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Sample records for tract alters nuclear

  1. Ataxin-1 with an expanded glutamine tract alters nuclear matrix-associated structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skinner, P J; Koshy, B T; Cummings, C J

    1997-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is one of several neurodegenerative disorders caused by an expansion of a polyglutamine tract. It is characterized by ataxia, progressive motor deterioration, and loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells. To understand the pathogenesis of SCA1, we examined the subcel......Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 (SCA1) is one of several neurodegenerative disorders caused by an expansion of a polyglutamine tract. It is characterized by ataxia, progressive motor deterioration, and loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells. To understand the pathogenesis of SCA1, we examined.......5 microm across, whereas the expanded ataxin-1 localizes to a single approximately 2-microm structure, before the onset of ataxia. Mutant ataxin-1 localizes to a single nuclear structure in affected neurons of SCA1 patients. Similarly, COS-1 cells transfected with wild-type or mutant ataxin-1 show...... a similar pattern of nuclear localization; with expanded ataxin-1 occurring in larger structures that are fewer in number than those of normal ataxin-1. Colocalization studies show that mutant ataxin-1 causes a specific redistribution of the nuclear matrix-associated domain containing promyelocytic...

  2. Hypertension alters GABA receptor-mediated inhibition of neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Lin; Zhang, Jing; Mifflin, Steve

    2003-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that microinjection of baclofen, a GABA(B) receptor agonist, into the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) results in an enhanced pressor response in hypertensive (HT) rats compared with normotensive (NT) rats, suggesting a possible alteration in the responses of neurons in this area to activation of GABA(B) receptors. The following studies were designed to determine whether HT alters the sensitivity of neurons in the NTS to GABA receptor agonists. Sham-operated NT and unilateral nephrectomized, renal-wrap HT Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized, and the responses of NTS neurons receiving aortic nerve (AN) afferent inputs to iontophoretic application of GABA, the GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol, and the GABA(B) agonist baclofen were examined. The AN input was classified as monosynaptic (MSN) if the cell responded to each of two stimuli separated by 5 ms with an action potential. If the cell did not respond, the input was considered polysynaptic (PSN). In MSNs, inhibition of AN-evoked discharge by GABA was not altered in 1 wk of HT but was reduced in 4 wk of HT, whereas in PSNs, sensitivity to GABA was reduced at 1 and 4 wk of HT. In HT rats, inhibition of AN-evoked discharge by baclofen was enhanced in MSNs, but not in PSNs, after 1 and 4 wk of HT, whereas inhibition by muscimol was reduced in MSNs and PSNs at 1 and 4 wk of HT. Changes in sensitivity to muscimol and baclofen within MSNs were the same whether the MSN received a slowly or a rapidly conducted AN afferent input. The results demonstrate that early in HT the sensitivity of NTS neurons to inhibitory amino acids is altered and that these changes are maintained for > or =4 wk. The alterations are dependent on the subtype of GABA receptor being activated and whether the neuron receives a mono- or polysynaptic baroreceptor afferent input.

  3. Corticospinal tract insult alters GABAergic circuitry in the mammalian spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey B. Russ

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available During perinatal development, corticospinal tract (CST projections into the spinal cord help refine spinal circuitry. Although the normal developmental processes that are controlled by the arrival of corticospinal input are becoming clear, little is known about how perinatal cortical damage impacts specific aspects of spinal circuit development, particularly the inhibitory microcircuitry that regulates spinal reflex circuits. In this study, we sought to determine how ischemic cortical damage impacts the synaptic attributes of a well-characterized population of inhibitory, GABAergic interneurons, called GABApre neurons, which modulates the efficiency of proprioceptive sensory terminals in the sensorimotor reflex circuit. We found that putative GABApre interneurons receive CST input and, using an established mouse model of perinatal stroke, that cortical ischemic injury results in a reduction of CST density within the intermediate region of the spinal cord, where these interneurons reside. Importantly, CST alterations were restricted to the side contralateral to the injury. Within the synaptic terminals of the GABApre interneurons, we observed a dramatic upregulation of the 65-isoform of the GABA synthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65. In accordance with the CST density reduction, GAD65 was elevated on the side of the spinal cord contralateral to cortical injury. This effect was not seen for other GABApre synaptic markers or in animals that received sham surgery. Our data reveal a novel effect of perinatal stroke that involves severe deficits in the architecture of descending spinal pathways, which in turn appear to promote molecular alterations in a specific spinal GABAergic circuit.

  4. Individualized prediction of schizophrenia based on the whole-brain pattern of altered white matter tract integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Jen; Liu, Chih-Min; Hsu, Yung-Chin; Lo, Yu-Chun; Hwang, Tzung-Jeng; Hwu, Hai-Gwo; Lin, Yi-Tin; Tseng, Wen-Yih Isaac

    2018-01-01

    A schizophrenia diagnosis relies on characteristic symptoms identified by trained physicians, and is thus prone to subjectivity. This study developed a procedure for the individualized prediction of schizophrenia based on whole-brain patterns of altered white matter tract integrity. The study comprised training (108 patients and 144 controls) and testing (60 patients and 60 controls) groups. Male and female participants were comparable in each group and were analyzed separately. All participants underwent diffusion spectrum imaging of the head, and the data were analyzed using the tract-based automatic analysis method to generate a standardized two-dimensional array of white matter tract integrity, called the connectogram. Unique patterns in the connectogram that most accurately identified schizophrenia were systematically reviewed in the training group. Then, the diagnostic performance of the patterns was individually verified in the testing group by using receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis. The performance was high in men (accuracy = 0.85) and satisfactory in women (accuracy = 0.75). In men, the pattern was located in discrete fiber tracts, as has been consistently reported in the literature; by contrast, the pattern was widespread over all tracts in women. These distinct patterns suggest that there is a higher variability in the microstructural alterations in female patients than in male patients. The individualized prediction of schizophrenia is feasible based on the different whole-brain patterns of tract integrity. The optimal masks and their corresponding regions in the fiber tracts could serve as potential imaging biomarkers for schizophrenia. Hum Brain Mapp 39:575-587, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. THE ESTROGENIC AND ANTIANDROGENIC PESTICIDE METHOXYCHLOR ALTERS THE REPRODUCTIVE TRACT AND BEHAVIOR WITHOUT AFFECTING PITUITARY SIZE OR LH AND PROLACTIN SECRETION IN MALE RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The estrogenic and antiandrogenic pesticide methoxychlor alters the reproductive tract and behavior without affecting pituitary size or LH and prolactin secretion in male rats.Gray LE Jr, Ostby J, Cooper RL, Kelce WR.Endocrinology Branch, United States Environment...

  6. Corrosion and alteration of materials from the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beauvy, M.; Berthoud, G.; Defranceschi, M.; Ducros, G.; Feron, D.; Guerin, Y.; Latge, C.; Limoge, Y.; Madic, C.; Santarini, G.; Seiler, J.M.; Vernaz, E.; Richet, C.

    2010-01-01

    , testing means, experimental techniques, internal corrosion of zircaloy sheath - the iodine effect, stress corrosion of nickel alloys - hydrogen influence, stress corrosion of stainless steels; C - wear corrosion: a coupled phenomenon, research in the framework of service life extension of the French electronuclear park; 3 - Corrosion in future reactors: A - corrosion in gas reactors: corrosion by helium impurities, oxidation resistance of silicon carbide, corrosion of graphite and carbon-carbon composites; B - corrosion in liquid metal reactors: sodium FBRs, lead and lead alloys reactors; C- corrosion in molten salt reactors: corrosion of Hastelloy N-type nickel alloys by molten fluorides, mass transfer in aniso-thermal fluoride systems, tellurium embrittlement, electrochemical study of pure metals corrosion in molten fluorides; 4 - Materials corrosion and alteration in the back-end of the fuel cycle: A - corrosion in concentrated nitric environment: materials behaviour, self-catalytic mechanism of nitric acid reduction; B - corrosion in unsaturated aqueous environment: metallic corrosion in unsaturated environment - application to the storage of waste containers, bitumens alteration, reinforced concrete behaviour and iron framework corrosion, concrete behaviour in severe thermal environment; C - Corrosion in saturated aqueous environment: metals corrosion in clayey environment, long-term behaviour of glasses, ceramics alteration, underwater concrete durability, clays transformation; D - materials biodegradation: microorganisms and nuclear wastes, biodegradation of bitumen, concretes and steels; 5 - Conclusion, glossary

  7. The impact of an anti-gravity treadmill (AlterG) training on walking capacity and corticospinal tract structure in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Sh; Marzbani, H; Raminfard, S; Birgani, P M; Rasooli, A H; Mirbagheri, M M

    2017-07-01

    We studied the effects of an anti-gravity treadmill (AlterG) training on walking capacity and corticospinal tract structure in children with Cerebral Palsy (CP). AlterG can help CP children walk on the treadmill by reducing their weights up to 80% and maintain their balance during locomotion. AlterG training thus has the potential to improve walking capacity permanently as it can provide systematic and intense locomotor training for sufficiently long period of time and produce brain neuroplasticity. AlterG training was given for 45 minutes, three times a week for two months. The neuroplasticity of corticospinal tract was evaluated using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI). The fractional Anisotropy (FA) feature was extracted to quantify structural changes of the corticospinal tract. Walking capacity was evaluated using popular clinical measurements of gait; i.e., walking speed, mobility and balance. The evaluations were done before and after training. Our results revealed that AlterG training resulted in an increase in average FA value of the corticospinal tract following the training. The outcome measures of clinical assessments of gait presented enhanced walking capacity of the CP subjects. Our findings indicated that the improved walking capacity was concurrent with the enhancement of the corticospinal tract structure. The clinical implication is that AlterG training may be considered as a therapeutic tool for permanent gait improvement in CP children.

  8. Sweetened carbonated drinks do not alter upper digestive tract physiology in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuomo, R; Savarese, M F; Sarnelli, G; Vollono, G; Rocco, A; Coccoli, P; Cirillo, C; Asciore, L; Nardone, G; Buyckx, M

    2008-07-01

    Sweetened carbonated beverages are widely consumed, which has fuelled several conflicting opinions about their effects on upper digestive tract functions. We aimed to evaluate the effect of sweetened carbonated drinks, consumed with a standard meal, on gastro-oesophageal reflux, gastric emptying and gallbladder contraction and postmeal sensations in healthy subjects. Thirteen healthy volunteers (seven women, six males; median age 22 years) were tested following the intake of 300 mL sweetened water containing increasing concentrations of carbon dioxide (seven subjects), and of 300 mL sweetened commercial flavoured drink with and without carbon dioxide (six subjects). Gastro-oesophageal reflux, gastric emptying and gallbladder contraction were studied by pH-impedance, octanoic acid breath test and ultrasound respectively. Gastro-oesophageal refluxes were significantly increased 1 h after meal with both water and commercial beverages; only sweetened water without carbon dioxide determined a persistently increasing number of refluxes 2 h postmeal. No differences were found for gastric emptying, gallbladder contraction or postmeal symptoms with any of the beverages tested. This study shows that 300 mL of sweetened carbonated beverage with different levels of carbonation or a commercial soft drink do not modify the physiology of the upper digestive tract.

  9. Nuclear medicine methods used in diagnosing diseases of the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostadinova, I.

    2001-01-01

    Using physiologic tracer scintigraphy may give unique information on gastrointestinal (GI) motility and function, supplementing the findings of rather invasive methods. Conventional barium-contrast x-ray studies of the GI tract, computed tomography, ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging afford high resolution images of the GI anatomy, but have a serious shortcoming - hardly lending themselves to quantification. As shown by the results functional scintigraphy is a sensitive, quantitative and noninvasive procedure. The potential of nuclear medicine methods to diagnose successfully diseases of the salivary glands, esophagus, stomach and visualization of GI bleeding and hepatobiliary system are comprehensively discussed. The advantages and drawbacks of radionuclide techniques are outlined, and compared with other methods of visualization. (author)

  10. Carbaryl-induced histopathologic alterations in the digestive tract of the Levantine frog, Pelophylax bedriagae (Anura: Ranidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çakici, Özlem

    2014-08-01

    In this study, histopathologic changes following carbaryl exposure for 96 hr were investigated in the digestive tract of Levantine frog, Pelophylax bedriagae. Adult frogs were exposed to carbaryl once by oral gavage in concentrations of 0.05, 0.1, and 0.2 mg/g. Histopathological changes were more prominent in medium- (0.1 mg/g) and high-dose (0.2 mg/g) groups than in the low-dose (0.05 mg/g) group. Esophageal cells showed vacuolization, cellular swelling, nuclear pyknosis, karyolysis, and necrosis. Additionally, esophageal glandular atrophy and infiltration of inflammatory cells around esophageal glands were observed at medium and high doses. In the stomach, there were prominent histopathologic defects such as cellular swelling and necrosis in gastric glands, necrotic cells within the interstitial spaces, separation of epithelial cell layer, congested vessels, and hemorrhage at medium and high doses. In the intestine, detachment of epithelial layer, epithelial cell disorganization, inflammation, and necrosis were detected at medium and high doses. The results of this study showed that carbaryl caused adverse effects on the digestive tract of the Levantine frog, P. bedriagae. © 2013 by The Author(s).

  11. Alterations and diseases of the gastrointestinal tract caused by old age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bayerl, F.

    1981-01-01

    The dissertation reviews the publications on 'The gastrointestinal tract in old age' since 1941. As in the 1941 publication by Heinrich, particular interest is taken in diagnostic radiology. The lower age limit of the cases described was set at 55 to 60 years. Oesophageal changes ranged from functional disturbances (e.g. atonia, changes in peristalsis, or dilatation) to chronic inflammation, displacement caused by the surrounding organs, and tumours (mainly carcinoma). Formation of diverticula takes an intermediate position. Of the gastric and duodenal changes, hiatal hermia and chronic atrophic gastritis were the most frequent. Ulcers caused by old age differ from 'common' ulcers in some respects, and the symptoms may be confused with those of gastric carcinoma. Early gastric carcinoma is another disease whose incidence increases with age. Thoracic and spinal changes may cause impressions on the stomach. The effects of old age on the time of passage of contrast media, on gastric tone, and on the shape of the stomach remain unclear. Changes caused by old age in the small and large intestine range from formation of diverticula and vascular diseases (e.g. ischaemic colitis and obstruction of the mesenteric vessels) to the frequent carcinoma of the large intestine and rectum. According to this study it has to be supposed that the degenerative atrophic processes of aging and previous diseases occurring increasingly in old age, favour the provocation of ratrogenic injuries. (orig./MG) [de

  12. Altered white matter tract property related to impaired focused attention, sustained attention, cognitive impulsivity and vigilance in attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Huey-Ling; Chen, Yu-Jen; Lo, Yu-Chun; Tseng, Wen-Yih I; Gau, Susan S

    2015-09-01

    The neural substrate for clinical symptoms and neuropsychological performance in individuals with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has rarely been studied and has yielded inconsistent results. We sought to compare the microstructural property of fibre tracts associated with the prefrontal cortex and its association with ADHD symptoms and a wide range of attention performance in youth with ADHD and healthy controls. We assessed youths with ADHD and age-, sex-, handedness-, coil- and intelligence-matched controls using the Conners' Continuous Performance Test (CCPT) for attention performance and MRI. The 10 target tracts, including the bilateral frontostriatal tracts (caudate to dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, ventrolateral prefrontal cortex and orbitofrontal cortex), superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) and cingulum bundle were reconstructed using diffusion spectrum imaging tractography. We computed generalized fractional anisotropy (GFA) values to indicate tract-specific microstructural property. We included 50 youths with ADHD and 50 healthy controls in our study. Youths with ADHD had lower GFA in the left frontostriatal tracts, bilateral SLF and right cingulum bundle and performed worse in the CCPT than controls. Furthermore, alteration of the right SLF GFA was most significantly associated with the clinical symptom of inattention in youths with ADHD. Finally, youths with ADHD had differential association patterns of the 10 fibre tract GFA values with attention performance compared with controls. Ten of the youths with ADHD were treated with methylphenidate, which may have long-term effects on microstructural property. Our study highlights the importance of the SLF, cingulum bundle and frontostriatal tracts for clinical symptoms and attention performance in youths with ADHD and demonstrates the involvement of different fibre tracts in attention performance in these individuals.

  13. What the Erythrocytic Nuclear Alteration Frequencies Could Tell Us about Genotoxicity and Macrophage Iron Storage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana M M Gomes

    Full Text Available Erythrocytic nuclear alterations have been considered as an indicative of organism's exposure to genotoxic agents. Due to their close relationship among their frequencies and DNA damages, they are considered excellent markers of exposure in eukaryotes. However, poor data has been found in literature concerning their genesis, differential occurrence and their life span. In this study, we use markers of cell viability; genotoxicity and cellular turn over in order to shed light to these events. Tilapia and their blood were exposed to cadmium in acute exposure and in vitro assays. They were analyzed using flow cytometry for oxidative stress and membrane disruption, optical microscopy for erythrocytic nuclear alteration, graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry for cadmium content in aquaria water, blood and cytochemical and analytical electron microscopy techniques for the hemocateretic aspects. The results showed a close relationship among the total nuclear alterations and cadmium content in the total blood and melanomacrophage centres area, mismatching reactive oxygen species and membrane damages. Moreover, nuclear alterations frequencies (vacuolated, condensed and blebbed showed to be associated to cadmium exposure whereas others (lobed and bud were associated to depuration period. Decrease on nuclear alterations frequencies was also associated with hemosiderin increase inside spleen and head kidney macrophages mainly during depurative processes. These data disclosure in temporal fashion the main processes that drive the nuclear alterations frequencies and their relationship with some cellular and systemic biomarkers.

  14. Nuclear, but not cytoplasmic, localization of survivin as a negative prognostic factor for survival in upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitamura, Hiroshi; Torigoe, Toshihiko; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Asanuma, Hiroko; Inoue, Ryuta; Nishida, Sachiyo; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Masumori, Naoya; Sato, Noriyuki; Tsukamoto, Taiji

    2013-01-01

    Survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein gene family, inhibits apoptosis and promotes mitosis. We determined whether nuclear or cytoplasmic localization of survivin could predict survival of patients with upper urinary tract urothelial carcinoma (UUTUC). Immunohistochemical staining for survivin was carried out on archival specimens from 125 consecutive patients with UUTUC who underwent radical nephroureterectomy. Nuclear and cytoplasmic staining of survivin was scored and compared with clinicopathologic features and cancer-specific survival (CSS). Nuclear expression of survivin was significantly correlated with tumor grade (p nuclear expression of survivin vs. 73 % for those without nuclear expression of survivin (hazard ratio = 2.19; 95 % confidence interval = 1.02-4.70; p = 0.043). The 5-year cancer-specific survival rates of patients with cytoplasmic survivin-negative and -positive tumors were 66 and 67 %, respectively. There was no difference in survival between patients with cytoplasmic survivin-negative tumors and those with cytoplasmic survivin-positive tumors. Using univariate analysis, nuclear survivin expression, tumor grade, pathological T stage, pathological N stage, and lymphovascular invasion were the predictive variables for CSS. In contrast, cytoplasmic survivin expression had no prognostic relevance. These data suggest that nuclear accumulation of survivin represents biologic aggressiveness and that nuclear survivin is a negative prognostic marker in patients with resected UUTUC.

  15. Assessment of the corticospinal tract alterations before and after resection of brainstem lesions using Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) and tractography at 3 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovanlikaya, Ilhami, E-mail: ilk2002@med.cornell.edu [Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States); Firat, Zeynep [Department of Radiology, Yeditepe University Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); Kovanlikaya, Arzu [Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States); Ulug, Aziz M. [Department of Radiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Yeditepe University, Istanbul (Turkey); Cihangiroglu, M. Mutlu [Department of Radiology, Yeditepe University Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey); John, Majnu [Department of Public Health, Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States); Bingol, Canan Aykut; Ture, Ugur [Institute of Neurological Sciences, Yeditepe University Hospital, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2011-03-15

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the role of Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) and Diffusion Tensor Tractography (DTT) on the corticospinal tract alterations due to space occupying lesions in the brainstem before and after surgical resection. Pre- and post-surgical DTI data were acquired in 14 patients undergoing surgical resection of brainstem lesions. Patterns of corticospinal tract (CST) alteration on DTT were compared with the neurological exams of the patients pre- and post-operatively. DTT, especially in 3D movie format, seemed very helpful for evaluating the relationship of the lesions with the corticospinal tracts for surgical approach. None of the patients developed additional motor deficit related to surgery except one patient who presented with cerebellar ataxia after surgery. All of the patients with normal CST on DTT presented without motor deficit on neurological exam. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive and negative predictive values of DTT before surgery were 100%, 63.6%, 42.9% and 100%, and the corresponding values after surgery were 100%, 96%, 75% and 100% respectively. Although it has low specificity before surgery, DTT is a potentially useful technique in evaluating the effects of brainstem lesions and surgical resection on the relevant corticospinal tracts with high negative predictive value and higher specificity after surgery.

  16. The use of positrons to survey alteration layers on synthetic nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiser, Joelle T.; Parruzot, Benjamin; Weber, Marc H.; Ryan, Joseph V.; McCloy, John S.; Wall, Nathalie A.

    2017-01-01

    In order to safeguard society and the environment, understanding radioactive waste glass alteration mechanisms in interactions with solutions and near-field materials, such as Fe, is essential to nuclear waste repository performance assessments. Alteration products are formed at the surface of glasses after reaction with solution. In this study, glass altered in the presence of Fe 0 in aqueous solution formed two alteration layers: one embedded with Fe closer to the surface and one without Fe found deeper in the sample. Both layers were found to be thinner than the alteration layer found in glass altered in aqueous solution only. For the first time, Doppler Broadening Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (DB-PAS) is used to non-destructively characterize the pore structures of glass altered in the presence of Fe 0 . Advantages and disadvantages of DB-PAS compared to other techniques used to analyze pore structures for altered glass samples are discussed. Ultimately, DB-PAS has shown to be an excellent choice for pore structure characterization for glasses with multiple alteration layers. Monte Carlo modeling predicted positron trajectories through the layers, and helped explain DB-PAS data, which showed that the deeper alteration layer without Fe had a similar composition and pore structure to layers on glass altered in water only.

  17. The use of positrons to survey alteration layers on synthetic nuclear waste glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiser, Joelle T.; Parruzot, Benjamin; Weber, Marc H.; Ryan, Joseph V.; McCloy, John S.; Wall, Nathalie A.

    2017-07-01

    In order to safeguard society and the environment, understanding radioactive waste glass alteration mechanisms in interactions with solutions and near-field materials, such as Fe, is essential to nuclear waste repository performance assessments. Alteration products are formed at the surface of glasses after reaction with solution. In this study, glass altered in the presence of Fe0 in aqueous solution formed two alteration layers: one embedded with Fe closer to the surface and one without Fe found deeper in the sample. Both layers were found to be thinner than the alteration layer found in glass altered in aqueous solution only. For the first time, Doppler Broadening Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (DB-PAS) is used to non-destructively characterize the pore structures of glass altered in the presence of Fe0. Advantages and disadvantages of DB-PAS compared to other techniques used to analyze pore structures for altered glass samples are discussed. Ultimately, DB-PAS has shown to be an excellent choice for pore structure characterization for glasses with multiple alteration layers. Monte Carlo modeling predicted positron trajectories through the layers, and helped explain DB-PAS data, which showed that the deeper alteration layer without Fe had a similar composition and pore structure to layers on glass altered in water only.

  18. Bedfordshire County Structure Plan. Proposed alterations. Results of public consultation. Policy 97: Nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The document refers to Alterations to the County Structure Plan, proposed by Bedfordshire County Council and submitted to the Secretary of State for the Environment. An additional Alteration initiated at the County Council's meeting, dealing with nuclear waste, had not been the subject of prior public consultation. Consultation had since been arranged, and the present document summarises the responses that have been received, and describes the next action to be taken. (U.K.)

  19. Permission for the alteration in fabrication business of nuclear fuel materials in Tokai Works of Japan Nuclear Fuel Conversion Company, Ltd. (report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    A report by the Nuclear Safety Commission to the Ministry of International Trade and Industry, concerning the permission of the alteration in the fabrication business of nuclear fuel materials in the Tokai Works Japan Nuclear Fuel Conversion Co. was presented; The technical capability of Japan Nuclear Fuel Conversion Co. and the safety after the alteration were confirmed by the NSC. The examination made by the Committee on Examination of Nuclear Fuel Safety of the NSC for the safety after the alteration is described: the aseismatic design and the countermeasures to fire in the conversion testing building, criticality management, waste treatment, radiation control, the exposure dose of general people. (Mori, K.)

  20. Energetics of metastudtite and implications for nuclear waste alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaofeng; Ushakov, Sergey V; Labs, Sabrina; Curtius, Hildegard; Bosbach, Dirk; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2014-12-16

    Metastudtite, (UO2)O2(H2O)2, is one of two known natural peroxide minerals, but little is established about its thermodynamic stability. In this work, its standard enthalpy of formation, -1,779.6 ± 1.9 kJ/mol, was obtained by high temperature oxide melt drop solution calorimetry. Decomposition of synthetic metastudtite was characterized by thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) with ex situ X-ray diffraction analysis. Four decomposition steps were observed in oxygen atmosphere: water loss around 220 °C associated with an endothermic heat effect accompanied by amorphization; another water loss from 400 °C to 530 °C; oxygen loss from amorphous UO3 to crystallize orthorhombic α-UO2.9; and reduction to crystalline U3O8. This detailed characterization allowed calculation of formation enthalpy from heat effects on decomposition measured by DSC and by transposed temperature drop calorimetry, and both these values agree with that from drop solution calorimetry. The data explain the irreversible transformation from studtite to metastudtite, the conditions under which metastudtite may form, and its significant role in the oxidation, corrosion, and dissolution of nuclear fuel in contact with water.

  1. Bedfordshire County Structure Plan. Proposed alterations -Public participation statement. Policy 97: Nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    The document describes steps taken, in accord with the Town and Country Planning Act 1971, by Bedfordshire County Council, submitting proposed Alterations to the County Structure Plan to the Secretary of State for the Environment. When approving the submission the Council decided to add an additional Alteration dealing with nuclear waste: as this had not been the subject of public consultation the Council decided to seek the public's views on the proposal before submitting the Alteration. The arrangements for consultation and a list of persons and organizations consulted are given, together with the arrangements for considering comments. (U.K.)

  2. Altered Cortical Thickness and Tract Integrity of the Mirror Neuron System and Associated Social Communication in Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Hsiang-Yun; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Hsu, Yung-Chin; Chen, Yu-Jen; Lo, Yu-Chun; Shih, Yao-Chia; Tseng, Wen-Yih Isaac

    2015-12-01

    Previous studies using neural activity recording and neuroimaging techniques have reported functional deficits in the mirror neuron system (MNS) for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). However, a few studies focusing on gray and white matter structures of the MNS have yielded inconsistent results. The current study recruited adolescents and young adults with ASD (aged 15-26 years) and age-matched typically developing (TD) controls (aged 14-25 years). The cortical thickness (CT) and microstructural integrity of the tracts connecting the regions forming the classical MNS were investigated. High-resolution T1-weighted imaging and diffusion spectrum imaging were performed to quantify the CT and tract integrity, respectively. The structural covariance of the CT of the MNS regions revealed a weaker coordination of the MNS network in ASD. A strong correlation was found between the integrity of the right frontoparietal tracts and the social communication subscores measured by the Chinese version of the Social Communication Questionnaire. The results showed that there were no significant mean differences in the CTs and tract integrity between the ASD and TD groups, but revealed a moderate or even reverse age effect on the frontal MNS structures in ASD. In conclusion, aberrant structural coordination may be an underlying factor affecting the function of the MNS in ASD patients. The association between the right frontoparietal tracts and social communication performance implies a neural correlate of communication processing in the autistic brain. This study provides evidence of abnormal MNS structures and their influence on social communication in individuals with ASD. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Basaltic glass alteration in confined media: analogy with nuclear glass in geological disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parruzot, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation concerns basaltic glass alteration mechanisms and rates. Through a better understanding of the processes controlling the basaltic glass durability, this thesis attempts to establish a link between laboratory studies and volcanic glass alteration in natural environment. The methodology used here is similar to the one used for nuclear glasses. Thus, we measured for the first time the residual alteration rate of basaltic glasses. Protective effect of the alteration film is clearly established. Moreover, synthetic glass representativeness is evaluated through a study focused on the effect of iron oxidation degree on the glass structure and leaching properties. A minor effect of Fe II on the forward rate and a negligible effect on the residual rate are shown. The residual rate is extrapolated at 5 C and compared to the mean alteration rate of natural samples of ages ranging from 1900 to 10 7 years. Non-zeolitized natural glasses follow this linear tendency, suggesting a control of the long-term rate by clayey secondary phase precipitation. Natural environments are open environments: a parametric study was performed in order to quantify the water flow rate effect on chemical composition of the alteration layer. When applied to two natural samples, the obtained laws provide coherent results. It seems possible to unify the descriptive approach from the study of natural environments to the mechanistic approach developed at the laboratory. The next step will consist in developing a model to transpose these results to nuclear glasses. (author) [fr

  4. Behaviour of model particles of local precipitations of surface nuclear explosion in food chain and digestive tract of farm animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koz'min, G.V.; Epimakhov, V.G.; Sanzharova, N.I.

    2016-01-01

    The behaviour regularities of radioactive particles - simulators of nuclear surface explosion local fall outs in food chain and gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of farm animals are analyzed. The results show that there is a large difference in transport regularities of radioactive silicate particles and radioactive solutions in GIT. At intake of young fission products high concentrations of radionuclides in GIT content deal with sorption and concentrating of radionuclides on food particles and observe in third stomach, blind gut, terminals of middle and bung guts. Transport regularities of fused radioactive particles depend on digestive apparatus mobility, content consistency and morphological peculiarities of mucosa, which work towards transport slowing and storage of such particles in the part of sheep GIT with minimal dry substance content - abomasum [ru

  5. Effect of low dose electron beam irradiation on the alteration layer formed during nuclear glass leaching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mougnaud, S., E-mail: sarah.mougnaud@gmail.com [CEA Marcoule, DEN, DTCD, SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Tribet, M. [CEA Marcoule, DEN, DTCD, SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Renault, J.-P. [NIMBE, CNRS, CEA, Université Paris Saclay, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Jollivet, P. [CEA Marcoule, DEN, DTCD, SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France); Panczer, G. [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR 5306, Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Charpentier, T. [NIMBE, CNRS, CEA, Université Paris Saclay, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Jégou, C. [CEA Marcoule, DEN, DTCD, SECM, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze cedex (France)

    2016-12-15

    repolymerizes. - Highlights: • The nuclear glass/water interface is examined in the residual rate regime. • Leaching behavior of externally irradiated glass with electrons is studied. • Previous irradiation of the glass does not modify the alteration layer structure. • Evolution of alteration layer under external electronic irradiation is investigated. • Alteration layer is less sensitive to radiation induced defects creation than glass.

  6. Study of nuclear glasses alteration gel and synthesis of some model gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricol, S.

    1995-01-01

    This work deals with the general problem of alteration of the reference nuclear glass R7T7. Attention is paid particularly to the altered layer formed at the glass surface during alteration process. In opposition to previous works, related essentially to glass dissolution kinetics based on chemical analyses of lixiviated elements, this thesis deals with alteration problems through structural studies of the reference glass and derived gel. This approach allows the determination of mechanisms for the gel formation and a better understanding of the behaviour of glasses towards lixiviation. Both approaches appeared complementary. Based on several spectroscopic techniques, this work showed the particular role of cations such as calcium, zirconium and iron. Studies of silica-based synthetic gels showed the synergic effect of formers cation and of one highly coordinated cation. The variation of the wavenumber related to Si-O-Si asymmetric stretching vibration can be correlated to O/Si ratio for ternary systems Si/Na/Zr. On the contrary, the Si losses of the materials depend on the number of non-bridging oxygen atoms. In the perspective of long-term behaviour, the alteration gel presents better characteristics than initial glass. It is therefore a highly stable material in static conditions. In the same way, synthetic gels are materials with very low solubilities (much lower than the alteration gel) and could be used as confining matrices. (authors). refs., 71 figs., 37 tabs

  7. Vorinostat differentially alters 3D nuclear structure of cancer and non-cancerous esophageal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandakumar, Vivek; Hansen, Nanna; Glenn, Honor L; Han, Jessica H; Helland, Stephanie; Hernandez, Kathryn; Senechal, Patti; Johnson, Roger H; Bussey, Kimberly J; Meldrum, Deirdre R

    2016-08-09

    The histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor vorinostat has received significant attention in recent years as an 'epigenetic' drug used to treat solid tumors. However, its mechanisms of action are not entirely understood, particularly with regard to its interaction with the aberrations in 3D nuclear structure that accompany neoplastic progression. We investigated the impact of vorinostat on human esophageal epithelial cell lines derived from normal, metaplastic (pre-cancerous), and malignant tissue. Using a combination of novel optical computed tomography (CT)-based quantitative 3D absorption microscopy and conventional confocal fluorescence microscopy, we show that subjecting malignant cells to vorinostat preferentially alters their 3D nuclear architecture relative to non-cancerous cells. Optical CT (cell CT) imaging of fixed single cells showed that drug-treated cancer cells exhibit significant alterations in nuclear morphometry. Confocal microscopy revealed that vorinostat caused changes in the distribution of H3K9ac-marked euchromatin and H3K9me3-marked constitutive heterochromatin. Additionally, 3D immuno-FISH showed that drug-induced expression of the DNA repair gene MGMT was accompanied by spatial relocation toward the center of the nucleus in the nuclei of metaplastic but not in non-neoplastic cells. Our data suggest that vorinostat's differential modulation of 3D nuclear architecture in normal and abnormal cells could play a functional role in its anti-cancer action.

  8. Alterations of peripheral leukocyte count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein in febrile urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naseri, Mitra

    2008-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of peripheral leukocyte count, differential leukocyte count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) level in febrile urinary tract infection (UTI) for defining the UTI level. A total of 61 children aged between 1 and 10 years with documented febrile UTI (axillary temperature > or = 38 degrees C) were studied. They had a urine culture positive for infection. Laboratory investigations including peripheral total and differential leukocyte counts, ESR, and CRP were assessed in relation to the inflammatory responses. Leukocyte count results were available in all of the patients, ESR in 41, and CRP in 36. Leukocyte count was normal in 6 patients (9.8%). Lymphocytic leukocytosis was seen in 1 patients (1.6%), neutrophilic leukocytosis in 25 (41.0%), and relative neutrophilia in 29 (47.5%). Thirty patients (73.2%) had a high ESR and 23 (63.9%) had a positive CRP. In children with a high ESR, 12 (29.3%) had neutrophilic leukocytosis and 14 (34.1%) had relative neutrophilia. Relative neutrophilia and neutrophilic leukocytosis with positive CRP both were found in 11 patients (30.6%). Negative CRP with absence of neutrophilic leukocytosis was found in a significantly higher proportion of patients. There were no direct correlations between the severity of systemic inflammatory responses and urinary tract inflammatory response. Findings of this study showed that ESR and differential leukocyte count are two valuable tests in febrile UTI and may be useful for localization of UTI level, but the total leukocyte count and CRP level as in qualitative methods are not useful, and many patients with febrile UTI do not have leukocytosis.

  9. Expanded polyalanine tracts function as nuclear export signals and promote protein mislocalization via eEF1A1 factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li; Ng, Nelson Ka Lam; Koon, Alex Chun; Chan, Ho Yin Edwin

    2017-04-07

    Polyalanine (poly(A)) diseases are caused by the expansion of translated GCN triplet nucleotide sequences encoding poly(A) tracts in proteins. To date, nine human disorders have been found to be associated with poly(A) tract expansions, including congenital central hypoventilation syndrome and oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy. Previous studies have demonstrated that unexpanded wild-type poly(A)-containing proteins localize to the cell nucleus, whereas expanded poly(A)-containing proteins primarily localize to the cytoplasm. Because most of these poly(A) disease proteins are transcription factors, this mislocalization causes cellular transcriptional dysregulation leading to cellular dysfunction. Correcting this faulty localization could potentially point to strategies to treat the aforementioned disorders, so there is a pressing need to identify the mechanisms underlying the mislocalization of expanded poly(A) protein. Here, we performed a glutathione S -transferase pulldown assay followed by mass spectrometry and identified eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1 α1 (eEF1A1) as an interacting partner with expanded poly(A)-containing proteins. Strikingly, knockdown of eEF1A1 expression partially corrected the mislocalization of the expanded poly(A) proteins in the cytoplasm and restored their functions in the nucleus. We further demonstrated that the expanded poly(A) domain itself can serve as a nuclear export signal. Taken together, this study demonstrates that eEF1A1 regulates the subcellular location of expanded poly(A) proteins and is therefore a potential therapeutic target for combating the pathogenesis of poly(A) diseases. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Gray and white matter alterations in early HIV-infected patients: Combined voxel-based morphometry and tract-based spatial statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Liu, Zhenyu; Liu, Jiaojiao; Tang, Zhenchao; Li, Hongjun; Tian, Jie

    2016-06-01

    To investigate both the gray matter (GM) and whiter matter (WM) alterations in a homogeneous cohort of early HIV-infected patients by combining voxel-based morphometry (VBM) and tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS). Twenty-six HIV and 26 control subjects enrolled in this study with 3D T1 and diffusion-tensor imaging acquired on a 3.0T Siemens scanner. Group differences in regional GM were assessed using VBM analysis, while differences in fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD), and relative anisotropy (RD) of WM were evaluated using TBSS analysis. After that, interactions between GM changes and white matter alterations were investigated by using a correlation analysis. The HIV-infected patients displayed decreased GM volume, mainly located in the bilateral frontal cortices, bilateral anterior cingulate cortex, and left supplementary motor area (P 0.05). Our results indicate that structural brain alterations occurred early in HIV-infected patients. The current study may shed further light on the potential brain effects of HIV. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2016;43:1474-1483. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Therapeutic effects of anti-gravity treadmill (AlterG) training on reflex hyper-excitability, corticospinal tract activities, and muscle stiffness in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvin, Sh; Taghiloo, A; Irani, A; Mirbagheri, M Mehdi

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to study therapeutic effects of antigravity treadmill (AlterG) training on reflex hyper-excitability, muscle stiffness, and corticospinal tract (CST) function in children with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP). Three children received AlterG training 3 days per week for 8 weeks as experimental group. Each session lasted 45 minutes. One child as control group received typical occupational therapy for the same amount of time. We evaluated hyper-excitability of lower limb muscles by H-reflex response. We quantified muscle stiffness by sonoelastography images of the affected muscles. We quantified CST activity by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). We performed the evaluations before and after training for both groups. H response latency and maximum M-wave amplitude were improved in experimental group after training compared to control group. Two children of experimental group had TMS response. Major parameters of TMS (i.e. peak-to-peak amplitude of motor evoked potential (MEP), latency of MEP, cortical silent period, and intensity of pulse) improved for both of them. Three parameters of texture analysis of sonoelastography images were improved for experimental group (i.e. contrast, entropy, and shear wave velocity). These findings indicate that AlterG training can improve reflexes, muscle stiffness, and CST activity in children with spastic hemiplegic CP and can be considered as a therapeutic tool to improve neuromuscular abnormalities occurring secondary to CP.

  12. Chemistry of diagenetically altered tuffs at a potential nuclear waste repository, Yucca Mountain, Nye County, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broxton, D.E.; Warren, R.G.; Hagan, R.C.; Luedemann, G.

    1986-10-01

    The chemistry of diagenetically altered tuffs at a potential nuclear waste repository, Yucca Mountain, Nevada is described. These tuffs contain substantial amounts of zeolites that are highly sorptive of certain radionuclides. Because of their widespread distribution, the zeolitic tuffs could provide important barriers to radionuclide migration. Physical properties of these tuffs and of their constituent zeolites are influenced by their chemical compositions. This study defines the amount of chemical variability within diagenetically altered tuffs and within diagenetic minerals at Yucca Mountain. Zeolitic tuffs at Yucca Mountain formed by diagenetic alteration of rhyolitic vitric tuffs. Despite their similar starting compositions, these tuffs developed compositions that vary both vertically and laterally. Widespread chemical variations were the result of open-system chemical diagenesis in which chemical components of the tuffs were mobilized and redistributed by groundwaters. Alkalies, alkaline earths, and silica were the most mobile elements during diagenesis. The zeolitic tuffs can be divided into three compositional groups: (1) calcium- and magnesium-rich tuffs associated with relatively thin zones of alteration in the unsaturated zone; (2) tuffs in thick zones of alteration at and below the water table that grade laterally from sodic compositions on the western side of Yucca Mountain to calcic compositions on the eastern side; and (3) potassic tuffs at the north end of Yucca Mountain. Physical properties of tuffs and their consistuent zeolites at Yucca Mountain may be affected by variations in compositions. Properties important for assessment of repository performance include behavior and ion exchange

  13. Alimentary tract absorption (f1 values) for radionuclides in local and regional fallout from nuclear tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Shawki A; Simon, Steven L; Bouville, André; Melo, Dunstana; Beck, Harold L

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents gastrointestinal absorption fractions (f1 values) for estimating internal doses from local and regional fallout radionuclides due to nuclear tests. The choice of f1 values are based on specific circumstances of weapons test conditions and a review of reported f1 values for elements in different physical and chemical states. Special attention is given to fallout from nuclear tests conducted at the Marshall Islands. We make a distinction between the f1 values for intakes of radioactive materials immediately after deposition (acute intakes) and intakes that occur in the course of months and years after deposition, following incorporation into terrestrial and aquatic foodstuffs (chronic intakes). Multiple f1 values for different circumstances where persons are exposed to radioactive fallout (e.g., local vs. regional fallout and coral vs. continental tests) are presented when supportive information is available. In some cases, our selected f1 values are similar to those adopted by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) (e.g., iodine and most actinides). However, f1 values for cesium and strontium derived from urine bioassay data of the Marshallese population are notably lower than the generic f1 values recommended by ICRP, particularly for acute intakes from local fallout (0.4 and 0.05 for Cs and Sr, respectively). The f1 values presented here form the first complete set of values relevant to realistic dose assessments for exposure to local or regional radioactive fallout.

  14. Effect of irradiation on the evolution of alteration layer formed during nuclear glass leaching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mougnaud, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    High-level radioactive waste (HLW) remaining after spent nuclear fuel reprocessing is immobilized within a glass matrix, eventually destined for geological disposal. Water intrusion into the repository is expected after several thousand years. The alteration of a non-radioactive surrogate for nuclear glass has been extensively studied and it has been determined that successive leaching mechanisms lead to the formation of a 'passivating' alteration layer and to the establishment of a residual rate regime in the long term. However, glass packages are submitted to the radioactivity of confined radioelements. This work focuses on the influence of irradiation on the alteration layer formed during the residual rate regime, in a structural and mechanistic point of view. Three focal areas have been selected. Non-radioactive simple glasses have been leached and externally irradiated in order to determine modifications induced by electronic effects (irradiations with electrons and alpha particles). The same type of glass samples have been previously irradiated with heavy ions and their leaching behavior have been studied in order to assess the impact of ballistic dose cumulated by the glass before water intrusion. Leaching behavior of a complex radioactive glass, doped with an alpha-emitter, has been studied to consider a more realistic situation. (author) [fr

  15. Cumulative and competitive effects of chemical elements on nuclear glass alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arena, Helene

    2016-01-01

    This work takes place in the context of the long-term behavior of nuclear glasses under repository conditions. The main objective is to identify, understand and compare the effects of some chemical elements present in the glass composition and/or in the repository media (Zn, Mg, Ni, Co, Fe, Ca, Gd, Ce, K, Cs, Cr and Ag) on the processes involved in glass alteration by water. The cumulative or competitive nature of the effects of these chemical elements was determined. To reach this goal, a 6 oxides simple glass (ISG) has been altered for more than 500 days in a solution containing one or more of the chemical elements of interest. The results indicate that Zn, Mg, Ni, Co and Fe elements increase glass alteration forming secondary phases with the same structure and stoichiometry (tri-octahedral smectites). To form, these silicates consume chemical elements (Si, Al) from the environment and induce a pH decrease until a limiting value of pH. Beyond this pH the precipitation of secondary phases is inhibited and these chemical elements can be integrated into the gel, replacing Ca whose solubility increases at lower pH. As long as they form secondary phases, the effects of these elements are cumulative. Rare earths Gd and Ce also increase glass alteration forming secondary phases but their effects are lower as they contain less silicon. These elements are not integrated in the gel. Chromium increases glass alteration by precipitating with Ca and leading to a less protective gel, depleted in Ca. Silver precipitates as AgCl and has no effect on the alteration of the glass. The chemical elements K, Cs and Ca limit glass alteration by integrating into the gel and slowing down the transport phenomena therein. This integration is competitive: the order of integration (quantity and effectiveness glass alteration limitation) is the following Ca≥≥Cs≥K. Thus, the increase of glass alteration may be proportional to the quantity of elements promoting the precipitation of

  16. Alterations in the nuclear proteome of HIV-1 infected T-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeBoer, Jason [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Creighton University, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Jagadish, Teena; Haverland, Nicole A. [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Neuroscience, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States); Madson, Christian J. [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Creighton University, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); Ciborowski, Pawel [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Neuroscience, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States); The Nebraska Center for Virology, University of Nebraska, Lincoln 68583 (United States); Belshan, Michael, E-mail: michaelbelshan@creighton.edu [Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Creighton University, 2500 California Plaza, Omaha, NE 68178 (United States); The Nebraska Center for Virology, University of Nebraska, Lincoln 68583 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Virus infection of a cell involves the appropriation of host factors and the innate defensive response of the cell. The identification of proteins critical for virus replication may lead to the development of novel, cell-based inhibitors. In this study we mapped the changes in T-cell nuclei during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) at 20 hpi. Using a stringent data threshold, a total of 13 and 38 unique proteins were identified in infected and uninfected cells, respectively, across all biological replicates. An additional 15 proteins were found to be differentially regulated between infected and control nuclei. STRING analysis identified four clusters of protein–protein interactions in the data set related to nuclear architecture, RNA regulation, cell division, and cell homeostasis. Immunoblot analysis confirmed the differential expression of several proteins in both C8166-45 and Jurkat E6-1 T-cells. These data provide a map of the response in host cell nuclei upon HIV-1 infection. - Highlights: • We identify changes in the expression of nuclear proteins during HIV-1 infection. • 163 nuclear proteins were found differentially regulated during HIV-1 infection. • Bioinformatic analysis identified several nuclear pathways altered by HIV infection. • Candidate factors were validated in two independent cell lines.

  17. Alterations in the nuclear proteome of HIV-1 infected T-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeBoer, Jason; Jagadish, Teena; Haverland, Nicole A.; Madson, Christian J.; Ciborowski, Pawel; Belshan, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Virus infection of a cell involves the appropriation of host factors and the innate defensive response of the cell. The identification of proteins critical for virus replication may lead to the development of novel, cell-based inhibitors. In this study we mapped the changes in T-cell nuclei during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) at 20 hpi. Using a stringent data threshold, a total of 13 and 38 unique proteins were identified in infected and uninfected cells, respectively, across all biological replicates. An additional 15 proteins were found to be differentially regulated between infected and control nuclei. STRING analysis identified four clusters of protein–protein interactions in the data set related to nuclear architecture, RNA regulation, cell division, and cell homeostasis. Immunoblot analysis confirmed the differential expression of several proteins in both C8166-45 and Jurkat E6-1 T-cells. These data provide a map of the response in host cell nuclei upon HIV-1 infection. - Highlights: • We identify changes in the expression of nuclear proteins during HIV-1 infection. • 163 nuclear proteins were found differentially regulated during HIV-1 infection. • Bioinformatic analysis identified several nuclear pathways altered by HIV infection. • Candidate factors were validated in two independent cell lines

  18. Nuclear and Mitochondrial DNA Alterations in Newborns with Prenatal Exposure to Cigarette Smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Pirini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Newborns exposed to maternal cigarette smoke (CS in utero have an increased risk of developing chronic diseases, cancer, and acquiring decreased cognitive function in adulthood. Although the literature reports many deleterious effects associated with maternal cigarette smoking on the fetus, the molecular alterations and mechanisms of action are not yet clear. Smoking may act directly on nuclear DNA by inducing mutations or epigenetic modifications. Recent studies also indicate that smoking may act on mitochondrial DNA by inducing a change in the number of copies to make up for the damage caused by smoking on the respiratory chain and lack of energy. In addition, individual genetic susceptibility plays a significant role in determining the effects of smoking during development. Furthermore, prior exposure of paternal and maternal gametes to cigarette smoke may affect the health of the developing individual, not only the in utero exposure. This review examines the genetic and epigenetic alterations in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA associated with smoke exposure during the most sensitive periods of development (prior to conception, prenatal and early postnatal and assesses how such changes may have consequences for both fetal growth and development.

  19. Incorporation of radionuclides in the alteration phases of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, E. C.; Kim, C.-W.; Wronkiewicz, D. J.

    1999-01-01

    Alteration may be expected for spent nuclear fuel exposed to groundwater under oxidizing conditions such as that which exist at the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The actinide elements released during the corrosion of spent fuel may be incorporated into the structures of secondary U 6+ phases. The incorporation of transuranics into the crystal structures of the alteration products may significantly decrease their mobility. A series of precipitation tests were conducted at 90 C to determine the potential incorporation of Ce 4+ and Nd 3+ (surrogates for Pu 4+ and Am 3+ , respectively) into uranyl phase. Dehydrated schoepite (UO 3 ·0.8-1.0HP 2 O) was produced by hydrolysis of a uranium oxyacetate solution containing either cerium or neodymium. ICP-MS analysis of the leachant, leachate, and solid phase reaction products which were dissolved in a HNO 3 solution indicates that 26 ppm of Ce was incorporated into dehydrated schoepite. ICP-MS results from the Nd-doped tests indicate significant neodymium incorporation as well, however, the heterogeneous distribution of Nd in the solid phase noted during the AEM/EELS examination implies that neodymium may not incorporate into the structure of dehydrated schoepite

  20. Childhood maltreatment is associated with alteration in global network fiber-tract architecture independent of history of depression and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Kyoko; Anderson, Carl M; Bolger, Elizabeth A; Khan, Alaptagin; McGreenery, Cynthia E; Teicher, Martin H

    2017-04-15

    Childhood maltreatment is a major risk factor for psychopathology. It is also associated with alterations in the network architecture of the brain, which we hypothesized may play a significant role in the development of psychopathology. In this study, we analyzed the global network architecture of physically healthy unmedicated 18-25 year old subjects (n=262) using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) MRI and tractography. Anatomical networks were constructed from fiber streams interconnecting 90 cortical or subcortical regions for subjects with no-to-low (n=122) versus moderate-to-high (n=140) exposure to maltreatment. Graph theory analysis revealed lower degree, strength, global efficiency, and maximum Laplacian spectra, higher pathlength, small-worldness and Laplacian skewness, and less deviation from artificial networks in subjects with moderate-to-high exposure to maltreatment. On balance, local clustering was similar in both groups, but the different clusters were more strongly interconnected in the no-to-low exposure group. History of major depression, anxiety and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder did not have a significant impact on global network measures over and above the effect of maltreatment. Maltreatment is an important factor that needs to be taken into account in studies examining the relationship between network differences and psychopathology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Diabetic polyneuropathy, sensory neurons, nuclear structure and spliceosome alterations: a role for CWC22

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Kobayashi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Unique deficits in the function of adult sensory neurons as part of their early neurodegeneration might account for progressive polyneuropathy during chronic diabetes mellitus. Here, we provide structural and functional evidence for aberrant pre-mRNA splicing in a chronic type 1 model of experimental diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN. Cajal bodies (CBs, unique nuclear substructures involved in RNA splicing, increased in number in diabetic sensory neurons, but their expected colocalization with survival motor neuron (SMN proteins was reduced – a mislocalization described in motor neurons of spinal muscular atrophy. Small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs, also participants in the spliceosome, had abnormal multiple nuclear foci unassociated with CBs, and their associated snRNAs were reduced. CWC22, a key spliceosome protein, was aberrantly upregulated in diabetic dorsal root ganglia (DRG, and impaired neuronal function. CWC22 attenuated sensory neuron plasticity, with knockdown in vitro enhancing their neurite outgrowth. Further, axonal delivery of CWC22 siRNA unilaterally to locally knock down the aberrant protein in diabetic nerves improved aspects of sensory function in diabetic mice. Collectively, our findings identify subtle but significant alterations in spliceosome structure and function, including dysregulated CBs and CWC22 overexpression, in diabetic sensory neurons that offer new ideas regarding diabetic sensory neurodegeneration in polyneuropathy.

  2. Changes at the nuclear lamina alter binding of pioneer factor Foxa2 in aged liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitton, Holly; Singh, Larry N; Patrick, Marissa A; Price, Andrew J; Osorio, Fernando G; López-Otín, Carlos; Bochkis, Irina M

    2018-02-27

    Increasing evidence suggests that regulation of heterochromatin at the nuclear envelope underlies metabolic disease susceptibility and age-dependent metabolic changes, but the mechanism is unknown. Here, we profile lamina-associated domains (LADs) using lamin B1 ChIP-Seq in young and old hepatocytes and find that, although lamin B1 resides at a large fraction of domains at both ages, a third of lamin B1-associated regions are bound exclusively at each age in vivo. Regions occupied by lamin B1 solely in young livers are enriched for the forkhead motif, bound by Foxa pioneer factors. We also show that Foxa2 binds more sites in Zmpste24 mutant mice, a progeroid laminopathy model, similar to increased Foxa2 occupancy in old livers. Aged and Zmpste24-deficient livers share several features, including nuclear lamina abnormalities, increased Foxa2 binding, de-repression of PPAR- and LXR-dependent gene expression, and fatty liver. In old livers, additional Foxa2 binding is correlated to loss of lamin B1 and heterochromatin (H3K9me3 occupancy) at these loci. Our observations suggest that changes at the nuclear lamina are linked to altered Foxa2 binding, enabling opening of chromatin and de-repression of genes encoding lipid synthesis and storage targets that contribute to etiology of hepatic steatosis. © 2018 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Ethics and embryonic stem cell research: altered nuclear transfer as a way forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlbut, William B

    2007-01-01

    Ethical controversy in stem cell research arises because current methods to produce embryonic stem cell lines require the destruction of living human embryos. For this reason, there is increasing interest in developing alternative, non-embryonic sources of pluripotent stem cells. This effort is especially important in the US due to the prevailing policy against federal funding of embryo-destructive research. Altered nuclear transfer (ANT) is one of several potential methods to develop alternative sources of pluripotent stem cells. This approach employs the technique of somatic cell nuclear transfer, but the somatic cell nucleus or egg cytoplasm (or both) are first altered before the somatic cell nucleus is transferred into the oocyte. This alteration precludes the coordinated organization and developmental potential that is necessary for the resulting biological entity to be an embryo, but it still allows the entity to generate pluripotent stem cells. Proof-of-principle for one variant of ANT has been established in mice by silencing the functional expression of the gene Cdx2 in the somatic cell nucleus prior to its transfer into an enucleated egg. From the resulting non-embryonic laboratory construct, fully functional pluripotent stem cells were procured. Other more recent studies have suggested the possibility of achieving the same results by preemptively silencing maternally derived Cdx2 messenger RNA in the egg before the act of nuclear transfer. The procedure would produce the equivalent of a tissue culture of pluripotent stem cells. In contrast to the use of embryos 'left over' from clinical in vitro fertilization, ANT could produce pluripotent stem cell lines with an unlimited range of specifically selected and controlled genotypes. Such flexibility would greatly facilitate the study of disease, drug development, and toxicology testing, and may allow the production of therapeutically useful pluripotent stem cells that are immune-compatible. If developed to

  4. Study of nuclear glasses alteration gel and synthesis of some model gels; Etude du gel d`alteration des verres nucleaires et synthese de gels modeles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricol, S.

    1995-10-05

    This work deals with the general problem of alteration of the reference nuclear glass R7T7. Attention is paid particularly to the altered layer formed at the glass surface during alteration process. In opposition to previous works, related essentially to glass dissolution kinetics based on chemical analyses of lixiviated elements, this thesis deals with alteration problems through structural studies of the reference glass and derived gel. This approach allows the determination of mechanisms for the gel formation and a better understanding of the behaviour of glasses towards lixiviation. Both approaches appeared complementary. Based on several spectroscopic techniques, this work showed the particular role of cations such as calcium, zirconium and iron. Studies of silica-based synthetic gels showed the synergic effect of formers cation and of one highly coordinated cation. The variation of the wavenumber related to Si-O-Si asymmetric stretching vibration can be correlated to O/Si ratio for ternary systems Si/Na/Zr. On the contrary, the Si losses of the materials depend on the number of non-bridging oxygen atoms. In the perspective of long-term behaviour, the alteration gel presents better characteristics than initial glass. It is therefore a highly stable material in static conditions. In the same way, synthetic gels are materials with very low solubilities (much lower than the alteration gel) and could be used as confining matrices. (authors). refs., 71 figs., 37 tabs.

  5. Uraninite alteration in an oxidizing environment and its relevance to the disposal of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, R.; Ewing, R.

    1990-12-01

    Uraninite is a natural analogue for spent nuclear fuel because of similarities in structure and chemistry. Effective assessment of the long-term behavior of spent fuel in a geologic repository requires a knowledge of the corrosion products produced in that environment. Several important natural analogue sites are reviewed, illustrating a wide variety of environments from oxidizing to reducing, including, among others: Cigar Lake, Canada, a uraninite-bearing ore body at depth within a strictly reducing environment; the ore body has 'seen' extensive groundwater interaction with virtually no significant oxidation or mobilization of U apperent. Koongara, Australia is a highly altered uraninite-bearing ore body partially exposed to meteoric water; alteration at depth has resulted from interaction with groundwater having a somewhat reduced Eh compared to the surface. Uraninite, Pb-uranyl oxide hydrates and uranyl silicates control U solubility at depth; uranyl phosphates and U adsorption onto clays and FeMn-oxides control U solubility near the surface. Pocos de Caldas, Brazil displays a redox from moving through uraninite-bearing rocks near the surface and shows local remobilization of U. Oklo, Gabon, a uraninite- and coffinite-bearing ore body, locally affected by intense hydrothermal alteration during fission reactions, demonstrates restricted radionuclide and fission product transport within a reducing environment. A current study being conducted by the authors at Shinkolbwe, Zaire, a uraninite-bearing ore body exposed to highly oxidizing conditions at the surface, provides over 50 species of uranyl phases for detailed study, and illustrates a complex uranyl phase paragenesis over several million years, from earliest-formed uranyl oxide hydrates and uranyl silicates to later-formed uranyl phosphate. (au) (268 refs.)

  6. Changes in mitochondrial DNA alter expression of nuclear encoded genes associated with tumorigenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jandova, Jana; Janda, Jaroslav [Southern Arizona VA Healthcare System, Department of Medicine, Dermatology Division and Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, 1515 N Campbell Avenue, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States); Sligh, James E, E-mail: jsligh@azcc.arizona.edu [Southern Arizona VA Healthcare System, Department of Medicine, Dermatology Division and Arizona Cancer Center, University of Arizona, 1515 N Campbell Avenue, Tucson, AZ 857 24 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    We previously reported the presence of a mtDNA mutation hotspot in UV-induced premalignant and malignant skin tumors in hairless mice. We have modeled this change (9821insA) in murine cybrid cells and demonstrated that this alteration in mtDNA associated with mtBALB haplotype can alter the biochemical characteristics of cybrids and subsequently can contribute to significant changes in their behavioral capabilities. This study shows that changes in mtDNA can produce differences in expression levels of specific nuclear-encoded genes, which are capable of triggering the phenotypes such as seen in malignant cells. From a potential list of differentially expressed genes discovered by microarray analysis, we selected MMP-9 and Col1a1 for further studies. Real-time PCR confirmed up-regulation of MMP-9 and down-regulation of Col1a1 in cybrids harboring the mtDNA associated with the skin tumors. These cybrids also showed significantly increased migration and invasion abilities compared to wild type. The non-specific MMP inhibitor, GM6001, was able to inhibit migratory and invasive abilities of the 9821insA cybrids confirming a critical role of MMPs in cellular motility. Nuclear factor-{kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B) is a key transcription factor for production of MMPs. An inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B activation, Bay 11-7082, was able to inhibit the expression of MMP-9 and ultimately decrease migration and invasion of mutant cybrids containing 9821insA. These studies confirm a role of NF-{kappa}B in the regulation of MMP-9 expression and through this regulation modulates the migratory and invasive capabilities of cybrids with mutant mtDNA. Enhanced migration and invasion abilities caused by up-regulated MMP-9 may contribute to the tumorigenic phenotypic characteristics of mutant cybrids. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cybrids are useful models to study the role of mtDNA changes in cancer development. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer mtDNA changes affect the expression of nuclear

  7. Dutasteride-mediated morphological changes in the genitourinary tract associated with altered expression patterns of the androgen and estrogen receptors in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enatsu, N; Chiba, K; Sumii, K; Fukuda, T; Okada, K; Matsushita, K; Fujisawa, M

    2017-03-01

    We evaluated the effects of dutasteride on the genitourinary tract using fifteen 8-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats. Animals were divided into three groups comprising five animals each and treated as follows. Group A was a control group, members of Group B received oral administration of dutasteride 0.1 mg/kg/day from the age of 8 to 16 weeks, and members of Group C were castrated at the age of 8 weeks. All rats were killed at the age of 16 weeks for the sample collection of blood, bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, and penis. Then, we evaluated the pathological examination for evaluating the tissue fibrosis and hormonal receptor expression. The results showed that the mean size of the prostate and seminal vesicles was smaller in Group B and Group C than in Group A. Serum and tissue concentrations of both testosterone and dihydrotestosterone were remarkably reduced in serum and all tissues in Group C compared with Group A. On the other hand, in Group B, only dihydrotestosterone was reduced in serum and penis. Histopathological examination revealed that Group C showed statistically significant histological changes, such as an increase in fibrotic tissue in the bladder, prostate, and penis. Similarly, Group B showed fibrotic changes in the prostate and penis compared with the Group A. Immunofluorescent staining revealed that the androgen receptor was more strongly expressed than the estrogen receptor beta in Group A. On the other hand, in Group C, weak expression of the androgen receptor and strong expression of the estrogen receptor beta was noted. In Group B, these changes were noted in the prostate and penis. These findings suggest that dutasteride cause morphological changes not only in prostate but also in penis. These changes are associated with altered expression patterns of androgen receptor and estrogen receptor. © 2016 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  8. Altered molecular profile in thyroid cancers from patients affected by the Three Mile Island nuclear accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, David; Russo, Mariano; Houser, Kenneth; Crist, Henry; Derr, Jonathan B; Walter, Vonn; Warrick, Joshua I; Sheldon, Kathryn E; Broach, James; Bann, Darrin V

    2017-07-01

    In 1979, Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear power plant experienced a partial meltdown with release of radioactive material. The effects of the accident on thyroid cancer (TC) in the surrounding population remain unclear. Radiation-induced TCs have a lower incidence of single nucleotide oncogenic driver mutations and higher incidence of gene fusions. We used next generation sequencing (NGS) to identify molecular signatures of radiation-induced TC in a cohort of TC patients residing near TMI during the time of the accident. Case series. We identified 44 patients who developed papillary thyroid carcinoma between 1974 and 2014. Patients who developed TC between 1984 and 1996 were at risk for radiation-induced TC, patients who developed TC before 1984 or after 1996 were the control group. We used targeted NGS of paired tumor and normal tissue from each patient to identify single nucleotide oncogenic driver mutations. Oncogenic gene fusions were identified using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. We identified 15 patients in the at-risk group and 29 patients in the control group. BRAF V600E mutations were identified in 53% patients in the at-risk group and 83% patients in the control group. The proportion of patients with BRAF mutations in the at-risk group was significantly lower than predicted by the The Cancer Genome Atlas cohort. Gene fusion or somatic copy number alteration drivers were identified in 33% tumors in the at-risk group and 14% of tumors in the control group. Findings were consistent with observations from other radiation-exposed populations. These data raise the possibility that radiation released from TMI may have altered the molecular profile of TC in the population surrounding TMI. 4 Laryngoscope, 127:S1-S9, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. Study of the confined solutions properties: case of gel formed during nuclear glass alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matar-Briman, I.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated the thermodynamic properties, the structure and the dynamics of confined solutions in model gels and in a gel coming from glass alteration. The first step was to determine the structure and the dynamics of pure confined water in porous materials by using nuclear magnetic resonance and neutron scattering. Meso-porous silica was elaborated and grafted by sol-gel route to decrease the pore sizes from 2.7 to 2 nm and to modify pore surfaces to have Si-OH, Zr-OH and Al-OH. The second step involved determining the dynamics of water in leachate confined in the model gels and in the gel of altered glass by using neutron scattering. In the model gels and at a 10 -12 -10 -9 second timescale, two kinds of waters were highlighted: first, an interfacial water linked to the pore surfaces and second, a free water in the pore core. Their ratio depends on the pore size and pore surface composition. Whatever the pore surface, when the pore size decreases the free water ratio in the pore center also decreases. For pores smaller than 2.3 nm and pore surfaces with Zr-OH or Al-OH surfaces, water is strongly linked to the surface and few water molecules are mobile. This is due to the ability of alumina and zirconia to immobilize water molecules through chemical coordination bonds stronger than the physical bonds established between silica and water. The result also highlight that pore surface composition could be the predominant parameter affecting the fixed proton content. Moreover, the mobility of water confined in a leachate is not modified. The study of the water dynamics in a gel formed during alteration of glass constituted of SiO 2 , Al 2 O 3 and CaO, and having a porosity between 2 and 7 nm showed the same behavior as water confined in pores presenting an Al-OH surface. (author) [fr

  10. Study of the mechanisms underlying resumptions of alteration. Modeling and evaluation of the impact on nuclear waste glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fournier, Maxime

    2015-01-01

    A sudden and still poorly understood phenomenon, the resumption of alteration results in a sudden acceleration of the glass alteration rate due to the destabilization of the amorphous passivating layer formed on the glass surface. Understanding the origin and the consequences of this phenomenon is a major issue for the prediction of nuclear glass long-term behavior. This study quantitatively links the alteration degree of a six-oxide reference glass and the formation mechanisms of zeolites and C-S-H that control the solution chemistry. The role played by the decrease in aluminum concentration as an indicator of resumption is highlighted. It appears that the resumption occurrence and rate are correlated to the couple (T, pH), but even in the most adverse situations the resumption rate is lower than the initial alteration rate, which remains the fastest kinetic regime. Previously limited to alkaline pH, the characterization of alteration resumptions was extended to conditions more representative of those found in a geological repository. This approach required the development of a new tool: seeding, that reduces or eliminates the latency period preceding a resumption. The results obtained demonstrate its usefulness in understanding the role of zeolites in amorphous layer destabilization and for modeling alteration resumptions. A geochemical modeling approach to alteration resumption is proposed, based on the formalism of the GRAAL glass alteration model. It is based on the calculation of zeolite thermodynamic constants, on the implementation of their nucleation and growth kinetics, and on assumptions related to the solubility of the amorphous layer. When zeolite precipitation consumes alkali, glass alteration - driven by zeolite precipitation - releases alkali. The model highlights the importance of such chemical couplings and shows that, in the stoichiometry of French nuclear reference glass, their cumulative effects are the cause of a pH decrease which limits

  11. IDH2 Mutations Define a Unique Subtype of Breast Cancer with Altered Nuclear Polarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Sarah; Weigelt, Britta; Wen, Huei-Chi; Pareja, Fresia; Raghavendra, Ashwini; Martelotto, Luciano G.; Burke, Kathleen A.; Basili, Thais; Li, Anqi; Geyer, Felipe C.; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Ng, Charlotte K.Y.; Jungbluth, Achim A.; Balss, Jörg; Pusch, Stefan; Baker, Gabrielle M.; Cole, Kimberly S.; von Deimling, Andreas; Batten, Julie M.; Marotti, Jonathan D.; Soh, Hwei-Choo; McCalip, Benjamin L.; Serrano, Jonathan; Lim, Raymond S.; Siziopikou, Kalliopi P.; Lu, Song; Liu, Xiaolong; Hammour, Tarek; Brogi, Edi; Snuderl, Matija; Iafrate, A. John; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; Schnitt, Stuart J.

    2017-01-01

    Solid papillary carcinoma with reverse polarity (SPCRP) is a rare breast cancer subtype with an obscure etiology. In this study, we sought to describe its unique histopathologic features and to identify the genetic alterations that underpin SPCRP using massively parallel whole-exome and targeted sequencing. The morphologic and immunohistochemical features of SPCRP support the invasive nature of this subtype. Ten of 13 (77%) SPCRPs harbored hotspot mutations at R172 of the isocitrate dehydrogenase IDH2, of which 8 of 10 displayed concurrent pathogenic mutations affecting PIK3CA or PIK3R1. One of the IDH2 wild-type SPCRPs harbored a TET2 Q548* truncating mutation coupled with a PIK3CA H1047R mutation. Functional studies demonstrated that IDH2 and PIK3CA hotspot mutations are likely drivers of SPCRP, resulting in its reversed nuclear polarization phenotype. Our results offer a molecular definition of SPCRP as a distinct breast cancer subtype. Concurrent IDH2 and PIK3CA mutations may help diagnose SPCRP and possibly direct effective treatment. PMID:27913435

  12. Effect of water α radiolysis on the spent nuclear fuel UO2 matrix alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucchini, J.F.

    2001-01-01

    In the option of long term storage or direct disposal of nuclear spent fuel, it is essential to study the long-term behaviour of the spent fuel matrix (UO 2 ) in water, in presence of ionizing radiations. This work gives some knowledge elements about the impact of aerated water alpha radiolysis on UO 2 alteration. An original experiment method was used in this study. UO 2 /water interfaces were irradiated by an external He 2+ ions beam. The sequential batch dissolution tests on UO 2 samples were performed in aerated deionized water, before, during and after a-irradiation under high fluxes. A corrosion product, identified as hydrated uranium peroxide, was formed on the UO 2 surface. The uranium release was 3 to 4 orders of magnitude higher under irradiation than out of irradiation. The concentrations of the radiolysis products H 2 O 2 and H 3 O + were affected by the uranium oxide surface. They could not only explain the whole uranium release reached during irradiation in water. Leaching experiments on UO X spent fuel samples (with or without the Zircaloy clad) were also performed, in hot cells. The uranium release was relatively small, and H 2 O 2 was not detected in solution. The rates of uranium release in aerated water during one hour were calculated. They were about mg -1 .m -2 .d -1 for spent fuel and for UO 2 , and about g -1 .m -2 .d -1 for UO 2 irradiated by He 2+ ions. The comparison of the results between the two kinds of experiment shows a difference of the behaviour in water between UO 2 irradiated by He 2+ ions and spent fuel. Some hypothesis are given to explain this difference. (author)

  13. Natural glass analogues to alteration of nuclear waste glass: A review and recommendations for further study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to review previous work on the weathering of natural glasses; and to make recommendations for further work with respect to studying the alteration of natural glasses as it relates quantifying rates of dissolution. the first task was greatly simplified by the published papers of Jercinovic and Ewing (1987) and Byers, Jercinovic, and Ewing (1987). The second task is obviously the more difficult of the two and the author makes no claim of completeness in this regard. Glasses weather in the natural environment by reacting with aqueous solutions producing a rind of secondary solid phases. It had been proposed by some workers that the thickness of this rind is a function of the age of the glass and thus could be used to estimate glass dissolution rates. However, Jercinovic and Ewing (1987) point out that in general the rind thickness does not correlate with the age of the glass owing to the differences in time of contact with the solution compared to the actual age of the sample. It should be noted that the rate of glass dissolution is also a function of the composition of both the glass and the solution, and the temperature. Quantification of the effects of these parameters (as well as time of contact with the aqueous phase and flow rates) would thus permit a prediction of the consequences of glass-fluid interactions under varying environmental conditions. Defense high- level nuclear waste (DHLW), consisting primarily of liquid and sludge, will be encapsulated by and dispersed in a borosilicate glass before permanent storage in a HLW repository. This glass containing the DHLW serves to dilute the radionuclides and to retard their dispersion into the environment. 318 refs.

  14. Natural glass analogues to alteration of nuclear waste glass: A review and recommendations for further study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to review previous work on the weathering of natural glasses; and to make recommendations for further work with respect to studying the alteration of natural glasses as it relates quantifying rates of dissolution. the first task was greatly simplified by the published papers of Jercinovic and Ewing (1987) and Byers, Jercinovic, and Ewing (1987). The second task is obviously the more difficult of the two and the author makes no claim of completeness in this regard. Glasses weather in the natural environment by reacting with aqueous solutions producing a rind of secondary solid phases. It had been proposed by some workers that the thickness of this rind is a function of the age of the glass and thus could be used to estimate glass dissolution rates. However, Jercinovic and Ewing (1987) point out that in general the rind thickness does not correlate with the age of the glass owing to the differences in time of contact with the solution compared to the actual age of the sample. It should be noted that the rate of glass dissolution is also a function of the composition of both the glass and the solution, and the temperature. Quantification of the effects of these parameters (as well as time of contact with the aqueous phase and flow rates) would thus permit a prediction of the consequences of glass-fluid interactions under varying environmental conditions. Defense high- level nuclear waste (DHLW), consisting primarily of liquid and sludge, will be encapsulated by and dispersed in a borosilicate glass before permanent storage in a HLW repository. This glass containing the DHLW serves to dilute the radionuclides and to retard their dispersion into the environment. 318 refs

  15. Australian Students' Views on Nuclear Issues: Does Teaching Alter Prior Beliefs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Sarina; Yeo, Shelley; Zadnik, Marjan

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the conceptual understandings of seventy-eight 16-year-old Australian high school students' and their knowledge about several issues related to nuclear energy. As a result of their study of the physics topic Nuclear Technology, the students learned more about applications of nuclear technology, had better though still…

  16. Alteration of reactor installation (alteration of No.1, No.2 and No.5 reactor facilities) in Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (Report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Commission presented the report to the Minister of International Trade and Industry on this alteration, on which the inguiry was made on July 17, 1987, after the prudent investigation and deliberation. The technical capability of the applicant was recognized as appropriate as the result of examination. It was judged that the safety after this alteration of reactor facilities can be ensured, as the result of examination. The main items of investigation were as follows: the safety related to the removal of leak control system from main steam isolation valves of No.2 and No.5 reactors, the safety related to the change of the number of relief safety valves of No.2 and No.5 reactors from 18 to 15, the safety related to the change of residual heat removal system of No.2 and No.5 reactors, the safety related to the change of power source for neutron flux monitors and reactor emergency shutdown system circuits of No.2 and No.5 reactors, the safety related to the change of liquid waste treatment system of No.5 reactor, the effect of incinerating spent resin to the environment, and the analysis of abnormal transient change during operation. (Kako, I.)

  17. Cell cycle-dependent alteration in NAC1 nuclear body dynamics and morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Pei-Hsun; Hung, Shen-Hsiu; Ren, Tina; Tseng, Yiider; Shih, Ie-Ming

    2011-01-01

    NAC1, a BTB/POZ family member, has been suggested to participate in maintaining the stemness of embryonic stem cells and has been implicated in the pathogenesis of human cancer. In ovarian cancer, NAC1 upregulation is associated with disease aggressiveness and with the development of chemoresistance. Like other BTB/POZ proteins, NAC1 forms discrete nuclear bodies in non-dividing cells. To investigate the biological role of NAC1 nuclear bodies, we characterized the expression dynamics of NAC1 nuclear bodies during different phases of the cell cycle. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching assays revealed that NAC1 was rapidly exchanged between the nucleoplasm and NAC1 nuclear bodies in interphase cells. The number of NAC1 bodies significantly increased and their size decreased in the S phase as compared to the G 0 /G 1 and G 2 phases. NAC1 nuclear bodies disappeared and NAC1 became diffuse during mitosis. NAC1 nuclear bodies reappeared immediately after completion of mitosis. These results indicate that a cell cycle-dependent regulatory mechanism controls NAC1 body formation in the nucleus and suggest that NAC1 body dynamics are associated with mitosis or cytokinesis

  18. Direct investigations of the immobilization of radionuclides in the alteration phases of spent nuclear fuel. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, P.C.; Finch, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    'In an oxidizing environment, such as in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, rapid alteration rates are expected for spent nuclear fuel. Lab.-scale simulations have repeatedly shown that the dominant alteration products under repository conditions will be uranyl phases. There is an inadequate database that relates to the effects of the alteration products on the release of radionuclides, but this information is essential to provide a radionuclide release estimate. It is likely that many of the radionuclides contained in the fuel will be incorporated into the alteration products that form, potentially with a profound impact on the future mobility of radionuclides in the repository. The authors objective is to characterize the incorporation of radionuclides into alteration products by synthesis of uranyl phases doped with radionuclides, appropriate surrogate elements, or non-radioactive isotopes, followed by detailed phase characterization by diffraction and spectroscopic techniques. The research will permit a more realistic estimate of the release rates of the radionuclides from the near-field environment. This report summarizes work after 8 months of a 3-year project. The objective of investigating radionuclide incorporation in uranyl phases has required the development of synthesis techniques for various uranyl phases that are expected to form under repository conditions. The authors have synthesized and determined the structures of several uranyl phases that are new to science and that may be important alteration products under repository conditions. They have also undertaken the determination and refinement of the crystal structures of various uranyl phases that are likely to form under repository conditions. Other experiments include the investigation of the ion-exchange properties of uranyl phases under repository conditions.'

  19. Direct Investigations of the Immobilization of Radionuclides in the Alteration Products of Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter C. Burns; Robert J. Finch; David J. Wronkiewicz

    2004-12-27

    Safe disposal of the nation's nuclear waste in a geological repository involves unique scientific and engineering challenges owing to the very long-lived radioactivity of the waste. The repository must retain a variety of radionuclides that have vastly different chemical characters for several thousand years. Most of the radioactivity that will be housed in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain will be associated with spent nuclear fuel, much of which is derived from commercial reactors. DOE is custodian of approximately 8000 tons of spent nuclear fuel that is also intended for eventual disposal in a geological repository. Unlike the spent fuel from commercial reactors, the DOE fuel is diverse in composition with more than 250 varieties. Safe disposal of spent fuel requires a detailed knowledge of its long-term behavior under repository conditions, as well as the fate of radionuclides released from the spent fuel as waste containers are breached.

  20. Alteration of R7T7-type nuclear glass in deep geological storage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Combarieu, G. de

    2007-02-01

    This PhD thesis is aimed to study the alteration of SON68 glass, French inactive glass of R7T7-type, in contact with near field materials of a deep geological storage (French concept from ANDRA) which are mainly metallic iron and Callovo-Oxfordian clay. Therefore, experiments involving a 'glass-iron-clay' system at lab-scale have been carried out. Interactions between glass, iron and clay have been characterised from submicron to millimeter scale by means of SEM, TEM, XRD and XAS and Raman spectroscopies in terms of chemistry and crystal-chemistry. In the mean time, a conceptual model of glass alteration has been developed to account for most of the experimental observations and known mechanisms of alteration. The model has been then transposed within the transport-chemistry code HYTEC, together with developed models of clay and iron corrosion, to simulate the experiments described above. This work is thus a contribution to the understanding of iron corrosion in Callovo-Oxfordian clay and subsequent glass alteration in the newly formed corrosion products, the whole process being considered as a lab-scale model of a deep geological storage of radioactive wastes. (author)

  1. Safety concerning the partial alteration of the fuel reprocessing facility in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    A report of the Committee on Examination of Nuclear Fuel Safety was presented to the Atomic Energy Commission of Japan, which is concerned with the safety in the partial alteration of the fuel reprocessing facility in the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Its safety was confirmed. The alteration is as follows. In order to raise the storage capacity of low-level radioactive solid wastes, the second storage is installed. The building for low-level solid waste storage is a ferro-concrete structure, total floor space is 1,260 m 2 , two-storied with one basement floor. The basement floor is for storage, the first floor for receiving, storage, etc., and the second floor for storage and machinery room. The capacity of the second storage is for about 9,500 200 l drums (equivalent to about four years waste discharge). The contents of the safety examination are safety of facilities such as aseismatic property and radiation protection, and effects on the surrounding environment. (Mori, K

  2. Microarray analysis reveals altered expression of a large number of nuclear genes in developing cytoplasmic male sterile Brassica napus flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Jenny; Lagercrantz, Ulf; Sundström, Jens; Teixeira, Rita; Wellmer, Frank; Meyerowitz, Elliot M; Glimelius, Kristina

    2007-02-01

    To gain new insights into the mechanism underlying cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS), we compared the nuclear gene expression profiles of flowers of a Brassica napus CMS line with that of the fertile B. napus maintainer line using Arabidopsis thaliana flower-specific cDNA microarrays. The CMS line used has a B. napus nuclear genome, but has a rearranged mitochondrial (mt) genome consisting of both B. napus and A. thaliana DNA. Gene expression profiling revealed that a large number of genes differed in expression between the two lines. For example, nuclear genes coding for proteins that are involved in protein import into organelles, genes expressed in stamens and pollen, as well as genes implicated in either cell-wall remodeling or architecture, were repressed in the CMS line compared with B. napus. These results show that the mt genome of the CMS line strongly influences nuclear gene expression, and thus reveal the importance of retrograde signalling between the mitochondria and the nucleus. Furthermore, flowers of the CMS line are characterized by a replacement of stamens with carpelloid organs, and thus partially resemble the APETALA3 (AP3) and PISTILLATA (PI) mutants. In accordance with this phenotype, AP3 expression was downregulated in the stamens, shortly before these organs developed carpelloid characteristics, even though it was initiated correctly. Repression of PI succeeded that of AP3 and might be a consequence of a loss of AP3 activity. These results suggest that AP3 expression in stamens depends on proper mt function and a correct nuclear-mt interaction, and that mt alterations cause the male sterility phenotype of the CMS line.

  3. Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home A-Z Health Topics Urinary tract infections Urinary tract infections > A-Z Health Topics Urinary tract infections (PDF, ... To receive Publications email updates Enter email Submit Urinary tract infections Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are most often caused ...

  4. Biological effect of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans on some potentially toxic elements during alteration of SON 68 nuclear glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachelet, M.; Crovisier, J. L.; Stille, P.; Vuilleumier, S.; Geoffroy, V.

    2009-04-01

    Although underground nuclear waste repositories are not expected to be favourable places for microbial activity, one should not exclude localized action of extremophilic bacteria on some materials involved in the storage concept. Among endogenous or accidentally introduced acidophiles, some are susceptible to lead to a locally drastic decreased in pH, with potential consequences on materials corrosion. Experiments were performed with Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans on 100-125 m french reference nuclear glass SON68 grains in a mineral medium under static conditions during 60 days at 25degC. Growth medium was periodically renewed and analyzed by ICP-AES and ICP-MS spectrometry for both major, trace and ultra-trace elements. Biofilm formation was evidenced by confocal laser microscopy, staining DNA with ethidium bromide and exopolysaccharides with calcofluor white. Biofilm thickness around material grains exceeded 20 m under the chosen experimental conditions. It can be noticed that while numerous studies on biofilm formation upon interaction between Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and materials are found in the literature, evidence for biofilm formation is still scarce for the case of the acidophilic bacterium A. thiooxidans. Presence of biofilm is a key parameter for material alteration at the solid/solution interface in biotic systems. Indeed, various constitutive elements of materials trapped in the polyanionic polymer of biofilm may also influence the alteration process. In particular, biofilm may reduce the alteration rate of materials by forming a protective barrier at their surface (Aouad et al., 2008). In this study, glass alteration rates, determined using strontium as tracer, showed that the progressive formation of a biofilm on the surface of glass has a protective effect against its alteration. Uranium and rare earth elements (REE) are efficiently trapped in the biogenic compartment of the system (exopolysaccharides + bacterial cells). Besides, the ratio

  5. Nano-Continuum Modeling of a Nuclear Glass Specimen Altered for 25 Years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steefel, Carl

    2014-01-06

    The purpose of this contribution is to report on preliminary nano-continuum scale modeling of nuclear waste glass corrosion. The focus of the modeling is an experiment involving a French glass SON68 specimen leached for 25 years in a granitic environment. In this report, we focus on capturing the nano-scale concentration profiles. We use a high resolution continuum model with a constant grid spacing of 1 nanometer to investigate the glass corrosion mechanisms.

  6. Differentiation alters stem cell nuclear architecture, mechanics, and mechano-sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Su-Jin; Driscoll, Tristan P; Thorpe, Stephen D; Nerurkar, Nandan L; Baker, Brendon M; Yang, Michael T; Chen, Christopher S; Lee, David A; Mauck, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) differentiation is mediated by soluble and physical cues. In this study, we investigated differentiation-induced transformations in MSC cellular and nuclear biophysical properties and queried their role in mechanosensation. Our data show that nuclei in differentiated bovine and human MSCs stiffen and become resistant to deformation. This attenuated nuclear deformation was governed by restructuring of Lamin A/C and increased heterochromatin content. This change in nuclear stiffness sensitized MSCs to mechanical-loading-induced calcium signaling and differentiated marker expression. This sensitization was reversed when the ‘stiff’ differentiated nucleus was softened and was enhanced when the ‘soft’ undifferentiated nucleus was stiffened through pharmacologic treatment. Interestingly, dynamic loading of undifferentiated MSCs, in the absence of soluble differentiation factors, stiffened and condensed the nucleus, and increased mechanosensitivity more rapidly than soluble factors. These data suggest that the nucleus acts as a mechanostat to modulate cellular mechanosensation during differentiation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18207.001 PMID:27901466

  7. Optimizing the protein switch: altering nuclear import and export signals, and ligand binding domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakar, Mudit; Davis, James R.; Kern, Steve E.; Lim, Carol S.

    2007-01-01

    Ligand regulated localization controllable protein constructs were optimized in this study. Several constructs were made from a classical nuclear export signal (HIV-rev, MAPKK, or progesterone receptor) in combination with a SV40 T-antigen type nuclear import signal. Different ligand binding domains (LBDs from glucocorticoid receptor or progesterone receptor) were also tested for their ability to impart control over localization of proteins. This study was designed to create constructs which are cytoplasmic in the absence of ligand and nuclear in the presence of ligand, and also to regulate the amount of protein translocating to the nucleus on ligand induction. The balance between the strengths of import and export signals was critical for overall localization of proteins. The amount of protein entering the nucleus was also affected by the dose of ligand (10-100nM). However, the overall import characteristics were determined by the strengths of localization signals and the inherent localization properties of the LBD used. This study established that the amount of protein present in a particular compartment can be regulated by the use of localization signals of various strengths. These optimized localization controllable protein constructs can be used to correct for diseases due to aberrant localization of proteins. PMID:17574289

  8. Silicon isotope ratio measurements by inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry for alteration studies of nuclear waste glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourgiotis, Alkiviadis; Ducasse, Thomas; Barker, Evelyne; Jollivet, Patrick; Gin, Stéphane; Bassot, Sylvain; Cazala, Charlotte

    2017-02-15

    High-level, long-lived nuclear waste arising from spent fuel reprocessing is vitrified in silicate glasses for final disposal in deep geologic formations. In order to better understand the mechanisms driving glass dissolution, glass alteration studies, based on silicon isotope ratio monitoring of 29 Si-doped aqueous solutions, were carried out in laboratories. This work explores the capabilities of the new type of quadrupole-based ICP-MS, the Agilent 8800 tandem quadrupole ICP-MS/MS, for accurate silicon isotope ratio determination for alteration studies of nuclear waste glasses. In order to avoid silicon polyatomic interferences, a new analytical method was developed using O 2 as the reaction gas in the Octopole Reaction System (ORS), and silicon isotopes were measured in mass-shift mode. A careful analysis of the potential polyatomic interferences on SiO + and SiO 2 + ion species was performed, and we found that SiO + ion species suffer from important polyatomic interferences coming from the matrix of sample and standard solutions (0.5M HNO 3 ). For SiO 2 + , no interferences were detected, and thus, these ion species were chosen for silicon isotope ratio determination. A number of key settings for accurate isotope ratio analysis like, detector dead time, integration time, number of sweeps, wait time offset, memory blank and instrumental mass fractionation, were considered and optimized. Particular attention was paid to the optimization of abundance sensitivity of the quadrupole mass filter before the ORS. We showed that poor abundance sensitivity leads to a significant shift of the data away from the Exponential Mass Fractionation Law (EMFL) due to the spectral overlaps of silicon isotopes combined with different oxygen isotopes (i.e. 28 Si 16 O 18 O + , 30 Si 16 O 16 O + ). The developed method was validated by measuring a series of reference solutions with different 29 Si enrichment. Isotope ratio trueness, uncertainty and repeatability were found to be

  9. Silicon isotope ratio measurements by inductively coupled plasma tandem mass spectrometry for alteration studies of nuclear waste glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourgiotis, Alkiviadis, E-mail: alkiviadis.gourgiotis@irsn.fr [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-DGE/SRTG/LT2S, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Ducasse, Thomas [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Barker, Evelyne [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-DGE/SRTG/LT2S, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Jollivet, Patrick; Gin, Stéphane [CEA, DEN, DTCD, SECM, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze (France); Bassot, Sylvain; Cazala, Charlotte [Institut de Radioprotection et de Sûreté Nucléaire (IRSN), PRP-DGE/SRTG/LT2S, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2017-02-15

    High-level, long-lived nuclear waste arising from spent fuel reprocessing is vitrified in silicate glasses for final disposal in deep geologic formations. In order to better understand the mechanisms driving glass dissolution, glass alteration studies, based on silicon isotope ratio monitoring of {sup 29}Si-doped aqueous solutions, were carried out in laboratories. This work explores the capabilities of the new type of quadrupole-based ICP-MS, the Agilent 8800 tandem quadrupole ICP-MS/MS, for accurate silicon isotope ratio determination for alteration studies of nuclear waste glasses. In order to avoid silicon polyatomic interferences, a new analytical method was developed using O{sub 2} as the reaction gas in the Octopole Reaction System (ORS), and silicon isotopes were measured in mass-shift mode. A careful analysis of the potential polyatomic interferences on SiO{sup +} and SiO{sub 2}{sup +} ion species was performed, and we found that SiO{sup +} ion species suffer from important polyatomic interferences coming from the matrix of sample and standard solutions (0.5M HNO{sub 3}). For SiO{sub 2}{sup +}, no interferences were detected, and thus, these ion species were chosen for silicon isotope ratio determination. A number of key settings for accurate isotope ratio analysis like, detector dead time, integration time, number of sweeps, wait time offset, memory blank and instrumental mass fractionation, were considered and optimized. Particular attention was paid to the optimization of abundance sensitivity of the quadrupole mass filter before the ORS. We showed that poor abundance sensitivity leads to a significant shift of the data away from the Exponential Mass Fractionation Law (EMFL) due to the spectral overlaps of silicon isotopes combined with different oxygen isotopes (i.e. {sup 28}Si{sup 16}O{sup 18}O{sup +}, {sup 30}Si{sup 16}O{sup 16}O{sup +}). The developed method was validated by measuring a series of reference solutions with different {sup 29}Si

  10. Clinoptilolite compositions in diagenetically-altered tuffs at a potential nuclear waste repository, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broxton, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    The compositions of Yucca Mountain clinoptilolites and their host tuffs are highly variable. Clinoptilolites and heulandites in fractures near the repository and in a thin, altered zone at the top of the Topopah Spring basal vitrophyre have consistent calcium-rich compositions. Below this level, clinoptilolites in thick zones of diagenetic alteration on the east side of Yucca Mountain have calcic-potassic compositions and become more calcium rich with depth. Clinoptilolites in stratigraphically equivalent tuffs to the west have sodic-potassic compositions and become more sodic with depth. Clinoptilolite properties important for repository performance assessment include thermal expansion/contraction behavior, hydration/dehydration behavior, and ion-exchange properties. These properties can be significantly affected by clinoptilolite compositions. The compositional variations for clinoptilolites found by this study suggest that the properties will vary vertically and laterally at Yucca Mountain. Used in conjunction with experimental data, the clinoptilolite compositions presented here can be used to model the behavior of clinoptilolites in the repository environment and along transport pathways

  11. Mechanical Strain Alters Cellular and Nuclear Dynamics at Early Stages of Oligodendrocyte Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhija, Ekta; Jagielska, Anna; Zhu, Lena; Bost, Alexander C; Ong, William; Chew, Sing Y; Shivashankar, G V; Van Vliet, Krystyn J

    2018-01-01

    Mechanical and physical stimuli including material stiffness and topography or applied mechanical strain have been demonstrated to modulate differentiation of glial progenitor and neural stem cells. Recent studies probing such mechanotransduction in oligodendrocytes have focused chiefly on the biomolecular components. However, the cell-level biophysical changes associated with such responses remain largely unknown. Here, we explored mechanotransduction in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) during the first 48 h of differentiation induction by quantifying the biophysical state in terms of nuclear dynamics, cytoskeleton organization, and cell migration. We compared these mechanophenotypic changes in OPCs exposed to both chemical cues (differentiation factors) and mechanical cues (static tensile strain of 10%) with those exposed to only those chemical cues. We observed that mechanical strain significantly hastened the dampening of nuclear fluctuations and decreased OPC migration, consistent with the progression of differentiation. Those biophysical changes were accompanied by increased production of the intracellular microtubule network. These observations provide insights into mechanisms by which mechanical strain of physiological magnitude could promote differentiation of progenitor cells to oligodendrocytes via inducing intracellular biophysical responses over hours to days post induction.

  12. Physiologic activation of nuclear factor kappa-B in the endometrium during the menstrual cycle is altered in endometriosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Ramos, Reinaldo; Rocco, Jocelyn; Rojas, Candy; Sovino, Hugo; Poch, Andrea; Kohen, Paulina; Alvarado-Díaz, Carlos; Devoto, Luigi

    2012-03-01

    To evaluate nuclear factor kappaB (NF-κB) activation and NF-κB-p65 subunit activation, immunolocalization, and expression in the endometrium of healthy women and endometriosis patients throughout the menstrual cycle. Prospective observational study. Affiliated hospital and university research laboratory. Twenty-four healthy women and 24 endometriosis patients. Menstrual, proliferative, and secretory endometrial biopsies. Assessment of NF-κB and p65 activation by protein-DNA binding assays and p65 localization and expression by immunohistochemistry. Total NF-κB-DNA binding was constitutive and variable in human endometrium accross the menstrual cycle. Healthy women (physiologic conditions) showed higher p65-DNA binding in proliferative than in menstrual and secretory endometrium. Conversely, in endometriosis patients, p65-DNA binding was higher in proliferative and secretory endometrium than in menstrual endometrium. Endometrial epithelial cells showed higher p65 expression level score than endometrial stromal cells. NF-κB activity is constitutive, physiologic, and variable in human endometrium. The physiologic cyclic p65 activation pattern was altered in endometriosis patients, showing no cyclic variation between the proliferative and secretory phase of the menstrual cycle. The absence of decreased p65 activity in secretory endometrium from endometriosis patients is concurrent with progesterone resistance and could participate in endometrial biologic alterations during the implantation window in endometriosis patients. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Priorities for modeling biological processes in climates altered by nuclear war

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detling, J.K.; Kercher, J.R.; Post, W.M.; Cowles, S.W.; Harwell, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    This document describes research that has been accomplished or currently models the effects of reduced light and temperature on terrestrial systems. We shall divide the systems to be studied into cultivated lands and uncultivated lands. The cultivated class consists of monoculture systems in which the individual plants belong to the same age and size class. The systems in the uncultivated class consist of uneven age, multi-species assemblies of interacting plants and animals. The uncultivated class ranges from minimally managed systems, e.g., rangelands and some forests, to completely unmanaged wildlands. For the cultivated case, the variable of concern is the annual yield of the crop under consideration. The models should be able to estimate percent yield loss as a function of reductions of light and temperature. The models should be accurate for the range of environments predicted for the growing season immediately following or during which the hypothetical nuclear exchange occurs. The models should be able to estimate yield loss in any subsequent year for which climatic conditions still differ significantly from normal. For the uncultivated case, the modelling program needs to be able to predict the effects on individual plants much the same as in the cultivated case; but in addition, the modelling program will have the task of estimating the effect that these changes in individual organisms will have at higher levels of organization, i.e., on populations, communities, and regional distributions of species. 25 refs., 1 tab

  14. Deltamethrin-induced nuclear erythrocyte alteration and damage to the gills and liver of Colossoma macropomum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Fernanda Dos Santos; Sousa, Natalino da Costa; Santos, Rudã Fernandes Brandão; Meneses, Juliana Oliveira; do Couto, Márcia Valéria Silva; de Almeida, Fabrício Tavares Cunha; de Sena Filho, José Guedes; Carneiro, Paulo César Falanghe; Maria, Alexandre Nizio; Fujimoto, Rodrigo Yudi

    2018-03-20

    Deltamethrin is one of the most commonly used pyrethroids in the world, and it has a high toxic potential, mainly on aquatic organism. Thus, the purpose of this study was to evaluate LC 50 values of deltamethrin on tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum) fingerlings and to investigate genotoxic effects and histopathological responses. Fish were exposed to different concentrations of deltamethrin (0, 6.16 × 10 -3 ; 6.44 × 10 -2 ; 1.34 × 10 -1 , and 1.93 × 10 -1  mg L -1 ) for 96 h. In addition, a genotoxicity analysis was carried out on peripheral blood erythrocytes and histopathological changes were classified by the severity degree of damage and organ functioning. The 96 h LC 50 value for tambaqui was estimated at 5.56 × 10 -2  mg L -1 using a static test system. Nuclear abnormalities in exposed fish included micronuclei, blebbed, notched, 8-shaped, and binucleated nuclei forms. Deltamethrin significantly induced a notched nucleus compared to other abnormalities. A histopathological examination showed hepatic lesions and gill damage. Deltamethrin was found to be highly toxic; it induced genotoxicity and caused liver and gill inflammation in tambaqui.

  15. The genitourinary tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currarino, G.

    1985-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in the field of pediatric uroradiology, as in most other aspects of radiology, since the last edition of this text was published in 1978. To a large extent, this progress was due to the remarkable advances in, and an increased application of, ultrasound, computed tomography, and nuclear imaging. In this section, an attempt has been made to incorporate and illustrate some of the applications of these diagnostic modalities to pediatric urology. The subjects discussed in this section include a brief account of the major radiologic procedures used in pediatric urology, followed by a review of the most common congenital and acquired diseases of the urinary tract and of the male and female genital tract, precocious puberty and intersex conditions, and disorders of the adrenal glands and related structures

  16. Altered surfactant homeostasis and recurrent respiratory failure secondary to TTF-1 nuclear targeting defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carnielli Virgilio P

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations of genes affecting surfactant homeostasis, such as SFTPB, SFTPC and ABCA3, lead to diffuse lung disease in neonates and children. Haploinsufficiency of NKX2.1, the gene encoding the thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1 - critical for lung, thyroid and central nervous system morphogenesis and function - causes a rare form of progressive respiratory failure designated brain-lung-thyroid syndrome. Molecular mechanisms involved in this syndrome are heterogeneous and poorly explored. We report a novel TTF-1 molecular defect causing recurrent respiratory failure episodes in an infant. Methods The subject was an infant with severe neonatal respiratory distress syndrome followed by recurrent respiratory failure episodes, hypopituitarism and neurological abnormalities. Lung histology and ultrastructure were assessed by surgical biopsy. Surfactant-related genes were studied by direct genomic DNA sequencing and array chromatine genomic hybridization (aCGH. Surfactant protein expression in lung tissue was analyzed by confocal immunofluorescence microscopy. For kinetics studies, surfactant protein B and disaturated phosphatidylcholine (DSPC were isolated from serial tracheal aspirates after intravenous administration of stable isotope-labeled 2H2O and 13C-leucine; fractional synthetic rate was derived from gas chromatography/mass spectrometry 2H and 13C enrichment curves. Six intubated infants with no primary lung disease were used as controls. Results Lung biopsy showed desquamative interstitial pneumonitis and lamellar body abnormalities suggestive of genetic surfactant deficiency. Genetic studies identified a heterozygous ABCA3 mutation, L941P, previously unreported. No SFTPB, SFTPC or NKX2.1 mutations or deletions were found. However, immunofluorescence studies showed TTF-1 prevalently expressed in type II cell cytoplasm instead of nucleus, indicating defective nuclear targeting. This pattern has not been reported in human

  17. Short communication: Glucagon-like peptide-2 and coccidiosis alter tight junction gene expression in the gastrointestinal tract of dairy calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, M P; Evock-Clover, C M; Elsasser, T H; Connor, E E

    2015-05-01

    nonruminants showing decreased expression of TJ complex proteins in the intestinal tract during pathogen-induced diarrhea and increased TJ protein expression in intestinal tissues in response to GLP-2 treatment. In conclusion, E. bovis reduces gene expression of TJ proteins primarily in cecum of calves 28d postinfection, and GLP-2 increases expression of selected TJ genes in intestinal tissues. Use of GLP-2 to improve gut barrier function in ruminants during pathogen-induced diarrhea warrants additional study. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The role of natural glasses as analogues in projecting the long-term alteration of high-level nuclear waste glasses: Part 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazer, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    The common observation of glasses persisting in natural environments for long periods of time (up to tens of millions of years) provides compelling evidence that these materials can be kinetically stable in a variety of subsurface environments. This paper reviews how natural and historical synthesized glasses can be employed as natural analogues for understanding and projecting the long-term alteration of high-level nuclear waste glasses. The corrosion of basaltic glass results in many of the same alteration features found in laboratory testing of the corrosion of high-level radioactive waste glasses. Evidence has also been found indicating similarities in the rate controlling processes, such as the effects of silica concentration on corrosion in groundwater and in laboratory leachates. Naturally altered rhyolitic glasses and tektites provide additional evidence that can be used to constrain estimates of long-term waste glass alteration. When reacted under conditions where water is plentiful, the corrosion for these glasses is dominated by network hydrolysis, while the corrosion is dominated by molecular water diffusion and secondary mineral formation under conditions where water contact is intermittent or where water is relatively scarce. Synthesized glasses that have been naturally altered result in alkali-depleted alteration features that are similar to those found for natural glasses and for nuclear waste glasses. The characteristics of these alteration features appear to be dependent on the alteration conditions which affect the dominant reaction processes during weathering. In all cases, care must be taken to ensure that the information being provided by natural analogues is related to nuclear waste glass corrosion in a clear and meaningful way

  19. Expression of the nuclear factor-κB inhibitor A20 is altered in the cystic fibrosis epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Catriona; Williams, Mark T; Mitchell, Kathryn; Elborn, J Stuart; Ennis, Madeleine; Schock, Bettina C

    2013-06-01

    A20 is a lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-inducible, cytoplasmic zinc finger protein, which inhibits Toll-like receptor-activated nuclear factor (NF)-κB signalling by deubiquitinating tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated factor (TRAF)-6. The action of A20 is facilitated by complex formation with ring finger protein (RNF)-11, Itch and TAX-1 binding protein-1 (TAX1BP1). This study investigated whether the expression of A20 is altered in the chronically inflamed cystic fibrosis (CF) airway epithelium. Nasal epithelial cells from CF patients (F508del homozygous), non-CF controls and immortalised epithelial cells (16HBE14o- and CFBE41o-) were stimulated with LPS. Cytoplasmic expression of A20 and expression of NF-κB subunits were analysed. Formation of the A20 ubiquitin editing complex was also investigated. In CFBE41o-, peak LPS-induced A20 expression was delayed compared with 16HBE14o- and fell significantly below basal levels 12-24 h after LPS stimulation. This was confirmed in primary CF airway cells. Additionally, a significant inverse relationship between A20 and p65 expression was observed. Inhibitor studies showed that A20 does not undergo proteasomal degradation in CFBE41o-. A20 interacted with TAX1BP1, RNF11 and TRAF6 in 16HBE14o- cells, but these interactions were not observed in CFBE41o-. The expression of A20 is significantly altered in CF, and important interactions with complex members and target proteins are lost, which may contribute to the state of chronic NF-κB-driven inflammation.

  20. Alteration in reactor installation (reactor facilities) of the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station of Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    A report of the Nuclear Safety Commission to the Ministry of International Trade and Industry concerning the alteration in reactor facilities in the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Stations, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc., was presented; its technical capability and the safety of the alteration were confirmed. The items which the Committee on Examination of Reactor Safety has examined for alteration safety are as follows: reactor core design including shutdown margin and mechanical design (involving subcriticality, mechanical strength, etc.), solid waste treatment system (plastic solidification), laundry waste liquid system (dry cleaning), the analysis of abnormal transient change in reactor operation (returning to normal operation without damaging the reactor core), the analysis of various accidents. (Mori, K.)

  1. Digestive tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, A.F.G. da

    1976-01-01

    Scintiscanning of salivary glands with (sup 99m)Tc is commented. The uses of triolein - and oleic acid labelled with 131 I, 125 I or 82 Br are discussed in the study of fat absorption, as well as 14 C and 191 Y. The use of 57 Co as a radiotracer in the intestinal absorption of vitamin B 12 is analysed. Orientation is given about 51 Cr - albumin clearance in the study of plasmatic protein loss by digestive tract. The radiotracers 131 I, 125 I and 51 Cr are pointed out in the investigation of immunoglobulins. Consideration is given to the quantification of digestive bleedings by the use of 51 Cr [pt

  2. Antibiotic and fermentative activity of bacteria found in water and digestive tract of fish from Lake Drukshiai at Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lubianskiene, V.; Jastiuginiene, R.

    1996-01-01

    The composition and antagonistic activity of microflora found in water and digestive tract of roaches - fish, which prevail in Lake Drukshiai, were investigated. The investigations revealed that unfavourable environmental conditions first of all gave rise to the changes in bacteria composition. It has been found that the bacteria of g. Vibrio, prevailed, their virulentic properties became more intense, antibiotical properties weakened, the prevailing microflora lost its ability to fight with pathogenic microorganisms. An increased lysozymic activity of g. Vibrio bacteria in the intestinal tract of fishes shows their resistance to phagocytosis and ability to stay for a long time in the digestive tract. The high antilysozymic activity of g. Vibrio bacteria in fishes digestive tract shows their ability to inactivate the lysozyme secreted by cells of organism reaction to pathogenic microflora. Antilysozymic and lysozymic activity of g. Vibrio bacteria is supposed to be one of the causes predetermining the predominance of this genus in biocenosis. The predominance of g. Vibrio bacteria in biocenosis of water and fish digestive tract bacteria, the strengthening of their virulentic properties speak for poor microecological conditions in the lake and lower immunological state of fish. 15 refs., 7 figs

  3. Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 knockdown enhances glucose uptake and alters glucose metabolism in AML12 hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaoyang; Huang, Huijing; Huang, Yi; Wang, Jinli; Yan, Jinhua; Ding, Ling; Zhang, Cuntai; Zhang, Le

    2017-05-01

    Nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor known to induce the expression of a variety of antioxidant and detoxification genes. Recently, increasing evidence has revealed roles for Nrf2 in glucose, lipid, and energy metabolism; however, the exact functions of Nrf2 in hepatocyte biology are largely unclear. In the current study, the transient knockdown of Nrf2 via siRNA transfection enhanced the glucose uptake of fasting AML12 hepatocytes to 325.3 ± 11.1% ( P glucose metabolism were then examined in AML12 cells under both high-glucose (33 mmol/L) and low-glucose (4.5 mmol/L) conditions. NK lowered the gene and protein expression of the anti-oxidases heme oxygenase-1 and NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 and increased p-eukaryotic initiation factor-2α S51 , p-nuclear factor-κB p65 S276 , and its downstream proinflammatory factors, including interleukin-1 beta, tumor necrosis factor-α, matrix metalloproteinase 2, and matrix metalloproteinase 9, at the protein level. NK also altered the protein expression of fibroblast growth factor 21, glucose transporter type 4, insulin-like growth factor 1, forkhead box protein O1, p-AKT S473 , and p-GSK3α/β Y279/Y216 , which are involved in glucose uptake, glycogenesis, and gluconeogenesis in AML12 cells. Our results provide a comprehensive understanding of the central role of Nrf2 in the regulation of glucose metabolism in AML12 hepatocytes, in addition to its classical roles in the regulation of redox signaling, endoplasmic reticulum stress and proinflammatory responses, and support the potential of Nrf2 as a therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of obesity and other associated metabolic syndromes. Impact statement Increasing evidence supports the complexity of Nrf2 functions beyond the antioxidant and detoxification response. Previous in vivo studies employing either Nrf2-knockout or Nrf2-activated mice have achieved a similar endpoint: protection against an obese and

  4. Urinary tract infection - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000505.htm Urinary tract infection - children To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A urinary tract infection is an infection of the urinary tract. This ...

  5. Study of the layer developed at the surface of a nuclear glass during alteration by water. Comparison between solution analysis data and electron microscopy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassin, J.H.; Touray, J.C.; Nogues, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    The alteration of a nuclear glass by boiling water leads to the formation of a layer whose thickness is 7 μm after 27 days and 15 μm after 52 days. This layer is composed of two parts: the outer one, widely crystallised, in which one finds a silico-phosphatic zone bearing rare-earth elements, and an inner part widely amorphous whose thickness is time dependent [fr

  6. Targeted ablation of nesprin 1 and nesprin 2 from murine myocardium results in cardiomyopathy, altered nuclear morphology and inhibition of the biomechanical gene response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indroneal Banerjee

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent interest has focused on the importance of the nucleus and associated nucleoskeleton in regulating changes in cardiac gene expression in response to biomechanical load. Mutations in genes encoding proteins of the inner nuclear membrane and nucleoskeleton, which cause cardiomyopathy, also disrupt expression of a biomechanically responsive gene program. Furthermore, mutations in the outer nuclear membrane protein Nesprin 1 and 2 have been implicated in cardiomyopathy. Here, we identify for the first time a role for the outer nuclear membrane proteins, Nesprin 1 and Nesprin 2, in regulating gene expression in response to biomechanical load. Ablation of both Nesprin 1 and 2 in cardiomyocytes, but neither alone, resulted in early onset cardiomyopathy. Mutant cardiomyocytes exhibited altered nuclear positioning, shape, and chromatin positioning. Loss of Nesprin 1 or 2, or both, led to impairment of gene expression changes in response to biomechanical stimuli. These data suggest a model whereby biomechanical signals are communicated from proteins of the outer nuclear membrane, to the inner nuclear membrane and nucleoskeleton, to result in changes in gene expression required for adaptation of the cardiomyocyte to changes in biomechanical load, and give insights into etiologies underlying cardiomyopathy consequent to mutations in Nesprin 1 and 2.

  7. The Alterations in Mitochondrial DNA Copy Number and Nuclear-Encoded Mitochondrial Genes in Rat Brain Structures after Cocaine Self-Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadakierska-Chudy, Anna; Kotarska, Agnieszka; Frankowska, Małgorzata; Jastrzębska, Joanna; Wydra, Karolina; Miszkiel, Joanna; Przegaliński, Edmund; Filip, Małgorzata

    2017-11-01

    The repeated intake of cocaine evokes oxidative stress that is present even during drug withdrawal. Recent studies demonstrate that cocaine-induced oxidative and/or endoplasmic reticulum stress can affect mitochondrial function and dynamics as well as the expression of mitochondrial and nuclear genes. These alterations in mitochondrial function may determine synaptic and behavioral plasticity. Mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) seem to play an important role in the initiation of drug addiction. We used a microarray approach to investigate the expression patterns of nuclear-encoded genes relevant for mitochondrial functions and quantitative real-time PCR assays to determine the numbers of copies of mtDNA and of mRNAs corresponding to two mitochondrial proteins in the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of rats during early cocaine abstinence. We found a significant elevation in the copy number of mtDNA and concomitant increased expression of mitochondrial genes. Moreover, microarray analysis revealed changes in the transcription of nuclear genes engaged in mtDNA replication, nucleoid formation, the oxidative phosphorylation pathway, and mitochondrial fission and fusion. Finally, we observed the upregulation of endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced genes. Cocaine self-administration influences the expression of both nuclear and mitochondrial genes as well as mtDNA replication. To determine whether these alterations serve as compensatory mechanisms to help maintain normal level of ATP production, further studies are necessary.

  8. Gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, R.D.; Pointon, R.C.S.

    1985-01-01

    At the time of writing, radiotherapy is of only minor use in the management of adenocarcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract, for a number of reasons. First, an exploratory laparotomy is generally needed for diagnosis, and if possible the tumour is resected or by-passed. Second, radiotherapy planning in the upper abdomen is complicated by the proximity of small bowel, kidneys, and spinal cord. Third, it has been assumed that these tumours cause death largely as a result of distant metastases, so that local radiotherapy, even if effective, would contribute little to survival. The continued interest in radiotherapy for this group of tumours arises out of the poor survival rates following surgery, which have not changed for many years, and the morbidity associated with their resection. It was hoped that the addition of cytotoxic agents to radical surgery would improve survival rates in carcinoma of the stomach and intraperitoneal colon. Despite a large number of well-organised prospective trials, using a variety of cytotoxic drugs, there is so far no evidence that the addition of chemotherapy to radical surgery improves survival for either tumour site. The authors are therefore faced with a group of tumours which are not only common, but commonly fatal and many surgeons would accept that a new approach using modern radiotherapy techniques may well be justified. There is evidence that this movement is already taking place for carcinoma of the rectum, and the indications for radiotherapy in this condition will be dealt with below. Before considering these it is worth dwelling briefly on recent changes in surgical and radiological practices which, if they fulfil expectations, might allow radiotherapy to be used for carcinoma of the colon, stomach, and pancreas as it is now used for rectal cancer

  9. Isotope tracing (29Si and 18O) of the alteration mechanisms of the French glass 'SON68' used for the storage of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valle, N.

    2001-01-01

    This study aims to enhance our understanding of the mechanisms of aqueous corrosion of the glasses used for the storage of nuclear waste. Glass samples 'SON68', doped with a different rare earth element (La, Ce or Nd), were altered simultaneously with water enriched in 29 Si and 18 O, throughout a period of 20 months. The aim of such isotope tracing was (i) to follow the 'real' exchanges between glass and solution and (ii) to understand the reactions involving Si-O bonds in the leached layer during alteration. Leachates were analyzed by ICP-MS and -AES, and elemental and isotopic variations in the altered glass layer were measured by ion-probe, using a depth profiling technique. Elemental analyses enabled the distribution of the elements in the two layers of altered glass (phyllosilicates and gel) to be established, and the results reveal a selective partitioning of elements between the two layers. Isotopic analyses of altered layers and leachates allowed phyllosilicates to be distinguished from gel, and suggest two different mechanisms of formation. Whilst phyllosilicates grow on the surface of the glass by a mechanism of precipitation, gel is formed by a succession of hydrolysis / condensation reactions taking place mainly at the gel / pristine glass interface. This gel is formed by the in situ rearrangement of hydrated species, without reaching equilibrium with the solution. Moreover, an experimental technique has been developed enabling one to trace the transport of silicon from the solution into the altered glasses, under an isotopic gradient. Diffusion profiles, obtained by ion-probe, have been modeled and have allowed the determination of the apparent silicon diffusion coefficient (DSi) in gels. Therefore, our experiments have permitted the quantification of the influence of both the alteration conditions (dynamic or static tests) and the solution composition on the value of DSi. (author)

  10. Partitioning of the rare earths and actinides between R7T7 nuclear glass alteration products and solution according to disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menard, O.

    1995-01-01

    The alteration of nuclear glass by water is liable to release radionuclides into the environment. Determining the release kinetics of these elements and their aqueous chemical forms are therefore essential steps in establishing the safety of a geological repository site. Leach tests were conducted with a nonradioactive specimen of the French ''R7T7'' light water containment glass spiked with U and Th, and with two R7T7 specimens spiked with 237 Np and 239 Pu, respectively. The alteration solution compositions were representative of deep groundwater and contained carbonate, sulfate, phosphate, fluorine and chlorine ions. The release of U, Th, Np and Pu, as well as of the rare earths La, Ce and Nd were monitored by ICP mass spectrometry and by α spectrometry. Scanning and transmission electron microscopic examination of the nonradioactive altered glass surfaces was also performed to assess the partitioning balance for the rare earths, U and Th between the glass alteration products and solution. The mobility of these elements depends on two competing mechanisms. The rare earths and thorium are incorporated in the alteration products (gel); the retention process is assumed to involve chemisorption or coprecipitation, enhanced in the gel layer by the presence of phosphate ions in particular. Conversely, the aqueous species in the alteration solutions (mainly anions) form complexes with the actinides and rare earths; this phenomenon is particularly evident with U and Np. The presence of carbonate ions favors this mobility. Plutonium differs from U and Np in that it is adsorbed mainly on colloids formed by glass dissolution, the principal factors governing its chemical evolution in solution. (author). refs., 122 figs., 185 tabs

  11. Safety in connection with the request for approval of the installation alteration in the fuel reprocessing facilities of Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    A report to the Prime Minister by the Nuclear Safety Commission was presented concerning the safety in the installation alteration of the fuel reprocessing facilities, as PNC had requested its approval to the Prime Minister. The safety was confirmed. The items of examination on the safety made by the committee on Examination of Nuclear Fuel Safety of NSC were the aseismic design of liquid waste storage, uranium denitration facility, intermediate gate and radioactive solid waste storage; the criticality safety design of the denitration facility; the radiation shielding design of the liquid waste storage, denitration facility and solid waste storage; the function of radioactive material containment of the liquid waste storage and denitration facility; the radiation control in the liquid waste storage, denitration facility and solid waste storage; the waste management in the liquid waste storage and denitration facility; fire and explosion prevention in the liquid waste storage; exposure dose from the liquid waste storage and denitration facility. (Mori, K.)

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... liver and gallbladder. gastrointestinal tract. heart. lungs. brain. thyroid. Nuclear medicine scans are typically used to help ... children. epilepsy . location, anatomy and function of the thyroid gland. top of page How does the nuclear ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... nuclear medicine imaging to evaluate organ systems, including the: kidneys and bladder. bones. liver and gallbladder. gastrointestinal tract. heart. lungs. brain. thyroid. Nuclear medicine scans are typically used to ...

  14. Scintigraphy findings in children presenting the first febrile infection of urinary tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duarte Perez, Maria Caridad; Piedra Bello, Misleidys; Guillen Dosal, Ana

    2010-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the more frequent bacterial infections in childhood. The aim of present research was to know the acute phase renal alterations of the first febrile infection of urinary tract

  15. Qualified Census Tracts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — A Qualified Census Tract (QCT) is any census tract (or equivalent geographic area defined by the Census Bureau) in which at least 50% of households have an income...

  16. Urinary tract infection - adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000521.htm Urinary tract infection - adults To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A urinary tract infection, or UTI, is an infection of the urinary ...

  17. Aberrant nuclear localization of β-catenin without genetic alterations in β-catenin or Axin genes in esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinoda Noriyuki

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background β-catenin is a multifunctional protein involved in two apparently independent processes: cell-cell adhesion and signal transduction. β-catenin is involved in Wnt signaling pathway that regulates cellular differentiation and proliferation. In this study, we investigated the expression pattern of β-catenin and cyclin D1 using immunohistochemistry and searched for mutations in exon 3 of the β-catenin gene and Axin gene in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. Materials and methods Samples were obtained from 50 esophageal cancer patients. Immunohistochemical staining for β-catenin and cyclin D1 was done. Mutational analyses of the exon3 of the β-catenin gene and Axin gene were performed on tumors with nuclear β-catenin expression. Results Four (8% esophageal cancer tissues showed high nuclear β-catenin staining. Overexpression of cyclin D1 was observed in 27 out of 50 (54% patients. All four cases that showed nuclear β-catenin staining overexpressed cyclin D1. No relationship was observed between the expression pattern of β-catenin and cyclin D1 and age, sex, tumor size, stage, differentiation grade, lymph node metastasis, response to chemotherapy, or survival. No mutational change was found in β-catenin exon 3 in the four cases with nuclear β-catenin staining. Sequencing analysis of the Axin cDNA revealed only a splicing variant (108 bp deletion, position 2302–2409 which was present in the paired normal mucosa. Conclusion A fraction of esophageal squamous cell carcinomas have abnormal nuclear accumulation of β-catenin accompanied with increased cyclin D1 expression. Mutations in β-catenin or axin genes are not responsible for this abnormal localization of β-catenin.

  18. Knock-down of methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2 causes alterations in cell proliferation and nuclear lamins expression in mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babbio Federica

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MeCP2 (CpG-binding protein 2 is a nuclear multifunctional protein involved in several cellular processes, like large-scale chromatin reorganization and architecture, and transcriptional regulation. In recent years, a non-neuronal role for MeCP2 has emerged in cell growth and proliferation. Mutations in the MeCP2 gene have been reported to determine growth disadvantages in cultured lymphocyte cells, and its functional ablation suppresses cell growth in glial cells and proliferation in mesenchymal stem cells and prostate cancer cells. MeCP2 interacts with lamin B receptor (LBR and with Heterochromatin Protein 1 (HP1 at the nuclear envelope (NE, suggesting that it could be part of complexes involved in attracting heterochromatin at the nuclear periphery and in mediating gene silencing. The nuclear lamins, major components of the lamina, have a role in maintaining NE integrity, in orchestrating mitosis, in DNA replication and transcription, in regulation of mitosis and apoptosis and in providing anchoring sites for chromatin domains. In this work, we inferred that MeCP2 might have a role in nuclear envelope stability, thereby affecting the proliferation pattern of highly proliferating systems. Results By performing knock-down (KD of MeCP2 in normal murine (NIH-3 T3 and in human prostate transformed cells (PC-3 and LNCaP, we observed a strong proliferation decrease and a defect in the cell cycle progression, with accumulation of cells in S/G2M, without triggering a strong apoptotic and senescent phenotype. In these cells, KD of MeCP2 evidenced a considerable decrease of the levels of lamin A, lamin C, lamin B1 and LBR proteins. Moreover, by confocal analysis we confirmed the reduction of lamin A levels, but we also observed an alteration in the shape of the nuclear lamina and an irregular nuclear rim. Conclusions Our results that indicate reduced levels of NE components, are consistent with a hypothesis that the deficiency of Me

  19. Retention of actinides and rare earth in the alteration gels of R7T7 nuclear glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advocat, Th.; Menard, O.; Chouchan, J.L.; Jollivet, P.

    1997-01-01

    Under oxic conditions, over 98.5% of the lanthanides and thorium released from the glass were retained in the alteration products on the glass surface, probably by coprecipitation with a siliceous gel. Uranium and Neptunium retention varied from 40% in carbonated medium to more than 95% in phosphate medium. With carbonate ions, Np and U formed stable complexes, which tend to limit actinide incorporation in the gel layer. Plutonium retention is larger than 90%. This element exhibited atypical behaviour to the extend that it was strongly bonded to colloidal particles in solution. (authors)

  20. ALS Associated Mutations in Matrin 3 Alter Protein-Protein Interactions and Impede mRNA Nuclear Export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Ashley; Garcia-Mansfield, Krystine; Singh, Gurkaran; Bakkar, Nadine; Pirrotte, Patrick; Bowser, Robert

    2017-11-06

    Mutations in Matrin 3 have recently been linked to ALS, though the mechanism that induces disease in these patients is unknown. To define the protein interactome of wild-type and ALS-linked MATR3 mutations, we performed immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry using NSC-34 cells expressing human wild-type or mutant Matrin 3. Gene ontology analysis identified a novel role for Matrin 3 in mRNA transport centered on proteins in the TRanscription and EXport (TREX) complex, known to function in mRNA biogenesis and nuclear export. ALS-linked mutations in Matrin 3 led to its re-distribution within the nucleus, decreased co-localization with endogenous Matrin 3 and increased co-localization with specific TREX components. Expression of disease-causing Matrin 3 mutations led to nuclear mRNA export defects of both global mRNA and more specifically the mRNA of TDP-43 and FUS. Our findings identify a potential pathogenic mechanism attributable to MATR3 mutations and further link cellular transport defects to ALS.

  1. Non-histone nuclear protein HMGN2 differently regulates the urothelium barrier function by altering expression of antimicrobial peptides and tight junction protein genes in UPEC J96-infected bladder epithelial cell monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hanwen; Miao, Junming; Zhang, Fumei; Xiong, Feng; Zhu, Feimei; Li, Jinyu; Wang, Xiaoying; Chen, Shanzhe; Chen, Junli; Huang, Ning; Wang, Yi

    2018-01-01

    The urinary tract is vulnerable to frequent challenges from environmental microflora. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) makes a major contribution to urinary tract infection (UTI). Previous studies have characterized positive roles of non-histone nuclear protein HMGN2 in lung epithelial innate immune response. In the study presented here, we found HMGN2 expression was up-regulated in UPEC J96-infected urothelium. Surprisingly, over-expression of HMGN2 promoted disruption of BECs 5637 cells' intercellular junctions by down-regulating tight junction (TJs) components' expression and physical structure under J96 infection. Further investigation showed that BECs 5637 monolayer, in which HMGN2 was over-expressed, had significantly increased permeability to J96. Our study systemically explored the regulatory roles of HMGN2 in BECs barrier function during UPEC infection and suggested different modulations of intracellular and paracellular routes through which UPEC invades the bladder epithelium.

  2. Local structures of mesoporous bioactive glasses and their surface alterations in vitro: inferences from solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawidjaja, Philips N.; Mathew, Renny; Lo, Andy Y. H.; Izquierdo-Barba, Isabel; García, Ana; Arcos, Daniel; Mattias Edén, María Vallet-Regí

    2012-01-01

    We review the benefits of using 29Si and 1H magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy for probing the local structures of both bulk and surface portions of mesoporous bioactive glasses (MBGs) of the CaO–SiO2−(P2O5) system. These mesoporous materials exhibit an ordered pore arrangement, and are promising candidates for improved bone and tooth implants. We discuss experimental MAS NMR results from three MBGs displaying different Ca, Si and P contents: the 29Si NMR spectra were recorded either directly by employing radio-frequency pulses to 29Si, or by magnetization transfers from neighbouring protons using cross polarization, thereby providing quantitative information about the silicate speciation present in the pore wall and at the MBG surface, respectively. The surface modifications were monitored for the three MBGs during their immersion in a simulated body fluid (SBF) for intervals between 30 min and one week. The results were formulated as a reaction sequence describing the interconversions between the distinct silicate species. We generally observed a depletion of Ca2+ ions at the MBG surface, and a minor condensation of the silicate-surface network over one week of SBF soaking. PMID:22349247

  3. Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    SBA National Resource Center: 800-621-3141 Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections and Catheterization in Children with Neurogenic Bladder and ... To protect the kidneys from damage – By preventing urinary tract infections (UTI) – By identifying and treating vesicoureteral remux (VUR). ...

  4. Imaging strategies in pediatric urinary tract infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dacher, Jean-Nicolas; Hitzel, Anne; Vera, Pierre; Avni, Fred E.

    2005-01-01

    This article is focused on the controversial topic of imaging strategies in pediatric urinary tract infection. A review of the recent literature illustrates the complementary roles of ultrasound, diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine. The authors stress the key role of ultrasound which has recently been debated. The commonly associated vesicoureteric reflux has to be classified as congenital or secondary due to voiding dysfunction. A series of frequently asked questions are addressed in a second section. The proposed answers are not the product of a consensus but should rather be considered as proposals to enrich the ongoing debate concerning the evaluation of urinary tract infection in children. (orig.)

  5. Imaging strategies in pediatric urinary tract infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dacher, Jean-Nicolas [University of Rouen, Quant-IF Laboratory, School of Medicine and Pharmacy, Rouen (France); Rouen University Hospital Charles Nicolle, Department of Radiology, Rouen (France); UFR Medecine Pharmacie de Rouen, Laboratoire Quant-If, Rouen (France); Hitzel, Anne; Vera, Pierre [University of Rouen, Quant-IF Laboratory, School of Medicine and Pharmacy, Rouen (France); CRLCC Henri Becquerel, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rouen (France); Avni, Fred E. [Free University of Brussels, Department of Radiology, Erasmus Hospital, Brussels (Belgium)

    2005-07-01

    This article is focused on the controversial topic of imaging strategies in pediatric urinary tract infection. A review of the recent literature illustrates the complementary roles of ultrasound, diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine. The authors stress the key role of ultrasound which has recently been debated. The commonly associated vesicoureteric reflux has to be classified as congenital or secondary due to voiding dysfunction. A series of frequently asked questions are addressed in a second section. The proposed answers are not the product of a consensus but should rather be considered as proposals to enrich the ongoing debate concerning the evaluation of urinary tract infection in children. (orig.)

  6. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... in your urinary tract. Let's find out more. What Exactly Is a Urinary Tract? Your urinary tract ... and you should see a doctor right away. What Will the Doctor Do? First, your doctor will ...

  7. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Kids / Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) What's in this article? What Exactly Is a Urinary Tract? Urinary Tract ... Nondiscrimination Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For ...

  8. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & ... in your urinary tract. Let's find out more. What Exactly Is a Urinary Tract? Your urinary tract ...

  9. Study of rhyolitic glasses alteration in contact with natural brines (Bolivia). Application to the study of the long-term behaviour of the R7T7 nuclear glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelouas, A.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to complement an experimental program on the R7T7 nuclear waste glass alteration in brines at 190 deg C in Germany by the analysis of the structure and the chemical composition of the alteration layers, and to study the alteration of rhyolitic glasses in natural brines from Bolivia as analogue for nuclear waste glasses disposed in salt formations. Alteration experiments with the R7T7 and basaltic glasses and obsidian in MgCl 2 -CaCl 2 -saturated brine at 190 deg. C were also conducted in order to study the influence of the glass composition on the nature of the secondary phases. The experiments with the R7T7 glass in three salt brines, saturated respectively in MgCl 2 , MgCl 2 -CaCl 2 and NaCl, showed that the solubilities of most radionuclides are controlled by the secondary phases. Nd, La, and Pr are trapped in powellite, Ce in cerianite, U in coffinite, and Sr is partially immobilized in barite. These phases are stable for more than one year. There is a good similarity between the secondary phases formed experimentally on volcanic glasses and the R7T7 glass altered in MgCl 2 -CaCl 2 -saturated brine. The abundance of Mg in solution permits the formation of similar magnesian clays on the glass samples independently of the nature of the initial glasses. These results support the use of volcanic glasses alteration patterns in Mg-rich solutions to understand the long-term behavior of nuclear waste glasses and to evaluate the stability of the secondary phases. The study of the sediments of Uyuni (Bolivia) showed that the corrosion rate of the rhyolitic glass in brines at 10 deg. C is 12 to 30 time lower than those of rhyolitic glasses altered in high dilute conditions. The low alteration rate of rhyolitic glasses in brines and the formation of secondary phases such as smectite, barite and cerianite (also formed during the experimental alteration of the R7T7 glass), permit us to expect the low alteration of nuclear waste glasses at long

  10. Upper respiratory tract (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The major passages and structures of the upper respiratory tract include the nose or nostrils, nasal cavity, mouth, throat (pharynx), and voice box (larynx). The respiratory system is lined with a mucous membrane that ...

  11. Smectite alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.M.

    1984-11-01

    This report contains the proceedings of a second workshop in Washington DC December 8-9, 1983 on the alteration of smectites intended for use as buffer materials in the long-term containment of nuclear wastes. It includes extended summaries of all presentations and a transcript of the detailed scientific discussion. The discussions centered on three main questions: What is the prerequisite for and what is the precise mechanism by which smectite clays may be altered to illite. What are likly sources of potassium with respect to the KBS project. Is it likely that the conversion of smectite to illite will be of importance in the 10 5 to the 10 6 year time frame. The workshop was convened to review considerations and conclusions in connection to these questions and also to broaden the discussion to consider the use of smectite clays as buffer materials for similar applications in different geographical and geological settings. SKBF/KBS technical report 83-03 contains the proceedings from the first workshop on these matters that was held at the State University of New York, Buffalo May 26-27, 1982. (Author)

  12. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... variety of diseases, including many types of cancers, heart disease, gastrointestinal, endocrine, neurological disorders and other abnormalities ... and bladder. bones. liver and gallbladder. gastrointestinal tract. heart. lungs. brain. thyroid. Nuclear medicine scans are typically ...

  13. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bladder. bones. liver and gallbladder. gastrointestinal tract. heart. lungs. brain. thyroid. Nuclear medicine scans are typically used ... gas via a mask, such as with a lung scan. Bladder: some exams require a catheter to ...

  14. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... bones. liver and gallbladder. gastrointestinal tract. heart. lungs. brain. thyroid. Nuclear medicine scans are typically used to ... differently than when breathing room air or holding his or her breath. With some exams, a catheter ...

  15. Children's (Pediatric) Nuclear Medicine

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exams at the same time. An emerging imaging technology, but not readily available at this time is ... bones. liver and gallbladder. gastrointestinal tract. heart. lungs. brain. thyroid. Nuclear medicine scans are typically used to ...

  16. Urinary Tract Infections (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Urinary Tract Infections KidsHealth / For Teens / Urinary Tract Infections What's in ... especially girls — visit a doctor. What Is a Urinary Tract Infection? A bacterial urinary tract infection (UTI) is the ...

  17. The Vaginal Microbiota and Urinary Tract Infection

    OpenAIRE

    STAPLETON, ANN E.

    2016-01-01

    The vagina is a key anatomical site in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection (UTI) in women, serving as a potential reservoir for infecting bacteria and a site at which interventions may decrease the risk of UTI. The vaginal microbiota is a dynamic and often critical factor in this pathogenic interplay, because changes in the characteristics of the vaginal microbiota resulting in the loss of normally protective Lactobacillus spp. increase the risk of UTI. These alterations may result fr...

  18. Tract specific analysis in patients with sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Yaqiong; Coloigner, Julie; Qu, Xiaoping; Choi, Soyoung; Bush, Adam; Borzage, Matt; Vu, Chau; Lepore, Natasha; Wood, John

    2015-12-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a hereditary blood disorder in which the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin molecule in red blood cells is abnormal. It affects numerous people in the world and leads to a shorter life span, pain, anemia, serious infections and neurocognitive decline. Tract-Specific Analysis (TSA) is a statistical method to evaluate white matter alterations due to neurocognitive diseases, using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images. Here, for the first time, TSA is used to compare 11 major brain white matter (WM) tracts between SCD patients and age-matched healthy subjects. Alterations are found in the corpus callosum (CC), the cortico-spinal tract (CST), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFO), inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), and uncinated fasciculus (UNC). Based on previous studies on the neurocognitive functions of these tracts, the significant areas found in this paper might be related to several cognitive impairments and depression, both of which are observed in SCD patients.

  19. Entrapment by magnetic microcapsules of the protein pyrolysates IQ, PhIP and Glu-P-1, and alteration of IQ metabolite exposure within the rat gastrointestinal tract by risk-modulating components of the human diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, I; Ohgaki, H; Ellul, A; Turesky, R J

    1992-12-01

    The entrapment of heterocyclic aromatic amine gastrointestinal (GI) carcinogens (HAAs), by retrievable semipermeable magnetic polyethylenimine (PEI) microcapsules was investigated in vitro and in vivo as an approach for human biomonitoring. Previous studies showed that PEI microcapsules successfully entrapped benzo[a]pyrene (B[]P) and its metabolites in the GI tract of rodents. In this study, we have shown that 14C-labelled 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5f]quinoline (IQ), 2-amino-1-methylphenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) and 2-amino-6-methyldipyrido[1,2-a:3'2'-d]imidazole (Glu-P-1) are adsorbed to PEI microcapsules in vitro and can be desorbed by treatment with ammoniac methanol. Binding of HAAs to PEI microcapsules containing copper phthalocyanine (TCPTS), a moiety which reversibly binds chemicals with aromatic planar structures, was 2- to 4-fold higher than with unmodified PEI microcapsules. PEI microcapsules also acted as a nucleophile and trapped the proximate carcinogenic metabolite of IQ, 2-hydroxy-amino-3-methyl-imidazo[4,5f]quinoline (N-hydroxy-IQ). The entrapment of 14C-labelled IQ and PhIP by microcapsules was investigated in vivo in male F344 rats fed a conventional chow diet or a human diet with varying amounts of fat and beef intake typically consumed in the UK. Animals were adapted to human diets which were either high (H) or low (L) in fat (F), beef protein (B) and dietary fibre non-starch polysaccharide (NSP). Microcapsule entrapment of IQ and metabolites was 0.5-2.0% of the dose and 4-fold higher in rats consuming a HF/HB/LNSP than those consuming a LF/LB/HNSP diet, these being respectively putatative high- and low-risk-associated diets. In the HF/HB/LNSP diet group, a higher amount of IQ metabolites were detected in the microcapsules; a lower proportion of covalently bound metabolites could be removed by acid hydrolysis. Urinary excretion was 2-fold greater and analysis of the urinary metabolites showed there to be lower sulfotransferase activity

  20. [Biliary tract tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavani, A; Negri, E; La Vecchia, C

    1996-01-01

    Biliary tract cancers are rare neoplasms including gallbladder cancer (the commonest), extrahepatic biliary tract cancer and cancer of the ampulla of Vater. Descriptive epidemiology of biliary tract cancers as a whole has two peculiarities: incidence and mortality rates are higher for women than men, and in some specific populations. Mortality rates are highest among New Mexico American Indian women, in Chile and Japan, lowest in Great Britain and Greece. Mortality trends vary widely: the largest increases have been observed in Japan, Hong-Kong and Spain and the largest decreases in the Anglo-Saxon populations. Our knowledge of biliary tract cancer etiology is limited. Defined risks include genetic factors (family history of biliary tract cancers, ethnicity), history of gallbladder disease, and cholelithiasis. Risk factors reported in some studies, on which, however, information is not consistent and which need further study, include overweight, some menstrual and reproductive factors (multiparity, young age at first birth, late menopause), low education, cigarette smoking, selected bacterial infections, some intestinal diseases and diabetes.

  1. Endocrine disruptors in female reproductive tract development and carcinogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Liang

    2009-01-01

    Growing concerns over endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and their effects on human fetal development and adult health have promoted research into the underlying molecular mechanisms of endocrine disruption. Gene targeting technology has allowed insight into the genetic pathways governing reproductive tract development and how exposure to EDCs during a critical developmental window can alter reproductive tract development, potentially forming the basis for adult diseases. This review prima...

  2. Geochemical modelling of the weathering zone of the 'Mina Fe' U deposit (Spain): A natural analogue for nuclear spent fuel alteration and stability processes in radwaste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcos, D.; Perez del Villar, L.; Bruno, J.; Domenech, C.

    2008-01-01

    The 'Mina Fe' U deposit (Salamanca, Spain) has been studied in the context of Enresa's programme for U-mine sites restoration and also as a natural analogue for processes in high-level nuclear waste (HLNW) geological disposal. The investigations encompassed an array of geoscience disciplines, such as structural geology, mineralogy, hydrogeology and elemental and isotopic geochemistry and hydrogeochemistry of the site. Based on the obtained results, a conceptual mineralogical and geochemical model was performed integrating the main geochemical processes occurring at the site: the interaction between oxidised and slightly acidic water with pyrite, pitchblende, calcite and dolomite, as essential minerals of the U fracture-filling mineralisation, and hydroxyapatite from the host rock, as the main source of P. This conceptual model has been tested in a systematic numerical model, which includes the main kinetic (pyrite and pitchblende dissolution) and equilibrium processes (carbonate mineral dissolution, and goethite, schoepite and autunite secondary precipitation). The results obtained from the reactive-transport model satisfactorily agree with the conceptual model previously established. The assumption of the precipitation of coffinite as a secondary mineral in the system cannot be correctly evaluated due to the lack of hydrochemical data from the reducing zone of the site and valid thermodynamic and kinetic data for this hydrated U(IV)-silicate. This precipitation can also be hampered by the probable existence of dissolved U(IV)-organic matter and/or uranyl carbonate complexes, which are thermodynamically stable under the alkaline and reducing conditions that prevail in the reducing zone of the system. Finally, the intense downwards oxic and acidic alteration in the upper part of the system is of no relevance for the performance assessment of a HLNW disposal. However, the acidic and oxidised conditions are quickly buffered to neutral-alkaline and reducing at very

  3. The respiratory tract microbial biogeography in alcohol use disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelson, Derrick R; Burnham, Ellen L; Maffei, Vincent J; Vandivier, R William; Blanchard, Eugene E; Shellito, Judd E; Luo, Meng; Taylor, Christopher M; Welsh, David A

    2018-01-01

    Individuals with alcohol use disorders (AUDs) are at an increased risk of pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Data of the lung microbiome in the setting of AUDs are lacking. The objective of this study was to determine the microbial biogeography of the upper and lower respiratory tract in individuals with AUDs compared with non-AUD subjects. Gargle, protected bronchial brush, and bronchoalveolar lavage specimens were collected during research bronchoscopies. Bacterial 16S gene sequencing and phylogenetic analysis was performed, and the alterations to the respiratory tract microbiota and changes in microbial biogeography were determined. The microbial structure of the upper and lower respiratory tract was significantly altered in subjects with AUDs compared with controls. Subjects with AUD have greater microbial diversity [ P respiratory tract displayed greater similarity in subjects with AUDs. Alcohol use is associated with an altered composition of the respiratory tract microbiota. Subjects with AUDs demonstrate convergence of the microbial phylogeny and taxonomic communities between distinct biogeographical sites within the respiratory tract. These results support a mechanistic pathway potentially explaining the increased incidence of pneumonia and lung diseases in patients with AUDs.

  4. Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plummer, Nancy; Michael, Nancy, Ed.

    This module on urinary tract infections is intended for use in inservice or continuing education programs for persons who administer medications in long-term care facilities. Instructor information, including teaching suggestions, and a listing of recommended audiovisual materials and their sources appear first. The module goal and objectives are…

  5. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Urinary Tract? Your urinary tract is actually a system made up of these main parts: two kidneys ... ON THIS TOPIC Chronic Kidney Diseases Movie: Urinary System Your Urinary System Bedwetting Contact Us Print Resources ...

  6. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Urinary Tract? Your urinary tract is actually a system made up of these main parts: two kidneys ... topic for: Kids Chronic Kidney Diseases Movie: Urinary System Your Urinary System Bedwetting View more Partner Message ...

  7. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) KidsHealth / For Kids / Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) What's in this article? What Exactly Is ...

  8. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) KidsHealth / For Kids / Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) What's in this article? What Exactly Is ...

  9. Slovak Republic act No. 541/2004 of 9 September 2004 on the peaceful use of nuclear energy (Atomic act) and on alterations and amendments to some acts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This Atomic act contains: Part I: Basic provisions; Paragraph (P) 1: Subject of act; P2: Definition of certain terms; P3: Principles od peaceful use of nuclear energy. Part II: State Administration, state supervision and competencies of the Authority; P4: Competence of the Authority; P5: Use of nuclear energy; P6: Application for permission or authorisation; P7: Permission or authorisation issuance conditions; P8: Essentials and issuance of permission or authorisation; P9: Modification, cancellation or extinction of permission or authorisation; P10: Duties of the authorisation holder; Part III: Nuclear materials, special materials and equipment, and shipment of radioactive materials; P11: Nuclear materials, special materials and equipment; P12: Management of nuclear materials; P13: Record keeping system and control of nuclear materials; P14: Import and export of nuclear materials, special materials and equipment; P15: Shipment of radioactive materials; P16: Shipment of radioactive waste between Member States and from and to the Community. Part IV: Nuclear installations; P17: Siting of nuclear installations; P18: Building permission for the construction of nuclear installations; P19: Commissioning of nuclear installations and operation of nuclear installations; P20: Decommissioning. Part V: Management of radioactive waste and spent fuel: P21: Management of radioactive waste and spent fuel; P22: Repository closure and institutional measures. Part VI: Nuclear safety, professional competency, quality assurance, physical protection, operational events and emergency preparedness: P23: Nuclear safety; P24: Professional competency; P25: Quality assurance; P26: Physical protection; P27: Operational events at nuclear installation and events during shipment of radioactive materials; P28: Emergency planning and emergency preparedness. Part VII: Liability for nuclear damage and financial coverage there of: P29: Liability for nuclear damage; P30: Financial coverage of liability

  10. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Kids / Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) What's in this article? What Exactly Is a Urinary Tract? Urinary Tract ... KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995- ...

  11. Alteration of R7T7-type nuclear glass in deep geological storage conditions; Alteration du verre de confinement de dechets type R7T7 en condition de stockage geologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combarieu, G. de

    2007-02-15

    This PhD thesis is aimed to study the alteration of SON68 glass, French inactive glass of R7T7-type, in contact with near field materials of a deep geological storage (French concept from ANDRA) which are mainly metallic iron and Callovo-Oxfordian clay. Therefore, experiments involving a 'glass-iron-clay' system at lab-scale have been carried out. Interactions between glass, iron and clay have been characterised from submicron to millimeter scale by means of SEM, TEM, XRD and XAS and Raman spectroscopies in terms of chemistry and crystal-chemistry. In the mean time, a conceptual model of glass alteration has been developed to account for most of the experimental observations and known mechanisms of alteration. The model has been then transposed within the transport-chemistry code HYTEC, together with developed models of clay and iron corrosion, to simulate the experiments described above. This work is thus a contribution to the understanding of iron corrosion in Callovo-Oxfordian clay and subsequent glass alteration in the newly formed corrosion products, the whole process being considered as a lab-scale model of a deep geological storage of radioactive wastes. (author)

  12. Isotope tracing ({sup 29}Si and {sup 18}O) of the alteration mechanisms of the French glass 'SON68' used for the storage of nuclear waste; Tracage isotopique ({sup 29}Si and {sup 18}O) des mecanismes de l'alteration du verre de confinement des dechets nucleaires: 'SON68'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle, N

    2001-07-01

    This study aims to enhance our understanding of the mechanisms of aqueous corrosion of the glasses used for the storage of nuclear waste. Glass samples 'SON68', doped with a different rare earth element (La, Ce or Nd), were altered simultaneously with water enriched in {sup 29}Si and {sup 18}O, throughout a period of 20 months. The aim of such isotope tracing was (i) to follow the 'real' exchanges between glass and solution and (ii) to understand the reactions involving Si-O bonds in the leached layer during alteration. Leachates were analyzed by ICP-MS and -AES, and elemental and isotopic variations in the altered glass layer were measured by ion-probe, using a depth profiling technique. Elemental analyses enabled the distribution of the elements in the two layers of altered glass (phyllosilicates and gel) to be established, and the results reveal a selective partitioning of elements between the two layers. Isotopic analyses of altered layers and leachates allowed phyllosilicates to be distinguished from gel, and suggest two different mechanisms of formation. Whilst phyllosilicates grow on the surface of the glass by a mechanism of precipitation, gel is formed by a succession of hydrolysis / condensation reactions taking place mainly at the gel / pristine glass interface. This gel is formed by the in situ rearrangement of hydrated species, without reaching equilibrium with the solution. Moreover, an experimental technique has been developed enabling one to trace the transport of silicon from the solution into the altered glasses, under an isotopic gradient. Diffusion profiles, obtained by ion-probe, have been modeled and have allowed the determination of the apparent silicon diffusion coefficient (DSi) in gels. Therefore, our experiments have permitted the quantification of the influence of both the alteration conditions (dynamic or static tests) and the solution composition on the value of DSi. (author)

  13. The Vaginal Microbiota and Urinary Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Ann E

    2016-12-01

    The vagina is a key anatomical site in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection (UTI) in women, serving as a potential reservoir for infecting bacteria and a site at which interventions may decrease the risk of UTI. The vaginal microbiota is a dynamic and often critical factor in this pathogenic interplay, because changes in the characteristics of the vaginal microbiota resulting in the loss of normally protective Lactobacillus spp. increase the risk of UTI. These alterations may result from the influence of estrogen deficiency, antimicrobial therapy, contraceptives, or other causes. Interventions to reduce adverse effects on the vaginal microbiota and/or to restore protective lactobacilli may reduce the risks of UTI.

  14. Radionuclide imaging of the urinary tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velchik, M.G.

    1985-11-01

    This article describes the role of nuclear medicine in the evaluation of the genitourinary tract. The technical aspects of radionuclide imaging (radiopharmaceuticals, radiation dosimetry, instrumentation, and method) are briefly presented, and each of the indications for renal scintigraphy--including the evaluation of differential renal function, hypertension, obstruction, renal transplants, masses, trauma, congenital anomalies, vesicoureteral reflux, and infection--are discussed. The relative advantages and disadvantages of radionuclide imaging with respect to alternative radiographic examinations (such as intravenous urography, ultrasonography, CT, angiography, and magnetic resonance imaging) are emphasized wherever applicable. 136 references.

  15. Considerations of the opinions and others in the public hearing on the alteration in reactor installation (addition of Unit 3) in the Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station of the Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    A public hearing was held in Hamaoka Town, Shizuoka Prefecture, on the alteration in reactor installation, i.e., the addition of Unit 3 in the Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station, Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., on March 19, 1981, by the Nuclear Safety Commission. The opinions and others stated by the local people were taken into consideration in the governmental examinations on the installation, etc. The considerations of such opinions principally in the examinations by NSC are explained in the form of questions (i.e. opinion, etc.) and answers (i.e. considerations) as follows: site conditions (earthquakes, ground, hydraulic features, etc.), the safety design of the reactor facilities (overall plant, aseismic design, the control of inflammable gas concentration, radioactive waste treatment, the reflection of accident experiences, etc.), radioactive waste management, radiation exposure relation, the technical capabilities of personnel (operation, etc.). (J.P.N.)

  16. Nuclear medicine with its interdependencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Newly developed nuclear methods and measuring techniques in the diagnosis and therapy of diseases of the blood, heart, vessels, thyroid, gastrointestinal tract, kidneys, skeleton and ophthalmological diseases are described. Occupational radiation exposure is briefly discussed. (AJ) [de

  17. Hydrothermal Alteration of Glass from Underground Nuclear Tests: Formation and Transport of Pu-clay Colloids at the Nevada National Security Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavarin, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhao, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Joseph, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Begg, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Boggs, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dai, Z. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kersting, A. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-05-27

    The testing of nuclear weapons at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), has led to the deposition of substantial quantities of plutonium into the environment. Approximately 2.8 metric tons (3.1×104 TBq) of Pu were deposited in the NNSS subsurface as a result of underground nuclear testing. While 3H is the most abundant anthropogenic radionuclide deposited in the NNSS subsurface (4.7×106 TBq), plutonium is the most abundant from a molar standpoint. The only radioactive elements in greater molar abundance are the naturally occurring K, Th, and U isotopes. 239Pu and 240Pu represent the majority of alpha-emitting Pu isotopes. The extreme temperatures associated with underground nuclear tests and the refractory nature of Pu results in most of the Pu (98%) being sequestered in melted rock, referred to as nuclear melt glass (Iaea, 1998). As a result, Pu release to groundwater is controlled, in large part, by the leaching (or dissolution) of nuclear melt glass over time. The factors affecting glass dissolution rates have been studied extensively. The dissolution of Pu-containing borosilicate nuclear waste glasses at 90ºC has been shown to lead to the formation of dioctahedral smectite colloids. Colloid-facilitated transport of Pu at the NNSS has been observed. Recent groundwater samples collected from a number of contaminated wells have yielded a wide range of Pu concentrations from 0.00022 to 2.0 Bq/L. While Pu concentrations tend to fall below the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for drinking water (0.56 Bq/L), we do not yet understand what factors limit the Pu concentration or its transport behavior. To quantify the upper limit of Pu concentrations produced as a result of melt glass dissolution and determine the nature of colloids and Pu associations, we performed a 3 year nuclear melt glass dissolution experiment

  18. Pitx2-mediated cardiac outflow tract remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hsiao-Yen; Xu, Jun; Eng, Diana; Gross, Michael K; Kioussi, Chrissa

    2013-05-01

    Heart morphogenesis involves sequential anatomical changes from a linear tube of a single channel peristaltic pump to a four-chamber structure with two channels controlled by one-way valves. The developing heart undergoes continuous remodeling, including septation. Pitx2-null mice are characterized by cardiac septational defects of the atria, ventricles, and outflow tract. Pitx2-null mice also exhibited a short outflow tract, including unseptated conus and deformed endocardial cushions. Cushions were characterized with a jelly-like structure, rather than the distinct membrane-looking leaflets, indicating that endothelial mesenchymal transition was impaired in Pitx2(-/-) embryos. Mesoderm cells from the branchial arches and neural crest cells from the otic region contribute to the development of the endocardial cushions, and both were reduced in number. Members of the Fgf and Bmp families exhibited altered expression levels in the mutants. We suggest that Pitx2 is involved in the cardiac outflow tract septation by promoting and/or maintaining the number and the remodeling process of the mesoderm progenitor cells. Pitx2 influences the expression of transcription factors and signaling molecules involved in the differentiation of the cushion mesenchyme during heart development. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Partitioning of the rare earths and actinides between R7T7 nuclear glass alteration products and solution according to disposal conditions; Partage des terres rares et des actinides entre solution et produits d`alteration du verre nucleaire type R7T7 en fonction des conditions de stockage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menard, O.

    1995-10-25

    The alteration of nuclear glass by water is liable to release radionuclides into the environment. Determining the release kinetics of these elements and their aqueous chemical forms are therefore essential steps in establishing the safety of a geological repository site. Leach tests were conducted with a nonradioactive specimen of the French ``R7T7`` light water containment glass spiked with U and Th, and with two R7T7 specimens spiked with {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu, respectively. The alteration solution compositions were representative of deep groundwater and contained carbonate, sulfate, phosphate, fluorine and chlorine ions. The release of U, Th, Np and Pu, as well as of the rare earths La, Ce and Nd were monitored by ICP mass spectrometry and by {alpha} spectrometry. Scanning and transmission electron microscopic examination of the nonradioactive altered glass surfaces was also performed to assess the partitioning balance for the rare earths, U and Th between the glass alteration products and solution. The mobility of these elements depends on two competing mechanisms. The rare earths and thorium are incorporated in the alteration products (gel); the retention process is assumed to involve chemisorption or coprecipitation, enhanced in the gel layer by the presence of phosphate ions in particular. Conversely, the aqueous species in the alteration solutions (mainly anions) form complexes with the actinides and rare earths; this phenomenon is particularly evident with U and Np. The presence of carbonate ions favors this mobility. Plutonium differs from U and Np in that it is adsorbed mainly on colloids formed by glass dissolution, the principal factors governing its chemical evolution in solution. (author). refs., 122 figs., 185 tabs.

  20. Urinary tract trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, J.E. (Sunnybrook Medical Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1983-09-01

    From a practical point of view, a woman who has blunt injury to the pelvic area with hematuria from the lower urinary tract, has a contused or ruptured bladder. In a man, such a situation calls for retrograde urethrography to determine if the injury is in the urethra or the bladder because the two organs are investigated differently. In both sexes, such injuries are usually associated with pelvic fractures. Massive bladder displacement and severe hemorrhage should alert one to the need for pelvic angiography to find and embolize the bleeding site within the first 24 hours after injury. For blunt trauma to the upper urinary tract an intravenous urogram with tomography is still the main examination. However, a normal intravenous urogram does not exclude serious injury. Therefore, if signs or symptoms persist, a computerized tomographic (CT) examination should be performed if available. Otherwise, a radionuclide study is advisable. Non-excretion on intravenous urography with tomography calls for selective renal arteriography to delineate the etiology. There can be serious renal trauma in the absence of hematuria, which may occur with renal pedicle injury or avulsion of the ureter. Minor forniceal ruptures may occasionally mask severe posterior renal lacerations.

  1. Alteration of 'R7T7' type nuclear glasses: statistical approach, experimental validation, local evolution model; Alteration des verres nucleaires de type 'R7T7': demarche statistique, validation experimentale, modele local d'evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thierry, F

    2003-02-01

    The aim of this work is to propose an evolution of nuclear (R7T7-type) glass alteration modeling. The first part of this thesis is about development and validation of the 'r(t)' model. This model which predicts the decrease of alteration rates in confined conditions is based upon a coupling between a first-order dissolution law and a diffusion barrier effect of the alteration gel layer. The values and the uncertainties regarding the main adjustable parameters of the model ({alpha}, Dg and C*) have been determined from a systematic study of the available experimental data. A program called INVERSION has been written for this purpose. This work lead to characterize the validity domain of the 'r(t)' model and to parametrize it. Validation experiments have been undertaken, confirming the validity of the parametrization over 200 days. A new model is proposed in the second part of this thesis. It is based on an inhibition of glass dissolution reaction by silicon coupled with a local description of silicon retention in the alteration gel layer. This model predicts the evolutions of boron and silicon concentrations in solution as well as the concentrations and retention profiles in the gel layer. These predictions have been compared to measurements of retention profiles by the secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) method. The model has been validated on fractions of gel layer which reactivity present low or moderate disparities. (author)

  2. Alteration of the magnitude of the proton magnetic moment in nuclear magnetons in connection with the changes in the atomic mass values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamyrin, B.A.; Aruev, N.N.; Alekseenko, S.A.

    1983-06-01

    In connection with the revision of the table values of the atomic masses and the forthcoming coordination of the values of the fundamental physical constants, the result of measurement of the proton magnetic moment in nuclear Magnetons obtained in 1971 is re-examined by taking into account recent data. With the atomic masses recognized in 1982 the proton magnetic moment expressed in nuclear magnetons without a correction for diamagnetic screening of the proton in a water molecule is found to be ..mu..sub(p)'/..mu..sub(n)=2.7927729+-0.0000012 (4.3x10/sup -5/%).

  3. Cold stress induces lower urinary tract symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Tetsuya; Ishizuka, Osamu; Nishizawa, Osamu

    2013-07-01

    Cold stress as a result of whole-body cooling at low environmental temperatures exacerbates lower urinary tract symptoms, such as urinary urgency, nocturia and residual urine. We established a model system using healthy conscious rats to explore the mechanisms of cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity. In this review, we summarize the basic findings shown by this model. Rats that were quickly transferred from room temperature (27 ± 2°C) to low temperature (4 ± 2°C) showed detrusor overactivity including increased basal pressure and decreased voiding interval, micturition volume, and bladder capacity. The cold stress-induced detrusor overactivity is mediated through a resiniferatoxin-sensitve C-fiber sensory nerve pathway involving α1-adrenergic receptors. Transient receptor potential melastatin 8 channels, which are sensitive to thermal changes below 25-28°C, also play an important role in mediating the cold stress responses. Additionally, the sympathetic nervous system is associated with transient hypertension and decreases of skin surface temperature that are closely correlated with the detrusor overactivity. With this cold stress model, we showed that α1-adrenergic receptor antagonists have the potential to treat cold stress-exacerbated lower urinary tract symptoms. In addition, we showed that traditional Japanese herbal mixtures composed of Hachimijiogan act, in part, by increasing skin temperature and reducing the number of cold sensitive transient receptor potential melastatin channels in the skin. The effects of herbal mixtures have the potential to treat and/or prevent the exacerbation of lower urinary tract symptoms by providing resistance to the cold stress responses. Our model provides new opportunities for utilizing animal disease models with altered lower urinary tract functions to explore the effects of novel therapeutic drugs. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  4. Loss of nuclear TDP-43 in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) causes altered expression of splicing machinery and widespread dysregulation of RNA splicing in motor neurones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Highley, J. Robin; Kirby, Janine; Jansweijer, Joeri A.; Webb, Philip S.; Hewamadduma, Channa A.; Heath, Paul R.; Higginbottom, Adrian; Raman, Rohini; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Cooper-Knock, Johnathan; McDermott, Christopher J.; Wharton, Stephen B.; Shaw, Pamela J.; Ince, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of nuclear TDP-43 characterizes sporadic and most familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). TDP-43 (encoded by TARDBP) has multiple roles in RNA processing. We aimed to determine whether (1) RNA splicing dysregulation is present in lower motor neurones in ALS and in a motor

  5. Neonatal Staphylococcus lugdunensis urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayakawa, Itaru; Hataya, Hiroshi; Yamanouchi, Hanako; Sakakibara, Hiroshi; Terakawa, Toshiro

    2015-08-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a known pathogen of infective endocarditis, but not of urinary tract infection. We report a previously healthy neonate without congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract who developed urinary tract infection due to Staphylococcus lugdunensis, illustrating that Staphylococcus lugdunensis can cause urinary tract infection even in those with no urinary tract complications. © 2015 Japan Pediatric Society.

  6. Tubular adenoma of the urinary tract: a newly described entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Chia-Sui; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2013-09-01

    Tubular adenomas in the urinary tract with the same appearance as those in the gastrointestinal tract have not yet been described in the literature. We herein report 4 cases of tubular adenomas in the urinary tract encountered within our consult practice. This lesion was defined by the presence of a collection of small round tubular glands with intestinal-type epithelium showing moderate dysplasia, identical to the histology of tubular adenomas in the intestinal tract. Patients ranged in age from 37 to 63 years (mean, 45 years), with 3 of the 4 being male (male-to-female ratio, 3:1). The locations were urinary bladder, prostatic urethra and ureter with hematuria, polyps, and obstructive mass as their presentations, respectively. One lesion was large measuring 1.4 cm associated with pseudoinvasion as well as invasive adenocarcinoma. Immunohistochemically, the tubular adenomas stained positive for CDX2 and CK20, while negative for GATA3 and CK7. One case showed positive nuclear β-catenin staining. Tubular adenoma of the urinary tract is a rare lesion, and recognition of this entity will encourage further reports and help to better understand the relation of tubular adenoma to concurrent and subsequent urinary tract malignancies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Liver and gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahid, M.A.

    1992-01-01

    Liver is often a site of a variety of diseases. A palpable liver during a routine clinical examination is an important finding and requires further investigations. The availability of non-invasive liver imaging procedures using nuclear, ultrasound, CT (and now MRI) techniques have immensely enhanced diagnostic accuracy in liver diseases. In this Chapter, a detailed description of routinely practised nuclear medicine procedures related to liver is given. Brief reference is also made to other imaging techniques, particularly ultrasonography, only for the purposes of comparison. Most of the information is based on our own clinical experience of past 30 years

  8. Urinary tract infections in women

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common bacterial infections in women, with half of all women experiencing at least one in their lifetime.1 Of the women affected, 25-30% develop recurrent infections unrelated to any functional or anatomical abnormality of the urinary tract.2 Most UTIs in women are episodes of acute.

  9. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ... English Español Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) KidsHealth / For Kids / Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) What's in this article? ...

  10. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ... English Español Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) KidsHealth / For Kids / Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) What's in this article? ...

  11. Similarities between the Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Nuclear Protein EBNA1 and the Pioneer Transcription Factor FoxA: Is EBNA1 a “Bookmarking” Oncoprotein that Alters the Host Cell Epigenotype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niller, Hans Helmut; Minarovits, Janos

    2012-01-01

    EBNA1, a nuclear protein expressed in all EBV-associated neoplasms is indispensable for the maintenance of the viral episomes in latently infected cells. EBNA1 may induce genetic alterations by upregulating cellular recombinases, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and affecting p53 levels and function. All these changes may contribute to tumorigenesis. In this overview we focus, however, on the epigenetic alterations elicited by EBNA1 by drawing a parallel between EBNA1 and the FoxA family of pioneer transcription factors. Both EBNA1 and FoxA induce local DNA demethylation, nucleosome destabilization and bind to mitotic chromosomes. Local DNA demethylation and nucleosome rearrangement mark active promoters and enhancers. In addition, EBNA1 and FoxA, when associated with mitotic chromatin may “bookmark” active genes and ensure their reactivation in postmitotic cells (epigenetic memory). We speculate that DNA looping induced by EBNA1-EBNA1 interactions may reorganize the cellular genome. Such chromatin loops, sustained in mitotic chromatin similarly to the long-distance interactions mediated by the insulator protein CTCF, may also mediate the epigenetic inheritance of gene expression patterns. We suggest that EBNA1 has the potential to induce patho-epigenetic alterations contributing to tumorigenesis. PMID:25436603

  12. Similarities between the Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV Nuclear Protein EBNA1 and the Pioneer Transcription Factor FoxA: Is EBNA1 a “Bookmarking” Oncoprotein that Alters the Host Cell Epigenotype?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Helmut Niller

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available EBNA1, a nuclear protein expressed in all EBV-associated neoplasms is indispensable for the maintenance of the viral episomes in latently infected cells. EBNA1 may induce genetic alterations by upregulating cellular recombinases, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS and affecting p53 levels and function. All these changes may contribute to tumorigenesis. In this overview we focus, however, on the epigenetic alterations elicited by EBNA1 by drawing a parallel between EBNA1 and the FoxA family of pioneer transcription factors. Both EBNA1 and FoxA induce local DNA demethylation, nucleosome destabilization and bind to mitotic chromosomes. Local DNA demethylation and nucleosome rearrangement mark active promoters and enhancers. In addition, EBNA1 and FoxA, when associated with mitotic chromatin may “bookmark” active genes and ensure their reactivation in postmitotic cells (epigenetic memory. We speculate that DNA looping induced by EBNA1-EBNA1 interactions may reorganize the cellular genome. Such chromatin loops, sustained in mitotic chromatin similarly to the long-distance interactions mediated by the insulator protein CTCF, may also mediate the epigenetic inheritance of gene expression patterns. We suggest that EBNA1 has the potential to induce patho-epigenetic alterations contributing to tumorigenesis.

  13. Similarities between the Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Nuclear Protein EBNA1 and the Pioneer Transcription Factor FoxA: Is EBNA1 a "Bookmarking" Oncoprotein that Alters the Host Cell Epigenotype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niller, Hans Helmut; Minarovits, Janos

    2012-09-17

    EBNA1, a nuclear protein expressed in all EBV-associated neoplasms is indispensable for the maintenance of the viral episomes in latently infected cells. EBNA1 may induce genetic alterations by upregulating cellular recombinases, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and affecting p53 levels and function. All these changes may contribute to tumorigenesis. In this overview we focus, however, on the epigenetic alterations elicited by EBNA1 by drawing a parallel between EBNA1 and the FoxA family of pioneer transcription factors. Both EBNA1 and FoxA induce local DNA demethylation, nucleosome destabilization and bind to mitotic chromosomes. Local DNA demethylation and nucleosome rearrangement mark active promoters and enhancers. In addition, EBNA1 and FoxA, when associated with mitotic chromatin may "bookmark" active genes and ensure their reactivation in postmitotic cells (epigenetic memory). We speculate that DNA looping induced by EBNA1-EBNA1 interactions may reorganize the cellular genome. Such chromatin loops, sustained in mitotic chromatin similarly to the long-distance interactions mediated by the insulator protein CTCF, may also mediate the epigenetic inheritance of gene expression patterns. We suggest that EBNA1 has the potential to induce patho-epigenetic alterations contributing to tumorigenesis.

  14. Calculus of radiolytic products generation in water due to alpha radiation. Determination of the spent nuclear fuels matrix alteration rate Determination of velocity of spent fuel matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinones, J.; Serrano, J.; Diaz Arocas, P.; Rodriguez Almazan, J. L.; Bruno, J.; Cera, E.; Merino, J.; Esteban, J. A.; Martinez-Esparza, A.

    2000-01-01

    The generation of radiolytic products as a result of alpha radiation in the surface of the spent fuel is a key process in order to understand how the it becomes degraded in repository conditions. The present work has established a radiolytic model based on a set of reactions involving fuel oxidation-dissolution and radiolytic products recombination. It also includes the decrease of the dose rates as the main alpha emitters decay away. Four cases, with varying parameters of the system, have been assessed. The results show a decrease in both the concentration of the radiolytic products in the gap water and the degradation of the fuel matrix. It has been estimated that in the period of the evaluation (10''6 years) up to 52% of the pellet is altered in the conservative cases, whereas only 11% is altered in the realistic cases. No significant differences were observed when the carbonates reactions were included in the system. (Author)

  15. On alteration of reactor installation (additional installation of No.3 and No.4 plants in the Genkai Nuclear Power Station, Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The Nuclear Safty Commission sent the reply to the Minister of International Trade and Industry on October 4, 1984, on this matter after having received the report from the Committee on Examination of Nuclear Reactor Safety and carried out the deliberation. It was judged that the applicant has the technical capability required for installing and operating these reactor facilities. Also it was judged that on the safety after these reactor plants are installed, there is no obstacle in the prevention of disaster due to contaminated substances and reactors. The policy of the investigation and deliberation is reported. The contents of the investigation and deliberation are the condition of location such as site, geological features and ground, earthquake, weather, hydraulic problem and social environments, the safety design of reactor facilities, the evaluation of radiation exposure dose in normal operation, the analysis of abnormal transient change in operation, accident analysis and the evaluation of location. (Kako, I.)

  16. Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccine Safety Frequently Asked Questions about Catheter-associated Urinary Tract Infections Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir What is ... an incision above the pubis. What is a urinary tract infection? A urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection ...

  17. [Prevalence of altered mismatch repair protein nuclear expression detected by immunohistochemistry on adenomas with high-grade dysplasia and features associated with this risk in a population-based study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basterra, Marta; Gomez, Marta; Mercado, María Del Rosario; Irisarri, Rebeca; Amorena, Edurne; Arrospide, Arantzazu; Montes, Marta; Aisa, Gregorio; Cambra, Koldo Iñaki; Urman, Jesús

    2016-10-01

    Alteration of mismatch repair system protein expression detected by immunohistochemistry (IHQ) in tumoural tissue is a useful technique for Lynch Syndrome (LS) screening. A recent review proposes LS screening through immunohistochemical study not only in all diagnosed cases of colorectal cancer (CRC) but also in advanced adenomas, especially in young patients. To assess the prevalence of altered IHQ carried out in all adenomas with high-grade dysplasia (HGD) diagnosed in our community in 2011, as well as the variables associated with this alteration. We included all the cases of adenomatous polyps with HGD diagnosed in the three public pathology laboratories of Navarre during 2011 and performed a statistical study to assess the association between different patient and lesion characteristics and altered IHQ results. A total of 213 colonic adenomas with HGD were diagnosed, and 26 (12.2%) cases were excluded from the final analysis (2 known LS, 22 without IHQ study and 2 with inconclusive IHQ studies). The final number of adenomas included was 187. Pathologic results were found in 10 cases (5.35%)-6 cases in MLH1 and PMS2, 2 cases in PMS2, 1 case in MSH6 and 1 case in MSH2 and MSH6. The factors showing a statistically significant association with the presence of abnormal proteins were the synchronous presence of CRC, the presence of only one advanced adenoma, proximal location of HGD and age <50 years. The percentage of pathologic nuclear expression found in IHQ is high. Consequently, screening of all diagnosed HGD could be indicated, especially in young patients, with a single AA and proximal HGD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  18. Precipitation of uraninite in chlorite-bearing veins of the hydrothermal alteration zone (argile de pile) of the natural nuclear reactor at Bangombe, Republic of Gabon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberly, P.; Ewing, R.; Janeczek, J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the mineralogy of a phyllosilicate/uraninite/galena-bearing vein located within the hydrothermal alteration halo associated with the Bangombe reactor. Phyllosilicates within the vein include a trioctahedral Al-Mg-Fe chlorite (ripidolite), Al-rich clay (kaolinite and/or donbassite) and illite. Textural relations obtained by backscattered-electron imaging suggest that ripidolite crystallized first among the sheet silicates. Uraninite is spatially associated with ripidolite and probably precipitated at a later time. While energy-dispersive X-ray analyses suggest that the uranium phase is predominantly uraninite, coffinite or other phases may also be present

  19. Lack of mitochondrial and nuclear-encoded subunits of complex I and alteration of the respiratory chain in Nicotiana sylvestris mitochondrial deletion mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierres, Sophie; Sabar, Mohammed; Lelandais, Christine; Chetrit, Philippe; Diolez, Philippe; Degand, Hervé; Boutry, Marc; Vedel, Fernand; de Kouchkovsky, Yaroslav; De Paepe, Rosine

    1997-01-01

    We previously have shown that Nicotiana sylvestris cytoplasmic male sterile (CMS) mutants I and II present large mtDNA deletions and that the NAD7 subunit of complex I (the main dehydrogenase of the mitochondrial respiratory chain) is absent in CMS I. Here, we show that, despite a large difference in size in the mtDNA deletion, CMS I and II display similar alterations. Both have an impaired development from germination to flowering, with partial male sterility that becomes complete under low light. Besides NAD7, two other complex I subunits are missing (NAD9 and the nucleus-encoded, 38-kDa subunit), identified on two-dimensional patterns of mitochondrial proteins. Mitochondria isolated from CMS leaves showed altered respiration. Although their succinate oxidation through complex II was close to that of the wild type, oxidation of glycine, a priority substrate of plant mitochondria, was significantly reduced. The remaining activity was much less sensitive to rotenone, indicating the breakdown of Complex I activity. Oxidation of exogenous NADH (coupled to proton gradient generation and partly sensitive to rotenone) was strongly increased. These results suggest respiratory compensation mechanisms involving additional NADH dehydrogenases to complex I. Finally, the capacity of the cyanide-resistant alternative oxidase pathway was enhanced in CMS, and higher amounts of enzyme were evidenced by immunodetection. PMID:9096412

  20. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & ... KidsHealth / For Kids / Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) What's in this article? What Exactly Is a Urinary ...

  1. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Urinary Tract Troubles Girls are more likely than boys to get a UTI. That's because their urethras are much shorter than boys' urethras. The shorter urethra means bacteria can get ...

  2. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a urinary tract infection before anyone else can see there's anything wrong with you. That's why it's ... signs of a kidney infection and you should see a doctor right away. What Will the Doctor ...

  3. Urinary Tract Infections - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... UTI (Urinary Tract Infection) - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified (Mandarin dialect)) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Urine Sample -- Female (Clean Catch) - 简体中文 (Chinese, Simplified ( ...

  4. Urinary Tract Infections in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Taskesen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections (UTI are frequent conditions in children. Untreated urinary tract infections can lead to serious kidney problems that could threaten the life of the child. Therefore, early detection and treatment of urinary tract infection is important. In older children, urinary tract infections may cause obvious symptoms such as stomach ache and disuria. In infants and young children, UTIs may be harder to detect because of less specific symptoms. Recurrences are common in children with urinary abnormalities such as neurogenic bladder, vesicourethral reflux or those with very poor toilet and hygiene habits. This article reviews the diagnostic approach and presents the current data related to the roles of radiologic imaging, surgical correction and antibiotic prophylaxis of UTIs in children. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2009; 18(2.000: 57-69

  5. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... para niños How the Body Works Puberty & Growing Up Staying Healthy Staying Safe Recipes & Cooking Health Problems ... Your urinary tract is actually a system made up of these main parts: two kidneys two ureters ( ...

  6. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... if I Have a UTI? You may notice signs of a urinary tract infection before anyone else ... it smell bad when you pee? These are signs that you might have a bladder infection, so ...

  7. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Drugs & Alcohol School & Jobs Sports Expert Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) KidsHealth / For Kids / ...

  8. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body. Ahhh! That feels better. Urinary Tract Troubles Girls are more likely than boys to get a ... away properly, they stay on your skin. In girls, this means they can grow near the opening ...

  9. Expansion of polyalanine tracts in the QA domain may play a critical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-09-03

    Sep 3, 2015 ... According to the analysis of the protein structure, RUNX2 has several functional domains: QA domain, runt domain, nuclear localization signal (NSL),. PST domain, VWRPY and nuclear matrix targeting sequence. (NMTS). The QA domain, a stretch of 23 polyglutamine and 17 polyalanine tracts, is located in ...

  10. Experimental study of the hydrothermal alteration of a chemical analogue of the French nuclear glass in a thermal gradient: characterization of newly formed phases and of matter transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poinssot, Christophe

    1994-01-01

    As the most dangerous radioactive wastes are to be stored in deep geological layers after having been packaged in barrels made of borosilicate glasses, this research report addresses the study of the alteration of such glasses through the study of a chemical analogue. In order to experimentally model phenomena involved within a storage, the studied glass has been submitted to different thermal gradients between 320 and 150 C and during 3 to 5 months. These gradients comply with those met about the parcels, and allows the spatial evolution of the waste parcel at a given moment, as well as the evolution in time (progressive cooling of wastes) to be simultaneously simulated. The different phases formed within the gradient have been studied and characterized by scanning electronic microscopy, semi-quantitative microanalysis, and X-ray micro-diffraction [fr

  11. Candida Urinary Tract Infection: Pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, John F.; Kavanagh, Kevin; Sobel, Jack D.; Kauffman, Carol A.; Newman, Cheryl A.

    2011-01-01

    Candida species are unusual causes of urinary tract infection (UTI) in healthy individuals, but common in the hospital setting or among patients with predisposing diseases and structural abnormalities of the kidney and collecting system. The urinary tract may be invaded in either an antegrade fashion from the bloodstream or retrograde via the urethra and bladder. Candida species employ a repertoire of virulence factors, including phenotypic switching, dimorphism, galvano - and thi...

  12. Atrio-His bundle tracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brechenmacher, C

    1975-01-01

    The atrio-His bundle tracts are very rare; only two have been found in 687 hearts studied histologically. These tracts have a similar appearance to those of the atrioventricular bundle and form a complete bypass of the atrioventricular node. In their presence the electrocardiogram may show a short or normal PR interval. They may be responsible for some cases of very rapid ventricular response to supraventricular arrhythmias. Images PMID:1191446

  13. Signs and symptoms of developmental abnormalities of the genitourinary tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Cesar Koch Nogueira

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: The abnormalities of the genitourinary tract development are the leading cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD in children. The diagnosis of this disease in Brazil is late and incomplete, which results in increased morbidity and mortality in this age group. Early diagnosis of this condition is the prerogative of generalist pediatricians, and the aim of this study was to review the clinical signs and symptoms associated with developmental abnormalities of the genitourinary tract. Data sources: Based on the description of a symbolic clinical case, the authors conducted a non-systematic review of medical literature. Data synthesis: The results suggest that the following data should be used as a warning for early diagnosis of affected children: (a combined urinary tract abnormalities (chromosomal abnormalities; sequence of malformations [VACTERLand Prune-Belly]; and musculoskeletal, digestive tract, heart, and nervous system malformations; (b previous history (congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract [CAKUT] in the family, low birth weight, and oligoamnios; (c clinical signs (polyuria/nocturia, urinary tract infection, systemic arterial hypertension, failure to thrive, weak urinary stream, difficulty to start urination, distended bladder, non-monosymptomatic enuresis, urinary/urge incontinence, and bowel and bladder dysfunction; and (d pre- and postnatal ultrasonographic alterations (increased anteroposterior diameter of the renal pelvis, mainly in the third trimester of pregnancy; single kidney; hydronephrosis associated with other abnormalities; and hydronephrosis with parenchymal involvement in the post-neonatal assessment. Conclusion: The suggestions shown here can help the pediatrician to establish clinical hypotheses for the early diagnosis of developmental abnormalities of the genitourinary tract without resorting to expensive and invasive procedures.

  14. Methyl parathion inhibits the nuclear maturation, decreases the cytoplasmic quality in oocytes and alters the developmental potential of embryos of Swiss albino mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nair, Ramya; Singh, Vikram Jeet; Salian, Sujith Raj; Kalthur, Sneha Guruprasad; D'Souza, Antony Sylvan; Shetty, Pallavi K.; Mutalik, Srinivas; Kalthur, Guruprasad; Adiga, Satish Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Methyl parathion (MP) is one of the most commonly used and extremely toxic organophosphorous group of pesticide. A large number of studies in the literature suggest that it has adverse effects on the male reproductive system. However, there is limited information about its toxicity to the female reproductive system. In the present study we report the toxic effects of methyl parathion on the female reproductive system using Swiss albino mice as the experimental model. The female mice were administered orally with 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg of MP. One week later, the mice were superovulated with pregnant mare serum gonadotrophin (PMSG) and human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) to study the quality of the oocytes, spindle organization, developmental potential of early embryos and the DNA integrity in blastocysts. MP exposure resulted in a non-significant decrease in the number of primordial follicles and increased DNA damage in granulosa cells. Though MP did not have any effect on the ovulation it had a significant inhibitory effect on the nuclear maturity of oocytes which was associated with spindle deformity. In addition, the oocytes had higher cytoplasmic abnormalities with depleted glutathione level. Even though it did not have any effect on the fertilization and blastocyst rate at lower doses, at 20 mg/kg MP it resulted in a significant decrease in blastocyst hatching, decrease in cell number and high DNA damage. While low body weight gain was observed in F1 generation from 5 mg/kg group, at higher dose, the body weight in F1 generation was marginally higher than control. Post-natal death in F1 generation was observed only in mice treated with 20 mg/kg MP. In conclusion, we report that MP has adverse effects on the oocyte quality, developmental potential of the embryo and reproductive outcome. - Highlights: • Methyl parathion induces severe cytoplasmic abnormalities in oocytes. • Inhibits nuclear maturation and spindle damage • Poor blastocyst quality and high DNA

  15. Methyl parathion inhibits the nuclear maturation, decreases the cytoplasmic quality in oocytes and alters the developmental potential of embryos of Swiss albino mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, Ramya; Singh, Vikram Jeet; Salian, Sujith Raj [Division of Clinical Embryology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal University, Manipal 576 104 (India); Kalthur, Sneha Guruprasad; D' Souza, Antony Sylvan [Department of Anatomy, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal University, Manipal 576 104 (India); Shetty, Pallavi K.; Mutalik, Srinivas [Department of Pharmaceutics, Manipal College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal 576 104 (India); Kalthur, Guruprasad, E-mail: guru.kalthur@manipal.edu [Division of Clinical Embryology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal University, Manipal 576 104 (India); Adiga, Satish Kumar [Division of Clinical Embryology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kasturba Medical College, Manipal University, Manipal 576 104 (India)

    2014-09-15

    Methyl parathion (MP) is one of the most commonly used and extremely toxic organophosphorous group of pesticide. A large number of studies in the literature suggest that it has adverse effects on the male reproductive system. However, there is limited information about its toxicity to the female reproductive system. In the present study we report the toxic effects of methyl parathion on the female reproductive system using Swiss albino mice as the experimental model. The female mice were administered orally with 5, 10 and 20 mg/kg of MP. One week later, the mice were superovulated with pregnant mare serum gonadotrophin (PMSG) and human chorionic gonadotrophin (hCG) to study the quality of the oocytes, spindle organization, developmental potential of early embryos and the DNA integrity in blastocysts. MP exposure resulted in a non-significant decrease in the number of primordial follicles and increased DNA damage in granulosa cells. Though MP did not have any effect on the ovulation it had a significant inhibitory effect on the nuclear maturity of oocytes which was associated with spindle deformity. In addition, the oocytes had higher cytoplasmic abnormalities with depleted glutathione level. Even though it did not have any effect on the fertilization and blastocyst rate at lower doses, at 20 mg/kg MP it resulted in a significant decrease in blastocyst hatching, decrease in cell number and high DNA damage. While low body weight gain was observed in F1 generation from 5 mg/kg group, at higher dose, the body weight in F1 generation was marginally higher than control. Post-natal death in F1 generation was observed only in mice treated with 20 mg/kg MP. In conclusion, we report that MP has adverse effects on the oocyte quality, developmental potential of the embryo and reproductive outcome. - Highlights: • Methyl parathion induces severe cytoplasmic abnormalities in oocytes. • Inhibits nuclear maturation and spindle damage • Poor blastocyst quality and high DNA

  16. Nuclear medicine in pediatrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gumplova, H.

    1982-01-01

    The methods of nuclear medicine are outlined used for examining children. The problems are discussed of children's exposure in isotope methods, diagnostic localization methods, in central nervous system examinations, skeleton, hematopoietic organs, gastrointestinal tract, respiratory organs, blood circulation system, and thyroid examinations. (J.B.)

  17. Psychological effects of nuclear warfare

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mickley, G.A.

    1987-01-01

    This report is divided into five parts. (1) Discussion of the psychological milieu before a nuclear confrontation. (2) Acute psychological reactions to nuclear warfare (some of which may reflect, in part, direct radiogenic alteration of nervous system functions). (3) Chronic psychological effects of a nuclear confrontation. (4) Issues concerning treatment of these psychological changes. (5) Prevention of adverse psychological reactions to nuclear warfare

  18. Nuclear Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundersen, Gregg G.; Worman, Howard J.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The nucleus is the largest organelle and is commonly depicted in the center of the cell. Yet during cell division, migration and differentiation, it frequently moves to an asymmetric position aligned with cell function. We consider the toolbox of proteins that move and anchor the nucleus within the cell and how forces generated by the cytoskeleton are coupled to the nucleus to move it. The significance of proper nuclear positioning is underscored by numerous diseases resulting from genetic alterations in the toolbox proteins. Finally, we discuss how nuclear position may influence cellular organization and signaling pathways. PMID:23498944

  19. Metabolic alterations produced by 3-nitropropionic acid in rat striata and cultured astrocytes: quantitative in vitro 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and biochemical characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, C.; Wan, Y.L.; Goh, C.C.; Tsai, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Quantitative high resolution in vitro 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was employed to study the metabolic effects of 3-nitropropionic acid associated with aging from perchloric acid extracts of rat striata. Systemic injection of 3-nitropropionic acid in rats at a dose of 10 mg/kg/day for seven consecutive days significantly impaired energy metabolism in rats one, four and eight months of age, as evidenced by a marked elevation of succinate and lactate levels. However, a significant decrease in N-acetyl-l-aspartate level, a neuronal marker, was observed in four- and eight-month-old rats but not in one-month-old rats. This would indicate that rats at four to eight months are more susceptible to 3-nitropropionic acid than those at one month. A significant decrease in GABA level was observed in four-month-old 3-nitropropionic acid-treated rats, which is consistent with the literature that GABAergic neurons are particularly vulnerable to 3-nitropropionic acid treatment. In addition, glutamine and glutamate levels were markedly decreased at four and eight months in 3-nitropropionic acid-treated rats. Since glutamine is synthesized predominantly in glia, the observation above suggests that 3-nitropropionic acid intoxication may involve perturbation of energy metabolism, glial injury and consequent neuronal damage. Astrocytes which are essential in the metabolism of glutamate and glutamine were used to further assess 3-nitropropionic acid-induced toxicity. Glial proliferation, mitochondrial metabolism and glutamine synthetase activity were all reduced by 3-nitropropionic acid treatment with a concomitant increase, in a dose-dependent manner, of lactate levels, suggesting that 3-nitropropionic acid is also detrimental to astrocytes in vivo and thus may affect metabolic interaction between neurons and glia.These results not only imply that 3-nitropropionic acid blocks energy metabolism prior to exerting neurotoxic damage but also demonstrate that the degree of

  20. Computertomographie of the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadler, H.W.; Roedl, W.

    1982-01-01

    Besides the demonstration of parenchymatous organs CT can be used also in the diagnosis of hollow organs of the gastrointestinal tract, e.g. the esophagus, stomach, duodenum, and the small and large bowels, since the development of fast scanners with higher resolution. Conventional X-ray and endoscopy have to be primary diagnostics. CT, on the other hand, is capable of assessing of extraluminal and intramural tumor extension. In inflammatory diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, CT can show the environmental reaction. In penetrating ulcers of the esophagus, stomach, and duodenum, the extension and direction of penetration can be figured by CT well. Extraenteral masses with secondary displacement, impression or infiltration of the gastrointestinal tract are often verified by CT only. One of the CT domains is the local relapse of rectum carcinoma following rectum amputation especially in differentiation from local scar formation. The importance of CT in radiotherapy treatment planning is not subject of this paper. (orig.) [de

  1. PABPN1 polyalanine tract deletion and long expansions modify its aggregation pattern and expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Arnaud F.; Ebihara, Mitsuru; Alexander, Christine; Dicaire, Marie-Josee; Sasseville, A. Marie-Josee; Langelier, Yves; Rouleau, Guy A.; Brais, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Expansions of a (GCN) 10 /polyalanine tract in the Poly(A) Binding Protein Nuclear 1 (PABPN1) cause autosomal dominant oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). In OPMD muscles, as in models, PABPN1 accumulates in intranuclear inclusions (INIs) whereas in other diseases caused by similar polyalanine expansions, the mutated proteins have been shown to abnormally accumulate in the cytoplasm. This study presents the impact on the subcellular localization of PABPN1 produced by large expansions or deletion of its polyalanine tract. Large tracts of more than 24 alanines result in the nuclear accumulation of PABPN1 in SFRS2-positive functional speckles and a significant decline in cell survival. These large expansions do not cause INIs formation nor do they lead to cytoplasmic accumulation. Deletion of the polyalanine tract induces the formation of aggregates that are located on either side and cross the nuclear membrane, highlighting the possible role of the N-terminal polyalanine tract in PABPN1 nucleo-cytoplasmic transport. We also show that even though five other proteins with polyalanine tracts tend to aggregate when over-expressed they do not co-aggregate with PABPN1 INIs. This study presents the first experimental evidence that there may be a relative loss of function in OPMD by decreasing the availability of PABPN1 through an INI-independent mechanism

  2. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a kidney infection , and it's serious because it can damage the kidneys and make you very sick. How Do I Know if I Have a UTI? You may notice signs of a urinary tract infection before anyone else can see there's anything wrong with you. That's why ...

  3. Urinary Tract Infections (For Kids)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Answers (Q&A) Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) KidsHealth / For ... Nondiscrimination Visit the Nemours Web site. Note: All information on KidsHealth® is for educational purposes only. For ...

  4. Urinary tract infections in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (cystitis or urethritis) with no urological anomalies and mostly affects girls over the age of 2 years. Complicated UTIs involve the renal parenchyma (pyelonephritis), and are usually associated with underlying congenital anomalies of the kidneys and urinary tract.9 These UTIs may result in significant short-term morbidity,.

  5. Candida urinary tract infection: pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John F; Kavanagh, Kevin; Sobel, Jack D; Kauffman, Carol A; Newman, Cheryl A

    2011-05-01

    Candida species are unusual causes of urinary tract infection (UTI) in healthy individuals, but common in the hospital setting or among patients with predisposing diseases and structural abnormalities of the kidney and collecting system. The urinary tract may be invaded in either an antegrade fashion from the bloodstream or retrograde via the urethra and bladder. Candida species employ a repertoire of virulence factors, including phenotypic switching, dimorphism, galvano - and thigmotropism, and hydrolytic enzymes, to colonize and then invade the urinary tract. Antegrade infection occurs primarily among patients predisposed to candidemia. The process of adherence to and invasion of the glomerulus, renal blood vessels, and renal tubules by Candida species was elegantly described in early histopathologic studies. Armed with modern molecular biologic techniques, the various virulence factors involved in bloodborne infection of the kidney are gradually being elucidated. Disturbances of urine flow, whether congenital or acquired, instrumentation of the urinary tract, diabetes mellitus, antimicrobial therapy, and immunosuppression underlie most instances of retrograde Candida UTI. In addition, bacterial UTIs caused by Enterobacteriaceae may facilitate the initial step in the process. Ascending infections generally do not result in candidemia in the absence of obstruction.

  6. GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT OF CLARIAS GARIEPINUS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    One hundred and fourteen (114) and one hundred and ninety nine (199) were infested fish samples from gills and gastrointestinal tract respectively. Parasites recovered during the survey include two species from gills identified as. Ergasilus sarsi ((24.60%) a crustacean (copepod), and one protozoan (myxosporean) named.

  7. Treatment ofurinary tract infection inchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Zwolińska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection is the most frequent bacterial infection in children. Its prevalence in the population younger than 14 years of age has been estimated at 5–10%. Its high recurrence, especially in patients with risk factors, poses a significant problem. The risk factors most common in the group of children ≤3 years are congenital defects blocking the flow of urine to the bladder, whereas in older children they most typically include a tendency for constipation and dysfunction of the lower urinary tract. The clinical picture is variable and depends on the child’s age, immunity status, pathogen virulence and localisation of infection. The mildest form of urinary tract infection is asymptomatic bacteriuria, whereas more severe presentations include acute pyelonephritis, acute focal bacterial nephritis and urosepsis. Prognosis is usually good, but under certain circumstances hypertension, proteinuria and chronic kidney disease may develop. Therefore, early introduced appropriate treatment is essential. According to the Polish Society for Paediatric Nephrology guidelines, asymptomatic bacteriuria does not warrant treatment, whereas febrile patients (>38°C under 24 months old with a suspicion for urinary tract infection must be promptly administered antibiotic therapy, after a urine specimen has been obtained for culture. For many years, urinary tract infection has remained a topic of controversy in terms of therapy duration and administration route. Inpatient treatment of children under 3 months of age is an accepted rule. Acute pyelonephritis necessitates a longer therapy, lasting from 7 to 10 days, whereas the duration of treatment of lower urinary tract infection has been cut down to 3 up to 5 days. Routine prophylactic antimicrobial therapy is not recommended following the initial urinary tract infection episode, yet should be considered in special circumstances. Alternative

  8. Tract profiles of white matter properties: automating fiber-tract quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeatman, Jason D; Dougherty, Robert F; Myall, Nathaniel J; Wandell, Brian A; Feldman, Heidi M

    2012-01-01

    Tractography based on diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) data is a method for identifying the major white matter fascicles (tracts) in the living human brain. The health of these tracts is an important factor underlying many cognitive and neurological disorders. In vivo, tissue properties may vary systematically along each tract for several reasons: different populations of axons enter and exit the tract, and disease can strike at local positions within the tract. Hence quantifying and understanding diffusion measures along each fiber tract (Tract Profile) may reveal new insights into white matter development, function, and disease that are not obvious from mean measures of that tract. We demonstrate several novel findings related to Tract Profiles in the brains of typically developing children and children at risk for white matter injury secondary to preterm birth. First, fractional anisotropy (FA) values vary substantially within a tract but the Tract FA Profile is consistent across subjects. Thus, Tract Profiles contain far more information than mean diffusion measures. Second, developmental changes in FA occur at specific positions within the Tract Profile, rather than along the entire tract. Third, Tract Profiles can be used to compare white matter properties of individual patients to standardized Tract Profiles of a healthy population to elucidate unique features of that patient's clinical condition. Fourth, Tract Profiles can be used to evaluate the association between white matter properties and behavioral outcomes. Specifically, in the preterm group reading ability is positively correlated with FA measured at specific locations on the left arcuate and left superior longitudinal fasciculus and the magnitude of the correlation varies significantly along the Tract Profiles. We introduce open source software for automated fiber-tract quantification (AFQ) that measures Tract Profiles of MRI parameters for 18 white matter tracts. With further validation, AFQ Tract

  9. Tract profiles of white matter properties: automating fiber-tract quantification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason D Yeatman

    Full Text Available Tractography based on diffusion weighted imaging (DWI data is a method for identifying the major white matter fascicles (tracts in the living human brain. The health of these tracts is an important factor underlying many cognitive and neurological disorders. In vivo, tissue properties may vary systematically along each tract for several reasons: different populations of axons enter and exit the tract, and disease can strike at local positions within the tract. Hence quantifying and understanding diffusion measures along each fiber tract (Tract Profile may reveal new insights into white matter development, function, and disease that are not obvious from mean measures of that tract. We demonstrate several novel findings related to Tract Profiles in the brains of typically developing children and children at risk for white matter injury secondary to preterm birth. First, fractional anisotropy (FA values vary substantially within a tract but the Tract FA Profile is consistent across subjects. Thus, Tract Profiles contain far more information than mean diffusion measures. Second, developmental changes in FA occur at specific positions within the Tract Profile, rather than along the entire tract. Third, Tract Profiles can be used to compare white matter properties of individual patients to standardized Tract Profiles of a healthy population to elucidate unique features of that patient's clinical condition. Fourth, Tract Profiles can be used to evaluate the association between white matter properties and behavioral outcomes. Specifically, in the preterm group reading ability is positively correlated with FA measured at specific locations on the left arcuate and left superior longitudinal fasciculus and the magnitude of the correlation varies significantly along the Tract Profiles. We introduce open source software for automated fiber-tract quantification (AFQ that measures Tract Profiles of MRI parameters for 18 white matter tracts. With further

  10. Urinary tract infection in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Theresa A; Juthani-Mehta, Manisha

    2013-10-01

    Urinary tract infection and asymptomatic bacteriuria are common in older adults. Unlike in younger adults, distinguishing symptomatic urinary tract infection from asymptomatic bacteriuria is problematic, as older adults, particularly those living in long-term care facilities, are less likely to present with localized genitourinary symptoms. Consensus guidelines have been published to assist clinicians with diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infection; however, a single evidence-based approach to diagnosis of urinary tract infection does not exist. In the absence of a gold standard definition of urinary tract infection that clinicians agree upon, overtreatment with antibiotics for suspected urinary tract infection remains a significant problem, and leads to a variety of negative consequences including the development of multidrug-resistant organisms. Future studies improving the diagnostic accuracy of urinary tract infections are needed. This review will cover the prevalence, diagnosis and diagnostic challenges, management, and prevention of urinary tract infection and asymptomatic bacteriuria in older adults.

  11. Biomechanical Remodeling of the Diabetic Gastrointestinal Tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Liao, Donghua; Yang, Jian

    2010-01-01

    Gastrointestinal tract sensory-motor abnormalities are common in patients with diabetes mellitus with symptoms arising from the whole GI tract. Common complaints include dysphasia, early satiety, reflux, constipation, abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. The pathogenesis of GI symptoms...

  12. Modulatory Effect of Taurine on 7,12-Dimethylbenz(a)Anthracene-Induced Alterations in Detoxification Enzyme System, Membrane Bound Enzymes, Glycoprotein Profile and Proliferative Cell Nuclear Antigen in Rat Breast Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanitha, Manickam Kalappan; Baskaran, Kuppusamy; Periyasamy, Kuppusamy; Selvaraj, Sundaramoorthy; Ilakkia, Aruldoss; Saravanan, Dhiravidamani; Venkateswari, Ramachandran; Revathi Mani, Balasundaram; Anandakumar, Pandi; Sakthisekaran, Dhanapal

    2016-08-01

    The modulatory effect of taurine on 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA)-induced breast cancer in rats was studied. DMBA (25 mg/kg body weight) was administered to induce breast cancer in rats. Protein carbonyl levels, activities of membrane bound enzymes (Na(+) /K(+) ATPase, Ca(2+) ATPase, and Mg(2+) ATPase), phase I drug metabolizing enzymes (cytochrome P450, cytochrome b5, NADPH cytochrome c reductase), phase II drug metabolizing enzymes (glutathione-S-transferase and UDP-glucuronyl transferase), glycoprotein levels, and proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were studied. DMBA-induced breast tumor bearing rats showed abnormal alterations in the levels of protein carbonyls, activities of membrane bound enzymes, drug metabolizing enzymes, glycoprotein levels, and PCNA protein expression levels. Taurine treatment (100 mg/kg body weight) appreciably counteracted all the above changes induced by DMBA. Histological examination of breast tissue further supported our biochemical findings. The results of the present study clearly demonstrated the chemotherapeutic effect of taurine in DMBA-induced breast cancer. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Composition and immunological significance of the upper respiratory tract microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenck, Louis Patrick; Surette, Michael G; Bowdish, Dawn M E

    2016-11-01

    The intestinal microbiota is essential for nutrient acquisition, immune development, and exclusion of invading pathogens. The upper respiratory tract (URT) microbiota is less well studied and does not appear to abide by many of the paradigms of the gastrointestinal tract. Decades of carriage studies in children have demonstrated that microbe-microbe competition and collusion occurs in the URT. Whether colonization with common pathogens (e.g., Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae) alters immune development or susceptibility to respiratory conditions is just beginning to be understood. Herein, we discuss the biogeography of the URT microbiota, the succession and evolution of the microbiota through the life course, and discuss the evidence for microbe-microbe interactions in colonization and infection. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  14. Lessons from Digestive-Tract Symbioses Between Bacteria and Invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, Joerg

    2016-09-08

    In most animals, digestive tracts harbor the greatest number of bacteria in the animal that contribute to its health: by aiding in the digestion of nutrients, provisioning essential nutrients and protecting against colonization by pathogens. Invertebrates have been used to enhance our understanding of metabolic processes and microbe-host interactions owing to experimental advantages. This review describes how advances in DNA sequencing technologies have dramatically altered how researchers investigate microbe-host interactions, including 16S rRNA gene surveys, metagenome experiments, and metatranscriptome studies. Advantages and challenges of each of these approaches are described herein. Hypotheses generated through omics studies can be directly tested using site-directed mutagenesis, and findings from transposon studies and site-directed experiments are presented. Finally, unique structural aspects of invertebrate digestive tracts that contribute to symbiont specificity are presented. The combination of omics approaches with genetics and microscopy allows researchers to move beyond correlations to identify conserved mechanisms of microbe-host interactions.

  15. Bladder Infection (Urinary Tract Infection - UTI) in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Urinary Tract & How It Works Bladder Infection (Urinary Tract Infection—UTI) in Adults View or Print All Sections ... Bladder infections are the most common type of urinary tract infection (UTI), but any part of your urinary tract ...

  16. Upper Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract X-Ray (Radiography)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z X-ray (Radiography) - Upper GI Tract Upper gastrointestinal tract radiography or ... X-ray? What is Upper Gastrointestinal (GI) Tract Radiography? Upper gastrointestinal tract radiography, also called an upper ...

  17. Urinary tract infections in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: review of prevalence, diagnosis, and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitzan O

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Orna Nitzan,1–3 Mazen Elias,2,4 Bibiana Chazan,1,2 Walid Saliba2,4 1Infectious Disease Unit, Ha’emek Medical Center, Afula, Israel; 2Bruce Rappaport Faculty of Medicine, Technion–Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel; 3Infectious Disease Unit, Padeh-Poriya Medical Center, 4Department of Internal Medicine C, Ha’emek Medical Center, Afula, Israel Abstract: Urinary tract infections are more common, more severe, and carry worse outcomes in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. They are also more often caused by resistant pathogens. Various impairments in the immune system, poor metabolic control, and incomplete bladder emptying due to autonomic neuropathy may all contribute to the enhanced risk of urinary tract infections in these patients. The new anti-diabetic sodium glucose cotransporter 2 inhibitors have not been found to significantly increase the risk of symptomatic urinary tract infections. Symptoms of urinary tract infection are similar to patients without diabetes, though some patients with diabetic neuropathy may have altered clinical signs. Treatment depends on several factors, including: presence of symptoms, severity of systemic symptoms, if infection is localized in the bladder or also involves the kidney, presence of urologic abnormalities, accompanying metabolic alterations, and renal function. There is no indication to treat diabetic patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria. Further studies are needed to improve the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes and urinary tract infections. Keywords: diabetes mellitus, diagnosis, management, prevalence, urinary tract infection

  18. Hyperammonemia associated with distal renal tubular acidosis or urinary tract infection: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clericetti, Caterina M; Milani, Gregorio P; Lava, Sebastiano A G; Bianchetti, Mario G; Simonetti, Giacomo D; Giannini, Olivier

    2018-03-01

    Hyperammonemia usually results from an inborn error of metabolism or from an advanced liver disease. Individual case reports suggest that both distal renal tubular acidosis and urinary tract infection may also result in hyperammonemia. A systematic review of the literature on hyperammonemia secondary to distal renal tubular acidosis and urinary tract infection was conducted. We identified 39 reports on distal renal tubular acidosis or urinary tract infections in association with hyperammonemia published between 1980 and 2017. Hyperammonemia was detected in 13 children with distal renal tubular acidosis and in one adult patient with distal renal tubular acidosis secondary to primary hyperparathyroidism. In these patients a negative relationship was observed between circulating ammonia and bicarbonate levels (P urinary tract infection was complicated by acute hyperammonemia and symptoms and signs of acute neuronal dysfunction, such as an altered level of consciousness, convulsions and asterixis, often associated with signs of brain edema, such as anorexia and vomiting. Urea-splitting bacteria were isolated in 28 of the 31 cases. The urinary tract was anatomically or functionally abnormal in 30 of these patients. This study reveals that both altered distal renal tubular acidification and urinary tract infection may be associated with relevant hyperammonemia in both children and adults.

  19. Prefrontal cortex white matter tracts in prodromal Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Joy T; Vaidya, Jatin G; Wassermann, Demian; Kim, Regina Eunyoung; Magnotta, Vincent A; Johnson, Hans J; Paulsen, Jane S

    2015-10-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is most widely known for its selective degeneration of striatal neurons but there is also growing evidence for white matter (WM) deterioration. The primary objective of this research was to conduct a large-scale analysis using multisite diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) tractography data to quantify diffusivity properties along major prefrontal cortex WM tracts in prodromal HD. Fifteen international sites participating in the PREDICT-HD study collected imaging and neuropsychological data on gene-positive HD participants without a clinical diagnosis (i.e., prodromal) and gene-negative control participants. The anatomical prefrontal WM tracts of the corpus callosum (PFCC), anterior thalamic radiations (ATRs), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculi (IFO), and uncinate fasciculi (UNC) were identified using streamline tractography of DWI. Within each of these tracts, tensor scalars for fractional anisotropy, mean diffusivity, radial diffusivity, and axial diffusivity coefficients were calculated. We divided prodromal HD subjects into three CAG-age product (CAP) groups having Low, Medium, or High probabilities of onset indexed by genetic exposure. We observed significant differences in WM properties for each of the four anatomical tracts for the High CAP group in comparison to controls. Additionally, the Medium CAP group presented differences in the ATR and IFO in comparison to controls. Furthermore, WM alterations in the PFCC, ATR, and IFO showed robust associations with neuropsychological measures of executive functioning. These results suggest long-range tracts essential for cross-region information transfer show early vulnerability in HD and may explain cognitive problems often present in the prodromal stage. Hum Brain Mapp 36:3717-3732, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Mucoadhesion and the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varum, Felipe J O; McConnell, Emma L; Sousa, Joao J S; Veiga, Francisco; Basit, Abdul W

    2008-01-01

    The concept of mucoadhesion is one that has the potential to improve the highly variable residence times experienced by drugs and dosage forms at various sites in the gastrointestinal tract, and consequently, to reduce variability and improve efficacy. Intimate contact with the mucosa should enhance absorption or improve topical therapy. A variety of approaches have been investigated for mucoadhesion in the gastrointestinal tract, particularly for the stomach and small intestine. Despite interesting results in these sites, mucoadhesive approaches have not yet shown success in humans. The potential of the lower gut for these applications has been largely neglected, although the large intestine in particular may benefit, and the colon has several factors that suggest mucoadhesion could be successful there, including lower motility and the possibility of a lower mucus turnover and thicker mucus layer. In vitro studies on colonic mucoadhesion show promise, and rectal administration has shown some positive results in vivo. This review considers the background to mucoadhesion with respect to the physiological conditions of the gastrointestinal tract as well as the principles that underlie this concept. Mucoadhesive approaches to gastrointestinal drug delivery will be examined, with particular attention given to the lower gut.

  1. URINARY TRACT INFECTION IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Margieva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The issues of diagnosing and treating urinary tract infections and their role in development of renal injury are being actively discussed by scientists and practicing pediatricians. The article presents the most recent data on etiological factors, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of this disease. It provides recommendations on diagnosis and management of patients depending on their age. The article presents a discussion of antibacterial therapy course duration and indications for anti-relapse treatment. The study demonstrates that intravenous antibacterial therapy must be launched immediately in neonates in the event of pyretic fever; empirical antibacterial therapy must be launched immediately in older children after diagnosis of the urinary tract infection has been confirmed; subsequently, treatment ought to be corrected depending on the results of a bacteriological trial, sensitivity to antibiotics and effectiveness of the prescribed antibiotic. Along with normalization of urination rhythm and water intake schedule, antibacterial preventive therapy might be considered, if effective, in the event of recurrent nature of the urinary tract infection. 

  2. Automated tractography in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy using TRActs Constrained by UnderLying Anatomy (TRACULA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara A.K. Kreilkamp

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: This study shows that TRACULA permits the detection of alterations of DTI tract scalar metrics in patients with TLE. It also provides the opportunity to explore relationships with structural volume measurements and clinical variables along white matter tracts. Our data suggests that the anterior temporal lobe portions of the uncinate and inferior-longitudinal fasciculus may be particularly vulnerable to pathological alterations in patients with TLE. These alterations are unrelated to the extent of hippocampal atrophy (and therefore potentially mediated by independent mechanisms but influenced by chronicity and severity of the disorder.

  3. Preoperative Quantitative MR Tractography Compared with Visual Tract Evaluation in Patients with Neuropathologically Confirmed Gliomas Grades II and III: A Prospective Cohort Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, Anna F.; Nilsson, Markus; Latini, Francesco; Mårtensson, Johanna; Zetterling, Maria; Berntsson, Shala G.; Alafuzoff, Irina; Lätt, Jimmy; Larsson, Elna-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Low-grade gliomas show infiltrative growth in white matter tracts. Diffusion tensor tractography can noninvasively assess white matter tracts. The aim was to preoperatively assess tumor growth in white matter tracts using quantitative MR tractography (3T). The hypothesis was that suspected infiltrated tracts would have altered diffusional properties in infiltrated tract segments compared to noninfiltrated tracts. Materials and Methods. Forty-eight patients with suspected low-grade glioma were included after written informed consent and underwent preoperative diffusion tensor imaging in this prospective review-board approved study. Major white matter tracts in both hemispheres were tracked, segmented, and visually assessed for tumor involvement in thirty-four patients with gliomas grade II or III (astrocytomas or oligodendrogliomas) on postoperative neuropathological evaluation. Relative fractional anisotropy (rFA) and mean diffusivity (rMD) in tract segments were calculated and compared with visual evaluation and neuropathological diagnosis. Results. Tract segment infiltration on visual evaluation was associated with a lower rFA and high rMD in a majority of evaluated tract segments (89% and 78%, resp.). Grade II and grade III gliomas had similar infiltrating behavior. Conclusion. Quantitative MR tractography corresponds to visual evaluation of suspected tract infiltration. It may be useful for an objective preoperative evaluation of tract segment involvement

  4. Nuclear law - Nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontier, Jean-Marie; Roux, Emmanuel; Leger, Marc; Deguergue, Maryse; Vallar, Christian; Pissaloux, Jean-Luc; Bernie-Boissard, Catherine; Thireau, Veronique; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Spencer, Mary; Zhang, Li; Park, Kyun Sung; Artus, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    This book contains the contributions presented during a one-day seminar. The authors propose a framework for a legal approach to nuclear safety, a discussion of the 2009/71/EURATOM directive which establishes a European framework for nuclear safety in nuclear installations, a comment on nuclear safety and environmental governance, a discussion of the relationship between citizenship and nuclear, some thoughts about the Nuclear Safety Authority, an overview of the situation regarding the safety in nuclear waste burying, a comment on the Nome law with respect to electricity price and nuclear safety, a comment on the legal consequences of the Fukushima accident on nuclear safety in the Japanese law, a presentation of the USA nuclear regulation, an overview of nuclear safety in China, and a discussion of nuclear safety in the medical sector

  5. Overexpression of nuclear apoptosis-inducing factor 1 altered the proteomic profile of human gastric cancer cell MKN45 and induced cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Yang

    Full Text Available Nuclear apoptosis-inducing factor 1 (NAIF1 was previously reported to induce apoptosis. Moreover, the expression of NAIF1 was significantly down-regulated in human gastric cancer tissues compared to adjacent normal tissues. However, the mechanism by which the NAIF1 gene induces apoptosis is not fully understood. Our results show that NAIF1 was minimally expressed in all the tested gastric cancer cell lines. Our data also demonstrates that NAIF1 is localized in the nuclei of cells as detected by monitoring the green fluorescence of NAIF1-GFP fusion protein using fluorescent confocal microscopy. Next, a comparative proteomic approach was used to identify the differential expression of proteins between gastric cancer cell lines MKN45/NAIF1 (- and MKN45/NAIF1 (+. We found five proteins (proteasome 26S subunit 2, proteasome 26S subunit 13, NADH dehydrogenase Fe-S protein 1, chaperonin containing TCP1 subunit 3 and thioredoxin reductase 1 that were up-regulated and three proteins (ribonuclease inhibitor 1, 14-3-3 protein epsilon isoform and apolipoprotein A-I binding protein that were down-regulated in the MKN45 cells overexpressing NAIF1. We also discovered that NAIF1 could induce cell cycle arrest at G1/S phase by altering the expression of cell cycle proteins cyclinD1, cdc2 and p21. The differentially expressed proteins identified here are related to various cellular programs involving cell cycle, apoptosis, and signal transduction regulation and suggest that NAIF1 may be a tumor suppressor in gastric cancer. Our research provides evidence that elucidates the role of how NAIF1 functions in gastric cancer.

  6. Urinary tract infections and Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Payam; Behzadi, Elham; Ranjbar, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract candidiasis is known as the most frequent nosocomial fungal infection worldwide. Candida albicans is the most common cause of nosocomial fungal urinary tract infections; however, a rapid change in the distribution of Candida species is undergoing. Simultaneously, the increase of urinary tract candidiasis has led to the appearance of antifungal resistant Candida species. In this review, we have an in depth look into Candida albicans uropathogenesis and distribution of the three most frequent Candida species contributing to urinary tract candidiasis in different countries around the world. For writing this review, Google Scholar -a scholarly search engine- (http://scholar.google.com/) and PubMed database (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/) were used. The most recently published original articles and reviews of literature relating to the first three Candida species causing urinary tract infections in different countries and the pathogenicity of Candida albicans were selected and studied. Although some studies show rapid changes in the uropathogenesis of Candida species causing urinary tract infections in some countries, Candida albicans is still the most important cause of candidal urinary tract infections. Despite the ranking of Candida albicans as the dominant species for urinary tract candidiasis, specific changes have occurred in some countries. At this time, it is important to continue the surveillance related to Candida species causing urinary tract infections to prevent, control and treat urinary tract candidiasis in future.

  7. URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS IN PREGNANCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Sivalingam

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections frequently affect pregnant mothers. This problem causes significant morbidity and healthcare expenditure. Three common clinical manifestations of UTIs in pregnancy are: asymptomatic bacteriuria, acute cystitis and acute pyelonephritis. Escherichia coli remains the most frequent organism isolated in UTIs. All pregnant mothers should be screened for UTIs in pregnancy and antibiotics should be commenced without delay. Urine culture and sensitivity is the gold standard in diagnosing UTIs. Without treatment, asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy is associated with preterm delivery, intrauterine growth retardation, low birth weight, maternal hypertension, pre-eclampsia and anaemia. Acute pyelonephritis can lead to maternal sepsis. Recurrent UTIs in pregnancy require prophylactic antibiotic treatment.

  8. Changes to the gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    This article explores changes in the ageing gastrointestinal tract, including: » Diminished sense of taste and smell. » Shrinking of the maxillary and mandibular bones in the jaw. » Slowing of oesophageal peristalsis giving a feeling that something is 'stuck in the throat'. » Relaxation of the lower sphincter leading to gastro-oesophageal reflux. » Reduction in gastric bicarbonate and prostaglandin in mucus increasing susceptibility to stomach ulcers. » Changes in villi in the small intestine reducing the area for absorption. » Overpopulation of bacteria in the small intestine leading to decreased absorption of folic acid and minerals.

  9. Nuclear desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huyghe, J.

    1975-01-01

    The use of small or medium size nuclear reactors for the desalination of sea water has gained economic interest since the increase of oil prices. These reactors, with a wide range of power from 135 to 1,100Mwth, are parrticularly interesting because their production of fresh water or electricity is tailored to the present need. The replacement of conventional fuel boilers by nuclear reactor boilers does not change the traditional desalination technology and alters very little the coupling of the electricity and water producing parts of the plant. It is a reasonable assumption that the performance of desalination plants will increase with the optimization of the design technology of a mixed plant. The cost of the water produced in a mixed plant is mainly related to local conditions and to the method of splitting the cost between water and electricity. It is therefore impossible to give in this paper a cost for the fresh water production [fr

  10. Cranberries and lower urinary tract infection prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Hisano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lower urinary tract infections are very common diseases. Recurrent urinary tract infections remain challenging to treat because the main treatment option is long-term antibiotic prophylaxis; however, this poses a risk for the emergence of bacterial resistance. Some options to avoid this risk are available, including the use of cranberry products. This article reviews the key methods in using cranberries as a preventive measure for lower urinary tract infections, including in vitro studies and clinical trials.

  11. [Diagnosis and management of urinary tract dilatations detected in utero].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Stephan; Guignard, Jean-Pierre

    2002-12-01

    About 1% of the newborns show abnormalities of the urinary tract, representing 25% of the antenatally detected malformations. Most of these urinary abnormalities are detected by prenatal ultrasound between the 14th and the 22nd week of gestation. Their outcome is determined during the first weeks of pregnancy and depends on the degree of renal impairment and the presence of associated extrarenal malformations. Establishing the outcome is often difficult, however it can be predicted by ultrasound and biochemistry of fetal urine. Prenatal management should consist in follow-up and careful organisation of the postnatal management of congenital uropathies. Every antenatally dilated urinary tract requires postnatal investigation. Postnatal ultrasound on the 3rd to 4th day of life is recommended for confirming or excluding urinary abnormalities. In case of persistence, ultrasound has to be completed by other radiologic methods. Voiding cystourethrography and/or nuclear renography allow to identify the origin of the observed abnormalities. Apart from a few situations needing immediate correction, surgical treatment is rarely indicated. The principal of postnatal management is prevention of urinary tract infections by antibiotic prophylaxis and a close follow-up until adulthood.

  12. Nuclear news for all

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    Fifty-seven percent of the employees of the Public Service Electric and Gas Company of Newark, NJ, answered No to the question: When people outside the company talk to you about nuclear power, do you feel you have enough information to adequately explain the company's position. Five booklets produced by the company's Advertising and Community Relations Department in July 1980 would have altered those results. The booklets (Nuclear Energy and the Environment, Low-Level Radiation, Nuclear Reactor Safety, Nuclear Waste Management and Disposal, and Alternative Energy Sources for Electric Generation) are summarized, and ordering information is given

  13. Environmental radon and radon daughter dosimetry in the respiratory tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McPherson, R.B.

    1979-04-01

    This report describes work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's program to determine safety and costs related to decommissioning nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Individual dose factors for the inhalation of radon and its daughter products are calculated for use in environmental dose assessments. The calculated committed dose equivalent factors for 222 Rn and its daughters are tabulated for lungs, bronchi tract and other organs. An activity median aerodynamic diameter of 0.1 μm was used. The dose to an individual is calculated by multiplying the estimated intake from inhalation for a particular radionuclide by the corresponding dose factor. A working level month-to-dose conversion factor is calculated to be 1 rad/WLM to the epithelial tissue of the T-B region, assuming 100% daughter equilibrium and 10% free 218 Po ions. This value is in reasonable agreement with recently reported values

  14. Environmental radon and radon daughter dosimetry in the respiratory tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPherson, R.B.

    1979-04-01

    This report describes work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's program to determine safety and costs related to decommissioning nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Individual dose factors for the inhalation of radon and its daughter products are calculated for use in environmental dose assessments. The calculated committed dose equivalent factors for /sup 222/Rn and its daughters are tabulated for lungs, bronchi tract and other organs. An activity median aerodynamic diameter of 0.1 ..mu..m was used. The dose to an individual is calculated by multiplying the estimated intake from inhalation for a particular radionuclide by the corresponding dose factor. A working level month-to-dose conversion factor is calculated to be 1 rad/WLM to the epithelial tissue of the T-B region, assuming 100% daughter equilibrium and 10% free /sup 218/Po ions. This value is in reasonable agreement with recently reported values.

  15. Public health implications of altered puberty timing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golub, M.S.; Collman, G.W.; Foster, P.M.

    2008-01-01

    Changes in puberty timing have implications for the treatment of individual children, for the risk of later adult disease, and for chemical testing and risk assessment for the population. Children with early puberty are at a risk for accelerated skeletal maturation and short adult height, early...... sexual debut, potential sexual abuse, and psychosocial difficulties. Altered puberty timing is also of concern for the development of reproductive tract cancers later in life. For example, an early age of menarche is a risk factor for breast cancer. A low age at male puberty is associated....... Altered timing of puberty also has implications for behavioral disorders. For example, an early maturation is associated with a greater incidence of conduct and behavior disorders during adolescence. Finally, altered puberty timing is considered an adverse effect in reproductive toxicity risk assessment...

  16. Public health implications of altered puberty timing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golub, M.S.; Collman, G.W.; Foster, P.M.

    2008-01-01

    sexual debut, potential sexual abuse, and psychosocial difficulties. Altered puberty timing is also of concern for the development of reproductive tract cancers later in life. For example, an early age of menarche is a risk factor for breast cancer. A low age at male puberty is associated....... Altered timing of puberty also has implications for behavioral disorders. For example, an early maturation is associated with a greater incidence of conduct and behavior disorders during adolescence. Finally, altered puberty timing is considered an adverse effect in reproductive toxicity risk assessment......Changes in puberty timing have implications for the treatment of individual children, for the risk of later adult disease, and for chemical testing and risk assessment for the population. Children with early puberty are at a risk for accelerated skeletal maturation and short adult height, early...

  17. Metastases of the digestive tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caramella, E.; Bruneton, J.N.; Roux, P.; Aubanel, D.; Lecomte, P.

    1983-01-01

    In addition to personal observations of 77 patients with one or more metastatic sites in the gastrointestinal tract, the authors reviewed over 1000 similar cases in the literature. The general radiologic aspects of each location (oesophagus, stomach, intestine, colon/rectum) are discussed. The pathophysiology of this type of metastasis explains the radiologic images obtained during barium transit examinations. The lymphatic type of spread observed in the oesophageal region in connection with carcinoma of the breast is the origin of stenosis of the middle third. The haematogenous type of diffusion encountered during melanomas creates intramural or intraluminal radiologic images. Two means of spread can be observed in the stomach. Haematogenous spread can result in frequently multiple and ulcerated nodular submucosal lesions from melanomas and bronchogenic carcinomas; it can also cause a more or less stenotic invasive image, especially in connection with carcinoma of the breast. Dissemination by means of the mesenteric reflections, and in particular around the gastrocolic ligament, explains the spread of a carcinoma of the transverse colon towards the stomach. The most frequent secondary sites in the gastrointestinal tract occur in the small intestine, the majority of these metastases being caused by pelvic tumours. Whether occurring in the small intestine or the colon, the patophysiology is similar: direct invasion by a non-contiguous primary carcinoma along the fascias and mesenteric attachments (more rarely by lymphatic permeation), dissemination by the peritoneal fluid or haematogenuous spread. In the first two types of dissemination cited, the image encountered is often hard to differentiate from radiation-induced lesions. (orig.)

  18. Peptide Hormones in the Gastrointestinal Tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehfeld, Jens F.

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal hormones are peptides released from endocrine cells and neurons in the digestive tract. More than 30 hormone genes are currently known to be expressed in the gastrointestinal tract, which makes the gut the largest hormone-producing organ in the body. Modern biology makes it feasi...

  19. urinary tract infections amongst pregnant women attending

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    INTRODUCTION. Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common bacterial infection during pregnancy and a significant cause of perinatal and maternal morbidity and mortality (1). It may be symptomatic, in form of urethritis, cystitis, pyelonephritis; or it may remain asymptomatic (2). Urinary Tract Infection is more common in women.

  20. Urinary tract infection in girls - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symptoms of urinary tract infection (UTI) should begin to improve within 1 to 2 days in most girls. The advice below may not ... Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2016:chap 127. Elder JS. Urinary tract infections. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, ...

  1. Constipation and reversible urinary tract abnormalities.

    OpenAIRE

    Dohil, R; Roberts, E; Jones, K V; Jenkins, H R

    1994-01-01

    Urinary tract anomalies were prospectively investigated with ultrasound in 29 children with functional constipation. These children were compared before and after treatment with 451 age matched healthy controls without constipation. The bladder residue and upper renal tract dilatation after micturition were significantly increased in the group with constipation and improved after treatment.

  2. Renal tract malformations: perspectives for nephrologists.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerecuk, L.; Schreuder, M.F.; Woolf, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    Renal tract malformations are congenital anomalies of the kidneys and/or lower urinary tract. One challenging feature of these conditions is that they can present not only prenatally but also in childhood or adulthood. The most severe types of malformations, such as bilateral renal agenesis or

  3. Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive tracers? ... funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that uses ...

  4. Survey of risk factors urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Dehghani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Women are very susceptible to urinary tract infections and pregnancy raises the risk of urinary tract infection. In general, little information on the risk factors of urinary tract infection in pregnancy is underway. Urinary tract infection in pregnancy is an important risk factor for pregnancy dire consequences. The purpose of this study is to find risk factors associated with urinary tract infection in pregnant women. Methods: The study was observational and retrospective analysis was carried on in the winter of which 310 pregnant women participated in 11 health centers in Shahrekord. Of these 155 cases (patients and 155 controls (healthy that were matched for age Information required from the health records of pregnant women and complete Czech list of researcher whose validity was confirmed by experts were gathered. Information needed by pregnant women health records and complete list researcher was collected. Czech list contains a number of possible risk factors for illness and demographic characteristics of the study participants was Statistical analysis software spss version 16 by using chi square tests and logistic regression and t analysis was performed. Results: Among the variables vomiting (p = 0/00 a history of urinary tract infection in a previous pregnancy (P =.001, CI = 1.508-4.408, OR = 2.578 abortion own history (P =.014, CI = 1.165 -3.847, OR = 2.117, respectively, the most important risk factors for urinary tract infection in pregnant women were determined. Conclusion: Prevention and treatment of vomiting in pregnancy prevention of urinary tract infections during pregnancy. Prevention of abortion can play an important role in the prevention of urinary tract infection and its complications in pregnancy. The study also revealed a number of factors can have an impact on urinary tract infection in pregnancy that has not been enough attention and it is necessary that more attention be placed on health programs and

  5. Invisible nuclear; converting nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jongmoon

    1993-03-01

    This book consists of 14 chapters which are CNN era and big science, from East and West to North and South, illusory nuclear strategy, UN and nuclear arms reduction, management of armaments, advent of petroleum period, the track of nuclear power generation, view of energy, internationalization of environment, the war over water in the Middle East, influence of radiation and an isotope technology transfer and transfer armament into civilian industry, the end of nuclear period and the nuclear Nonproliferation, national scientific and technological power and political organ and executive organ.

  6. Pathogenic and Diagnostic Potential of BLCA-1 and BLCA-4 Nuclear Proteins in Urothelial Cell Carcinoma of Human Bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Santoni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC of the bladder is one of the most common malignancies of genitourinary tract. Patients with bladder cancer need a life-long surveillance, directly due to the relatively high recurrence rate of this tumor. The use of cystoscopy represents the gold standard for the followup of previously treated patients. Nevertheless, several factors, including cost and invasiveness, render cystoscopy not ideal for routine controls. Advances in the identification of specific alterations in the nuclear structure of bladder cancer cells have opened novel diagnostic landscapes. The members of nuclear matrix protein family BLCA-1 and BLCA-4, are currently under evaluation as bladder cancer urinary markers. They are involved in tumour cell proliferation, survival, and angiogenesis. In this paper, we illustrate the role of BLCA-1 and BLCA-4 in bladder carcinogenesis and their potential exploitation as biomarkers in this cancer.

  7. Prevalence of urinary tract infection and vesicoureteral reflux in children with lower urinary tract dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Batavia, Jason P; Ahn, Jennifer J; Fast, Angela M; Combs, Andrew J; Glassberg, Kenneth I

    2013-10-01

    Lower urinary tract dysfunction is a common pediatric urological problem that is often associated with urinary tract infection. We determined the prevalence of a urinary tract infection history in children with lower urinary tract dysfunction and its association, if any, with gender, bowel dysfunction, vesicoureteral reflux and specific lower urinary tract conditions. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of children diagnosed with and treated for lower urinary tract dysfunction, noting a history of urinary tract infection with or without fever, gender, bowel dysfunction and vesicoureteral reflux in association with specific lower urinary tract conditions. Of the 257 boys and 366 girls with a mean age of 9.1 years 207 (33%) had a urinary tract infection history, including 88 with at least 1 febrile infection. A total of 64 patients underwent voiding cystourethrogram/videourodynamics, which revealed reflux in 44 (69%). In 119 of the 207 patients all infections were afebrile and 18 underwent voiding cystourethrogram/videourodynamics, which revealed reflux in 5 (28%). A urinary tract infection history was noted in 53% of girls but only 5% of boys (p infection history than patients with idiopathic detrusor overactivity disorder or primary bladder neck dysfunction (each p urinary tract dysfunction have a much higher urinary tract infection incidence than males. This association was most often noted for lower urinary tract conditions in which urinary stasis occurs, including detrusor underutilization disorder and dysfunctional voiding. Reflux was found in most girls with a history of febrile infections. Since reflux was identified in more than a quarter of girls with only afebrile infections who were evaluated for reflux, it may be reasonable to perform voiding cystourethrogram or videourodynamics in some of them to identify reflux. Copyright © 2013 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Frailty and Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suskind, Anne M

    2017-09-01

    The incidence of both frailty and lower urinary tract symptoms, including urinary incontinence, overactive bladder, underactive bladder, and benign prostatic hyperplasia, increases with age. However, our understanding of the relationship between frailty and lower urinary tract symptoms, both in terms of pathophysiology and in terms of the evaluation and management of such symptoms, is greatly lacking. This brief review will summarize definitions and measurement tools associated with frailty and will also review the existing state of the literature on frailty and lower urinary tract symptoms in older individuals.

  9. Diagnosis of liver, biliary tract and gastrointestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aburano, Tamio

    1981-01-01

    The role of RI imaging in the diagnosis of lesions of the liver, biliary tracts and gastrointestinal tracts are reviewed, and representative cases are shown. Liver scintigraphy was of value for the diagnosis of lesions limitted to the liver such as primary and metastatic liver cancer and inflammatory liver diseases. However, RI methods were less useful in the diagnosis of lesions of the biliary tracts and stomach. RI scintigraphy was more sensitive than angiography in the detection of Meckel's deverticulum, Ballet's esophagus, and gastrointestinal hemorrhage. (Tsunoda, M.)

  10. Nuclear liability - nuclear insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roesch, H.

    1981-01-01

    In the fourth concluding article on this subject (following articles in VW 1981 pp. 483, 552 and 629), the author explains procedures, duties and obligations according to the Para. Para. 5, 6 and 7 of the AHBKA. These obligations are to be observed before or after the occurrence of damages. In addition, legal consequences following violations of duties - loss of right - joint, insurance, transfer ban, period for filing suit, duty to notify, 'The German Nuclear Reactor Insurance and Reinsurance Community', the insurance according to the 'General terms and conditions governing the liability insurance of licensed activities involving nuclear fuels and other radioactive substances outside nuclear installations (AHBStr.)', object, beginning and exclusion of coverage, 'Special conditions governing the transport of nuclear fuels according to Para. 25 (2) of the Atomic Energy Law' are attached to the General Terms and Conditions governing the liability insurance of licenced activities involving nuclear fuels and other radioactive substances outside nuclear installations. (HSCH) [de

  11. Global alteration of climate - hopes and fears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viktorov, V.V.

    1992-01-01

    Problems concerning gaseous emission affecting the global climate alteration connected with hotbed effect are considered. Economical and social-political ways of solution of the problem of minimization of gaseous wastes are described. Role of nuclear power plants and alternative power plants in the hotbed effect are analyzed. International cooperation in environmental protection policy is discussed

  12. Fictions of nuclear disaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowling, D.

    1987-01-01

    This work is critical study of literary interpretations of the nuclear holocaust. The author examines more than 250 stories and novels dealing with the theme of nuclear power and its devastating potential implications. Addressing such topics as the scientist and Armageddon, the role of religion, future evolution and mutation, and the postnuclear society, the author assesses the response of Bradbury, Lessing, Malamud, Shute, Huxley, Vonnegut, Heinlein, and others to the threat of nuclear apocalypse, with in-depth analyses of Alter Miller's A canticle for Leibowitz and Russell Hoban's Riddley Walker.

  13. VT 2010 Census Tract Boundaries and Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) TRACT2010 contains a subset of attributes from Summary File 1 of the 2010 Decennial Census. The TIGER/Line Files are shapefiles and related...

  14. Unusual foreign bodies of upper gastrointestinal tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nijhawan, S; Rai, R R; Agarwal, S; Vijayvergiya, R

    1995-01-01

    We report management of unusual foreign bodies of upper gastrointestinal tract, namely beer bottle cap, raisins and pistachu, mango peel, betelnut and plum seed at a university hospital in Northern India.

  15. Real-Time Vocal Tract Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Benkrid

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available To date, most speech synthesis techniques have relied upon the representation of the vocal tract by some form of filter, a typical example being linear predictive coding (LPC. This paper describes the development of a physiologically realistic model of the vocal tract using the well-established technique of transmission line modelling (TLM. This technique is based on the principle of wave scattering at transmission line segment boundaries and may be used in one, two, or three dimensions. This work uses this technique to model the vocal tract using a one-dimensional transmission line. A six-port scattering node is applied in the region separating the pharyngeal, oral, and the nasal parts of the vocal tract.

  16. Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP) Activities by Tract

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The data being displayed are census tract level counts of NSP-funded activities and is derived from an extract of HUD's Community Planning and Development’s (CPD)...

  17. Nuclear Medicine week in Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padhy, A.K.

    2003-01-01

    During the week of 6-12 October 2003 the IAEA organized a Research Coordination Meeting on 'Relationship between lower Respiratory Tract Infection, Gastroesophageal reflux and bronchial Asthma in children' at Hospital San Ignacio in Bogota. Besides there were four workshops in Bogota; workshops on Bone infection and Bone scan in Pediatric ortopaedics at Hospital Militar and Fundacion CardioInfantil, a workshop for Nuclear Medicine Technologists and a workshop on Sentinel Lymph Node mapping and Surgical Gamma Probe Application at Institute of Oncology. A nuclear cardiology workshop was organized in Medellin, and finally crowning them all was the 9th Congress of the Colombian Association of Nuclear Medicine at Cali from 10-12 October, 2003; probably the largest and best Colombian nuclear medicine congress every held in the country. A workshop was also organized in Cali for nuclear medicine technologists in conjunction with the Annual Convention. It was a mix of IAEA's Technical Cooperation and Regular Budget activities along with the activities of Colombian Association of Nuclear Medicine, bringing in absolute synergy to galvanize the entire nuclear medicine community of the country. The week saw nuclear medicine scientists from more than 20 IAEA Member States converging on Colombia to spread the message of nuclear medicine, share knowledge and to foster International understanding and friendship among the nuclear medicine people of the world

  18. Large melanoma metastases to the gastrointestinal tract.

    OpenAIRE

    Silverman, J M; Hamlin, J A

    1989-01-01

    It is well known that malignant melanoma can metastasize widely. Although these metastases in the gastrointestinal tract usually appear as small 'bull's-eye' or 'target' lesions, there are a few reports of relatively large melanoma metastases. We report five cases of large melanoma lesions metastatic to the alimentary canal. We also emphasise the consideration of a thorough gastrointestinal tract evaluation in patients with malignant melanoma especially if they are symptomatic.

  19. Mechanisms of urinary tract sterility maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Okrągła

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Physiologically, urine and the urinary tract are maintained sterile because of physical and chemical properties of urine and the innate immune system’s action. The urinary tract is constantly exposed to the invasion of microorganisms from the exterior environment, also because of the anatomical placement of the urethra, in the vicinity of the rectum. Particularly vulnerable to urinary tract infections (UTI are women (an additional risk factor is pregnancy, but also the elderly and children. The main pathogens causing UTI are bacteria; in 70-95% of cases it is the bacterium Escherichia coli. Infections caused by viruses and fungi are less common and are associated with decreased immunity, pharmacotherapy, or some diseases. Bacteria have evolved a number of factors that facilitate the colonization of the urinary tract: the cover and cell membrane antigens O and K1, lipopolysaccharide (LPS, fimbriae, pile and cilia. On the other hand, the human organism has evolved mechanisms to hinder colonization of the urinary tract: mechanisms arising from the anatomical structure of the urinary tract, the physicochemical properties of the urine and the activity of the innate immune system, also known as non-specific, which isolates and destroys pathogens using immunological processes, and the mechanisms for release of antimicrobial substances such as Tamm-Horsfall protein, mucopolysaccharides, immunoglobulins IgA and IgG, lactoferrin, lipocalin, neutrophils, cytokines and antimicrobial peptides. This review aims to analyze the state of knowledge on the mechanisms to maintain the sterility of the urinary tract used by the human organism and bacterial virulence factors to facilitate the colonization of the urinary tract.

  20. [Nuclear theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haxton, W.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research in nuclear physics. Topics covered in this paper are: symmetry principles; nuclear astrophysics; nuclear structure; quark-gluon plasma; quantum chromodynamics; symmetry breaking; nuclear deformation; and cold fusion

  1. [Urinary tract infection and neurogenic bladder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomon, J; Gory, A; Bernard, L; Ruffion, A; Denys, P; Chartier-Kastler, E

    2007-05-01

    One of the main complications of spinal cord injury is neurogenic bladder when the bladder fails to empty spontaneously. Urinary tract infection is the leading cause of morbidity and the second cause of mortality in these subjects. Patient education and personalized medical follow-up must ensure adapted management depending on the risk factors and the voiding mode. The risk of urinary tract infection can be decreased by perfect neurological control of detrusor activity combined with a method of drainage: intermittent self-catheterization. Despite these measures, many patients experience recurrent symptomatic urinary tract infections. Repeated antibiotic therapy increases the risk of selection of multiresistant bacteria without reducing either the incidence or the severity of symptomatic urinary tract infections. Asymptomatic bacteriuria is very frequent in patients treated by intermittent catheterization and does not justify antibiotic therapy, as antiseptics and urinary alkalinizers or acidifiers have been shown to be effective. "Antibiocycle" strategies could have a beneficial role by significantly decreasing the number of infections and hospitalizations with no major ecological risks, by using molecules that are well tolerated orally with a low selection pressure. All febrile urinary tract infections require rapid investigation and an urgent urological and infectious diseases opinion (abscess, severe sepsis, resistance). The SPILF-AFU 2002 consensus conference provided answers to major questions concerning the definition, treatment and prevention of nosocomial urinary tract infection, especially in a context of neurogenic bladder.

  2. FAQs about Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the bladder. What are the symptoms of a urinary tract infection? Some of the common symptoms of a urinary tract infection are: • Burning or ... catheter is removed. Sometimes people with catheter-associated urinary tract ... these symptoms of infection. Can catheter-associated urinary tract infections ...

  3. Nuclear power and nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaughen, V.C.A.

    1983-01-01

    The proliferation of nuclear weapons and the expanded use of nuclear energy for the production of electricity and other peaceful uses are compared. The difference in technologies associated with nuclear weapons and nuclear power plants are described

  4. Haemophilus haemolyticus: A Human Respiratory Tract Commensal to Be Distinguished from Haemophilus influenzae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, T.F.; Brauer, A.L.; Sethi, S.

    2007-01-01

    Background. Haemophilus influenzae is a common pathogen in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In a prospective study, selected isolates of apparent H. influenzae had an altered phenotype. We tested the hypothesis that these variant strains were genetically different from ty...... distinguish H. haemolyticus from H. influenzae. H. haemolyticus is a respiratory tract commensal. The recognition that some strains of apparent H. influenzae are H. haemolyticus substantially strengthens the association of true H. influenzae with clinical infection....

  5. [The curative action of Monticelli Term's water in upper respiratory tract diseases (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchi, R; Jemmi, G; Barani, B

    1976-01-01

    The Authors study the action of the sodio bromide-iodic water of Monticelli Terme in upper respiratory tract disease and particularly assert that is not to neglect the organic ground on which establishes mucosa's disease. Therman treatment gives the best therapeutic results in every patient presenting chronic inflammatory processes of the upper respiratory trach alternating periods of quiescency and of activity, and poor therapeutic action in patients presenting chronic inveterate diseases with great alterations in vascular and glandular components of the mucosa.

  6. Seminal Fluid-Mediated Inflammation in Physiology and Pathology of the Female Reproductive Tract

    OpenAIRE

    Adefuye, Anthonio O.; Adeola, Henry A.; Sales, Kurt J.; Katz, Arieh A.

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation is a multifaceted process involving a host of resident and recruited immune cells that eliminate the insult or injury and initiate tissue repair. In the female reproductive tract (FMRT), inflammation-mediated alterations in epithelial, vascular, and immune functions are important components of complex physiological processes and many local and systemic pathologies. It is well established that intracoital and postcoital function of seminal fluid (SF) goes beyond nutritive support ...

  7. The nature of immune responses to urinary tract infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Soman N.; Miao, Yuxuan

    2016-01-01

    The urinary tract is constantly exposed to microorganisms that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract, but generally the urinary tract resists infection by gut microorganisms. This resistance to infection is mainly ascribed to the versatility of the innate immune defences in the urinary tract as the adaptive immune responses are limited, particularly when only the lower urinary tract is infected. In recent years, as the strengths and weaknesses of the immune system of the urinary tract have emerged and as the virulence attributes of uropathogens are recognized, several potentially effective and unconventional strategies to contain or prevent urinary tract infections have emerged. PMID:26388331

  8. Angiodysplasia and lower gastrointestinal tract bleeding in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, R; Gorbien, M J

    1995-04-24

    Angiodysplasia of the colon is one of the most common causes of major lower intestinal tract bleeding in the elderly; it occurs predominantly in the cecum and on the right side of the colon and is thought to result from degenerative changes associated with aging. The clinical presentation is varied, ranging from hematochezia or melena to iron-deficiency anemia resulting from long-term blood loss. Accurate diagnosis may require a combination of diagnostic techniques, such as angiography, nuclear scanning, and colonoscopy. The management plan should be individualized for each patient depending on severity, rate of rebleeding, and issues of comorbidity. Although conservative medical management is a reasonable option for many patients, endoscopic treatment has generally replaced surgery as the first line of definitive treatment for angiodysplasias in most of these patients. The risk of rebleeding is a considerable problem, and surgical therapy yields better results in this aspect. The role of hormonal therapy is not clearly established.

  9. [Injuries to the biliary tract during cholecystectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treska, V; Skalický, T; Safránek, J; Kreuzberg, B

    2005-01-01

    Injuries to the biliary tract during both the laparoscopic or the open cholecystectomic procedures, remain among the most serious iatrogenic injuries with high morbidity and mortality rates. The higher the number of the laparoscopic cholecystectomies, the higher the number of the injuries to the biliary tract. Early peroperative recognition of these injuries is a prerequisite for successful biliary tract reconstructions. Mucosal hepaticojejunoanastomosis according to Roux is the golden standard of the reconstrucion treatment. Stenoses in anastomoses followed by development of cholangitides are considered serious postoperative complications. In these cases, endoscopic and transparietal dilation with plastic stents implantation is the method of choice. Technically exacting reoperations then follow. The authors present a trial group of 11 patients, who were treated in the Surgical Clinic of the Faculty Hospital in Plzen for biliary tract injuries during cholecyctomic procedures (8 were laparoscopic and 3 open), from 01-01-2000 to 01-09-2004. Severe inflammatory changes in the region of the Calot triangle, were the commonest cause of the biliary tract injuries during primary operations. In most cases (N = 8) the injury was diagnosed and managed immediately during the primary procedure. Hepaticojejunoanastomosis according to Roux was the principal procedure used to repair the biliary tract (N = 8). Postoperative morbidity reached 36.4%, 2 elderly patients exited (18.2%) due to septic multiorgan failure on the 15th day and the 7th month after the surgical procedure. Multidisciplinary approach of a team of experienced surgeons, endoscopists and radiologists in the hepatobiliary region is a fundamental prerequisite for long-term successful outcomes of technically exacting reconstructive procedures of the hepatobiliry tract.

  10. Nuclear rights - nuclear wrongs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, E.F.; Miller, F.D.; Paul, J.; Ahrens, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 11 selections. The titles are: Three Ways to Kill Innocent Bystanders: Some Conundrums Concerning the Morality of War; The International Defense of Liberty; Two Concepts of Deterrence; Nuclear Deterrence and Arms Control; Ethical Issues for the 1980s; The Moral Status of Nuclear Deterrent Threats; Optimal Deterrence; Morality and Paradoxical Deterrence; Immoral Risks: A Deontological Critique of Nuclear Deterrence; No War Without Dictatorship, No Peace Without Democracy: Foreign Policy as Domestic Politics; Marxism-Leninism and its Strategic Implications for the United States; Tocqueveille War.

  11. Nuclear moments

    CERN Document Server

    Kopferman, H; Massey, H S W

    1958-01-01

    Nuclear Moments focuses on the processes, methodologies, reactions, and transformations of molecules and atoms, including magnetic resonance and nuclear moments. The book first offers information on nuclear moments in free atoms and molecules, including theoretical foundations of hyperfine structure, isotope shift, spectra of diatomic molecules, and vector model of molecules. The manuscript then takes a look at nuclear moments in liquids and crystals. Discussions focus on nuclear paramagnetic and magnetic resonance and nuclear quadrupole resonance. The text discusses nuclear moments and nucl

  12. Diabetes and Risk of Community-Acquired Respiratory Tract Infections, Urinary Tract Infections, and Bacteremia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Reimar W.; Mor, Anil

    2013-01-01

    This review provides an update on the risk of several important community-acquired infections seen in patients with diabetes: respiratory tract infections, urinary tract infections, and bacteremia. Respiratory tract infections: Recent epidemiological evidence shows a modest (1.25 to 1.75-fold) risk...... and tuberculosis. Limited data is available for diabetes and influenza, yet both influenza and pneumococcal vaccination is recommended in patients with diabetes. Urinary tract infections: The risk of asymptomatic bacteriuria and cystitis is 1.5 to 2 times increased in diabetes patients, while their risk...... factors for urinary tract infection are the same as in persons without diabetes. Bacteremia: The risk of bacteremia due to pneumococci is approximately 1.5 times increased in diabetes, similar to the increased risk for pneumonia. In comparison, diabetes is associated with 2.5 to 3 times increased risk...

  13. Lower urinary tract development and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouly, Hila Milo; Lu, Weining

    2013-01-01

    Congenital Anomalies of the Lower Urinary Tract (CALUT) are a family of birth defects of the ureter, the bladder and the urethra. CALUT includes ureteral anomalies such as congenital abnormalities of the ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) and ureterovesical junction (UVJ), and birth defects of the bladder and the urethra such as bladder-exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC), prune belly syndrome (PBS), and posterior urethral valves (PUV). CALUT is one of the most common birth defects and is often associated with antenatal hydronephrosis, vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), urinary tract obstruction, urinary tract infections (UTI), chronic kidney disease and renal failure in children. Here, we discuss the current genetic and molecular knowledge about lower urinary tract development and genetic basis of CALUT in both human and mouse models. We provide an overview of the developmental processes leading to the formation of the ureter, bladder, and urethra, and different genes and signaling pathways controlling these developmental processes. Human genetic disorders that affect the ureter, bladder and urethra and associated gene mutations are also presented. As we are entering the post-genomic era of personalized medicine, information in this article may provide useful interpretation for the genetic and genomic test results collected from patients with lower urinary tract birth defects. With evidence-based interpretations, clinicians may provide more effective personalized therapies to patients and genetic counseling for their families. PMID:23408557

  14. Lower urinary tract development and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasouly, Hila Milo; Lu, Weining

    2013-01-01

    Congenital anomalies of the lower urinary tract (CALUT) are a family of birth defects of the ureter, the bladder, and the urethra. CALUT includes ureteral anomaliesc such as congenital abnormalities of the ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) and ureterovesical junction (UVJ), and birth defects of the bladder and the urethra such as bladder-exstrophy-epispadias complex (BEEC), prune belly syndrome (PBS), and posterior urethral valves (PUVs). CALUT is one of the most common birth defects and is often associated with antenatal hydronephrosis, vesicoureteral reflux (VUR), urinary tract obstruction, urinary tract infections (UTI), chronic kidney disease, and renal failure in children. Here, we discuss the current genetic and molecular knowledge about lower urinary tract development and genetic basis of CALUT in both human and mouse models. We provide an overview of the developmental processes leading to the formation of the ureter, the bladder, and the urethra, and different genes and signaling pathways controlling these developmental processes. Human genetic disorders that affect the ureter, the bladder and the urethra and associated gene mutations are also presented. As we are entering the postgenomic era of personalized medicine, information in this article may provide useful interpretation for the genetic and genomic test results collected from patients with lower urinary tract birth defects. With evidence-based interpretations, clinicians may provide more effective personalized therapies to patients and genetic counseling for their families. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Treatment of opinions, etc. in the public hearing on the alteration of reactor installation (addition of Unit 2) in the Shimane Nuclear Power Station of The Chugoku Electric Power Company, Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Commission has acknowledged the governmental policy, and further decided on the treatment of the opinions expressed by the local people in the public hearing held in May, 1983, in Shimane Prefecture on the addition of Unit 2 to the Shimane Nuclear Power Station, Chugoku Electric Power Co., Inc. The NSC has directed the Committee on Examination of Reactor Safety to take into consideration the opinions in its later examination. The opinions expressed by the local people in the form of question are given as follows: siting conditions (earthquake, ground, weather, etc.), the safety design for reactor installation (general aspect, aseismatic design, core design, ECCS, the teaching of TMI accident, etc.), radioactive wastes, radiation exposure, site evaluation. (Mori, K.)

  16. An overview of the literature on congenital lower urinary tract obstruction and introduction to the PLUTO trial: percutaneous shunting in lower urinary tract obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, R Katie; Kilby, Mark D

    2009-02-01

    Congenital lower urinary tract obstruction (LUTO) comprises a heterogeneous group of pathologies causing obstruction to the urethra, the most common being posterior urethral valves. Such pathology is often associated with high perinatal mortality and varying degrees of perinatal and infant morbidity. A high proportion of LUTO may be visualised during routine second trimester (and first trimester) ultrasound giving rise to the possibility of determining individual fetal prognosis and treatments such as vesico-amniotic shunting, with a view to altering pathogenesis. The aims of the percutaneous shunting in low urinary tract obstruction (PLUTO) trial are to determine the effectiveness of these treatments and accuracy of the investigations with the primary outcome measures being perinatal mortality and postnatal renal function.

  17. Galectin-1 and galectin-3 in fetal development of bovine respiratory and digestive tracts. Comparison of cell type-specific expression profiles and subcellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaltner, Herbert; Seyrek, Kamel; Heck, Andrea; Sinowatz, Fred; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2002-01-01

    Histochemical monitoring of developmental processes is presently centered on protein-protein interactions. However, oligosaccharides have the potential to store and transmit biological information. Carbohydrate chains of cellular glycoconjugates present determinants for binding of endogenous lectins. This interaction can be relevant for developmental processes. In fact, beta-galactosides and their derivatives serve as ligands for members of the lectin family of galectins. Since it is unclear to what extent functions of different galectins differ or overlap, hereby introducing redundancy into this system, monitoring of galectin presence during tissue maturation should include more than one type of galectin (galectin fingerprinting). Here, we focus on the two most frequently described ones, namely the homodimeric prototype galectin-1 and the chimera-type galectin-3, the latter one so far not characterized from bovine tissue. In the first step, we have detected its presence biochemically in addition to the abundant galectin-1 in bovine respiratory and digestive tracts during development. Evidently, diversification of the primitive foregut will not lead to an alteration of this property. Immunohistochemistry revealed clear differences in the galectins' localization profiles. Galectin-1 expression is strong in mesenchymal cells, especially smooth muscle cells, while epithelial lining harbors galectin-3. A gradual increase in staining intensity with development is especially observed in the case of galectin-3. Notably, this change is accompanied by a shift from primarily nuclear localization to the cytoplasm, an alteration not seen for galectin-1. However, nuclear presence of galectin-1 is encountered. Thus, the delineation of differences in expression of galectin-1 and -3 with respect to cell types and in the developmental course of subcellular localization argues in favor of mediation of nonoverlapping functions by these two homologous, endogenous lectins.

  18. Streptococcus pneumoniae urinary tract infection in pedeatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pougnet, Richard; Sapin, Jeanne; De Parscau, Loïc; Pougnet, Laurence

    2017-06-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae infections in children are most often lung infections or meningitis. Urinary tract infections are much rarer. We present the case of a urinary tract infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae. The clinical picture was classical. The urine culture showed the presence of Streptococcus pneumoniae in urine (10 4 UFC/mL; with 2 × 10 4 leucocytes/mL). The literature mentions a few cases of such infections. In some studies, the prevalence of Streptococcus pneumoniae in urine of children is less than 1%. Those children mostly present abnormalities of urinary tract. In our case, urinary ultrasound scan have shown the presence of an ectopic kidney in this child. The discussion between the clinician and the biologist has contributed to the discovery of this renal anomaly.

  19. Sperm interaction with the female reproductive tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Druart, X

    2012-08-01

    Sperm transit in the female tract is a critical event for the success of fertilization. From their deposition in the vagina to final migration in the oviduct, sperm pass through the different compartments of the genital tract in which they encounter different environments. The cervix and the uterotubal junction (UTJ) are two barriers with different relative importance according to the species. The protein composition, the degree of glycosylation and the hydration of the cervical mucus change during the oestrous cycle. Several sperm surface proteins are associated with their migration through the cervical mucus and the UTJ. Data regarding the interaction of sperm with secretions of the epithelial tissue lining the different compartments of the female genital tract during the sperm transit are reviewed, with a particular emphasis on the migration of sperm through the cervix. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  20. Molecular insights into the specific recognition between the RNA binding domain qRRM2 of hnRNP F and G-tract RNA: A molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingyun; Yan, Feng

    2017-12-09

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein F (hnRNP F) controls the expression of various genes through regulating the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs in the nucleus. It uses three quasi-RNA recognition motifs (qRRMs) to recognize G-tract RNA which contains at least three consecutive guanines. The structures containing qRRMs of hnRNP F in complex with G-tract RNA have been determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, shedding light on the recognition mechanism of qRRMs with G-tract RNA. However, knowledge of the recognition details is still lacking. To investigate how qRRMs specifically bind with G-tract RNA and how the mutations of any guanine to an adenine in the G-tract affect the binding, molecular dynamics simulations with binding free energy analysis were performed based on the NMR structure of qRRM2 in complex with G-tract RNA. Simulation results demonstrate that qRRM2 binds strongly with G-tract RNA, but any mutation of the G-tract leads to a drastic reduction of the binding free energy. Further comparisons of the energetic components reveal that van der Waals and non-polar interactions play essential roles in the binding between qRRM2 and G-tract RNA, but the interactions are weakened by the effect of RNA mutations. Structural and dynamical analyses indicate that when qRRM2 binds with G-tract RNA, both qRRM2 and G-tract maintain stabilized structures and dynamics; however, the stability is disrupted by the mutations of the G-tract. These results provide novel insights into the recognition mechanism of qRRM2 with G-tract RNA that are not elucidated by the NMR technique. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. VIRAL ETIOLOGY OF RECURRENT URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Ibishev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Recurrent urinary tract infection is an actual problem of modern urology.Objective. Complex investigation of urinary tract infections including viral etiology for chronic recurrent cystitis in womenMaterials and methods. The study included 31 women with recurrent infection of urinary tract. Inclusion criteria were the presence of lower urinary tract symptoms caused by infection, severe recurrent course, the lack of anatomical and functional disorders of the urinary tract, the absence of bacterial pathogens during the study, taking into account the culture of aerobic and anaerobic culturing techniques.Results. The analysis of the clinical manifestations, the dominant in the study group were pain and urgency to urinate at 100% and 90% of women surveyed, respectively, and less frequent urination were recorded in 16.1% of patients. In general clinical examination of urine in all cases identified leukocyturia and 90% of the hematuria. By using a polymerase chain reaction (PCR in midstream urine of all examined was verified 10 types of human papilloma virus (HPV with the predominance of 16 and 18 types . Considering the presence of recurrent infectious and inflammatory processes of the urinary tract, cystoscopy with bladder biopsy was performed for all patients. When histomorphological biopsies of all patients surveyed noted the presence of the specific characteristics of HPV: papillary hyperplasia with squamous koilocytosis, pale cytoplasm and shrunken kernels. When analyzing the results of PCR biopsy data corresponded with the results of PCR in midstream urine in all biopsies was detected HPV.Conclusions. Human papillomavirus infection may be involved in the development of viral cystitis. In the etiological structure of viral cystitis, both highly oncogenic and low oncogenic HPV types can act.

  2. Urinary tract infection pathogenesis: host factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapleton, Ann E

    2014-03-01

    Clinically, host factors in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection (UTI) may be considered as modifiable (eg, behaviors associated with increased risk of UTI, anatomic and functional problems of the urinary tract) and thus potentially amenable to a change in patient behavior or treatment approach, or as intrinsic and nonmodifiable host factors that neither the patient nor the clinician can influence (eg, gender and genetic influences associated with UTI). Although considering nonmodifiable host factors may be discouraging to patients and clinicians at present, some genetic associations have the potential for future predictive value and may interface with future treatments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Urinary tract dysfunction in older patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdejo, Carlos; Méndez, Santiago; Salinas, Jesús

    2016-11-18

    Urinary tract dysfunction in older patients has a multifactorial aetiology and is not a uniform clinical condition. Changes due to physiological ageing as well as comorbidity and polypharmacy, can produce several dynamic conditions such as urinary incontinence and urinary retention. Lower urinary tract symptoms increase with age in both sexes and are a major problem in older patients due to their medical and psychosocial consequences. For these reasons, in assessing urinary dysfunction in older patients, we should consider external circumstances such as polypharmacy, poor mobility, affective and cognitive disorders and also accessibility to housing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Small cell carcinoma of the gynecologic tract: a multifaceted spectrum of lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atienza-Amores, Maria; Guerini-Rocco, Elena; Soslow, Robert A; Park, Kay J; Weigelt, Britta

    2014-08-01

    Small cell carcinoma (SmCC) of the female genital tract constitutes a diagnostic and clinical challenge given its rarity and the lack of standardized therapeutic approaches. Here we review the morphological, clinical and molecular features of gynecologic SmCCs and discuss potential areas for future research. Data for this review article were identified by searches of PubMed, EMBASE and the Internet using the search terms "small cell carcinoma" or "neuroendocrine carcinoma" and "gynecologic", "uterine cervix", "cervix", "uterus", "endometrium", "ovary", "vagina", "fallopian tube" or "vulva", and research articles published in English between 1972 and February 2014 were included. SmCCs arising from different organs within the gynecologic tract share the same histopathologic characteristics, which closely resemble those of small cell lung carcinoma. The expression of at least one immunohistochemical neuroendocrine marker is a common finding. The uterine cervix is the most frequent site of SmCC in the female genital tract. HPV infection seems to play a role in the development of cervical SmCC but not in cancers of other gynecologic sites. FIGO stage is an established prognostic factor, in particular in SCCs of the cervix. Irrespective of the site, SmCCs of the gynecologic tract display an aggressive clinical behavior with few reported long-term survivors. The therapeutic management includes surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Despite the potential differences in etiology and risk factors, SmCCs from different sites of the gynecologic tract have similar morphologic appearances and clinical behavior. Recent genomic analyses of small cell carcinoma of the lung have revealed potential driver genomic alterations. We posit that the comprehensive genomic characterization of gynecologic SmCCs may lead to the identification of markers that result in an improvement of diagnostic reproducibility of SmCCs of the gynecologic tract, and of molecular aberrations that may be

  5. Effects of selected neuropeptides, mating status and castration on male reproductive tract movements and immunolocalization of neuropeptides in earwigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Susan M; TeBrugge, Victoria A; Murray, Jill A; Schuler, Ashley M; Tobe, Stephen S

    2009-01-01

    In earwigs, the male reproductive system is complex, comprising accessory glands and long dual intromittent organs for transfer of materials to the female and for removal of rival sperm. We investigated potential factors altering contractions of the male reproductive tracts in vitro. Tracts from 0-day (newly emerged) males displayed relatively little motility in vitro; however, those from 5-day (intermediate stage of sexual maturity) and 8-day (fully mature) males pulsed vigorously. Both 1 and 100 nM proctolin (RYLPT-OH) stimulated the rate of contraction of reproductive tracts from both 5-day and 8-day males. In contrast, 1 nM and 100 nM FGLa AST (cockroach allatostatin) did not affect pulsations. However, 10 microM FGLa AST decreased activity of reproductive tracts. Mating decreased motility of tracts from 5-day old males, but did not alter motility of tracts from 8-day old males. Castration of larvae significantly suppressed reproductive tract motility in subsequent 8-day old adults compared with those of intact or sham-operated adults. Castration also suppressed seminal vesicle size. Lastly, we assessed the presence and distribution of proctolin-like and allatostatin-like immunoreactivity in tissues. Immunoreactivity to FGLa AST and proctolin was widespread, occurring in the brain and ventral ganglia. Surprisingly, we did not detect immunoreactivity to either FGLa AST or proctolin within the reproductive system; however, proctolin immunoreactivity was evident in nerves extending from the terminal ganglion of 8-day, but not 0-day, males. Collectively, these experiments demonstrate that the male earwig reproductive system is an appropriate model for use in addressing sexual maturation and activities in male insects.

  6. Nuclear power

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    David Waller and Alan McDonald ask whether a nuclear renaissance can be predicted; Judith M. Greenwald discusses keeping the nuclear power option open; Paul Mobbs considers the availability of uranium and the future of nuclear energy.

  7. Nuclear Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawi, Ramsey D.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the use of nuclear medicine techniques in diagnosis and therapy. Describes instrumentation in diagnostic nuclear medicine and predicts future trends in nuclear medicine imaging technology. (Author/MM)

  8. Bacterial interference in upper respiratory tract infections: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benninger, Michael; Brook, Itzhak; Bernstein, Joel M; Casey, Janet R; Roos, Kristian; Marple, Bradley; Farrar, Judith R

    2011-01-01

    Published definitions of bacterial interference (BI) differ, some focusing on changes in the normal flora and others on changes in subsequent infection. A need for consensus was identified at a roundtable discussion of BI in upper respiratory tract infections (URTI). We conducted a systematic review of the available data to justify a consensus definition of BI specific to URTI as "a dynamic, antagonistic interaction between at least 2 organisms that affects the life cycle of each, changes the microenvironment, and alters the organisms' colonization, invasiveness, and ability to affect the health of the host." Continued communication among the faculty postroundtable was used to identify and refine the search criteria to (1) in vitro and in vivo studies assessing bacterial URTI, (2) BI evaluated by response to treatment of URTI with antimicrobial agents, and (3) bacterial function in relation to interactions between normal (nonpathogenic) and pathological flora. The criteria were applied to systematic searches of MEDLINE (1950 onward), EMBASE (1974 onward), and the Cochrane Library (2007). Twenty-nine studies met the inclusion criteria, most focused on children with recurrent infections. Qualitative analysis supports the consensus definition. Interfering organisms affected the life cycle of test pathogens and inhibited their colonization, invasiveness, and health outcomes. Data were insufficient for statistical analysis. Interactions between interfering organisms and potential pathogens isolated from the same host can alter response to infection and treatment. More studies are needed, particularly in adults, to understand the role of interfering organisms, the influence of antibiotics, and the potential for recolonization posttreatment.

  9. Multi-detector CT urography: effect of oral hydration and contrast medium volume on renal parenchymal enhancement and urinary tract opacification - a quantitative and qualitative analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szolar, Dieter H.; Tillich, Manfred; Preidler, Klaus W. [Diagnostikum Graz-Suedwest, Graz (Austria)

    2010-09-15

    To assess the effect of oral hydration and contrast-medium volume on renal enhancement and urinary tract opacification in multi-detector CT urography. A total of 192 patients were assigned to different protocols with varying doses of contrast agent with and without oral hydration. The attenuation was measured in the renal parenchyma in the unenhanced, nephrographic and excretory phase, and in the urinary tract in excretory phase imaging, respectively. Opacification of the urinary tract was graded on volume rendered images. Oral hydration did not significantly alter renal parenchymal enhancement in both the nephrographic and the excretory phase (p > 0.001), but significantly decreased mean attenuation of the urinary tract in the excretory phase (p {<=} 0.001), and improved continuous opacification of all ureter segments (p < 0.01). Higher volumes of contrast medium improved renal parenchymal enhancement (p {<=} 0.001) and continuous opacification of the urinary tract (p {<=} 0.01). Oral hydration leads to lower attenuation values in the urinary tract but improves the continuous opacification of the tract. Increase in contrast medium volume leads to higher renal parenchymal enhancement as well as to an increased continuous opacification of the urinary tract. Decrease in contrast medium volume cannot be compensated for by oral hydration in terms of parenchymal enhancement. (orig.)

  10. Urinary Tract Infection in Children: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzana Hamid

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is one of the most common paediatric infections. By the time children are 5 years old, about 8% of girls and about 1-2% of boys have had at least one episode of UTI. UTIs are caused mainly by colonic bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, followed by Klebsiella and Proteus. However, any organism that gains access to the urinary tract system may cause infection, including fungi (Candida species and viruses. In some instances, UTI results in recognition of an important underlying structural abnormality of the urinary tract. The febrile infant or child with clinically significant bacteriuria and no other site of infection to explain the fever, even in the absence of systemic symptoms has UTI. Signs and symptoms of UTIs vary depending on the child's age and on which part of the urinary tract is infected. The diagnosis of UTI is based on routine microscopic examination and culture of a properly collected urine specimen. Imaging studies are done in selected patients to identify anatomic abnormalities. Most cases of uncomplicated UTI respond readily to outpatient antibiotic treatment without further sequelae. All patients should have close follow-up to evaluate response to antibiotics and to prevent the development of long term complication.

  11. [Fungal infections of the gastrointestinal tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maragkoudakis, Emmanouil; Realdi, Giuseppe; Dore, Maria Pina

    2005-06-01

    In immunocompetent subjects fungal infections of the gastrointestinal tract are uncommon. Candida esophagitis remains the single most common fungal infection in immunocompromised hosts or in H. pylori- infected patients who receive antibiotic therapy. Enteric fungal infections are uncommon even in HIV-infected patients. Antifungal agents such as amphotericin B, ketoconazole, fluconazole, and the various formulations of itraconazole are effective for most cases.

  12. Urinary tract infection among apparently healthy commercial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... with age playing a prominent factor. Therefore, as road safety campaigns are encouraged for transport workers, concerted efforts must also be made to enlighten them on the need to avoid risky sexual behaviours including drug and alcohol abuse. Keywords: Urinary Tract Infections, Asymptomatic UTI, Personal hygiene, ...

  13. Endoscopic stent placement throughout the gastrointestinal tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, M.W.

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis we focussed our research on stent placement throughout the GI tract. In search for ideal stents for treatment of malignant oesophageal stenosis and gastric outlet obstruction we evaluated new stent designs in prospective cohort studies. Smaller research projects mainly aimed to

  14. 22 RESISTANCE PATTERN OF URINARY TRACT INFECTION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    drclement

    22. RESISTANCE PATTERN OF URINARY TRACT INFECTION BACTERIAL ISOLATES. TO SELECTED QUINOLONES. *A.R.M Momoh, *M.AC. Odike, * S. Olowo, **A.A. Momoh, **P.O. Okolo. Department of *Pathological Sciences, College of Medicine, A.A.U/IRRUA Specialist. Teaching Hospital, IRRUA, Edo State, ...

  15. [Lower urinary tract dysfunction following radical hysterectomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoun, F; Roumeguère, T

    2015-12-01

    Radical hysterectomy is associated with a significant amount of urinary functional complications and a negative impact on quality of life. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of the neurological etiology of lower urinary tract dysfunction following radical hysterectomy and to establish an optimal postoperative management strategy. We performed a comprehensive overview using the following terms: "radical hysterectomy" and "urologic diseases etiology" or "urologic disease prevention and control". The reported incidence of lower urinary tract dysfunction after radical hysterectomy varies from 12 to 85%. Several animal and clinical urodynamic studies corroborate the neurologic etiology of the dysfunction. Lower urinary tract dysfunction is a common postoperative finding (70-85%) but spontaneous recovery is to be expected within 6-12 months after surgery. The most frequent long term sequela is stress urinary incontinence (40% of cases) and its management is complex and challenging. Postoperative refractory overactive bladder and bladder underactivity can be treated by neuromodulation of sacral roots and superior hypogastric plexus, respectively. In the absence of good clinical predictors, preoperative urodynamic examinations could have a role in understanding the pathophysiology of the dysfunction before such interventions. The pathophysiology of lower urinary tract dysfunction following radical hysterectomy is multifactorial. Its management is complex and should be multidisciplinary. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Febrile urinary tract infections: pyelonephritis and urosepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneeberger, Caroline; Holleman, Frits; Geerlings, Suzanne E.

    2016-01-01

    Complicated infections of the urinary tract (UTI) including pyelonephritis and urosepsis are also called febrile UTI. This review describes insights from the literature on this topic since July 2014. Recent studies regarding risk factors and consequences of febrile UTI confirmed existing knowledge.

  17. Diverticular Disease of the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Aaron

    2017-12-01

    Almost all gastrointestinal tract diverticula require no intervention if they are asymptomatic. There is no clear diagnostic modality of choice for diagnosis and surveillance of diverticulum. Medical treatment should be attempted before surgical intervention because significant morbidity is may be associated with resection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Targeted Therapy for Biliary Tract Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuse, Junji; Okusaka, Takuji

    2011-01-01

    It is necessary to establish effective chemotherapy to improve the survival of patients with biliary tract cancer, because most of these patients are unsuitable candidates for surgery, and even patients undergoing curative surgery often have recurrence. Recently, the combination of cisplatin plus gemcitabine was reported to show survival benefits over gemcitabine alone in randomized clinical trials conducted in the United Kingdom and Japan. Thus, the combination of cisplatin plus gemcitabine is now recognized as the standard therapy for unresectable biliary tract cancer. One of the next issues that need to be addressed is whether molecular targeted agents might also be effective against biliary tract cancer. Although some targeted agents have been investigated as monotherapy for first-line chemotherapy, none were found to exert satisfactory efficacy. On the other hand, monoclonal antibodies such as bevacizumab and cetuximab have also been investigated in combination with a gemcitabine-based regimen and have been demonstrated to show promising activity. Furthermore, clinical trials using new targeted agents for biliary tract cancer are also proposed. This cancer is a relatively rare and heterogeneous tumor consisting of cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder carcinoma. Therefore, a large randomized clinical trial is necessary to confirm the efficacy of chemotherapy, and international collaboration is important

  19. Medical Prescription Pitfalls of Uncomplicated Urinary Tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medical Prescription Pitfalls of Uncomplicated Urinary Tract Infections in Government Healthcare Facilities in Zambia. ... The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in installed (for example, a recent version of Adobe Acrobat Reader). If you would like more information about how ...

  20. Targeting nitric oxide in the gastrointestinal tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Gerard; van Goor, Harm; Jansen, Peter L M; Moshage, Han

    This review discusses the contributions of the three nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) isozymes neuronal NOS (nNOS), endothelial NOS (eNOS) and inducible NOS (iNOS) to the function and diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Small (nanomolar) quantities of NO produced by calcium-dependent nNOS play a

  1. Targeting nitric oxide in the gastrointestinal tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Gerard; van Goor, Harry; Jansen, Peter L. M.; Moshage, Han

    2004-01-01

    This review discusses the contributions of the three nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS) isozymes neuronal NOS (nNOS), endothelial NOS (eNOS) and inducible NOS (iNOS) to the function and diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Small (nanomolar) quantities of NO produced by calcium-dependent nNOS play a

  2. Medical Prescription Pitfalls of Uncomplicated Urinary Tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of this evaluation was to identify pitfalls in medical prescriptions of uncomplicated urinary tract infections in government healthcare facilities in Zambia. Design: This was a cross sectional and government healthcare facilities were conveniently sampled. Main outcome measures: Rate of compliance to ...

  3. Asymptomatic urinary tract infection among pregnant women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: A good proportion of pregnant women patronize traditional birth homes in Nigeria for ante-natal care. This study aimed at determining the prevalence, risk factors, and susceptibility profile of etiologic agents of urinary tract infection among ante-natal attendees in a traditional birth home in Benin City, Nigeria.

  4. Management of Urinary Tract Infections in Children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is defined as a significant growth of bacteria in the urine, together with fever, lethargy, dysuria, pain, anorexia, vomiting and possible kidney scarring.1,2,3. UTIs are usually caused by gram-negative aerobic bacilli; approximately 80% are caused by Escherichia coli.2,4 Other causative ...

  5. Urinary tract infection in renal transplant recipients

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Introduction: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the commonest bacterial infection occurring in renal transplant recipients, and it is associated with significant morbidity. This study aimed to assess the characteristics of all UTI episodes diagnosed in renal transplant patients who attended regularly for follow up in the ...

  6. Reproductive tract infections among women attending primary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reproductive tract infections among women attending primary health care facilities in Moshi, Tanzania. ... 43% of laboratory diagnosed RTIs were asymptomatic. Although none of the women had reported abnormal urogenital symptoms during routine clinical consultation, 64% revealed such symptoms on direct questioning.

  7. Targeted Therapy for Biliary Tract Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuse, Junji, E-mail: jfuruse@ks.kyorin-u.ac.jp [Department of Internal Medicine, Medical Oncology, Kyorin University School of Medicine, 6-20-2, Shinkawa, Mitaka, Tokyo, 181-8611 (Japan); Okusaka, Takuji [Department of Hepatobiliary and Pancreatic Oncology, National Cancer Center Hospital, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045 (Japan)

    2011-05-03

    It is necessary to establish effective chemotherapy to improve the survival of patients with biliary tract cancer, because most of these patients are unsuitable candidates for surgery, and even patients undergoing curative surgery often have recurrence. Recently, the combination of cisplatin plus gemcitabine was reported to show survival benefits over gemcitabine alone in randomized clinical trials conducted in the United Kingdom and Japan. Thus, the combination of cisplatin plus gemcitabine is now recognized as the standard therapy for unresectable biliary tract cancer. One of the next issues that need to be addressed is whether molecular targeted agents might also be effective against biliary tract cancer. Although some targeted agents have been investigated as monotherapy for first-line chemotherapy, none were found to exert satisfactory efficacy. On the other hand, monoclonal antibodies such as bevacizumab and cetuximab have also been investigated in combination with a gemcitabine-based regimen and have been demonstrated to show promising activity. Furthermore, clinical trials using new targeted agents for biliary tract cancer are also proposed. This cancer is a relatively rare and heterogeneous tumor consisting of cholangiocarcinoma and gallbladder carcinoma. Therefore, a large randomized clinical trial is necessary to confirm the efficacy of chemotherapy, and international collaboration is important.

  8. Reproductive tract morphometry and some haematological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    16 female grower rabbits were randomly assigned to any of 4 isonitrogeneous and iso-caloric diets containing 0%, 10%, 20% and 30% pawpaw meal (PPM) such that to each dietary treatment were 4 does. After 7 weeks of ad libitum feeding, all the animals were sacrificed and evaluated for reproductive tract morphometry ...

  9. [Diagnosis and treatment of respiratory tract burns].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimova, L I; Loginov, L P; Smol'skii, B G; Pelikh, S T; Skripal', A Iu

    1979-08-01

    The work gives an analysis of clinical signs in 111 patients with burns of the respiratory tract. Two complexes of curative measures are proposed according to anatomical changes found in fibrobronchoscopy. The fibrobronchoscopies are of special importance in the treatment of burns of the tracheobronchial tree.

  10. Bifidobacteria in the digestive tract of bumblebees

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Killer, Jiří; Kopečný, Jan; Mrázek, Jakub; Rada, V.; Dubá, S.; Marounek, Milan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 2 (2010), s. 165-170 ISSN 1075-9964 R&D Projects: GA ČR GD525/08/H060 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50450515 Keywords : Bifidobacteria * Bumblebee * Digestive tract Subject RIV: GM - Food Processing Impact factor: 2.448, year: 2010

  11. Whither the legal control of nuclear energy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, Peter

    1995-01-01

    International nuclear trade is governed by the regime of legal control of nuclear energy, nuclear materials, knowledge of nuclear processes and weapons. Nuclear trade is under pinned by international agreements concerning physical protection and safeguards, the control of nuclear weapons, the protection of nuclear materials from terrorist action and third part liability. The political and geographical boundary changes of the past two years have significantly altered the background against which this regime has developed. Such changes have affected nuclear trade. The paper summarised the legal control of nuclear energy between States, identifies the areas of change which may affect this regime and the consequences for international trade. Conclusions are drawn as to the development of the international legal control of nuclear energy. (author). 21 refs

  12. White matter tract integrity of frontostriatal circuit in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder: association with attention performance and symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yi-Huan; Gau, Susan Shur-Fen; Lo, Yu-Chun; Tseng, Wen-Yih Isaac

    2014-01-01

    The frontostriatal circuit has been postulated to account for the core symptoms such as inattention in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This study investigated the white matter integrity of frontostriatal fiber tracts using diffusion spectrum imaging (DSI) tractography and its correlations with measures of multi-dimensional aspects of inattention based on psychiatric interview and attention tasks in 25 children with ADHD and 25 matched typically developing (TD) children. All the subjects were assessed with comprehensive psychiatric interviews and the Conner's Continuous Performance Test (CCPT). DSI data were acquired on a 3-Tesla MRI system. The frontostriatal fiber pathways were reconstructed by deterministic tractography, and generalized fractional anisotropy values were measured along individual targeted tracts to investigate alterations in microstructure integrity. Children with ADHD performed worse than TD children in the dimensions of focused attention, sustained attention, impulsivity, and vigilance of the CCPT, and showed impaired integrity in four bilateral frontostriatal tracts, namely the dorsolateral-caudate, medial prefrontal-caudate, orbitofrontal-caudate, and ventrolateral-caudate tracts, and in global white matter as well. The integrity of the left orbitofronto-caudate tract was associated with the symptom of inattention in children with ADHD, compatible with the attention deficit and motivational dysfunction theories in ADHD. The integrity of the frontostriatal tracts was associated with the attention performance only in TD children, suggestive of possible recruitment of tracts other than the frontostriatal tracts implicated in attention deficits in children with ADHD. In conclusion, our results demonstrate the functional involvement of the frontostriatal circuit with respect to clinical symptoms and attention performance. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Genotypic adaptations associated with prolonged persistence of Lactobacillus plantarum in the murine digestive tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bokhorst-van de Veen, Hermien; Smelt, Maaike J; Wels, Michiel; van Hijum, Sacha A F T; de Vos, Paul; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Bron, Peter A

    2013-08-01

    Probiotic bacteria harbor effector molecules that confer health benefits, but also adaptation factors that enable them to persist in the gastrointestinal tract of the consumer. To study these adaptation factors, an antibiotic-resistant derivative of the probiotic model organism Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 was repeatedly exposed to the mouse digestive tract by three consecutive rounds of (re)feeding of the longest persisting colonies. This exposure to the murine intestine allowed the isolation of intestine-adapted derivatives of the original strain that displayed prolonged digestive tract residence time. Re-sequencing of the genomes of these adapted derivatives revealed single nucleotide polymorphisms as well as a single nucleotide insertion in comparison with the genome of the original WCFS1 strain. Detailed in silico analysis of the identified genomic modifications pinpointed that alterations in the coding regions of genes encoding cell envelope associated functions and energy metabolism appeared to be beneficial for the gastrointestinal tract survival of L. plantarum WCFS1. This work demonstrates the feasibility of experimental evolution for the enhancement of the gastrointestinal residence time of probiotic strains, while full-genome resequencing of the adapted isolates provided clues towards the bacterial functions involved. Enhanced gastrointestinal residence is industrially relevant because it enhances the efficacy of the delivery of viable probiotics in situ.

  14. Tract-based spatial statistics analysis of white matter changes in children with anisometropic amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qian; Zhai, Liying; Jiang, Qinying; Qin, Wen; Li, Qingji; Yin, Xiaohui; Guo, Mingxia

    2015-06-15

    Amblyopia is a neurological disorder of vision that follows abnormal binocular interaction or visual deprivation during early life. Previous studies have reported multiple functional or structural cortical alterations. Although white matter was also studied, it still cannot be clarified clearly which fasciculus was affected by amblyopia. In the present study, tract-based spatial statistics analysis was applied to diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to investigate potential diffusion changes of neural tracts in anisometropic amblyopia. Fractional anisotropy (FA) value was calculated and compared between 20 amblyopic children and 18 healthy age-matched controls. In contrast to the controls, significant decreases in FA values were found in right optic radiation (OR), left inferior longitudinal fasciculus/inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (ILF/IFO) and right superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) in the amblyopia. Furthermore, FA values of these identified tracts showed positive correlation with visual acuity. It can be inferred that abnormal visual input not only hinders OR from well developed, but also impairs fasciculi associated with dorsal and ventral visual pathways, which may be responsible for the amblyopic deficiency in object discrimination and stereopsis. Increased FA was detected in right posterior part of corpus callosum (CC) with a medium effect size, which may be due to compensation effect. DTI with subsequent measurement of FA is a useful tool for investigating neuronal tract involvement in amblyopia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Disordered microbial communities in the upper respiratory tract of cigarette smokers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily S Charlson

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smokers have an increased risk of infectious diseases involving the respiratory tract. Some effects of smoking on specific respiratory tract bacteria have been described, but the consequences for global airway microbial community composition have not been determined. Here, we used culture-independent high-density sequencing to analyze the microbiota from the right and left nasopharynx and oropharynx of 29 smoking and 33 nonsmoking healthy asymptomatic adults to assess microbial composition and effects of cigarette smoking. Bacterial communities were profiled using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S sequence tags (803,391 total reads, aligned to 16S rRNA databases, and communities compared using the UniFrac distance metric. A Random Forest machine-learning algorithm was used to predict smoking status and identify taxa that best distinguished between smokers and nonsmokers. Community composition was primarily determined by airway site, with individuals exhibiting minimal side-of-body or temporal variation. Within airway habitats, microbiota from smokers were significantly more diverse than nonsmokers and clustered separately. The distributions of several genera were systematically altered by smoking in both the oro- and nasopharynx, and there was an enrichment of anaerobic lineages associated with periodontal disease in the oropharynx. These results indicate that distinct regions of the human upper respiratory tract contain characteristic microbial communities that exhibit disordered patterns in cigarette smokers, both in individual components and global structure, which may contribute to the prevalence of respiratory tract complications in this population.

  16. Assessment of global and regional diffusion changes along white matter tracts in parkinsonian disorders by MR tractography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Surova

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to determine the usefulness of diffusion tensor tractography (DTT in parkinsonian disorders using a recently developed method for normalization of diffusion data and tract size along white matter tracts. Furthermore, the use of DTT in selected white matter tracts for differential diagnosis was assessed. METHODS: We quantified global and regional diffusion parameters in major white matter tracts in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA, progressive nuclear palsy (PSP, idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD and healthy controls. Diffusion tensor imaging data sets with whole brain coverage were acquired at 3 T using 48 diffusion encoding directions and a voxel size of 2×2×2 mm(3. DTT of the corpus callosum (CC, cingulum (CG, corticospinal tract (CST and middle cerebellar peduncles (MCP was performed using multiple regions of interest. Regional evaluation comprised projection of fractional anisotropy (FA, mean diffusivity (MD, radial diffusivity (RD and the apparent area coefficient (AAC onto a calculated mean tract and extraction of their values along each structure. RESULTS: There were significant changes of global DTT parameters in the CST (MSA and PSP, CC (PSP and CG (PSP. Consistent tract-specific variations in DTT parameters could be seen along each tract in the different patient groups and controls. Regional analysis demonstrated significant changes in the anterior CC (MD, RD and FA, CST (MD and CG (AAC of patients with PSP compared to controls. Increased MD in CC and CST, as well as decreased AAC in CG, was correlated with a diagnosis of PSP compared to IPD. CONCLUSIONS: DTT can be used for demonstrating disease-specific regional white matter changes in parkinsonian disorders. The anterior portion of the CC was identified as a promising region for detection of neurodegenerative changes in patients with PSP, as well as for differential diagnosis between PSP and IPD.

  17. MRI of the fetal gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saguintaah, Magali; Couture, Alain; Veyrac, Corinne; Baud, Catherine; Quere, Marie-Pierre

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To determine the MRI patterns of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract in normal fetuses and some GI tract abnormalities. Materials and methods: A retrospective (1996-1998) and prospective (1999-2000) study of 48 fetal abdominal MRI scans was performed between 23 and 38 weeks of gestation. T1-weighted (T1-W) fast gradient-echo (Flash 2D) and T2-weighted (T2-W) HASTE sequences were obtained on a 1.5-T unit, in frontal and sagittal planes, after maternal premedication. Fresh meconium was also studied. Results: Normal patterns (40 cases): the rectum was seen in all cases and exhibited meconium-like high signal on T1-W images and low signal on T2-W images. It was close to the bladder whatever the fetal gender with its cul-de-sac being at least 10 mm below the bladder neck. The large bowel had a same signal; the distal colon was demonstrated more frequently than the proximal colon. The small bowel was transiently hyperintense on TI-W images early in gestation and then hyperintense on T2-W images. Normal measurements were obtained. GI tract abnormalities (eight cases): cysts close to normal bowel (n=2), atresias (n=5; microcolon, dilated small bowel with abnormal signal, one with a meconium cyst) and a cloacal malformation with midgut malrotation (n=1; abnormal liquid signal in the rectum separated from the bladder wall and colon located on the left side). Conclusions: MRI provided complete visualisation of the fetal GI tract, showed specific signal intensities, identified the level of an obstruction, detected a microcolon, and demonstrated communication between urinary and GI tracts. It shows great potential. (orig.)

  18. Oncometabolites: linking altered metabolism with cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Pollard, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of cancer-associated mutations in genes encoding key metabolic enzymes has provided a direct link between altered metabolism and cancer. Advances in mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance technologies have facilitated high-resolution metabolite profiling of cells and tumors and identified the accumulation of metabolites associated with specific gene defects. Here we review the potential roles of such “oncometabolites” in tumor evolution and as clinical biomarkers for the detection of cancers characterized by metabolic dysregulation. PMID:23999438

  19. Histopatology of the reproductive tract of Nellore pubertal heifers with genital ureaplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pôrto, Regiani; Oliveira, Benedito; Ferraz, Henrique; Caixeta, Luciano; Viu, Marco Antonio; Gambarini, Maria Lúcia

    2017-01-01

    In order to study and characterize the lesions in the reproductive tract of Nellore heifers naturally infected with Ureaplasma diversum and presenting granular vulvovaginitis syndrome (GVS), fragments of uterine tube, uterus, cervix, vagina and vulva of 20 animals were evaluated. The macroscopic lesions of the vulvovaginal mucosa were classified in scores of "1" mild, until "4", severe inflammation and pustular or necrotic lesions. The histopathological evaluation was performed using scores of "1" to "4", according to the inflammatory alterations. The fragments with severe microscopic lesions (3 and 4) were from the uterine tubes and uterus, which showed leukocytes infiltration and destruction and/or necrosis of epithelium. Alterations in the lower reproductive tract fragments were mild, but characteristics of acute inflammatory processes. The histopathological findings of the reproductive tract of females naturally infected with Ureaplasma diversum are consistent with injuries that compromise the environment from the local where spermatozoa acquires ability to fertilize an oocyte until those where the oocyte is fertilized. Therefore, animals with GVS should be identified early in the herd, because, besides the reduction in the fertility rates caused by tissue damages, they can contribute to disseminate the microorganism. Key words: bovine, tissue evaluation, reproduction, Ureaplasma diversum.

  20. Axonal remodeling in the corticospinal tract after stroke: how does rehabilitative training modulate it?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naohiko Okabe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke causes long-term disability, and rehabilitative training is commonly used to improve the consecutive functional recovery. Following brain damage, surviving neurons undergo morphological alterations to reconstruct the remaining neural network. In the motor system, such neural network remodeling is observed as a motor map reorganization. Because of its significant correlation with functional recovery, motor map reorganization has been regarded as a key phenomenon for functional recovery after stroke. Although the mechanism underlying motor map reorganization remains unclear, increasing evidence has shown a critical role for axonal remodeling in the corticospinal tract. In this study, we review previous studies investigating axonal remodeling in the corticospinal tract after stroke and discuss which mechanisms may underlie the stimulatory effect of rehabilitative training. Axonal remodeling in the corticospinal tract can be classified into three types based on the location and the original targets of corticospinal neurons, and it seems that all the surviving corticospinal neurons in both ipsilesional and contralesional hemisphere can participate in axonal remodeling and motor map reorganization. Through axonal remodeling, corticospinal neurons alter their output selectivity from a single to multiple areas to compensate for the lost function. The remodeling of the corticospinal axon is influenced by the extent of tissue destruction and promoted by various therapeutic interventions, including rehabilitative training. Although the precise molecular mechanism underlying rehabilitation-promoted axonal remodeling remains elusive, previous data suggest that rehabilitative training promotes axonal remodeling by upregulating growth-promoting and downregulating growth-inhibiting signals.

  1. Histopatology of the reproductive tract of Nellore pubertal heifers with genital ureaplasmosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    REGIANI PÔRTO

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT In order to study and characterize the lesions in the reproductive tract of Nellore heifers naturally infected with Ureaplasma diversum and presenting granular vulvovaginitis syndrome (GVS, fragments of uterine tube, uterus, cervix, vagina and vulva of 20 animals were evaluated. The macroscopic lesions of the vulvovaginal mucosa were classified in scores of “1” mild, until “4”, severe inflammation and pustular or necrotic lesions. The histopathological evaluation was performed using scores of “1” to “4”, according to the inflammatory alterations. The fragments with severe microscopic lesions (3 and 4 were from the uterine tubes and uterus, which showed leukocytes infiltration and destruction and/or necrosis of epithelium. Alterations in the lower reproductive tract fragments were mild, but characteristics of acute inflammatory processes. The histopathological findings of the reproductive tract of females naturally infected with Ureaplasma diversum are consistent with injuries that compromise the environment from the local where spermatozoa acquires ability to fertilize an oocyte until those where the oocyte is fertilized. Therefore, animals with GVS should be identified early in the herd, because, besides the reduction in the fertility rates caused by tissue damages, they can contribute to disseminate the microorganism. Key words: bovine, tissue evaluation, reproduction, Ureaplasma diversum.

  2. Urinary Tract Infection in Febrile Children with Sickle Cell Anaemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eastern Nigeria. Children with this disease have increased tendency to develop frequent and severe infections especially of the urinary tract, bones and lungs. The prevalence of urinary tract infection (UTI) has however not been reported in this part ...

  3. Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections and Related Conditions (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections and Related Conditions KidsHealth / For Parents / Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections and Related Conditions What's in this article? What ...

  4. Urinary tract infection in women - self-care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most urinary tract infections (UTIs) are caused by bacteria that enter the urethra and travel to the bladder. ... BATHING AND HYGIENE To prevent future urinary tract infections, you ... make infections more likely. Change your pad each time you ...

  5. Detecting Kidney and Urinary Tract Abnormalities Before Birth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Guide Detecting Kidney and Urinary Tract Abnormalities Before Birth Print Email Ultrasound examinations are often done as ... What causes urinary tract abnormalities to occur before birth? In about one of 500 births, some abnormality ...

  6. White matter abnormalities in major depression: a tract-based spatial statistics and rumination study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nianming Zuo

    Full Text Available Increasing evidence indicates that major depressive disorder (MDD is usually accompanied by altered white matter in the prefrontal cortex, the parietal lobe and the limbic system. As a behavioral abnormity of MDD, rumination has been believed to be a substantial indicator of the mental state of the depressive state. So far, however, no report that we are aware of has evaluated the relationship between white matter alterations and the ruminative state. In this study, we first explored the altered white matter using a tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS method based on diffusion tensor imaging of 19 healthy and 16 depressive subjects. We then investigated correlations between the altered white matter microstructure in the identified altered regions and the severity of ruminations measured by the ruminative response scale. Our results demonstrated altered white matter microstructure in circuits connecting the prefrontal lobe, the parietal lobe and the limbic system (p<0.005, uncorrected, findings which support previous research. More importantly, the result also indicated that a greater alteration in the white matter is associated with a more ruminative state (p<0.05, Bonferroni corrected. The detected abnormalities in the white matter should be interpreted cautiously because of the small sample size in this study. This finding supports the psychometric significance of white matter deficits in MDD.

  7. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentle, B.C.

    1986-01-01

    Several growth areas for nuclear medicine were defined. Among them were: cardiac nuclear medicine, neuro-psychiatric nuclear medicine, and cancer diagnosis through direct tumor imaging. A powerful new tool, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) was lauded as the impetus for new developments in nuclear medicine. The political environment (funding, degree of autonomy) was discussed, as were the economic and scientific environments

  8. Nuclear links

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The subject is dealt with in sections: introduction; energy and the third world; world energy consumption 1978; oil -the energy dilemma; nuclear chains - introduction; uranium; Namibia; enrichment and reprocessing; countries with enrichment and reprocessing facilities; waste; conclusion; why take the nuclear option; third world countries with nuclear reactors; the arms connection; government spending and human resources 1977 (by countries); nuclear power - the final solution; the fascists; world bank; campaigns; community action in Plogoff; Australian labour movement; NUM against nuclear power; Scottish campaign; students against nuclear energy; anti-nuclear campaign; partizans; 3W1 disarmament and development; campaign ATOM; CANUC; 3W1; SANE. (U.K.)

  9. How Family Physicians Manage Urinary Tract Infection in Women

    OpenAIRE

    Woolnough, K. V.; Domovitch, E.

    1983-01-01

    Physicians vary in their approaches to urinary tract infections in females. We studied 198 women with symptoms suggesting urinary tract infection. Computer analysis failed to identify any clusters of symptoms, signs or significant historical data which would predict significant bacteriuria with acceptable accuracy. Routine culturing of all symptomatic women is not recommended. Risk factors causing complications of urinary tract infection are reviewed.

  10. Urinary tract infections in symptomatic pregnant women attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Several notable human pathogens cause urinary tract infections. Several factors are known to predispose an individual to developing urinary tract infections; one of the factors is pregnancy. Therefore, this research set out to determine the bacteriologic profile of urinary tract infection and the susceptibility pattern ...

  11. Urinary Tract Infections in Children : EAU/ESPU Guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stein, Raimund; Dogan, Hasan S.; Hoebeke, Piet; Kocvara, Radim; Nijman, Rien J. M.; Radmayr, Christian; Tekgul, Serdar

    Context: In 30% of children with urinary tract anomalies, urinary tract infection (UTI) can be the first sign. Failure to identify patients at risk can result in damage to the upper urinary tract. Objective: To provide recommendations for the diagnosis, treatment, and imaging of children presenting

  12. urinary tract infections in symptomatic pregnant women attending

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    cause urinary tract infections. Several factors are known to predispose an individual to developing urinary tract infections; one of the factors is pregnancy. Therefore, this research set out to determine the bacteriologic profile of urinary tract infection and the susceptibility pattern among symptomatic pregnant women in Abuja.

  13. The microbiota of the respiratory tract : Gatekeeper to respiratory health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Man, Wing Ho; De Steenhuijsen Piters, Wouter A.A.; Bogaert, Debby

    2017-01-01

    The respiratory tract is a complex organ system that is responsible for the exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide. The human respiratory tract spans from the nostrils to the lung alveoli and is inhabited by niche-specific communities of bacteria. The microbiota of the respiratory tract probably acts

  14. Dissolution studies of natural analogues spent fuel and U(VI)-Silicon phases of and oxidative alteration process; Estudios de disolucion de analogos naturales de combustible nuclear irradiado y de fases de U(VI)-Silicio representativas de un proceso de alteracion oxidativa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Morales, I.

    2000-07-01

    In order to understand the long-term behavior of the nuclear spent fuel in geological repository conditions, we have performed dissolution studies with natural analogues to UO{sub 2} as well as with solid phases representatives of the oxidative alteration pathway of uranium dioxide, as observed in both natural environment and laboratory studies. In all cases, we have studied the influence of the bicarbonate concentration in the dissolution process, as a first approximation to the groundwater composition of a granitic environment, where carbonate is one of the most important complexing agents. As a natural analogue to the nuclear spent fuel some uraninite samples from the Oklo are deposit in Gabon, where chain fission reactions took place 2000 millions years ago, as well as a pitchblende sample from the mine Fe ore deposit, in Salamanca (spain) have been studied. The studies have been performed at 25 and 60 degree centigree and 60 degree centigree, and they have focussed on the determination of both the thermodynamic and the kinetic properties of the different samples studied, using batch and continuous experimental methodologies, respectively. (Author)

  15. Nuclear terrorism

    OpenAIRE

    RUTIC SRDJAN Z.

    2016-01-01

    The paper has analyzed different manifestations of terrorism with nuclear weapons and ionizing radiation as a special kind of terrorism. Possibilities that terrorist groups come into possession of nuclear weapons and apply them for terrorist purposes have been analysed. The forms and methods of terrorist activities with nuclear means have been given as well. It has been concluded that nuclear terrorism includes various forms of threats, including not only nuclear weapons but also the sources ...

  16. Radiological evaluation congenital gastrointestinal tract anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Young Hee; Kim, Ock [Hanil Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jung Wha [Seoul Nationl Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-06-15

    With the improvements, during recent years, in the control of the infections and nutritional diseases the subject of congenital malformation becomes of increasing importance. The radiologic signs are crucial for prompt diagnosis of anomalies of alimentary tract and with early identification of resulting complication, surgical therapy is usually life-saving. 30 cases of congenital anomalies of alimentary tract in infants were reviewed in respect of age, sex, incidence and radiological findings. The results are summarized as follows; 1, The most common lesion was hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, followed by congenital megacolon and anorectal anomaly, tracheoesophageal fistula, intestinal atresia. 2. Male outnumbered female in most congenital anomalies of alimentary tract. 25 cases were under the age of 1 month. 3. Common symptoms of upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction are vomiting and abdominal distension. In the obstruction of lower gastrointestinal tract, abdominal distension and failure of meconium passage were noted. 4. Roentgenologic findings were as follows, a. Chest A-P and lateral view: In tracheoesophageal fistula, saccular dilatation of upper esophagus and displacement of trachea anterolaterally were the most common finding. b. Simple abdomen: Obstructive pattern of proximal portion of duodenum shows in 11 cases, of distal bowel shows in 16 cases. Duodenal atresia showed 'double bubble' sign, hypertrophic pyloric stenosis showed marked gastric distension, paucity of air in small bowel and increases gastric peristalsis were the most common findings. Hirschsprung's disease showed absenced of rectal gas almostly. The variable length between blind hindgut to anus was seen in anorectal anomalies. c. Esophagogram: Blind sac of upper esophagus was seen at the 4th thoracic spinal level and displacement of trachea anterolaterally. 1 case of tracheoesophageal fistula had an intact esophageal lumen. d. Upper G-I series: In hypertrophic pyloric

  17. Radiological evaluation congenital gastrointestinal tract anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Young Hee; Kim, Ock; Jang, Jung Wha

    1983-01-01

    With the improvements, during recent years, in the control of the infections and nutritional diseases the subject of congenital malformation becomes of increasing importance. The radiologic signs are crucial for prompt diagnosis of anomalies of alimentary tract and with early identification of resulting complication, surgical therapy is usually life-saving. 30 cases of congenital anomalies of alimentary tract in infants were reviewed in respect of age, sex, incidence and radiological findings. The results are summarized as follows; 1, The most common lesion was hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, followed by congenital megacolon and anorectal anomaly, tracheoesophageal fistula, intestinal atresia. 2. Male outnumbered female in most congenital anomalies of alimentary tract. 25 cases were under the age of 1 month. 3. Common symptoms of upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction are vomiting and abdominal distension. In the obstruction of lower gastrointestinal tract, abdominal distension and failure of meconium passage were noted. 4. Roentgenologic findings were as follows, a. Chest A-P and lateral view: In tracheoesophageal fistula, saccular dilatation of upper esophagus and displacement of trachea anterolaterally were the most common finding. b. Simple abdomen: Obstructive pattern of proximal portion of duodenum shows in 11 cases, of distal bowel shows in 16 cases. Duodenal atresia showed 'double bubble' sign, hypertrophic pyloric stenosis showed marked gastric distension, paucity of air in small bowel and increases gastric peristalsis were the most common findings. Hirschsprung's disease showed absenced of rectal gas almostly. The variable length between blind hindgut to anus was seen in anorectal anomalies. c. Esophagogram: Blind sac of upper esophagus was seen at the 4th thoracic spinal level and displacement of trachea anterolaterally. 1 case of tracheoesophageal fistula had an intact esophageal lumen. d. Upper G-I series: In hypertrophic pyloric stenosis, delayed

  18. Endocrine Control of Mucosal Immunity in the Female Reproductive Tract: Impact of Environmental Disruptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, B.; Patel, M.; Fahey, J.; Wira, C.

    2015-01-01

    The complexity of the human female reproductive tract (FRT) with its multiple levels of hormonally controlled immune protection has only begun to be understood. Dissecting the functions and roles of the immune system in the FRT is complicated by the differential hormonal regulation of its distinct anatomical structures that vary throughout the menstrual cycle. Although many fundamental mechanisms of steroid regulation of reproductive tract immune function have been determined, the effects of exogenous synthetic steroids or endocrine disruptors on immune function and disease susceptibility in the FRT have yet to be evaluated in detail. There is increasing evidence that environmental or synthetic molecules can alter normal immune function. This review provides an overview of the innate and adaptive immune systems, the current status of immune function in the FRT and the potential risks of environmental or pharmacological molecules that may perturb this system. PMID:22289638

  19. Nuclear safeguards and nuclear shutdowns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worthington, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    The issues involved in the California nuclear initiative (Proposition 15) are described. Some of the characteristics of the anti-nuclear lobby are outlined. Some do's and don'ts for the nuclear group are listed. The nuclear shutdown effort was concentrated on the safeguards and high-level waste disposal issues

  20. Neuroendocrine tumors of the gastrointestinal tract; Multimodale Bildgebung neuroendokriner Tumoren des Gastrointestinaltrakts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzapfel, Konstantin; Eiber, Matthias; Rummeny, Ernst J. [Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie; Gaertner, Florian C. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2014-03-15

    Neuroendocrine tumors (neuroendokrine Tumoren) are rare entities. They can be found in all organs and show substantial biologic heterogeneity depending on involved organ, clinical symptoms and histopathologic morphology. Involvement of organs like larynx, cervix uteri, ovary, gallbladder, liver or kidney is extensively rare. The majority of neuroendokrine Tumoren are found in gastrointestinal tract and lung and are classified as neuroendokrine Tumoren of foregut (stomach, duodenum, pancreas, lung), midgut (jejunum, ileum, appendix, right side of the colon) and hindgut (left side of the colon, rectum). The role of imaging is to localize and delineate the primary tumor and to detect metastases. In the diagnosis of neuroendokrine Tumoren radiologic techniques like computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are applied. In certain cases nuclear medicine techniques like somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) and positron emission tomography (PET) using radioactively labelled somatostatin analogues are used. The present article reviews characteristic imaging findings of neuroendokrine Tumoren of the gastrointestinal tract. (orig.)

  1. Radiation protection philosophy alters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Firmin, G.

    1977-01-01

    Two significant events that have taken place this year in the field of radiation protection are reported. New SI units have been proposed (and effectively adopted), and the ICRP has revised its recommendations. Changes of emphasis in the latest recommendations (ICRP Publication 26) imply an altered radiation protection philosophy, in particular the relation of dose limits to estimates of average risk, an altered view of the critical organ approach and a new attitude to genetic dose to the population. (author)

  2. Value of cystography in urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncrieff, M W; Whitelaw, R

    1976-01-01

    Fifty-one children with a bacteriologically proven urinary tract infection had both an intravenous urogram (IVU) and a micturating cystogram. The IVU was normal in 35. Only 6 of these children showed reflux in the cystogram, affecting 7 of the 70 ureters at risk. Since reflux on its own does not cause renal damage, which occurs only with super-added infection, detection of reflux is not important providing the urine is kept sterile. We suggest that cystography be deferred providing the IVU is normal until recurrent infections occur while under hospital care, and, with this policy this unpleasant and sometimes hazardous investigation could be avoided in many children with a single urinary tract infection. PMID:1008600

  3. Urinary tract infection in kidney transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón-Mora, Natalia; Pachón Díaz, Jerónimo; Cordero Matía, Elisa

    2017-04-01

    Infectious complications remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality among transplant recipients. Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common infectious complication in kidney transplant recipients with a reported incidence from 25% to 75%, varies widely likely due to differences in definition, diagnostic criteria, study design, and length of observation. We sought reviews the incidence and importance of urinary tract infection on graft survival, the microbiology with special emphasis on multidrug resistant microorganisms, the therapeutic management of UTI and the prophylaxis of recurrent UTI among solid organ transplant recipients, highlighting the need for prospective clinical trials to unify the clinical management in this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  4. Carcinoids tumors of the digestive tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, S.M.R. de; Prais, M.; Matushita, J.P.K.; Matushita, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    Eighteen cases of carcinoid tumors in the digestive tract have been analyzed. They have been selected at Hospital dos Servidores do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, taking into account patients, age and sex, lesions' location and size, clinical manifestations, presence of metastases as well as a classical carcinoid syndrome establisment. Carcinoid tumors come from the digestive tract 'argenta fim'' cells, the ones which produce endocrines. Such endocrines are responsible for a great number of clinical manifestations. The classical syndrome is directly related to the presence of hepatic metastases. The authors propose to correlate what has been found with descriptions in medical literature emphasizing the radiographic aspects which have been observed. A frequent ''apendicular'' location and the difficulty of giving a precise diagnosis before surgery is also emphasized. (author) [pt

  5. Rationale diagnostic approach to biliary tract imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmberger, H.; Huppertz, A.; Ruell, T.; Zillinger, C.; Ehrenberg, C.; Roesch, T.

    1998-01-01

    Since the introduction of MR cholangiography (MRC) diagnostic imaging of the biliary tract has been significantly improved. While percutaneous ultrasonography is still the primary examination, computed tomography (CT), conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as well as the direct imaging modalities of the biliary tract - iv cholangiography, endoscopic-retrograde-cholangiography (ERC), and percutaneous-transhepatic-cholangiography (PTC) are in use. This article discusses the clinical value of the different diagnostic techniques for the various biliary pathologies with special attention to recent developments in MRC techniques. An algorithm is presented offering a rational approach to biliary disorders. With further technical improvement shifts from ERC(P) to MRC(P) for biliary imaging could be envisioned, ERCP further concentrating on its role as a minimal invasive treatment option. (orig.) [de

  6. Alteration of the timing of implantation by in vivo gene transfer: delay of implantation by suppression of nuclear factor κB activity and partial rescue by leukemia inhibitory factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hitomi; Kimura, Tadashi; Ogita, Kazuhide; Koyama, Shinsuke; Tsujie, Tomoko; Tsutsui, Tateki; Shimoya, Koichiro; Koyama, Masayasu; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Murata, Yuji

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) is activated in the murine endometrium during implantation period [Am. J. Reprod. Immunol. 51 (2004) 16]. Transient transfection of IκBα mutant (IκBαM) cDNA into the mouse uterine cavity using hemagglutinating virus of Japan envelope vector suppressed uterine NF-κB activity less than half of that observed in control on days 3.5 and 4.5 p.c. IκBαM cDNA transfection led to significant delay of implantation. After IκBαM cDNA transfection, LIF mRNA expression in the uterus was significantly suppressed on days 3.5 and 4.5 p.c. Co-transfection of LIF cDNA with IκBαM cDNA in the uterus partially rescued the delay of implantation induced by suppression of NF-κB activity. Taken together, these findings indicate that NF-κB activation determines the timing of the implantation, at least in part, via control of LIF expression

  7. Diagnosis and management of fungal urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Carol A

    2014-03-01

    When the terms funguria or fungal urinary tract infection are used, most physicians are referring to candiduria and urinary tract infections due to Candida species. Other fungi, including yeasts and molds can involve the kidney during the course of disseminated infection, but rarely cause symptoms referable to the urinary tract. Candida species appear to be unique in their ability to both colonize and cause invasive disease in the urinary tract. This overview focuses only on candiduria and Candida urinary tract infection because they are common and many times present perplexing management issues. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Preoperative urinary tract obstruction in scoliosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Shigeru; Kotani, Toshiaki; Mori, Kazuetsu; Kawamura, Ken; Ohtake, Akira

    2017-01-01

    While the association between scoliosis and cardiac and respiratory function impairments has been well characterized in clinical practice and research, the potential effect of scoliosis on urinary tract structure and renal function has received little attention. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the preoperative clinical characteristics of urinary tract structure and renal function in pediatric patients with idiopathic scoliosis, using a combination of blood tests, urinalysis, and imaging. Preoperative measures of urinary tract structure and renal function were obtained for 16 patients, 13-17 years old, scheduled for corrective surgery for idiopathic scoliosis. Preoperative assessment included blood test and urinalysis, combined with structural imaging on ultrasound (US), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), magnetic resonance urography (MRU), and radioisotope tracing (RI), using technetium-99 m mercaptoacetyltriglycine ( 99m Tc-MAG3). Differences in blood and urine tests between patients with and without urinary tract obstruction (UTO) were evaluated for significance using Mann-Whitney U test. For all 16 patients, blood tests and MRU were within normal limits. Dilatation of the renal pelvis was identified on US in eight patients (50.0%). UTO was identified on RI in six patients (37.5%). UTO was associated with elevated β2-microglobulin concentration. Urinary β2-microglobulin concentration >0.7 μg/mg Cr differentiated patients with UTO from those without UTO, with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 70%. β2-Microglobulin concentration may be a useful marker to screen for asymptomatic UTO in patients with idiopathic scoliosis. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  9. Chlamydia and Male Lower Urinary Tract Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Young-Suk; Lee, Kyu-Sung

    2013-01-01

    Of the chlamydia species that can cause infections in humans, C. trachomatis is responsible for lower urinary tract diseases in men and women. C. trachomatis infections are prevalent worldwide, but current research is focused on females, with the burden of disease and infertility sequelae considered to be a predominantly female problem. However, a role for this pathogen in the development of male urethritis, epididymitis, and orchitis is widely accepted. Also, it can cause complications such ...

  10. Neuropeptides in Lower Urinary Tract (LUT) Function

    OpenAIRE

    Arms, Lauren; Vizzard, Margaret A.

    2011-01-01

    Numerous neuropeptide/receptor systems including vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide, substance P, neurokinin A, bradykinin, and endothelin-1 are expressed in the lower urinary tract (LUT) in both neural and non-neural (e.g., urothelium) components. LUT neuropeptide immunoreactivity is present in afferent and autonomic efferent neurons innervating the bladder and urethra and in the urothelium of the urinary bla...

  11. Expression and antimicrobial function of beta-defensin 1 in the lower urinary tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Becknell

    Full Text Available Beta defensins (BDs are cationic peptides with antimicrobial activity that defend epithelial surfaces including the skin, gastrointestinal, and respiratory tracts. However, BD expression and function in the urinary tract are incompletely characterized. The purpose of this study was to describe Beta Defensin-1 (BD-1 expression in the lower urinary tract, regulation by cystitis, and antimicrobial activity toward uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC in vivo. Human DEFB1 and orthologous mouse Defb1 mRNA are detectable in bladder and ureter homogenates, and human BD-1 protein localizes to the urothelium. To determine the relevance of BD-1 to lower urinary tract defense in vivo, we evaluated clearance of UPEC by Defb1 knockout (Defb1(-/- mice. At 6, 18, and 48 hours following transurethral UPEC inoculation, no significant differences were observed in bacterial burden in bladders or kidneys of Defb1(-/- and wild type C57BL/6 mice. In wild type mice, bladder Defb1 mRNA levels decreased as early as two hours post-infection and reached a nadir by six hours. RT-PCR profiling of BDs identified expression of Defb3 and Defb14 mRNA in murine bladder and ureter, which encode for mBD-3 and mBD-14 protein, respectively. MBD-14 protein expression was observed in bladder urothelium following UPEC infection, and both mBD-3 and mBD-14 displayed dose-dependent bactericidal activity toward UPEC in vitro. Thus, whereas mBD-1 deficiency does not alter bladder UPEC burden in vivo, we have identified mBD-3 and mBD-14 as potential mediators of mucosal immunity in the lower urinary tract.

  12. Antimicrobial Stewardship and Urinary Tract Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian M. Abbo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections are the most common bacterial infections encountered in ambulatory and long-term care settings in the United States. Urine samples are the largest single category of specimens received by most microbiology laboratories and many such cultures are collected from patients who have no or questionable urinary symptoms. Unfortunately, antimicrobials are often prescribed inappropriately in such patients. Antimicrobial use, whether appropriate or inappropriate, is associated with the selection for antimicrobial-resistant organisms colonizing or infecting the urinary tract. Infections caused by antimicrobial-resistant organisms are associated with higher rates of treatment failures, prolonged hospitalizations, increased costs and mortality. Antimicrobial stewardship consists of avoidance of antimicrobials when appropriate and, when antimicrobials are indicated, use of strategies to optimize the selection, dosing, route of administration, duration and timing of antimicrobial therapy to maximize clinical cure while limiting the unintended consequences of antimicrobial use, including toxicity and selection of resistant microorganisms. This article reviews successful antimicrobial stewardship strategies in the diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infections.

  13. Biliary tract cancers: current concepts and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Gregory D; O'Reilly, Eileen M

    2005-02-01

    Biliary tract cancer, which consists of gall bladder cancer and cholangio-carcinoma, presents many challenges to practising physicians. It is a relatively rare cancer that often causes a diagnostic dilemma, as its presentation may be similar to that of non-malignant conditions. In many cases, histological or cytological confirmation of a cancer diagnosis is not possible preoperatively. The management of this disease is also complex due to a morbid patient population and limited data on the optimal therapeutic approach. Surgery remains the mainstay of treatment, although the extent of resection required is still debated. The role of adjuvant therapy is also controversial, but a combined modality approach appears to be beneficial in patients with a high risk of recurrence, such as those with node positive tumors or positive resection margins. When surgery is not possible, the prognosis of patients with biliary tract cancer is very poor. In unresectable patients, the combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy can result in a prolonged survival for some patients. In the palliative setting, biliary stenting and other supportive measures can alleviate symptoms and improve survival. Gemcitabine-based combination chemotherapy may also provide successful palliation and has achieved response rates of approximately 30% and a median survival of > 15 months in one study. Ultimately, treatment decisions should be individualised and participation in clinical trials is encouraged. Further progress in the management of biliary tract cancer is anticipated using biological therapies and continued research is essential to discover the optimal treatment for this challenging disease.

  14. Neural Control of the Lower Urinary Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groat, William C.; Griffiths, Derek; Yoshimura, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    This article summarizes anatomical, neurophysiological, pharmacological, and brain imaging studies in humans and animals that have provided insights into the neural circuitry and neurotransmitter mechanisms controlling the lower urinary tract. The functions of the lower urinary tract to store and periodically eliminate urine are regulated by a complex neural control system in the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral autonomic ganglia that coordinates the activity of smooth and striated muscles of the bladder and urethral outlet. The neural control of micturition is organized as a hierarchical system in which spinal storage mechanisms are in turn regulated by circuitry in the rostral brain stem that initiates reflex voiding. Input from the forebrain triggers voluntary voiding by modulating the brain stem circuitry. Many neural circuits controlling the lower urinary tract exhibit switch-like patterns of activity that turn on and off in an all-or-none manner. The major component of the micturition switching circuit is a spinobulbospinal parasympathetic reflex pathway that has essential connections in the periaqueductal gray and pontine micturition center. A computer model of this circuit that mimics the switching functions of the bladder and urethra at the onset of micturition is described. Micturition occurs involuntarily in infants and young children until the age of 3 to 5 years, after which it is regulated voluntarily. Diseases or injuries of the nervous system in adults can cause the re-emergence of involuntary micturition, leading to urinary incontinence. Neuroplasticity underlying these developmental and pathological changes in voiding function is discussed. PMID:25589273

  15. Children's concepts of the urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Equit, Monika; Sambach, Heike; Niemczyk, Justine; von Gontard, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    To assess children's body concepts about anatomy and physiology of the urinary tract, children drew pictures responding to the question 'Where do you believe urine comes from?' A total of 152 children in three groups were examined. 81 children were out-patients. Of these, 36 children were being seen for the first time and 45 children had previously undergone bladder and bowel group training. They were compared to 71 continent controls. Children were given a body silhouette, in which they drew their view of the urinary tract. Half of the children (52.6%) drew a bladder and other organs; nearly 43% drew a tube or other anatomically incorrect pictures. Significant differences were found for group and age. Children who had undergone the group training more often drew a bladder and other organs (80%). Correct pictures and pictures of bladder and other organs were more common from children aged 11-16 years. Children have subjective concepts of the urinary tract which do not follow actual anatomy and physiology. For medical interventions as well as any training programmes, it is essential to understand these concepts and provide instructions in a child-centred and developmentally adequate way. Copyright © 2012 Journal of Pediatric Urology Company. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Urinary tract infections in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phé, Véronique; Pakzad, Mahreen; Curtis, Carmel; Porter, Bernadette; Haslam, Collette; Chataway, Jeremy; Panicker, Jalesh N

    2016-06-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are commonly reported by people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS) and significantly impact quality of life. To provide an overview of the problem of UTIs in PwMS and offer a practical approach for the diagnosis and management. A review of the literature through a Pubmed search up to October 2015 was performed using the following keywords: multiple sclerosis, neurogenic bladder, urinary tract infections, relapse, dipsticks, culture, recurrent and prevention. Noteworthy topics include the definition of a confirmed symptomatic UTI as a positive urine culture defined by >10(5) colony-forming units (CFU)/mL or >10(4) CFU/mL if a urethral catheter urine sample is taken, or any count of bacteria in a suprapubic bladder puncture specimen, both in addition to symptoms including fever, pain, changes in lower urinary tract symptoms or neurological status. Urinalysis is useful to exclude a UTI; however, on its own is insufficient to confirm a UTI, for which urine culture is required. Experts advise asymptomatic UTIs should not be treated except in the context of an acute relapse. From international guidelines, there is no validated strategy to prevent recurrent UTIs in PwMS. This review provides an overview of the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of UTIs in the setting of multiple sclerosis (MS). © The Author(s), 2016.

  17. Nosocomial urinary tract infections: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovelli, Valerio; Gaziev, Gabriele; Topazio, Luca; Bove, Pierluigi; Vespasiani, Giuseppe; Finazzi Agrò, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Nosocomial urinary tract infections are a common complication in healthcare systems worldwide. A review of the literature was performed in June 2014 using the Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) database, through either PubMed or Ovid as a search engine, to identify publications regarding nosocomial urinary tract infections (NUTIs) definition, epidemiology, etiology and treatment.According to current definitions, more than 30% of nosocomial infections are urinary tract infections (UTIs). A UTI is defined 'nosocomial' (NUTI) when it is acquired in any healthcare institution or, more generally, when it is related to patient management. The origin of nosocomial bacteria is endogenous (the patient's flora) in two thirds of the cases. Patients with indwelling urinary catheters, those undergoing urological surgery and manipulations, long-stay elderly male patients and patients with debilitating diseases are at high risk of developing NUTIs. All bacterial NUTIs should be treated, whether the patient is harboring a urinary catheter or not. The length of treatment depends on the infection site. There is abundance of important guidance which should be considered to reduce the risk of NUTIs (hand disinfection with instant hand sanitizer, wearing non-sterile gloves permanently, isolation of infected or colonized catheterized patients). Patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria can generally be treated initially with catheter removal or catheter exchange, and do not necessarily need antimicrobial therapy. Symptomatic patients should receive antibiotic therapy. Resistance of urinary pathogens to common antibiotics is currently a topic of concern.

  18. Recurrent urinary tract infections in females

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohsin, R.; Siddiqui, K.M.

    2010-01-01

    Uncomplicated Urinary tract infections are common in adult women across the entire age spectrum, with mean annual incidence of 15% and 10% in those aged 15-39 and 40-79 years, respectively. Urinary tract infection (UTI), with its diverse clinical syndromes and affected host groups, remains one of the most common but widely misunderstood and challenging infectious diseases encountered in clinical practice. Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) present a significant problem for women and a challenge for the doctors who care for them. The diagnosis of uncomplicated UTI can be achieved best by a thorough assessment of patient symptoms with or without the addition of a urine dipstick test. Treatment should be based on the most recent guidelines, taking into account resistance patterns in the local community. The patient who suffers from recurrent UTIs can be treated safely and effectively with continuous antibiotic prophylaxis, post-coital therapy, or self-initiated treatment. This review article covers the latest trends in the management of recurrent UTI among women. Further research is needed regarding rapid diagnosis of UTI, accurate presumptive identification of patients with resistant pathogens, and development of new antimicrobials for drug-resistant UTI. (author)

  19. Proteus mirabilis and Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Jessica N.; Pearson, Melanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Proteus mirabilis is a Gram-negative bacterium which is well-known for its ability to robustly swarm across surfaces in a striking bulls’-eye pattern. Clinically, this organism is most frequently a pathogen of the urinary tract, particularly in patients undergoing long-term catheterization. This review covers P. mirabilis with a focus on urinary tract infections (UTI), including disease models, vaccine development efforts, and clinical perspectives. Flagella-mediated motility, both swimming and swarming, is a central facet of this organism. The regulation of this complex process and its contribution to virulence is discussed, along with the type VI-secretion system-dependent intra-strain competition which occurs during swarming. P. mirabilis uses a diverse set of virulence factors to access and colonize the host urinary tract, including urease and stone formation, fimbriae and other adhesins, iron and zinc acquisition, proteases and toxins, biofilm formation, and regulation of pathogenesis. While significant advances in this field have been made, challenges remain to combatting complicated UTI and deciphering P. mirabilis pathogenesis. PMID:26542036

  20. New markers of urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masajtis-Zagajewska, Anna; Nowicki, Michal

    2017-08-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is the most common bacterial infection independent of age. It is also one of the most common causes of hospitalizations for infections among elderly people and the most common indication for antibiotic prescriptions in primary care. Both diagnostics and management of lower and upper urinary tract infections provide challenges in clinical practice due to their high prevalence and recurrence, and worldwide increase of antibiotic resistance. The clinical symptoms of UTI are often uncharacteristic or asymptomatic. The accurate diagnosis and early treatment are crucial due to risk of septicaemia and long-term consequences. Currently the diagnosis of urinary tract infection is based on the presence of clinical symptoms in combination with the results of nitrite strip test indicating the presence of bacteria in urine and semi-quantitative measurement of white blood cells count in urine. Although urine culture is the gold standard in UTI diagnostics it is both time-consuming and costly. Searching for novel biomarkers of UTI has attracted much attention in recent years. The article reviews several promising serum and urine biomarkers of UTI such as leukocyte esterase, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, interleukins, elastase alpha (1)-proteinase inhibitor, lactofferin, secretory immunoglobulin A, heparin-binding protein, xanthine oxidase, myeloperoxidase, soluble triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1, α-1 microglobulin (α1Mg) and tetrazolium nitroblue test (TNB). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. No. 250-Recurrent Urinary Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epp, Annette; Larochelle, Annick

    2017-10-01

    To provide an update of the definition, epidemiology, clinical presentation, investigation, treatment, and prevention of recurrent urinary tract infections in women. Continuous antibiotic prophylaxis, post-coital antibiotic prophylaxis, and acute self-treatment are all efficient alternatives to prevent recurrent urinary tract infection. Vaginal estrogen and cranberry juice can also be effective prophylaxis alternatives. A search of PubMed and The Cochrane Library for articles published in English identified the most relevant literature. Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date restrictions. This update is the consensus of the Sub-Committee on Urogynaecology of the Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. Recommendations were made according to the guidelines developed by the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). Recurrent urinary tract infections need careful investigation and can be efficiently treated and prevented. Different prophylaxis options can be selected according to each patient's characteristics. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. [COMPLICATED URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS IN THE ELDERLY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćosić, I; Ćosić, V

    2016-12-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are the most common bacterial infections involving lower (cystitis, prostatitis) or upper (pyelonephritis, renal abscess, perinephric abscess) urinary tract. Differentiation of complicated and uncomplicated UTI is usually based on the presence of structural or functional urinary tract abnormalities, which can increase the risk of treatment failure and development of serious complications. Factors that increase the risk are foreign bodies, stones, obstruction, neurogenic bladder, kidney transplantation, immunosuppression, and pregnancy. Complicated UTI includes a spectrum of conditions that increase the risk of treatment failure, as well as of serious complications such as bacteremia and sepsis, perinephric abscess, renal impairment and emphysematous pyelonephritis. To avoid the potentially devastating outcomes, appropriate diagnostic procedures, antibiotic and surgical treatment, and appropriate follow-up are required. The incidence of complicated UTI will grow in the future due to general aging of the population, increasing incidence of diabetes, and ever growing number of immunocompromised and immunosuppressed patients. It is of key importance to recognize complicated UTI on time, and treat it wisely and aggressively to reduce duration of the disease and the risk of antibiotic resistance.

  3. Altered mental status as a presentation of juvenile polyposis syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Hansraj

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile polyposis coli (JPC is a rare hereditary disorder in which patients have multiple polyps in the gastrointestinal tract and present most commonly with hematochezia. We describe a 4-year-old with intermittent rectal prolapse presenting with altered mental status and headaches. JPC was diagnosed by the presence of multiple, pedunculated, colonic polyps on colonoscopy; his altered mental status resulted from cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Although JPC is known to be associated with a protein losing enteropathy (PLE, this usually manifests as merely hypoalbuminemia and protein losses without major clinical sequelae. We present a rare complication of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis which highlights altered mental status as a rare presentation of JPC. To our knowledge, this is the first case report in the literature linking JPC, decreased protein S activity, a single mutation in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene and cerebral thrombosis.

  4. Upper tract urothelial carcinomas: frequency of association with mismatch repair protein loss and lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Holly L; McKenney, Jesse K; Heald, Brandie; Stephenson, Andrew; Campbell, Steven C; Plesec, Thomas; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Increased risk for upper tract urothelial carcinoma is described in patients with Lynch syndrome, caused by germline mutations in mismatch repair genes. We aimed to identify the frequency of mismatch repair protein loss in upper tract urothelial carcinoma and its potential for identifying an association with Lynch syndrome. We queried our database to identify upper tract urothelial carcinomas. Patients were cross-referenced for history of colorectal carcinoma or other common Lynch syndrome-associated neoplasms to enrich for potential Lynch syndrome cases. Tumor histopathologic characteristics were reviewed and each case was analyzed for loss of mismatch repair proteins, MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2, by immunohistochemistry. Of 444 patients with upper tract urothelial carcinoma, a subset of 215 (encompassing 30 with upper tract urothelial carcinoma and another common Lynch syndrome-associated neoplasm) was analyzed for loss of mismatch repair protein expression. Of 30 patients with Lynch syndrome-associated neoplasms, six had documented Lynch syndrome, including two with Muir-Torre syndrome. Mismatch repair protein loss was identified in 7% of total upper tract urothelial carcinomas and 30% of patients with Lynch syndrome-associated neoplasms (including all patients with Lynch syndrome/Muir-Torre syndrome). Of patients without history of Lynch syndrome-associated neoplasms, 5 of 184 (2.7%) had loss of mismatch repair protein expression. Twelve cases with mismatch repair protein loss demonstrated loss of MSH2 and MSH6, and 2 had isolated loss of MSH6. MLH1 and PMS2 expression were consistently retained. Although increased intratumoral lymphocytes, inverted growth, pushing tumor-stromal interface, and lack of nuclear pleomorphism were more commonly seen in cases with mismatch repair protein loss, only intratumoral lymphocytes and presence of pushing borders were statistically significant. MLH1 and PMS2 testing appear to have little utility in upper tract urothelial

  5. JPRS Report, Nuclear Developments

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1989-01-01

    Partial Contents: Nuclear Weapons, Nuclear Development, Nuclear Power Plant, Uranium, Missiles, Space Firm Protested, Satellite, Rocket Launching, Nuclear Submarine, Environmental, Radioactivity, Nuclear Plant...

  6. Rethinking India’s Nuclear Policy:Credible Minimum Nuclear Deterrence as a Dynamic Transformation of Nuclear Option Open

    OpenAIRE

    Nakanishi, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    After its 1998 nuclear test, India’s nuclear doctrine was described as ‘credible minimum nuclear deterrence’. India’s nuclear doctrine and policy are often characterized, in the academic discourse, as if the country pursues an assertive military doctrine and policy. Has the Indian National Congress (INC)-led government that has been in place since 2004 altered the nuclear policy formulated by the former Bharatiya Jhanata Party (BJP)-led government? Although the BJP-led government led India to...

  7. Nuclear forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venugopal, V.

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear forensics is the analysis of nuclear materials recovered from either the capture of unused materials, or from the radioactive debris following a nuclear explosion and can contribute significantly to the identification of the sources of the materials and the industrial processes used to obtain them. In the case of an explosion, nuclear forensics can also reconstruct key features of the nuclear device. Nuclear forensic analysis works best in conjunction with other law enforcement, radiological protection dosimetry, traditional forensics, and intelligence work to provide the basis for attributing the materials and/or nuclear device to its originators. Nuclear forensics is a piece of the overall attribution process, not a stand-alone activity

  8. Nuclear Scans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuclear scans use radioactive substances to see structures and functions inside your body. They use a special ... images. Most scans take 20 to 45 minutes. Nuclear scans can help doctors diagnose many conditions, including ...

  9. Music and Alterity Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Martí

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The concept of alterity constitutes an important issue in anthropological research and, therefore, in the study of musical practices, as well. Without it, we could hardly understand other kinds of music situated in different spaces and time from the observer. In order to effectively approach these musical practices, we have to develop strategies to help us reduce as much as possible that which distorts the vision of the other. However, beyond the strictly epistemological and methodological issues, the study of music cannot ignore the ethical question related to the manner in which Western thought has understood and treated the other: through a hierarchical and stereotypical type of thinking based on the condition of otherness. Throughout the article, different alterity procedures are presented and discussed, such as synecdochization, exoticization, undervaluation, overvaluation, misunderstanding and exclusion. Taking these different alterity strategies into account may help us to better understand how the musical other is constructed, used and ultimately instrumentalized.

  10. Nuclear structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastham, D.A.; Joy, T.

    1986-01-01

    The paper on 'nuclear structure' is the Appendix to the Daresbury (United Kingdom) Annual Report 1985/86, and contains the research work carried out at the Nuclear Structure Facility, Daresbury, within that period. During the year a total of 74 experiments were scheduled covering the main areas of activity including: nuclear collective motion, nuclei far from stability, and nuclear collisions. The Appendix contains brief reports on these experiments and associated theory. (U.K.)

  11. Calculus of radiolytic products generation in water due to alpha radiation. Determination of the spent nuclear fuels matrix alteration rate Determination of velocity of spent fuel matrix; Calculo de la generacion de productos radioliticos en agua por radiacion {alpha}. Determinacion de la velocidad de alteracion de la matriz del combustible nuclear gastado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quinones, J.; Serrano, J.; Diaz Arocas, P.; Rodriguez Almazan, J. L. [Ciemat. Madrid (Spain); Bruno, J.; Cera, E.; Merino, J.; Esteban, J. A.; Martinez-Esparza, A. [Enresa. Madrid (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    The generation of radiolytic products as a result of alpha radiation in the surface of the spent fuel is a key process in order to understand how the it becomes degraded in repository conditions. The present work has established a radiolytic model based on a set of reactions involving fuel oxidation-dissolution and radiolytic products recombination. It also includes the decrease of the dose rates as the main alpha emitters decay away. Four cases, with varying parameters of the system, have been assessed. The results show a decrease in both the concentration of the radiolytic products in the gap water and the degradation of the fuel matrix. It has been estimated that in the period of the evaluation (10''6 years) up to 52% of the pellet is altered in the conservative cases, whereas only 11% is altered in the realistic cases. No significant differences were observed when the carbonates reactions were included in the system. (Author)

  12. Microbial Biogeography and Core Microbiota of the Rat Digestive Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongyao; Chen, Haiqin; Mao, Bingyong; Yang, Qin; Zhao, Jianxin; Gu, Zhennan; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Yong Q.; Chen, Wei

    2017-04-01

    As a long-standing biomedical model, rats have been frequently used in studies exploring the correlations between gastrointestinal (GI) bacterial biota and diseases. In the present study, luminal and mucosal samples taken along the longitudinal axis of the rat digestive tract were subjected to 16S rRNA gene sequencing-based analysis to determine the baseline microbial composition. Results showed that the community diversity increased from the upper to lower GI segments and that the stratification of microbial communities as well as shift of microbial metabolites were driven by biogeographic location. A greater proportion of lactate-producing bacteria (such as Lactobacillus, Turicibacter and Streptococcus) were found in the stomach and small intestine, while anaerobic Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae, fermenting carbohydrates and plant aromatic compounds, constituted the bulk of the large-intestinal core microbiota where topologically distinct co-occurrence networks were constructed for the adjacent luminal and mucosal compartments. When comparing the GI microbiota from different hosts, we found that the rat microbial biogeography might represent a new reference, distinct from other murine animals. Our study provides the first comprehensive characterization of the rat GI microbiota landscape for the research community, laying the foundation for better understanding and predicting the disease-related alterations in microbial communities.

  13. Nuclear electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friese, T.

    1981-09-01

    A short survey is given on nuclear radiation detectors and nuclear electronics. It is written for newcomers and those, who are not very familiar with this technique. Some additional information is given on typical failures in nuclear measurement systems. (orig.) [de

  14. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    d'Easum, Lille.

    1976-03-01

    An environmentalist's criticism of nuclear energy is given, on a layman's level. Such subjects as conflict of interest in controlling bodies, low-level radiation, reactor safety, liability insurance, thermal pollution, economics, heavy water production, export of nuclear technology, and the history of the anti-nuclear movement are discussed in a sensationalistic tone. (E.C.B.)

  15. Nuclear terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Recent reports of alleged terrorist plans to build a 'dirty bomb' have heightened longstanding concerns about nuclear terrorism. This briefing outlines possible forms of attack, such as: detonation of a nuclear weapon; attacks involving radioactive materials; attacks on nuclear facilities. Legislation addressing these risks and the UK's strategy for coping with them are also considered

  16. Nuclear weapons, nuclear effects, nuclear war

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bing, G.F.

    1991-08-20

    This paper provides a brief and mostly non-technical description of the militarily important features of nuclear weapons, of the physical phenomena associated with individual explosions, and of the expected or possible results of the use of many weapons in a nuclear war. Most emphasis is on the effects of so-called ``strategic exchanges.``

  17. Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 is a versatile mucin-like molecule likely to play a differential role in digestive tract cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollenhauer, J; Herbertz, S; Helmke, B

    2001-01-01

    Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 (DMBT1) has been proposed as a candidate tumor suppressor gene for brain, lung, and digestive tract cancer. In particular, alterations of the gene and/or a loss of expression have been observed in gastric, colorectal, and esophageal carcinomas. Initial evidence...

  18. Tethering tracts in spina bifida occulta: revisiting an established nomenclature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpal, Sharad; Salamat, M Shahriar; Tubbs, R Shane; Kelly, David R; Oakes, W Jerry; Iskandar, Bermans J

    2007-09-01

    The goal of the present study goal was to systematically confirm the previously recognized nomenclature for tethering tracts that are part of the spectrum of occult spinal dysraphic lesions. The tethering tract in 20 patients with spina bifida occulta underwent histological examination with H & E staining and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) immunolabeling, and additional selected specimens were stained with Masson trichrome. All tethering tracts contained fibrous connective tissue. Four tracts were lined with epithelial cells and either originated within a dermoid cyst, terminated at a skin dimple/sinus opening, or had both of these characteristics. No tethering tracts exhibited EMA positivity or meningeal elements. Although all tethering tracts originated in juxtaposition to the spinal cord, their termination sites were variable. Based on histological findings and presumed embryological origin, the authors broadly classified tethering tracts terminating within the dura mater, epidural space, or lamina as "short tethering tracts" (STTs). The STTs occurred mostly in conjunction with split cord malformations and had a purely fibrous composition. Tethering tracts terminating superficial to the overlying lamina were classified as "long tethering tracts" (LTTs), and the authors propose that these are embryologically distinct from STTs. The LTTs were of two varieties: epithelial and nonepithelial, the former being typically associated with a skin dimple or spinal cord (epi)dermoid cyst. In fact, analysis of the data suggested that not every tethering tract terminating in or on the skin should be classified as a dermal sinus tract without histological confirmation, and because no evidence of meningeal tissue-lined tracts was detected, the use of the term "meningocele manqué" may not be appropriate.

  19. The Gastrointestinal Tract Microbiota and Allergic Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyburz, Andreas; Müller, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract microbiota is required for optimal digestion of foods, for the development of resistance against pathogens (termed colonization resistance), for the development of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue, and for local as well as systemic immune homeostasis. Certain constituents of the GI tract microbiota are widely recognized as critical regulators and modulators of their host's immune response. These include bacterial members of the microbiota as well as parasitic nematodes. Immune regulation by immunomodulatory members of the GI microbiota primarily serves to subvert host antimicrobial immune defenses and promote persistent colonization, but as a side effect may prevent or suppress immunological disorders resulting from inappropriate responses to harmless antigens, such as allergy, colitis or autoimmunity. Many of the best understood GI-resident immunomodulatory species have co-evolved with their mammalian hosts for tens of thousands of years and masterfully manipulate host immune responses. In this review, we discuss the epidemiological evidence for the role of the GI tract microbiota as a whole, and of specific members, in protection against allergic and other immunological disorders. We then focus on the mechanistic basis of microbial immunomodulation, which is presented using several well-understood paradigmatic examples, that is, helminths, Helicobacter pylori, Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli. In a final chapter, we highlight past and ongoing attempts at harnessing the immunomodulatory properties of GI microbiota species and their secreted products for intervention studies and describe the promises and limitations of these experimental approaches. The effects of pro- and prebiotics, bacterial lysates, as well as of fecal microbiota transplantation are presented and compared. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. [Obstructive azoospermia and malformations of seminal tract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrone, C; Ceratti, G; Bonazzi, A; Rocca Rossetti, S; Bianchi, M

    1996-12-01

    About 10% of the cases of male infertility is represented by the obstruction of the seminal tract, which may be congenital or secondary to inflammatory events or surgery. The most frequent obstructive malformation of the seminal tract is the bilateral agenesia of the vas deferens. Such malformation is typical of the cystic fibrosis (CF), an autosomal recessive disorder determining chronic respiratory infections with bronchiectasia, and pancreatic failure. Recently the defective gene responsible for CF has been identified on the long arm of the chromosome 7. Congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens (CBAVD) may be present in otherwise healthy males without clinical evidence of CF. Genetics studies demonstrated that most CBAVD display at least one detectable CF mutation, therefore this disease can be considered as an incomplete clinical form of CF. With the realization that a man with CBAVD may have CF, albeit a genital form, considerable care is required not only to document his specific mutations, but also to test his partner for CF mutations to evaluate the risk that their child would have CF. The association of chronic suppurating respiratory disease with obstructive azoospermia characterizes also the Young's syndrome. In this disease the obstruction could possibly be the result of defective epididymal sperm transport, related to an abnormality in the mucus. Despite some clinical common aspects, CF and Young's syndrome are two distinct entity. In fact, no CF mutations have been demonstrated in Young's syndrome. Congenital obstructive abnormalities of the vas deferens and epididymis are often associate to cryptorchidism (36-68% of the cases) and to patent processus vaginalis. The degree of testicular retention and processus vaginalis closure correlates well with the incidence of associated epididymal defects. Rare causes of congenital obstructive azoospermia are represent by the cyst of Müllerian or Wolffian origin. An obstruction to the progression of the

  1. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This digest document was written by members of the union of associations of ex-members and retired people of the Areva group (UARGA). It gives a comprehensive overview of the nuclear industry world, starting from radioactivity and its applications, and going on with the fuel cycle (front-end, back-end, fuel reprocessing, transports), the nuclear reactors (PWR, BWR, Candu, HTR, generation 4 systems), the effluents from nuclear facilities, the nuclear wastes (processing, disposal), and the management and safety of nuclear activities. (J.S.)

  2. Body growth in urinary tract malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, C; Schaefer, F; Schärer, K

    1993-04-01

    Body height and height velocity were analysed in 54 children with obstructive urinary tract malformations over a mean period of 8.7 years, using new auxological methods. At the time of diagnosis, 9% of patients had a height of more than 2 standard deviations below the normal mean. Mean relative height changed significantly from the first to the last observation, the standard deviation score (SDS) increasing from -0.16 to +0.36 in patients with hydronephrosis compared with normal children (P pubertal spurt. Final height and target height calculated from parents' height differed only slightly from that of the normal population.

  3. Urinary Tract Infection: Pathogenesis and Outlook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Lisa K; Hunstad, David A

    2016-11-01

    The clinical syndromes comprising urinary tract infection (UTI) continue to exert significant impact on millions of patients worldwide, most of whom are otherwise healthy women. Antibiotic therapy for acute cystitis does not prevent recurrences, which plague up to one fourth of women after an initial UTI. Rising antimicrobial resistance among uropathogenic bacteria further complicates therapeutic decisions, necessitating new approaches based on fundamental biological investigation. In this review, we highlight contemporary advances in the field of UTI pathogenesis and how these might inform both our clinical perspective and future scientific priorities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Urinary Tract Infection and Neurogenic Bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKibben, Maxim J; Seed, Patrick; Ross, Sherry S; Borawski, Kristy M

    2015-11-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are frequent, recurrent, and lifelong for patients with neurogenic bladder and present challenges in diagnosis and treatment. Patients often present without classic symptoms of UTI but with abdominal or back pain, increased spasticity, and urinary incontinence. Failure to recognize and treat infections can quickly lead to life-threatening autonomic dysreflexia or sepsis, whereas overtreatment contributes to antibiotic resistance, thus limiting future treatment options. Multiple prevention methods are used but evidence-based practices are few. Prevention and treatment of symptomatic UTI requires a multimodal approach that focuses on bladder management as well as accurate diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Urinary tract infections in the elderly population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, S James; Lancaster, Jason W

    2011-10-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are a common problem in the elderly population. The spectrum of disease varies from a relatively benign cystitis to potentially life-threatening pyelonephritis. This review covers the management of asymptomatic bacteriuria, acute uncomplicated cystitis, acute uncomplicated pyelonephritis, antibiotic resistance, catheter-associated bacteriuria/symptomatic UTIs, and antibiotic prophylaxis for recurrent infections in elderly men and women. Literature was obtained from English-language searches of MEDLINE (1966-April 2011), Cochrane Library, BIOSIS (1993-April 2011), and EMBASE (1970-April 2011). Further publications were identified from citations of resulting articles. Search terms included, but were not limited to, urinary tract infections, asymptomatic bacteriuria, acute uncomplicated cystitis, acute uncomplicated pyelonephritis, antibiotic resistance, catheter associated urinary tract infections, recurrent urinary tract infections, and elderly. The prevalence of UTIs in elderly women depends on the location in which these women are living. For elderly women living in the community, UTIs compromise the second most common infection, whereas in residents of long-term care facilities (LTCFs) and hospitalized subjects, it is the number one cause of infection. The spectrum of patient presentation varies from classic signs and symptoms in the independent elderly population to atypical presentations, including increased lethargy, delirium, blunted fever response, and anorexia. Although there are few guidelines specifically directed toward the management of UTIs in the elderly population, therapy generally mirrors the recommendations for the younger adult age groups. When choosing a treatment regimen, special attention must be given to the severity of illness, living conditions, existing comorbidities, presence of external devices, local antibiotic resistance patterns, and the ability of the patient to comply with therapy. Improved guidelines

  6. Nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamal, Anwar

    2014-01-01

    Explains the concepts in detail and in depth. Provides step-by-step derivations. Contains numerous tables and diagrams. Supports learning and teaching with numerous worked examples, questions and problems with answers. Sketches also the historical development of the subject. This textbook explains the experimental basics, effects and theory of nuclear physics. It supports learning and teaching with numerous worked examples, questions and problems with answers. Numerous tables and diagrams help to better understand the explanations. A better feeling to the subject of the book is given with sketches about the historical development of nuclear physics. The main topics of this book include the phenomena associated with passage of charged particles and radiation through matter which are related to nuclear resonance fluorescence and the Moessbauer effect., Gamov's theory of alpha decay, Fermi theory of beta decay, electron capture and gamma decay. The discussion of general properties of nuclei covers nuclear sizes and nuclear force, nuclear spin, magnetic dipole moment and electric quadrupole moment. Nuclear instability against various modes of decay and Yukawa theory are explained. Nuclear models such as Fermi Gas Model, Shell Model, Liquid Drop Model, Collective Model and Optical Model are outlined to explain various experimental facts related to nuclear structure. Heavy ion reactions, including nuclear fusion, are explained. Nuclear fission and fusion power production is treated elaborately.

  7. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The committee concludes that the nature of the proliferation problem is such that even stopping nuclear power completely could not stop proliferation completely. Countries can acquire nuclear weapons by means independent of commercial nuclear power. It is reasonable to suppose if a country is strongly motivated to acquire nuclear weapons, it will have them by 2010, or soon thereafter, no matter how nuclear power is managed in the meantime. Unilateral and international diplomatic measures to reduce the motivations that lead to proliferation should be high on the foreign policy agenda of the United States. A mimimum antiproliferation prescription for the management of nuclear power is to try to raise the political barriers against proliferation through misuse of nuclear power by strengthening the Non-Proliferation Treaty, and to seek to raise the technological barriers by placing fuel-cycle operations involving weapons-usable material under international control. Any such measures should be considered tactics to slow the spread of nuclear weapons and thus earn time for the exercise of statesmanship. The committee concludes the following about technical factors that should be considered in formulating nuclear policy: (1) rate of growth of electricity use is a primary factor; (2) growth of conventional nuclear power will be limited by producibility of domestic uranium sources; (3) greater contribution of nuclear power beyond 400 GWe past the year 2000 can only be supported by advanced reactor systems; and (4) several different breeder reactors could serve in principle as candidates for an indefinitely sustainable source of energy

  8. Nuclear forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karadeniz, O.; Guenalp, G.

    2010-01-01

    This review discusses the methodology of nuclear forensics and illicit trafficking of nuclear materials. Nuclear forensics is relatively new scientific branch whose aim it is to read out material inherent from nuclear material. Nuclear forensics investigations have to be considered as part of a comprehensive set of measures for detection,interception, categorization and characterization of illicitly trafficking nuclear material. Prevention, detection and response are the main elements in combating illicit trafficking. Forensics is a key element in the response process. Forensic science is defined as the application of a broad spectrum of sciences to answer questions of interest to the legal system. Besides, in this study we will explain age determination of nuclear materials.

  9. Nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangwani, Saloni; Chakrabortty, Sumita

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear fuel is a material that can be consumed to derive nuclear energy, by analogy to chemical fuel that is burned for energy. Nuclear fuels are the most dense sources of energy available. Nuclear fuel in a nuclear fuel cycle can refer to the fuel itself, or to physical objects (for example bundles composed of fuel rods) composed of the fuel material, mixed with structural, neutron moderating, or neutron reflecting materials. Long-lived radioactive waste from the back end of the fuel cycle is especially relevant when designing a complete waste management plan for SNF. When looking at long-term radioactive decay, the actinides in the SNF have a significant influence due to their characteristically long half-lives. Depending on what a nuclear reactor is fueled with, the actinide composition in the SNF will be different. The following paper will also include the uses. advancements, advantages, disadvantages, various processes and behavior of nuclear fuels

  10. Nuclear networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Wei; Burke, Brian

    2017-07-04

    Nuclear lamins are intermediate filament proteins that represent important structural components of metazoan nuclear envelopes (NEs). By combining proteomics and superresolution microscopy, we recently reported that both A- and B-type nuclear lamins form spatially distinct filament networks at the nuclear periphery of mouse fibroblasts. In particular, A-type lamins exhibit differential association with nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Our studies reveal that the nuclear lamina network in mammalian somatic cells is less ordered and more complex than that of amphibian oocytes, the only other system in which the lamina has been visualized at high resolution. In addition, the NPC component Tpr likely links NPCs to the A-type lamin network, an association that appears to be regulated by C-terminal modification of various A-type lamin isoforms. Many questions remain, however, concerning the structure and assembly of lamin filaments, as well as with their mode of association with other nuclear components such as peripheral chromatin.

  11. Nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertes, A.; Kiss, I.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the application of nuclear science in modern chemistry. The first group of chapters discuss the basic phenomena and concepts of nuclear physics with emphasis on their relation to chemical problems, including the main properties and the composition of atomic nuclei, nuclear reactions, radioactive decay and interactions of radiation with matter. These chapters provide the basis for understanding the following chapters which encompass the wide scope of nuclear chemistry. The methods of the investigation of chemical structure based on the interaction of nuclear radiation with matter including positronium chemistry and other exotic atoms is elaborated in particular detail. Separate chapters are devoted to the use of radioactive tracers, the chemical consequences of nuclear processes (i.e. hot atom chemistry), radiation chemistry, isotope effects and their applications, and the operation of nuclear reactors. (Auth.)

  12. Nuclear chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vertes, A.; Kiss, I.

    1987-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the application of nuclear science in modern chemistry. The first group of chapters discuss the basic phenomena and concepts of nuclear physics with emphasis on their relation to chemical problems, including the main properties and the composition of atomic nuclei, nuclear reactions, radioactive decay and interactions of radiation with matter. These chapters provide the basis for understanding the following chapters which encompass the wide scope of nuclear chemistry. The methods of the investigation of chemical structure based on the interaction of nuclear radiation with matter including positronium chemistry and other exotic atoms is elaborated in particular detail. Separate chapters are devoted to the use of radioactive tracers, the chemical consequences of nuclear processes (i.e. hot atom chemistry), radiation chemistry, isotope effects and their applications, and the operation of nuclear reactors

  13. MUC1 positive, Kras and Pten driven mouse gynecologic tumors replicate human tumors and vary in survival and nuclear grade based on anatomical location.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejas S Tirodkar

    Full Text Available Activating mutations of Kras oncogene and deletions of Pten tumor suppressor gene play important roles in cancers of the female genital tract. We developed here new preclinical models for gynecologic cancers, using conditional (Cre-loxP mice with floxed genetic alterations in Kras and Pten. The triple transgenic mice, briefly called MUC1KrasPten, express human MUC1 antigen as self and carry a silent oncogenic KrasG12D and Pten deletion mutation. Injection of Cre-encoding adenovirus (AdCre in the ovarian bursa, oviduct or uterus activates the floxed mutations and initiates ovarian, oviductal, and endometrial cancer, respectively. Anatomical site-specific Cre-loxP recombination throughout the genital tract of MUC1KrasPten mice leads to MUC1 positive genital tract tumors, and the development of these tumors is influenced by the anatomical environment. Endometrioid histology was consistently displayed in all tumors of the murine genital tract (ovaries, oviducts, and uterus. Tumors showed increased expression of MUC1 glycoprotein and triggered de novo antibodies in tumor bearing hosts, mimicking the immunobiology seen in patients. In contrast to the ovarian and endometrial tumors, oviductal tumors showed higher nuclear grade. Survival for oviduct tumors was significantly lower than for endometrial tumors (p = 0.0015, yet similar to survival for ovarian cancer. Oviducts seem to favor the development of high grade tumors, providing preclinical evidence in support of the postulated role of fallopian tubes as the originating site for high grade human ovarian tumors.

  14. Regional vulnerability of longitudinal cortical association connectivity: Associated with structural network topology alterations in preterm children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceschin, Rafael; Lee, Vince K; Schmithorst, Vince; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    alteration in eigenvector centrality, clustering coefficient (inter-regional) and participation co-efficient (inter-modular) alterations of frontal-striatal and fronto-limbic nodes suggesting re-organization of these pathways. Both along tract and structural topology network measurements correlated strongly with motor and visual clinical outcome scores. This study shows the value of combining along-tract analysis and structural network topology in depicting not only selective parietal occipital regional vulnerability but also reorganization of frontal-striatal and frontal-limbic pathways in preterm children with cerebral palsy. These finding also support the concept that widespread, but selective posterior-anterior neural network connectivity alterations in preterm children with cerebral palsy likely contribute to the pathogenesis of neurosensory and cognitive impairment in this group.

  15. [Repair effect of BMSCs on digestive tract injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Guiqing; Zhang, Mingming; Wu, Xiaoting

    2009-06-01

    To investigate the effect of BMSCs on the repair of digestive tract injury and its mechanisms. Recent literature on the effect of BMSCs on the repair of digestive tract injury was reviewed. BMSCs had the potency of self-replication, proliferation and multipotential differentiation, which played an important role in the repair of digestive tract injury. The probable mechanisms included: BMSCs' ability of migrating to the injured tissue and inhibiting the host immune response; BMSCs' dedifferentiation and redifferentiation; BMSCs' direct differentiation into the epithelial cells or the stem cells of digestive tract; BMSCs' fusion with the stem cells or the mature epithelial cells of digestive tract; BMSCs' participation in the reconstruction of injured microenvironment. BMSCs participates in the repair of digestive tract injury and has a bright future in the treatment of digestive system disease.

  16. Postpartum urinary tract infection by mode of delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundersen, Tina Djernis; Krebs, Lone; Loekkegaard, Ellen Christine Leth

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the association between postpartum urinary tract infection and intended mode of delivery as well as actual mode of delivery. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: All live births in Denmark between 2004 and 2010 (n=450 856). Births were classified...... was postpartum urinary tract infection (n=16 295) within 30 days post partum, defined as either a diagnosis of urinary tract infection in the National Patient Registry or redemption of urinary tract infection-specific antibiotics recorded in the Register of Medicinal Product Statistics. RESULTS: We found that 4.......6% of women with intended caesarean delivery and 3.5% of women with intended vaginal delivery were treated for postpartum urinary tract infection.Women with intended caesarean delivery had a significantly increased risk of postpartum urinary tract infection compared with women with intended vaginal delivery...

  17. Dose distributions of patients from chest fluoroscopy, upper GI-tract radiography and cinematography in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusama, T.; Kai, M.; Ohta, K.

    1996-01-01

    The per caput dose from medical exposure in Japan is several times higher than in other developed countries. There are no dose limitations for medical exposure. Then, the appropriate applications of radiation diagnosis/treatments (justification of practices) and the quality control of diagnosis/treatments (optimization of protection) are needed to reduce the doses from medical exposure. It is well documented that patient doses from a X-ray diagnosis are distributed in the broad range. Recently, the IAEA introduced guidance levels for some typical X-ray diagnosis and in vivo nuclear medicines. We carried out the investigation of dose distribution of patients from the X-ray examinations of chest, cardiovascular cinematography and upper GI-tract X-ray examination in order to give the basic information on the quality control of each X-ray diagnosis. These X-ray diagnoses are performed frequently in Japan, and especially chest X-ray examinations are carried out periodically to all population more than 18 years old as legal health check and GI-tract X-ray examinations to the persons more than 35 years old. The cardiovascular cinematography and the upper GI-tract X-ray examination bring higher effective dose for patients. More information is therefore, needed for the reduction and quality control of medical exposure in Japan. (author)

  18. Nuclear renaissance and nuclear nonproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuno, Yusuke

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear energy would grow in response to climate change and the need for a stable energy supply even in an unstable global non-proliferation regime. Some emerging countries probably will try to acquire nuclear fuel cycle as a part of the peaceful use of nuclear energy. How to avoid the risk of proliferation of sensitive technologies is a crucial challenge for the international community. This paper describes the direction to peaceful use of nuclear technology, particularly nuclear fuel cycle, with appropriate non-proliferation measures. (author)

  19. Nuclear blackmail and nuclear balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betts, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    This book raises pointed questions about nuclear saber rattling. More than a dozen cases since the bombing of Hiroshima and Magasaki in which some sort of nuclear threat was used as a sparring technique in tense confrontations are cited. Each incident is described and analyzed. Two theories offered to explain America's use of nuclear threats, the balance of interest theory and the balance of power theory, are contrasted throughout the book. This book helps to fill the gap in the understanding of nuclear weapons and their uses, while pointing out that nuclear bravado could lead to an unintended unleashing of these weapons

  20. Multiscale Systems Modeling of Male Reproductive Tract ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The reproductive tract is a complex, integrated organ system with diverse embryology and unique sensitivity to prenatal environmental exposures that disrupt morphoregulatory processes and endocrine signaling. U.S. EPA’s in vitro high-throughput screening (HTS) database (ToxCastDB) was used to profile the bioactivity of 54 chemicals with male developmental consequences across ~800 molecular and cellular features [Leung et al., accepted manuscript]. The in vitro bioactivity on molecular targets could be condensed into 156 gene annotations in a bipartite network. These results highlighted the role of estrogen and androgen signaling pathways in male reproductive tract development, and importantly, broadened the list of molecular targets to include GPCRs, cytochrome-P450s, vascular remodeling proteins, and retinoic acid signaling. A multicellular agent-based model was used to simulate the complex interactions between morphoregulatory, endocrine, and environmental influences during genital tubercle (GT) development. Spatially dynamic signals (e.g., SHH, FGF10, and androgen) were implemented in the model to address differential adhesion, cell motility, proliferation, and apoptosis. Urethral tube closure was an emergent feature of the model that was linked to gender-specific rates of ventral mesenchymal proliferation and urethral plate endodermal apoptosis, both under control of androgen signaling [Leung et al., manuscript in preparation]. A systemic parameter sweep w

  1. Biofabrication and biomaterials for urinary tract reconstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsawy MM

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Moustafa M Elsawy,1–3 Achala de Mel1 1Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, Royal Free Hospital, NHS Trust, University College London (UCL, 2Division of Reconstructive Urology, University College London Hospitals (uclh, London, UK; 3Urology Department, School of Medicine, Alexandria, University, Alexandria, EgyptAbstract: Reconstructive urologists are constantly facing diverse and complex pathologies that require structural and functional restoration of urinary organs. There is always a demand for a biocompatible material to repair or substitute the urinary tract instead of using patient’s autologous tissues with its associated morbidity. Biomimetic approaches are tissue-engineering tactics aiming to tailor the material physical and biological properties to behave physiologically similar to the urinary system. This review highlights the different strategies to mimic urinary tissues including modifications in structure, surface chemistry, and cellular response of a range of biological and synthetic materials. The article also outlines the measures to minimize infectious complications, which might lead to graft failure. Relevant experimental and preclinical studies are discussed, as well as promising biomimetic approaches such as three-dimensional bioprinting. Keywords: reconstruction, biofunctionalization, tissue engineering, urinary tract

  2. Sonographic findings of biliary tract disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Duck Soo; Kim, Jung Sick; Kim, Byung Young; Kim, Si Woon; Lee, Chong Kil [Fatima Hospital, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-03-15

    Forty one patients gallbladder and bile duct diseases were studied clinically and sonographically. Twenty nine (seventy one percent) patients were distributed between age forty to fifty nine and male to female ratio was 1 : 1.4. The order of frequency of biliary tract disease was cholelithiasis, acclculous cholecystitis, CBD stone and CBD cancer. Sonographic findings of cholelithiasis were strong echo with posterior shadowing, faint internal echoes without shadowing, gallbladder wall thickening and anechoicity of the gallbladder wall. Instead of small proportion of gallbladder distension and wall anechoicity, faint internal echoes without shadowing were seen in ten of nineteen cases of choleithiasis. On choledocholithiasis, meniscus sign at the junction of the stone and gallbladder wall was identified in most cases and was helpful to differentiation stone from malignancy. The degree of CBD dilatation was more severe in malignancy than in CBD stone and ascaris in CBD. Sonographic examination was useful in detection of gallbladder and biliary tree pathology and the cause of biliary tract obstruction could be identified.

  3. Oncologic imaging of the genitourinary tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClennan, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    Malignant neoplasms of the genitourinary (GU) tract account for a significant number of cancer-related deaths in man. For example, prostate cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related death in adult males. Early diagnosis and treatment can have a profound effect on patient prognosis and survival. This paper examines the large body of information related to primary tumors of the kidney, bladder, and prostate, and their pattern of spread. Tumor oncology is discussed and related to the utility of available techniques, such as CT, MR imaging, and US. Imaging strategies are discussed that stress consideration of therapeutic efficacy and patient outcome. Current tumor staging and classification is presented and the various imaging strategies keyed to detection, definition, and treatment options for GU tract tumors. The strengths and limitations of modern imaging techniques are reviewed. An optimal approach to effective workup is developed with regard to availability, evolving technology, and cost efficacy. The controversies and conflicts in imaging and treatment options are explored while constructing a step-by-step approach that is both flexible and pragmatic for the clinician and radiologist faced daily with oncologic management choices

  4. Gastrointestinal tract disorders in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durazzo, Marilena; Campion, Daniela; Fagoonee, Sharmila; Pellicano, Rinaldo

    2017-12-01

    The number and the proportion of older people in the world have both increased substantially in recent years in most countries, and the growth is projected to accelerate in the coming decades. It is thus important to gain a better understanding of the most frequent diseases in people living to advanced old age. Although the aging process has clinically significant effects on oropharyngeal and upper esophageal motility, colonic function and gastrointestinal (GI) immunity, no specific GI disease of the aged population is known. Nevertheless, the prevalence of GI symptoms and signs have increased, due to aging processes and to the superimposed effects of comorbidities and environmental exposure (medications, alcohol, tobacco). As a consequence, GI morbidity in the elderly represents an increasingly relevant burden for public health systems. This review focuses on the most frequent GI disorders of the elderly, describing their epidemiological, pathophysiological and clinical implications. The main benign diseases, symptoms or signs involving the GI tract are discussed, debating the potential role of a multidisciplinary approach when appropriate. Finally, it is highlighted that age-related physiologic changes in most systems, including the GI tract, affect diagnostic test interpretation and response to treatments, and may be difficult to differentiate from disease. This should be considered together with the fact that, with multiple coexisting diseases, there is a less consistent relationship between disease and clinical manifestations in the elderly.

  5. Radionuclide imaging of the lower genitourinary tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowery, P.A.; Pjura, G.A.; Kin, E.E.; Brown, W.D.

    1988-01-01

    The major use of radionuclide cystography is in the management of children with vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). Reflux is common, occurring in one-third to one-half of children with urinary tract infection. The significance of VUR lies in its associated symptoms and consequences, which include impaired renal growth and function, vague ill health, renal pain, and more importantly the development of reflux nephropathy, a significant cause of end-stage renal disease and hypertension in children. Although reflux may resolve spontaneously, particularly milder degrees of reflux, the age at which this may occur is unpredictable and repeated follow-up cystography over a number of years may be necessary. Therefore, it is important to minimize radiation to the child while providing accurate diagnostic information. This paper discusses how the technique of radionuclide cystography compares favorably with routine contrast voiding cystourethrography (VCUG) in these respects, and in addition can provide quantitative information not obtained by radiographic techniques. Other indications may include screening siblings of patients known to have reflux, follow-up of antireflux surgery and occasionally screening for reflux in children who have had urinary tract infection

  6. Development of a Vaccine against Escherichia coli Urinary Tract Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry L. T. Mobley

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is the second most common infection in humans after those involving the respiratory tract. This results not only in huge annual economic costs, but in decreased workforce productivity and high patient morbidity. Most infections are caused by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC. Antibiotic treatment is generally effective for eradication of the infecting strain; however, documentation of increasing antibiotic resistance, allergic reaction to certain pharmaceuticals, alteration of normal gut flora, and failure to prevent recurrent infections represent significant barriers to treatment. As a result, approaches to prevent UTI such as vaccination represent a gap that must be addressed. Our laboratory has made progress toward development of a preventive vaccine against UPEC. The long-term research goal is to prevent UTIs in women with recurrent UTIs. Our objective has been to identify the optimal combination of protective antigens for inclusion in an effective UTI vaccine, optimal adjuvant, optimal dose, and optimal route of delivery. We hypothesized that a multi-subunit vaccine elicits antibody that protects against experimental challenge with UPEC strains. We have systematically identified four antigens that can individually protect experimentally infected mice from colonization of the bladder and/or kidneys by UPEC when administered intranasally with cholera toxin (CT as an adjuvant. To advance the vaccine for utility in humans, we will group the individual antigens, all associated with iron acquisition (IreA, Hma, IutA, FyuA, into an effective combination to establish a multi-subunit vaccine. We demonstrated for all four vaccine antigens that antigen-specific serum IgG represents a strong correlate of protection in vaccinated mice. High antibody titers correlate with low colony forming units (CFUs of UPEC following transurethral challenge of vaccinated mice. However, the contribution of cell-mediated immunity cannot

  7. IN VITRO ACTIVITY OF VACCINIUM MACROCARPON (CRANBERRY) ON URINARY TRACT PATHOGENS IN UNCOMPLICATED URINARY TRACT INFECTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukhari, Saima; Chiragh, Sadia; Tariq, Sumbal; Alam, Muhammad Adeel; Wazir, Muhammad Salim; Suleman, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is the most common bacterial infection in the community, mainly caused by Escherichia coli (E coli). Due to its high incidence and recurrence, problems are faced in the treatment with antibiotics. Cranberry being herbal remedy have long been the focus of interest for their beneficial effects in preventing urinary tract infections. This study was conducted to analyse in vitro activity of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) on uropathogenic E coli in uncomplicated urinary tract infections. In this laboratory based single group experimental study, anti-bacterial activity of Vaccinium macrocarpon concentrate on urinary tract E coli was investigated, in vitro. Ninety-six culture positive cases of different uropathogens were identified. Vaccinium macrocarpon concentrate at different concentrations was prepared in distilled water and put in wells punched in nutrient agar. E coli isolates were inoculated on the plates and incubated at 37 °C for 24 hours. A citric acid solution of the same pH as that of Vaccinium macrocarpon was used and put in a well on the same plate to exclude the effect of pH. A total of 35 isolates of E coli were identified out of 96 culture positive specimens of urine and found sensitive to Vaccinium macrocarpon (p<0.000). Results revealed that Vaccinium macrocarpon has antibacterial effect against E coli. Furthermore the antibacterial activity of Vaccinium macrocarpon has dose response relationship. Acidic nature of Vaccinium macrocarpon due to its pH is not contributory towards its antibacterial effect. Vaccinium macrocarpon concentrate may be used in urinary tract infection caused by E coli.

  8. In vitro activity of vaccinium macrocarpon (cranberry) on urinary tract pathogens in uncomplicated urinary tract infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bukhari, S.; Tariq, S.; Alam, M.A.; Chiragh, S.; Wazir, M.S.; Suleman, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infection is the most common bacterial infection in the community, mainly caused by Escherichia coli (E coli). Due to its high incidence and recurrence, problems are faced in the treatment with antibiotics. Cranberry being herbal remedy have long been the focus of interest for their beneficial effects in preventing urinary tract infections. This study was conducted to analyse in vitro activity of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon) on uropathogenic E coli in uncomplicated urinary tract infections. Method: In this laboratory based single group experimental study, anti-bacterial activity of Vaccinium macrocarpon concentrate on urinary tract E coli was investigated, in vitro. Ninety-six culture positive cases of different uropathogens were identified. Vaccinium macrocarpon concentrate at different concentrations was prepared in distilled water and put in wells punched in nutrient agar. E coli isolates were inoculated on the plates and incubated at 37 Degree C for 24 hours. A citric acid solution of the same pH as that of Vaccinium macrocarpon was used and put in a well on the same plate to exclude the effect of pH. Results: A total of 35 isolates of E coli were identified out of 96 culture positive specimens of urine and found sensitive to Vaccinium macrocarpon (p<0.000). Results revealed that Vaccinium macrocarpon has antibacterial effect against E coli. Furthermore the antibacterial activity of Vaccinium macrocarpon has dose response relationship. Acidic nature of Vaccinium macrocarpon due to its pH is not contributory towards its antibacterial effect. Conclusion: Vaccinium macrocarpon concentrate may be used in urinary tract infection caused by E coli. (author)

  9. Acute ingestion dosimetry using the ICRP 30 gastrointestinal tract model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassels, B.M.

    1987-01-01

    This paper examines the gastrointestinal (GI) tract model used for dosimetry as outlined in ICRP30, to allow quick calculations of effective dose equivalents for acute radionuclide ingestion. A computer program has been developed to emulate the GI tract model. The program and associated data files are structured so that the GI tract model parameters can be varied, while the file structure and algorithm for the GI tract model should require minimal modification to allow the same theories that apply in this model to be used for other dosimetric models

  10. A prospective study of urinary tract infection during pelvic radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bialas, I.; Bessell, E.M.; Sokal, M.

    1989-01-01

    The frequency of urinary tract infection before and during pelvic radiotherapy was studied prospectively in 172 patients who were not catherised and had not had instrumentation for at least 4 weeks prior to radiotherapy. The incidence of urinary tract infection prior to radiotherapy was 17% and a further 17% of patients develped a urinary tract infection during radiotherapy. Mid-stream specimens of urine (MSU) should be examined for infection on a weekly basis during pelvic radiotherapy not only to identify this additional 17% of patients but also to detect those patients who have persistent urinary tract infection in spite of treatment with appropriate antibiotics. (author). 6 refs.; 1 fig.; 4 tabs

  11. Diagnosis and treatment of urinary tract infections across age groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Christine M; Lowder, Jerry L

    2018-01-02

    Urinary tract infections are the most common outpatient infections, but predicting the probability of urinary tract infections through symptoms and test results can be complex. The most diagnostic symptoms of urinary tract infections include change in frequency, dysuria, urgency, and presence or absence of vaginal discharge, but urinary tract infections may present differently in older women. Dipstick urinalysis is popular for its availability and usefulness, but results must be interpreted in context of the patient's pretest probability based on symptoms and characteristics. In patients with a high probability of urinary tract infection based on symptoms, negative dipstick urinalysis does not rule out urinary tract infection. Nitrites are likely more sensitive and specific than other dipstick components for urinary tract infection, particularly in the elderly. Positive dipstick testing is likely specific for asymptomatic bacteriuria in pregnancy, but urine culture is still the test of choice. Microscopic urinalysis is likely comparable to dipstick urinalysis as a screening test. Bacteriuria is more specific and sensitive than pyuria for detecting urinary tract infection, even in older women and during pregnancy. Pyuria is commonly found in the absence of infection, particularly in older adults with lower urinary tract symptoms such as incontinence. Positive testing may increase the probability of urinary tract infection, but initiation of treatment should take into account risk of urinary tract infection based on symptoms as well. In cases in which the probability of urinary tract infection is moderate or unclear, urine culture should be performed. Urine culture is the gold standard for detection of urinary tract infection. However, asymptomatic bacteriuria is common, particularly in older women, and should not be treated with antibiotics. Conversely, in symptomatic women, even growth as low as 10 2 colony-forming unit/mL could reflect infection. Resistance is

  12. Nuclear energy and nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.A.L.

    1983-06-01

    We all want to prevent the use of nuclear weapons. The issue before us is how best to achieve this objective; more specifically, whether the peaceful applications of nuclear energy help or hinder, and to what extent. Many of us in the nuclear industry are working on these applications from a conviction that without peaceful nuclear energy the risk of nuclear war would be appreciably greater. Others, however, hold the opposite view. In discussing the subject, a necessary step in allaying fears is understanding some facts, and indeed facing up to some unpalatable facts. When the facts are assessed, and a balance struck, the conclusion is that peaceful nuclear energy is much more part of the solution to preventing nuclear war than it is part of the problem

  13. Role of the Gastrointestinal Tract Microbiome in the Pathophysiology of Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad U. Sohail

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of diabetes mellitus is rapidly increasing throughout the world. Although the exact cause of the disease is not fully clear, perhaps, genetics, ethnic origin, obesity, age, and lifestyle are considered as few of many contributory factors for the disease pathogenesis. In recent years, the disease progression is particularly linked with functional and taxonomic alterations in the gastrointestinal tract microbiome. A change in microbial diversity, referred as microbial dysbiosis, alters the gut fermentation profile and intestinal wall integrity and causes metabolic endotoxemia, low-grade inflammation, autoimmunity, and other affiliated metabolic disorders. This article aims to summarize the role of the gut microbiome in the pathogenesis of diabetes. Additionally, we summarize gut microbial dysbiosis in preclinical and clinical diabetes cases reported in literature in the recent years.

  14. Associations of obesity, physical activity and diet with benign prostatic hyperplasia and lower urinary tract symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raheem, Omer A; Parsons, J Kellogg

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological and clinical data indicate that modifiable lifestyle factors - including obesity, physical activity, and diet - significantly influence the risks of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Modifiable factors associated with significantly increased risks of symptomatic BPH and LUTS include obesity and consumption of meat and fat. Factors associated with decreased risks include increased physical activity, vegetable consumption, and moderate alcohol intake. Obesity potentially attenuates the clinical efficacy of 5α-reductase inhibitors (5-ARI). Randomized clinical trials of lifestyle alterations - such as weight loss, exercise, and diet - for the prevention or treatment of BPH and LUTS have yet to be performed. Obesity, physical activity, and diet substantially alter the risks of symptomatic BPH and LUTS. 5-ARIs exhibit diminished efficacy in obese patients. Although clinical trials of lifestyle modifications have yet to be undertaken, it is reasonable to promote weight loss, exercise, and healthy diet within the context of standard treatments for symptomatic BPH and LUTS.

  15. Role of the Gastrointestinal Tract Microbiome in the Pathophysiology of Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althani, Asmaa; Anwar, Haseeb; Rizzi, Roberto; Marei, Hany E.

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of diabetes mellitus is rapidly increasing throughout the world. Although the exact cause of the disease is not fully clear, perhaps, genetics, ethnic origin, obesity, age, and lifestyle are considered as few of many contributory factors for the disease pathogenesis. In recent years, the disease progression is particularly linked with functional and taxonomic alterations in the gastrointestinal tract microbiome. A change in microbial diversity, referred as microbial dysbiosis, alters the gut fermentation profile and intestinal wall integrity and causes metabolic endotoxemia, low-grade inflammation, autoimmunity, and other affiliated metabolic disorders. This article aims to summarize the role of the gut microbiome in the pathogenesis of diabetes. Additionally, we summarize gut microbial dysbiosis in preclinical and clinical diabetes cases reported in literature in the recent years. PMID:29082264

  16. Alteration of gastrointestinal transit time in the rat after bile duct cannulation surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayres, P.H.; Medinsky, M.A.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Bond, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Alteration of gastrointestinal (GI) transit time could affect the bioavailability of a toxicant if the toxicant is absorbed in the GI tract. The effect of surgery on GI transit time was investigated using radiographic imaging of barium during passage through the GI tract of the rat. Bile duct cannulation surgery delayed transit of barium to over 18 h, whereas in the normal animal, transit required approximately 6 h. GI transit time was only moderately affected by laparotomy after an 18-h postsurgery recovery period. These results suggest that the gastrointestinal absorption of orally administered toxicants could be affected by bile duct cannulation. 3 references, 1 figure, 1 table

  17. Urinary ATP as an indicator of infection and inflammation of the urinary tract in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Gill, Kiren; Horsley, Harry; Kupelian, Anthony S; Baio, Gianluca; De Iorio, Maria; Sathiananamoorthy, Sanchutha; Khasriya, Rajvinder; Rohn, Jennifer L; Wildman, Scott S.P.; Malone-Lee, James

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND:\\ud Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) is a neurotransmitter and inflammatory cytokine implicated in the pathophysiology of lower urinary tract disease. ATP additionally reflects microbial biomass thus has potential as a surrogate marker of urinary tract infection (UTI). The optimum clinical sampling method for ATP urinalysis has not been established. We tested the potential of urinary ATP in the assessment of lower urinary tract symptoms, infection and inflammation, and validated sam...

  18. Voice disorders in residual paracoccidioidomycosis in upper airways and digestive tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Ananda Dutra; Vargas, Amanda Pereira; Lucena, Marcia Mendonça; Ruas, Ana Cristina Nunes; Braga, Fernanda da Silva Santos; Bom-Braga, Mateus Pereira; Bom-Braga, Frederico Pereira; do Valle, Antonio Carlos Francesconi; Igreja, Ricardo Pereira; Valete-Rosalino, Cláudia Maria

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic mycosis of acute and chronic evolution, caused by species belonging to the genus Paracoccidioides. It is considered the most prevalent systemic endemic mycosis in Latin America, with cases in the tropical and subtropical regions. Residual PCM refers to the fibrotic scar sequelae resulting from the disease treatment which, when associated with collagen accumulation, leads to functional and anatomic alterations in the organs. The aim of this study was to evaluate the vocal function of patients with residual PCM in upper airways and digestive tract. We performed a cross-sectional study in 2010 in a cohort of 21 patients with residual PCM in upper airways and digestive tract. The average age was 49.48±9.1 years, and only two (9.5%) patients were female. The study was performed in the 1-113 month-period (median 27) after the end of drug treatment. Five (23.8%) patients had alterations in the larynx as a sequela of the disease. However, all patients had vocal changes in vocal auditory perceptual analysis by GRBASI scale. The computerized acoustic analysis using the software Vox Metria, showed that 11 patients (52.4%) presented alterations in jitter, 15 (71.4%) in shimmer, 8 (38.1%) in F0, 4 (19%) in glottal to noise excitation (GNE), 7 (33.3%) in the presence of noise and 12 (57.1%) in the presence of vibratory irregularity. The great frequency of alterations in residual PCM suggests that the patients in such phase could benefit from a multidisciplinary treatment, offering them integral monitoring of the disease, including speech rehabilitation after the PCM is healed. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, P.

    1990-01-01

    Written from the basis of neutrality, neither for nor against nuclear power this book considers whether there are special features of nuclear power which mean that its development should be either promoted or restrained by the State. The author makes it dear that there are no easy answers to the questions raised by the intervention of nuclear power but calls for openness in the nuclear decision making process. First, the need for energy is considered; most people agree that energy is the power to progress. Then the historicalzed background to the current position of nuclear power is given. Further chapters consider the fuel cycle, environmental impacts including carbon dioxide emission and the greenhouse effect, the costs, safety and risks and waste disposal. No conclusion either for or against nuclear power is made. The various shades of opinion are outlined and the arguments presented so that readers can come to their own conclusions. (UK)

  20. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, Arthur.

    1980-01-01

    This chapter of the final report of the Royal Commission on Electric Power Planning in Ontario updates its interim report on nuclear power in Ontario (1978) in the light of the Three Mile Island accident and presents the commission's general conclusions and recommendations relating to nuclear power. The risks of nuclear power, reactor safety with special reference to Three Mile Island and incidents at the Bruce generating station, the environmental effects of uranium mining and milling, waste management, nuclear power economics, uranium supplies, socio-political issues, and the regulation of nuclear power are discussed. Specific recommendations are made concerning the organization and public control of Ontario Hydro, but the commission concluded that nuclear power is acceptable in Ontario as long as satisfactory progress is made in the disposal of uranium mill tailings and spent fuel wastes. (LL)

  1. Findings in cystourethrography that suggest lower urinary tract dysfunction in children with vesicoureteral reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ubirajara Barroso Jr

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Children with lower urinary tract dysfunction and vesicoureteral reflux, at cystography assessment, frequently present alterations in the lower urinary tract anatomy such as dilated posterior urethra, irregularity of the bladder wall and diverticula. However, the significance of these findings is unknown. The objective of this study is to evaluate the incidence of these findings, their time of disappearance and their correlation with the severity of the reflux. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 193 children with vesicoureteral reflux, considered simple, in the age group above 5 years at the moment of diagnosis, were analyzed. The recommendation for follow-up of these patients was one voiding cystoureterography (VCUG each year. Only patients with a minimum of 2 VCUGs performed in a period of at least 6 months were considered. The VCUGs were classified as positive and negative in relation to findings that were characteristic of lower urinary tract dysfunction (LUTD. RESULTS: From the 193 children analyzed, 50 (26% presented positive VCUG and 143 negative VCUG. From the patients without symptoms of lower urinary tract dysfunction (n = 135, 12 (9% presented positive VCUG and 123 (91% a negative VCUG. From the patients with negative VCUG, 68 (48% presented unilateral reflux and 75 (52% presented bilateral reflux. From those with positive VCUG, 26 (52% had unilateral reflux and 24 bilateral reflux (48%. This difference was not statistically significant. A higher incidence of grade II reflux was more evident in patients with negative VCUG and degree III in patients with positive VCUG (p < 0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrated that 64% of the patients with LUTD and reflux presented findings in the VCUG that suggest dysfunction.

  2. Nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, S.B.

    1991-01-01

    This book is a simple and direct introduction to the tools of modern nuclear physics, both experimental and mathematical. Emphasizes physical intuition and illuminating analogies, rather than formal mathematics. Topics covered include particle accelerators, radioactive series, types of nuclear reactions, detection of the neutrino, nuclear isomerism, binding energy of nuclei, fission chain reactions, and predictions of the shell model. Each chapter contains problems and illustrative examples. Pre-requisites are calculus and elementary vector analysis

  3. Nuclear astrophysics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haxton, W.C.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of core-collapse supernovae is used to illustrate the many connections between nuclear astrophysics and the problems nuclear physicists study in terrestrial laboratories. Efforts to better understand the collapse and mantle ejection are also motivated by a variety of interdisciplinary issues in nuclear, particle, and astrophysics, including galactic chemical evolution, neutrino masses and mixing, and stellar cooling by the emission of new particles. The current status of theory and observations is summarized

  4. Nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This document brings together a series of articles illustrating the way nuclear safety is conceived organised and applied in France. It also deals with foreign experts contributions related to the safety of future nuclear power plants and the impact of probabilistic studies. The opinion of a french Deputy, pleading for nuclear transparency, is sustained by the final conclusions analysing the lessons learned from the past and the current priorities [fr

  5. Computational hemodynamic optimization predicts dominant aortic arch selection is driven by embryonic outflow tract orientation in the chick embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, William J; Teslovich, Nikola C; Dur, Onur; Keller, Bradley B; Pekkan, Kerem

    2012-09-01

    In the early embryo, a series of symmetric, paired vessels, the aortic arches, surround the foregut and distribute cardiac output to the growing embryo and fetus. During embryonic development, the arch vessels undergo large-scale asymmetric morphogenesis to form species-specific adult great vessel patterns. These transformations occur within a dynamic biomechanical environment, which can play an important role in the development of normal arch configurations or the aberrant arch morphologies associated with congenital cardiac defects. Arrested migration and rotation of the embryonic outflow tract during late stages of cardiac looping has been shown to produce both outflow tract and several arch abnormalities. Here, we investigate how changes in flow distribution due to a perturbation in the angular orientation of the embryonic outflow tract impact the morphogenesis and growth of the aortic arches. Using a combination of in vivo arch morphometry with fluorescent dye injection and hemodynamics-driven bioengineering optimization-based vascular growth modeling, we demonstrate that outflow tract orientation significantly changes during development and that the associated changes in hemodynamic load can dramatically influence downstream aortic arch patterning. Optimization reveals that balancing energy expenditure with diffusive capacity leads to multiple arch vessel patterns as seen in the embryo, while minimizing energy alone led to the single arch configuration seen in the mature arch of aorta. Our model further shows the critical importance of the orientation of the outflow tract in dictating morphogenesis to the adult single arch and accurately predicts arch IV as the dominant mature arch of aorta. These results support the hypothesis that abnormal positioning of the outflow tract during early cardiac morphogenesis may lead to congenital defects of the great vessels due to altered hemodynamic loading.

  6. Nuclear Asia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferguson, Joseph; Tarleton, Gael

    2004-01-01

    .... This event was an opportunity for policy makers, security analysts, nuclear scientists and engineers, regional experts, and military planners to share perspectives and identify those issues requiring...

  7. Nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The area of nuclear medicine, the development of artificially produced radioactive isotopes for medical applications, is relatively recent. Among the subjects covered in a lengthy discussion are the following: history of development; impact of nuclear medicine; understanding the most effective use of radioisotopes; most significant uses of nuclear medicine radioimmunoassays; description of equipment designed for use in the field of nuclear medicine (counters, scanning system, display systems, gamma camera); description of radioisotopes used and their purposes; quality control. Numerous historical photographs are included. 52 refs

  8. Nuclear Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, E G [ed.

    1989-01-01

    This document is a review journal that covers significant developments in the field of nuclear safety. Its scope includes the analysis and control of hazards associated with nuclear energy, operations involving fissionable materials, and the products of nuclear fission and their effects on the environment. Primary emphasis is on safety in reactor design, construction, and operation; however, the safety aspects of the entire fuel cycle, including fuel fabrication, spent-fuel processing, nuclear waste disposal, handling of radioisotopes, and environmental effects of these operations, are also treated.

  9. Diagnostic interventions in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thrall, J.H.; Swanson, D.P.

    1989-01-01

    Diagnostic interventions in nuclear medicine may be defined as the coadministration of a nonradioactive drug or application of a physical stimulus or physiologic maneuver to enhance the diagnostic utility of a nuclear medicine test. The rationale for each interventional maneuver follows from the physiology or metabolism of the particular organ or organ system under evaluation. Diagnostic inference is drawn from the pattern of change in the biodistribution of the tracer in response to the intervention-induced change in metabolism or function. In current practice, the most commonly performed interventional maneuvers are aimed at studies of the heart, genitourinary system, hepatobiliary system, and gastrointestinal tract. The single most commonly performed interventional study in the United States is the stress Thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scan aimed at the diagnosis of coronary artery disease. The stress portion of the study is accomplished with dynamic leg exercise on a treadmill and is aimed at increasing myocardial oxygen demands. Areas of myocardium distal to hemodynamically significant lesions in the coronary arteries become ischemic at peak stress due to the inability of the stenotic vessel to respond to the oxygen demand/blood flow needs of the myocardium. Ischemic areas are readily recognized as photopenic defects on scans obtained immediately after exercise, with normalization upon delayed imaging. Diuresis renography is aimed at the differential diagnosis of hydroureteronephrosis. By challenging the urinary tract collecting structures with an augmented urine flow, dilated, unobstructed systems can be differentiated from systems with significant mechanical obstruction. 137 references

  10. Physiologic Status Monitoring via the Gastrointestinal Tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Traverso

    Full Text Available Reliable, real-time heart and respiratory rates are key vital signs used in evaluating the physiological status in many clinical and non-clinical settings. Measuring these vital signs generally requires superficial attachment of physically or logistically obtrusive sensors to subjects that may result in skin irritation or adversely influence subject performance. Given the broad acceptance of ingestible electronics, we developed an approach that enables vital sign monitoring internally from the gastrointestinal tract. Here we report initial proof-of-concept large animal (porcine experiments and a robust processing algorithm that demonstrates the feasibility of this approach. Implementing vital sign monitoring as a stand-alone technology or in conjunction with other ingestible devices has the capacity to significantly aid telemedicine, optimize performance monitoring of athletes, military service members, and first-responders, as well as provide a facile method for rapid clinical evaluation and triage.

  11. Neuropeptides in Lower Urinary Tract (LUT) Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arms, Lauren; Vizzard, Margaret A.

    2014-01-01

    Numerous neuropeptide/receptor systems including vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide, substance P, neurokinin A, bradykinin, and endothelin-1 are expressed in the lower urinary tract (LUT) in both neural and non-neural (e.g., urothelium) components. LUT neuropeptide immunoreactivity is present in afferent and autonomic efferent neurons innervating the bladder and urethra and in the urothelium of the urinary bladder. Neuropeptides have tissue-specific distributions and functions in the LUT and exhibit neuroplastic changes in expression and function with LUT dysfunction following neural injury, inflammation and disease. LUT dysfunction with abnormal voiding including urinary urgency, increased voiding frequency, nocturia, urinary incontinence and pain may reflect a change in the balance of neuropeptides in bladder reflex pathways. LUT neuropeptide/receptor systems may represent potential targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21290237

  12. Vocal tract dynamics in an adult stutterer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley Wolk

    1981-11-01

    Full Text Available The present study was motivated by the clinical observation of "laryngeal spasms" during dysfluency in an adult female  stutterer. The flexible fiberoptic nasolaryngoscope was employed in an attempt to assess this phenomenon objectively. Findings from fiberscopic and spectrographic investigations provided evidence for a disturbance in laryngeal behaviour, and in turn served to determine the nature of the treatment programme. Asymmetry of the vocal folds  and partial abductory laryngeal behaviour, reflecting  a conflict between adductory and abductory forces, characterized the dysfluency  in this patient. A subjective evaluation after treatment revealed a reduction in both severity and frequency of stuttering behaviour. Furthermore, fiberscopic examination carried out after treatment revealed an absence of the laryngeal disturbances noted previously. Results are considered in terms of vocal tract dynamics in stuttering and its clinical applicability.

  13. [Upper respiratory tract infections and sports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffi El Amari, Emmanuelle

    2010-08-11

    Upper respiratory tract infections are frequent in athletes. Mainly of viral origin, they are treated symptomatically. Infectious mononucleosis is associated with an estimated 2% per hundred risk of splenic rupture, which occurs between day four and twenty one of the illness. Therefore return to play guidelines recommend avoiding, exercice during the first twenty one days. Physical exercise seems to influence the immune system, depending on the intensity and length of it. But the relationship between physical exercise and risk of infections remains controversial: some articles showing an increase in risk, whereas others suggesting a certain degree of protection, in athletes. The actual generally accepted working theory is the J-curve proposed by Nieman. This model remains to be formally proven.

  14. Corrosive injuries of the upper gastrointestinal tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babu Lal Meena

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Corrosive injury of the upper gastrointestinal tract is a worldwide clinical problem, mostly occurring in children. Alkaline agents produce deeper injuries whereas acidic agents produce superficial injuries usually. Hoarseness, stridor, and respiratory distress indicate airway injury. Dysphagia, odynophagia, and drooling of saliva suggest esophageal injury whereas abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting are indicative of stomach injury. X-rays should be done to rule out perforation. Endoscopy is usually recommended in the first 12–48 h although it is safe up to 96 h after caustic ingestion. Endoscopy should be performed with caution and gentle insufflation. Initial management includes getting intravenous access and replacement of fluids. Hyperemia and superficial ulcerations have excellent recovery while deeper injuries require total parenteral nutrition or feeding jejunostomy. Patients suspected of perforation should be subjected to laparotomy. Common complications after corrosive injury are esophageal stricture, gastric outlet obstruction, and development of esophageal and gastric carcinoma.

  15. Actinide absorption from the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, M.F.

    1981-01-01

    A summary of our research is presented, describing the importance of the animal species, route of entry, oxidation state, solubility, and organic binding on the absorption of actinides from the gastrointestinal tract. The animal species tested made little difference in absorption, nor was the oxidation state a major factor in plutonium absorption under nonfasting conditions. The organic binding of actinides to either plant or animal tissues resulted in a 2- to 4-fold increase, except for 237 Np, which caused a 10-fold decrease. The age of the animals was the major influence on absorption. In all species studied, neonates absorbed more actinide than did the adults by two or three orders of magnitude. Retention of the actinide in the intestinal mucosa of rats and swine amounted to about half the dose of 238 Pu-nitrate administered; both after gavage and inhalation

  16. Targeted therapy for biliary tract cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Jason E; Zhu, Andrew X

    2012-07-01

    Biliary tract cancers (BTCs) are a heterogeneous group of malignancies, with a historically poor prognosis as a whole. Until recently, the development of effective therapeutics was hampered by the relatively low incidence, heterogeneity in patients and tumors, and correspondingly poor clinical trial enrollments. With the publication of the landmark phase III ABC-02 trial demonstrating the superiority of gemcitabine and cisplatin combination chemotherapy, the landscape changed for the development of new agents. Despite this progress, there are currently no approved targeted agents for BTC. This review will focus on recent developments in targeted therapeutics, directed against several key signaling pathways in BTC, including epidermal growth factor receptor, angiogenesis, and the mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. Data from recent phase I and II trials will be discussed, along with a preview of upcoming trials involving targeted therapies.

  17. Anatomy and Physiology of the Auditory Tracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad hosein Hekmat Ara

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Hearing is one of the excel sense of human being. Sound waves travel through the medium of air and enter the ear canal and then hit the tympanic membrane. Middle ear transfer almost 60-80% of this mechanical energy to the inner ear by means of “impedance matching”. Then, the sound energy changes to traveling wave and is transferred based on its specific frequency and stimulates organ of corti. Receptors in this organ and their synapses transform mechanical waves to the neural waves and transfer them to the brain. The central nervous system tract of conducting the auditory signals in the auditory cortex will be explained here briefly.

  18. Prion Diseases and the Gastrointestinal Tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwynivere A Davies

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The gastrointestinal (GI tract plays a central role in the pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. These are human and animal diseases that include bovine spongiform encephalopathy, scrapie and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. They are uniformly fatal neurological diseases, which are characterized by ataxia and vacuolation in the central nervous system. Alhough they are known to be caused by the conversion of normal cellular prion protein to its infectious conformational isoform (PrPsc the process by which this isoform is propagated and transported to the brain remains poorly understood. M cells, dendritic cells and possibly enteroendocrine cells are important in the movement of infectious prions across the GI epithelium. From there, PrPsc propagation requires B lymphocytes, dendritic cells and follicular dendritic cells of Peyer’s patches. The early accumulation of the disease-causing agent in the plexuses of the enteric nervous system supports the contention that the autonomic nervous system is important in disease transmission. This is further supported by the presence of PrPsc in the ganglia of the parasympathetic and sympathetic nerves that innervate the GI tract. Additionally, the lymphoreticular system has been implicated as the route of transmission from the gut to the brain. Although normal cellular prion protein is found in the enteric nervous system, its role has not been characterized. Further research is required to understand how the cellular components of the gut wall interact to propagate and transmit infectious prions to develop potential therapies that may prevent the progression of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies.

  19. The gastrointestinal tract microbiome, probiotics, and mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitetta, Luis; Bambling, Matthew; Alford, Hollie

    2014-12-01

    Mental health is closely linked to physical health. Depression (e.g., major depression) is highly prevalent worldwide and a major cause of disability. In a subgroup with treatment-resistant depression, standard pharmacotherapy interventions provide small if any incremental improvement in patient outcomes and may also require the application of an alternate approach. Therefore, in addition to the standard pharmacotherapies prescribed, patients will also be advised on the benefits of psychological counseling, electroconvulsive therapy, and transcranial magnetic stimulation or increasing physical activity and reducing harmful substance consumption. Numerous nutraceuticals have a beneficial role in treatment-resistant depression and include, herbal medicines of which Hypericum perforatum is the best studied, omega-3 fatty acid preparations, S-Adenosyl-L-Methionine (SAMe), various mineral formulations (e.g., magnesium) and folate (singly or in combination with B group vitamins) are prescribed to a lesser extent. Furthermore, a largely neglected area of research activity has been the role of live probiotic cultures that contribute to repairing dysbiosis (a leaky gut barrier abnormality) in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). In this commentary, we build a hypothesis that in addition suggests that GIT metabolites that are elaborated by the microbiome cohort may provide novel and significant avenues for efficacious therapeutic interventions for mood disorders. We posit that the microbiome in the gastrointestinal tract is implicit as an important participant for the amelioration of adverse mood conditions via the diverse metabolic activities provided by live beneficial bacteria (probiotics) as an active adjuvant treatment. This activity is in part triggered by a controlled release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and hence further questions the antioxidant/oxidative stress postulate.

  20. Urinary tract infections in the geriatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpay, Yesim; Aykin, Nevil; Korkmaz, Pinar; Gulduren, Hakki Mustafa; Caglan, Figen Cevik

    2018-01-01

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are the second most common infection in geriatric population. This study investigated clinical findings, diagnostic approaches, complicating factors, prognosis, causative microorganisms and antimicrobial susceptibility in geriatric patients diagnosed with UTI. A total of 140 hospitalised patients with UTIs were evaluated within three years between January 2011-January 2015 at the Eskisehir Yunus Emre State Hospital. UTI diagnosed when there were systemic and urinary signs and symptoms and a positive dipstick test and urine culture result, leukocyte and CRP like serum parameters. Among the studied patients, 41.4% had urological diseases, 20.7% had diabetes mellitus and 19.2% had neurological diseases. The most common symptoms and signs were fever, dysuria nausea/vomiting, general condition impairment, pyuria, haematuria. The laboratory values for CRP, ESR and leukocyte count were 84 mg/dL, 56 mm/s and 11.9 (10^3μL), with mean values being determined. Among patients having a urinary catheter (17.1%), 27.9% had a history of UTI, while 29.3% had been hospitalised. Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae were the most commonly identified microorganisms. The mean duration for hospitalisation was 7.6 days, while a 5% mortality rate was observed over the course of the disease. Because of the potential for serious complications and mortality, elderly patients with urinary tract infection, should receive immediate empirical treatment based on anamnesis, clinical evaluation and urinalysis and should be re-examined using results from cultures and antibiograms upon follow-up.

  1. Urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigil, Humberto R.

    2016-01-01

    There is a high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract function. This results in significant morbidity and health care utilization. Multiple well-established risk factors unique to a neurogenic bladder (NB) exist while others require ongoing investigation. It is important for care providers to have a good understanding of the different structural, physiological, immunological and catheter-related risk factors so that they may be modified when possible. Diagnosis remains complicated. Appropriate specimen collection is of paramount importance and a UTI cannot be diagnosed based on urinalysis or clinical presentation alone. A culture result with a bacterial concentration of ≥103 CFU/mL in combination with symptoms represents an acceptable definition for UTI diagnosis in NB patients. Cystoscopy, ultrasound and urodynamics should be utilized for the evaluation of recurrent infections in NB patients. An acute, symptomatic UTI should be treated with antibiotics for 5–14 days depending on the severity of the presentation. Antibiotic selection should be based on local and patient-based resistance patterns and the spectrum should be as narrow as possible if there are no concerns regarding urosepsis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) should not be treated because of rising resistance patterns and lack of clinical efficacy. The most important preventative measures include closed catheter drainage in patients with an indwelling catheter and the use of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) over other methods of bladder management if possible. The use of hydrophilic or impregnated catheters is not recommended. Intravesical Botox, bacterial interference and sacral neuromodulation show significant promise for the prevention of UTIs in higher risk NB patients and future, multi-center, randomized controlled trials are required. PMID:26904414

  2. Urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigil, Humberto R; Hickling, Duane R

    2016-02-01

    There is a high incidence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in patients with neurogenic lower urinary tract function. This results in significant morbidity and health care utilization. Multiple well-established risk factors unique to a neurogenic bladder (NB) exist while others require ongoing investigation. It is important for care providers to have a good understanding of the different structural, physiological, immunological and catheter-related risk factors so that they may be modified when possible. Diagnosis remains complicated. Appropriate specimen collection is of paramount importance and a UTI cannot be diagnosed based on urinalysis or clinical presentation alone. A culture result with a bacterial concentration of ≥10(3) CFU/mL in combination with symptoms represents an acceptable definition for UTI diagnosis in NB patients. Cystoscopy, ultrasound and urodynamics should be utilized for the evaluation of recurrent infections in NB patients. An acute, symptomatic UTI should be treated with antibiotics for 5-14 days depending on the severity of the presentation. Antibiotic selection should be based on local and patient-based resistance patterns and the spectrum should be as narrow as possible if there are no concerns regarding urosepsis. Asymptomatic bacteriuria (AB) should not be treated because of rising resistance patterns and lack of clinical efficacy. The most important preventative measures include closed catheter drainage in patients with an indwelling catheter and the use of clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) over other methods of bladder management if possible. The use of hydrophilic or impregnated catheters is not recommended. Intravesical Botox, bacterial interference and sacral neuromodulation show significant promise for the prevention of UTIs in higher risk NB patients and future, multi-center, randomized controlled trials are required.

  3. Nuclear weapons headed for the trash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arkin, W.M.; Durrant, D.; Kristensen, H.

    1991-01-01

    Whether he intended it or not, Bush has taken steps that mean the beginning of the end for nuclear weapons. His proposals significantly reduce the numbers of nuclear weapons and the burdens associated with deploying and controlling them. And although he retains many of the options for continuing and regenerating the nuclear arsenal, he has exposed the fact that there are no longer any grand justifications or doctrinal needs for nuclear weapons - and that the nuclear machine is choking on its economic, political, environmental, and human contradictions. The initiatives fundamentally altered the nuclear stance of both nations. Yet, as momentous as the changes were, they were set in motion in an almost businesslike manner. Neither leader truly framed the moves as an end to the nuclear age. But they didn't need to. The steps they have taken practically guarantee it

  4. Urinary tract candidiasis in HIV+ patients and sensitivity patterns of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The incidence of Candida urinary tract infections is gradually on the rise and is an important public health problem. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of urinary tract candidiasis (candiduria) in HIV positive patients in Dschang District Hospital and the antifungal susceptibility test of isolates. A total of 285 ...

  5. Molecular characterization of bacterial communities in the human gastrointestinal tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoetendal, E.G.

    2001-01-01

    The human gastrointestinal (GI) tract is a complex ecosystem in which host and microbial cells live in close contact with each other. The microbial community in the human GI tract has an important nutritional and protective function and mainly consists of anaerobic bacteria. After birth,

  6. Cost Analysis of Medications Used in Upper Respiratory Tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To conduct a cost analysis, a narrow cost-utility study, for upper respiratory tract infection medications in University Sans Malaysia's clinics. Methods: Retrospective analysis was done for all medical claims of upper respiratory tract infections in the period 2008 - 2009. The study was done in the clinics under ...

  7. Anatomical studies of the gastrointestinal tract of the striped sand ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was carried out on the gross anatomical, morphometric features and histology of the gastrointestinal tract of the Striped Sand Snake (Psammophis sibilans). Ten snakes (five males and five females) were euthanized and dissected for the study. The gastrointestinal tract appeared as a straight tubular organ from oral ...

  8. Urinary tract infections in women with urogynaecological symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lakeman, Marielle M. E.; Roovers, Jan-Paul W. R.

    2016-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are common in the field of urogynaecology. Women with persistent urinary symptoms seem more likely to have bacteriuria despite negative cultures. In this review, we will give an overview of the recent insights on the relationship between urinary tract infection and

  9. Genital tract morphometry and haematology of male rabbits fed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genital tract morphometry and haematology of male rabbits fed graded levels of cassava leaf meal. ... It was concluded that the inclusion of up to 27% of CLM in bucks' diets is not detrimental to good health and normal reproductive tract development. It is recommended that further studies on the feeding potentials of ...

  10. Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections due to Asymptomatic Colonic Diverticulitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangelos Falidas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Colovesical fistula is a common complication of diverticulitis. Pneumaturia, fecaluria, urinary tract infections, abdominal pain, and dysuria are commonly reported. The authors report a case of colovesical fistula due to asymptomatic diverticulitis, and they emphasize the importance of deeply investigate recurrent urinary tract infection without any bowel symptoms. They also briefly review the literature.

  11. Recurrent Urinary Tract Infections due to Asymptomatic Colonic Diverticulitis

    OpenAIRE

    Falidas, Evangelos; Anyfantakis, Georgios; Boutzouvis, Stavros; Kyriakopoulos, Michail; Mathioulakis, Stavros; Vlachos, Konstantinos; Villias, Constantinos

    2012-01-01

    Colovesical fistula is a common complication of diverticulitis. Pneumaturia, fecaluria, urinary tract infections, abdominal pain, and dysuria are commonly reported. The authors report a case of colovesical fistula due to asymptomatic diverticulitis, and they emphasize the importance of deeply investigate recurrent urinary tract infection without any bowel symptoms. They also briefly review the literature.

  12. Prevalence of Urinary Tract Infections (UTI) in sexually active ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aresearch to investigate the prevalence of urinary tract infections in sexually active women (18 – 41 years) from selected health care centres in Abakaliki was carried out. Attempt was made to fined out the number of treated cases, aetiologic agents and age range with highest incdence o urinary tract infections over the study ...

  13. Contrast media for radiological examination in gastrointestinal tract leakage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.Z. Ginai (Abida)

    1987-01-01

    textabstractThe aim of this investigation has been to find a safe and suitable contrast medium for radiological evaluation of the gastrointestinal tract in cases where leakage outside the GIT can be suspected. Leakage outside the gastro-intestinal tract lumen can occur in many ways eg.,

  14. Urinary Tract Infection In Young Healthy Women Following ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections in outpatient clinical settings globally. Young healthy women are at highest risk of community-acquired UTI. While uncomplicated UTI is not life-threatening, it is associated with high morbidity and treatment costs. The pathogenesis of urinary tract ...

  15. Cranberry for Urinary Tract Infection: From Bench to Bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Sureda, Antoni; Daglia, Maria; Izadi, Morteza; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Urinary tract infections are common infectious diseases which can occur in any part of the urinary tract such as bladder, kidney, ureters, and urethra. They are commonly caused by bacteria that enter through the urethra. Urinary tract infections commonly develop in the bladder and spread to renal tissues. Up to now, there are different antimicrobial agents which have beneficial role on urinary tract infections. However, most of them cause different adverse effects and therefore, much attention has been paid to the search for effective therapeutic agents with negligible adverse effects. Cranberry is known as one of the most important edible plants, which possesses potent antimicrobial effects against the bacteria responsible for urinary tract infections. Growing evidence has shown that cranberry suppresses urinary tract infections and eradicates the bacteria. Therefore, the aim of this study is to critically review the available literature regarding the antimicrobial activities of cranberry against urinary tract infection microorganisms. In addition, we discuss etiology, epidemiology, risk factors, and current drugs of urinary tract infections to provide a more complete picture of this disease.

  16. Childhood urinary tract infection in Benin City: pathogens and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anti-microbial sensitivity pattern of bacterial isolates implicated in urinary tract infection (UTI) amongst children was studied using the disc diffusion method. The prospective study was carried out in 65 children managed for urinary tract infection in the paediatric facilities of the University of Benin Teaching Hospital, Benin ...

  17. Bacterial Uropathogens in Urinary Tract Infection and Antibiotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infections encountered by clinicians in developing countries. Area-specific monitoring studies aimed to gain knowledge about the type of pathogens responsible for urinary tract infections and their resistance patterns may help the clinician to ...

  18. Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection as a Cause of Outpatient Clinic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-03-01

    Mar 1, 2018 ... BACKGROUND: Failure to timely diagnose and treat urinary tract infections is associated with grave long term consequences. The objectives of this study included assessing the proportion and predictors of Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) as a cause of pediatric outpatient department (OPD) visits and ...

  19. Female genital tract cancers in Sagamu, southwest, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To describe pattern of female genital tract cancers seen at Olabisi Onabanjo University Teaching Hospital (OOUTH), Sagamu, Nigeria. Design: This is a retrospective review of all cases of female genital tract cancers managed at the Gynaecology department of OOUTH, Sagamu, Nigeria. Setting: OOUTH is a ...

  20. Antibiotic Sensitivity of Bacterial Pathogens in Urinary Tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibiotic Sensitivity of Bacterial Pathogens in Urinary Tract Infections at Muhimbili National Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. ... Prevalence and sensitivity trends of urinary tract bacterial isolates were determined through a cross sectional retrospective study at Muhimbili National Hospital in Dar es Salaam. Four hundred ...

  1. Biomechanics of the Gastrointestinal Tract in Health and Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Jingbo; Liao, Donghua; Gregersen, Hans

    2010-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract is functionally subjected to dimensional changes. Hence, biomechanical properties such as the stress-strain relationships are of particularly importance. These properties vary along the normal GI tract and remodel in response to growth, aging and disease. The biome...

  2. Incidence of piscine parasites on the gills and gastrointestinal tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Incidence of piscine parasites on the gills and gastrointestinal tract of clarias gariepinus (teugels) at bagauda fish farm, Kkano. ... The aim of this work is to investigate piscine parasites of gills and intestinal tract of Clarias gariepinus. Six hundred and forty five (645) specimens of specie were examined fortnightly for a period ...

  3. Urinary Tract Infections in Children with Primary Nephrotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary Tract Infections in Children with Primary Nephrotic Syndrome and Acute Glomerulonephritis. ... West African Journal of Medicine ... Abstract. BACKGROUND: The occurrence of urinary tract infection (UTI) in children with Nephrotic syndrome (NS) has been widely reported by various workers, but not much has been ...

  4. Foreign bodies of the upper digestive tract in Komfo Anokye ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Foreign bodies of the upper digestive tract in Komfo Anokye teaching hospital. ... Journal of Science and Technology (Ghana) ... the foreign body, the management and the outcome of foreign body impaction in the upper digestive tract, in Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) between January 2007 and December 2012.

  5. Anatomy and histology of the lower urinary tract

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pradidarcheep, Wisuit; Wallner, Christian; Dabhoiwala, Noshir F.; Lamers, Wouter H.

    2011-01-01

    The function of the lower urinary tract is basically storage of urine in the bladder and the at-will periodic evacuation of the stored urine. Urinary incontinence is one of the most common lower urinary tract disorders in adults, but especially in the elderly female. The urethra, its sphincters, and

  6. Visceral pain originating from the upper urinary tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Katja Venborg; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr; Frimodt-Møller, Poul Christian

    2010-01-01

    Pain originating from the upper urinary tract is a common problem and stone colic is one of the most intense pain conditions that can be experienced in the clinic. The pain is difficult to alleviate and often leads to medical attention. In humans, pain mechanisms of the upper urinary tract pain...

  7. Prostate cancer case finding in patients with lower urinary tract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the proportion of patients with Carcinoma of the Prostate in patients presenting with Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms. Methods: This was a four years prospective case finding study of patients aged 50 years and above with Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms (LUTS) in a private hospital in Dar-Es Salaam.

  8. Altered metabolism in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Locasale Jason W

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cancer cells have different metabolic requirements from their normal counterparts. Understanding the consequences of this differential metabolism requires a detailed understanding of glucose metabolism and its relation to energy production in cancer cells. A recent study in BMC Systems Biology by Vasquez et al. developed a mathematical model to assess some features of this altered metabolism. Here, we take a broader look at the regulation of energy metabolism in cancer cells, considering their anabolic as well as catabolic needs. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1752-0509/4/58/

  9. Nuclear lifetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caraca, J.M.G.

    1976-01-01

    The importance of the results obtained in experiments of measurement of lifetimes for a detailed knowledge of nuclear structure is referred. Direct methods of measurement of nuclear lifetimes are described, namely, electronic methods, recoil-distance method, doppler shift atenuation method and blocking-method. A brief reference is made to indirect methods for measurement of life-times

  10. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This brochure is intended as a contribution to a better and more general understanding of one of the most urgent problems of present society. Emphasis is laid on three issues that are always raised in the nuclear debate: 1) Fuel cycle, 2) environmental effects of nuclear power plants, 3) waste disposal problems. (GL) [de

  11. Nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    This book reviews the accomplishments, operations, and problems faced by the defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. Specifically, it discusses the recommendations that the Safety Board made to improve safety and health conditions at the Department of Energy's defense nuclear facilities, problems the Safety Board has encountered in hiring technical staff, and management problems that could affect the Safety Board's independence and credibility

  12. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, J.G.

    1984-01-01

    The achievements in commercial nuclear power plants over the past 30 years since the first one was commissioned in 1954 are described. By 1982 there were 297 commercial nuclear units in operation world-wide with a capacity of 173GWe and a further 216 units (205GWe) were under construction. The number and performance of the different types of reactors is examined and the experience in different countries is considered. In particular, nuclear power in France and the USA are compared. Uranium production and demand and the attitude to fuel reprocessing in different countries is considered. It is concluded that with increasing demands for energy, nuclear power must be developed to the full. If the conditions are right it can be the most economically advantageous method of energy production. However public acceptance of nuclear power must be sought as this influences the political will for a nuclear power programme. Winning the public's trust and confidence is thus an important part of the nuclear industry's job. The future place of nuclear power in the developing countries is also an issue which must be tackled. (U.K.)

  13. Nuclear violence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mullen, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    A great deal of attention has been paid in the past decade or so to the characteristics of terrorists and their apparent goals and objectives, capabilities, and evolving strategy and tactics with respect to nuclear terrorism. In contrast, little has been said about the procedural aspects of nuclear terrorism, and even less about the way in which such endeavors can fail. This latter omission is important because it bears directly on the ability to evaluate credibly the potential for nuclear terrorism. Here, the author addresses the requirements inherent in acquiring a nuclear explosive capability by three routes: separation of plutonium from irradiated light or heavy water reactor (LWR or HWR) fuel, processing, or use of separated fissile material, and theft of a nuclear weapon. In addition, he deals with other potential acts of nuclear terrorism: sabotage of power reactors, uranium enrichment facilities and spent nuclear fuel in transport, and dispersal of radioactive materials, in particular, plutonium. He specifically does not look at the design or production of a nuclear weapon. Finally, the discussion here assumes that the terrorist is subnational; that is, a nation is not involved. Also, the discussion of subnational participation does not address the possibility of collusion with insiders

  14. Nuclear pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramade, Francois

    1979-01-01

    In this chapter devoted to nuclear pollution the following topics were studied: fundamentals of radiobiology (ecological importance of the various radioisotopes, biological effects of ionizing radiations); ecological effects of radioactive fallout (contamination of atmosphere, terrestrial ecosystems, oceans). The electronuclear industry and its environmental impact. PWR type reactors, fuel reprocessing plants, contamination of trophic chains by radionuclides released in the environment from nuclear installations [fr

  15. Nuclear installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This document presents the fulfilling of the Brazilian obligations under the Convention on Nuclear Safety. The Chapter 2 of the document contains some details about the existing Brazilian nuclear installations. Also, safety improvements at Angra 1 and aspects of Angra 2 and 3 are reported

  16. Nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Khalik Wood

    2003-01-01

    This chapter discuss on nuclear power and its advantages. The concept of nucleus fission, fusion, electric generation are discussed in this chapter. Nuclear power has big potential to become alternative energy to substitute current conventional energy from coal, oil and gas

  17. Nuclear facts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The subject is discussed as follows: the case for using nuclear energy (Britain's energy needs; energy policy); safety; transport of spent fuel; radiation (natural radioactivity); environment (land use of nuclear power plants; storage and disposal of radioactive wastes). (U.K.)

  18. Value of Ultrasound in Detecting Urinary Tract Anomalies After First Febrile Urinary Tract Infection in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobrial, Emad E; Abdelaziz, Doaa M; Sheba, Maha F; Abdel-Azeem, Yasser S

    2016-05-01

    Background Urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection that affects part of the urinary tract. Ultrasound is a noninvasive test that can demonstrate the size and shape of kidneys, presence of dilatation of the ureters, and the existence of anatomic abnormalities. The aim of the study is to estimate the value of ultrasound in detecting urinary tract anomalies after first attack of UTI. Methods This study was conducted at the Nephrology Clinic, New Children's Hospital, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, from August 2012 to March 2013, and included 30 children who presented with first attack of acute febrile UTI. All patients were subjected to urine analysis, urine culture and sensitivity, serum creatinine, complete blood count, and imaging in the form of renal ultrasound, voiding cysto-urethrography, and renal scan. Results All the patients had fever with a mean of 38.96°C ± 0.44°C and the mean duration of illness was 6.23 ± 5.64 days. Nineteen patients (63.3%) had an ultrasound abnormality. The commonest abnormalities were kidney stones (15.8%). Only 2 patients who had abnormal ultrasound had also vesicoureteric reflux on cystourethrography. Sensitivity of ultrasound was 66.7%, specificity was 37.5%, positive predictive value was 21.1%, negative predictive value was 81.8%, and total accuracy was 43.33%. Conclusion We concluded that ultrasound alone was not of much value in diagnosing and putting a plan of first attack of febrile UTI. It is recommended that combined investigations are the best way to confirm diagnosis of urinary tract anomalies. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. The innate immune response during urinary tract infection and pyelonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John David; Schwaderer, Andrew L; Becknell, Brian; Watson, Joshua; Hains, David S

    2014-07-01

    Despite its proximity to the fecal flora, the urinary tract is considered sterile. The precise mechanisms by which the urinary tract maintains sterility are not well understood. Host immune responses are critically important in the antimicrobial defense of the urinary tract. During recent years, considerable advances have been made in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying immune homeostasis of the kidney and urinary tract. Dysfunctions in these immune mechanisms may result in acute disease, tissue destruction and overwhelming infection. The objective of this review is to provide an overview of the innate immune response in the urinary tract in response to microbial assault. In doing so, we focus on the role of antimicrobial peptides-a ubiquitous component of the innate immune response.

  20. Dependence of paracentric inversion rate on tract length

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    York, Thomas L; Durrett, Rick; Nielsen, Rasmus

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We develop a Bayesian method based on MCMC for estimating the relative rates of pericentric and paracentric inversions from marker data from two species. The method also allows estimation of the distribution of inversion tract lengths. RESULTS: We apply the method to data from...... Drosophila melanogaster and D. yakuba. We find that pericentric inversions occur at a much lower rate compared to paracentric inversions. The average paracentric inversion tract length is approx. 4.8 Mb with small inversions being more frequent than large inversions.If the two breakpoints defining...... a paracentric inversion tract are uniformly and independently distributed over chromosome arms there will be more short tract-length inversions than long; we find an even greater preponderance of short tract lengths than this would predict. Thus there appears to be a correlation between the positions...

  1. Experience of MR urography for urinary tract obstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, Hirofumi; Yamane, Akifumi; Wataru, Shodo

    1998-01-01

    Recently the diagnostic technique of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has developed rapidly, becoming one of the most effective methods of diagnosis, for urological disease, apart from ultrasonography (US) and computed tomography (CT). Nine patients with urinary tract obstruction were examined with a modified, heavily T2-weighted fast spine-echo pulse sequence (MR urography) between October, 1995, and August, 1997. Without the use of contrast medium we were able to discern urinary tract obstruction which could not be discerned by intravenous pyelography (IVP) or retrograde pyelography (RP). In conclusion, MR urography is able to provide fine details whilst reflecting renal function in cases of urinary tract obstruction which IVP and RP can not, for example a decrease in renal function, large prostatic hypertrophy, gross hematuria, lower ureteral tract disease, urinary diversion and urinary tract obstruction in children. (author)

  2. Alterations of the visual pathways in congenital blindness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ptito, Maurice; Schneider, Fabien C G; Paulson, Olaf B

    2008-01-01

    We used whole brain MRI voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to study the anatomical organization of the visual system in congenitally blind (CB) adults. Eleven CB without a history of visual perception were compared with 21 age- and sex-matched normal-sighted controls (NS). CB showed significant atrophy...... of the geniculo-striate system, encompassing the optic nerves, the optic chiasm, the optic radiations and the primary visual cortex (BA17). The volume decrease in BA17 reached 25% in both hemispheres. The pulvinar and its projections to the associative visual areas were also dramatically altered, BA18....../19 and the middle temporal cortex (MT) showing volume reductions of up to 20%. Additional significant white matter alterations were observed in the inferior longitudinal tract and in the posterior part of the corpus callosum, which links the visual areas of both hemispheres. Our data indicate that the afferent...

  3. Nuclear proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stencel, S.

    1978-01-01

    The terms and reactions to President Carter's nuclear policy, culminating in the 1978 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act, are reviewed and analyzed. The new law increases restrictions on nuclear exports, encourages continued use of light water reactors in preference to plutonium-fueled reactors, and emphasizes technical solutions to proliferation problems. Critics of the law point out that it will hurt U.S. trade unfairly, that other countries do not have as many fuel options as the U.S. has, and that nuclear sales have as many political and economic as technical solutions. Compromise areas include new international safety guidelines, the possibility of an international nuclear fuel bank, and a willingness to consider each case on its merits. 21 references

  4. Nuclear haematology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masjhur, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear techniques have been applied to study diagnose and treat various haematological disorders for more than five decades. Two scientists are regarded as pioneers in this field, i.e. John Lawrence who in 1938 used 32 P to treat chronic myeloid leukaemia and George Hevessy who used 32 P labelled erythrocytes to measure blood volume in 1939. At present, many nuclear medicine procedures are available for diagnosis and therapy of a variety of haematological disorders. Although nuclear techniques are somewhat complex, they give direct and quantitative assessment of the kinetics of blood elements as compared to other non-isotopic haematological tests. Basically, equipment required for nuclear haematology is very simple such as well scintillation counters to measure radioactivity in blood samples. More sophisticated equipment like rectilinear scanner or gamma camera is required when imaging is necessary. An overview of the basic principles and clinical applications of nuclear haematology is given

  5. Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    In this short paper it has only been possible to deal in a rather general way with the standards of safety used in the UK nuclear industry. The record of the industry extending over at least twenty years is impressive and, indeed, unique. No other industry has been so painstaking in protection of its workers and in its avoidance of damage to the environment. Headings are: introduction; how a nuclear power station works; radiation and its effects (including reference to ICRP, the UK National Radiological Protection Board, and safety standards); typical radiation doses (natural radiation, therapy, nuclear power programme and other sources); safety of nuclear reactors - design; key questions (matters of concern which arise in the public mind); safety of operators; safety of people in the vicinity of a nuclear power station; safety of the general public; safety bodies. (U.K.)

  6. Ocean acidification refugia of the Florida Reef Tract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek P Manzello

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification (OA is expected to reduce the calcification rates of marine organisms, yet we have little understanding of how OA will manifest within dynamic, real-world systems. Natural CO(2, alkalinity, and salinity gradients can significantly alter local carbonate chemistry, and thereby create a range of susceptibility for different ecosystems to OA. As such, there is a need to characterize this natural variability of seawater carbonate chemistry, especially within coastal ecosystems. Since 2009, carbonate chemistry data have been collected on the Florida Reef Tract (FRT. During periods of heightened productivity, there is a net uptake of total CO(2 (TCO(2 which increases aragonite saturation state (Ω(arag values on inshore patch reefs of the upper FRT. These waters can exhibit greater Ω(arag than what has been modeled for the tropical surface ocean during preindustrial times, with mean (± std. error Ω(arag-values in spring = 4.69 (±0.101. Conversely, Ω(arag-values on offshore reefs generally represent oceanic carbonate chemistries consistent with present day tropical surface ocean conditions. This gradient is opposite from what has been reported for other reef environments. We hypothesize this pattern is caused by the photosynthetic uptake of TCO(2 mainly by seagrasses and, to a lesser extent, macroalgae in the inshore waters of the FRT. These inshore reef habitats are therefore potential acidification refugia that are defined not only in a spatial sense, but also in time; coinciding with seasonal productivity dynamics. Coral reefs located within or immediately downstream of seagrass beds may find refuge from OA.

  7. Ocean Acidification Refugia of the Florida Reef Tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzello, Derek P.; Enochs, Ian C.; Melo, Nelson; Gledhill, Dwight K.; Johns, Elizabeth M.

    2012-01-01

    Ocean acidification (OA) is expected to reduce the calcification rates of marine organisms, yet we have little understanding of how OA will manifest within dynamic, real-world systems. Natural CO2, alkalinity, and salinity gradients can significantly alter local carbonate chemistry, and thereby create a range of susceptibility for different ecosystems to OA. As such, there is a need to characterize this natural variability of seawater carbonate chemistry, especially within coastal ecosystems. Since 2009, carbonate chemistry data have been collected on the Florida Reef Tract (FRT). During periods of heightened productivity, there is a net uptake of total CO2 (TCO2) which increases aragonite saturation state (Ωarag) values on inshore patch reefs of the upper FRT. These waters can exhibit greater Ωarag than what has been modeled for the tropical surface ocean during preindustrial times, with mean (± std. error) Ωarag-values in spring = 4.69 (±0.101). Conversely, Ωarag-values on offshore reefs generally represent oceanic carbonate chemistries consistent with present day tropical surface ocean conditions. This gradient is opposite from what has been reported for other reef environments. We hypothesize this pattern is caused by the photosynthetic uptake of TCO2 mainly by seagrasses and, to a lesser extent, macroalgae in the inshore waters of the FRT. These inshore reef habitats are therefore potential acidification refugia that are defined not only in a spatial sense, but also in time; coinciding with seasonal productivity dynamics. Coral reefs located within or immediately downstream of seagrass beds may find refuge from OA. PMID:22848575

  8. Lower urinary tract dysfunction in patients with functional movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batla, Amit; Pareés, Isabel; Edwards, Mark J; Stamelou, Maria; Bhatia, Kailash P; Panicker, Jalesh N

    2016-02-15

    Functional movement disorders (FMD) are not associated with the kind of structural or biochemical alterations seen in other movement disorders and therefore would be unlikely to be associated with lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction. However, LUT symptoms have been observed in patients with FMD. To evaluate the frequency and pattern of LUT symptoms, their possible nature and the impact they have on the quality of life of patients with FMD. The clinical records of patients with FMD were reviewed retrospectively and patients reporting LUT symptoms were invited to complete standardised validated questionnaires-Urinary Symptom Profile (USP) and Short Form-Qualiveen (SFQ). Management of LUT dysfunction was also reviewed. Out of the 150 patients with clinically established (n=97) or probable (n=53) FMDs, thirty (20%) self-reported LUT symptoms. Twenty two of these completed the USP and SFQ questionnaires. Overactive bladder symptoms were most commonly reported (n=14; 63.6%). Patients with fixed dystonia reported more severe LUT symptoms and had higher SFQ scores as compared to patients with other FMDs (p=0.01). Five patients with significant LUT symptoms had been referred to uroneurology. Of them, three had urinary retention managed with sacral neuromodulation, two had overactive bladder and were managed conservatively. LUT dysfunction can be seen in 20% patients with FMD. Patients with fixed dystonia are more likely to report LUT dysfunction which can be severe. It may be advisable to ask for LUT symptoms in all patients with FMD and be more proactive in referring them for specialist investigation and treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Prevalence of upper urinary tract anomalies in hospitalized premature infants with urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachharajani, A; Vricella, G J; Najaf, T; Coplen, D E

    2015-05-01

    The 2011 American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) guidelines address imaging after initial febrile urinary tract infection (UTI) in infants >2 months of age. We sought to determine the frequency of upper urinary tract anomalies (hydronephrosis and vesicoureteral reflux (VUR)) in hospitalized premature infants with UTI. We retrospectively reviewed the electronic medical records of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admissions at a tertiary care children's hospital between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2010. We queried the records for UTI, renal ultrasound (US) and voiding cystourethrogram (VCUG). We identified 3518 unique admissions. UTI occurred in 118 infants (3%). Sixty-nine (60%) had a normal US. Renal dilation was predominantly renal pelvic dilation (12%) and isolated caliectasis (22%). VUR was identified in 15 (14%) infants evaluated with a VCUG. VUR was identified in nine (12%) infants without and in seven (16%) with an abnormality on US. Reflux was identified in 7% of male and 38% of female infants with a UTI. Anatomic abnormalities of the upper urinary tract are uncommon in premature infants with a UTI that occurs during neonatal hospitalization. In concordance with the AAP guidelines, a VCUG may not be required in all NICU infants under age 2 months after a single UTI.

  10. Cutaneous sinus tracts (or emerging sinus tracts of odontogenic origin: a report of 3 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald S Brown

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Ronald S Brown1, Robert Jones2, Tawana Feimster3, Frances E Sam21Department of Oral Diagnostic Services, Howard University College of Dentistry, Washington, DC, USA; 2Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Howard University College of Dentistry, Washington, DC, USA; 3Department of Endodontics, Howard University College of Dentistry, Washington, DC, USAAbstract: Three cases are presented in which patients presented with either cutaneous swelling or cutaneous sinus tracts of odontogenic origin. A cutaneous sinus tract of odontogenic origin is a pathway through the alveolar bone that typically begins at the apex of an infected tooth or of an infected portion of the dental alveolus and empties infected material (pus through the skin. Where as the more common finding of an oral fistula is a pathway from the apical periodontal area of a tooth to the surface of the oral mucous membrane, permitting the discharge of suppurative material. Diagnosis, etiology and treatment are discussed with reference to patient history, clinical examinations, imaging, and treatment perspectives.Keywords: dental abscess, fistula, cutaneous sinus tract, odotogenic infection

  11. MR evaluation of wallerian degeneration of the pyramidal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imai, Shun; Sone, Shusuke; Sakai, Fumikazu; Aoki, Jun; Kasuga, Toshio; Oguchi, Kazuhiro (Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Tanizaki, Yoshio; Miyatake, Masaki; Ooki, Hiroyuki

    1991-04-01

    This study is based on 135 magnetic resonance (MR) examinations of 110 patients with wallerian degeneration of the pyramidal tract shown on MR images acquired on a mid field imaging scanner. The MR findings of wallerian degeneration were abnormal signal band along the course of the pyramidal tract and ipsilateral brain stem shrinkage. In all 110 cases an abnormal signal band was seen on T2-weighted spin-echo images, that is, a hypointense band in four examinations between 30 days and 116 days after onset of symptoms, and hyperintense band in 122 examinations. The hyperintense signal on T2-weighted images was shown in most cases after 200 days from the onset. In one case a signal of the pyramidal tract showed a hyperintense band at 7 days, hypointense at 30 days, and hyperintense again at 123 days after onset. Sequential MR examinations of another case showed gradual narrowing of the hyperintense signal band and progression of the ipsilateral brainstem shrinkage. The narrowing of the pyramidal tract and the ipsilateral brain stem shrinkage tended to be shown after 6 months from onset. MR findings of wallerian degeneration of the pyramidal tract may be divided into the following four stages; (1) pyramidal tract is isointense or occasionally hyperintense on T2-weighted images within about 1 month from onset, (2) pyramidal tract is hypointense on T2-weighted images between about 1 to 3 months, (3) pyramidal tract is hyperintense on T2-weighted images and no pyramidal tract narrowing or brain stem shrinkage is shown after about 3 months from onset, and (4) narrowing of the pyramidal tract and ipsilateral brain stem shrinkage are evident after 6 months. (author).

  12. Nuclear questions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durrani, M. [Physics World (United Kingdom)

    2006-01-01

    The future of nuclear power has returned to centre stage. Freezing weather on both sides of the Atlantic and last month's climate-change talks in Montreal have helped to put energy and the future of nuclear power right back on the political agenda. The issue is particularly pressing for those countries where existing nuclear stations are reaching the end of their lives. In the UK, prime minister Tony Blair has commissioned a review of energy, with a view to deciding later this year whether to build new nuclear power plants. The review comes just four years after the Labour government published a White Paper on energy that said the country should keep the nuclear option open but did not follow this up with any concrete action. In Germany, new chancellor and former physicist Angela Merkel is a fan of nuclear energy and had said she would extend the lifetime of its nuclear plants beyond 2020, when they are due to close. However, that commitment has had to be abandoned, at least for the time being, following negotiations with her left-wing coalition partners. The arguments in favour of nuclear power will be familiar to all physicists - it emits almost no carbon dioxide and can play a vital role in maintaining a diverse energy supply. To over-rely on imported supplies of oil and gas can leave a nation hostage to fortune. The arguments against are equally easy to list - the public is scared of nuclear power, it generates dangerous waste with potentially huge clean-up costs, and it is not necessarily cheap. Nuclear plants could also be a target for terrorist attacks. Given political will, many of these problems can be resolved, or at least tackled. China certainly sees the benefits of nuclear power, as does Finland, which is building a new 1600 MW station - the world's most powerful - that is set to open in 2009. Physicists, of course, are essential to such developments. They play a vital role in ensuring the safety of such plants and developing new types of

  13. Pituitary apoplexy with optic tract oedema and haemorrhage in a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenthall, R.; Jaspan, T. [Univ. Hospital Nottingham (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology; Gonugunta, V. [Department of Neurosurgery, Univ. Hospital Nottingham, Queen' s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2001-02-01

    Bilateral optic tract oedema, left optic tract haemorrhage and subarachnoid haemorrhage occurred in a 70-year-old man with pituitary apoplexy associated with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. Left optic tract haemorrhage was confirmed on MRI. (orig.)

  14. Nuclear war and nuclear peace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segal, G.; Moreton, E.; Freedman, L.; Baylis, J.

    1983-01-01

    This book is an in-depth examination of East-West tactical and strategic nuclear weapons policy. The contributors explore such issues as the history and implications of tactical weapons in Europe, the general conflicts that have characterized US and Soviet interaction, the development of British nuclear weapons policy, and arms control including SALT I and II and the START talks.

  15. Altered Development of White Matter in Youth at High Familial Risk for Bipolar Disorder: A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versace, Amelia; Ladouceur, Cecile D.; Romero, Soledad; Birmaher, Boris; Axelson, David A.; Kupfer, David J.; Phillips, Mary L.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To study white matter (WM) development in youth at high familial risk for bipolar disorder (BD). WM alterations are reported in youth and adults with BD. WM undergoes important maturational changes in adolescence. Age-related changes in WM microstructure using diffusion tensor imaging with tract-based spatial statistics in healthy…

  16. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rippon, S.

    1984-01-01

    Do we need nuclear energy. Is it safe. What are the risks. Will it lead to proliferation. The questions are endless, the answers often confused. In the vigorous debates that surround the siting and operation of nuclear power plants, it is all too easy to lose sight of the central issues amid the mass of arguments and counter-arguments put forward. And there remains the doubt, who do we believe. This book presents the facts, simply, straightforwardly, and comprehensibly. It describes the different types of nuclear reactor, how they work, how energy is produced and transformed into usable power, how nuclear waste is handled, what safeguards are built in to prevent accident, contamination and misuse. More important, it does this in the context of the real world, examining the benefits as well as the dangers of a nuclear power programme, quantifying the risks, and providing an authoritative account of the nuclear industry worldwide. Technically complex and politically controversial, the contribution of nuclear energy to our future energy requirements is a crucial topic of our time. (author)

  17. Nuclear inheritance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpech, Therese

    1997-01-01

    Since the end of the East-West confronting, the nuclear weapon issue has been focused in an international debate with obvious repercussions in Europe, because it is the European continent which indicated first the significance of nuclear deterrence. This debate refers first upon the past, as the German unification allowed capturing numerous documents of Warsaw treaty which revealed the intentions and the plans of Soviet Union during the cold war, and secondly concerns the future, since the role of nuclear weapons must be re-thought in a new context. This is the subject of this book, which refers also to the problem of the nuclear proliferation in the world and evolution of different countries in a political and regional context. The extension of the non-proliferation treaty for an undefined duration, in May 1995, is a incontestable victory because this treaty rules the renouncement to nuclear weapons of 185 countries. However, it does not solve most sensible problems like the Iraq case, for which a specific inspection regime has been instituted, or the case of Iran, which is suspected to acquire the bomb, although no clear evidence has been provided up to now. This is also the case of Israel, India and Pakistan which allege plainly their willingness of keeping open, from security reasons, their nuclear option. The content is displayed in five chapters: 1. Introduction; 2. The role of the nuclear weapons after the cold war; 3. The nuclear proliferation at crossroads; 4. Undefined extension of the NPT, a striking but fragile victory; 5. Conclusions. An appendix containing the text of the Nuclear Weapon Non-Proliferation Treaty and a chronology are added

  18. Rotterdam Nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    In 1965 Rotterdam Nuclear received an order for the design, supply of materials, manufacture, testing, inspection and preparation for shipment of one 450MW Boiling Water Reactor pressure vessel. This was one of the first orders for a reactor pressure vessel, ever obtained by a European Manufacturer. The Company has since supplied 19 reactor pressure vessels for nuclear power stations, having a total weight of about 10,000,000kg. The nuclear power stations in which these are installed represent an electrical output of about 15,000MW and they are located in seven different countries (USA, Spain, Switzerland, Argentina, Sweden, Germany and the Netherlands). (Auth.)

  19. Nuclear questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohlfeld, W.

    1977-01-01

    This brochure 'nuclear problems' deals with the attitude of the protestant church in the region around the northern Elbe towards further quantitative economic growth, esp. nuclear energy, with the following essays: preaching the Gospel in an environment in danger: the Christian occident and the problems of the third world, facing the problems of exhausted supplies, the role of the prophet, problem of environment - a problem of theology, the political dimension, against ATW, signal Brokdorf, strange effects (defense of the church from unqualified teachings by non-professionals), Christian liberty, church and nuclear energy, violence and robes. (HP) [de

  20. Nuclear electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucero B, E.

    1989-01-01

    The rapid technical development of Colombia over the past years, resulted among others, a considerable increase in the number of measuring instrumentation and testing laboratories, scientific research and metrology centers, in industry, agriculture, public health, education on the nuclear field, etc. IAN is a well organized institution with qualified management, trained staff and reasonably equipped laboratories to carry out tasks as: Metrology, standardization, quality control and maintenance and repair of nuclear instruments. The government of Colombia has adopted a policy to establish and operate through the country maintenance and repair facilities for nuclear instrumentation. This policy is reflected in the organization of electronic laboratories in Bogota-IAN

  1. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wethe, Per Ivar

    2009-01-01

    Today we know two forms of nuclear energy: fission and fusion. Fission is the decomposition of heavy nuclei, while fusion is the melting together of light nuclei. Both processes create a large surplus of energy. Technologically, we can currently only use fission to produce energy in today's nuclear power plants, but there is intense research worldwide in order to realize a controlled fusion process. In a practical context, today's nuclear energy is a sustained source of energy since the resource base is virtually unlimited. When fusion technology is realized, the resource supply will be a marginal problem. (AG)

  2. Neural plasticity in the gastrointestinal tract: chronic inflammation, neurotrophic signals, and hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demir, Ihsan Ekin; Schäfer, Karl-Herbert; Tieftrunk, Elke; Friess, Helmut; Ceyhan, Güralp O

    2013-04-01

    Neural plasticity is not only the adaptive response of the central nervous system to learning, structural damage or sensory deprivation, but also an increasingly recognized common feature of the gastrointestinal (GI) nervous system during pathological states. Indeed, nearly all chronic GI disorders exhibit a disease-stage-dependent, structural and functional neuroplasticity. At structural level, GI neuroplasticity usually comprises local tissue hyperinnervation (neural sprouting, neural, and ganglionic hypertrophy) next to hypoinnervated areas, a switch in the neurochemical (neurotransmitter/neuropeptide) code toward preferential expression of neuropeptides which are frequently present in nociceptive neurons (e.g., substance P/SP, calcitonin-gene-related-peptide/CGRP) and of ion channels (TRPV1, TRPA1, PAR2), and concomitant activation of peripheral neural glia. The functional counterpart of these structural alterations is altered neuronal electric activity, leading to organ dysfunction (e.g., impaired motility and secretion), together with reduced sensory thresholds, resulting in hypersensitivity and pain. The present review underlines that neural plasticity in all GI organs, starting from esophagus, stomach, small and large intestine to liver, gallbladder, and pancreas, actually exhibits common phenotypes and mechanisms. Careful appraisal of these GI neuroplastic alterations reveals that--no matter which etiology, i.e., inflammatory, infectious, neoplastic/malignant, or degenerative--neural plasticity in the GI tract primarily occurs in the presence of chronic tissue- and neuro-inflammation. It seems that studying the abundant trophic and activating signals which are generated during this neuro-immune-crosstalk represents the key to understand the remarkable neuroplasticity of the GI tract.

  3. [Nuclear medicine and radiopharmaceuticals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopena Novales, P; Plancha Mansanet, M C; Martinez Carsi, C; Sopena Monforte, R

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear Medicine is a medical specialty that allows modern diagnostics and treatments using radiopharmaceuticals original radiotracers (drugs linked to a radioactive isotope). In Europe, radiopharmaceuticals are considered a special group of drugs and thus their preparation and use are regulated by a set of policies that have been adopted by individual member countries. The radiopharmaceuticals used in diagnostic examinations are administered in very small doses. So, in general, they have no pharmacological action, side effects or serious adverse reactions. The biggest problem associated with their use are the alterations in their biodistribution that may cause diagnostic errors. Nuclear Medicine is growing considerably influenced by the appearance and development of new radiopharmaceuticals in both the diagnostic and therapeutic fields and primarily to the impact of new multimodality imaging techniques (SPECT-CT, PET-CT, PET-MRI, etc.). It's mandatory to know the limitations of these techniques, distribution and eventual physiological alterations of radiopharmaceuticals, contraindications and adverse reactions of radiological contrasts, and the possible interference of both. Copyright © 2013 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. The effect of hormones on the lower urinary tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Dudley; Toozs-Hobson, Philip; Cardozo, Linda

    2013-12-01

    The female genital and lower urinary tracts share a common embryological origin, arising from the urogenital sinus and both are sensitive to the effects of the female sex steroid hormones throughout life. Estrogen is known to have an important role in the function of the lower urinary tract and estrogen and progesterone receptors have been demonstrated in the vagina, urethra, bladder and pelvic floor musculature. In addition estrogen deficiency occurring following the menopause is known to cause atrophic change and may be associated with lower urinary tract symptoms such as frequency, urgency, nocturia, urgency incontinence and recurrent infection. These may also co-exist with symptoms of urogenital atrophy such as dyspareunia, itching, vaginal burning and dryness. Epidemiological studies have implicated estrogen deficiency in the aetiology of lower urinary tract symptoms with 70% of women relating the onset of urinary incontinence to their final menstrual period. Whilst for many years systemic and vaginal estrogen therapy was felt to be beneficial in the treatment of lower urinary and genital tract symptoms this evidence has recently been challenged by large epidemiological studies investigating the use of systemic hormone replacement therapy as primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease and osteoporosis. The aim of this paper is to examine the effect of the sex hormones, estrogen and progesterone, on the lower urinary tract and to review the current evidence regarding the role of systemic and vaginal estrogens in the management of lower urinary tract symptoms and urogenital atrophy.

  5. Comparative developmental biology of the cardiac inflow tract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona, Rita; Ariza, Laura; Cañete, Ana; Muñoz-Chápuli, Ramón

    2018-03-01

    The vertebrate heart receives the blood through the cardiac inflow tract. This area has experienced profound changes along the evolution of vertebrates; changes that have a reflection in the cardiac ontogeny. The development of the inflow tract involves dynamic changes due to the progressive addition of tissue derived from the secondary heart field. The inflow tract is the site where oxygenated blood coming from lungs is received separately from the systemic return, where the cardiac pacemaker is established and where the proepicardium develops. Differential cell migration towards the inflow tract breaks the symmetry of the primary heart tube and determines the direction of the cardiac looping. In air-breathing vertebrates, an inflow tract reorganization is essential to keep separate blood flows from systemic and pulmonary returns. Finally, the sinus venosus endocardium has recently been recognized as playing a role in the constitution of the coronary vasculature. Due to this developmental complexity, congenital anomalies of the inflow tract can cause severe cardiac diseases. We aimed to review the recent literature on the cellular and molecular mechanisms that regulate the morphogenesis of the cardiac inflow tract, together with comparative and evolutionary details, thus providing a basis for a better understanding of these mechanisms. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Spinal tract pathology in AIDS: postmortem MRI correlation with neuropathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santosh, C.G. [City Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom). MRI Unit; Bell, J.E. [Western General Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom). Neuropathology Lab.; Best, J.J.K. [City Hospital, Edinburgh (United Kingdom). MRI Unit

    1995-02-01

    Vacuolar myelopathy (VM) and tract pallor are poorly understood spinal tract abnormalities in patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). We studied the ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect these changes in spinal cord specimens postmortem and whether criteria could be formulated which would allow these conditions to be differentiated from other lesions of the spinal cord in AIDS, such as lymphoma, cytomegalovirus (CMV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) myelitis. We imaged 38 postmortem specimens of spinal cord. The MRI studies were interpreted blind. The specimens included cases of VM myelin pallor. CMV myeloradiculitis, HIV myelitis, lymphoma as well as normal cords, both HIV+ve and HIV-ve. MRI showed abnormal signal, suggestive of tract pathology, in 10 of the 14 cases with histopathological evidence of tract changes. The findings in VM and tract pallor on proton-density and T{sub 2}-weighted MRI were increased signal from the affected white-matter tracts, present on multiple contiguous slices and symmetrical in most cases. The pattern was sufficiently distinct to differentiate spinal tract pathology from other spinal cord lesions in AIDS. (orig.)

  7. Microflora of hydrobionts digestive tract in Kaunas water storage reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shyvokiene, J.; Mickiene, L.; Mileriene, E.

    1996-01-01

    Microbiological and ichthiological investigations carried out in 1990 and 1992 showed the variability of bacterial cenoses in the digestive tract of hydrobionts before and after setting in motion Kruonis hydro pumped storage. The studies also showed that microorganisms of the digestive tract of the hydrobionts investigated were involved in the degradation of nutritional substrates and could serve as indicators of an anthropogenic effect. Before setting in motion the hydro pumped storage hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria (HDB) were detected in the digestive tract of the freshwater shrimps, opossum shrimps, sticklebacks, zebra mussels and roaches. The greatest number of HDB was found in the digestive tract of the roach while in perches they were not detected. However after setting in motion the hydro pumped storage , high numbers of HDB were determined in the digestive tracts of all the hydrobionts investigated. It has been shown that the function of bacterial digestion is conditioned not only by the nutrition specificity of the macroorganism, but on its environment as well. With the aid of enzymes secreted by microorganisms organic compounds difficult to assimilate are transformed into valuable nutrients. Besides, the functional activity of microorganisms of the digestive tract of the hydrobionts indicate the intensity of the digestive process and physiological state of their organism. Therefore, when investigating fish stocks in hydrosystems one must evaluate inner resources of their organism, i.e. functional activities and the activity of digestive tract microorganisms, their quantitative and qualitative composition, relationship with the macroorganism, its growth rate and environment. (author). 15 refs., 5 tabs

  8. Nuclear microscopy as a tool in TiO2 nanoparticles bioaccumulation studies in aquatic species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinheiro, Teresa; Moita, Liliana; Silva, Luís; Mendonça, Elsa; Picado, Ana

    2013-01-01

    Engineered Titanium nanoparticles are used for a wide range of applications from coatings, sunscreen cosmetic additives to solar cells or water treatment agents. Inevitably environmental exposure can be expected and data on the ecotoxicological evaluation of nanoparticles are still scarce. The potential effects of nanoparticles of titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) on two model organisms, the water flea, Daphnia magna and the duckweed Lemna minor, were examined in semichronic toxicity tests. Daphnia and Lemna were exposed to TiO 2 nanoparticles (average particle size value of 28 ± 11 nm (n = 42); concentration range, 1.4–25 mg/L) by dietary route and growth in medium containing the nanoparticles of TiO 2 , respectively. Both morphology and microdistribution of Ti in the individuals were examined by nuclear microscopy techniques. A significant amount of TiO 2 was found accumulated in Daphnia exposed to nanoparticles. Nuclear microscopy imaging revealed that Ti was localized only in the digestive tract of the Daphnia, which displayed difficulty in eliminating the nanoparticles from their body. Daphnia showed higher mortality when exposed to higher concentrations of TiO 2 (>10 mg/L). The exposure to TiO 2 nanoparticles above 25 mg/L caused morphological alterations in Lemna. The roots became stiff and fronds colorless. The Ti mapping of cross-sections of roots and fronds showed that Ti was mainly deposited in the epidermis of the fronds and roots, with minor internalization. In summary, exposure of aquatic organisms to TiO 2 nanoparticles may alter the physiology of these organisms at individual and population levels, posing risks to aquatic ecosystems

  9. Nuclear microscopy as a tool in TiO2 nanoparticles bioaccumulation studies in aquatic species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Teresa; Moita, Liliana; Silva, Luís; Mendonça, Elsa; Picado, Ana

    2013-07-01

    Engineered Titanium nanoparticles are used for a wide range of applications from coatings, sunscreen cosmetic additives to solar cells or water treatment agents. Inevitably environmental exposure can be expected and data on the ecotoxicological evaluation of nanoparticles are still scarce. The potential effects of nanoparticles of titanium dioxide (TiO2) on two model organisms, the water flea, Daphnia magna and the duckweed Lemna minor, were examined in semichronic toxicity tests. Daphnia and Lemna were exposed to TiO2 nanoparticles (average particle size value of 28 ± 11 nm (n = 42); concentration range, 1.4-25 mg/L) by dietary route and growth in medium containing the nanoparticles of TiO2, respectively. Both morphology and microdistribution of Ti in the individuals were examined by nuclear microscopy techniques. A significant amount of TiO2 was found accumulated in Daphnia exposed to nanoparticles. Nuclear microscopy imaging revealed that Ti was localized only in the digestive tract of the Daphnia, which displayed difficulty in eliminating the nanoparticles from their body. Daphnia showed higher mortality when exposed to higher concentrations of TiO2 (>10 mg/L). The exposure to TiO2 nanoparticles above 25 mg/L caused morphological alterations in Lemna. The roots became stiff and fronds colorless. The Ti mapping of cross-sections of roots and fronds showed that Ti was mainly deposited in the epidermis of the fronds and roots, with minor internalization. In summary, exposure of aquatic organisms to TiO2 nanoparticles may alter the physiology of these organisms at individual and population levels, posing risks to aquatic ecosystems.

  10. Nuclear constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper is written in two tables. The first one describes the different particles (bosons and fermions). The second one gives the isotopes nuclear constants of the different elements, for Z = 1 to 56. (A.L.B.)

  11. Nuclear constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper is written in two tables. The first one describes the different particles (bosons and fermions). The second one gives the isotopes nuclear constants of the different elements, for Z = 56 to 68. (A.L.B.)

  12. Nuclear constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.

    1998-01-01

    This paper is made of two tables. The first table describes the different particles (bosons and fermions) while the second one gives the nuclear constants of isotopes from the different elements with Z = 1 to 25. (J.S.)

  13. Nuclear constants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foos, J.

    1999-01-01

    This paper is written in two tables. The first one describes the different particles (bosons and fermions). The second one gives the isotopes nuclear constants of the different elements, for Z = 56 to 68. (A.L.B.)

  14. Nuclear reaction

    CERN Multimedia

    Penwarden, C

    2001-01-01

    At the European Research Organization for Nuclear Research, Nobel laureates delve into the mysteries of particle physics. But when they invited artists from across the continent to visit their site in Geneva, they wanted a new kind of experiment.

  15. Nuclear Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The Nuclear Engineering Division is engaged in both teaching and research. Staff members teach both graduate and undergraduate courses at the UPR Mayaguez Campus and direct the thesis work of nuclear engineering students. They do research on their own projects and assist the staff of other PRNC divisions as the need arises. The scientists on the Division's staff all hold joint appointments at PRNC and UPR, and they make up the faculty of the UPR Nuclear Engineering Department, the Head of the PRNC Division being also the Chairman of the UPR Department. The Division provides the classrooms, offices, laboratories and equipment, and most of the administrative personnel required for the education and training of the graduate students at the UPR Nuclear Engineering Department

  16. Nuclear honeymoon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Full text: The Australian National University (ANU) and the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) to collaborate across research fields including key accelerator facilities, future energy sources and nuclear non-proliferation. T he potential of this partnership demonstrates the value of Commonwealth institutions working together for the betterment of all Australians,' says ANY vice-chancellor Professor Ian Chubb who believes that both organisations have infrastructure and facilities available that if shared could bring greater benefit to the nation. The partnership will develop a national strategy to coordinate use and development of a heavy-ion accelerator and ion source technology, he says. In addition, it will undertake collaborative activities that enhance educational programs in nuclear physics, nuclear engineering and materials science.

  17. Nuclear shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linares, R.C.; Nienart, L.F.; Toelcke, G.A.

    1976-01-01

    A process is described for preparing melt-processable nuclear shielding compositions from chloro-fluoro substituted ethylene polymers, particularly PCTFE and E-CTFE, containing 1 to 75 percent by weight of a gadolinium compound. 13 claims, no drawings

  18. Nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended in 1987, directed the Secretary of Energy to, among other things, investigate Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as a potential site for permanently disposing of highly radioactive wastes in an underground repository. In April 1991, the authors testified on Yucca Mountain project expenditures before your Subcommittee. Because of the significance of the authors findings regrading DOE's program management and expenditures, you asked the authors to continue reviewing program expenditures in depth. As agreed with your office, the authors reviewed the expenditures of project funds made available to the Department of Energy's (DOE) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, which is the lead project contractor for developing a nuclear waste package that wold be used for disposing of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain. This report discusses the laboratory's use of nuclear waste funds to support independent research projects and to manage Yucca Mountain project activities. It also discusses the laboratory's project contracting practices

  19. Nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarride, Bruno

    2015-10-01

    The author proposes an overview of methods and concepts used in the nuclear industry, at the design level as well as at the exploitation level, to ensure an acceptable safety level, notably in the case of nuclear reactors. He first addresses the general objectives of nuclear safety and the notion of acceptable risk: definition and organisation of nuclear safety (relationships between safety authorities and operators), notion of acceptable risk, deterministic safety approach and main safety principles (safety functions and confinement barriers, concept of defence in depth). Then, the author addresses the safety approach at the design level: studies of operational situations, studies of internal and external aggressions, safety report, design principles for important-for-safety systems (failure criterion, redundancy, failure prevention, safety classification). The next part addresses safety during exploitation and general exploitation rules: definition of the operation domain and of its limits, periodic controls and tests, management in case of incidents, accidents or aggressions

  20. Impact of amoxicillin therapy on resistance selection in patients with community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malhotra-Kumar, Surbhi; Van Heirstraeten, Liesbet; Coenen, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the effect of amoxicillin treatment on resistance selection in patients with community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial. METHODS: Patients were prescribed amoxicillin 1 g, three times daily (n = 52) or placebo (n = 50...... that recommend amoxicillin when an antibiotic is indicated for community-acquired lower respiratory tract infections.......) for 7 days. Oropharyngeal swabs obtained before, within 48 h post-treatment and at 28-35 days were assessed for proportions of amoxicillin-resistant (ARS; amoxicillin MIC ≥2 mg/L) and -non-susceptible (ANS; MIC ≥0.5 mg/L) streptococci. Alterations in amoxicillin MICs and in penicillin...