademark of MathWorks. The paper explains the genetic-algorithms-based method and presents details on the computation procedures for each type of inexact operation programming problems. A comparison of the results generated by the proposed method based on genetic algorithms with those produced by the traditional interactive binary analysis method is also presented.

  15. Population genetics of traditionally managed maize : farming practice as a determinant of genetic structure and identity of maize landraces in Mexico

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heerwaarden, van J.

    2007-01-01

    A large amount of crop genetic diversity is being maintained in farmers' fields worldwide. The population genetics of traditionally managed landraces is therefore of interest to the conservation of genetic resources. The growing trend towards agricultural modernization and the prospect of

  16. Reaching the Non-Traditional Stopout Population: A Segmentation Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatzel, Kim; Callahan, Thomas; Scott, Crystal J.; Davis, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    An estimated 21% of 25-34-year-olds in the United States, about eight million individuals, have attended college and quit before completing a degree. These non-traditional students may or may not return to college. Those who return to college are referred to as stopouts, whereas those who do not return are referred to as stayouts. In the face of…

  17. A Declarative Design Approach to Modeling Traditional and Non-Traditional Space Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoag, Lucy M.

    The space system design process is known to be laborious, complex, and computationally demanding. It is highly multi-disciplinary, involving several interdependent subsystems that must be both highly optimized and reliable due to the high cost of launch. Satellites must also be capable of operating in harsh and unpredictable environments, so integrating high-fidelity analysis is important. To address each of these concerns, a holistic design approach is necessary. However, while the sophistication of space systems has evolved significantly in the last 60 years, improvements in the design process have been comparatively stagnant. Space systems continue to be designed using a procedural, subsystem-by-subsystem approach. This method is inadequate since it generally requires extensive iteration and limited or heuristic-based search, which can be slow, labor-intensive, and inaccurate. The use of a declarative design approach can potentially address these inadequacies. In the declarative programming style, the focus of a problem is placed on what the objective is, and not necessarily how it should be achieved. In the context of design, this entails knowledge expressed as a declaration of statements that are true about the desired artifact instead of explicit instructions on how to implement it. A well-known technique is through constraint-based reasoning, where a design problem is represented as a network of rules and constraints that are reasoned across by a solver to dynamically discover the optimal candidate(s). This enables implicit instantiation of the tradespace and allows for automatic generation of all feasible design candidates. As such, this approach also appears to be well-suited to modeling adaptable space systems, which generally have large tradespaces and possess configurations that are not well-known a priori. This research applied a declarative design approach to holistic satellite design and to tradespace exploration for adaptable space systems. The

  18. Functional dyspepsia: A new approach from traditional Persian medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Pasalar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: One of the most common global disorders is related to gastrointestinal system. Functional dyspepsia (FD defined as upper abdominal pain and discomfort in the absence of organic ailments is a prevalent disease without any confirmed medication. The purpose of this study was to find gastric disorders which might be coincidental to FD based on traditional Persian medicine (TPM. Materials and Methods: We searched the main textbooks of TPM including Al-Havi (by Rhazes, Canon of medicine (by Avicenna, ZakhireKhawrazmshahi (by Ismail Jorjani, Moalijat-e Aghili and Makhzan Al-adviya (by Mohammad Hosein AghiliShirazi, and ExirAzam (by Hakim Azam Khan. Also, we searched Pubmed, Scopus, Science Direct, Medline, scientific information database (SID, Iranmedex and Google Scholar from 1980 to 1 August 2014 for dyspepsia, gastrointestinal disease, traditional Persian medicine, and gastric dystemperaments. Results: There is no equivalent term for FD in traditional Persian medicine although similar signs and symptoms are visible in terms like simple cold dystemperament of stomach, indigestion, and digestion debility in TPM sources. Some treatments mentioned in TPM have shown promising results in the current experimental tests. Conclusion: Finding these similarities in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM textbooks may lead to discovering new remedies for this widespread disease.

  19. Functional dyspepsia: A new approach from traditional Persian medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasalar, Mehdi; Nimrouzi, Majid; Choopani, Rasool; Mosaddegh, Mahmoud; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Mohagheghzadeh, Abdolali; Bagheri Lankarani, Kamran

    2016-01-01

    Objective: One of the most common global disorders is related to gastrointestinal system. Functional dyspepsia (FD) defined as upper abdominal pain and discomfort in the absence of organic ailments is a prevalent disease without any confirmed medication. The purpose of this study was to find gastric disorders which might be coincidental to FD based on traditional Persian medicine (TPM). Materials and Methods: We searched the main textbooks of TPM including Al-Havi (by Rhazes), Canon of medicine (by Avicenna), ZakhireKhawrazmshahi (by Ismail Jorjani), Moalijat-e Aghili and Makhzan Al-adviya (by Mohammad Hosein AghiliShirazi), and ExirAzam (by Hakim Azam Khan). Also, we searched Pubmed, Scopus, Science Direct, Medline, scientific information database (SID), Iranmedex and Google Scholar from 1980 to 1 August 2014 for dyspepsia, gastrointestinal disease, traditional Persian medicine, and gastric dystemperaments. Results: There is no equivalent term for FD in traditional Persian medicine although similar signs and symptoms are visible in terms like simple cold dystemperament of stomach, indigestion, and digestion debility in TPM sources. Some treatments mentioned in TPM have shown promising results in the current experimental tests. Conclusion: Finding these similarities in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) textbooks may lead to discovering new remedies for this widespread disease. PMID:27222829

  20. Use of Traditional and Genetically Modified Probiotics in Human Health: What Does the Future Hold?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; Langella, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    Probiotics are live, nonpathogenic microorganisms that confer benefits to human health when administered in adequate amounts. Among the frequent proposed health benefits attributed to probiotics, their ability to interact with the host immune system is now well demonstrated. Although history has revealed that probiotics were part of fermented foods in the past, clinicians have started to use them therapeutically in regular diets. Moreover, the use of genetically modified probiotics to deliver molecules of therapeutic interest is gaining importance as an extension of the probiotic concept. This chapter summarizes some of the recent findings and perspectives on the use of both traditional and genetically modified probiotics to treat human diseases as well as what the future may hold concerning the use of these probiotics in humans.

  1. Approach to Health Supporting System Using Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watsuji, Tadashi; Shinohara, Shoji; Arita, Seizaburo

    The primary prevention of disease related to the lifestyle is an essential theme in medical research. Preventing before it arises is the important concept in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Since TCM, which emphasizes individual physical condition in medical treatment, has recently attracted considerable attention globally, objective diagnostic methods in TCM have been investigated in this work. Firstly, the fuzzy theory was applied to develop a tongue diagnosis supporting system based on the tongue diagnosis in TCM. Secondly, the usefulness of TCM health questionnaire was examined to identify individual physical condition. Our results suggest that the TCM health questionnaire is useful in the construction of a health supporting system based on TCM.

  2. Traditional and non-traditional approaches to the prediction of natural disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapunov, Valentin; Glazyrina, Tatiana

    2016-04-01

    information in space and in time - from the past or the future, however, a diffuse form. The less significant by energy event is, the farther it is remote in time, the less accurate it becomes the transmitted information. Hence: 1. Create in addition to traditional monitoring system for monitoring the behavior of animals that can anticipate disasters natural and anthropogenic genesis based on the properties proscopy. 2. Carry out laboratory investigations of the physical properties of time based on the ideas Kozyrev and other Russian scientists. 3. Some known devices may be used to predict the existing, such as torsion balance. 4. To develop a theoretical framework of proscopy is actual field of both theoretical and applied science.

  3. Genetic Approaches to Develop Salt Tolerant Germplasm

    KAUST Repository

    Tester, Mark A.

    2015-08-19

    Forty percent of the world\\'s food is produced under irrigation, and this is directly threatened by over-exploitation and changes in the global environment. One way to address this threat is to develop systems for increasing our ability to use lower quality water, in particular saline water. Low cost partial desalination of brackish water, use of saline water for cooling and increases in the salinity tolerance of crops can all contribute to the development of this new agricultural system. In this talk, the focus will be on the use of forward genetic approaches for discovery of genes related to salinity tolerance in barley and tomatoes. Rather than studying salinity tolerance as a trait in itself, we dissect salinity tolerance into a series of components that are hypothesised to contribute to overall salinity tolerance (following the paradigm of Munns & Tester, 2008). For example, one significant component of tolerance of most crop plants to moderate soil salinity is due to the ability to maintain low concentrations of Na+ in the leaves, and much analysis of this aspect has been done (e.g. Roy et al., 2013, 2014). A major site for the control of shoot Na+ accumulation is at the plasma membrane of the mature stele of the root. Alleles of HKT, a major gene underlying this transport process have been characterized and, in work led by Dr Rana Munns (CSIRO), have now been introgressed into commercial durum wheat and led to significantly increased yields in saline field conditions (Munns et al., 2012). The genotyping of mapping populations is now highly efficient. However, the ability to quantitatively phenotype these populations is now commonly limiting forward progress in plant science. The increasing power of digital imaging and computational technologies offers the opportunity to relieve this phenotyping bottleneck. The Plant Accelerator is a 4500m2 growth facility that provides non-destructive phenotyping of large populations of plants (http

  4. Genetic Analysis of Fusarium Head Blight Resistance in CIMMYT Bread Wheat Line C615 Using Traditional and Conditional QTL Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xin; Cheng, Jingye; Jiang, Zhengning; Hu, Wenjing; Bie, Tongde; Gao, Derong; Li, Dongsheng; Wu, Ronglin; Li, Yuling; Chen, Shulin; Cheng, Xiaoming; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Yong; Cheng, Shunhe

    2018-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a destructive wheat disease present throughout the world, and host resistance is an effective and economical strategy used to control FHB. Lack of adequate resistance resource is still a main bottleneck for FHB genetics and wheat breeding research. The synthetic-derived bread wheat line C615, which does not carry the Fhb1 gene, is a promising source of FHB resistance for breeding. A population of 198 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) produced by crossing C615 with the susceptible cultivar Yangmai 13 was evaluated for FHB response using point and spray inoculations. As the disease phenotype is frequently complicated by other agronomic traits, we used both traditional and multivariate conditional QTL mapping approaches to investigate the genetic relationships (at the individual QTL level) between FHB resistance and plant height (PH), spike compactness (SC), and days to flowering (FD). A linkage map was constructed from 3,901 polymorphic SNP markers, which covered 2,549.2 cM. Traditional and conditional QTL mapping analyses found 13 and 22 QTL for FHB, respectively; 10 were identified by both methods. Among these 10, three QTL from C615 were detected in multiple years; these QTL were located on chromosomes 2AL, 2DS, and 2DL. Conditional QTL mapping analysis indicated that, at the QTL level, SC strongly influenced FHB in point inoculation; whereas PH and SC contributed more to FHB than did FD in spray inoculation. The three stable QTL ( QFhbs-jaas.2AL, QFhbp-jaas.2DS , and QFhbp-jaas.2DL ) for FHB were partly affected by or were independent of the three agronomic traits. The QTL detected in this study improve our understanding of the genetic relationships between FHB response and related traits at the QTL level and provide useful information for marker-assisted selection for the improvement of FHB resistance in breeding.

  5. Genetic Analysis of Fusarium Head Blight Resistance in CIMMYT Bread Wheat Line C615 Using Traditional and Conditional QTL Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xin; Cheng, Jingye; Jiang, Zhengning; Hu, Wenjing; Bie, Tongde; Gao, Derong; Li, Dongsheng; Wu, Ronglin; Li, Yuling; Chen, Shulin; Cheng, Xiaoming; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Yong; Cheng, Shunhe

    2018-01-01

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a destructive wheat disease present throughout the world, and host resistance is an effective and economical strategy used to control FHB. Lack of adequate resistance resource is still a main bottleneck for FHB genetics and wheat breeding research. The synthetic-derived bread wheat line C615, which does not carry the Fhb1 gene, is a promising source of FHB resistance for breeding. A population of 198 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) produced by crossing C615 with the susceptible cultivar Yangmai 13 was evaluated for FHB response using point and spray inoculations. As the disease phenotype is frequently complicated by other agronomic traits, we used both traditional and multivariate conditional QTL mapping approaches to investigate the genetic relationships (at the individual QTL level) between FHB resistance and plant height (PH), spike compactness (SC), and days to flowering (FD). A linkage map was constructed from 3,901 polymorphic SNP markers, which covered 2,549.2 cM. Traditional and conditional QTL mapping analyses found 13 and 22 QTL for FHB, respectively; 10 were identified by both methods. Among these 10, three QTL from C615 were detected in multiple years; these QTL were located on chromosomes 2AL, 2DS, and 2DL. Conditional QTL mapping analysis indicated that, at the QTL level, SC strongly influenced FHB in point inoculation; whereas PH and SC contributed more to FHB than did FD in spray inoculation. The three stable QTL (QFhbs-jaas.2AL, QFhbp-jaas.2DS, and QFhbp-jaas.2DL) for FHB were partly affected by or were independent of the three agronomic traits. The QTL detected in this study improve our understanding of the genetic relationships between FHB response and related traits at the QTL level and provide useful information for marker-assisted selection for the improvement of FHB resistance in breeding. PMID:29780395

  6. An ergonomic approach for designing indian traditional vegetable cutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhara, Prakash C; De, Sujaya; Sengupta, Piyali; Maity, Payel; Pal, Amitava

    2015-01-01

    In India varieties of hand tools have been used to cut the vegetables. Traditional vegetable cutter is a commonly used hand tool which has been used for years in the kitchen. The tool may have some design related problems. The present study was undertaken to reduce those problems. The study objective was to evaluate a new design of traditional vegetable cutters for use in the Indian kitchen. One hundred and fifty Indian women who regularly used a vegetable cutter for cooking purposes participated in this study. The design of the vegetable cutter was modified based on the postural preference of the users and other anthropometric factors including the blade angle, length, breadth and width of the sitting area. The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was assessed by means of a questionnaire for subjects' feedback. New concepts of the design were proposed and a few prototypes were made and were tested by paired comparison using the EMG system. A large number of subjects (61%) used the vegetable cutter while sitting on the floor with folded knees and the prevalence of MSD in most of the body parts was comparatively lower in this posture than that in squatting posture. In the new design, a broad platform was suggested to provide a more comfortable sitting when a subject sits on it with folded knees. For the vegetable cutter, the blade angle was made at 120° with a broad folded wooden base as the final prototype of the cutter. The length, breadth, and thickness of the base were selected based on the results of the anthropometric measurements among the prototypes of the cutters. The selected vegetable cutter showed the least myoelectric activity among the prototypes during cutting vegetables. The modified vegetable cutter appeared to be ergonomically effective, less prone to muscular stress, and compatible for preferred posture of the users.

  7. Updating the CS Curriculum: Traditional vs. Market-Driven Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedzad Mehic

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a method of updating a curriculum of a typical computer science department. The suggested approach promotes the role of a university as an academic environment, targeting excellence in teaching degree programs, as well as a qualified partner in partnership with businesses, especially with industry, in sharing knowledge and skills, supporting the concept of a quality process and quality products. Cooperation with industry firms, through real problem solving approaches and using emerging technologies that might drive the best demand in future markets, will prepare students to take advantage of opportunities, gain experience, and make an impact immediately. As a case study, the paper describes how this approach is applied to Computer Science Department at University of Bahrain.

  8. Determination of genetic variability of traditional varieties of Brazilian rice using microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Brondani

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The rice (Oryza sativa breeding program of the Rice and Bean research center of the Brazilian agricultural company Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária (Embrapa is well established and provides new cultivars every year to attend the demand for improved high yielding varieties with tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the elite genitors used to compose new populations for selection are closely related, contributing to the yield plateau reached in the last 20 years. To overcome this limit, it is necessary to broaden the genetic basis of the cultivars using diverse germplasm such as wild relatives or traditional varieties, with the latter being more practical because they are more easily crossed with elite germplasm to accelerate the recovery of modern plant types in the breeding lines. The objective of our study was to characterize the allelic diversity of 192 traditional varieties of Brazilian rice using 12 simple sequence repeat (SSR or microsatellite markers. The germplasm was divided into 39 groups by common name similarity. A total of 176 alleles were detected, 30 of which (from 23 accessions were exclusive. The number of alleles per marker ranged from 6 to 22, with an average of 14.6 alleles per locus. We identified 16 accessions as a mixture of pure lines or heterozygous plants. Dendrogram analysis identified six clusters of identical accessions with different common names and just one cluster with identical accessions with the same common name, indicating that SSR markers are fundamental to determining the genetic relationship between landraces. A subset of 24 landraces, representatives of the 13 similarity groups plus the 11 accessions not grouped, was the most variable set of genotypes analyzed. These accessions can be used as genitors to increase the genetic variability available to rice breeding programs.

  9. Negative pressure dressing combined with a traditional approach for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-07-21

    Jul 21, 2011 ... Deep burns of the calvarium due to high-voltage electrical current present serious therapeutic challenges in the healing. In this study, as an alternative approach to the treatment of burned skull, negative pressure dressing is used to facilitate separation of the necrotic bones from healthy margins of the ...

  10. A Modern Clinical Approach of the Traditional Korean Saam Acupuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manyong Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Saam acupuncture is one of the original therapeutic modalities representing traditional Korean medicine. It was originally described in a manuscript that is estimated to be published at some point between 1644 and 1742, in the middle of the Cho Sun dynasty, by a Korean Buddhist monk whose name is unknown. The principle of combining five shu points is based on the theory of Nan-jing. The treatment and diagnosis concepts in Saam acupuncture were mainly influenced by Dongeuibogam and Chimgoogyeong-heombang. The basic characteristic of combining five shu points in Saam acupuncture is the selection of the tonification and sedation points along the self-meridian and other meridians based on creation and governor relationships. Saam acupuncture clinical studies have mainly focused on musculoskeletal pain and autonomic nervous system regulation. From a neurophysiological perspective, Saam acupuncture, which involves five shu points as the main treatment aspect, has the advantage of increasing parasympathetic nerve activation and adjusting the balance of the autonomic nervous system. Inserting a needle into the skin layer while considering the respiratory phase and stimulating the needle gently and lightly could maximize the effect of Saam acupuncture. The specific Saam acupuncture prescribed should be identified on the basis of the neurobiological perspective.

  11. Holistic approach to functional constipation: Perspective of traditional Persian medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimrouzi, Majid; Zarshenas, Mohammad M

    2015-11-23

    Traditional Persian medicine (TPM) proposes a different viewpoint to the chronic diseases. Diagnosis and implemented treatment are based on individual differences among patients. Constipation or Ea'teghal-e-batn is a condition in which the patient develops difficult or painful defecation. Based on TPM concepts, the fifirst digestion step starts from halq (oral cavity), and ends via defecation from the maq'ad (anus). Avicenna believed that four faculties, ha'zemeh (digestive), ja'zebeh (absorptive), ma'sekeh (retentive) and da'fe'eh (propulsive), are involved in the process of digestion and absorption of the ingested food and expelling the waste materials. The bowel movement and appearance of the stool is a measure for evaluating the gastrointestinal healthy function. Defecation should be with no pain and fecal material should have no burning and acuity. Low food intake or foods with dry temperament, dryness of gastrointestinal tract, diaphoresis and heavy exercise as well as intestine sensory loss were discussed as main causes of constipation. Management of constipation in TPM includes dietary schemes, oil massages and subsequently simple herbal medicines. According to TPM theories, the fifirst step in treating a disease is the elimination of disease causes (asbabe- maraz) and also providing the causes of health (asbab-e-sehhat). Health care providers should know the proper condition which the herbal medicines should be administered in and be able to guide the patients about the benefifits and hazards of herbal remedies, commonly used in their living origin.

  12. Mineralogical characterization of beach sand minerals: traditional and modern approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamurthy, P.

    2016-01-01

    Precise identification of beach sand minerals is an essential prerequisite for the reserve estimation of a given deposit and also in the subsequent evaluation of the process flow sheet for its optimal recovery. Traditional methods that are used for the identification of the beach sand minerals such as magnetite, hematite, ilmenite, rutile, anatase, zircon, garnet, sillimanite, monazite, quartz and others include heavy liquid separation (bromoform and methylene iodide) and studying the optical properties of the grains from different fractions so as to identify the specific phases in a sample. Grain counting of specific minerals from a given sievefraction under a petrological microscope to estimate the mode and their subsequent conversion in to weight percent fractions forms the critical second stage that is followed by the reserve estimates. These methodologies are tedious and time consuming often involving a few days for a single sample. The paper introduces the numerous instrumental methods (XRF, XRD - Rietveld and CCSEM) of mineral speciation and their qualification in with case studies from the west coast deposits in India

  13. Non-traditional approaches to teaching GPS online

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, A.; Wolf, D. F., II

    2009-12-01

    Students are increasingly turning to the web for quality education that fits into their lives. Nonetheless, online learning brings challenges as well as a fresh opportunity for exploring pedagogical practices not present on traditional higher education programs, particularly in the sciences. A team of two dozen Empire State College-State University of New York instructional designers, faculty, and other staff are working on making science relevant to non-majors who may initially have anxiety about general education science courses. One of these courses, GPS and the New Geography, focuses on how Global Positioning System (GPS) technology provides a base for inquiry and scientific discovery from a range of environmental issues with local, regional, and global scope. GPS and the New Geography is an introductory level course developed under a grant supported by the Charitable Leadership Foundation. Taking advantage of the proliferation of tools currently available for online learning management systems, we explore current trends in Web 2.0 applications to aggregate and leverage data to create a nontraditional, interactive learning environment. Using our best practices to promote on-line discussion and interaction, these tools help engage students and foster deep learning. During the 15-week term students learn through case studies, problem-based exercises, and the use of scientific data; thus, expanding their spatial literacy and gain experience using real spatial technology tools to enhance their understanding of real-world issues. In particular, we present how the use of Mapblogs an in-house developed blogging platform that uses GIS interplaying with GPS units, interactive data presentations, intuitive visual working environments, harnessing RSS feeds, and other nontraditional Web 2.0 technology has successfully promoted active learning in the virtual learning environment.

  14. Traditional Amerindian cultivators combine directional and ideotypic selection for sustainable management of cassava genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duputié, A; Massol, F; David, P; Haxaire, C; McKey, D

    2009-06-01

    Plant domestication provides striking examples of rapid evolution. Yet, it involves more complex processes than plain directional selection. Understanding the dynamics of diversity in traditional agroecosystems is both a fundamental goal in evolutionary biology and a practical goal in conservation. We studied how Amerindian cultivators maintain dynamically evolving gene pools in cassava. Farmers purposely maintain diversity in the form of phenotypically distinct, clonally propagated landraces. Landrace gene pools are continuously renewed by incorporating seedlings issued from spontaneous sexual reproduction. This poses two problems: agronomic quality may decrease because some seedlings are inbred, and landrace identity may be progressively lost through the incorporation of unrelated seedlings. Using a large microsatellite dataset, we show that farmers solve these problems by applying two kinds of selection: directional selection against inbred genotypes, and counter-selection of off-type phenotypes, which maintains high intra-landrace relatedness. Thus, cultural elements such as ideotypes (a representation of the ideal phenotype of a landrace) can shape genetic diversity.

  15. Business Process Management – A Traditional Approach Versus a Knowledge Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Paiano

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The enterprise management represents a heterogeneous aggregate of both resources and assets that need to be coordinated and orchestrated in order to reach the goals related to the business mission. Influences and forces that may influence this process, and also for that they should be considered, are not concentrated in the business environment, but they are related to the entireoperational context of a company. For this reason, business processes must be the most versatile and flexible with respect to the changes that occur within the whole operational context of a company.Considering the supportive role that information systems play in favour of Business Process Management - BPM, it is also essential to implement a constant, continuous and quick mechanism for the information system alignment with respect to the evolution followed by business processes.In particular, such mechanism must intervene on BPM systems in order to keep them aligned and compliant with respect to both the context changes and the regulations. In order to facilitate this alignment mechanism, companies are already referring to the support offered by specific solutions, such as knowledge bases. In this context, a possible solution might be the approach we propose, which is based on a specific framework called Process Management System. Our methodology implements a knowledge base support for business experts, which is not limited to the BPM operating phases, but includes also the engineering and prototyping activities of the corresponding information system. This paper aims to compare and evaluate a traditional BPM approach with respect to theapproach we propose. In effect, such analysis aims to emphasize the lack of traditional methodology especially with respect to the alignment between business processes and information systems, along with their compliance with context domain and regulations.

  16. Relaxed Observance of Traditional Marriage Rules Allows Social Connectivity without Loss of Genetic Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillot, Elsa G; Hazelton, Martin L; Karafet, Tatiana M; Lansing, J Stephen; Sudoyo, Herawati; Cox, Murray P

    2015-09-01

    Marriage rules, the community prescriptions that dictate who an individual can or cannot marry, are extremely diverse and universally present in traditional societies. A major focus of research in the early decades of modern anthropology, marriage rules impose social and economic forces that help structure societies and forge connections between them. However, in those early anthropological studies, the biological benefits or disadvantages of marriage rules could not be determined. We revisit this question by applying a novel simulation framework and genome-wide data to explore the effects of Asymmetric Prescriptive Alliance, an elaborate set of marriage rules that has been a focus of research for many anthropologists. Simulations show that strict adherence to these marriage rules reduces genetic diversity on the autosomes, X chromosome and mitochondrial DNA, but relaxed compliance produces genetic diversity similar to random mating. Genome-wide data from the Indonesian community of Rindi, one of the early study populations for Asymmetric Prescriptive Alliance, are more consistent with relaxed compliance than strict adherence. We therefore suggest that, in practice, marriage rules are treated with sufficient flexibility to allow social connectivity without significant degradation of biological diversity. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  17. Genetic divergence among accessions of melon from traditional agriculture of the Brazilian Northeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragão, F A S; Torres Filho, J; Nunes, G H S; Queiróz, M A; Bordallo, P N; Buso, G S C; Ferreira, M A; Costa, Z P; Bezerra Neto, F

    2013-12-06

    The genetic divergence of 38 melon accessions from traditional agriculture of the Brazilian Northeast and three commercial hybrids were evaluated using fruit descriptors and microsatellite markers. The melon germplasm belongs to the botanic varieties cantalupensis (19), momordica (7), conomon (4), and inodorus (3), and to eight genotypes that were identified only at the species level. The fruit descriptors evaluated were: number of fruits per plant (NPF), fruit mass (FM; kg), fruit longitudinal diameter (LD; cm), fruit transversal diameter (TD; cm), shape index based on the LD/TD ratio, flesh pulp thickness, cavity thickness (CT; cm), firmness fruit pulp (N), and soluble solids (SS; °Brix). The results showed high variability for all descriptors, especially for NPF, LD, and FM. The grouping analysis based on fruit descriptors produced eight groups without taxonomic criteria. The LD (22.52%), NPF (19.70%), CT (16.13%), and SS (9.57%) characteristics were the descriptors that contributed the most to genotype dissimilarity. The 17 simple sequence repeat polymorphic markers amplified 41 alleles with an average of 2.41 alleles and three genotypes per locus. Some markers presented a high frequency for the main allele. The genetic diversity ranged from 0.07 to 0.60, the observed heterozygosity had very low values, and the mean polymorphism information content was 0.32. Molecular genetic similarity analyses clustered the accessions in 13 groups, also not following taxonomic ranks. There was no association between morphoagronomic and molecular groupings. In conclusion, there was great variability among the accessions and among and within botanic groups.

  18. Parental Involvement in the Musical Education of Violin Students: Suzuki and "Traditional" Approaches Compared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugeja, Clare

    2009-01-01

    This article investigates parental involvement in the musical education of violin students and the changing role of the parents' across the learning process. Two contexts were compared, one emphasising the Suzuki methodology and the other a "traditional" approach. Students learning "traditionally" are typically taught note reading from the…

  19. COMPARISON OF THE TRADITIONAL STRENGTH OF MATERIALS APPROACH TO DESIGN WITH THE FRACTURE MECHANICS APPROACH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Z. Ceylan

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this activity is to show that the use of the traditional strength of materials approach to the drip shield and the waste package (WP) designs is bounding and appropriate when compared to the fracture mechanics approach. The scope of this activity is limited to determining the failure assessment diagrams for the two materials at issue: Ti-7 and Alloy 22. This calculation is intended for use in support of the license application design of the drip shield and the WP. This activity is associated with the drip shield and the WP designs. The activity evaluation for work package number P32 12234F2, included in ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Design Description for LA'' (Ref. 1, p. A-6), has determined that the development of this document is subject to ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' requirements. The control of the electronic management of data is accomplished in accordance with the methods specified in Reference 1, Section 10. AP-3.124, ''Design Calculations and Analysis'' (Ref. 2), is used to develop and document the calculation

  20. The Costs and Risks of Maturing Technologies, Traditionally vs. Evolutionary Approaches

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pennock, Michael J; Rouse, William B

    2008-01-01

    .... This results in more frequent, smaller increments of deployed capability. In theory, evolutionary acquisition could be more cost effective than traditional acquisition approaches because it avoids most of the risk inherent...

  1. Bobath and traditional approaches in post-stroke gait rehabilitation in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikołajewska Emilia

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Study aim: The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of a study of post-stroke gait reeducation using the Bobath neuro‑developmental treatment (NDT-Bobath method and the traditional approach.

  2. Bobath and traditional approaches in post-stroke gait rehabilitation in adults

    OpenAIRE

    Mikołajewska Emilia

    2017-01-01

    Study aim: The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of a study of post-stroke gait reeducation using the Bobath neuro‑developmental treatment (NDT-Bobath) method and the traditional approach.

  3. Simulation Approach for Timing Analysis of Genetic Logic Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baig, Hasan; Madsen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    in a manner similar to electronic logic circuits, but they are much more stochastic and hence much harder to characterize. In this article, we introduce an approach to analyze the threshold value and timing of genetic logic circuits. We show how this approach can be used to analyze the timing behavior...... of single and cascaded genetic logic circuits. We further analyze the timing sensitivity of circuits by varying the degradation rates and concentrations. Our approach can be used not only to characterize the timing behavior but also to analyze the timing constraints of cascaded genetic logic circuits...

  4. Mechanisms of Bunyavirus Virulence: A Genetic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    of canine parvovirus Type-2, feline panleukopenia virus and mink enteritis virus. Virology 129,401-414. Partner A., Webster, R. G., and Bean W. J...CM, and Webster RG. Procedures for the characterization of the genetic material of candidate vaccine strains. Develop Biol Standard 39:15-24, 1977

  5. A “genetics first” approach to selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    A different approach for using genomic information in genetic improvement is proposed. Past research in population genetics and animal breeding combined with information on sequence variants suggest the possibility that selection might be able to capture a portion of inbreeding and heterosis effect...

  6. Empirical valence bond models for reactive potential energy surfaces: a parallel multilevel genetic program approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellucci, Michael A; Coker, David F

    2011-07-28

    We describe a new method for constructing empirical valence bond potential energy surfaces using a parallel multilevel genetic program (PMLGP). Genetic programs can be used to perform an efficient search through function space and parameter space to find the best functions and sets of parameters that fit energies obtained by ab initio electronic structure calculations. Building on the traditional genetic program approach, the PMLGP utilizes a hierarchy of genetic programming on two different levels. The lower level genetic programs are used to optimize coevolving populations in parallel while the higher level genetic program (HLGP) is used to optimize the genetic operator probabilities of the lower level genetic programs. The HLGP allows the algorithm to dynamically learn the mutation or combination of mutations that most effectively increase the fitness of the populations, causing a significant increase in the algorithm's accuracy and efficiency. The algorithm's accuracy and efficiency is tested against a standard parallel genetic program with a variety of one-dimensional test cases. Subsequently, the PMLGP is utilized to obtain an accurate empirical valence bond model for proton transfer in 3-hydroxy-gamma-pyrone in gas phase and protic solvent. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  7. Traditional Knowledge and Access to Genetic Resources Critical Elements towards a National Policy and Legislation for Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Rojas

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Traditional knowledge, hereinafter TK, is a broad concept that is deeply rooted in the life of billions of people, especially within the indigenous communities that have developed it either in the North or in the South. TK has multiple manifestations in several fields, from medicinal uses of plants and herbs, to artistic creations. Bio-prospective activities during the 90 have brought the TK problematic to the international fora: the indigenous communities, South Governments, NGO’s and some other groups have complained against the everlasting misappropriation of TK. Since genetic resources are scarce in the North, TK has been reaching increasing value for transnational companies and Universities research groups who have turned their interest to it as a critical source of their R+D projects to advance their business and academic agendas. This work addresses the problematic of TK as well as the Access to Genetic Resources and the benefit Sharing derived from it (hereinafter ABS. It intends to contribute to clarify some still obscure issues for Chile and to show some valuable international experiences to advance in the process of drafting a national strategy, policy and legislation to regulate the issues surrounding TK and AGR. The work calls for a collaborative approach between the main stakeholders to better achieve huge humanity challenges as fighting hunger and catastrophic diseases. The first part addresses the main concerns about TK from an international legal perspective, explaining different views and issues, some of them quite controversial. The second part brings up an interesting new approach to align conflicting interest in the international world, the so-called public-private partnership. The third part is an attempt to provide guidance to decision makers in Chile and eventually some other developing countries on how to face such a process having in mind the fulfillment of the principles and objectives surrounding TK and ABS. The

  8. Engaging nurses in genetics: the strategic approach of the NHS National Genetics Education and Development Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Maggie; Tonkin, Emma; Burke, Sarah

    2008-04-01

    The UK government announced the establishment of an NHS National Genetics Education and Development Centre in its Genetics White Paper. The Centre aims to lead and coordinate developments to enhance genetics literacy of health professionals. The nursing program takes a strategic approach based on Ajzen's Theory of Planned Behavior, using the UK nursing genetics competences as the platform for development. The program team uses innovative approaches to raise awareness of the relevance of genetics, working collaboratively with policy stakeholders, as key agents of change in promoting competence. Providing practical help in preparing learning and teaching resources lends further encouragement. Evaluation of the program is dependent on gathering baseline data, and the program has been informed by an education needs analysis. The challenges faced are substantial and necessitate international collaboration where expertise and resources can be shared to produce a global system of influence to facilitate the engagement of non-genetic nurses.

  9. Genetic testing in congenital heart disease:A clinical approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marie A Chaix; Gregor Andelfinger; Paul Khairy

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease(CHD) is the most common type of birth defect. Traditionally, a polygenic model defined by the interaction of multiple genes and environmental factors was hypothesized to account for different forms of CHD. It is now understood that the contribution of genetics to CHD extends beyond a single unified paradigm. For example, monogenic models and chromosomal abnormalities have been associated with various syndromic and non-syndromic forms of CHD. In such instances, genetic investigation and testing may potentially play an important role in clinical care. A family tree with a detailed phenotypic description serves as the initial screening tool to identify potentially inherited defects and to guide further genetic investigation. The selection of a genetic test is contingent upon the particular diagnostic hypothesis generated by clinical examination. Genetic investigation in CHD may carry the potential to improve prognosis by yielding valuable information with regards to personalized medical care, confidence in the clinical diagnosis, and/or targeted patient followup. Moreover, genetic assessment may serve as a tool to predict recurrence risk, define the pattern of inheritance within a family, and evaluate the need for further family screening. In some circumstances, prenatal or preimplantation genetic screening could identify fetuses or embryos at high risk for CHD. Although genetics may appear to constitute a highly specialized sector of cardiology, basic knowledge regarding inheritance patterns, recurrence risks, and available screening and diagnostic tools, including their strengths and limitations, could assist the treating physician in providing sound counsel.

  10. Genetic testing in congenital heart disease: A clinical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaix, Marie A; Andelfinger, Gregor; Khairy, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common type of birth defect. Traditionally, a polygenic model defined by the interaction of multiple genes and environmental factors was hypothesized to account for different forms of CHD. It is now understood that the contribution of genetics to CHD extends beyond a single unified paradigm. For example, monogenic models and chromosomal abnormalities have been associated with various syndromic and non-syndromic forms of CHD. In such instances, genetic investigation and testing may potentially play an important role in clinical care. A family tree with a detailed phenotypic description serves as the initial screening tool to identify potentially inherited defects and to guide further genetic investigation. The selection of a genetic test is contingent upon the particular diagnostic hypothesis generated by clinical examination. Genetic investigation in CHD may carry the potential to improve prognosis by yielding valuable information with regards to personalized medical care, confidence in the clinical diagnosis, and/or targeted patient follow-up. Moreover, genetic assessment may serve as a tool to predict recurrence risk, define the pattern of inheritance within a family, and evaluate the need for further family screening. In some circumstances, prenatal or preimplantation genetic screening could identify fetuses or embryos at high risk for CHD. Although genetics may appear to constitute a highly specialized sector of cardiology, basic knowledge regarding inheritance patterns, recurrence risks, and available screening and diagnostic tools, including their strengths and limitations, could assist the treating physician in providing sound counsel. PMID:26981213

  11. Genetic & epigenetic approach to human obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Rajender Rao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is an important clinical and public health challenge, epitomized by excess adipose tissue accumulation resulting from an imbalance in energy intake and energy expenditure. It is a forerunner for a variety of other diseases such as type-2-diabetes (T2D, cardiovascular diseases, some types of cancer, stroke, hyperlipidaemia and can be fatal leading to premature death. Obesity is highly heritable and arises from the interplay of multiple genes and environmental factors. Recent advancements in Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have shown important steps towards identifying genetic risks and identification of genetic markers for lifestyle diseases, especially for a metabolic disorder like obesity. According to the 12 th u0 pdate of Human Obesity Gene Map there are 253 quantity trait loci (QTL for obesity related phenotypes from 61 genome wide scan studies. Contribution of genetic propensity of individual ethnic and racial variations in obesity is an active area of research. Further, understanding its complexity as to how these variations could influence ones susceptibility to become or remain obese will lead us to a greater understanding of how obesity occurs and hopefully, how to prevent and treat this condition. In this review, various strategies adapted for such an analysis based on the recent advances in genome wide and functional variations in human obesity are discussed.

  12. Practical Skills Training in Agricultural Education--A Comparison between Traditional and Blended Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deegan, Donna; Wims, Padraig; Pettit, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this article the use of blended learning multimedia materials as an education tool was compared with the traditional approach for skills training. Design/Methodology/Approach: This study was conducted in Ireland using a pre-test, post-test experimental design. All students were instructed on how to complete two skills using either a…

  13. Designing Genetics Instruction for a Socratic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idros, Sharifah Norhaidah Syed

    2004-01-01

    Science is at heart a rational activity. Reasoning, being an important component of critical thinking has been successfully taught using Socratic methods. As an approach, the instructor or designer of instruction models an inquiring and probing mind focusing on providing questions and not answers. The main aim has been to allow learners to…

  14. Cross-National Prevalence of Traditional Bullying, Traditional Victimization, Cyberbullying and Cyber-Victimization: Comparing Single-Item and Multiple-Item Approaches of Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagida, Takuya; Gradinger, Petra; Strohmeier, Dagmar; Solomontos-Kountouri, Olga; Trip, Simona; Bora, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Many large-scale cross-national studies rely on a single-item measurement when comparing prevalence rates of traditional bullying, traditional victimization, cyberbullying, and cyber-victimization between countries. However, the reliability and validity of single-item measurement approaches are highly problematic and might be biased. Data from…

  15. Review: domestic animal forensic genetics - biological evidence, genetic markers, analytical approaches and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanthaswamy, S

    2015-10-01

    This review highlights the importance of domestic animal genetic evidence sources, genetic testing, markers and analytical approaches as well as the challenges this field is facing in view of the de facto 'gold standard' human DNA identification. Because of the genetic similarity between humans and domestic animals, genetic analysis of domestic animal hair, saliva, urine, blood and other biological material has generated vital investigative leads that have been admitted into a variety of court proceedings, including criminal and civil litigation. Information on validated short tandem repeat, single nucleotide polymorphism and mitochondrial DNA markers and public access to genetic databases for forensic DNA analysis is becoming readily available. Although the fundamental aspects of animal forensic genetic testing may be reliable and acceptable, animal forensic testing still lacks the standardized testing protocols that human genetic profiling requires, probably because of the absence of monetary support from government agencies and the difficulty in promoting cooperation among competing laboratories. Moreover, there is a lack in consensus about how to best present the results and expert opinion to comply with court standards and bear judicial scrutiny. This has been the single most persistent challenge ever since the earliest use of domestic animal forensic genetic testing in a criminal case in the mid-1990s. Crime laboratory accreditation ensures that genetic test results have the courts' confidence. Because accreditation requires significant commitments of effort, time and resources, the vast majority of animal forensic genetic laboratories are not accredited nor are their analysts certified forensic examiners. The relevance of domestic animal forensic genetics in the criminal justice system is undeniable. However, further improvements are needed in a wide range of supporting resources, including standardized quality assurance and control protocols for sample

  16. A multiobjective approach to the genetic code adaptability problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Lariza Laura; de Oliveira, Paulo S L; Tinós, Renato

    2015-02-19

    The organization of the canonical code has intrigued researches since it was first described. If we consider all codes mapping the 64 codes into 20 amino acids and one stop codon, there are more than 1.51×10(84) possible genetic codes. The main question related to the organization of the genetic code is why exactly the canonical code was selected among this huge number of possible genetic codes. Many researchers argue that the organization of the canonical code is a product of natural selection and that the code's robustness against mutations would support this hypothesis. In order to investigate the natural selection hypothesis, some researches employ optimization algorithms to identify regions of the genetic code space where best codes, according to a given evaluation function, can be found (engineering approach). The optimization process uses only one objective to evaluate the codes, generally based on the robustness for an amino acid property. Only one objective is also employed in the statistical approach for the comparison of the canonical code with random codes. We propose a multiobjective approach where two or more objectives are considered simultaneously to evaluate the genetic codes. In order to test our hypothesis that the multiobjective approach is useful for the analysis of the genetic code adaptability, we implemented a multiobjective optimization algorithm where two objectives are simultaneously optimized. Using as objectives the robustness against mutation with the amino acids properties polar requirement (objective 1) and robustness with respect to hydropathy index or molecular volume (objective 2), we found solutions closer to the canonical genetic code in terms of robustness, when compared with the results using only one objective reported by other authors. Using more objectives, more optimal solutions are obtained and, as a consequence, more information can be used to investigate the adaptability of the genetic code. The multiobjective approach

  17. Traditional and Flipped Classroom Approaches Delivered by Two Different Teachers: The Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limniou, Maria; Schermbrucker, Ian; Lyons, Minna

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was for students to express their views on teaching approaches delivered by two teachers under the perspectives of Higher Order Thinking Skills (HOTS) development, their preferences on learning material and learning activities. First year psychology students followed both the traditional and a flipped classroom…

  18. Surgery-first orthognathic approach vs traditional orthognathic approach: Oral health-related quality of life assessed with 2 questionnaires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelo, Sandro; Gasparini, Giulio; Garagiola, Umberto; Cordaro, Massimo; Di Nardo, Francesco; Staderini, Edoardo; Patini, Romeo; de Angelis, Paolo; D'Amato, Giuseppe; Saponaro, Gianmarco; Moro, Alessandro

    2017-08-01

    The purposes of the study were to investigate and evaluate the differences detected by the patients between the traditional orthognathic approach and the surgery-first one in terms of level of satisfaction and quality of life. A total of 30 patients who underwent orthognathic surgery for correction of malocclusions were selected and included in this study. Fifteen patients were treated with the conventional orthognathic surgery approach, and 15 patients with the surgery-first approach. Variables were assessed through the Orthognathic Quality of Life Questionnaire and the Oral Health Impact Profile questionnaire and analyzed with 2-way repeated-measures analysis of variance. The results showed significant differences in terms of the Orthognathic Quality of Life Questionnaire (P surgery in the surgery-first group and an initial worsening during orthodontic treatment in the traditional approach group followed by postoperative improvement. This study showed that the worsening of the facial profile during the traditional orthognathic surgery approach decompensation phase has a negative impact on the perception of patients' quality of life. Surgeons should consider the possibility of a surgery-first approach to prevent this occurrence. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Target identification of natural and traditional medicines with quantitative chemical proteomics approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jigang; Gao, Liqian; Lee, Yew Mun; Kalesh, Karunakaran A; Ong, Yong Siang; Lim, Jaehong; Jee, Joo-Eun; Sun, Hongyan; Lee, Su Seong; Hua, Zi-Chun; Lin, Qingsong

    2016-06-01

    Natural and traditional medicines, being a great source of drugs and drug leads, have regained wide interests due to the limited success of high-throughput screening of compound libraries in the past few decades and the recent technology advancement. Many drugs/bioactive compounds exert their functions through interaction with their protein targets, with more and more drugs showing their ability to target multiple proteins, thus target identification has an important role in drug discovery and biomedical research fields. Identifying drug targets not only furthers the understanding of the mechanism of action (MOA) of a drug but also reveals its potential therapeutic applications and adverse side effects. Chemical proteomics makes use of affinity chromatography approaches coupled with mass spectrometry to systematically identify small molecule-protein interactions. Although traditional affinity-based chemical proteomics approaches have made great progress in the identification of cellular targets and elucidation of MOAs of many bioactive molecules, nonspecific binding remains a major issue which may reduce the accuracy of target identification and may hamper the drug development process. Recently, quantitative proteomics approaches, namely, metabolic labeling, chemical labeling, or label-free approaches, have been implemented in target identification to overcome such limitations. In this review, we will summarize and discuss the recent advances in the application of various quantitative chemical proteomics approaches for the identification of targets of natural and traditional medicines. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. A Hybrid Genetic Algorithm Approach for Optimal Power Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sydulu Maheswarapu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper puts forward a reformed hybrid genetic algorithm (GA based approach to the optimal power flow. In the approach followed here, continuous variables are designed using real-coded GA and discrete variables are processed as binary strings. The outcomes are compared with many other methods like simple genetic algorithm (GA, adaptive genetic algorithm (AGA, differential evolution (DE, particle swarm optimization (PSO and music based harmony search (MBHS on a IEEE30 bus test bed, with a total load of 283.4 MW. Its found that the proposed algorithm is found to offer lowest fuel cost. The proposed method is found to be computationally faster, robust, superior and promising form its convergence characteristics.

  1. Genetic Approaches to Appearance and Ancestry : Improving Forensic DNA Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C. Chaitanya (Lakshmi)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractTraditionally, routine forensic casework is based on comparative grounds. DNA profiles obtained from crime-scenes are compared with those of potential suspects or DNA profiles deposited in forensic DNA databases. The principal limitation of such comparative approach is that trace

  2. Understanding the Science-Learning Environment: A Genetically Sensitive Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haworth, Claire M. A.; Davis, Oliver S. P.; Hanscombe, Ken B.; Kovas, Yulia; Dale, Philip S.; Plomin, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that environmental influences on school science performance increase in importance from primary to secondary school. Here we assess for the first time the relationship between the science-learning environment and science performance using a genetically sensitive approach to investigate the aetiology of this link. 3000…

  3. Blended Design Approach of Long Span Structure and Malay Traditional Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundari, Titin

    2017-12-01

    The growing population in the world is so fast, which is followed by the increasing need of some new and large activities. Architects face the problem on how to facilitate buildings with various activities such as for large meeting, conference, indoors gymnasium and sports, and many others. The long span structure of building is one of the solutions to solve that problem. Generally, large buildings which implemented this structure will look as a technological, modern and futuristic ones or even neo futuristic performance. But on the other hand, many people still want to enjoy the specific and unique senses of local traditional architecture. So is the Malay people who want an easy pleasant large facilities which can be fulfilled by implementing modern long span building structure technology. In the same time, their unique sense of Malay traditional architecture can still be maintained. To overcome this double problems of design, it needs a blended design approach of long span structure and Malay Traditional Architecture.

  4. The population genetics of cultivation: domestication of a traditional Chinese medicine, Scrophularia ningpoensis Hemsl. (Scrophulariaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Domestic cultivation of medicinal plants is an important strategy for protecting these species from over harvesting. Some species of medicinal plants have been brought into cultivation for more than hundreds years. Concerns about severe loss of genetic diversity and sustainable cultivation can potentially limit future use of these valuable plants. Genetic studies with comprehensive sampling of multiple medicinal species by molecular markers will allow for assessment and management of these species. Here we examine the population genetic consequences of cultivation and domestication in Scrophularia ningpoensis Hemsl. We used chloroplast DNA and genomic AFLP markers to clarify not only the effects of domestication on genetic diversity, but also determine the geographic origins of cultivars and their genetic divergence from native populations. These results will allow both better management of cultivated populations, but also provide insights for crop improvement. RESULTS: Twenty-one cpDNA haplotypes of S. ningpoensis were identified. Wild populations contain all haplotypes, whereas only three haplotypes were found in cultivated populations with wild populations having twice the haplotype diversity of cultivated populations. Genetic differentiation between cultivated populations and wild populations was significant. Genomic AFLP markers revealed similar genetic diversity patterns. Furthermore, Structure analysis grouped all wild populations into two gene pools; two of which shared the same gene pool with cultivated S. ningpoensis. The result of Neighbor-Joining analysis was consistent with the structure analysis. In principal coordinate analysis, three cultivated populations from Zhejiang Province grouped together and were separated from other cultivated populations. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that cultivated S. ningpoensis has experienced dramatic loss of genetic diversity under anthropogenic influence. We postulate that strong

  5. The population genetics of cultivation: domestication of a traditional Chinese medicine, Scrophularia ningpoensis Hemsl. (Scrophulariaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuan; Li, Pan; Wang, Rui-Hong; Schaal, Barbara A; Fu, Cheng-Xin

    2014-01-01

    Domestic cultivation of medicinal plants is an important strategy for protecting these species from over harvesting. Some species of medicinal plants have been brought into cultivation for more than hundreds years. Concerns about severe loss of genetic diversity and sustainable cultivation can potentially limit future use of these valuable plants. Genetic studies with comprehensive sampling of multiple medicinal species by molecular markers will allow for assessment and management of these species. Here we examine the population genetic consequences of cultivation and domestication in Scrophularia ningpoensis Hemsl. We used chloroplast DNA and genomic AFLP markers to clarify not only the effects of domestication on genetic diversity, but also determine the geographic origins of cultivars and their genetic divergence from native populations. These results will allow both better management of cultivated populations, but also provide insights for crop improvement. Twenty-one cpDNA haplotypes of S. ningpoensis were identified. Wild populations contain all haplotypes, whereas only three haplotypes were found in cultivated populations with wild populations having twice the haplotype diversity of cultivated populations. Genetic differentiation between cultivated populations and wild populations was significant. Genomic AFLP markers revealed similar genetic diversity patterns. Furthermore, Structure analysis grouped all wild populations into two gene pools; two of which shared the same gene pool with cultivated S. ningpoensis. The result of Neighbor-Joining analysis was consistent with the structure analysis. In principal coordinate analysis, three cultivated populations from Zhejiang Province grouped together and were separated from other cultivated populations. These results suggest that cultivated S. ningpoensis has experienced dramatic loss of genetic diversity under anthropogenic influence. We postulate that strong artificial selection for medicinal quality has

  6. An imaging genetics approach to understanding social influence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily eFalk

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Normative social influences shape nearly every aspect of our lives, yet the biological processes mediating the impact of these social influences on behavior remain incompletely understood. In this Hypothesis, we outline a theoretical framework and an integrative research approach to the study of social influences on the brain and genetic moderators of such effects. First, we review neuroimaging evidence linking social influence and conformity to the brain’s reward system. We next review neuroimaging evidence linking social punishment (exclusion to brain systems involved in the experience of pain, as well as evidence linking exclusion to conformity. We suggest that genetic variants that increase sensitivity to social cues may predispose individuals to be more sensitive to either social rewards or punishments (or potentially both, which in turn increases conformity and susceptibility to normative social influences more broadly. To this end, we review evidence for genetic moderators of neurochemical responses in the brain, and suggest ways in which genes and pharmacology may modulate sensitivity to social influences. We conclude by proposing an integrative imaging genetics approach to the study of brain mediators and genetic modulators of a variety of social influences on human attitudes, beliefs, and actions.

  7. An imaging genetics approach to understanding social influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Emily B; Way, Baldwin M; Jasinska, Agnes J

    2012-01-01

    Normative social influences shape nearly every aspect of our lives, yet the biological processes mediating the impact of these social influences on behavior remain incompletely understood. In this Hypothesis, we outline a theoretical framework and an integrative research approach to the study of social influences on the brain and genetic moderators of such effects. First, we review neuroimaging evidence linking social influence and conformity to the brain's reward system. We next review neuroimaging evidence linking social punishment (exclusion) to brain systems involved in the experience of pain, as well as evidence linking exclusion to conformity. We suggest that genetic variants that increase sensitivity to social cues may predispose individuals to be more sensitive to either social rewards or punishments (or potentially both), which in turn increases conformity and susceptibility to normative social influences more broadly. To this end, we review evidence for genetic moderators of neurochemical responses in the brain, and suggest ways in which genes and pharmacology may modulate sensitivity to social influences. We conclude by proposing an integrative imaging genetics approach to the study of brain mediators and genetic modulators of a variety of social influences on human attitudes, beliefs, and actions.

  8. Intellectual property rights, benefit-sharing and development of "improved traditional medicines": A new approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willcox, Merlin; Diallo, Drissa; Sanogo, Rokia; Giani, Sergio; Graz, Bertrand; Falquet, Jacques; Bodeker, Gerard

    2015-12-24

    Protection of intellectual property rights and benefit-sharing are key issues for all ethnopharmacological research. The International Society of Ethnobiology has produced helpful guidelines on access and benefit-sharing which are widely viewed as a "gold standard" but the question remains how best to apply these guidelines in practice. Difficult questions include ownership of traditional knowledge, making appropriate agreements, and how appropriately to share benefits. We present the case study of the development of an "improved traditional medicine" for malaria in Mali and we report how benefit-sharing was applied in this case. The knowledge about the selected plant came independently from several families and traditional healers. The IPR approach was to recognise that this traditional knowledge belongs to the people of Mali and was used for their benefit in developing a new "improved traditional medicine" (ITM). The traditional healer whose method of preparation was used, and who collaborated in clinical trials, did not request any financial reward but asked for the ITM to be named after him. The most sustainable benefit for the community was sharing the results of which preparation of which medicinal plant seemed to be the most effective for treating malaria. Attempts at providing a health centre and training a health worker for the village did not prove to be sustainable. Respect for intellectual property rights and benefit-sharing are possible even in a context where the knowledge is not owned by a clearly identified person or group of people. The most sustainable benefits are intangible rather than material: namely recognition, improved knowledge about which traditional treatment is the best and how to prepare and take it. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. WONOEP appraisal: new genetic approaches to study epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossignol, Elsa; Kobow, Katja; Simonato, Michele; Loeb, Jeffrey A.; Grisar, Thierry; Gilby, Krista L.; Vinet, Jonathan; Kadam, Shilpa D.; Becker, Albert J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective New genetic investigation techniques, including next-generation sequencing, epigenetic profiling, cell lineage mapping, targeted genetic manipulation of specific neuronal cell types, stem cell reprogramming and optogenetic manipulations within epileptic networks are progressively unravelling the mysteries of epileptogenesis and ictogenesis. These techniques have opened new avenues to discover the molecular basis of epileptogenesis and to study the physiological impacts of mutations in epilepsy-associated genes on a multilayer level, from cells to circuits. Methods This manuscript reviews recently published applications of these new genetic technologies in the study of epilepsy, as well as work presented by the authors at the genetic session of the XII Workshop on the Neurobiology of Epilepsy in Quebec, Canada. Results Next-generation sequencing is providing investigators with an unbiased means to assess the molecular causes of sporadic forms of epilepsy and have revealed the complexity and genetic heterogeneity of sporadic epilepsy disorders. To assess the functional impact of mutations in these newly identified genes on specific neuronal cell-types during brain development, new modeling strategies in animals, including conditional genetics in mice and in utero knockdown approaches, are enabling functional validation with exquisite cell-type and temporal specificity. In addition, optogenetics, using cell-type specific Cre recombinase driver lines, is enabling investigators to dissect networks involved in epilepsy. Genetically-encoded cell-type labeling is also providing new means to assess the role of the non-neuronal components of epileptic networks such as glial cells. Furthermore, beyond its role in revealing coding variants involved in epileptogenesis, next-generation sequencing can be used to assess the epigenetic modifications that lead to sustained network hyperexcitability in epilepsy, including methylation changes in gene promoters and non

  10. Spatial genetic structuring of baobab (Adansonia digitata, Malvaceae) in the traditional agroforestry systems of West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyndt, Tina; Assogbadjo, Achille E; Hardy, Olivier J; Glele Kakaï, Romain; Sinsin, Brice; Van Damme, Patrick; Gheysen, Godelieve

    2009-05-01

    This study evaluates the spatial genetic structure of baobab (Adansonia digitata) populations from West African agroforestry systems at different geographical scales using AFLP fingerprints. Eleven populations from four countries (Benin, Ghana, Burkina Faso, and Senegal) had comparable levels of genetic diversity, although the two populations in the extreme west (Senegal) had less diversity. Pairwise F(ST) ranged from 0.02 to 0.28 and increased with geographic distance, even at a regional scale. Gene pools detected by Bayesian clustering seem to be a byproduct of the isolation-by-distance pattern rather than representing actual discrete entities. The organization of genetic diversity appears to result essentially from spatially restricted gene flow, with some influences of human seed exchange. Despite the potential for relatively long-distance pollen and seed dispersal by bats within populations, statistically significant spatial genetic structuring within populations (SGS) was detected and gave a mean indirect estimate of neighborhood size of ca. 45. This study demonstrated that relatively high levels of genetic structuring are present in baobab at both large and within-population level, which was unexpected in regard to its dispersal by bats and the influence of human exchange of seeds. Implications of these results for the conservation of baobab populations are discussed.

  11. A genetic ensemble approach for gene-gene interaction identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Joshua WK

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has now become clear that gene-gene interactions and gene-environment interactions are ubiquitous and fundamental mechanisms for the development of complex diseases. Though a considerable effort has been put into developing statistical models and algorithmic strategies for identifying such interactions, the accurate identification of those genetic interactions has been proven to be very challenging. Methods In this paper, we propose a new approach for identifying such gene-gene and gene-environment interactions underlying complex diseases. This is a hybrid algorithm and it combines genetic algorithm (GA and an ensemble of classifiers (called genetic ensemble. Using this approach, the original problem of SNP interaction identification is converted into a data mining problem of combinatorial feature selection. By collecting various single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP subsets as well as environmental factors generated in multiple GA runs, patterns of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions can be extracted using a simple combinatorial ranking method. Also considered in this study is the idea of combining identification results obtained from multiple algorithms. A novel formula based on pairwise double fault is designed to quantify the degree of complementarity. Conclusions Our simulation study demonstrates that the proposed genetic ensemble algorithm has comparable identification power to Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (MDR and is slightly better than Polymorphism Interaction Analysis (PIA, which are the two most popular methods for gene-gene interaction identification. More importantly, the identification results generated by using our genetic ensemble algorithm are highly complementary to those obtained by PIA and MDR. Experimental results from our simulation studies and real world data application also confirm the effectiveness of the proposed genetic ensemble algorithm, as well as the potential benefits of

  12. Reverse Genetics Approaches for the Development of Influenza Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogales, Aitor; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses cause annual seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics of human respiratory disease. Influenza virus infections represent a serious public health and economic problem, which are most effectively prevented through vaccination. However, influenza viruses undergo continual antigenic variation, which requires either the annual reformulation of seasonal influenza vaccines or the rapid generation of vaccines against potential pandemic virus strains. The segmented nature of influenza virus allows for the reassortment between two or more viruses within a co-infected cell, and this characteristic has also been harnessed in the laboratory to generate reassortant viruses for their use as either inactivated or live-attenuated influenza vaccines. With the implementation of plasmid-based reverse genetics techniques, it is now possible to engineer recombinant influenza viruses entirely from full-length complementary DNA copies of the viral genome by transfection of susceptible cells. These reverse genetics systems have provided investigators with novel and powerful approaches to answer important questions about the biology of influenza viruses, including the function of viral proteins, their interaction with cellular host factors and the mechanisms of influenza virus transmission and pathogenesis. In addition, reverse genetics techniques have allowed the generation of recombinant influenza viruses, providing a powerful technology to develop both inactivated and live-attenuated influenza vaccines. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of state-of-the-art, plasmid-based, influenza reverse genetics approaches and their implementation to provide rapid, convenient, safe and more effective influenza inactivated or live-attenuated vaccines. PMID:28025504

  13. Applications of a formal approach to decipher discrete genetic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corblin, Fabien; Fanchon, Eric; Trilling, Laurent

    2010-07-20

    A growing demand for tools to assist the building and analysis of biological networks exists in systems biology. We argue that the use of a formal approach is relevant and applicable to address questions raised by biologists about such networks. The behaviour of these systems being complex, it is essential to exploit efficiently every bit of experimental information. In our approach, both the evolution rules and the partial knowledge about the structure and the behaviour of the network are formalized using a common constraint-based language. In this article our formal and declarative approach is applied to three biological applications. The software environment that we developed allows to specifically address each application through a new class of biologically relevant queries. We show that we can describe easily and in a formal manner the partial knowledge about a genetic network. Moreover we show that this environment, based on a constraint algorithmic approach, offers a wide variety of functionalities, going beyond simple simulations, such as proof of consistency, model revision, prediction of properties, search for minimal models relatively to specified criteria. The formal approach proposed here deeply changes the way to proceed in the exploration of genetic and biochemical networks, first by avoiding the usual trial-and-error procedure, and second by placing the emphasis on sets of solutions, rather than a single solution arbitrarily chosen among many others. Last, the constraint approach promotes an integration of model and experimental data in a single framework.

  14. Genetic approaches refine ex situ lowland tapir (Tapirus terrestris) conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves da Silva, Anders; Lalonde, Danielle R; Quse, Viviana; Shoemaker, Alan; Russello, Michael A

    2010-01-01

    Ex situ conservation management remains an important tool in the face of continued habitat loss and global environmental change. Here, we use microsatellite marker variation to evaluate conventional assumptions of pedigree-based ex situ population management and directly inform a captive lowland tapir breeding program within a range country. We found relatively high levels of genetic variation (N(total) = 41; mean H(E) = 0.67 across 10 variable loci) and little evidence for relatedness among founder individuals (N(founders) = 10; mean relatedness = -0.05). Seven of 29 putative parent-offspring relationships were excluded by parentage analysis based on allele sharing, and we identified 2 individuals of high genetic value to the population (mk Traditional assumptions of founders being unrelated and individuals of unknown origin being highly related led to overestimates of mean kinship and inbreeding, and underestimates of gene diversity, when compared with values found when genetic markers were used to inform kinship. We discuss our results within the context of recent studies that have assessed the utility of neutral molecular markers for ex situ conservation.

  15. Multiobjective genetic algorithm approaches to project scheduling under risk

    OpenAIRE

    Kılıç, Murat; Kilic, Murat

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis, project scheduling under risk is chosen as the topic of research. Project scheduling under risk is defined as a biobjective decision problem and is formulated as a 0-1 integer mathematical programming model. In this biobjective formulation, one of the objectives is taken as the expected makespan minimization and the other is taken as the expected cost minimization. As the solution approach to this biobjective formulation genetic algorithm (GA) is chosen. After carefully invest...

  16. An imaging genetics approach to understanding social influence

    OpenAIRE

    Emily eFalk; Emily eFalk; Baldwin eWay; Agnes eJasinska

    2012-01-01

    Normative social influences shape nearly every aspect of our lives, yet the biological processes mediating the impact of these social influences on behavior remain incompletely understood. In this Hypothesis, we outline a theoretical framework and an integrative research approach to the study of social influences on the brain and genetic moderators of such effects. First, we review neuroimaging evidence linking social influence and conformity to the brain’s reward system. We next review neur...

  17. An imaging genetics approach to understanding social influence

    OpenAIRE

    Falk, Emily B.; Way, Baldwin M.; Jasinska, Agnes J.

    2012-01-01

    Normative social influences shape nearly every aspect of our lives, yet the biological processes mediating the impact of these social influences on behavior remain incompletely understood. In this Hypothesis, we outline a theoretical framework and an integrative research approach to the study of social influences on the brain and genetic moderators of such effects. First, we review neuroimaging evidence linking social influence and conformity to the brain's reward system. We next review neuro...

  18. A Comparison of Student Academic Performance with Traditional, Online, and Flipped Instructional Approaches in a C# Programming Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Jason H.; Sharp, Laurie A.

    2017-01-01

    Aim/Purpose: Compared student academic performance on specific course requirements in a C# programming course across three instructional approaches: traditional, online, and flipped. Background: Addressed the following research question--When compared to the online and traditional instructional approaches, does the flipped instructional approach…

  19. State Traditions and Language Regimes: A Historical Institutionalism Approach to Language Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonntag Selma K.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is an elaboration of a theoretical framework we developed in the introductory chapter of our co-edited volume, State Traditions and Language Regimes (McGill-Queen’s University Press, 2015. Using a historical institutionalism approach derived from political science, we argue that language policies need to be understood in terms of their historical and institutional context. The concept of ‘state tradition’ focuses our attention on the relative autonomy of the state in terms of its normative and institutional traditions that lead to particular path dependencies of language policy choices, subject to change at critical junctures. ‘Language regime’ is the conceptual link between state traditions and language policy choices: it allows us to analytically conceptualize how and why these choices are made and how and why they change. We suggest that our framework offers a more robust analysis of language politics than other approaches found in sociolinguistics and normative theory. It also challenges political science to become more engaged with scholarly debate on language policy and linguistic diversity.

  20. COMPARATIVE STUDY BETWEEN TRADITIONAL AND ENTERPRISE RISK MANAGEMENT -A THEORETICAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cican Simona-Iulia

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The complexity, volatility and unpredictability of the current economic environment are a daily reminder that organizations face many risks. The traditional approach, according to which risk is a necessary evil which must be removed, is no longer sufficient and that is why companies nowadays are forced to spend significant resources to manage risks. Risk transparency is what one looks for; therefore, identification and management of risks within an organization become increasingly necessary for success and longevity. Risk approach has a major role in a company’s ability to avoid, reduce and turn risks into opportunities. Enterprise risk management is a new concept that revolutionizes the traditional approach and summarizes risk management in an integrated, comprehensive and strategic system. Studies use several synonyms for enterprise risk management such as integrated risk management, holistic risk management, global risk management and strategic risk management. Enterprise risk management implements at the end of the last century a new way to deal with risks: the holistic approach. This risks approach – i.e. interaction of several types of risks which become increasingly threatening and varied and may cause more damage than individual risk – brings forward the need of risk management and raises issues at the highest level of company management. For a proper view on company risks, each individual risk and the possibility of risk interaction must be understood. This is essential to establish a risk classification according to their impact on the company. Traditional approach on risk management, as a management function, is limited to only threats and losses, so relatively few organizations see risks as potential earning-generated opportunities. However, risk management process is not radically changed. Enterprise risk management is an improved version of the traditional risk management, created by expanding its scope. The new risk

  1. Molecular genetics and livestock selection. Approaches, opportunities and risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    Following domestication, livestock were selected both naturally through adaptation to their environments and by man so that they would fulfil a particular use. As selection methods have become more sophisticated, rapid progress has been made in improving those traits that are easily measured. However, selection has also resulted in decreased diversity. In some cases, improved breeds have replaced local breeds, risking the loss of important survival traits. The advent of molecular genetics provides the opportunity to identify the genes that control particular traits by a gene mapping approach. However, as with selection, the early mapping studies focused on traits that are easy to measure. Where molecular genetics can play a valuable role in livestock production is by providing the means to select effectively for traits that are difficult to measure. Identifying the genes underpinning particular traits requires a population in which these traits are segregating. Fortunately, several experimental populations have been created that have allowed a wide range of traits to be studied. Gene mapping work in these populations has shown that the role of particular genes in controlling variation in a given trait can depend on the genetic background. A second finding is that the most favourable alleles for a trait may in fact. be present in animals that perform poorly for the trait. In the long term, knowledge of -the genes controlling particular traits, and the way they interact with the genetic background, will allow introgression between breeds and the assembly of genotypes that are best suited to particular environments, producing animals with the desired characteristics. If used wisely, this approach will maintain genetic diversity while improving performance over a wide range of desired traits. (author)

  2. Prospecting for bioactive constituents from traditional medicinal plants through ethnobotanical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Ronghui; Wang, Yuehu; Long, Bo; Kennelly, Edward; Wu, Shibiao; Liu, Bo; Li, Ping; Long, Chunlin

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacologically active constituents from traditional medicinal plants have received great attention as sources of novel agents, pharmaceutical intermediates, and chemical entities for synthetic or semisynthetic drugs due to their potent pharmacological activities, low toxicity, and economic viability. Numerous components have been isolated from traditional medicinal plants, including alkaloids, flavonoids, and terpenoids, and clinical and experimental studies suggested that these components have useful pharmacological properties such as antiinfectious, antioxidative, and antiinflammatory effects. In this review, modern ethnobotanical approaches to explore folk medicinal plants as candidates for drug discovery with the greatest possibility of success are discussed. Determining the bioactive mechanisms and tracing structure-activity relationships will promote the discovery of new drugs and pharmacological agents.

  3. Comparative Analysis of Automatic Exudate Detection between Machine Learning and Traditional Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopharak, Akara; Uyyanonvara, Bunyarit; Barman, Sarah; Williamson, Thomas

    To prevent blindness from diabetic retinopathy, periodic screening and early diagnosis are neccessary. Due to lack of expert ophthalmologists in rural area, automated early exudate (one of visible sign of diabetic retinopathy) detection could help to reduce the number of blindness in diabetic patients. Traditional automatic exudate detection methods are based on specific parameter configuration, while the machine learning approaches which seems more flexible may be computationally high cost. A comparative analysis of traditional and machine learning of exudates detection, namely, mathematical morphology, fuzzy c-means clustering, naive Bayesian classifier, Support Vector Machine and Nearest Neighbor classifier are presented. Detected exudates are validated with expert ophthalmologists' hand-drawn ground-truths. The sensitivity, specificity, precision, accuracy and time complexity of each method are also compared.

  4. Rationale for an integrated approach to genetic epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laberge, Claude M; Knoppers, Bartha Maria

    1992-10-01

    Genetic knowledge is now in the public domain and its interpretation by the media and the citizens brings the issues into the public forum of discussion for the necessary ethical, legal and socio-cultural evaluation of its application. Science is being perceived by some as dangerous and as requiring international regulation. Others feel that genetic knowledge will be the breakthrough that will permit medical progress and individual autonomy with regards to personal health and lifestyle choices. The mapping of the human genome has already yielded valuable information on an increasing number of diseases and their variants. Prevailing popular and journalistic archetypes ("imaginaires") used in the media are perceived by the producers as slowing down the possible application of genetic knowledge. The answers to these dilemmas are not readily apparent nor are they prescribed by classical philosophy of medicine. Since genetic knowledge eventually resides with the individual who carries the genes of disease and/or susceptibility, a logical approach to integration of this knowledge at a societal level would seem to reside with individual education and decision-making. The politics of the ensuing social debate could transform the current social contract since an individual's interests need to be balanced against those of his or her immediate family in the sharing of information. The ethical foundations of such a contract requires the genetic education of "Everyone" as a matter of urgent priority. Genetic education should not serve ideological power struggles between the medical establishment and the ethical-legal alliance. Instead, it should ensure the transfer of knowledge to physicians, to patients, to users, to planners, to social science and humanities researchers and to politicians, so that they may make "informed" and free decisions....

  5. Mouse genetic approaches applied to the normal tissue radiation response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haston, Christina K.

    2012-01-01

    The varying responses of inbred mouse models to radiation exposure present a unique opportunity to dissect the genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and tissue injury. Such studies are complementary to human association studies as they permit both the analysis of clinical features of disease, and of specific variants associated with its presentation, in a controlled environment. Herein I review how animal models are studied to identify specific genetic variants influencing predisposition to radiation-induced traits. Among these radiation-induced responses are documented strain differences in repair of DNA damage and in extent of tissue injury (in the lung, skin, and intestine) which form the base for genetic investigations. For example, radiation-induced DNA damage is consistently greater in tissues from BALB/cJ mice, than the levels in C57BL/6J mice, suggesting there may be an inherent DNA damage level per strain. Regarding tissue injury, strain specific inflammatory and fibrotic phenotypes have been documented for principally, C57BL/6 C3H and A/J mice but a correlation among responses such that knowledge of the radiation injury in one tissue informs of the response in another is not evident. Strategies to identify genetic differences contributing to a trait based on inbred strain differences, which include linkage analysis and the evaluation of recombinant congenic (RC) strains, are presented, with a focus on the lung response to irradiation which is the only radiation-induced tissue injury mapped to date. Such approaches are needed to reveal genetic differences in susceptibility to radiation injury, and also to provide a context for the effects of specific genetic variation uncovered in anticipated clinical association studies. In summary, mouse models can be studied to uncover heritable variation predisposing to specific radiation responses, and such variations may point to pathways of importance to phenotype development in the clinic.

  6. DNA enrichment approaches to identify unauthorized genetically modified organisms (GMOs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arulandhu, Alfred J; van Dijk, Jeroen P; Dobnik, David; Holst-Jensen, Arne; Shi, Jianxin; Zel, Jana; Kok, Esther J

    2016-07-01

    With the increased global production of different genetically modified (GM) plant varieties, chances increase that unauthorized GM organisms (UGMOs) may enter the food chain. At the same time, the detection of UGMOs is a challenging task because of the limited sequence information that will generally be available. PCR-based methods are available to detect and quantify known UGMOs in specific cases. If this approach is not feasible, DNA enrichment of the unknown adjacent sequences of known GMO elements is one way to detect the presence of UGMOs in a food or feed product. These enrichment approaches are also known as chromosome walking or gene walking (GW). In recent years, enrichment approaches have been coupled with next generation sequencing (NGS) analysis and implemented in, amongst others, the medical and microbiological fields. The present review will provide an overview of these approaches and an evaluation of their applicability in the identification of UGMOs in complex food or feed samples.

  7. Comparison of a Traditional Probabilistic Risk Assessment Approach with Advanced Safety Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Curtis L; Mandelli, Diego; Zhegang Ma

    2014-11-01

    As part of the Light Water Sustainability Program (LWRS) [1], the purpose of the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) [2] Pathway research and development (R&D) is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margin management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. In this paper, we describe the RISMC analysis process illustrating how mechanistic and probabilistic approaches are combined in order to estimate a safety margin. We use the scenario of a “station blackout” (SBO) wherein offsite power and onsite power is lost, thereby causing a challenge to plant safety systems. We describe the RISMC approach, illustrate the station blackout modeling, and contrast this with traditional risk analysis modeling for this type of accident scenario. We also describe our approach we are using to represent advanced flooding analysis.

  8. Causation of nervous system tumors in children: insights from traditional and genetically engineered animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, Jerry M.

    2004-01-01

    Pediatric neurogenic tumors include primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs), especially medulloblastoma; ependymomas and choroid plexus papillomas; astrocytomas; retinoblastoma; and sympathetic neuroblastoma. Meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors, although uncommon in childhood, are also significant because they can result from exposures of children to ionizing radiation. Specific chromosomal loci and specific genes are related to each of these tumor types. Virtually all these genes appear to act as tumor suppressor genes, which are inactivated in tumor cells by mutations or by chromosomal loss. In genetically engineered mice, some genes that are clearly associated with specific human tumors (e.g., RB1 in retinoblastoma and NF2 in meningiomas and schwannomas) have no such effect. Other genetic constructs in mice involving the genes p53, ptc1, and Nf1 have produced tumors remarkably similar to some of the human pediatric neoplasms. Some of these tumors become clinically apparent after only a few weeks, while the mice are still juveniles, especially when two or more tumor suppressor genes are inactivated in the same genetic construct. Conversely, at least one genetic pathway in rodents involving point mutation in the coding region of a transforming gene (neu in malignant schwannomas) does not appear to operate in any human tumors. The nervous system is markedly susceptible to experimental carcinogenesis during early life in rodents, dogs, primates, and other nonhuman species, and there is no obvious reason why this generalization should not also apply to humans. However, except for therapeutic ionizing radiation, no physical, chemical, or biological cause of human pediatric nervous system tumors is known. The failure of experimental transplacental carcinogenesis to mirror human pediatric experience more closely may reflect the need for multiple mutational events in target cells, and for experimental carcinogens that are capable of causing the full spectrum of

  9. GABAA receptor binding molecules from traditional Chinese Medicine: An in silico approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Lv

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The advents of how anesthesia works have helped in the discovery of anesthetic target protein. One such target protein named ϒ-aminobutyric acid (GABAA, which is the chief inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. Asparagine at 289 position of GABAA protein within TM2 is important for its anesthetic function. This study explores Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM against ASN 289 of GABAA for novel anesthetic compounds. The in silico approach showed gastrodin out of all compounds to be the best compound to start further analysis. It is a potential anesthetic compound suitable for the development of new drug.

  10. [Traditional and modern approaches to culture of preimplantation mammalian embryos in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusentsev, E Iu; Igonina, T N; Amstislavskiĭ, S Ia

    2014-01-01

    This review covers the basic principles and methods of in vitro culture of preimplantation mammalian embryos. The features of in vitro development of embryos of various species of animals with allowance for the composition of nutrient media are described, with special attention paid to those species that have traditionally been consideredas laboratory (i.e., mice, rats, and hamsters). The effects of suboptimal culturing conditions of preimplantation embryos on the formation of the phenotype of individuals developed from these embryos are discussed. New approaches to optimize the conditions of the development of preimplantation mammalian embryos in vitro are analyzed.

  11. Managing and monitoring tuberculosis using web-based tools in combination with traditional approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Ann Ln; Darton, Thomas C; Foster, Rachel A

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health emergency. Ongoing challenges include the coordination of national and international control programs, high levels of drug resistance in many parts of the world, and availability of accurate and rapid diagnostic tests. The increasing availability and reliability of Internet access throughout both affluent and resource-limited countries brings new opportunities to improve TB management and control through the integration of web-based technologies with traditional approaches. In this review, we explore current and potential future use of web-based tools in the areas of TB diagnosis, treatment, epidemiology, service monitoring, and teaching and training.

  12. An Airborne Conflict Resolution Approach Using a Genetic Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondoloni, Stephane; Conway, Sheila

    2001-01-01

    An airborne conflict resolution approach is presented that is capable of providing flight plans forecast to be conflict-free with both area and traffic hazards. This approach is capable of meeting constraints on the flight plan such as required times of arrival (RTA) at a fix. The conflict resolution algorithm is based upon a genetic algorithm, and can thus seek conflict-free flight plans meeting broader flight planning objectives such as minimum time, fuel or total cost. The method has been applied to conflicts occurring 6 to 25 minutes in the future in climb, cruise and descent phases of flight. The conflict resolution approach separates the detection, trajectory generation and flight rules function from the resolution algorithm. The method is capable of supporting pilot-constructed resolutions, cooperative and non-cooperative maneuvers, and also providing conflict resolution on trajectories forecast by an onboard FMC.

  13. The holist tradition in twentieth century genetics. Wilhelm Johannsen's genotype concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll-Hansen, Nils

    2014-06-01

    The terms 'genotype', 'phenotype' and 'gene' originally had a different meaning from that in the Modern Synthesis. These terms were coined in the first decade of the twentieth century by the Danish plant physiologist Wilhelm Johannsen. His bean selection experiment and his theoretical analysis of the difference between genotype and phenotype were important inputs to the formation of genetics as a well-defined special discipline. This paper shows how Johannsen's holistic genotype theory provided a platform for criticism of narrowly genocentric versions of the chromosome theory of heredity that came to dominate genetics in the middle decades of the twentieth century. Johannsen came to recognize the epoch-making importance of the work done by the Drosophila group, but he continued to insist on the incompleteness of the chromosome theory. Genes of the kind that they mapped on the chromosomes could only give a partial explanation of biological heredity and evolution. © 2014 The Author. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  14. Landscape genetic approaches to guide native plant restoration in the Mojave Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shryock, Daniel F.; Havrilla, Caroline A.; DeFalco, Lesley; Esque, Todd C.; Custer, Nathan; Wood, Troy E.

    2016-01-01

    Restoring dryland ecosystems is a global challenge due to synergistic drivers of disturbance coupled with unpredictable environmental conditions. Dryland plant species have evolved complex life-history strategies to cope with fluctuating resources and climatic extremes. Although rarely quantified, local adaptation is likely widespread among these species and potentially influences restoration outcomes. The common practice of reintroducing propagules to restore dryland ecosystems, often across large spatial scales, compels evaluation of adaptive divergence within these species. Such evaluations are critical to understanding the consequences of large-scale manipulation of gene flow and to predicting success of restoration efforts. However, genetic information for species of interest can be difficult and expensive to obtain through traditional common garden experiments. Recent advances in landscape genetics offer marker-based approaches for identifying environmental drivers of adaptive genetic variability in non-model species, but tools are still needed to link these approaches with practical aspects of ecological restoration. Here, we combine spatially-explicit landscape genetics models with flexible visualization tools to demonstrate how cost-effective evaluations of adaptive genetic divergence can facilitate implementation of different seed sourcing strategies in ecological restoration. We apply these methods to Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) markers genotyped in two Mojave Desert shrub species of high restoration importance: the long-lived, wind-pollinated gymnosperm Ephedra nevadensis, and the short-lived, insect-pollinated angiosperm Sphaeralcea ambigua. Mean annual temperature was identified as an important driver of adaptive genetic divergence for both species. Ephedra showed stronger adaptive divergence with respect to precipitation variability, while temperature variability and precipitation averages explained a larger fraction of adaptive

  15. Ultrasonography-guided peripheral intravenous access versus traditional approaches in patients with difficult intravenous access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantino, Thomas G; Parikh, Aman K; Satz, Wayne A; Fojtik, John P

    2005-11-01

    We assess the success rate of emergency physicians in placing peripheral intravenous catheters in difficult-access patients who were unsuccessfully cannulated by emergency nurses. A technique using real-time ultrasonographic guidance by 2 physicians was compared with traditional approaches using palpation and landmark guidance. This was a prospective, systematically allocated study of all patients requiring intravenous access who presented to 2 university hospitals between October 2003 and March 2004. Inclusion criterion was the inability of any available nurse to obtain intravenous access after at least 3 attempts on a subgroup of patients who had a history of difficult intravenous access because of obesity, history of intravenous drug abuse, or chronic medical problems. Exclusion criterion was the need for central venous access. Patients presenting on odd days were allocated to the ultrasonographic-guided group, and those presenting on even days were allocated to the traditional-approach group. Endpoints were successful cannulation, number of sticks, time, and patient satisfaction. Sixty patients were enrolled, 39 on odd days and 21 on even days. Success rate was greater for the ultrasonographic group (97%) versus control (33%), difference in proportions of 64% (95% confidence interval [CI] 39% to 71%). The ultrasonographic group required less overall time (13 minutes versus 30 minutes, for a difference of 17 [95% CI 0.8 to 25.6]), less time to successful cannulation from first percutaneous puncture (4 minutes versus 15 minutes, for a difference of 11 [95% CI 8.2 to 19.4]), and fewer percutaneous punctures (1.7 versus 3.7, for a difference of 2.0 [95% CI 1.27 to 2.82]) and had greater patient satisfaction (8.7 versus 5.7, for a difference of 3.0 [95% CI 1.82 to 4.29]) than the traditional landmark approach. Ultrasonographic-guided peripheral intravenous access is more successful than traditional "blind" techniques, requires less time, decreases the number of

  16. Modeling AEC—New Approaches to Study Rare Genetic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Peter J.; Dinella, Jason; Fete, Mary; Siegfried, Elaine C.; Koster, Maranke I.

    2015-01-01

    Ankyloblepharon-ectodermal defects-cleft lip/palate (AEC) syndrome is a rare monogenetic disorder that is characterized by severe abnormalities in ectoderm-derived tissues, such as skin and its appendages. A major cause of morbidity among affected infants is severe and chronic skin erosions. Currently, supportive care is the only available treatment option for AEC patients. Mutations in TP63, a gene that encodes key regulators of epidermal development, are the genetic cause of AEC. However, it is currently not clear how mutations in TP63 lead to the various defects seen in the patients’ skin. In this review, we will discuss current knowledge of the AEC disease mechanism obtained by studying patient tissue and genetically engineered mouse models designed to mimic aspects of the disorder. We will then focus on new approaches to model AEC, including the use of patient cells and stem cell technology to replicate the disease in a human tissue culture model. The latter approach will advance our understanding of the disease and will allow for the development of new in vitro systems to identify drugs for the treatment of skin erosions in AEC patients. Further, the use of stem cell technology, in particular induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC), will enable researchers to develop new therapeutic approaches to treat the disease using the patient’s own cells (autologous keratinocyte transplantation) after correction of the disease-causing mutations. PMID:24665072

  17. Arylamine N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2 genetic diversity and traditional subsistence: a worldwide population survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrey Sabbagh

    Full Text Available Arylamine N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2 is involved in human physiological responses to a variety of xenobiotic compounds, including common therapeutic drugs and exogenous chemicals present in the diet and the environment. Many questions remain about the evolutionary mechanisms that have led to the high prevalence of slow acetylators in the human species. Evidence from recent surveys of NAT2 gene variation suggests that NAT2 slow-causing variants might have become targets of positive selection as a consequence of the shift in modes of subsistence and lifestyle in human populations in the last 10,000 years. We aimed to test more extensively the hypothesis that slow acetylation prevalence in humans is related to the subsistence strategy adopted by the past populations. To this end, published frequency data on the most relevant genetic variants of NAT2 were collected from 128 population samples (14,679 individuals representing different subsistence modes and dietary habits, allowing a thorough analysis at both a worldwide and continent scale. A significantly higher prevalence of the slow acetylation phenotype was observed in populations practicing farming (45.4% and herding (48.2% as compared to populations mostly relying on hunting and gathering (22.4% (P = 0.0007. This was closely mirrored by the frequency of the slow 590A variant that was found to occur at a three-fold higher frequency in food producers (25% as compared to hunter-gatherers (8%. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the Neolithic transition to subsistence economies based on agricultural and pastoral resources modified the selective regime affecting the NAT2 acetylation pathway. Furthermore, the vast amount of data collected enabled us to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date description of NAT2 worldwide genetic diversity, thus building up a useful resource of frequency data for further studies interested in epidemiological or anthropological research

  18. Maximizing lifetime of wireless sensor networks using genetic approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagh, Sanjeev; Prasad, Ramjee

    2014-01-01

    The wireless sensor networks are designed to install the smart network applications or network for emergency solutions, where human interaction is not possible. The nodes in wireless sensor networks have to self organize as per the users requirements through monitoring environments. As the sensor......-objective parameters are considered to solve the problem using genetic algorithm of evolutionary approach.......The wireless sensor networks are designed to install the smart network applications or network for emergency solutions, where human interaction is not possible. The nodes in wireless sensor networks have to self organize as per the users requirements through monitoring environments. As the sensor...

  19. A reverse genetics approach to study feline infectious peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekes, Gergely; Spies, Danica; Bank-Wolf, Barbara; Thiel, Volker; Thiel, Heinz-Jürgen

    2012-06-01

    Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a lethal immunopathological disease caused by feline coronaviruses (FCoVs). Here, we describe a reverse genetics approach to study FIP by assessing the pathogenicity of recombinant type I and type II and chimeric type I/type II FCoVs. All recombinant FCoVs established productive infection in cats, and recombinant type II FCoV (strain 79-1146) induced FIP. Virus sequence analyses from FIP-diseased cats revealed that the 3c gene stop codon of strain 79-1146 has changed to restore a full-length open reading frame (ORF).

  20. Dating Antarctic ice sheet collapse: Proposing a molecular genetic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugnell, Jan M.; Pedro, Joel B.; Wilson, Nerida G.

    2018-01-01

    Sea levels at the end of this century are projected to be 0.26-0.98 m higher than today. The upper end of this range, and even higher estimates, cannot be ruled out because of major uncertainties in the dynamic response of polar ice sheets to a warming climate. Here, we propose an ecological genetics approach that can provide insight into the past stability and configuration of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS). We propose independent testing of the hypothesis that a trans-Antarctic seaway occurred at the last interglacial. Examination of the genomic signatures of bottom-dwelling marine species using the latest methods can provide an independent window into the integrity of the WAIS more than 100,000 years ago. Periods of connectivity facilitated by trans-Antarctic seaways could be revealed by dating coalescent events recorded in DNA. These methods allow alternative scenarios to be tested against a fit to genomic data. Ideal candidate taxa for this work would need to possess a circumpolar distribution, a benthic habitat, and some level of genetic structure indicated by phylogeographical investigation. The purpose of this perspective piece is to set out an ecological genetics method to help resolve when the West Antarctic Ice Shelf last collapsed.

  1. The effect of three different educational approaches on children's drawing ability: Steiner, Montessori and traditional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, M V; Rowlands, A

    2000-12-01

    Although there is a national curriculum for art education in the UK there are also alternative approaches in the private sector. This paper addresses the issue of the effect of these approaches on children's drawing ability. To compare the drawing ability in three drawing tasks of children in Steiner, Montessori and traditional schools. The participants were 60 school children between the ages of 5;11 and 7;2. Twenty children were tested in each type of school. Each child completed three drawings: a free drawing, a scene and an observational drawing. As predicted, the free and scene drawings of children in the Steiner school were rated more highly than those of children in Montessori and traditional schools. Steiner children's use of colour was also rated more highly, although they did not use more colours than the other children. Steiner children used significantly more fantasy topics in their free drawings. Further observation indicated that the Steiner children were better at using the whole page and organising their drawings into a scene; their drawings were also more detailed. Contrary to previous research Montessori children did not draw more inanimate objects and geometrical shapes or fewer people than other children. Also, contrary to the prediction, Steiner children were significantly better rather than worse than other children at observational drawing. The results suggest that the approach to art education in Steiner schools is conducive not only to more highly rated imaginative drawings in terms of general drawing ability and use of colour but also to more accurate and detailed observational drawings.

  2. Nuclear power plant maintenance scheduling dilemma: a genetic algorithm approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahdavi, M.H.; Modarres, M.

    2004-01-01

    There are huge numbers of components scheduled for maintenance when a nuclear power plant is shut down. Among these components, a number of them are safety related which their operability as well as reliability when plant becomes up is main concerns. Not performing proper maintenance on this class of components/system would impose substantial risk on operating the NPP. In this paper a new approach based on genetic algorithms is presented to optimize the NPP maintenance schedule during shutdown. following this approach the cost incurred by maintenance activities for each schedule is balanced with the risk imposed by the maintenance scheduling plan to the plant operation status when it is up. The risk model implemented in the GA scheduler as its evaluation function is developed on the basis of the probabilistic risk assessment methodology. the Ga optimizers itself is shown to be superior compared to other optimization methods such as the monte carlo technique

  3. A Heuristics Approach for Classroom Scheduling Using Genetic Algorithm Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Izah R.; Sufahani, Suliadi; Ali, Maselan; Razali, Siti N. A. M.

    2018-04-01

    Reshuffling and arranging classroom based on the capacity of the audience, complete facilities, lecturing time and many more may lead to a complexity of classroom scheduling. While trying to enhance the productivity in classroom planning, this paper proposes a heuristic approach for timetabling optimization. A new algorithm was produced to take care of the timetabling problem in a university. The proposed of heuristics approach will prompt a superior utilization of the accessible classroom space for a given time table of courses at the university. Genetic Algorithm through Java programming languages were used in this study and aims at reducing the conflicts and optimizes the fitness. The algorithm considered the quantity of students in each class, class time, class size, time accessibility in each class and lecturer who in charge of the classes.

  4. Production of amino acids - Genetic and metabolic engineering approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin-Ho; Wendisch, Volker F

    2017-12-01

    The biotechnological production of amino acids occurs at the million-ton scale and annually about 6milliontons of l-glutamate and l-lysine are produced by Escherichia coli and Corynebacterium glutamicum strains. l-glutamate and l-lysine production from starch hydrolysates and molasses is very efficient and access to alternative carbon sources and new products has been enabled by metabolic engineering. This review focusses on genetic and metabolic engineering of amino acid producing strains. In particular, rational approaches involving modulation of transcriptional regulators, regulons, and attenuators will be discussed. To address current limitations of metabolic engineering, this article gives insights on recent systems metabolic engineering approaches based on functional tools and method such as genome reduction, amino acid sensors based on transcriptional regulators and riboswitches, CRISPR interference, small regulatory RNAs, DNA scaffolding, and optogenetic control, and discusses future prospects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A genetic algorithm approach to recognition and data mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punch, W.F.; Goodman, E.D.; Min, Pei [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    We review here our use of genetic algorithm (GA) and genetic programming (GP) techniques to perform {open_quotes}data mining,{close_quotes} the discovery of particular/important data within large datasets, by finding optimal data classifications using known examples. Our first experiments concentrated on the use of a K-nearest neighbor algorithm in combination with a GA. The GA selected weights for each feature so as to optimize knn classification based on a linear combination of features. This combined GA-knn approach was successfully applied to both generated and real-world data. We later extended this work by substituting a GP for the GA. The GP-knn could not only optimize data classification via linear combinations of features but also determine functional relationships among the features. This allowed for improved performance and new information on important relationships among features. We review the effectiveness of the overall approach on examples from biology and compare the effectiveness of the GA and GP.

  6. Identification of Potential Biomarkers from Aconitum carmichaelii, a Traditional Chinese Medicine, Using a Metabolomic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dake; Shi, Yana; Zhu, Xinyan; Liu, Li; Ji, Pengzhang; Long, Chunlin; Shen, Yong; Kennelly, Edward J

    2018-04-01

    Despite their well-known toxicity, Aconitum species are important traditional medicines worldwide. Aconitum carmichaelii , known in Chinese as (fuzi), is an officially recognized traditional Chinese medicine with characteristic analgesic and anti-inflammatory activities, whose principal pharmacological ingredients are considered as aconitine-type diterpene alkaloids. Notwithstanding the long-recorded use of A. carmichaelii in traditional Chinese medicine, no single-entity aconitum alkaloid drug has been developed for clinical use. UPLC-Q-TOF-MS was used to investigate the marker compounds that can be used to differentiate A. carmichaelii from seven other Aconitum species collected in Yunnan Province. Nontargeted principle component analysis scores plots found that all the tested Aconitum species clustered into three distinct groups, and A. carmichaelii was significantly different chemically than the other seven species. Furthermore, the primary and lateral roots of A. carmichaelii also showed significant differences. Using orthogonal partial least squares discriminate analysis analysis, eight marker compounds were identified, including 14-acetylkarakoline, aconitine, carmichaeline, fuziline, hypaconitine, mesaconitine, neoline, and talatisamine. Four of these aconitum alkaloids, fuziline, hypaconitine, mesaconitine, and neoline, showed significant analgesic activity in a dose-dependent manner compared to the negative and positive controls. However, hypaconitine, mesaconitine, and neoline exhibited significant acute toxicity activity, while fuziline showed no acute toxicity in mice, suggesting the relative safety of this alkaloid. This study provides a good example of how to differentiate an authentic medicinal plant from common adulterants using a metabolomics approach, and to identify compounds that may be developed into new drugs. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Comparison of traditional and recent approaches in the promotion of balance and strength in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granacher, Urs; Muehlbauer, Thomas; Zahner, Lukas; Gollhofer, Albert; Kressig, Reto W

    2011-05-01

    Demographic change in industrialized countries produced an increase in the proportion of elderly people in our society, resulting in specific healthcare challenges. One such challenge is how to effectively deal with the increased risk of sustaining a fall and fall-related injuries in old age. Deficits in postural control and muscle strength represent important intrinsic fall risk factors. Thus, adequate training regimens need to be designed and applied that have the potential to reduce the rate of falling in older adults by countering these factors. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to compare traditional and recent approaches in the promotion of balance and strength in older adults. Traditionally, balance and resistance training programmes proved to be effective in improving balance and strength, and in reducing the number of falls. Yet, it was argued that these training protocols are not specific enough to induce adaptations in neuromuscular capacities that are specifically needed in actual balance-threatening situations (e.g. abilities to recover balance and to produce force explosively). Recent studies indicated that perturbation-based or multitask balance training and power/high-velocity resistance training have the potential to improve these specific capacities because they comply with the principle of training specificity. In fact, there is evidence that these specifically tailored training programmes are more effective in improving balance recovery mechanisms and muscle power than traditional training protocols. A few pilot studies have even shown that these recently designed training protocols have an impact on the reduction of fall incidence rate in older adults. Further research is needed to confirm these results and to elucidate the underlying mechanisms responsible for the adaptive processes.

  8. A Quantitative Proteomics Approach to Clinical Research with Non-Traditional Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rígel Licier

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The proper handling of samples to be analyzed by mass spectrometry (MS can guarantee excellent results and a greater depth of analysis when working in quantitative proteomics. This is critical when trying to assess non-traditional sources such as ear wax, saliva, vitreous humor, aqueous humor, tears, nipple aspirate fluid, breast milk/colostrum, cervical-vaginal fluid, nasal secretions, bronco-alveolar lavage fluid, and stools. We intend to provide the investigator with relevant aspects of quantitative proteomics and to recognize the most recent clinical research work conducted with atypical samples and analyzed by quantitative proteomics. Having as reference the most recent and different approaches used with non-traditional sources allows us to compare new strategies in the development of novel experimental models. On the other hand, these references help us to contribute significantly to the understanding of the proportions of proteins in different proteomes of clinical interest and may lead to potential advances in the emerging field of precision medicine.

  9. A Quantitative Proteomics Approach to Clinical Research with Non-Traditional Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licier, Rígel; Miranda, Eric; Serrano, Horacio

    2016-10-17

    The proper handling of samples to be analyzed by mass spectrometry (MS) can guarantee excellent results and a greater depth of analysis when working in quantitative proteomics. This is critical when trying to assess non-traditional sources such as ear wax, saliva, vitreous humor, aqueous humor, tears, nipple aspirate fluid, breast milk/colostrum, cervical-vaginal fluid, nasal secretions, bronco-alveolar lavage fluid, and stools. We intend to provide the investigator with relevant aspects of quantitative proteomics and to recognize the most recent clinical research work conducted with atypical samples and analyzed by quantitative proteomics. Having as reference the most recent and different approaches used with non-traditional sources allows us to compare new strategies in the development of novel experimental models. On the other hand, these references help us to contribute significantly to the understanding of the proportions of proteins in different proteomes of clinical interest and may lead to potential advances in the emerging field of precision medicine.

  10. Managing and monitoring tuberculosis using web-based tools in combination with traditional approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chapman AL

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ann LN Chapman,1 Thomas C Darton,2 Rachel A Foster11Department of Infection and Tropical Medicine, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield, 2Oxford Vaccine Group, Centre for Clinical Vaccinology and Tropical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UKAbstract: Tuberculosis (TB remains a global health emergency. Ongoing challenges include the coordination of national and international control programs, high levels of drug resistance in many parts of the world, and availability of accurate and rapid diagnostic tests. The increasing availability and reliability of Internet access throughout both affluent and resource-limited countries brings new opportunities to improve TB management and control through the integration of web-based technologies with traditional approaches. In this review, we explore current and potential future use of web-based tools in the areas of TB diagnosis, treatment, epidemiology, service monitoring, and teaching and training.Keywords: tuberculosis, information communication technology, Internet

  11. Functional vs. Traditional Analysis in Biomechanical Gait Data: An Alternative Statistical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jihong; Seeley, Matthew K; Francom, Devin; Reese, C Shane; Hopkins, J Ty

    2017-12-01

    In human motion studies, discrete points such as peak or average kinematic values are commonly selected to test hypotheses. The purpose of this study was to describe a functional data analysis and describe the advantages of using functional data analyses when compared with a traditional analysis of variance (ANOVA) approach. Nineteen healthy participants (age: 22 ± 2 yrs, body height: 1.7 ± 0.1 m, body mass: 73 ± 16 kg) walked under two different conditions: control and pain+effusion. Pain+effusion was induced by injection of sterile saline into the joint capsule and hypertonic saline into the infrapatellar fat pad. Sagittal-plane ankle, knee, and hip joint kinematics were recorded and compared following injections using 2×2 mixed model ANOVAs and FANOVAs. The results of ANOVAs detected a condition × time interaction for the peak ankle (F1,18 = 8.56, p = 0.01) and hip joint angle (F1,18 = 5.77, p = 0.03), but did not for the knee joint angle (F1,18 = 0.36, p = 0.56). The functional data analysis, however, found several differences at initial contact (ankle and knee joint), in the mid-stance (each joint) and at toe off (ankle). Although a traditional ANOVA is often appropriate for discrete or summary data, in biomechanical applications, the functional data analysis could be a beneficial alternative. When using the functional data analysis approach, a researcher can (1) evaluate the entire data as a function, and (2) detect the location and magnitude of differences within the evaluated function.

  12. Functional vs. Traditional Analysis in Biomechanical Gait Data: An Alternative Statistical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Jihong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In human motion studies, discrete points such as peak or average kinematic values are commonly selected to test hypotheses. The purpose of this study was to describe a functional data analysis and describe the advantages of using functional data analyses when compared with a traditional analysis of variance (ANOVA approach. Nineteen healthy participants (age: 22 ± 2 yrs, body height: 1.7 ± 0.1 m, body mass: 73 ± 16 kg walked under two different conditions: control and pain+effusion. Pain+effusion was induced by injection of sterile saline into the joint capsule and hypertonic saline into the infrapatellar fat pad. Sagittal-plane ankle, knee, and hip joint kinematics were recorded and compared following injections using 2×2 mixed model ANOVAs and FANOVAs. The results of ANOVAs detected a condition × time interaction for the peak ankle (F1,18 = 8.56, p = 0.01 and hip joint angle (F1,18 = 5.77, p = 0.03, but did not for the knee joint angle (F1,18 = 0.36, p = 0.56. The functional data analysis, however, found several differences at initial contact (ankle and knee joint, in the mid-stance (each joint and at toe off (ankle. Although a traditional ANOVA is often appropriate for discrete or summary data, in biomechanical applications, the functional data analysis could be a beneficial alternative. When using the functional data analysis approach, a researcher can (1 evaluate the entire data as a function, and (2 detect the location and magnitude of differences within the evaluated function.

  13. Genetic and neural approaches to nuclear transient identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Jose Carlos Soares de; Mol, Antonio Carlos de Abreu; Pereira, Claudio Marcio Nascimento Abreu; Lapa, Celso Marcelo Franklin

    2005-01-01

    This work presents two approaches for pattern recognition to the same set of reactor signals. The first one describes a possibilistic approach optimized by genetic algorithm. The use of a possibilistic classification provides a natural and consistent classification rules, leading naturally to a good heuristic to handle the 'don't know' response, in case of unrecognized transient, which is fairly desirable in transient classification systems where safety is critical, since wrong or not reliable classifications can be catastrophic. Application of the proposed approach to a nuclear transient identification problem reveals good capability of the genetic algorithm in learning optimized possibilistic classification rules for efficient diagnosis including 'don't know' response. The second one uses two multilayer neural networks (NN). The first NN is responsible for the dynamic identification. This NN uses, as input, a short set (in a moving time window) of recent measurements of each variable avoiding the necessity of using starting events. The second NN is used to validate the instantaneous identification (from the first net) through the validation of each variable. This net is responsible for allowing the system to provide a 'don't know' response. In order to validate both methods, a Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) transient identification problem comprising postulated accidents, simulated for a pressurized water reactor, was proposed in the validation process it has been considered noisy data in order to evaluate the method robustness. Obtained results reveal the ability of the methods in dealing with both dynamic identification of transients and correct 'don't know' response. (author)

  14. Review of traditional and non-traditional medicinal genetic resources in the USDA, ARS, PGRCU collection evaluated for flavonoid concentrations and anthocyanin indexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Non-traditional medicinal species include velvetleaf (Abutilon theophrasti Medik.), Desmodium species, Termanus labialis (L.f.) Spreng. and the traditional species consists of roselle (Hibiscus sabdariffa L.). There is a need to identify plant sources of flavonoids and anthocyanins since they have s...

  15. A genetic approach to shape reconstruction in limited data tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turcanu, C.; Craciunescu, T.

    2001-01-01

    The paper proposes a new method for shape reconstruction in computerized tomography. Unlike nuclear medicine applications, in physical science problems we are often confronted with limited data sets: constraints in the number of projections or limited view angles . The problem of image reconstruction from projection may be considered as a problem of finding an image (solution) having projections that match the experimental ones. In our approach, we choose a statistical correlation coefficient to evaluate the fitness of any potential solution. The optimization process is carried out by a genetic algorithm. The algorithm has some features common to all genetic algorithms but also some problem-oriented characteristics. One of them is that a chromosome, representing a potential solution, is not linear but coded as a matrix of pixels corresponding to a two-dimensional image. This kind of internal representation reflects the genuine manifestation and slight differences between two points situated in the original problem space give rise to similar differences once they become coded. Another particular feature is a newly built crossover operator: the grid-based crossover, suitable for high dimension two-dimensional chromosomes. Except for the population size and the dimension of the cutting grid for the grid-based crossover, all the other parameters of the algorithm are independent of the geometry of the tomographic reconstruction. The performances of the method are evaluated on a phantom typical for an application with limited data sets: the determination of the neutron energy spectra with time resolution in case of short-pulsed neutron emission. A genetic reconstruction is presented. The qualitative judgement and also the quantitative one, based on some figures of merit, point out that the proposed method ensures an improved reconstruction of shapes, sizes and resolution in the image, even in the presence of noise. (authors)

  16. The challenges and promises of genetic approaches for ballast water management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Anaïs; Basurko, Oihane C.; Rodríguez-Ezpeleta, Naiara

    2018-03-01

    Ballast water is a main vector of introduction of Harmful Aquatic Organisms and Pathogens, which includes Non-Indigenous Species. Numerous and diversified organisms are transferred daily from a donor to a recipient port. Developed to prevent these introduction events, the International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships' Ballast Water and Sediments will enter into force in 2017. This international convention is asking for the monitoring of Harmful Aquatic Organisms and Pathogens. In this review, we highlight the urgent need to develop cost-effective methods to: (1) perform the biological analyses required by the convention; and (2) assess the effectiveness of two main ballast water management strategies, i.e. the ballast water exchange and the use of ballast water treatment systems. We have compiled the biological analyses required by the convention, and performed a comprehensive evaluation of the potential and challenges of the use of genetic tools in this context. Following an overview of the studies applying genetic tools to ballast water related research, we present metabarcoding as a relevant approach for early detection of Harmful Aquatic Organisms and Pathogens in general and for ballast water monitoring and port risk assessment in particular. Nonetheless, before implementation of genetic tools in the context of the ballast water management convention, benchmarked tests against traditional methods should be performed, and standard, reproducible and easy to apply protocols should be developed.

  17. New approach of a traditional analysis for predicting near-exit jet liquid instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Guillermo; Collicott, Steven

    2015-11-01

    Traditional linear instability theory for round liquid jets requires an exit-plane velocity profile be assumed so as to derive the characteristic growth rates and wavelengths of instabilities. This requires solving an eigenvalue problem for the Rayleigh Equation. In this new approach, a hyperbolic tangent velocity profile is assumed at the exit-plane of a round jet and a comparison is made with a hyperbolic secant profile. Temporal and Spatial Stability Analysis (TSA and SSA respectively) are the employed analytical tools to compare results of predicted most-unstable wavelengths from the given analytical velocity profiles and from previous experimental work. The local relevance of the velocity profile in the near-exit region of a liquid jet and the validity of an inviscid formulation through the Rayleigh equation are discussed as well. A comparison of numerical accuracy is made between two different mathematical approaches for the hyperbolic tangent profile with and without the Ricatti transformation. Reynolds number based on the momentum thickness of the boundary layer at the exit plane non-dimensionalizes the problem and, the Re range, based on measurements by Portillo in 2011, is 185 to 600. Wavelength measurements are taken from Portillo's experiment. School of Mechanical Engineering at Universidad del Valle, supported by a grant from Fulbright and Colciencias. Ph.D. student at the School of Aeronautics and Astronautics Purdue University.

  18. Risk assessment of nanomaterials and nanoproducts – adaptation of traditional approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahnel, J; Fleischer, T; Seitz, S B

    2013-01-01

    Different approaches have been adopted for assessing the potential risks of conventional chemicals and products for human health. In general, the traditional paradigm is a toxicological-driven chemical-by-chemical approach, focusing on single toxic endpoints. Scope and responsibilities for the development and implementation of a risk assessment concept vary across sectors and areas and depends on the specific regulatory environment and the specific protection goals. Thus, risk assessment implication is a complex task based not only on science based knowledge but also on the regulatory context involving different parties and stakeholders. Questions have been raised whether standard paradigms for conventional chemicals would be applicable and adequate for new materials, products and applications of nanotechnology. Most scientists and stakeholders assume that current standard methods are in principle applicable to nanomaterials, but specific aspects require further development. The paper presents additional technical improvements like the complementary use of the life cycle methodology and the support of risk-based classification systems. But also aspects improving the utility of risk assessment with regard to societal impacts on risk governance are discussed.

  19. A weed-crop complex in sorghum: The dynamics of genetic diversity in a traditional farming system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnaud, Adeline; Deu, Monique; Garine, Eric; Chantereau, Jacques; Bolteu, Justin; Koïda, Esaei Ouin; McKey, Doyle; Joly, Hélène I

    2009-10-01

    Despite the major ecological and economic impacts of gene flow between domesticated plants and their wild relatives, many aspects of the process, particularly the relative roles of natural and human selection in facilitating or constraining gene flow, are still poorly understood. We developed a multidisciplinary approach, involving both biologists and social scientists, to investigate the dynamics of genetic diversity of a sorghum weed-crop complex in a village of Duupa farmers in northern Cameroon. Farmers distinguish a gradient from weedy morphotypes (naa baa see, haariya, and genkiya) to domesticated morphotypes; haariya and genkiya have intermediate morphological traits. We investigated the pattern of diversity in this complex using both morphological and genetic data. Our biological results are interpreted in the light of data on farmers' taxonomy and practices such as spatial pattern of planting and plant selection. Both morphological and genetic data are congruent with farmers' taxonomy and confirm the introgressed status of intermediate weedy morphotypes. Farmers actively select against weedy morphotypes, but several practices unconsciously favor gene flow. Furthermore, haariya and genkiya may facilitate introgression between naa baa see and domesticated morphotypes by virtue of their intermediate flowering period and their mode of management by farmers.

  20. Human Metabolic Enzymes Deficiency: A Genetic Mutation Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Chaturvedi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the extreme challenges in biology is to ameliorate the understanding of the mechanisms which emphasize metabolic enzyme deficiency (MED and how these pretend to have influence on human health. However, it has been manifested that MED could be either inherited as inborn error of metabolism (IEM or acquired, which carries a high risk of interrupted biochemical reactions. Enzyme deficiency results in accumulation of toxic compounds that may disrupt normal organ functions and cause failure in producing crucial biological compounds and other intermediates. The MED related disorders cover widespread clinical presentations and can involve almost any organ system. To sum up the causal factors of almost all the MED-associated disorders, we decided to embark on a less traveled but nonetheless relevant direction, by focusing our attention on associated gene family products, regulation of their expression, genetic mutation, and mutation types. In addition, the review also outlines the clinical presentations as well as diagnostic and therapeutic approaches.

  1. A genetic epidemiology approach to cyber-security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Santiago; Kott, Alexander; Barabási, Albert-László

    2014-07-16

    While much attention has been paid to the vulnerability of computer networks to node and link failure, there is limited systematic understanding of the factors that determine the likelihood that a node (computer) is compromised. We therefore collect threat log data in a university network to study the patterns of threat activity for individual hosts. We relate this information to the properties of each host as observed through network-wide scans, establishing associations between the network services a host is running and the kinds of threats to which it is susceptible. We propose a methodology to associate services to threats inspired by the tools used in genetics to identify statistical associations between mutations and diseases. The proposed approach allows us to determine probabilities of infection directly from observation, offering an automated high-throughput strategy to develop comprehensive metrics for cyber-security.

  2. Analyzing Constructions of Polytheistic and Monotheistic Religious Traditions: A Critical Multicultural Approach to Textbooks in Quebec

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdou, Ehaab D.; Chan, W. Y. Alice

    2017-01-01

    How are religious traditions and exchanges between them constructed in textbooks used in Quebec? Through a critical discourse analysis of History and Citizenship Education, and Ethics and Religious Culture textbooks, we find that the Abrahamic monotheistic tradition is valorized, while non-Abrahamic monotheistic traditions and polytheism are…

  3. Traditional Agroforestry Systems and Food Supply under the Food Sovereignty Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Yazzur Hernández

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Intensive production systems have damaged many natural ecosystems and have altered their capacity to provide ecosystem services such as climate regulation, soil fertility, and vector-borne disease control. Therefore, these agroecosystems are unsustainable and poorly resilient. However, traditional agroforestry systems (TAS contribute to the conservation of biodiversity and to the provision of inputs for the maintenance of local populations. The objective of this study was to evaluate the contribution of the TAS in the food supply under the food sovereignty (FSv approach in three different ethnic groups. The study was conducted in three communities of different origin in the State of Campeche, one Maya Tseltal-Chol, the other Mestizo, and the third Yucatec Mayan. The theoretical-methodological framework of this research was based on agroecology. Ethnographic methods and participatory research activities were carried out to describe and analyze the factors that strengthen FSv using five indicators. Our results present a description and analysis of resource access, current production models, patterns of consumption and food security, commercialization and participation in decision-making of these communities. Traditional agroecological management practices are still preserved and native species are still being cultivated. Farmers obtain about 55% of their food from TAS. The consumption of food is influenced by the culture, the purchasing power linked to economic activities and government support. TAS have played a strategic role for the survival of families but to ensure their contribution to FSv, it is necessary to articulate the actions of the sectors that share the same objective and encourage the active participation of communities in agricultural policies.

  4. Genetic ancestry in relation to the metabolic response to a U.S. versus traditional Mexican diet: a randomized crossover feeding trial among women of Mexican descent

    OpenAIRE

    Santiago-Torres, Margarita; De Dieu Tapsoba, Jean; Kratz, Mario; Lampe, Johanna W.; Breymeyer, Kara L.; Levy, Lisa; Song, Xiaoling; Villase?or, Adriana; Wang, Ching-Yun; Fejerman, Laura; Neuhouser, Marian L.; Carlson, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Certain populations with a large proportion of Indigenous American (IA) genetic ancestry may be evolutionarily adapted to traditional diets high in legumes and complex carbohydrates, and may have a detrimental metabolic response to U.S. diets high in refined carbohydrates and added sugars. We tested whether IA ancestry modified the metabolic response to a U.S. versus traditional Mexican diet in a controlled dietary intervention. Methods First and second generation Mexican immigrant...

  5. A genetic programming approach for Burkholderia Pseudomallei diagnostic pattern discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zheng Rong; Lertmemongkolchai, Ganjana; Tan, Gladys; Felgner, Philip L.; Titball, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Finding diagnostic patterns for fighting diseases like Burkholderia pseudomallei using biomarkers involves two key issues. First, exhausting all subsets of testable biomarkers (antigens in this context) to find a best one is computationally infeasible. Therefore, a proper optimization approach like evolutionary computation should be investigated. Second, a properly selected function of the antigens as the diagnostic pattern which is commonly unknown is a key to the diagnostic accuracy and the diagnostic effectiveness in clinical use. Results: A conversion function is proposed to convert serum tests of antigens on patients to binary values based on which Boolean functions as the diagnostic patterns are developed. A genetic programming approach is designed for optimizing the diagnostic patterns in terms of their accuracy and effectiveness. During optimization, it is aimed to maximize the coverage (the rate of positive response to antigens) in the infected patients and minimize the coverage in the non-infected patients while maintaining the fewest number of testable antigens used in the Boolean functions as possible. The final coverage in the infected patients is 96.55% using 17 of 215 (7.4%) antigens with zero coverage in the non-infected patients. Among these 17 antigens, BPSL2697 is the most frequently selected one for the diagnosis of Burkholderia Pseudomallei. The approach has been evaluated using both the cross-validation and the Jack–knife simulation methods with the prediction accuracy as 93% and 92%, respectively. A novel approach is also proposed in this study to evaluate a model with binary data using ROC analysis. Contact: z.r.yang@ex.ac.uk PMID:19561021

  6. Citizen Hydrology - Tradeoffs between Traditional Continuous Approaches and Temporally Discrete Hydrologic Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davids, Jeffrey; Rutten, Martine; van de Giesen, Nick; Mehl, Steffen; Norris, James

    2016-04-01

    Traditional approaches to hydrologic data collection rely on permanent installations of sophisticated and relatively accurate but expensive monitoring equipment at limited numbers of sites. Consequently, the spatial coverage of the data is limited and the cost is high. Moreover, achieving adequate maintenance of the sophisticated equipment often exceeds local technical and resource capacity, and experience has shown that permanently deployed monitoring equipment is susceptible to vandalism, theft, and other hazards. Rather than using expensive, vulnerable installations at a few points, SmartPhones4Water (S4W), a form of citizen science, leverages widely available mobile technology to gather hydrologic data at many sites in a manner that is highly repeatable and scalable. The tradeoff for increased spatial resolution, however, is reduced observation frequency. As a first step towards evaluating the tradeoffs between the traditional continuous monitoring approach and emerging citizen science methods, 50 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow gages were randomly selected from the population of roughly 350 USGS gages operated in California. Gaging station metadata and historical 15 minute flow data for the period from 01/10/2007 through 31/12/2014 were compiled for each of the selected gages. Historical 15 minute flow data were then used to develop daily, monthly, and yearly determinations of average, minimum, maximum streamflow, cumulative runoff, and streamflow distribution. These statistics were then compared to similar statistics developed from randomly selected daily and weekly spot measurements of streamflow. Cumulative runoff calculated from daily and weekly observations were within 10 percent of actual runoff calculated from 15 minute data for 75 percent and 46 percent of sites respectively. As anticipated, larger watersheds with less dynamic temporal variability compared more favorably for all statistics evaluated than smaller watersheds. Based on the

  7. Rethinking the Risk Management Process for Genetically Engineered Crop Varieties in Small-scale, Traditionally Based Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Cleveland

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Proponents of genetically engineered (GE crops often assume that the risk management used in the industrial world is appropriate for small-scale, traditionally based agriculture in the Third World. Opponents of GE crops often assume that risk management is inappropriate for the Third World, because it is inherently biased in favor of the industrial world. We examine both of these assumptions, by rethinking risk management for GE crops and transgenes, using the example of maize transgene flow from the U.S. to Mexico. Risk management for the Third World is a necessary first step of a broader benefit-cost analysis of GE crops, which would include comparisons with existing varieties and with alternative varieties such as transgenic farmer varieties and organic varieties. Our goal is to use existing information on GE crops and on the social and biological characteristics of Third World agriculture to identify key processes that need to be considered in risk management, and the additional research required to adequately understand them. The four main steps in risk management are hazard identification, risk analysis (exposure x harm, risk evaluation, and risk treatment. We use informal event trees to identify possible exposure to GE crops and transgenes, and resulting biological and social harm; give examples of farmers' ability to evaluate social harm; and discuss the possibilities for risk treatment. We conclude that risk management is relevant for Third World agriculture, but needs to be based on the unique biological and social characteristics of small-scale, traditionally based agriculture, including the knowledge and values of Third World farmers and consumers.

  8. Teaching medical students a clinical approach to altered mental status: simulation enhances traditional curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy D. Sperling

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Simulation-based medical education (SBME is increasingly being utilized for teaching clinical skills in undergraduate medical education. Studies have evaluated the impact of adding SBME to third- and fourth-year curriculum; however, very little research has assessed its efficacy for teaching clinical skills in pre-clerkship coursework. To measure the impact of a simulation exercise during a pre-clinical curriculum, a simulation session was added to a pre-clerkship course at our medical school where the clinical approach to altered mental status (AMS is traditionally taught using a lecture and an interactive case-based session in a small group format. The objective was to measure simulation's impact on students’ knowledge acquisition, comfort, and perceived competence with regards to the AMS patient. Methods: AMS simulation exercises were added to the lecture and small group case sessions in June 2010 and 2011. Simulation sessions consisted of two clinical cases using a high-fidelity full-body simulator followed by a faculty debriefing after each case. Student participation in a simulation session was voluntary. Students who did and did not participate in a simulation session completed a post-test to assess knowledge and a survey to understand comfort and perceived competence in their approach to AMS. Results: A total of 154 students completed the post-test and survey and 65 (42% attended a simulation session. Post-test scores were higher in students who attended a simulation session compared to those who did not (p<0.001. Students who participated in a simulation session were more comfortable in their overall approach to treating AMS patients (p=0.05. They were also more likely to state that they could articulate a differential diagnosis (p=0.03, know what initial diagnostic tests are needed (p=0.01, and understand what interventions are useful in the first few minutes (p=0.003. Students who participated in a simulation session

  9. Semantic ambiguity effects on traditional Chinese character naming: A corpus-based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ya-Ning; Lee, Chia-Ying

    2017-11-09

    Words are considered semantically ambiguous if they have more than one meaning and can be used in multiple contexts. A number of recent studies have provided objective ambiguity measures by using a corpus-based approach and have demonstrated ambiguity advantages in both naming and lexical decision tasks. Although the predictive power of objective ambiguity measures has been examined in several alphabetic language systems, the effects in logographic languages remain unclear. Moreover, most ambiguity measures do not explicitly address how the various contexts associated with a given word relate to each other. To explore these issues, we computed the contextual diversity (Adelman, Brown, & Quesada, Psychological Science, 17; 814-823, 2006) and semantic ambiguity (Hoffman, Lambon Ralph, & Rogers, Behavior Research Methods, 45; 718-730, 2013) of traditional Chinese single-character words based on the Academia Sinica Balanced Corpus, where contextual diversity was used to evaluate the present semantic space. We then derived a novel ambiguity measure, namely semantic variability, by computing the distance properties of the distinct clusters grouped by the contexts that contained a given word. We demonstrated that semantic variability was superior to semantic diversity in accounting for the variance in naming response times, suggesting that considering the substructure of the various contexts associated with a given word can provide a relatively fine scale of ambiguity information for a word. All of the context and ambiguity measures for 2,418 Chinese single-character words are provided as supplementary materials.

  10. Hormesis as a mechanistic approach to understanding herbal treatments in traditional Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dali; Calabrese, Edward J; Lian, Baoling; Lin, Zhifen; Calabrese, Vittorio

    2018-04-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been long practiced and is becoming ever more widely recognized as providing curative and/or healing treatments for a number of diseases and physiological conditions. This paper posits that herbal medicines used in TCM treatments may act through hormetic dose-response mechanisms. It is proposed that the stimulatory (i.e., low dose) and inhibitory (i.e., high dose) components of the hormetic dose response correspond to respective "regulating" and "curing" aspects of TCM herbal treatments. Specifically, the "regulating" functions promote adaptive or preventive responses, while "curing" treatments alleviate the clinical symptoms. Patterns of hormetic responses are described, and the applicability of these processes to herbal medicines of TCM are explicated. It is noted that a research agenda aimed at elucidating these mechanisms and patterns would be expansive and complex. However, we argue its value, in that hormesis may afford something akin to a Rosetta Stone with which to interpret, translate, and explain TCM herbology in ways that are aligned with biomedical perspectives that could enable a more integrative approach to medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Approaches to establish Q-markers for the quality standards of traditional Chinese medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wenzhi; Zhang, Yibei; Wu, Wanying; Huang, Luqi; Guo, Dean; Liu, Changxiao

    2017-07-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has played a pivotal role in maintaining the health of Chinese people and is now gaining increasing acceptance around the global scope. However, TCM is confronting more and more concerns with respect to its quality. The intrinsic "multicomponent and multitarget" feature of TCM necessitates the establishment of a unique quality and bioactivity evaluation system, which is different from that of the Western medicine. However, TCM is investigated essentially as "herbal medicine" or "natural product", and the pharmacopoeia quality monographs are actually chemical-markers-based, which can ensure the consistency only in the assigned chemical markers, but, to some extent, have deviated from the basic TCM theory. A concept of "quality marker" (Q-marker), following the "property-effect-component" theory, is proposed. The establishment of Q-marker integrates multidisciplinary technologies like natural products chemistry, analytical chemistry, bionics, chemometrics, pharmacology, systems biology, and pharmacodynamics, etc. Q-marker-based fingerprint and multicomponent determination conduce to the construction of more scientific quality control system of TCM. This review delineates the background, definition, and properties of Q-marker, and the associated technologies applied for its establishment. Strategies and approaches for establishing Q-marker-based TCM quality control system are presented and highlighted with a few TCM examples.

  12. Mitigating global warming: traditional versus alternative approaches in a planning versus a market context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olerup, Brita [Royal Inst. of Technology, Dept. of Industrial Economics and Management, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2002-06-01

    Economic efficiency tends to be an important argument when different means of environmental control are assessed and suggested. Considering that the most cost-efficient means are not the ones most frequently chosen and used, some other qualities seem to play an equally important role. I use findings from organisational theory and negotiation theory to better understand what is concealed in the black-box of decision-making and implementation. My empirical material consists of case studies of four different means of environmental control used in Sweden during the 1990s to mitigate the threat of global warming. These are an environmental tax, a licensing trial, municipal energy planning, and technology procurement. Each represents a particular discipline (economic, legal, physical planning, or technological) in which a context (planning or market) and an approach (traditional relay race or alternative process-oriented) are combined. Although each means has its particular niche, some qualities stand out as superior. Such means need to be divisible in space as well as in time. It is then easier to get started. Since it is just as easy to deviate from, rather than adhere to, the predetermined course after a while, some incentive must be given to the person in charge of implementation. In other words, the classic proverb of using sticks and carrots is still valid although it is not always taken to heart and practised. (Author)

  13. A New Spectral Shape-Based Record Selection Approach Using Np and Genetic Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edén Bojórquez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With the aim to improve code-based real records selection criteria, an approach inspired in a parameter proxy of spectral shape, named Np, is analyzed. The procedure is based on several objectives aimed to minimize the record-to-record variability of the ground motions selected for seismic structural assessment. In order to select the best ground motion set of records to be used as an input for nonlinear dynamic analysis, an optimization approach is applied using genetic algorithms focuse on finding the set of records more compatible with a target spectrum and target Np values. The results of the new Np-based approach suggest that the real accelerograms obtained with this procedure, reduce the scatter of the response spectra as compared with the traditional approach; furthermore, the mean spectrum of the set of records is very similar to the target seismic design spectrum in the range of interest periods, and at the same time, similar Np values are obtained for the selected records and the target spectrum.

  14. A Comparison of Student Academic Performance with Traditional, Online, And Flipped Instructional Approaches in a C# Programming Course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason H. Sharp

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: Compared student academic performance on specific course requirements in a C# programming course across three instructional approaches: traditional, online, and flipped. Background: Addressed the following research question: When compared to the online and traditional instructional approaches, does the flipped instructional approach have a greater impact on student academic performance with specific course requirements in a C# programming course? Methodology: Quantitative research design conducted over eight 16-week semesters among a total of 271 participants who were undergraduate students en-rolled in a C# programming course. Data collected were grades earned from specific course requirements and were analyzed with the nonparametric Kruskal Wallis H-Test using IBM SPSS Statistics, Version 23. Contribution: Provides empirical findings related to the impact that different instructional approaches have on student academic performance in a C# programming course. Also describes implications and recommendations for instructors of programming courses regarding instructional approaches that facilitate active learning, student engagement, and self-regulation. Findings: Resulted in four statistically significant findings, indicating that the online and flipped instructional approaches had a greater impact on student academic performance than the traditional approach. Recommendations for Practitioners: Implement instructional approaches such as online, flipped, or blended which foster active learning, student engagement, and self-regulation to increase student academic performance. Recommendation for Researchers: Build upon this study and others similar to it to include factors such as gender, age, ethnicity, and previous academic history. Impact on Society: Acknowledge the growing influence of technology on society as a whole. Higher education coursework and programs are evolving to encompass more digitally-based learning contexts, thus

  15. Discovery of Intermetallic Compounds from Traditional to Machine-Learning Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliynyk, Anton O; Mar, Arthur

    2018-01-16

    Intermetallic compounds are bestowed by diverse compositions, complex structures, and useful properties for many materials applications. How metallic elements react to form these compounds and what structures they adopt remain challenging questions that defy predictability. Traditional approaches offer some rational strategies to prepare specific classes of intermetallics, such as targeting members within a modular homologous series, manipulating building blocks to assemble new structures, and filling interstitial sites to create stuffed variants. Because these strategies rely on precedent, they cannot foresee surprising results, by definition. Exploratory synthesis, whether through systematic phase diagram investigations or serendipity, is still essential for expanding our knowledge base. Eventually, the relationships may become too complex for the pattern recognition skills to be reliably or practically performed by humans. Complementing these traditional approaches, new machine-learning approaches may be a viable alternative for materials discovery, not only among intermetallics but also more generally to other chemical compounds. In this Account, we survey our own efforts to discover new intermetallic compounds, encompassing gallides, germanides, phosphides, arsenides, and others. We apply various machine-learning methods (such as support vector machine and random forest algorithms) to confront two significant questions in solid state chemistry. First, what crystal structures are adopted by a compound given an arbitrary composition? Initial efforts have focused on binary equiatomic phases AB, ternary equiatomic phases ABC, and full Heusler phases AB 2 C. Our analysis emphasizes the use of real experimental data and places special value on confirming predictions through experiment. Chemical descriptors are carefully chosen through a rigorous procedure called cluster resolution feature selection. Predictions for crystal structures are quantified by evaluating

  16. System versus traditional approach in road traffic injury prevention. A call for action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davoud Khorasani-Zavareh

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Road traffic injuries (RTIs are a major public health problem worldwide, especially in low- and middle-income countries (LMICsand require concerted efforts for effective and sustainable prevention. A variety of measures need to be considered when planning activities. This is particularly true in LMICs. Iran, for example, despite its enormous efforts in recent years in both pre-crash and post crash measures as well as social policy changes, continues to be challenged by the sheer magnitude of this major public health problem. Accordingly, stakeholders’ perceptions, the approach and the kind of preventive activities are crucial. On the whole, there are two different approaches in RTI prevention: the individual approach and the system approach.In the individual approach, there is a tendency for researchers and particularly practitioners to identify only one or a few elements, which usually can be found in many LMICs. Traditionally, in such countries many studies have focused on factors relating to driver errors, poor vehicles and the road environment instead of finding the reason for injury outcome. In many LMICs, the majority of preventive activities target road-user behaviors, which are usually tackled by means of education and enforcement. Hence the primary responsibility is assigned to the road user. However, while safe road-user behavior is one important component, changing such behavior should not simply be focused on education and enforcement. When WHO launched its call to action, it invited members of the public to be part of the solution. The initiative focused on five important courses of action for the general public including: not speeding; wearing a seat-belt; being visible on the road; wearing a helmet; and never drinking and driving. Studies on public education efficiency have revealed that a decrease in crashes due to such campaigns can occur only if they clearly target specific forms of behavior, like seat belt use or helmet

  17. Contribution of genetic background, traditional risk factors, and HIV-related factors to coronary artery disease events in HIV-positive persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rotger, Margalida; Glass, Tracy R; Junier, Thomas; Lundgren, Jens; Neaton, James D; Poloni, Estella S; van 't Wout, Angélique B; Lubomirov, Rubin; Colombo, Sara; Martinez, Raquel; Rauch, Andri; Günthard, Huldrych F; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Wentworth, Deborah; van Manen, Danielle; Gras, Luuk A; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Albini, Laura; Torti, Carlo; Jacobson, Lisa P; Li, Xiuhong; Kingsley, Lawrence A; Carli, Federica; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Ford, Emily S; Sereti, Irini; Hadigan, Colleen; Martinez, Esteban; Arnedo, Mireia; Egaña-Gorroño, Lander; Gatell, Jose M; Law, Matthew; Bendall, Courtney; Petoumenos, Kathy; Rockstroh, Jürgen; Wasmuth, Jan-Christian; Kabamba, Kabeya; Delforge, Marc; De Wit, Stephane; Berger, Florian; Mauss, Stefan; de Paz Sierra, Mariana; Losso, Marcelo; Belloso, Waldo H; Leyes, Maria; Campins, Antoni; Mondi, Annalisa; De Luca, Andrea; Bernardino, Ignacio; Barriuso-Iglesias, Mónica; Torrecilla-Rodriguez, Ana; Gonzalez-Garcia, Juan; Arribas, José R; Fanti, Iuri; Gel, Silvia; Puig, Jordi; Negredo, Eugenia; Gutierrez, Mar; Domingo, Pere; Fischer, Julia; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Macken, Alan; Woo, James; McGinty, Tara; Mallon, Patrick; Mangili, Alexandra; Skinner, Sally; Wanke, Christine A; Reiss, Peter; Weber, Rainer; Bucher, Heiner C; Fellay, Jacques; Telenti, Amalio; Tarr, Philip E; Schölvinck, Elisabeth H.

    BACKGROUND: Persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have increased rates of coronary artery disease (CAD). The relative contribution of genetic background, HIV-related factors, antiretroviral medications, and traditional risk factors to CAD has not been fully evaluated in the

  18. Contribution of genetic background, traditional risk factors, and HIV-related factors to coronary artery disease events in HIV-positive persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rotger, Margalida; Glass, Tracy R.; Junier, Thomas; Lundgren, Jens; Neaton, James D.; Poloni, Estella S.; van 't Wout, Angélique B.; Lubomirov, Rubin; Colombo, Sara; Martinez, Raquel; Rauch, Andri; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Wentworth, Deborah; van Manen, Danielle; Gras, Luuk A.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Albini, Laura; Torti, Carlo; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Li, Xiuhong; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Carli, Federica; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Ford, Emily S.; Sereti, Irini; Hadigan, Colleen; Martinez, Esteban; Arnedo, Mireia; Egaña-Gorroño, Lander; Gatell, Jose M.; Law, Matthew; Bendall, Courtney; Petoumenos, Kathy; Rockstroh, Jürgen; Wasmuth, Jan-Christian; Kabamba, Kabeya; Delforge, Marc; de Wit, Stephane; Berger, Florian; Mauss, Stefan; de Paz Sierra, Mariana; Losso, Marcelo; Belloso, Waldo H.; Leyes, Maria; Campins, Antoni; Mondi, Annalisa; de Luca, Andrea; Bernardino, Ignacio; Barriuso-Iglesias, Mónica; Torrecilla-Rodriguez, Ana; Gonzalez-Garcia, Juan; Arribas, José R.; Fanti, Iuri; Gel, Silvia; Puig, Jordi; Negredo, Eugenia; Gutierrez, Mar; Domingo, Pere; Fischer, Julia; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Macken, Alan; Woo, James; McGinty, Tara; Mallon, Patrick; Mangili, Alexandra; Skinner, Sally; Wanke, Christine A.; Reiss, Peter; Weber, Rainer; Bucher, Heiner C.; Fellay, Jacques; Telenti, Amalio; Tarr, Philip E.; Gras, A. Luuk; van Wout, Angelique B.; Arnedo-Valero, Mireia; Sierra, Mariana de Paz; Rodriguez, Ana Torrecilla; Garcia, Juan Gonzalez; Arribas, Jose R.; Aubert, V.; Barth, J.; Battegay, M.; Bernasconi, E.; Böni, J.; Bucher, H. C.; Burton-Jeangros, C.; Calmy, A.; Cavassini, M.; Egger, M.; Elzi, L.; Fehr, J.; Fellay, J.; Francioli, P.; Furrer, H.; Fux, C. A.; Gorgievski, M.; Günthard, H.; Haerry, D.; Hasse, B.; Hirsch, H. H.; Hirschel, B.; Hösli, I.; Kahlert, C.; Kaiser, L.; Keiser, O.; Kind, C.; Klimkait, T.; Kovari, H.; Ledergerber, B.; Martinetti, G.; Martinez de Tejada, B.; Metzner, K.; Müller, N.; Nadal, D.; Pantaleo, G.; Rauch, A.; Regenass, S.; Rickenbach, M.; Rudin, C.; Schmid, P.; Schultze, D.; Schöni-Affolter, F.; Schüpbach, J.; Speck, R.; Taffé, P.; Tarr, P.; Telenti, A.; Trkola, A.; Vernazza, P.; Weber, R.; Prins, Yerly S. J. M.; Kuijpers, T. W.; Scherpbier, H. J.; Boer, K.; van der Meer, J. T. M.; Wit, F. W. M. N.; Godfried, M. H.; van der Poll, T.; Nellen, F. J. B.; Lange, J. M. A.; Geerlings, S. E.; van Vugt, M.; Vrouenraets, S. M. E.; Pajkrt, D.; Bos, J. C.; van der Valk, M.; Schreij, G.; Lowe, S.; Oude Lashof, A.; Pronk, M. J. H.; Bravenboer, B.; van der Ende, M. E.; de Vries-Sluijs, T. E. M. S.; Schurink, C. A. M.; van der Feltz, M.; Nouwen, J. L.; Gelinck, L. B. S.; Verbon, A.; Rijnders, B. J. A.; van de Ven-de Ruiter, E. D.; Slobbe, L.; Haag, Den; Kauffmann, R. H.; Schippers, E. F.; Groeneveld, P. H. P.; Alleman, M. A.; Bouwhuis, J. W.; ten Kate, R. W.; Soetekouw, R.; Kroon, F. P.; van den Broek, P. J.; van Dissel, J. T.; Arend, S. M.; van Nieuwkoop, C.; de Boer, M. J. G.; Jolink, H.; den Hollander, J. G.; Pogany, K.; Bronsveld, W.; Kortmann, W.; van Twillert, G.; van Houte, D. P. F.; Polée, M. B.; van Vonderen, M. G. A.; ten Napel, C. H. H.; Kootstra, G. J.; Brinkman, K.; Blok, W. L.; Frissen, P. H. J.; Schouten, W. E. M.; van den Berk, G. E. L.; Juttmann, J. R.; van Kasteren, M. E. E.; Brouwer, A. E.; Mulder, J. W.; van Gorp, E. C. M.; Smit, P. M.; Weijer, S.; van Eeden, A.; Verhagen, D. W. M.; Sprenger, H. G.; Doedens, R.; Scholvinck, E. H.; van Assen, S.; Stek, C. J.; Hoepelman, I. M.; Mudrikova, T.; Schneider, M. M. E.; Jaspers, C. A. J. J.; Ellerbroek, P. M.; Peters, E. J. G.; Maarschalk-Ellerbroek, L. J.; Oosterheert, J. J.; Arends, J. E.; Wassenberg, M. W. M.; van der Hilst, J. C. H.; Richter, C.; van der Berg, J. P.; Gisolf, E. H.; Margolick, Joseph B.; Plankey, Michael; Crain, Barbara; Dobs, Adrian; Farzadegan, Homayoon; Gallant, Joel; Johnson-Hill, Lisette; Sacktor, Ned; Selnes, Ola; Shepard, James; Thio, Chloe; Phair, John P.; Wolinsky, Steven M.; Badri, Sheila; Conover, Craig; O'Gorman, Maurice; Ostrow, David; Palella, Frank; Ragin, Ann; Detels, Roger; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Aronow, Aaron; Bolan, Robert; Breen, Elizabeth; Butch, Anthony; Fahey, John; Jamieson, Beth; Miller, Eric N.; Oishi, John; Vinters, Harry; Visscher, Barbara R.; Wiley, Dorothy; Witt, Mallory; Yang, Otto; Young, Stephen; Zhang, Zuo Feng; Rinaldo, Charles R.; Becker, James T.; Cranston, Ross D.; Martinson, Jeremy J.; Mellors, John W.; Silvestre, Anthony J.; Stall, Ronald D.; Muñoz, Alvaro; Abraham, Alison; Althoff, Keri; Cox, Christopher; D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Gange, Stephen J.; Golub, Elizabeth; Schollenberger, Janet; Seaberg, Eric C.; Su, Sol; Huebner, Robin E.; Dominguez, Geraldina; Moroni, M.; Angarano, G.; Antinori, A.; Carosi, G.; Cauda, R.; Monforte, A. d'Arminio; Di Perri, G.; Galli, M.; Iardino, R.; Ippolito, G.; Lazzarin, A.; Perno, C. F.; Sagnelli, E.; Viale, P. L.; Von Schlosser, F.; d'Arminio Monforte, A.; Ammassari, A.; Andreoni, M.; Balotta, C.; Bonfanti, P.; Bonora, S.; Borderi, M.; Capobianchi, M. R.; Castagna, A.; Ceccherini-Silberstein, F.; Cozzi-Lepri, A.; de Luca, A.; Gargiulo, M.; Gervasoni, C.; Girardi, E.; Lichtner, M.; Lo Caputo, S.; Madeddu, G.; Maggiolo, F.; Marcotullio, S.; Monno, L.; Murri, R.; Mussini, C.; Puoti, M.; Torti, C.; Fanti, I.; Formenti, T.; Galli, Laura; Lorenzini, Patrizia; Montroni, M.; Giacometti, A.; Costantini, A.; Riva, A.; Tirelli, U.; Martellotta, F.; Ladisa, N.; Lazzari, G.; Verucchi, G.; Castelli, F.; Scalzini, A.; Minardi, C.; Bertelli, D.; Quirino, T.; Abeli, C.; Manconi, P. E.; Piano, P.; Vecchiet, J.; Falasca, K.; Carnevale, G.; Lorenzotti, S.; Sighinolfi, L.; Segala, D.; Leoncini, F.; Mazzotta, F.; Pozzi, M.; Cassola, G.; Viscoli, G.; Viscoli, A.; Piscopo, R.; Mazzarello, G.; Mastroianni, C.; Belvisi, V.; Caramma, I.; Chiodera, A.; Castelli, P.; Rizzardini, G.; Ridolfo, A. L.; Foschi, A.; Salpietro, S.; Galli, A.; Bigoloni, A.; Spagnuolo, V.; Merli, S.; Carenzi, L.; Moioli, M. C.; Cicconi, P.; Bisio, L.; Gori, A.; Lapadula, G.; Abrescia, N.; Chirianni, A.; de Marco, M.; Ferrari, C.; Borghi, R.; Baldelli, F.; Belfiori, B.; Parruti, G.; Ursini, T.; Magnani, G.; Ursitti, M. A.; Narciso, P.; Tozzi, V.; Vullo, V.; d'Avino, A.; Zaccarelli, M.; Gallo, L.; Acinapura, R.; Capozzi, M.; Libertone, R.; Trotta, M. P.; Tebano, G.; Cattelan, A. M.; Mura, M. S.; Caramello, P.; Orofino, G. C.; Sciandra, M.; Raise, N. N.; Ebo, F.; Pellizzer, G.; Manfrin, V.; Law, M.; Petoumenos, K.; McManus, H.; Wright, S.; Bendall, C.; Moore, R.; Edwards, S.

    2013-01-01

    Persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have increased rates of coronary artery disease (CAD). The relative contribution of genetic background, HIV-related factors, antiretroviral medications, and traditional risk factors to CAD has not been fully evaluated in the setting of HIV

  19. Translation and genetic criticism : genetic and editorial approaches to the 'untranslatable' in Joyce and Beckett

    OpenAIRE

    Hulle, Van, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Genetics of translation may suggest a unidirectional link between two fields of research (genetic criticism applied to translation), but there are many ways in which translation and genetic criticism interact. This article's research hypothesis is that an exchange of ideas between translation studies and genetic criticism can be mutually beneficial in more than one way. The main function of this exchange is to enhance a form of textual awareness, and to realize this enhanced textual...

  20. Genetic approaches to understanding post-traumatic stress disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almli, Lynn M.; Fani, Negar; Smith, Alicia K.; Ressler, Kerry J.

    2015-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is increasingly recognized as both a disorder of enormous mental health and societal burden, but also as an anxiety disorder that may be particularly understandable from a scientific perspective. Specifically, PTSD can be conceptualized as a disorder of fear and stress dysregulation, and the neural circuitry underlying these pathways in both animals and humans are becoming increasingly well understood. Furthermore, PTSD is the only disorder in psychiatry in which the initiating factor, the trauma exposure, can be identified. Thus, the pathophysiology of the fear and stress response underlying PTSD can be examined and potentially interrupted. Twin studies have shown that the development of PTSD following a trauma is heritable, and that genetic risk factors may account for up to 30–40% of this heritability. A current goal is to understand the gene pathways that are associated with PTSD, and how those genes act on the fear/stress circuitry to mediate risk vs. resilience for PTSD. This review will examine gene pathways that have recently been analysed, primarily through candidate gene studies (including neuroimaging studies of candidate genes), in addition to genome-wide associations and the epigenetic regulation of PTSD. Future and on-going studies are utilizing larger and collaborative cohorts to identify novel gene candidates through genome-wide association and other powerful genomic approaches. Identification of PTSD biological pathways strengthens the hope of progress in the mechanistic understanding of a model psychiatric disorder and allows for the development of targeted treatments and interventions. PMID:24103155

  1. Genetic approaches to understanding post-traumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almli, Lynn M; Fani, Negar; Smith, Alicia K; Ressler, Kerry J

    2014-02-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is increasingly recognized as both a disorder of enormous mental health and societal burden, but also as an anxiety disorder that may be particularly understandable from a scientific perspective. Specifically, PTSD can be conceptualized as a disorder of fear and stress dysregulation, and the neural circuitry underlying these pathways in both animals and humans are becoming increasingly well understood. Furthermore, PTSD is the only disorder in psychiatry in which the initiating factor, the trauma exposure, can be identified. Thus, the pathophysiology of the fear and stress response underlying PTSD can be examined and potentially interrupted. Twin studies have shown that the development of PTSD following a trauma is heritable, and that genetic risk factors may account for up to 30-40% of this heritability. A current goal is to understand the gene pathways that are associated with PTSD, and how those genes act on the fear/stress circuitry to mediate risk vs. resilience for PTSD. This review will examine gene pathways that have recently been analysed, primarily through candidate gene studies (including neuroimaging studies of candidate genes), in addition to genome-wide associations and the epigenetic regulation of PTSD. Future and on-going studies are utilizing larger and collaborative cohorts to identify novel gene candidates through genome-wide association and other powerful genomic approaches. Identification of PTSD biological pathways strengthens the hope of progress in the mechanistic understanding of a model psychiatric disorder and allows for the development of targeted treatments and interventions.

  2. Investigation of Liver Injury of Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. in Rats by Metabolomics and Traditional Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Xia Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Liver injury induced by Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. (PM have been reported since 2006, which aroused widespread concern. However, the toxicity mechanism of PM liver injury remained unclear. In this study, the mechanism of liver injury induced by different doses of PM after long-term administration was investigated in rats by metabolomics and traditional approaches. Rats were randomly divided into control group and PM groups. PM groups were oral administered PM of low (10 g/kg, medium (20 g/kg, high (40 g/kg dose, while control group was administered distilled water. After 28 days of continuous administration, the serum biochemical indexes in the control and three PM groups were measured and the liver histopathology were analyzed. Also, UPLC-Q-TOF-MS with untargeted metabolomics was performed to identify the possible metabolites and pathway of liver injury caused by PM. Compared with the control group, the serum levels of ALT, AST, ALP, TG, and TBA in middle and high dose PM groups were significantly increased. And the serum contents of T-Bil, D-Bil, TC, TP were significantly decreased. However, there was no significant difference between the low dose group of PM and the control group except serum AST, TG, T-Bil, and D-Bil. Nine biomarkers were identified based on biomarkers analysis. And the pathway analysis indicated that fat metabolism, amino acid metabolism and bile acid metabolism were involved in PM liver injury. Based on the biomarker pathway analysis, PM changed the lipid metabolism, amino acid metabolism and bile acid metabolism and excretion in a dose-dependent manner which was related to the mechanism of liver injury.

  3. Human dissection: an approach to interweaving the traditional and humanistic goals of medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzolo, Lawrence J

    2002-12-15

    Anatomy remains one of the core courses of medical school, but the time devoted to it is decreasing. To accommodate the explosion of medical knowledge, educators search to streamline the curriculum. Because it is time-consuming, dissection comes under increased scrutiny. Even in the face of these pressures to reduce course hours, I would like to propose broadening, not reducing, the responsibilities of the anatomy instructor. Anatomy instructors can play a crucial role in helping medical schools meet the critical need to cultivate humanistic values, especially in the arena of end-of-life care. Anatomy can--and should--play an important role in a curriculum-wide effort to address this issue. Just as dissection remains an essential technique to teach three-dimensional concepts, the cadaver dissection lab is an ideal place to introduce concepts of humanistic care. The lab evokes the students' memories, speculations, and fears about serious illness in themselves, their families, and loved ones. Some programs address these reactions with supplemental activities, such as journaling, essay writing, and small group discussion. Valuable as these activities may be, anatomy instructors can achieve more by recognizing their role as a mentor, who can integrate humanistic values into traditional course objectives in a way that adds little time to the curriculum. The attitude of the instructor in ministering to the students' needs as they undertake the emotionally charged task of dissection can provide a model for how the students will respond, in turn, to the hopes and fears of their patients-and to their own reactions to dying. This approach will allow students to implement and practice humanistic values immediately, laying a foundation for their clinical training. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Natural ecosystem mimicry in traditional dryland agroecosystems: Insights from an empirical and holistic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Julien; Michon, Geneviève; Carrière, Stéphanie M

    2017-12-15

    While the aim of Ecological Intensification is to enable the design of more sustainable and productive agricultural systems, it is not suited to dryland agroecosystems that are driven by non-equilibrium dynamics and intrinsic variability. Instead, a model based on mobility and variability management has been proposed for these agroecosystems. However, this model remains under-applied in southern Morocco where there have been few studies on the functioning of traditional agroecosystems. This paper focuses on an agroecosystem in the Moroccan Saharan fringe zone that combines agriculture and pastoralism in an acacia parkland. A grounded theory approach was used over a three-year investigation period (i) to highlight how agro-pastoral activities interface with environmental variability, and (ii) to analyze the formal and informal institutions that support these activities. Results show that farmers interface with rainfall variability through (i) an opportunistic agricultural calendar, (ii) a variation of cultivated areas, and (iii) crop diversification. Herders combine macro-mobility (nomads move over long distances to track rainfall) and micro-mobility (nomadic and sedentary herds are driven on a daily basis around settlements) to optimize the exploitation of ecological heterogeneity. During droughts, they also resort to State-subsidized forage supplies. Both cultivation and pastoral activities tend to interface with ecological dynamics and to mimic nature, resulting in a human-modified parkland that could be considered as a 'green agroecosystem'. The sustainability of natural resource use relies on flexible property rights, backed up by a social and cultural norm-based regulation system, that allow crop-livestock integration and landscape collective management. Despite encouraging results, the agroecosystem appears to be threatened by current agricultural policies, rural exodus and the lack of social recognition of nomadism. Nevertheless, because ecosystem mimicry of

  5. Forward Genetic Approaches for Elucidation of Novel Regulators of Lyme Arthritis Severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth K.C. Bramwell

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Patients experiencing natural infection with Borrelia burgdorferi display a spectrum of associated symptoms and severity, strongly implicating the impact of genetically determined host factors in the pathogenesis of Lyme disease. Herein, we provide a summary of the host genetic factors that have been demonstrated to influence the severity and chronicity of Lyme arthritis symptoms, and a review of the resources available, current progress, and added value of a forward genetic approach for identification of novel genetic regulators.

  6. Comparing Hybrid Learning with Traditional Approaches on Learning the Microsoft Office Power Point 2003 Program in Tertiary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernadakis, Nikolaos; Antoniou, Panagiotis; Giannousi, Maria; Zetou, Eleni; Kioumourtzoglou, Efthimis

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a hybrid learning approach to deliver a computer science course concerning the Microsoft office PowerPoint 2003 program in comparison to delivering the same course content in the form of traditional lectures. A hundred and seventy-two first year university students were randomly…

  7. Evaluating Views of Lecturers on the Consistency of Teaching Content with Teaching Approach: Traditional versus Reform Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevimli, Eyup

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the consistency of teaching content with teaching approaches in calculus on the basis of lecturers' views. In this sense, the structures of the examples given in two commonly used calculus textbooks, both in traditional and reform classrooms, are compared. The content analysis findings show that the examples in both…

  8. On Chalk and Cheese, Babies and Bathwater and Squared Circles: Can Traditional and Communicative Approaches Be Reconciled?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maley, Alan

    Many second language teachers in the People's Republic of China, upon encountering the communicative approach, reject it as both unworkable and unnecessary in China, where traditional instruction produces the expected results. However, the educational system is such that students who get to the university are highly motivated and talented, but the…

  9. Actual versus Implied Physics Students: How Students from Traditional Physics Classrooms Related to an Innovative Approach to Quantum Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøe, Maria Vetleseter; Henriksen, Ellen Karoline; Angell, Carl

    2018-01-01

    Calls for renewal of physics education include more varied learning activities and increased focus on qualitative understanding and history and philosophy of science (HPS) aspects. We have studied an innovative approach implementing such features in quantum physics in traditional upper secondary physics classrooms in Norway. Data consists of 11…

  10. Modelling Autistic Features in Mice Using Quantitative Genetic Approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molenhuis, Remco T; Bruining, Hilgo; Kas, Martien J

    2017-01-01

    Animal studies provide a unique opportunity to study the consequences of genetic variants at the behavioural level. Human studies have identified hundreds of risk genes for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) that can lead to understanding on how genetic variation contributes to individual differences in

  11. Ethical genetic research in Indigenous communities: challenges and successful approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWhirter, Rebekah E; Mununggirritj, Djapirri; Marika, Dipililnga; Dickinson, Joanne L; Condon, John R

    2012-12-01

    Indigenous populations, in common with all populations, stand to benefit from the potential of genetic research to lead to improvements in diagnostic and therapeutic tools for a wide range of complex diseases. However, many Indigenous communities, especially ones that are isolated, are not included in genetic research efforts. This situation is largely a consequence of the challenges of ethically conducting genetic research in Indigenous communities and compounded by Indigenous peoples' negative past experiences with genetic issues. To examine ways of addressing these challenges, we review one investigation of a cancer cluster in remote Aboriginal communities in Arnhem Land, Australia. Our experiences demonstrate that genetic research can be both ethically and successfully conducted with Indigenous communities by respecting the authority of the community, involving community members, and including regular community review throughout the research process. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Assuring the safety of genetically modified (GM) foods: the importance of an holistic, integrative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockburn, Andrew

    2002-09-11

    Genes change continuously by natural mutation and recombination enabling man to select and breed crops having the most desirable traits such as yield or flavour. Genetic modification (GM) is a recent development which allows specific genes to be identified, isolated, copied and inserted into other plants with a high level of specificity. The food safety considerations for GM crops are basically the same as those arising from conventionally bred crops, very few of which have been subject to any testing yet are generally regarded as being safe to eat. In contrast a rigorous safety testing paradigm has been developed for GM crops, which utilises a systematic, stepwise and holistic approach. The resultant science based process, focuses on a classical evaluation of the toxic potential of the introduced novel trait and the wholesomeness of the transformed crop. In addition, detailed consideration is given to the history and safe use of the parent crop as well as that of the gene donor. The overall safety evaluation is conducted under the concept known as substantial equivalence which is enshrined in all international crop biotechnology guidelines. This provides the framework for a comparative approach to identify the similarities and differences between the GM product and its comparator which has a known history of safe use. By building a detailed profile on each step in the transformation process, from parent to new crop, and by thoroughly evaluating the significance from a safety perspective, of any differences that may be detected, a very comprehensive matrix of information is constructed which enables the conclusion as to whether the GM crop, derived food or feed is as safe as its traditional counterpart. Using this approach in the evaluation of more than 50 GM crops which have been approved worldwide, the conclusion has been that foods and feeds derived from genetically modified crops are as safe and nutritious as those derived from traditional crops. The lack of

  13. Traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine approaches to mental health care and psychological wellbeing in India and China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirthalli, Jagadisha; Zhou, Liang; Kumar, Kishore; Gao, Jie; Vaid, Henna; Liu, Huiming; Hankey, Alex; Wang, Guojun; Gangadhar, Bangalore N; Nie, Jing-Bao; Nichter, Mark

    2016-07-01

    India and China face the same challenge of having too few trained psychiatric personnel to manage effectively the substantial burden of mental illness within their population. At the same time, both countries have many practitioners of traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine who are a potential resource for delivery of mental health care. In our paper, part of The Lancet and Lancet Psychiatry's Series about the China-India Mental Health Alliance, we describe and compare types of traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine in India and China. Further, we provide a systematic overview of evidence assessing the effectiveness of these alternative approaches for mental illness and discuss challenges in research. We suggest how practitioners of traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine and mental health professionals might forge collaborative relationships to provide more accessible, affordable, and acceptable mental health care in India and China. A substantial proportion of individuals with mental illness use traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine, either exclusively or with biomedicine, for reasons ranging from faith and cultural congruence to accessibility, cost, and belief that these approaches are safe. Systematic reviews of the effectiveness of traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine find several approaches to be promising for treatment of mental illness, but most clinical trials included in these systematic reviews have methodological limitations. Contemporary methods to establish efficacy and safety-typically through randomised controlled trials-need to be complemented by other means. The community of practice built on collaborative relationships between practitioners of traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine and providers of mental health care holds promise in bridging the treatment gap in mental health care in India and China. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Common heritable effects underpin concerns over norm maintenance and in-group favoritism: evidence from genetic analyses of right-wing authoritarianism and traditionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Gary J; Bates, Timothy C

    2014-08-01

    Research has shown that in-group favoritism is associated with concerns over the maintenance of social norms. Here we present two studies examining whether genetic factors underpin this association. A classical twin design was used to decompose phenotypic variance into genetic and environmental components in two studies. Study 1 used 812 pairs of adult U.S. twins from the nationally representative MIDUS II sample. Study 2 used 707 pairs of middle-age twins from the Minnesota Twin Registry. In-group favoritism was measured with scales tapping preferences for in-group (vs. out-group) individuals; norm concerns were measured with the Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire-Traditionalism (Study 1) and Right-Wing Authoritarianism (RWA; Study 2) scales. In Study 1, heritable effects underlying traditionalism were moderately (c. 35%) overlapping with the genetic variance underpinning in-group favoritism. In Study 2, heritable influences on RWA were entirely shared with the heritable effects on in-group favoritism. Moreover, we observed that Big Five Openness shared common genetic links to both RWA and in-group favoritism. These results suggest that, at the genetic level, in-group favoritism is linked with a system related to concern over normative social practices, which is, in turn, partially associated with trait Openness. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. What next for preimplantation genetic screening? A polar body approach!

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geraedts, Joep; Collins, John; Gianaroli, Luca; Goossens, Veerle; Handyside, Alan; Harper, Joyce; Montag, Markus; Repping, Sjoerd; Schmutzler, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    Screening of human preimplantation embryos for numerical chromosome abnormalities has been conducted mostly at the preimplantation stage using fluorescence in situ hybridization. However, it is clear that preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) as it is currently practiced does not improve live

  16. Congenital hydrocephalus in clinical practice : A genetic diagnostic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, J. M. A.; Schrander-Stumpel, C. T. R. M.; Krapels, P. C.; de Die-Smulders, C. E. M.; van Lint, F. H. M.; Willekes, C.; Weber, J. W.; Gavilanes, A. W. D.; Macville, M. V. E.; Stegmann, A. P. A.; Engelen, J. J. M.; Bakker, J.; Vos, Y. J.; Frints, S. G. M.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital hydrocephalus is a common and often disabling disorder. The etiology is very heterogeneous. Little is known about the genetic causes of congenital hydrocephalus. A retrospective survey was performed including patients with primary congenital hydrocephalus referred to the Department of

  17. Introduction to focus issue: quantitative approaches to genetic networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Réka; Collins, James J; Glass, Leon

    2013-06-01

    All cells of living organisms contain similar genetic instructions encoded in the organism's DNA. In any particular cell, the control of the expression of each different gene is regulated, in part, by binding of molecular complexes to specific regions of the DNA. The molecular complexes are composed of protein molecules, called transcription factors, combined with various other molecules such as hormones and drugs. Since transcription factors are coded by genes, cellular function is partially determined by genetic networks. Recent research is making large strides to understand both the structure and the function of these networks. Further, the emerging discipline of synthetic biology is engineering novel gene circuits with specific dynamic properties to advance both basic science and potential practical applications. Although there is not yet a universally accepted mathematical framework for studying the properties of genetic networks, the strong analogies between the activation and inhibition of gene expression and electric circuits suggest frameworks based on logical switching circuits. This focus issue provides a selection of papers reflecting current research directions in the quantitative analysis of genetic networks. The work extends from molecular models for the binding of proteins, to realistic detailed models of cellular metabolism. Between these extremes are simplified models in which genetic dynamics are modeled using classical methods of systems engineering, Boolean switching networks, differential equations that are continuous analogues of Boolean switching networks, and differential equations in which control is based on power law functions. The mathematical techniques are applied to study: (i) naturally occurring gene networks in living organisms including: cyanobacteria, Mycoplasma genitalium, fruit flies, immune cells in mammals; (ii) synthetic gene circuits in Escherichia coli and yeast; and (iii) electronic circuits modeling genetic networks

  18. Genetic algorithm and neural network hybrid approach for job-shop scheduling

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Kai; Yang, Shengxiang; Wang, Dingwei

    1998-01-01

    Copyright @ 1998 ACTA Press This paper proposes a genetic algorithm (GA) and constraint satisfaction adaptive neural network (CSANN) hybrid approach for job-shop scheduling problems. In the hybrid approach, GA is used to iterate for searching optimal solutions, CSANN is used to obtain feasible solutions during the iteration of genetic algorithm. Simulations have shown the valid performance of the proposed hybrid approach for job-shop scheduling with respect to the quality of solutions and ...

  19. A Comparison of Classification Approaches for Cyberbullying and Traditional Bullying Using Data from Six European Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultze-Krumbholz, Anja; Göbel, Kristin; Scheithauer, Herbert; Brighi, Antonella; Guarini, Annalisa; Tsorbatzoudis, Haralambos; Barkoukis, Vassilis; Pyzalski, Jacek; Plichta, Piotr; Del Rey, Rosario; Casas, José A.; Thompson, Fran; Smith, Peter K.

    2015-01-01

    In recently published studies on cyberbullying, students are frequently categorized into distinct (cyber)bully and (cyber)victim clusters based on theoretical assumptions and arbitrary cut-off scores adapted from traditional bullying research. The present study identified involvement classes empirically using latent class analysis (LCA), to…

  20. An Effective Approach to Violence Prevention: Traditional Martial Arts in Middle School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zivin, Gail; Hassan, Nimr R.; DePaula, Geraldine F.; Monti, Daniel A.; Harlan, Carmen; Hossain, Kashfia D.; Patterson, Ksai

    2001-01-01

    Replicated and extended the design and outcome measures of several small studies. In these studies, juveniles at high risk for violence and delinquency showed decreased violence and positive changes in psychological risk factors after being required to take a school-linked course in traditional martial arts. (Author)

  1. Comparing Two Survey Research Approaches: E-Mail and Web-Based Technology versus Traditional Mail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Colleen M.; Mailloux, Mark R.

    2001-01-01

    Contrasted two survey methodologies: e-mail-Web and traditional mail. Found that: (1) e-mail-Web respondents were proportionately more likely to be male and enrolled in school full-time; (2) more individual question non-response was present for the e-mail-Web sample; and (3) e-mail-Web respondents value different aspects of graduate school. (EV)

  2. The Impact of Nintendo Wii to Physical Education Students' Balance Compared to the Traditional Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernadakis, Nikolaos; Gioftsidou, Asimenia; Antoniou, Panagiotis; Ioannidis, Dionysis; Giannousi, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there is a difference between an exergame-based and a traditional balance training program, in undergraduate Physical Education students. Thirty two third-year undergraduate students at the Democritus University of Thrace were randomly divided into two training program groups of 16 students each,…

  3. A Comparative Meta-Analysis of 5E and Traditional Approaches in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anil, Özgür; Batdi, Veli

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to compare the 5E learning model with traditional learning methods in terms of their effect on students' academic achievement, retention and attitude scores. In this context, the meta-analytic method known as the "analysis of analyses" was used and a review undertaken of the studies and theses (N = 14) executed…

  4. Factors Affecting Students' Satisfaction in Engineering Disciplines: Traditional vs. Blended Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Caro, Eva; Campuzano-Bolarin, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    In this paper a two-year field study was carried out to analyse how satisfaction differs across the traditional and blended learning methods. Altogether, 21 courses for graduate and postgraduate engineering students were evaluated. Several variables and their relationship with student satisfaction in the first year, with all courses delivered in…

  5. Contribution of Genetic Background, Traditional Risk Factors, and HIV-Related Factors to Coronary Artery Disease Events in HIV-Positive Persons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotger, Margalida; Glass, Tracy R.; Junier, Thomas; Lundgren, Jens; Neaton, James D.; Poloni, Estella S.; van 't Wout, Angélique B.; Lubomirov, Rubin; Colombo, Sara; Martinez, Raquel; Rauch, Andri; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Wentworth, Deborah; van Manen, Danielle; Gras, Luuk A.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Albini, Laura; Torti, Carlo; Jacobson, Lisa P.; Li, Xiuhong; Kingsley, Lawrence A.; Carli, Federica; Guaraldi, Giovanni; Ford, Emily S.; Sereti, Irini; Hadigan, Colleen; Martinez, Esteban; Arnedo, Mireia; Egaña-Gorroño, Lander; Gatell, Jose M.; Law, Matthew; Bendall, Courtney; Petoumenos, Kathy; Rockstroh, Jürgen; Wasmuth, Jan-Christian; Kabamba, Kabeya; Delforge, Marc; De Wit, Stephane; Berger, Florian; Mauss, Stefan; de Paz Sierra, Mariana; Losso, Marcelo; Belloso, Waldo H.; Leyes, Maria; Campins, Antoni; Mondi, Annalisa; De Luca, Andrea; Bernardino, Ignacio; Barriuso-Iglesias, Mónica; Torrecilla-Rodriguez, Ana; Gonzalez-Garcia, Juan; Arribas, José R.; Fanti, Iuri; Gel, Silvia; Puig, Jordi; Negredo, Eugenia; Gutierrez, Mar; Domingo, Pere; Fischer, Julia; Fätkenheuer, Gerd; Alonso-Villaverde, Carlos; Macken, Alan; Woo, James; McGinty, Tara; Mallon, Patrick; Mangili, Alexandra; Skinner, Sally; Wanke, Christine A.; Reiss, Peter; Weber, Rainer; Bucher, Heiner C.; Fellay, Jacques; Telenti, Amalio; Tarr, Philip E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have increased rates of coronary artery disease (CAD). The relative contribution of genetic background, HIV-related factors, antiretroviral medications, and traditional risk factors to CAD has not been fully evaluated in the setting of HIV infection. Methods In the general population, 23 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were shown to be associated with CAD through genome-wide association analysis. Using the Metabochip, we genotyped 1875 HIV-positive, white individuals enrolled in 24 HIV observational studies, including 571 participants with a first CAD event during the 9-year study period and 1304 controls matched on sex and cohort. Results A genetic risk score built from 23 CAD-associated SNPs contributed significantly to CAD (P = 2.9×10−4). In the final multivariable model, participants with an unfavorable genetic background (top genetic score quartile) had a CAD odds ratio (OR) of 1.47 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05–2.04). This effect was similar to hypertension (OR = 1.36; 95% CI, 1.06–1.73), hypercholesterolemia (OR = 1.51; 95% CI, 1.16–1.96), diabetes (OR = 1.66; 95% CI, 1.10–2.49), ≥1 year lopinavir exposure (OR = 1.36; 95% CI, 1.06–1.73), and current abacavir treatment (OR = 1.56; 95% CI, 1.17–2.07). The effect of the genetic risk score was additive to the effect of nongenetic CAD risk factors, and did not change after adjustment for family history of CAD. Conclusions In the setting of HIV infection, the effect of an unfavorable genetic background was similar to traditional CAD risk factors and certain adverse antiretroviral exposures. Genetic testing may provide prognostic information complementary to family history of CAD. PMID:23532479

  6. The tradition algorithm approach underestimates the prevalence of serodiagnosis of syphilis in HIV-infected individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Chen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Currently, there are three algorithms for screening of syphilis: traditional algorithm, reverse algorithm and European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC algorithm. To date, there is not a generally recognized diagnostic algorithm. When syphilis meets HIV, the situation is even more complex. To evaluate their screening performance and impact on the seroprevalence of syphilis in HIV-infected individuals, we conducted a cross-sectional study included 865 serum samples from HIV-infected patients in a tertiary hospital. Every sample (one per patient was tested with toluidine red unheated serum test (TRUST, T. pallidum particle agglutination assay (TPPA, and Treponema pallidum enzyme immunoassay (TP-EIA according to the manufacturer's instructions. The results of syphilis serological testing were interpreted following different algorithms respectively. We directly compared the traditional syphilis screening algorithm with the reverse syphilis screening algorithm in this unique population. The reverse algorithm achieved remarkable higher seroprevalence of syphilis than the traditional algorithm (24.9% vs. 14.2%, p < 0.0001. Compared to the reverse algorithm, the traditional algorithm also had a missed serodiagnosis rate of 42.8%. The total percentages of agreement and corresponding kappa values of tradition and ECDC algorithm compared with those of reverse algorithm were as follows: 89.4%,0.668; 99.8%, 0.994. There was a very good strength of agreement between the reverse and the ECDC algorithm. Our results supported the reverse (or ECDC algorithm in screening of syphilis in HIV-infected populations. In addition, our study demonstrated that screening of HIV-populations using different algorithms may result in a statistically different seroprevalence of syphilis.

  7. The tradition algorithm approach underestimates the prevalence of serodiagnosis of syphilis in HIV-infected individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Peng, Xiuming; Xie, Tiansheng; Jin, Changzhong; Liu, Fumin; Wu, Nanping

    2017-07-01

    Currently, there are three algorithms for screening of syphilis: traditional algorithm, reverse algorithm and European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) algorithm. To date, there is not a generally recognized diagnostic algorithm. When syphilis meets HIV, the situation is even more complex. To evaluate their screening performance and impact on the seroprevalence of syphilis in HIV-infected individuals, we conducted a cross-sectional study included 865 serum samples from HIV-infected patients in a tertiary hospital. Every sample (one per patient) was tested with toluidine red unheated serum test (TRUST), T. pallidum particle agglutination assay (TPPA), and Treponema pallidum enzyme immunoassay (TP-EIA) according to the manufacturer's instructions. The results of syphilis serological testing were interpreted following different algorithms respectively. We directly compared the traditional syphilis screening algorithm with the reverse syphilis screening algorithm in this unique population. The reverse algorithm achieved remarkable higher seroprevalence of syphilis than the traditional algorithm (24.9% vs. 14.2%, p algorithm, the traditional algorithm also had a missed serodiagnosis rate of 42.8%. The total percentages of agreement and corresponding kappa values of tradition and ECDC algorithm compared with those of reverse algorithm were as follows: 89.4%,0.668; 99.8%, 0.994. There was a very good strength of agreement between the reverse and the ECDC algorithm. Our results supported the reverse (or ECDC) algorithm in screening of syphilis in HIV-infected populations. In addition, our study demonstrated that screening of HIV-populations using different algorithms may result in a statistically different seroprevalence of syphilis.

  8. A propensity score approach to correction for bias due to population stratification using genetic and non-genetic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huaqing; Rebbeck, Timothy R; Mitra, Nandita

    2009-12-01

    Confounding due to population stratification (PS) arises when differences in both allele and disease frequencies exist in a population of mixed racial/ethnic subpopulations. Genomic control, structured association, principal components analysis (PCA), and multidimensional scaling (MDS) approaches have been proposed to address this bias using genetic markers. However, confounding due to PS can also be due to non-genetic factors. Propensity scores are widely used to address confounding in observational studies but have not been adapted to deal with PS in genetic association studies. We propose a genomic propensity score (GPS) approach to correct for bias due to PS that considers both genetic and non-genetic factors. We compare the GPS method with PCA and MDS using simulation studies. Our results show that GPS can adequately adjust and consistently correct for bias due to PS. Under no/mild, moderate, and severe PS, GPS yielded estimated with bias close to 0 (mean=-0.0044, standard error=0.0087). Under moderate or severe PS, the GPS method consistently outperforms the PCA method in terms of bias, coverage probability (CP), and type I error. Under moderate PS, the GPS method consistently outperforms the MDS method in terms of CP. PCA maintains relatively high power compared to both MDS and GPS methods under the simulated situations. GPS and MDS are comparable in terms of statistical properties such as bias, type I error, and power. The GPS method provides a novel and robust tool for obtaining less-biased estimates of genetic associations that can consider both genetic and non-genetic factors. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Contribution of genetic background, traditional risk factors, and HIV-related factors to coronary artery disease events in HIV-positive persons

    OpenAIRE

    Rotger, Margalida; Glass, Tracy R; Junier, Thomas; Lundgren, Jens; Neaton, James D; Poloni, Estella S; van 't Wout, Angélique B; Lubomirov, Rubin; Colombo, Sara; Martinez, Raquel; Rauch, Andri; Günthard, Huldrych F; Neuhaus, Jacqueline; Wentworth, Deborah; van Manen, Danielle

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Persons infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have increased rates of coronary artery disease (CAD). The relative contribution of genetic background, HIV-related factors, antiretroviral medications, and traditional risk factors to CAD has not been fully evaluated in the setting of HIV infection. METHODS: In the general population, 23 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were shown to be associated with CAD through genome-wide association analysis. Using the ...

  10. A Comparison of Traditional Book Reviews and Amazon.com Book Reviews of Fiction Using a Content Analysis Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christy Sich

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective - This study compared the quality and helpfulness of traditional book review sources with the online user rating system in Amazon.com in order to determine if one mode is superior to the other and should be used by library selectors to assist in making purchasing decisions. Methods - For this study, 228 reviews of 7 different novels were analyzed using a content analysis approach. Of these, 127 reviews came from traditional review sources and 101 reviews were published on Amazon.com. Results - Using a checklist developed for this study, a significant difference in the quality of reviews was discovered. Reviews from traditional sources scored significantly higher than reviews from Amazon.com. The researcher also looked at review length. On average, Amazon.com reviews are shorter than reviews from traditional sources. Review rating—favourable, unfavourable, or mixed/neutral—also showed a lack of consistency between the two modes of reviews. Conclusion - Although Amazon.com provides multiple reviews of a book on one convenient site, traditional sources of professionally written reviews would most likely save librarians more time in making purchasing decisions, given the higher quality of the review assessment.

  11. Genes, Culture and Conservatism-A Psychometric-Genetic Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwabe, Inga; Jonker, Wilfried; van den Berg, Stéphanie M

    2016-07-01

    The Wilson-Patterson conservatism scale was psychometrically evaluated using homogeneity analysis and item response theory models. Results showed that this scale actually measures two different aspects in people: on the one hand people vary in their agreement with either conservative or liberal catch-phrases and on the other hand people vary in their use of the "?" response category of the scale. A 9-item subscale was constructed, consisting of items that seemed to measure liberalism, and this subscale was subsequently used in a biometric analysis including genotype-environment interaction, correcting for non-homogeneous measurement error. Biometric results showed significant genetic and shared environmental influences, and significant genotype-environment interaction effects, suggesting that individuals with a genetic predisposition for conservatism show more non-shared variance but less shared variance than individuals with a genetic predisposition for liberalism.

  12. Genetic algorithm approach to thin film optical parameters determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurecka, S.; Jureckova, M.; Muellerova, J.

    2003-01-01

    Optical parameters of thin film are important for several optical and optoelectronic applications. In this work the genetic algorithm proposed to solve optical parameters of thin film values. The experimental reflectance is modelled by the Forouhi - Bloomer dispersion relations. The refractive index, the extinction coefficient and the film thickness are the unknown parameters in this model. Genetic algorithm use probabilistic examination of promissing areas of the parameter space. It creates a population of solutions based on the reflectance model and then operates on the population to evolve the best solution by using selection, crossover and mutation operators on the population individuals. The implementation of genetic algorithm method and the experimental results are described too (Authors)

  13. Systems Pharmacology-Based Approach of Connecting Disease Genes in Genome-Wide Association Studies with Traditional Chinese Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jihye; Yoo, Minjae; Shin, Jimin; Kim, Hyunmin; Kang, Jaewoo; Tan, Aik Choon

    2018-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) originated in ancient China has been practiced over thousands of years for treating various symptoms and diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms of TCM in treating these diseases remain unknown. In this study, we employ a systems pharmacology-based approach for connecting GWAS diseases with TCM for potential drug repurposing and repositioning. We studied 102 TCM components and their target genes by analyzing microarray gene expression experiments. We constructed disease-gene networks from 2558 GWAS studies. We applied a systems pharmacology approach to prioritize disease-target genes. Using this bioinformatics approach, we analyzed 14,713 GWAS disease-TCM-target gene pairs and identified 115 disease-gene pairs with q value < 0.2. We validated several of these GWAS disease-TCM-target gene pairs with literature evidence, demonstrating that this computational approach could reveal novel indications for TCM. We also develop TCM-Disease web application to facilitate the traditional Chinese medicine drug repurposing efforts. Systems pharmacology is a promising approach for connecting GWAS diseases with TCM for potential drug repurposing and repositioning. The computational approaches described in this study could be easily expandable to other disease-gene network analysis.

  14. How psychology affects decisions in corporate finance: Traditional vs. behavioural approach

    OpenAIRE

    Luca Piras

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research is to draw a theoretical line to connect on a common conceptual base, behavioural fi-nance with what is internationally known as Modern Fi-nance. The debate often involves discussions about the prevalence of rationality over irrationality. This paper will address mainly two questions: as an economist, should I propend for traditional or for behavioural finance? And, perhaps more important, are they in opposition to each other? Linking the principles upon which the tra...

  15. An integrated approach project for the revaluation of a traditional sourdough bread production chain

    OpenAIRE

    Piazza, C.; Giudici, P.; Corbellini, M.; Gianinetti, A.; Morcia, C.; Terzi, V.

    2008-01-01

    The influence of organic and conventional farming systems on the performance of a panel of old and modern Italian bread wheat varieties has been evaluated, with the aim to individuate an agronomic protocol suitable for the production of a sourdough bread traditionally prepared in a hill zone of Emilia-Romagna. The agronomic and technological characterisation of the wheat samples obtained in organic and conventional farming conditions has been done and the sensorial qualities of the sourdough ...

  16. Metagenomic approach reveals microbial diversity and predictive microbial metabolic pathways in Yucha, a traditional Li fermented food

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Jiachao; Wang, Xiaoru; Huo, Dongxue; Li, Wu; Hu, Qisong; Xu, Chuanbiao; Liu, Sixin; Li, Congfa

    2016-01-01

    Yucha is a typical traditional fermented food of the Li population in the Hainan province of China, and it is made up of cooked rice and fresh fish. In the present study, metagenomic approach and culture-dependent technology were applied to describe the diversity of microbiota and identify beneficial microbes in the Yucha. At the genus level, Lactobacillus was the most abundant genus (43.82% of the total reads), followed by Lactococcus, Enterococcus, Vibrio, Weissella, Pediococcus, Enterobact...

  17. Investigating an Ethical Approach to Genetically Modified Crops in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetically modified (GM) crops gained attention in southern Africa in the context of broader debates about the struggle for food security and poverty alleviation to achieve sustainable development. The prospects of GM crops as a technological innovation have provoked numerous debates and environmental concern ...

  18. Genetic bases of the nutritional approach to migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marchis, Maria Laura; Guadagni, Fiorella; Silvestris, Erica; Lovero, Domenica; Della-Morte, David; Ferroni, Patrizia; Barbanti, Piero; Palmirotta, Raffaele

    2018-03-08

    Migraine is a common multifactorial and polygenic neurological disabling disorder characterized by a genetic background and associated to environmental, hormonal and food stimulations. A large series of evidence suggest a strong correlation between nutrition and migraine and indicates several commonly foods, food additives and beverages that may be involved in the mechanisms triggering the headache attack in migraine-susceptible persons. There are foods and drinks, or ingredients of the same, that can trigger the migraine crisis as well as some foods play a protective function depending on the specific genetic sensitivity of the subject. The recent biotechnological advances have enhanced the identification of some genetic factors involved in onset diseases and the identification of sequence variants of genes responsible for the individual sensitivity to migraine trigger-foods. Therefore many studies are aimed at the analysis of polymorphisms of genes coding for the enzymes involved in the metabolism of food factors in order to clarify the different ways in which people respond to foods based on their genetic constitution. This review discusses the latest knowledge and scientific evidence of the role of gene variants and nutrients, food additives and nutraceuticals interactions in migraine.

  19. A holistic approach to genetic conservation of Pinus strobiformis

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.M. Waring; R. Sniezko; B.A. Goodrich; C. Wehenkel; J.J. Jacobs

    2017-01-01

    Pinus strobiformis (southwestern white pine) is threatened by both a rapidly changing climate and the tree disease white pine blister rust, caused by an introduced fungal pathogen, Cronartium ribicola. We began a proactive program in ~2009 to sustain P. strobiformis that includes genetic conservation, research, and management strategies. Research...

  20. The characterization of goat genetic diversity : Towards a genomic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ajmone-Marsan, P.; Colli, L.; Han, J. L.; Achilli, A.; Lancioni, H.; Joost, S.; Crepaldi, P.; Pilla, F.; Stella, A.; Taberlet, P.; Boettcher, P.; Negrini, R.; Lenstra, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of genetic diversity at molecular level has been proposed as a valuable complement and sometimes proxy to phenotypic diversity of local breeds and is presently considered as one of the FAO priorities for breed characterization. By recommending a set of selected molecular markers

  1. 1 Hierarchical Approaches to the Analysis of Genetic Diversity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-04-14

    Apr 14, 2015 ... Study of genetic diversity is the process by which variation ... diversity tree is available, a core collection can be selected by .... are numerous natural factors, such as hybridization and clinical .... to develop a deeper understanding of the topic .... This can be detected by southern hybridization after running ...

  2. Traditional vs. Modern Approaches in Business English Teaching in the Economic Field

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Teodorescu

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to examine different techniques and approaches used in teaching and learning business English in the economic field. Besides applying the already well-known methods used in second language acquisition, we also tried to incorporate computer-mediated communication into the communicative approach. At all times, the choice of the methods and approaches used in teaching business English has focused on our students' needs in their vocation or job. We worked with two groups of studen...

  3. A systems genetics approach provides a bridge from discovered genetic variants to biological pathways in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirofumi Nakaoka

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS have yielded novel genetic loci underlying common diseases. We propose a systems genetics approach to utilize these discoveries for better understanding of the genetic architecture of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Current evidence of genetic associations with RA was sought through PubMed and the NHGRI GWAS catalog. The associations of 15 single nucleotide polymorphisms and HLA-DRB1 alleles were confirmed in 1,287 cases and 1,500 controls of Japanese subjects. Among these, HLA-DRB1 alleles and eight SNPs showed significant associations and all but one of the variants had the same direction of effect as identified in the previous studies, indicating that the genetic risk factors underlying RA are shared across populations. By receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the area under the curve (AUC for the genetic risk score based on the selected variants was 68.4%. For seropositive RA patients only, the AUC improved to 70.9%, indicating good but suboptimal predictive ability. A simulation study shows that more than 200 additional loci with similar effect size as recent GWAS findings or 20 rare variants with intermediate effects are needed to achieve AUC = 80.0%. We performed the random walk with restart (RWR algorithm to prioritize genes for future mapping studies. The performance of the algorithm was confirmed by leave-one-out cross-validation. The RWR algorithm pointed to ZAP70 in the first rank, in which mutation causes RA-like autoimmune arthritis in mice. By applying the hierarchical clustering method to a subnetwork comprising RA-associated genes and top-ranked genes by the RWR, we found three functional modules relevant to RA etiology: "leukocyte activation and differentiation", "pattern-recognition receptor signaling pathway", and "chemokines and their receptors".These results suggest that the systems genetics approach is useful to find directions of future mapping strategies to illuminate

  4. An experimental detrending approach to attributing change of pan evaporation in comparison with the traditional partial differential method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tingting; Sun, Fubao; Xia, Jun; Liu, Wenbin; Sang, Yanfang

    2017-04-01

    In predicting how droughts and hydrological cycles would change in a warming climate, change of atmospheric evaporative demand measured by pan evaporation (Epan) is one crucial element to be understood. Over the last decade, the derived partial differential (PD) form of the PenPan equation is a prevailing attribution approach to attributing changes to Epan worldwide. However, the independency among climatic variables required by the PD approach cannot be met using long term observations. Here we designed a series of numerical experiments to attribute changes of Epan over China by detrending each climatic variable, i.e., an experimental detrending approach, to address the inter-correlation among climate variables, and made comparison with the traditional PD method. The results show that the detrending approach is superior not only to a complicate system with multi-variables and mixing algorithm like aerodynamic component (Ep,A) and Epan, but also to a simple case like radiative component (Ep,R), when compared with traditional PD method. The major reason for this is the strong and significant inter-correlation of input meteorological forcing. Very similar and fine attributing results have been achieved based on detrending approach and PD method after eliminating the inter-correlation of input through a randomize approach. The contribution of Rh and Ta in net radiation and thus Ep,R, which has been overlooked based on the PD method but successfully detected by detrending approach, provides some explanation to the comparing results. We adopted the control run from the detrending approach and applied it to made adjustment of PD method. Much improvement has been made and thus proven this adjustment an effective way in attributing changes to Epan. Hence, the detrending approach and the adjusted PD method are well recommended in attributing changes in hydrological models to better understand and predict water and energy cycle.

  5. Food Control and a Citizen Science Approach for Improving Teaching of Genetics in Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrell, Y. J.; Muñoz-Colmenero, A. M.; Dopico, E.; Miralles, L.; Garcia-Vazquez, E.

    2016-01-01

    A Citizen Science approach was implemented in the laboratory practices of Genetics at the University of Oviedo, related with the engaging topic of Food Control. Real samples of food products consumed by students at home ("students as samplers") were employed as teaching material in three different courses of Genetics during the academic…

  6. An Inquiry-Based Approach of Traditional "Step-by-Step" Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalay, L.; Tóth, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This is the start of a road map for the effective introduction of inquiry-based learning in chemistry. Advantages of inquiry-based approaches to the development of scientific literacy are widely discussed in the literature. However, unless chemistry educators take account of teachers' reservations and identified disadvantages such approaches will…

  7. Safety of genetically engineered foods: approaches to assessing unintended health effects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on Identifying and Assessing Unintended Effects of Genetically Engineered Foods on Human Health, National Research Council

    2004-01-01

    .... It identifies and recommends several pre- and post-market approaches to guide the assessment of unintended compositional changes that could result from genetically modified foods and research avenues...

  8. String figures as mathematics? an anthropological approach to string figure-making in oral tradition societies

    CERN Document Server

    Vandendriessche, Eric

    2015-01-01

    This book addresses the mathematical rationality contained in the making of string figures. It does so by using interdisciplinary methods borrowed from anthropology, mathematics, history and philosophy of mathematics. The practice of string figure-making has long been carried out in many societies, and particularly in those of oral tradition. It consists in applying a succession of operations to a string (knotted into a loop), mostly using the fingers and sometimes the feet, the wrists or the mouth. This succession of operations is intended to generate a final figure. The book explores differ

  9. New approach to high-risk pregnancy begins far earlier than traditional programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-10-01

    Why? Because traditional programs that focus on women as soon as they become pregnant are not making any headway against the incidence of low and very low birth weight (LBW) babies. As a result, while more of these babies are surviving, a significant number have disabilities that will impact them for life while costing the health care system dearly. Experts at Emory University in Atlanta believe there must be a better way to curb the incidence of poor birth outcomes, and they are putting their theories to work in a new program focused on "interpregnancy" care.

  10. Bat Species Comparisons Based on External Morphology: A Test of Traditional versus Geometric Morphometric Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmieder, Daniela A; Benítez, Hugo A; Borissov, Ivailo M; Fruciano, Carmelo

    2015-01-01

    External morphology is commonly used to identify bats as well as to investigate flight and foraging behavior, typically relying on simple length and area measures or ratios. However, geometric morphometrics is increasingly used in the biological sciences to analyse variation in shape and discriminate among species and populations. Here we compare the ability of traditional versus geometric morphometric methods in discriminating between closely related bat species--in this case European horseshoe bats (Rhinolophidae, Chiroptera)--based on morphology of the wing, body and tail. In addition to comparing morphometric methods, we used geometric morphometrics to detect interspecies differences as shape changes. Geometric morphometrics yielded improved species discrimination relative to traditional methods. The predicted shape for the variation along the between group principal components revealed that the largest differences between species lay in the extent to which the wing reaches in the direction of the head. This strong trend in interspecific shape variation is associated with size, which we interpret as an evolutionary allometry pattern.

  11. Bat Species Comparisons Based on External Morphology: A Test of Traditional versus Geometric Morphometric Approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela A Schmieder

    Full Text Available External morphology is commonly used to identify bats as well as to investigate flight and foraging behavior, typically relying on simple length and area measures or ratios. However, geometric morphometrics is increasingly used in the biological sciences to analyse variation in shape and discriminate among species and populations. Here we compare the ability of traditional versus geometric morphometric methods in discriminating between closely related bat species--in this case European horseshoe bats (Rhinolophidae, Chiroptera--based on morphology of the wing, body and tail. In addition to comparing morphometric methods, we used geometric morphometrics to detect interspecies differences as shape changes. Geometric morphometrics yielded improved species discrimination relative to traditional methods. The predicted shape for the variation along the between group principal components revealed that the largest differences between species lay in the extent to which the wing reaches in the direction of the head. This strong trend in interspecific shape variation is associated with size, which we interpret as an evolutionary allometry pattern.

  12. DNA barcoding and traditional taxonomy: an integrated approach for biodiversity conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Bhavisha P; Thaker, Vrinda S

    2017-07-01

    Biological diversity is depleting at an alarming rate. Additionally, a vast amount of biodiversity still remains undiscovered. Taxonomy has been serving the purpose of describing, naming, and classifying species for more than 250 years. DNA taxonomy and barcoding have accelerated the rate of this process, thereby providing a tool for conservation practice. DNA barcoding and traditional taxonomy have their own inherent merits and demerits. The synergistic use of both methods, in the form of integrative taxonomy, has the potential to contribute to biodiversity conservation in a pragmatic timeframe and overcome their individual drawbacks. In this review, we discuss the basics of both these methods of biological identification (traditional taxonomy and DNA barcoding), the technical advances in integrative taxonomy, and future trends. We also present a comprehensive compilation of published examples of integrative taxonomy that refer to nine topics within biodiversity conservation. Morphological and molecular species limits were observed to be congruent in ∼41% of the 58 source studies. The majority of the studies highlighted the description of cryptic diversity through the use of molecular data, whereas research areas like endemism, biological invasion, and threatened species were less discussed in the literature.

  13. How psychology affects decisions in corporate finance: Traditional vs. behavioural approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Piras

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to draw a theoretical line to connect on a common conceptual base, behavioural fi-nance with what is internationally known as Modern Fi-nance. The debate often involves discussions about the prevalence of rationality over irrationality. This paper will address mainly two questions: as an economist, should I propend for traditional or for behavioural finance? And, perhaps more important, are they in opposition to each other? Linking the principles upon which the traditional theory of finance is based to behavioural finance appears also to be useful to better understand recent global turmoil in the world financial system. In finding such links, behavioural finance studies will help on driving research to define market models much closer to reality than they are today. Thus literature recognition will be carried out, starting from the most important contribution to fundamental analysis, value theory, going through modern portfolio theory and efficient market hypothesis to seminal contributions on behavioural finance, reaching recent findings of Neuronomics, in order to establish some common theoretical base in corporate finance studies.

  14. Reaching Urban Poor Hypertensive Patients: A Novel Model of Chronic Disease Care Versus a Traditional Fee-for-Service Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Jim; Guse, Clare E

    2016-08-09

    There is a significant disparity in hypertensive treatment rates between those with and without health insurance. If left untreated, hypertension leads to significant morbidity and mortality. The uninsured face numerous barriers to access chronic disease care. We developed the Community-based Chronic Disease Management (CCDM) clinics specifically for the uninsured with hypertension utilizing nurse-led teams, community-based locations, and evidence-based clinical protocols. All services, including laboratory and medications, are provided on-site and free of charge. In order to ascertain if the CCDM model of care was as effective as traditional models of care in achieving blood pressure goals, we compared CCDM clinics' hypertensive care outcomes with 2 traditional fee-for-service physician-led clinics. All the clinics are located near one another in poor urban neighborhoods of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Patients seen at the CCDM clinics and at 1 of the 2 traditional clinics showed a statistically significant improvement in reaching blood pressure goal at 6 months (P fee-for-service clinics when compared with the CCDM clinics. The CCDM model of care is at least as effective in controlling hypertension as more traditional fee-for-service models caring for the same population. The CCDM model of care to treat hypertension may offer another approach for engaging the urban poor in chronic disease care. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Detection of consensuses and treatment principles of diabetic nephropathy in traditional Chinese medicine: A new approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Tong

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: The results suggest that the community detection-based approach is useful and feasible for uncovering consensuses and treatment principles of DN treatment in TCM, and could be used to address other similar problems in TCM.

  16. Food control and a citizen science approach for improving teaching of Genetics in universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrell, Y J; Muñoz-Colmenero, A M; Dopico, E; Miralles, L; Garcia-Vazquez, E

    2016-09-10

    A Citizen Science approach was implemented in the laboratory practices of Genetics at the University of Oviedo, related with the engaging topic of Food Control. Real samples of food products consumed by students at home (students as samplers) were employed as teaching material in three different courses of Genetics during the academic year 2014-2015: Experimental Methods in Food Production (MBTA) (Master level), and Applied Molecular Biology (BMA) and Conservation Genetics and Breeding (COMGE) (Bachelor/Degree level). Molecular genetics based on PCR amplification of DNA markers was employed for species identification of 22 seafood products in COMGE and MBTA, and for detection of genetically modified (GM) maize from nine products in BMA. In total six seafood products incorrectly labeled (27%), and two undeclared GM maize (22%) were found. A post-Laboratory survey was applied for assessing the efficacy of the approach for improving motivation in the Laboratory Practices of Genetics. Results confirmed that students that worked on their own samples from local markets were significantly more motivated and better evaluated their Genetic laboratory practices than control students (χ(2)  = 12.11 p = 0.033). Our results suggest that citizen science approaches could not be only useful for improving teaching of Genetics in universities but also to incorporate students and citizens as active agents in food control. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(5):450-462, 2016. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  17. Genetic ancestry in relation to the metabolic response to a US versus traditional Mexican diet: a randomized crossover feeding trial among women of Mexican descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago-Torres, M; De Dieu Tapsoba, J; Kratz, M; Lampe, J W; Breymeyer, K L; Levy, L; Song, X; Villaseñor, A; Wang, C-Y; Fejerman, L; Neuhouser, M L; Carlson, C S

    2017-03-01

    Certain populations with a large proportion of indigenous American (IA) genetic ancestry may be evolutionarily adapted to traditional diets high in legumes and complex carbohydrates, and may have a detrimental metabolic response to US diets high in refined carbohydrates and added sugars. We tested whether IA ancestry modified the metabolic response to a US versus traditional Mexican diet in a controlled dietary intervention. First and second generation Mexican immigrant women (n=53) completed a randomized crossover feeding trial testing the effects of a US versus traditional Mexican diet. The metabolic response to the diets was measured by fasting serum concentrations of glucose, insulin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), adiponectin, C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and computed homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA IR ). Blood collected at baseline was used for genotyping, and estimation of African, European and IA ancestries with the use of 214 ancestry informative markers. The genetic ancestral background was 56% IA, 38% European and 6% African. Women in the highest IA ancestry tertile (>62%) were shorter in height, less educated and less acculturated to the US lifestyle, and tended to have higher waist-to-hip ratio compared with women in the middle and lowest IA ancestry tertiles, respectively. Compared with the US diet, the traditional Mexican diet tended to reduce glucose, insulin, IGF-1, IGFBP-3 and HOMA IR among women in the middle IA ancestry group (IA ancestry ⩽45-62%), whereas having no effect on biomarkers related to inflammation. We observed modest interactions between IA ancestry and the metabolic response to a US versus traditional Mexican diet among Mexican immigrant women.

  18. The practice of genetic counselling: a Ccmparative approach to understanding genetic counselling in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suli, S.

    2009-01-01

    This article provides an empirical account of the application of genetic counselling in China based on interviews, clinical observation and literature research during a field study from September 2008 to February 2009, carried out mainly in China and partly in Hong Kong and the United Kingdom.

  19. Invasion success in Cogongrass (Imperata cylindrica): A population genetic approach exploring genetic diversity and historical introductions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rima D. Lucardi; Lisa E. Wallace; Gary N. Ervin

    2014-01-01

    Propagule pressure significantly contributes to and limits the potential success of a biological invasion, especially during transport, introduction, and establishment. Events such as multiple introductions of foreign parent material and gene flow among them can increase genetic diversity in founding populations, often leading to greater invasion success. We applied...

  20. Comparison of Student Performance in Video Game Format vs. Traditional Approach in Introductory Astronomy Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barringer, Daniel; Kregenow, Julia M.; Palma, Christopher; Plummer, Julia

    2015-01-01

    In Spring of 2014, Penn State debuted an online Introductory Astronomy (AST 001) section that was designed as a video game. Previous studies have shown that well-designed games help learners to build accurate understanding of embedded concepts and processes and aid learner motivation, which strongly contributes to a student's willingness to learn. We start by presenting the learning gains as measured with the Test of Astronomy Standards (TOAST) from this new course design. We further compare the learning gains from the video game section with learning gains measured from more traditional online formats and in-person lecture sections of AST 001 taught at Penn State over the last five years to evaluate the extent to which this new medium for online Astronomy education supports student learning.

  1. Participatory conservation approaches for satoyama, the traditional forest and agricultural landscape of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobori, Hiromi; Primack, Richard B

    2003-06-01

    The traditional agricultural landscape of Japan, known as satoyama, consists of a mixture of forests, wet rice paddy fields, grasslands, and villages. This landscape supports a great diversity of plant and animal species, many of which are significant to the Japanese culture. The satoyama landscape is currently being rapidly converted to residential and industrial uses in Japan's expanding metropolitan areas, with the local loss of many species. Only 7% of the land in the Yokohama area remains as satoyama. City residents and older farmers have become key participants in programs to protect examples of satoyama. Many urban residents value the experience of participating in agricultural and conservation activities once they are made aware of the threat faced by the satoyama landscape. In one particularly successful program, conservation efforts and fund-raising are linked to "Totoro", an imaginary forest animal featured in a popular animated film.

  2. A new interdisciplinary approach to the study of the origins of traditional polyphony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordania Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses a new model of the origins of choral singing in the context of human evolutionary history. Hominid interaction with predators is seen as a crucial force in the evolution of human morphology and behaviour. Group singing and dancing, with body painting and the use of masks, are perceived as critical elements of the strategy to deter predators and to put hominids into an altered state of consciousness. In this state, humans do not feel fear and pain and are ready to sacrifice their lives for the common goal. This psychological condition is still important to many human group activities, particularly in religion and the military. The mosaic distribution of polyphonic traditions is discussed in the context of the origins of language and articulated speech.

  3. Temari Reiki: a new hands-off approach to traditional Reiki.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Jane Stewart

    2013-04-01

    This paper encapsulates the history of Reiki, an ancient healing art, from its origins in Japan to current practice in the United States. It defines Reiki therapy and discusses the development of a new Reiki method called Temari Reiki and the use of two additional chakras. Lastly, sample clients scenarios are provided. Because of the success of Temari Reiki in my practice, recommendations include that it be integrated as therapy to augment traditional Western medicine-based patient care plans for patients with cancer, pain, stress and other disabling health issues. Also, additional research using randomized clinical trials is recommended to examine the benefits of Temari Reiki for improving patients' well-being in mind, body and spirit. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  4. Current mass spectrometry approaches and challenges for the bioanalysis of traditional Chinese medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xin; Wang, Rui; Zhou, Xu; Li, Ping; Yang, Hua

    2016-07-15

    Traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) are gaining more and more attentions all over the world. The focus of TCMs researches were gradually shifted from chemical research to the combination study of chemical and life sciences. However, obtaining precise information of TCMs process in vivo or in vitro is still a bottleneck in bioanalysis of TCMs for their chemical composition complexity. This paper reviewed the recent analytical methods especially mass spectrometry technology in the bioanalysis of TCMs, and data processing techniques in the qualitative and quantitative analyses of metabolite of TCMs. Additionally, the difficulties encountered in the analyzing biological samples in TCMs and the solutions to these problems have been mentioned. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. From ancient to avant-garde: a review of traditional and modern multimodal approaches to surgical anatomy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Minhao; Wattchow, David; de Fontgalland, Dayan

    2018-03-01

    The landscape of surgical anatomy education is progressively changing. Traditional methods, such as cadaveric dissection and didacticism are being increasingly phased out in undergraduate courses for multimodal approaches incorporating problem-based learning, radiology and computer-based simulations. Although effective at clinically contextualizing and integrating anatomical information, these approaches may be a poor substitute for fostering a grasp of foundational 'pure' anatomy. Dissection is ideal for this purpose and hence remains the cornerstone of anatomical education. However, novel methods and technological advancements continually give way to adjuncts such as cadaveric surgery, three-dimensional printing, virtual simulation and live surgical streaming, which have demonstrated significant efficacy alone or alongside dissection. Therefore, although divergent paradigms of 'new versus old' approaches have engulfed and divided the community, educators should seek to integrate the ancient and avant-garde to comprehensively satisfy all of the modern anatomy learner's educational needs. © 2017 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  6. A New Approach to Tuning Heuristic Parameters of Genetic Algorithms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Holeňa, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 3 (2006), s. 562-569 ISSN 1790-0832. [AIKED'06. WSEAS International Conference on Artificial Intelligence , Knowledge Engineering and Data Bases. Madrid, 15.02.2006-17.02.2006] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA201/05/0325; GA ČR(CZ) GA201/05/0557 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : evolutionary optimization * genetic algorithms * heuristic parameters * parameter tuning * artificial neural networks * convergence speed * population diversity Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science

  7. Theorising Masculinities and Crime: A Genetic-Social Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Owen, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines competing notions of ‘masculinities’ in relation to crime, and the global nature of gendered inequalities. It is the contention here that social constructionist theories of male sexualities contain certain theoretical deficits. It is suggested that a post-Postmodern analysis of ‘masculinities’ might incorporate some of the insights from Owen’s Genetic-Social meta-theoretical framework. Owen’s ‘sensitising’ framework has been ‘applied’ to the sociological study of human bio...

  8. Molecular approaches for genetic improvement of seed quality and characterization of genetic diversity in soybean: a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Niraj; Khare, Dhirendra

    2016-10-01

    Soybean is an economically important leguminous crop. Genetic improvements of soybeans have focused on enhancement of seed and oil yield, development of varieties suited to different cropping systems, and breeding resistant/tolerant varieties for various biotic and abiotic stresses. Plant breeders have used conventional breeding techniques for the improvement of these traits in soybean. The conventional breeding process can be greatly accelerated through the application of molecular and genomic approaches. Molecular markers have proved to be a new tool in soybean breeding by enhancing selection efficiency in a rapid and time-bound manner. An overview of molecular approaches for the genetic improvement of soybean seed quality parameters, considering recent applications of marker-assisted selection and 'omics' research, is provided in this article.

  9. Traditional Indigenous Approaches to Healing and the modern welfare of Traditional Knowledge, Spirituality and Lands: A critical reflection on practices and policies taken from the Canadian Indigenous Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian A. Robbins

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In order for traditional knowledge to be maintained and to develop, it has to be practiced. Traditional healing provides a vehicle for this to occur. In Canada, the spiritual revitalization of Indigenous communities and individuals often involves the use numerous components of traditional healing. These elements are reflectedmost clearly at the grassroots level, however, current Indigenous programs delivered by Indigenous and governmental agencies have made some accommodating efforts as well. Perhaps most importantly, traditional knowledge and Indigenous spirituality hinges on the maintenance and renewal of relationships to the land.Indigenous land bases and the environment as a whole remain vitally important to the practice of traditional healing.A focus on Indigenous healing, when discussing Indigenous knowledge systems and spirituality, is paramount today due to the large scale suppression of Indigenous cultural expressions during the process of colonization. With respect to policy, there appears to be a historical progression of perception or attitude towards Indigenous traditional healing in Canada from one of disfavour to one favour. There are nevertheless continuing challenges for traditional healing. Mainstream perceptions and subsequent policy implementations sometimes still reflect attitudes that were formulated during the decline of traditional healing practice during colonization processes. As a consequence the ability for particular communities to maintain and use their specific understandings ofIndigenous knowledge continues encounter obstacles. Indigenous Knowledge systems are living entities and not relics of the past. Today, these knowledge systems are still greatly being applied to help Indigenous communities and Indigenous people recover fromintergenerational pain and suffering endured during the colonization process. Future policy development and implementation should aim to support Indigenous peoples and communities when

  10. A Novel Interactive Online Module in a Traditional Curriculum through a Blended Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbard, Leslie Laing; Salajan, Florin

    2009-01-01

    A unique approach was planned and implemented for undergraduate dental students that would reinforce the principles of removable partial denture (RPD) design. 162 students were grouped according to their year of dental studies (66 second-year students and 96 third-year students) within the Discipline of Prosthodontics at the Faculty of Dentistry,…

  11. Modern versus Tradition: Are There Two Different Approaches to Reading of the Confucian Classics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chung-yi

    2016-01-01

    How to read the Confucian Classics today? Scholars with philosophical training usually emphasize that the philosophical approach, in comparison with the classicist and historical ones, is the best way to read the Confucian Classics, for it can dig out as much intellectual resources as possible from the classical texts in order to show their modern…

  12. A Modern Approach to the Traditional Textbook: Bringing Introductory Geology Courses into the 21st Century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman Ford, K.; Ford, K. R.

    2013-12-01

    Undergraduate introductory geology courses are required in many colleges nationwide as part of the general education requirement. As a result, a large portion of those students are non-majors and most are not science majors. Textbooks used in these courses are often extensive with respect to the amount of material covered which tends to be overwhelming to the average student. Thus, students often purchase the pricey textbook but turn to their smartphones, notebooks, and laptops for answers. Before the development of the internet, students spent many hours in libraries and with their textbooks organizing and retrieving information. However, new technologies in the 21st century have essentially replaced traditional textbooks with students turning to online search engines, such as Google, to study and to complete homework assignments. Presently, online search engines may be more intuitive, but what's going on in the background isn't intuitive at all, and few students have a clear understanding of how search engines operate. Effectively this leads to students without the conception of how to build an adequate search strategy independent of search engines. Often, students are directed to online encyclopedias that may have erroneous information. Here, we employ an alternative to traditional textbooks and online search engines by implementing a guidebook with electronic resources for online activities and homework assignments. The proposed guidebook is roughly modeled after the American Geosciences Institute's Geoscience Handbook: AGI Data Sheets 4th, revised edition, and will include diagrams, graphs, charts, and pictures of basic geologic principles, processes, and earth materials. Along with the information, each topic will have online resources including sites for general reading, specific assignments that require visiting scientifically sound websites (i.e., USGS, GSA, AGU, Science, Nature), online self-assessment activities, and Google Earth activities. In addition

  13. Introduction: integrating genetic and cultural evolutionary approaches to language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesoudi, Alex; McElligott, Alan G; Adger, David

    2011-04-01

    The papers in this special issue of Human Biology address recent research in the field of language evolution, both the genetic evolution of the language faculty and the cultural evolution of specific languages. While both of these areas have received increasing interest in recent years, there is also a need to integrate these somewhat separate efforts and explore the relevant gene-culture coevolutionary interactions. Here we summarize the individual contributions, set them in the context of the wider literature, and identify outstanding future research questions. The first set of papers concerns the comparative study of nonhuman communication in primates and birds from both a behavioral and neurobiological perspective, revealing evidence for several common language-related traits in various nonhuman species and providing clues as to the evolutionary origin and function of the human language faculty. The second set of papers discusses the consequences of viewing language as a culturally evolving system in its own right, including claims that this removes the need for strong genetic biases for language acquisition, and that phylogenetic evolutionary methods can be used to reconstruct language histories. We conclude by highlighting outstanding areas for future research, including identifying the precise selection pressures that gave rise to the language faculty in ancestral hominin species, and determining the strength, domain specificity, and origin of the cultural transmission biases that shape languages as they pass along successive generations of language learners.

  14. Fish crackers development from minced fish and starch: an innovative approach to a traditional product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Rodrigues Pinheiro Neiva

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to develop sensory acceptable, high nutritional value fish crackers that could be kept at room temperature for 180 days. Minced fish of different low-value species was the raw material employed to produce two types of fish crackers: a the traditional keropok cracker, which was expanded by deep frying; and b a low-fat fish cracker, expanded by microwave cooking. The protein content of the fried fish crackers (FFCs and that of the microwaved fish crackers (MFCs were high (10.86 and 14.70%, respectively. The essential amino acid contents of the two types of fish cracker were above the FAO requirements for adults, and the lysine content was above the requirements for children. Sensory analysis, performed by adult panelists, resulted in a general level of acceptability of 90% for the MFCs and of 97% for the FFCs. Vacuum packaging maintained microbiological and physicochemical properties for a storage period of 180 days at room temperature.

  15. Assessing Pictograph Recognition: A Comparison of Crowdsourcing and Traditional Survey Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Jinqiu; Argo, Lauren; Stoddard, Greg; Bray, Bruce E; Zeng-Treitler, Qing

    2015-12-17

    Compared to traditional methods of participant recruitment, online crowdsourcing platforms provide a fast and low-cost alternative. Amazon Mechanical Turk (MTurk) is a large and well-known crowdsourcing service. It has developed into the leading platform for crowdsourcing recruitment. To explore the application of online crowdsourcing for health informatics research, specifically the testing of medical pictographs. A set of pictographs created for cardiovascular hospital discharge instructions was tested for recognition. This set of illustrations (n=486) was first tested through an in-person survey in a hospital setting (n=150) and then using online MTurk participants (n=150). We analyzed these survey results to determine their comparability. Both the demographics and the pictograph recognition rates of online participants were different from those of the in-person participants. In the multivariable linear regression model comparing the 2 groups, the MTurk group scored significantly higher than the hospital sample after adjusting for potential demographic characteristics (adjusted mean difference 0.18, 95% CI 0.08-0.28, Ptraditional in-person surveys, but it cannot replace them.

  16. Virtual surgery simulation versus traditional approaches in training of residents in cervical pedicle screw placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yang; Shi, Jiangang; Lin, Yanping; Chen, Huajiang; Yuan, Wen

    2018-06-01

    The cervical screw placement is one of the most difficult procedures in spine surgery, which often needs a long period of repeated practices and could cause screw placement-related complications. We performed this cadaver study to investigate the effectiveness of virtual surgical training system (VSTS) on cervical pedicle screw instrumentation for residents. A total of ten novice residents were randomly assigned to two groups: the simulation training (ST) group (n = 5) and control group (n = 5). The ST group received a surgical training of cervical pedicle screw placement on VSTS and the control group was given an introductory teaching session before cadaver test. Ten fresh adult spine specimens including 6 males and 4 females were collected, and were randomly allocated to the two groups. The bilateral C3-C6 pedicle screw instrumentation was performed in the specimens of the two groups, respectively. After instrumentation, screw positions of the two groups were evaluated by image examinations. There was significantly statistical difference in screw penetration rates between the ST (10%) and control group (62.5%, P VSTS as an advanced training tool exhibited promising effects on improving performance of novice residents in cervical pedicle screw placement compared with the traditional teaching methods.

  17. Optimization of a Non-traditional Unsupervised Classification Approach for Land Cover Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, R. K.; Brumfield, J. O.; Campbell, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    The conditions under which a hybrid of clustering and canonical analysis for image classification produce optimum results were analyzed. The approach involves generation of classes by clustering for input to canonical analysis. The importance of the number of clusters input and the effect of other parameters of the clustering algorithm (ISOCLS) were examined. The approach derives its final result by clustering the canonically transformed data. Therefore the importance of number of clusters requested in this final stage was also examined. The effect of these variables were studied in terms of the average separability (as measured by transformed divergence) of the final clusters, the transformation matrices resulting from different numbers of input classes, and the accuracy of the final classifications. The research was performed with LANDSAT MSS data over the Hazleton/Berwick Pennsylvania area. Final classifications were compared pixel by pixel with an existing geographic information system to provide an indication of their accuracy.

  18. Access and benefits sharing of genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge in northern Canada: understanding the legal environment and creating effective research agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geary, Janis; Jardine, Cynthia G; Guebert, Jenilee; Bubela, Tania

    2013-01-01

    Research in northern Canada focused on Aboriginal peoples has historically benefited academia with little consideration for the people being researched or their traditional knowledge (TK). Although this attitude is changing, the complexity of TK makes it difficult to develop mechanisms to preserve and protect it. Protecting TK becomes even more important when outside groups become interested in using TK or materials with associated TK. In the latter category are genetic resources, which may have commercial value and are the focus of this article. This article addresses access to and use of genetic resources and associated TK in the context of the historical power-imbalances in research relationships in Canadian north. Review. Research involving genetic resources and TK is becoming increasingly relevant in northern Canada. The legal framework related to genetic resources and the cultural shift of universities towards commercial goals in research influence the environment for negotiating research agreements. Current guidelines for research agreements do not offer appropriate guidelines to achieve mutual benefit, reflect unequal bargaining power or take the relationship between parties into account. Relational contract theory may be a useful framework to address the social, cultural and legal hurdles inherent in creating research agreements.

  19. Access and benefits sharing of genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge in northern Canada: understanding the legal environment and creating effective research agreements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janis Geary

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. Research in northern Canada focused on Aboriginal peoples has historically benefited academia with little consideration for the people being researched or their traditional knowledge (TK. Although this attitude is changing, the complexity of TK makes it difficult to develop mechanisms to preserve and protect it. Protecting TK becomes even more important when outside groups become interested in using TK or materials with associated TK. In the latter category are genetic resources, which may have commercial value and are the focus of this article. Objective. This article addresses access to and use of genetic resources and associated TK in the context of the historical power-imbalances in research relationships in Canadian north. Design. Review. Results. Research involving genetic resources and TK is becoming increasingly relevant in northern Canada. The legal framework related to genetic resources and the cultural shift of universities towards commercial goals in research influence the environment for negotiating research agreements. Current guidelines for research agreements do not offer appropriate guidelines to achieve mutual benefit, reflect unequal bargaining power or take the relationship between parties into account. Conclusions. Relational contract theory may be a useful framework to address the social, cultural and legal hurdles inherent in creating research agreements.

  20. A genetic-neural artificial intelligence approach to resins optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabral, Denise C.; Barros, Marcio P.; Lapa, Celso M.F.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.

    2005-01-01

    This work presents a preliminary study about the viability and adequacy of a new methodology for the definition of one of the main properties of ion exchange resins used for isotopic separation. Basically, the main problem is the definition of pelicule diameter in case of pelicular ion exchange resins, in order to achieve the best performance in the shortest time. In order to achieve this, a methodology was developed, based in two classic techniques of Artificial Intelligence (AI). At first, an artificial neural network (NN) was trained to map the existing relations between the nucleus radius and the resin's efficiency associated with the exchange time. Later on, a genetic algorithm (GA) was developed in order to find the best pelicule dimension. Preliminary results seem to confirm the potential of the method, and this can be used in any chemical process employing ion exchange resins. (author)

  1. The underlying mechanisms of genetic innovation and speciation in the family Corynebacteriaceae: A phylogenomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Xiao-Yang; Jiang, Zhao; Yang, Ling-Ling; Huang, Ying

    2017-02-01

    The pangenome of a bacterial species population is formed by genetic reduction and genetic expansion over the long course of evolution. Gene loss is a pervasive source of genetic reduction, and (exogenous and endogenous) gene gain is the main driver of genetic expansion. To understand the genetic innovation and speciation of the family Corynebacteriaceae, which cause a wide range of serious infections in humans and animals, we analyzed the pangenome of this family, and reconstructed its phylogeny using a phylogenomics approach. Genetic variations have occurred throughout the whole evolutionary history of the Corynebacteriaceae. Gene loss has been the primary force causing genetic changes, not only in terms of the number of protein families affected, but also because of its continuity on the time series. The variation in metabolism caused by these genetic changes mainly occurred for membrane transporters, two-component systems, and metabolism related to amino acids and carbohydrates. Interestingly, horizontal gene transfer (HGT) not only caused changes related to pathogenicity, but also triggered the acquisition of antimicrobial resistance. The Darwinian theory of evolution did not adequately explain the effects of dispersive HGT and/or gene loss in the evolution of the Corynebacteriaceae. These findings provide new insight into the evolution and speciation of Corynebacteriaceae and advance our understanding of the genetic innovation in microbial populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Genetic Complexity of Episodic Memory: A Twin Approach to Studies of Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremen, William S.; Spoon, Kelly M.; Jacobson, Kristen C.; Vasilopoulos, Terrie; McCaffery, Jeanne M.; Panizzon, Matthew S.; Franz, Carol E.; Vuoksimaa, Eero; Xian, Hong; Rana, Brinda K.; Toomey, Rosemary; McKenzie, Ruth; Lyons, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Episodic memory change is a central issue in cognitive aging, and understanding that process will require elucidation of its genetic underpinnings. A key limiting factor in genetically informed research on memory has been lack of attention to genetic and phenotypic complexity, as if “memory is memory” and all well-validated assessments are essentially equivalent. Here we applied multivariate twin models to data from late-middle-aged participants in the Vietnam Era Twin Study of Aging to examine the genetic architecture of 6 measures from 3 standard neuropsychological tests: the California Verbal Learning Test-2, and Wechsler Memory Scale-III Logical Memory (LM) and Visual Reproductions (VR). An advantage of the twin method is that it can estimate the extent to which latent genetic influences are shared or independent across different measures before knowing which specific genes are involved. The best-fitting model was a higher order common pathways model with a heritable higher order general episodic memory factor and three test-specific subfactors. More importantly, substantial genetic variance was accounted for by genetic influences that were specific to the latent LM and VR subfactors (28% and 30%, respectively) and independent of the general factor. Such unique genetic influences could partially account for replication failures. Moreover, if different genes influence different memory phenotypes, they could well have different age-related trajectories. This approach represents an important step toward providing critical information for all types of genetically informative studies of aging and memory. PMID:24956007

  3. Catecholaminergic systems in stress: structural and molecular genetic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvetnansky, Richard; Sabban, Esther L; Palkovits, Miklos

    2009-04-01

    Stressful stimuli evoke complex endocrine, autonomic, and behavioral responses that are extremely variable and specific depending on the type and nature of the stressors. We first provide a short overview of physiology, biochemistry, and molecular genetics of sympatho-adrenomedullary, sympatho-neural, and brain catecholaminergic systems. Important processes of catecholamine biosynthesis, storage, release, secretion, uptake, reuptake, degradation, and transporters in acutely or chronically stressed organisms are described. We emphasize the structural variability of catecholamine systems and the molecular genetics of enzymes involved in biosynthesis and degradation of catecholamines and transporters. Characterization of enzyme gene promoters, transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms, transcription factors, gene expression and protein translation, as well as different phases of stress-activated transcription and quantitative determination of mRNA levels in stressed organisms are discussed. Data from catecholamine enzyme gene knockout mice are shown. Interaction of catecholaminergic systems with other neurotransmitter and hormonal systems are discussed. We describe the effects of homotypic and heterotypic stressors, adaptation and maladaptation of the organism, and the specificity of stressors (physical, emotional, metabolic, etc.) on activation of catecholaminergic systems at all levels from plasma catecholamines to gene expression of catecholamine enzymes. We also discuss cross-adaptation and the effect of novel heterotypic stressors on organisms adapted to long-term monotypic stressors. The extra-adrenal nonneuronal adrenergic system is described. Stress-related central neuronal regulatory circuits and central organization of responses to various stressors are presented with selected examples of regulatory molecular mechanisms. Data summarized here indicate that catecholaminergic systems are activated in different ways following exposure to distinct

  4. Frame by frame stop motion non-traditional approaches to stop motion animation

    CERN Document Server

    Gasek, Tom

    2011-01-01

    In a world that is dominated by computer images, alternative stop motion techniques like pixilation, time-lapse photography and down-shooting techniques combined with new technologies offer a new, tangible and exciting approach to animation. With over 25 years professional experience, industry veteran, Tom Gasek presents a comprehensive guide to stop motion animation without the focus on puppetry or model animation. With tips, tricks and hands-on exercises, Frame by Frame will help both experienced and novice filmmakers get the most effective results from this underutilized branch of animation

  5. Comparative Study Between the Two Experimental Design Approaches Taguchi and Traditional in Presence of Control by Control Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arias-Nava Elías Heriberto

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Design of experiments plays an important role in the field of creating and innovating process and products directly in manufacturing and improving areas. There are several areas into designs of experiments; robust design is one of them. Robust parameter design is a principle that emphasize in products creation through a correct selection of values called “control” which make a product robust to the variability by the noise introducing by another factors known as “noise” factors. This article aims for a comparative study between two well-known robust design methodologies, making a special emphasis in the control by control interaction effects over optimal operating conditions. The results showed that Taguchi´s crossed arrays are unable to estimate all significant terms in a model. The optimizations result concludes that the Taguchi´s approach is less efficient than the traditional approach in both; maximization and minimization.

  6. Traditional genetic improvement and use of biotechnological techniques in searching of resistance to main fungi pathogens of Musa spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Leiva-Mora

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Bananas and plantain are important food staple in human diet, even cooked or consumed fresh. Fungal diseases caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense (Foc and Mycosphaerella fijiensis have threated to distroy Musa spp. Those crops are difficult to breed genetically because they are steriles, do not produce fertil seeds and they are partenocarpic. Genetic crossing by hibridization have been used successfully in FHIA and IITA Musa breeding programs, they have released numerous improved hybrids to those diseases. Plant Biotechnology has developed a set of techniques for Musa micropropagation to increase multiplication rates, healthy and safety plant material for plantation. Mutagenic techniques, somaclonal variation, somatic embryogenesis and more recient genetic transformation have enabled advances and complementation with clasical Musa breeding for searching resistance to principal fungal pathogen of Musa spp. Field evaluation systems to find Musa resistant genotypes to Foc and M. fijiensis have demostrated to be usefull but laborious. Nevertheless to enhance eficacy in selection of promissory genotypes the development of reproducible early evaluation methodologies by using fungal pathogens or their derivates is needed. Key words: evaluation and selection, Fusarium oxysporum, improvement

  7. Surgery in biliary lithiasis: from the traditional "open" approach to laparoscopy and the "rendezvous" technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarantino, Giuseppe; Magistri, Paolo; Ballarin, Roberto; Assirati, Giacomo; Di Cataldo, Antonio; Di Benedetto, Fabrizio

    2017-12-15

    According to the current literature, biliary lithiasis is a worldwide-diffused condition that affects almost 20% of the general population. The rate of common bile duct stones (CBDS) in patients with symptomatic cholelithiasis is estimated to be 10% to 33%, depending on patient's age. Compared to stones in the gallbladder, the natural history of secondary CBDS is still not completely understood. It is not clear whether an asymptomatic choledocholithiasis requires treatment or not. For many years, open cholecystectomy with choledochotomy and/or surgical sphincterotomy and cleaning of the bile duct were the gold standard to treat both pathologies. Development of both endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) and laparoscopic surgery, together with improvements in diagnostic procedures, influenced new approaches to the management of CBDS in association with gallstones. We decided to systematically review the literature in order to identify all the current therapeutic options for CBDS. A systematic literature search was performed independently by two authors using PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus and the Cochrane Library Central. The therapeutic approach nowadays varies greatly according to the availability of experience and expertise in each center, and includes open or laparoscopic common bile duct exploration, various combinations of laparoscopic cholecystectomy and ERCP and combined laparoendoscopic rendezvous. Although ERCP followed by laparoscopic cholecystectomy is currently preferred in the majority of hospitals worldwide, the optimal treatment for concomitant gallstones and CBDS is still under debate, and greatly varies among different centers. Copyright © 2017 The Editorial Board of Hepatobiliary & Pancreatic Diseases International. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Speed Bump Detection Using Accelerometric Features: A Genetic Algorithm Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celaya-Padilla, Jose M; Galván-Tejada, Carlos E; López-Monteagudo, F E; Alonso-González, O; Moreno-Báez, Arturo; Martínez-Torteya, Antonio; Galván-Tejada, Jorge I; Arceo-Olague, Jose G; Luna-García, Huizilopoztli; Gamboa-Rosales, Hamurabi

    2018-02-03

    Among the current challenges of the Smart City, traffic management and maintenance are of utmost importance. Road surface monitoring is currently performed by humans, but the road surface condition is one of the main indicators of road quality, and it may drastically affect fuel consumption and the safety of both drivers and pedestrians. Abnormalities in the road, such as manholes and potholes, can cause accidents when not identified by the drivers. Furthermore, human-induced abnormalities, such as speed bumps, could also cause accidents. In addition, while said obstacles ought to be signalized according to specific road regulation, they are not always correctly labeled. Therefore, we developed a novel method for the detection of road abnormalities (i.e., speed bumps). This method makes use of a gyro, an accelerometer, and a GPS sensor mounted in a car. After having the vehicle cruise through several streets, data is retrieved from the sensors. Then, using a cross-validation strategy, a genetic algorithm is used to find a logistic model that accurately detects road abnormalities. The proposed model had an accuracy of 0.9714 in a blind evaluation, with a false positive rate smaller than 0.018, and an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.9784. This methodology has the potential to detect speed bumps in quasi real-time conditions, and can be used to construct a real-time surface monitoring system.

  9. Structural modification of polysaccharides: A biochemical-genetic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Roger G.; Petersen, Gene R.

    1991-01-01

    Polysaccharides have a wide range of industrial and biomedical applications. An industry trend is underway towards the increased use of bacteria to produce polysaccharides. Long term goals of this work are the adaptation and enhancement of saccharide properties for electronic and optic applications. In this report we illustrate the application of enzyme-bearing bacteriophage on strains of the enteric bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae, which produces a polysaccharide with the relatively rare rheological property of drag-reduction. This has resulted in the production of new polysaccharides with enhanced rheological properties. Our laboratory is developing techniques for processing and structurally modifying bacterial polysaccharides and oligosaccharides which comprise their basic polymeric repeat units. Our research has focused on bacteriophage which produce specific polysaccharide degrading enzymes. This has lead to the development of enzymes generated by bacteriophage as tools for polysaccharide modification and purification. These enzymes were used to efficiently convert the native material to uniform-sized high molecular weight polymers, or alternatively into high-purity oligosaccharides. Enzyme-bearing bacteriophage also serve as genetic selection tools for bacteria that produce new families of polysaccharides with modified structures.

  10. Speed Bump Detection Using Accelerometric Features: A Genetic Algorithm Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M. Celaya-Padilla

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Among the current challenges of the Smart City, traffic management and maintenance are of utmost importance. Road surface monitoring is currently performed by humans, but the road surface condition is one of the main indicators of road quality, and it may drastically affect fuel consumption and the safety of both drivers and pedestrians. Abnormalities in the road, such as manholes and potholes, can cause accidents when not identified by the drivers. Furthermore, human-induced abnormalities, such as speed bumps, could also cause accidents. In addition, while said obstacles ought to be signalized according to specific road regulation, they are not always correctly labeled. Therefore, we developed a novel method for the detection of road abnormalities (i.e., speed bumps. This method makes use of a gyro, an accelerometer, and a GPS sensor mounted in a car. After having the vehicle cruise through several streets, data is retrieved from the sensors. Then, using a cross-validation strategy, a genetic algorithm is used to find a logistic model that accurately detects road abnormalities. The proposed model had an accuracy of 0.9714 in a blind evaluation, with a false positive rate smaller than 0.018, and an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.9784. This methodology has the potential to detect speed bumps in quasi real-time conditions, and can be used to construct a real-time surface monitoring system.

  11. A functional data analysis approach for genetic association studies

    OpenAIRE

    Reimherr, Matthew; Nicolae, Dan

    2014-01-01

    We present a new method based on Functional Data Analysis (FDA) for detecting associations between one or more scalar covariates and a longitudinal response, while correcting for other variables. Our methods exploit the temporal structure of longitudinal data in ways that are otherwise difficult with a multivariate approach. Our procedure, from an FDA perspective, is a departure from more established methods in two key aspects. First, the raw longitudinal phenotypes are assembled into functio...

  12. A genetic programming approach to oral cancer prognosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Sze Tan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background The potential of genetic programming (GP on various fields has been attained in recent years. In bio-medical field, many researches in GP are focused on the recognition of cancerous cells and also on gene expression profiling data. In this research, the aim is to study the performance of GP on the survival prediction of a small sample size of oral cancer prognosis dataset, which is the first study in the field of oral cancer prognosis. Method GP is applied on an oral cancer dataset that contains 31 cases collected from the Malaysia Oral Cancer Database and Tissue Bank System (MOCDTBS. The feature subsets that is automatically selected through GP were noted and the influences of this subset on the results of GP were recorded. In addition, a comparison between the GP performance and that of the Support Vector Machine (SVM and logistic regression (LR are also done in order to verify the predictive capabilities of the GP. Result The result shows that GP performed the best (average accuracy of 83.87% and average AUROC of 0.8341 when the features selected are smoking, drinking, chewing, histological differentiation of SCC, and oncogene p63. In addition, based on the comparison results, we found that the GP outperformed the SVM and LR in oral cancer prognosis. Discussion Some of the features in the dataset are found to be statistically co-related. This is because the accuracy of the GP prediction drops when one of the feature in the best feature subset is excluded. Thus, GP provides an automatic feature selection function, which chooses features that are highly correlated to the prognosis of oral cancer. This makes GP an ideal prediction model for cancer clinical and genomic data that can be used to aid physicians in their decision making stage of diagnosis or prognosis.

  13. A genetic programming approach to oral cancer prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Mei Sze; Tan, Jing Wei; Chang, Siow-Wee; Yap, Hwa Jen; Abdul Kareem, Sameem; Zain, Rosnah Binti

    2016-01-01

    The potential of genetic programming (GP) on various fields has been attained in recent years. In bio-medical field, many researches in GP are focused on the recognition of cancerous cells and also on gene expression profiling data. In this research, the aim is to study the performance of GP on the survival prediction of a small sample size of oral cancer prognosis dataset, which is the first study in the field of oral cancer prognosis. GP is applied on an oral cancer dataset that contains 31 cases collected from the Malaysia Oral Cancer Database and Tissue Bank System (MOCDTBS). The feature subsets that is automatically selected through GP were noted and the influences of this subset on the results of GP were recorded. In addition, a comparison between the GP performance and that of the Support Vector Machine (SVM) and logistic regression (LR) are also done in order to verify the predictive capabilities of the GP. The result shows that GP performed the best (average accuracy of 83.87% and average AUROC of 0.8341) when the features selected are smoking, drinking, chewing, histological differentiation of SCC, and oncogene p63. In addition, based on the comparison results, we found that the GP outperformed the SVM and LR in oral cancer prognosis. Some of the features in the dataset are found to be statistically co-related. This is because the accuracy of the GP prediction drops when one of the feature in the best feature subset is excluded. Thus, GP provides an automatic feature selection function, which chooses features that are highly correlated to the prognosis of oral cancer. This makes GP an ideal prediction model for cancer clinical and genomic data that can be used to aid physicians in their decision making stage of diagnosis or prognosis.

  14. 11. Traditional and Innovative Methods in Approaching Music Styles. Pedagogical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iaţeşen Loredana Viorica

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The approach to music styles entails an in-depth musicological analysis aimed at synthesizing numerous bibliographical sources belonging to different fields and directions of research. A chronological overview of studies (Jean Molino, Fait musical et sémiologie de la musique, 1975; Jean Jaques Nattiez, Quelques reflexions du style, 1993; R. J. Pascall, Style, in The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, 1994; Jean Jaques Nattiez, La musique de l’avenir, in Musique. Une Encyclopédie pour le XXI siècle, 2003; Mario Baroni, Stil şi mutaţii stilistice în tradiţia muzicală europeană, in Musique Une encyclopédie pour le XXI siècle, 2006 and of universal (Leonard Meyer, Explaining Music, 1973; Charles Rosen, Le style classique: Haydn. Mozart, Beethoven, 1978; Leonard B. Meyer, Style and Music. Theory, History and Ideology, 1989; and Romanian specialised literature (Cornel Ţăranu, Elemente de stilistică muzicală (sec. XX, 1981; Edgar Papu, Despre stiluri, 1986; Valentina Sandu-Dediu, Alegeri Atitudini Afecte, 2010; Vasile Iliuţ, O carte a stilurilor muzicale, 2011; Valentin Timaru, Stilistică muzicală, 2014 from the late 20th century and the beginning of the 21st century, reveal the different and, more often than not, contrasting views of historians, analysts, aestheticians, philosophers, scholars and educators, starting from the meaning of the very idea of style, to the reception of this phenomenon in contemporaneity. On these grounds, this study proposes a systematization of the most relevant landmarks in documentation to date, for the purpose of applying them from a didactic perspective.

  15. Improved Genetic Profiling of Anthropometric Traits Using a Big Data Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriol Canela-Xandri

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS promised to translate their findings into clinically beneficial improvements of patient management by tailoring disease management to the individual through the prediction of disease risk. However, the ability to translate genetic findings from GWAS into predictive tools that are of clinical utility and which may inform clinical practice has, so far, been encouraging but limited. Here we propose to use a more powerful statistical approach, the use of which has traditionally been limited due to computational requirements and lack of sufficiently large individual level genotyped cohorts, but which improve the prediction of multiple medically relevant phenotypes using the same panel of SNPs. As a proof of principle, we used a shared panel of 319,038 common SNPs with MAF > 0.05 to train the prediction models in 114,264 unrelated White-British individuals for height and four obesity related traits (body mass index, basal metabolic rate, body fat percentage, and waist-to-hip ratio. We obtained prediction accuracies that ranged between 46% and 75% of the maximum achievable given the captured heritable component. For height, this represents an improvement in prediction accuracy of up to 68% (184% more phenotypic variance explained over SNPs reported to be robustly associated with height in a previous GWAS meta-analysis of similar size. Across-population predictions in White non-British individuals were similar to those in White-British whilst those in Asian and Black individuals were informative but less accurate. We estimate that the genotyping of circa 500,000 unrelated individuals will yield predictions between 66% and 82% of the SNP-heritability captured by common variants in our array. Prediction accuracies did not improve when including rarer SNPs or when fitting multiple traits jointly in multivariate models.

  16. Molecular genetic approaches to the study of cellular senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goletz, T J; Smith, J R; Pereira-Smith, O M

    1994-01-01

    Cellular senescence is an inability of cells to synthesize DNA and divide, which results in a terminal loss of proliferation despite the maintenance of basic metabolic processes. Senescence has been proposed as a model for the study of aging at the cellular level, and the basis for this model system and its features have been summarized. Although strong experimental evidence exists to support the hypothesis that cellular senescence is a dominant active process, the mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon remain a mystery. Investigators have taken several approaches to gain a better understanding of senescence. Several groups have documented the differences between young and senescent cells, and others have identified changes that occur during the course of a cell's in vitro life span. Using molecular and biochemical approaches, important changes in gene expression and function of cell-cycle-associated products have been identified. The active production of an inhibitor of DNA synthesis has been demonstrated. This may represent the final step in a cascade of events governing senescence. The study of immortal cells which have escaped senescence has also provided useful information, particularly with regard to the genes governing the senescence program. These studies have identified four complementation groups for indefinite division, which suggests that there are at least four genes or gene pathways in the senescence program. Through the use of microcell-mediated chromosome transfer, chromosomes encoding senescence genes have been identified; efforts to clone these genes are ongoing.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Comparison of weighting approaches for genetic risk scores in gene-environment interaction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüls, Anke; Krämer, Ursula; Carlsten, Christopher; Schikowski, Tamara; Ickstadt, Katja; Schwender, Holger

    2017-12-16

    Weighted genetic risk scores (GRS), defined as weighted sums of risk alleles of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), are statistically powerful for detection gene-environment (GxE) interactions. To assign weights, the gold standard is to use external weights from an independent study. However, appropriate external weights are not always available. In such situations and in the presence of predominant marginal genetic effects, we have shown in a previous study that GRS with internal weights from marginal genetic effects ("GRS-marginal-internal") are a powerful and reliable alternative to single SNP approaches or the use of unweighted GRS. However, this approach might not be appropriate for detecting predominant interactions, i.e. interactions showing an effect stronger than the marginal genetic effect. In this paper, we present a weighting approach for such predominant interactions ("GRS-interaction-training") in which parts of the data are used to estimate the weights from the interaction terms and the remaining data are used to determine the GRS. We conducted a simulation study for the detection of GxE interactions in which we evaluated power, type I error and sign-misspecification. We compared this new weighting approach to the GRS-marginal-internal approach and to GRS with external weights. Our simulation study showed that in the absence of external weights and with predominant interaction effects, the highest power was reached with the GRS-interaction-training approach. If marginal genetic effects were predominant, the GRS-marginal-internal approach was more appropriate. Furthermore, the power to detect interactions reached by the GRS-interaction-training approach was only slightly lower than the power achieved by GRS with external weights. The power of the GRS-interaction-training approach was confirmed in a real data application to the Traffic, Asthma and Genetics (TAG) Study (N = 4465 observations). When appropriate external weights are unavailable, we

  18. Comparison of harmonic blade versus traditional approach in canine patients undergoing spinal decompressive surgery for naturally occurring thoracolumbar disk extrusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca F Hettlich

    Full Text Available To assess feasibility of the harmonic Osteovue blade (HOB for use in the soft tissue approach for dogs undergoing hemilaminectomy and to compare outcomes between dogs undergoing HOB or traditional approach (TRAD.A prospective randomized clinical trial was performed using 20 client-owned dogs with thoracolumbar intervertebral disk extrusion requiring hemilaminectomy. Dogs were randomly assigned to HOB or TRAD. Neurologic function and pain scores were assessed pre-operatively. Intraoperative blood loss and surgical approach time as well as postoperative pain and wound healing scores were recorded. Additionally, neurologic recovery and owner perceived quality of life were recorded at day 10 and 30 postoperative.There was no significant difference in sex distribution, weight, age, preoperative neurological grade and pain score, and perioperative outcome measures between groups. Intraoperative total blood loss was minimal for HOB and TRAD (median: 0 ml (range 0-9 and 2.2 ml (range 0-6.8, respectively; p = 0.165 and approach times were similar (median: 7 min (range 5-12 and 8 min (range 5-13, respectively; p = 0.315. While changes in wound healing scores were similar, changes in postoperative pain scores and neurological function were significantly improved in the HOB compared to the TRAD group. Postoperative complications in the HOB group consisted of automutilation of part of the incision and development of a small soft, non-painful subcutaneous swelling in 1 dog each.The HOB is a safe and effective tool for the soft tissue approach for routine spinal surgery in dogs and is associated with decreased pain and increased neurological function post-surgery.

  19. Population-genetic approach to standardization of radiation and non-radiation factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telnov, I.

    2006-01-01

    Numerous studies demonstrate the importance of genetic predisposition in the development of wide range of pathologies and unfavorable effects caused by different factors. This prompts to account for genetic factors in the risk assessment of unfavorable effects. Current approaches used to solve this problem are far from perfect. On the one hand, recommendations on occupational selection bas ed on genetic signs are presently considered as human rights violation. On the other hand, to medically inform an individual with certain genetic characteristics about possible unfavorable health effects due to occupational hazard has little effect. Finally, a vast number of polymorphic genes in human genome (at least 30%) hampers accounting for all possible factors of genetic predisposition to the increasing number of environmental factors. Therefore, the current situation proves it appropriate to develop the new approach to account for genetic predisposition of individuals that would be free of flaws considered above. A possible basis for such an approach is the assessment of genotype specific relative risk (G.S.R.R.) that accounts for genetic predisposition (susceptibility) of individuals to the effects of unfavorable factors. The study used results from 65 studies. This effort was undertaken to study the association between 32 diseases and unfavorable effects and 17 genetic polymorphic systems. Data analysis included calculation of relative risk (R.R.) of specific diseases or effects development in individuals with different genotypes. Genotype-specific relative risk (G.S.R.R.) of diseases and unfavorable effects in individuals with 'sensitive' genotypes was calculated. Since about the third of genes in human genome are polymorphic, and therefore, a considerable number of genes can be involved in genetic predisposition of an individual to a specific unfavorable effect, an averaged G.S.R.R. of diseases and unfavorable effects was calculated for integral characteristics on

  20. Non-Genetic Engineering Approaches for Isolating and Generating Novel Yeasts for Industrial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, P. J.; Bellon, J. R.; Schmidt, S. A.; Varela, C.; Pretorius, I. S.

    Generating novel yeast strains for industrial applications should be quite straightforward; after all, research into the genetics, biochemistry and physiology of Baker's Yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has paved the way for many advances in the modern biological sciences. We probably know more about this humble eukaryote than any other, and it is the most tractable of organisms for manipulation using modern genetic engineering approaches. In many countries, however, there are restrictions on the use of genetically-modified organisms (GMOs), particularly in foods and beverages, and the level of consumer acceptance of GMOs is, at best, variable. Thus, many researchers working with industrial yeasts use genetic engineering techniques primarily as research tools, and strain development continues to rely on non-GM technologies. This chapter explores the non-GM tools and strategies available to such researchers.

  1. On Generating Optimal Signal Probabilities for Random Tests: A Genetic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Srinivas

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic Algorithms are robust search and optimization techniques. A Genetic Algorithm based approach for determining the optimal input distributions for generating random test vectors is proposed in the paper. A cost function based on the COP testability measure for determining the efficacy of the input distributions is discussed. A brief overview of Genetic Algorithms (GAs and the specific details of our implementation are described. Experimental results based on ISCAS-85 benchmark circuits are presented. The performance of our GAbased approach is compared with previous results. While the GA generates more efficient input distributions than the previous methods which are based on gradient descent search, the overheads of the GA in computing the input distributions are larger.

  2. Environmental Contamination Genetic Consequences Monitoring on the Former Semipalatinsk Test Site: General Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seisebaev, A.T.; Bakhtin, M.M.; Zhapbasov, R.Zh.

    1998-01-01

    genetic monitoring of natural populations of plants and animals and the theoretic approach for their fulfillment. We also consider the main issues of research work on assessment and forecast of the remote genetic consequences of nuclear tests at STS: 1) assessment of the environmental radiation situation; determination of the indicator species of plants and animals and the criteria encompassing the different levels from the molecular one through the genetic to the population one; 2) study of the dose dependence of the genetic effects under the chronic ionizing radiation; 3) analysis of mutation process dynamics in the following generations of population under various exposure condition; 4) study of the possible ways of population adaptation to the chronic impact of various radiation doses; 5) analysis of relation between different genetic changes in exposed population and ecology alterations, etc

  3. Zebrafish Functional Genetics Approach to the Pathogenesis of Well-Differentiated Liposarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Roderick JE, LaBelle JL, Bird G, Mathieu R, Bodaar K, Colon D, Pyati U, Stevenson KE, Qi J, Harris M, Silverman LB, Sallan SE, Bradner JL, Neuberg DS...pathogenesis of high-risk T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Our approach combines human cancer genomics with functional genetics, biochemistry and

  4. Chapter 7. Management strategies for dwarf mistletoes: Biological, chemical, and genetic approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. F. Shamoun; L. E. DeWald

    2002-01-01

    The opportunity and need for management of mistletoe populations with biological, chemical, and genetic approaches are greatest for application to the dwarf mistletoes. Although much information is available on these management strategies (see reviews by Hawksworth 1972, Knutson 1978), significant research and development are still required for these to become...

  5. A Comparison Study: The New Extended Shelf Life Isopropyl Ester PMR Technology versus The Traditional Methyl Ester PMR Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, William B.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Sivko, Gloria S.

    2005-01-01

    Polymerization of Monomeric Reactants (PMR) monomer solutions and carbon cloth prepregs of PMR II-50 and VCAP-75 were prepared using both the traditional limited shelf life methanol based PMR approach and a novel extended shelf life isopropanol based PMR approach. The methyl ester and isopropyl ester based PMR monomer solutions and PMR prepregs were aged for up to four years at freezer and room temperatures. The aging products formed were monitored using high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The composite processing flow characteristics and volatile contents of the aged prepregs were also correlated versus room temperature storage time. Composite processing cycles were developed and six ply cloth laminates were fabricated with prepregs after various extended room temperature storage times. The composites were then evaluated for glass transition temperature (Tg), thermal decomposition temperature (Td), initial flexural strength (FS) and modulus (FM), long term (1000 hours at 316 C) thermal oxidative stability (TOS), and retention of FS and FM after 1000 hours aging at 316 C. The results for each ester system were comparable. Freezer storage was found to prevent the formation of aging products for both ester systems. Room temperature storage of the novel isopropyl ester system increased PMR monomer solution and PMR prepreg shelf life by at least an order of magnitude while maintaining composite properties.

  6. Diversity trends in bread wheat in Italy during the 20th century assessed by traditional and multivariate approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormoli, Leonardo; Costa, Corrado; Negri, Stefano; Perenzin, Maurizio; Vaccino, Patrizia

    2015-02-25

    A collection of 157 Triticum aestivum accessions, representative of wheat breeding in Italy during the 20(th) century, was assembled to describe the evolutionary trends of cultivated varieties throughout this period. The lines were cultivated in Italy, in two locations, over two growing seasons, and evaluated for several agronomical, morphological and qualitative traits. Analyses were conducted using the most common univariate approach on individual plant traits coupled with a correspondance multivariate approach. ANOVA showed a clear trend from old to new varieties, leading towards earliness, plant height reduction and denser spikes with smaller seeds. The average protein content gradually decreased over time; however this trend did not affect bread-making quality, because it was counterbalanced by a gradual increase of SDS sedimentation volume, achieved by the incorporation of favourable alleles into recent cultivars. Correspondence analysis allowed an overall view of the breeding activity. A clear-cut separation was observed between ancient lines and all the others, matched with a two-step gradient, the first, corresponding roughly to the period 1920-1940, which can be ascribed mostly to genetics, the second, from the 40s onward, which can be ascribed also to the farming practice innovations, such as improvement of mechanical devices and optimised use of fertilizers.

  7. [Genetic diagnostics of pathogenic splicing abnormalities in the clinical laboratory--pitfalls and screening approaches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimi, Hideki; Ogawa, Tomomi; Note, Rhougou; Hayashi, Shirou; Ueno, Tomohiro; Harada, Kenu; Uji, Yoshinori; Kitajima, Isao

    2010-12-01

    In recent years, genetic diagnostics of pathogenic splicing abnormalities are increasingly recognized as critically important in the clinical genetic diagnostics. It is reported that approximately 10% of pathogenic mutations causing human inherited diseases are splicing mutations. Nonetheless, it is still difficult to identify splicing abnormalities in routine genetic diagnostic settings. Here, we studied two different kinds of cases with splicing abnormalities. The first case is a protein S deficiency. Nucleotide analyses revealed that the proband had a previously reported G to C substitution in the invariant AG dinucleotide at the splicing acceptor site of intronl/exon2, which produces multiple splicing abnormalities resulting in protein S deficiency. The second case is an antithrombin (AT) deficiency. This proband had a previously reported G to A substitution, at nucleotide position 9788 in intron 4, 14 bp in front of exon 5, which created a de novo exon 5 splice site and resulted in AT deficiency. From a practical standpoint, we discussed the pitfalls, attentions, and screening approaches in genetic diagnostics of pathogenic splicing abnormalities. Due to the difficulty with full-length sequence analysis of introns, and the lack of RNA samples, splicing mutations may escape identification. Although current genetic testing remains to be improved, to screen for splicing abnormalities more efficiently, it is significant to use an appropriate combination of various approaches such as DNA and/or RNA samples, splicing mutation databases, bioinformatic tools to detect splice sites and cis-regulatory elements, and in vitro and/or in vivo experimentally methods as needed.

  8. Arbitrariness is not enough: towards a functional approach to the genetic code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacková, Ľudmila; Matlach, Vladimír; Faltýnek, Dan

    2017-12-01

    Arbitrariness in the genetic code is one of the main reasons for a linguistic approach to molecular biology: the genetic code is usually understood as an arbitrary relation between amino acids and nucleobases. However, from a semiotic point of view, arbitrariness should not be the only condition for definition of a code, consequently it is not completely correct to talk about "code" in this case. Yet we suppose that there exist a code in the process of protein synthesis, but on a higher level than the nucleic bases chains. Semiotically, a code should be always associated with a function and we propose to define the genetic code not only relationally (in basis of relation between nucleobases and amino acids) but also in terms of function (function of a protein as meaning of the code). Even if the functional definition of meaning in the genetic code has been discussed in the field of biosemiotics, its further implications have not been considered. In fact, if the function of a protein represents the meaning of the genetic code (the sign's object), then it is crucial to reconsider the notion of its expression (the sign) as well. In our contribution, we will show that the actual model of the genetic code is not the only possible and we will propose a more appropriate model from a semiotic point of view.

  9. Beyond Traditional Extreme Value Theory Through a Metastatistical Approach: Lessons Learned from Precipitation, Hurricanes, and Storm Surges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marani, M.; Zorzetto, E.; Hosseini, S. R.; Miniussi, A.; Scaioni, M.

    2017-12-01

    The Generalized Extreme Value (GEV) distribution is widely adopted irrespective of the properties of the stochastic process generating the extreme events. However, GEV presents several limitations, both theoretical (asymptotic validity for a large number of events/year or hypothesis of Poisson occurrences of Generalized Pareto events), and practical (fitting uses just yearly maxima or a few values above a high threshold). Here we describe the Metastatistical Extreme Value Distribution (MEVD, Marani & Ignaccolo, 2015), which relaxes asymptotic or Poisson/GPD assumptions and makes use of all available observations. We then illustrate the flexibility of the MEVD by applying it to daily precipitation, hurricane intensity, and storm surge magnitude. Application to daily rainfall from a global raingauge network shows that MEVD estimates are 50% more accurate than those from GEV when the recurrence interval of interest is much greater than the observational period. This makes MEVD suited for application to satellite rainfall observations ( 20 yrs length). Use of MEVD on TRMM data yields extreme event patterns that are in better agreement with surface observations than corresponding GEV estimates.Applied to the HURDAT2 Atlantic hurricane intensity dataset, MEVD significantly outperforms GEV estimates of extreme hurricanes. Interestingly, the Generalized Pareto distribution used for "ordinary" hurricane intensity points to the existence of a maximum limit wind speed that is significantly smaller than corresponding physically-based estimates. Finally, we applied the MEVD approach to water levels generated by tidal fluctuations and storm surges at a set of coastal sites spanning different storm-surge regimes. MEVD yields accurate estimates of large quantiles and inferences on tail thickness (fat vs. thin) of the underlying distribution of "ordinary" surges. In summary, the MEVD approach presents a number of theoretical and practical advantages, and outperforms traditional

  10. Risk management in medical product development process using traditional FMEA and fuzzy linguistic approach: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkire, Milind Shrikant; Rane, Santosh B.; Jadhav, Jagdish Rajaram

    2015-12-01

    Medical product development (MPD) process is highly multidisciplinary in nature, which increases the complexity and the associated risks. Managing the risks during MPD process is very crucial. The objective of this research is to explore risks during MPD in a dental product manufacturing company and propose a model for risk mitigation during MPD process to minimize failure events. A case study approach is employed. The existing MPD process is mapped with five phases of the customized phase gate process. The activities during each phase of development and risks associated with each activity are identified and categorized based on the source of occurrence. The risks are analyzed using traditional Failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA) and fuzzy FMEA. The results of two methods when compared show that fuzzy approach avoids the duplication of RPNs and helps more to convert cognition of experts into information to get values of risk factors. The critical, moderate, low level and negligible risks are identified based on criticality; risk treatments and mitigation model are proposed. During initial phases of MPD, the risks are less severe, but as the process progresses the severity of risks goes on increasing. The MPD process should be critically designed and simulated to minimize the number of risk events and their severity. To successfully develop the products/devices within the manufacturing companies, the process risk management is very essential. A systematic approach to manage risks during MPD process will lead to the development of medical products with expected quality and reliability. This is the first research of its kind having focus on MPD process risks and its management. The methodology adopted in this paper will help the developers, managers and researchers to have a competitive edge over the other companies by managing the risks during the development process.

  11. A fuzzy genetic approach for network reconfiguration to enhance voltage stability in radial distribution systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahoo, N.C. [Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Multimedia University, Jalan Ayer Keroh Lama, Bukit Beruang, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia); Prasad, K. [Faculty of Information Science and Technology, Multimedia University, Jalan Ayer Keroh Lama, Bukit Beruang, 75450 Melaka (Malaysia)

    2006-11-15

    This paper presents a fuzzy genetic approach for reconfiguration of radial distribution systems (RDS) so as to maximize the voltage stability of the network for a specific set of loads. The network reconfiguration involves a mechanism for selection of the best set of branches to be opened, one from each loop, such that the reconfigured RDS possesses desired performance characteristics. This discrete solution space is better handled by the proposed scheme, which maximizes a suitable optimizing function (computed using two different approaches). In the first approach, this function is chosen as the average of a voltage stability index of all the buses in the RDS, while in the second approach, the complete RDS is reduced to a two bus equivalent system and the optimizing function is the voltage stability index of this reduced two bus system. The fuzzy genetic algorithm uses a suitable coding and decoding scheme for maintaining the radial nature of the network at every stage of genetic evolution, and it also uses a fuzzy rule based mutation controller for efficient search of the solution space. This method, tested on 69 bus and 33 bus RDSs, shows promising results for the both approaches. It is also observed that the network losses are reduced when the voltage stability is enhanced by the network reconfiguration. (author)

  12. Comparing targeted exome and whole exome approaches for genetic diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Gorokhova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Massively parallel sequencing is rapidly becoming a widely used method in genetic diagnostics. However, there is still no clear consensus as to which approach can most efficiently identify the pathogenic mutations carried by a given patient, while avoiding false negative and false positive results. We developed a targeted exome approach (MyoPanel2 in order to optimize genetic diagnosis of neuromuscular disorders. Using this approach, we were able to analyse 306 genes known to be mutated in myopathies as well as in related disorders, obtaining 98.8% target sequence coverage at 20×. Moreover, MyoPanel2 was able to detect 99.7% of 11,467 known mutations responsible for neuromuscular disorders. We have then used several quality control parameters to compare performance of the targeted exome approach with that of whole exome sequencing. The results of this pilot study of 140 DNA samples suggest that targeted exome sequencing approach is an efficient genetic diagnostic test for most neuromuscular diseases.

  13. A fuzzy genetic approach for network reconfiguration to enhance voltage stability in radial distribution systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, N.C.; Prasad, K.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a fuzzy genetic approach for reconfiguration of radial distribution systems (RDS) so as to maximize the voltage stability of the network for a specific set of loads. The network reconfiguration involves a mechanism for selection of the best set of branches to be opened, one from each loop, such that the reconfigured RDS possesses desired performance characteristics. This discrete solution space is better handled by the proposed scheme, which maximizes a suitable optimizing function (computed using two different approaches). In the first approach, this function is chosen as the average of a voltage stability index of all the buses in the RDS, while in the second approach, the complete RDS is reduced to a two bus equivalent system and the optimizing function is the voltage stability index of this reduced two bus system. The fuzzy genetic algorithm uses a suitable coding and decoding scheme for maintaining the radial nature of the network at every stage of genetic evolution, and it also uses a fuzzy rule based mutation controller for efficient search of the solution space. This method, tested on 69 bus and 33 bus RDSs, shows promising results for the both approaches. It is also observed that the network losses are reduced when the voltage stability is enhanced by the network reconfiguration

  14. Incorporating Wiki Technology in a Traditional Biostatistics Course: Effects on University Students’ Collaborative Learning, Approaches to Learning and Course Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley S.M. Fong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: To investigate the effectiveness of incorporating wiki technology in an under-graduate biostatistics course for improving university students’ collaborative learning, approaches to learning, and course performance. Methodology: During a three year longitudinal study, twenty-one and twenty-four undergraduate students were recruited by convenience sampling and assigned to a wiki group (2014-2015 and a control group (2013-2014 and 2015-2016, respectively. The students in the wiki group attended face-to-face lectures and used a wiki (PBworks weekly for online- group discussion, and the students in the control group had no access to the wiki and interacted face-to-face only. The students’ collaborative learning, approaches to learning, and course performance were evaluated using the Group Process Questionnaire (GPQ, Revised Study Process Questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F and course results, respectively, after testing. Findings: Multivariate analysis of variance results revealed that the R-SPQ-2F surface approach score, surface motive and strategy subscores were lower in the wiki group than in the control group (p < 0.05. The GPQ individual accountability and equal opportunity scores (components of collaboration were higher in the wiki group than in the control group (p < 0.001. No significant between-groups differences were found in any of the other outcome variables (i.e., overall course result, R-SPQ-2F deep approach score and subscores, GPQ positive interdependence score, social skills score, and composite score. Looking at the Wiki Questionnaire results, the subscale and composite scores we obtained were 31.5% to 37.7% lower than the norm. The wiki was used at a frequency of about 0.7 times per week per student. Recommendations for Practitioners: Using wiki technology in conjunction with the traditional face-to-face teaching method in a biostatistics course can enhance some aspects of undergraduate students’ collaborative learning

  15. Neuro-genetic hybrid approach for the solution of non-convex economic dispatch problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, T.N.; Asar, A.U.

    2009-01-01

    ED (Economic Dispatch) is non-convex constrained optimization problem, and is used for both on line and offline studies in power system operation. Conventionally, it is solved as convex problem using optimization techniques by approximating generator input/output characteristic. Curves of monotonically increasing nature thus resulting in an inaccurate dispatch. The GA (Genetic Algorithm) has been used for the solution of this problem owing to its inherent ability to address the convex and non-convex problems equally. This approach brings the solution to the global minimum region of search space in a short time and then takes longer time to converge to near optimal results. GA based hybrid approaches are used to fine tune the near optimal results produced by GA. This paper proposes NGH (Neuro Genetic Hybrid) approach to solve the economic dispatch with valve point effect. The proposed approach combines the GA with the ANN (Artificial Neural Network) using SI (Swarm Intelligence) learning rule. The GA acts as a global optimizer and the neural network fine tunes the GA results to the desired targets. Three machines standard test system has been tested for validation of the approach. Comparing the results with GA and NGH model based on back-propagation learning, the proposed approach gives contrast improvements showing the promise of the approach. (author)

  16. Genetic Approaches to Study Meiosis and Meiosis-Specific Gene Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassir, Yona; Stuart, David T

    2017-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a long history as a model organism for studies of meiosis and the cell cycle. The popularity of this yeast as a model is in large part due to the variety of genetic and cytological approaches that can be effectively performed with the cells. Cultures of the cells can be induced to synchronously progress through meiosis and sporulation allowing large-scale gene expression and biochemical studies to be performed. Additionally, the spore tetrads resulting from meiosis make it possible to characterize the haploid products of meiosis allowing investigation of meiotic recombination and chromosome segregation. Here we describe genetic methods for analysis progression of S. cerevisiae through meiosis and sporulation with an emphasis on strategies for the genetic analysis of regulators of meiosis-specific genes.

  17. Maternal Smoking During Pregnancy and Offspring Birth Weight: A Genetically-Informed Approach Comparing Multiple Raters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopik, Valerie S.; Marceau, Kristine; Palmer, Rohan H. C.; Smith, Taylor F.; Heath, Andrew C.

    2016-01-01

    Maternal smoking during pregnancy (SDP) is a significant public health concern with adverse consequences to the health and well-being of the fetus. There is considerable debate about the best method of assessing SDP, including birth/medical records, timeline follow-back approaches, multiple reporters, and biological verification (e.g., cotinine). This is particularly salient for genetically-informed approaches where it is not always possible or practical to do a prospective study starting during the prenatal period when concurrent biological specimen samples can be collected with ease. In a sample of families (N = 173) specifically selected for sibling pairs discordant for prenatal smoking exposure, we: (1) compare rates of agreement across different types of report—maternal report of SDP, paternal report of maternal SDP, and SDP contained on birth records from the Department of Vital Statistics; (2) examine whether SDP is predictive of birth weight outcomes using our best SDP report as identified via step (1); and (3) use a sibling-comparison approach that controls for genetic and familial influences that siblings share in order to assess the effects of SDP on birth weight. Results show high agreement between reporters and support the utility of retrospective report of SDP. Further, we replicate a causal association between SDP and birth weight, wherein SDP results in reduced birth weight even when accounting for genetic and familial confounding factors via a sibling comparison approach. PMID:26494459

  18. Analysis of stock investment selection based on CAPM using covariance and genetic algorithm approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukono; Susanti, D.; Najmia, M.; Lesmana, E.; Napitupulu, H.; Supian, S.; Putra, A. S.

    2018-03-01

    Investment is one of the economic growth factors of countries, especially in Indonesia. Stocks is a form of investment, which is liquid. In determining the stock investment decisions which need to be considered by investors is to choose stocks that can generate maximum returns with a minimum risk level. Therefore, we need to know how to allocate the capital which may give the optimal benefit. This study discusses the issue of stock investment based on CAPM which is estimated using covariance and Genetic Algorithm approach. It is assumed that the stocks analyzed follow the CAPM model. To do the estimation of beta parameter on CAPM equation is done by two approach, first is to be represented by covariance approach, and second with genetic algorithm optimization. As a numerical illustration, in this paper analyzed ten stocks traded on the capital market in Indonesia. The results of the analysis show that estimation of beta parameters using covariance and genetic algorithm approach, give the same decision, that is, six underpriced stocks with buying decision, and four overpriced stocks with a sales decision. Based on the analysis, it can be concluded that the results can be used as a consideration for investors buying six under-priced stocks, and selling four overpriced stocks.

  19. Metagenomic approach reveals microbial diversity and predictive microbial metabolic pathways in Yucha, a traditional Li fermented food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiachao; Wang, Xiaoru; Huo, Dongxue; Li, Wu; Hu, Qisong; Xu, Chuanbiao; Liu, Sixin; Li, Congfa

    2016-08-31

    Yucha is a typical traditional fermented food of the Li population in the Hainan province of China, and it is made up of cooked rice and fresh fish. In the present study, metagenomic approach and culture-dependent technology were applied to describe the diversity of microbiota and identify beneficial microbes in the Yucha. At the genus level, Lactobacillus was the most abundant genus (43.82% of the total reads), followed by Lactococcus, Enterococcus, Vibrio, Weissella, Pediococcus, Enterobacter, Salinivibrio, Acinetobacter, Macrococcus, Kluyvera and Clostridium; this result was confirmed by q-PCR. PCoA based on Weighted UniFrac distances showed an apparent clustering pattern for Yucha samples from different locations, and Lactobacillus sakei, Lactobacillus saniviri and Staphylococcus sciuri represented OTUs according to the major identified markers. At the microbial functional level, it was observed that there was an enrichment of metabolic functional features, including amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism, which implied that the microbial metabolism in the Yucha samples tended to be vigorous. Accordingly, we further investigated the correlation between the predominant microbes and metabolic functional features. Thirteen species of Lactobacillus (147 strains) were isolated, and Lactobacillus plantarum (60 isolates) and Lactobacillus pentosus (34 isolates) were isolated from every sample.

  20. Drought assessment in the Dongliao River basin: traditional approaches vs. generalized drought assessment index based on water resources systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, B. S.; Yan, D. H.; Wang, H.; Liu, J. H.; Yang, Z. Y.; Qin, T. L.; Yin, J.

    2015-08-01

    Drought is firstly a resource issue, and with its development it evolves into a disaster issue. Drought events usually occur in a determinate but a random manner. Drought has become one of the major factors to affect sustainable socioeconomic development. In this paper, we propose the generalized drought assessment index (GDAI) based on water resources systems for assessing drought events. The GDAI considers water supply and water demand using a distributed hydrological model. We demonstrate the use of the proposed index in the Dongliao River basin in northeastern China. The results simulated by the GDAI are compared to observed drought disaster records in the Dongliao River basin. In addition, the temporal distribution of drought events and the spatial distribution of drought frequency from the GDAI are compared with the traditional approaches in general (i.e., standard precipitation index, Palmer drought severity index and rate of water deficit index). Then, generalized drought times, generalized drought duration, and generalized drought severity were calculated by theory of runs. Application of said runs at various drought levels (i.e., mild drought, moderate drought, severe drought, and extreme drought) during the period 1960-2010 shows that the centers of gravity of them all distribute in the middle reaches of Dongliao River basin, and change with time. The proposed methodology may help water managers in water-stressed regions to quantify the impact of drought, and consequently, to make decisions for coping with drought.

  1. AGROBACTERIUM-MEDIATED GENETIC TRANSFORMATION OF SORGHUM USING TISSUE CULTURE-BASED AND POLLEN-MEDIATED APPROACHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elkonin L.A.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Genetic transformation is a powerful tool for genetic improvement of arable crops. Genetic engineering approaches are especially important for modification of starch and protein contents, vitamin and micronutrient concentration, improvement of nutritive value of protein fractions, and increase tolerance to environmental stresses. Application of transgenic technologies for genetic improvement of sorghum, a highly productive heat tolerant and drought resistant crop, is extremely important since climate aridization in many regions all over the globe hampers sustainable production of traditional cereals, such as wheat, maize and barley. However, sorghum, in spite of great number of investigations, is one of the most recalcitrant crop species to genetic modification. The most frequently reported problems are a low frequency of transformation and silencing of transgenes. Using the A. tumefaciens strain AGL0/p35SGIB with the bar and gus-intron genes under the nos and CaMV35S promoters, respectively, we studied different methods of Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of the grain sorghum: in vitro culture-based techniques, by inoculation of immature embryos or embryo-derived calli, and pollen-mediated approach, by inoculation of flowering panicles. Four lines of grain sorghum – Milo-10, [9E] Milo-10 (CMS-line, KVV-114, and KVV-45 – were used. In both approaches, for activation of vir-genes agrobacterial cell suspension was grown in the AB or modified AB media with acetosyringone at room temperature. In vitro culture approach was effective for obtaining transgenic plants in the lines Milo-10 and KVV-45, which were able to produce embryogenic callus from immature embryos after their co-cultivation with agrobacterial cell suspension. Callus cultures tolerant to glufosinate ammonium (GA and capable to plant regeneration were obtained. The frequency of immature embryos producing PCR-positive transgenic plants varied in different experiments

  2. Earthquake—explosion discrimination using genetic algorithm-based boosting approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlic, Niksa; Loncaric, Sven

    2010-02-01

    An important and challenging problem in seismic data processing is to discriminate between natural seismic events such as earthquakes and artificial seismic events such as explosions. Many automatic techniques for seismogram classification have been proposed in the literature. Most of these methods have a similar approach to seismogram classification: a predefined set of features based on ad-hoc feature selection criteria is extracted from the seismogram waveform or spectral data and these features are used for signal classification. In this paper we propose a novel approach for seismogram classification. A specially formulated genetic algorithm has been employed to automatically search for a near-optimal seismogram feature set, instead of using ad-hoc feature selection criteria. A boosting method is added to the genetic algorithm when searching for multiple features in order to improve classification performance. A learning set of seismogram data is used by the genetic algorithm to discover a near-optimal feature set. The feature set identified by the genetic algorithm is then used for seismogram classification. The described method is developed to classify seismograms in two groups, whereas a brief overview of method extension for multiple group classification is given. For method verification, a learning set consisting of 40 local earthquake seismograms and 40 explosion seismograms was used. The method was validated on seismogram set consisting of 60 local earthquake seismograms and 60 explosion seismograms, with correct classification of 85%.

  3. Genetic engineering of industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains using a selection/counter-selection approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutyna, Dariusz R; Cordente, Antonio G; Varela, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    Gene modification of laboratory yeast strains is currently a very straightforward task thanks to the availability of the entire yeast genome sequence and the high frequency with which yeast can incorporate exogenous DNA into its genome. Unfortunately, laboratory strains do not perform well in industrial settings, indicating the need for strategies to modify industrial strains to enable strain development for industrial applications. Here we describe approaches we have used to genetically modify industrial strains used in winemaking.

  4. Feature Selection using Multi-objective Genetic Algorith m: A Hybrid Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Ahuja, Jyoti; GJUST - Guru Jambheshwar University of Sciecne and Technology; Ratnoo, Saroj Dahiya; GJUST - Guru Jambheshwar University of Sciecne and Technology

    2015-01-01

    Feature selection is an important pre-processing task for building accurate and comprehensible classification models. Several researchers have applied filter, wrapper or hybrid approaches using genetic algorithms which are good candidates for optimization problems that involve large search spaces like in the case of feature selection. Moreover, feature selection is an inherently multi-objective problem with many competing objectives involving size, predictive power and redundancy of the featu...

  5. Developmental psychopathology in an era of molecular genetics and neuroimaging: A developmental neurogenetics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Luke W

    2015-05-01

    The emerging field of neurogenetics seeks to model the complex pathways from gene to brain to behavior. This field has focused on imaging genetics techniques that examine how variability in common genetic polymorphisms predict differences in brain structure and function. These studies are informed by other complimentary techniques (e.g., animal models and multimodal imaging) and have recently begun to incorporate the environment through examination of Imaging Gene × Environment interactions. Though neurogenetics has the potential to inform our understanding of the development of psychopathology, there has been little integration between principles of neurogenetics and developmental psychopathology. The paper describes a neurogenetics and Imaging Gene × Environment approach and how these approaches have been usefully applied to the study of psychopathology. Six tenets of developmental psychopathology (the structure of phenotypes, the importance of exploring mechanisms, the conditional nature of risk, the complexity of multilevel pathways, the role of development, and the importance of who is studied) are identified, and how these principles can further neurogenetics applications to understanding the development of psychopathology is discussed. A major issue of this piece is how neurogenetics and current imaging and molecular genetics approaches can be incorporated into developmental psychopathology perspectives with a goal of providing models for better understanding pathways from among genes, environments, the brain, and behavior.

  6. Method of transient identification based on a possibilistic approach, optimized by genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Jose Carlos Soares de

    2001-02-01

    This work develops a method for transient identification based on a possible approach, optimized by Genetic Algorithm to optimize the number of the centroids of the classes that represent the transients. The basic idea of the proposed method is to optimize the partition of the search space, generating subsets in the classes within a partition, defined as subclasses, whose centroids are able to distinguish the classes with the maximum correct classifications. The interpretation of the subclasses as fuzzy sets and the possible approach provided a heuristic to establish influence zones of the centroids, allowing to achieve the 'don't know' answer for unknown transients, that is, outside the training set. (author)

  7. A probabilistic multi objective CLSC model with Genetic algorithm-ε_Constraint approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza TaheriMoghadam

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an uncertain multi objective closed-loop supply chain is developed. The first objective function is maximizing the total profit. The second objective function is minimizing the use of row materials. In the other word, the second objective function is maximizing the amount of remanufacturing and recycling. Genetic algorithm is used for optimization and for finding the pareto optimal line, Epsilon-constraint method is used. Finally a numerical example is solved with proposed approach and performance of the model is evaluated in different sizes. The results show that this approach is effective and useful for managerial decisions.

  8. Identifying genetic signatures of selection in a non-model species, alpine gentian (Gentiana nivalis L.), using a landscape genetic approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bothwell, H.; Bisbing, S.; Therkildsen, Nina Overgaard

    2013-01-01

    It is generally accepted that most plant populations are locally adapted. Yet, understanding how environmental forces give rise to adaptive genetic variation is a challenge in conservation genetics and crucial to the preservation of species under rapidly changing climatic conditions. Environmental...... loci, we compared outlier locus detection methods with a recently-developed landscape genetic approach. We analyzed 157 loci from samples of the alpine herb Gentiana nivalis collected across the European Alps. Principle coordinates of neighbor matrices (PCNM), eigenvectors that quantify multi...... variables identified eight more potentially adaptive loci than models run without spatial variables. 3) When compared to outlier detection methods, the landscape genetic approach detected four of the same loci plus 11 additional loci. 4) Temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation were the three major...

  9. Genetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubitschek, H.E.

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported on the following research projects: genetic effects of high LET radiations; genetic regulation, alteration, and repair; chromosome replication and the division cycle of Escherichia coli; effects of radioisotope decay in the DNA of microorganisms; initiation and termination of DNA replication in Bacillus subtilis; mutagenesis in mouse myeloma cells; lethal and mutagenic effects of near-uv radiation; effect of 8-methoxypsoralen on photodynamic lethality and mutagenicity in Escherichia coli; DNA repair of the lethal effects of far-uv; and near uv irradiation of bacterial cells

  10. The ‘Morbid Anatomy’ of the Human Genome: Tracing the Observational and Representational Approaches of Postwar Genetics and Biomedicine The William Bynum Prize Essay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores evolving conceptions and depictions of the human genome among human and medical geneticists during the postwar period. Historians of science and medicine have shown significant interest in the use of informational approaches in postwar genetics, which treat the genome as an expansive digital data set composed of three billion DNA nucleotides. Since the 1950s, however, geneticists have largely interacted with the human genome at the microscopically visible level of chromosomes. Mindful of this, I examine the observational and representational approaches of postwar human and medical genetics. During the 1970s and 1980s, the genome increasingly came to be understood as, at once, a discrete part of the human anatomy and a standardised scientific object. This paper explores the role of influential medical geneticists in recasting the human genome as being a visible, tangible, and legible entity, which was highly relevant to traditional medical thinking and practice. I demonstrate how the human genome was established as an object amenable to laboratory and clinical research, and argue that the observational and representational approaches of postwar medical genetics reflect, more broadly, the interdisciplinary efforts underlying the development of contemporary biomedicine. PMID:25045177

  11. The 'morbid anatomy' of the human genome: tracing the observational and representational approaches of postwar genetics and biomedicine the William Bynum Prize Essay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Andrew J

    2014-07-01

    This paper explores evolving conceptions and depictions of the human genome among human and medical geneticists during the postwar period. Historians of science and medicine have shown significant interest in the use of informational approaches in postwar genetics, which treat the genome as an expansive digital data set composed of three billion DNA nucleotides. Since the 1950s, however, geneticists have largely interacted with the human genome at the microscopically visible level of chromosomes. Mindful of this, I examine the observational and representational approaches of postwar human and medical genetics. During the 1970s and 1980s, the genome increasingly came to be understood as, at once, a discrete part of the human anatomy and a standardised scientific object. This paper explores the role of influential medical geneticists in recasting the human genome as being a visible, tangible, and legible entity, which was highly relevant to traditional medical thinking and practice. I demonstrate how the human genome was established as an object amenable to laboratory and clinical research, and argue that the observational and representational approaches of postwar medical genetics reflect, more broadly, the interdisciplinary efforts underlying the development of contemporary biomedicine.

  12. Analysis of bacterial community during the fermentation of pulque, a traditional Mexican alcoholic beverage, using a polyphasic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalante, Adelfo; Giles-Gómez, Martha; Hernández, Georgina; Córdova-Aguilar, María Soledad; López-Munguía, Agustín; Gosset, Guillermo; Bolívar, Francisco

    2008-05-31

    In this study, the characterization of the bacterial community present during the fermentation of pulque, a traditional Mexican alcoholic beverage from maguey (Agave), was determined for the first time by a polyphasic approach in which both culture and non-culture dependent methods were utilized. The work included the isolation of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), aerobic mesophiles, and 16S rDNA clone libraries from total DNA extracted from the maguey sap (aguamiel) used as substrate, after inoculation with a sample of previously produced pulque and followed by 6-h fermentation. Microbiological diversity results were correlated with fermentation process parameters such as sucrose, glucose, fructose and fermentation product concentrations. In addition, medium rheological behavior analysis and scanning electron microscopy in aguamiel and during pulque fermentation were also performed. Our results showed that both culture and non-culture dependent approaches allowed the detection of several new and previously reported species within the alpha-, gamma-Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. Bacteria diversity in aguamiel was composed by the heterofermentative Leuconostoc citreum, L. mesenteroides, L. kimchi, the gamma-Proteobacteria Erwinia rhapontici, Enterobacter spp. and Acinetobacter radioresistens. Inoculation with previously fermented pulque incorporated to the system microbiota, homofermentative lactobacilli related to Lactobacillus acidophilus, several alpha-Proteobacteria such as Zymomonas mobilis and Acetobacter malorum, other gamma-Proteobacteria and an important amount of yeasts, creating a starting metabolic diversity composed by homofermentative and heterofermentative LAB, acetic and ethanol producing microorganisms. At the end of the fermentation process, the bacterial diversity was mainly composed by the homofermentative Lactobacillus acidophilus, the heterofermentative L. mesenteroides, Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and the alpha-Proteobacteria A. malorum. After

  13. Phytogeographic and genetic variation in Sorbus, a traditional antidiabetic medicine—adaptation in action in both a plant and a discipline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Bailie

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Mountain ash (Sorbus decora and S. americana is used by the Cree Nation of the James Bay region of Quebec (Eeyou Istchee as traditional medicine. Its potential as an antidiabetic medicine is thought to vary across its geographical range, yet little is known about the factors that affect its antioxidant capacity. Here, we examined metabolite gene expression in relation to antioxidant activity, linking phytochemistry and medicinal potential. Samples of leaf and bark from S. decora and S. americana were collected from 20 populations at four different latitudes. Two genes known to produce antidiabetic substances, flavonol synthase and squalene synthase, were analyzed using quantitative real time PCR. Gene expression was significantly higher for flavonol synthase compared to squalene synthase and increased in the most Northern latitude. Corresponding differences observed in the antioxidant capacity of ethanolic extracts from the bark of Sorbus spp. confirm that plants at higher latitudes increase production of stress-induced secondary metabolites and support Aboriginal perceptions of their higher medicinal potential. Modern genetic techniques such as quantitative real time PCR offer unprecedented resolution to substantiate and scrutinise Aboriginal medicinal plant perception. Furthermore, it offers valuable insights into how environmental stress can trigger an adaptive response resulting in the accumulation of secondary metabolites with human medicinal properties.

  14. Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer: successful systematic implementation of a group approach to genetic counselling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benusiglio, Patrick R; Di Maria, Marina; Dorling, Leila; Jouinot, Anne; Poli, Antoine; Villebasse, Sophie; Le Mentec, Marine; Claret, Béatrice; Boinon, Diane; Caron, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    The increase in referrals to cancer genetics clinics, partially associated with the "Angelina Jolie effect", presents a challenge to existing services, many are already running at full capacity. More efficient ways to deliver genetic counselling are therefore urgently needed. We now systematically offer group instead of standard individual counselling to patients with suspected Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer. Group sessions last 30 min. The first twenty consist of a presentation by the genetic counsellor, the next ten of a discussion involving a cancer geneticist and a psychologist. A short individual consultation ensues, where personal and family issues are addressed and consent obtained. Blood is drawn afterwards. Satisfaction and knowledge are evaluated. We report data for the Oct-2014-Aug-2015 period. 210 patients attended group counselling, up to eight simultaneously. We always fitted them within a 4-h time frame. Mean satisfaction score was 41/43. Knowledge scores increased from 3.1/6 to 4.9/6 post-counselling (p value group counselling, we have withstood increases in referrals without compromising care. The "Angelina Jolie effect" and rapid developments in personalized medicine threaten to overwhelm cancer genetics clinics. In this context, our innovative approach should ensure that all patients have access to approved services.

  15. Usher syndrome: an effective sequencing approach to establish a genetic and clinical diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenarduzzi, S; Vozzi, D; Morgan, A; Rubinato, E; D'Eustacchio, A; Osland, T M; Rossi, C; Graziano, C; Castorina, P; Ambrosetti, U; Morgutti, M; Girotto, G

    2015-02-01

    Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by retinitis pigmentosa, sensorineural hearing loss and, in some cases, vestibular dysfunction. The disorder is clinically and genetically heterogeneous and, to date, mutations in 11 genes have been described. This finding makes difficult to get a precise molecular diagnosis and offer patients accurate genetic counselling. To overcome this problem and to increase our knowledge of the molecular basis of Usher syndrome, we designed a targeted resequencing custom panel. In a first validation step a series of 16 Italian patients with known molecular diagnosis were analysed and 31 out of 32 alleles were detected (97% of accuracy). After this step, 31 patients without a molecular diagnosis were enrolled in the study. Three out of them with an uncertain Usher diagnosis were excluded. One causative allele was detected in 24 out 28 patients (86%) while the presence of both causative alleles characterized 19 patients out 28 (68%). Sixteen novel and 27 known alleles were found in the following genes: USH2A (50%), MYO7A (7%), CDH23 (11%), PCDH15 (7%) and USH1G (2%). Overall, on the 44 patients the protocol was able to characterize 74 alleles out of 88 (84%). These results suggest that our panel is an effective approach for the genetic diagnosis of Usher syndrome leading to: 1) an accurate molecular diagnosis, 2) better genetic counselling, 3) more precise molecular epidemiology data fundamental for future interventional plans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Kaare; McGue, Matt

    2016-01-01

    The sequenced genomes of individuals aged ≥80 years, who were highly educated, self-referred volunteers and with no self-reported chronic diseases were compared to young controls. In these data, healthy ageing is a distinct phenotype from exceptional longevity and genetic factors that protect...

  17. Agreement on Access and Benefit-sharing for Academic Research: A toolbox for drafting Mutually Agreed Terms for access to Genetic Resources and to Associated Traditional Knowledge and Benefit-sharing

    OpenAIRE

    Biber-Klemm, Susette; Martinez, Sylvia I.; Jacob, Anne; Jevtic, Ana

    2016-01-01

    This manual contains a set of model clauses that enables users and providers of genetic resources and associated traditional knowledge to set up a legal contract that is adapted to the individual academic research situation. If mutually negotiated and agreed upon by the involved partners this agreement can yield a “Mutually Agreed Terms” ABS contract.

  18. Ruminant Nutrition Symposium: a systems approach to integrating genetics, nutrition, and metabolic efficiency in dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, J P

    2012-06-01

    The role of the dairy cow is to help provide high-quality protein and other nutrients for humans. We must select and manage cows with the goal of reaching the greatest possible efficiency for any given environment. We have increased efficiency tremendously over the years, yet the variation in productive and reproductive efficiency among animals is still quite large. In part this is because of a lack of full integration of genetic, nutritional, and reproductive biology into management decisions. However, integration across these disciplines is increasing as biological research findings show more specific control points at which genetics, nutrition, and reproduction interact. An ordered systems biology approach that focuses on why and how cells regulate energy and N use and on how and why organs interact by endocrine and neurocrine mechanisms will speed improvements in efficiency. More sophisticated dairy managers will demand better information to improve the efficiency of their animals. Using genetic improvement and proper animal management to improve milk productive and reproductive efficiency requires a deeper understanding of metabolic processes during the transition period. Using existing metabolic models, we can design experiments specifically to integrate new data from transcriptional arrays into models that describe nutrient use in farm animals. A systems modeling approach can help focus our research to make faster and large advances in efficiency and show directly how this can be applied on the farms.

  19. Approaches to quality management and accreditation in a genetic testing laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berwouts, Sarah; Morris, Michael A; Dequeker, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    Medical laboratories, and specifically genetic testing laboratories, provide vital medical services to different clients: clinicians requesting a test, patients from whom the sample was collected, public health and medical-legal instances, referral laboratories and authoritative bodies. All expect results that are accurate and obtained in an efficient and effective manner, within a suitable time frame and at acceptable cost. There are different ways of achieving the end results, but compliance with International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 15189, the international standard for the accreditation of medical laboratories, is becoming progressively accepted as the optimal approach to assuring quality in medical testing. We present recommendations and strategies designed to aid genetic testing laboratories with the implementation of a quality management system, including key aspects such as document control, external quality assessment, internal quality control, internal audit, management review, validation, as well as managing the human side of change. The focus is on pragmatic approaches to attain the levels of quality management and quality assurance required for accreditation according to ISO 15189, within the context of genetic testing. Attention is also given to implementing efficient and effective quality improvement. PMID:20720559

  20. Evolving attractive faces using morphing technology and a genetic algorithm: a new approach to determining ideal facial aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Brian J F; Karimi, Koohyar; Devcic, Zlatko; McLaren, Christine E; Chen, Wen-Pin

    2008-06-01

    similar collection of morphometric measures. No correlation with more commonly accepted measures such as the length facial thirds or fifths were identified. When images are examined as a montage (by generation), clear distinct trends are identified: oval shaped faces, distinct arched eyebrows, and full lips predominate. Faces evolve to approximate the guidelines suggested by classical canons. F3 and F4 generation faces look profoundly similar. The statistical and qualitative analysis indicates that the algorithm and methodology succeeds in generating successively more attractive faces. The use of genetic algorithms in combination with a morphing software and traditional focus-group derived attractiveness scores can be used to evolve attractive synthetic faces. We have demonstrated that the evolution of attractive faces can be mimicked in software. Genetic algorithms and morphing provide a robust alternative to traditional approaches rooted in comparing attractiveness scores with a series of morphometric measurements in human subjects.

  1. The Genetics of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder and Tourette Syndrome: An Epidemiological and Pathway-Based Approach for Gene Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grados, Marco A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To provide a contemporary perspective on genetic discovery methods applied to obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette syndrome (TS). Method: A review of research trends in genetics research in OCD and TS is conducted, with emphasis on novel approaches. Results: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are now in progress in OCD…

  2. Dynamic Load Balanced Clustering using Elitism based Random Immigrant Genetic Approach for Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mohaideen Pitchai

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Network (WSN consists of a large number of small sensors with restricted energy. Prolonged network lifespan, scalability, node mobility and load balancing are important needs for several WSN applications. Clustering the sensor nodes is an efficient technique to reach these goals. WSN have the characteristics of topology dynamics because of factors like energy conservation and node movement that leads to Dynamic Load Balanced Clustering Problem (DLBCP. In this paper, Elitism based Random Immigrant Genetic Approach (ERIGA is proposed to solve DLBCP which adapts to topology dynamics. ERIGA uses the dynamic Genetic Algorithm (GA components for solving the DLBCP. The performance of load balanced clustering process is enhanced with the help of this dynamic GA. As a result, the ERIGA achieves to elect suitable cluster heads which balances the network load and increases the lifespan of the network.

  3. Branch-pipe-routing approach for ships using improved genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Haiteng; Niu, Wentie

    2016-09-01

    Branch-pipe routing plays fundamental and critical roles in ship-pipe design. The branch-pipe-routing problem is a complex combinatorial optimization problem and is thus difficult to solve when depending only on human experts. A modified genetic-algorithm-based approach is proposed in this paper to solve this problem. The simplified layout space is first divided into threedimensional (3D) grids to build its mathematical model. Branch pipes in layout space are regarded as a combination of several two-point pipes, and the pipe route between two connection points is generated using an improved maze algorithm. The coding of branch pipes is then defined, and the genetic operators are devised, especially the complete crossover strategy that greatly accelerates the convergence speed. Finally, simulation tests demonstrate the performance of proposed method.

  4. A Genetic Algorithms-based Approach for Optimized Self-protection in a Pervasive Service Middleware

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Weishan; Ingstrup, Mads; Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2009-01-01

    With increasingly complex and heterogeneous systems in pervasive service computing, it becomes more and more important to provide self-protected services to end users. In order to achieve self-protection, the corresponding security should be provided in an optimized manner considering...... the constraints of heterogeneous devices and networks. In this paper, we present a Genetic Algorithms-based approach for obtaining optimized security configurations at run time, supported by a set of security OWL ontologies and an event-driven framework. This approach has been realized as a prototype for self-protection...... in the Hydra middleware, and is integrated with a framework for enforcing the computed solution at run time using security obligations. The experiments with the prototype on configuring security strategies for a pervasive service middleware show that this approach has acceptable performance, and could be used...

  5. Impact of virtual learning environment (VLE): A technological approach to genetics teaching on high school students' content knowledge, self-efficacy and career goal aspirations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandi, Kamala M.

    This study examines the effect of a technology-based instructional tool 'Geniverse' on the content knowledge gains, Science Self-Efficacy, Technology Self-Efficacy, and Career Goal Aspirations among 283 high school learners. The study was conducted in four urban high schools, two of which have achieved Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) and two have not. Students in both types of schools were taught genetics either through Geniverse, a virtual learning environment or Dragon genetics, a paper-pencil activity embedded in traditional instructional method. Results indicated that students in all schools increased their knowledge of genetics using either type of instructional approach. Students who were taught using Geniverse demonstrated an advantage for genetics knowledge although the effect was small. These increases were more pronounced in the schools that had been meeting the AYP goal. The other significant effect for Geniverse was that students in the technology-enhanced classrooms increased in science Self-Efficacy while students in the non-technology enhanced classrooms decreased. In addition, students from Non-AYP schools showed an improvement in Science and Technology Self-Efficacy; however the effects were small. The implications of these results for the future use of technology-enriched classrooms were discussed. Keywords: Technology-based instruction, Self-Efficacy, career goals and Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP).

  6. Approaches in Characterizing Genetic Structure and Mapping in a Rice Multiparental Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Chitra; Mauleon, Ramil; Lacorte, Vanica; Jubay, Monalisa; Zaw, Hein; Bonifacio, Justine; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Huang, B Emma; Leung, Hei

    2017-06-07

    Multi-parent Advanced Generation Intercross (MAGIC) populations are fast becoming mainstream tools for research and breeding, along with the technology and tools for analysis. This paper demonstrates the analysis of a rice MAGIC population from data filtering to imputation and processing of genetic data to characterizing genomic structure, and finally quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping. In this study, 1316 S6:8 indica MAGIC (MI) lines and the eight founders were sequenced using Genotyping by Sequencing (GBS). As the GBS approach often includes missing data, the first step was to impute the missing SNPs. The observable number of recombinations in the population was then explored. Based on this case study, a general outline of procedures for a MAGIC analysis workflow is provided, as well as for QTL mapping of agronomic traits and biotic and abiotic stress, using the results from both association and interval mapping approaches. QTL for agronomic traits (yield, flowering time, and plant height), physical (grain length and grain width) and cooking properties (amylose content) of the rice grain, abiotic stress (submergence tolerance), and biotic stress (brown spot disease) were mapped. Through presenting this extensive analysis in the MI population in rice, we highlight important considerations when choosing analytical approaches. The methods and results reported in this paper will provide a guide to future genetic analysis methods applied to multi-parent populations. Copyright © 2017 Raghavan et al.

  7. Approaches in Characterizing Genetic Structure and Mapping in a Rice Multiparental Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chitra Raghavan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Multi-parent Advanced Generation Intercross (MAGIC populations are fast becoming mainstream tools for research and breeding, along with the technology and tools for analysis. This paper demonstrates the analysis of a rice MAGIC population from data filtering to imputation and processing of genetic data to characterizing genomic structure, and finally quantitative trait loci (QTL mapping. In this study, 1316 S6:8 indica MAGIC (MI lines and the eight founders were sequenced using Genotyping by Sequencing (GBS. As the GBS approach often includes missing data, the first step was to impute the missing SNPs. The observable number of recombinations in the population was then explored. Based on this case study, a general outline of procedures for a MAGIC analysis workflow is provided, as well as for QTL mapping of agronomic traits and biotic and abiotic stress, using the results from both association and interval mapping approaches. QTL for agronomic traits (yield, flowering time, and plant height, physical (grain length and grain width and cooking properties (amylose content of the rice grain, abiotic stress (submergence tolerance, and biotic stress (brown spot disease were mapped. Through presenting this extensive analysis in the MI population in rice, we highlight important considerations when choosing analytical approaches. The methods and results reported in this paper will provide a guide to future genetic analysis methods applied to multi-parent populations.

  8. Optimal planning approaches with multiple impulses for rendezvous based on hybrid genetic algorithm and control method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JingRui Zhang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we focus on safe and effective completion of a rendezvous and docking task by looking at planning approaches and control with fuel-optimal rendezvous for a target spacecraft running on a near-circular reference orbit. A variety of existent practical path constraints are considered, including the constraints of field of view, impulses, and passive safety. A rendezvous approach is calculated by using a hybrid genetic algorithm with those constraints. Furthermore, a control method of trajectory tracking is adopted to overcome the external disturbances. Based on Clohessy–Wiltshire equations, we first construct the mathematical model of optimal planning approaches of multiple impulses with path constraints. Second, we introduce the principle of hybrid genetic algorithm with both stronger global searching ability and local searching ability. We additionally explain the application of this algorithm in the problem of trajectory planning. Then, we give three-impulse simulation examples to acquire an optimal rendezvous trajectory with the path constraints presented in this article. The effectiveness and applicability of the tracking control method are verified with the optimal trajectory above as control objective through the numerical simulation.

  9. Multi-platform metabolomics and a genetic approach support the authentication of agarwood produced by Aquilaria crassna and Aquilaria malaccensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Huy Truong; Min, Jung-Eun; Long, Nguyen Phuoc; Thanh, Ma Chi; Le, Thi Hong Van; Lee, Jeongmi; Park, Jeong Hill; Kwon, Sung Won

    2017-08-05

    Agarwood, the resinous heartwood produced by some Aquilaria species such as Aquilaria crassna, Aquilaria malaccensis and Aquilaria sinensis, has been traditionally and widely used in medicine, incenses and especially perfumes. However, up to now, the authentication of agarwood has been largely based on morphological characteristics, a method which is prone to errors and lacks reproducibility. Hence, in this study, we applied metabolomics and a genetic approach to the authentication of two common agarwood chips, those produced by Aquilaria crassna and Aquilaria malaccensis. Primary metabolites, secondary metabolites and DNA markers of agarwood were authenticated by 1 H NMR metabolomics, GC-MS metabolomics and DNA-based techniques, respectively. The results indicated that agarwood chips could be classified accurately by all the methods illustrated in this study. Additionally, the pros and cons of each method are also discussed. To the best of our knowledge, our research is the first study detailing all the differences in the primary and secondary metabolites, as well as the DNA markers between the agarwood produced by these two species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Conservation and re-development of sade traditional kampong at Rambitan village with local approach and cultural landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harapan Siregar, Andi

    2018-03-01

    Sade Kampong is one of the traditional kampongs in Indonesia, which located at Rambitan Village, Lombok. Lombok has been developed for tourism activity since years ago. The Lombok Province Government has identified Tourism as one of the key drives for the economic development. Hotel resort and others hospitalities buildings have been developed to all of the areas. Nowadays, the development of Sade Cultural Kampong will therefore open up new and demand oriented products (only focus on traditional woven of Sasak). Sade Kampong should be developed as a tourism destination with appreciated and developed its heritage and traditions with sustainability concepts (with the focus on social, economic, and environmental). This paper will elaborate some local potential Sade Kampong, such as architecture, culture, and landscape as a local potential for developing a new tourism destination.

  11. Evaluation of a non-targeted "Omic"' approach in the safety assessment of genetically modified plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Metzdorff, Stine Broeng; Kok, E. J.; Knuthsen, Pia

    2006-01-01

    -time PCR, and High Performance Liquid Chromatography. Analysis by cDNA microarray was used as a non-targeted approach for the identification of potential unintended effects caused by the transformation. The results revealed that, although the transgenic lines possessed different types of integration events...... has the potential to become a useful tool for screening of unintended effects, but state that it is crucial to have substantial information on the natural variation in traditional crops in order to be able to interpret "ornics" data correctly within the framework of food safety assessment strategies...

  12. A Genetic Algorithm-based Antenna Selection Approach for Large-but-Finite MIMO Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Makki, Behrooz

    2016-12-29

    We study the performance of antenna selectionbased multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) networks with large but finite number of transmit antennas and receivers. Considering the continuous and bursty communication scenarios with different users’ data request probabilities, we develop an efficient antenna selection scheme using genetic algorithms (GA). As demonstrated, the proposed algorithm is generic in the sense that it can be used in the cases with different objective functions, precoding methods, levels of available channel state information and channel models. Our results show that the proposed GAbased algorithm reaches (almost) the same throughput as the exhaustive search-based optimal approach, with substantially less implementation complexity.

  13. A Genetic Algorithm-based Antenna Selection Approach for Large-but-Finite MIMO Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Makki, Behrooz; Ide, Anatole; Svensson, Tommy; Eriksson, Thomas; Alouini, Mohamed-Slim

    2016-01-01

    We study the performance of antenna selectionbased multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) networks with large but finite number of transmit antennas and receivers. Considering the continuous and bursty communication scenarios with different users’ data request probabilities, we develop an efficient antenna selection scheme using genetic algorithms (GA). As demonstrated, the proposed algorithm is generic in the sense that it can be used in the cases with different objective functions, precoding methods, levels of available channel state information and channel models. Our results show that the proposed GAbased algorithm reaches (almost) the same throughput as the exhaustive search-based optimal approach, with substantially less implementation complexity.

  14. Approach to estimation of level of information security at enterprise based on genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    V, Stepanov L.; V, Parinov A.; P, Korotkikh L.; S, Koltsov A.

    2018-05-01

    In the article, the way of formalization of different types of threats of information security and vulnerabilities of an information system of the enterprise and establishment is considered. In a type of complexity of ensuring information security of application of any new organized system, the concept and decisions in the sphere of information security are expedient. One of such approaches is the method of a genetic algorithm. For the enterprises of any fields of activity, the question of complex estimation of the level of security of information systems taking into account the quantitative and qualitative factors characterizing components of information security is relevant.

  15. A combined genetic and multi medium approach revels new secondary metabolites in Aspergillus nidulans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klejnstrup, Marie Louise; Nielsen, Morten Thrane; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    Secondary metabolites are a diverse group of metabolites which serve as important natural sources of drugs for treating diseases. The availability of full genome sequences of several filamentous fungi has revealed a large genetic potential for production of secondary metabolites that are not obse......Secondary metabolites are a diverse group of metabolites which serve as important natural sources of drugs for treating diseases. The availability of full genome sequences of several filamentous fungi has revealed a large genetic potential for production of secondary metabolites...... that are not observed under standard laboratory conditions. Genetic approaches have proven a fruitfull strategy towards the production and identification of these unknown metabolites. Examples include deletion of the cclA1 and laeA2 genes in A. nidulans which affects the expression of secondary metabolites including...... monodictyphenone and terrequinone A respectively. We have deleted the cclA gene in A. nidulans and grown the mutants on several complex media to provoke the production of secondary metabolites. This resulted in the production of several metabolites not previously reported from A. nidulans. Some of these have been...

  16. Genetic engineering represents a safe approach for innovations improving nutritional contents of major food crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Arber

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available About 70 years ago early microbial genetic research revealed that inherited phenotypic traits become determined by DNA filaments composed of 4 different nucleotides that are linearly arranged. In the meantime we know that genes, the determinants of specific life functions, are genomic segments of an average size of about 1000 nucleotides, i.e. a very small part of a genome. Fundamental insights into the structures and functions of selected genes can be reached by sorting out the relevant short DNA segment, splicing this fragment into a natural gene vector such as a viral genome or a fertility plasmid. This allows the researchers to transfer the genetic hybrid into an appropriate host cell in order to produce many copies that can then serve for functional and structural analysis. This research approach became efficient in the 1970s. On the request of involved researchers, safety guidelines became proposed 1975 at the Asilomar Conference on Recombinant DNA (Berg, Baltimore, Brenner, Roblin, & Singer, 1975, then generally introduced and still largely followed nowadays. Carefully carried out genetic engineering by horizontally transferring a selected and functionally well known DNA segment into the genome of another organism has in many published biosafety investigations never shown any unexpected harmful effect. We will present below selected examples of research contributions enabling innovations for the benefit of human life conditions.

  17. An efficient Bayesian meta-analysis approach for studying cross-phenotype genetic associations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunabha Majumdar

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous analysis of genetic associations with multiple phenotypes may reveal shared genetic susceptibility across traits (pleiotropy. For a locus exhibiting overall pleiotropy, it is important to identify which specific traits underlie this association. We propose a Bayesian meta-analysis approach (termed CPBayes that uses summary-level data across multiple phenotypes to simultaneously measure the evidence of aggregate-level pleiotropic association and estimate an optimal subset of traits associated with the risk locus. This method uses a unified Bayesian statistical framework based on a spike and slab prior. CPBayes performs a fully Bayesian analysis by employing the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC technique Gibbs sampling. It takes into account heterogeneity in the size and direction of the genetic effects across traits. It can be applied to both cohort data and separate studies of multiple traits having overlapping or non-overlapping subjects. Simulations show that CPBayes can produce higher accuracy in the selection of associated traits underlying a pleiotropic signal than the subset-based meta-analysis ASSET. We used CPBayes to undertake a genome-wide pleiotropic association study of 22 traits in the large Kaiser GERA cohort and detected six independent pleiotropic loci associated with at least two phenotypes. This includes a locus at chromosomal region 1q24.2 which exhibits an association simultaneously with the risk of five different diseases: Dermatophytosis, Hemorrhoids, Iron Deficiency, Osteoporosis and Peripheral Vascular Disease. We provide an R-package 'CPBayes' implementing the proposed method.

  18. Evaluation of Average Life Expectancy of Exposed Individuals and their offspring: Population Genetic Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telnov, V. I.; Sotnik, N. V.

    2004-01-01

    Average life expectancy (ALE) is a significant integrating indicator of the population health. It can be affected by many factors such as radiation and hereditary ones. A population-genetic analysis of the average life expectancy (ALE) was performed for nuclear workers at the Mayak Production. Association exposed to external and internal radiation over a wide dose range and their offspring. A methodical approach was proposed to determine ALE for individuals with different genotypes and estimate ALE in the population based on genotype distribution. The analysis of a number of genetic markers revealed significant changes in the age-specific pattern of the Hp types in workers over 60 years. Such changes were caused by both radiation and non-radiation (cardiovascular pathology) factors. In the first case ALE decreased as Hp 1-1 > Hp 2-2> Hp2-1 (radiation). In the second case, it decreased as Hp 1-1> Hp-2-1> Hp2-2 (non-radiation). analysis of genetic markers in the workers offspring indicated significant shifts in distribution of the Hp types, especially an increase in the proportion of Hp 2-2 at doses from external γ-rays over 200 cGy to parents by the time of conception. Based on the non-radiation genotype differences in ALE in this group of offspring, the preliminary calculation of ALE was carried out, which indicated its reduction by 0.52 years in comparison with the control. (Author) 21 refs

  19. Leveraging ethnic group incidence variation to investigate genetic susceptibility to glioma: A novel candidate SNP approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ian Jacobs

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Using a novel candidate SNP approach, we aimed to identify a possible genetic basis for the higher glioma incidence in Whites relative to East Asians and African-Americans. Methods: We hypothesized that genetic regions containing SNPs with extreme differences in allele frequencies across ethnicities are most likely to harbor susceptibility variants. We used International HapMap Project data to identify 3,961 candidate SNPs with the largest allele frequency differences in Whites compared to East Asians and Africans and tested these SNPs for association with glioma risk in a set of White cases and controls. Top SNPs identified in the discovery dataset were tested for association with glioma in five independent replication datasets. Results: No SNP achieved statistical significance in either the discovery or replication datasets after accounting for multiple testing. However, the most strongly associated SNP, rs879471, was found to be in linkage disequilibrium with a previously identified risk SNP, rs6010620, in RTEL1. We estimate rs6010620 to account for a glioma incidence rate ratio of 1.34 for Whites relative to East Asians. Conclusions: We explored genetic susceptibility to glioma using a novel candidate SNP method which may be applicable to other diseases with appropriate epidemiologic patterns.

  20. Assessment of reflectivity of noise barriers in the far field – QUIESST method compared to traditional approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roo, F. de

    2013-01-01

    The sound reflectivity of noise barriers elements is one of the major acoustic product characteristics. Traditionally this property was tested in reverberation rooms according to EN 1793-1 and the results were used to predict the effect of sound reflections in the far field. As in many cases these

  1. Comparison of iPad applications with traditional activities using person-centred care approach: impact on well-being for persons with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Fong Yoke; Yeo, Donald; George, Stacey; Barr, Christopher

    2014-03-01

    Professionals working with people with dementia need to develop new activities that occupy patients and increase positive emotions. Dementia care mapping is a reliable method of measuring well-being during activities with people with dementia. The iPad has many applications that may be suitable as a group activity for persons with dementia. Six people with dementia took part in two traditional and two iPad activities over two days. Well-being was recorded using dementia care mapping. Subjects displayed similar or better levels of well-being during iPad activities than traditional activities. A larger variation of behaviors was seen during iPad activities than traditional activities. With detailed planning using a person-centred care approach, iPad group activity has the potential to be as effective and engaging as other conventional activities in achieving well-being.

  2. A semi-supervised learning approach to predict synthetic genetic interactions by combining functional and topological properties of functional gene network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Kyungsook

    2010-06-01

    very small training sets and large test sets. Conclusions We developed a graph-based SSL classifier for predicting the SGI. The classifier employs topological properties of weighted FGN as input features and simultaneously employs information induced from labelled and unlabelled data. Our analysis indicates that the topological properties of weighted FGN can be employed to accurately predict SGI. Also, the graph-based SSL method outperforms the traditional standard supervised approach, especially when used with small training sets. The proposed method can alleviate experimental burden of exhaustive test and provide a useful guide for the biologist in narrowing down the candidate gene pairs with SGI. The data and source code implementing the method are available from the website: http://home.ustc.edu.cn/~yzh33108/GeneticInterPred.htm

  3. Tracing Technological Development Trajectories: A Genetic Knowledge Persistence-Based Main Path Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunseok Park

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to propose a new method to identify main paths in a technological domain using patent citations. Previous approaches for using main path analysis have greatly improved our understanding of actual technological trajectories but nonetheless have some limitations. They have high potential to miss some dominant patents from the identified main paths; nonetheless, the high network complexity of their main paths makes qualitative tracing of trajectories problematic. The proposed method searches backward and forward paths from the high-persistence patents which are identified based on a standard genetic knowledge persistence algorithm. We tested the new method by applying it to the desalination and the solar photovoltaic domains and compared the results to output from the same domains using a prior method. The empirical results show that the proposed method can dramatically reduce network complexity without missing any dominantly important patents. The main paths identified by our approach for two test cases are almost 10x less complex than the main paths identified by the existing approach. The proposed approach identifies all dominantly important patents on the main paths, but the main paths identified by the existing approach miss about 20% of dominantly important patents.

  4. New approaches to the treatment of orphan genetic disorders: Mitigating molecular pathologies using chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RENATA V. VELHO

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available With the advance and popularization of molecular techniques, the identification of genetic mutations that cause diseases has increased dramatically. Thus, the number of laboratories available to investigate a given disorder and the number of subsequent diagnosis have increased over time. Although it is necessary to identify mutations and provide diagnosis, it is also critical to develop specific therapeutic approaches based on this information. This review aims to highlight recent advances in mutation-targeted therapies with chemicals that mitigate mutational pathology at the molecular level, for disorders that, for the most part, have no effective treatment. Currently, there are several strategies being used to correct different types of mutations, including the following: the identification and characterization of translational readthrough compounds; antisense oligonucleotide-mediated splicing redirection; mismatch repair; and exon skipping. These therapies and other approaches are reviewed in this paper.

  5. New approaches to the treatment of orphan genetic disorders: Mitigating molecular pathologies using chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velho, Renata V; Sperb-Ludwig, Fernanda; Schwartz, Ida V D

    2015-08-01

    With the advance and popularization of molecular techniques, the identification of genetic mutations that cause diseases has increased dramatically. Thus, the number of laboratories available to investigate a given disorder and the number of subsequent diagnosis have increased over time. Although it is necessary to identify mutations and provide diagnosis, it is also critical to develop specific therapeutic approaches based on this information. This review aims to highlight recent advances in mutation-targeted therapies with chemicals that mitigate mutational pathology at the molecular level, for disorders that, for the most part, have no effective treatment. Currently, there are several strategies being used to correct different types of mutations, including the following: the identification and characterization of translational readthrough compounds; antisense oligonucleotide-mediated splicing redirection; mismatch repair; and exon skipping. These therapies and other approaches are reviewed in this paper.

  6. Synthetic biology approaches in cancer immunotherapy, genetic network engineering, and genome editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarti, Deboki; Cho, Jang Hwan; Weinberg, Benjamin H; Wong, Nicole M; Wong, Wilson W

    2016-04-18

    Investigations into cells and their contents have provided evolving insight into the emergence of complex biological behaviors. Capitalizing on this knowledge, synthetic biology seeks to manipulate the cellular machinery towards novel purposes, extending discoveries from basic science to new applications. While these developments have demonstrated the potential of building with biological parts, the complexity of cells can pose numerous challenges. In this review, we will highlight the broad and vital role that the synthetic biology approach has played in applying fundamental biological discoveries in receptors, genetic circuits, and genome-editing systems towards translation in the fields of immunotherapy, biosensors, disease models and gene therapy. These examples are evidence of the strength of synthetic approaches, while also illustrating considerations that must be addressed when developing systems around living cells.

  7. A Parallel Approach To Optimum Actuator Selection With a Genetic Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, James L.

    2000-01-01

    Recent discoveries in smart technologies have created a variety of aerodynamic actuators which have great potential to enable entirely new approaches to aerospace vehicle flight control. For a revolutionary concept such as a seamless aircraft with no moving control surfaces, there is a large set of candidate locations for placing actuators, resulting in a substantially larger number of combinations to examine in order to find an optimum placement satisfying the mission requirements. The placement of actuators on a wing determines the control effectiveness of the airplane. One approach to placement Maximizes the moments about the pitch, roll, and yaw axes, while minimizing the coupling. Genetic algorithms have been instrumental in achieving good solutions to discrete optimization problems, such as the actuator placement problem. As a proof of concept, a genetic has been developed to find the minimum number of actuators required to provide uncoupled pitch, roll, and yaw control for a simplified, untapered, unswept wing model. To find the optimum placement by searching all possible combinations would require 1,100 hours. Formulating the problem and as a multi-objective problem and modifying it to take advantage of the parallel processing capabilities of a multi-processor computer, reduces the optimization time to 22 hours.

  8. A systematic approach to assessing the clinical significance of genetic variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duzkale, H; Shen, J; McLaughlin, H; Alfares, A; Kelly, M A; Pugh, T J; Funke, B H; Rehm, H L; Lebo, M S

    2013-11-01

    Molecular genetic testing informs diagnosis, prognosis, and risk assessment for patients and their family members. Recent advances in low-cost, high-throughput DNA sequencing and computing technologies have enabled the rapid expansion of genetic test content, resulting in dramatically increased numbers of DNA variants identified per test. To address this challenge, our laboratory has developed a systematic approach to thorough and efficient assessments of variants for pathogenicity determination. We first search for existing data in publications and databases including internal, collaborative and public resources. We then perform full evidence-based assessments through statistical analyses of observations in the general population and disease cohorts, evaluation of experimental data from in vivo or in vitro studies, and computational predictions of potential impacts of each variant. Finally, we weigh all evidence to reach an overall conclusion on the potential for each variant to be disease causing. In this report, we highlight the principles of variant assessment, address the caveats and pitfalls, and provide examples to illustrate the process. By sharing our experience and providing a framework for variant assessment, including access to a freely available customizable tool, we hope to help move towards standardized and consistent approaches to variant assessment. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A practical approach to screen for authorised and unauthorised genetically modified plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waiblinger, Hans-Ulrich; Grohmann, Lutz; Mankertz, Joachim; Engelbert, Dirk; Pietsch, Klaus

    2010-03-01

    In routine analysis, screening methods based on real-time PCR are most commonly used for the detection of genetically modified (GM) plant material in food and feed. In this paper, it is shown that the combination of five DNA target sequences can be used as a universal screening approach for at least 81 GM plant events authorised or unauthorised for placing on the market and described in publicly available databases. Except for maize event LY038, soybean events DP-305423 and BPS-CV127-9 and cotton event 281-24-236 x 3006-210-23, at least one of the five genetic elements has been inserted in these GM plants and is targeted by this screening approach. For the detection of these sequences, fully validated real-time PCR methods have been selected. A screening table is presented that describes the presence or absence of the target sequences for most of the listed GM plants. These data have been verified either theoretically according to available databases or experimentally using available reference materials. The screening table will be updated regularly by a network of German enforcement laboratories.

  10. Process planning optimization on turning machine tool using a hybrid genetic algorithm with local search approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliang Su

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A turning machine tool is a kind of new type of machine tool that is equipped with more than one spindle and turret. The distinctive simultaneous and parallel processing abilities of turning machine tool increase the complexity of process planning. The operations would not only be sequenced and satisfy precedence constraints, but also should be scheduled with multiple objectives such as minimizing machining cost, maximizing utilization of turning machine tool, and so on. To solve this problem, a hybrid genetic algorithm was proposed to generate optimal process plans based on a mixed 0-1 integer programming model. An operation precedence graph is used to represent precedence constraints and help generate a feasible initial population of hybrid genetic algorithm. Encoding strategy based on data structure was developed to represent process plans digitally in order to form the solution space. In addition, a local search approach for optimizing the assignments of available turrets would be added to incorporate scheduling with process planning. A real-world case is used to prove that the proposed approach could avoid infeasible solutions and effectively generate a global optimal process plan.

  11. Re-description and Reassignment of the Damselfish Abudefduf luridus (Cuvier, 1830) Using Both Traditional and Geometric Morphometric Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, W. James [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Albertson, R Craig [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Jacob, Rick E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Westneat, Mark W. [Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Here we present a re-description of Abudefduf luridus and reassign it to the genus Similiparma. We supplement traditional diagnoses and descriptions of this species with quantitative anatomical data collected from a family-wide geometric morphometric analysis of head morphology (44 species representing all 30 damselfish genera) and data from cranial micro-CT scans of fishes in the genus Similiparma. The use of geometric morphometric analyses (and other methods of shape analysis) permits detailed comparisons between the morphology of specific taxa and the anatomical diversity that has arisen in an entire lineage. This provides a particularly useful supplement to traditional description methods and we recommend the use of such techniques by systematists. Similiparma and its close relatives constitute a branch of the damselfish phylogenetic tree that predominantly inhabits rocky reefs in the Atlantic and Eastern Pacific, as opposed to the more commonly studied damselfishes that constitute a large portion of the ichthyofauna on all coral-reef communities.

  12. A HUMANISING ECONOMIC APPROACH ON COMPETITION POLICY OR HOW THE BEHAVIORAL ECONOMICS BLENDS WITH “TRADITIONAL ECONOMICS”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liviana Andreea Niminet

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral are crucial for understanding both the consumer’s attitude and firms’ attitude as well as for understanding the market outcomes. The past ten years brought a lot of attention from researchers and policy-makers on the behavioral economics issue. Classical, traditional economic models rely on the assumptions of rationality and ordered preferences. Behavioral economics explores interactions between demand and supply including information framing, the use of heuristics in decision-making and time-inconsistent preferences. The research on behavioral economics has led to an extensive debate about the relative merits of both traditional and behavioral economics. First of all we propose to highlight the advantages and disadvantages of behavioral economics versus traditional economics on a very sensitive issue: the competition policy. Then we address market issues that can be solved by means of behavioral economics afterwards turning out attention to the remedies of behavioral economics and ,last but not least, the United Kingdom successful model on the matter of competition policy.

  13. Marine Resource Management in the Hawaiian Archipelago: The Traditional Hawaiian System in Relation to the Western Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. L. Jokiel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Over a period of many centuries the Polynesians who inhabited Hawai‘i developed a carefully regulated and sustainable “ahupua‘a” management system that integrated watershed, freshwater and nearshore marine resources based on the fundamental linkages between all ecosystems from the mountain tops to the sea. This traditional scheme employed adaptive management practices keyed to subtle changes in natural resources. Sophisticated social controls on resource utilization were an important component of the system. Over the past two centuries a “Western system” gradually replaced much of the traditional Hawaiian system. There are major differences between the two systems in the areas of management practices, management focus, knowledge base, dissemination of information, resource monitoring, legal authority, access rights, stewardship and enforcement. However, there is a recent shift toward incorporating elements of the traditional scheme using methods and terminology acceptable and appropriate to present day realities. This trend is exemplified by the management plan for the newly formed Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. This is one of the largest protected areas in the world and is being managed with a focus on Native Hawaiian cultural values in relation to conservation, ecological, historical, scientific, and educational resource protection.

  14. Pre-emptive resource-constrained multimode project scheduling using genetic algorithm: A dynamic forward approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aidin Delgoshaei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The issue resource over-allocating is a big concern for project engineers in the process of scheduling project activities. Resource over-allocating drawback is frequently seen after scheduling of a project in practice which causes a schedule to be useless. Modifying an over-allocated schedule is very complicated and needs a lot of efforts and time. In this paper, a new and fast tracking method is proposed to schedule large scale projects which can help project engineers to schedule the project rapidly and with more confidence. Design/methodology/approach: In this article, a forward approach for maximizing net present value (NPV in multi-mode resource constrained project scheduling problem while assuming discounted positive cash flows (MRCPSP-DCF is proposed. The progress payment method is used and all resources are considered as pre-emptible. The proposed approach maximizes NPV using unscheduled resources through resource calendar in forward mode. For this purpose, a Genetic Algorithm is applied to solve. Findings: The findings show that the proposed method is an effective way to maximize NPV in MRCPSP-DCF problems while activity splitting is allowed. The proposed algorithm is very fast and can schedule experimental cases with 1000 variables and 100 resources in few seconds. The results are then compared with branch and bound method and simulated annealing algorithm and it is found the proposed genetic algorithm can provide results with better quality. Then algorithm is then applied for scheduling a hospital in practice. Originality/value: The method can be used alone or as a macro in Microsoft Office Project® Software to schedule MRCPSP-DCF problems or to modify resource over-allocated activities after scheduling a project. This can help project engineers to schedule project activities rapidly with more accuracy in practice.

  15. Comparing Multiple Intelligences Approach with Traditional Teaching on Eight Grade Students' Achievement in and Attitudes toward Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Osman Nafiz; Dogan, Alev; Gokcek, Nur; Kilic, Ziya; Kilic, Esma

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of multiple intelligences (MI) teaching approach on 8th Grade students' achievement in and attitudes toward science. This study used a pretest-posttest control group experimental design. While the experimental group (n=30) was taught a unit on acids and bases using MI teaching approach, the…

  16. Molecular and Chemical Genetic Approaches to Developmental Origins of Aging and Disease in Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Tomoyuki; Kishi, Shuji

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of diseases increases rapidly with age, accompanied by progressive deteriorations of physiological functions in organisms. Aging-associated diseases are sporadic but mostly inevitable complications arising from senescence. Senescence is often considered the antithesis of early development, but yet there may be factors and mechanisms in common between these two phenomena over the dynamic process of aging. The association between early development and late-onset disease with advancing age is thought to come from a consequence of developmental plasticity, the phenomenon by which one genotype can give rise to a range of physiologically and/or morphologically adaptive states in response to different environmental or genetic perturbations. On the one hand, we hypothesized that the future aging process can be predictive based on adaptivity during the early developmental period. Modulating the thresholds of adaptive plasticity by chemical genetic approaches, we have been investigating whether any relationship exists between the regulatory mechanisms that function in early development and in senescence using the zebrafish (Danio rerio), a small freshwater fish and a useful model animal for genetic studies. We have successfully conducted experiments to isolate zebrafish mutants expressing apparently altered senescence phenotypes during embryogenesis (“embryonic senescence”), subsequently showing shortened lifespan in adulthoods. We anticipate that previously uncharacterized developmental genes may mediate the aging process and play a pivotal role in senescence. On the other hand, unexpected senescence-related genes might also be involved in the early developmental process and regulation. The ease of manipulation using the zebrafish system allows us to conduct an exhaustive exploration of novel genes and small molecular compounds that can be linked to the senescence phenotype, and thereby facilitates searching for the evolutionary and developmental origins

  17. A genetic algorithm approach to optimization for the radiological worker allocation problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Chen; Masakuni Narita; Masashi Tsuji; Sangduk Sa

    1996-01-01

    The worker allocation optimization problem in radiological facilities inevitably involves various types of requirements and constraints relevant to radiological protection and labor management. Some of these goals and constraints are not amenable to a rigorous mathematical formulation. Conventional methods for this problem rely heavily on sophisticated algebraic or numerical algorithms, which cause difficulties in the search for optimal solutions in the search space of worker allocation optimization problems. Genetic algorithms (GAB) are stochastic search algorithms introduced by J. Holland in the 1970s based on ideas and techniques from genetic and evolutionary theories. The most striking characteristic of GAs is the large flexibility allowed in the formulation of the optimal problem and the process of the search for the optimal solution. In the formulation, it is not necessary to define the optimal problem in rigorous mathematical terms, as required in the conventional methods. Furthermore, by designing a model of evolution for the optimal search problem, the optimal solution can be sought efficiently with computational simple manipulations without highly complex mathematical algorithms. We reported a GA approach to the worker allocation problem in radiological facilities in the previous study. In this study, two types of hard constraints were employed to reduce the huge search space, where the optimal solution is sought in such a way as to satisfy as many of soft constraints as possible. It was demonstrated that the proposed evolutionary method could provide the optimal solution efficiently compared with conventional methods. However, although the employed hard constraints could localize the search space into a very small region, it brought some complexities in the designed genetic operators and demanded additional computational burdens. In this paper, we propose a simplified evolutionary model with less restrictive hard constraints and make comparisons between

  18. A nuclear reload optimization approach using a real coded genetic algorithm with random keys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Alan M.M. de; Schirru, Roberto; Medeiros, Jose A.C.C.

    2009-01-01

    The fuel reload of a Pressurized Water Reactor is made whenever the burn up of the fuel assemblies in the nucleus of the reactor reaches a certain value such that it is not more possible to maintain a critical reactor producing energy at nominal power. The problem of fuel reload optimization consists on determining the positioning of the fuel assemblies within the nucleus of the reactor in an optimized way to minimize the cost benefit relationship of fuel assemblies cost per maximum burn up, and also satisfying symmetry and safety restrictions. The fuel reload optimization problem difficulty grows exponentially with the number of fuel assemblies in the nucleus of the reactor. During decades the fuel reload optimization problem was solved manually by experts that used their knowledge and experience to build configurations of the reactor nucleus, and testing them to verify if safety restrictions of the plant are satisfied. To reduce this burden, several optimization techniques have been used, included the binary code genetic algorithm. In this work we show the use of a real valued coded approach of the genetic algorithm, with different recombination methods, together with a transformation mechanism called random keys, to transform the real values of the genes of each chromosome in a combination of discrete fuel assemblies for evaluation of the reload optimization. Four different recombination methods were tested: discrete recombination, intermediate recombination, linear recombination and extended linear recombination. For each of the 4 recombination methods 10 different tests using different seeds for the random number generator were conducted 10 generating, totaling 40 tests. The results of the application of the genetic algorithm are shown with formulation of real numbers for the problem of the nuclear reload of the plant Angra 1 type PWR. Since the best results in the literature for this problem were found by the parallel PSO we will it use for comparison

  19. Spatial patterns of diversity and genetic erosion of traditional cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) cultivation in the Peruvian Amazon: an evaluation of socio-economic and environmental indicators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemen, L.; Scheldeman, X.; Soto Cabellos, V.; Salazar, S.R.; Guarino, L.

    2007-01-01

    This study evaluates quantitatively the suitability of the use of site-specific socio-economic and environmental data as indicators to rapidly assess patterns of diversity and genetic erosion risk in cassava. Socio-economic data as well as farmers¿ estimation of genetic erosion were collected in the

  20. An evidence-based approach to medicinal plants for the treatment of sperm abnormalities in traditional Persian medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahvilzadeh, M; Hajimahmoodi, M; Toliyat, T; Karimi, M; Rahimi, R

    2016-10-01

    Infertility is defined as inability of a sexually active couple to conceive after 1 year of regular intercourse without contraception. Male factors account for 20%-50% of cases of infertility. The aim of this study was to review medicinal plants that proposed to improve sperm abnormalities in traditional Persian medicine. For this purpose, PubMed, Scopus, GoogleScholar and Cochrane library were explored for medicinal plants used in traditional Persian medicine for sperm abnormalities to obtain studies giving any evidence for their efficacy and pharmacological mechanisms related to male infertility. Data were collected for the years 1966 to March 2015. For some of them, including Chlorophytum borivilianum, Crocus sativus, Nigella sativa, Sesamum indicum, Tribulus terrestris, Mucuna pruriens and Withania somnifera, more reliable evidence was found. The mechanisms involved in the beneficial effects of medicinal plants in sperm abnormalities are antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-oedematous and venotonic activity as well as containing precursors for sperm production and increasing blood testosterone level. Various phytochemical categories including saponins, phytosterols, carotenoids, oxygenated volatile compounds, phenolic compounds and alkaloids seem to be responsible for these beneficial effects. Further studies are recommended for obtaining more conclusive results about the efficacy and safety of the mentioned medicinal plants. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  1. Approach to a State of the Art of Traditional and Popular Medicinal Practices in Hispano-American

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Alberto Garzón Chirivi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17227/01234870.41folios157.168 This article presents a state of the art of academic production concerning traditional and popular medicine in Latin America. It analyzes the relation between studies on chamanismo (the art of medicine men in indigenous communities in some Spanish-speaking countries (Colombia, Peru, Bolivia, Mexico, Spain and studies on curanderismo (the art of healers in urban contexts and evidences recurring elements of a magical, religious and medical kind in their therapeutic practices. Likewise, it shows the changes in the understanding of these systems of treatment and assistance to health and sickness, their permanence and incidence on collective practices associated to spirituality, as well as the construction of alternatives of individual and social health and the interdisciplinary character of the existing research studies. This article, too, proposes the existence of an analytical vacuum regarding gender, class and ethnic group in the studies on traditional and popular medicine.

  2. A bayesian approach to inferring the genetic population structure of sugarcane accessions from INTA (Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Inés Pocovi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the population structure and genetic diversity in sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum L. accessions from INTA germplasm bank (Argentina will be of great importance for germplasm collection and breeding improvement as it will identify diverse parental combinations to create segregating progenies with maximum genetic variability for further selection. A Bayesian approach, ordination methods (PCoA, Principal Coordinate Analysis and clustering analysis (UPGMA, Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Mean were applied to this purpose. Sixty three INTA sugarcane hybrids were genotyped for 107 Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR and 136 Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP loci. Given the low probability values found with AFLP for individual assignment (4.7%, microsatellites seemed to perform better (54% for STRUCTURE analysis that revealed the germplasm to exist in five optimum groups with partly corresponding to their origin. However clusters shown high degree of admixture, F ST values confirmed the existence of differences among groups. Dissimilarity coefficients ranged from 0.079 to 0.651. PCoA separated sugarcane in groups that did not agree with those identified by STRUCTURE. The clustering including all genotypes neither showed resemblance to populations find by STRUCTURE, but clustering performed considering only individuals displaying a proportional membership > 0.6 in their primary population obtained with STRUCTURE showed close similarities. The Bayesian method indubitably brought more information on cultivar origins than classical PCoA and hierarchical clustering method.

  3. Intracellular, genetic or congenital immunisation--transgenic approaches to increase disease resistance of farm animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M; Brem, G

    1996-01-26

    Novel approaches to modify disease resistance or susceptibility in livestock are justified not only by economical reasons and with respect to animal welfare but also by recent advancements in molecular genetics. The control or elimination of infectious pathogens in farm animals is historically achieved by the use of vaccines and drugs and by quarantine safeguards and eradication. Currently, research on the improvement of disease resistance based on nucleic acid technology focuses on two main issues: additive gene transfer and the development of nucleic acid vaccines. The strategies aim at the stable or transient expression of components known to influence non-specific or specific host defence mechanisms against infectious pathogens. Thus, candidates for gene transfer experiments include all genes inducing or conferring innate and acquired immunity as well as specific disease resistance genes. Referring to the site and mode of action and the source of the effective agent the strategies are termed 'intracellular', 'genetic' and 'congenital' immunisation. The targeted disruption (deletive gene transfer) of disease susceptibility genes awaits the establishment of totipotential embryonic cell lineages in farm animals. The cytokine network regulates cellular viability, growth and differentiation in physiological and pathophysiological states. The identification of the JAK-STAT pathway used by many cytokines for their intracellular signal propagation has provided not only new target molecules for modulating the immune response but will also permit the further elucidation of host-pathogen interactions and resistance mechanisms.

  4. Pollen Sterility—A Promising Approach to Gene Confinement and Breeding for Genetically Modified Bioenergy Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert P. Kausch

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Advanced genetic and biotechnology tools will be required to realize the full potential of food and bioenergy crops. Given current regulatory concerns, many transgenic traits might never be deregulated for commercial release without a robust gene confinement strategy in place. The potential for transgene flow from genetically modified (GM crops is widely known. Pollen-mediated transfer is a major component of gene flow in flowering plants and therefore a potential avenue for the escape of transgenes from GM crops. One approach for preventing and/or mitigating transgene flow is the production of trait linked pollen sterility. To evaluate the feasibility of generating pollen sterility lines for gene confinement and breeding purposes we tested the utility of a promoter (Zm13Pro from a maize pollen-specific gene (Zm13 for driving expression of the reporter gene GUS and the cytotoxic gene barnase in transgenic rice (Oryza sativa ssp. Japonica cv. Nipponbare as a monocot proxy for bioenergy grasses. This study demonstrates that the Zm13 promoter can drive pollen-specific expression in stably transformed rice and may be useful for gametophytic transgene confinement and breeding strategies by pollen sterility in food and bioenergy crops.

  5. A Reverse Genetics Approach for the Design of Methyltransferase-Defective Live Attenuated Avian Metapneumovirus Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Sun, Jing; Wei, Yongwei; Li, Jianrong

    2016-01-01

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV), also known as avian pneumovirus or turkey rhinotracheitis virus, is the causative agent of turkey rhinotracheitis and is associated with swollen head syndrome in chickens. aMPV belongs to the family Paramyxoviridae which includes many important human pathogens such as human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human metapneumovirus (hMPV), and human parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3). The family also includes highly lethal emerging pathogens such as Nipah virus and Hendra virus, as well as agriculturally important viruses such as Newcastle disease virus (NDV). For many of these viruses, there is no effective vaccine. Here, we describe a reverse genetics approach to develop live attenuated aMPV vaccines by inhibiting the viral mRNA cap methyltransferase. The viral mRNA cap methyltransferase is an excellent target for the attenuation of paramyxoviruses because it plays essential roles in mRNA stability, efficient viral protein translation and innate immunity. We have described in detail the materials and methods used to generate recombinant aMPVs that lack viral mRNA cap methyltransferase activity. We have also provided methods to evaluate the genetic stability, pathogenesis, and immunogenicity of live aMPV vaccine candidates in turkeys.

  6. An Interval-Valued Approach to Business Process Simulation Based on Genetic Algorithms and the BPMN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario G.C.A. Cimino

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Simulating organizational processes characterized by interacting human activities, resources, business rules and constraints, is a challenging task, because of the inherent uncertainty, inaccuracy, variability and dynamicity. With regard to this problem, currently available business process simulation (BPS methods and tools are unable to efficiently capture the process behavior along its lifecycle. In this paper, a novel approach of BPS is presented. To build and manage simulation models according to the proposed approach, a simulation system is designed, developed and tested on pilot scenarios, as well as on real-world processes. The proposed approach exploits interval-valued data to represent model parameters, in place of conventional single-valued or probability-valued parameters. Indeed, an interval-valued parameter is comprehensive; it is the easiest to understand and express and the simplest to process, among multi-valued representations. In order to compute the interval-valued output of the system, a genetic algorithm is used. The resulting process model allows forming mappings at different levels of detail and, therefore, at different model resolutions. The system has been developed as an extension of a publicly available simulation engine, based on the Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN standard.

  7. A HYBRID GENETIC ALGORITHM-NEURAL NETWORK APPROACH FOR PRICING CORES AND REMANUFACTURED CORES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Seidi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT:Sustainability has become a major issue in most economies, causing many leading companies to focus on product recovery and reverse logistics. Remanufacturing is an industrial process that makes used products reusable. One of the important aspects in both reverse logistics and remanufacturing is the pricing of returned and remanufactured products (called cores. In this paper, we focus on pricing the cores and remanufactured cores. First we present a mathematical model for this purpose. Since this model does not satisfy our requirements, we propose a simulation optimisation approach. This approach consists of a hybrid genetic algorithm based on a neural network employed as the fitness function. We use automata learning theory to obtain the learning rate required for training the neural network. Numerical results demonstrate that the optimal value of the acquisition price of cores and price of remanufactured cores is obtained by this approach.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Volhoubaarheid het ‘n belangrike saak geword in die meeste ekonomieë, wat verskeie maatskappye genoop het om produkherwinning en omgekeerde logistiek te onder oë te neem. Hervervaardiging is ‘n industriële proses wat gebruikte produkte weer bruikbaar maak. Een van die belangrike aspekte in beide omgekeerde logistiek en hervervaardiging is die prysbepaling van herwinne en hervervaardigde produkte. Hierdie artikel fokus op die prysbepalingsaspekte by wyse van ‘n wiskundige model.

  8. Plant responses to UV and blue light: biochemical and genetic approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, G.I.; Christie, J.M.; Fuglevand, G.; Long, J.C.; Jackson, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    UV and blue light control many aspects of plant growth and development. It is evident that several different photoreceptors mediate responses to UV and blue light, and there are reports of the functional and biochemical characterisation of a putative photoreceptor for phototropism and of the functional and molecular characterisation of the CRY1 photoreceptor, encoded by the Arabidopsis HY4 gene. The CRY1 photoreceptor mediates extension growth and gene expression responses to UV-A/blue light presumably through different or branching signal transduction pathways. Progress has been made in cell physiological and biochemical studies of UV/blue light signal transduction, but much remains to be done to relate candidate UV/blue signal transduction events to particular photoreceptors and responses. The application of a genetic approach in Arabidopsis has been responsible for many advances in understanding UV/blue responses, but further UV-B, UV-A and blue light response mutants need to be isolated. (author)

  9. Test interval optimization of safety systems of nuclear power plant using fuzzy-genetic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durga Rao, K.; Gopika, V.; Kushwaha, H.S.; Verma, A.K.; Srividya, A.

    2007-01-01

    Probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) is the most effective and efficient tool for safety and risk management in nuclear power plants (NPP). PSA studies not only evaluate risk/safety of systems but also their results are very useful in safe, economical and effective design and operation of NPPs. The latter application is popularly known as 'Risk-Informed Decision Making'. Evaluation of technical specifications is one such important application of Risk-Informed decision making. Deciding test interval (TI), one of the important technical specifications, with the given resources and risk effectiveness is an optimization problem. Uncertainty is inherently present in the availability parameters such as failure rate and repair time due to the limitation in assessing these parameters precisely. This paper presents a solution to test interval optimization problem with uncertain parameters in the model with fuzzy-genetic approach along with a case of application from a safety system of Indian pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR)

  10. Optimization of Electrical System for Offshore Wind Farms via a Genetic Algorithm Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Menghua

    , and the LTC limitation of transformers, the power generation limits and the voltage operation range are considered as the constraints. The optimization method combined with probabilistic analysis is used to obtain the capacity of a given wind farm site. The OES-OWF is approached by Genetic Algorithm (GA...... to very different costs, system reliability, power quality, and power losses etc. Therefore, the optimization of electrical system design for offshore wind farms becomes more and more necessary. There are two tasks in this project: 1) the first one is to construct an algorithm for finding the capacity......). This platform is based on a knowledge database, and composed of several functional modules such as cost calculation, reliability evaluation, losses calculation, AC-DC integrated load flow algorithm etc. All these modules are based on a spreadsheet database which provides an interface for users to input...

  11. A NAÏVE APPROACH TO SPEED UP PORTFOLIO OPTIMIZATION PROBLEM USING A MULTIOBJECTIVE GENETIC ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baixauli-Soler, J. Samuel

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Genetic algorithms (GAs are appropriate when investors have the objective of obtaining mean‑variance (VaR efficient frontier as minimising VaR leads to non‑convex and non‑differential risk‑return optimisation problems. However GAs are a time‑consuming optimisation technique. In this paper, we propose to use a naïve approach consisting of using samples split by quartile of risk to obtain complete efficient frontiers in a reasonable computation time. Our results show that using reduced problems which only consider a quartile of the assets allow us to explore the efficient frontier for a large range of risk values. In particular, the third quartile allows us to obtain efficient frontiers from the 1.8% to 2.5% level of VaR quickly, while that of the first quartile of assets is from 1% to 1.3% level of VaR.

  12. An Adaptive Agent-Based Model of Homing Pigeons: A Genetic Algorithm Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Oloo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Conventionally, agent-based modelling approaches start from a conceptual model capturing the theoretical understanding of the systems of interest. Simulation outcomes are then used “at the end” to validate the conceptual understanding. In today’s data rich era, there are suggestions that models should be data-driven. Data-driven workflows are common in mathematical models. However, their application to agent-based models is still in its infancy. Integration of real-time sensor data into modelling workflows opens up the possibility of comparing simulations against real data during the model run. Calibration and validation procedures thus become automated processes that are iteratively executed during the simulation. We hypothesize that incorporation of real-time sensor data into agent-based models improves the predictive ability of such models. In particular, that such integration results in increasingly well calibrated model parameters and rule sets. In this contribution, we explore this question by implementing a flocking model that evolves in real-time. Specifically, we use genetic algorithms approach to simulate representative parameters to describe flight routes of homing pigeons. The navigation parameters of pigeons are simulated and dynamically evaluated against emulated GPS sensor data streams and optimised based on the fitness of candidate parameters. As a result, the model was able to accurately simulate the relative-turn angles and step-distance of homing pigeons. Further, the optimised parameters could replicate loops, which are common patterns in flight tracks of homing pigeons. Finally, the use of genetic algorithms in this study allowed for a simultaneous data-driven optimization and sensitivity analysis.

  13. A statistical approach to quantification of genetically modified organisms (GMO) using frequency distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdes, Lars; Busch, Ulrich; Pecoraro, Sven

    2014-12-14

    According to Regulation (EU) No 619/2011, trace amounts of non-authorised genetically modified organisms (GMO) in feed are tolerated within the EU if certain prerequisites are met. Tolerable traces must not exceed the so-called 'minimum required performance limit' (MRPL), which was defined according to the mentioned regulation to correspond to 0.1% mass fraction per ingredient. Therefore, not yet authorised GMO (and some GMO whose approvals have expired) have to be quantified at very low level following the qualitative detection in genomic DNA extracted from feed samples. As the results of quantitative analysis can imply severe legal and financial consequences for producers or distributors of feed, the quantification results need to be utterly reliable. We developed a statistical approach to investigate the experimental measurement variability within one 96-well PCR plate. This approach visualises the frequency distribution as zygosity-corrected relative content of genetically modified material resulting from different combinations of transgene and reference gene Cq values. One application of it is the simulation of the consequences of varying parameters on measurement results. Parameters could be for example replicate numbers or baseline and threshold settings, measurement results could be for example median (class) and relative standard deviation (RSD). All calculations can be done using the built-in functions of Excel without any need for programming. The developed Excel spreadsheets are available (see section 'Availability of supporting data' for details). In most cases, the combination of four PCR replicates for each of the two DNA isolations already resulted in a relative standard deviation of 15% or less. The aims of the study are scientifically based suggestions for minimisation of uncertainty of measurement especially in -but not limited to- the field of GMO quantification at low concentration levels. Four PCR replicates for each of the two DNA isolations

  14. Incorporating Functional Genomic Information in Genetic Association Studies Using an Empirical Bayes Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Amy V; Cox, Angela; Lin, Wei-Yu; Easton, Douglas F; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Walters, Kevin

    2016-04-01

    There is a large amount of functional genetic data available, which can be used to inform fine-mapping association studies (in diseases with well-characterised disease pathways). Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) prioritization via Bayes factors is attractive because prior information can inform the effect size or the prior probability of causal association. This approach requires the specification of the effect size. If the information needed to estimate a priori the probability density for the effect sizes for causal SNPs in a genomic region isn't consistent or isn't available, then specifying a prior variance for the effect sizes is challenging. We propose both an empirical method to estimate this prior variance, and a coherent approach to using SNP-level functional data, to inform the prior probability of causal association. Through simulation we show that when ranking SNPs by our empirical Bayes factor in a fine-mapping study, the causal SNP rank is generally as high or higher than the rank using Bayes factors with other plausible values of the prior variance. Importantly, we also show that assigning SNP-specific prior probabilities of association based on expert prior functional knowledge of the disease mechanism can lead to improved causal SNPs ranks compared to ranking with identical prior probabilities of association. We demonstrate the use of our methods by applying the methods to the fine mapping of the CASP8 region of chromosome 2 using genotype data from the Collaborative Oncological Gene-Environment Study (COGS) Consortium. The data we analysed included approximately 46,000 breast cancer case and 43,000 healthy control samples. © 2016 The Authors. *Genetic Epidemiology published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Approaches to pre-formulation R and D for phytopharmaceuticals emanating from herb based traditional Ayurvedic processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D B Anantha Narayana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Botanicals constitute a large part of the drugs from the traditional medicine (TM and ethno medicine (EM known for their history of safe use (HOSU. Phytopharmaceuticals having a base of such origin offer high advantages as they come with safety profiles, and often allow extrapolation of the HOSU data, under certain circumstances. However, while current pharmaceutical technologies are being adopted by the industry to make phytopharmaceuticals with such origin, there is a need for preformulation research and development (R and D during formulation. Some suggestions for R and D studies in case of aqueous extracts known in Ayurveda, converted on an industrial scale to obtain a phytopharmaceutical, and formulated as a solid dosage form (granules, tablets, or capsules are discussed.

  16. Planning additional drilling campaign using two-space genetic algorithm: A game theoretical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumral, Mustafa; Ozer, Umit

    2013-03-01

    Grade and tonnage are the most important technical uncertainties in mining ventures because of the use of estimations/simulations, which are mostly generated from drill data. Open pit mines are planned and designed on the basis of the blocks representing the entire orebody. Each block has different estimation/simulation variance reflecting uncertainty to some extent. The estimation/simulation realizations are submitted to mine production scheduling process. However, the use of a block model with varying estimation/simulation variances will lead to serious risk in the scheduling. In the medium of multiple simulations, the dispersion variances of blocks can be thought to regard technical uncertainties. However, the dispersion variance cannot handle uncertainty associated with varying estimation/simulation variances of blocks. This paper proposes an approach that generates the configuration of the best additional drilling campaign to generate more homogenous estimation/simulation variances of blocks. In other words, the objective is to find the best drilling configuration in such a way as to minimize grade uncertainty under budget constraint. Uncertainty measure of the optimization process in this paper is interpolation variance, which considers data locations and grades. The problem is expressed as a minmax problem, which focuses on finding the best worst-case performance i.e., minimizing interpolation variance of the block generating maximum interpolation variance. Since the optimization model requires computing the interpolation variances of blocks being simulated/estimated in each iteration, the problem cannot be solved by standard optimization tools. This motivates to use two-space genetic algorithm (GA) approach to solve the problem. The technique has two spaces: feasible drill hole configuration with minimization of interpolation variance and drill hole simulations with maximization of interpolation variance. Two-space interacts to find a minmax solution

  17. Systematic documentation and analysis of human genetic variation in hemoglobinopathies using the microattribution approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Giardine (Belinda); J. Borg (Joseph); D.R. Higgs (Douglas); K.R. Peterson (Kenneth R.); J.N.J. Philipsen (Sjaak); D. Maglott (Donna); B.K. Singleton (Belinda K.); D.J. Anstee (David J.); A.N. Basak (Nazli); B.H. Clark (Bruce); F.C. Costa (Flavia C.); P. Faustino (Paula); H. Fedosyuk (Halyna); A.E. Felice (Alex); A. Francina (Alain); R. Galanello (Renzo); M.V.E. Gallivan (Monica V. E.); M. Georgitsi (Marianthi); R.J. Gibbons (Richard J.); P.C. Giordano (Piero Carlo); C.L. Harteveld (Cornelis); J.D. Hoyer (James D.); M. Jarvis (Martin); P. Joly (Philippe); E. Kanavakis (Emmanuel); P. Kollia (Panagoula); S. Menzel (Stephan); W.G. Miller (William); K. Moradkhani (Kamran); J. Old (John); A. Papachatzpoulou (Adamantia); M.N. Papadakis (Manoussos); P. Papadopoulos (Petros); S. Pavlovic (Sonja); L. Perseu (Lucia); M. Radmilovic (Milena); C. Riemer (Cathy); S. Satta (Stefania); I.A. Schrijver (Ingrid); M. Stojiljkovic (Maja); S.L. Thein; J. Traeger-Synodinos (Joanne); R. Tully (Ray); T. Wada (Takahito); J.S. Waye (John); C. Wiemann (Claudia); B. Zukic (Branka); D.H.K. Chui (David H. K.); H. Wajcman (Henri); R. Hardison (Ross); G.P. Patrinos (George)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWe developed a series of interrelated locus-specific databases to store all published and unpublished genetic variation related to hemoglobinopathies and thalassemia and implemented microattribution to encourage submission of unpublished observations of genetic variation to these public

  18. Biotechnological approaches for the genetic improvement of Jatropha curcas L.: A biodiesel plant

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Nitish; Singh, Amritpal S.; Kumari, Swati; Reddy, Muppala P.

    2015-01-01

    . In this review, an effort is made to project the current biotechnology and molecular biology tools employed in the direction of, evaluating the genetic diversity and phylogeny revelation of Jatropha spp., identification of genetic markers for desirable traits

  19. Applying new genetic approaches to improve quality of population assessment of green and loggerhead turtles

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — As the NOAA-Fisheries? National Sea Turtle Genetics Lab, the SWFSC Marine Turtle Genetics Program has the lead responsibility for generating, analyzing and...

  20. A chemical genetic approach to engineer phototropin kinases for substrate labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnabel, Jonathan; Hombach, Peter; Waksman, Thomas; Giuriani, Giovanni; Petersen, Jan; Christie, John M

    2018-04-13

    Protein kinases (PKs) control many aspects of plant physiology by regulating signaling networks through protein phosphorylation. Phototropins (phots) are plasma membrane-associated serine/threonine PKs that control a range of physiological processes that collectively serve to optimize photosynthetic efficiency in plants. These include phototropism, leaf positioning and flattening, chloroplast movement, and stomatal opening. Despite their identification over two decades ago, only a handful of substrates have been identified for these PKs. Progress in this area has been hampered by the lack of a convenient means to confirm the identity of potential substrate candidates. Here we demonstrate that the kinase domain of Arabidopsis phot1 and phot2 can be successfully engineered to accommodate non-natural ATP analogues by substituting the bulky gatekeeper residue threonine for glycine. This approach circumvents the need for radioactivity to track phot kinase activity and follow light-induced receptor autophosphorylation in vitro by incorporating thiophosphate from N 6 -benzyl-ATPγS. Consequently, thiophosphorylation of phot substrate candidates can be readily monitored when added or co-expressed with phots in vitro Furthermore, gatekeeper-modified phot1 retained its functionality and its ability to accommodate N 6 -benzyl-ATPγS as a phosphodonor when expressed in Arabidopsis We therefore anticipate that this chemical genetic approach will provide new opportunities for labeling and identifying substrates for phots and other related AGC kinases under in vitro and near-native in vivo conditions. © 2018 Schnabel et al.

  1. Revisiting regional flood frequency analysis in Slovakia: the region-of-influence method vs. traditional regional approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaál, Ladislav; Kohnová, Silvia; Szolgay, Ján.

    2010-05-01

    During the last 10-15 years, the Slovak hydrologists and water resources managers have been devoting considerable efforts to develop statistical tools for modelling probabilities of flood occurrence in a regional context. Initially, these models followed concepts to regional flood frequency analysis that were based on fixed regions, later the Hosking and Wallis's (HW; 1997) theory was adopted and modified. Nevertheless, it turned out to be that delineating homogeneous regions using these approaches is not a straightforward task, mostly due to the complex orography of the country. In this poster we aim at revisiting flood frequency analyses so far accomplished for Slovakia by adopting one of the pooling approaches, i.e. the region-of-influence (ROI) approach (Burn, 1990). In the ROI approach, unique pooling groups of similar sites are defined for each site under study. The similarity of sites is defined through Euclidean distance in the space of site attributes that had also proved applicability in former cluster analyses: catchment area, afforested area, hydrogeological catchment index and the mean annual precipitation. The homogeneity of the proposed pooling groups is evaluated by the built-in homogeneity test by Lu and Stedinger (1992). Two alternatives of the ROI approach are examined: in the first one the target size of the pooling groups is adjusted to the target return period T of the estimated flood quantiles, while in the other one, the target size is fixed, regardless of the target T. The statistical models of the ROI approach are inter-compared by the conventional regionalization approach based on the HW methodology where the parameters of flood frequency distributions were derived by means of L-moment statistics and a regional formula for the estimation of the index flood was derived by multiple regression methods using physiographic and climatic catchment characteristics. The inter-comparison of different frequency models is evaluated by means of the

  2. Southern-by-Sequencing: A Robust Screening Approach for Molecular Characterization of Genetically Modified Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina M. Zastrow-Hayes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular characterization of events is an integral part of the advancement process during genetically modified (GM crop product development. Assessment of these events is traditionally accomplished by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and Southern blot analyses. Southern blot analysis can be time-consuming and comparatively expensive and does not provide sequence-level detail. We have developed a sequence-based application, Southern-by-Sequencing (SbS, utilizing sequence capture coupled with next-generation sequencing (NGS technology to replace Southern blot analysis for event selection in a high-throughput molecular characterization environment. SbS is accomplished by hybridizing indexed and pooled whole-genome DNA libraries from GM plants to biotinylated probes designed to target the sequence of transformation plasmids used to generate events within the pool. This sequence capture process enriches the sequence data obtained for targeted regions of interest (transformation plasmid DNA. Taking advantage of the DNA adjacent to the targeted bases (referred to as next-to-target sequence that accompanies the targeted transformation plasmid sequence, the data analysis detects plasmid-to-genome and plasmid-to-plasmid junctions introduced during insertion into the plant genome. Analysis of these junction sequences provides sequence-level information as to the following: the number of insertion loci including detection of unlinked, independently segregating, small DNA fragments; copy number; rearrangements, truncations, or deletions of the intended insertion DNA; and the presence of transformation plasmid backbone sequences. This molecular evidence from SbS analysis is used to characterize and select GM plants meeting optimal molecular characterization criteria. SbS technology has proven to be a robust event screening tool for use in a high-throughput molecular characterization environment.

  3. Time series segmentation: a new approach based on Genetic Algorithm and Hidden Markov Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toreti, A.; Kuglitsch, F. G.; Xoplaki, E.; Luterbacher, J.

    2009-04-01

    The subdivision of a time series into homogeneous segments has been performed using various methods applied to different disciplines. In climatology, for example, it is accompanied by the well-known homogenization problem and the detection of artificial change points. In this context, we present a new method (GAMM) based on Hidden Markov Model (HMM) and Genetic Algorithm (GA), applicable to series of independent observations (and easily adaptable to autoregressive processes). A left-to-right hidden Markov model, estimating the parameters and the best-state sequence, respectively, with the Baum-Welch and Viterbi algorithms, was applied. In order to avoid the well-known dependence of the Baum-Welch algorithm on the initial condition, a Genetic Algorithm was developed. This algorithm is characterized by mutation, elitism and a crossover procedure implemented with some restrictive rules. Moreover the function to be minimized was derived following the approach of Kehagias (2004), i.e. it is the so-called complete log-likelihood. The number of states was determined applying a two-fold cross-validation procedure (Celeux and Durand, 2008). Being aware that the last issue is complex, and it influences all the analysis, a Multi Response Permutation Procedure (MRPP; Mielke et al., 1981) was inserted. It tests the model with K+1 states (where K is the state number of the best model) if its likelihood is close to K-state model. Finally, an evaluation of the GAMM performances, applied as a break detection method in the field of climate time series homogenization, is shown. 1. G. Celeux and J.B. Durand, Comput Stat 2008. 2. A. Kehagias, Stoch Envir Res 2004. 3. P.W. Mielke, K.J. Berry, G.W. Brier, Monthly Wea Rev 1981.

  4. Modeling solar radiation of Mediterranean region in Turkey by using fuzzy genetic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kisi, Ozgur

    2014-01-01

    The study investigates the ability of FG (fuzzy genetic) approach in modeling solar radiation of seven cities from Mediterranean region of Anatolia, Turkey. Latitude, longitude, altitude and month of the year data from the Adana, K. Maras, Mersin, Antalya, Isparta, Burdur and Antakya cities are used as inputs to the FG model to estimate one month ahead solar radiation. FG model is compared with ANNs (artificial neural networks) and ANFIS (adaptive neruro fuzzzy inference system) models with respect to RMSE (root mean square errors), MAE (mean absolute errors) and determination coefficient (R 2 ) statistics. Comparison results indicate that the FG model performs better than the ANN and ANFIS models. It is found that the FG model can be successfully used for estimating solar radiation by using latitude, longitude, altitude and month of the year information. FG model with RMSE = 6.29 MJ/m 2 , MAE = 4.69 MJ/m 2 and R 2 = 0.905 in the test stage was found to be superior to the optimal ANN model with RMSE = 7.17 MJ/m 2 , MAE = 5.29 MJ/m 2 and R 2 = 0.876 and ANFIS model with RMSE = 6.75 MJ/m 2 , MAE = 5.10 MJ/m 2 and R 2 = 0.892 in estimating solar radiation. - Highlights: • SR (Solar radiation) of seven cities from Mediterranean region of Turkey is predicted. • FG (Fuzzy genetic) models are developed for accurately estimation of SR. • The ability of the FG models used in the study is found to be satisfactory. • FG models are compared with commonly used ANNs (artificial neural networks). • FG models are found to perform better than the ANNs models

  5. From animal models to human disease: a genetic approach for personalized medicine in ALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picher-Martel, Vincent; Valdmanis, Paul N; Gould, Peter V; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Dupré, Nicolas

    2016-07-11

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is the most frequent motor neuron disease in adults. Classical ALS is characterized by the death of upper and lower motor neurons leading to progressive paralysis. Approximately 10 % of ALS patients have familial form of the disease. Numerous different gene mutations have been found in familial cases of ALS, such as mutations in superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43), fused in sarcoma (FUS), C9ORF72, ubiquilin-2 (UBQLN2), optineurin (OPTN) and others. Multiple animal models were generated to mimic the disease and to test future treatments. However, no animal model fully replicates the spectrum of phenotypes in the human disease and it is difficult to assess how a therapeutic effect in disease models can predict efficacy in humans. Importantly, the genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity of ALS leads to a variety of responses to similar treatment regimens. From this has emerged the concept of personalized medicine (PM), which is a medical scheme that combines study of genetic, environmental and clinical diagnostic testing, including biomarkers, to individualized patient care. In this perspective, we used subgroups of specific ALS-linked gene mutations to go through existing animal models and to provide a comprehensive profile of the differences and similarities between animal models of disease and human disease. Finally, we reviewed application of biomarkers and gene therapies relevant in personalized medicine approach. For instance, this includes viral delivering of antisense oligonucleotide and small interfering RNA in SOD1, TDP-43 and C9orf72 mice models. Promising gene therapies raised possibilities for treating differently the major mutations in familial ALS cases.

  6. The Threat of Uncertainty: Why Using Traditional Approaches for Evaluating Spacecraft Reliability are Insufficient for Future Human Mars Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromgren, Chel; Goodliff, Kandyce; Cirillo, William; Owens, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Through the Evolvable Mars Campaign (EMC) study, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) continues to evaluate potential approaches for sending humans beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). A key aspect of these missions is the strategy that is employed to maintain and repair the spacecraft systems, ensuring that they continue to function and support the crew. Long duration missions beyond LEO present unique and severe maintainability challenges due to a variety of factors, including: limited to no opportunities for resupply, the distance from Earth, mass and volume constraints of spacecraft, high sensitivity of transportation element designs to variation in mass, the lack of abort opportunities to Earth, limited hardware heritage information, and the operation of human-rated systems in a radiation environment with little to no experience. The current approach to maintainability, as implemented on ISS, which includes a large number of spares pre-positioned on ISS, a larger supply sitting on Earth waiting to be flown to ISS, and an on demand delivery of logistics from Earth, is not feasible for future deep space human missions. For missions beyond LEO, significant modifications to the maintainability approach will be required.Through the EMC evaluations, several key findings related to the reliability and safety of the Mars spacecraft have been made. The nature of random and induced failures presents significant issues for deep space missions. Because spare parts cannot be flown as needed for Mars missions, all required spares must be flown with the mission or pre-positioned. These spares must cover all anticipated failure modes and provide a level of overall reliability and safety that is satisfactory for human missions. This will require a large amount of mass and volume be dedicated to storage and transport of spares for the mission. Further, there is, and will continue to be, a significant amount of uncertainty regarding failure rates for spacecraft

  7. A Proteomic Approach for the Diagnosis of ‘Oketsu’ (blood stasis, a Pathophysiologic Concept of Japanese Traditional (Kampo Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinami Matsumoto

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available ‘Oketsu’ is a pathophysiologic concept in Japanese traditional (Kampo medicine, primarily denoting blood stasis/stagnant syndrome. Here we have explored plasma protein biomarkers and/or diagnostic algorithms for ‘Oketsu’. Sixteen rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients were treated with keishibukuryogan (KBG, a representative Kampo medicine for improving ‘Oketsu’. Plasma samples were diagnosed as either having an ‘Oketsu’ (n = 19 or ‘non-Oketsu’ (n = 29 state according to Terasawa's ‘Oketsu’ scoring system. Protein profiles were obtained by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF MS and hierarchical clustering and decision tree analyses were performed. KBG treatment for 4 or 12 weeks decreased the ‘Oketsu’ scores significantly. SELDI protein profiles gave 266 protein peaks, whose expression was significantly different between the ‘Oketsu’ and ‘non-Oketsu’ states. Hierarchical clustering gave three major clusters (I, II, III. The majority (68.4% of ‘Oketsu’ samples were clustered into one cluster as the principal component of cluster I. The remaining ‘Oketsu’ profiles constituted a minor component of cluster II and were all derived from patients cured of the ‘Oketsu’ state at 12 weeks. Construction of the decision tree addressed the possibility of developing a diagnostic algorithm for ‘Oketsu’. A reduction in measurement/pre-processing conditions (from 55 to 16 gave a similar outcome in the clustering and decision tree analyses. The present study suggests that the pathophysiologic concept of Kampo medicine ‘Oketsu’ has a physical basis in terms of the profile of blood proteins. It may be possible to establish a set of objective criteria for diagnosing ‘Oketsu’ using a combination of proteomic and bioinformatics-based classification methods.

  8. The pitfalls of capital budgeting : when costs correlate to oil price. Is the real-options approach superior to traditional valuation?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiozer, R.F. [Getulio Vargas Foundation, Sao Paolo (Brazil). School of Administration de Empresas; Costa Lima, G.A.; Suslick, S.B. [Unicamp, Campinas (Brazil). Center of Petroleum Studies

    2007-07-01

    Due to increased demand for drilling rigs, specialized labor force and other resources, the costs of exploration, appraisal, development and production have significantly risen over the last five years. The change in costs has mostly been attributed to the increased activity in the oil and gas exploration and production (EP) industry, as a result of the increase in oil prices. It was hypothesized that operating costs in the EP industry were strongly correlated to the price of oil. However, the correlation between prices and costs has traditionally been overlooked in the capital budgeting process. This paper investigated the economic relationship between oil price and the operating costs in the EP industry. It also explored its implications for the capital budgeting process and decision-making. The paper demonstrated the evaluation of projects under traditional net present value (NPV) and real-option approaches. Empirical evidence was also provided on how costs correlated to oil prices. The differences between project valuation when cost-price correlation was taken into account or not was also discussed. Last, findings, conclusions and general implications of the results obtained for the decision-making process were identified. It was concluded that there was a positive correlation between price and operating costs, and that overlooking this relationship would have significant implications on the valuation of investment projects, both using a traditional NPV methodology, which resulted in undervalued projects, and under real option analysis, which resulted in overvaluing projects. 6 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  9. The pitfalls of capital budgeting : when costs correlate to oil price. Is the real-options approach superior to traditional valuation?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiozer, R.F.; Costa Lima, G.A.; Suslick, S.B.

    2007-01-01

    Due to increased demand for drilling rigs, specialized labor force and other resources, the costs of exploration, appraisal, development and production have significantly risen over the last five years. The change in costs has mostly been attributed to the increased activity in the oil and gas exploration and production (EP) industry, as a result of the increase in oil prices. It was hypothesized that operating costs in the EP industry were strongly correlated to the price of oil. However, the correlation between prices and costs has traditionally been overlooked in the capital budgeting process. This paper investigated the economic relationship between oil price and the operating costs in the EP industry. It also explored its implications for the capital budgeting process and decision-making. The paper demonstrated the evaluation of projects under traditional net present value (NPV) and real-option approaches. Empirical evidence was also provided on how costs correlated to oil prices. The differences between project valuation when cost-price correlation was taken into account or not was also discussed. Last, findings, conclusions and general implications of the results obtained for the decision-making process were identified. It was concluded that there was a positive correlation between price and operating costs, and that overlooking this relationship would have significant implications on the valuation of investment projects, both using a traditional NPV methodology, which resulted in undervalued projects, and under real option analysis, which resulted in overvaluing projects. 6 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs

  10. A review of genome-wide approaches to study the genetic basis for spermatogenic defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aston, Kenneth I; Conrad, Donald F

    2013-01-01

    Rapidly advancing tools for genetic analysis on a genome-wide scale have been instrumental in identifying the genetic bases for many complex diseases. About half of male infertility cases are of unknown etiology in spite of tremendous efforts to characterize the genetic basis for the disorder. Advancing our understanding of the genetic basis for male infertility will require the application of established and emerging genomic tools. This chapter introduces many of the tools available for genetic studies on a genome-wide scale along with principles of study design and data analysis.

  11. Construction of the first compendium of chemical-genetic profiles in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and comparative compendium approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Sangjo [Bioinformatics Lab, Healthcare Group, SK Telecom, 9-1, Sunae-dong, Pundang-gu, Sungnam-si, Kyunggi-do 463-784 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Minho [Department of Bio and Brain Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hyeshik [Department of Biological Science, Seoul National University, 599 Gwanakro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Miyoung [Department of New Drug Discovery and Development, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Han-Oh [Bioneer Corp., 8-11 Munpyeongseo-ro, Daedeok-gu, Daejeon 306-220 (Korea, Republic of); Kwak, Youn-Sig [Department of Applied Biology, Gyeongsang National University, 501 Jinju-daero, Jinju, Gyeongnam 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Hye-jeong [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dongsup [Department of Bio and Brain Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Sung-Ook [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Inha University Hospital, 7-206 Sinheung-dong, Jung-gu, Incheon 400-711 (Korea, Republic of); Hoe, Kwang-Lae [Department of New Drug Discovery and Development, Chungnam National University, 99 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Uk [Aging Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology (KRIBB), 125 Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-806 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •The first compendium of chemical-genetic profiles form fission yeast was generated. •The first HTS of drug mode-of-action in fission yeast was performed. •The first comparative chemical genetic analysis between two yeasts was conducted. -- Abstract: Genome-wide chemical genetic profiles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae since the budding yeast deletion library construction have been successfully used to reveal unknown mode-of-actions of drugs. Here, we introduce comparative approach to infer drug target proteins more accurately using two compendiums of chemical-genetic profiles from the budding yeast S. cerevisiae and the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. For the first time, we established DNA-chip based growth defect measurement of genome-wide deletion strains of S. pombe, and then applied 47 drugs to the pooled heterozygous deletion strains to generate chemical-genetic profiles in S. pombe. In our approach, putative drug targets were inferred from strains hypersensitive to given drugs by analyzing S. pombe and S. cerevisiae compendiums. Notably, many evidences in the literature revealed that the inferred target genes of fungicide and bactericide identified by such comparative approach are in fact the direct targets. Furthermore, by filtering out the genes with no essentiality, the multi-drug sensitivity genes, and the genes with less eukaryotic conservation, we created a set of drug target gene candidates that are expected to be directly affected by a given drug in human cells. Our study demonstrated that it is highly beneficial to construct the multiple compendiums of chemical genetic profiles using many different species. The fission yeast chemical-genetic compendium is available at (http://pombe.kaist.ac.kr/compendium)

  12. Evaluation of two-year Jewish genetic disease screening program in Atlanta: insight into community genetic screening approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yunru; Liu, Shuling; Grinzaid, Karen

    2015-04-01

    Improvements in genetic testing technologies have led to the development of expanded carrier screening panels for the Ashkenazi Jewish population; however, there are major inconsistencies in current screening practices. A 2-year pilot program was launched in Atlanta in 2010 to promote and facilitate screening for 19 Jewish genetic diseases. We analyzed data from this program, including participant demographics and outreach efforts. This retrospective analysis is based on a de-identified dataset of 724 screenees. Data were obtained through medical chart review and questionnaires and included demographic information, screening results, response to outreach efforts, and follow-up behavior and preferences. We applied descriptive analysis, chi-square tests, and logistic regression to analyze the data and compare findings with published literature. The majority of participants indicated that they were not pregnant or did not have a partner who was pregnant were affiliated with Jewish organizations and reported 100 % AJ ancestry. Overall, carrier frequency was 1 in 3.9. Friends, rabbis, and family members were the most common influencers of the decision to receive screening. People who were older, had a history of pregnancy, and had been previously screened were more likely to educate others (all p influencers who then encouraged screening in the target population. Educating influencers and increasing overall awareness were the most effective outreach strategies.

  13. Panorama of Reconstruction of Skull Base Defects: From Traditional Open to Endonasal Endoscopic Approaches, from Free Grafts to Microvascular Flaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Camilo; Mason, Eric; Solares, C. Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction A substantial body of literature has been devoted to the distinct characteristics and surgical options to repair the skull base. However, the skull base is an anatomically challenging location that requires a three-dimensional reconstruction approach. Furthermore, advances in endoscopic skull base surgery encompass a wide range of surgical pathology, from benign tumors to sinonasal cancer. This has resulted in the creation of wide defects that yield a new challenge in skull base reconstruction. Progress in technology and imaging has made this approach an internationally accepted method to repair these defects. Objectives Discuss historical developments and flaps available for skull base reconstruction. Data Synthesis Free grafts in skull base reconstruction are a viable option in small defects and low-flow leaks. Vascularized flaps pose a distinct advantage in large defects and high-flow leaks. When open techniques are used, free flap reconstruction techniques are often necessary to repair large entry wound defects. Conclusions Reconstruction of skull base defects requires a thorough knowledge of surgical anatomy, disease, and patient risk factors associated with high-flow cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Various reconstruction techniques are available, from free tissue grafting to vascularized flaps. Possible complications that can befall after these procedures need to be considered. Although endonasal techniques are being used with increasing frequency, open techniques are still necessary in selected cases. PMID:25992142

  14. Is it acceptable to approach colorectal cancer patients at diagnosis to discuss genetic testing? A pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Porteous, M; Dunckley, M; Appleton, S; Catt, S; Dunlop, M; Campbell, H; Cull, A

    2003-01-01

    In this pilot study, the acceptability of approaching 111 newly diagnosed colorectal cancer patients with the offer of genetic testing for hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) was assessed. A total of 78% of participants found it highly acceptable to have the information about HNPCC brought to their attention at that time.

  15. Biosafety risk assessment approaches for insect-resistant genetically modified crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inaam Ullah

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Environmental risk assessment (ERA is imperative for commercial release of insect resistant, genetically modified crops (IR-GMCs.An insect specific, spider venom peptideω-HXTX-Hv1a (Hvt was successfully expressed in cotton plants. The cotton plants producing Hvt protein have demonstrated resistance against economically important insect pest species. The study was performed to assess the effects of Hvt producing cotton plants on Honey bees (Apis mellifera. Methods: Three approaches were used to evaluate the effects of Hvt protein on adults of honeybees; whole plant assays in flight cages, in vitro assays with pollen of Hvt-cotton, and assays with elevated levels of purified Hvt protein. Pollens of Bt cotton or purified Bt proteins were used as control. Results: The field experiments did not yield any meaningful data due to high rate of mortality in all treatments including the control. However, the laboratory experiments provided conclusive results in which Hvt, purified or in pollens, did not affect the survival or longevity of the bees compared to the control. During the course of study we were able to compare the quality, effectiveness and economics of different experiments. Conclusions: We conclude that Hvt either purified or produced in cotton plants do not affect the survival or longevity of honey bees. We are also of the view that starting at laboratory level assays not only gives meaningful data but also saves a lot of time and money that can be spent on other important questions regarding safety of a particular transgenic crop. Hence, a purpose-based, tiered approach could be the best choice for pre-release ERA of IR-GMCs.

  16. Intelligent control a hybrid approach based on fuzzy logic, neural networks and genetic algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Siddique, Nazmul

    2014-01-01

    Intelligent Control considers non-traditional modelling and control approaches to nonlinear systems. Fuzzy logic, neural networks and evolutionary computing techniques are the main tools used. The book presents a modular switching fuzzy logic controller where a PD-type fuzzy controller is executed first followed by a PI-type fuzzy controller thus improving the performance of the controller compared with a PID-type fuzzy controller.  The advantage of the switching-type fuzzy controller is that it uses one rule-base thus minimises the rule-base during execution. A single rule-base is developed by merging the membership functions for change of error of the PD-type controller and sum of error of the PI-type controller. Membership functions are then optimized using evolutionary algorithms. Since the two fuzzy controllers were executed in series, necessary further tuning of the differential and integral scaling factors of the controller is then performed. Neural-network-based tuning for the scaling parameters of t...

  17. Somatic cell and molecular genetics approach to DNA repair and mutagenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    In the CHO cell line, UV-sensitive mutants representing five genetic complementation groups have been identified. Mutants from each of these groups were shown to be defective in performing the incision step of repair after exposure to UV. The large number of complementation groups of xeroderma pigmentosa mutations has raised the question whether these groups all correspond to single gene loci. The same issue applies to the 5 groups of UV-sensitive CHO mutants. One approach toward answering this question is to localize in the human karyotype the genes that complement the defects in the CHO mutants. Thus, by making CHO/human cell hybrids under the appropriate selective conditions, we have begun to map each of the complementing human genes. The mutation in strain UV20 (Group 2) was complemented by human chromosome 19. Preliminary evidence suggests that UV5 may also be complemented by human chromosome 19 while each of the other 3 groups involves a different human chromosome. Somewhat surprisingly, mutant EM9 is also complemented by a gene on chromosome 19

  18. Control of bovine spongiform encephalopathy by genetic engineering: possible approaches and regulatory considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavora, J.S.; Kochhar, H.P.S.; Gifford, G.A.

    2005-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) include bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), scrapie in sheep and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in humans. A new CJD variant (nvCJD) is believed to be related to consumption of meat from BSE cattle. In TSE individuals, prion proteins (PrP) with approximately 250 amino acids convert to the pathogenic prion PrP Sc , leading to a dysfunction of the central neural system. Research elsewhere with mice has indicated a possible genetic engineering approach to the introduction of BSE resistance: individuals with amino acid substitutions at positions 167 or 218, inoculated with a pathogenic prion protein, did not support PrP Sc replication. This raises the possibility of producing prion-resistant cattle with a single PrP amino acid substitution. Since prion-resistant animals might still harbour acquired prion infectivity, regulatory assessment of the engineered animals would need to ascertain that such possible 'carriers' do not result in a threat to animal and human health. (author)

  19. Molecular genetic approach to human meningioma: loss of genes on chromosome 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seizinger, B.R.; De La Monte, S.; Atkins, L.; Gusella, J.F.; Martuza, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    A molecular genetic approach employing polymorphic DNA markers has been used to investigate the role of chromosomal aberrations in meningioma, one of the most common tumors of the human nervous system. Comparison of the alleles detected by DNA markers in tumor DNA versus DNA from normal tissue revealed chromosomal alterations present in primary surgical specimens. In agreement with cytogenetic studies of cultured meningiomas, the most frequent alteration detected was loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 22. Forty of 51 patients were constitutionally heterozygous for at least one chromosome 22 DNA marker. Seventeen of the 40 constitutionally heterozygotic patients (43%) displayed hemizygosity for the corresponding marker in their meningioma tumor tissues. Loss of heterozygosity was also detected at a significantly lower frequency for markers on several other autosomes. In view of the striking association between acoustic neuroma and meningioma in bilateral acoustic neurofibromatosis and the discovery that acoustic neuromas display specific loss of genes on chromosome 22, the authors propose that a common mechanism involving chromosome 22 is operative in the development of both tumor types. Fine-structure mapping to reveal partial deletions in meningiomas may provide the means to clone and characterize a gene (or genes) of importance for tumorigenesis in this and possibly other clinically associated tumors of the human nervous system

  20. BP neural network optimized by genetic algorithm approach for titanium and iron content prediction in EDXRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jun; Liu Mingzhe; Li Zhe; Li Lei; Shi Rui; Tuo Xianguo

    2015-01-01

    The quantitative elemental content analysis is difficult due to the uniform effect, particle effect and the element matrix effect, etc, when using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) technique. In this paper, a hybrid approach of genetic algorithm (GA) and back propagation (BP) neural network was proposed without considering the complex relationship between the concentration and intensity. The aim of GA optimized BP was to get better network initial weights and thresholds. The basic idea was that the reciprocal of the mean square error of the initialization BP neural network was set as the fitness value of the individual in GA, and the initial weights and thresholds were replaced by individuals, and then the optimal individual was sought by selection, crossover and mutation operations, finally a new BP neural network model was created with the optimal initial weights and thresholds. The calculation results of quantitative analysis of titanium and iron contents for five types of ore bodies in Panzhihua Mine show that the results of classification prediction are far better than that of overall forecasting, and relative errors of 76.7% samples are less than 2% compared with chemical analysis values, which demonstrates the effectiveness of the proposed method. (authors)

  1. Molecular Approaches for High Throughput Detection and Quantification of Genetically Modified Crops: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim B. Salisu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available As long as the genetically modified crops are gaining attention globally, their proper approval and commercialization need accurate and reliable diagnostic methods for the transgenic content. These diagnostic techniques are mainly divided into two major groups, i.e., identification of transgenic (1 DNA and (2 proteins from GMOs and their products. Conventional methods such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA were routinely employed for DNA and protein based quantification respectively. Although, these Techniques (PCR and ELISA are considered as significantly convenient and productive, but there is need for more advance technologies that allow for high throughput detection and the quantification of GM event as the production of more complex GMO is increasing day by day. Therefore, recent approaches like microarray, capillary gel electrophoresis, digital PCR and next generation sequencing are more promising due to their accuracy and precise detection of transgenic contents. The present article is a brief comparative study of all such detection techniques on the basis of their advent, feasibility, accuracy, and cost effectiveness. However, these emerging technologies have a lot to do with detection of a specific event, contamination of different events and determination of fusion as well as stacked gene protein are the critical issues to be addressed in future.

  2. Combined Simulated Annealing and Genetic Algorithm Approach to Bus Network Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Olszewski, Piotr; Goh, Pong-Chai

    A new method - combined simulated annealing (SA) and genetic algorithm (GA) approach is proposed to solve the problem of bus route design and frequency setting for a given road network with fixed bus stop locations and fixed travel demand. The method involves two steps: a set of candidate routes is generated first and then the best subset of these routes is selected by the combined SA and GA procedure. SA is the main process to search for a better solution to minimize the total system cost, comprising user and operator costs. GA is used as a sub-process to generate new solutions. Bus demand assignment on two alternative paths is performed at the solution evaluation stage. The method was implemented on four theoretical grid networks of different size and a benchmark network. Several GA operators (crossover and mutation) were utilized and tested for their effectiveness. The results show that the proposed method can efficiently converge to the optimal solution on a small network but computation time increases significantly with network size. The method can also be used for other transport operation management problems.

  3. A group approach to genetic counselling of cardiomyopathy patients: satisfaction and psychological outcomes sufficient for further implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Ellen; Birnie, Erwin; Ranchor, Adelita V; van Tintelen, J Peter; van Langen, Irene M

    2015-11-01

    The introduction of next-generation sequencing in everyday clinical genetics practise is increasing the number of genetic disorders that can be confirmed at DNA-level, and consequently increases the possibilities for cascade screening. This leads to a greater need for genetic counselling, whereas the number of professionals available to provide this is limited. We therefore piloted group genetic counselling for symptomatic cardiomyopathy patients at regional hospitals, to assess whether this could be an acceptable alternative to individual counselling. We performed a cohort study with pre- and post-counselling patient measurements using questionnaires, supplemented with evaluations of the group counselling format by the professionals involved. Patients from eight regional hospitals in the northern part of the Netherlands were included. Questionnaires comprised patient characteristics, psychological measures (personal perceived control (PPC), state and trait anxiety inventory (STAI)), and satisfaction with counsellors, counselling content and design. In total, 82 patients (mean age 57.5 year) attended one of 13 group sessions. Median PPC and STAI scores showed significantly higher control and lower anxiety after the counselling. Patients reported they were satisfied with the counsellors, and almost 75% of patients were satisfied with the group counselling. Regional professionals were also, overall, satisfied with the group sessions. The genetics professionals were less satisfied, mainly because of their perceived large time investment and less-than-expected group interaction. Hence, a group approach to cardiogenetic counselling is feasible, accessible, and psychologically effective, and could be one possible approach to counselling the increasing patient numbers in cardiogenetics.

  4. Equilibrium and non-equilibrium concepts in forest genetic modelling: population- and individually-based approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Kramer, Koen; van der Werf, D. C.

    2010-01-01

    The environment is changing and so are forests, in their functioning, in species composition, and in the species’ genetic composition. Many empirical and process-based models exist to support forest management. However, most of these models do not consider the impact of environmental changes and forest management on genetic diversity nor on the rate of adaptation of critical plant processes. How genetic diversity and rates of adaptation depend on management actions is a crucial next step in m...

  5. Parametric optimization of multiple quality characteristics in laser cutting of Inconel-718 by using hybrid approach of multiple regression analysis and genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Prashant Kumar; Pandey, Arun Kumar

    2018-06-01

    Inconel-718 has found high demand in different industries due to their superior mechanical properties. The traditional cutting methods are facing difficulties for cutting these alloys due to their low thermal potential, lower elasticity and high chemical compatibility at inflated temperature. The challenges of machining and/or finishing of unusual shapes and/or sizes in these materials have also faced by traditional machining. Laser beam cutting may be applied for the miniaturization and ultra-precision cutting and/or finishing by appropriate control of different process parameter. This paper present multi-objective optimization the kerf deviation, kerf width and kerf taper in the laser cutting of Incone-718 sheet. The second order regression models have been developed for different quality characteristics by using the experimental data obtained through experimentation. The regression models have been used as objective function for multi-objective optimization based on the hybrid approach of multiple regression analysis and genetic algorithm. The comparison of optimization results to experimental results shows an improvement of 88%, 10.63% and 42.15% in kerf deviation, kerf width and kerf taper, respectively. Finally, the effects of different process parameters on quality characteristics have also been discussed.

  6. A Systems Genetic Approach to Identify Low Dose Radiation-Induced Lymphoma Susceptibility/DOE2013FinalReport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balmain, Allan [University of California, San Francisco; Song, Ihn Young [University of California, San Francisco

    2013-05-15

    The ultimate goal of this project is to identify the combinations of genetic variants that confer an individual's susceptibility to the effects of low dose (0.1 Gy) gamma-radiation, in particular with regard to tumor development. In contrast to the known effects of high dose radiation in cancer induction, the responses to low dose radiation (defined as 0.1 Gy or less) are much less well understood, and have been proposed to involve a protective anti-tumor effect in some in vivo scientific models. These conflicting results confound attempts to develop predictive models of the risk of exposure to low dose radiation, particularly when combined with the strong effects of inherited genetic variants on both radiation effects and cancer susceptibility. We have used a Systems Genetics approach in mice that combines genetic background analysis with responses to low and high dose radiation, in order to develop insights that will allow us to reconcile these disparate observations. Using this comprehensive approach we have analyzed normal tissue gene expression (in this case the skin and thymus), together with the changes that take place in this gene expression architecture a) in response to low or high- dose radiation and b) during tumor development. Additionally, we have demonstrated that using our expression analysis approach in our genetically heterogeneous/defined radiation-induced tumor mouse models can uniquely identify genes and pathways relevant to human T-ALL, and uncover interactions between common genetic variants of genes which may lead to tumor susceptibility.

  7. Quantitative genetics of Taura syndrome resistance in Pacific (Penaeus vannamei): A cure model approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ødegård, Jørgen; Gitterle, Thomas; Madsen, Per

    2011-01-01

    cure survival model using Gibbs sampling, treating susceptibility and endurance as separate genetic traits. Results: Overall mortality at the end of test was 28%, while 38% of the population was considered susceptible to the disease. The estimated underlying heritability was high for susceptibility (0....... However, genetic evaluation of susceptibility based on the cure model showed clear associations with standard genetic evaluations that ignore the cure fraction for these data. Using the current testing design, genetic variation in observed survival time and absolute survival at the end of test were most...

  8. Safety of genetically engineered foods: approaches to assessing unintended health effects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on Identifying and Assessing Unintended Effects of Genetically Engineered Foods on Human Health, National Research Council

    2004-01-01

    Assists policymakers in evaluating the appropriate scientific methods for detecting unintended changes in food and assessing the potential for adverse health effects from genetically modified products...

  9. Genetic and Computational Approaches for Studying Plant Development and Abiotic Stress Responses Using Image-Based Phenotyping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, M. T.; Walia, H.; Grondin, A.; Knecht, A.

    2017-12-01

    The development of abiotic stress tolerant crops (i.e. drought, salinity, or heat stress) requires the discovery of DNA sequence variants associated with stress tolerance-related traits. However, many traits underlying adaptation to abiotic stress involve a suite of physiological pathways that may be induced at different times throughout the duration of stress. Conventional single-point phenotyping approaches fail to fully capture these temporal responses, and thus downstream genetic analysis may only identify a subset of the genetic variants that are important for adaptation to sub-optimal environments. Although genomic resources for crops have advanced tremendously, the collection of phenotypic data for morphological and physiological traits is laborious and remains a significant bottleneck in bridging the phenotype-genotype gap. In recent years, the availability of automated, image-based phenotyping platforms has provided researchers with an opportunity to collect morphological and physiological traits non-destructively in a highly controlled environment. Moreover, these platforms allow abiotic stress responses to be recorded throughout the duration of the experiment, and have facilitated the use of function-valued traits for genetic analyses in major crops. We will present our approaches for addressing abiotic stress tolerance in cereals. This talk will focus on novel open-source software to process and extract biological meaningful data from images generated from these phenomics platforms. In addition, we will discuss the statistical approaches to model longitudinal phenotypes and dissect the genetic basis of dynamic responses to these abiotic stresses throughout development.

  10. A bio-cultural approach to the study of food choice: The contribution of taste genetics, population and culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risso, Davide S; Giuliani, Cristina; Antinucci, Marco; Morini, Gabriella; Garagnani, Paolo; Tofanelli, Sergio; Luiselli, Donata

    2017-07-01

    The study of food choice, one of the most complex human traits, requires an integrated approach that takes into account environmental, socio-cultural and biological diversity. We recruited 183 volunteers from four geo-linguistic groups and highly diversified in terms of both genetic background and food habits from whom we collected genotypes and phenotypes tightly linked to taste perception. We confirmed previous genetic associations, in particular with stevioside perception, and noted significant differences in food consumption: in particular, broccoli, mustard and beer consumption scores were significantly higher (Adjusted P = 0.02, Adjusted P diversity and cultural aspects in taste perception and food consumption. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Approaches in the risk assessment of genetically modified foods by the Hellenic Food Safety Authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varzakas, Theodoros H; Chryssochoidis, G; Argyropoulos, D

    2007-04-01

    Risk analysis has become important to assess conditions and take decisions on control procedures. In this context it is considered a prerequisite in the evaluation of GM food. Many consumers worldwide worry that food derived from genetically modified organisms (GMOs) may be unhealthy and hence regulations on GMO authorisations and labelling have become more stringent. Nowadays there is a higher demand for non-GM products and these products could be differentiated from GM products using the identity preservation system (IP) that could apply throughout the grain processing system. IP is the creation of a transparent communication system that encompasses HACCP, traceability and related systems in the supply chain. This process guarantees that certain characteristics of the lots of food (non-GM origin) are maintained "from farm to fork". This article examines the steps taken by the Hellenic Food Safety Authority to examine the presence of GMOs in foods. The whole integrated European legislation framework currently in place still needs to be implemented in Greece. Penalties should be enforced to those who import, process GMOs without special licence and do not label those products. Similar penalties should be enforced to those companies that issue false certificates beyond the liabilities taken by the food enterprises for farmers' compensation. We argue that Greece has no serious reasons to choose the use of GMOs due to the fact that the structural and pedologic characteristics of the Greek agriculture favour the biological and integrated cultivation more. Greece is not in favour of the politics behind coexistence of conventional and GM plants and objects to the use of GMOs in the food and the environment because the processor has a big burden in terms of money, time and will suffer a great deal in order to prove that their products are GMO free or that any contamination is adventitious or technically unavoidable. Moreover, Greece owns a large variety of genetic

  12. Keeping Tradition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zenhong, C.; Buwalda, P.L.

    2011-01-01

    Chinese dumplings such as Jiao Zi and Bao Zi are two of the popular traditional foods in Asia. They are usually made from wheat flour dough (rice flour or starch is sometimes used) that contains fillings. They can be steamed, boiled and fried and are consumed either as a main meal or dessert. As

  13. A rigorous approach to facilitate and guarantee the correctness of the genetic testing management in human genome information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Luciano V; Malkowski, Simon; Braghetto, Kelly R; Passos-Bueno, Maria R; Zatz, Mayana; Pu, Calton; Ferreira, João E

    2011-12-22

    Recent medical and biological technology advances have stimulated the development of new testing systems that have been providing huge, varied amounts of molecular and clinical data. Growing data volumes pose significant challenges for information processing systems in research centers. Additionally, the routines of genomics laboratory are typically characterized by high parallelism in testing and constant procedure changes. This paper describes a formal approach to address this challenge through the implementation of a genetic testing management system applied to human genome laboratory. We introduced the Human Genome Research Center Information System (CEGH) in Brazil, a system that is able to support constant changes in human genome testing and can provide patients updated results based on the most recent and validated genetic knowledge. Our approach uses a common repository for process planning to ensure reusability, specification, instantiation, monitoring, and execution of processes, which are defined using a relational database and rigorous control flow specifications based on process algebra (ACP). The main difference between our approach and related works is that we were able to join two important aspects: 1) process scalability achieved through relational database implementation, and 2) correctness of processes using process algebra. Furthermore, the software allows end users to define genetic testing without requiring any knowledge about business process notation or process algebra. This paper presents the CEGH information system that is a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) based on a formal framework to support genetic testing management for Mendelian disorder studies. We have proved the feasibility and showed usability benefits of a rigorous approach that is able to specify, validate, and perform genetic testing using easy end user interfaces.

  14. Comparison of a traditional with a new approach based on Graph Theory to vulnerability assessment to natural hazards: a study case on a socio-economic complex system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arosio, Marcello; Martina, Mario L. V.

    2017-04-01

    The emergent behaviour of the contemporary complex, socio-technical and interconnected society makes the collective risk greater than the sum of the parts and this requires a holistic, systematic and integrated approach. Although there have been major improvements in recent years, there are still some limitation in term of a holistic approach that is able to include the emergent value hidden in the connections between exposed elements and the interactions between the different spheres of the multi-hazards, vulnerability, exposure and resilience. To deal with these challenges it is necessary to consider the connections between the exposed elements (e.g. populations, schools, hospital, etc.) and to quantify the relative importance of the elements and their interconnections (e.g. the need of injured people to go to hospital or children to school). In a system (e.g. road, hospital and ecological network, etc.), or in a System of System (e.g. socio-technical urban service), there are critical elements that, beyond the intrinsic vulnerability, can be characterized by greater or lower vulnerability because of their physical, geographical, cyber or logical connections. To this aim, we propose in this study a comparative analysis between traditional reductionist approach and a new holistic approach to vulnerability assessment to natural hazards. The analysis considers a study case of a socio-economic complex system through an innovative approach based on the properties of graph G=(N,L). A graph consists of two sets N (nodes) and L (links): the nodes represent the single exposed elements (physical, social, environmental, etc.) to a hazard, while the links (or connections) represent the interaction between the elements. The final goal is to illustrate an application of this innovative approach of integrated collective vulnerability assessment.

  15. A new approach to nuclear reactor design optimization using genetic algorithms and regression analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Akansha; Tsvetkov, Pavel V.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper presents a new method useful for the optimization of complex dynamic systems. • The method uses the strengths of; genetic algorithms (GA), and regression splines. • The method is applied to the design of a gas cooled fast breeder reactor design. • Tools like Java, R, and codes like MCNP, Matlab are used in this research. - Abstract: A module based optimization method using genetic algorithms (GA), and multivariate regression analysis has been developed to optimize a set of parameters in the design of a nuclear reactor. GA simulates natural evolution to perform optimization, and is widely used in recent times by the scientific community. The GA fits a population of random solutions to the optimized solution of a specific problem. In this work, we have developed a genetic algorithm to determine the values for a set of nuclear reactor parameters to design a gas cooled fast breeder reactor core including a basis thermal–hydraulics analysis, and energy transfer. Multivariate regression is implemented using regression splines (RS). Reactor designs are usually complex and a simulation needs a significantly large amount of time to execute, hence the implementation of GA or any other global optimization techniques is not feasible, therefore we present a new method of using RS in conjunction with GA. Due to using RS, we do not necessarily need to run the neutronics simulation for all the inputs generated from the GA module rather, run the simulations for a predefined set of inputs, build a multivariate regression fit to the input and the output parameters, and then use this fit to predict the output parameters for the inputs generated by GA. The reactor parameters are given by the, radius of a fuel pin cell, isotopic enrichment of the fissile material in the fuel, mass flow rate of the coolant, and temperature of the coolant at the core inlet. And, the optimization objectives for the reactor core are, high breeding of U-233 and Pu-239 in

  16. Responsible genetic approach to stock restoration, sea ranching and stock enhancement of marine fishes and invertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grant, W. Stewart; Jasper, James; Bekkevold, Dorte

    2017-01-01

    of marine fishes and invertebrates have been implemented with various outcomes. A review of the literature indicates that considerable effort has been directed toward culture technologies to maximize production, but scant attention has been given to genetic risks to wild populations. Genetic risks from...

  17. Minimal approaches to genetic improvement of growth rates in white spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    D.T. Lester

    1973-01-01

    Several features of central importance to genetic improvement of white spruce have been demonstrated by tree breeders. First, white spruce is genetically a highly variable species and much of the existent variation can be readily incorporated in planting stock (Jeffers 1969, Holst and Teich 1969). Second, local seed often is not the best for rapid growth (Nienstaedt...

  18. A Top-down Approach to Genetic Circuit Synthesis and Optimized Technology Mapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baig, Hasan; Madsen, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Genetic logic circuits are becoming popular as an emerging field of technology. They are composed of genetic parts of DNA and work inside a living cell to perform a dedicated boolean function triggered by the presence or absence of certain proteins or other species....

  19. A Powerful Approach to Estimating Annotation-Stratified Genetic Covariance via GWAS Summary Statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiongshi; Li, Boyang; Ou, Derek; Erlendsdottir, Margret; Powles, Ryan L; Jiang, Tony; Hu, Yiming; Chang, David; Jin, Chentian; Dai, Wei; He, Qidu; Liu, Zefeng; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Crane, Paul K; Zhao, Hongyu

    2017-12-07

    Despite the success of large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWASs) on complex traits, our understanding of their genetic architecture is far from complete. Jointly modeling multiple traits' genetic profiles has provided insights into the shared genetic basis of many complex traits. However, large-scale inference sets a high bar for both statistical power and biological interpretability. Here we introduce a principled framework to estimate annotation-stratified genetic covariance between traits using GWAS summary statistics. Through theoretical and numerical analyses, we demonstrate that our method provides accurate covariance estimates, thereby enabling researchers to dissect both the shared and distinct genetic architecture across traits to better understand their etiologies. Among 50 complex traits with publicly accessible GWAS summary statistics (N total ≈ 4.5 million), we identified more than 170 pairs with statistically significant genetic covariance. In particular, we found strong genetic covariance between late-onset Alzheimer disease (LOAD) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), two major neurodegenerative diseases, in single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with high minor allele frequencies and in SNPs located in the predicted functional genome. Joint analysis of LOAD, ALS, and other traits highlights LOAD's correlation with cognitive traits and hints at an autoimmune component for ALS. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Impact of Evolutionary Driving Forces on Human Complex Diseases: A Population Genetics Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr T. M. Saeb

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigating the molecular evolution of human genome has paved the way to understand genetic adaptation of humans to the environmental changes and corresponding complex diseases. In this review, we discussed the historical origin of genetic diversity among human populations, the evolutionary driving forces that can affect genetic diversity among populations, and the effects of human movement into new environments and gene flow on population genetic diversity. Furthermore, we presented the role of natural selection on genetic diversity and complex diseases. Then we reviewed the disadvantageous consequences of historical selection events in modern time and their relation to the development of complex diseases. In addition, we discussed the effect of consanguinity on the incidence of complex diseases in human populations. Finally, we presented the latest information about the role of ancient genes acquired from interbreeding with ancient hominids in the development of complex diseases.

  1. New technique targeting the C5 nerve root proximal to the traditional interscalene sonoanatomical approach is analgesic for outpatient arthroscopic shoulder surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobie, Katherine H; Shi, Yaping; Shotwell, Matthew S; Sandberg, Warren S

    2016-11-01

    Regional anesthesia and analgesia for shoulder surgery is most commonly performed via interscalene nerve block. We developed an ultrasound-guided technique that specifically targets the C5 nerve root proximal to the traditional interscalene block and assessed its efficacy for shoulder analgesia. Prospective case series. Vanderbilt Bone and Joint Surgery Center. Patients undergoing shoulder arthroscopy at an ambulatory surgery center. Thirty-five outpatient shoulder arthroscopy patients underwent an analgesic nerve block using a new technique where ultrasound visualization of the C5 nerve root served as the primary target at a level proximal to the traditional interscalene approach. The block was performed with 15mL of 0.5% plain ropivicaine. Post anesthesia care unit pain scores, opioid consumption, hand strength, and duration of block were recorded. Cadaver dissection after injection with methylene blue confirmed that the primary target under ultrasound visualization was the C5 nerve root. Pain scores revealed 97% patients had 0/10 pain at arrival to PACU, with 91% having a pain score of 3/10 or less at discharge from PACU. Medical Research Council (MRC) hand strength mean (SD) score was 4.17 (0.92) on a scale of 1-5. The mean (SD) duration of the block was 13.9 (3.5) hours. A new technique for ultrasound-guided blockade at the level of the C5 nerve root proximal to the level of the traditional interscalene block is efficacious for shoulder post-operative pain control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Virus fitness differences observed between two naturally occurring isolates of Ebola virus Makona variant using a reverse genetics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albariño, César G; Guerrero, Lisa Wiggleton; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Kainulainen, Markus H; Whitmer, Shannon L M; Welch, Stephen R; Nichol, Stuart T

    2016-09-01

    During the large outbreak of Ebola virus disease that occurred in Western Africa from late 2013 to early 2016, several hundred Ebola virus (EBOV) genomes have been sequenced and the virus genetic drift analyzed. In a previous report, we described an efficient reverse genetics system designed to generate recombinant EBOV based on a Makona variant isolate obtained in 2014. Using this system, we characterized the replication and fitness of 2 isolates of the Makona variant. These virus isolates are nearly identical at the genetic level, but have single amino acid differences in the VP30 and L proteins. The potential effects of these differences were tested using minigenomes and recombinant viruses. The results obtained with this approach are consistent with the role of VP30 and L as components of the EBOV RNA replication machinery. Moreover, the 2 isolates exhibited clear fitness differences in competitive growth assays. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. COST AND TIME ESTIMATES DURING THE SUPPLIER SELECTION OF AN INFORMATION SYSTEM FOR LEGAL AREA: A CASE STUDY COMPARING TRADITIONAL AND AGILE PROJECT APPROACHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vieira, G. L. S.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Considering a direct correlation between projects requirements details levels and their performance, this paper aims to evaluate whether the adoption of more extensive and detailed cost, time and scope estimation processes based on both practices, traditional and agile, and executed concurrently with the supplier selection stage, could guarantee greater accuracy in these estimates, thus increasing project success rates. Based on a case study for the information system project implementation into the legal area of a large Brazilian company, five suppliers had their proposals analyzed and compared in terms of the costs and deadlines involved, as well as the project management processes used in theirs estimates. From the obtained results, it was possible to observe that not all companies follow, at least during the prospecting phase, their service proposals described management processes, according to the theory. Another important finding was that the proposals involving, at least partially, agile approach concepts, were more likely to justify their estimates. These proposals still presented lower values, whenever compared to those less adherents to the theoretical concepts, as those based on traditional concepts.

  4. Direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry and multivariate data analysis: a novel approach to rapid identification of analytical markers for quality control of traditional Chinese medicine preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Shanshan; Wang, Lu; Chen, Teng; Wang, Yuefei; Mo, Huanbiao; Qu, Haibin

    2012-07-06

    The paper presents a novel strategy to identify analytical markers of traditional Chinese medicine preparation (TCMP) rapidly via direct analysis in real time mass spectrometry (DART-MS). A commonly used TCMP, Danshen injection, was employed as a model. The optimal analysis conditions were achieved by measuring the contribution of various experimental parameters to the mass spectra. Salvianolic acids and saccharides were simultaneously determined within a single 1-min DART-MS run. Furthermore, spectra of Danshen injections supplied by five manufacturers were processed with principal component analysis (PCA). Obvious clustering was observed in the PCA score plot, and candidate markers were recognized from the contribution plots of PCA. The suitability of potential markers was then confirmed by contrasting with the results of traditional analysis methods. Using this strategy, fructose, glucose, sucrose, protocatechuic aldehyde and salvianolic acid A were rapidly identified as the markers of Danshen injections. The combination of DART-MS with PCA provides a reliable approach to the identification of analytical markers for quality control of TCMP. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparative genomic and phylogenetic approaches to characterize the role of genetic recombination in mycobacterial evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Silvia E; Showers-Corneli, Patrice; Dardenne, Caitlin N; Harpending, Henry H; Martin, Darren P; Beiko, Robert G

    2012-01-01

    The genus Mycobacterium encompasses over one hundred named species of environmental and pathogenic organisms, including the causative agents of devastating human diseases such as tuberculosis and leprosy. The success of these human pathogens is due in part to their ability to rapidly adapt to their changing environment and host. Recombination is the fastest way for bacterial genomes to acquire genetic material, but conflicting results about the extent of recombination in the genus Mycobacterium have been reported. We examined a data set comprising 18 distinct strains from 13 named species for evidence of recombination. Genomic regions common to all strains (accounting for 10% to 22% of the full genomes of all examined species) were aligned and concatenated in the chromosomal order of one mycobacterial reference species. The concatenated sequence was screened for evidence of recombination using a variety of statistical methods, with each proposed event evaluated by comparing maximum-likelihood phylogenies of the recombinant section with the non-recombinant portion of the dataset. Incongruent phylogenies were identified by comparing the site-wise log-likelihoods of each tree using multiple tests. We also used a phylogenomic approach to identify genes that may have been acquired through horizontal transfer from non-mycobacterial sources. The most frequent associated lineages (and potential gene transfer partners) in the Mycobacterium lineage-restricted gene trees are other members of suborder Corynebacterinae, but more-distant partners were identified as well. In two examined cases of potentially frequent and habitat-directed transfer (M. abscessus to Segniliparus and M. smegmatis to Streptomyces), observed sequence distances were small and consistent with a hypothesis of transfer, while in a third case (M. vanbaalenii to Streptomyces) distances were larger. The analyses described here indicate that whereas evidence of recombination in core regions within the genus is

  6. Unraveling the genetic landscape of autosomal recessive Charcot-Marie-Tooth neuropathies using a homozygosity mapping approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimoń, Magdalena; Battaloǧlu, Esra; Parman, Yesim; Erdem, Sevim; Baets, Jonathan; De Vriendt, Els; Atkinson, Derek; Almeida-Souza, Leonardo; Deconinck, Tine; Ozes, Burcak; Goossens, Dirk; Cirak, Sebahattin; Van Damme, Philip; Shboul, Mohammad; Voit, Thomas; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Dan, Bernard; El-Khateeb, Mohammed S.; Guergueltcheva, Velina; Lopez-Laso, Eduardo; Goemans, Nathalie; Masri, Amira; Züchner, Stephan; Timmerman, Vincent; Topaloǧlu, Haluk; De Jonghe, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal recessive forms of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (ARCMT) are rare but severe disorders of the peripheral nervous system. Their molecular basis is poorly understood due to the extensive genetic and clinical heterogeneity, posing considerable challenges for patients, physicians, and researchers. We report on the genetic findings from a systematic study of a large collection of 174 independent ARCMT families. Initial sequencing of the three most common ARCMT genes (ganglioside-induced differentiation protein 1—GDAP1, SH3 domain and tetratricopeptide repeats-containing protein 2—SH3TC2, histidine-triad nucleotide binding protein 1—HINT1) identified pathogenic mutations in 41 patients. Subsequently, 87 selected nuclear families underwent single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping and homozygosity mapping, followed by targeted screening of known ARCMT genes. This strategy provided molecular diagnosis to 22 % of the families. Altogether, our unbiased genetic approach identified pathogenic mutations in ten ARCMT genes in a total of 41.3 % patients. Apart from a newly described founder mutation in GDAP1, the majority of variants constitute private molecular defects. Since the gene testing was independent of the clinical phenotype of the patients, we identified mutations in patients with unusual or additional clinical features, extending the phenotypic spectrum of the SH3TC2 gene. Our study provides an overview of the ARCMT genetic landscape and proposes guidelines for tackling the genetic heterogeneity of this group of hereditary neuropathies. PMID:25231362

  7. Contribution of genetic background, traditional risk factors, and HIV-related factors to coronary artery disease events in HIV-positive persons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rotger, Margalida; Glass, Tracy R; Junier, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    in the setting of HIV infection. METHODS: In the general population, 23 common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were shown to be associated with CAD through genome-wide association analysis. Using the Metabochip, we genotyped 1875 HIV-positive, white individuals enrolled in 24 HIV observational studies......, including 571 participants with a first CAD event during the 9-year study period and 1304 controls matched on sex and cohort. RESULTS: A genetic risk score built from 23 CAD-associated SNPs contributed significantly to CAD (P = 2.9 × 10(-4)). In the final multivariable model, participants...

  8. Metabolomics of Genetically Modified Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Simó

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolomic-based approaches are increasingly applied to analyse genetically modified organisms (GMOs making it possible to obtain broader and deeper information on the composition of GMOs compared to that obtained from traditional analytical approaches. The combination in metabolomics of advanced analytical methods and bioinformatics tools provides wide chemical compositional data that contributes to corroborate (or not the substantial equivalence and occurrence of unintended changes resulting from genetic transformation. This review provides insight into recent progress in metabolomics studies on transgenic crops focusing mainly in papers published in the last decade.

  9. Metabolomics of Genetically Modified Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simó, Carolina; Ibáñez, Clara; Valdés, Alberto; Cifuentes, Alejandro; García-Cañas, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    Metabolomic-based approaches are increasingly applied to analyse genetically modified organisms (GMOs) making it possible to obtain broader and deeper information on the composition of GMOs compared to that obtained from traditional analytical approaches. The combination in metabolomics of advanced analytical methods and bioinformatics tools provides wide chemical compositional data that contributes to corroborate (or not) the substantial equivalence and occurrence of unintended changes resulting from genetic transformation. This review provides insight into recent progress in metabolomics studies on transgenic crops focusing mainly in papers published in the last decade. PMID:25334064

  10. A Genetic Algorithms Based Approach for Identification of Escherichia coli Fed-batch Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olympia Roeva

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the use of genetic algorithms for identification of Escherichia coli fed-batch fermentation process. Genetic algorithms are a directed random search technique, based on the mechanics of natural selection and natural genetics, which can find the global optimal solution in complex multidimensional search space. The dynamic behavior of considered process has known nonlinear structure, described with a system of deterministic nonlinear differential equations according to the mass balance. The parameters of the model are estimated using genetic algorithms. Simulation examples for demonstration of the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed identification scheme are included. As a result, the model accurately predicts the process of cultivation of E. coli.

  11. Immune System and Genetics: A Different Approach to the Diversity of Antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matta Camacho, Nubia Estela

    2011-01-01

    It is common to find in immunology or genetic books a chapter entitled immune system and genetics; this association focuses on how the generation of antibodies broke the paradigm one gene, one protein, since in this case one gene generates millions of proteins. However, the immune system has many more links to genetics and heredity. For example, any substance or compound that an organism produces is a potential antigen, when it is recognized as foreign by the immune system of another organism from the same or different species. The proteins that are potentially antigenic are encoded by the individual's genotype. The ability of the immune system to respond to antigenic proteins, as well as the type and intensity of that response, are also correlated with the organism's genotype. In addition, deficiencies in the immune response may be associated with mutations or genetic polymorphisms, which result in susceptibility to infection diseases.

  12. The Third International Meeting on Genetic Disorders in the RAS/MAPK Pathway: Toward a Therapeutic Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Korf, Bruce; Ahmadian, Reza; Allanson, Judith; Aoki, Yoko; Bakker, Annette; Wright, Emma Burkitt; Denger, Brian; Elgersma, Ype; Gelb, Bruce D.; Gripp, Karen W.; Kerr, Bronwyn; Kontaridis, Maria; Lazaro, Conxi; Linardic, Corinne; Lozano, Reymundo

    2015-01-01

    "The Third International Meeting on Genetic Disorders in the RAS/MAPK Pathway: Towards a Therapeutic Approach" was held at the Renaissance Orlando at SeaWorld Hotel (August 2-4, 2013). Seventy-one physicians and scientists attended the meeting, and parallel meetings were held by patient advocacy groups (CFC International, Costello Syndrome Family Network, NF Network and Noonan Syndrome Foundation). Parent and patient advocates opened the meeting with a panel discussion to set the stage regard...

  13. A genome-wide approach accounting for body mass index identifies genetic variants influencing fasting glycemic traits and insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manning, Alisa K; Hivert, Marie-France; Scott, Robert A

    2012-01-01

    pathways might be uncovered by accounting for differences in body mass index (BMI) and potential interactions between BMI and genetic variants. We applied a joint meta-analysis approach to test associations with fasting insulin and glucose on a genome-wide scale. We present six previously unknown loci...... associated with fasting insulin at P triglyceride and lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels, suggesting a role for these loci...

  14. Genetic shifting: a novel approach for controlling vector-borne diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, Jeffrey R.; Tabachnick, Walter J.

    2014-01-01

    Rendering populations of vectors of diseases incapable of transmitting pathogens through genetic methods has long been a goal of vector geneticists. We outline a method to achieve this goal that does not involve introduction of any new genetic variants to the target population. Rather we propose that shifting the frequencies of naturally occurring alleles that confer refractoriness to transmission can reduce transmission below a sustainable level. The program employs methods successfully used...

  15. The client-centred approach as experienced by male neurological rehabilitation clients in occupational therapy. A qualitative study based on a grounded theory tradition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Velde, Dominique; Devisch, Ignaas; De Vriendt, Patricia

    2016-08-01

    Purpose To explore the perspectives of male clients in a neurological rehabilitation setting with regard to the occupational therapy they have received and the client-centred approach. Method This study involved a qualitative research design based on the grounded theory tradition. Individual in-depth interviews were used to collect data. Data were analysed using a constant comparative method. Seven male participants from an inpatient neurological setting were included using a theoretical sampling technique. Results Three themes emerged to describe the approach of the therapists to client-centred practice: (a) a shared biomedical focus as the start of the rehabilitation process, (b) the un-simultaneous shift from a biomedical towards a psycho-social focus and (c) formal versus informal nature of gathering client information. Conclusion A client-centred approach entails a shift from the therapist focussing on recovery from the short-term neurological issues towards the long-term consequences of the disease. According to the client, this shift in reasoning must occur at a specific and highly subjective moment during the rehabilitation process. Identifying this moment could strengthen the client-centred approach. Implications for Rehabilitation Client-centred practice entails a shift from recovering the short-term neurological issues towards the long-term psycho-social consequences of the disease. To be effective in client-centred practice, the clients expect from the professional to be an authority with regard to biomedical issues and to be partner with regard to psycho-social issues. Client-centred practice is most likely to be successful when client is susceptible to discuss his psycho-social issues and finding this moment is a challenge for the professional. Using formal methods for goal setting do not necessarily cover all the information needed for a client-centred therapy programme. Rather, using informal methods could lead to a more valid image of the client.

  16. Identifying Associations Between Brain Imaging Phenotypes and Genetic Factors via A Novel Structured SCCA Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lei; Zhang, Tuo; Liu, Kefei; Yan, Jingwen; Yao, Xiaohui; Risacher, Shannon L; Saykin, Andrew J; Han, Junwei; Guo, Lei; Shen, Li

    2017-06-01

    Brain imaging genetics attracts more and more attention since it can reveal associations between genetic factors and the structures or functions of human brain. Sparse canonical correlation analysis (SCCA) is a powerful bi-multivariate association identification technique in imaging genetics. There have been many SCCA methods which could capture different types of structured imaging genetic relationships. These methods either use the group lasso to recover the group structure, or employ the graph/network guided fused lasso to find out the network structure. However, the group lasso methods have limitation in generalization because of the incomplete or unavailable prior knowledge in real world. The graph/network guided methods are sensitive to the sign of the sample correlation which may be incorrectly estimated. We introduce a new SCCA model using a novel graph guided pairwise group lasso penalty, and propose an efficient optimization algorithm. The proposed method has a strong upper bound for the grouping effect for both positively and negatively correlated variables. We show that our method performs better than or equally to two state-of-the-art SCCA methods on both synthetic and real neuroimaging genetics data. In particular, our method identifies stronger canonical correlations and captures better canonical loading profiles, showing its promise for revealing biologically meaningful imaging genetic associations.

  17. Genetic Susceptibility to Vitiligo: GWAS Approaches for Identifying Vitiligo Susceptibility Genes and Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Changbing; Gao, Jing; Sheng, Yujun; Dou, Jinfa; Zhou, Fusheng; Zheng, Xiaodong; Ko, Randy; Tang, Xianfa; Zhu, Caihong; Yin, Xianyong; Sun, Liangdan; Cui, Yong; Zhang, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is an autoimmune disease with a strong genetic component, characterized by areas of depigmented skin resulting from loss of epidermal melanocytes. Genetic factors are known to play key roles in vitiligo through discoveries in association studies and family studies. Previously, vitiligo susceptibility genes were mainly revealed through linkage analysis and candidate gene studies. Recently, our understanding of the genetic basis of vitiligo has been rapidly advancing through genome-wide association study (GWAS). More than 40 robust susceptible loci have been identified and confirmed to be associated with vitiligo by using GWAS. Most of these associated genes participate in important pathways involved in the pathogenesis of vitiligo. Many susceptible loci with unknown functions in the pathogenesis of vitiligo have also been identified, indicating that additional molecular mechanisms may contribute to the risk of developing vitiligo. In this review, we summarize the key loci that are of genome-wide significance, which have been shown to influence vitiligo risk. These genetic loci may help build the foundation for genetic diagnosis and personalize treatment for patients with vitiligo in the future. However, substantial additional studies, including gene-targeted and functional studies, are required to confirm the causality of the genetic variants and their biological relevance in the development of vitiligo. PMID:26870082

  18. A possibilistic approach for transient identification with 'don't know' response capability optimized by genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Jose Carlos S. de; Schirru, Roberto; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.; Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ

    2002-01-01

    This work describes a possibilistic approach for transient identification based on the minimum centroids set method, proposed in previous work, optimized by genetic algorithm. The idea behind this method is to split the complex classification problem into small and simple ones, so that the performance in the classification can be increased. In order to accomplish that, a genetic algorithm is used to learn, from realistic simulated data, the optimized time partitions, which the robustness and correctness in the classification are maximized. The use of a possibilistic classification approach propitiates natural and consistent classification rules, leading naturally to a good heuristic to handle the 'don't know 'response, in case of unrecognized transient, which is fairly desirable in transient classification systems where safety is critical. Application of the proposed approach to a nuclear transient indentification problem reveals good capability of the genetic algorithm in learning optimized possibilistic classification rules for efficient diagnosis including 'don't know' response. Obtained results are shown and commented. (author)

  19. Systematic documentation and analysis of human genetic variation using the microattribution approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardine, Belinda; Borg, Joseph; Higgs, Douglas R.; Peterson, Kenneth R.; Maglott, Donna; Basak, A. Nazli; Clark, Barnaby; Faustino, Paula; Felice, Alex E.; Francina, Alain; Gallivan, Monica V. E.; Georgitsi, Marianthi; Gibbons, Richard J.; Giordano, Piero C.; Harteveld, Cornelis L.; Joly, Philippe; Kanavakis, Emmanuel; Kollia, Panagoula; Menzel, Stephan; Miller, Webb; Moradkhani, Kamran; Old, John; Papachatzopoulou, Adamantia; Papadakis, Manoussos N.; Papadopoulos, Petros; Pavlovic, Sonja; Philipsen, Sjaak; Radmilovic, Milena; Riemer, Cathy; Schrijver, Iris; Stojiljkovic, Maja; Thein, Swee Lay; Traeger-Synodinos, Jan; Tully, Ray; Wada, Takahito; Waye, John; Wiemann, Claudia; Zukic, Branka; Chui, David H. K.; Wajcman, Henri; Hardison, Ross C.; Patrinos, George P.

    2013-01-01

    We developed a series of interrelated locus-specific databases to store all published and unpublished genetic variation related to these disorders, and then implemented microattribution to encourage submission of unpublished observations of genetic variation to these public repositories 1. A total of 1,941 unique genetic variants in 37 genes, encoding globins (HBA2, HBA1, HBG2, HBG1, HBD, HBB) and other erythroid proteins (ALOX5AP, AQP9, ARG2, ASS1, ATRX, BCL11A, CNTNAP2, CSNK2A1, EPAS1, ERCC2, FLT1, GATA1, GPM6B, HAO2, HBS1L, KDR, KL, KLF1, MAP2K1, MAP3K5, MAP3K7, MYB, NOS1, NOS2, NOS3, NOX3, NUP133, PDE7B, SMAD3, SMAD6, and TOX) are currently documented in these databases with reciprocal attribution of microcitations to data contributors. Our project provides the first example of implementing microattribution to incentivise submission of all known genetic variation in a defined system. It has demonstrably increased the reporting of human variants and now provides a comprehensive online resource for systematically describing human genetic variation in the globin genes and other genes contributing to hemoglobinopathies and thalassemias. The large repository of previously reported data, together with more recent data, acquired by microattribution, demonstrates how the comprehensive documentation of human variation will provide key insights into normal biological processes and how these are perturbed in human genetic disease. Using the microattribution process set out here, datasets which took decades to accumulate for the globin genes could be assembled rapidly for other genes and disease systems. The principles established here for the globin gene system will serve as a model for other systems and the analysis of other common and/or complex human genetic diseases. PMID:21423179

  20. Shortest-path network analysis is a useful approach toward identifying genetic determinants of longevity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J R Managbanag

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Identification of genes that modulate longevity is a major focus of aging-related research and an area of intense public interest. In addition to facilitating an improved understanding of the basic mechanisms of aging, such genes represent potential targets for therapeutic intervention in multiple age-associated diseases, including cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders. To date, however, targeted efforts at identifying longevity-associated genes have been limited by a lack of predictive power, and useful algorithms for candidate gene-identification have also been lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have utilized a shortest-path network analysis to identify novel genes that modulate longevity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Based on a set of previously reported genes associated with increased life span, we applied a shortest-path network algorithm to a pre-existing protein-protein interaction dataset in order to construct a shortest-path longevity network. To validate this network, the replicative aging potential of 88 single-gene deletion strains corresponding to predicted components of the shortest-path longevity network was determined. Here we report that the single-gene deletion strains identified by our shortest-path longevity analysis are significantly enriched for mutations conferring either increased or decreased replicative life span, relative to a randomly selected set of 564 single-gene deletion strains or to the current data set available for the entire haploid deletion collection. Further, we report the identification of previously unknown longevity genes, several of which function in a conserved longevity pathway believed to mediate life span extension in response to dietary restriction. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work demonstrates that shortest-path network analysis is a useful approach toward identifying genetic determinants of longevity and represents the first application of

  1. [Traditional nostrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Shigeru

    2006-01-01

    The commercialization of drugs started toward the end of Heian period (794-1192) when not only aristocrats and monks who were traditional patrons to drug makers, but also local clans and landlords who became powerful as a result of the disbanding of aristocratic manors accumulated enough wealth to spend money on medicine. Although traveling around the country was still a dangerous endeavor, merchants assembled groups to bring lucrative foreign drugs (mainly Chinese) to remote areas. The spread of commercial drugs to common people, however, did not happen until the early Edo period (1603-1867), when the so-called barrier system was installed nationwide to make domestic travel safe. Commercialization started in large cities and gradually spread to other areas. Many nostrums popular until recently appeared in the Genroku period (1688-1703) or later. Many such nostrums were all-cures, often consisting of such active ingredients as Saussureae radix, Agalloch, or Gambir. Even in the Edo period, many people living in agricultural or fishing villages, as well as those in the lower tier, were still poor. Much of the medication available to those people was therefore made of various plant or animal-derived substances that were traditionally used as folk medicines.

  2. New approaches to evaluating the genetic effects of the atomic bombs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neel, J.V.

    1995-01-01

    In the aftermath of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki fifty years ago, one of the compelling biomedical questions that arose concerned the genetic effects of this exposure. More recently, revelations of the extent of industrial or accidental exposures in the former Soviet Union and charges that employment in the Sellafield Nuclear Reprocessing Plant in West Cumbria, England has resulted in a gene-mediated increase in children of plant employees have served to keep in the public mind the issue of the genetic risks of exposure to ionizing radiation. The study of the genetic effects of the atomic bombs has moved from the gross morphological level of congenital malformations to the examination of DNA. However, were the need for such genetic studies to arise in the foreseeable future, despite this impressive progress in DNA-oriented systems, the documentation of congenital defect, genetic disease and child survival would still be an essential component of any future study. Whatever the geneticists may think, the phenotypic well-being and survival of children are still the primary indicators on which the public, who ultimately supports these studies, will base its judgement of risk. 28 refs

  3. Control of Disease Induced by Tospoviruses in Tomato: An Update of the Genetic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cebolla-Cornejo

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Advances in the search for genetic resistance to tospoviruses affecting tomato crops are reviewed. The economic losses caused by Tomato spotted wilt tospovirus (TSWV, the great number of hosts it affects and its wide distribution around the world has made TSWV one of the ten most important plant viruses. Other viruses in or related to the same genus also cause severe damage, although their presence in the world is much more localized. Due to the limited effectiveness of physical, chemical and biological control methods, the use of genetic resistance for control is the best management strategy on a medium-long term basis. Given the relative ease with which new TSWV isolates that overcome existing genetic resistance are generated, it is of prime importance to continue the search for new sources of resistance, as well as to promote a better exploitation of available ones. A better understanding of the mechanisms causing resistance and of their genetic control, as well as the identification of molecular markers linked to resistance genes, would enable the pyramiding of different resistance genes. This would be a positive contribution to the development of a greater and more durable resistance. It is also necessary to further the study of genetic resistance to other viruses of the genus Tospovirus, as globalisation can speed up their distribution throughout the world.

  4. Genetic diversity among Korean bermudagrass (Cynodon spp.) ecotypes characterized by morphological, cytological and molecular approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Si-Yong; Lee, Geung-Joo; Lim, Ki Byung; Lee, Hye Jung; Park, In Sook; Chung, Sung Jin; Kim, Jin-Baek; Kim, Dong Sub; Rhee, Hye Kyung

    2008-04-30

    The genus Cynodon comprises ten species. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genetic diversity of Korean bermudagrasses at the morphological, cytological and molecular levels. Morphological parameters, the nuclear DNA content and ploidy levels were observed in 43 bermudagrass ecotypes. AFLP markers were evaluated to define the genetic diversity, and chromosome counts were made to confirm the inferred cytotypes. Nuclear DNA contents were in the ranges 1.42-1.56, 1.94-2.19, 2.54, and 2.77-2.85 pg/2C for the triploid, tetraploid, pentaploid, and hexaploid accessions, respectively. The inferred cytotypes were triploid (2n = 3x = 27), tetraploid (2n = 4x = 36), pentaploid (2n = 5x = 45), and hexaploid (2n = 6x = 54), but the majority of the collections were tetraploid (81%). Mitotic chromosome counts verified the corresponding ploidy levels. The fast growing fine-textured ecotypes had lower ploidy levels, while the pentaploids and hexaploids were coarse types. The genetic similarity ranged from 0.42 to 0.94 with an average of 0.64. UPGMA cluster analysis and principle coordinate analysis separated the ecotypes into 6 distinct groups. The genetic similarity suggests natural hybridization between the different cytotypes, which could be useful resources for future breeding and genetic studies.

  5. An emergentist vs a linear approach to social change processes: a gender look in contemporary India between modernity and Hindu tradition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condorelli, Rosalia

    2015-01-01

    Using Census of India data from 1901 to 2011 and national and international reports on women's condition in India, beginning with sex ratio trends according to regional distribution up to female infanticides and sex-selective abortions and dowry deaths, this study examines the sociological aspects of the gender imbalance in modern contemporary India. Gender inequality persistence in India proves that new values and structures do not necessarily lead to the disappearance of older forms, but they can co-exist with mutual adaptations and reinforcements. Data analysis suggests that these unexpected combinations are not comprehensible in light of a linear concept of social change which is founded, in turn, on a concept of social systems as linear interaction systems that relate to environmental perturbations according to proportional cause and effect relationships. From this perspective, in fact, behavioral attitudes and interaction relationships should be less and less proportionally regulated by traditional values and practices as exposure to modernizing influences increases. And progressive decreases should be found in rates of social indicators of gender inequality like dowry deaths (the inverse should be found in sex ratio trends). However, data does not confirm these trends. This finding leads to emphasize a new theoretical and methodological approach toward social systems study, namely the conception of social systems as complex adaptive systems and the consequential emergentist, nonlinear conception of social change processes. Within the framework of emergentist theory of social change is it possible to understand the lasting strength of the patriarchal tradition and its problematic consequences in the modern contemporary India.

  6. Modern vs. Traditional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhenhui, Rao

    1999-01-01

    This article discusses traditional methods, such as the grammar-translation, and modern methods, the communicative approach, for teaching English-as-a-foreign-language in China. The relationship between linguistic accuracy and communicative competence, student-centered orientation, and the role of the teacher are highlighted. (Author/VWL)

  7. Isolation and genetic analysis of pure cells from forensic biological mixtures: The precision of a digital approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, F; Rapone, C; Bregola, G; Aversa, R; de Meo, A; Signorini, G; Sergio, M; Ferrarini, A; Lanzellotto, R; Medoro, G; Giorgini, G; Manaresi, N; Berti, A

    2017-07-01

    Latest genotyping technologies allow to achieve a reliable genetic profile for the offender identification even from extremely minute biological evidence. The ultimate challenge occurs when genetic profiles need to be retrieved from a mixture, which is composed of biological material from two or more individuals. In this case, DNA profiling will often result in a complex genetic profile, which is then subject matter for statistical analysis. In principle, when more individuals contribute to a mixture with different biological fluids, their single genetic profiles can be obtained by separating the distinct cell types (e.g. epithelial cells, blood cells, sperm), prior to genotyping. Different approaches have been investigated for this purpose, such as fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS) or laser capture microdissection (LCM), but currently none of these methods can guarantee the complete separation of different type of cells present in a mixture. In other fields of application, such as oncology, DEPArray™ technology, an image-based, microfluidic digital sorter, has been widely proven to enable the separation of pure cells, with single-cell precision. This study investigates the applicability of DEPArray™ technology to forensic samples analysis, focusing on the resolution of the forensic mixture problem. For the first time, we report here the development of an application-specific DEPArray™ workflow enabling the detection and recovery of pure homogeneous cell pools from simulated blood/saliva and semen/saliva mixtures, providing full genetic match with genetic profiles of corresponding donors. In addition, we assess the performance of standard forensic methods for DNA quantitation and genotyping on low-count, DEPArray™-isolated cells, showing that pure, almost complete profiles can be obtained from as few as ten haploid cells. Finally, we explore the applicability in real casework samples, demonstrating that the described approach provides complete

  8. Merging data from genetic and epigenetic approaches to better understand autistic spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, Dennis R; Guidotti, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by a wide range of cognitive and behavioral abnormalities. Genetic research has identified large numbers of genes that contribute to ASD phenotypes. There is compelling evidence that environmental factors contribute to ASD through influences that differentially impact the brain through epigenetic mechanisms. Both genetic mutations and epigenetic influences alter gene expression in different cell types of the brain. Mutations impact the expression of large numbers of genes and also have downstream consequences depending on specific pathways associated with the mutation. Environmental factors impact the expression of sets of genes by altering methylation/hydroxymethylation patterns, local histone modification patterns and chromatin remodeling. Herein, we discuss recent developments in the research of ASD with a focus on epigenetic pathways as a complement to current genetic screening.

  9. Genetic shifting: a novel approach for controlling vector-borne diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Jeffrey R; Tabachnick, Walter J

    2014-06-01

    Rendering populations of vectors of diseases incapable of transmitting pathogens through genetic methods has long been a goal of vector geneticists. We outline a method to achieve this goal that does not involve the introduction of any new genetic variants to the target population. Rather we propose that shifting the frequencies of naturally occurring alleles that confer refractoriness to transmission can reduce transmission below a sustainable level. The program employs methods successfully used in plant and animal breeding. Because no artificially constructed genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are introduced into the environment, the method is minimally controversial. We use Aedes aegypti and dengue virus (DENV) for illustrative purposes but point out that the proposed program is generally applicable to vector-borne disease control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A Genetic Algorithm Approach to the Optimization of a Radioactive Waste Treatment System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yeongjin; Lee, Kunjai; Koh, Y.; Mun, J.H.; Kim, H.S.

    1998-01-01

    This study is concerned with the applications of goal programming and genetic algorithm techniques to the analysis of management and operational problems in the radioactive waste treatment system (RWTS). A typical RWTS is modeled and solved by goal program and genetic algorithm to study and resolve the effects of conflicting objectives such as cost, limitation of released radioactivity to the environment, equipment utilization and total treatable radioactive waste volume before discharge and disposal. The developed model is validated and verified using actual data obtained from the RWTS at Kyoto University in Japan. The solution by goal programming and genetic algorithm would show the optimal operation point which is to maximize the total treatable radioactive waste volume and minimize the released radioactivity of liquid waste even under the restricted resources. The comparison of two methods shows very similar results. (author)

  11. Y chromosome microdeletions and alterations of spermatogenesis, patient approach and genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rives, Nathalie

    2014-05-01

    Infertility affects 15% of couples at reproductive age and human male infertility appears frequently idiopathic. The main genetic causes of spermatogenesis defect responsible for non-obstructive azoospermia and severe oligozoospermia are constitutional chromosomal abnormalities and microdeletions in the azoospermia factor region of the Y chromosome. The improvement of the Yq microdeletion screening method gave new insights in the mechanism responsible for the genesis of Yq microdeletions and for the consequences of the management of male infertility and genetic counselling in case of assisted reproductive technology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Autism and genetics: Clinical approach and association study with two markers of HRAS gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herault, J.; Petit, E.; Cherpi, C. [Laboratoire de Biochimie Medicale, Tours (France)] [and others

    1995-08-14

    Twin studies and familial aggregation studies indicate that genetic factors could play a role in infantile autism. In an earlier study, we identified a possible positive association between autism and a c-Harvey-ras (HRAS) oncogene marker at the 3{prime} end of the coding region. In an attempt to confirm this finding, we studied a larger population, well-characterized clinically and genetically. We report a positive association between autism and two HRAS markers, the 3{prime} marker used in the initial study and an additional marker in exon 1. 46 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  13. Bodies in skin: a philosophical and theological approach to genetic skin diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walser, Angelika

    2010-03-01

    This contribution evolved from my work in a European network and is dedicated to the rare genetic skin diseases. To gain a deeper knowledge about the question, what it means to suffer from a genetic skin disease, I have discussed the concepts of skin in philosophical and theological anthropology. Presuming that ancient interpretations of skin diseases (moral and cultical impurity) are still relevant today, feminist Christian theology shows the ways of deconstructing stigmatizing paradigma by using the body as a hermeneutic category. Skin becomes the "open borderline" of the human being, pointing out both the social vulnerability and the transcendent capacity of the human person.

  14. Electromagnetic energy as a bridge between atomic and cellular levels in the genetics approach to cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofani, Santi

    2015-01-01

    Literature on magnetic fields (MF) and gene expression, as well as on DNA damage, supports the hypothesis that electromagnetic energy may act at atomic level influencing genetic stability. According to quantum physics, MF act on the interconversion of singlet and triplet spin states, and therefore on genetic instability, activating oxidative processes connected to biological free radicals formation, particularly ROS. In the above frame, the results of in vitro and in vivo laboratory trials have been analyzed. The use of a static MF amplitude modulated by 50 Hz MF, with a time average total intensity of 5.5 mT, has been shown to influence tumor cell functions such as cell proliferation, apoptosis, p53 expression, inhibition of tumor growth and prolongation of survival in animals, evidence that MF can be more effective than chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide) in inhibiting metastatic spread and growth, having synergistic activity with chemotherapy (Cis-platin), and no observable side effects or toxicity in animals or in humans. The beneficial biological/clinical effects observed, without any adverse effects, have been confirmed by various authors and augur well for the potentiality of this new approach to treat genetically based diseases like cancer. Further studies are needed to develop a quantum physics approach to biology, allowing a stable bridge to be built between atomic and cellular levels, therefore developing quantum biology.

  15. CRISPR-Cas9: a promising genetic engineering approach in cancer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratan, Zubair Ahmed; Son, Young-Jin; Uddin, Bhuiyan Mohammad Mahtab; Yusuf, Md. Abdullah; Zaman, Sojib Bin; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Banu, Laila Anjuman

    2018-01-01

    Bacteria and archaea possess adaptive immunity against foreign genetic materials through clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) systems. The discovery of this intriguing bacterial system heralded a revolutionary change in the field of medical science. The CRISPR and CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) based molecular mechanism has been applied to genome editing. This CRISPR-Cas9 technique is now able to mediate precise genetic corrections or disruptions in in vitro and in vivo environments. The accuracy and versatility of CRISPR-Cas have been capitalized upon in biological and medical research and bring new hope to cancer research. Cancer involves complex alterations and multiple mutations, translocations and chromosomal losses and gains. The ability to identify and correct such mutations is an important goal in cancer treatment. In the context of this complex cancer genomic landscape, there is a need for a simple and flexible genetic tool that can easily identify functional cancer driver genes within a comparatively short time. The CRISPR-Cas system shows promising potential for modeling, repairing and correcting genetic events in different types of cancer. This article reviews the concept of CRISPR-Cas, its application and related advantages in oncology. PMID:29434679

  16. A clinical approach to the diagnosis of patients with leukodystrophies and genetic leukoencephelopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parikh, Sumit; Bernard, Geneviève; Leventer, Richard J.; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; van Hove, Johan; Pizzino, Amy; McNeill, Nathan H.; Helman, Guy; Simons, Cas; Schmidt, Johanna L.; Rizzo, William B.; Patterson, Marc C.; Taft, Ryan J.; Vanderver, Adeline

    2015-01-01

    Leukodystrophies (LD) and genetic leukoencephalopathies (gLE) are disorders that result in white matter abnormalities in the central nervous system (CNS). Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging (MRI) has dramatically improved and systematized the diagnosis of LDs and gLEs, and in combination with specific

  17. Students' Understanding of Genetics Concepts: The Effect of Reasoning Ability and Learning Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiliç, Didem; Saglam, Necdet

    2014-01-01

    Students tend to learn genetics by rote and may not realise the interrelationships in daily life. Because reasoning abilities are necessary to construct relationships between concepts and rote learning impedes the students' sound understanding, it was predicted that having high level of formal reasoning and adopting meaningful learning orientation…

  18. Biotechnological approaches for the genetic improvement of Jatropha curcas L.: A biodiesel plant

    KAUST Repository

    Kumar, Nitish

    2015-08-14

    Ever increasing demand for energy sources and reduction of non-renewable fossil fuel reserves have lead to exploration of alternative and renewable energy sources. Due to wide distribution, agronomic suitability, and desirable oil properties, J. curcas has been identified as a renewable and alternative energy source of biodiesel. Large scale commercial cultivation of this crop would not only be environmentally friendly and be worthwhile in carbon sequestration but also in decreasing the energy supply pressures. Wide adaptation across geographic regions, short gestation period compared to most tree species, rapid growth, hardiness, optimum plant size, and easy propagation in combination make this species suitable for large scale cultivation on barren lands. The limited information of the genetics and inheritance of desirable traits, unpredictable and low yields, the limited diversity and susceptibility to diseases and insects are however, key limitations in fruitful farming of J. curcas. In this review, an effort is made to project the current biotechnology and molecular biology tools employed in the direction of, evaluating the genetic diversity and phylogeny revelation of Jatropha spp., identification of genetic markers for desirable traits, development of efficient micropropagation and regeneration system, and genetic transformation methods for J. curcas. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Genetic characterization, species differentiation and detection of Fasciola spp. by molecular approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Hai-Long

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Liver flukes belonging to the genus Fasciola are among the causes of foodborne diseases of parasitic etiology. These parasites cause significant public health problems and substantial economic losses to the livestock industry. Therefore, it is important to definitively characterize the Fasciola species. Current phenotypic techniques fail to reflect the full extent of the diversity of Fasciola spp. In this respect, the use of molecular techniques to identify and differentiate Fasciola spp. offer considerable advantages. The advent of a variety of molecular genetic techniques also provides a powerful method to elucidate many aspects of Fasciola biology, epidemiology, and genetics. However, the discriminatory power of these molecular methods varies, as does the speed and ease of performance and cost. There is a need for the development of new methods to identify the mechanisms underpinning the origin and maintenance of genetic variation within and among Fasciola populations. The increasing application of the current and new methods will yield a much improved understanding of Fasciola epidemiology and evolution as well as more effective means of parasite control. Herein, we provide an overview of the molecular techniques that are being used for the genetic characterization, detection and genotyping of Fasciola spp..

  20. Genetic characterization, species differentiation and detection of Fasciola spp. by molecular approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Lin; Chen, Mu-Xin; Alasaad, Samer; Elsheikha, Hany M; Li, Juan; Li, Hai-Long; Lin, Rui-Qing; Zou, Feng-Cai; Zhu, Xing-Quan; Chen, Jia-Xu

    2011-06-10

    Liver flukes belonging to the genus Fasciola are among the causes of foodborne diseases of parasitic etiology. These parasites cause significant public health problems and substantial economic losses to the livestock industry. Therefore, it is important to definitively characterize the Fasciola species. Current phenotypic techniques fail to reflect the full extent of the diversity of Fasciola spp. In this respect, the use of molecular techniques to identify and differentiate Fasciola spp. offer considerable advantages. The advent of a variety of molecular genetic techniques also provides a powerful method to elucidate many aspects of Fasciola biology, epidemiology, and genetics. However, the discriminatory power of these molecular methods varies, as does the speed and ease of performance and cost. There is a need for the development of new methods to identify the mechanisms underpinning the origin and maintenance of genetic variation within and among Fasciola populations. The increasing application of the current and new methods will yield a much improved understanding of Fasciola epidemiology and evolution as well as more effective means of parasite control. Herein, we provide an overview of the molecular techniques that are being used for the genetic characterization, detection and genotyping of Fasciola spp..

  1. A multi-objective genetic approach to domestic load scheduling in an energy management system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Ana; Antunes, Carlos Henggeler; Oliveira, Carlos; Gomes, Álvaro

    2014-01-01

    In this paper a multi-objective genetic algorithm is used to solve a multi-objective model to optimize the time allocation of domestic loads within a planning period of 36 h, in a smart grid context. The management of controllable domestic loads is aimed at minimizing the electricity bill and the end-user’s dissatisfaction concerning two different aspects: the preferred time slots for load operation and the risk of interruption of the energy supply. The genetic algorithm is similar to the Elitist NSGA-II (Nondominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm II), in which some changes have been introduced to adapt it to the physical characteristics of the load scheduling problem and improve usability of results. The mathematical model explicitly considers economical, technical, quality of service and comfort aspects. Illustrative results are presented and the characteristics of different solutions are analyzed. - Highlights: • A genetic algorithm similar to the NSGA-II is used to solve a multi-objective model. • The optimized time allocation of domestic loads in a smart grid context is achieved. • A variable preference profile for the operation of the managed loads is included. • A safety margin is used to account for the quality of the energy services provided. • A non-dominated front with the solutions in the two-objective space is obtained

  2. A patient centred approach to care planning for patients with chronic genetic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alastair Kent

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay proposes seven pre-requisites for the creation of effective programmes of care and support for patients living with the consequences of chronic genetic diseases. It then goes on to discuss the role of patient organisations and other stakeholders in bringing about the development and implementation of these.

  3. A systems genetics approach identifies genes and pathways for type 2 diabetes in human islets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taneera, Jalal; Lang, Stefan; Sharma, Amitabh

    2012-01-01

    Close to 50 genetic loci have been associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D), but they explain only 15% of the heritability. In an attempt to identify additional T2D genes, we analyzed global gene expression in human islets from 63 donors. Using 48 genes located near T2D risk variants, we identified ...

  4. Nature, nurture, and item response theory: a psychometric approach to behaviour genetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwabe, Inga

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation discusses a number of psychometric issues that require special attention in the analysis of genetically-informative data, such as data on twins. These include heterogeneous measurement error, scaling and scale transformation, and harmonization of phenotypes. It is shown how

  5. Cracking anxiety in the mouse : a quantitative (epi)genetic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Labots, M.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to improve existing methodologies and apply genetic strategies in order to identify (main-effect, epistatic, multiple and pleiotropic) quantitative trait loci and to decipher functional candidate genes for anxiety-related behavior and baseline blood plasma total

  6. Reclassification of Mixed Oligoastrocytic Tumors Using a Genetically Integrated Diagnostic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Ik Kim

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Mixed gliomas, such as oligoastrocytomas (OA, anaplastic oligoastrocytomas, and glioblastomas (GBMs with an oligodendroglial component (GBMO are defined as tumors composed of a mixture of two distinct neoplastic cell types, astrocytic and oligodendroglial. Recently, mutations ATRX and TP53, and codeletion of 1p/19q are shown to be genetic hallmarks of astrocytic and oligodendroglial tumors, respectively. Subsequent molecular analyses of mixed gliomas preferred the reclassification to either oligodendroglioma or astrocytoma. This study was designed to apply genetically integrated diagnostic criteria to mixed gliomas and determine usefulness and prognostic value of new classification in Korean patients. Methods Fifty-eight cases of mixed OAs and GBMOs were retrieved from the pathology archives of Seoul National University Hospital from 2004 to 2015. Reclassification was performed according to genetic and immunohistochemical properties. Clinicopathological characteristics of each subgroup were evaluated. Overall survival was assessed and compared between subgroups. Results We could reclassify all mixed OAs and GBMOs into either astrocytic or oligodendroglial tumors. Notably, 29 GBMOs could be reclassified into 11 cases of GBM, IDH-mutant, 16 cases of GBM, IDH-wildtype, and two cases of anaplastic oligodendroglioma, IDH mutant. Overall survival was significantly different among these new groups (p<.001. Overall survival and progression-free survival were statistically better in gliomas with IDH mutation, ATRX mutation, no microscopic necrosis, and young patient age (cut off, 45 years old. Conclusions Our results strongly suggest that a genetically integrated diagnosis of glioma better reflects prognosis than former morphology-based methods.

  7. Genetic, Genomic, and Breeding Approaches to Further Explore Kernel Composition Traits and Grain Yield in Maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, Helena Sofia Pereira

    2009-01-01

    Maize ("Zea mays L.") is a model species well suited for the dissection of complex traits which are often of commercial value. The purpose of this research was to gain a deeper understanding of the genetic control of maize kernel composition traits starch, protein, and oil concentration, and also kernel weight and grain yield. Germplasm with…

  8. Metabologenomics of Phaeochromocytoma and Paraganglioma: An Integrated Approach for Personalised Biochemical and Genetic Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhofer, Graeme; Klink, Barbara; Richter, Susan; Lenders, Jacques Wm; Robledo, Mercedes

    2017-04-01

    The tremendous advances over the past two decades in both clinical genetics and biochemical testing of chromaffin cell tumours have led to new considerations about how these aspects of laboratory medicine can be integrated to improve diagnosis and management of affected patients. With germline mutations in 15 genes now identified to be responsible for over a third of all cases of phaeochromocytomas and paragangliomas, these tumours are recognised to have one of the richest hereditary backgrounds among all neoplasms. Depending on the mutation, tumours show distinct differences in metabolic pathways that relate to or even directly impact clinical presentation. At the same time, there has been improved understanding about how catecholamines are synthesised, stored, secreted and metabolised by chromaffin cell tumours. Although the tumours may not always secrete catecholamines it has become clear that almost all continuously produce and metabolise catecholamines. This has not only fuelled changes in laboratory medicine, but has also assisted in recognition of genotype-biochemical phenotype relationships important for diagnostics and clinical care. In particular, differences in catecholamine and energy pathway metabolomes can guide genetic testing, assist with test interpretation and provide predictions about the nature, behaviour and imaging characteristics of the tumours. Conversely, results of genetic testing are important for guiding how routine biochemical testing should be employed and interpreted in surveillance programmes for at-risk patients. In these ways there are emerging needs for modern laboratory medicine to seamlessly integrate biochemical and genetic testing into the diagnosis and management of patients with chromaffin cell tumours.

  9. Molecular, Genetic and Agronomic Approaches to Utilizing Pulses as Cover Crops and Green Manure into Cropping Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, Eleni; Abraham, Eleni; Chachalis, Demosthenis; Travlos, Ilias

    2017-06-05

    Cover crops constitute one of the most promising agronomic practices towards a more sustainable agriculture. Their beneficial effects on main crops, soil and environment are many and various, while risks and disadvantages may also appear. Several legumes show a high potential but further research is required in order to suggest the optimal legume cover crops for each case in terms of their productivity and ability to suppress weeds. The additional cost associated with cover crops should also be addressed and in this context the use of grain legumes such as cowpea, faba bean and pea could be of high interest. Some of the aspects of these grain legumes as far as their use as cover crops, their genetic diversity and their breeding using conventional and molecular approaches are discussed in the present review. The specific species seem to have a high potential for use as cover crops, especially if their noticeable genetic diversity is exploited and their breeding focuses on several desirable traits.

  10. Women-specific risk factors for heart failure: A genetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kemp, Jet; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte

    2018-03-01

    Heart failure is a complex disease, which is presented differently by men and women. Several studies have shown that reproductive factors, such as age at natural menopause, parity and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), may play a role in the development of heart failure. Shared genetics may provide clues to underlying mechanisms; however, this has never been examined. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to explore whether any reproductive factor is potentially related to heart failure in women, based on genetic similarities. Conducting a systematic literature review, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with reproductive factors, heart failure and its risk factors were extracted from recent genome-wide association studies. We tested whether there was any overlap between the SNPs and their proxies of reproductive risk factors with those known for heart failure or its risk factors. In total, 520 genetic variants were found that are associated with reproductive factors, namely age at menarche, age at natural menopause, menstrual cycle length, PCOS, preeclampsia, preterm delivery and spontaneous dizygotic twinning. For heart failure and associated phenotypes, 25 variants were found. Genetic variants for reproductive factors did not overlap with those for heart failure. However, age at menarche, gestational diabetes and PCOS were found to be genetically linked to risk factors for heart failure, such as atrial fibrillation, diabetes and smoking. Corresponding implicated genes, such as TNNI3K, ErbB3, MKL2, MTNR1B and PRKD1, may explain the associations between reproductive factors and heart failure. Exact effector mechanisms of these genes remain to be investigated further. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. A novel genetic score approach using instruments to investigate interactions between pathways and environment: application to air pollution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Abele Bind

    Full Text Available Air pollution has been associated with increased systemic inflammation markers. We developed a new pathway analysis approach to investigate whether gene variants within relevant pathways (oxidative stress, endothelial function, and metal processing modified the association between particulate air pollution and fibrinogen, C-reactive protein (CRP, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1. Our study population consisted of 822 elderly participants of the Normative Aging Study (1999-2011. To investigate the role of biological mechanisms and to reduce the number of comparisons in the analysis, we created pathway-specific scores using gene variants related to each pathway. To select the most appropriate gene variants, we used the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (Lasso to relate independent outcomes representative of each pathway (8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine for oxidative stress, augmentation index for endothelial function, and patella lead for metal processing to gene variants. A high genetic score corresponds to a higher allelic risk profile. We fit mixed-effects models to examine modification by the genetic score of the weekly air pollution association with the outcome. Among participants with higher genetic scores within the oxidative stress pathway, we observed significant associations between particle number and fibrinogen, while we did not find any association among participants with lower scores (p(interaction = 0.04. Compared to individuals with low genetic scores of metal processing gene variants, participants with higher scores had greater effects of particle number on fibrinogen (p(interaction = 0.12, CRP (p(interaction = 0.02, and ICAM-1 (pinteraction = 0.08. This two-stage penalization method is easy to implement and can be used for large-scale genetic applications.

  12. A proteomic network approach across the ALS-FTD disease spectrum resolves clinical phenotypes and genetic vulnerability in human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umoh, Mfon E; Dammer, Eric B; Dai, Jingting; Duong, Duc M; Lah, James J; Levey, Allan I; Gearing, Marla; Glass, Jonathan D; Seyfried, Nicholas T

    2018-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are neurodegenerative diseases with overlap in clinical presentation, neuropathology, and genetic underpinnings. The molecular basis for the overlap of these disorders is not well established. We performed a comparative unbiased mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of frontal cortical tissues from postmortem cases clinically defined as ALS, FTD, ALS and FTD (ALS/FTD), and controls. We also included a subset of patients with the C9orf72 expansion mutation, the most common genetic cause of both ALS and FTD Our systems-level analysis of the brain proteome integrated both differential expression and co-expression approaches to assess the relationship of these differences to clinical and pathological phenotypes. Weighted co-expression network analysis revealed 15 modules of co-expressed proteins, eight of which were significantly different across the ALS-FTD disease spectrum. These included modules associated with RNA binding proteins, synaptic transmission, and inflammation with cell-type specificity that showed correlation with TDP-43 pathology and cognitive dysfunction. Modules were also examined for their overlap with TDP-43 protein-protein interactions, revealing one module enriched with RNA-binding proteins and other causal ALS genes that increased in FTD/ALS and FTD cases. A module enriched with astrocyte and microglia proteins was significantly increased in ALS cases carrying the C9orf72 mutation compared to sporadic ALS cases, suggesting that the genetic expansion is associated with inflammation in the brain even without clinical evidence of dementia. Together, these findings highlight the utility of integrative systems-level proteomic approaches to resolve clinical phenotypes and genetic mechanisms underlying the ALS-FTD disease spectrum in human brain. © 2017 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  13. BRCA mutation carrier detection. A model-based cost-effectiveness analysis comparing the traditional family history approach and the testing of all patients with breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norum, Jan; Grindedal, Eli Marie; Heramb, Cecilie; Karsrud, Inga; Ariansen, Sarah Louise; Undlien, Dag Erik; Schlichting, Ellen; Mæhle, Lovise

    2018-01-01

    Background Identification of BRCA mutation carriers among patients with breast cancer (BC) involves costs and gains. Testing has been performed according to international guidelines, focusing on family history (FH) of breast and/or ovarian cancer. An alternative is testing all patients with BC employing sequencing of the BRCA genes and Multiplex Ligation Probe Amplification (MLPA). Patients and methods A model-based cost-effectiveness analysis, employing data from Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål (OUH-U) and a decision tree, was done. The societal and the healthcare perspectives were focused and a lifetime perspective employed. The comparators were the traditional FH approach used as standard of care at OUH-U in 2013 and the intervention (testing all patients with BC) performed in 2014 and 2015 at the same hospital. During the latter period, 535 patients with BC were offered BRCA testing with sequencing and MLPA. National 2014 data on mortality rates and costs were implemented, a 3% discount rate used and the costing year was 2015. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated in euros (€) per life-year gained (LYG). Results The net healthcare cost (healthcare perspective) was €40 503/LYG. Including all resource use (societal perspective), the cost was €5669/LYG. The univariate sensitivity analysis documented the unit cost of the BRCA test and the number of LYGs the prominent parameters affecting the result. Diagnostic BRCA testing of all patients with BC was superior to the FH approach and cost-effective within the frequently used thresholds (healthcare perspective) in Norway (€60 000–€80 000/LYG). PMID:29682331

  14. A Mathematical Model of Profit-Loss Sharing Scheme of Small Investment for Traditional Market Traders using The Semi-Fuzzy Logic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novriana Sumarti

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of micro-finance investment using profit-loss sharing scheme are made and implemented to simulated data. Here profits from the venture will be shared in a portion between the investor and the entity running the business. The scheme can be classified as Musharaka type of investment in Sharia economy. The proposed model is theoretically implemented with data from small-scale traders at a local traditional market who have small turnover. They are common target of usurers who lend money with high interest rate and penalties. If the traders are in unfortunate conditions, they are potentially in poorer condition than before committing themselves to the usurer. In the conventional practices of the profit sharing scheme, the investor will get a fixed portion of the trader’s income, which is applied for all kind of small-scale traders. If the traders are diligent and hard worker and have very high turnover, then the investor will gain much more profit whether the contributed capital is small or large. In this paper, the scheme is implemented using Semi-Fuzzy Logic Approach so that the profit-loss sharing scheme can achieve its intended goal, which is to make a profitable investment not only for the investor but also for traders. The approach is not fully using Fuzzy Logic because some variables are still in crisp numbers and the optimization problem is regular in the form of crisp numbers. Based on the existing data, the results show that the optimal profit share is depended on the income of the traders. The higher the income coming from the venture, the lesser the profit share for the investor which is reasonable with the fixed initial contributed capital.

  15. BRCA mutation carrier detection. A model-based cost-effectiveness analysis comparing the traditional family history approach and the testing of all patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norum, Jan; Grindedal, Eli Marie; Heramb, Cecilie; Karsrud, Inga; Ariansen, Sarah Louise; Undlien, Dag Erik; Schlichting, Ellen; Mæhle, Lovise

    2018-01-01

    Identification of BRCA mutation carriers among patients with breast cancer (BC) involves costs and gains. Testing has been performed according to international guidelines, focusing on family history (FH) of breast and/or ovarian cancer. An alternative is testing all patients with BC employing sequencing of the BRCA genes and Multiplex Ligation Probe Amplification (MLPA). A model-based cost-effectiveness analysis, employing data from Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål (OUH-U) and a decision tree, was done. The societal and the healthcare perspectives were focused and a lifetime perspective employed. The comparators were the traditional FH approach used as standard of care at OUH-U in 2013 and the intervention (testing all patients with BC) performed in 2014 and 2015 at the same hospital. During the latter period, 535 patients with BC were offered BRCA testing with sequencing and MLPA. National 2014 data on mortality rates and costs were implemented, a 3% discount rate used and the costing year was 2015. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated in euros (€) per life-year gained (LYG). The net healthcare cost (healthcare perspective) was €40 503/LYG. Including all resource use (societal perspective), the cost was €5669/LYG. The univariate sensitivity analysis documented the unit cost of the BRCA test and the number of LYGs the prominent parameters affecting the result.Diagnostic BRCA testing of all patients with BC was superior to the FH approach and cost-effective within the frequently used thresholds (healthcare perspective) in Norway (€60 000-€80 000/LYG).

  16. Compound to Extract to Formulation: a knowledge-transmitting approach for metabolites identification of Gegen-Qinlian Decoction, a traditional Chinese medicine formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Xue; Wang, Qi; Wang, Shuang; Miao, Wen-juan; Li, Yan-jiao; Xiang, Cheng; Guo, De-an; Ye, Min

    2016-01-01

    Herbal medicines usually contain a large group of chemical components, which may be transformed into more complex metabolites in vivo. In this study, we proposed a knowledge-transmitting strategy for metabolites identification of compound formulas. Gegen-Qinlian Decoction (GQD) is a classical formula in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). It is widely used to treat diarrhea and diabetes in clinical practice. However, only tens of metabolites could be detected using conventional approaches. To comprehensively identify the metabolites of GQD, a “compound to extract to formulation” strategy was established in this study. The metabolic pathways of single representative constituents in GQD were studied, and the metabolic rules were transmitted to chemically similar compounds in herbal extracts. After screening diversified metabolites from herb extracts, the knowledge was summarized to identify the metabolites of GQD. Tandem mass spectrometry (MSn), fragment-based scan (NL, PRE), and selected reaction monitoring (SRM) were employed to identify, screen, and monitor the metabolites, respectively. Using this strategy, we detected 131 GQD metabolites (85 were newly generated) in rats biofluids. Among them, 112 metabolites could be detected when GQD was orally administered at a clinical dosage (12.5 g/kg). This strategy could be used for systematic metabolites identification of complex Chinese medicine formulas. PMID:27996040

  17. Genetic counseling and the ethical issues around direct to consumer genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Alice K; Ho, Anita

    2012-06-01

    Over the last several years, direct to consumer(DTC) genetic testing has received increasing attention in the public, healthcare and academic realms. DTC genetic testing companies face considerable criticism and scepticism,particularly from the medical and genetic counseling community. This raises the question of what specific aspects of DTC genetic testing provoke concerns, and conversely,promises, for genetic counselors. This paper addresses this question by exploring DTC genetic testing through an ethic allens. By considering the fundamental ethical approaches influencing genetic counseling (the ethic of care and principle-based ethics) we highlight the specific ethical concerns raised by DTC genetic testing companies. Ultimately,when considering the ethics of DTC testing in a genetic counseling context, we should think of it as a balancing act. We need careful and detailed consideration of the risks and troubling aspects of such testing, as well as the potentially beneficial direct and indirect impacts of the increased availability of DTC genetic testing. As a result it is essential that genetic counselors stay informed and involved in the ongoing debate about DTC genetic testing and DTC companies. Doing so will ensure that the ethical theories and principles fundamental to the profession of genetic counseling are promoted not just in traditional counseling sessions,but also on a broader level. Ultimately this will help ensure that the public enjoys the benefits of an increasingly genetic based healthcare system.

  18. Order Batching in Warehouses by Minimizing Total Tardiness: A Hybrid Approach of Weighted Association Rule Mining and Genetic Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Azadnia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the cost-intensive issues in managing warehouses is the order picking problem which deals with the retrieval of items from their storage locations in order to meet customer requests. Many solution approaches have been proposed in order to minimize traveling distance in the process of order picking. However, in practice, customer orders have to be completed by certain due dates in order to avoid tardiness which is neglected in most of the related scientific papers. Consequently, we proposed a novel solution approach in order to minimize tardiness which consists of four phases. First of all, weighted association rule mining has been used to calculate associations between orders with respect to their due date. Next, a batching model based on binary integer programming has been formulated to maximize the associations between orders within each batch. Subsequently, the order picking phase will come up which used a Genetic Algorithm integrated with the Traveling Salesman Problem in order to identify the most suitable travel path. Finally, the Genetic Algorithm has been applied for sequencing the constructed batches in order to minimize tardiness. Illustrative examples and comparisons are presented to demonstrate the proficiency and solution quality of the proposed approach.

  19. Investigating the role of retinal Müller cells with approaches in genetics and cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Suhua; Zhu, Meili; Ash, John D; Wang, Yunchang; Le, Yun-Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Müller cells are major macroglia and play many essential roles as a supporting cell in the retina. As Müller cells only constitute a small portion of retinal cells, investigating the role of Müller glia in retinal biology and diseases is particularly challenging. To overcome this problem, we first generated a Cre/lox-based conditional gene targeting system that permits the genetic manipulation and functional dissection of gene of interests in Müller cells. To investigate diabetes-induced alteration of Müller cells, we recently adopted methods to analyze Müller cells survival/death in vitro and in vivo. We also used normal and genetically altered primary cell cultures to reveal the mechanistic insights for Müller cells in biological and disease processes. In this article, we will discuss the applications and limitations of these methodologies, which may be useful for research in retinal Müller cell biology and pathophysiology.

  20. Situating cognitive/socio-cognitive approaches to student learning in genetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindfield, Ann C. H.

    2009-03-01

    In this volume, Furberg and Arnseth report on a study of genetics learning from a socio-cultural perspective, focusing on students' meaning making as they engage in collaborative problem solving. Throughout the paper, they criticize research on student understanding and conceptual change conducted from a cognitive/socio-cognitive perspective on several reasonable grounds. However, their characterization of work undertaken from this perspective sometimes borders on caricature, failing to acknowledge the complexities of the research and the contexts within which it has been carried out. In this commentary, I expand their characterization of the cognitive/socio-cognitive perspective in general and situate my own work on genetics learning so as to provide a richer view of the enterprise. From this richer, more situated view, I conclude that research from both perspectives and collaboration between those looking at learning from different perspectives will ultimately provide a more complete picture of science learning.

  1. Entropy and Information Approaches to Genetic Diversity and its Expression: Genomic Geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William B. Sherwin

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights advantages of entropy-based genetic diversity measures, at levels from gene expression to landscapes. Shannon’s entropy-based diversity is the standard for ecological communities. The exponentials of Shannon’s and the related “mutual information” excel in their ability to express diversity intuitively, and provide a generalised method of considering microscopic behaviour to make macroscopic predictions, under given conditions. The hierarchical nature of entropy and information allows integrated modeling of diversity along one DNA sequence, and between different sequences within and among populations, species, etc. The aim is to identify the formal connections between genetic diversity and the flow of information to and from the environment.

  2. An information-gain approach to detecting three-way epistatic interactions in genetic association studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Ting; Chen, Yuanzhu; Kiralis, Jeff W

    2013-01-01

    Background Epistasis has been historically used to describe the phenomenon that the effect of a given gene on a phenotype can be dependent on one or more other genes, and is an essential element for understanding the association between genetic and phenotypic variations. Quantifying epistasis......-way epistasis. Methods Such a measure is based on information gain, and is able to separate all lower order effects from pure three-way epistasis. Results Our method was verified on synthetic data and applied to real data from a candidate-gene study of tuberculosis in a West African population....... In the tuberculosis data, we found a statistically significant pure three-way epistatic interaction effect that was stronger than any lower-order associations. Conclusion Our study provides a methodological basis for detecting and characterizing high-order gene-gene interactions in genetic association studies....

  3. Genetics of PCOS: A systematic bioinformatics approach to unveil the proteins responsible for PCOS

    OpenAIRE

    Panda, Pritam Kumar; Rane, Riya; Ravichandran, Rahul; Singh, Shrinkhla; Panchal, Hetalkumar

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a hormonal imbalance in women, which causes problems during menstrual cycle and in pregnancy that sometimes results in fatality. Though the genetics of PCOS is not fully understood, early diagnosis and treatment can prevent long-term effects. In this study, we have studied the proteins involved in PCOS and the structural aspects of the proteins that are taken into consideration using computational tools. The proteins involved are modeled using Modeller 9v14...

  4. Gene targeting approaches to complex genetic diseases: atherosclerosis and essential hypertension.

    OpenAIRE

    Smithies, O; Maeda, N

    1995-01-01

    Gene targeting allows precise, predetermined changes to be made in a chosen gene in the mouse genome. To date, targeting has been used most often for generation of animals completely lacking the product of a gene of interest. The resulting "knockout" mice have confirmed some hypotheses, have upset others, but have rarely been uninformative. Models of several human genetic diseases have been produced by targeting--including Gaucher disease, cystic fibrosis, and the fragile X syndrome. These di...

  5. The future: genetics advances in MEN1 therapeutic approaches and management strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Sunita K

    2017-10-01

    The identification of the multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 ( MEN1 ) gene in 1997 has shown that germline heterozygous mutations in the MEN1 gene located on chromosome 11q13 predisposes to the development of tumors in the MEN1 syndrome. Tumor development occurs upon loss of the remaining normal copy of the MEN1 gene in MEN1-target tissues. Therefore, MEN1 is a classic tumor suppressor gene in the context of MEN1. This tumor suppressor role of the protein encoded by the MEN1 gene, menin, holds true in mouse models with germline heterozygous Men1 loss, wherein MEN1-associated tumors develop in adult mice after spontaneous loss of the remaining non-targeted copy of the Men1 gene. The availability of genetic testing for mutations in the MEN1 gene has become an essential part of the diagnosis and management of MEN1. Genetic testing is also helping to exclude mutation-negative cases in MEN1 families from the burden of lifelong clinical screening. In the past 20 years, efforts of various groups world-wide have been directed at mutation analysis, molecular genetic studies, mouse models, gene expression studies, epigenetic regulation analysis, biochemical studies and anti-tumor effects of candidate therapies in mouse models. This review will focus on the findings and advances from these studies to identify MEN1 germline and somatic mutations, the genetics of MEN1-related states, several protein partners of menin, the three-dimensional structure of menin and menin-dependent target genes. The ongoing impact of all these studies on disease prediction, management and outcomes will continue in the years to come. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  6. Genetic Algorithm Based PID Controller Tuning Approach for Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    A. Jayachitra; R. Vinodha

    2014-01-01

    Genetic algorithm (GA) based PID (proportional integral derivative) controller has been proposed for tuning optimized PID parameters in a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) process using a weighted combination of objective functions, namely, integral square error (ISE), integral absolute error (IAE), and integrated time absolute error (ITAE). Optimization of PID controller parameters is the key goal in chemical and biochemical industries. PID controllers have narrowed down the operating r...

  7. A Novel Approach to Managing Invasive Termite Species Using Genetically Engineered Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    Coptotcnnes fonnosanus; lytic peptide; defaunation; tennite gut bacteria ; yeast 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF 18. NUMBER 19a. NAME OF...genetically modified bacteria in a termite colony ; no detrimental gene products were expressed for termite control. Preliminary data suggested that lytic...defaunated within 4 weeks. The yeast -based prototype paratransgenesis system provided proof of concept that a symbiotic microorganism can act as a “Trojan

  8. A Massively Parallel Sequencing Approach Uncovers Ancient Origins and High Genetic Variability of Endangered Przewalski's Horses

    OpenAIRE

    Goto, Hiroki; Ryder, Oliver A.; Fisher, Allison R.; Schultz, Bryant; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L.; Nekrutenko, Anton; Makova, Kateryna D.

    2011-01-01

    The endangered Przewalski's horse is the closest relative of the domestic horse and is the only true wild horse species surviving today. The question of whether Przewalski's horse is the direct progenitor of domestic horse has been hotly debated. Studies of DNA diversity within Przewalski's horses have been sparse but are urgently needed to ensure their successful reintroduction to the wild. In an attempt to resolve the controversy surrounding the phylogenetic position and genetic diversity o...

  9. A symmetry model for genetic coding via a wallpaper group composed of the traditional four bases and an imaginary base E: towards category theory-like systematization of molecular/genetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawamura, Jitsuki; Morishita, Shigeru; Ishigooka, Jun

    2014-05-07

    Previously, we suggested prototypal models that describe some clinical states based on group postulates. Here, we demonstrate a group/category theory-like model for molecular/genetic biology as an alternative application of our previous model. Specifically, we focus on deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) base sequences. We construct a wallpaper pattern based on a five-letter cruciform motif with letters C, A, T, G, and E. Whereas the first four letters represent the standard DNA bases, the fifth is introduced for ease in formulating group operations that reproduce insertions and deletions of DNA base sequences. A basic group Z5 = {r, u, d, l, n} of operations is defined for the wallpaper pattern, with which a sequence of points can be generated corresponding to changes of a base in a DNA sequence by following the orbit of a point of the pattern under operations in group Z5. Other manipulations of DNA sequence can be treated using a vector-like notation 'Dj' corresponding to a DNA sequence but based on the five-letter base set; also, 'Dj's are expressed graphically. Insertions and deletions of a series of letters 'E' are admitted to assist in describing DNA recombination. Likewise, a vector-like notation Rj can be constructed for sequences of ribonucleic acid (RNA). The wallpaper group B = {Z5×∞, ●} (an ∞-fold Cartesian product of Z5) acts on Dj (or Rj) yielding changes to Dj (or Rj) denoted by 'Dj◦B(j→k) = Dk' (or 'Rj◦B(j→k) = Rk'). Based on the operations of this group, two types of groups-a modulo 5 linear group and a rotational group over the Gaussian plane, acting on the five bases-are linked as parts of the wallpaper group for broader applications. As a result, changes, insertions/deletions and DNA (RNA) recombination (partial/total conversion) are described. As an exploratory study, a notation for the canonical "central dogma" via a category theory-like way is presented for future developments. Despite the large incompleteness of our

  10. Genetic counseling follow-up - a retrospective study with a quantitative approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Pina-Neto João M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of genetic counseling (GC was evaluated in families, who were interviewed at least two and half years and at most seven years after GC at the Genetics Service of the University Hospital, Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo (HC, FMRP, USP. The 113 families interviewed in this study were asked 48 questions and all children born after GC were studied clinically. We evaluated the families for spontaneous motivation for GC and understanding of GC information, their reproductive decisions, changes in the family after GC and the health status of new children. The majority of families seen at the Hospital das Clínicas de Ribeirão Preto were not spontaneously motivated to undergo GC. They had a low level of understanding about the information they received during GC. Generally families were using contraceptive methods (even when at low genetic risk with a consequent low rate of pregnancies and children born after GC. These families also had a very low rate of child adoption and divorces when compared to other studies.

  11. A new approach to self-organizing fuzzy polynomial neural networks guided by genetic optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Sung-Kwun; Pedrycz, Witold

    2005-01-01

    In this study, we introduce a new topology of Fuzzy Polynomial Neural Networks (FPNN) that is based on a genetically optimized multilayer perceptron with fuzzy polynomial neurons (FPNs) and discuss its comprehensive design methodology. The underlying methodology involves mechanisms of genetic optimization, especially genetic algorithms (GAs). Let us recall that the design of the 'conventional' FPNNs uses an extended Group Method of Data Handling (GMDH) and exploits a fixed fuzzy inference type located at each FPN of the FPNN as well as considers a fixed number of input nodes at FPNs (or nodes) located in each layer. The proposed FPNN gives rise to a structurally optimized structure and comes with a substantial level of flexibility in comparison to the one we encounter in conventional FPNNs. The structural optimization is realized via GAs whereas in the case of the parametric optimization we proceed with a standard least square method based learning. Through the consecutive process of such structural and parametric optimization, an optimized and flexible fuzzy neural network is generated in a dynamic fashion. The performance of the proposed gFPNN is quantified through experimentation that exploits standard data already being used in fuzzy modeling. The results reveal superiority of the proposed networks over the existing fuzzy and neural models

  12. Forensic Science in Support of Wildlife Conservation Efforts - Genetic Approaches (Global Trends).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linacre, A

    2011-01-01

    Wildlife forensic science is a relatively recent development to meet the increasing need of the criminal justice system where there are investigations in alleged transgressions of either international or national legislation. This application of science draws on conservation genetics and forensic geneticists from mainstream forensic science. This review is a broad overview of the history of forensic wildlife science and some of the recent developments in forensic wildlife genetics with the application of DNA developments to nonhuman samples encountered in a forensic science investigation. The review will move from methods to look at the entire genome, when there is no previous knowledge of the species studied, through methods of species identification, using DNA to determine a possible geographic origin, through to assigning samples to a particular individual or a close genetic relative of this individual. The transfer of research methods into the criminal justice system for the investigation of wildlife crimes has been largely successful as is illustrated in the review. The review concludes with comments on the need for standardization and regulation in wildlife forensic science. Copyright © 2011 Central Police University.

  13. Chaotic logic gate: A new approach in set and design by genetic algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyki, Mahmood; Yaghoobi, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    How to reconfigure a logic gate is an attractive subject for different applications. Chaotic systems can yield a wide variety of patterns and here we use this feature to produce a logic gate. This feature forms the basis for designing a dynamical computing device that can be rapidly reconfigured to become any wanted logical operator. This logic gate that can reconfigure to any logical operator when placed in its chaotic state is called chaotic logic gate. The reconfiguration realize by setting the parameter values of chaotic logic gate. In this paper we present mechanisms about how to produce a logic gate based on the logistic map in its chaotic state and genetic algorithm is used to set the parameter values. We use three well-known selection methods used in genetic algorithm: tournament selection, Roulette wheel selection and random selection. The results show the tournament selection method is the best method for set the parameter values. Further, genetic algorithm is a powerful tool to set the parameter values of chaotic logic gate

  14. Buffering mechanisms in aging: a systems approach toward uncovering the genetic component of aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aviv Bergman

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available An unrealized potential to understand the genetic basis of aging in humans, is to consider the immense survival advantage of the rare individuals who live 100 years or more. The Longevity Gene Study was initiated in 1998 at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine to investigate longevity genes in a selected population: the "oldest old" Ashkenazi Jews, 95 years of age and older, and their children. The study proved the principle that some of these subjects are endowed with longevity-promoting genotypes. Here we reason that some of the favorable genotypes act as mechanisms that buffer the deleterious effect of age-related disease genes. As a result, the frequency of deleterious genotypes may increase among individuals with extreme lifespan because their protective genotype allows disease-related genes to accumulate. Thus, studies of genotypic frequencies among different age groups can elucidate the genetic determinants and pathways responsible for longevity. Borrowing from evolutionary theory, we present arguments regarding the differential survival via buffering mechanisms and their target age-related disease genes in searching for aging and longevity genes. Using more than 1,200 subjects between the sixth and eleventh decades of life (at least 140 subjects in each group, we corroborate our hypotheses experimentally. We study 66 common allelic site polymorphism in 36 candidate genes on the basis of their phenotype. Among them we have identified a candidate-buffering mechanism and its candidate age-related disease gene target. Previously, the beneficial effect of an advantageous cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP-VV genotype on lipoprotein particle size in association with decreased metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, as well as with better cognitive function, have been demonstrated. We report an additional advantageous effect of the CETP-VV (favorable genotype in neutralizing the deleterious effects of the lipoprotein(a (LPA gene

  15. A Bayesian phylogenetic approach to estimating the stability of linguistic features and the genetic biasing of tone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dediu, Dan

    2011-02-07

    Language is a hallmark of our species and understanding linguistic diversity is an area of major interest. Genetic factors influencing the cultural transmission of language provide a powerful and elegant explanation for aspects of the present day linguistic diversity and a window into the emergence and evolution of language. In particular, it has recently been proposed that linguistic tone-the usage of voice pitch to convey lexical and grammatical meaning-is biased by two genes involved in brain growth and development, ASPM and Microcephalin. This hypothesis predicts that tone is a stable characteristic of language because of its 'genetic anchoring'. The present paper tests this prediction using a Bayesian phylogenetic framework applied to a large set of linguistic features and language families, using multiple software implementations, data codings, stability estimations, linguistic classifications and outgroup choices. The results of these different methods and datasets show a large agreement, suggesting that this approach produces reliable estimates of the stability of linguistic data. Moreover, linguistic tone is found to be stable across methods and datasets, providing suggestive support for the hypothesis of genetic influences on its distribution.

  16. Identification of novel genetic loci for osteoporosis and/or rheumatoid arthritis using cFDR approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rou Zhou

    Full Text Available There are co-morbidity between osteoporosis (OP and rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Some genetic risk factors have been identified for these two phenotypes respectively in previous research; however, they accounted for only a small portion of the underlying total genetic variances. Here, we sought to identify additional common genetic loci associated with OP and/or RA. The conditional false discovery rate (cFDR approach allows detection of additional genetic factors (those respective ones as well as common pleiotropic ones for the two associated phenotypes. We collected and analyzed summary statistics provided by large, multi-center GWAS studies of FNK (femoral neck BMD (a major risk factor for osteoporosis (n = 53,236 and RA (n = 80,799. The conditional quantile-quantile (Q-Q plots can assess the enrichment of SNPs related to FNK BMD and RA, respectively. Furthermore, we identified shared loci between FNK BMD and RA using conjunction cFDR (ccFDR. We found strong enrichment of p-values in FNK BMD when conditional Q-Q was done on RA and vice versa. We identified 30 novel OP-RA associated pleiotropic loci that have not been reported in previous OP or RA GWAS, 18 of which located in the MHC (major histocompatibility complex region previously reported to play an important role in immune system and bone health. We identified some specific novel polygenic factors for OP and RA respectively, and identified 30 novel OP-RA associated pleiotropic loci. These discovery findings may offer novel pathobiological insights, and suggest new targets and pathways for drug development in OP and RA patients.

  17. Connecting Palau's marine protected areas: a population genetic approach to conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cros, Annick; Toonen, Robert J.; Donahue, Megan J.; Karl, Stephen A.

    2017-09-01

    Bleaching events are becoming more frequent and are projected to become annual in Micronesia by 2040. To prepare for this threat, the Government of Palau is reviewing its marine protected area network to increase the resilience of the reefs by integrating connectivity into the network design. To support their effort, we used high-throughput sequencing of microsatellites to create genotypes of colonies of the coral Acropora hyacinthus to characterize population genetic structure and dispersal patterns that led to the recovery of Palau's reefs from a 1998 bleaching event. We found no evidence of a founder effect or refugium where colonies may have survived to recolonize the reef. Instead, we found significant pairwise F' st values, indicating population structure and low connectivity among most of the 25 sites around Palau. We used kinship to measure genetic differences at the individual level among sites and found that differences were best explained by the degree of exposure to the ocean [ F 1,20 = 3.015, Pr(> F) = 0.01], but with little of the total variation explained. A permutation test of the pairwise kinship coefficients revealed that there was self-seeding within sites. Overall, the data point to the population of A. hyacinthus in Palau recovering from a handful of surviving colonies with population growth primarily from self-seeding and little exchange among sites. This finding has significant implications for the management strategies for the reefs of Palau, and we recommend increasing the number and distribution of management areas around Palau to capture the genetic architecture and increase the chances of protecting potential refuges in the future.

  18. Student performance and their perception of a patient-oriented problem-solving approach with audiovisual aids in teaching pathology: a comparison with traditional lectures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjun Singh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Arjun SinghDepartment of Pathology, Sri Venkateshwara Medical College Hospital and Research Centre, Pondicherry, IndiaPurpose: We use different methods to train our undergraduates. The patient-oriented problem-solving (POPS system is an innovative teaching–learning method that imparts knowledge, enhances intrinsic motivation, promotes self learning, encourages clinical reasoning, and develops long-lasting memory. The aim of this study was to develop POPS in teaching pathology, assess its effectiveness, and assess students’ preference for POPS over didactic lectures.Method: One hundred fifty second-year MBBS students were divided into two groups: A and B. Group A was taught by POPS while group B was taught by traditional lectures. Pre- and post-test numerical scores of both groups were evaluated and compared. Students then completed a self-structured feedback questionnaire for analysis.Results: The mean (SD difference in pre- and post-test scores of groups A and B was 15.98 (3.18 and 7.79 (2.52, respectively. The significance of the difference between scores of group A and group B teaching methods was 16.62 (P < 0.0001, as determined by the z-test. Improvement in post-test performance of group A was significantly greater than of group B, demonstrating the effectiveness of POPS. Students responded that POPS facilitates self-learning, helps in understanding topics, creates interest, and is a scientific approach to teaching. Feedback response on POPS was strong in 57.52% of students, moderate in 35.67%, and negative in only 6.81%, showing that 93.19% students favored POPS over simple lectures.Conclusion: It is not feasible to enforce the PBL method of teaching throughout the entire curriculum; However, POPS can be incorporated along with audiovisual aids to break the monotony of dialectic lectures and as alternative to PBL.Keywords: medical education, problem-solving exercise, problem-based learning

  19. Student performance and their perception of a patient-oriented problem-solving approach with audiovisual aids in teaching pathology: a comparison with traditional lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arjun

    2011-01-01

    We use different methods to train our undergraduates. The patient-oriented problem-solving (POPS) system is an innovative teaching-learning method that imparts knowledge, enhances intrinsic motivation, promotes self learning, encourages clinical reasoning, and develops long-lasting memory. The aim of this study was to develop POPS in teaching pathology, assess its effectiveness, and assess students' preference for POPS over didactic lectures. One hundred fifty second-year MBBS students were divided into two groups: A and B. Group A was taught by POPS while group B was taught by traditional lectures. Pre- and posttest numerical scores of both groups were evaluated and compared. Students then completed a self-structured feedback questionnaire for analysis. The mean (SD) difference in pre- and post-test scores of groups A and B was 15.98 (3.18) and 7.79 (2.52), respectively. The significance of the difference between scores of group A and group B teaching methods was 16.62 (P effectiveness of POPS. Students responded that POPS facilitates self-learning, helps in understanding topics, creates interest, and is a scientific approach to teaching. Feedback response on POPS was strong in 57.52% of students, moderate in 35.67%, and negative in only 6.81%, showing that 93.19% students favored POPS over simple lectures. It is not feasible to enforce the PBL method of teaching throughout the entire curriculum; However, POPS can be incorporated along with audiovisual aids to break the monotony of dialectic lectures and as alternative to PBL.

  20. Quantitative Seq-LGS: Genome-Wide Identification of Genetic Drivers of Multiple Phenotypes in Malaria Parasites

    KAUST Repository

    Abkallo, Hussein M.; Martinelli, Axel; Inoue, Megumi; Ramaprasad, Abhinay; Xangsayarath, Phonepadith; Gitaka, Jesse; Tang, Jianxia; Yahata, Kazuhide; Zoungrana, Augustin; Mitaka, Hayato; Hunt, Paul; Carter, Richard; Kaneko, Osamu; Mustonen, Ville; Illingworth, Christopher J.R.; Pain, Arnab; Culleton, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the genetic determinants of phenotypes that impact on disease severity is of fundamental importance for the design of new interventions against malaria. Traditionally, such discovery has relied on labor-intensive approaches that require

  1. A non-genetic approach to labelling acute myeloid leukemia and bone marrow cells with quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yanwen; Tan, Dongming; Chen, Zheng; Hu, Chenxi; Mao, Zhengwei J; Singleton, Timothy P; Zeng, Yan; Shao, Xuejun; Yin, Bin

    2014-06-01

    The difficulty in manipulation of leukemia cells has long hindered the dissection of leukemia pathogenesis. We have introduced a non-genetic approach of marking blood cells, using quantum dots. We compared quantum dots complexed with different vehicles, including a peptide Tat, cationic polymer Turbofect and liposome. Quantum dots-Tat showed the highest efficiency of marking hematopoietic cells among the three vehicles. Quantum dots-Tat could also label a panel of leukemia cell lines at varied efficiencies. More uniform intracellular distributions of quantum dots in mouse bone marrow and leukemia cells were obtained with quantum dots-Tat, compared with the granule-like formation obtained with quantum dots-liposome. Our results suggest that quantum dots have provided a photostable and non-genetic approach that labels normal and malignant hematopoietic cells, in a cell type-, vehicle-, and quantum dot concentration-dependent manner. We expect for potential applications of quantum dots as an easy and fast marking tool assisting investigations of various types of blood cells in the future.

  2. Diabetes Mellitus in Neonates and Infants: Genetic Heterogeneity, Clinical Approach to Diagnosis, and Therapeutic Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Cabezas, Oscar; Ellard, Sian

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, we have witnessed major advances in the understanding of the molecular basis of neonatal and infancy-onset diabetes. It is now widely accepted that diabetes presenting before 6 months of age is unlikely to be autoimmune type 1 diabetes. The vast majority of such patients will have a monogenic disorder responsible for the disease and, in some of them, also for a number of other associated extrapancreatic clinical features. Reaching a molecular diagnosis will have immediate clinical consequences for about half of affected patients, as identification of a mutation in either of the two genes encoding the ATP-sensitive potassium channel allows switching from insulin injections to oral sulphonylureas. It also facilitates genetic counselling within the affected families and predicts clinical prognosis. Importantly, monogenic diabetes seems not to be limited to the first 6 months but extends to some extent into the second half of the first year of life, when type 1 diabetes is the more common cause of diabetes. From a scientific perspective, the identification of novel genetic aetiologies has provided important new knowledge regarding the development and function of the human pancreas. PMID:24051999

  3. Wavelet-linear genetic programming: A new approach for modeling monthly streamflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravansalar, Masoud; Rajaee, Taher; Kisi, Ozgur

    2017-06-01

    The streamflows are important and effective factors in stream ecosystems and its accurate prediction is an essential and important issue in water resources and environmental engineering systems. A hybrid wavelet-linear genetic programming (WLGP) model, which includes a discrete wavelet transform (DWT) and a linear genetic programming (LGP) to predict the monthly streamflow (Q) in two gauging stations, Pataveh and Shahmokhtar, on the Beshar River at the Yasuj, Iran were used in this study. In the proposed WLGP model, the wavelet analysis was linked to the LGP model where the original time series of streamflow were decomposed into the sub-time series comprising wavelet coefficients. The results were compared with the single LGP, artificial neural network (ANN), a hybrid wavelet-ANN (WANN) and Multi Linear Regression (MLR) models. The comparisons were done by some of the commonly utilized relevant physical statistics. The Nash coefficients (E) were found as 0.877 and 0.817 for the WLGP model, for the Pataveh and Shahmokhtar stations, respectively. The comparison of the results showed that the WLGP model could significantly increase the streamflow prediction accuracy in both stations. Since, the results demonstrate a closer approximation of the peak streamflow values by the WLGP model, this model could be utilized for the simulation of cumulative streamflow data prediction in one month ahead.

  4. Patient Electronic Health Records as a Means to Approach Genetic Research in Gastroenterology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthakrishnan, Ashwin N; Lieberman, David

    2015-10-01

    Electronic health records (EHRs) are being increasingly utilized and form a unique source of extensive data gathered during routine clinical care. Through use of codified and free text concepts identified using clinical informatics tools, disease labels can be assigned with a high degree of accuracy. Analysis linking such EHR-assigned disease labels to a biospecimen repository has demonstrated that genetic associations identified in prospective cohorts can be replicated with adequate statistical power and novel phenotypic associations identified. In addition, genetic discovery research can be performed utilizing clinical, laboratory, and procedure data obtained during care. Challenges with such research include the need to tackle variability in quality and quantity of EHR data and importance of maintaining patient privacy and data security. With appropriate safeguards, this novel and emerging field of research offers considerable promise and potential to further scientific research in gastroenterology efficiently, cost-effectively, and with engagement of patients and communities. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Epigenome-wide association study of DNA methylation in narcolepsy: an integrated genetic and epigenetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Mihoko; Miyagawa, Taku; Toyoda, Hiromi; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Honda, Makoto

    2018-04-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy, which is a hypersomnia characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy, is a multifactorial disease caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Several genetic factors including HLA-DQB1*06:02 have been identified; however, the disease etiology is still unclear. Epigenetic modifications, such as DNA methylation, have been suggested to play an important role in the pathogenesis of complex diseases. Here, we examined DNA methylation profiles of blood samples from narcolepsy and healthy control individuals and performed an epigenome-wide association study (EWAS) to investigate methylation loci associated with narcolepsy. Moreover, data from the EWAS and a previously performed narcolepsy genome-wide association study were integrated to search for methylation loci with causal links to the disease. We found that (1) genes annotated to the top-ranked differentially methylated positions (DMPs) in narcolepsy were associated with pathways of hormone secretion and monocarboxylic acid metabolism. (2) Top-ranked narcolepsy-associated DMPs were significantly more abundant in non-CpG island regions and more than 95 per cent of such sites were hypomethylated in narcolepsy patients. (3) The integrative analysis identified the CCR3 region where both a single methylation site and multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms were found to be associated with the disease as a candidate region responsible for narcolepsy. The findings of this study suggest the importance of future replication studies, using methylation technologies with wider genome coverage and/or larger number of samples, to confirm and expand on these results.

  6. Hereditary arrhythmias and cardiomyopathies: decision-making about genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Clauden; Calamaro, Emily; Vinocur, Jeffrey M

    2018-01-01

    The modern field of clinical genetics has advanced beyond the traditional teachings familiar to most practicing cardiologists. Increased understanding of the roles of genetic testing may improve uptake and appropriateness of use. Clinical genetics has become integral to the management of patients with hereditary arrhythmia and cardiomyopathy diagnoses. Depending on the condition, genetic testing may be useful for diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, family screening, and reproductive planning. However, genetic testing is a powerful tool with potential for underuse, overuse, and misuse. In the absence of a substantial body of literature on how these guidelines are applied in clinical practice, we use a case-based approach to highlight key lessons and pitfalls. Importantly, in many scenarios genetic testing has become the standard of care supported by numerous class I recommendations; genetic counselors can improve accessibility to and appropriate use and application of testing. Optimal management of hereditary arrhythmias and cardiomyopathies incorporates genetic testing, applied as per consensus guidelines, with involvement of a multidisciplinary team.

  7. Cryptic Genetic Variation in Evolutionary Developmental Genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalise B. Paaby

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary developmental genetics has traditionally been conducted by two groups: Molecular evolutionists who emphasize divergence between species or higher taxa, and quantitative geneticists who study variation within species. Neither approach really comes to grips with the complexities of evolutionary transitions, particularly in light of the realization from genome-wide association studies that most complex traits fit an infinitesimal architecture, being influenced by thousands of loci. This paper discusses robustness, plasticity and lability, phenomena that we argue potentiate major evolutionary changes and provide a bridge between the conceptual treatments of macro- and micro-evolution. We offer cryptic genetic variation and conditional neutrality as mechanisms by which standing genetic variation can lead to developmental system drift and, sheltered within canalized processes, may facilitate developmental transitions and the evolution of novelty. Synthesis of the two dominant perspectives will require recognition that adaptation, divergence, drift and stability all depend on similar underlying quantitative genetic processes—processes that cannot be fully observed in continuously varying visible traits.

  8. European rational approach for the genetics of diabetic complications--EURAGEDIC: patient populations and strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarnow, L.; Groop, P.H.; Hadjadj, S.

    2008-01-01

    in 541 independent parent-offspring trios with or without diabetic nephropathy was applied for validation of consistency. Candidate genes were selected based on previous linkage studies, knowledge of metabolic pathways, and animal models. A comprehensive SNP discovery in more than 100 candidate genes......BACKGROUND: Diabetic nephropathy is likely to be a complex genetic trait. To date, most diabetic nephropathy candidate gene studies have tested a limited number of genes and variants in small sized populations, or in populations that were poorly matched or phenotyped. The main objective...... of the EURAGEDIC study was to address these problems. METHODS: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in candidate genes were tested for association with overt diabetic nephropathy (persistent albuminuria >300 mg/24 h) in a large (n=2499) Type 1 diabetes case/control study. Testing for transmission disequilibrium...

  9. Genetic Markers Analyses and Bioinformatic Approaches to Distinguish Between Olive Tree (Olea europaea L.) Cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Ayed, Rayda; Ben Hassen, Hanen; Ennouri, Karim; Rebai, Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    The genetic diversity of 22 olive tree cultivars (Olea europaea L.) sampled from different Mediterranean countries was assessed using 5 SNP markers (FAD2.1; FAD2.3; CALC; SOD and ANTHO3) located in four different genes. The genotyping analysis of the 22 cultivars with 5 SNP loci revealed 11 alleles (average 2.2 per allele). The dendrogram based on cultivar genotypes revealed three clusters consistent with the cultivars classification. Besides, the results obtained with the five SNPs were compared to those obtained with the SSR markers using bioinformatic analyses and by computing a cophenetic correlation coefficient, indicating the usefulness of the UPGMA method for clustering plant genotypes. Based on principal coordinate analysis using a similarity matrix, the first two coordinates, revealed 54.94 % of the total variance. This work provides a more comprehensive explanation of the diversity available in Tunisia olive cultivars, and an important contribution for olive breeding and olive oil authenticity.

  10. Residential-commercial energy input estimation based on genetic algorithm (GA) approaches: an application of Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozturk, H.K.; Canyurt, O.E.; Hepbasli, A.; Utlu, Z.

    2004-01-01

    The main objective of the present study is to develop the energy input estimation equations for the residential-commercial sector (RCS) in order to estimate the future projections based on genetic algorithm (GA) notion and to examine the effect of the design parameters on the energy input of the sector. For this purpose, the Turkish RCS is given as an example. The GA Energy Input Estimation Model (GAEIEM) is used to estimate Turkey's future residential-commercial energy input demand based on gross domestic product (GDP), population, import, export, house production, cement production and basic house appliances consumption figures. It may be concluded that the three various forms of models proposed here can be used as an alternative solution and estimation techniques to available estimation techniques. It is also expected that this study will be helpful in developing highly applicable and productive planning for energy policies. (author)

  11. The role of crossover operator in evolutionary-based approach to the problem of genetic code optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Błażej, Paweł; Wnȩtrzak, Małgorzata; Mackiewicz, Paweł

    2016-12-01

    One of theories explaining the present structure of canonical genetic code assumes that it was optimized to minimize harmful effects of amino acid replacements resulting from nucleotide substitutions and translational errors. A way to testify this concept is to find the optimal code under given criteria and compare it with the canonical genetic code. Unfortunately, the huge number of possible alternatives makes it impossible to find the optimal code using exhaustive methods in sensible time. Therefore, heuristic methods should be applied to search the space of possible solutions. Evolutionary algorithms (EA) seem to be ones of such promising approaches. This class of methods is founded both on mutation and crossover operators, which are responsible for creating and maintaining the diversity of candidate solutions. These operators possess dissimilar characteristics and consequently play different roles in the process of finding the best solutions under given criteria. Therefore, the effective searching for the potential solutions can be improved by applying both of them, especially when these operators are devised specifically for a given problem. To study this subject, we analyze the effectiveness of algorithms for various combinations of mutation and crossover probabilities under three models of the genetic code assuming different restrictions on its structure. To achieve that, we adapt the position based crossover operator for the most restricted model and develop a new type of crossover operator for the more general models. The applied fitness function describes costs of amino acid replacement regarding their polarity. Our results indicate that the usage of crossover operators can significantly improve the quality of the solutions. Moreover, the simulations with the crossover operator optimize the fitness function in the smaller number of generations than simulations without this operator. The optimal genetic codes without restrictions on their structure

  12. Molecular genetic approach for screening of hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metka Ravnik-Glavač

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The main goal of knowledge concerning human diseases is to transfer as much as possible useful information into clinical applications. Hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC is the most common autosomal dominant inherited predisposition for colorectal cancer, accounting for 1–2% of all bowel cancer. The only way to diagnose HNPCC is by a family history consistent with the disease defined by International Collaborative Group on HNPCC (Amsterdam criteria I and II. The main molecular cause of HNPCC is a constitutional mutation in one of the mismatch repair (MMR genes. Since HNPCC mutations have been detected also in families that did not fulfil the Amsterdam criteria, molecular genetic characteristics of HNPCC cancers have been proposed as valuable first step in HNPCC identification. Microsatellite instability is present in about 90% of cancers of HNPCC patients. However, of all MSI colorectal cancers 80– 90% are sporadic. Several molecular mechanisms have been uncovered that enable distinguishing to some extent between sporadic and HNPCC cancers with MSI including hypermethylation of hMLH1 promoter and frequent mutations in BAX and TGFBR2 in sporadic CRC with MSI-H.Conclusions: The determination of MSI status and careful separation of MSI positive colorectal cancer into sporadic MSIL, sporadic MSI-H, and HNPCC MSI-H followed by mutation detection in MMR genes is important for prevention, screening and management of colorectal cancer. In some studies we and others have already shown that large-scale molecular genetic analysis for HNPCC can be done and is sensitive enough to approve population screening. Population screening includes also colonoscopy which is restricted only to the obligate carriers of the mutation. This enables that the disease is detected in earlier stages which would greatly decrease medical treatment costs and most importantly decrease mortality. In Slovenia we have started population screening based

  13. A haplotype regression approach for genetic evaluation using sequences from the 1000 bull genomes Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakhssassi, K.; González-Recio, O.

    2017-01-01

    Haplotypes from sequencing data may improve the prediction accuracy in genomic evaluations as haplotypes are in stronger linkage disequilibrium with quantitative trait loci than markers from SNP chips. This study focuses first, on the creation of haplotypes in a population sample of 450 Holstein animals, with full-sequence data from the 1000 bull genomes project; and second, on incorporating them into the whole genome prediction model. In total, 38,319,258 SNPs (and indels) from Next Generation Sequencing were included in the analysis. After filtering variants with minor allele frequency (MAF< 0.025) 13,912,326 SNPs were available for the haplotypes extraction with findhap.f90. The number of SNPs in the haploblocks was on average 924 SNP (166,552 bp). Unique haplotypes were around 97% in all chromosomes and were ignored leaving 153,428 haplotypes. Estimated haplotypes had a large contribution to the total variance of genomic estimated breeding values for kilogram of protein, Global Type Index, Somatic Cell Score and Days Open (between 32 and 99.9%). Haploblocks containing haplotypes with large effects were selected by filtering for each trait, haplotypes whose effect was larger/lower than the mean plus/minus 3 times the standard deviation (SD) and 1 SD above the mean of the haplotypes effect distribution. Results showed that filtering by 3 SD would not be enough to capture a large proportion of genetic variance, whereas filtering by 1 SD could be useful but model convergence should be considered. Additionally, sequence haplotypes were able to capture additional genetic variance to the polygenic effect for traits undergoing lower selection intensity like fertility and health traits.

  14. A molecular genetic approach to roebuck individual identification in the case of poaching in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Application of the molecular genetic methods in forensic cases dealing with wild animals has significantly increased recently. These techniques are practically used in order to help solving four key problems : determination of kind of the wild animal, geographic origin, kinship ties and individual identification. In this work the first case of introducing the examination of polimorphism of microsatelite genetic markers within forensic analysis in the cases of poaching in Serbia is presented. The objectives of this forensic analysis was to determine if the meat confiscated during house search of the suspect comes from roebuck origin (Capreolus capreolus, which remains had been found by a game warden in the field during closed season, where the suspect denied the offense, claiming that the meat comes from other roebuck that had been shot during the previous hunting season. DNK was isolated from the skin and fur samples taken from the roebuck corpse found in the woods, as well as from the frozen meat found in the suspect’s house. Both amplification and polimorphism examination of the eight microsatelite markers (ROE01, NVHRT21, NVHRT24, NVHRT48, NVHRT73, RT7 AND RT27 were carried out. In all the examined samples, the same pattern of variability of the tested microsatelites was determined, that is it was proved that DNK profiles of the samples taken from roebuck corpse were identical to DNK profile of the meat sample found in the suspect’s house. This result clearly indicates that all the examined biological samples originate from the same animal, and consequently represents forensically valid evidence in the case of roebuck poaching. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III46002

  15. A novel approach for the detection and genetic analysis of live melanoma circulating tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melody J Xu

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cell (CTC detection and genetic analysis may complement currently available disease assessments in patients with melanoma to improve risk stratification and monitoring. We therefore sought to establish the feasibility of a telomerase-based assay for detecting and isolating live melanoma CTCs.The telomerase-based CTC assay utilizes an adenoviral vector that, in the presence of elevated human telomerase activity, drives the amplification of green fluorescent protein. Tumor cells are then identified via an image processing system. The protocol was tested on melanoma cells in culture or spiked into control blood, and on samples from patients with metastatic melanoma. Genetic analysis of the isolated melanoma CTCs was then performed for BRAF mutation status.The adenoviral vector was effective for all melanoma cell lines tested with sensitivity of 88.7% (95%CI 85.6-90.4% and specificity of 99.9% (95%CI 99.8-99.9%. In a pilot trial of patients with metastatic disease, CTCs were identified in 9 of 10 patients, with a mean of 6.0 CTCs/mL. At a cutoff of 1.1 CTCs/mL, the telomerase-based assay exhibits test performance of 90.0% sensitivity and 91.7% specificity. BRAF mutation analysis of melanoma cells isolated from culture or spiked control blood, or from pilot patient samples was found to match the known BRAF mutation status of the cell lines and primary tumors.To our knowledge, this is the first report of a telomerase-based assay effective for detecting and isolating live melanoma CTCs. These promising findings support further studies, including towards integrating into the management of patients with melanoma receiving multimodality therapy.

  16. University Students’ Reflections on Representations in Genetics and Stereochemistry Revealed by a Focus Group Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inger Edfors

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Genetics and organic chemistry are areas of science that students regard as difficult to learn. Part of this difficulty is derived from the disciplines having representations as part of their discourses. In order to optimally support students’ meaning-making, teachers need to use representations to structure the meaning-making experience in thoughtful ways that consider the variation in students’ prior knowledge. Using a focus group setting, we explored 43 university students’ reasoning on representations in introductory chemistry and genetics courses. Our analysis of eight focus group discussions revealed how students can construct somewhat bewildered relations with disciplinary-specific representations. The students stated that they preferred familiar representations, but without asserting the meaning-making affordances of those representations. Also, the students were highly aware of the affordances of certain representations, but nonetheless chose not to use those representations in their problem solving. We suggest that an effective representation is one that, to some degree, is familiar to the students, but at the same time is challenging and not too closely related to “the usual one”. The focus group discussions led the students to become more aware of their own and others ways of interpreting different representations. Furthermore, feedback from the students’ focus group discussions enhanced the teachers’ awareness of the students’ prior knowledge and limitations in students’ representational literacy. Consequently, we posit that a focus group setting can be used in a university context to promote both student meaning-making and teacher professional development in a fruitful way.

  17. A haplotype regression approach for genetic evaluation using sequences from the 1000 bull genomes Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakhssassi, K.; González-Recio, O.

    2017-07-01

    Haplotypes from sequencing data may improve the prediction accuracy in genomic evaluations as haplotypes are in stronger linkage disequilibrium with quantitative trait loci than markers from SNP chips. This study focuses first, on the creation of haplotypes in a population sample of 450 Holstein animals, with full-sequence data from the 1000 bull genomes project; and second, on incorporating them into the whole genome prediction model. In total, 38,319,258 SNPs (and indels) from Next Generation Sequencing were included in the analysis. After filtering variants with minor allele frequency (MAF< 0.025) 13,912,326 SNPs were available for the haplotypes extraction with findhap.f90. The number of SNPs in the haploblocks was on average 924 SNP (166,552 bp). Unique haplotypes were around 97% in all chromosomes and were ignored leaving 153,428 haplotypes. Estimated haplotypes had a large contribution to the total variance of genomic estimated breeding values for kilogram of protein, Global Type Index, Somatic Cell Score and Days Open (between 32 and 99.9%). Haploblocks containing haplotypes with large effects were selected by filtering for each trait, haplotypes whose effect was larger/lower than the mean plus/minus 3 times the standard deviation (SD) and 1 SD above the mean of the haplotypes effect distribution. Results showed that filtering by 3 SD would not be enough to capture a large proportion of genetic variance, whereas filtering by 1 SD could be useful but model convergence should be considered. Additionally, sequence haplotypes were able to capture additional genetic variance to the polygenic effect for traits undergoing lower selection intensity like fertility and health traits.

  18. A massively parallel sequencing approach uncovers ancient origins and high genetic variability of endangered Przewalski's horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Hiroki; Ryder, Oliver A; Fisher, Allison R; Schultz, Bryant; Kosakovsky Pond, Sergei L; Nekrutenko, Anton; Makova, Kateryna D

    2011-01-01

    The endangered Przewalski's horse is the closest relative of the domestic horse and is the only true wild horse species surviving today. The question of whether Przewalski's horse is the direct progenitor of domestic horse has been hotly debated. Studies of DNA diversity within Przewalski's horses have been sparse but are urgently needed to ensure their successful reintroduction to the wild. In an attempt to resolve the controversy surrounding the phylogenetic position and genetic diversity of Przewalski's horses, we used massively parallel sequencing technology to decipher the complete mitochondrial and partial nuclear genomes for all four surviving maternal lineages of Przewalski's horses. Unlike single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing usually affected by ascertainment bias, the present method is expected to be largely unbiased. Three mitochondrial haplotypes were discovered-two similar ones, haplotypes I/II, and one substantially divergent from the other two, haplotype III. Haplotypes I/II versus III did not cluster together on a phylogenetic tree, rejecting the monophyly of Przewalski's horse maternal lineages, and were estimated to split 0.117-0.186 Ma, significantly preceding horse domestication. In the phylogeny based on autosomal sequences, Przewalski's horses formed a monophyletic clade, separate from the Thoroughbred domestic horse lineage. Our results suggest that Przewalski's horses have ancient origins and are not the direct progenitors of domestic horses. The analysis of the vast amount of sequence data presented here suggests that Przewalski's and domestic horse lineages diverged at least 0.117 Ma but since then have retained ancestral genetic polymorphism and/or experienced gene flow.

  19. A Hierarchical and Distributed Approach for Mapping Large Applications to Heterogeneous Grids using Genetic Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Soumya; Jain, Amit; Das, Sajal K.; Biswas, Rupak

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a distributed approach for mapping a single large application to a heterogeneous grid environment. To minimize the execution time of the parallel application, we distribute the mapping overhead to the available nodes of the grid. This approach not only provides a fast mapping of tasks to resources but is also scalable. We adopt a hierarchical grid model and accomplish the job of mapping tasks to this topology using a scheduler tree. Results show that our three-phase algorithm provides high quality mappings, and is fast and scalable.

  20. Genetic characterization of two traditional leafy vegetables ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-24

    Oct 24, 2011 ... Adéoti, K.1,2, Rival, A.3, Dansi, A.2*, Santoni, S.4, Brown, S.5, Beule, T.3, Nato, ... ecogeographical origin and the status (cultivated or wild) of the analyzed .... ethanol 96%) were added to 200 µl of DAN solution and incubated.