WorldWideScience

Sample records for track structure simulation

  1. Track-structure simulations for charged particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingfelder, Michael

    2012-11-01

    Monte Carlo track-structure simulations provide a detailed and accurate picture of radiation transport of charged particles through condensed matter of biological interest. Liquid water serves as a surrogate for soft tissue and is used in most Monte Carlo track-structure codes. Basic theories of radiation transport and track-structure simulations are discussed and differences compared to condensed history codes highlighted. Interaction cross sections for electrons, protons, alpha particles, and light and heavy ions are required input data for track-structure simulations. Different calculation methods, including the plane-wave Born approximation, the dielectric theory, and semi-empirical approaches are presented using liquid water as a target. Low-energy electron transport and light ion transport are discussed as areas of special interest.

  2. Online Simulation of Radiation Track Structure Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik

    2015-01-01

    Space radiation comprises protons, helium and high charged and energy (HZE) particles. High-energy particles are a concern for human space flight, because they are no known options for shielding astronauts from them. When these ions interact with matter, they damage molecules and create radiolytic species. The pattern of energy deposition and positions of the radiolytic species, called radiation track structure, is highly dependent on the charge and energy of the ion. The radiolytic species damage biological molecules, which may lead to several long-term health effects such as cancer. Because of the importance of heavy ions, the radiation community is very interested in the interaction of HZE particles with DNA, notably with regards to the track structure. A desktop program named RITRACKS was developed to simulate radiation track structure. The goal of this project is to create a web interface to allow registered internal users to use RITRACKS remotely.

  3. WE-D-BRF-01: FEATURED PRESENTATION - Investigating Particle Track Structures Using Fluorescent Nuclear Track Detectors and Monte Carlo Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowdell, S; Paganetti, H; Schuemann, J; Greilich, S; Zimmerman, F; Evans, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To report on the efforts funded by the AAPM seed funding grant to develop the basis for fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD) based radiobiological experiments in combination with dedicated Monte Carlo simulations (MCS) on the nanometer scale. Methods: Two confocal microscopes were utilized in this study. Two FNTD samples were used to find the optimal microscope settings, one FNTD irradiated with 11.1 MeV/u Gold ions and one irradiated with 428.77 MeV/u Carbon ions. The first sample provided a brightly luminescent central track while the latter is used to test the capabilities to observe secondary electrons. MCS were performed using TOPAS beta9 version, layered on top of Geant4.9.6p02. Two sets of simulations were performed, one with the Geant4-DNA physics list and approximating the FNTDs by water, a second set using the Penelope physics list in a water-approximated FNTD and a aluminum-oxide FNTD. Results: Within the first half of the funding period, we have successfully established readout capabilities of FNTDs at our institute. Due to technical limitations, our microscope setup is significantly different from the approach implemented at the DKFZ, Germany. However, we can clearly reconstruct Carbon tracks in 3D with electron track resolution of 200 nm. A second microscope with superior readout capabilities will be tested in the second half of the funding period, we expect an improvement in signal to background ratio with the same the resolution.We have successfully simulated tracks in FNTDs. The more accurate Geant4-DNA track simulations can be used to reconstruct the track energy from the size and brightness of the observed tracks. Conclusion: We have achieved the goals set in the seed funding proposal: the setup of FNTD readout and simulation capabilities. We will work on improving the readout resolution to validate our MCS track structures down to the nanometer scales

  4. Energy dependent track structure parametrizations for protons and carbon ions based on nano-metric simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frauke, A.; Wilkens, J.J.; Villagrasa, C.; Rabus, H.

    2015-01-01

    The BioQuaRT project within the European Metrology Research Programme aims at correlating ion track structure characteristics with the biological effects of radiation and develops measurement and simulation techniques for determining ion track structure on different length scales from about 2 nm to about 10 μm. Within this framework, we investigate methods to translate track-structure quantities derived on a nanometer scale to macroscopic dimensions. Input data sets were generated by simulations of ion tracks of protons and carbon ions in liquid water using the Geant-4 Monte Carlo tool-kit with the Geant-4-DNA processes. Based on the energy transfer points - recorded with nanometer resolution - we investigated parametrizations of overall properties of ion track structure. Three different track structure parametrizations have been developed using the distances to the 10 next neighbouring ionizations, the radial energy distribution and ionisation cluster size distributions. These parametrizations of nanometer-scale track structure build a basis for deriving biologically relevant mean values which are essential in the clinical situation where each voxel is exposed to a mixed radiation field. (authors)

  5. On the consistency of Monte Carlo track structure DNA damage simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pater, Piotr, E-mail: piotr.pater@mail.mcgill.ca; Seuntjens, Jan; El Naqa, Issam [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec H3G 1A4 (Canada); Bernal, Mario A. [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas 13083-859 (Brazil)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: Monte Carlo track structures (MCTS) simulations have been recognized as useful tools for radiobiological modeling. However, the authors noticed several issues regarding the consistency of reported data. Therefore, in this work, they analyze the impact of various user defined parameters on simulated direct DNA damage yields. In addition, they draw attention to discrepancies in published literature in DNA strand break (SB) yields and selected methodologies. Methods: The MCTS code Geant4-DNA was used to compare radial dose profiles in a nanometer-scale region of interest (ROI) for photon sources of varying sizes and energies. Then, electron tracks of 0.28 keV–220 keV were superimposed on a geometric DNA model composed of 2.7 × 10{sup 6} nucleosomes, and SBs were simulated according to four definitions based on energy deposits or energy transfers in DNA strand targets compared to a threshold energy E{sub TH}. The SB frequencies and complexities in nucleosomes as a function of incident electron energies were obtained. SBs were classified into higher order clusters such as single and double strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs) based on inter-SB distances and on the number of affected strands. Results: Comparisons of different nonuniform dose distributions lacking charged particle equilibrium may lead to erroneous conclusions regarding the effect of energy on relative biological effectiveness. The energy transfer-based SB definitions give similar SB yields as the one based on energy deposit when E{sub TH} ≈ 10.79 eV, but deviate significantly for higher E{sub TH} values. Between 30 and 40 nucleosomes/Gy show at least one SB in the ROI. The number of nucleosomes that present a complex damage pattern of more than 2 SBs and the degree of complexity of the damage in these nucleosomes diminish as the incident electron energy increases. DNA damage classification into SSB and DSB is highly dependent on the definitions of these higher order structures and their

  6. On the consistency of Monte Carlo track structure DNA damage simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pater, Piotr; Seuntjens, Jan; El Naqa, Issam; Bernal, Mario A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Monte Carlo track structures (MCTS) simulations have been recognized as useful tools for radiobiological modeling. However, the authors noticed several issues regarding the consistency of reported data. Therefore, in this work, they analyze the impact of various user defined parameters on simulated direct DNA damage yields. In addition, they draw attention to discrepancies in published literature in DNA strand break (SB) yields and selected methodologies. Methods: The MCTS code Geant4-DNA was used to compare radial dose profiles in a nanometer-scale region of interest (ROI) for photon sources of varying sizes and energies. Then, electron tracks of 0.28 keV–220 keV were superimposed on a geometric DNA model composed of 2.7 × 10 6 nucleosomes, and SBs were simulated according to four definitions based on energy deposits or energy transfers in DNA strand targets compared to a threshold energy E TH . The SB frequencies and complexities in nucleosomes as a function of incident electron energies were obtained. SBs were classified into higher order clusters such as single and double strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs) based on inter-SB distances and on the number of affected strands. Results: Comparisons of different nonuniform dose distributions lacking charged particle equilibrium may lead to erroneous conclusions regarding the effect of energy on relative biological effectiveness. The energy transfer-based SB definitions give similar SB yields as the one based on energy deposit when E TH ≈ 10.79 eV, but deviate significantly for higher E TH values. Between 30 and 40 nucleosomes/Gy show at least one SB in the ROI. The number of nucleosomes that present a complex damage pattern of more than 2 SBs and the degree of complexity of the damage in these nucleosomes diminish as the incident electron energy increases. DNA damage classification into SSB and DSB is highly dependent on the definitions of these higher order structures and their implementations. The authors

  7. Flagged uniform particle splitting for variance reduction in proton and carbon ion track-structure simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Méndez, José; Schuemann, Jan; Incerti, Sebastien; Paganetti, Harald; Schulte, Reinhard; Faddegon, Bruce

    2017-08-01

    Flagged uniform particle splitting was implemented with two methods to improve the computational efficiency of Monte Carlo track structure simulations with TOPAS-nBio by enhancing the production of secondary electrons in ionization events. In method 1 the Geant4 kernel was modified. In method 2 Geant4 was not modified. In both methods a unique flag number assigned to each new split electron was inherited by its progeny, permitting reclassification of the split events as if produced by independent histories. Computational efficiency and accuracy were evaluated for simulations of 0.5-20 MeV protons and 1-20 MeV u-1 carbon ions for three endpoints: (1) mean of the ionization cluster size distribution, (2) mean number of DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) and double-strand breaks (DSBs) classified with DBSCAN, and (3) mean number of SSBs and DSBs classified with a geometry-based algorithm. For endpoint (1), simulation efficiency was 3 times lower when splitting electrons generated by direct ionization events of primary particles than when splitting electrons generated by the first ionization events of secondary electrons. The latter technique was selected for further investigation. The following results are for method 2, with relative efficiencies about 4.5 times lower for method 1. For endpoint (1), relative efficiency at 128 split electrons approached maximum, increasing with energy from 47.2  ±  0.2 to 66.9  ±  0.2 for protons, decreasing with energy from 51.3  ±  0.4 to 41.7  ±  0.2 for carbon. For endpoint (2), relative efficiency increased with energy, from 20.7  ±  0.1 to 50.2  ±  0.3 for protons, 15.6  ±  0.1 to 20.2  ±  0.1 for carbon. For endpoint (3) relative efficiency increased with energy, from 31.0  ±  0.2 to 58.2  ±  0.4 for protons, 23.9  ±  0.1 to 26.2  ±  0.2 for carbon. Simulation results with and without splitting agreed within 1% (2 standard

  8. Structural Sparse Tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tianzhu

    2015-06-01

    Sparse representation has been applied to visual tracking by finding the best target candidate with minimal reconstruction error by use of target templates. However, most sparse representation based trackers only consider holistic or local representations and do not make full use of the intrinsic structure among and inside target candidates, thereby making the representation less effective when similar objects appear or under occlusion. In this paper, we propose a novel Structural Sparse Tracking (SST) algorithm, which not only exploits the intrinsic relationship among target candidates and their local patches to learn their sparse representations jointly, but also preserves the spatial layout structure among the local patches inside each target candidate. We show that our SST algorithm accommodates most existing sparse trackers with the respective merits. Both qualitative and quantitative evaluations on challenging benchmark image sequences demonstrate that the proposed SST algorithm performs favorably against several state-of-the-art methods.

  9. WE-DE-202-01: Connecting Nanoscale Physics to Initial DNA Damage Through Track Structure Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuemann, J. [Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer has been established as a highly precise and effective way to eradicate a localized region of diseased tissue. To achieve further significant gains in the therapeutic ratio, we need to move towards biologically optimized treatment planning. To achieve this goal, we need to understand how the radiation-type dependent patterns of induced energy depositions within the cell (physics) connect via molecular, cellular and tissue reactions to treatment outcome such as tumor control and undesirable effects on normal tissue. Several computational biology approaches have been developed connecting physics to biology. Monte Carlo simulations are the most accurate method to calculate physical dose distributions at the nanometer scale, however simulations at the DNA scale are slow and repair processes are generally not simulated. Alternative models that rely on the random formation of individual DNA lesions within one or two turns of the DNA have been shown to reproduce the clusters of DNA lesions, including single strand breaks (SSBs), double strand breaks (DSBs) without the need for detailed track structure simulations. Efficient computational simulations of initial DNA damage induction facilitate computational modeling of DNA repair and other molecular and cellular processes. Mechanistic, multiscale models provide a useful conceptual framework to test biological hypotheses and help connect fundamental information about track structure and dosimetry at the sub-cellular level to dose-response effects on larger scales. In this symposium we will learn about the current state of the art of computational approaches estimating radiation damage at the cellular and sub-cellular scale. How can understanding the physics interactions at the DNA level be used to predict biological outcome? We will discuss if and how such calculations are relevant to advance our understanding of radiation damage and its repair, or, if the underlying biological

  10. WE-DE-202-02: Are Track Structure Simulations Truly Needed for Radiobiology at the Cellular and Tissue Levels?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, R. [University of Washington (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer has been established as a highly precise and effective way to eradicate a localized region of diseased tissue. To achieve further significant gains in the therapeutic ratio, we need to move towards biologically optimized treatment planning. To achieve this goal, we need to understand how the radiation-type dependent patterns of induced energy depositions within the cell (physics) connect via molecular, cellular and tissue reactions to treatment outcome such as tumor control and undesirable effects on normal tissue. Several computational biology approaches have been developed connecting physics to biology. Monte Carlo simulations are the most accurate method to calculate physical dose distributions at the nanometer scale, however simulations at the DNA scale are slow and repair processes are generally not simulated. Alternative models that rely on the random formation of individual DNA lesions within one or two turns of the DNA have been shown to reproduce the clusters of DNA lesions, including single strand breaks (SSBs), double strand breaks (DSBs) without the need for detailed track structure simulations. Efficient computational simulations of initial DNA damage induction facilitate computational modeling of DNA repair and other molecular and cellular processes. Mechanistic, multiscale models provide a useful conceptual framework to test biological hypotheses and help connect fundamental information about track structure and dosimetry at the sub-cellular level to dose-response effects on larger scales. In this symposium we will learn about the current state of the art of computational approaches estimating radiation damage at the cellular and sub-cellular scale. How can understanding the physics interactions at the DNA level be used to predict biological outcome? We will discuss if and how such calculations are relevant to advance our understanding of radiation damage and its repair, or, if the underlying biological

  11. WE-DE-202-01: Connecting Nanoscale Physics to Initial DNA Damage Through Track Structure Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuemann, J.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer has been established as a highly precise and effective way to eradicate a localized region of diseased tissue. To achieve further significant gains in the therapeutic ratio, we need to move towards biologically optimized treatment planning. To achieve this goal, we need to understand how the radiation-type dependent patterns of induced energy depositions within the cell (physics) connect via molecular, cellular and tissue reactions to treatment outcome such as tumor control and undesirable effects on normal tissue. Several computational biology approaches have been developed connecting physics to biology. Monte Carlo simulations are the most accurate method to calculate physical dose distributions at the nanometer scale, however simulations at the DNA scale are slow and repair processes are generally not simulated. Alternative models that rely on the random formation of individual DNA lesions within one or two turns of the DNA have been shown to reproduce the clusters of DNA lesions, including single strand breaks (SSBs), double strand breaks (DSBs) without the need for detailed track structure simulations. Efficient computational simulations of initial DNA damage induction facilitate computational modeling of DNA repair and other molecular and cellular processes. Mechanistic, multiscale models provide a useful conceptual framework to test biological hypotheses and help connect fundamental information about track structure and dosimetry at the sub-cellular level to dose-response effects on larger scales. In this symposium we will learn about the current state of the art of computational approaches estimating radiation damage at the cellular and sub-cellular scale. How can understanding the physics interactions at the DNA level be used to predict biological outcome? We will discuss if and how such calculations are relevant to advance our understanding of radiation damage and its repair, or, if the underlying biological

  12. WE-DE-202-02: Are Track Structure Simulations Truly Needed for Radiobiology at the Cellular and Tissue Levels?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, R.

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy for the treatment of cancer has been established as a highly precise and effective way to eradicate a localized region of diseased tissue. To achieve further significant gains in the therapeutic ratio, we need to move towards biologically optimized treatment planning. To achieve this goal, we need to understand how the radiation-type dependent patterns of induced energy depositions within the cell (physics) connect via molecular, cellular and tissue reactions to treatment outcome such as tumor control and undesirable effects on normal tissue. Several computational biology approaches have been developed connecting physics to biology. Monte Carlo simulations are the most accurate method to calculate physical dose distributions at the nanometer scale, however simulations at the DNA scale are slow and repair processes are generally not simulated. Alternative models that rely on the random formation of individual DNA lesions within one or two turns of the DNA have been shown to reproduce the clusters of DNA lesions, including single strand breaks (SSBs), double strand breaks (DSBs) without the need for detailed track structure simulations. Efficient computational simulations of initial DNA damage induction facilitate computational modeling of DNA repair and other molecular and cellular processes. Mechanistic, multiscale models provide a useful conceptual framework to test biological hypotheses and help connect fundamental information about track structure and dosimetry at the sub-cellular level to dose-response effects on larger scales. In this symposium we will learn about the current state of the art of computational approaches estimating radiation damage at the cellular and sub-cellular scale. How can understanding the physics interactions at the DNA level be used to predict biological outcome? We will discuss if and how such calculations are relevant to advance our understanding of radiation damage and its repair, or, if the underlying biological

  13. Simulations of DSB Yields and Radiation-induced Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Based on the Stochastic Track Structure Induced by HZE Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a new particle track and DNA damage model, in which the particle stochastic track structure is combined with the random walk (RW) structure of chromosomes in a cell nucleus. The motivation for this effort stems from the fact that the model with the RW chromosomes, NASARTI (NASA radiation track image) previously relied on amorphous track structure, while the stochastic track structure model RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) was focused on more microscopic targets than the entire genome. We have combined chromosomes simulated by RWs with stochastic track structure, which uses nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS in a voxelized space. The new simulations produce the number of DSBs as function of dose and particle fluence for high-energy particles, including iron, carbon and protons, using voxels of 20 nm dimension. The combined model also calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The joined computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The joined model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation. We found that the main advantage of the joined model is our ability to simulate small doses: 0.05-0.5 Gy. At such low doses, the stochastic track structure proved to be indispensable, as the action of individual delta-rays becomes more important.

  14. Simulations of DSB Yields and Radiation-induced Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Based on the Stochastic Track Structure iIduced by HZE Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a new particle track and DNA damage model, in which the particle stochastic track structure is combined with the random walk (RW) structure of chromosomes in a cell nucleus. The motivation for this effort stems from the fact that the model with the RW chromosomes, NASARTI (NASA radiation track image) previously relied on amorphous track structure, while the stochastic track structure model RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) was focused on more microscopic targets than the entire genome. We have combined chromosomes simulated by RWs with stochastic track structure, which uses nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS in a voxelized space. The new simulations produce the number of DSBs as function of dose and particle fluence for high-energy particles, including iron, carbon and protons, using voxels of 20 nm dimension. The combined model also calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The joined computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The joined model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation. We found that the main advantage of the joined model is our ability to simulate small doses: 0.05-0.5 Gy. At such low doses, the stochastic track structure proved to be indispensable, as the action of individual delta-rays becomes more important.

  15. Classifications of track structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paretzke, H.G.

    1984-01-01

    When ionizing particles interact with matter they produce random topological structures of primary activations which represent the initial boundary conditions for all subsequent physical, chemical and/or biological reactions. There are two important aspects of research on such track structures, namely their experimental or theoretical determination on one hand and the quantitative classification of these complex structures which is a basic pre-requisite for the understanding of mechanisms of radiation actions. This paper deals only with the latter topic, i.e. the problems encountered in and possible approaches to quantitative ordering and grouping of these multidimensional objects by their degrees of similarity with respect to their efficiency in producing certain final radiation effects, i.e. to their ''radiation quality.'' Various attempts of taxonometric classification with respect to radiation efficiency have been made in basic and applied radiation research including macro- and microdosimetric concepts as well as track entities and stopping power based theories. In this paper no review of those well-known approaches is given but rather an outline and discussion of alternative methods new to this field of radiation research which have some very promising features and which could possibly solve at least some major classification problems

  16. Cluster analysis of track structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalik, V.

    1991-01-01

    One of the possibilities of classifying track structures is application of conventional partition techniques of analysis of multidimensional data to the track structure. Using these cluster algorithms this paper attempts to find characteristics of radiation reflecting the spatial distribution of ionizations in the primary particle track. An absolute frequency distribution of clusters of ionizations giving the mean number of clusters produced by radiation per unit of deposited energy can serve as this characteristic. General computation techniques used as well as methods of calculations of distributions of clusters for different radiations are discussed. 8 refs.; 5 figs

  17. RITRACKS: A Software for Simulation of Stochastic Radiation Track Structure, Micro and Nanodosimetry, Radiation Chemistry and DNA Damage for Heavy Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, I; Wu, H

    2014-01-01

    The code RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) has been developed over the last few years at the NASA Johnson Space Center to simulate the effects of ionizing radiations at the microscopic scale, to understand the effects of space radiation at the biological level. The fundamental part of this code is the stochastic simulation of radiation track structure of heavy ions, an important component of space radiations. The code can calculate many relevant quantities such as the radial dose, voxel dose, and may also be used to calculate the dose in spherical and cylindrical targets of various sizes. Recently, we have incorporated DNA structure and damage simulations at the molecular scale in RITRACKS. The direct effect of radiations is simulated by introducing a slight modification of the existing particle transport algorithms, using the Binary-Encounter-Bethe model of ionization cross sections for each molecular orbitals of DNA. The simulation of radiation chemistry is done by a step-by-step diffusion-reaction program based on the Green's functions of the diffusion equation]. This approach is also used to simulate the indirect effect of ionizing radiation on DNA. The software can be installed independently on PC and tablets using the Windows operating system and does not require any coding from the user. It includes a Graphic User Interface (GUI) and a 3D OpenGL visualization interface. The calculations are executed simultaneously (in parallel) on multiple CPUs. The main features of the software will be presented.

  18. Geant4-DNA track-structure simulations for gold nanoparticles: The importance of electron discrete models in nanometer volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Dousatsu; Kyriakou, Ioanna; Okada, Shogo; Tran, Hoang N; Lampe, Nathanael; Guatelli, Susanna; Bordage, Marie-Claude; Ivanchenko, Vladimir; Murakami, Koichi; Sasaki, Takashi; Emfietzoglou, Dimitris; Incerti, Sebastien

    2018-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are known to enhance the absorbed dose in their vicinity following photon-based irradiation. To investigate the therapeutic effectiveness of GNPs, previous Monte Carlo simulation studies have explored GNP dose enhancement using mostly condensed-history models. However, in general, such models are suitable for macroscopic volumes and for electron energies above a few hundred electron volts. We have recently developed, for the Geant4-DNA extension of the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit, discrete physics models for electron transport in gold which include the description of the full atomic de-excitation cascade. These models allow event-by-event simulation of electron tracks in gold down to 10 eV. The present work describes how such specialized physics models impact simulation-based studies on GNP-radioenhancement in a context of x-ray radiotherapy. The new discrete physics models are compared to the Geant4 Penelope and Livermore condensed-history models, which are being widely used for simulation-based NP radioenhancement studies. An ad hoc Geant4 simulation application has been developed to calculate the absorbed dose in liquid water around a GNP and its radioenhancement, caused by secondary particles emitted from the GNP itself, when irradiated with a monoenergetic electron beam. The effect of the new physics models is also quantified in the calculation of secondary particle spectra, when originating in the GNP and when exiting from it. The new physics models show similar backscattering coefficients with the existing Geant4 Livermore and Penelope models in large volumes for 100 keV incident electrons. However, in submicron sized volumes, only the discrete models describe the high backscattering that should still be present around GNPs at these length scales. Sizeable differences (mostly above a factor of 2) are also found in the radial distribution of absorbed dose and secondary particles between the new and the existing Geant4

  19. Track structure in biological models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, S B

    1986-01-01

    High-energy heavy ions in the galactic cosmic radiation (HZE particles) may pose a special risk during long term manned space flights outside the sheltering confines of the earth's geomagnetic field. These particles are highly ionizing, and they and their nuclear secondaries can penetrate many centimeters of body tissue. The three dimensional patterns of ionizations they create as they lose energy are referred to as their track structure. Several models of biological action on mammalian cells attempt to treat track structure or related quantities in their formulation. The methods by which they do this are reviewed. The proximity function is introduced in connection with the theory of Dual Radiation Action (DRA). The ion-gamma kill (IGK) model introduces the radial energy-density distribution, which is a smooth function characterizing both the magnitude and extension of a charged particle track. The lethal, potentially lethal (LPL) model introduces lambda, the mean distance between relevant ion clusters or biochemical species along the track. Since very localized energy depositions (within approximately 10 nm) are emphasized, the proximity function as defined in the DRA model is not of utility in characterizing track structure in the LPL formulation.

  20. FDTD Seismic Simulation of Moving Tracked Vehicle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ketcham, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the utility of a large finite-difference time domain (FDTD) simulation of seismic wave propagation from a spatially and time varying source that generically represents a moving tracked vehicle...

  1. Track structure for low energy ions including charge exchange processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uehara, S.; Nikjoo, H.

    2002-01-01

    The model and development is described of a new generation of Monte Carlo track structure codes. The code LEAHIST simulates full slowing down of low-energy proton history tracks in the range 1 keV-1 MeV and the code LEAHIST simulates low-energy alpha particle history tracks in the range 1 keV-8 MeV in water. All primary ion interactions are followed down to 1 keV and all electrons to 1 eV. Tracks of secondary electrons ejected by ions were traced using the electron code KURBUC. Microdosimetric parameters derived by analysis of generated tracks are presented. (author)

  2. Simulation and Track Reconstruction for Beam Telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Maqbool, Salman

    2017-01-01

    Beam telescopes are an important tool to test new detectors under development in a particle beam. To test these novel detectors and determine their properties, the particle tracks need to be reconstructed from the known detectors in the telescope. Based on the reconstructed track, its predicted position on the Device under Test (DUT) are compared with the actual hits on the DUT. Several methods exist for track reconstruction, but most of them do not account for the effects of multiple scattering. General Broken Lines is one such algorithm which incorporates these effects during reconstruction. The aim of this project was to simulate the beam telescope and extend the track reconstruction framework for the FE-I4 telescope, which takes these effects into account. Section 1 introduces the problem, while section 2 focuses on beam telescopes. This is followed by the Allpix2 simulation framework in Section 3. And finally, Section 4 introduces the Proteus track reconstruction framework along with the General Broken ...

  3. A Benchmark and Simulator for UAV Tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Mueller, Matthias; Smith, Neil; Ghanem, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new aerial video dataset and benchmark for low altitude UAV target tracking, as well as, a photorealistic UAV simulator that can be coupled with tracking methods. Our benchmark provides the first evaluation of many state-of-the-art and popular trackers on 123 new and fully annotated HD video sequences captured from a low-altitude aerial perspective. Among the compared trackers, we determine which ones are the most suitable for UAV tracking both in terms of tracking accuracy and run-time. The simulator can be used to evaluate tracking algorithms in real-time scenarios before they are deployed on a UAV “in the field”, as well as, generate synthetic but photo-realistic tracking datasets with automatic ground truth annotations to easily extend existing real-world datasets. Both the benchmark and simulator are made publicly available to the vision community on our website to further research in the area of object tracking from UAVs. (https://ivul.kaust.edu.sa/Pages/pub-benchmark-simulator-uav.aspx.). © Springer International Publishing AG 2016.

  4. A Benchmark and Simulator for UAV Tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Mueller, Matthias

    2016-09-16

    In this paper, we propose a new aerial video dataset and benchmark for low altitude UAV target tracking, as well as, a photorealistic UAV simulator that can be coupled with tracking methods. Our benchmark provides the first evaluation of many state-of-the-art and popular trackers on 123 new and fully annotated HD video sequences captured from a low-altitude aerial perspective. Among the compared trackers, we determine which ones are the most suitable for UAV tracking both in terms of tracking accuracy and run-time. The simulator can be used to evaluate tracking algorithms in real-time scenarios before they are deployed on a UAV “in the field”, as well as, generate synthetic but photo-realistic tracking datasets with automatic ground truth annotations to easily extend existing real-world datasets. Both the benchmark and simulator are made publicly available to the vision community on our website to further research in the area of object tracking from UAVs. (https://ivul.kaust.edu.sa/Pages/pub-benchmark-simulator-uav.aspx.). © Springer International Publishing AG 2016.

  5. Two lectures on track structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waligorski, M.P.R.

    1987-01-01

    In a series of two lectures the principles of track structure theory, developed by Katz and collaborators, are reviewed. The text is intended to serve as an introduction to the theory. Applications of the model to c-hit physical detectors and to biological systems are reviewed. The model relates the signal of a detector after doses of X and gamma radiations to its signal after heavy charged particle irradiations, and is applicable to a variety of physical dosimeters: alanine, thermoluminescence and the Fricke dosimeters, to the inactivation of enzymes and viruses, and to biological systems: description of survival and neoplastic transformations in mammalian cells. Application of the model to heavy-ion cancer radiotherapy and to radiation protection is discussed as well as the controversies around the track structure approach. The model suggests new insights to fundamental research in detector theory and in radiobiology and in their applications in radiotherapy and radiation protection. 41 refs., 39 figs. (author)

  6. Tracking of large-scale structures in turbulent channel with direct numerical simulation of low Prandtl number passive scalar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiselj, Iztok

    2014-12-01

    Channel flow DNS (Direct Numerical Simulation) at friction Reynolds number 180 and with passive scalars of Prandtl numbers 1 and 0.01 was performed in various computational domains. The "normal" size domain was ˜2300 wall units long and ˜750 wall units wide; size taken from the similar DNS of Moser et al. The "large" computational domain, which is supposed to be sufficient to describe the largest structures of the turbulent flows was 3 times longer and 3 times wider than the "normal" domain. The "very large" domain was 6 times longer and 6 times wider than the "normal" domain. All simulations were performed with the same spatial and temporal resolution. Comparison of the standard and large computational domains shows the velocity field statistics (mean velocity, root-mean-square (RMS) fluctuations, and turbulent Reynolds stresses) that are within 1%-2%. Similar agreement is observed for Pr = 1 temperature fields and can be observed also for the mean temperature profiles at Pr = 0.01. These differences can be attributed to the statistical uncertainties of the DNS. However, second-order moments, i.e., RMS temperature fluctuations of standard and large computational domains at Pr = 0.01 show significant differences of up to 20%. Stronger temperature fluctuations in the "large" and "very large" domains confirm the existence of the large-scale structures. Their influence is more or less invisible in the main velocity field statistics or in the statistics of the temperature fields at Prandtl numbers around 1. However, these structures play visible role in the temperature fluctuations at low Prandtl number, where high temperature diffusivity effectively smears the small-scale structures in the thermal field and enhances the relative contribution of large-scales. These large thermal structures represent some kind of an echo of the large scale velocity structures: the highest temperature-velocity correlations are not observed between the instantaneous temperatures and

  7. Simulation and track reconstruction for beam telescopes

    CERN Document Server

    Maqbool, Salman

    2017-01-01

    Beam telescopes are used for testing new detectors under development. Sensors are placed and a particle beam is passed through them. To test these novel detectors and determine their properties, the particle tracks need to be reconstructed from the known detectors in the telescope. Based on the reconstructed track, it’s predicted hits on the Device under Test (DUT) are compared with the actual hits on the DUT. Several methods exist for track reconstruction, but most of them don’t account for the effects of multiple scattering. General Broken Lines is one such algorithm which incorporates these effects during reconstruction. The aim of this project was to simulate the beam telescope and extend the track reconstruction framework for the FE-I4 telescope, which takes these effects into account. Section 1 introduces the problem, while section 2 focuses on beam telescopes. This is followed by the Allpix2 simulation framework in Section 3. And finally, Section 4 introduces the Proteus track reconstruction framew...

  8. Dynamic kirigami structures for integrated solar tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoureux, Aaron; Lee, Kyusang; Shlian, Matthew; Forrest, Stephen R.; Shtein, Max

    2015-01-01

    Optical tracking is often combined with conventional flat panel solar cells to maximize electrical power generation over the course of a day. However, conventional trackers are complex and often require costly and cumbersome structural components to support system weight. Here we use kirigami (the art of paper cutting) to realize novel solar cells where tracking is integral to the structure at the substrate level. Specifically, an elegant cut pattern is made in thin-film gallium arsenide solar cells, which are then stretched to produce an array of tilted surface elements which can be controlled to within ±1°. We analyze the combined optical and mechanical properties of the tracking system, and demonstrate a mechanically robust system with optical tracking efficiencies matching conventional trackers. This design suggests a pathway towards enabling new applications for solar tracking, as well as inspiring a broader range of optoelectronic and mechanical devices. PMID:26348820

  9. VLSI structures for track finding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dell'Orso, M.

    1989-01-01

    We discuss the architecture of a device based on the concept of associative memory designed to solve the track finding problem, typical of high energy physics experiments, in a time span of a few microseconds even for very high multiplicity events. This ''machine'' is implemented as a large array of custom VLSI chips. All the chips are equal and each of them stores a number of ''patterns''. All the patterns in all the chips are compared in parallel to the data coming from the detector while the detector is being read out. (orig.)

  10. Synthetic tracked aperture ultrasound imaging: design, simulation, and experimental evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haichong K; Cheng, Alexis; Bottenus, Nick; Guo, Xiaoyu; Trahey, Gregg E; Boctor, Emad M

    2016-04-01

    Ultrasonography is a widely used imaging modality to visualize anatomical structures due to its low cost and ease of use; however, it is challenging to acquire acceptable image quality in deep tissue. Synthetic aperture (SA) is a technique used to increase image resolution by synthesizing information from multiple subapertures, but the resolution improvement is limited by the physical size of the array transducer. With a large F-number, it is difficult to achieve high resolution in deep regions without extending the effective aperture size. We propose a method to extend the available aperture size for SA-called synthetic tracked aperture ultrasound (STRATUS) imaging-by sweeping an ultrasound transducer while tracking its orientation and location. Tracking information of the ultrasound probe is used to synthesize the signals received at different positions. Considering the practical implementation, we estimated the effect of tracking and ultrasound calibration error to the quality of the final beamformed image through simulation. In addition, to experimentally validate this approach, a 6 degree-of-freedom robot arm was used as a mechanical tracker to hold an ultrasound transducer and to apply in-plane lateral translational motion. Results indicate that STRATUS imaging with robotic tracking has the potential to improve ultrasound image quality.

  11. Tracking coherent structures in massively-separated and turbulent flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwood, Matthew; Huang, Yangzi; Green, Melissa

    2018-01-01

    Coherent vortex structures are tracked in simulations of massively-separated and turbulent flows. Topological Lagrangian saddle points are found using intersections of the positive and negative finite-time Lyapunov exponent ridges, and these points are then followed in order to track individual coherent structure motion both in a complex interacting three-dimensional flow (turbulent channel) and during vortex formation (two-dimensional bluff body shedding). For a simulation of wall-bounded turbulence in a channel flow, tracking Lagrangian saddles shows that the average structure convection speed exhibits a similar trend as a previously published result based on velocity and pressure correlations, giving validity to the method. When this tracking method is applied in a study of a circular cylinder in cross-flow it shows that Lagrangian saddles rapidly accelerate away from the cylinder surface as the vortex sheds. This saddle behavior is compared with the time-resolved static pressure distribution on the circular cylinder, yielding locations on a cylinder surface where common sensors could detect this phenomenon, which is not available from force measurements or vortex circulation calculations. The current method of tracking coherent structures yields insight into the behavior of the coherent structures in both of the diverse flows presented, highlighting the breadth of its potential application.

  12. Wire chamber requirements and tracking simulation studies for tracking systems at the superconducting super collider

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.G.; Niczyporuk, B.B.; Palounek, A.P.T.

    1989-02-01

    Limitations placed on wire chambers by radiation damage and rate requirements in the SSC environment are reviewed. Possible conceptual designs for wire chamber tracking systems which meet these requirements are discussed. Computer simulation studies of tracking in such systems are presented. Simulations of events from interesting physics at the SSC, including hits from minimum bias background events, are examined. Results of some preliminary pattern recognition studies are given. Such computer simulation studies are necessary to determine the feasibility of wire chamber tracking systems for complex events in a high-rate environment such as the SSC. 11 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  13. A variable structure tracking controller for robot manipulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Hoon; Shin, Hwi Beom

    1997-01-01

    In this paper, a continuous variable structure tracking controller is designed for the purpose of the control of robot manipulators to follow a given desired planned trajectory with high accuracy. The robustness and continuity of the algorithm are much improved by means of the feedforward compensation technique based on the disturbance observer without any chattering problem. Also the stability of the algorithm is analyzed in detail, further more the usefulness and good performances are verified through computer simulation studies. (author)

  14. A Monte Carlo track structure code for low energy protons

    CERN Document Server

    Endo, S; Nikjoo, H; Uehara, S; Hoshi, M; Ishikawa, M; Shizuma, K

    2002-01-01

    A code is described for simulation of protons (100 eV to 10 MeV) track structure in water vapor. The code simulates molecular interaction by interaction for the transport of primary ions and secondary electrons in the form of ionizations and excitations. When a low velocity ion collides with the atoms or molecules of a target, the ion may also capture or lose electrons. The probabilities for these processes are described by the quantity cross-section. Although proton track simulation at energies above Bragg peak (>0.3 MeV) has been achieved to a high degree of precision, simulations at energies near or below the Bragg peak have only been attempted recently because of the lack of relevant cross-section data. As the hydrogen atom has a different ionization cross-section from that of a proton, charge exchange processes need to be considered in order to calculate stopping power for low energy protons. In this paper, we have used state-of-the-art Monte Carlo track simulation techniques, in conjunction with the pub...

  15. Tracking simulation and wire chamber requirements for the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.G.; Niczyporuk, B.B.; Palounek, A.P.T.

    1988-11-01

    Limitations placed on wire chambers by radiation damage and rate requirements in the SSC environment are reviewed. Possible conceptual designs for wire chamber tracking systems which meet these requirements are discussed. Computer simulation studies of tracking in such systems are presented. Simulations of events from interesting physics at the SSC, including hits from minimum bias background events, are examined. Results of some preliminary pattern recognition studies are given. 16 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Simulation of an advanced small aperture track system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tommy J.; Crockett, Gregg A.; Brunson, Richard L.; Beatty, Brad; Zahirniak, Daniel R.; Deuto, Bernard G.

    2001-08-01

    Simulation development for EO Systems has progressed to new levels with the advent of COTS software tools such as Matlab/Simulink. These tools allow rapid reuse of simulation library routines. We have applied these tools to newly emerging Acquisition Tracking and Pointing (ATP) systems using many routines developed through a legacy to High Energy Laser programs such as AirBorne Laser, Space Based Laser, Tactical High Energy Laser, and The Air Force Research Laboratory projects associated with the Starfire Optical Range. The simulation architecture allows ease in testing various track algorithms under simulated scenes with the ability to rapidly vary system hardware parameters such as track sensor and track loop control systems. The atmospheric turbulence environment and associated optical distortion is simulated to high fidelity levels through the application of an atmospheric phase screen model to produce scintillation of the laser illuminator uplink. The particular ATP system simulated is a small transportable system for tracking satellites in a daytime environment and projects a low power laser and receives laser return from retro-reflector equipped satellites. The primary application of the ATP system (and therefore the simulation) is the determination of the illuminator beam profile, jitter, and scintillation of the low power laser at the satellite. The ATP system will serve as a test bed for satellite tracking in a high background during daytime. Of particular interest in this simulation is the ability to emulate the hardware modelogic within the simulation to test and refine system states and mode change decisions. Additionally, the simulation allows data from the hardware system tests to be imported into Matlab and to thereby drive the simulation or to be easily compared to simulation results.

  17. Structural mechanics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biffle, J.H.

    1992-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratory has a very broad structural capability. Work has been performed in support of reentry vehicles, nuclear reactor safety, weapons systems and components, nuclear waste transport, strategic petroleum reserve, nuclear waste storage, wind and solar energy, drilling technology, and submarine programs. The analysis environment contains both commercial and internally developed software. Included are mesh generation capabilities, structural simulation codes, and visual codes for examining simulation results. To effectively simulate a wide variety of physical phenomena, a large number of constitutive models have been developed

  18. Level tracking in detailed reactor simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aktas, B.; Mahaffy, J.H. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1995-09-01

    We introduce a useful test problem for judging the performance of reactor safety codes in situations where moving two-phase mixture levels are present. The test problem tracks a two-phase liquid level as it rises and then falls back to its original position. Pure air exists above the level, and a low void air-water mixture is below the level. Conditions are subcooled and isothermal to remove complications resulting from failures of interfacial heat transfer packages to properly account for the level. Comparisons are made between the performance of current versions of CATHARE, RELAP5, TRAC-BF1, and TRAC-PF1. These system codes are based on finite-difference methods with a fixed, Eulerian staggered grid in space. When a partially filled cell with a mixture level discontinuity becomes the donor cell, the sharp changes in fluid properties across the interface results in numerical oscillations of various terms. Furthermore, the cell-to-cell convection of mass, momentum and energy are inaccurately predicted nearby a mixture level. To adequately model moving mixture levels, an efficient discontinuity tracking method for the finite-difference Eulerian approximations is described. This model had been implemented in the TRAC-BWR code for the two-phase mixture level tracking since the TRAC-BD1 Version (released April 1984). The result of the test problem run by the current version of TRAC-BF1/MOD1 with the mixture level tracking model shows some peculiar behavior of the variables such as velocities, pressures and interfacial terms. A systematic approach to improving performance of the tracking method is described. Implementing this approach in TRAC-BF1/MOD1 has shown a major improvement in the results.

  19. FATRAS - the ATLAS Fast Track Simulation project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mechnich, J.

    2011-01-01

    The Monte Carlo simulation of the detector response is an integral component of any analysis performed with data from the LHC experiments. As these simulated data sets must be both large and precise, their production is a CPU-intensive task. ATLAS has developed full and fast detector simulation

  20. Multiple-lesion track-structure model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.W.; Cucinotta, F.A.; Shinn, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    A multilesion cell kinetic model is derived, and radiation kinetic coefficients are related to the Katz track structure model. The repair-related coefficients are determined from the delayed plating experiments of Yang et al. for the C3H10T1/2 cell system. The model agrees well with the x ray and heavy ion experiments of Yang et al. for the immediate plating, delaying plating, and fractionated exposure protocols employed by Yang. A study is made of the effects of target fragments in energetic proton exposures and of the repair-deficient target-fragment-induced lesions

  1. Structure modification of particle track membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lueck, H.B.; Gemende, B.; Heinrich, B.

    1991-01-01

    Three different structure modifications were studied in order to improve the flux and dirt loading capacity of particle track membranes without affecting their retention characteristic. Divergent irradiation is a very effective tool for decreasing the number of multiple pores and increasing the porosity up to 20 per cent. The technique leads to a remarkable but not efficient enhancement of the surface porosity. Improved surface porosity produced by a double irradiation technique turns out to be very effective with respect to the filtration performance. (author)

  2. Sensitivity of Simulated Cyclone Gonu Intensity and Track to Variety ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    57

    improvement in simulated intensity, an accuracy reduction in simulated track was observed. Increasing ... improve the prediction of the TC Gonu using the Advanced Hurricane WRF (AHW) model. For the first time, ...... World Meteorological Organization (2014) Tropical cyclone operational plan for the Bay of. Bengal and the ...

  3. Track Simulation and Reconstruction in the ATLAS experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Salzburger, Andreas; Elsing, Markus

    The reconstruction and simulation of particle trajectories is an inevitable part of the analysis strate- gies for data taken with the ATLAS detector. Many aspects and necessary parts of a high-quality track reconstruction will be presented and discussed in this work. At first, the technical realisation of the data model and the reconstruction geometry will be given; the reconstruction geometry is charac- terised by a newly developed navigation model and an automated procedure for the synchronisation of the detailed simulation geometry description with the simplified reconstruction geometry model, which allows a precise description of the tracker material in track reconstruction. Both components help the coherent and fast integration of material effects in a newly established track extrapolation package, that is discussed in the following. The extrapolation engine enables a highly precise trans- port of the track parameterisation and the associated covariances through the complex magnetic field and the detec...

  4. A simulation framework for the CMS Track Trigger electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Amstutz, Christian; Weber, Marc; Palla, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    A simulation framework has been developed to test and characterize algorithms, architectures and hardware implementations of the vastly complex CMS Track Trigger for the high luminosity upgrade of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva. High-level SystemC models of all system components have been developed to simulate a portion of the track trigger. The simulation of the system components together with input data from physics simulations allows evaluating figures of merit, like delays or bandwidths, under realistic conditions. The use of SystemC for high-level modelling allows \\mbox{co-simulation} with models developed in Hardware Description Languages, e.g.~VHDL or Verilog. Therefore, the simulation framework can also be used as a test bench for digital modules developed for the final system.

  5. A simulation framework for the CMS Track Trigger electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amstutz, C.; Weber, M.; Magazzù, G.; Palla, F.

    2015-01-01

    A simulation framework has been developed to test and characterize algorithms, architectures and hardware implementations of the vastly complex CMS Track Trigger for the high luminosity upgrade of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva. High-level SystemC models of all system components have been developed to simulate a portion of the track trigger. The simulation of the system components together with input data from physics simulations allows evaluating figures of merit, like delays or bandwidths, under realistic conditions. The use of SystemC for high-level modelling allows co-simulation with models developed in Hardware Description Languages, e.g. VHDL or Verilog. Therefore, the simulation framework can also be used as a test bench for digital modules developed for the final system

  6. A simulation framework for the CMS Track Trigger electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amstutz, C.; Magazzù, G.; Weber, M.; Palla, F.

    2015-03-01

    A simulation framework has been developed to test and characterize algorithms, architectures and hardware implementations of the vastly complex CMS Track Trigger for the high luminosity upgrade of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva. High-level SystemC models of all system components have been developed to simulate a portion of the track trigger. The simulation of the system components together with input data from physics simulations allows evaluating figures of merit, like delays or bandwidths, under realistic conditions. The use of SystemC for high-level modelling allows co-simulation with models developed in Hardware Description Languages, e.g. VHDL or Verilog. Therefore, the simulation framework can also be used as a test bench for digital modules developed for the final system.

  7. Simulation of phase structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, J.

    1995-01-01

    This memo outlines a procedure developed by the author to extract information from phase measurements and produce a simulated phase structure for use in modeling optical systems, including characteristic optics for the Beamlet and NIF laser systems. The report includes an IDL program listing

  8. Fast emulation of track reconstruction in the CMS simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Komm, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Simulated samples of various physics processes are a key ingredient within analyses to unlock the physics behind LHC collision data. Samples with more and more statistics are required to keep up with the increasing amounts of recorded data. During sample generation, significant computing time is spent on the reconstruction of charged particle tracks from energy deposits which additionally scales with the pileup conditions. In CMS, the FastSimulation package is developed for providing a fast alternative to the standard simulation and reconstruction workflow. It employs various techniques to emulate track reconstruction effects in particle collision events. Several analysis groups in CMS are utilizing the package, in particular those requiring many samples to scan the parameter space of physics models (e.g. SUSY) or for the purpose of estimating systematic uncertainties. The strategies for and recent developments in this emulation are presented, including a novel, flexible implementation of tracking emulation w...

  9. Fast simulation of the forward tracking detector of HPLUS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yapeng; Fan Ruirui; Fu Fen; Yue Ke; Yuan Xiaohua; Xu Huagen; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing; Yao Nan; Xu Hushan; Jin Genming; Liang Jinjie; Chen Ruofu; Sun Zhiyu; Duan Limin; Xiao Zhigang; Tsinghua Univ., Beijing

    2008-01-01

    The necessity of installing a forward tracking detector stack is discussed for the Hadron Physics Lanzhou Spectrometer(HPLUS). A local tracker is developed to solve the multi-track finding problem. The track candidates are searched iteratively via Hough Transform. The fake tracks are removed by a least square fitting process. With this tracker we have studied the feasibility of pp→pp+φ(→K + K - ), a typical physical channel proposed on HPLUS. The single track momentum resolution due to the uncertainty of the positioning in FTD is 1.3%. The multiple scattering effect contributes about 20% to the momentum resolution in the FTD coverage. The width and the signal-to-background ratio of the reconstructed φ are 1.51 MeV and 4.36, respectively, taking into account the direct Kaon channel pp→pp+K + K - as background. The geometry coverage of FTD for qb events is about 85.4%. Based on the current fast simulation and estimation, the geometrical configuration of FTD meets the physical requirement of HPLUS under the current luminosity and multiplicity conditions. The tracker is applicable in the full simulation coming next and is extendable to other tracking component of HPLUS. (authors)

  10. Natural tracer test simulation by stochastic particle tracking method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerer, P.; Mose, R.; Semra, K.

    1990-01-01

    Stochastic particle tracking methods are well adapted to 3D transport simulations where discretization requirements of other methods usually cannot be satisfied. They do need a very accurate approximation of the velocity field. The described code is based on the mixed hybrid finite element method (MHFEM) to calculated the piezometric and velocity field. The random-walk method is used to simulate mass transport. The main advantages of the MHFEM over FD or FE are the simultaneous calculation of pressure and velocity, which are considered as unknowns; the possibility of interpolating velocities everywhere; and the continuity of the normal component of the velocity vector from one element to another. For these reasons, the MHFEM is well adapted for particle tracking methods. After a general description of the numerical methods, the model is used to simulate the observations made during the Twin Lake Tracer Test in 1983. A good match is found between observed and simulated heads and concentrations. (Author) (12 refs., 4 figs.)

  11. Particle Tracking and Simulation on the .NET Framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Hiroshi; Scarvie, Tom

    2006-01-01

    Particle tracking and simulation studies are becoming increasingly complex. In addition to the use of more sophisticated graphics, interactive scripting is becoming popular. Compatibility with different control systems requires network and database capabilities. It is not a trivial task to fulfill all the various requirements without sacrificing runtime performance. We evaluated the effectiveness of the .NET framework by converting a C++ simulation code to C. The portability to other platforms is mentioned in terms of Mono

  12. Dynamic vortex dust structures in a nuclear-track plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rykov, V A; Khudyakov, A V; Filinov, V S; Vladimirov, V I; Deputatova, L V; Krutov, D V; Fortov, V E

    2003-01-01

    Results are presented from Monte Carlo calculations of the electric charge on dust grains in a plasma produced during the slowing down of radioactive decay products of californium nuclei in neon. The dust grain charging is explained as being due to the drift of electrons and ions in an external electric field. It is shown that the charges of the grains depend on their coordinates and strongly fluctuate with time. The time-averaged grain charges agree with the experimental data obtained on ordered liquid-like dust structures in a nuclear-track plasma. The time-averaged dust grain charges are used to carry out computer modelling of the formation of dynamic vortex structures observed in experiments. Evidence is obtained for the fact that the electrostatic forces experienced by the dust grains are potential in character. The paper is supplemented by a video clip showing the typical dynamics of the simulated vortex dust structure

  13. Particle tracking in sophisticated CAD models for simulation purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulkimo, J.; Vuoskoski, J.

    1995-01-01

    The transfer of physics detector models from computer aided design systems to physics simulation packages like GEANT suffers from certain limitations. In addition, GEANT is not able to perform particle tracking in CAD models. We describe an application which is able to perform particle tracking in boundary models constructed in CAD systems. The transfer file format used is the new international standard, STEP. The design and implementation of the application was carried out using object-oriented techniques. It will be integrated in the future object-oriented version of GEANT. (orig.)

  14. Particle tracking in sophisticated CAD models for simulation purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulkimo, J.; Vuoskoski, J.

    1996-02-01

    The transfer of physics detector models from computer aided design systems to physics simulation packages like GEANT suffers from certain limitations. In addition, GEANT is not able to perform particle tracking in CAD models. We describe an application which is able to perform particle tracking in boundary models constructed in CAD systems. The transfer file format used is the new international standard, STEP. The design and implementation of the application was carried out using object-oriented techniques. It will be integrated in the future object-oriented version of GEANT.

  15. Vibro-acoustic performance of newly designed tram track structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haladin, Ivo; Lakušić, Stjepan; Ahac, Maja

    2017-09-01

    Rail vehicles in interaction with a railway structure induce vibrations that are propagating to surrounding structures and cause noise disturbance in the surrounding areas. Since tram tracks in urban areas often share the running surface with road vehicles one of top priorities is to achieve low maintenance and long lasting structure. Research conducted in scope of this paper gives an overview of newly designed tram track structures designated for use on Zagreb tram network and their performance in terms of noise and vibration mitigation. Research has been conducted on a 150 m long test section consisted of three tram track types: standard tram track structure commonly used on tram lines in Zagreb, optimized tram structure for better noise and vibration mitigation and a slab track with double sleepers embedded in a concrete slab, which presents an entirely new approach of tram track construction in Zagreb. Track has been instrumented with acceleration sensors, strain gauges and revision shafts for inspection. Relative deformations give an insight into track structure dynamic load distribution through the exploitation period. Further the paper describes vibro-acoustic measurements conducted at the test site. To evaluate the track performance from the vibro-acoustical standpoint, detailed analysis of track decay rate has been analysed. Opposed to measurement technique using impact hammer for track decay rate measurements, newly developed measuring technique using vehicle pass by vibrations as a source of excitation has been proposed and analysed. Paper gives overview of the method, it’s benefits compared to standard method of track decay rate measurements and method evaluation based on noise measurements of the vehicle pass by.

  16. Simple scaling for faster tracking simulation in accelerator multiparticle dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLachlan, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    Macroparticle tracking is a direct and attractive approach to following the evolution of a phase space distribution. When the particles interact through short range wake fields or when inter-particle force is included, calculations of this kind require a large number of macroparticles. It is possible to reduce both the number of macroparticles required and the number of tracking steps per unit simulated time by employing a simple scaling which can be inferred directly from the single-particle equations of motion. In many cases of practical importance the speed of calculation improves with the fourth power of the scaling constant. Scaling has been implemented in an existing longitudinal tracking code; early experience supports the concept and promises major time savings. Limitations on the scaling are discussed

  17. Robust visual tracking via structured multi-task sparse learning

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tianzhu; Ghanem, Bernard; Liu, Si; Ahuja, Narendra

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we formulate object tracking in a particle filter framework as a structured multi-task sparse learning problem, which we denote as Structured Multi-Task Tracking (S-MTT). Since we model particles as linear combinations of dictionary

  18. Simulation of Telescope Detectivity for Geo Survey and Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, P.

    2014-09-01

    As the number of space debris on Earths Orbit increases steadily, the need to survey, track and catalogue them becomes of key importance. In this context, CNES has been using the TAROT Telescopes (Rapid Telescopes for Transient Objects owned and operated by CNRS) for several years to conduct studies about space surveillance and tracking. Today, two testbeds of services using the TAROT telescopes are running every night: one for GEO situational awareness and the second for debris tracking. Additionally to the CNES research activity on space surveillance and tracking domain, an operational collision avoidance service for LEO and GEO satellites is in place at CNES for several years. This service named CAESAR (Conjunction Analysis and Evaluation: Alerts and Recommendations) is used by CNES as well as by external customers. As the optical debris tracking testbed based on TAROT telescopes is the first step toward an operational provider of GEO measures that could be used by CAESAR, simulations have been done to help choosing the sites and types of telescopes that could be added in the GEO survey and debris tracking telescope network. One of the distinctive characteristics of the optical observation of space debris compared to traditional astronomic observation is the need to observe objects at low elevations. The two mains reasons for this are the need to observe the GEO belt from non-equatorial sites and the need to observe debris at longitudes far from the telescope longitude. This paper presents the results of simulations of the detectivity for GEO debris of various telescopes and sites, based on models of the GEO belt, the atmosphere and the instruments. One of the conclusions is that clever detection of faint streaks and spread sources by image processing is one of the major keys to improve the detection of debris on the GEO belt.

  19. Pygmalion in Instruction? Tracking, Teacher Reward Structures, and Educational Inequality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ida Gran

    2018-01-01

    I combine sociological and economic research to test a new theoretical model of the causes and consequences of teacher responses to students’ track location. I examine the impact of teacher reward structures on educational inequality by analyzing how grading practices affect students’ effort...... and achievement across tracks. Differences in grading practices determine incentive structures for student behavior and educational investments and thus may be an important mechanism in explaining track effects on academic achievement. I apply student fixed effects models across tracks to the NELS:88 and find...

  20. AUV-Based Plume Tracking: A Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awantha Jayasiri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a simulation study of an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV navigation system operating in a GPS-denied environment. The AUV navigation method makes use of underwater transponder positioning and requires only one transponder. A multirate unscented Kalman filter is used to determine the AUV orientation and position by fusing high-rate sensor data and low-rate information. The paper also proposes a gradient-based, efficient, and adaptive novel algorithm for plume boundary tracking missions. The algorithm follows a centralized approach and it includes path optimization features based on gradient information. The proposed algorithm is implemented in simulation on the AUV-based navigation system and successful boundary tracking results are obtained.

  1. Interface tracking simulations of bubbly flows in PWR relevant geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Jun, E-mail: jfang3@ncsu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Rasquin, Michel, E-mail: michel.rasquin@colorado.edu [Aerospace Engineering Department, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Bolotnov, Igor A., E-mail: igor_bolotnov@ncsu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • Simulations were performed for turbulent bubbly flows in PWR subchannel geometry. • Liquid turbulence is fully resolved by direct numerical simulation approach. • Bubble behavior is captured using level-set interface tracking method. • Time-averaged single- and two-phase turbulent flow statistical quantities are obtained. - Abstract: The advances in high performance computing (HPC) have allowed direct numerical simulation (DNS) approach coupled with interface tracking methods (ITM) to perform high fidelity simulations of turbulent bubbly flows in various complex geometries. In this work, we have chosen the geometry of the pressurized water reactor (PWR) core subchannel to perform a set of interface tracking simulations (ITS) with fully resolved liquid turbulence. The presented research utilizes a massively parallel finite-element based code, PHASTA, for the subchannel geometry simulations of bubbly flow turbulence. The main objective for this research is to demonstrate the ITS capabilities in gaining new insight into bubble/turbulence interactions and assisting the development of improved closure laws for multiphase computational fluid dynamics (M-CFD). Both single- and two-phase turbulent flows were studied within a single PWR subchannel. The analysis of numerical results includes the mean gas and liquid velocity profiles, void fraction distribution and turbulent kinetic energy profiles. Two sets of flow rates and bubble sizes were used in the simulations. The chosen flow rates corresponded to the Reynolds numbers of 29,079 and 80,775 based on channel hydraulic diameter (D{sub h}) and mean velocity. The finite element unstructured grids utilized for these simulations include 53.8 million and 1.11 billion elements, respectively. This has allowed to fully resolve all the turbulence scales and the deformable interfaces of individual bubbles. For the two-phase flow simulations, a 1% bubble volume fraction was used which resulted in 17 bubbles in

  2. The TL fluence response to heavy charged particles using the track interaction model and track structure information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Villafuerte, M.; Avila, O.

    2002-01-01

    The extended track interaction model, ETIM, has recently been proposed to explain the TLD-100 fluence response of peak 5 to heavy ions. This model includes the track structure information through the use of the luminescent-centre occupation probability obtained from radial dose distributions produced by the ions as they travel through the dosemeter. In this work an implementation of ETIM using Monte Carlo techniques is presented. The simulation was applied to calculate the response of peak 5 of both sensitised and normal TLD-100 crystals to 2.6 and 6.8 MeV 4 He ions. The simulation shows that the TL-fluence response has a strong dependence on ion energy, in disagreement with experimental observations. In spite of this, good agreement between the simulated TL-fluence response calculated for the 6.8 MeV 4 He radial distributions and the experimental data for the two energies was achieved. (author)

  3. PYRO - new capability for isotopic mass tracking in pyroprocess simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liaw, J.R.; Ackerman, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    A new computational code package called PYRO has been developed to support the IFR fuel recycle demonstration project in the HFEF/S facility at ANL-W. The basic pyrochemical code PYRO1 1 models the atomic mass flows and phase compositions of 48 essential chemical elements involved in the pyroprocess. It has been extended to PYRO1 2 by linking with the ORIGEN code to track more than 1000 isotopic species, their radioactive decays, and related phenomena. This paper first describes the pyroprocess to be modeled and the pyrochemical capability that has been implemented in PYRO1 1 , and then gives a full account on the algorithm of extending it to PYRO1 2 for isotopic mass tracking. Results from several scoping and simulation runs will be discussed to illustrate the significance of modeling in process radioactive decays

  4. PYRO: New capability for isotopic mass tracking in pyroprocess simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liaw, J.R.; Ackerman, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    A new computational code package called PYRO has been developed to support the IFR fuel recycle demonstration project in the HFEF/S facility at ANL-W. The basic pyrochemical code PYRO1-1 models the atomic mass flows and phase compositions of 48 essential chemical elements involved in the pyroprocess. It has been extended to PYRO1-2 by linking with the ORIGEN code to track more than 1000 isotopic species, their radioactive decays, and related phenomena. This paper first describes the pyroprocess to be modeled and the pyrochemical capability that has been implemented in PYRO1-1, and then gives a full account on the algorithm of extending it to PYRO1-2 for isotopic mass tracking. Results from several scoping and simulation runs will be discussed to illustrate the significance of modeling in-process radioactive decays. 16 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Situation awareness measures for simulated submarine track management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loft, Shayne; Bowden, Vanessa; Braithwaite, Janelle; Morrell, Daniel B; Huf, Samuel; Durso, Francis T

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether the Situation Present Assessment Method (SPAM) and the Situation Awareness Global Assessment Technique (SAGAT) predict incremental variance in performance on a simulated submarine track management task and to measure the potential disruptive effect of these situation awareness (SA) measures. Submarine track managers use various displays to localize and track contacts detected by own-ship sensors. The measurement of SA is crucial for designing effective submarine display interfaces and training programs. Participants monitored a tactical display and sonar bearing-history display to track the cumulative behaviors of contacts in relationship to own-ship position and landmarks. SPAM (or SAGAT) and the Air Traffic Workload Input Technique (ATWIT) were administered during each scenario, and the NASA Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) and Situation Awareness Rating Technique were administered postscenario. SPAM and SAGAT predicted variance in performance after controlling for subjective measures of SA and workload, and SA for past information was a stronger predictor than SA for current/future information. The NASA-TLX predicted performance on some tasks. Only SAGAT predicted variance in performance on all three tasks but marginally increased subjective workload. SPAM, SAGAT, and the NASA-TLX can predict unique variance in submarine track management performance. SAGAT marginally increased subjective workload, but this increase did not lead to any performance decrement. Defense researchers have identified SPAM as an alternative to SAGAT because it would not require field exercises involving submarines to be paused. SPAM was not disruptive, but it is potentially problematic that SPAM did not predict variance in all three performance tasks. © 2014, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  6. Track structure model of cell damage in space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Robert; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wilson, John W.; Shinn, Judy L.; Ngo, Duc M.

    1992-01-01

    The phenomenological track-structure model of cell damage is discussed. A description of the application of the track-structure model with the NASA Langley transport code for laboratory and space radiation is given. Comparisons to experimental results for cell survival during exposure to monoenergetic, heavy-ion beams are made. The model is also applied to predict cell damage rates and relative biological effectiveness for deep-space exposures.

  7. Basic simulation models of phase tracking devices using Matlab

    CERN Document Server

    Tranter, William

    2010-01-01

    The Phase-Locked Loop (PLL), and many of the devices used for frequency and phase tracking, carrier and symbol synchronization, demodulation, and frequency synthesis, are fundamental building blocks in today's complex communications systems. It is therefore essential for both students and practicing communications engineers interested in the design and implementation of modern communication systems to understand and have insight into the behavior of these important and ubiquitous devices. Since the PLL behaves as a nonlinear device (at least during acquisition), computer simulation can be used

  8. The seam visual tracking method for large structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Qilin; Jiang, Xiaomin; Liu, Xiaoguang; Cheng, Taobo; Zhu, Yulong

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a compact and flexible weld visual tracking method is proposed. Firstly, there was the interference between the visual device and the work-piece to be welded when visual tracking height cannot change. a kind of weld vision system with compact structure and tracking height is researched. Secondly, according to analyze the relative spatial pose between the camera, the laser and the work-piece to be welded and study with the theory of relative geometric imaging, The mathematical model between image feature parameters and three-dimensional trajectory of the assembly gap to be welded is established. Thirdly, the visual imaging parameters of line structured light are optimized by experiment of the weld structure of the weld. Fourth, the interference that line structure light will be scatters at the bright area of metal and the area of surface scratches will be bright is exited in the imaging. These disturbances seriously affect the computational efficiency. The algorithm based on the human eye visual attention mechanism is used to extract the weld characteristics efficiently and stably. Finally, in the experiment, It is verified that the compact and flexible weld tracking method has the tracking accuracy of 0.5mm in the tracking of large structural parts. It is a wide range of industrial application prospects.

  9. Using music structure to improve beat tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannenberg, Roger B.

    2005-09-01

    Beats are an important feature of most music. Beats are used in music information retrieval systems for genre classification, similarity search, and segmentation. However, beats can be difficult to identify, especially in music audio. Traditional beat trackers attempt to (1) match predicted beats to observations of likely beats, and (2) maintain a fairly steady tempo. A third criterion can be added: when repetitions of musical passages occur, the beats in the first repetition should align with the beats in all other repetitions. This third criterion improves beat tracking performance significantly. Repetitions of musical passages are discovered in audio data by searching for similar sequences of chroma vectors. Beats are ``tracked'' by first locating a sequence of likely beats in the music audio using high frequency energy as an indicator of beat likelihood. This beat sequence is then extended by searching forward and backward for more matching beats, allowing slight variations in tempo, and using a relaxation algorithm to optimize the proposed beat locations with respect to the three criteria. Other high-level music features may offer further improvements in beat identification.

  10. Simulation of linac operation using the tracking code L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drevlak, M.; Timm, M.; Weiland, T.

    1996-01-01

    In linear accelerators, misalignments of the machine elements can cause considerable emittance growth due to wake fields, dispersion and other effects. Hence, tight limits are imposed on machine tolerances, design parameters and methods of machine operation. In order to simulate the beam dynamics in linacs, the tracking code L has been developed. Including both single- and multi-bunch effects, the behaviour of the beam in the machine can be simulated and adjustments on parameters of the machine elements up to complete correction techniques and operation procedures can be applied. Utilization of the program is facilitated by a graphical user interface. In this paper we will give an overview over the capabilities of this code and demonstrate its efficiency at attacking the problems associated with large linear accelerators. (author)

  11. Motion Tracking for Medical Imaging: A Non-Visible Structured Light Tracking Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2012-01-01

    We present a system for head motion tracking in 3D brain imaging. The system is based on facial surface reconstruction and tracking using a structured light (SL) scanning principle. The system is designed to fit into narrow 3D medical scanner geometries limiting the field of view. It is tested......, is that it is not necessary to place markers on the patient. This provides a simpler workflow and eliminates uncertainties related to marker attachment and stability. We show proof of concept of a marker less tracking system especially designed for clinical use with promising results....... in a clinical setting on the high resolution research tomograph (HRRT), Siemens PET scanner with a head phantom and volunteers. The SL system is compared to a commercial optical tracking system, the Polaris Vicra system, from NDI based on translatory and rotary ground truth motions of the head phantom...

  12. Radiation damage to DNA: The importance of track structure

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, M A

    1999-01-01

    A wide variety of biological effects are induced by ionizing radiation, from cell death to mutations and carcinogenesis. The biological effectiveness is found to vary not only with the absorbed dose but also with the type of radiation and its energy, i.e., with the nature of radiation tracks. An overview is presented of some of the biological experiments using different qualities of radiation, which when compared with Monte Carlo track structure studies, have highlighted the importance of the localized spatial properties of stochastic energy deposition on the nanometer scale at or near DNA. The track structure leads to clustering of damage which may include DNA breaks, base damage etc., the complexity of the cluster and therefore its biological repairability varying with radiation type. The ability of individual tracks to produce clustered damage, and the subsequent biological response are important in the assessment of the risk associated with low-level human exposure. Recent experiments have also shown that...

  13. Information structure and reference tracking in complex sentences

    CERN Document Server

    Gijn, Rik van; Matic, Dejan

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses argument marking and reference tracking in Mekens complex clauses and their correlation to information structure. The distribution of pronominal arguments in Mekens simple clauses follows an absolutive pattern with main verbs. Complex clauses maintain the morphological absolutive argument marking, but show a nominative pattern with respect to argument reference tracking, since transitive and intransitive subjects function as syntactic pivots. The language extends the use of argument-marking verb morphology to control the reference of discourse participants across clauses.

  14. Preparation of fluoropolymer-based ion-track membranes. Structure of latent tracks and pretreatment effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaki, Tetsuya; Nuryanthi, Nuryanthi; Koshikawa, Hiroshi; Sawada, Shinichi; Hakoda, Teruyuki; Hasegawa, Shin; Asano, Masaharu; Maekawa, Yasunari

    2012-01-01

    High-energy heavy-ion induced damage, called latent tracks m organic polymers can sometimes be etched out chemically to give submicro- and nano-sized pores. Our focus is placed on ion-track membranes of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF), a type of fluoropolymer, which were previously considered as a matrix of polymer electrolyte fuel-cell membranes. There have been no optimized methods of preparing the PVDF-based ion-track membranes. We thus examined chemical structures of the defects created in the track, and accordingly, presented a pretreatment technique for achieving more efficient track etching. A 25 μm-thick PVDF film was bombarded with 1.1 GeV 238 U or 450 MeV 129 Xe ions. In the multi-purpose chamber, degradation processes were monitored in-situ by FT-IR spectroscopy and residual gas analysis as a function of the fluence up to 6.0 x 10 11 ions/cm 2 . The films irradiated at 8 ions/cm 2 were etched in a 9 M KOH aqueous solution at 80degC. We also performed the conductometric etching, which allows monitoring of pore evolution versus etching time by recording the electrical conductance through the membrane. At fluences above 1 x 10 10 ions/cm 2 , the film showed two new absorption bands identified as double-bond stretching vibrations of in-chain unsaturations -CH=CF- and fluorinated vinyl groups -CF 2 CH=CF 2 . These defects would result from the evolution of HF. The knowledge of the solubility in a permanganate alkaline solution and our preliminary experiment suggested the importance of oxidized tracks for the easy introduction of the etching agent. We finally found that the pretreatment with ozone could oxidize the double bonds in the tracks, thereby vigorously promoting track etching before breakthrough. (author)

  15. Particle tracking code of simulating global RF feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mestha, L.K.

    1991-09-01

    It is well known in the ''control community'' that a good feedback controller design is deeply rooted in the physics of the system. For example, when accelerating the beam we must keep several parameters under control so that the beam travels within the confined space. Important parameters include the frequency and phase of the rf signal, the dipole field, and the cavity voltage. Because errors in these parameters will progressively mislead the beam from its projected path in the tube, feedback loops are used to correct the behavior. Since the feedback loop feeds energy to the system, it changes the overall behavior of the system and may drive it to instability. Various types of controllers are used to stabilize the feedback loop. Integrating the beam physics with the feedback controllers allows us to carefully analyze the beam behavior. This will not only guarantee optimal performance but will also significantly enhance the ability of the beam control engineer to deal effectively with the interaction of various feedback loops. Motivated by this theme, we developed a simple one-particle tracking code to simulate particle behavior with feedback controllers. In order to achieve our fundamental objective, we can ask some key questions: What are the input and output parameters? How can they be applied to the practical machine? How can one interface the rf system dynamics such as the transfer characteristics of the rf cavities and phasing between the cavities? Answers to these questions can be found by considering a simple case of a single cavity with one particle, tracking it turn-by-turn with appropriate initial conditions, then introducing constraints on crucial parameters. Critical parameters are rf frequency, phase, and amplitude once the dipole field has been given. These are arranged in the tracking code so that we can interface the feedback system controlling them

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation for PBR pebble tracking simulation via a random walk approach using Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyoung O; Holmes, Thomas W; Calderon, Adan F; Gardner, Robin P

    2012-05-01

    Using a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, random walks were used for pebble tracking in a two-dimensional geometry in the presence of a biased gravity field. We investigated the effect of viscosity damping in the presence of random Gaussian fluctuations. The particle tracks were generated by Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation for a Pebble Bed Reactor. The MD simulations were conducted in the interaction of noncohesive Hertz-Mindlin theory where the random walk MC simulation has a correlation with the MD simulation. This treatment can easily be extended to include the generation of transient gamma-ray spectra from a single pebble that contains a radioactive tracer. Then the inverse analysis thereof could be made to determine the uncertainty of the realistic measurement of transient positions of that pebble by any given radiation detection system designed for that purpose. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Structural Measures to Track the Evolution of SNOMED CT Hierarchies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Duo; Gu, Huanying (Helen); Perl, Yehoshua; Halper, Michael; Ochs, Christopher; Elhanan, Gai; Chen, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT) is an extensive reference terminology with an attendant amount of complexity. It has been updated continuously and revisions have been released semi-annually to meet users’ needs and to reflect the results of quality assurance (QA) activities. Two measures based on structural features are proposed to track the effects of both natural terminology growth and QA activities based on aspects of the complexity of SNOMED CT. These two measures, called the structural density measure and accumulated structural measure, are derived based on two abstraction networks, the area taxonomy and the partial-area taxonomy. The measures derive from attribute relationship distributions and various concept groupings that are associated with the abstraction networks. They are used to track the trends in the complexity of structures as SNOMED CT changes over time. The measures were calculated for consecutive releases of five SNOMED CT hierarchies, including the Specimen hierarchy. The structural density measure shows that natural growth tends to move a hierarchy’s structure toward a more complex state, whereas the accumulated structural measure shows that QA processes tend to move a hierarchy’s structure toward a less complex state. It is also observed that both the structural density and accumulated structural measures are useful tools to track the evolution of an entire SNOMED CT hierarchy and reveal internal concept migration within it. PMID:26260003

  18. Neutron-induced complex reaction analysis with 3D nuclear track simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sajo-Bohus, L.; Palfalvi, J.K.; Akatov, Yu.; Arevalo, O.; Greaves, E.D.; Nemeth, P.; Palacios, D.; Szabo, J.; Eoerdoegh, I.

    2005-01-01

    Complex (multiple) etched tracks are analysed through digitised images and 3D simulation by a purpose-built algorithm. From a binary track image an unfolding procedure is followed to generate a 3D track model, from which several track parameters are estimated. The method presented here allows the deposited energy, that originated from particle fragmentation or carbon spallation by means of induced tracks in commercially available PADC detectors, to be estimated. Results of evaluated nuclear tracks related to 12 C (n,3αn ' ) reaction are presented here. The detectors were exposed on the ISS in 2001

  19. Motion tracking in narrow spaces: A structured light approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel tracking system for patient head motion inside 3D medical scanners. Currently, the system is targeted at the Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) PET scanner. Partial face surfaces are reconstructed using a miniaturized structured light system. The reconstructed 3D...

  20. Pygmalion in Instruction? Tracking, Teacher Reward Structures, and Educational Inequality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ida Gran

    2018-01-01

    I combine sociological and economic research to test a new theoretical model of the causes and consequences of teacher responses to students’ track location. I examine the impact of teacher reward structures on educational inequality by analyzing how grading practices affect students’ effort...

  1. Track structure in radiation biology: theory and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikjoo, H; Uehara, S; Wilson, W E; Hoshi, M; Goodhead, D T

    1998-04-01

    A brief review is presented of the basic concepts in track structure and the relative merit of various theoretical approaches adopted in Monte-Carlo track-structure codes are examined. In the second part of the paper, a formal cluster analysis is introduced to calculate cluster-distance distributions. Total experimental ionization cross-sections were least-square fitted and compared with the calculation by various theoretical methods. Monte-Carlo track-structure code Kurbuc was used to examine and compare the spectrum of the secondary electrons generated by using functions given by Born-Bethe, Jain-Khare, Gryzinsky, Kim-Rudd, Mott and Vriens' theories. The cluster analysis in track structure was carried out using the k-means method and Hartigan algorithm. Data are presented on experimental and calculated total ionization cross-sections: inverse mean free path (IMFP) as a function of electron energy used in Monte-Carlo track-structure codes; the spectrum of secondary electrons generated by different functions for 500 eV primary electrons; cluster analysis for 4 MeV and 20 MeV alpha-particles in terms of the frequency of total cluster energy to the root-mean-square (rms) radius of the cluster and differential distance distributions for a pair of clusters; and finally relative frequency distribution for energy deposited in DNA, single-strand break and double-strand breaks for 10MeV/u protons, alpha-particles and carbon ions. There are a number of Monte-Carlo track-structure codes that have been developed independently and the bench-marking presented in this paper allows a better choice of the theoretical method adopted in a track-structure code to be made. A systematic bench-marking of cross-sections and spectra of the secondary electrons shows differences between the codes at atomic level, but such differences are not significant in biophysical modelling at the macromolecular level. Clustered-damage evaluation shows: that a substantial proportion of dose ( 30%) is

  2. Structural simulation of natural zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez P, E.; Carrera G, L.M.

    1997-01-01

    The application of X-ray diffraction (XRD) in the study of crystalline structures of the natural and modified zeolites allows the identification, lattice parameter determination and the crystallinity grade of the sample of interest. Until two decades ago, simulation methods of X-ray diffraction patterns were developed with which was possible to do reliable determinations of their crystalline structure. In this work it is presented the first stage of the crystalline structure simulation of zeolitic material from Etla, Oaxaca which has been studied for using it in the steam production industry and purification of industrial water. So that the natural material was modified for increasing its sodium contents and this material in its turn was put in contact with aqueous solutions of Na, Mg and Ca carbonates. All the simulations were done with the Lazy-Pulverix method. The considered phase was clinoptilolite. It was done the comparison with three clinoptilolite reported in the literature. (Author)

  3. Implementation of the P barANDA Planar-GEM tracking detector in Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divani Veis, Nazila; Ehret, Andre; Firoozabadi, Mohammad M.; Karabowicz, Radoslaw; Maas, Frank; Saito, Nami; Saito, Takehiko R.; Voss, Bernd; PANDA Gem-Tracker Subgroup

    2018-02-01

    The P barANDA experiment at FAIR will be performed to investigate different aspects of hadron physics using anti-proton beams interacting with a fixed nuclear target. The experimental setup consists of a complex series of detector components covering a large solid angle. A detector with a gaseous active media equipped with gas electron multiplier (GEM) technique will be employed to measure tracks of charged particles at forward direction in order to achieve a high momentum resolution. In this work, a full setup of the GEM tracking detector has been implemented in the P barANDA Monte Carlo simulation package (PandaRoot) based on the current technical and conceptual design, and the expected performance of the P barANDA GEM-tracking detector has been investigated. Furthermore, material-budget studies in terms of the radiation length of the P barANDA GEM-tracking detector have been made in order to investigate the effect of the detector materials and its associated structures to particle measurements.

  4. Real-time model for simulating a tracked vehicle on deformable soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Meywerk

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Simulation is one possibility to gain insight into the behaviour of tracked vehicles on deformable soils. A lot of publications are known on this topic, but most of the simulations described there cannot be run in real-time. The ability to run a simulation in real-time is necessary for driving simulators. This article describes an approach for real-time simulation of a tracked vehicle on deformable soils. The components of the real-time model are as follows: a conventional wheeled vehicle simulated in the Multi Body System software TRUCKSim, a geometric description of landscape, a track model and an interaction model between track and deformable soils based on Bekker theory and Janosi–Hanamoto, on one hand, and between track and vehicle wheels, on the other hand. Landscape, track model, soil model and the interaction are implemented in MATLAB/Simulink. The details of the real-time model are described in this article, and a detailed description of the Multi Body System part is omitted. Simulations with the real-time model are compared to measurements and to a detailed Multi Body System–finite element method model of a tracked vehicle. An application of the real-time model in a driving simulator is presented, in which 13 drivers assess the comfort of a passive and an active suspension of a tracked vehicle.

  5. Performance studies of the P barANDA planar GEM-tracking detector in physics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divani Veis, Nazila; Firoozabadi, Mohammad M.; Karabowicz, Radoslaw; Maas, Frank; Saito, Takehiko R.; Voss, Bernd; ̅PANDA Gem-Tracker Subgroup

    2018-03-01

    The P barANDA experiment will be installed at the future facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR) in Darmstadt, Germany, to study events from the annihilation of protons and antiprotons. The P barANDA detectors can cover a wide physics program about baryon spectroscopy and nucleon structure as well as the study of hadrons and hypernuclear physics including the study of excited hyperon states. One very specific feature of most hyperon ground states is the long decay length of several centimeters in the forward direction. The central tracking detectors of the P barANDA setup are not sufficiently optimized for these long decay lengths. Therefore, using a set of the planar GEM-tracking detectors in the forward region of interest can improve the results in the hyperon physics-benchmark channel. The current conceptual designed P barANDA GEM-tracking stations contribute the measurement of the particles emitted in the polar angles between about 2 to 22 degrees. For this designed detector performance and acceptance, studies have been performed using one of the important hyperonic decay channel p bar p → Λ bar Λ → p bar pπ+π- in physics simulations. The simulations were carried out using the PandaRoot software packages based on the FairRoot framework.

  6. Simulated sensitivity of tropical cyclone track to the moisture in an idealized monsoon gyre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Ziyu; Ge, Xuyang; Guo, Bingyao

    2017-12-01

    In this study, the sensitivity of tropical cyclone (TC) track to the moisture condition in a nearby monsoon gyre (MG) is investigated. Numerical simulations reveal that TC track is highly sensitive to the spatial distribution of relative humidity (RH). In an experiment conducted with higher (lower) RH in the eastern (western) semicircle of an MG, the TC experiences a sharp northward turning. In contrast, when the RH pattern is reversed, the simulated TC does not show a sharp northward turning. The RH distribution modulates the intensity and structure of both the TC and MG, so that when the TC is initially embedded in a moister environment, convection is enhanced in the outer core, which favors an expansion of the outer core size. A TC with a larger outer size has greater beta-effect propagation, favoring a faster westward translational speed. Meanwhile, higher RH enhances the vorticity gradient within the MG and promotes a quicker attraction between the TC and MG centers through vorticity segregation process. These cumulative effects cause the TC to collocate with the MG center. Once the coalescence process takes place, the energy dispersion associated with the TC and MG is enhanced, which rapidly strengthens southwesterly flows on the eastern flanks. The resulting steering flow leads the TC to take a sharp northward track.

  7. Radiation damage to DNA: The importance of track structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.A.

    1999-01-01

    A wide variety of biological effects are induced by ionizing radiation, from cell death to mutations and carcinogenesis. The biological effectiveness is found to vary not only with the absorbed dose but also with the type of radiation and its energy, i.e., with the nature of radiation tracks. An overview is presented of some of the biological experiments using different qualities of radiation, which when compared with Monte Carlo track structure studies, have highlighted the importance of the localized spatial properties of stochastic energy deposition on the nanometer scale at or near DNA. The track structure leads to clustering of damage which may include DNA breaks, base damage etc., the complexity of the cluster and therefore its biological repairability varying with radiation type. The ability of individual tracks to produce clustered damage, and the subsequent biological response are important in the assessment of the risk associated with low-level human exposure. Recent experiments have also shown that biological response to radiation is not always restricted to the 'hit' cell but can sometimes be induced in 'un-hit' cells near by

  8. Object tracking by occlusion detection via structured sparse learning

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tianzhu

    2013-06-01

    Sparse representation based methods have recently drawn much attention in visual tracking due to good performance against illumination variation and occlusion. They assume the errors caused by image variations can be modeled as pixel-wise sparse. However, in many practical scenarios these errors are not truly pixel-wise sparse but rather sparsely distributed in a structured way. In fact, pixels in error constitute contiguous regions within the object\\'s track. This is the case when significant occlusion occurs. To accommodate for non-sparse occlusion in a given frame, we assume that occlusion detected in previous frames can be propagated to the current one. This propagated information determines which pixels will contribute to the sparse representation of the current track. In other words, pixels that were detected as part of an occlusion in the previous frame will be removed from the target representation process. As such, this paper proposes a novel tracking algorithm that models and detects occlusion through structured sparse learning. We test our tracker on challenging benchmark sequences, such as sports videos, which involve heavy occlusion, drastic illumination changes, and large pose variations. Experimental results show that our tracker consistently outperforms the state-of-the-art. © 2013 IEEE.

  9. Occlusion detection via structured sparse learning for robust object tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tianzhu

    2014-01-01

    Sparse representation based methods have recently drawn much attention in visual tracking due to good performance against illumination variation and occlusion. They assume the errors caused by image variations can be modeled as pixel-wise sparse. However, in many practical scenarios, these errors are not truly pixel-wise sparse but rather sparsely distributed in a structured way. In fact, pixels in error constitute contiguous regions within the object’s track. This is the case when significant occlusion occurs. To accommodate for nonsparse occlusion in a given frame, we assume that occlusion detected in previous frames can be propagated to the current one. This propagated information determines which pixels will contribute to the sparse representation of the current track. In other words, pixels that were detected as part of an occlusion in the previous frame will be removed from the target representation process. As such, this paper proposes a novel tracking algorithm that models and detects occlusion through structured sparse learning. We test our tracker on challenging benchmark sequences, such as sports videos, which involve heavy occlusion, drastic illumination changes, and large pose variations. Extensive experimental results show that our proposed tracker consistently outperforms the state-of-the-art trackers.

  10. Structure-aware Local Sparse Coding for Visual Tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Qi, Yuankai

    2018-01-24

    Sparse coding has been applied to visual tracking and related vision problems with demonstrated success in recent years. Existing tracking methods based on local sparse coding sample patches from a target candidate and sparsely encode these using a dictionary consisting of patches sampled from target template images. The discriminative strength of existing methods based on local sparse coding is limited as spatial structure constraints among the template patches are not exploited. To address this problem, we propose a structure-aware local sparse coding algorithm which encodes a target candidate using templates with both global and local sparsity constraints. For robust tracking, we show local regions of a candidate region should be encoded only with the corresponding local regions of the target templates that are the most similar from the global view. Thus, a more precise and discriminative sparse representation is obtained to account for appearance changes. To alleviate the issues with tracking drifts, we design an effective template update scheme. Extensive experiments on challenging image sequences demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm against numerous stateof- the-art methods.

  11. Cosmic ray-induced spallation recoil tracks in meteoritic phosphates: simulation at the CERN synchrocyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perron, C [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 75 - Paris (France). Inst. d` Astrophysique; [Museum National d` Histoire Naturelle, 75 - Paris (France)

    1994-12-31

    Annealed meteoritic phosphate crystals have been irradiated by 600 MeV protons to simulate cosmic ray irradiation in space. Spallation recoil tracks were then revealed, which mimic fission tracks, specially when observed in the SEM. A production yield of 9.3 {+-} 2.2 x 10{sup 8} spallation track per proton has been obtained for merrillite, and a substantially lower value (2.5 per proton) for apatite. A nominal production yield in space of 6 tracks per year has been derived, which may be used for a rough estimate of spallation track densities in chondritic merrillite. (Author).

  12. PEPT: An invaluable tool for 3-D particle tracking and CFD simulation verification in hydrocyclone studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann Alex C.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Particle tracks in a hydrocyclone generated both experimentally by positron emission particle tracking (PEPT and numerically with Eulerian-Lagranian CFD have been studied and compared. A hydrocyclone with a cylinder-on-cone design was used in this study, the geometries used in the CFD simulations and in the experiments being identical. It is shown that it is possible to track a fast-moving particle in a hydrocyclone using PEPT with high temporal and spatial resolutions. The numerical 3-D particle trajectories were generated using the Large Eddy Simulation (LES turbulence model for the fluid and Lagrangian particle tracking for the particles. The behaviors of the particles were analyzed in detail and were found to be consistent between experiments and CFD simulations. The tracks of the particles are discussed and related to the fluid flow field visualized in the CFD simulations using the cross-sectional static pressure distribution.

  13. Ion track membranes providing heat pipe surfaces with capillary structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akapiev, G.N.; Dmitriev, S.N.; Erler, B.; Shirkova, V.V.; Schulz, A.; Pietsch, H.

    2003-01-01

    The microgalvanic method for metal filling of etched ion tracks in organic foils is of particular interest for the fabrication of microsized structures. Microstructures like copper whiskers with a high aspect ratio produced in ion track membranes are suitable for the generation of high-performance heat transfer surfaces. A surface with good heat transfer characteristics is defined as a surface on which a small temperature difference causes a large heat transfer from the surface material to the liquid. It is well-known that a porous surface layer transfers to an evaporating liquid a given quantity of heat at a smaller temperature difference than does a usual smooth surface. Copper whiskers with high aspect ratio and a density 10 5 per cm 2 form such a porous structure, which produces strong capillary forces and therefore a maximum of heat transfer coefficients

  14. Motion tracking in narrow spaces: a structured light approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel tracking system for patient head motion inside 3D medical scanners. Currently, the system is targeted at the Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) PET scanner. Partial face surfaces are reconstructed using a miniaturized structured light system. The reconstructed 3D...... the system to a standard optical motion tracker based on a rigid tracking tool. Our system achieves an angular RMSE of 0.11 degrees demonstrating its relevance for motion compensated 3D scan image reconstructions as well as its competitiveness against the standard optical system with an RMSE of 0.08 degrees...... point clouds are matched to a reference surface using a robust iterative closest point algorithm. A main challenge is the narrow geometry requiring a compact structured light system and an oblique angle of observation. The system is validated using a mannequin head mounted on a rotary stage. We compare...

  15. Track structure theory in radiobiology and in radiation detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, R.

    1978-01-01

    The response of biological cells, and many physical radiation and track detectors to ionizing radiations and to energetic heavily ionizing particles, results from the secondary and higher generation electrons ejected from the atoms and molecules of the detector by the incident primary radiation. The theory uses a calculation of the radial distribution of local dose deposited by secondary electrons (delta-rays) from an energetic heavy ion as a transfer function, relating the dose-response relation measured (or postulated) for a particular detector in a uniform radiation field (gamma-rays) to obtain the radial distribution in response about the ion's path, and thus the structure of the track of a particle. Subsequent calculations yield the response of the detector to radiation fields of arbitrary quality. The models which have been used for detector response arise from target theory, and are of the form of statistical models called multi-hit or multi-target detectors, in which it is assumed that there are sensitive elements (emulsion grains, or biological cell nuclei) which may require many hits (emulsion grains) or single hits in different targets (say, cellular chromosomes) in order to produce the observed end-point. Recent work has demonstrated that many-hit physical detectors do exist. From both emulsion sensitometry and from the structure of tracks of heavy ions, it can be shown that emulsion-developer combinations exist which yield many-hit response. There is also some evidence that the supralinearity in thermoluminescent dosimeters arises from a mixture of 1-hit and 2-hit response, perhaps of different trap structures within the same TLD crystal. These detectors can be expected to mimic the response of biological cells to radiations of different quality. Their patterns of response may help us to understand better the structure of particle tracks in SSNTD's. (author)

  16. Hybrid Simulation of Composite Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgh, Jacob Herold

    experiment. The technique has primarily been used within earthquake engineering but many other fields of engineering have utilized the method with benefit. However, these previous efforts have focused on structures with a simple boundary between the numerical and physical substructure i.e. few degrees...... the transfer system and the control and monitoring techniques in the shared boundary is therefore a key issue in this type of hybrid simulation. During the research, hybrid simulation platforms have been programmed capable of running on different time scales with advanced control and monitoring techniques...

  17. Quantification and differentiation of nuclear tracks in SSNTD by simulation of their diffraction pattern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, D.; Palacios, F.; Vitoria, T.

    2001-01-01

    An alternative method to count and differentiate nuclear tracks in SSNTD is described. The method is based on the simulation and analysis of Fraunhofer diffraction pattern formed when coherent light passes through tracks of an etched detector. Transformation of the optical system was carried out by a digital procedure of Fourier Transform. Spectral analysis of the radial intensity distribution facilitated to quantify and differentiate tracks for its diameters. The formalism outlined is also applicable to elliptic tracks. Different components of the developed software (TRACKS) are shown. Results obtained by simulation and by the theoretical model gave satisfactory concordance. With the purpose of optimizing the proposed method, technical variants of optic microscopy are discussed. A model that considers the correction for track overlapping was developed and applied. Count error is small when track distribution changes in the field of view. The proposed method can differentiate genuine tracks from defects and anomalies of the detector. Analyzing the influence of illumination conditions and focus of the microscope on track counting and discrimination, the preliminary treatment of images obtained by the CCD camera was established. The proposed method allows, with low cost and operation simplicity, guaranteeing high speed in the obtaining of results, to calculate with good approximation track density in CR-39 detectors and to differentiate the energy of incident ions by track diameters with satisfactory accuracy and precision

  18. Robust visual tracking via structured multi-task sparse learning

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tianzhu

    2012-11-09

    In this paper, we formulate object tracking in a particle filter framework as a structured multi-task sparse learning problem, which we denote as Structured Multi-Task Tracking (S-MTT). Since we model particles as linear combinations of dictionary templates that are updated dynamically, learning the representation of each particle is considered a single task in Multi-Task Tracking (MTT). By employing popular sparsity-inducing lp,q mixed norms (specifically p∈2,∞ and q=1), we regularize the representation problem to enforce joint sparsity and learn the particle representations together. As compared to previous methods that handle particles independently, our results demonstrate that mining the interdependencies between particles improves tracking performance and overall computational complexity. Interestingly, we show that the popular L1 tracker (Mei and Ling, IEEE Trans Pattern Anal Mach Intel 33(11):2259-2272, 2011) is a special case of our MTT formulation (denoted as the L11 tracker) when p=q=1. Under the MTT framework, some of the tasks (particle representations) are often more closely related and more likely to share common relevant covariates than other tasks. Therefore, we extend the MTT framework to take into account pairwise structural correlations between particles (e.g. spatial smoothness of representation) and denote the novel framework as S-MTT. The problem of learning the regularized sparse representation in MTT and S-MTT can be solved efficiently using an Accelerated Proximal Gradient (APG) method that yields a sequence of closed form updates. As such, S-MTT and MTT are computationally attractive. We test our proposed approach on challenging sequences involving heavy occlusion, drastic illumination changes, and large pose variations. Experimental results show that S-MTT is much better than MTT, and both methods consistently outperform state-of-the-art trackers. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media New York.

  19. AGATA gamma-ray tracking simulations and data analysis working group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of this meeting was to review the present state of the AGATA project (Advanced GAmma Tracking Array). The following issues were dealt with: -) detectors and preamplifiers, -) ancillary detectors, -) tracking, -) physics simulations and key experiments, -) in-beam tests, -) data acquisition, -) data processing: front end electronics, and -) infrastructure. This document gathers only the slides of the presentations.

  20. AGATA gamma-ray tracking simulations and data analysis working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this meeting was to review the present state of the AGATA project (Advanced GAmma Tracking Array). The following issues were dealt with: -) detectors and preamplifiers, -) ancillary detectors, -) tracking, -) physics simulations and key experiments, -) in-beam tests, -) data acquisition, -) data processing: front end electronics, and -) infrastructure. This document gathers only the slides of the presentations

  1. MODAL TRACKING of A Structural Device: A Subspace Identification Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Franco, S. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ruggiero, E. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Emmons, M. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lopez, I. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Stoops, L. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-03-20

    Mechanical devices operating in an environment contaminated by noise, uncertainties, and extraneous disturbances lead to low signal-to-noise-ratios creating an extremely challenging processing problem. To detect/classify a device subsystem from noisy data, it is necessary to identify unique signatures or particular features. An obvious feature would be resonant (modal) frequencies emitted during its normal operation. In this report, we discuss a model-based approach to incorporate these physical features into a dynamic structure that can be used for such an identification. The approach we take after pre-processing the raw vibration data and removing any extraneous disturbances is to obtain a representation of the structurally unknown device along with its subsystems that capture these salient features. One approach is to recognize that unique modal frequencies (sinusoidal lines) appear in the estimated power spectrum that are solely characteristic of the device under investigation. Therefore, the objective of this effort is based on constructing a black box model of the device that captures these physical features that can be exploited to “diagnose” whether or not the particular device subsystem (track/detect/classify) is operating normally from noisy vibrational data. Here we discuss the application of a modern system identification approach based on stochastic subspace realization techniques capable of both (1) identifying the underlying black-box structure thereby enabling the extraction of structural modes that can be used for analysis and modal tracking as well as (2) indicators of condition and possible changes from normal operation.

  2. Modal-space reference-model-tracking fuzzy control of earthquake excited structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwan-Soon; Ok, Seung-Yong

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an adaptive modal-space reference-model-tracking fuzzy control technique for the vibration control of earthquake-excited structures. In the proposed approach, the fuzzy logic is introduced to update optimal control force so that the controlled structural response can track the desired response of a reference model. For easy and practical implementation, the reference model is constructed by assigning the target damping ratios to the first few dominant modes in modal space. The numerical simulation results demonstrate that the proposed approach successfully achieves not only the adaptive fault-tolerant control system against partial actuator failures but also the robust performance against the variations of the uncertain system properties by redistributing the feedback control forces to the available actuators.

  3. Heavy particle track structure parameters for biophysical modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watt, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    Averaged values of physical track structure parameters are important in radiobiology and radiological protection for the expression of damage mechanisms and for quantifying radiation effects. To provide a ready reference, tables of relevant quantities have been compiled for heavy charged particles in liquid water. The full tables will be published elsewhere but here illustrative examples are given of the trends for the most important quantities. In the tables, data are given for 74 types of heavy charged particle ranging from protons to uranium ions at specific energies between 0.1 keV/u and 1 GeV/u. Aggregate effects in liquid water are taken into account implicitly in the calculations. Results are presented for instantaneous particle energies and for averages over the charged particle equilibrium spectrum. The latter are of special relevance to radiation dosimetry. Quality parameters calculated are: β 2 ; z 2 /β 2 ; linear primary ionisation and the mean free path between ionisations; LET; track and dose-restricted LET with 100 eV cut-off; relative variances; delta-ray energies and ranges; ion energies and ranges and kerma factors. Here, the procedures used in the calculations are indicated. Representative results are shown in graphical form. The role of the physical track properties is discussed with regard to optimisation of the design of experiments intended to elucidate biological damage mechanisms in mammalian cells and their relevance to radiological protection. ((orig.))

  4. Track structure theory in radiobiology and in radiation detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, R.

    1976-01-01

    The response of biological cells, and many physical radiation and track detectors to ionizing radiations, and to energetic heavily ionizing particles results from the secondary and higher generation electrons ejected from the atoms and molecules of the detector by the incident primary radiation. The models which have been used for detector response arise from target theory, and are of the form of statistical models called multi-hit or multi-target detectors, in which it is assumed that there are sensitive elements (emulsion grains, or biological cell nuclei) which may require many hits (emulsion grains) or single hits in different targets (say, cellular chromosomes) in order to produce the observed endpoint. Physically, a hit is interpreted as a 'registered event' caused by an electron passing through the sensitive site, with an efficiency which depends on the electron's speed. Some knowledge of size of the sensitive volume and of the sensitive target is required to make the transition from gamma-ray response to heavy ion response. Recent work has demonstrated that many-hit physical detectors do exist. From both emulsion sensitometry and from the structure of tracks of heavy ions, we are able to show that emulsion-developer combinations exist which yield many-hit response. There is also some evidence that the supralinearity in thermoluminescent dosimeters arises from a trap structures within the same TLD crystal. These detectors can be expected to mimic the response of biological cells to radiations of different quality. Their patterns of response may help us to understand better the structure of particle tracks in SSNTD's. (orig./ORU) [de

  5. CAMS prototype extension: Integration of data acquisition, signal validation, tracking simulator, predictive simulator, state identification, and probabilistic safety assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fantoni, Paolo; Iguchi, Yukihiro; Meyer, Geir; Soerensen, Aimar; Van Dyck, Claude

    1996-04-01

    CAMS (Computerized Accident Management Support) is a system that will provide assistance to the staff in the control room, in the technical support centre, and in a national safety centre. These three groups of users do not need the same type of support. Support is offered in identification of the plant state, in assessment of the future development of the accident, and in planning of accident mitigation strategies. Last year the predictive part of the system was tested at a safety exercise arranged by the Swedish Nuclear Inspectorate, and found to be a useful tool, with potential for further development. Now, new methods are added in signal validation, state identification, tracking simulation, predictive simulation, risk monitoring, and man-machine interface design. A prototype will be demonstrated at Loen in May 1996. This prototype is still under development. The purpose of this prototype is to test those methods in a simulated environment to verify that the developed functions, using different techniques, can work together producing the desired result in an efficient way. The plan is to test these techniques at power plants. During the CAMS design, a considerable effort has been given to maintain the generality of the CAMS concept; although the referenced process has been so far a BWR nuclear plant, the use of this structure and design can be applied to other processes, including non-nuclear processes. The research programme is carried out in close cooperation with member organizations (author)

  6. Storm track response to climate change: Insights from simulations using an idealized dry GCM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbengue, Cheikh; Schneider, Tapio

    2013-04-01

    The midlatitude storm tracks, where the most intense extratropical cyclones are found, are an important fixture in the general circulation. They are instrumental in balancing the Earth's heat, momentum, and moisture budgets and are responsible for the weather and climatic patterns over large regions of the Earth's surface. As a result, the midlatitude storm tracks are the subject of a considerable amount of scientific research to understand their response to global warming. This has produced the robust result showing that the storm tracks migrate poleward with global warming. However, the dynamical mechanisms responsible for this migration remain unclear. Our work seeks to broaden understanding of the dynamical mechanisms responsible for storm track migration. Competing mechanisms present in the comprehensive climate models often used to study storm track dynamics make it difficult to determine the primary mechanisms responsible for storm track migration. We are thus prompted to study storm track dynamics from a simplified and idealized framework, which enables the decoupling of mean temperature effects from the effects of static stability and of tropical from extratropical effects. Using a statistically zonally symmetric, dry general circulation model (GCM), we conduct a series of numerical simulations to help understand the storm track response to global mean temperatures and to the tropical convective static stability, which we can vary independently. We define storm tracks as regions of zonally and temporally averaged maxima of barotropic eddy kinetic energy (EKE). This storm track definition also allows us to use previously found scalings between the magnitude of bulk measures of mean available potential energy (MAPE) and EKE, to decompose MAPE, and to obtain some mechanistic understanding of the storm track response in our simulations. These simulations provide several insights, which enable us to extend upon existing theories on the mechanisms driving the

  7. Instrumentation by distributed optical fiber sensors of a new ballastless track structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapeleau, Xavier; Cottineau, Louis-Marie; Sedran, Thierry; Gueguen, Ivan; Cailliau, Joël

    2013-04-01

    While relatively expensive to build, ballastless track structures are presently seen as an attractive alternative to conventional ballast. With its service life of at least 60 years, they require little maintenance and hence they offer great availability. Other reasons for using ballastless tracks instead of ballasted tracks are the lack of suitable ballast material and the need of less noise and vibration for high-speed, in particularly. A new ballastless track structure has been designed to be circulated up to 300km/h, with a target life of 100 years. It is an interoperable way on concrete slabs that are cast-in-place and slip formed. This structure has been built and tested at the scale one in our laboratory. Indeed, ten millions cyclic loads were applied at 2.5Hz to evaluate the fatigue behaviour under selected mechanical and thermal conditions. To monitor the thermo-mechanical behavior of this new structure and to verify the numerical simulations used for its design, a lot of sensors have been embedded. In particularly, we have tested an optical fiber as distributed sensors to measure strain distribution in the railway model. This sensor can also be used to detect, localize and monitor cracks in concrete slabs. The optical fiber sensing technique ("Rayleigh technique") used in this experimentation has a centimetric spatial resolution which allows to measure complex strain profiles unlike electrical strain gauges which only give local information. Firstly, optical cables used as sensors have been successfully embedded and attached to the reinforcing steel bars in the structure. We have noted that they are resistant enough to resist concrete pouring and working activities. Secondly, strains measured by conventional strain gauges has confirmed the quality of the strain profiles measurements obtained by optical fiber sensors. Moreover, we have found a good agreement between experimental profiles measurements and those obtained by numerical simulations. Early

  8. Modification of track membranes structure by gas discharge etching method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dmitriev, S.N.; Kravets, L.I.

    1996-01-01

    An investigation of the properties of polyethyleneterephthalate track membranes (PET TM) treated with the plasma RF-discharge in air has been performed. The influence of the plasma treatment conditions on the basic properties of the membranes, namely pore size and pore shape, porosity and mechanical strength has been studied. It was arranged that the effect of air plasma on the PET TM results to etching a membrane's surface layer. The membranes' pore size and the form in this case change. It is shown that it is possible to change the structure of track membranes directly by the gas discharge etching method. Depending on the choice of discharge parameters, it is possible to make etching either in a part of the channel or along the whole length of the pore channels. In both cases the membranes with an asymmetric pore shape are formed which possess higher porosity and flow rate. The use of the membranes of such a type allows one to increase drastically the efficiency of the filtration processes. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  9. Reducing the throughput time of the diagnostic track involving CT scanning with computer simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lent, Wineke A.M. van; Deetman, Joost W.; Teertstra, H. Jelle; Muller, Sara H.; Hans, Erwin W.; Harten, Wim H. van

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: To examine the use of computer simulation to reduce the time between the CT request and the consult in which the CT report is discussed (diagnostic track) while restricting idle time and overtime. Methods: After a pre implementation analysis in our case study hospital, by computer simulation three scenarios were evaluated on access time, overtime and idle time of the CT; after implementation these same aspects were evaluated again. Effects on throughput time were measured for outpatient short-term and urgent requests only. Conclusion: The pre implementation analysis showed an average CT access time of 9.8 operating days and an average diagnostic track of 14.5 operating days. Based on the outcomes of the simulation, management changed the capacity for the different patient groups to facilitate a diagnostic track of 10 operating days, with a CT access time of 7 days. After the implementation of changes, the average diagnostic track duration was 12.6 days with an average CT access time of 7.3 days. The fraction of patients with a total throughput time within 10 days increased from 29% to 44% while the utilization remained equal with 82%, the idle time increased by 11% and the overtime decreased by 82%. The fraction of patients that completed the diagnostic track within 10 days improved with 52%. Computer simulation proved useful for studying the effects of proposed scenarios in radiology management. Besides the tangible effects, the simulation increased the awareness that optimizing capacity allocation can reduce access times.

  10. Reducing the throughput time of the diagnostic track involving CT scanning with computer simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lent, Wineke A.M. van, E-mail: w.v.lent@nki.nl [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital (NKI-AVL), P.O. Box 90203, 1006 BE Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Twente, IGS Institute for Innovation and Governance Studies, Department of Health Technology Services Research (HTSR), Enschede (Netherlands); Deetman, Joost W., E-mail: j.deetman@nki.nl [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital (NKI-AVL), P.O. Box 90203, 1006 BE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Teertstra, H. Jelle, E-mail: h.teertstra@nki.nl [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital (NKI-AVL), P.O. Box 90203, 1006 BE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Muller, Sara H., E-mail: s.muller@nki.nl [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital (NKI-AVL), P.O. Box 90203, 1006 BE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hans, Erwin W., E-mail: e.w.hans@utwente.nl [University of Twente, School of Management and Governance, Dept. of Industrial Engineering and Business Intelligence Systems, Enschede (Netherlands); Harten, Wim H. van, E-mail: w.v.harten@nki.nl [Netherlands Cancer Institute - Antoni van Leeuwenhoek Hospital (NKI-AVL), P.O. Box 90203, 1006 BE Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Twente, IGS Institute for Innovation and Governance Studies, Department of Health Technology Services Research (HTSR), Enschede (Netherlands)

    2012-11-15

    Introduction: To examine the use of computer simulation to reduce the time between the CT request and the consult in which the CT report is discussed (diagnostic track) while restricting idle time and overtime. Methods: After a pre implementation analysis in our case study hospital, by computer simulation three scenarios were evaluated on access time, overtime and idle time of the CT; after implementation these same aspects were evaluated again. Effects on throughput time were measured for outpatient short-term and urgent requests only. Conclusion: The pre implementation analysis showed an average CT access time of 9.8 operating days and an average diagnostic track of 14.5 operating days. Based on the outcomes of the simulation, management changed the capacity for the different patient groups to facilitate a diagnostic track of 10 operating days, with a CT access time of 7 days. After the implementation of changes, the average diagnostic track duration was 12.6 days with an average CT access time of 7.3 days. The fraction of patients with a total throughput time within 10 days increased from 29% to 44% while the utilization remained equal with 82%, the idle time increased by 11% and the overtime decreased by 82%. The fraction of patients that completed the diagnostic track within 10 days improved with 52%. Computer simulation proved useful for studying the effects of proposed scenarios in radiology management. Besides the tangible effects, the simulation increased the awareness that optimizing capacity allocation can reduce access times.

  11. Target tracking using DMLC for volumetric modulated arc therapy: A simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Baozhou; Rangaraj, Dharanipathy; Papiez, Lech; Oddiraju, Swetha; Yang Deshan; Li, H. Harold [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Washington University, 4921 Parkview Place, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Southwestern Medical Center, University of Texas, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Washington University, 4921 Parkview Place, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States)

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: Target tracking using dynamic multileaf collimator (DMLC) is a promising approach for intrafraction motion management in radiation therapy. The purpose of this work is to develop a DMLC tracking algorithm capable of delivering volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to the targets that experience two-dimensional (2D) rigid motion in the beam's eye view. Methods: The problem of VMAT delivery to moving targets is formulated as a control problem with constraints. The relationships between gantry speed, gantry acceleration, MLC leaf-velocity, dose rate, and target motion are derived. An iterative search algorithm is developed to find numerical solutions for efficient delivery of a specific VMAT plan to the moving target using 2D DMLC tracking. The delivery of five VMAT lung plans is simulated. The planned and delivered fluence maps in the target-reference frame are calculated and compared. Results: The simulation demonstrates that the 2D tracking algorithm is capable of delivering the VMAT plan to a moving target fast and accurately without violating the machine constraints and the integrity of the treatment plan. The average delivery time is only 29 s longer than that of no-tracking delivery, 101 versus 72 s, respectively. The fluence maps are normalized to 200 MU and the average root-mean-square error between the desired and the delivered fluence is 2.1 MU, compared to 14.8 MU for no-tracking and 3.6 MU for one-dimensional tracking. Conclusions: A locally optimal MLC tracking algorithm for VMAT delivery is proposed, aiming at shortest delivery time while maintaining treatment plan invariant. The inconsequential increase of treatment time due to DMLC tracking is clinically desirable, which makes VMAT with DMLC tracking attractive in treating moving tumors.

  12. Design and control of one precise tracking simulation bed for Chinese 20/30 meter optic/infrared telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Changzhi; Li, Xiaoyan; Song, Xiaoli; Niu, Yong; Li, Aihua; Zhang, Zhenchao

    2012-09-01

    Direct drive technology is the key to solute future 30-m and larger telescope motion system to guarantee a very high tracking accuracy, in spite of unbalanced and sudden loads such as wind gusts and in spite of a structure that, because of its size, can not be infinitely stiff. However, this requires the design and realization of unusually large torque motor that the torque slew rate must be extremely steep too. A conventional torque motor design appears inadequate. This paper explores one redundant unit permanent magnet synchronous motor and its simulation bed for 30-m class telescope. Because its drive system is one high integrated electromechanical system, one complexly electromechanical design method is adopted to improve the efficiency, reliability and quality of the system during the design and manufacture circle. This paper discusses the design and control of the precise tracking simulation bed in detail.

  13. Tracking in full Monte Carlo detector simulations of 500 GeV e+e- collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronan, M.T.

    2000-01-01

    In full Monte Carlo simulation models of future Linear Collider detectors, charged tracks are reconstructed from 3D space points in central tracking detectors. The track reconstruction software is being developed for detailed physics studies that take realistic detector resolution and background modeling into account. At this stage of the analysis, reference tracking efficiency and resolutions for ideal detector conditions are presented. High performance detectors are being designed to carry out precision studies of e + e - annihilation events in the energy range of 500 GeV to 1.5 TeV. Physics processes under study include Higgs mass and branching ratio measurements, measurement of possible manifestations of Supersymmetry (SUSY), precision Electro-Weak (EW) studies and searches for new phenomena beyond their current expectations. The relatively-low background machine environment at future Linear Colliders will allow precise measurements if proper consideration is given to the effects of the backgrounds on these studies. In current North American design studies, full Monte Carlo detector simulation and analysis is being used to allow detector optimization taking into account realistic models of machine backgrounds. In this paper the design of tracking software that is being developed for full detector reconstruction is discussed. In this study, charged tracks are found from simulated space point hits allowing for the straight-forward addition of background hits and for the accounting of missing information. The status of the software development effort is quantified by some reference performance measures, which will be modified by future work to include background effects

  14. Ground Simulation of an Autonomous Satellite Rendezvous and Tracking System Using Dual Robotic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trube, Matthew J.; Hyslop, Andrew M.; Carignan, Craig R.; Easley, Joseph W.

    2012-01-01

    A hardware-in-the-loop ground system was developed for simulating a robotic servicer spacecraft tracking a target satellite at short range. A relative navigation sensor package "Argon" is mounted on the end-effector of a Fanuc 430 manipulator, which functions as the base platform of the robotic spacecraft servicer. Machine vision algorithms estimate the pose of the target spacecraft, mounted on a Rotopod R-2000 platform, relay the solution to a simulation of the servicer spacecraft running in "Freespace", which performs guidance, navigation and control functions, integrates dynamics, and issues motion commands to a Fanuc platform controller so that it tracks the simulated servicer spacecraft. Results will be reviewed for several satellite motion scenarios at different ranges. Key words: robotics, satellite, servicing, guidance, navigation, tracking, control, docking.

  15. Simulations of mixing in Inertial Confinement Fusion with front tracking and sub-grid scale models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Verinder; Lim, Hyunkyung; Melvin, Jeremy; Cheng, Baolian; Glimm, James; Sharp, David

    2015-11-01

    We present two related results. The first discusses the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RMI) and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (RTI) and their evolution in Inertial Confinement Fusion simulations. We show the evolution of the RMI to the late time RTI under transport effects and tracking. The role of the sub-grid scales helps capture the interaction of turbulence with diffusive processes. The second assesses the effects of concentration on the physics model and examines the mixing properties in the low Reynolds number hot spot. We discuss the effect of concentration on the Schmidt number. The simulation results are produced using the University of Chicago code FLASH and Stony Brook University's front tracking algorithm.

  16. Chromosome aberration model combining radiation tracks, chromatin structure, DSB repair and chromatin mobility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedland, W.; Kundrat, P.

    2015-01-01

    The module that simulates the kinetics and yields of radiation-induced chromosome aberrations within the biophysical code PARTRAC is described. Radiation track structures simulated by Monte Carlo methods are overlapped with multi-scale models of DNA and chromatin to assess the resulting DNA damage. Spatial mobility of individual DNA ends from double-strand breaks is modelled simultaneously with their processing by the non-homologous end-joining enzymes. To score diverse types of chromosome aberrations, the joined ends are classified regarding their original chromosomal location, orientation and the involvement of centromeres. A comparison with experimental data on dicentrics induced by gamma and alpha particles shows that their relative dose dependence is predicted correctly, although the absolute yields are overestimated. The critical model assumptions on chromatin mobility and on the initial damage recognition and chromatin remodelling steps and their future refinements to solve this issue are discussed. (authors)

  17. On the structure of etched ion tracks in polymers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hnatowicz, Vladimír; Vacík, Jiří; Apel, P. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 121, APR (2016), s. 106-109 ISSN 0969-806X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP108/12/G108; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011019 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : polymers * ion tracks * track etching Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.315, year: 2016

  18. Structured building model reduction toward parallel simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobbs, Justin R. [Cornell University; Hencey, Brondon M. [Cornell University

    2013-08-26

    Building energy model reduction exchanges accuracy for improved simulation speed by reducing the number of dynamical equations. Parallel computing aims to improve simulation times without loss of accuracy but is poorly utilized by contemporary simulators and is inherently limited by inter-processor communication. This paper bridges these disparate techniques to implement efficient parallel building thermal simulation. We begin with a survey of three structured reduction approaches that compares their performance to a leading unstructured method. We then use structured model reduction to find thermal clusters in the building energy model and allocate processing resources. Experimental results demonstrate faster simulation and low error without any interprocessor communication.

  19. SPMHD simulations of structure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, David J.; On, Alvina Y. L.; Wu, Kinwah; Kawata, Daisuke

    2018-05-01

    The intracluster medium of galaxy clusters is permeated by μ {G} magnetic fields. Observations with current and future facilities have the potential to illuminate the role of these magnetic fields play in the astrophysical processes of galaxy clusters. To obtain a greater understanding of how the initial seed fields evolve to the magnetic fields in the intracluster medium requires magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We critically assess the current smoothed particle magnetohydrodynamic (SPMHD) schemes, especially highlighting the impact of a hyperbolic divergence cleaning scheme and artificial resistivity switch on the magnetic field evolution in cosmological simulations of the formation of a galaxy cluster using the N-body/SPMHD code GCMHD++. The impact and performance of the cleaning scheme and two different schemes for the artificial resistivity switch is demonstrated via idealized test cases and cosmological simulations. We demonstrate that the hyperbolic divergence cleaning scheme is effective at suppressing the growth of the numerical divergence error of the magnetic field and should be applied to any SPMHD simulation. Although the artificial resistivity is important in the strong field regime, it can suppress the growth of the magnetic field in the weak field regime, such as galaxy clusters. With sufficient resolution, simulations with divergence cleaning can reproduce observed magnetic fields. We conclude that the cleaning scheme alone is sufficient for galaxy cluster simulations, but our results indicate that the SPMHD scheme must be carefully chosen depending on the regime of the magnetic field.

  20. Vibronic-structure tracking: A shortcut for vibrationally resolved UV/Vis-spectra calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, Dennis; König, Carolin; Neugebauer, Johannes, E-mail: j.neugebauer@uni-muenster.de [Theoretische Organische Chemie, Organisch-Chemisches Institut and Center for Multiscale Theory and Computation, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, Corrensstraße 40, 48149 Münster (Germany)

    2014-10-28

    The vibrational coarse structure and the band shapes of electronic absorption spectra are often dominated by just a few molecular vibrations. By contrast, the simulation of the vibronic structure even in the simplest theoretical models usually requires the calculation of the entire set of normal modes of vibration. Here, we exploit the idea of the mode-tracking protocol [M. Reiher and J. Neugebauer, J. Chem. Phys. 118, 1634 (2003)] in order to directly target and selectively calculate those normal modes which have the largest effect on the vibronic band shape for a certain electronic excitation. This is achieved by defining a criterion for the importance of a normal mode to the vibrational progressions in the absorption band within the so-called “independent mode, displaced harmonic oscillator” (IMDHO) model. We use this approach for a vibronic-structure investigation for several small test molecules as well as for a comparison of the vibronic absorption spectra of a truncated chlorophyll a model and the full chlorophyll a molecule. We show that the method allows to go beyond the often-used strategy to simulate absorption spectra based on broadened vertical excitation peaks with just a minimum of computational effort, which in case of chlorophyll a corresponds to about 10% of the cost for a full simulation within the IMDHO approach.

  1. Origins and Destinations: Tracking Planet Composition through Planet Formation Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chance, Quadry; Ballard, Sarah

    2018-01-01

    There are now several thousand confirmed exoplanets, a number which far exceeds our resources to study them all in detail. In particular, planets around M dwarfs provide the best opportunity for in-depth study of their atmospheres by telescopes in the near future. The question of which M dwarf planets most merit follow-up resources is a pressing one, given that NASA’s TESS mission will soon find hundreds of such planets orbiting stars bright enough for both ground and spaced-based follow-up.Our work aims to predict the approximate composition of planets around these stars through n-body simulations of the last stage of planet formation. With a variety of initial disk conditions, we investigate how the relative abundances of both refractory and volatile compounds in the primordial planetesimals are mapped to the final planet outcomes. These predictions can serve to provide a basis for making an educated guess about (a) which planets to observe with precious resources like JWST and (b) how to identify them based on dynamical clues.

  2. Modeling Radiation Effects of Ultrasoft X Rays on the Basis of Amorphous Track Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Tamara; Scifoni, Emanuele; Krämer, Michael; Durante, Marco; Scholz, Michael; Friedrich, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    There is experimental evidence that ultrasoft X rays (0.1-5 keV) show a higher biological effectiveness than high-energy photons. Similar to high-LET radiation, this is attributed to a rather localized dose distribution associated with a considerably smaller range of secondary electrons, which results in an increasing yield of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and potentially more complex lesions. We previously reported on the application of the Giant LOop Binary LEsion (GLOBLE) model to ultrasoft X rays, in which experimental values of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for DSB induction were used to show that this increasing DSB yield was sufficient to explain the enhanced effectiveness in the cell inactivation potential of ultrasoft X rays. Complementary to GLOBLE, we report here on a modeling approach to predict the increased DSB yield of ultrasoft X rays on the basis of amorphous track structure formed by secondary electrons, which was derived from Monte Carlo track structure simulations. This procedure is associated with increased production of single-strand break (SSB) clusters, which are caused by the highly localized energy deposition pattern induced by low-energy photons. From this, the RBE of ultrasoft X rays can be determined and compared to experimental data, showing that the inhomogeneity of the energy deposition pattern represents the key variable to describe the increased biological effectiveness of ultrasoft X rays. Thus, this work demonstrates an extended applicability of the amorphous track structure concept and tests its limits with respect to its predictive power. The employed model mechanism offers a possible explanation for how the cellular response to ultrasoft X rays is directly linked to the energy deposition properties on the nanometric scale.

  3. Development of a new approach to simulate a particle track under electrochemical etching in polymeric detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mostofizadeh, Ali; Huang, Yudong; Kardan, M. Reza; Babakhani, Asad; Sun Xiudong

    2012-01-01

    A numerical approach based on image processing was developed to simulate a particle track in a typical polymeric detector, e.g., polycarbonate, under electrochemical etching. The physical parameters such as applied voltage, detector thickness, track length, the radii of curvature at the tip of track, and the incidence angle of the particle were considered, and then the boundary condition of the problem was defined. A numerical method was developed to solve Laplace equation, and then the distribution of the applied voltage was obtained through the polymer volume. Subsequently, the electric field strengths in the detector elements were computed. In each step of the computation, an image processing technique was applied to convert the computed values to grayscale images. The results showed that a numerical solution to Laplace equation is dedicatedly an attractive approach to provide us the accurate values of electric field strength through the polymeric detector volume as well as the track area. According to the results, for a particular condition of the detector thickness equal to 445 μm, track length of 21 μm, the radii of 2.5 μm at track tip, the incidence angle of 90°, and the applied voltage of 2080 V, after computing Laplace equation for an extremely high population of 4000 × 4000 elements of detector, the average field strength at the tip of track was computed equal to 0.31 MV cm −1 which is in the range of dielectric strength for polymers. The results by our computation confirm Smythe’s model for estimating the ECE-tracks.

  4. Measuring Human Performance in Simulated Nuclear Power Plant Control Rooms Using Eye Tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovesdi, Casey Robert [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rice, Brandon Charles [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bower, Gordon Ross [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Spielman, Zachary Alexander [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hill, Rachael Ann [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); LeBlanc, Katya Lee [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Control room modernization will be an important part of life extension for the existing light water reactor fleet. As part of modernization efforts, personnel will need to gain a full understanding of how control room technologies affect performance of human operators. Recent advances in technology enables the use of eye tracking technology to continuously measure an operator’s eye movement, which correlates with a variety of human performance constructs such as situation awareness and workload. This report describes eye tracking metrics in the context of how they will be used in nuclear power plant control room simulator studies.

  5. Measuring Human Performance in Simulated Nuclear Power Plant Control Rooms Using Eye Tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovesdi, Casey Robert; Rice, Brandon Charles; Bower, Gordon Ross; Spielman, Zachary Alexander; Hill, Rachael Ann; LeBlanc, Katya Lee

    2015-01-01

    Control room modernization will be an important part of life extension for the existing light water reactor fleet. As part of modernization efforts, personnel will need to gain a full understanding of how control room technologies affect performance of human operators. Recent advances in technology enables the use of eye tracking technology to continuously measure an operator's eye movement, which correlates with a variety of human performance constructs such as situation awareness and workload. This report describes eye tracking metrics in the context of how they will be used in nuclear power plant control room simulator studies.

  6. Dual linear structured support vector machine tracking method via scale correlation filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weisheng; Chen, Yanquan; Xiao, Bin; Feng, Chen

    2018-01-01

    Adaptive tracking-by-detection methods based on structured support vector machine (SVM) performed well on recent visual tracking benchmarks. However, these methods did not adopt an effective strategy of object scale estimation, which limits the overall tracking performance. We present a tracking method based on a dual linear structured support vector machine (DLSSVM) with a discriminative scale correlation filter. The collaborative tracker comprised of a DLSSVM model and a scale correlation filter obtains good results in tracking target position and scale estimation. The fast Fourier transform is applied for detection. Extensive experiments show that our tracking approach outperforms many popular top-ranking trackers. On a benchmark including 100 challenging video sequences, the average precision of the proposed method is 82.8%.

  7. Data needs for the track structure of alpha particles and electrons in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagnamenta, A.

    1983-01-01

    We have made calculations of the ionization spectra for alpha particle and electron tracks in water. We have also computed the number of ions created per micrometre of track length, the energy distribution of the secondaries, and the energy expended per ion pair created. Our aim is less toward theoretical derivations than to obtain a numerically accurate description of the track structure at all energies in a form suitable for biomedical applications. 13 references

  8. New Low Cost Structure for Dual Axis Mount Solar Tracking System Using Adaptive Solar Sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Argeseanu, Alin; Ritchie, Ewen; Leban, Krisztina Monika

    2010-01-01

    A solar tracking system is designed to optimize the operation of solar energy receivers. The objective of this paper is proposing a new tracking system structure with two axis. The success strategy of this new project focuses on the economical analysis of solar energy. Therefore it is important...... to determine the most cost effective design, to consider the costs of production and maintenance, and operating. The proposed tracking system uses a new solar sensor position with an adaptive feature....

  9. Lagrangian Particle Tracking Simulation for Warm-Rain Processes in Quasi-One-Dimensional Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunishima, Y.; Onishi, R.

    2017-12-01

    Conventional cloud simulations are based on the Euler method and compute each microphysics process in a stochastic way assuming infinite numbers of particles within each numerical grid. They therefore cannot provide the Lagrangian statistics of individual particles in cloud microphysics (i.e., aerosol particles, cloud particles, and rain drops) nor discuss the statistical fluctuations due to finite number of particles. We here simulate the entire precipitation process of warm-rain, with tracking individual particles. We use the Lagrangian Cloud Simulator (LCS), which is based on the Euler-Lagrangian framework. In that framework, flow motion and scalar transportation are computed with the Euler method, and particle motion with the Lagrangian one. The LCS tracks particle motions and collision events individually with considering the hydrodynamic interaction between approaching particles with a superposition method, that is, it can directly represent the collisional growth of cloud particles. It is essential for trustworthy collision detection to take account of the hydrodynamic interaction. In this study, we newly developed a stochastic model based on the Twomey cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activation for the Lagrangian tracking simulation and integrated it into the LCS. Coupling with the Euler computation for water vapour and temperature fields, the initiation and condensational growth of water droplets were computed in the Lagrangian way. We applied the integrated LCS for a kinematic simulation of warm-rain processes in a vertically-elongated domain of, at largest, 0.03×0.03×3000 (m3) with horizontal periodicity. Aerosol particles with a realistic number density, 5×107 (m3), were evenly distributed over the domain at the initial state. Prescribed updraft at the early stage initiated development of a precipitating cloud. We have confirmed that the obtained bulk statistics fairly agree with those from a conventional spectral-bin scheme for a vertical column

  10. Artificial ion tracks in volcanic dark mica simulating natural radiation damage: A scanning force microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, M.; Glasmacher, U.A.; Moine, B.; Mueller, C.; Neumann, R.; Wagner, G.A.

    2002-01-01

    A new dating technique uses alpha-recoil tracks (ART), formed by the natural α-decay of U, Th and their daughter products, to determine the formation age of Quaternary volcanic rocks ( 6 a). Visualization of etched ART by scanning force microscopy (SFM) enables to access track densities beyond 10 8 cm -2 and thus extend the new ART-dating technique to an age range >10 6 a. In order to simulate natural radiation damage, samples of phlogopite, originating from Quaternary and Tertiary volcanic rocks of the Eifel (Germany) and Kerguelen Islands (Indian Ocean) were irradiated with U, Ni (11.4 MeV/u), Xe, Cr, Ne (1.4 MeV/u) and Bi (200 keV) ions. After irradiation and etching with HF at various etching times, phlogopite surfaces were visualized by SFM. Hexagonal etch pits are typical of U, Xe and Cr ion tracks, but the etch pits of Ni, Ne and Bi ion tracks are triangular. Surfaces irradiated with U, Xe, Cr and Ni ions do not show any significant difference between etch pit density and irradiation fluence, whereas the Ne-irradiated surface show ∼14 times less etch pit density. The etching rate v H (parallel to cleavage) depends on the chemical composition of the phlogopite. The etching rate v T ' (along the track) increases with energy loss

  11. Flying Boresight for Advanced Testing and Calibration of Tracking Antennas and Flight Path Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, D.

    2015-09-01

    The application of ground-based boresight sources for calibration and testing of tracking antennas usually entails various difficulties, mostly due to unwanted ground effects. To avoid this problem, DLR MORABA developed a small, lightweight, frequency-adjustable S-band boresight source, mounted on a small remote-controlled multirotor aircraft. Highly accurate GPS-supported, position and altitude control functions allow both, very steady positioning of the aircraft in mid-air, and precise waypoint-based, semi-autonomous flights. In contrast to fixed near-ground boresight sources this flying setup enables to avoid obstructions in the Fresnel zone between source and antenna. Further, it minimizes ground reflections and other multipath effects which can affect antenna calibration. In addition, the large operating range of a flying boresight simplifies measurements in the far field of the antenna and permits undisturbed antenna pattern tests. A unique application is the realistic simulation of sophisticated flight paths, including overhead tracking and demanding trajectories of fast objects such as sounding rockets. Likewise, dynamic tracking tests are feasible which provide crucial information about the antenna pedestal performance — particularly at high elevations — and reveal weaknesses in the autotrack control loop of tracking antenna systems. During acceptance tests of MORABA's new tracking antennas, a manned aircraft was never used, since the Flying Boresight surpassed all expectations regarding usability, efficiency, and precision. Hence, it became an integral part of MORABA's standard antenna setup and calibration procedures.

  12. Vehicle response-based track geometry assessment using multi-body simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Sönke; Causse, Julien; Coudert, Frédéric

    2018-02-01

    The assessment of the geometry of railway tracks is an indispensable requirement for safe rail traffic. Defects which represent a risk for the safety of the train have to be identified and the necessary measures taken. According to current standards, amplitude thresholds are applied to the track geometry parameters measured by recording cars. This geometry-based assessment has proved its value but suffers from the low correlation between the geometry parameters and the vehicle reactions. Experience shows that some defects leading to critical vehicle reactions are underestimated by this approach. The use of vehicle responses in the track geometry assessment process allows identifying critical defects and improving the maintenance operations. This work presents a vehicle response-based assessment method using multi-body simulation. The choice of the relevant operation conditions and the estimation of the simulation uncertainty are outlined. The defects are identified from exceedances of track geometry and vehicle response parameters. They are then classified using clustering methods and the correlation with vehicle response is analysed. The use of vehicle responses allows the detection of critical defects which are not identified from geometry parameters.

  13. Structured light 3D tracking system for measuring motions in PET brain imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Jørgensen, Morten Rudkjær; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold

    2010-01-01

    Patient motion during scanning deteriorates image quality, especially for high resolution PET scanners. A new proposal for a 3D head tracking system for motion correction in high resolution PET brain imaging is set up and demonstrated. A prototype tracking system based on structured light with a ...

  14. Pulse shape analysis for γ-ray tracking. Part I: Pulse shape simulation with JASS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlarb, M.; Gernhaeuser, R.; Klupp, S.; Kruecken, R.

    2011-01-01

    Next-generation γ -ray spectrometers based on highly segmented HPGe detectors are using the recent technique of γ -ray tracking to significantly improve on efficiency and Doppler correction capabilities. A precise reconstruction of the individual interaction locations within the active material is possible through the use of pulse shape analysis (PSA) which, in turn, demands an accurate knowledge of the detector response. We developed JASS, a Java-based simulation software package to generate pulse shapes for the AGATA detectors from physics constraints and basic material parameters. For verifying the simulation experimental data from a coincidence scan with known interaction locations was used. The achieved position resolution, in the order of a few millimeters, is within the requirements of the γ -ray tracking array. (orig.)

  15. Structure of heavy-ion tracks in zircon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunshausen, G.; Bursill, L.A.; Vetter, J.; Spohr, R.

    1990-01-01

    Gem quality zirconas (ZrSiO 4 ) were irradiated with 14MeV/u Pb ions. Observations of heavy-ion tracks confirmed that fission or heavy-ion irradiation damage is confined to a 50-100 Aangstroem core region, which has undergone a crystalline-glass phase transition. 3 refs., 3 figs

  16. Structure-aware Local Sparse Coding for Visual Tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Qi, Yuankai; Qin, Lei; Zhang, Jian; Zhang, Shengping; Huang, Qingming; Yang, Ming-Hsuan

    2018-01-01

    with the corresponding local regions of the target templates that are the most similar from the global view. Thus, a more precise and discriminative sparse representation is obtained to account for appearance changes. To alleviate the issues with tracking drifts, we

  17. TRACKING SIMULATIONS NEAR HALF-INTEGER RESONANCE AT PEP-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nosochkov, Yuri

    2003-01-01

    Beam-beam simulations predict that PEP-II luminosity can be increased by operating the horizontal betatron tune near and above a half-integer resonance. However, effects of the resonance and its synchrotron sidebands significantly enhance betatron and chromatic perturbations which tend to reduce dynamic aperture. In the study, chromatic variation of horizontal tune near the resonance was minimized by optimizing local sextupoles in the Interaction Region. Dynamic aperture was calculated using tracking simulations in LEGO code. Dependence of dynamic aperture on the residual orbit, dispersion and β distortion after correction was investigated

  18. Real-time tumor tracking using implanted positron emission markers: Concept and simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Tong; Wong, Jerry T.; Shikhaliev, Polad M.; Ducote, Justin L.; Al-Ghazi, Muthana S.; Molloi, Sabee

    2006-01-01

    The delivery accuracy of radiation therapy for pulmonary and abdominal tumors suffers from tumor motion due to respiration. Respiratory gating should be applied to avoid the use of a large target volume margin that results in a substantial dose to the surrounding normal tissue. Precise respiratory gating requires the exact spatial position of the tumor to be determined in real time during treatment. Usually, fiducial markers are implanted inside or next to the tumor to provide both accurate patient setup and real-time tumor tracking. However, current tumor tracking systems require either substantial x-ray exposure to the patient or large fiducial markers that limit the value of their application for pulmonary tumors. We propose a real-time tumor tracking system using implanted positron emission markers (PeTrack). Each marker will be labeled with low activity positron emitting isotopes, such as 124 I, 74 As, or 84 Rb. These isotopes have half-lives comparable to the duration of radiation therapy (from a few days to a few weeks). The size of the proposed PeTrack marker will be 0.5-0.8 mm, which is approximately one-half the size of markers currently employed in other techniques. By detecting annihilation gammas using position-sensitive detectors, multiple positron emission markers can be tracked in real time. A multimarker localization algorithm was developed using an Expectation-Maximization clustering technique. A Monte Carlo simulation model was developed for the PeTrack system. Patient dose, detector sensitivity, and scatter fraction were evaluated. Depending on the isotope, the lifetime dose from a 3.7 MBq PeTrack marker was determined to be 0.7-5.0 Gy at 10 mm from the marker. At the center of the field of view (FOV), the sensitivity of the PeTrack system was 240-320 counts/s per 1 MBq marker activity within a 30 cm thick patient. The sensitivity was reduced by 45% when the marker was near the edge of the FOV. The scatter fraction ranged from 12% ( 124 I, 74 As

  19. Photonic band gap structure simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chiping; Shapiro, Michael A.; Smirnova, Evgenya I.; Temkin, Richard J.; Sirigiri, Jagadishwar R.

    2006-10-03

    A system and method for designing photonic band gap structures. The system and method provide a user with the capability to produce a model of a two-dimensional array of conductors corresponding to a unit cell. The model involves a linear equation. Boundary conditions representative of conditions at the boundary of the unit cell are applied to a solution of the Helmholtz equation defined for the unit cell. The linear equation can be approximated by a Hermitian matrix. An eigenvalue of the Helmholtz equation is calculated. One computation approach involves calculating finite differences. The model can include a symmetry element, such as a center of inversion, a rotation axis, and a mirror plane. A graphical user interface is provided for the user's convenience. A display is provided to display to a user the calculated eigenvalue, corresponding to a photonic energy level in the Brilloin zone of the unit cell.

  20. Positron follow-up in liquid water: I. A new Monte Carlo track-structure code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, C; Le Loirec, C

    2006-04-07

    When biological matter is irradiated by charged particles, a wide variety of interactions occur, which lead to a deep modification of the cellular environment. To understand the fine structure of the microscopic distribution of energy deposits, Monte Carlo event-by-event simulations are particularly suitable. However, the development of these track-structure codes needs accurate interaction cross sections for all the electronic processes: ionization, excitation, positronium formation and even elastic scattering. Under these conditions, we have recently developed a Monte Carlo code for positrons in water, the latter being commonly used to simulate the biological medium. All the processes are studied in detail via theoretical differential and total cross-section calculations performed by using partial wave methods. Comparisons with existing theoretical and experimental data in terms of stopping powers, mean energy transfers and ranges show very good agreements. Moreover, thanks to the theoretical description of positronium formation, we have access, for the first time, to the complete kinematics of the electron capture process. Then, the present Monte Carlo code is able to describe the detailed positronium history, which will provide useful information for medical imaging (like positron emission tomography) where improvements are needed to define with the best accuracy the tumoural volumes.

  1. SPACE CHARGE SIMULATION METHODS INCORPORATED IN SOME MULTI - PARTICLE TRACKING CODES AND THEIR RESULTS COMPARISON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BEEBE - WANG, J.; LUCCIO, A.U.; D IMPERIO, N.; MACHIDA, S.

    2002-01-01

    Space charge in high intensity beams is an important issue in accelerator physics. Due to the complicity of the problems, the most effective way of investigating its effect is by computer simulations. In the resent years, many space charge simulation methods have been developed and incorporated in various 2D or 3D multi-particle-tracking codes. It has becoming necessary to benchmark these methods against each other, and against experimental results. As a part of global effort, we present our initial comparison of the space charge methods incorporated in simulation codes ORBIT++, ORBIT and SIMPSONS. In this paper, the methods included in these codes are overviewed. The simulation results are presented and compared. Finally, from this study, the advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed

  2. SPACE CHARGE SIMULATION METHODS INCORPORATED IN SOME MULTI - PARTICLE TRACKING CODES AND THEIR RESULTS COMPARISON.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BEEBE - WANG,J.; LUCCIO,A.U.; D IMPERIO,N.; MACHIDA,S.

    2002-06-03

    Space charge in high intensity beams is an important issue in accelerator physics. Due to the complicity of the problems, the most effective way of investigating its effect is by computer simulations. In the resent years, many space charge simulation methods have been developed and incorporated in various 2D or 3D multi-particle-tracking codes. It has becoming necessary to benchmark these methods against each other, and against experimental results. As a part of global effort, we present our initial comparison of the space charge methods incorporated in simulation codes ORBIT++, ORBIT and SIMPSONS. In this paper, the methods included in these codes are overviewed. The simulation results are presented and compared. Finally, from this study, the advantages and disadvantages of each method are discussed.

  3. Evaluation of structural reliability using simulation methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baballëku Markel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Eurocode describes the 'index of reliability' as a measure of structural reliability, related to the 'probability of failure'. This paper is focused on the assessment of this index for a reinforced concrete bridge pier. It is rare to explicitly use reliability concepts for design of structures, but the problems of structural engineering are better known through them. Some of the main methods for the estimation of the probability of failure are the exact analytical integration, numerical integration, approximate analytical methods and simulation methods. Monte Carlo Simulation is used in this paper, because it offers a very good tool for the estimation of probability in multivariate functions. Complicated probability and statistics problems are solved through computer aided simulations of a large number of tests. The procedures of structural reliability assessment for the bridge pier and the comparison with the partial factor method of the Eurocodes have been demonstrated in this paper.

  4. Improving accuracy of overhanging structures for selective laser melting through reliability characterization of single track formation on thick powder beds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohanty, Sankhya; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2016-01-01

    Repeatability and reproducibility of parts produced by selective laser melting is a standing issue, and coupled with a lack of standardized quality control presents a major hindrance towards maturing of selective laser melting as an industrial scale process. Consequently, numerical process...... modelling has been adopted towards improving the predictability of the outputs from the selective laser melting process. Establishing the reliability of the process, however, is still a challenge, especially in components having overhanging structures.In this paper, a systematic approach towards...... establishing reliability of overhanging structure production by selective laser melting has been adopted. A calibrated, fast, multiscale thermal model is used to simulate the single track formation on a thick powder bed. Single tracks are manufactured on a thick powder bed using same processing parameters...

  5. Digestion proteomics: tracking lactoferrin truncation and peptide release during simulated gastric digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosvenor, Anita J; Haigh, Brendan J; Dyer, Jolon M

    2014-11-01

    The extent to which nutritional and functional benefit is derived from proteins in food is related to its breakdown and digestion in the body after consumption. Further, detailed information about food protein truncation during digestion is critical to understanding and optimising the availability of bioactives, in controlling and limiting allergen release, and in minimising or monitoring the effects of processing and food preparation. However, tracking the complex array of products formed during the digestion of proteins is not easily accomplished using classical proteomics. We here present and develop a novel proteomic approach using isobaric labelling to mapping and tracking protein truncation and peptide release during simulated gastric digestion, using bovine lactoferrin as a model food protein. The relative abundance of related peptides was tracked throughout a digestion time course, and the effect of pasteurisation on peptide release assessed. The new approach to food digestion proteomics developed here therefore appears to be highly suitable not only for tracking the truncation and relative abundance of released peptides during gastric digestion, but also for determining the effects of protein modification on digestibility and potential bioavailability.

  6. Circuit Simulation for Solar Power Maximum Power Point Tracking with Different Buck-Boost Converter Topologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaw-Kuen Shiau

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The power converter is one of the essential elements for effective use of renewable power sources. This paper focuses on the development of a circuit simulation model for maximum power point tracking (MPPT evaluation of solar power that involves using different buck-boost power converter topologies; including SEPIC, Zeta, and four-switch type buck-boost DC/DC converters. The circuit simulation model mainly includes three subsystems: a PV model; a buck-boost converter-based MPPT system; and a fuzzy logic MPPT controller. Dynamic analyses of the current-fed buck-boost converter systems are conducted and results are presented in the paper. The maximum power point tracking function is achieved through appropriate control of the power switches of the power converter. A fuzzy logic controller is developed to perform the MPPT function for obtaining maximum power from the PV panel. The MATLAB-based Simulink piecewise linear electric circuit simulation tool is used to verify the complete circuit simulation model.

  7. Investigating the Mobility of Light Autonomous Tracked Vehicles using a High Performance Computing Simulation Capability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrut, Dan; Mazhar, Hammad; Melanz, Daniel; Lamb, David; Jayakumar, Paramsothy; Letherwood, Michael; Jain, Abhinandan; Quadrelli, Marco

    2012-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the physics-based simulation of light tracked vehicles operating on rough deformable terrain. The focus is on small autonomous vehicles, which weigh less than 100 lb and move on deformable and rough terrain that is feature rich and no longer representable using a continuum approach. A scenario of interest is, for instance, the simulation of a reconnaissance mission for a high mobility lightweight robot where objects such as a boulder or a ditch that could otherwise be considered small for a truck or tank, become major obstacles that can impede the mobility of the light autonomous vehicle and negatively impact the success of its mission. Analyzing and gauging the mobility and performance of these light vehicles is accomplished through a modeling and simulation capability called Chrono::Engine. Chrono::Engine relies on parallel execution on Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) cards.

  8. Hybrid Discrete Element - Finite Element Simulation for Railway Bridge-Track Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewunruen, S.; Mirza, O.

    2017-10-01

    At the transition zone or sometimes called ‘bridge end’ or ‘bridge approach’, the stiffness difference between plain track and track over bridge often causes aggravated impact loading due to uneven train movement onto the area. The differential track settlement over the transition has been a classical problem in railway networks, especially for the aging rail infrastructures around the world. This problem is also additionally worsened by the fact that the construction practice over the area is difficult, resulting in a poor compaction of formation and subgrade. This paper presents an advanced hybrid simulation using coupled discrete elements and finite elements to investigate dynamic interaction at the transition zone. The goal is to evaluate the dynamic stresses and to better understand the impact dynamics redistribution at the bridge end. An existing bridge ‘Salt Pan Creek Railway Bridge’, located between Revesby and Kingsgrove, has been chosen for detailed investigation. The Salt Pan Bridge currently demonstrates crushing of the ballast causing significant deformation and damage. Thus, it’s imperative to assess the behaviours of the ballast under dynamic loads. This can be achieved by modelling the nonlinear interactions between the steel rail and sleeper, and sleeper to ballast. The continuum solid elements of track components have been modelled using finite element approach, while the granular media (i.e. ballast) have been simulated by discrete element method. The hybrid DE/FE model demonstrates that ballast experiences significant stresses at the contacts between the sleeper and concrete section. These overburden stress exists in the regions below the outer rails, identify fouling and permanent deformation of the ballast.

  9. Track structure based modelling of light ion radiation effects on nuclear and mitochondrial DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Elke; Ottolenghi, Andrea; Dingfelder, Michael; Friedland, Werner; Kundrat, Pavel; Baiocco, Giorgio

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation risk assessment is of great importance for manned spaceflights in order to estimate risks and to develop counter-measures to reduce them. Biophysical simulations with PARTRAC can help greatly to improve the understanding of initial biological response to ionizing radiation. Results from modelling radiation quality dependent DNA damage and repair mechanisms up to chromosomal aberrations (e.g. dicentrics) can be used to predict radiation effects depending on the kind of mixed radiation field exposure. Especially dicentric yields can serve as a biomarker for an increased risk due to radiation and hence as an indicator for the effectiveness of the used shielding. PARTRAC [1] is a multi-scale biophysical research MC code for track structure based initial DNA damage and damage response modelling. It integrates physics, radiochemistry, detailed nuclear DNA structure and molecular biology of DNA repair by NHEJ-pathway to assess radiation effects on cellular level [2]. Ongoing experiments with quasi-homogeneously distributed compared to sub-micrometre focused bunches of protons, lithium and carbon ions allow a separation of effects due to DNA damage complexity on nanometre scale from damage clustering on (sub-) micrometre scale [3, 4]. These data provide an unprecedented benchmark for the DNA damage response model in PARTRAC and help understand the mechanisms leading to cell killing and chromosomal aberrations (e.g. dicentrics) induction. A large part of space radiation is due to a mixed ion field of high energy protons and few heavier ions that can be only partly absorbed by the shielding. Radiation damage induced by low-energy ions significantly contributes to the high relative biological efficiency (RBE) of ion beams around Bragg peak regions. For slow light ions the physical cross section data basis in PARTRAC has been extended to investigate radiation quality effects in the Bragg peak region [5]. The resulting range and LET values agree with ICRU data

  10. TrackArt: the user friendly interface for single molecule tracking data analysis and simulation applied to complex diffusion in mica supported lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysik, Artur; Kraut, Rachel S

    2014-05-01

    Single molecule tracking (SMT) analysis of fluorescently tagged lipid and protein probes is an attractive alternative to ensemble averaged methods such as fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) or fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) for measuring diffusion in artificial and plasma membranes. The meaningful estimation of diffusion coefficients and their errors is however not straightforward, and is heavily dependent on sample type, acquisition method, and equipment used. Many approaches require advanced computing and programming skills for their implementation. Here we present TrackArt software, an accessible graphic interface for simulation and complex analysis of multiple particle paths. Imported trajectories can be filtered to eliminate spurious or corrupted tracks, and are then analyzed using several previously described methodologies, to yield single or multiple diffusion coefficients, their population fractions, and estimated errors. We use TrackArt to analyze the single-molecule diffusion behavior of a sphingolipid analog SM-Atto647N, in mica supported DOPC (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) bilayers. Fitting with a two-component diffusion model confirms the existence of two separate populations of diffusing particles in these bilayers on mica. As a demonstration of the TrackArt workflow, we characterize and discuss the effective activation energies required to increase the diffusion rates of these populations, obtained from Arrhenius plots of temperature-dependent diffusion. Finally, TrackArt provides a simulation module, allowing the user to generate models with multiple particle trajectories, diffusing with different characteristics. Maps of domains, acting as impermeable or permeable obstacles for particles diffusing with given rate constants and diffusion coefficients, can be simulated or imported from an image. Importantly, this allows one to use simulated data with a known diffusion behavior as a comparison for results

  11. Energy deposition by a 106Ru/106Rh eye applicator simulated using LEPTS, a low-energy particle track simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuss, M.C.; Munoz, A.; Oller, J.C.; Blanco, F.; Williart, A.; Limao-Vieira, P.; Borge, M.J.G.; Tengblad, O.; Huerga, C.; Tellez, M.; Garcia, G.

    2011-01-01

    The present study introduces LEPTS, an event-by-event Monte Carlo programme, for simulating an ophthalmic 106 Ru/ 106 Rh applicator relevant in brachytherapy of ocular tumours. The distinctive characteristics of this code are the underlying radiation-matter interaction models that distinguish elastic and several kinds of inelastic collisions, as well as the use of mostly experimental input data. Special emphasis is placed on the treatment of low-energy electrons for generally being responsible for the deposition of a large portion of the total energy imparted to matter. - Highlights: → We present the Monte Carlo code LEPTS, a low-energy particle track simulation. → Carefully selected input data from 10 keV to 1 eV. → Application to an electron emitting Ru-106/Rh-106 plaque used in brachytherapy.

  12. A Simulation Study of a Radiofrequency Localization System for Tracking Patient Motion in Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Ostyn

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the most widely used tools in cancer treatment is external beam radiotherapy. However, the major risk involved in radiotherapy is excess radiation dose to healthy tissue, exacerbated by patient motion. Here, we present a simulation study of a potential radiofrequency (RF localization system designed to track intrafraction motion (target motion during the radiation treatment. This system includes skin-wearable RF beacons and an external tracking system. We develop an analytical model for direction of arrival measurement with radio frequencies (GHz range for use in a localization estimate. We use a Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the relationship between a localization estimate and angular resolution of sensors (signal receivers in a simulated room. The results indicate that the external sensor needs an angular resolution of about 0.03 degrees to achieve millimeter-level localization accuracy in a treatment room. This fundamental study of a novel RF localization system offers the groundwork to design a radiotherapy-compatible patient positioning system for active motion compensation.

  13. A Simulation Study of a Radiofrequency Localization System for Tracking Patient Motion in Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostyn, Mark; Kim, Siyong; Yeo, Woon-Hong

    2016-04-13

    One of the most widely used tools in cancer treatment is external beam radiotherapy. However, the major risk involved in radiotherapy is excess radiation dose to healthy tissue, exacerbated by patient motion. Here, we present a simulation study of a potential radiofrequency (RF) localization system designed to track intrafraction motion (target motion during the radiation treatment). This system includes skin-wearable RF beacons and an external tracking system. We develop an analytical model for direction of arrival measurement with radio frequencies (GHz range) for use in a localization estimate. We use a Monte Carlo simulation to investigate the relationship between a localization estimate and angular resolution of sensors (signal receivers) in a simulated room. The results indicate that the external sensor needs an angular resolution of about 0.03 degrees to achieve millimeter-level localization accuracy in a treatment room. This fundamental study of a novel RF localization system offers the groundwork to design a radiotherapy-compatible patient positioning system for active motion compensation.

  14. External motion tracking for brain imaging: structured light tracking with invisible light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus Reinhold; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2010-01-01

    The importance of motion correction in 3D medical imaging increases with increasing scanner resolution. It is necessary for scanners with long image acquisition and low contrast images to correct for patient motion in order to optimize image quality. We present a near infrared structured light...... stereo depth map system for head motion estimation inside 3D medical scanners with limited space....

  15. Simulation of reinforced concrete NPP structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zverev, A.B.; Yaskevich, E.E.; Tarannikov, V.N.; Loginov, A.Ya.; Lagutov, V.I.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of stress-strained state of NPP frame structures at different stages of their operation using the method of physical simulation, is conducted. Comparison of model investigations to the data of full-scale deformation measurement allows one to define the strength resource of the structures under operation. Bench test layout and results of investigations into strength, deformation, thermal-physical and acoustic emission parameters of the investigated processes during model loading, are presented

  16. The along track scanning radiometer for ERS-1 - Scan geometry and data simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, A. J. Fred; Cechet, Robert P.; Barton, Ian J.; Llewellyn-Jones, David T.

    1990-01-01

    The first European remote-sensing satellite (ERS-1), due to be launched in 1990, will carry the along track scanning radiometer (ATSR), which has been specifically designed to give accurate satellite measurements of sea surface temperature (SST). Details of the novel scanning technique used by the ATSR are given, and data from the NOAA-9 AVHRR instrument are used to simulate raw ATSR imagery. Because of the high precision of the onboard blackbodies, the active cooling of the detectors, 12-b digitization, and dual-angle capability, the ATSR promises to achieve higher-accuracy satellite-derived SSTs than are currently available.

  17. Seismic analysis of structures by simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundararajan, C.; Gangadharan, A.C.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents a state-of-the-art survey, and recommendations for future work in the area of stochastic seismic analysis by Monte Carlo simulation. First the Monte Carlo simulation procedure is described, with special emphasis on a 'unified approach' for the digital generation of artificial earthquake motions. Next, the advantages and disadvantages of the method over the power spectral method are discussed; and finally, an efficient 'Hybrid Monte Carlo-Power Spectral Method' is developed. The Monte Carlo simulation procedure consists of the following tasks: (1) Digital generation of artificial earthquake motions, (2) Response analysis of the structure to a number of sample motions, and (3) statistical analysis of the structural responses

  18. Simulating the formation of cosmic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenk, C S

    2002-06-15

    A timely combination of new theoretical ideas and observational discoveries has brought about significant advances in our understanding of cosmic evolution. Computer simulations have played a key role in these developments by providing the means to interpret astronomical data in the context of physical and cosmological theory. In the current paradigm, our Universe has a flat geometry, is undergoing accelerated expansion and is gravitationally dominated by elementary particles that make up cold dark matter. Within this framework, it is possible to simulate in a computer the emergence of galaxies and other structures from small quantum fluctuations imprinted during an epoch of inflationary expansion shortly after the Big Bang. The simulations must take into account the evolution of the dark matter as well as the gaseous processes involved in the formation of stars and other visible components. Although many unresolved questions remain, a coherent picture for the formation of cosmic structure is now beginning to emerge.

  19. Seismic analysis of structures by simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundararajan, C.; Gangadharan, A.C.

    1977-01-01

    The paper presents a state-of-the-art survey, and recommendations for future work in the area of stochastic seismic analysis by Monte Carlo simulation. First the Monte Carlo simulation procedure is described with special emphasis on a 'unified approach' for the digital generation of anificial earthquake motions. Next, the advantages and disadvantages of the method over the power spectral method are discussed; and finally, an efficient 'Hybrid Monte Carlo-Power Spectral Method' is developed. The Monte Carlo simulation procedure consists of the following tasks: (1) Digital generation of artificial earthquake motions, (2) Response analysis of the structure to a number of sample motions, and (3) Statistical analysis of the structural responses. (Auth.)

  20. Comparisons of Particle Tracking Techniques and Galerkin Finite Element Methods in Flow Simulations on Watershed Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, D.; Yeh, G.

    2009-12-01

    This paper applies two numerical approximations, the particle tracking technique and Galerkin finite element method, to solve the diffusive wave equation in both one-dimensional and two-dimensional flow simulations. The finite element method is one of most commonly approaches in numerical problems. It can obtain accurate solutions, but calculation times may be rather extensive. The particle tracking technique, using either single-velocity or average-velocity tracks to efficiently perform advective transport, could use larger time-step sizes than the finite element method to significantly save computational time. Comparisons of the alternative approximations are examined in this poster. We adapt the model WASH123D to examine the work. WASH123D is an integrated multimedia, multi-processes, physics-based computational model suitable for various spatial-temporal scales, was first developed by Yeh et al., at 1998. The model has evolved in design capability and flexibility, and has been used for model calibrations and validations over the course of many years. In order to deliver a locally hydrological model in Taiwan, the Taiwan Typhoon and Flood Research Institute (TTFRI) is working with Prof. Yeh to develop next version of WASH123D. So, the work of our preliminary cooperationx is also sketched in this poster.

  1. An integrated approach to endoscopic instrument tracking for augmented reality applications in surgical simulation training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukas, Constantinos; Lahanas, Vasileios; Georgiou, Evangelos

    2013-12-01

    Despite the popular use of virtual and physical reality simulators in laparoscopic training, the educational potential of augmented reality (AR) has not received much attention. A major challenge is the robust tracking and three-dimensional (3D) pose estimation of the endoscopic instrument, which are essential for achieving interaction with the virtual world and for realistic rendering when the virtual scene is occluded by the instrument. In this paper we propose a method that addresses these issues, based solely on visual information obtained from the endoscopic camera. Two different tracking algorithms are combined for estimating the 3D pose of the surgical instrument with respect to the camera. The first tracker creates an adaptive model of a colour strip attached to the distal part of the tool (close to the tip). The second algorithm tracks the endoscopic shaft, using a combined Hough-Kalman approach. The 3D pose is estimated with perspective geometry, using appropriate measurements extracted by the two trackers. The method has been validated on several complex image sequences for its tracking efficiency, pose estimation accuracy and applicability in AR-based training. Using a standard endoscopic camera, the absolute average error of the tip position was 2.5 mm for working distances commonly found in laparoscopic training. The average error of the instrument's angle with respect to the camera plane was approximately 2°. The results are also supplemented by video segments of laparoscopic training tasks performed in a physical and an AR environment. The experiments yielded promising results regarding the potential of applying AR technologies for laparoscopic skills training, based on a computer vision framework. The issue of occlusion handling was adequately addressed. The estimated trajectory of the instruments may also be used for surgical gesture interpretation and assessment. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Design and Development of Mechanical Structure and Control System for Tracked Trailing Mobile Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Hongchuan Xu; Jianxing Ren; Rui Zhu; Zhiwei Chen

    2013-01-01

    Along with the science and technology unceasing progress, the uses of tracing robots become more and more widely. Tracked tracing robot was adopted as the research object in this paper, mechanical structure and control system of robot was designed and developmented. In mechanical structure design part, structure designed and positioned  were completed, including design of robot body, wheel, underpan, transmission structure and the positioning of batteries, control panel, sensors, etc, and the...

  3. Evaluation of a BGO-Based PET System for Single-Cell Tracking Performance by Simulation and Phantom Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Ouyang PhD

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A recent method based on positron emission was reported for tracking moving point sources using the Inveon PET system. However, the effect of scanner background noise was not further explored. Here, we evaluate tracking with the Genisys4, a bismuth germanate-based PET system, which has no significant intrinsic background and may be better suited to tracking lower and/or faster activity sources. Position-dependent sensitivity of the Genisys4 was simulated in Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE using a static 18F point source. Trajectories of helically moving point sources with varying activity and rotation speed were reconstructed from list-mode data as described previously. Simulations showed that the Inveon’s ability to track sources within 2 mm of localization error is limited to objects with a velocity-to-activity ratio < 0.13 mm/decay, compared to < 0.29 mm/decay for the Genisys4. Tracking with the Genisys4 was then validated using a physical phantom of helically moving [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose-in-oil droplets (< 0.24 mm diameter, 139-296 Bq, yielding < 1 mm localization error under the tested conditions, with good agreement between simulated sensitivity and measured activity (Pearson correlation R = .64, P << .05 in a representative example. We have investigated the tracking performance with the Genisys4, and results suggest the feasibility of tracking low activity, point source-like objects with this system.

  4. Occlusion detection via structured sparse learning for robust object tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tianzhu; Ghanem, Bernard; Xu, Changsheng; Ahuja, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    occlusion through structured sparse learning. We test our tracker on challenging benchmark sequences, such as sports videos, which involve heavy occlusion, drastic illumination changes, and large pose variations. Extensive experimental results show that our

  5. Object tracking by occlusion detection via structured sparse learning

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tianzhu; Ghanem, Bernard; Xu, Changsheng; Ahuja, Narendra

    2013-01-01

    occlusion through structured sparse learning. We test our tracker on challenging benchmark sequences, such as sports videos, which involve heavy occlusion, drastic illumination changes, and large pose variations. Experimental results show that our tracker

  6. Dust Storm Feature Identification and Tracking from 4D Simulation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, M.; Yang, C. P.

    2016-12-01

    Dust storms cause significant damage to health, property and the environment worldwide every year. To help mitigate the damage, dust forecasting models simulate and predict upcoming dust events, providing valuable information to scientists, decision makers, and the public. Normally, the model simulations are conducted in four-dimensions (i.e., latitude, longitude, elevation and time) and represent three-dimensional (3D), spatial heterogeneous features of the storm and its evolution over space and time. This research investigates and proposes an automatic multi-threshold, region-growing based identification algorithm to identify critical dust storm features, and track the evolution process of dust storm events through space and time. In addition, a spatiotemporal data model is proposed, which can support the characterization and representation of dust storm events and their dynamic patterns. Quantitative and qualitative evaluations for the algorithm are conducted to test the sensitivity, and capability of identify and track dust storm events. This study has the potential to assist a better early warning system for decision-makers and the public, thus making hazard mitigation plans more effective.

  7. Track structure and dose: Alternative conceptual bases for nuclear therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, R.

    1987-01-01

    track segment high LET bombardments, and should include time dependent effects such as fading. 6 refs, 6 figs

  8. Subset simulation for structural reliability sensitivity analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Shufang; Lu Zhenzhou; Qiao Hongwei

    2009-01-01

    Based on two procedures for efficiently generating conditional samples, i.e. Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) simulation and importance sampling (IS), two reliability sensitivity (RS) algorithms are presented. On the basis of reliability analysis of Subset simulation (Subsim), the RS of the failure probability with respect to the distribution parameter of the basic variable is transformed as a set of RS of conditional failure probabilities with respect to the distribution parameter of the basic variable. By use of the conditional samples generated by MCMC simulation and IS, procedures are established to estimate the RS of the conditional failure probabilities. The formulae of the RS estimator, its variance and its coefficient of variation are derived in detail. The results of the illustrations show high efficiency and high precision of the presented algorithms, and it is suitable for highly nonlinear limit state equation and structural system with single and multiple failure modes

  9. Triphasic contrast enhanced CT simulation with bolus tracking for pancreas SBRT target delineation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Devon J; Patel, Bhavik N; Adamson, Justus D; Subashi, Ergys; Salama, Joseph K; Palta, Manisha

    Bolus-tracked multiphasic contrast computed tomography (CT) is often used in diagnostic radiology to enhance the visibility of pancreas tumors, but is uncommon in radiation therapy pancreas CT simulation, and its impact on gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation is unknown. This study evaluates the lesion conspicuity and consistency of pancreas stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) GTVs contoured in the different contrast phases of triphasic CT simulation scans. Triphasic, bolus-tracked planning CT simulation scans of 10 consecutive pancreas SBRT patients were acquired, yielding images of the pancreas during the late arterial (LA), portal venous (PV), and either the early arterial or delayed phase. GTVs were contoured on each phase by a gastrointestinal-specialized radiation oncologist and reviewed by a fellowship-trained abdominal radiologist who specializes in pancreatic imaging. The volumes of the registered GTVs, their overlap ratio, and the 3-dimensional margin expansions necessary for each GTV to fully encompass GTVs from the other phases were calculated. The contrast difference between tumor and normal pancreas was measured, and 2 radiation oncologists rank-ordered the phases according to their value for the lesion-contouring task. Tumor-to-pancreas enhancement was on average much larger for the LA and PV than the delayed phase or early arterial phases; the LA and PV phases were also consistently preferred by the radiation oncologists. Enhancement differences among the phases resulted in highly variable GTV volumes with no observed trends. Overlap ratios ranged from 18% to 75% across all 3 phases, improving to 43% to 91% when considering only the preferred LA and PV phases. GTV expansions necessary to encompass all GTVs ranged from 0.3 to 1.8 cm for all 3 phases, improving slightly to 0.1 to 1.4 cm when considering just the LA and PV phases. For pancreas SBRT, we recommend combining the GTVs from a multiphasic CT simulation with bolus-tracking, including

  10. Contributions to reinforced concrete structures numerical simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badel, P.B.

    2001-07-01

    In order to be able to carry out simulations of reinforced concrete structures, it is necessary to know two aspects: the behaviour laws have to reflect the complex behaviour of concrete and a numerical environment has to be developed in order to avoid to the user difficulties due to the softening nature of the behaviour. This work deals with these two subjects. After an accurate estimation of two behaviour models (micro-plan and mesoscopic models), two damage models (the first one using a scalar variable, the other one a tensorial damage of the 2 order) are proposed. These two models belong to the framework of generalized standard materials, which renders their numerical integration easy and efficient. A method of load control is developed in order to make easier the convergence of the calculations. At last, simulations of industrial structures illustrate the efficiency of the method. (O.M.)

  11. An improved detector response simulation for the CBM silicon tracking system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malygina, Hanna [Goethe University, Frankfurt (Germany); Friese, Volker [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment(CBM) at FAIR is designed to explore the QCD phase diagram in the region of high net-baryon densities. The central detector component the Silicon Tracking System (STS) is build from double-sided micro-strip sensors. To achieve realistic simulations the response of the silicon strip sensors should be precisely included in the digitizer which simulates a complete chain of physical processes caused by charged particles traversing the detector, from charge creation in silicon to a digital output signal. The new version of the STS digitizer comprises in addition non-uniform energy loss distributions (according to the Urban theory), thermal diffusion and charge redistribution over the read-out channels due to interstrip capacitances. The improved response simulation was tested with parameters reproducing the anticipated running conditions of the CBM experiment. Two different method for cluster finding were used. The results for hit position residuals, cluster size distribution, as well as for some other parameters of reconstruction quality are presented. The achieved advance is assessed by a comparison with the previous, simpler version of the STS detector response simulation.

  12. Integration of communications and tracking data processing simulation for space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacovara, Robert C.

    1987-01-01

    A simplified model of the communications network for the Communications and Tracking Data Processing System (CTDP) was developed. It was simulated by use of programs running on several on-site computers. These programs communicate with one another by means of both local area networks and direct serial connections. The domain of the model and its simulation is from Orbital Replaceable Unit (ORU) interface to Data Management Systems (DMS). The simulation was designed to allow status queries from remote entities across the DMS networks to be propagated through the model to several simulated ORU's. The ORU response is then propagated back to the remote entity which originated the request. Response times at the various levels were investigated in a multi-tasking, multi-user operating system environment. Results indicate that the effective bandwidth of the system may be too low to support expected data volume requirements under conventional operating systems. Instead, some form of embedded process control program may be required on the node computers.

  13. Structured Light-Based Motion Tracking in the Limited View of an MR Head Coil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erikshøj, M.; Olesen, Oline Vinter; Conradsen, Knut

    2013-01-01

    A markerless motion tracking (MT) system developed for use in PET brain imaging has been tested in the limited field of view (FOV) of the MR head coil from the Siemens Biograph mMR. The system is a 3D surface scanner that uses structured light (SL) to create point cloud reconstructions of the fac......A markerless motion tracking (MT) system developed for use in PET brain imaging has been tested in the limited field of view (FOV) of the MR head coil from the Siemens Biograph mMR. The system is a 3D surface scanner that uses structured light (SL) to create point cloud reconstructions...

  14. Quantitative analysis of the TMJ movement with a new mandibular movement tracking and simulation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Seung; Hwang, Soon Jung; Choi, Soon Chul; Lee, Sam Sun; Heo, Min Suk; Heo, Kyung Hoe; Yi, Won Jin

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a system for the measurement and simulation of the TMJ movement and to analyze the mandibular movement quantitatively. We devised patient-specific splints and a registration body for the TMJ movement tracking. The mandibular movements of the 12 subjects with facial deformity and 3 controls were obtained by using an optical tracking system and the patient-specific splints. The mandibular part was manually segmented from the CT volume data of a patient. Three-dimensional surface models of the maxilla and the mandible were constructed using the segmented data. The continuous movement of the mandible with respect to the maxilla could be simulated by applying the recorded positions sequentially. Trajectories of the selected reference points were calculated during simulation and analyzed. The selected points were the most superior point of bilateral condyle, lower incisor point, and pogonion. There were significant differences (P<0.05) between control group and pre-surgical group in the maximum displacement of left superior condyle, lower incisor, and pogonion in vertical direction. Differences in the maximum lengths of the right and the left condyle were 0.59 ± 0.30 mm in pre-surgical group and 2.69 ± 2.63 mm in control group, which showed a significant difference (P<0.005). The maximum of differences between lengths of the right and the left calculated during one cycle also showed a significant difference between two groups (P<0.05). Significant differences in mandibular movements between the groups implies that facial deformity have an effect on the movement asymmetry of the mandible.

  15. Thyroid cell irradiation by radioiodines: a new Monte Carlo electron track-structure code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champion, Christophe; Elbast, Mouhamad; Colas-Linhart, Nicole; Ting-Di Wu

    2007-01-01

    The most significant impact of the Chernobyl accident is the increased incidence of thyroid cancer among children who were exposed to short-lived radioiodines and 131-iodine. In order to accurately estimate the radiation dose provided by these radioiodines, it is necessary to know where iodine is incorporated. To do that, the distribution at the cellular level of newly organified iodine in the immature rat thyroid was performed using secondary ion mass microscopy (NanoSIMS 50 ). Actual dosimetric models take only into account the averaged energy and range of beta particles of the radio-elements and may, therefore, imperfectly describe the real distribution of dose deposit at the microscopic level around the point sources. Our approach is radically different since based on a track-structure Monte Carlo code allowing following-up of electrons down to low energies (∼= 10 eV) what permits a nanometric description of the irradiation physics. The numerical simulations were then performed by modelling the complete disintegrations of the short-lived iodine isotopes as well as of 131 I in new born rat thyroids in order to take into account accurate histological and biological data for the thyroid gland. (author)

  16. Simulation study of multi-step model algorithmic control of the nuclear reactor thermal power tracking system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Xiaoping; Xu Tianshu

    2001-01-01

    The classical control method is usually hard to ensure the thermal power tracking accuracy, because the nuclear reactor system is a complex nonlinear system with uncertain parameters and disturbances. A sort of non-parameter model is constructed with the open-loop impulse response of the system. Furthermore, a sort of thermal power tracking digital control law is presented using the multi-step model algorithmic control principle. The control method presented had good tracking performance and robustness. It can work despite the existence of unmeasurable disturbances. The simulation experiment testifies the correctness and effectiveness of the method. The high accuracy matching between the thermal power and the referenced load is achieved

  17. Multibody simulations of trolleybus vertical dynamics and influences of spring-damper structural elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polach P.

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Vertical dynamic properties of the ŠKODA 21 Tr low-floor trolleybus were investigated on an artificial test track when driving with a real vehicle and when simulating driving with a multibody model along a virtual test track. Driving along the artificial test track was aimed to determine vertical dynamic properties of the real trolleybus and on the basis of them to verify computer trolleybus models. Time histories and extreme values of the air springs relative deflections are the monitored quantities. Due to differences of the experiments and the computer simulations results the influences of the characteristics of the spring-damper structural elements of the axles suspension and the radial characteristics of the tires used in the trolleybus multibody model on the extreme values of the monitored quantities are evaluated.

  18. Eye tracking detects disconjugate eye movements associated with structural traumatic brain injury and concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadani, Uzma; Ritlop, Robert; Reyes, Marleen; Nehrbass, Elena; Li, Meng; Lamm, Elizabeth; Schneider, Julia; Shimunov, David; Sava, Maria; Kolecki, Radek; Burris, Paige; Altomare, Lindsey; Mehmood, Talha; Smith, Theodore; Huang, Jason H; McStay, Christopher; Todd, S Rob; Qian, Meng; Kondziolka, Douglas; Wall, Stephen; Huang, Paul

    2015-04-15

    Disconjugate eye movements have been associated with traumatic brain injury since ancient times. Ocular motility dysfunction may be present in up to 90% of patients with concussion or blast injury. We developed an algorithm for eye tracking in which the Cartesian coordinates of the right and left pupils are tracked over 200 sec and compared to each other as a subject watches a short film clip moving inside an aperture on a computer screen. We prospectively eye tracked 64 normal healthy noninjured control subjects and compared findings to 75 trauma subjects with either a positive head computed tomography (CT) scan (n=13), negative head CT (n=39), or nonhead injury (n=23) to determine whether eye tracking would reveal the disconjugate gaze associated with both structural brain injury and concussion. Tracking metrics were then correlated to the clinical concussion measure Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 3 (SCAT3) in trauma patients. Five out of five measures of horizontal disconjugacy were increased in positive and negative head CT patients relative to noninjured control subjects. Only one of five vertical disconjugacy measures was significantly increased in brain-injured patients relative to controls. Linear regression analysis of all 75 trauma patients demonstrated that three metrics for horizontal disconjugacy negatively correlated with SCAT3 symptom severity score and positively correlated with total Standardized Assessment of Concussion score. Abnormal eye-tracking metrics improved over time toward baseline in brain-injured subjects observed in follow-up. Eye tracking may help quantify the severity of ocular motility disruption associated with concussion and structural brain injury.

  19. Realworld maximum power point tracking simulation of PV system based on Fuzzy Logic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Ahmed M.; El-arini, Mahdi M. M.; Ghitas, Ahmed; Fathy, Ahmed

    2012-12-01

    In the recent years, the solar energy becomes one of the most important alternative sources of electric energy, so it is important to improve the efficiency and reliability of the photovoltaic (PV) systems. Maximum power point tracking (MPPT) plays an important role in photovoltaic power systems because it maximize the power output from a PV system for a given set of conditions, and therefore maximize their array efficiency. This paper presents a maximum power point tracker (MPPT) using Fuzzy Logic theory for a PV system. The work is focused on the well known Perturb and Observe (P&O) algorithm and is compared to a designed fuzzy logic controller (FLC). The simulation work dealing with MPPT controller; a DC/DC Ćuk converter feeding a load is achieved. The results showed that the proposed Fuzzy Logic MPPT in the PV system is valid.

  20. Realworld maximum power point tracking simulation of PV system based on Fuzzy Logic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Othman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, the solar energy becomes one of the most important alternative sources of electric energy, so it is important to improve the efficiency and reliability of the photovoltaic (PV systems. Maximum power point tracking (MPPT plays an important role in photovoltaic power systems because it maximize the power output from a PV system for a given set of conditions, and therefore maximize their array efficiency. This paper presents a maximum power point tracker (MPPT using Fuzzy Logic theory for a PV system. The work is focused on the well known Perturb and Observe (P&O algorithm and is compared to a designed fuzzy logic controller (FLC. The simulation work dealing with MPPT controller; a DC/DC Ćuk converter feeding a load is achieved. The results showed that the proposed Fuzzy Logic MPPT in the PV system is valid.

  1. Correction of head movements in positron emission tomography using point source tracking system: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarparvar, Babak; Shamsaei, Mojtaba; Rajabi, Hossein

    2012-01-01

    The motion of the head during brain positron emission tomography (PET) acquisitions has been identified as a source of artifact in the reconstructed image. In this study, a method is described to develop an image-based motion correction technique for correcting the post-acquisition data without using external optical motion-tracking system such as POLARIS. In this technique, GATE has been used to simulate PET brain scan using point sources mounted around the head to accurately monitor the position of the head during the time frames. The measurement of head motion in each frame showed a transformation in the image frame matrix, resulting in a fully corrected data set. Using different kinds of phantoms and motions, the accuracy of the correction method is tested and its applicability to experimental studies is demonstrated as well.

  2. A Deep-Structured Conditional Random Field Model for Object Silhouette Tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Shafiee

    Full Text Available In this work, we introduce a deep-structured conditional random field (DS-CRF model for the purpose of state-based object silhouette tracking. The proposed DS-CRF model consists of a series of state layers, where each state layer spatially characterizes the object silhouette at a particular point in time. The interactions between adjacent state layers are established by inter-layer connectivity dynamically determined based on inter-frame optical flow. By incorporate both spatial and temporal context in a dynamic fashion within such a deep-structured probabilistic graphical model, the proposed DS-CRF model allows us to develop a framework that can accurately and efficiently track object silhouettes that can change greatly over time, as well as under different situations such as occlusion and multiple targets within the scene. Experiment results using video surveillance datasets containing different scenarios such as occlusion and multiple targets showed that the proposed DS-CRF approach provides strong object silhouette tracking performance when compared to baseline methods such as mean-shift tracking, as well as state-of-the-art methods such as context tracking and boosted particle filtering.

  3. Numerical simulation of single bubbles rising through subchannels with interface tracking method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroyuki Yoshida; Takuji Nagayoshi; Hidesada Tamai; Tazuyuki Takase; Hajime Akimoto

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Although the sub-channel codes are used for the thermal-hydraulic analysis of fuel bundles in nuclear reactors from the former, many compositions and empirical equations based on experimental results are needed to predict the two-phase flow behavior in details. When there are no experimental data such as the reduced-moderation light water reactor (RMWR) which is studied by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), therefore, it is very difficult to obtain highly precise predictions. The RMWR core has remarkably narrow gap spacing between fuel rods (i.e., around 1 mm) which are arranged at a triangular tight-lattice configuration. To evaluate the feasibility and to optimize the thermal design of the RMWR core, a full-scale bundle test is required. However, several systematic full-scale tests are difficult to perform during an initial design phase from economic and temporal reason. Thus, we made a plan to develop a mechanistic BT model to evaluate the effects of the geometry configuration by a two-phase flow numerical simulation. In the plan of the mechanistic BT model development, three dimensional two-phase flow simulation codes with the interface tracking method, the moving particle semi-implicit method and the advanced two-fluid model are developed. In this study, as a part of this model development, detailed two-phase flow simulation code using interface tracking method (named TPFIT) is developed. In this paper, the results of TPFIT code with the advanced interface tracking method applied to single bubbles behavior through subchannels) to verify TPFIT code performance in complicated flow channel as rod bundles. In the simulation, the flow channel is composed of a square duct and four tubes with outside diameters D = 12 mm. The width and height of the duct are 27.2 mm and 192 mm, respectively. In the flow channel, the tubes are used to simulate fuel rods. One center subchannel and four periphery subchannels exist in the

  4. Hybrid Method Simulation of Slender Marine Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Niels Hørbye

    This present thesis consists of an extended summary and five appended papers concerning various aspects of the implementation of a hybrid method which combines classical simulation methods and artificial neural networks. The thesis covers three main topics. Common for all these topics...... only recognize patterns similar to those comprised in the data used to train the network. Fatigue life evaluation of marine structures often considers simulations of more than a hundred different sea states. Hence, in order for this method to be useful, the training data must be arranged so...... that a single neural network can cover all relevant sea states. The applicability and performance of the present hybrid method is demonstrated on a numerical model of a mooring line attached to a floating offshore platform. The second part of the thesis demonstrates how sequential neural networks can be used...

  5. Enhanced Optical Head Tracking for Cranial Radiation Therapy: Supporting Surface Registration by Cutaneous Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wissel, Tobias, E-mail: wissel@rob.uni-luebeck.de [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Graduate School for Computing in Medicine and Life Science, University of Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Stüber, Patrick; Wagner, Benjamin [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Graduate School for Computing in Medicine and Life Science, University of Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Bruder, Ralf [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Erdmann, Christian [Institute for Neuroradiology, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Hostein, Campus Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Deutz, Christin-Sophie [Clinic for Oral and Maxillo-Facial Surgery, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Hostein, Campus Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Sack, Benjamin [Department of Neurology, Universitätsklinikum Schleswig-Hostein, Campus Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Manit, Jirapong [Institute for Robotics and Cognitive Systems, University of Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); Graduate School for Computing in Medicine and Life Science, University of Lübeck, Lübeck (Germany); and others

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: To support surface registration in cranial radiation therapy by structural information. The risk for spatial ambiguities is minimized by using tissue thickness variations predicted from backscattered near-infrared (NIR) light from the forehead. Methods and Materials: In a pilot study we recorded NIR surface scans by laser triangulation from 30 volunteers of different skin type. A ground truth for the soft-tissue thickness was segmented from MR scans. After initially matching the NIR scans to the MR reference, Gaussian processes were trained to predict tissue thicknesses from NIR backscatter. Moreover, motion starting from this initial registration was simulated by 5000 random transformations of the NIR scan away from the MR reference. Re-registration to the MR scan was compared with and without tissue thickness support. Results: By adding prior knowledge to the backscatter features, such as incident angle and neighborhood information in the scanning grid, we showed that tissue thickness can be predicted with mean errors of <0.2 mm, irrespective of the skin type. With this additional information, the average registration error improved from 3.4 mm to 0.48 mm by a factor of 7. Misalignments of more than 1 mm were almost thoroughly (98.9%) pushed below 1 mm. Conclusions: For almost all cases tissue-enhanced matching achieved better results than purely spatial registration. Ambiguities can be minimized if the cutaneous structures do not agree. This valuable support for surface registration increases tracking robustness and avoids misalignment of tumor targets far from the registration site.

  6. Enhanced Optical Head Tracking for Cranial Radiation Therapy: Supporting Surface Registration by Cutaneous Structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wissel, Tobias; Stüber, Patrick; Wagner, Benjamin; Bruder, Ralf; Erdmann, Christian; Deutz, Christin-Sophie; Sack, Benjamin; Manit, Jirapong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To support surface registration in cranial radiation therapy by structural information. The risk for spatial ambiguities is minimized by using tissue thickness variations predicted from backscattered near-infrared (NIR) light from the forehead. Methods and Materials: In a pilot study we recorded NIR surface scans by laser triangulation from 30 volunteers of different skin type. A ground truth for the soft-tissue thickness was segmented from MR scans. After initially matching the NIR scans to the MR reference, Gaussian processes were trained to predict tissue thicknesses from NIR backscatter. Moreover, motion starting from this initial registration was simulated by 5000 random transformations of the NIR scan away from the MR reference. Re-registration to the MR scan was compared with and without tissue thickness support. Results: By adding prior knowledge to the backscatter features, such as incident angle and neighborhood information in the scanning grid, we showed that tissue thickness can be predicted with mean errors of <0.2 mm, irrespective of the skin type. With this additional information, the average registration error improved from 3.4 mm to 0.48 mm by a factor of 7. Misalignments of more than 1 mm were almost thoroughly (98.9%) pushed below 1 mm. Conclusions: For almost all cases tissue-enhanced matching achieved better results than purely spatial registration. Ambiguities can be minimized if the cutaneous structures do not agree. This valuable support for surface registration increases tracking robustness and avoids misalignment of tumor targets far from the registration site.

  7. Mars gravity field error analysis from simulated radio tracking of Mars Observer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.E.; Lerch, F.J.; Chan, J.C.; Chinn, D.S.; Iz, H.B.; Mallama, A.; Patel, G.B.

    1990-01-01

    The Mars Observer (MO) Mission, in a near-polar orbit at 360-410 km altitude for nearly a 2-year observing period, will greatly improve our understanding of the geophysics of Mars, including its gravity field. To assess the expected improvement of the gravity field, the authors have conducted an error analysis based upon the mission plan for the Mars Observer radio tracking data from the Deep Space Network. Their results indicate that it should be possible to obtain a high-resolution model (spherical harmonics complete to degree and order 50 corresponding to a 200-km horizontal resolution) for the gravitational field of the planet. This model, in combination with topography from MO altimetry, should provide for an improved determination of the broad scale density structure and stress state of the Martian crust and upper mantle. The mathematical model for the error analysis is based on the representation of doppler tracking data as a function of the Martian gravity field in spherical harmonics, solar radiation pressure, atmospheric drag, angular momentum desaturation residual acceleration (AMDRA) effects, tracking station biases, and the MO orbit parameters. Two approaches are employed. In the first case, the error covariance matrix of the gravity model is estimated including the effects from all the nongravitational parameters (noise-only case). In the second case, the gravity recovery error is computed as above but includes unmodelled systematic effects from atmospheric drag, AMDRA, and solar radiation pressure (biased case). The error spectrum of gravity shows an order of magnitude of improvement over current knowledge based on doppler data precision from a single station of 0.3 mm s -1 noise for 1-min integration intervals during three 60-day periods

  8. The Impact of the Geometrical Structure of the DNA on Parameters of the Track-Event Theory for Radiation Induced Cell Kill.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uwe Schneider

    Full Text Available When fractionation schemes for hypofractionation and stereotactic body radiotherapy are considered, a reliable cell survival model at high dose is needed for calculating doses of similar biological effectiveness. An alternative to the LQ-model is the track-event theory which is based on the probabilities for one- and two two-track events. A one-track-event (OTE is always represented by at least two simultaneous double strand breaks. A two-track-event (TTE results in one double strand break. Therefore at least two two-track-events on the same or different chromosomes are necessary to produce an event which leads to cell sterilization. It is obvious that the probabilities of OTEs and TTEs must somehow depend on the geometrical structure of the chromatin. In terms of the track-event theory the ratio ε of the probabilities of OTEs and TTEs includes the geometrical dependence and is obtained in this work by simple Monte Carlo simulations.For this work it was assumed that the anchors of loop forming chromatin are most sensitive to radiation induced cell deaths. Therefore two adjacent tetranucleosomes representing the loop anchors were digitized. The probability ratio ε of OTEs and TTEs was factorized into a radiation quality dependent part and a geometrical part: ε = εion ∙ εgeo. εgeo was obtained for two situations, by applying Monte Carlo simulation for DNA on the tetranucleosomes itself and for linker DNA. Low energy electrons were represented by randomly distributed ionizations and high energy electrons by ionizations which were simulated on rays. εion was determined for electrons by using results from nanodosimetric measurements. The calculated ε was compared to the ε obtained from fits of the track event model to 42 sets of experimental human cell survival data.When the two tetranucleosomes are in direct contact and the hits are randomly distributed εgeo and ε are 0.12 and 0.85, respectively. When the hits are simulated on rays

  9. Initial assessment of tumor tracking with a gimbaled linac system in clinical circumstances: A patient simulation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Depuydt, Tom; Poels, Kenneth; Verellen, Dirk; Engels, Benedikt; Collen, Christine; Haverbeke, Chloe; Gevaert, Thierry; Buls, Nico; Van Gompel, Gert; Reynders, Truus; Duchateau, Michael; Tournel, Koen; Boussaer, Marlies; Steenbeke, Femke; Vandenbroucke, Frederik; De Ridder, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To have an initial assessment of the Vero Dynamic Tracking workflow in clinical circumstances and quantify the performance of the tracking system, a simulation study was set up on 5 lung and liver patients. Methods and materials: The preparatory steps of a tumor tracking treatment, based on fiducial markers implanted in the tumor, were executed allowing pursuit of the tumor with the gimbaled linac and monitoring X-rays acquisition, however, without activating the 6 MV beam. Data were acquired on workflow time-efficiency, tracking accuracy and imaging exposure. Results: The average time between the patient entering the treatment room and the first treatment field was about 9 min. The time for building the correlation model was 3.2 min. Tracking errors of 0.55 and 0.95 mm (1σ) were observed in PAN/TILT direction and a 2D range of 3.08 mm. A skin dose was determined of 0.08 mGy/image, with a source-to-skin distance of 900 mm and kV exposure of 1 mAs. On average 1.8 mGy/min kV skin dose was observed for 1 Hz monitoring. Conclusion: The Vero tracking solution proved to be fully functional and showed performance comparable with other real-time tracking systems

  10. Simulation of plasma double-layer structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovsky, J.E.; Joyce, G.

    1982-01-01

    Electrostatic plasma double layers are numerically simulated by means of a magnetized 2 1/2-dimensional particle-in-cell method. The investigation of planar double layers indicates that these one-dimensional potential structures are susceptible to periodic disruption by instabilities in the low-potential plasmas. Only a slight increase in the double-layer thickness with an increase in its obliqueness to the magnetic field is observed. Weak magnetization results in the double-layer electric-field alignment of accelerated particles and strong magnetization results in their magnetic-field alignment. The numerial simulations of spatially periodic two-dimensional double layers also exhibit cyclical instability. A morphological invariance in two-dimensional double layers with respect to the degree of magnetization implies that the potential structures scale with Debye lengths rather than with gyroradii. Electron-beam excited electrostatic electron-cyclotron waves and (ion-beam driven) solitary waves are present in the plasmas adjacent to the double layers

  11. DYNECHARM++: a toolkit to simulate coherent interactions of high-energy charged particles in complex structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagli, Enrico; Guidi, Vincenzo

    2013-08-01

    A toolkit for the simulation of coherent interactions between high-energy charged particles and complex crystal structures, called DYNECHARM++ has been developed. The code has been written in C++ language taking advantage of this object-oriented programing method. The code is capable to evaluating the electrical characteristics of complex atomic structures and to simulate and track the particle trajectory within them. Calculation method of electrical characteristics based on their expansion in Fourier series has been adopted. Two different approaches to simulate the interaction have been adopted, relying on the full integration of particle trajectories under the continuum potential approximation and on the definition of cross-sections of coherent processes. Finally, the code has proved to reproduce experimental results and to simulate interaction of charged particles with complex structures.

  12. Convection methodology for fission track annealing: direct and inverse numerical simulations in the multi-exponential case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miellou, J.C.; Igli, H.; Grivet, M.; Rebetez, M.; Chambaudet, A.

    1994-01-01

    In minerals, the uranium fission tracks are sensitive to temperature and time. The consequence is that the etchable lengths are reduced. To simulate the phenomenon, at the last International Conference on Nuclear Tracks in solids at Beijing in 1992, we proposed a convection model for fission track annealing based on a reaction situation associated with only one activation energy. Moreover a simple inverse method based on the resolution of an ordinary differential equation was described, making it possible to retrace the thermal history in this mono-exponential situation. The aim of this paper is to consider a more involved class of models including multi-exponentials associated with several activation energies. We shall describe in this framework the modelling of the direct phenomenon and the resolution of the inverse problem. Results of numerical simulations and comparison with the mono-exponential case will be presented. 5 refs. (author)

  13. Characteristics of different convective parameterization schemes on the simulation of intensity and track of severe extratropical cyclones over North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, P. K.; Liberato, Margarida L. R.; Ferreira, Juan A.; Dasamsetti, S.; Vijaya Bhaskara Rao, S.

    2018-01-01

    The role of the convective parameterization schemes (CPSs) in the ARW-WRF (WRF) mesoscale model is examined for extratropical cyclones (ETCs) over the North Atlantic Ocean. The simulation of very severe winter storms such as Xynthia (2010) and Gong (2013) are considered in this study. Most popular CPSs within WRF model, along with Yonsei University (YSU) planetary boundary layer (PBL) and WSM6 microphysical parameterization schemes are incorporated for the model experiments. For each storm, four numerical experiments were carried out using New Kain Fritsch (NKF), Betts-Miller-Janjic (BMJ), Grell 3D Ensemble (Gr3D) and no convection scheme (NCS) respectively. The prime objectives of these experiments were to recognize the best CPS that can forecast the intensity, track, and landfall over the Iberian Peninsula in advance of two days. The WRF model results such as central sea level pressure (CSLP), wind field, moisture flux convergence, geopotential height, jet stream, track and precipitation have shown sensitivity CPSs. The 48-hour lead simulations with BMJ schemes produce the best simulations both regarding ETCs intensity and track than Gr3D and NKF schemes. The average MAE and RMSE of intensities are least that (6.5 hPa in CSLP and 3.4 ms- 1 in the 10-m wind) found in BMJ scheme. The MAE and RMSE for and intensity and track error have revealed that NCS produces large errors than other CPSs experiments. However, for track simulation of these ETCs, at 72-, 48- and 24-hour means track errors were 440, 390 and 158 km respectively. In brevity, BMJ and Gr3D schemes can be used for short and medium range predictions of the ETCs over North Atlantic. For the evaluation of precipitation distributions using Gr3D scheme are good agreement with TRMM satellite than other CPSs.

  14. Determination of ion track and shapes with damage simulations on the base of ellipsometric and backscattering spectrometric measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polgar, O.; Fried, M.; Khanh, N.; Petrik, P.; Barsony, I. [Research Institute for Technical Phisycs and Materials Science, Budapest (Hungary)

    2008-05-15

    On the base of geometrical and statistical considerations a damage simulator was created in order to determine the ion track-radius and -shape of ion-implantation caused damage in single-crystalline Si. Damage vs. dose curves calculated by spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) and Rutherford backscattering/channeling spectrometry (RBS/C) measurements, using different doses of 100 keV Xe implantation, gave information about the damage profile in depth. Both methods are required, because of dose-dependent discrepancies of SE compared with RBS/C [Fried et al., Thin Solid Films 455/456, 404 (2004)]. Different kinds of damage models were investigated to calculate the ion track-radius and to describe the damages in depth and the shape of ion track. Comparing directly the simulated and the measured damage vs. dose curves, the damage function and the other simulation parameters were optimized and hence the ion track size and even the shape can be determined. The dose dependent mean size of the unchanged crystalline regions, obtained from the simulation was correlated with the complex dielectric functions, obtained from the SE analysis. The results clearly show the effect of decreasing size of the unchanged crystalline regions. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  15. DIVIDED ATTENTION IN EXPERIENCED YOUNG AND OLDER DRIVERS - LANE TRACKING AND VISUAL ANALYSIS IN A DYNAMIC DRIVING SIMULATOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BROUWER, WH; WATERINK, W; VANWOLFFELAAR, PC; ROTHENGATTER, T

    1991-01-01

    A simulated driving task that required the simultaneous execution of two continuous visual tasks was administered to 12 healthy young (mean age 26.1 years) and 12 healthy older (mean age 64.4 years) experienced and currently active drivers. The first task was a compensatory lane-tracking task

  16. An Efficient and Robust Method for Lagrangian Magnetic Particle Tracking in Fluid Flow Simulations on Unstructured Grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen Stuart, D.C.; Kleijn, C.R.; Kenjeres, S.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we report on a newly developed particle tracking scheme for fluid flow simulations on 3D unstructured grids, aiming to provide detailed insights in the particle behaviour in complex geometries. A possible field of applications is the Magnetic Drug Targeting (MDT) technique, on which

  17. A Framework for Occupancy Tracking in a Building via Structural Dynamics Sensing of Footstep Vibrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey D. Poston

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Counting the number of occupants in building areas over time—occupancy tracking—provides valuable information for responding to emergencies, optimizing thermal conditions or managing personnel. This capability is distinct from tracking individual building occupants as they move within a building, has lower complexity than conventional tracking algorithms require, and avoids privacy concerns that tracking individuals may pose. The approach proposed here is a novel combination of data analytics applied to measurements from a building’s structural dynamics sensors (e.g., accelerometers or geophones. Specifically, measurements of footstep-generated structural waves provide evidence of occupancy in a building area. These footstep vibrations can be distinguished from other vibrations, and, once identified, the footsteps can be located. These locations, in turn, form the starting point of estimating occupancy in an area. In order to provide a meaningful occupancy count, however, it is first necessary to associate discrete footsteps with individuals. The proposed framework incorporates a tractable algorithm for this association task. The proposed algorithms operate online, updating occupancy count over time as new footsteps are detected. Experiments with measurements from a public building illustrate the operation of the proposed framework. This approach offers an advantage over others based on conventional technologies by avoiding the cost of a separate sensor system devoted to occupancy tracking.

  18. Target tracking control and semi-physical simulation of Qball-X4 quad-rotor unmanned aerial vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, a set of integrated ground target tracking flight system has been proposed based on the Qball-X4 quad-rotor unmanned aerial vehicle hardware platform and the QuaRC software platform. Both of the hardware and software platforms are developed by Quanser Company, Canada. The proposed tracking and positioning algorithm could be divided into several stages. First, a tracker is developed based on an optical flow method to track the target; and then, in order to improve the reliability of tracking algorithm and also help in retrieving the lost target, a cascade target detector is developed; meanwhile, a model updated scheme aiming at some possible errors in tracking and detecting process is presented based on Positive-Negative (P-N learning system; at last, a monocular visual positioning system is designed based on the corresponding navigation message. In addition, the effectiveness of the proposed flight control system is verified by both simulation and hardware-in-loop system results in several tracking flight tests.

  19. Imaging infrared: Scene simulation, modeling, and real image tracking; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Mar. 30, 31, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triplett, Milton J.; Wolverton, James R.; Hubert, August J.

    1989-09-01

    Various papers on scene simulation, modeling, and real image tracking using IR imaging are presented. Individual topics addressed include: tactical IR scene generator, dynamic FLIR simulation in flight training research, high-speed dynamic scene simulation in UV to IR spectra, development of an IR sensor calibration facility, IR celestial background scene description, transmission measurement of optical components at cryogenic temperatures, diffraction model for a point-source generator, silhouette-based tracking for tactical IR systems, use of knowledge in electrooptical trackers, detection and classification of target formations in IR image sequences, SMPRAD: simplified three-dimensional cloud radiance model, IR target generator, recent advances in testing of thermal imagers, generic IR system models with dynamic image generation, modeling realistic target acquisition using IR sensors in multiple-observer scenarios, and novel concept of scene generation and comprehensive dynamic sensor test.

  20. Finite element simulations of low-mass readout cables for the CBM Silicon Tracking System using RAPHAEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singla, M., E-mail: M.Singla@gsi.de [Goethe University, Frankfurt (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Chatterji, S.; Müller, W.F.J.; Kleipa, V.; Heuser, J.M. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-01-21

    The first three-dimensional simulation study of thin multi-line readout cables using finite element simulation tool RAPHAEL is being reported. The application is the Silicon Tracking System (STS) of the fixed-target heavy-ion experiment Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM), under design at the forthcoming accelerator center FAIR in Germany. RAPHAEL has been used to design low-mass analog readout cables with minimum possible Equivalent Noise Charge (ENC). Various trace geometries and trace materials have been explored in detail for this optimization study. These cables will bridge the distance between the microstrip detectors and the signal processing electronics placed at the periphery of the silicon tracking stations. SPICE modeling has been implemented in Sentaurus Device to study the transmission loss (dB loss) in cables and simulation has been validated with measurements. An optimized design having minimum possible ENC, material budget and transmission loss for the readout cables has been proposed.

  1. Deformation mechanisms of a porous structure of the poly(ethylene terephthalate) nuclear track membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovchinnikov, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    The deformation mechanisms of a porous structure of the nuclear track membrane made of poly(ethylene terephthalate) are investigated in the temperature range from 333 to 473 K. It is shown that the pore size of the membrane can both decrease and increase. The analytical equation based on the Alfrey mechanical approach to the relaxation deformation of polymers describes the experimental data satisfactorily over the whole range of temperatures and pore radii of the membranes. 21 refs.; 5 figs.; 3 tabs

  2. Designing and Simulation of a Two-Axis Solar Tracking System by Exact Relations of Solar Angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faezeh Esmaili Ranjbar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a system has been designed and simulated to track sunlight, which identifies sun location based on the exact relations of solar angles and without any optical sensor. In fact the relations which have been used in this study are far more accurate compared to similar cases, because of using the "equation of time" and reducing the tracking time of every 15 minutes. In this system, an economical micro-controller has been used to generate the necessary orders to control system and two stepper motors for powering solar array. By adding a real-time clock IC (RTC to angle differentiation circuit, dynamic plane has improved.

  3. Optimizing the balance between task automation and human manual control in simulated submarine track management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Stephanie I; Visser, Troy A W; Huf, Samuel; Loft, Shayne

    2017-09-01

    Automation can improve operator performance and reduce workload, but can also degrade operator situation awareness (SA) and the ability to regain manual control. In 3 experiments, we examined the extent to which automation could be designed to benefit performance while ensuring that individuals maintained SA and could regain manual control. Participants completed a simulated submarine track management task under varying task load. The automation was designed to facilitate information acquisition and analysis, but did not make task decisions. Relative to a condition with no automation, the continuous use of automation improved performance and reduced subjective workload, but degraded SA. Automation that was engaged and disengaged by participants as required (adaptable automation) moderately improved performance and reduced workload relative to no automation, but degraded SA. Automation engaged and disengaged based on task load (adaptive automation) provided no benefit to performance or workload, and degraded SA relative to no automation. Automation never led to significant return-to-manual deficits. However, all types of automation led to degraded performance on a nonautomated task that shared information processing requirements with automated tasks. Given these outcomes, further research is urgently required to establish how to design automation to maximize performance while keeping operators cognitively engaged. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. Simulation model of ANN based maximum power point tracking controller for solar PV system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Anil K.; Singh, Bhupal [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Ajay Kumar Garg Engineering College, Ghaziabad 201009 (India); Kaushika, N.D.; Agarwal, Niti [School of Research and Development, Bharati Vidyapeeth College of Engineering, A-4 Paschim Vihar, New Delhi 110063 (India)

    2011-02-15

    In this paper the simulation model of an artificial neural network (ANN) based maximum power point tracking controller has been developed. The controller consists of an ANN tracker and the optimal control unit. The ANN tracker estimates the voltages and currents corresponding to a maximum power delivered by solar PV (photovoltaic) array for variable cell temperature and solar radiation. The cell temperature is considered as a function of ambient air temperature, wind speed and solar radiation. The tracker is trained employing a set of 124 patterns using the back propagation algorithm. The mean square error of tracker output and target values is set to be of the order of 10{sup -5} and the successful convergent of learning process takes 1281 epochs. The accuracy of the ANN tracker has been validated by employing different test data sets. The control unit uses the estimates of the ANN tracker to adjust the duty cycle of the chopper to optimum value needed for maximum power transfer to the specified load. (author)

  5. SAXS investigation of latent track structure in HDPE irradiated with high energy Fe ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hai, Yang; Huang, Can [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Ma, Mingwang [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Institute of Electronic Engineering, CAEP, Mianyang 621900 (China); Liu, Qi; Wang, Yuzhu; Liu, Yi; Tian, Feng; Lin, Jun [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Zhu, Zhiyong, E-mail: zhuzhiyong@sinap.ac.cn [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2015-08-01

    Semi-crystalline high density polyethylene (HDPE) samples were irradiated with 1.157 GeV {sup 56}Fe ion beams to fluences ranging from 1 × 10{sup 11} to 6 × 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2}. The radiation induced changes in nano/microstructure were investigated with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) technique. The scattering contributions from HDPE matrix and ion tracks are successfully separated and analyzed through tilted SAXS measurements with respect to the X-ray beam direction. Lorentz correction, one-dimensional correlation function calculation, fractal nature analysis of the isotropic scattering pattern reveal that HDPE long period polymeric structures are damaged and new materials, possibly clusters of carbon-rich materials, are formed inside the ion tracks. Least square curve fitting of the scattering contribution from the ion track reveals that the track is composed of a core of about 5.3 nm in radius, characterized by a significant density deficit compared to the virgin HDPE, surrounded by a shell of about 4.3 nm in thickness with less density reduction.

  6. Structural Uncertainty in Antarctic sea ice simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, D. P.

    2016-12-01

    The inability of the vast majority of historical climate model simulations to reproduce the observed increase in Antarctic sea ice has motivated many studies about the quality of the observational record, the role of natural variability versus forced changes, and the possibility of missing or inadequate forcings in the models (such as freshwater discharge from thinning ice shelves or an inadequate magnitude of stratospheric ozone depletion). In this presentation I will highlight another source of uncertainty that has received comparatively little attention: Structural uncertainty, that is, the systematic uncertainty in simulated sea ice trends that arises from model physics and mean-state biases. Using two large ensembles of experiments from the Community Earth System Model (CESM), I will show that the model is predisposed towards producing negative Antarctic sea ice trends during 1979-present, and that this outcome is not simply because the model's decadal variability is out-of-synch with that in nature. In the "Tropical Pacific Pacemaker" ensemble, in which observed tropical Pacific SST anomalies are prescribed, the model produces very realistic atmospheric circulation trends over the Southern Ocean, yet the sea ice trend is negative in every ensemble member. However, if the ensemble-mean trend (commonly interpreted as the forced response) is removed, some ensemble members show a sea ice increase that is very similar to the observed. While this results does confirm the important role of natural variability, it also suggests a strong bias in the forced response. I will discuss the reasons for this systematic bias and explore possible remedies. This an important problem to solve because projections of 21st -Century changes in the Antarctic climate system (including ice sheet surface mass balance changes and related changes in the sea level budget) have a strong dependence on the mean state of and changes in the Antarctic sea ice cover. This problem is not unique to

  7. Investigating added value of regional climate modeling in North American winter storm track simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poan, E. D.; Gachon, P.; Laprise, R.; Aider, R.; Dueymes, G.

    2018-03-01

    Extratropical Cyclone (EC) characteristics depend on a combination of large-scale factors and regional processes. However, the latter are considered to be poorly represented in global climate models (GCMs), partly because their resolution is too coarse. This paper describes a framework using possibilities given by regional climate models (RCMs) to gain insight into storm activity during winter over North America (NA). Recent past climate period (1981-2005) is considered to assess EC activity over NA using the NCEP regional reanalysis (NARR) as a reference, along with the European reanalysis ERA-Interim (ERAI) and two CMIP5 GCMs used to drive the Canadian Regional Climate Model—version 5 (CRCM5) and the corresponding regional-scale simulations. While ERAI and GCM simulations show basic agreement with NARR in terms of climatological storm track patterns, detailed bias analyses show that, on the one hand, ERAI presents statistically significant positive biases in terms of EC genesis and therefore occurrence while capturing their intensity fairly well. On the other hand, GCMs present large negative intensity biases in the overall NA domain and particularly over NA eastern coast. In addition, storm occurrence over the northwestern topographic regions is highly overestimated. When the CRCM5 is driven by ERAI, no significant skill deterioration arises and, more importantly, all storm characteristics near areas with marked relief and over regions with large water masses are significantly improved with respect to ERAI. Conversely, in GCM-driven simulations, the added value contributed by CRCM5 is less prominent and systematic, except over western NA areas with high topography and over the Western Atlantic coastlines where the most frequent and intense ECs are located. Despite this significant added-value on seasonal-mean characteristics, a caveat is raised on the RCM ability to handle storm temporal `seriality', as a measure of their temporal variability at a given

  8. WE-H-BRA-08: A Monte Carlo Cell Nucleus Model for Assessing Cell Survival Probability Based On Particle Track Structure Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Chicago, IL (United States); Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (Georgia); Wang, C [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (Georgia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To correlate the damage produced by particles of different types and qualities to cell survival on the basis of nanodosimetric analysis and advanced DNA structures in the cell nucleus. Methods: A Monte Carlo code was developed to simulate subnuclear DNA chromatin fibers (CFs) of 30nm utilizing a mean-free-path approach common to radiation transport. The cell nucleus was modeled as a spherical region containing 6000 chromatin-dense domains (CDs) of 400nm diameter, with additional CFs modeled in a sparser interchromatin region. The Geant4-DNA code was utilized to produce a particle track database representing various particles at different energies and dose quantities. These tracks were used to stochastically position the DNA structures based on their mean free path to interaction with CFs. Excitation and ionization events intersecting CFs were analyzed using the DBSCAN clustering algorithm for assessment of the likelihood of producing DSBs. Simulated DSBs were then assessed based on their proximity to one another for a probability of inducing cell death. Results: Variations in energy deposition to chromatin fibers match expectations based on differences in particle track structure. The quality of damage to CFs based on different particle types indicate more severe damage by high-LET radiation than low-LET radiation of identical particles. In addition, the model indicates more severe damage by protons than of alpha particles of same LET, which is consistent with differences in their track structure. Cell survival curves have been produced showing the L-Q behavior of sparsely ionizing radiation. Conclusion: Initial results indicate the feasibility of producing cell survival curves based on the Monte Carlo cell nucleus method. Accurate correlation between simulated DNA damage to cell survival on the basis of nanodosimetric analysis can provide insight into the biological responses to various radiation types. Current efforts are directed at producing cell

  9. A simulation of the Four-way lunar Lander-Orbiter tracking mode for the Chang'E-5 mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Ye, Mao; Yan, Jianguo; Hao, Weifeng; Barriot, Jean-Pierre

    2016-06-01

    The Chang'E-5 mission is the third phase of the Chinese Lunar Exploration Program and will collect and return lunar samples. After sampling, the Orbiter and the ascent vehicle will rendezvous and dock, and both spacecraft will require high precision orbit navigation. In this paper, we present a novel tracking mode-Four-way lunar Lander-Orbiter tracking that possibly can be employed during the Chang'E-5 mission. The mathematical formulas for the Four-way lunar Lander-Orbiter tracking mode are given and implemented in our newly-designed lunar spacecraft orbit determination and gravity field recovery software, the LUnar Gravity REcovery and Analysis Software/System (LUGREAS). The simulated observables permit analysis of the potential contribution Four-way lunar Lander-Orbiter tracking could make to precision orbit determination for the Orbiter. Our results show that the Four-way lunar Lander-Orbiter Range Rate has better geometric constraint on the orbit, and is more sensitive than the traditional two-way range rate that only tracks data between the Earth station and lunar Orbiter. After combining the Four-way lunar Lander-Orbiter Range Rate data with the traditional two-way range rate data and considering the Lander position error and lunar gravity field error, the accuracy of precision orbit determination for the Orbiter in the simulation was improved significantly, with the biggest improvement being one order of magnitude, and the Lander position could be constrained to sub-meter level. This new tracking mode could provide a reference for the Chang'E-5 mission and have enormous potential for the positioning of future lunar farside Lander due to its relay characteristic.

  10. Numerical simulation of track settlement using a multibody dynamic software a holistic approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tejada, Alejandro de Miguel; Lau, A.; Santos, Ilmar

    2017-01-01

    that it is necessary to intensify the frequency and the amount of maintenance works in the critical track sections, resulting in increased costs for the infrastructure manager. The fundamental idea of this work is to create and implement a novel methodology to analyse the train/track dynamic interaction and its...

  11. Incremental Structured Dictionary Learning for Video Sensor-Based Object Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ming; Yang, Hua; Zheng, Shibao; Zhou, Yi; Yu, Zhenghua

    2014-01-01

    To tackle robust object tracking for video sensor-based applications, an online discriminative algorithm based on incremental discriminative structured dictionary learning (IDSDL-VT) is presented. In our framework, a discriminative dictionary combining both positive, negative and trivial patches is designed to sparsely represent the overlapped target patches. Then, a local update (LU) strategy is proposed for sparse coefficient learning. To formulate the training and classification process, a multiple linear classifier group based on a K-combined voting (KCV) function is proposed. As the dictionary evolves, the models are also trained to timely adapt the target appearance variation. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations on challenging image sequences compared with state-of-the-art algorithms demonstrate that the proposed tracking algorithm achieves a more favorable performance. We also illustrate its relay application in visual sensor networks. PMID:24549252

  12. Incremental Structured Dictionary Learning for Video Sensor-Based Object Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Xue

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available To tackle robust object tracking for video sensor-based applications, an online discriminative algorithm based on incremental discriminative structured dictionary learning (IDSDL-VT is presented. In our framework, a discriminative dictionary combining both positive, negative and trivial patches is designed to sparsely represent the overlapped target patches. Then, a local update (LU strategy is proposed for sparse coefficient learning. To formulate the training and classification process, a multiple linear classifier group based on a K-combined voting (KCV function is proposed. As the dictionary evolves, the models are also trained to timely adapt the target appearance variation. Qualitative and quantitative evaluations on challenging image sequences compared with state-of-the-art algorithms demonstrate that the proposed tracking algorithm achieves a more favorable performance. We also illustrate its relay application in visual sensor networks.

  13. Structure and electrochemical properties of the track membranes modified by tetrafluoroethane plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravets, L.I.; Dmitriev, S.N.; Goryacheva, T.A.; Satulu, V.; Mitu, B.; Dinescu, G.

    2010-01-01

    A structure and charge transport properties of the poly(ethylene terephthalate) track membrane modified by the 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane plasma have been studied. It has been found that the polymer deposition on the surface of a track membrane via the plasma polymerization of 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane results in the creation of bilayered composite membranes that possess a conductivity asymmetry in electrolyte solutions - a rectification effect similar to that of p-n junction in semiconductors. This effect is caused by an important reduction of the pore diameter in the polymer layer that leads to changing the pore geometry as well as by existence of an interface between two layers with different concentrations of carboxyl groups. Information about the charge transport in the studied membranes has been obtained by the method of impedance spectroscopy

  14. Fast Poisson Solvers for Self-Consistent Beam-Beam and Space-Charge Field Computation in Multiparticle Tracking Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Florio, Adrien; Pieloni, Tatiana; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2015-01-01

    We present two different approaches to solve the 2-dimensional electrostatic problem with open boundary conditions to be used in fast tracking codes for beam-beam and space charge simulations in high energy accelerators. We compare a fast multipoles method with a hybrid Poisson solver based on the fast Fourier transform and finite differences in polar coordinates. We show that the latter outperforms the first in terms of execution time and precision, allowing for a reduction of the noise in the tracking simulation. Furthermore the new algorithm is shown to scale linearly on parallel architectures with shared memory. We conclude by effectively replacing the HFMM by the new Poisson solver in the COMBI code.

  15. Simulating CubeSat Structure Deployment Dynamics, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is high value in simulating the nonlinear dynamics of stowing, deploying, and performance of deployable space structures, especially given the profound...

  16. Numerical methods and inversion algorithms in reservoir simulation based on front tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haugse, Vidar

    1999-04-01

    This thesis uses front tracking to analyse laboratory experiments on multiphase flow in porous media. New methods for parameter estimation for two- and three-phase relative permeability experiments have been developed. Up scaling of heterogeneous and stochastic porous media is analysed. Numerical methods based on front tracking is developed and analysed. Such methods are efficient for problems involving steep changes in the physical quantities. Multi-dimensional problems are solved by combining front tracking with dimensional splitting. A method for adaptive grid refinement is developed.

  17. Coating and functionalization of high density ion track structures by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mättö, Laura [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 (Finland); Szilágyi, Imre M., E-mail: imre.szilagyi@mail.bme.hu [Department of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Szent Gellért tér 4, Budapest H-1111 (Hungary); MTA-BME Technical Analytical Research Group, Szent Gellért tér 4, Budapest H-1111 (Hungary); Department of Chemistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, Helsinki FI-00014 (Finland); Laitinen, Mikko [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 (Finland); Ritala, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku [Department of Chemistry, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 55, Helsinki FI-00014 (Finland); Sajavaara, Timo [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 (Finland)

    2016-10-01

    In this study flexible TiO{sub 2} coated porous Kapton membranes are presented having electron multiplication properties. 800 nm crossing pores were fabricated into 50 μm thick Kapton membranes using ion track technology and chemical etching. Consecutively, 50 nm TiO{sub 2} films were deposited into the pores of the Kapton membranes by atomic layer deposition using Ti({sup i}OPr){sub 4} and water as precursors at 250 °C. The TiO{sub 2} films and coated membranes were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray reflectometry (XRR). Au metal electrode fabrication onto both sides of the coated foils was achieved by electron beam evaporation. The electron multipliers were obtained by joining two coated membranes separated by a conductive spacer. The results show that electron multiplication can be achieved using ALD-coated flexible ion track polymer foils. - Highlights: • Porous Kapton membranes were obtained by ion track technology and chemical etching. • TiO{sub 2} films were deposited by ALD into the pores of the Kapton membranes. • TiO{sub 2} nanotube array was prepared by removing the polymer core. • MCP structures were obtained from the coated membranes. • Electron multiplication was achieved using the ALD-coated Kapton foils.

  18. Comparison of various structural damage tracking techniques with unknown excitations based on experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hongwei; Yang, Jann N.; Zhou, Li

    2009-03-01

    An early detection of structural damages is critical for the decision making of repair and replacement maintenance in order to guarantee a specified structural reliability. Consequently, the structural damage detection, based on vibration data measured from the structural health monitoring (SHM) system, has received considerable attention recently. The traditional time-domain analysis techniques, such as the least square estimation (LSE) method and the extended Kalman filter (EKF) approach, require that all the external excitations (inputs) be available, which may not be the case for some SHM systems. Recently, these two approaches have been extended to cover the general case where some of the external excitations (inputs) are not measured, referred to as the LSE with unknown inputs (LSE-UI) and the EKF with unknown inputs (EKF-UI). Also, new analysis methods, referred to as the sequential non-linear least-square estimation with unknown inputs and unknown outputs (SNLSE-UI-UO) and the quadratic sum-square error with unknown inputs (QSSE-UI), have been proposed for the damage tracking of structures when some of the acceleration responses are not measured and the external excitations are not available. In this paper, these newly proposed analysis methods will be compared in terms of accuracy, convergence and efficiency, for damage identification of structures based on experimental data obtained through a series of experimental tests using a small-scale 3-story building model with white noise excitation. The capability of the LSE-UI, EKF-UI, SNLSE-UI-UO and QSSE-UI approaches in tracking the structural damages will be demonstrated.

  19. Real-time target tracking of soft tissues in 3D ultrasound images based on robust visual information and mechanical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, Lucas; Krupa, Alexandre; Dardenne, Guillaume; Le Bras, Anthony; Marchand, Eric; Marchal, Maud

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present a real-time approach that allows tracking deformable structures in 3D ultrasound sequences. Our method consists in obtaining the target displacements by combining robust dense motion estimation and mechanical model simulation. We perform evaluation of our method through simulated data, phantom data, and real-data. Results demonstrate that this novel approach has the advantage of providing correct motion estimation regarding different ultrasound shortcomings including speckle noise, large shadows and ultrasound gain variation. Furthermore, we show the good performance of our method with respect to state-of-the-art techniques by testing on the 3D databases provided by MICCAI CLUST'14 and CLUST'15 challenges. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Particle Tracking and Deposition from CFD Simulations using a Viscoelastic Particle Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Losurdo, M.

    2009-01-01

    In the present dissertation the mathematical modelling of particle deposition is studied and the solution algorithms for particle tracking, deposition and deposit growth are developed. Particle deposition is modelled according to mechanical impact and contact mechanics taking into account the

  1. Tracking the Reorganization of Module Structure in Time-Varying Weighted Brain Functional Connectivity Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christoph; Piper, Diana; Pester, Britta; Mierau, Andreas; Witte, Herbert

    2018-05-01

    Identification of module structure in brain functional networks is a promising way to obtain novel insights into neural information processing, as modules correspond to delineated brain regions in which interactions are strongly increased. Tracking of network modules in time-varying brain functional networks is not yet commonly considered in neuroscience despite its potential for gaining an understanding of the time evolution of functional interaction patterns and associated changing degrees of functional segregation and integration. We introduce a general computational framework for extracting consensus partitions from defined time windows in sequences of weighted directed edge-complete networks and show how the temporal reorganization of the module structure can be tracked and visualized. Part of the framework is a new approach for computing edge weight thresholds for individual networks based on multiobjective optimization of module structure quality criteria as well as an approach for matching modules across time steps. By testing our framework using synthetic network sequences and applying it to brain functional networks computed from electroencephalographic recordings of healthy subjects that were exposed to a major balance perturbation, we demonstrate the framework's potential for gaining meaningful insights into dynamic brain function in the form of evolving network modules. The precise chronology of the neural processing inferred with our framework and its interpretation helps to improve the currently incomplete understanding of the cortical contribution for the compensation of such balance perturbations.

  2. Radial dose distribution around an energetic heavy ion and an ion track structure model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, Katsutoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Ohno, Shin-ichi; Namba, Hideki; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Watanabe, Ritsuko

    1997-03-01

    Ionization currents produced in a small wall-less ionization chamber located at varying distance from the 200 MeV Ni{sup 12+} ion`path traversing Ar gas were measured and utilized to construct a track structure model. Using the LET value of 200 MeV Ni{sup 12+} and G(Fe{sup 3+}) in Fricke solutions (= 15.4) for fast electrons, we estimate G(Fe{sup 3+}) for this ion to be 5.0. (author)

  3. Response of winter North Atlantic storm track to climate change in the CNRM-CM5 simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvin, Fabrice; Oudar, Thomas; Sanchez-Gomez, Emilia; Terray, Laurent

    2016-04-01

    Climate variability in Europe in winter is largely controlled by North Atlantic storm tracks. These are associated with transport of energy, momentum, and water vapour, between the equator and mid latitudes. Extratropical cyclones have caused severe damages over some regions in north-western Europe, since they can combine extreme precipitation and strong winds. This is why it is relevant to study the impact of climate change on the extratropical cyclones, principally on their intensity, position or lifespan. Indeed, several recent studies have focused on this subject by using atmospheric reanalysis and general circulation models (GCMs). The main conclusions from the CMIP3 simulations showed a decreasing of the total number of cyclones and a poleward shift of their tracks in response to global warming. In the recent CMIP5 exercise, the consensus is not so clear, probably due to more complex feedbacks acting in the different models. Thus, the question of changes in North Atlantic storm-tracks with warming remains open. The main goal of this work is to explore the changes in the North Atlantic storm-tracks in the past and future decades and to analyze the contributions of the different external forcings (natural and anthropogenic) versus the internal variability. On this purpose, we use the Detection and Attribution (D&A) simulations performed with the coupled model CNRM-CM5. To characterize the extratropical cyclones and their tracks, a tracking scheme based on the detection of maximum of relative vorticity at 850 hPa is conducted. We show that the coupled model fairly well reproduces the storm genesis locations as well as the tracks pathways comparing to several atmospheric reanalysis products. In the recent historical period (1950-2005), the model shows a decrease in the number of storms in the southern North-Atlantic, when all the forcings (anthropogenic and natural) are prescribed. Even if the role of internal variability is important in the last decades (the

  4. Towards an in-plane methodology to track breast lesions using mammograms and patient-specific finite-element simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapuebla-Ferri, Andrés; Cegoñino-Banzo, José; Jiménez-Mocholí, Antonio-José; Pérez del Palomar, Amaya

    2017-11-01

    In breast cancer screening or diagnosis, it is usual to combine different images in order to locate a lesion as accurately as possible. These images are generated using a single or several imaging techniques. As x-ray-based mammography is widely used, a breast lesion is located in the same plane of the image (mammogram), but tracking it across mammograms corresponding to different views is a challenging task for medical physicians. Accordingly, simulation tools and methodologies that use patient-specific numerical models can facilitate the task of fusing information from different images. Additionally, these tools need to be as straightforward as possible to facilitate their translation to the clinical area. This paper presents a patient-specific, finite-element-based and semi-automated simulation methodology to track breast lesions across mammograms. A realistic three-dimensional computer model of a patient’s breast was generated from magnetic resonance imaging to simulate mammographic compressions in cranio-caudal (CC, head-to-toe) and medio-lateral oblique (MLO, shoulder-to-opposite hip) directions. For each compression being simulated, a virtual mammogram was obtained and posteriorly superimposed to the corresponding real mammogram, by sharing the nipple as a common feature. Two-dimensional rigid-body transformations were applied, and the error distance measured between the centroids of the tumors previously located on each image was 3.84 mm and 2.41 mm for CC and MLO compression, respectively. Considering that the scope of this work is to conceive a methodology translatable to clinical practice, the results indicate that it could be helpful in supporting the tracking of breast lesions.

  5. Measurements and TCAD simulation of novel ATLAS planar pixel detector structures for the HL-LHC upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nellist, C.; Dinu, N.; Gkougkousis, E.; Lounis, A.

    2015-01-01

    The LHC accelerator complex will be upgraded between 2020–2022, to the High-Luminosity-LHC, to considerably increase statistics for the various physics analyses. To operate under these challenging new conditions, and maintain excellent performance in track reconstruction and vertex location, the ATLAS pixel detector must be substantially upgraded and a full replacement is expected. Processing techniques for novel pixel designs are optimised through characterisation of test structures in a clean room and also through simulations with Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD). A method to study non-perpendicular tracks through a pixel device is discussed. Comparison of TCAD simulations with Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) measurements to investigate the doping profile of structures and validate the simulation process is also presented

  6. Measurements and TCAD simulation of novel ATLAS planar pixel detector structures for the HL-LHC upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00304438; Gkougkousis, E.; Lounis, A.

    2015-01-01

    The LHC accelerator complex will be upgraded between 2020-2022, to the High-Luminosity-LHC, to considerably increase statistics for the various physics analyses. To operate under these challenging new conditions, and maintain excellent performance in track reconstruction and vertex location, the ATLAS pixel detector must be substantially upgraded and a full replacement is expected. Processing techniques for novel pixel designs are optimised through characterisation of test structures in a clean room and also through simulations with Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD). A method to study non-perpendicular tracks through a pixel device is discussed. Comparison of TCAD simulations with Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) measurements to investigate the doping profile of structures and validate the simulation process is also presented.

  7. Statistical tracking of tree-like tubular structures with efficient branching detection in 3D medical image data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, X; Heimann, T; Meinzer, H P; Wegner, I; Lo, P; Sumkauskaite, M; Puderbach, M; De Bruijne, M

    2012-01-01

    The segmentation of tree-like tubular structures such as coronary arteries and airways is an essential step for many 3D medical imaging applications. Statistical tracking techniques for the extraction of elongated structures have received considerable attention in recent years due to their robustness against image noise and pathological changes. However, most tracking methods are limited to a specific application and do not support branching structures efficiently. In this work, we present a novel statistical tracking approach for the extraction of different types of tubular structures with ringlike cross-sections. Domain-specific knowledge is learned from training data sets and integrated into the tracking process by simple adaption of parameters. In addition, an efficient branching detection algorithm is presented. This approach was evaluated by extracting coronary arteries from 32 CTA data sets and distal airways from 20 CT scans. These data sets were provided by the organizers of the workshop ‘3D Segmentation in the Clinic: A Grand Challenge II-Coronary Artery Tracking (CAT08)’ and ‘Extraction of Airways from CT 2009 (EXACT’09)’. On average, 81.5% overlap and 0.51 mm accuracy for the tracking of coronary arteries were achieved. For the extraction of airway trees, 51.3% of the total tree length, 53.6% of the total number of branches and a 4.98% false positive rate were attained. In both experiments, our approach is comparable to state-of-the-art methods. (paper)

  8. The design and simulated performance of a fast Level 1 track trigger for the ATLAS High Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Martensson, Mikael; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the High Luminosity LHC will face a fivefold increase in the number of interactions per bunch crossing relative to the ongoing Run 2. This will require a proportional improvement in rejection power at the earliest levels of the detector trigger system, while preserving good signal efficiency. One critical aspect of this improvement will be the implementation of precise track reconstruction, through which sharper trigger turn-on curves can be achieved, and b-tagging and tau-tagging techniques can in principle be implemented. The challenge of such a project comes in the development of a fast, custom electronic device integrated in the hardware based first trigger level of the experiment. This article will discuss the requirements, architecture and projected performance of the system in terms of tracking, timing and physics, based on detailed simulations. Studies are carried out using data from the strip subsystem only or both strip and pixel subsystems.

  9. Dynamic Modeling and Simulation of Marine Satellite Tracking Antenna Using Lagrange Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yunlong; Soltani, Mohsen; Hussain, Dil muhammed Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Marine Satellite Tracking Antenna (MSTA) is a necessary device in ships for receiving satellite signals when they are sailing on the sea. This paper presents a simple methodology to obtain the dynamic equations of MSTA through Lagrange method, which is fundamental in design of modelbased controll......Marine Satellite Tracking Antenna (MSTA) is a necessary device in ships for receiving satellite signals when they are sailing on the sea. This paper presents a simple methodology to obtain the dynamic equations of MSTA through Lagrange method, which is fundamental in design of modelbased...

  10. Statistical tracking of tree-like tubular structures with efficient branching detection in 3D medical image data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, X.; Heimann, T.; Lo, P.

    2012-01-01

    to their robustness against image noise and pathological changes. However, most tracking methods are limited to a specific application and do not support branching structures efficiently. In this work, we present a novel statistical tracking approach for the extraction of different types of tubular structures...... with ringlike cross-sections. Domain-specific knowledge is learned from training data sets and integrated into the tracking process by simple adaption of parameters. In addition, an efficient branching detection algorithm is presented. This approach was evaluated by extracting coronary arteries from 32 CTA data...... for the tracking of coronary arteries were achieved. For the extraction of airway trees, 51.3% of the total tree length, 53.6% of the total number of branches and a 4.98% false positive rate were attained. In both experiments, our approach is comparable to state-of-the-art methods....

  11. Visualizing Structure and Dynamics of Disaccharide Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, J. F.; Beckham, G. T.; Himmel, M. E.; Crowley, M. F.

    2012-01-01

    We examine the effect of several solvent models on the conformational properties and dynamics of disaccharides such as cellobiose and lactose. Significant variation in timescale for large scale conformational transformations are observed. Molecular dynamics simulation provides enough detail to enable insight through visualization of multidimensional data sets. We present a new way to visualize conformational space for disaccharides with Ramachandran plots.

  12. Kinematic structures in galactic disc simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roca-F� brega, S.; Romero-Gómez, M.; Figueras, F.; Antoja Castelltort, Teresa; Valenzuela, O.; Henney, W.J.; Torres-Peimbert, S.

    2011-01-01

    N-body and test particle simulations have been used to characterize the stellar streams in the galactic discs of Milky Way type galaxies. Tools such as the second and third order moments of the velocity ellipsoid and clustering methods -EM-WEKA and FoF- allow characterizing these kinematic

  13. Simulation of Adaptive Kinetic Architectural Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Poul Henning

    2010-01-01

    to obtain the control forces that must be known in order to control the shape of a real variable geometry truss structure. An experimental test of the of the shape control approach has been implemented using VGT truss structure and a low-cost data acquisition system based on the open-source Arduino...

  14. Online image guided tumour tracking with scanned proton beams : a comprehensive simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Ye; Knopf, A; Tanner, Colby; Lomax, Antony J.

    2014-01-01

    Tumour tracking with scanned particle beams potentially requires accurate 3D information on both tumour motion and related density variations. We have previously developed a model-based motion reconstruction method, which allows for the prediction of deformable motions from sparsely sampled

  15. A Monte-Carlo code for the detailed simulation of electron and light-ion tracks in condensed matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emfietzoglou, D.; Papamichael, G.; Karava, K.; Androulidakis, I.; Pathak, A.; Phillips, G. W.; Moscovitch, M.; Kostarelos, K.

    2006-01-01

    In an effort to understand the basic mechanism of the action of charged particles in solid radiation dosimeters, we extend our Monte-Carlo code (MC4) to condensed media (liquids/solids) and present new track-structure calculations for electrons and protons. Modeling the energy dissipation process is based on a model dielectric function, which accounts in a semi-empirical and self-consistent way for condensed-phase effects which are computationally intractable. Importantly, these effects mostly influence track-structure characteristics at the nano-meter scale, which is the focus of radiation action models. Since the event-by-event scheme for electron transport is impractical above several kilo-electron volts, a condensed-history random-walk scheme has been implemented to transport the energetic delta rays produced by energetic ions. Based on the above developments, new track-structure calculations are presented for two representative dosimetric materials, namely, liquid water and silicon. Results include radial dose distributions in cylindrical and spherical geometries, as well as, clustering distributions, which, among other things, are important in predicting irreparable damage in biological systems and prompt electric-fields in microelectronics. (authors)

  16. Simulation of the Band Structure of Graphene and Carbon Nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mina, Aziz N; Awadallah, Attia A; Ahmed, Riham R; Phillips, Adel H

    2012-01-01

    Simulation technique has been performed to simulate the band structure of both graphene and carbon nanotube. Accordingly, the dispersion relations for graphene and carbon nanotube are deduced analytically, using the tight binding model and LCAO scheme. The results from the simulation of the dispersion relation of both graphene and carbon nanotube were found to be consistent with those in the literature which indicates the correctness of the process of simulation technique. The present research is very important for tailoring graphene and carbon nanotube with specific band structure, in order to satisfy the required electronic properties of them.

  17. Modeling and Simulation for the Knowledge Management for Distributed Tracking (KMDT) Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ceruti, Marion G; Wright, Tedd L; Wilcox, Dwight R; McGirr, Scott C

    2005-01-01

    .... The focus of the simulation effort is on a hypothetical scenario designed to simulate how knowledge management technologies, such as ontologies and intelligent agents can be used to improve battle space awareness...

  18. Thyroid cell irradiation by radioiodines: a new Monte Carlo electron track-structure code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Champion

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The most significant impact of the Chernobyl accident is the increased incidence of thyroid cancer among children who were exposed to short-lived radioiodines and 131-iodine. In order to accurately estimate the radiation dose provided by these radioiodines, it is necessary to know where iodine is incorporated. To do that, the distribution at the cellular level of newly organified iodine in the immature rat thyroid was performed using secondary ion mass microscopy (NanoSIMS50. Actual dosimetric models take only into account the averaged energy and range of beta particles of the radio-elements and may, therefore, imperfectly describe the real distribution of dose deposit at the microscopic level around the point sources. Our approach is radically different since based on a track-structure Monte Carlo code allowing following-up of electrons down to low energies (~ 10eV what permits a nanometric description of the irradiation physics. The numerical simulations were then performed by modelling the complete disintegrations of the short-lived iodine isotopes as well as of 131I in new born rat thyroids in order to take into account accurate histological and biological data for the thyroid gland.O impacto mais significante do acidente de Chernobyl é o crescimento da incidência de câncer de tireóide em crianças que foram expostas a radioiodos de vida curta e ao Iodo-131. Na estimativa precisa da dose de radiação fornecida por esses radioiodos, é necessário conhecer onde o iodo está incorporado. Para obtermos esse resultado, a distribuição em nível celular de iodo recentemente organificado na tireóde de ratos imaturos foi realizada usando microscopia de massa iônica secundária (NanoSIMS50. Modelos dosimétricos atuais consideram apenas a energia média das partículas beta dos radioelementos e pode, imperfeitamente descrever a distribuição real de dose ao nível microscópico em torno dos pontos pesquisados. Nossa abordagem

  19. High-LET dose-response characteristics by track structure theory of heavy charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, J.W.; Olsen, K.J.

    1981-09-01

    The track structure theory developed by Katz and co-workers ascribes the effect of high-LET radiation to the highly inhomogeneous dose distribution due to low energy Δ-rays ejected from the particle track. The theory predicts the effectiveness of high-LET radiation by using the ion parameters zsub(eff') effective charge of the ion, and β = v/c, the relative ion velocity, together with the characteristic dose D 37 derived from low-LET dose-response characteristic of the detector and the approximate size asub(0) of the sensitive element of the detector. 60 Co gamma-irradiation is used as a reference low-LET radiation, while high-LET radiation ranging from 16 MeV protons to 4 MeV/amu 16 0-ions covering an initial LET range of 30-5500 MeVcm 2 /g is obtained from a tandem Van de Graaff accelerator. A thin film (5mg/cm 2 ) radiochromic dye cyanide plastic dosemeter was used as detector with the characteristic dose of 16.8 Mrad and a sensitive element size of 10 -7 cm. Theoretical and experimental effectiveness, RBE, agreed within 10 to 25% depending on LET. (author)

  20. Fishing for radiation quality: chromosome aberrations and the role of radiation track structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    The yield of chromosome aberrations is not only dependent on dose but also on radiation quality, with high linear energy transfer (LET) typically having a greater biological effectiveness per unit dose than those of low-LET radiation. Differences in radiation track structure and cell morphology can also lead to quantitative differences in the spectra of the resulting chromosomal rearrangements, especially at low doses associated with typical human exposures. The development of combinatorial fluorescent labelling techniques (such as mFISH and mBAND) has helped to reveal the complexity of rearrangements, showing increasing complexity of observed rearrangements with increasing LET but has a resolution limited to ∼10 MBp. High-LET particles have not only been shown to produce clustered sites of DNA damage but also produce multiple correlated breaks along its path resulting in DNA fragments smaller than the resolution of these techniques. Additionally, studies have shown that the vast majority of radiation-induced HPRT mutations were also not detectable using fluorescent in situ hybridisation (FISH) techniques, with correlation of breaks along the track being reflected in the complexity of mutations, with intra- and inter-chromosomal insertions, and inversions occurring at the sites of some of the deletions. Therefore, the analysis of visible chromosomal rearrangements observed using current FISH techniques is likely to represent just the tip of the iceberg, considerably underestimating the extent and complexity of radiation induced rearrangements. (author)

  1. Simulating the structure of gypsum composites using pulverized basalt waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buryanov Аleksandr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the possibility of simulating the structure of gypsum composite modified with basalt dust waste to make materials and products based on it. Structural simulating of the topological space in gypsum modified composite by optimizing its grain-size composition highly improves its physical and mechanical properties. Strength and density tests have confirmed the results of the simulation. The properties of modified gypsum materials are improved by obtaining of denser particle packing in the presence of hemihydrate of finely dispersed basalt and plasticizer particles in the system, and by engaging basalt waste in the structuring process of modified gypsum stone.

  2. Towards understanding the impact of assimilating along-track SLA data on simulated eddy characteristics in the Agulhas System

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Vos, M

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available understanding the impact of assimilating along-track SLA data on simulated eddy characteristics in the Agulhas System Marc de Vos1, 3, Björn Backeberg2, 3, 4 and François Counillon4 Marine Research Unit, South African Weather Service, South Africa1 Coastal... and 1 Tel: +27 21 935 5764; Email: marc.devos@weathersa.co.za dipoles reach the Agulhas Current frequently and on occasion propagate all the way to the retroflection, influencing its position and modulating ring shedding events there (Schouten et al...

  3. The effect of visual-motion time-delays on pilot performance in a simulated pursuit tracking task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, G. K., Jr.; Riley, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental study was made to determine the effect on pilot performance of time delays in the visual and motion feedback loops of a simulated pursuit tracking task. Three major interrelated factors were identified: task difficulty either in the form of airplane handling qualities or target frequency, the amount and type of motion cues, and time delay itself. In general, the greater the task difficulty, the smaller the time delay that could exist without degrading pilot performance. Conversely, the greater the motion fidelity, the greater the time delay that could be tolerated. The effect of motion was, however, pilot dependent.

  4. Coherent Structures in Numerically Simulated Plasma Turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed-Hansen, O.; Pécseli, H.L.; Trulsen, J.

    1989-01-01

    Low level electrostatic ion acoustic turbulence generated by the ion-ion beam instability was investigated numerically. The fluctuations in potential were investigated by a conditional statistical analysis revealing propagating coherent structures having the form of negative potential wells which...

  5. FINE-SCALE STRUCTURES OF FLUX ROPES TRACKED BY ERUPTING MATERIAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Ting; Zhang Jun, E-mail: liting@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2013-06-20

    We present Solar Dynamics Observatory observations of two flux ropes tracked out by material from a surge and a failed filament eruption on 2012 July 29 and August 4, respectively. For the first event, the interaction between the erupting surge and a loop-shaped filament in the east seems to 'peel off' the filament and add bright mass into the flux rope body. The second event is associated with a C-class flare that occurs several minutes before the filament activation. The two flux ropes are, respectively, composed of 85 {+-} 12 and 102 {+-} 15 fine-scale structures, with an average width of about 1.''6. Our observations show that two extreme ends of the flux rope are rooted in opposite polarity fields and each end is composed of multiple footpoints (FPs) of fine-scale structures. The FPs of the fine-scale structures are located at network magnetic fields, with magnetic fluxes from 5.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} Mx to 8.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} Mx. Moreover, almost half of the FPs show converging motion of smaller magnetic structures over 10 hr before the appearance of the flux rope. By calculating the magnetic fields of the FPs, we deduce that the two flux ropes occupy at least 4.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} Mx and 7.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} Mx magnetic fluxes, respectively.

  6. Numerical Simulation of Vertical Random Vibration of Train-Slab Track-Bridge Interaction System by PEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-ping Zeng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the numerical simulation of the vertical random vibration of train-slab track-bridge interaction system by means of finite element method and pseudoexcitation method. Each vehicle is modeled as four-wheelset mass-spring-damper system with two-layer suspension systems. The rail, slab, and bridge girder are modeled by three-layer elastic Bernoulli-Euler beams connected with each other by spring and damper elements. The equations of motion for the entire system are derived according to energy principle. By regarding rail irregularity as a series of multipoint, different-phase random excitations, the random load vectors of the equations of motion are obtained by pseudoexcitation method. Taking a nine-span simply supported beam bridge traveled by a train consisting of 8 vehicles as an example, the vertical random vibration responses of the system are investigated. Firstly, the suitable number of discrete frequencies of rail irregularity is obtained by numerical experimentations. Secondly, the reliability and efficiency of pseudoexcitation method are verified through comparison with Monte Carlo method. Thirdly, the random vibration characteristics of train-slab track-bridge interaction system are analyzed by pseudoexcitation method. Finally, applying the 3σ rule for Gaussian stochastic process, the maximum responses of train-slab track-bridge interaction system with respect to various train speeds are studied.

  7. Monte Carlo simulation of prompt γ-ray emission in proton therapy using a specific track length estimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Kanawati, W; Létang, J M; Sarrut, D; Freud, N; Dauvergne, D; Pinto, M; Testa, É

    2015-01-01

    A Monte Carlo (MC) variance reduction technique is developed for prompt-γ emitters calculations in proton therapy. Prompt-γ emitted through nuclear fragmentation reactions and exiting the patient during proton therapy could play an important role to help monitoring the treatment. However, the estimation of the number and the energy of emitted prompt-γ per primary proton with MC simulations is a slow process. In order to estimate the local distribution of prompt-γ emission in a volume of interest for a given proton beam of the treatment plan, a MC variance reduction technique based on a specific track length estimator (TLE) has been developed. First an elemental database of prompt-γ emission spectra is established in the clinical energy range of incident protons for all elements in the composition of human tissues. This database of the prompt-γ spectra is built offline with high statistics. Regarding the implementation of the prompt-γ TLE MC tally, each proton deposits along its track the expectation of the prompt-γ spectra from the database according to the proton kinetic energy and the local material composition. A detailed statistical study shows that the relative efficiency mainly depends on the geometrical distribution of the track length. Benchmarking of the proposed prompt-γ TLE MC technique with respect to an analogous MC technique is carried out. A large relative efficiency gain is reported, ca. 10 5 . (paper)

  8. Simulation algorithm for spiral case structure in hydropower station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-yong Xu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the damage-plasticity model for concrete that was verified by the model experiment was used to calculate the damage to a spiral case structure based on the damage mechanics theory. The concrete structure surrounding the spiral case was simulated with a three-dimensional finite element model. Then, the distribution and evolution of the structural damage were studied. Based on investigation of the change of gap openings between the steel liner and concrete structure, the impact of the non-uniform variation of gaps on the load-bearing ratio between the steel liner and concrete structure was analyzed. The comparison of calculated results of the simplified and simulation algorithms shows that the simulation algorithm is a feasible option for the calculation of spiral case structures. In addition, the shell-spring model was introduced for optimization analysis, and the results were reasonable.

  9. Multiple Hypothesis Tracking (MHT) for Space Surveillance: Results and Simulation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N.; Poore, A.; Sheaff, C.; Aristoff, J.; Jah, M.

    2013-09-01

    With the anticipated installation of more accurate sensors and the increased probability of future collisions between space objects, the potential number of observable space objects is likely to increase by an order of magnitude within the next decade, thereby placing an ever-increasing burden on current operational systems. Moreover, the need to track closely-spaced objects due, for example, to breakups as illustrated by the recent Chinese ASAT test or the Iridium-Kosmos collision, requires new, robust, and autonomous methods for space surveillance to enable the development and maintenance of the present and future space catalog and to support the overall space surveillance mission. The problem of correctly associating a stream of uncorrelated tracks (UCTs) and uncorrelated optical observations (UCOs) into common objects is critical to mitigating the number of UCTs and is a prerequisite to subsequent space catalog maintenance. Presently, such association operations are mainly performed using non-statistical simple fixed-gate association logic. In this paper, we report on the salient features and the performance of a newly-developed statistically-robust system-level multiple hypothesis tracking (MHT) system for advanced space surveillance. The multiple-frame assignment (MFA) formulation of MHT, together with supporting astrodynamics algorithms, provides a new joint capability for space catalog maintenance, UCT/UCO resolution, and initial orbit determination. The MFA-MHT framework incorporates multiple hypotheses for report to system track data association and uses a multi-arc construction to accommodate recently developed algorithms for multiple hypothesis filtering (e.g., AEGIS, CAR-MHF, UMAP, and MMAE). This MHT framework allows us to evaluate the benefits of many different algorithms ranging from single- and multiple-frame data association to filtering and uncertainty quantification. In this paper, it will be shown that the MHT system can provide superior

  10. Two-dimensional direct numerical simulation of bubble cloud cavitation by front-tracking method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, G; Shimizu, S; Tryggvason, G

    2015-01-01

    Unsteady bubble cloud cavitation phenomenon caused by negative pressure pulse has been treated numerically by applying a front tracking method. The behaviour of bubble cloud expanding and contracting is evaluated by tracking the motion of all bubble interfaces. Numerical investigation demonstrates that: (1) In the collapsing of bubble cloud micro liquid jets toward the inner bubbles are formed while the outer layer bubbles contract extremely, and then a high impact pressure is released when the inner central bubble contacts to its minimum. (2) The oscillation of bubble cloud depends upon the void fraction greatly. In the case of high void fraction, the frequency of cloud oscillation is lower than that of individual bubble and the decay of the oscillation becomes much slowly also

  11. Design of Accelerator Online Simulator Server Using Structured Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Guobao

    2012-01-01

    Model based control plays an important role for a modern accelerator during beam commissioning, beam study, and even daily operation. With a realistic model, beam behaviour can be predicted and therefore effectively controlled. The approach used by most current high level application environments is to use a built-in simulation engine and feed a realistic model into that simulation engine. Instead of this traditional monolithic structure, a new approach using a client-server architecture is under development. An on-line simulator server is accessed via network accessible structured data. With this approach, a user can easily access multiple simulation codes. This paper describes the design, implementation, and current status of PVData, which defines the structured data, and PVAccess, which provides network access to the structured data.

  12. Impact of the track structure of heavy charged particles on cytogenetic damage in human blood lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ryonfa; Nasonova, Elena; Sommer, Sylwetster; Hartel, Carola; Durante, Marco; Ritter, Sylvia

    In space, astronauts are unavoidably exposed to charged particles from protons to irons. For a better estimate of the health risks of astronauts, further knowledge on the biological effects of charged particles, in particular the induction of cytogenetic damage is required. One im-portant factor that determines the biological response is the track structure of particles, i.e. their microscopic dose deposition in cells. The aim of the present study was to assess the influence of track structure of heavy ions on the yield and the quality of cytogenetic damage in human peripheral blood lymphocytes representing normal tissue. Cells were irradiated with 9.5 MeV/u C-ions or 990 MeV/u Fe-ions which have a comparable LET (175 keV/µm and 155 keV/µm, respectively) but a different track radius (2.3 and 6200 µm, respectively). When aberrations were analyzed in first cycle metaphases collected at different post-irradiation times (48-84 h) following fluorescence plus Giemsa staining, an increase in the aberration yield with sampling time was observed for both radiation qualities reflecting a damage dependent cell cycle progression delay to mitosis. The pronounced differences in the aberration frequency per cell are attributable to the stochastic distribution of particle traversals per cell nucleus (radius: 2.8 µm). Following C-ion exposure we found a high fraction of non-aberrant cells in samples collected at 48 h which represent cells not directly hit by a particle and slightly damaged cells that successfully repaired the induced lesions. In addition, at higher C-ion fluences the aberra-tion yield saturated, suggesting that a fraction of lymphocytes receiving multiple particle hits is not able to reach mitosis. On the other hand, at 48 h after Fe-ion exposure the proportion of non-aberrant cells is lower than after C-ion irradiation clearly reflecting the track structure of high energy particles (i.e. more homogeneous dose deposition compared to low energy C

  13. Advanced vectorial simulation of VCSELs with nano structures invited paper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    The single-mode properties and design issues of three vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) structures incorporating nano structures are rigorously investigated. Nano structuring enables to deliver selective pumping or loss to the fundamental mode as well as stabilizing the output...... polarization state. Comparison of three vectorial simulation methods reveals that the modal expansion method is suitable for treating the nano structured VCSEL designs....

  14. Structure modulates similarity-based interference in sluicing: An eye tracking study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse A. Harris

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In cue-based content-addressable approaches to memory, a target and its competitors are retrieved in parallel from memory via a fast, associative cue-matching procedure under a severely limited focus of attention. Such a parallel matching procedure could in principle ignore the serial order or hierarchical structure characteristic of linguistic relations. I present an eye tracking while reading experiment that investigates whether the sentential position of a potential antecedent modulates the strength of similarity-based interference, a well-studied effect in which increased similarity in features between a target and its competitors results in slower and less accurate retrieval overall. The manipulation trades on an independently established Locality bias in sluiced structures to associate a wh-remnant (which ones in clausal ellipsis with the most local correlate (some wines, as in The tourists enjoyed some wines, but I don’t know which ones. The findings generally support cue-based parsing models of sentence processing that are subject to similarity-based interference in retrieval, and provide additional support to the growing body of evidence that retrieval is sensitive to both the structural position of a target antecedent and its competitors, and the specificity of retrieval cues.

  15. Gamma irradiation effects on the thermal, optical and structural properties of Cr-39 nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouh, S.A.; Said, A.F.; Atta, M.R.; EL-Mellegy, W.M.; EL-Meniawi, S.

    2006-01-01

    A study of the effect of gamma irradiation on the thermal, optical and structural properties of CR-39 diglycol carbonate solid state nuclear track detector (SSNTD) has been carried out. Samples from CR-39 polymer were irradiated with gamma doses at levels between 20 and 300 KGy. Non-isothermal studies were carried out using thermo-gravimetry (TG), differential thermo-gravimetry (DTG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) to obtain the activation energy of decomposition and the transition temperatures for the non-irradiated and irradiated CR-39 samples. In addition, optical and structural property studies were performed on non-irradiated and irradiated CR-39 samples using refractive index and X-ray diffraction measurements. The variation of onset temperature of decomposition (To) thermal activation energy of decomposition (Ea) melting temperature (Tm) refractive index (n) and the mass fraction of the amorphous phase with the gamma dose were studied. It was found that many changes in the thermal, optical and structural properties of the CR-39 polymer could be produced by gamma irradiation via the degradation and cross linking mechanisms. Also, the gamma dose gave an advantage for increasing the correlation between the thermal stability of CR-39 polymer and the bond formation created by the ionizing effect of gamma radiation

  16. Opto-structural characterization of gamma irradiated Bayfol polymer track detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tayel, A. [Physics Department, Faculty of Industrial Education, Helwan University, Cairo (Egypt); Zaki, M.F., E-mail: moha1016@yahoo.com [Experimental Nuclear Physics Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, P.O. 13759, Abu Zaabal, Cairo (Egypt); El Basaty, A.B. [Physics Department, Faculty of Industrial Education, Helwan University, Cairo (Egypt); Hegazy, Tarek M. [Physics Department, College of Women for Arts, Science and Education, Ain Shams University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2013-11-15

    Bayfol CR 1-4 is one of polymeric solid state nuclear track detector which has numerous applications due to its outstanding optical, mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. In the present study, Bayfol polymer is irradiated with different doses of gamma rays ranging from 0 to 1000 KGy. The effects of gamma irradiations on the optical, structural and chemical properties of Bayfol were studied using Ultraviolet and visible (UV/Vis) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The UV–Vis spectra of irradiated samples show that the absorption edge is shifted towards longer wavelength comparing to pristine sample spectrum. This behavior indicates that there is a decrease in the band gap after irradiation. The maximum decrease in the band gap is about 0.8 eV. The XRD patterns of amorphous halo of pristine and irradiated samples show a fluctuation of integrated intensity of amorphous halo. This indicates a change in the structure due to gamma irradiation. In order to understand that structure change mechanism, we used the FTIR spectroscopy.

  17. A highly scalable particle tracking algorithm using partitioned global address space (PGAS) programming for extreme-scale turbulence simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buaria, D.; Yeung, P. K.

    2017-12-01

    A new parallel algorithm utilizing a partitioned global address space (PGAS) programming model to achieve high scalability is reported for particle tracking in direct numerical simulations of turbulent fluid flow. The work is motivated by the desire to obtain Lagrangian information necessary for the study of turbulent dispersion at the largest problem sizes feasible on current and next-generation multi-petaflop supercomputers. A large population of fluid particles is distributed among parallel processes dynamically, based on instantaneous particle positions such that all of the interpolation information needed for each particle is available either locally on its host process or neighboring processes holding adjacent sub-domains of the velocity field. With cubic splines as the preferred interpolation method, the new algorithm is designed to minimize the need for communication, by transferring between adjacent processes only those spline coefficients determined to be necessary for specific particles. This transfer is implemented very efficiently as a one-sided communication, using Co-Array Fortran (CAF) features which facilitate small data movements between different local partitions of a large global array. The cost of monitoring transfer of particle properties between adjacent processes for particles migrating across sub-domain boundaries is found to be small. Detailed benchmarks are obtained on the Cray petascale supercomputer Blue Waters at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. For operations on the particles in a 81923 simulation (0.55 trillion grid points) on 262,144 Cray XE6 cores, the new algorithm is found to be orders of magnitude faster relative to a prior algorithm in which each particle is tracked by the same parallel process at all times. This large speedup reduces the additional cost of tracking of order 300 million particles to just over 50% of the cost of computing the Eulerian velocity field at this scale. Improving support of PGAS models on

  18. Development of Viscoelastic Multi-Body Simulation and Impact Response Analysis of a Ballasted Railway Track under Cyclic Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Nishiura

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Simulation of a large number of deformable bodies is often difficult because complex high-level modeling is required to address both multi-body contact and viscoelastic deformation. This necessitates the combined use of a discrete element method (DEM and a finite element method (FEM. In this study, a quadruple discrete element method (QDEM was developed for dynamic analysis of viscoelastic materials using a simpler algorithm compared to the standard FEM. QDEM easily incorporates the contact algorithm used in DEM. As the first step toward multi-body simulation, the fundamental performance of QDEM was investigated for viscoelastic analysis. The amplitude and frequency of cantilever elastic vibration were nearly equal to those obtained by the standard FEM. A comparison of creep recovery tests with an analytical solution showed good agreement between them. In addition, good correlation between the attenuation degree and the real physical viscosity was confirmed for viscoelastic vibration analysis. Therefore, the high accuracy of QDEM in the fundamental analysis of infinitesimal viscoelastic deformations was verified. Finally, the impact response of a ballast and sleeper under cyclic loading on a railway track was analyzed using QDEM as an application of deformable multi-body dynamics. The results showed that the vibration of the ballasted track was qualitatively in good agreement with the actual measurements. Moreover, the ballast layer with high friction reduced the ballasted track deterioration. This study suggests that QDEM, as an alternative to DEM and FEM, can provide deeper insights into the contact dynamics of a large number of deformable bodies.

  19. Impact of Simulated Knee Injuries on the Patellofemoral and Tibiofemoral Kinematics Investigated with an Electromagnetic Tracking Approach: A Cadaver Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Rath

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the approach of using an electromagnetic tracking (EMT system for measuring the effects of stepwise, simulated knee injuries on patellofemoral (PF and tibiofemoral (TF kinematics. Methods. Three cadaver knees were placed in a motion rig. EMT sensors were mounted on the patella, the medial/lateral femoral epicondyles, the tibial condyle, and the tibial tuberosity (TT. After determining the motion of an intact knee, three injuries were simulated and the resulting bony motion was tracked. Results. Starting with the intact knee fully extended (0° flexion and bending it to approximately 20°, the patella shifted slightly in the medial direction. Then, while bending the knee to the flexed position (90° flexion, the patella shifted progressively more laterally. After transecting the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL, the base of the medial menisci (MM at the pars intermedia, and the medial collateral ligament (MCL, individual changes were observed. For example, the medial femoral epicondyle displayed a medial lift-off in all knees. Conclusion. We demonstrated that our EMT approach is an acceptable method to accurately measure PF joint motion. This method could also enable visualization and in-depth analysis of in vivo patellar function in total knee arthroplasty, if it is established for routine clinical use.

  20. Simulation of DNA Damage in Human Cells from Space Radiation Using a Physical Model of Stochastic Particle Tracks and Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; Hada, Megumi; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a recently developed model, in which chromosomes simulated by NASARTI (NASA Radiation Tracks Image) is combined with nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) in a voxelized space. The model produces the number of DSBs, as a function of dose for high-energy iron, oxygen, and carbon ions, and He ions. The combined model calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The merged computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The merged model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation.

  1. Multi-parameter decoupling and slope tracking control strategy of a large-scale high altitude environment simulation test cabin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ke

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A large-scale high altitude environment simulation test cabin was developed to accurately control temperatures and pressures encountered at high altitudes. The system was developed to provide slope-tracking dynamic control of the temperature–pressure two-parameter and overcome the control difficulties inherent to a large inertia lag link with a complex control system which is composed of turbine refrigeration device, vacuum device and liquid nitrogen cooling device. The system includes multi-parameter decoupling of the cabin itself to avoid equipment damage of air refrigeration turbine caused by improper operation. Based on analysis of the dynamic characteristics and modeling for variations in temperature, pressure and rotation speed, an intelligent controller was implemented that includes decoupling and fuzzy arithmetic combined with an expert PID controller to control test parameters by decoupling and slope tracking control strategy. The control system employed centralized management in an open industrial ethernet architecture with an industrial computer at the core. The simulation and field debugging and running results show that this method can solve the problems of a poor anti-interference performance typical for a conventional PID and overshooting that can readily damage equipment. The steady-state characteristics meet the system requirements.

  2. Track structure of protons and other light ions in liquid water: applications of the LIonTrack code at the nanometer scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäckström, G; Galassi, M E; Tilly, N; Ahnesjö, A; Fernández-Varea, J M

    2013-06-01

    The LIonTrack (Light Ion Track) Monte Carlo (MC) code for the simulation of H(+), He(2+), and other light ions in liquid water is presented together with the results of a novel investigation of energy-deposition site properties from single ion tracks. The continuum distorted-wave formalism with the eikonal initial state approximation (CDW-EIS) is employed to generate the initial energy and angle of the electrons emitted in ionizing collisions of the ions with H2O molecules. The model of Dingfelder et al. ["Electron inelastic-scattering cross sections in liquid water," Radiat. Phys. Chem. 53, 1-18 (1998); "Comparisons of calculations with PARTRAC and NOREC: Transport of electrons in liquid water," Radiat. Res. 169, 584-594 (2008)] is linked to the general-purpose MC code PENELOPE/penEasy to simulate the inelastic interactions of the secondary electrons in liquid water. In this way, the extended PENELOPE/penEasy code may provide an improved description of the 3D distribution of energy deposits (EDs), making it suitable for applications at the micrometer and nanometer scales. Single-ionization cross sections calculated with the ab initio CDW-EIS formalism are compared to available experimental values, some of them reported very recently, and the theoretical electronic stopping powers are benchmarked against those recommended by the ICRU. The authors also analyze distinct aspects of the spatial patterns of EDs, such as the frequency of nearest-neighbor distances for various radiation qualities, and the variation of the mean specific energy imparted in nanoscopic targets located around the track. For 1 MeV/u particles, the C(6+) ions generate about 15 times more clusters of six EDs within an ED distance of 3 nm than H(+). On average clusters of two to three EDs for 1 MeV/u H(+) and clusters of four to five EDs for 1 MeV/u C(6+) could be expected for a modeling double strand break distance of 3.4 nm.

  3. Evaluation of integration methods for hybrid simulation of complex structural systems through collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Carpio R., Maikol; Hashemi, M. Javad; Mosqueda, Gilberto

    2017-10-01

    This study examines the performance of integration methods for hybrid simulation of large and complex structural systems in the context of structural collapse due to seismic excitations. The target application is not necessarily for real-time testing, but rather for models that involve large-scale physical sub-structures and highly nonlinear numerical models. Four case studies are presented and discussed. In the first case study, the accuracy of integration schemes including two widely used methods, namely, modified version of the implicit Newmark with fixed-number of iteration (iterative) and the operator-splitting (non-iterative) is examined through pure numerical simulations. The second case study presents the results of 10 hybrid simulations repeated with the two aforementioned integration methods considering various time steps and fixed-number of iterations for the iterative integration method. The physical sub-structure in these tests consists of a single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) cantilever column with replaceable steel coupons that provides repeatable highlynonlinear behavior including fracture-type strength and stiffness degradations. In case study three, the implicit Newmark with fixed-number of iterations is applied for hybrid simulations of a 1:2 scale steel moment frame that includes a relatively complex nonlinear numerical substructure. Lastly, a more complex numerical substructure is considered by constructing a nonlinear computational model of a moment frame coupled to a hybrid model of a 1:2 scale steel gravity frame. The last two case studies are conducted on the same porotype structure and the selection of time steps and fixed number of iterations are closely examined in pre-test simulations. The generated unbalance forces is used as an index to track the equilibrium error and predict the accuracy and stability of the simulations.

  4. Energy deposition by a {sup 106}Ru/{sup 106}Rh eye applicator simulated using LEPTS, a low-energy particle track simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuss, M.C. [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Munoz, A.; Oller, J.C. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas, Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Avenida Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avenida Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Williart, A. [Departamento de Fisica de los Materiales, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Senda del Rey 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Limao-Vieira, P. [Laboratorio de Colisoes Atomicas e Moleculares, Departamento de Fisica, CEFITEC, FCT-Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Quinta da Torre, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Borge, M.J.G.; Tengblad, O. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Huerga, C.; Tellez, M. [Hospital Universitario La Paz, Paseo de la Castellana 261, 28046 Madrid (Spain); Garcia, G., E-mail: g.garcia@iff.csic.es [Instituto de Fisica Fundamental, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Fisica de los Materiales, Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Senda del Rey 9, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-09-15

    The present study introduces LEPTS, an event-by-event Monte Carlo programme, for simulating an ophthalmic {sup 106}Ru/{sup 106}Rh applicator relevant in brachytherapy of ocular tumours. The distinctive characteristics of this code are the underlying radiation-matter interaction models that distinguish elastic and several kinds of inelastic collisions, as well as the use of mostly experimental input data. Special emphasis is placed on the treatment of low-energy electrons for generally being responsible for the deposition of a large portion of the total energy imparted to matter. - Highlights: > We present the Monte Carlo code LEPTS, a low-energy particle track simulation. > Carefully selected input data from 10 keV to 1 eV. > Application to an electron emitting Ru-106/Rh-106 plaque used in brachytherapy.

  5. High quantum efficiency photocathode simulation for the investigation of novel structured designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opachich, Y. P., E-mail: opachiyp@nv.doe.gov; Ross, P. W.; Huffman, E.; Koch, J. A. [National Security Technologies LLC, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); MacPhee, A. G.; Nagel, S. R.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Hilsabeck, T. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A computer model in CST Studio Suite has been developed to evaluate several novel geometrically enhanced photocathode designs. This work was aimed at identifying a structure that would increase the total electron yield by a factor of two or greater in the 1–30 keV range. The modeling software was used to simulate the electric field and generate particle tracking for several potential structures. The final photocathode structure has been tailored to meet a set of detector performance requirements, namely, a spatial resolution of <40 μm and a temporal spread of 1–10 ps. We present the details of the geometrically enhanced photocathode model and resulting static field and electron emission characteristics.

  6. Small scale structure of magnetospheric electron density through on-line tracking of plasma resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higel, B.

    1978-01-01

    The plasma resonance phenomena observed at fsub(pe), nfsub(ce), and fsub(qn) by the GEOS-1 S-301 relaxation sounder are identified through a pattern recognition software process implemented in a mini-computer which receives on-line the compressed data. First, this processing system distributes in real time fsub(pe) and fsub(ce) measurements to the ground media. Second, it drives and controls automatically the S-301 on-board experiment by sending appropriate telecommands: the tracking of resonances is performed by shortening the frequency sweeps to a narrow range centered on the resonance location. Examples of such tracking sequences are presented, exhibiting sampling rates of the electron density measurements from once every 22s (slowest rate) to once every 86 ms (highest rate available). The results give evidence of the existence of very small scale structures in the magnetospheric density, having characteristic sizes of the order of a few 10 2 m or/and a few 10 -1 s. The relative amplitude of these density fluctuations is typically 1%. Because of satellite spinning, fixed frequency sounding sequences allow to measure in a few seconds the directivity features of the plasma resonance signals. Examples of directional patterns in the plane perpendicular to the geomagnetic field are presented: the electrostatic nature of the waves received at fsub(pe), nfsub(ce), and fsub(qn) being consistent with these patterns, the corresponding k vector orientations become available. The Bernstein modes properties are used to interpret the nfsub(ce) and fsub(qn) results. (Auth.)

  7. Simulating radial dose of ion tracks in liquid water simulated with Geant4-DNA: A comparative study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Incerti, S.; Psaltaki, M.; Gillet, P.; Barberet, P.; Bardies, M.; Bernal, M. A.; Bordage, M. C.; Breton, V.; Davídková, Marie; Delage, E.; El Bitar, Z.; Francis, Z.; Guatelli, S.; Ivanchenko, A.; Ivanchenko, V.; Karamitros, M.; Lee, S. B.; Maigne, L.; Meylan, S.; Murakami, K.; Nieminen, P.; Payno, H.; Perrot, Y.; Petrovic, I.; Pham, Q. T.; Ristic-Fira, A.; Santin, G.; Sasaki, T.; Seznec, H.; Shin, J. I.; Štěpán, Václav; Tran, H. N.; Villagrasa, C.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 333, AUG (2014), s. 92-98 ISSN 0168-583X Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : Monte-Carlo- Simulation * Tissue-Equivalent gas * heavy-ion * Alpha-Beams * Particles * Dosimetry * Protons * Models * Codes * Path Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.124, year: 2014

  8. Automated simulation and study of spatial-structural design processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davila Delgado, J.M.; Hofmeyer, H.; Stouffs, R.; Sariyildiz, S.

    2013-01-01

    A so-called "Design Process Investigation toolbox" (DPI toolbox), has been developed. It is a set of computational tools that simulate spatial-structural design processes. Its objectives are to study spatial-structural design processes and to support the involved actors. Two case-studies are

  9. TURBULENT DYNAMICS IN SOLAR FLARE SHEET STRUCTURES MEASURED WITH LOCAL CORRELATION TRACKING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie, D. E., E-mail: mckenzie@physics.montana.edu [Department of Physics, Montana State University, P.O. Box 173840, Bozeman, MT 59717-3840 (United States)

    2013-03-20

    High-resolution observations of the Sun's corona in extreme ultraviolet and soft X-rays have revealed a new world of complexity in the sheet-like structures connecting coronal mass ejections (CMEs) to the post-eruption flare arcades. This article presents initial findings from an exploration of dynamic flows in two flares observed with Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA. The flows are observed in the hot ({approx}> 10 MK) plasma above the post-eruption arcades and measured with local correlation tracking. The observations demonstrate significant shears in velocity, giving the appearance of vortices and stagnations. Plasma diagnostics indicate that the plasma {beta} exceeds unity in at least one of the studied events, suggesting that the coronal magnetic fields may be significantly affected by the turbulent flows. Although reconnection models of eruptive flares tend to predict a macroscopic current sheet in the region between the CME and the flare arcade, it is not yet clear whether the observed sheet-like structures are identifiable as the current sheets or 'thermal halos' surrounding the current sheets. Regardless, the relationship between the turbulent motions and the embedded magnetic field is likely to be complicated, involving dynamic fluid processes that produce small length scales in the current sheet. Such processes may be crucial for triggering, accelerating, and/or prolonging reconnection in the corona.

  10. The effect of a graphical interpretation of a statistic trend indicator (Trigg's Tracking Variable) on the detection of simulated changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, R R; Merry, A F

    2011-09-01

    Anaesthesia involves processing large amounts of information over time. One task of the anaesthetist is to detect substantive changes in physiological variables promptly and reliably. It has been previously demonstrated that a graphical trend display of historical data leads to more rapid detection of such changes. We examined the effect of a graphical indication of the magnitude of Trigg's Tracking Variable, a simple statistically based trend detection algorithm, on the accuracy and latency of the detection of changes in a micro-simulation. Ten anaesthetists each viewed 20 simulations with four variables displayed as the current value with a simple graphical trend display. Values for these variables were generated by a computer model, and updated every second; after a period of stability a change occurred to a new random value at least 10 units from baseline. In 50% of the simulations an indication of the rate of change was given by a five level graphical representation of the value of Trigg's Tracking Variable. Participants were asked to indicate when they thought a change was occurring. Changes were detected 10.9% faster with the trend indicator present (mean 13.1 [SD 3.1] cycles vs 14.6 [SD 3.4] cycles, 95% confidence interval 0.4 to 2.5 cycles, P = 0.013. There was no difference in accuracy of detection (median with trend detection 97% [interquartile range 95 to 100%], without trend detection 100% [98 to 100%]), P = 0.8. We conclude that simple statistical trend detection may speed detection of changes during routine anaesthesia, even when a graphical trend display is present.

  11. Structure optimization and simulation analysis of the quartz micromachined gyroscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuezhong Wu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Structure optimization and simulation analysis of the quartz micromachined gyroscope are reported in this paper. The relationships between the structure parameters and the frequencies of work mode were analysed by finite element analysis. The structure parameters of the quartz micromachined gyroscope were optimized to reduce the difference between the frequencies of the drive mode and the sense mode. The simulation results were proved by testing the prototype gyroscope, which was fabricated by micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS technology. Therefore, the frequencies of the drive mode and the sense mode can match each other by the structure optimization and simulation analysis of the quartz micromachined gyroscope, which is helpful in the design of the high sensitivity quartz micromachined gyroscope.

  12. Simulation of Wave Overtopping of Maritime Structures in a Numerical Wave Flume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago C. A. Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical wave flume based on the particle finite element method (PFEM is applied to simulate wave overtopping for impermeable maritime structures. An assessment of the performance and robustness of the numerical wave flume is carried out for two different cases comparing numerical results with experimental data. In the first case, a well-defined benchmark test of a simple low-crested structure overtopped by regular nonbreaking waves is presented, tested in the lab, and simulated in the numerical wave flume. In the second case, state-of-the-art physical experiments of a trapezoidal structure placed on a sloping beach overtopped by regular breaking waves are simulated in the numerical wave flume. For both cases, main overtopping events are well detected by the numerical wave flume. However, nonlinear processes controlling the tests proposed, such as nonlinear wave generation, energy losses along the wave propagation track, wave reflection, and overtopping events, are reproduced with more accuracy in the first case. Results indicate that a numerical wave flume based on the PFEM can be applied as an efficient tool to supplement physical models, semiempirical formulations, and other numerical techniques to deal with overtopping of maritime structures.

  13. Classifying and modelling spiral structures in hydrodynamic simulations of astrophysical discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgan, D. H.; Ramón-Fox, F. G.; Bonnell, I. A.

    2018-05-01

    We demonstrate numerical techniques for automatic identification of individual spiral arms in hydrodynamic simulations of astrophysical discs. Building on our earlier work, which used tensor classification to identify regions that were `spiral-like', we can now obtain fits to spirals for individual arm elements. We show this process can even detect spirals in relatively flocculent spiral patterns, but the resulting fits to logarithmic `grand-design' spirals are less robust. Our methods not only permit the estimation of pitch angles, but also direct measurements of the spiral arm width and pattern speed. In principle, our techniques will allow the tracking of material as it passes through an arm. Our demonstration uses smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations, but we stress that the method is suitable for any finite-element hydrodynamics system. We anticipate our techniques will be essential to studies of star formation in disc galaxies, and attempts to find the origin of recently observed spiral structure in protostellar discs.

  14. Experimental data from irradiation of physical detectors disclose weaknesses in basic assumptions of the δ ray theory of track structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, K. J.; Hansen, Jørgen-Walther

    1985-01-01

    The applicability of track structure theory has been tested by comparing predictions based on the theory with experimental high-LET dose-response data for an amino acid alanine and a nylon based radiochromic dye film radiation detector. The linear energy transfer LET, has been varied from 28...

  15. Direct Lagrangian tracking simulations of particles in vertically-developing atmospheric clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishi, Ryo; Kunishima, Yuichi

    2017-11-01

    We have been developing the Lagrangian Cloud Simulator (LCS), which follows the so-called Euler-Lagrangian framework, where flow motion and scalar transportations (i.e., temperature and humidity) are computed with the Euler method and particle motion with the Lagrangian method. The LCS simulation considers the hydrodynamic interaction between approaching particles for robust collision detection. This leads to reliable simulations of collision growth of cloud droplets. Recently the activation process, in which aerosol particles become tiny liquid droplets, has been implemented in the LCS. The present LCS can therefore consider the whole warm-rain precipitation processes -activation, condensation, collision and drop precipitation. In this talk, after briefly introducing the LCS, we will show kinematic simulations using the LCS for quasi-one dimensional domain, i.e., vertically elongated 3D domain. They are compared with one-dimensional kinematic simulations using a spectral-bin cloud microphysics scheme, which is based on the Euler method. The comparisons show fairly good agreement with small discrepancies, the source of which will be presented. The Lagrangian statistics, obtained for the first time for the vertical domain, will be the center of discussion. This research was supported by MEXT as ``Exploratory Challenge on Post-K computer'' (Frontiers of Basic Science: Challenging the Limits).

  16. Spectral Bio-indicator Simulations for Tracking Photosynthetic Activities in a Corn Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yen-Ben; Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Huemmrich, K. Fred; Zhang, Qingyuan; Corp, Lawrence; Campbell, Petya; Kustas, William

    2011-01-01

    Accurate assessment of vegetation canopy optical properties plays a critical role in monitoring natural and managed ecosystems under environmental changes. In this context, radiative transfer (RT) models simulating vegetation canopy reflectance have been demonstrated to be a powerful tool for understanding and estimating spectral bio-indicators. In this study, two narrow band spectroradiometers were utilized to acquire observations over corn canopies for two summers. These in situ spectral data were then used to validate a two-layer Markov chain-based canopy reflectance model for simulating the Photochemical Reflectance Index (PRI), which has been widely used in recent vegetation photosynthetic light use efficiency (LUE) studies. The in situ PRI derived from narrow band hyperspectral reflectance exhibited clear responses to: 1) viewing geometry which affects the asset of light environment; and 2) seasonal variation corresponding to the growth stage. The RT model (ACRM) successfully simulated the responses to the variable viewing geometry. The best simulations were obtained when the model was set to run in the two layer mode using the sunlit leaves as the upper layer and shaded leaves as the lower layer. Simulated PRI values yielded much better correlations to in situ observations when the cornfield was dominated by green foliage during the early growth, vegetative and reproductive stages (r = 0.78 to 0.86) than in the later senescent stage (r = 0.65). Further sensitivity analyses were conducted to show the important influences of leaf area index (LAI) and the sunlit/shaded ratio on PRI observations.

  17. Curvilinear immersed boundary method for simulating fluid structure interaction with complex 3D rigid bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borazjani, Iman; Ge, Liang; Sotiropoulos, Fotis

    2008-08-01

    The sharp-interface CURVIB approach of Ge and Sotiropoulos [L. Ge, F. Sotiropoulos, A numerical method for solving the 3D unsteady incompressible Navier-Stokes equations in curvilinear domains with complex immersed boundaries, Journal of Computational Physics 225 (2007) 1782-1809] is extended to simulate fluid structure interaction (FSI) problems involving complex 3D rigid bodies undergoing large structural displacements. The FSI solver adopts the partitioned FSI solution approach and both loose and strong coupling strategies are implemented. The interfaces between immersed bodies and the fluid are discretized with a Lagrangian grid and tracked with an explicit front-tracking approach. An efficient ray-tracing algorithm is developed to quickly identify the relationship between the background grid and the moving bodies. Numerical experiments are carried out for two FSI problems: vortex induced vibration of elastically mounted cylinders and flow through a bileaflet mechanical heart valve at physiologic conditions. For both cases the computed results are in excellent agreement with benchmark simulations and experimental measurements. The numerical experiments suggest that both the properties of the structure (mass, geometry) and the local flow conditions can play an important role in determining the stability of the FSI algorithm. Under certain conditions the FSI algorithm is unconditionally unstable even when strong coupling FSI is employed. For such cases, however, combining the strong coupling iteration with under-relaxation in conjunction with the Aitken's acceleration technique is shown to effectively resolve the stability problems. A theoretical analysis is presented to explain the findings of the numerical experiments. It is shown that the ratio of the added mass to the mass of the structure as well as the sign of the local time rate of change of the force or moment imparted on the structure by the fluid determine the stability and convergence of the FSI

  18. Design, Simulation, Software Development, and Testing of a Compact Aircraft Tracking Payload for the CanX-7 Nanosatellite Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Ian Graham

    Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) is quickly becoming the new standard for more efficient air traffic control, but as a satellite/ground-based hybrid system it faces limitations on its usefulness over oceans and remote areas. Tracking of aircraft from space presents many challenges that if overcome will greatly increase the safety and efficiency of commercial air travel in these areas. This thesis presents work performed to develop a flight-ready ADS-B receiver payload for the CanX-7 technology demonstration satellite. Work presented includes a simulation of payload performance and coverage area, the design and testing of a single-feed circularly polarized L-band antenna, the design of software to control the payload and manage its data, and verification of the performance of the hardware prior to integration with the satellite and launch. Also included is a short overview of results from the seven-month aircraft tracking campaign conducted with the spacecraft.

  19. The design and simulated performance of a fast Level 1 track trigger for the ATLAS High Luminosity Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Martensson, Mikael; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment at the high-luminosity LHC will face a five-fold increase in the number of interactions per collision relative to the ongoing Run 2. This will require a proportional improvement in rejection power at the earliest levels of the detector trigger system, while preserving good signal efficiency. One critical aspect of this improvement will be the implementation of precise track reconstruction, through which sharper trigger turn-on curves can be achieved, and b-tagging and tau-tagging techniques can in principle be implemented. The challenge of such a project comes in the development of a fast, custom electronic device integrated in the hardware-based first trigger level of the experiment, with repercussions propagating as far as the detector read-out philosophy. This talk will discuss the requirements, architecture and projected performance of the system in terms of tracking, timing and physics, based on detailed simulations. Studies are carried out comparing two detector geometries and using...

  20. Accurate transport simulation of electron tracks in the energy range 1 keV-4 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobut, V.; Cirioni, L.; Patau, J.P.

    2004-01-01

    Multipurpose electron transport simulation codes are widely used in the fields of radiation protection and dosimetry. Broadly based on multiple scattering theories and continuous energy loss stopping powers with some mechanism taking straggling into account, they give reliable answers to many problems. However they may be unsuitable in some specific situations. In fact, many of them are not able to accurately describe particle transport through very thin slabs and/or in high atomic number materials, or also when knowledge of high-resolution depth dose distributions is required. To circumvent these deficiencies, we developed a Monte Carlo code simulating each interaction along electron tracks. Gas phase elastic cross sections are corrected to take into account solid state effects. Inelastic interactions are described within the framework of the Martinez et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 67 (1990) 2955] theory intended to deal with energy deposition in both condensed insulators and conductors. The model described in this paper is validated for some materials as aluminium and silicon, encountered in spectrometric and dosimetric devices. Comparisons with experimental, theoretical and other simulation results are made for angular distributions and energy spectra of transmitted electrons through slabs of different thicknesses and for depth energy distributions in semi-infinite media. These comparisons are quite satisfactory

  1. Modification of the poly(ethylene) terephthalate track membrane structure and surface in the plasma of non-polymerized gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravets, L.I.; Dmitriev, S.N.; Apel, P.Y.

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of the properties of poly(ethylene) terephthalate track membranes (PETTMs) treated with a plasma RF-discharge in non-polymerized gases has been performed. The influence of the plasma treatment conditions on the basic properties of the membranes has been studied. It was arranged that the effect of non-polymerized gases plasma on the PETTMs results to etching a membrane's surface layer. The membranes' pore size and the form in this case change. It is shown that it is possible to change the structure of track membranes directly by gas discharge etching

  2. Stochastic search in structural optimization - Genetic algorithms and simulated annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajela, Prabhat

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of illustrative applications of genetic algorithms and simulated annealing methods in structural optimization. The advantages of such stochastic search methods over traditional mathematical programming strategies are emphasized; it is noted that these methods offer a significantly higher probability of locating the global optimum in a multimodal design space. Both genetic-search and simulated annealing can be effectively used in problems with a mix of continuous, discrete, and integer design variables.

  3. Simulator study of the effect of visual-motion time delays on pilot tracking performance with an audio side task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, D. R.; Miller, G. K., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of time delay was determined in the visual and motion cues in a flight simulator on pilot performance in tracking a target aircraft that was oscillating sinusoidally in altitude only. An audio side task was used to assure the subject was fully occupied at all times. The results indicate that, within the test grid employed, about the same acceptable time delay (250 msec) was obtained for a single aircraft (fighter type) by each of two subjects for both fixed-base and motion-base conditions. Acceptable time delay is defined as the largest amount of delay that can be inserted simultaneously into the visual and motion cues before performance degradation occurs. A statistical analysis of the data was made to establish this value of time delay. Audio side task provided quantitative data that documented the subject's work level.

  4. A general-purpose framework to simulate musculoskeletal system of human body: using a motion tracking approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsani, Hossein; Rostami, Mostafa; Gudarzi, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Computation of muscle force patterns that produce specified movements of muscle-actuated dynamic models is an important and challenging problem. This problem is an undetermined one, and then a proper optimization is required to calculate muscle forces. The purpose of this paper is to develop a general model for calculating all muscle activation and force patterns in an arbitrary human body movement. For this aim, the equations of a multibody system forward dynamics, which is considered for skeletal system of the human body model, is derived using Lagrange-Euler formulation. Next, muscle contraction dynamics is added to this model and forward dynamics of an arbitrary musculoskeletal system is obtained. For optimization purpose, the obtained model is used in computed muscle control algorithm, and a closed-loop system for tracking desired motions is derived. Finally, a popular sport exercise, biceps curl, is simulated by using this algorithm and the validity of the obtained results is evaluated via EMG signals.

  5. Physiological and Dual Task Assessment of Workload during Tracking and Simulated Flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    on approach, and below the lines if the pilot is too low on approach. The FOLS (also called the " meatball ") is clearly visible from a simulated 4 miles...experimenter provided simple advice (e.g., "You came in too high (or too low) that time.", or "Don’t forget to watch the meatball carefully as you get

  6. Computational details of the Monte Carlo simulation of proton and electron tracks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaider, M.; Brenner, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    The code PROTON simulates the elastic and nonelastic interactions of protons and electrons in water vapor. In this paper, the treatment of elastic angular scattering of electrons as utilized in PROTON is described and compared with alternate formalisms. The sensitivity of the calculation to different treatments of this process is examined in terms of proximity functions of energy deposition. 5 figures

  7. Structural simulation of natural zeolites; Simulacion estructural de zeolitas naturales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez P, E.; Carrera G, L.M. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    The application of X-ray diffraction (XRD) in the study of crystalline structures of the natural and modified zeolites allows the identification, lattice parameter determination and the crystallinity grade of the sample of interest. Until two decades ago, simulation methods of X-ray diffraction patterns were developed with which was possible to do reliable determinations of their crystalline structure. In this work it is presented the first stage of the crystalline structure simulation of zeolitic material from Etla, Oaxaca which has been studied for using it in the steam production industry and purification of industrial water. So that the natural material was modified for increasing its sodium contents and this material in its turn was put in contact with aqueous solutions of Na, Mg and Ca carbonates. All the simulations were done with the Lazy-Pulverix method. The considered phase was clinoptilolite. It was done the comparison with three clinoptilolite reported in the literature. (Author)

  8. The effect of track structure on the induction of chromosomal aberrations in murine cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, M.; Cella, L.; Furusawa, Y.; George, K.; Gialanella, G.; Grossi, G.; Pugliese, M.; Saito, M.; Yang, T. C.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: To measure chromosome aberrations in C3H 10T1/2 mouse fibroblasts using FISH painting at the first mitosis following exposure to 30 keV/microm hydrogen or neon ions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cells in plateau-phase were irradiated with 0.86 MeV protons at the TTT-3 Tandem accelerator in Naples (Italy), or with 400 MeV/n Ne ions at the HIMAC accelerator in Chiba (Japan). Colcemid-blocked cells were harvested at the first mitosis following exposure, and chromosome spreads were hybridized in situ with a fluorescein-labelled composite mouse DNA probe specific for chromosomes 2 and 8. RESULTS: Protons were more efficient than neon ions at the same LET in the induction of chromosome interchanges and breaks. Yields of complex exchanges were similar for both particles at the same dose, but protons produced mostly insertions, while with Ne exposure non-reciprocal exchanges were the most frequent complex-type exchange. CONCLUSIONS: Charged particles with the same LET produce different yields of chromosome aberrations, and some observed differences can be explained based on the available track-structure models.

  9. Tracking of Nuclear Cable Insulation Polymer Structural Changes using the Gel Fraction and Uptake Factor Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Miguel; Huang, Qian; Fifield, Leonard S.

    2018-04-11

    Cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE) cable insulation samples were exposed to heat and gamma radiation at a series of temperatures, dose rates, and exposure times to evaluate the effects of these variables on material degradation. The samples were tested using the solvent incubation method to collect gel fraction and uptake factor data in order to assess the crosslinking and chain scission occurring in polymer samples with aging. Consistent with previous reports, gel fraction values were observed to increase and uptake factor values to decrease with radiation and thermal exposure. The trends seen were also more prominent as exposure time increased, suggesting this to be a viable method of tracking structural changes in the XLPE-insulated cable material over extended periods. For the conditions explored, the cable insulation material evaluated did not indicate signs of anomalous aging such as inverse temperature effect in which radiation-induced aging is more severe at lower temperature. Ongoing aging under identical radiation conditions and at lower temperature will further inform conclusions regarding the importance of inverse temperature effects for this material under these conditions.

  10. Numerical simulation of two-phase flow behavior in Venturi scrubber by interface tracking method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horiguchi, Naoki, E-mail: s1430215@u.tsukuba.ac.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4, Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1, Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8577 (Japan); Yoshida, Hiroyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4, Shirakata, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Abe, Yutaka [University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1, Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8577 (Japan)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • Self-priming occur because of pressure balance between inside and outside of throat is confirmed. • VS has similar flow with a Venturi tube except of disturbance and burble flow is considered. • Some of atomization simulated are validated qualitatively by comparison with previous studies. - Abstract: From the viewpoint of protecting a containment vessel of light water reactor and suppressing the diffusion of radioactive materials from a light water reactor, it is important to develop the device which allows a filtered venting of contaminated high pressure gas. In the filtered venting system that used in European reactors, so called Multi Venturi scrubbers System is used to realize filtered venting without any power supply. This system is able to define to be composed of Venturi scrubbers (VS) and a bubble column. In the VS, scrubbing of contaminated gas is promoted by both gas releases through the submerged VS and gas-liquid contact with splay flow formed by liquid suctioned through a hole provided by the pressure difference between inner and outer regions of a throat part of the VS. However, the scrubbing mechanism of the self-priming VS including effects of gas mass flow rate and shape of the VS are understood insufficiently in the previous studies. Therefore, we started numerical and experimental study to understand the detailed two-phase flow behavior in the VS. In this paper, to understand the VS operation characteristics for the filtered venting, we performed numerical simulations of two-phase flow behavior in the VS. In the first step of this study, we perform numerical simulations of supersonic flow by the TPFIT to validate the applicability of the TPFIT for high velocity flow like flow in the VS. In the second step, numerical simulation of two-phase flow behavior in the VS including self-priming phenomena. As the results, dispersed flow in the VS was reproduced in the numerical simulation, as same as the visualization experiments.

  11. Numerical simulation of two-phase flow behavior in Venturi scrubber by interface tracking method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiguchi, Naoki; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Abe, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Self-priming occur because of pressure balance between inside and outside of throat is confirmed. • VS has similar flow with a Venturi tube except of disturbance and burble flow is considered. • Some of atomization simulated are validated qualitatively by comparison with previous studies. - Abstract: From the viewpoint of protecting a containment vessel of light water reactor and suppressing the diffusion of radioactive materials from a light water reactor, it is important to develop the device which allows a filtered venting of contaminated high pressure gas. In the filtered venting system that used in European reactors, so called Multi Venturi scrubbers System is used to realize filtered venting without any power supply. This system is able to define to be composed of Venturi scrubbers (VS) and a bubble column. In the VS, scrubbing of contaminated gas is promoted by both gas releases through the submerged VS and gas-liquid contact with splay flow formed by liquid suctioned through a hole provided by the pressure difference between inner and outer regions of a throat part of the VS. However, the scrubbing mechanism of the self-priming VS including effects of gas mass flow rate and shape of the VS are understood insufficiently in the previous studies. Therefore, we started numerical and experimental study to understand the detailed two-phase flow behavior in the VS. In this paper, to understand the VS operation characteristics for the filtered venting, we performed numerical simulations of two-phase flow behavior in the VS. In the first step of this study, we perform numerical simulations of supersonic flow by the TPFIT to validate the applicability of the TPFIT for high velocity flow like flow in the VS. In the second step, numerical simulation of two-phase flow behavior in the VS including self-priming phenomena. As the results, dispersed flow in the VS was reproduced in the numerical simulation, as same as the visualization experiments.

  12. A discriminative structural similarity measure and its application to video-volume registration for endoscope three-dimensional motion tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiongbiao; Mori, Kensaku

    2014-06-01

    Endoscope 3-D motion tracking, which seeks to synchronize pre- and intra-operative images in endoscopic interventions, is usually performed as video-volume registration that optimizes the similarity between endoscopic video and pre-operative images. The tracking performance, in turn, depends significantly on whether a similarity measure can successfully characterize the difference between video sequences and volume rendering images driven by pre-operative images. The paper proposes a discriminative structural similarity measure, which uses the degradation of structural information and takes image correlation or structure, luminance, and contrast into consideration, to boost video-volume registration. By applying the proposed similarity measure to endoscope tracking, it was demonstrated to be more accurate and robust than several available similarity measures, e.g., local normalized cross correlation, normalized mutual information, modified mean square error, or normalized sum squared difference. Based on clinical data evaluation, the tracking error was reduced significantly from at least 14.6 mm to 4.5 mm. The processing time was accelerated more than 30 frames per second using graphics processing unit.

  13. Thin film growth into the ion track structures in polyimide by atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mättö, L.; Malm, J.; Arstila, K.; Sajavaara, T.

    2017-09-01

    High-aspect ratio porous structures with controllable pore diameters and without a stiff substrate can be fabricated using the ion track technique. Atomic layer deposition is an ideal technique for depositing thin films and functional surfaces on complicated 3D structures due to the high conformality of the films. In this work, we studied Al2O3 and TiO2 films grown by ALD on pristine polyimide (Kapton HN) membranes as well as polyimide membranes etched in sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) and boric acid (BO3) solution by means of RBS, PIXE, SEM-EDX and helium ion microcopy (HIM). The focus was on the first ALD growth cycles. The areal density of Al2O3 film in the 400 cycle sample was determined to be 51 ± 3 × 1016 at./cm2, corresponding to the thickness of 55 ± 3 nm. Furthermore, the growth per cycle was 1.4 Å/cycle. The growth is highly linear from the first cycles. In the case of TiO2, the growth per cycle is clearly slower during the first 200 cycles but then it increases significantly. The growth rate based on RBS measurements is 0.24 Å/cycle from 3 to 200 cycles and then 0.6 Å/cycle between 200 and 400 cycles. The final areal density of TiO2 film after 400 cycles is 148 ± 3 × 1015 at./cm2 which corresponds to the thickness of 17.4 ± 0.4 nm. The modification of the polyimide surface by etching prior to the deposition did not have an effect on the Al2O3 and TiO2 growth.

  14. The application of front tracking to the simulation of shock refractions and shock accelerated interface mixing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharp, D.H.; Grove, J.W.; Yang, Y.; Boston, B.; Holmes, R.; Zhang, Q.; Glimm, J.

    1993-01-01

    The mixing behavior of two or more fluids plays an important role in a number of physical processes and technological applications. The authors consider two basic types of mechanical (i.e., non-diffusive) fluid mixing. If a heavy fluid is suspended above a lighter fluid in the presence of a gravitational field, small perturbations at the fluid interface will grow. This process is known as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. One can visualize this instability in terms of bubbles of the light fluid rising into the heavy fluid, and fingers (spikes) of the heavy fluid falling into the light fluid. A similar process, called the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability occurs when an interface is accelerated by a shock wave. These instabilities have several common features. Indeed, Richtmyer's approach to understanding the shock induced instability was to view that process as resulting from an acceleration of the two fluids by a strong gravitational field acting for a short time. Here, the authors report new results on the Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities. Highlights include calculations of Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities in curved geometries without grid orientation effects, improved agreement between computations and experiments in the case of Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities at a plane interface, and a demonstration of an increase in the Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer growth rate with increasing compressibility, along with a loss of universality of this growth rate. The principal computational tool used in obtaining these results was a code based on the front tracking method

  15. Temperature field simulation of complex structures in fire environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Weifen; Hao Zhiming; Li Minghai

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the typical model of the system of dangerous goods - steel - wood composite structure including components of explosives is used as the research object. Using MARC program, the temperature field of the structure in the fire environment is simulated. Radiation, conduction and convection heat transfer within the gap of the structure are taken into account, contact heat transfer is also considered. The phenomenon of thermal decomposition of wood in high temperature is deal with by equivalent method. The results show that the temperature of the explosives is not high in the fire environment. The timber inside the composite structure has played a very good insulation effect of explosives.

  16. Development of porous structure simulator for multi-scale simulation of irregular porous catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, Michihisa; Suzuki, Ai; Sahnoun, Riadh; Tsuboi, Hideyuki; Hatakeyama, Nozomu; Endou, Akira; Takaba, Hiromitsu; Kubo, Momoji; Del Carpio, Carlos A.; Miyamoto, Akira

    2008-01-01

    Efficient development of highly functional porous materials, used as catalysts in the automobile industry, demands a meticulous knowledge of the nano-scale interface at the electronic and atomistic scale. However, it is often difficult to correlate the microscopic interfacial interactions with macroscopic characteristics of the materials; for instance, the interaction between a precious metal and its support oxide with long-term sintering properties of the catalyst. Multi-scale computational chemistry approaches can contribute to bridge the gap between micro- and macroscopic characteristics of these materials; however this type of multi-scale simulations has been difficult to apply especially to porous materials. To overcome this problem, we have developed a novel mesoscopic approach based on a porous structure simulator. This simulator can construct automatically irregular porous structures on a computer, enabling simulations with complex meso-scale structures. Moreover, in this work we have developed a new method to simulate long-term sintering properties of metal particles on porous catalysts. Finally, we have applied the method to the simulation of sintering properties of Pt on alumina support. This newly developed method has enabled us to propose a multi-scale simulation approach for porous catalysts

  17. Vertically integrated simulation tools for self-consistent tracking and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forest, E.; Nishimura, H.

    1989-03-01

    A modeling, simulation and analysis code complex, the Gemini Package, was developed for the study of single-particle dynamics in the Advanced Light Source (ALS), a 1--2 GeV synchrotron radiation source now being built at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The purpose of this paper is to describe the philosophy behind the package, with special emphasis on our vertical approach. 8 refs., 2 figs

  18. Beam tracking simulation in the central region of a 13 MeV PET cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anggraita, Pramudita; Santosa, Budi; Taufik, Mulyani, Emy; Diah, Frida Iswinning

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports the trajectories simulation of proton beam in the central region of a 13 MeV PET cyclotron, operating with negative proton beam (for easier beam extraction using a stripper foil), 40 kV peak accelerating dee voltage at fourth harmonic frequency of 77.88 MHz, and average magnetic field of 1.275 T. The central region covers fields of 240mm × 240mm × 30mm size at 1mm resolution. The calculation was also done at finer 0.25mm resolution covering fields of 30mm × 30mm × 4mm size to see the effects of 0.55mm horizontal width of the ion source window and the halted trajectories of positive proton beam. The simulations show up to 7 turns of orbital trajectories, reaching about 1 MeV of beam energy. The distribution of accelerating electric fields and magnetic fields inside the cyclotron were calculated in 3 dimension using Opera3D code and Tosca modules for static magnetic and electric fields. The trajectory simulation was carried out using Scilab 5.3.3 code.

  19. Dynamical simulation of structural multiplicity in grain boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majid, I.; Bristowe, P.D.

    1987-06-01

    Work on a computer simulation study of a low-energy high-angle boundary structure which is not periodic have been recently reported. This result is of interest since grain boundary structures are usually assumed to have a periodicity corresponding to the appropriate coincidence site lattice (CSL) and many experimental observations of the structure of grain boundaries performed using conventional and high-resolution electron microscopy, electron diffraction and x-ray diffraction appear to support this work. However, this work, using empirical interatomic pair potentials and the relaxation method of molecular statics, have simulated a Σ = 5 36.87 0 (001) twist boundary and found a low energy structure having a larger repeat cell than the CSL and is composed of two different types of structural unit that are randomly distributed in the boundary plane. This result, which has been termed the multiplicity of grain boundary structures, has also been found in the simulation of tilt boundaries. The multiplicity phenomenon is of special interest in twist boundaries since it is used as a structural model to explain the x-ray scattering from a Σ = 5 boundary in gold. These scattering patterns had previously remained unexplained using stable structures that had simple CSL periodicity. Also, the effect of having a multiple number of low energy structural units coexisting in the grain boundary is of more general interest since it implies that the boundary structures may be quasi-periodic and, in some circumstances, may even result in a roughening of the boundary plane. This paper extends this work by showing, using molecular dynamics, that a multiplicity of structural units can actually nucleate spontaneously in a high-angle grain boundary at finite temperatures

  20. Application of physical and numerical simulations for interpretation of peripheral coarse grain structure during hot extrusion of AA7020 aluminum alloy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eivani, A.R.; Zhou, J.

    2017-01-01

    In this research, hot compression test is used to simulate the metallurgical phenomena occurring in the peripheral part of AA7020 aluminum alloy extrudates during hot extrusion and leading to the formation of the peripheral coarse grain (PCG) structure. The temperature profiles at a tracking

  1. Latent track structure in polymers as observed by a highly sensitive electrolytical conductivity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danziger, M.; Schulz, A.; Trofimov, V.V.; Prokert, K.

    1994-01-01

    First results of a new electrolytical conductivity cell are reported concerning the initial stage of the pore opening process during track etching in vitreous solids. On the basis of the soft mode (low energy excitation) model for track etching, a distribution function for the number of performed micropores as function of time is calculated. The results account for the radial etch rate as function of the effective pore radius. ((orig.))

  2. A structural health monitoring fastener for tracking fatigue crack growth in bolted metallic joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakow, Alexi Schroder

    Fatigue cracks initiating at fastener hole locations in metallic components are among the most common form of airframe damage. The fastener hole site has been surveyed as the second leading initiation site for fatigue related accidents of fixed wing aircraft. Current methods for inspecting airframes for these cracks are manual, whereby inspectors rely on non-destructive inspection equipment or hand-held probes to scan over areas of a structure. Use of this equipment often demands disassembly of the vehicle to search appropriate hole locations for cracks, which elevates the complexity and cost of these maintenance inspections. Improved reliability, safety, and reduced cost of such maintenance can be realized by the permanent integration of sensors with a structure to detect this damage. Such an integrated system of sensors would form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system. In this study, an Additive, Interleaved, Multi-layer Electromagnetic (AIME) sensor was developed and integrated with the shank of a fastener to form a SHM Fastener, a new SHM technology targeted at detection of fastener hole cracks. The major advantages of the SHM Fastener are its installation, which does not require joint layer disassembly, its capability to detect inner layer cracks, and its capability to operate in a continuous autonomous mode. Two methods for fabricating the proposed SHM Fastener were studied. The first option consisted of a thin flexible printed circuit film that was bonded around a thin metallic sleeve placed around the fastener shank. The second option consisted of coating sensor materials directly to the shank of a part in an effort to increase the durability of the sensor under severe loading conditions. Both analytical and numerical models were developed to characterize the capability of the sensors and provide a design tool for the sensor layout. A diagnostic technique for crack growth monitoring was developed to complete the SHM system, which consists of the

  3. Design and simulation of maximum power point tracking (MPPT) system on solar module system using constant voltage (CV) method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatara, Sevty Satria; Iskandar, Reza Fauzi; Kirom, M. Ramdlan

    2016-02-01

    Solar energy is one of renewable energy resource where needs a photovoltaic module to convert it into electrical energy. One of the problems on solar energy conversion is the process of battery charging. To improve efficiency of energy conversion, PV system needs another control method on battery charging called maximum power point tracking (MPPT). This paper report the study on charging optimation using constant voltage (CV) method. This method has a function of determining output voltage of the PV system on maximal condition, so PV system will always produce a maximal energy. A model represented a PV system with and without MPPT was developed using Simulink. PV system simulation showed a different outcome energy when different solar radiation and numbers of solar module were applied in the model. On the simulation of solar radiation 1000 W/m2, PV system with MPPT produces 252.66 Watt energy and PV system without MPPT produces 252.66 Watt energy. The larger the solar radiation, the greater the energy of PV modules was produced.

  4. A simple method for simulation of coherent synchrotron radiation in a tracking code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borland, M.

    2000-01-01

    Coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) is of great interest to those designing accelerators as drivers for free-electron lasers (FELs). Although experimental evidence is incomplete, CSR is predicted to have potentially severe effects on the emittance of high-brightness electron beams. The performance of an FEL depends critically on the emittance, current, and energy spread of the beam. Attempts to increase the current through magnetic bunch compression can lead to increased emittance and energy spread due to CSR in the dipoles of such a compressor. The code elegant was used for design and simulation of the bunch compressor for the Low-Energy Undulator Test Line (LEUTL) FEL at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). In order to facilitate this design, a fast algorithm was developed based on the 1-D formalism of Saldin and coworkers. In addition, a plausible method of including CSR effects in drift spaces following the chicane magnets was developed and implemented. The algorithm is fast enough to permit running hundreds of tolerance simulations including CSR for 50 thousand particles. This article describes the details of the implementation and shows results for the APS bunch compressor

  5. Extending Correlation Filter-Based Visual Tracking by Tree-Structured Ensemble and Spatial Windowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundogdu, Erhan; Ozkan, Huseyin; Alatan, A Aydin

    2017-11-01

    Correlation filters have been successfully used in visual tracking due to their modeling power and computational efficiency. However, the state-of-the-art correlation filter-based (CFB) tracking algorithms tend to quickly discard the previous poses of the target, since they consider only a single filter in their models. On the contrary, our approach is to register multiple CFB trackers for previous poses and exploit the registered knowledge when an appearance change occurs. To this end, we propose a novel tracking algorithm [of complexity O(D) ] based on a large ensemble of CFB trackers. The ensemble [of size O(2 D ) ] is organized over a binary tree (depth D ), and learns the target appearance subspaces such that each constituent tracker becomes an expert of a certain appearance. During tracking, the proposed algorithm combines only the appearance-aware relevant experts to produce boosted tracking decisions. Additionally, we propose a versatile spatial windowing technique to enhance the individual expert trackers. For this purpose, spatial windows are learned for target objects as well as the correlation filters and then the windowed regions are processed for more robust correlations. In our extensive experiments on benchmark datasets, we achieve a substantial performance increase by using the proposed tracking algorithm together with the spatial windowing.

  6. Computer simulation of structural modifications induced by highly energetic ions in uranium dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasajima, Y., E-mail: sasajima@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ibaraki University, 4-12-1 Nakanarusawa, Hitachi 316-8511 (Japan); Frontier Research Center for Applied Atomic Sciences, Ibaraki University, Shirakata 162-4, Tokai 319-1106 (Japan); Osada, T. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Ibaraki University, 4-12-1 Nakanarusawa, Hitachi 316-8511 (Japan); Ishikawa, N. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Shirakata Shirane 2-4, Tokai 319-1195 (Japan); Iwase, A. [Department of Materials Science, Osaka Prefecture University, Gakuen-cho 1-1, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    The structural modification caused by the high-energy-ion irradiation of single-crystalline uranium dioxide was simulated by the molecular dynamics method. As the initial condition, high kinetic energy was supplied to the individual atoms within a cylindrical region of nanometer-order radius located in the center of the specimen. The potential proposed by Basak et al. [C.B. Basak, A.K. Sengupta, H.S. Kamath, J. Alloys Compd. 360 (2003) 210–216] was utilized to calculate interaction between atoms. The supplied kinetic energy was first spent to change the crystal structure into an amorphous one within a short period of about 0.3 ps, then it dissipated in the specimen. The amorphous track radius R{sub a} was determined as a function of the effective stopping power gS{sub e}, i.e., the kinetic energy of atoms per unit length created by ion irradiation (S{sub e}: electronic stopping power, g: energy transfer ratio from stopping power to lattice vibration energy). It was found that the relationship between R{sub a} and gS{sub e} follows the relation R{sub a}{sup 2}=aln(gS{sub e})+b. Compared to the case of Si and β-cristobalite single crystals, it was harder to produce amorphous track because of the long range interaction between U atoms.

  7. Computer simulation of structural modifications induced by highly energetic ions in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasajima, Y.; Osada, T.; Ishikawa, N.; Iwase, A.

    2013-01-01

    The structural modification caused by the high-energy-ion irradiation of single-crystalline uranium dioxide was simulated by the molecular dynamics method. As the initial condition, high kinetic energy was supplied to the individual atoms within a cylindrical region of nanometer-order radius located in the center of the specimen. The potential proposed by Basak et al. [C.B. Basak, A.K. Sengupta, H.S. Kamath, J. Alloys Compd. 360 (2003) 210–216] was utilized to calculate interaction between atoms. The supplied kinetic energy was first spent to change the crystal structure into an amorphous one within a short period of about 0.3 ps, then it dissipated in the specimen. The amorphous track radius R a was determined as a function of the effective stopping power gS e , i.e., the kinetic energy of atoms per unit length created by ion irradiation (S e : electronic stopping power, g: energy transfer ratio from stopping power to lattice vibration energy). It was found that the relationship between R a and gS e follows the relation R a 2 =aln(gS e )+b. Compared to the case of Si and β-cristobalite single crystals, it was harder to produce amorphous track because of the long range interaction between U atoms

  8. Molecular simulations of hydrated proton exchange membranes. The structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcharnd, Gabriel [Duisburg-Essen Univ., Essen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Theoretische Chemie; Bordeaux Univ., Talence (France). Dept. of Chemistry; Bopp, Philippe A. [Bordeaux Univ., Talence (France). Dept. of Chemistry; Spohr, Eckhard [Duisburg-Essen Univ., Essen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Theoretische Chemie

    2013-01-15

    The structure of two hydrated proton exchange membranes for fuel cells (PEMFC), Nafion {sup registered} (Dupont) and Hyflon {sup registered} (Solvay), is studied by all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. Since the characteristic times of these systems are long compared to the times for which they can be simulated, several different, but equivalent, initial configurations with a large degree of randomness are generated for different water contents and then equilibrated and simulated in parallel. A more constrained structure, analog to the newest model proposed in the literature based on scattering experiments, is investigated in the same way. One might speculate that a limited degree of entanglement of the polymer chains is a key feature of the structures showing the best agreement with experiment. Nevertheless, the overall conclusion remains that the scattering experiments cannot distinguish between the several, in our view equally plausible, structural models. We thus find that the characteristic features of experimental scattering curves are, after equilibration, fairly well reproduced by all systems prepared with our method. We thus study in more detail some structural details. We attempt to characterize the spatial and size distribution of the water rich domains, which is where the proton diffusion mostly takes place, using several clustering algorithms. (orig.)

  9. WE-G-BRF-06: Positron Emission Tomography (PET)-Guided Dynamic Lung Tumor Tracking for Cancer Radiotherapy: First Patient Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J; Loo, B; Graves, E; Yamamoto, T; Keall, P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: PET-guided dynamic tumor tracking is a novel concept of biologically targeted image guidance for radiotherapy. A dynamic tumor tracking algorithm based on list-mode PET data has been developed and previously tested on dynamic phantom data. In this study, we investigate if dynamic tumor tracking is clinically feasible by applying the method to lung cancer patient PET data. Methods: PET-guided tumor tracking estimates the target position of a segmented volume in PET images reconstructed continuously from accumulated coincidence events correlated with external respiratory motion, simulating real-time applications, i.e., only data up to the current time point is used to estimate the target position. A target volume is segmented with a 50% threshold, consistently, of the maximum intensity in the predetermined volume of interest. Through this algorithm, the PET-estimated trajectories are quantified from four lung cancer patients who have distinct tumor location and size. The accuracy of the PET-estimated trajectories is evaluated by comparing to external respiratory motion because the ground-truth of tumor motion is not known in patients; however, previous phantom studies demonstrated sub-2mm accuracy using clinically derived 3D tumor motion. Results: The overall similarity of motion patterns between the PET-estimated trajectories and the external respiratory traces implies that the PET-guided tracking algorithm can provide an acceptable level of targeting accuracy. However, there are variations in the tracking accuracy between tumors due to the quality of the segmentation which depends on target-to-background ratio, tumor location and size. Conclusion: For the first time, a dynamic tumor tracking algorithm has been applied to lung cancer patient PET data, demonstrating clinical feasibility of real-time tumor tracking for integrated PET-linacs. The target-to-background ratio is a significant factor determining accuracy: screening during treatment planning would

  10. Biomolecular structure refinement using the GROMOS simulation software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmid, Nathan; Allison, Jane R.; Dolenc, Jožica; Eichenberger, Andreas P.; Kunz, Anna-Pitschna E.; Gunsteren, Wilfred F. van

    2011-01-01

    For the understanding of cellular processes the molecular structure of biomolecules has to be accurately determined. Initial models can be significantly improved by structure refinement techniques. Here, we present the refinement methods and analysis techniques implemented in the GROMOS software for biomolecular simulation. The methodology and some implementation details of the computation of NMR NOE data, 3 J-couplings and residual dipolar couplings, X-ray scattering intensities from crystals and solutions and neutron scattering intensities used in GROMOS is described and refinement strategies and concepts are discussed using example applications. The GROMOS software allows structure refinement combining different types of experimental data with different types of restraining functions, while using a variety of methods to enhance conformational searching and sampling and the thermodynamically calibrated GROMOS force field for biomolecular simulation.

  11. Biomolecular structure refinement using the GROMOS simulation software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, Nathan; Allison, Jane R.; Dolenc, Jozica; Eichenberger, Andreas P.; Kunz, Anna-Pitschna E.; Gunsteren, Wilfred F. van, E-mail: wfvgn@igc.phys.chem.ethz.ch [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology ETH, Laboratory of Physical Chemistry (Switzerland)

    2011-11-15

    For the understanding of cellular processes the molecular structure of biomolecules has to be accurately determined. Initial models can be significantly improved by structure refinement techniques. Here, we present the refinement methods and analysis techniques implemented in the GROMOS software for biomolecular simulation. The methodology and some implementation details of the computation of NMR NOE data, {sup 3}J-couplings and residual dipolar couplings, X-ray scattering intensities from crystals and solutions and neutron scattering intensities used in GROMOS is described and refinement strategies and concepts are discussed using example applications. The GROMOS software allows structure refinement combining different types of experimental data with different types of restraining functions, while using a variety of methods to enhance conformational searching and sampling and the thermodynamically calibrated GROMOS force field for biomolecular simulation.

  12. Track structure analysis illustrating the prominent role of low-energy electrons in radiobiological effects of low-LET radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikjoo, H.; Goodhead, D.T.

    1991-01-01

    Monte Carlo track structure methods have been used to illustrate the importance of low-energy electrons produced by low-LET radiations. It is shown that these low-energy secondary electrons contribute substantially to the dose in all low-LET irradiations and are particularly efficient at producing highly localized clusters of atomic damage which may be responsible for a major part of the biological effectiveness of low-LET radiations. The data generated by Monte Carlo track structure techniques and by earlier semi-analytical methods based on the LET concept have been compared in terms of cumulative and differential fractions of total dose absorbed as a function of electron energy. The data show that low-energy secondary electrons account for up to nearly 50% of the total dose imparted to a medium when irradiated with electrons or photons. (author)

  13. Monte Carlo simulation of ionizing radiation induced DNA strand breaks utilizing coarse grained high-order chromatin structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ying; Yang, Gen; Liu, Feng; Wang, Yugang

    2016-01-07

    Ionizing radiation threatens genome integrity by causing DNA damage. Monte Carlo simulation of the interaction of a radiation track structure with DNA provides a powerful tool for investigating the mechanisms of the biological effects. However, the more or less oversimplification of the indirect effect and the inadequate consideration of high-order chromatin structures in current models usually results in discrepancies between simulations and experiments, which undermine the predictive role of the models. Here we present a biophysical model taking into consideration factors that influence indirect effect to simulate radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in eukaryotic cells with high-order chromatin structures. The calculated yields of single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks (DSBs) for photons are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The calculated yields of DSB for protons and α particles are consistent with simulations by the PARTRAC code, whereas an overestimation is seen compared with the experimental results. The simulated fragment size distributions for (60)Co γ irradiation and α particle irradiation are compared with the measurements accordingly. The excellent agreement with (60)Co irradiation validates our model in simulating photon irradiation. The general agreement found in α particle irradiation encourages model applicability in the high linear energy transfer range. Moreover, we demonstrate the importance of chromatin high-order structures in shaping the spectrum of initial damage.

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of ionizing radiation induced DNA strand breaks utilizing coarse grained high-order chromatin structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Ying; Yang, Gen; Liu, Feng; Wang, Yugang

    2016-01-01

    Ionizing radiation threatens genome integrity by causing DNA damage. Monte Carlo simulation of the interaction of a radiation track structure with DNA provides a powerful tool for investigating the mechanisms of the biological effects. However, the more or less oversimplification of the indirect effect and the inadequate consideration of high-order chromatin structures in current models usually results in discrepancies between simulations and experiments, which undermine the predictive role of the models. Here we present a biophysical model taking into consideration factors that influence indirect effect to simulate radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in eukaryotic cells with high-order chromatin structures. The calculated yields of single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks (DSBs) for photons are in good agreement with the experimental measurements. The calculated yields of DSB for protons and α particles are consistent with simulations by the PARTRAC code, whereas an overestimation is seen compared with the experimental results. The simulated fragment size distributions for 60 Co γ irradiation and α particle irradiation are compared with the measurements accordingly. The excellent agreement with 60 Co irradiation validates our model in simulating photon irradiation. The general agreement found in α particle irradiation encourages model applicability in the high linear energy transfer range. Moreover, we demonstrate the importance of chromatin high-order structures in shaping the spectrum of initial damage. (paper)

  15. Laboratory-Scale Bismuth Phosphate Extraction Process Simulation To Track Fate of Fission Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serne, R. JEFFREY; Lindberg, Michael J.; Jones, Thomas E.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Krupka, Kenneth M.

    2007-02-28

    Recent field investigation that collected and characterized vadose zone sediments from beneath inactive liquid disposal facilities at the Hanford 200 Areas show lower than expected concentrations of a long-term risk driver, Tc-99. Therefore laboratory studies were performed to re-create one of the three processes that were used to separate the plutonium from spent fuel and that created most of the wastes disposed or currently stored in tanks at Hanford. The laboratory simulations were used to compare with current estimates based mainly on flow sheet estimates and spotty historical data. Three simulations of the bismuth phosphate precipitation process show that less that 1% of the Tc-99, Cs-135/137, Sr-90, I-129 carry down with the Pu product and thus these isotopes should have remained within the metals waste streams that after neutralization were sent to single shell tanks. Conversely, these isotopes should not be expected to be found in the first and subsequent cycle waste streams that went to cribs. Measurable quantities (~20 to 30%) of the lanthanides, yttrium, and trivalent actinides (Am and Cm) do precipitate with the Pu product, which is higher than the 10% estimate made for current inventory projections. Surprisingly, Se (added as selenate form) also shows about 10% association with the Pu/bismuth phosphate solids. We speculate that the incorporation of some Se into the bismuth phosphate precipitate is caused by selenate substitution into crystal lattice sites for the phosphate. The bulk of the U daughter product Th-234 and Np-237 daughter product Pa-233 also associate with the solids. We suspect that the Pa daughter products of U (Pa-234 and Pa-231) would also co-precipitate with the bismuth phosphate induced solids. No more than 1 % of the Sr-90 and Sb-125 should carry down with the Pu product that ultimately was purified. Thus the current scheme used to estimate where fission products end up being disposed overestimates by one order of magnitude the

  16. Development of a Computer Application to Simulate Porous Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.C. Reis

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Geometric modeling is an important tool to evaluate structural parameters as well as to follow the application of stereological relationships. The obtention, visualization and analysis of volumetric images of the structure of materials, using computational geometric modeling, facilitates the determination of structural parameters of difficult experimental access, such as topological and morphological parameters. In this work, we developed a geometrical model implemented by computer software that simulates random pore structures. The number of nodes, number of branches (connections between nodes and the number of isolated parts, are obtained. Also, the connectivity (C is obtained from this application. Using a list of elements, nodes and branches, generated by the software, in AutoCAD® command line format, the obtained structure can be viewed and analyzed.

  17. Tracking the fate of pasta (T. Durum semolina) immunogenic proteins by in vitro simulated digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamone, Gianfranco; Nitride, Chiara; Picariello, Gianluca; Addeo, Francesco; Ferranti, Pasquale; Mackie, Alan

    2015-03-18

    The aim of the present study was to identify and characterize the celiacogenic/immunogenic proteins and peptides released during digestion of pasta (Triticum durum semolina). Cooked pasta was digested using a harmonized in vitro static model of oral-gastro-duodenal digestion. The course of pasta protein digestion was monitored by SDS-PAGE, and gluten proteins were specifically analyzed by Western blot using sera of celiac patients. Among the allergens, nonspecific lipid-transfer protein was highly resistant to gastro-duodenal hydrolysis, while other digestion-stable allergens such as α-amylase/trypsin inhibitors were not detected being totally released in the pasta cooking water. To simulate the final stage of intestinal degradation, the gastro-duodenal digesta were incubated with porcine jejunal brush-border membrane hydrolases. Sixty-one peptides surviving the brush-border membrane peptidases were identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, including several gluten-derived sequences encrypting different motifs responsible for the induction of celiac disease. These results provide new insights into the persistence of wheat-derived peptides during digestion of cooked pasta samples.

  18. Simulation of Structural Transformations in Heating of Alloy Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkin, A. S.; Makarov, E. L.; Kurkin, A. B.; Rubtsov, D. E.; Rubtsov, M. E.

    2017-07-01

    Amathematical model for computer simulation of structural transformations in an alloy steel under the conditions of the thermal cycle of multipass welding is presented. The austenitic transformation under the heating and the processes of decomposition of bainite and martensite under repeated heating are considered. Amethod for determining the necessary temperature-time parameters of the model from the chemical composition of the steel is described. Published data are processed and the results used to derive regression models of the temperature ranges and parameters of transformation kinetics of alloy steels. The method developed is used in computer simulation of the process of multipass welding of pipes by the finite-element method.

  19. Coalescence of silver unidimensional structures by molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez A, M.; Gutierrez W, C.E.; Mondragon, G.; Arenas, J.

    2007-01-01

    The study of nanoparticles coalescence and silver nano rods phenomena by means of molecular dynamics simulation under the thermodynamic laws is reported. In this work we focus ourselves to see the conditions under which the one can be given one dimension growth of silver nano rods for the coalescence phenomenon among two nano rods or one nano rod and one particle; what allows us to study those structural, dynamic and morphological properties of the silver nano rods to different thermodynamic conditions. The simulations are carried out using the Sutton-Chen potentials of interaction of many bodies that allow to obtain appropriate results with the real physical systems. (Author)

  20. 3D-finite element impact simulation on concrete structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heider, N.

    1989-12-15

    The analysis of impact processes is an interesting application of full 3D Finite Element calculations. This work presents a simulation of the penetration process of a Kinetic Energy projectile into a concrete target. Such a calculation requires an adequate FE model, especially a proper description of the crack opening process in front of the projectile. The aim is the prediction of the structural survival of the penetrator case with the help of an appropriate failure criterion. Also, the computer simulation allows a detailed analysis of the physical phenomena during impact. (orig.) With 4 refs., 14 figs.

  1. ON THE DETECTION AND TRACKING OF SPACE DEBRIS USING THE MURCHISON WIDEFIELD ARRAY. I. SIMULATIONS AND TEST OBSERVATIONS DEMONSTRATE FEASIBILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tingay, S. J.; Wayth, R. B.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Kennewell, J.; Arcus, W.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Emrich, D.; Herne, D.; Kudryavtseva, N.; Lynch, M.; Ord, S. M.; Waterson, M. [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research, Curtin University, Perth (Australia); Kaplan, D. L. [University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee (United States); McKinley, B.; Briggs, F.; Bell, M.; Gaensler, B. M. [ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO), Sydney (Australia); Smith, C. [Electro Optic Systems Pty Ltd, Canberra (Australia); Zhang, K. [RMIT University, Melbourne (Australia); Barnes, D. G., E-mail: s.tingay@curtin.edu.au [Monash e-Research Centre, Monash University, Clayton (Australia); and others

    2013-10-01

    The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is a new low-frequency interferometric radio telescope, operating in the benign radio frequency environment of remote Western Australia. The MWA is the low-frequency precursor to the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and is the first of three SKA precursors to be operational, supporting a varied science mission ranging from the attempted detection of the Epoch of Reionization to the monitoring of solar flares and space weather. In this paper we explore the possibility that the MWA can be used for the purposes of Space Situational Awareness (SSA). In particular we propose that the MWA can be used as an element of a passive radar facility operating in the frequency range 87.5-108 MHz (the commercial FM broadcast band). In this scenario the MWA can be considered the receiving element in a bi-static radar configuration, with FM broadcast stations serving as non-cooperative transmitters. The FM broadcasts propagate into space, are reflected off debris in Earth orbit, and are received at the MWA. The imaging capabilities of the MWA can be used to simultaneously detect multiple pieces of space debris, image their positions on the sky as a function of time, and provide tracking data that can be used to determine orbital parameters. Such a capability would be a valuable addition to Australian and global SSA assets, in terms of southern and eastern hemispheric coverage. We provide a feasibility assessment of this proposal, based on simple calculations and electromagnetic simulations, that shows that the detection of sub-meter size debris should be possible (debris radius of >0.5 m to ∼1000 km altitude). We also present a proof-of-concept set of observations that demonstrate the feasibility of the proposal, based on the detection and tracking of the International Space Station via reflected FM broadcast signals originating in southwest Western Australia. These observations broadly validate our calculations and simulations. We discuss some

  2. On the Detection and Tracking of Space Debris Using the Murchison Widefield Array. I. Simulations and Test Observations Demonstrate Feasibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingay, S. J.; Kaplan, D. L.; McKinley, B.; Briggs, F.; Wayth, R. B.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Kennewell, J.; Smith, C.; Zhang, K.; Arcus, W.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Emrich, D.; Herne, D.; Kudryavtseva, N.; Lynch, M.; Ord, S. M.; Waterson, M.; Barnes, D. G.; Bell, M.; Gaensler, B. M.; Lenc, E.; Bernardi, G.; Greenhill, L. J.; Kasper, J. C.; Bowman, J. D.; Jacobs, D.; Bunton, J. D.; deSouza, L.; Koenig, R.; Pathikulangara, J.; Stevens, J.; Cappallo, R. J.; Corey, B. E.; Kincaid, B. B.; Kratzenberg, E.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McWhirter, S. R.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Salah, J. E.; Whitney, A. R.; Deshpande, A.; Prabu, T.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Srivani, K. S.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Ewall-Wice, A.; Feng, L.; Goeke, R.; Morgan, E.; Remillard, R. A.; Williams, C. L.; Hazelton, B. J.; Morales, M. F.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Mitchell, D. A.; Procopio, P.; Riding, J.; Webster, R. L.; Wyithe, J. S. B.; Oberoi, D.; Roshi, A.; Sault, R. J.; Williams, A.

    2013-10-01

    The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is a new low-frequency interferometric radio telescope, operating in the benign radio frequency environment of remote Western Australia. The MWA is the low-frequency precursor to the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and is the first of three SKA precursors to be operational, supporting a varied science mission ranging from the attempted detection of the Epoch of Reionization to the monitoring of solar flares and space weather. In this paper we explore the possibility that the MWA can be used for the purposes of Space Situational Awareness (SSA). In particular we propose that the MWA can be used as an element of a passive radar facility operating in the frequency range 87.5-108 MHz (the commercial FM broadcast band). In this scenario the MWA can be considered the receiving element in a bi-static radar configuration, with FM broadcast stations serving as non-cooperative transmitters. The FM broadcasts propagate into space, are reflected off debris in Earth orbit, and are received at the MWA. The imaging capabilities of the MWA can be used to simultaneously detect multiple pieces of space debris, image their positions on the sky as a function of time, and provide tracking data that can be used to determine orbital parameters. Such a capability would be a valuable addition to Australian and global SSA assets, in terms of southern and eastern hemispheric coverage. We provide a feasibility assessment of this proposal, based on simple calculations and electromagnetic simulations, that shows that the detection of sub-meter size debris should be possible (debris radius of >0.5 m to ~1000 km altitude). We also present a proof-of-concept set of observations that demonstrate the feasibility of the proposal, based on the detection and tracking of the International Space Station via reflected FM broadcast signals originating in southwest Western Australia. These observations broadly validate our calculations and simulations. We discuss some

  3. ON THE DETECTION AND TRACKING OF SPACE DEBRIS USING THE MURCHISON WIDEFIELD ARRAY. I. SIMULATIONS AND TEST OBSERVATIONS DEMONSTRATE FEASIBILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tingay, S. J.; Wayth, R. B.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Kennewell, J.; Arcus, W.; Bhat, N. D. R.; Emrich, D.; Herne, D.; Kudryavtseva, N.; Lynch, M.; Ord, S. M.; Waterson, M.; Kaplan, D. L.; McKinley, B.; Briggs, F.; Bell, M.; Gaensler, B. M.; Smith, C.; Zhang, K.; Barnes, D. G.

    2013-01-01

    The Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) is a new low-frequency interferometric radio telescope, operating in the benign radio frequency environment of remote Western Australia. The MWA is the low-frequency precursor to the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and is the first of three SKA precursors to be operational, supporting a varied science mission ranging from the attempted detection of the Epoch of Reionization to the monitoring of solar flares and space weather. In this paper we explore the possibility that the MWA can be used for the purposes of Space Situational Awareness (SSA). In particular we propose that the MWA can be used as an element of a passive radar facility operating in the frequency range 87.5-108 MHz (the commercial FM broadcast band). In this scenario the MWA can be considered the receiving element in a bi-static radar configuration, with FM broadcast stations serving as non-cooperative transmitters. The FM broadcasts propagate into space, are reflected off debris in Earth orbit, and are received at the MWA. The imaging capabilities of the MWA can be used to simultaneously detect multiple pieces of space debris, image their positions on the sky as a function of time, and provide tracking data that can be used to determine orbital parameters. Such a capability would be a valuable addition to Australian and global SSA assets, in terms of southern and eastern hemispheric coverage. We provide a feasibility assessment of this proposal, based on simple calculations and electromagnetic simulations, that shows that the detection of sub-meter size debris should be possible (debris radius of >0.5 m to ∼1000 km altitude). We also present a proof-of-concept set of observations that demonstrate the feasibility of the proposal, based on the detection and tracking of the International Space Station via reflected FM broadcast signals originating in southwest Western Australia. These observations broadly validate our calculations and simulations. We discuss some

  4. Tracking Ionic Rearrangements and Interpreting Dynamic Volumetric Changes in Two-Dimensional Metal Carbide Supercapacitors: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kui; Lin, Zifeng; Merlet, Céline; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Miao, Ling; Jiang, Jianjun; Simon, Patrice

    2017-12-06

    We present a molecular dynamics simulation study achieved on two-dimensional (2D) Ti 3 C 2 T x MXenes in the ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([EMIM] + [TFSI] - ) electrolyte. Our simulations reproduce the different patterns of volumetric change observed experimentally for both the negative and positive electrodes. The analysis of ionic fluxes and structure rearrangements in the 2D material provide an atomic scale insight into the charge and discharge processes in the layer pore and confirm the existence of two different charge-storage mechanisms at the negative and positive electrodes. The ionic number variation and the structure rearrangement contribute to the dynamic volumetric changes of both electrodes: negative electrode expansion and positive electrode contraction. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Functional Annotation of Ion Channel Structures by Molecular Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trick, Jemma L; Chelvaniththilan, Sivapalan; Klesse, Gianni; Aryal, Prafulla; Wallace, E Jayne; Tucker, Stephen J; Sansom, Mark S P

    2016-12-06

    Ion channels play key roles in cell membranes, and recent advances are yielding an increasing number of structures. However, their functional relevance is often unclear and better tools are required for their functional annotation. In sub-nanometer pores such as ion channels, hydrophobic gating has been shown to promote dewetting to produce a functionally closed (i.e., non-conductive) state. Using the serotonin receptor (5-HT 3 R) structure as an example, we demonstrate the use of molecular dynamics to aid the functional annotation of channel structures via simulation of the behavior of water within the pore. Three increasingly complex simulation analyses are described: water equilibrium densities; single-ion free-energy profiles; and computational electrophysiology. All three approaches correctly predict the 5-HT 3 R crystal structure to represent a functionally closed (i.e., non-conductive) state. We also illustrate the application of water equilibrium density simulations to annotate different conformational states of a glycine receptor. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. A new scaling approach for the mesoscale simulation of magnetic domain structures using Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radhakrishnan, B., E-mail: radhakrishnb@ornl.gov; Eisenbach, M.; Burress, T.A.

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Developed new scaling technique for dipole–dipole interaction energy. • Developed new scaling technique for exchange interaction energy. • Used scaling laws to extend atomistic simulations to micrometer length scale. • Demonstrated transition from mono-domain to vortex magnetic structure. • Simulated domain wall width and transition length scale agree with experiments. - Abstract: A new scaling approach has been proposed for the spin exchange and the dipole–dipole interaction energy as a function of the system size. The computed scaling laws are used in atomistic Monte Carlo simulations of magnetic moment evolution to predict the transition from single domain to a vortex structure as the system size increases. The width of a 180° – domain wall extracted from the simulated structures is in close agreement with experimentally values for an F–Si alloy. The transition size from a single domain to a vortex structure is also in close agreement with theoretically predicted and experimentally measured values for Fe.

  7. Weighted Branching Simulation Distance for Parametric Weighted Kripke Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foshammer, Louise; Larsen, Kim Guldstrand; Mariegaard, Anders

    2016-01-01

    This paper concerns branching simulation for weighted Kripke structures with parametric weights. Concretely, we consider a weighted extension of branching simulation where a single transitions can be matched by a sequence of transitions while preserving the branching behavior. We relax this notion...... to allow for a small degree of deviation in the matching of weights, inducing a directed distance on states. The distance between two states can be used directly to relate properties of the states within a sub-fragment of weighted CTL. The problem of relating systems thus changes to minimizing the distance...... which, in the general parametric case, corresponds to finding suitable parameter valuations such that one system can approximately simulate another. Although the distance considers a potentially infinite set of transition sequences we demonstrate that there exists an upper bound on the length...

  8. A three-region model for tracking a two-phase mixture water level in the micro-simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seok, Ho

    1994-02-01

    -site transient analysis, and engineering studies. The present simulator consists of three functional modules: plant module, graphic module, and man-machine interaction module. The plant module includes models for core kinetics, reactor coolant system, steam generator, main steam line, BOP, and control and protection system. Each of the model is optimized to obtain the capability of real-time simulation. For simulating the thermal-hydraulic behavior of reactor coolant system in the plant module, FISA-2/WS (Fully-Implicit Safety Analysis-2/WorkStation) is developed, which adopts an implicit algorithms for their inherent stability and efficiency in solving the stiff set of equations resulted from component models. It allows the use of a larger time-step than the Courant limit without any numerical instability, and it also guarantees reasonable accuracy. And the level tracking logic and the peak cladding temperature calculation model on the basis of the simple analytical model are used to track the two-phase water level in the core and to predict the cladding temperature in the uncovered region of the core under accidents, respectively. The graphic module is designed to provide the user with more information at a glance by dynamically displaying schematic diagrams of the systems, symbols indicating the operating status of each component, trend curves, and the main control room. Especially, the CONTROL ROOM menu is designed to enable user to perform his specific actions through the schematic diagrams of the main control panels in the similar way in which operators do them in the main control room for the KO-RI nuclear power plant unit 2. In each schematic diagram of 5 sections the indicators and alarms display the various operating parameter, alarm signals, and trip signals, and the user can control the various components by operating the corresponding switches in each section through the mouse. Also, user can initiate his actions through various system diagrams. As tools for the man

  9. Simulation approaches to probabilistic structural design at the component level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stancampiano, P.A.

    1978-01-01

    In this paper, structural failure of large nuclear components is viewed as a random process with a low probability of occurrence. Therefore, a statistical interpretation of probability does not apply and statistical inferences cannot be made due to the sparcity of actual structural failure data. In such cases, analytical estimates of the failure probabilities may be obtained from stress-strength interference theory. Since the majority of real design applications are complex, numerical methods are required to obtain solutions. Monte Carlo simulation appears to be the best general numerical approach. However, meaningful applications of simulation methods suggest research activities in three categories: methods development, failure mode models development, and statistical data models development. (Auth.)

  10. Simulation and analysis of an isolated full-bridge DC/DC boost converter operating with a modified perturb and observe maximum power point tracking algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calebe A. Matias

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study is to simulate and analyze an isolated full-bridge DC/DC boost converter, for photovoltaic panels, running a modified perturb and observe maximum power point tracking method. The zero voltage switching technique was used in order to minimize the losses of the converter for a wide range of solar operation. The efficiency of the power transfer is higher than 90% for large solar operating points. The panel enhancement due to the maximum power point tracking algorithm is 5.06%.

  11. Does sound structure affect word learning? An eye-tracking study of Danish learning toddlers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trecca, Fabio; Bleses, Dorthe; Madsen, Thomas O.

    2018-01-01

    closely related languages. In support of this hypothesis, recent work has shown that the phonetic properties of Danish negatively affect online language processing in young Danish children. In this study, we used eye-tracking to investigate whether the challenges associated with processing Danish also...

  12. The detector response simulation for the CBM silicon tracking system as a tool for hit error estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malygina, Hanna [Goethe Universitaet Frankfurt (Germany); KINR, Kyiv (Ukraine); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Friese, Volker; Zyzak, Maksym [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: CBM-Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment(CBM) at FAIR is designed to explore the QCD phase diagram in the region of high net-baryon densities. As the central detector component, the Silicon Tracking System (STS) is based on double-sided micro-strip sensors. To achieve realistic modelling, the response of the silicon strip sensors should be precisely included in the digitizer which simulates a complete chain of physical processes caused by charged particles traversing the detector, from charge creation in silicon to a digital output signal. The current implementation of the STS digitizer comprises non-uniform energy loss distributions (according to the Urban theory), thermal diffusion and charge redistribution over the read-out channels due to interstrip capacitances. Using the digitizer, one can test an influence of each physical processes on hit error separately. We have developed a new cluster position finding algorithm and a hit error estimation method for it. Estimated errors were verified by the width of pull distribution (expected to be about unity) and its shape.

  13. A Structural Reliability Business Process Modelling with System Dynamics Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, C. Y.; Chan, S. L.; Ip, W. H.

    2010-01-01

    Business activity flow analysis enables organizations to manage structured business processes, and can thus help them to improve performance. The six types of business activities identified here (i.e., SOA, SEA, MEA, SPA, MSA and FIA) are correlated and interact with one another, and the decisions from any business activity form feedback loops with previous and succeeding activities, thus allowing the business process to be modelled and simulated. For instance, for any company that is eager t...

  14. Real time tracking in liver SBRT: comparison of CyberKnife and Vero by planning structure-based γ-evaluation and dose-area-histograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sothmann, T; Blanck, O; Poels, K; Werner, R; Gauer, T

    2016-02-21

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare two clinical tracking systems for radiosurgery with regard to their dosimetric and geometrical accuracy in liver SBRT: the robot-based CyberKnife and the gimbal-based Vero. Both systems perform real-time tumour tracking by correlating internal tumour and external surrogate motion. CyberKnife treatment plans were delivered to a high resolution 2D detector array mounted on a 4D motion platform, with the platform simulating (a) tumour motion trajectories extracted from the corresponding CyberKnife predictor log files and (b) the tumour motion trajectories with superimposed baseline-drift. Static reference and tracked dose measurements were compared and dosimetric as well as geometrical uncertainties analyzed by a planning structure-based evaluation. For (a), γ-passing rates inside the CTV (γ-criteria of 1% / 1 mm) ranged from 95% to 100% (CyberKnife) and 98% to 100% (Vero). However, dosimetric accuracy decreases in the presence of the baseline-drift. γ-passing rates for (b) ranged from 26% to 92% and 94% to 99%, respectively; i.e. the effect was more pronounced for CyberKnife. In contrast, the Vero system led to maximum dose deviations in the OAR between  +1.5 Gy to +6.0 Gy (CyberKnife: +0.5 Gy to +3.5 Gy). Potential dose shifts were interpreted as motion-induced geometrical tracking errors. Maximum observed shift ranges were  -1.0 mm to  +0.7 mm (lateral) /-0.6 mm to +0.1 mm (superior-inferior) for CyberKnife and  -0.8 mm to +0.2 mm /-0.8 mm to +0.4 mm for Vero. These values illustrate that CyberKnife and Vero provide high precision tracking of regular breathing patterns. Even for the modified motion trajectory, the obtained dose distributions appear to be clinical acceptable with regard to literature QA γ-criteria of 3% / 3 mm.

  15. Interaction of light with hematite hierarchical structures: Experiments and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distaso, Monica; Zhuromskyy, Oleksander; Seemann, Benjamin; Pflug, Lukas; Mačković, Mirza; Encina, Ezequiel; Taylor, Robin Klupp; Müller, Rolf; Leugering, Günter; Spiecker, Erdmann; Peschel, Ulf; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2017-03-01

    Mesocrystalline particles have been recognized as a class of multifunctional materials with potential applications in different fields. However, the internal organization of nanocomposite mesocrystals and its influence on the final properties have not yet been investigated. In this paper, a novel strategy based on electrodynamic simulations is developed to shed light on how the internal structure of mesocrystals influences their optical properties. In a first instance, a unified design protocol is reported for the fabrication of hematite/PVP particles with different morphologies such as pseudo-cubes, rods-like and apple-like structures and controlled particle size distributions. The optical properties of hematite/PVP mesocrystals are effectively simulated by taking their aggregate and nanocomposite structure into consideration. The superposition T-Matrix approach accounts for the aggregate nature of mesocrystalline particles and validate the effective medium approximation used in the framework of the Mie theory and electromagnetic simulation such as Finite Element Method. The approach described in our paper provides the framework to understand and predict the optical properties of mesocrystals and more general, of hierarchical nanostructured particles.

  16. Filament winding technique, experiment and simulation analysis on tubular structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quanjin, Ma; Rejab, M. R. M.; Kaige, Jiang; Idris, M. S.; Harith, M. N.

    2018-04-01

    Filament winding process has emerged as one of the potential composite fabrication processes with lower costs. Filament wound products involve classic axisymmetric parts (pipes, rings, driveshafts, high-pressure vessels and storage tanks), non-axisymmetric parts (prismatic nonround sections and pipe fittings). Based on the 3-axis filament winding machine has been designed with the inexpensive control system, it is completely necessary to make a relative comparison between experiment and simulation on tubular structure. In this technical paper, the aim of this paper is to perform a dry winding experiment using the 3-axis filament winding machine and simulate winding process on the tubular structure using CADWIND software with 30°, 45°, 60° winding angle. The main result indicates that the 3-axis filament winding machine can produce tubular structure with high winding pattern performance with different winding angle. This developed 3-axis winding machine still has weakness compared to CAWIND software simulation results with high axes winding machine about winding pattern, turnaround impact, process error, thickness, friction impact etc. In conclusion, the 3-axis filament winding machine improvements and recommendations come up with its comparison results, which can intuitively understand its limitations and characteristics.

  17. Effects of track structure and cell inactivation on the calculation of heavy ion mutation rates in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Shavers, M. R.; Katz, R.

    1996-01-01

    It has long been suggested that inactivation severely effects the probability of mutation by heavy ions in mammalian cells. Heavy ions have observed cross sections of inactivation that approach and sometimes exceed the geometric size of the cell nucleus in mammalian cells. In the track structure model of Katz the inactivation cross section is found by summing an inactivation probability over all impact parameters from the ion to the sensitive sites within the cell nucleus. The inactivation probability is evaluated using the dose-response of the system to gamma-rays and the radial dose of the ions and may be equal to unity at small impact parameters for some ions. We show how the effects of inactivation may be taken into account in the evaluation of the mutation cross sections from heavy ions in the track structure model through correlation of sites for gene mutation and cell inactivation. The model is fit to available data for HPRT mutations in Chinese hamster cells and good agreement is found. The resulting calculations qualitatively show that mutation cross sections for heavy ions display minima at velocities where inactivation cross sections display maxima. Also, calculations show the high probability of mutation by relativistic heavy ions due to the radial extension of ions track from delta-rays in agreement with the microlesion concept. The effects of inactivation on mutations rates make it very unlikely that a single parameter such as LET or Z*2/beta(2) can be used to specify radiation quality for heavy ion bombardment.

  18. Etched ion tracks in silicon oxide and silicon oxynitride as charge injection or extraction channels for novel electronic structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, D.; Petrov, A.V.; Hoppe, K.; Fahrner, W.R.; Papaleo, R.M.; Berdinsky, A.S.; Chandra, A.; Chemseddine, A.; Zrineh, A.; Biswas, A.; Faupel, F.; Chadderton, L.T.

    2004-01-01

    The impact of swift heavy ions onto silicon oxide and silicon oxynitride on silicon creates etchable tracks in these insulators. After their etching and filling-up with highly resistive matter, these nanometric pores can be used as charge extraction or injection paths towards the conducting channel in the underlying silicon. In this way, a novel family of electronic structures has been realized. The basic characteristics of these 'TEMPOS' (=tunable electronic material with pores in oxide on silicon) structures are summarized. Their functionality is determined by the type of insulator, the etch track diameters and lengths, their areal densities, the type of conducting matter embedded therein, and of course by the underlying semiconductor and the contact geometry. Depending on the TEMPOS preparation recipe and working point, the structures may resemble gatable resistors, condensors, diodes, transistors, photocells, or sensors, and they are therefore rather universally applicable in electronics. TEMPOS structures are often sensitive to temperature, light, humidity and organic gases. Also light-emitting TEMPOS structures have been produced. About 37 TEMPOS-based circuits such as thermosensors, photosensors, humidity and alcohol sensors, amplifiers, frequency multipliers, amplitude modulators, oscillators, flip-flops and many others have already been designed and successfully tested. Sometimes TEMPOS-based circuits are more compact than conventional electronics

  19. COMPARISON OF SOLAR SURFACE FLOWS INFERRED FROM TIME-DISTANCE HELIOSEISMOLOGY AND COHERENT STRUCTURE TRACKING USING HMI/SDO OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Švanda, Michal; Roudier, Thierry; Rieutord, Michel; Burston, Raymond; Gizon, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    We compare measurements of horizontal flows on the surface of the Sun using helioseismic time-distance inversions and coherent structure tracking of solar granules. Tracking provides two-dimensional horizontal flows on the solar surface, whereas the time-distance inversions estimate the full three-dimensional velocity flows in the shallow near-surface layers. Both techniques use Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager observations as input. We find good correlations between the various measurements resulting from the two techniques. Further, we find a good agreement between these measurements and the time-averaged Doppler line-of-sight velocity, and also perform sanity checks on the vertical flow that resulted from the three-dimensional time-distance inversion.

  20. Efficient Eulerian gyrokinetic simulations with block-structured grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarema, Denis

    2017-01-01

    Gaining a deep understanding of plasma microturbulence is of paramount importance for the development of future nuclear fusion reactors, because it causes a strong outward transport of heat and particles. Gyrokinetics has proven itself as a valid mathematical model to simulate such plasma microturbulence effects. In spite of the advantages of this model, nonlinear radially extended (or global) gyrokinetic simulations are still extremely computationally expensive, involving a very large number of computational grid points. Hence, methods that reduce the number of grid points without a significant loss of accuracy are a prerequisite to be able to run high-fidelity simulations. At the level of the mathematical model, the gyrokinetic approach achieves a reduction from six to five coordinates in comparison to the fully kinetic models. This reduction leads to an important decrease in the total number of computational grid points. However, the velocity space mixed with the radial direction still requires a very fine resolution in grid based codes, due to the disparities in the thermal speed, which are caused by a strong temperature variation along the radial direction. An attempt to address this problem by modifying the underlying gyrokinetic set of equations leads to additional nonlinear terms, which are the most expensive parts to simulate. Furthermore, because of these modifications, well-established and computationally efficient implementations developed for the original set of equations can no longer be used. To tackle such issues, in this thesis we introduce an alternative approach of blockstructured grids. This approach reduces the number of grid points significantly, but without changing the underlying mathematical model. Furthermore, our technique is minimally invasive and allows the reuse of a large amount of already existing code using rectilinear grids, modifications being necessary only on the block boundaries. Moreover, the block-structured grid can be

  1. Efficient Eulerian gyrokinetic simulations with block-structured grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarema, Denis

    2017-01-20

    Gaining a deep understanding of plasma microturbulence is of paramount importance for the development of future nuclear fusion reactors, because it causes a strong outward transport of heat and particles. Gyrokinetics has proven itself as a valid mathematical model to simulate such plasma microturbulence effects. In spite of the advantages of this model, nonlinear radially extended (or global) gyrokinetic simulations are still extremely computationally expensive, involving a very large number of computational grid points. Hence, methods that reduce the number of grid points without a significant loss of accuracy are a prerequisite to be able to run high-fidelity simulations. At the level of the mathematical model, the gyrokinetic approach achieves a reduction from six to five coordinates in comparison to the fully kinetic models. This reduction leads to an important decrease in the total number of computational grid points. However, the velocity space mixed with the radial direction still requires a very fine resolution in grid based codes, due to the disparities in the thermal speed, which are caused by a strong temperature variation along the radial direction. An attempt to address this problem by modifying the underlying gyrokinetic set of equations leads to additional nonlinear terms, which are the most expensive parts to simulate. Furthermore, because of these modifications, well-established and computationally efficient implementations developed for the original set of equations can no longer be used. To tackle such issues, in this thesis we introduce an alternative approach of blockstructured grids. This approach reduces the number of grid points significantly, but without changing the underlying mathematical model. Furthermore, our technique is minimally invasive and allows the reuse of a large amount of already existing code using rectilinear grids, modifications being necessary only on the block boundaries. Moreover, the block-structured grid can be

  2. Contributions to reinforced concrete structures numerical simulations; Contributions a la simulation numerique de structures en beton arme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badel, P.B

    2001-07-15

    In order to be able to carry out simulations of reinforced concrete structures, it is necessary to know two aspects: the behaviour laws have to reflect the complex behaviour of concrete and a numerical environment has to be developed in order to avoid to the user difficulties due to the softening nature of the behaviour. This work deals with these two subjects. After an accurate estimation of two behaviour models (micro-plan and mesoscopic models), two damage models (the first one using a scalar variable, the other one a tensorial damage of the 2 order) are proposed. These two models belong to the framework of generalized standard materials, which renders their numerical integration easy and efficient. A method of load control is developed in order to make easier the convergence of the calculations. At last, simulations of industrial structures illustrate the efficiency of the method. (O.M.)

  3. Amyloid oligomer structure characterization from simulations: A general method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Phuong H., E-mail: phuong.nguyen@ibpc.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie Théorique, UPR 9080, CNRS Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité IBPC, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Li, Mai Suan [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotnikow 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Derreumaux, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.derreumaux@ibpc.fr [Laboratoire de Biochimie Théorique, UPR 9080, CNRS Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité IBPC, 13 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Institut Universitaire de France, 103 Bvd Saint-Germain, 75005 Paris (France)

    2014-03-07

    Amyloid oligomers and plaques are composed of multiple chemically identical proteins. Therefore, one of the first fundamental problems in the characterization of structures from simulations is the treatment of the degeneracy, i.e., the permutation of the molecules. Second, the intramolecular and intermolecular degrees of freedom of the various molecules must be taken into account. Currently, the well-known dihedral principal component analysis method only considers the intramolecular degrees of freedom, and other methods employing collective variables can only describe intermolecular degrees of freedom at the global level. With this in mind, we propose a general method that identifies all the structures accurately. The basis idea is that the intramolecular and intermolecular states are described in terms of combinations of single-molecule and double-molecule states, respectively, and the overall structures of oligomers are the product basis of the intramolecular and intermolecular states. This way, the degeneracy is automatically avoided. The method is illustrated on the conformational ensemble of the tetramer of the Alzheimer's peptide Aβ{sub 9−40}, resulting from two atomistic molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent, each of 200 ns, starting from two distinct structures.

  4. Monte-Carlo simulation of dispersion fuel meat structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Zhonghu; Ying Shihao

    2003-01-01

    Under the irradiation conditions in research reactors, the inter-diffusion occurs at the fuel particle and matrix interfaces of U 3 Si 2 -Al dispersion fuel. Because of the inter-diffusion reaction, the U 3 Al 7 Si 2 layer is formed around each U 3 Si 2 particle. The layer thickness grows up with irradiation duration and fission density. The formation of resultant layer causes the consumption of U 3 Si 2 fuel and aluminum matrix. This process leads to the evolution of geometrical structure of fuel meat. According to the stochastic locations of particles in dispersion, the authors developed a simulation method for the evolution of the fuel meat structure by utilizing Monte-Carlo method. Every particle is characterized by its diameter and location. The parameters of meat structure include particle size distribution, as-fabricated fuel volume fraction, resultant layer thickness, layer volume fraction, U 3 Si 2 fuel volume fraction, aluminum volume fraction, contiguity probability and inter-linkage fraction of particles. Particularly for the dispersion with as-fabricated fuel volume fraction of 43% and particle sizes in a well-defined normal distribution, more than 13000 sampling particles are simulated in the meat volume of 6 mm x 6 mm x 0.5 mm. The meat structure parameters are calculated as functions of layer thickness in the range from 0-16 μm. (authors)

  5. Analysis of forest structure using thematic mapper simulator data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, D. L.; Westman, W. E.; Brass, J. A.; Stephenson, N. J.; Ambrosia, V. G.; Spanner, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    The potential of Thematic Mapper Simulator (TMS) data for sensing forest structure information has been explored by principal components and feature selection techniques. In a survey of forest structural properties conducted for 123 field sites of the Sequoia National Park, the canopy closure could be well estimated (r = 0.62 to 0.69) by a variety of channel bands and band ratios, without reference to the forest type. Estimation of the basal area was less successful (r = 0.51 or less) on the average, but could be improved for certain forest types when data were stratified by floristic composition. To achieve such a stratification, individual sites were ordinated by a detrended correspondence analysis based on the canopy of dominant species. The analysis of forest structure in the Sequoia data suggests that total basal area can be best predicted in stands of lower density, and in younger even-aged managed stands.

  6. Modeling bistable behaviors in morphing structures through finite element simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qiaohang; Zheng, Huang; Chen, Wenzhe; Chen, Zi

    2014-01-01

    Bistable structures, exemplified by the Venus flytrap and slap bracelets, can transit between different configurations upon certain external stimulation. Here we study, through three-dimensional finite element simulations, the bistable behaviors in elastic plates in the absence of terminate loads, but with pre-strains in one (or both) of the two composite layers. Both the scenarios with and without a given geometric mis-orientation angle are investigated, the results of which are consistent with recent theoretical and experimental studies. This work can open ample venues for programmable designs of plant/shell structures with large deformations, with applications in designing bio-inspired robotics for biomedical research and morphing/deployable structures in aerospace engineering.

  7. Track structure model for damage to mammalian cell cultures during solar proton events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Townsend, L. W.; Shinn, J. L.; Katz, R.

    1992-01-01

    Solar proton events (SPEs) occur infrequently and unpredictably, thus representing a potential hazard to interplanetary space missions. Biological damage from SPEs will be produced principally through secondary electron production in tissue, including important contributions due to delta rays from nuclear reaction products. We review methods for estimating the biological effectiveness of SPEs using a high energy proton model and the parametric cellular track model. Results of the model are presented for several of the historically largest flares using typical levels and body shielding.

  8. Development and mechanical properties of structural materials from lunar simulants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Chandra S.; Girdner, K.; Saadatmanesh, H.; Allen, T.

    1991-01-01

    Development of the technologies for manufacture of structural and construction materials on the Moon, utilizing local lunar soil (regolith), without the use of water, is an important element for habitats and explorations in space. Here, it is vital that the mechanical behavior such as strength and flexural properties, fracture toughness, ductility and deformation characteristics be defined toward establishment of the ranges of engineering applications of the materials developed. The objective is to describe the research results in two areas for the above goal: (1) liquefaction of lunar simulant (at about 100 C) with different additives (fibers, powders, etc.); and (2) development and use of a new triaxial test device in which lunar simulants are first compressed under cycles of loading, and then tested with different vacuums and initial confining or in situ stress.

  9. Coding considerations for standalone molecular dynamics simulations of atomistic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaya, R. O.; Terblans, J. J.

    2017-10-01

    The laws of Newtonian mechanics allow ab-initio molecular dynamics to model and simulate particle trajectories in material science by defining a differentiable potential function. This paper discusses some considerations for the coding of ab-initio programs for simulation on a standalone computer and illustrates the approach by C language codes in the context of embedded metallic atoms in the face-centred cubic structure. The algorithms use velocity-time integration to determine particle parameter evolution for up to several thousands of particles in a thermodynamical ensemble. Such functions are reusable and can be placed in a redistributable header library file. While there are both commercial and free packages available, their heuristic nature prevents dissection. In addition, developing own codes has the obvious advantage of teaching techniques applicable to new problems.

  10. Tracking influence between naive Bayes models using score-based structure learning

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ajoodha, R

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Current structure learning practices in Bayesian networks have been developed to learn the structure between observable variables and learning latent parameters independently. One exception establishes a variant of EM for learning the structure...

  11. Simulations of the neutral structure within the dusk side aurora

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. F. Parish

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Observations of neutral winds from rocket release experiments within the premidnight and postmidnight substorm recovery phase aurora, show very large E-region neutral winds of several hundred m/s, where winds measured on the dusk side are even larger than those on the dawn side. These large winds are also associated with strong shears, and there is evidence that some of the regions below these shears may be unstable. The mechanisms which generate this strong vertical structure are not well understood. It is also not known whether the acceleration conditions in the pre and post midnight sectors of the aurora may produce significantly different neutral responses on the dawn and dusk sides. Simulations have been performed using a three-dimensional high resolution limited area thermosphere model to try to understand the neutral structure within the dawn and dusk side aurora. When simulations are performed using auroral forcing alone, for equivalent conditions within the dawn and dusk sectors, differences are found in the simulated response on each side. When measured values of auroral forcing parameters, and background winds and tides consistent with recent observations, are used as model inputs, some of the main features of the zonal and meridional wind observations are reproduced in the simulations, but the magnitude of the peak zonal wind around 140 km tends to be too small and the maximum meridional wind around 130 km is overestimated. The winds above 120 km altitude are found to be sensitive to changes in electric fields and ion densities, as was the case for the dawn side, but the effects of background winds and tides on the magnitudes of the winds above 120 km are found to be relatively small on the dusk side. The structure below 120 km appears to be related mainly to background winds and tides rather than auroral forcing, as was found in earlier studies on the dawn side, although the peak magnitudes of simulated wind variations in the 100 to

  12. Robust simulation of buckled structures using reduced order modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, R.; Perez, R.A.; Spottswood, S.M.

    2016-01-01

    Lightweight metallic structures are a mainstay in aerospace engineering. For these structures, stability, rather than strength, is often the critical limit state in design. For example, buckling of panels and stiffeners may occur during emergency high-g maneuvers, while in supersonic and hypersonic aircraft, it may be induced by thermal stresses. The longstanding solution to such challenges was to increase the sizing of the structural members, which is counter to the ever present need to minimize weight for reasons of efficiency and performance. In this work we present some recent results in the area of reduced order modeling of post- buckled thin beams. A thorough parametric study of the response of a beam to changing harmonic loading parameters, which is useful in exposing complex phenomena and exercising numerical models, is presented. Two error metrics that use but require no time stepping of a (computationally expensive) truth model are also introduced. The error metrics are applied to several interesting forcing parameter cases identified from the parametric study and are shown to yield useful information about the quality of a candidate reduced order model. Parametric studies, especially when considering forcing and structural geometry parameters, coupled environments, and uncertainties would be computationally intractable with finite element models. The goal is to make rapid simulation of complex nonlinear dynamic behavior possible for distributed systems via fast and accurate reduced order models. This ability is crucial in allowing designers to rigorously probe the robustness of their designs to account for variations in loading, structural imperfections, and other uncertainties. (paper)

  13. Robust simulation of buckled structures using reduced order modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, R.; Perez, R. A.; Spottswood, S. M.

    2016-09-01

    Lightweight metallic structures are a mainstay in aerospace engineering. For these structures, stability, rather than strength, is often the critical limit state in design. For example, buckling of panels and stiffeners may occur during emergency high-g maneuvers, while in supersonic and hypersonic aircraft, it may be induced by thermal stresses. The longstanding solution to such challenges was to increase the sizing of the structural members, which is counter to the ever present need to minimize weight for reasons of efficiency and performance. In this work we present some recent results in the area of reduced order modeling of post- buckled thin beams. A thorough parametric study of the response of a beam to changing harmonic loading parameters, which is useful in exposing complex phenomena and exercising numerical models, is presented. Two error metrics that use but require no time stepping of a (computationally expensive) truth model are also introduced. The error metrics are applied to several interesting forcing parameter cases identified from the parametric study and are shown to yield useful information about the quality of a candidate reduced order model. Parametric studies, especially when considering forcing and structural geometry parameters, coupled environments, and uncertainties would be computationally intractable with finite element models. The goal is to make rapid simulation of complex nonlinear dynamic behavior possible for distributed systems via fast and accurate reduced order models. This ability is crucial in allowing designers to rigorously probe the robustness of their designs to account for variations in loading, structural imperfections, and other uncertainties.

  14. Simulation of Cu-Mg metallic glass: Thermodynamics and structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Nicholas; Schiøtz, Jakob; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2004-01-01

    We have obtained effective medium theory interatomic potential parameters suitable for studying Cu-Mg metallic glasses. We present thermodynamic and structural results from simulations of such glasses over a range of compositions. We have produced low-temperature configurations by cooling from...... the melt at as slow a rate as practical, using constant temperature and pressure molecular dynamics. During the cooling process we have carried out thermodynamic analyses based on the temperature dependence of the enthalpy and its derivative, the specific heat, from which the glass transition temperature...

  15. TH-AB-BRA-08: Simulated Tumor Tracking in An MRI Linac for Lung Tumor Lesions Using the Monaco Treatment Planning System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ward, S; Kim, A; McCann, C; Ruschin, M; Cheung, P; Sahgal, A; Keller, B [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To simulate tumor tracking in an Elekta MRI-linac (MRL) and to compare this tracking method with our current ITV approach in terms of OAR sparing for lung cancer patients. Methods: Five SABR-NSCLC patients with central lung tumors were selected for reasons of potential enhancement of tumor-tissue delineation using MRI. The Monaco TPS was used to compare the current clinical ITV approach to a simulated, novel tracking method which used a 7MV MRL beam in the presence of an orthogonal 1.5 T magnetic field (4D-MRL method). In the simulated tracking scenario, achieved using the virtual couch shift (VCS), the PTV was defined using an isotropic 5mm margin applied to the GTV of each phase, as acquired from an 8-phase amplitude-binned 4DCT. These VCS plans were optimized and weighted on each phase. The dose weighting was performed using the patient-specific breathing traces. The doses were accumulated on the inhale phase. The two methods were compared by assessing the OAR DVHs. Results: The 4D-MRL method resulted in a reduced target volume (by an average of 29% over all patients). The benefits of using an MRL tracking system depended on the tumor motion amplitude and the relative OAR motion (ROM) to the target. The reduction in mean doses to parallel organs was up to 3 Gy for the heart and 2.1 Gy for the lung. The reductions in maximum doses to serial organs were up to 9.4 Gy, 5.6 Gy, and 8.7 Gy for the esophagus, spinal cord, and the trachea, respectively. Serial organs benefited from MRL tracking when the ROM was ≥ 0.3 cm despite small tumor motion amplitude in some cases. Conclusions: This work demonstrated the potential benefit for an MRL tracking system to spare OARs in SABR-NSCLC patients with central tumors. The benefits are embodied in the target volume reduction. This project was made possible with the financial support of Elekta.

  16. Plasma-chemical modification of the structure and properties of poly(ethylene terephthalate) track membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravets, L I; Dmitriev, S N; Dinescu, G; Lazea, A; Sleptsov, V V; Elinson, V M

    2007-01-01

    A process of extraction of the low-molecular products of the synthesis from the poly(ethylene terephthalate) track membranes modified by plasma has been investigated. It is shown that the deposition of a thin polymeric hydrocarbon film by cyclohexane plasma on the membrane surface with preliminary treatment in a plasma of non-polymerizing gases, for example oxygen, allows one to produce membranes possessing a high productivity. Their advantages are much better hydrodynamic properties and a small amount of the low-molecular products of the synthesis extracted by organic solvents

  17. On-Line Identification of Simulation Examples for Forgetting Methods to Track Time Varying Parameters Using the Alternative Covariance Matrix in Matlab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachálek, Ján

    2011-12-01

    The paper compares the abilities of forgetting methods to track time varying parameters of two different simulated models with different types of excitation. The observed parameters in the simulations are the integral sum of the Euclidean norm, deviation of the parameter estimates from their true values and a selected band prediction error count. As supplementary information, we observe the eigenvalues of the covariance matrix. In the paper we used a modified method of Regularized Exponential Forgetting with Alternative Covariance Matrix (REFACM) along with Directional Forgetting (DF) and three standard regularized methods.

  18. Radiography simulation based on exposure buildup factors for multilayer structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinkovic, Predrag; Pesic, Milan

    2009-01-01

    Monte Carlo techniques were usually used to study the effect of scattered photons on a radiographic X-ray image. Such approach is accurate, but computer time consuming. On the other hand, the exposure buildup factors can be used as approximate and efficient assessment to account for the scattering of X-rays. This method uses the known radiography parameters to find the resulting detector exposure due to both scattered and un-collided photons. A model for radiography simulation, based on X-ray dose buildup factor, is proposed. This model includes non-uniform attenuation in voxelized object of imaging (patient body tissue). Composition of patient body is considered as a multi-layer structure. Various empirical formulas exist for multi-layer structure calculations and they all calculate multi-layer buildup factors by combining single-layer buildup factors. The proposed model is convenient in cases when more exact techniques (like Monte Carlo) are not economical. (author)

  19. The Structural Underpinnings of Policy Learning: A Classroom Policy Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Stephen

    This paper investigates the relationship between the centrality of individual actors in a social network structure and their policy learning performance. In a dynamic comparable to real-world policy networks, results from a classroom simulation demonstrate a strong relationship between centrality in social learning networks and grade performance. Previous research indicates that social network centrality should have a positive effect on learning in other contexts and this link is tested in a policy learning context. Second, the distinction between collaborative learning versus information diffusion processes in policy learning is examined. Third, frequency of interaction is analyzed to determine whether consistent, frequent tics have a greater impact on the learning process. Finally, the data arc analyzed to determine if the benefits of centrality have limitations or thresholds when benefits no longer accrue. These results demonstrate the importance of network structure, and support a collaborative conceptualization of the policy learning process.

  20. Understanding nucleon structure using lattice simulations. Recent progress on three different structural observables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schroers, W.

    2007-01-01

    This review focuses on the discussion of three key results of nucleon structure calculations on the lattice. These three results are the quark contribution to the nucleon spin, J q , the nucleon-Δ transition form factors, and the nucleon axial coupling, g A . The importance for phenomenology and experiment is discussed and the requirements for future simulations are pointed out. (orig.)

  1. Modeling and Simulation of Variable Mass, Flexible Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobbe, Patrick A.; Matras, Alex L.; Wilson, Heath E.

    2009-01-01

    distribution of mass in the fuel tank or Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) case for various propellant levels. Based on the mass consumed by the liquid engine or SRB, the appropriate propellant model is coupled with the dry structure model for the stage. Then using vehicle configuration data, the integrated vehicle model is assembled and operated on by the constant system shape functions. The system mode shapes and frequencies can then be computed from the resulting generalized mass and stiffness matrices for that mass configuration. The rigid body mass properties of the vehicle are derived from the integrated vehicle model. The coupling terms between the vehicle rigid body motion and elastic deformation are also updated from the constant system shape functions and the integrated vehicle model. This approach was first used to analyze variable mass spinning beams and then prototyped into a generic dynamics simulation engine. The resulting code was tested against Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV-)class problems worked in the TREETOPS simulation package and by Wilson [2]. The Ares I System Integration Laboratory (SIL) is currently being developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to test vehicle avionics hardware and software in a hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) environment and certify that the integrated system is prepared for flight. The Ares I SIL utilizes the Ares Real-Time Environment for Modeling, Integration, and Simulation (ARTEMIS) tool to simulate the launch vehicle and stimulate avionics hardware. Due to the presence of vehicle control system filters and the thrust oscillation suppression system, which are tuned to the structural characteristics of the vehicle, ARTEMIS must incorporate accurate structural models of the Ares I launch vehicle. The ARTEMIS core dynamics simulation models the highly coupled nature of the vehicle flexible body dynamics, propellant slosh, and vehicle nozzle inertia effects combined with mass and flexible body properties that vary significant with time

  2. Parameter estimation of a three-axis spacecraft simulator using recursive least-squares approach with tracking differentiator and Extended Kalman Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zheyao; Qi, Naiming; Chen, Yukun

    2015-12-01

    Spacecraft simulators are widely used to study the dynamics, guidance, navigation, and control of a spacecraft on the ground. A spacecraft simulator can have three rotational degrees of freedom by using a spherical air-bearing to simulate a frictionless and micro-gravity space environment. The moment of inertia and center of mass are essential for control system design of ground-based three-axis spacecraft simulators. Unfortunately, they cannot be known precisely. This paper presents two approaches, i.e. a recursive least-squares (RLS) approach with tracking differentiator (TD) and Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) method, to estimate inertia parameters. The tracking differentiator (TD) filter the noise coupled with the measured signals and generate derivate of the measured signals. Combination of two TD filters in series obtains the angular accelerations that are required in RLS (TD-TD-RLS). Another method that does not need to estimate the angular accelerations is using the integrated form of dynamics equation. An extended TD (ETD) filter which can also generate the integration of the function of signals is presented for RLS (denoted as ETD-RLS). States and inertia parameters are estimated simultaneously using EKF. The observability is analyzed. All proposed methods are illustrated by simulations and experiments.

  3. Gamma radiations induced micro-structural modifications and track registration properties in cellulose triacetate polymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasher, Sangeeta; Mukesh Kumar; Singh, Surinder

    2015-01-01

    The influences of gamma radiations from a 60 Co source on the physical and the chemical properties of cellulose triacetate polymer have been analyzed and reported. The analytical techniques such as FTIR and UV-VIS spectroscopy have been employed to study the chemical properties of the polymer before and after irradiation. The band gap and urbech's energies have been calculated from the UV-VIS spectral data and those were found to remain constant up to a gamma dose of 10 kGy and decrease thereafter. FTIR studies reveal the fact that there is a generation of CO 2 and -OH groups at higher doses, which is further confirmed from the decarboxylation mechanism in esters. Aliphatic C-H stretching intensity has also been found to increase with gamma dose. G-value for some groups and bond stretches, has also been reported evidencing the percentage degradation of the polymer by gamma radiations. The changes in track registration properties of the polymer alongwith the activation energies for bulk and track etch rates have been reported. The etch rates have been observed to increase, which can accounts for the presence of oxygen. It is found that cellulose triacetate is a highly radiation resistant polymer as it is influenced to a very little extent up to the dose of 10 kGy. The changes are pronounced at higher gamma doses of 500 and 10 3 kGy. (author)

  4. Quantifying white matter structural integrity with high-definition fiber tracking in traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presson, Nora; Krishnaswamy, Deepa; Wagener, Lauren; Bird, William; Jarbo, Kevin; Pathak, Sudhir; Puccio, Ava M; Borasso, Allison; Benso, Steven; Okonkwo, David O; Schneider, Walter

    2015-03-01

    There is an urgent, unmet demand for definitive biological diagnosis of traumatic brain injury (TBI) to pinpoint the location and extent of damage. We have developed High-Definition Fiber Tracking, a 3 T magnetic resonance imaging-based diffusion spectrum imaging and tractography analysis protocol, to quantify axonal injury in military and civilian TBI patients. A novel analytical methodology quantified white matter integrity in patients with TBI and healthy controls. Forty-one subjects (23 TBI, 18 controls) were scanned with the High-Definition Fiber Tracking diffusion spectrum imaging protocol. After reconstruction, segmentation was used to isolate bilateral hemisphere homologues of eight major tracts. Integrity of segmented tracts was estimated by calculating homologue correlation and tract coverage. Both groups showed high correlations for all tracts. TBI patients showed reduced homologue correlation and tract spread and increased outlier count (correlations>2.32 SD below control mean). On average, 6.5% of tracts in the TBI group were outliers with substantial variability among patients. Number and summed deviation of outlying tracts correlated with initial Glasgow Coma Scale score and 6-month Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended score. The correlation metric used here can detect heterogeneous damage affecting a low proportion of tracts, presenting a potential mechanism for advancing TBI diagnosis. Reprint & Copyright © 2015 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  5. Simulation and analysis of tape spring for deployed space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wei; Cao, DongJing; Lian, MinLong

    2018-03-01

    The tape spring belongs to the configuration of ringent cylinder shell, and the mechanical properties of the structure are significantly affected by the change of geometrical parameters. There are few studies on the influence of geometrical parameters on the mechanical properties of the tape spring. The bending process of the single tape spring was simulated based on simulation software. The variations of critical moment, unfolding moment, and maximum strain energy in the bending process were investigated, and the effects of different radius angles of section and thickness and length on driving capability of the simple tape spring was studied by using these parameters. Results show that the driving capability and resisting disturbance capacity grow with the increase of radius angle of section in the bending process of the single tape spring. On the other hand, these capabilities decrease with increasing length of the single tape spring. In the end, the driving capability and resisting disturbance capacity grow with the increase of thickness in the bending process of the single tape spring. The research has a certain reference value for improving the kinematic accuracy and reliability of deployable structures.

  6. LOOS: an extensible platform for the structural analysis of simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, Tod D; Grossfield, Alan

    2009-01-01

    We have developed LOOS (Lightweight Object-Oriented Structure-analysis library) as an object-oriented library designed to facilitate the rapid development of tools for the structural analysis of simulations. LOOS supports the native file formats of most common simulation packages including AMBER, CHARMM, CNS, Gromacs, NAMD, Tinker, and X-PLOR. Encapsulation and polymorphism are used to simultaneously provide a stable interface to the programmer and make LOOS easily extensible. A rich atom selection language based on the C expression syntax is included as part of the library. LOOS enables students and casual programmer-scientists to rapidly write their own analytical tools in a compact and expressive manner resembling scripting. LOOS is written in C++ and makes extensive use of the Standard Template Library and Boost, and is freely available under the GNU General Public License (version 3) LOOS has been tested on Linux and MacOS X, but is written to be portable and should work on most Unix-based platforms.

  7. Structural performance of HEPA filters under simulated tornado conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horak, H.L.; Gregory, W.S.; Ricketts, C.I.; Smith, P.R.

    1982-02-01

    This report contains the results of structural tests to determine the response of High Efficiency Particulate Air filters to simulated tornado conditions. The data include the structural limits of the filters, their resistance at high flow rates, and the effects of filter design features and tornado parameters. Considering all the filters tested, the mean break pressure or structural limit was found to be 2.35 pse (16.2 kPa). The maximum value was 2.87 psi (19.8 kPa), and the low value found was 1.31 psi (9.0 kPa). The type of failure was usually a medium break of the downstream filter fold. The type of filters that were evaluated were nuclear grade with design flow rates of 1000 cfm (0.472 m 3 /s), standard separators, and folded medium design. The parameters evaluated that are characteristic of the filter included manufacturer, separator type, faceguards, pack tightness, and aerosol loading. Manufacturer and medium properties were found to have a large effect on the structural limits

  8. Computational simulation of acoustic fatigue for hot composite structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhal, S. N.; Nagpal, V. K.; Murthy, P. L. N.; Chamis, C. C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents predictive methods/codes for computational simulation of acoustic fatigue resistance of hot composite structures subjected to acoustic excitation emanating from an adjacent vibrating component. Select codes developed over the past two decades at the NASA Lewis Research Center are used. The codes include computation of (1) acoustic noise generated from a vibrating component, (2) degradation in material properties of the composite laminate at use temperature, (3) dynamic response of acoustically excited hot multilayered composite structure, (4) degradation in the first-ply strength of the excited structure due to acoustic loading, and (5) acoustic fatigue resistance of the excited structure, including propulsion environment. Effects of the laminate lay-up and environment on the acoustic fatigue life are evaluated. The results show that, by keeping the angled plies on the outer surface of the laminate, a substantial increase in the acoustic fatigue life is obtained. The effect of environment (temperature and moisure) is to relieve the residual stresses leading to an increase in the acoustic fatigue life of the excited panel.

  9. Simulation and modeling of the crushing behavior of structural members

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toi, Yutaka

    1986-01-01

    The analysis of the crushing behavior (the behavior of compressive breakdown accompanied by super large deformation) of structural members is an important subject which becomes the base of the ultimate strength design of the structures which may cause collision accident such as automobiles, ships and aircrafts, and of those which are feared to be collided such as offshore structures, bridge piers and nuclear power plants. However, since it is a phenomenon of very strong nonlinearity, its analysis is accompanied by large difficulty. In this report, three kinds of the approach for this problem, that is, rigid-plastic theoretical analysis, the simulation using a rigid body and spring model and nonlinear finite element analysis, are explained, referring to the example of calculation by the authors on the non-axisymmetric crushing problem of cylindrical shells. In crushing problem, the matters of concern are the amount of collision energy which can be absorbed by the plastic deformation of structures and the amount of deformation. It can be said that the increase of calculation cost brings about the heightening of calculation accuracy. The nonlinear finite element analysis is promising because its calculation cost is expected to lower in future. (Kako, I.)

  10. Concurrent Probabilistic Simulation of High Temperature Composite Structural Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdi, Frank

    1996-01-01

    A computational structural/material analysis and design tool which would meet industry's future demand for expedience and reduced cost is presented. This unique software 'GENOA' is dedicated to parallel and high speed analysis to perform probabilistic evaluation of high temperature composite response of aerospace systems. The development is based on detailed integration and modification of diverse fields of specialized analysis techniques and mathematical models to combine their latest innovative capabilities into a commercially viable software package. The technique is specifically designed to exploit the availability of processors to perform computationally intense probabilistic analysis assessing uncertainties in structural reliability analysis and composite micromechanics. The primary objectives which were achieved in performing the development were: (1) Utilization of the power of parallel processing and static/dynamic load balancing optimization to make the complex simulation of structure, material and processing of high temperature composite affordable; (2) Computational integration and synchronization of probabilistic mathematics, structural/material mechanics and parallel computing; (3) Implementation of an innovative multi-level domain decomposition technique to identify the inherent parallelism, and increasing convergence rates through high- and low-level processor assignment; (4) Creating the framework for Portable Paralleled architecture for the machine independent Multi Instruction Multi Data, (MIMD), Single Instruction Multi Data (SIMD), hybrid and distributed workstation type of computers; and (5) Market evaluation. The results of Phase-2 effort provides a good basis for continuation and warrants Phase-3 government, and industry partnership.

  11. Simulation tools for guided wave based structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesnil, Olivier; Imperiale, Alexandre; Demaldent, Edouard; Baronian, Vahan; Chapuis, Bastien

    2018-04-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is a thematic derived from Non Destructive Evaluation (NDE) based on the integration of sensors onto or into a structure in order to monitor its health without disturbing its regular operating cycle. Guided wave based SHM relies on the propagation of guided waves in plate-like or extruded structures. Using piezoelectric transducers to generate and receive guided waves is one of the most widely accepted paradigms due to the low cost and low weight of those sensors. A wide range of techniques for flaw detection based on the aforementioned setup is available in the literature but very few of these techniques have found industrial applications yet. A major difficulty comes from the sensitivity of guided waves to a substantial number of parameters such as the temperature or geometrical singularities, making guided wave measurement difficult to analyze. In order to apply guided wave based SHM techniques to a wider spectrum of applications and to transfer those techniques to the industry, the CEA LIST develops novel numerical methods. These methods facilitate the evaluation of the robustness of SHM techniques for multiple applicative cases and ease the analysis of the influence of various parameters, such as sensors positioning or environmental conditions. The first numerical tool is the guided wave module integrated to the commercial software CIVA, relying on a hybrid modal-finite element formulation to compute the guided wave response of perturbations (cavities, flaws…) in extruded structures of arbitrary cross section such as rails or pipes. The second numerical tool is based on the spectral element method [2] and simulates guided waves in both isotropic (metals) and orthotropic (composites) plate like-structures. This tool is designed to match the widely accepted sparse piezoelectric transducer array SHM configuration in which each embedded sensor acts as both emitter and receiver of guided waves. This tool is under development and

  12. Dust grain charges in a nuclear-track plasma and the formation of dynamic vortex dust structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rykov, V.A.; Khudyakov, A.V.; Filinov, V.S.; Vladimirov, V.I.; Deputatova, L.V.; Krutov, D.V.; Nefedov, A.P.; Fortov, V.E.

    2002-01-01

    Results are presented from Monte Carlo calculations of the electric charge of dust grains in a plasma produced during the slowing down of the radioactive decay products of californium nuclei in neon. The dust grain charging is explained for the first time as being due to the drift of electrons and ions in an external electric field. It is shown that the charges of the grains depend on their coordinates and strongly fluctuate with time. The time-averaged grain charges agree with the experimental data obtained on ordered liquidlike dust structures in a nuclear-track plasma. The time-averaged dust grain charges are used to carry out computer modeling of the formation of dynamic vortex structures observed in experiments. Evidence is obtained of the fact that the electrostatic forces experienced by the dust grains are potential in character

  13. Empty tracks optimization based on Z-Map model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Le; Yan, Guangrong; Wang, Zaijun; Zang, Genao

    2017-12-01

    For parts with many features, there are more empty tracks during machining. If these tracks are not optimized, the machining efficiency will be seriously affected. In this paper, the characteristics of the empty tracks are studied in detail. Combining with the existing optimization algorithm, a new tracks optimization method based on Z-Map model is proposed. In this method, the tool tracks are divided into the unit processing section, and then the Z-Map model simulation technique is used to analyze the order constraint between the unit segments. The empty stroke optimization problem is transformed into the TSP with sequential constraints, and then through the genetic algorithm solves the established TSP problem. This kind of optimization method can not only optimize the simple structural parts, but also optimize the complex structural parts, so as to effectively plan the empty tracks and greatly improve the processing efficiency.

  14. EEG and Eye Tracking Signatures of Target Encoding during Structured Visual Search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Marie Brouwer

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available EEG and eye tracking variables are potential sources of information about the underlying processes of target detection and storage during visual search. Fixation duration, pupil size and event related potentials (ERPs locked to the onset of fixation or saccade (saccade-related potentials, SRPs have been reported to differ dependent on whether a target or a non-target is currently fixated. Here we focus on the question of whether these variables also differ between targets that are subsequently reported (hits and targets that are not (misses. Observers were asked to scan 15 locations that were consecutively highlighted for 1 s in pseudo-random order. Highlighted locations displayed either a target or a non-target stimulus with two, three or four targets per trial. After scanning, participants indicated which locations had displayed a target. To induce memory encoding failures, participants concurrently performed an aurally presented math task (high load condition. In a low load condition, participants ignored the math task. As expected, more targets were missed in the high compared with the low load condition. For both conditions, eye tracking features distinguished better between hits and misses than between targets and non-targets (with larger pupil size and shorter fixations for missed compared with correctly encoded targets. In contrast, SRP features distinguished better between targets and non-targets than between hits and misses (with average SRPs showing larger P300 waveforms for targets than for non-targets. Single trial classification results were consistent with these averages. This work suggests complementary contributions of eye and EEG measures in potential applications to support search and detect tasks. SRPs may be useful to monitor what objects are relevant to an observer, and eye variables may indicate whether the observer should be reminded of them later.

  15. An investigation on how inner-core structures obtained through radar data assimilation affect track forecasting of typhoon Jangmi (2008) near Taiwan Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingjun; Xue, Ming; Zhao, Kun

    2016-09-01

    The impacts of radar data assimilation (DA) on the westward track deflection of Typhoon Jangmi (2008) near Taiwan Island and the deflection mechanism are investigated. Initial conditions from two data assimilation experiments with significant track forecast differences are analyzed and compared. The environmental, axisymmetric, wave number 1 to 3 asymmetric fields of the typhoon are decomposed by using vortex separation and Fourier decomposition methods. The components are selectively recomposed into new initial conditions that include different vortex-scale components to examine the impact of individual components on the track prediction. The wave number 1 asymmetric structure is found to play a dominant role in the westward deflection of Typhoon Jangmi, and the accurate analysis of this component with radar DA helps to improve the track forecast. The wave number 1 asymmetric circulation is manifested as a pair of cyclonic and anticyclonic gyres with well-defined ventilation flows through the inner-core region, which provides additional steering of the typhoon vortex. The layer-mean environmental steering flow and ventilation flow associated with the wave number 1 gyres are further calculated to quantitatively evaluate the impact of ventilation flow. The ventilation flow is shown to be responsible for most of the westward motion component, suggesting again its role in causing the westward track deflection of Typhoon Jangmi. The results also suggest the importance of analyzing vortex-scale asymmetric structures for accurate tropical cyclone track forecasting, especially when there is a significant track deflection.

  16. Kinetic Modeling of the Lif:Mg,Ti TL System including Defect Creation: Implications to, and Development of Track Structure Theory Calculations of Heavy Charged Particle Radiation Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eliyahu, Ian

    2015-01-01

    relative OA band HCP induced efficiencies as described in the following. The high fluence region has allowed the determination of the saturation concentration of the F band and 4.77 eV band using the Beer-Lambert and Smakula formulas. The results indicate order of magnitude enhanced concentrations of vii these centers following the proton and He irradiations relative to photon irradiation. 2. Kinetic Analysis: The second focus of investigation was the development of a kinetic model to describe charge carrier transport in the LiF:Mg,Ti system including three features delineated in the following. The primary motivation for the kinetic analysis was the intention to modify track structure theory by taking into account enhanced vacancy/F center creation in the low ionization density kinetic simulations but was expanded in order to simulate the unique features of dose response in LiF:Mg,Ti. The kinetic model includes: c) Estimated electron-hole (e-h) and e-only population of the spatially correlated trapping center/luminescent center responsible for composite glow peak 5 in the glow curve of LiF:Mg,Ti. d) Combined localized and delocalized recombination of the e-h and e-only centers in the recombination stage. These features are shown to be capable of simulating both the linear/supralinear dose response and the dependence of the supralinearity on photon energy as is observed for composite peak 5. Both of these characteristics have previously eluded the predictive powers of kinetic theory based exclusively on delocalized recombination. e) Vacancy/F center creation in the irradiation stage including vacancyinterstitial recombination. The kinetic model with the latter mechanisms attempts to resolve a central question concerning the mechanisms leading to the linear/exponentially saturating dose response of the F band even though Fluorine vacancies are being continuously created during the irradiation. The electron-trapping characteristics of the created vacancies are assumed to

  17. Simulation study of dynamo structure in reversed field pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, A.; Sato, K.I.; Ashida, H.; Amano, T.

    1992-10-01

    The dynamo structure in the reversed field pinch (RFP) is studied through the nonlinear dynamics of single-helicity mode. Simulation is concentrated upon the physical structure of nonlinear interactions of the plasma flow and magnetic fluctuation. The result indicates that when the initial equilibrium profile is deformed by resistive diffusion, the radial flow is driven near the core of the plasma. As this flow forms a vortex structure and magnetic fluctuation grows radially, the dynamo electric field is spirally induced just inside the reversal surface and then the toroidal flux is increased. This dynamo electric field correlates to nonlinear evolution of the kinetic energy of m=1 mode, and the increase of the toroidal flux is originated in the growth process of the magnetic energy of this mode. Consequently, the RFP configuration can be sustained by the single-helicity evolution of m=1 mode alone, and the electric field induced by the interactions of the toroidal velocity and the radial magnetic field is the most dominant source on the dynamo action. (author)

  18. Orion Crew Module / Service Module Structural Weight and Center of Gravity Simulator and Vehicle Motion Simulator Hoist Structure for Orion Service Module Umbilical Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascoli, Peter A.; Haddock, Michael H.

    2014-01-01

    An Orion Crew Module Service Module Structural Weight and Center of Gravity Simulator and a Vehicle Motion Simulator Hoist Structure for Orion Service Module Umbilical Testing were designed during a summer 2014 internship in Kennedy Space Centers Structures and Mechanisms Design Branch. The simulator is a structure that supports ballast, which will be integrated into an existing Orion mock-up to simulate the mass properties of the Exploration Mission-1 flight vehicle in both fueled and unfueled states. The simulator mimics these configurations through the use of approximately 40,000 lbf of steel and water ballast, and a steel support structure. Draining four water tanks, which house the water ballast, transitions the simulator from the fueled to unfueled mass properties. The Ground Systems Development and Operations organization will utilize the simulator to verify and validate equipment used to maneuver and transport the Orion spacecraft in its fueled and unfueled configurations. The second design comprises a cantilevered tripod hoist structure that provides the capability to position a large Orion Service Module Umbilical in proximity to the Vehicle Motion Simulator. The Ground Systems Development and Operations organization will utilize the Vehicle Motion Simulator, with the hoist structure attached, to test the Orion Service Module Umbilical for proper operation prior to installation on the Mobile Launcher. Overall, these two designs provide NASA engineers viable concepts worthy of fabricating and placing into service to prepare for the launch of Orion in 2017.

  19. Simulating liquid water for determining its structural and transport properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arismendi-Arrieta, Daniel; Medina, Juan S.; Fanourgakis, George S.; Prosmiti, Rita; Delgado-Barrio, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are carried out for calculating structural and transport properties of pure liquid water, such as radial distribution functions and self-diffusion and viscosity coefficients, respectively. We employed reparameterized versions of the ab initio water potential by Niesar, Clementi and Corongiu (NCC). In order to investigate the role of the electrostatic contribution, the partial charges of the NCC model are adjusted so that to reproduce the dipole moment values of the SPC/E, SPC/Fw and TIP4P/2005 water models. The single and collective transport coefficients are obtained by employing the Green–Kubo relations at various temperatures. Additionally, in order to overcome convergence difficulties arising from the long correlation times of the stress-tensor autocorrelation functions, a previously reported fitting scheme was employed. The present results indicate that there is a significant relationship between the dipole moment value of the model, and the calculated transport coefficients. We found that by adjusting the molecular dipole moment of the NCC to the value of the TIP4P/2005, the obtained values for the self-diffusion and viscosity coefficients are in better agreement with experiment, compared to the values obtained with the original NCC model. Even though the predictions of the present model exhibits an overall correct behavior, we conclude that further improvements are still required. In order to achieve that, a careful reparameterization of the repulsion–dispersion terms of the potential model is proposed. Also, the effect of the inclusion of many-body effects such as polarizability, should also be investigated. - Highlights: ► Transport properties of liquid water are important in bio-simulations. ► Self-diffusion coefficient, shear and bulk viscosities calculations from NVE molecular dynamics simulations. ► Their comparison with experimental data provides information on intermolecular forces, and serve to develop water

  20. Simulating the 3-D Structure of Titan's Upper Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, J. M.; Waite, H.; Westlake, J.; Magee, B.

    2009-05-01

    We present results from the 3-D Titan Global Ionosphere-Thermosphere Model (Bell et al [2009], PSS, in review). We show comparisons between simulated N2, CH4, and H2 density fields and the in-situ data from the Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer (INMS). We describe the temperature and wind fields consistent with these density calculations. Variations with local time, longitude, and latitude will be addressed. Potential plasma heating sources can be estimated using the 1-D model of De La Haye et al [2007, 2008] and the impacts on the thermosphere of Titan can be assessed in a global sense in Titan-GITM. Lastly, we will place these findings within the context of recent work in modeling the 2-D structure of Titan's upper atmosphere (Mueller-Wodarg et al [2008]).

  1. Ventilation Structure Improvement of Induction Motor Using Multiphysics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Huang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Temperature rise analysis has significant impact in the design of air-cooled asynchronous induction motor. However, the affection cannot be accurately evaluated by using traditional empirical curves method due to the complexity of the inductor architecture. Considering Joules losses in stator windings and the induced eddy current in squirrel cages, and heat dissipation by air convection and solid conduction, in this paper a 3-D coupled-field finite-element method (FEM is investigated to demonstrate the temperature distribution. The Joules losses calculated by 3-D eddy- current field analysis are used as the input for the thermal field analysis, which is deeply dependent on accurate air fluid field analysis. A novel multi-component fluid model is employed to deal with the influence of rotor rotation upon the air convection. The simulation results show the fatal influence of the ventilation structure and the effectiveness of the proposed cooling improvement way.

  2. Numerical simulation of the structure of collisionless supercritical shocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipatov, A.S.

    1990-01-01

    Research on the structure of a collisionless shock wave and on acceleration of charged particles is important for analyzing the processes accompanying solar flares, and also for studying the shock waves which are excited in the interaction of the solar wind with planets, comets and interstellar gas, the mechanisms for the acceleration of cosmic rays, the processes accompanying magnetic field reconnection, explosion of Supernova. The study of the shock is also important for studying the processes in the active experiments in space. In the present report only supercritical shocks are considered, when partial ion reflection plays a controlling roll in shock formation. One- and two-dimensional simulations of the perpendicular shocks are presented. (R.P.) 33 refs.; 4 figs

  3. Development and mechanical properties of structural materials from lunar simulant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Chandra S.

    1991-01-01

    Development of versatile engineering materials from locally available materials in space is an important step toward establishment of outposts such as on the moon and Mars. Here development of the technologies for manufacture of structural and construction materials on the moon, utilizing local lunar soil (regolith), without the use of water, is an important element for habitats and explorations in space. It is also vital that the mechanical behavior such as strength and flexural properties, fracture toughness, ductility, and deformation characteristics are defined toward establishment of the ranges of engineering applications of the materials developed. The objectives include two areas: (1) thermal liquefaction of lunar simulant (at about 1100 C) with different additives (fibers, powders, etc.); and (2) development and use of a traxial test device in which lunar simulants are first compacted under cycles of loading, and then tested with different vacuums and initial confining or insitu stress. The second area was described in previous progress reports and publications; since the presently available device allows vacuum levels up to only 10(exp -4) torr, it is recommended that a vacuum pump that can allow higher levels of vacuum is acquired.

  4. A simulation model for analysing brain structure deformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bona, Sergio Di [Institute for Information Science and Technologies, Italian National Research Council (ISTI-8211-CNR), Via G Moruzzi, 1-56124 Pisa (Italy); Lutzemberger, Ludovico [Department of Neuroscience, Institute of Neurosurgery, University of Pisa, Via Roma, 67-56100 Pisa (Italy); Salvetti, Ovidio [Institute for Information Science and Technologies, Italian National Research Council (ISTI-8211-CNR), Via G Moruzzi, 1-56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2003-12-21

    Recent developments of medical software applications from the simulation to the planning of surgical operations have revealed the need for modelling human tissues and organs, not only from a geometric point of view but also from a physical one, i.e. soft tissues, rigid body, viscoelasticity, etc. This has given rise to the term 'deformable objects', which refers to objects with a morphology, a physical and a mechanical behaviour of their own and that reflects their natural properties. In this paper, we propose a model, based upon physical laws, suitable for the realistic manipulation of geometric reconstructions of volumetric data taken from MR and CT scans. In particular, a physically based model of the brain is presented that is able to simulate the evolution of different nature pathological intra-cranial phenomena such as haemorrhages, neoplasm, haematoma, etc and to describe the consequences that are caused by their volume expansions and the influences they have on the anatomical and neuro-functional structures of the brain.

  5. Optics of the human cornea influence the accuracy of stereo eye-tracking methods: a simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsingerhorn, A D; Boonstra, F N; Goossens, H H L M

    2017-02-01

    Current stereo eye-tracking methods model the cornea as a sphere with one refractive surface. However, the human cornea is slightly aspheric and has two refractive surfaces. Here we used ray-tracing and the Navarro eye-model to study how these optical properties affect the accuracy of different stereo eye-tracking methods. We found that pupil size, gaze direction and head position all influence the reconstruction of gaze. Resulting errors range between ± 1.0 degrees at best. This shows that stereo eye-tracking may be an option if reliable calibration is not possible, but the applied eye-model should account for the actual optics of the cornea.

  6. Simulation of Cu-Mg metallic glass: Thermodynamics and structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, Nicholas P.; Schioetz, Jakob; Jacobsen, Karsten W.

    2004-01-01

    We have obtained effective medium theory interatomic potential parameters suitable for studying Cu-Mg metallic glasses. We present thermodynamic and structural results from simulations of such glasses over a range of compositions. We have produced low-temperature configurations by cooling from the melt at as slow a rate as practical, using constant temperature and pressure molecular dynamics. During the cooling process we have carried out thermodynamic analyses based on the temperature dependence of the enthalpy and its derivative, the specific heat, from which the glass transition temperature may be determined. We have also carried out structural analyses using the radial distribution function (RDF) and common neighbor analysis (CNA). Our analysis suggests that the splitting of the second peak, commonly associated with metallic glasses, in fact, has little to do with the glass transition itself, but is simply a consequence of the narrowing of peaks associated with structural features present in the liquid state. In fact, the splitting temperature for the Cu-Cu RDF is well above T g . The CNA also highlights a strong similarity between the structure of the intermetallic alloys and the amorphous alloys of similar composition. We have also investigated the diffusivity in the supercooled regime. Its temperature dependence indicates fragile-liquid behavior, typical of binary metallic glasses. On the other hand, the relatively low specific-heat jump of around 1.5k B /atom indicates apparent strong-liquid behavior, but this can be explained by the width of the transition due to the high cooling rates

  7. The structure of Karman vortex streets in the atmospheric boundary layer derived from large eddy simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinze, Rieke; Raasch, Siegfried; Etling, Dieter [Hannover Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Meteorologie und Klimatologie

    2012-06-15

    Karman vortex streets generated in the wake of an idealized island are studied using large eddy simulation (LES). Simulations were carried out under conditions of a dry convective boundary layer, capped by an inversion below the island top. These conditions are more realistic compared to previous studies in which mesoscale models with a uniform stable stratification were used. Several properties of the vortex streets like the shedding period of the vortices and the distances between cyclonic and anti-cyclonic vortices were determined for various values of Froude number and surface heat flux. The main focus of the study was to identify the azimuthally averaged structure of fully developed single vortices, which is presented here for the first time. For this purpose a tracking mechanism was developed which allows to detect and to follow vortices automatically. Because the capping inversion is located below the obstacle top, the vortices extend throughout the whole depth of the mixed layer and their features are almost constant with height. They have a nearly upright vertical axis with a warm core, which is feeded by a convergent near-surface inflow of warm air. The vortex core is dominated by a continuous updraft in the order of 10 cm s{sup -1}, which is associated with a divergent outflow of air at the vortex' top. This flow divergence creates an additional increase in temperature due to a locally sinking inversion, which is probably responsible for the cloud-free eye of many observed vortices. An increase in the surface heat flux is causing a faster decay of the vortices due to stronger boundary layer turbulence. Other vortex features derived from the simulations are very similar to those from previous studies. (orig.)

  8. High-Resolution Tracking Asymmetric Lithium Insertion and Extraction and Local Structure Ordering in SnS2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Yu-Yang; Huang, Yuan; Liao, Lei; Sutter, Peter; Liu, Kaihui; Yu, Dapeng; Wang, En-Ge

    2016-09-14

    In the rechargeable lithium ion batteries, the rate capability and energy efficiency are largely governed by the lithium ion transport dynamics and phase transition pathways in electrodes. Real-time and atomic-scale tracking of fully reversible lithium insertion and extraction processes in electrodes, which would ultimately lead to mechanistic understanding of how the electrodes function and why they fail, is highly desirable but very challenging. Here, we track lithium insertion and extraction in the van der Waals interactions dominated SnS2 by in situ high-resolution TEM method. We find that the lithium insertion occurs via a fast two-phase reaction to form expanded and defective LiSnS2, while the lithium extraction initially involves heterogeneous nucleation of intermediate superstructure Li0.5SnS2 domains with a 1-4 nm size. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the Li0.5SnS2 is kinetically favored and structurally stable. The asymmetric reaction pathways may supply enlightening insights into the mechanistic understanding of the underlying electrochemistry in the layered electrode materials and also suggest possible alternatives to the accepted explanation of the origins of voltage hysteresis in the intercalation electrode materials.

  9. Excitation of Structures Near Railway Tracks-Analysis of the Wave Propagation Path

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucinskas, Paulius; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard

    2017-01-01

    High-speed rails are an attractive alternative to other forms of intercity transportation. It is a fast, cost-efficient and environmentally friendly solution, which is being developed in various countries across the world. However, in order to be successful, high-speed rails need to transport...... trains. Unfortunately, the prediction of vibrations in nearby structures is difficult, as wave propagation from the vibration source to the structure is a complex phenomenon. The behaviour of the structure is highly dependent on the path along which the vibrations travel between their source...

  10. Testing simulation and structural models with applications to energy demand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Hendrik

    2007-12-01

    This dissertation deals with energy demand and consists of two parts. Part one proposes a unified econometric framework for modeling energy demand and examples illustrate the benefits of the technique by estimating the elasticity of substitution between energy and capital. Part two assesses the energy conservation policy of Daylight Saving Time and empirically tests the performance of electricity simulation. In particular, the chapter "Imposing Monotonicity and Curvature on Flexible Functional Forms" proposes an estimator for inference using structural models derived from economic theory. This is motivated by the fact that in many areas of economic analysis theory restricts the shape as well as other characteristics of functions used to represent economic constructs. Specific contributions are (a) to increase the computational speed and tractability of imposing regularity conditions, (b) to provide regularity preserving point estimates, (c) to avoid biases existent in previous applications, and (d) to illustrate the benefits of our approach via numerical simulation results. The chapter "Can We Close the Gap between the Empirical Model and Economic Theory" discusses the more fundamental question of whether the imposition of a particular theory to a dataset is justified. I propose a hypothesis test to examine whether the estimated empirical model is consistent with the assumed economic theory. Although the proposed methodology could be applied to a wide set of economic models, this is particularly relevant for estimating policy parameters that affect energy markets. This is demonstrated by estimating the Slutsky matrix and the elasticity of substitution between energy and capital, which are crucial parameters used in computable general equilibrium models analyzing energy demand and the impacts of environmental regulations. Using the Berndt and Wood dataset, I find that capital and energy are complements and that the data are significantly consistent with duality

  11. Optics of the human cornea influence the accuracy of stereo eye-tracking methods: a simulation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barsingerhorn, A.D.; Boonstra, F.N.; Goossens, H.H.L.M.

    2017-01-01

    Current stereo eye-tracking methods model the cornea as a sphere with one refractive surface. However, the human cornea is slightly aspheric and has two refractive surfaces. Here we used ray-tracing and the Navarro eye-model to study how these optical properties affect the accuracy of different

  12. Structure of automated system for tracking the formation and burial of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, A.A.

    1993-01-01

    Intermediate- and low-activity wastes are formed when radionuclides are used in science, industry, agriculture, and medicine. A centralized system, including territorial specialized complexes and radioactive-waste burial sites (RWBS), has been created for collection, processing, and long-term storage. At this time, however, the records kept of wastes for long-term storage and assessment of their preparation for burial do not come up to current scientific and technical requirements at most RWBSs in Russia. It is necessary, therefore, to create an automated tracking system. Earlier studies, considered the design of a system for monitoring and recording the handling of sources of ionizing radiation, which are the most hazardous part of the wastes. The novel proposed automated system incorporates distinctive functional elements and makes for higher quality waste processing and efficient data exchange. It performs such functions as recording the wastes earmarked for burial, processing, and long-term storage, and where they are stored in the RWBS; ensuring an optimum cycle of collection, transportation, processing, and long-term storage of wastes; recording planned monitored levels of discharges and ejections of substances at the RWBSs; recording the wastes delivered for storage and stored on RWBSs; making calculations, including an estimate of the costs of transport, processing, and storage of wastes for each enterprise, with allowance for penalties; classifying wastes according to processing methods and determining the optimum operating regime and technological facilities; identifying the parameters of wastes delivered for processing and burial; and predicting the deliveries of wastes to RWBSs, planning the construction of new special storage facilities and containers for temporary and long-term storage of wastes

  13. 49 CFR 239.103 - Passenger train emergency simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... effectiveness of its plan during that major emergency and, as appropriate, modify the rescheduled simulation. (d... greater than the current reporting threshold of part 225 of this chapter to railroad on-track equipment, signals, tracks, track structures, or roadbeds, including labor costs and the costs for acquiring new...

  14. Imaging of optic nerve head pore structure with motion corrected deeply penetrating OCT using tracking SLO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vienola, Kari V.; Braaf, Boy; Sheehy, Christy K.; Yang, Qiang; Tiruveedhula, Pavan; de Boer, Johannes F.; Roorda, Austin

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To remove the eye motion and stabilize the optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) system for obtaining high quality images of the optic nerve head (ONH) and the pore structure of the lamina cribrosa. Methods An optical coherence tomography (OCT) instrument was combined with an active eye

  15. Tracking of the micro-structural changes of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patai, Kálmán; Szente, Virág; Süvegh, Károly; Zelkó, Romána

    2010-12-01

    The morphology and the micro-structural changes of levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine systems (IUSs) were studied in relation to the duration of their application. The morphology of the removed IUSs was examined without pre-treatment by scanning electron microscopy. The micro-structural changes of the different layers of IUSs were tracked by positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. Besides the previously found incrustation formation, the free volume of the hormone containing reservoir was remarkably increased after 3 years of application, thus increasing the real volume of the core of the systems. Although the free volume of the membrane encasing the core was not significantly changed in the course of the application, as a result of the core expansion, microcracks could be formed on the membrane surface. Along these cracks, deposits of different compositions can be formed, causing inflammatory complications and influencing the drug release of IUSs. Stability tests in combination with micro-structural screening of such IUSs could be required during their development phase to avoid the undesired side effects. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Application of PM-355 track detectors for investigation of the spatial structure of plasma-proton streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinowski, K., E-mail: k.malinowski@ipj.gov.p [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ), 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Skladnik-Sadowska, E.; Sadowski, M.J.; Czaus, K. [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (IPJ), 05-400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    2009-10-15

    The paper describes the use of PM-355 track detectors for studies of spatial structures and energies of pulsed plasma-proton streams generated by an RPI-IBIS accelerator, powered from a 30-kJ condenser bank. Measurements were performed for different operational modes depending on a delay between the gas injection and discharge initiation. To study a spatial structure of the plasma-proton streams we used an ion pinhole camera with PM-355 detectors, placed at the symmetry axis of the experimental chamber, at a distance of 22 cm from electrode ends. To record low-energy (not below 30 keV) protons we did not apply any filter. To select protons of higher energies we used additional absorption filters made of Al-foils of 0.75, 1.5 and 3.0 mum in thickness, which eliminated protons of energies below 125, 210 and 345 keV, respectively. The spatial structure of the proton beams was analyzed and their dependence on the initial gas conditions was investigated.

  17. Structural functional associations of the orbit in thyroid eye disease: Kalman filters to track extraocular rectal muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaganti, Shikha; Nelson, Katrina; Mundy, Kevin; Luo, Yifu; Harrigan, Robert L.; Damon, Steve; Fabbri, Daniel; Mawn, Louise; Landman, Bennett

    2016-03-01

    Pathologies of the optic nerve and orbit impact millions of Americans and quantitative assessment of the orbital structures on 3-D imaging would provide objective markers to enhance diagnostic accuracy, improve timely intervention, and eventually preserve visual function. Recent studies have shown that the multi-atlas methodology is suitable for identifying orbital structures, but challenges arise in the identification of the individual extraocular rectus muscles that control eye movement. This is increasingly problematic in diseased eyes, where these muscles often appear to fuse at the back of the orbit (at the resolution of clinical computed tomography imaging) due to inflammation or crowding. We propose the use of Kalman filters to track the muscles in three-dimensions to refine multi-atlas segmentation and resolve ambiguity due to imaging resolution, noise, and artifacts. The purpose of our study is to investigate a method of automatically generating orbital metrics from CT imaging and demonstrate the utility of the approach by correlating structural metrics of the eye orbit with clinical data and visual function measures in subjects with thyroid eye disease. The pilot study demonstrates that automatically calculated orbital metrics are strongly correlated with several clinical characteristics. Moreover, it is shown that the superior, inferior, medial and lateral rectus muscles obtained using Kalman filters are each correlated with different categories of functional deficit. These findings serve as foundation for further investigation in the use of CT imaging in the study, analysis and diagnosis of ocular diseases, specifically thyroid eye disease.

  18. Development, simulation and testing of structural materials for DEMO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laesser, R.; Baluc, N.; Boutard, J.-L.; Diegele, E.; Gasparotto, M.; Riccardi, B.; Dudarev, S.; Moeslang, A.; Pippan, R.; Schaaf, B. van der

    2006-01-01

    up to 40 dpa/fpy in a limited volume. Recent advances in multiscale materials modelling have significantly improved the understanding of the processes leading from the atomistic defects to the changes of macroscopic properties. In future modelling will become an important tool for correlating experimental results achieved under different irradiation conditions (material testing reactors, fast reactors, accelerators, etc.), optimisation of the IFMIF test matrix and extrapolation to DEMO relevant operation parameters. This paper will describe the most promising structural materials with focus on Eurofer, present recently obtained results, simulations and testing, and will also address open material aspects on the path to DEMO. (author)

  19. Can community structure track sea-level rise? Stress and competitive controls in tidal wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schile, Lisa M; Callaway, John C; Suding, Katharine N; Kelly, N Maggi

    2017-02-01

    Climate change impacts, such as accelerated sea-level rise, will affect stress gradients, yet impacts on competition/stress tolerance trade-offs and shifts in distributions are unclear. Ecosystems with strong stress gradients, such as estuaries, allow for space-for-time substitutions of stress factors and can give insight into future climate-related shifts in both resource and nonresource stresses. We tested the stress gradient hypothesis and examined the effect of increased inundation stress and biotic interactions on growth and survival of two congeneric wetland sedges, Schoenoplectus acutus and Schoenoplectus americanus . We simulated sea-level rise across existing marsh elevations and those not currently found to reflect potential future sea-level rise conditions in two tidal wetlands differing in salinity. Plants were grown individually and together at five tidal elevations, the lowest simulating an 80-cm increase in sea level, and harvested to assess differences in biomass after one growing season. Inundation time, salinity, sulfides, and redox potential were measured concurrently. As predicted, increasing inundation reduced biomass of the species commonly found at higher marsh elevations, with little effect on the species found along channel margins. The presence of neighbors reduced total biomass of both species, particularly at the highest elevation; facilitation did not occur at any elevation. Contrary to predictions, we documented the competitive superiority of the stress tolerator under increased inundation, which was not predicted by the stress gradient hypothesis. Multifactor manipulation experiments addressing plant response to accelerated climate change are integral to creating a more realistic, valuable, and needed assessment of potential ecosystem response. Our results point to the important and unpredicted synergies between physical stressors, which are predicted to increase in intensity with climate change, and competitive forces on biomass as

  20. Recent Developments in the Code RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Ponomarev, Artem L.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2018-01-01

    The code RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) was developed to simulate detailed stochastic radiation track structures of ions of different types and energies. Many new capabilities were added to the code during the recent years. Several options were added to specify the times at which the tracks appear in the irradiated volume, allowing the simulation of dose-rate effects. The code has been used to simulate energy deposition in several targets: spherical, ellipsoidal and cylindrical. More recently, density changes as well as a spherical shell were implemented for spherical targets, in order to simulate energy deposition in walled tissue equivalent proportional counters. RITRACKS is used as a part of the new program BDSTracks (Biological Damage by Stochastic Tracks) to simulate several types of chromosome aberrations in various irradiation conditions. The simulation of damage to various DNA structures (linear and chromatin fiber) by direct and indirect effects has been improved and is ongoing. Many improvements were also made to the graphic user interface (GUI), including the addition of several labels allowing changes of units. A new GUI has been added to display the electron ejection vectors. The parallel calculation capabilities, notably the pre- and post-simulation processing on Windows and Linux machines have been reviewed to make them more portable between different systems. The calculation part is currently maintained in an Atlassian Stash® repository for code tracking and possibly future collaboration.

  1. Evolution of atomic-scale surface structures during ion bombardment: A fractal simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaheen, M.A.; Ruzic, D.N.

    1993-01-01

    Surfaces of interest in microelectronics have been shown to exhibit fractal topographies on the atomic scale. A model utilizing self-similar fractals to simulate surface roughness has been added to the ion bombardment code TRIM. The model has successfully predicted experimental sputtering yields of low energy (less then 1000 eV) Ar on Si and D on C using experimentally determined fractal dimensions. Under ion bombardment the fractal surface structures evolve as the atoms in the collision cascade are displaced or sputtered. These atoms have been tracked and the evolution of the surface in steps of one monolayer of flux has been determined. The Ar--Si system has been studied for incidence energies of 100 and 500 eV, and incidence angles of 0 degree, 30 degree, and 60 degree. As expected, normally incident ion bombardment tends to reduce the roughness of the surface, whereas large angle ion bombardment increases the degree of surface roughness. Of particular interest though, the surfaces are still locally self-similar fractals after ion bombardment and a steady state fractal dimension is reached, except at large angles of incidence

  2. ACTS: from ATLAS software towards a common track reconstruction software

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00349786; The ATLAS collaboration; Salzburger, Andreas; Kiehn, Moritz; Hrdinka, Julia; Calace, Noemi

    2017-01-01

    Reconstruction of charged particles' trajectories is a crucial task for most particle physics experiments. The high instantaneous luminosity achieved at the LHC leads to a high number of proton-proton collisions per bunch crossing, which has put the track reconstruction software of the LHC experiments through a thorough test. Preserving track reconstruction performance under increasingly difficult experimental conditions, while keeping the usage of computational resources at a reasonable level, is an inherent problem for many HEP experiments. Exploiting concurrent algorithms and using multivariate techniques for track identification are the primary strategies to achieve that goal. Starting from current ATLAS software, the ACTS project aims to encapsulate track reconstruction software into a generic, framework- and experiment-independent software package. It provides a set of high-level algorithms and data structures for performing track reconstruction tasks as well as fast track simulation. The software is de...

  3. Recent advances in the GENFIT track fitting package

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bicker, Karl A. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Hoeppner, Christian; Ketzer, Bernhard; Neubert, Sebastian; Paul, Stephan; Rauch, Johannes [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Munich (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The GENFIT software package provides a framework for track fitting. Due to the modular and generic structure, it is usable with arbitrary detector and field geometries. GENFIT is used in several collaborations (e.g. Belle II, COMPASS, FOPI, PANDA). GENFIT provides hit classes for common detector types and their information is used by GENFIT in their native coordinate system. Hits are collected in tracks, as are track representations. The track representation handles the extrapolation of the track through matter and fields. Multiple track representations can be fitted simultaneously. GENFIT has recently been equipped with several new features. Besides adding Smoothing, the standard Kalman fit algorithm has been extended by a Deterministic Annealing Filter (DAF), which can tag noise hits. An interface to the RAVE vertexing package has equipped GENFIT with the capability for vertex reconstruction and fitting. Results from simulation and real data are presented.

  4. Predictability of steel containment response near failure track 3 - structural integrity, dynamic behavior, and seismic design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costello, J.F.; Ludwigsen, J.S.; Luk, V.K.; Hessheimer, M.F.

    2000-01-01

    The Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation of Japan and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, are co-sponsoring and jointly funding a Cooperative Containment Research Program at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA. As a part of this program, a steel containment vessel model and contact structure assembly was tested to failure with over pressurization at Sandia on December 11--12, 1996. The steel containment vessel model was a mixed-scale model (1:10 in geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness) of a steel containment for an improved Mark-II Boiling Water Reactor plant in Japan. The contact structure, which is a thick, bell-shaped steel shell separated at a nominally uniform distance from the model, provides a simplified representation of features of the concrete reactor shield building in the actual plant. The objective of the internal pressurization test was to provide measurement data of the structural response of the model up to its failure in order to validate analytical modeling, to find its pressure capacity, and to observe the failure model and mechanisms

  5. An Uncertainty Structure Matrix for Models and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Lawrence L.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Hemsch, Michael J.; Luckring, James M.; Tripathi, Ram K.

    2008-01-01

    Software that is used for aerospace flight control and to display information to pilots and crew is expected to be correct and credible at all times. This type of software is typically developed under strict management processes, which are intended to reduce defects in the software product. However, modeling and simulation (M&S) software may exhibit varying degrees of correctness and credibility, depending on a large and complex set of factors. These factors include its intended use, the known physics and numerical approximations within the M&S, and the referent data set against which the M&S correctness is compared. The correctness and credibility of an M&S effort is closely correlated to the uncertainty management (UM) practices that are applied to the M&S effort. This paper describes an uncertainty structure matrix for M&S, which provides a set of objective descriptions for the possible states of UM practices within a given M&S effort. The columns in the uncertainty structure matrix contain UM elements or practices that are common across most M&S efforts, and the rows describe the potential levels of achievement in each of the elements. A practitioner can quickly look at the matrix to determine where an M&S effort falls based on a common set of UM practices that are described in absolute terms that can be applied to virtually any M&S effort. The matrix can also be used to plan those steps and resources that would be needed to improve the UM practices for a given M&S effort.

  6. The development of a 4D treatment planning methodology to simulate the tracking of central lung tumors in an MRI-linac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ward, Shahad M; Kim, Anthony; McCann, Claire; Ruschin, Mark; Cheung, Patrick; Sahgal, Arjun; Keller, Brian M

    2018-01-01

    Targeting and tracking of central lung tumors may be feasible on the Elekta MRI-linac (MRL) due to the soft-tissue visualization capabilities of MRI. The purpose of this work is to develop a novel treatment planning methodology to simulate tracking of central lung tumors with the MRL and to quantify the benefits in OAR sparing compared with the ITV approach. Full 4D-CT datasets for five central lung cancer patients were selected to simulate the condition of having 4D-pseudo-CTs derived from 4D-MRI data available on the MRL with real-time tracking capabilities. We used the MRL treatment planning system to generate two plans: (a) with a set of MLC-defined apertures around the target at each phase of the breathing ("4D-MRL" method); (b) with a fixed set of fields encompassing the maximum inhale and exhale of the breathing cycle ("ITV" method). For both plans, dose accumulation was performed onto a reference phase. To further study the potential benefits of a 4D-MRL method, the results were stratified by tumor motion amplitude, OAR-to-tumor proximity, and the relative OAR motion (ROM). With the 4D-MRL method, the reduction in mean doses was up to 3.0 Gy and 1.9 Gy for the heart and the lung. Moreover, the lung's V12.5 Gy was spared by a maximum of 300 cc. Maximum doses to serial organs were reduced by up to 6.1 Gy, 1.5 Gy, and 9.0 Gy for the esophagus, spinal cord, and the trachea, respectively. OAR dose reduction with our method depended on the tumor motion amplitude and the ROM. Some OARs with large ROMs and in close proximity to the tumor benefited from tracking despite small tumor amplitudes. We developed a novel 4D tracking methodology for the MRL for central lung tumors and quantified the potential dosimetric benefits compared with our current ITV approach. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  7. Simulation of the diffusion of implanted impurities in silicon structures at the rapid thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarov, F.F.; Komarov, A.F.; Mironov, A.M.; Makarevich, Yu.V.; Miskevich, S.A.; Zayats, G.M.

    2011-01-01

    Physical and mathematical models and numerical simulation of the diffusion of implanted impurities during rapid thermal treatment of silicon structures are discussed. The calculation results correspond to the experimental results with a sufficient accuracy. A simulation software system has been developed that is integrated into ATHENA simulation system developed by Silvaco Inc. This program can simulate processes of the low-energy implantation of B, BF 2 , P, As, Sb, C ions into the silicon structures and subsequent rapid thermal annealing. (authors)

  8. Simulations of structure formation in interacting dark energy cosmologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldi, M.

    2009-01-01

    The evidence in favor of a dark energy component dominating the Universe, and driving its presently accelerated expansion, has progressively grown during the last decade of cosmological observations. If this dark energy is given by a dynamic scalar field, it may also have a direct interaction with other matter fields in the Universe, in particular with cold dark matter. Such interaction would imprint new features on the cosmological background evolution as well as on the growth of cosmic structure, like an additional long-range fifth-force between massive particles, or a variation in time of the dark matter particle mass. We present here the implementation of these new physical effects in the N-body code GADGET-2, and we discuss the outcomes of a series of high-resolution N-body simulations for a selected family of interacting dark energy models. We interestingly find, in contrast with previous claims, that the inner overdensity of dark matter halos decreases in these models with respect to ΛCDM, and consistently halo concentrations show a progressive reduction for increasing couplings. Furthermore, the coupling induces a bias in the overdensities of cold dark matter and baryons that determines a decrease of the halo baryon fraction below its cosmological value. These results go in the direction of alleviating tensions between astrophysical observations and the predictions of the ΛCDM model on small scales, thereby opening new room for coupled dark energy models as an alternative to the cosmological constant.

  9. Tracking ultrasonically structural changes of natural aquatic organic carbon: Chemical fractionation and spectroscopic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Juboori, Raed A; Yusaf, Talal; Aravinthan, Vasantha; Bowtell, Leslie

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the structural alteration to DOC for a range of ultrasound treatments was investigated with chemical fractionation and UV-vis spectroscopic measurement. Ultrasound treatments were applied in continuous and pulsed modes at power levels of 48 and 84 W for effective treatment times of 5 and 15 min. Overall results show that the ultrasound treatments tended to degrade the hydrophobic aromatic fraction, while increasing the hydrophilic fraction to a lesser extent. The highest recorded reduction of hydrophobic DOC (17.8%) was achieved with pulse treatment of 84 W for15 min, while the highest increase in the hydrophilic DOC (10.5%) was obtained with continuous treatment at 84 W and 5 min. The optimal ultrasound treatment conditions were found to be pulse mode at high power and short treatment time, causing a minimal increase in the hydrophilic fraction of 1.3% with moderate removal of the hydrophobic fraction of 15.52%. The same treatment conditions, with longer treatment time, resulted in the highest removal of SUVA254 and SUVA280 of 17.09% and 16.93, respectively. These results indicate the potential for ultrasound treatments in DOC structural alteration. The hydrophobic fraction showed strong and significant correlations with UV absorbance at 254 and 280 nm. A254/A204 also exhibited strong and significant correlations with the hydrophobic/hydrophilic ratio. The other UV ratios (A250/A365 (E2/E3) and A254/A436) had weak and insignificant correlations with the hydrophobic/hydrophilic ratio. This confirms the applicability of UV indices as a suitable surrogate method for estimating the hydrophobic/hydrophilic structure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Use of Structures in Communication Networks to Track Membership in Terrorist Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A Eiselt

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This concept paper investigates possibilities to detect terrorist cells based on communications between individuals without the need for wiretapping. The advantages of such procedure are apparent: fewer (if any legal requirements, and, most importantly, the possibility to automate the surveillance. After a brief review of the pertinent literature, we offer three approaches that are designed to aid in the detection of not only terrorist cells, but also the command structures within the cells. The techniques are demonstrated by using a small illustration. The paper concludes by outlining limitations of the procedures described here.

  11. Estimation of Structure-Borne Noise Reduction Effect of Steel Railway Bridge Equipped with Floating Ladder Track and Floating Reinforced-Concrete Deck

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tsutomu; Sogabe, Masamichi; Asanuma, Kiyoshi; Wakui, Hajime

    A number of steel railway bridges have been constructed in Japan. Thin steel members used for the bridges easily tend to vibrate and generate structure-borne noise. Accordingly, the number of constructions of steel railway bridges tends to decrease in the urban areas from a viewpoint of environmental preservation. Then, as a countermeasure against structure-borne noise generated from steel railway bridges, we have developed a new type of the steel railway bridge equipped with a floating-ladder track and a floating reinforced-concrete (RC) deck. As a result of train-running experiment, it became apparent that the new steel railway bridge installed by double floating system has reduced a vibration velocity level by 10.5 dB(A) at main girder web as compared with a steel railway bridge installed by directly fastened track. This reduction effect was achieved by the ladder track and RC deck supported by resilient materials.

  12. Monitoring the Algerian Basin through glider observations, satellite altimetry and numerical simulations along a SARAL/AltiKa track

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aulicino, G.; Cotroneo, Y.; Ruiz, S.; Sánchez Román, A.; Pascual, A.; Fusco, G.; Tintoré, J.; Budillon, G.

    2018-03-01

    The Algerian Basin is a key component of the general circulation in the Western Mediterranean Sea. The presence of both fresh Atlantic water and more saline Mediterranean water gives the basin an intense inflow/outflow regime and complex circulation patterns. Energetic mesoscale structures that evolve from meanders of the Algerian Current into isolated cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies dominate the area, with marked repercussions on biological activity. Despite its remarkable importance, this region and its variability are still poorly known and basin-wide knowledge of its meso- and submesoscale features is still incomplete. Studying such complex processes requires a synergistic approach that involves integrated observing systems. In recent years, several studies have demonstrated the advantages of combined use of autonomous underwater vehicles, such as gliders, with a new generation of satellite altimetry. In this context, we present results of an observational program conducted in the Algerian Basin during fall 2014 and 2015 that aimed to advance our knowledge of its main features. The study was carried out through analysis of high resolution glider observations, collected along the Algerian BAsin Circulation Unmanned Survey (ABACUS) chokepoint, in synergy with co-located SARAL/AltiKa altimetric products and CMEMS numerical simulations. Results show that glider-derived dynamic height and SARAL/AltiKa absolute dynamic topography have similar patterns, with RMS of the differences ranging between 1.11 and 2.90 cm. Even though larger discrepancies are observed near the Balearic and Algerian coasts, correlation coefficients between glider and satellite observations seem mostly to be affected by reduced synopticity between the measurements. Glider observations acquired during the four surveys reveal the presence of several water masses of Atlantic and Mediterranean origin (i.e., AW and LIW at different modification levels) with marked seasonal variability.

  13. Micromechanics based simulation of ductile fracture in structural steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellavajjala, Ravi Kiran

    The broader aim of this research is to develop fundamental understanding of ductile fracture process in structural steels, propose robust computational models to quantify the associated damage, and provide numerical tools to simplify the implementation of these computational models into general finite element framework. Mechanical testing on different geometries of test specimens made of ASTM A992 steels is conducted to experimentally characterize the ductile fracture at different stress states under monotonic and ultra-low cycle fatigue (ULCF) loading. Scanning electron microscopy studies of the fractured surfaces is conducted to decipher the underlying microscopic damage mechanisms that cause fracture in ASTM A992 steels. Detailed micromechanical analyses for monotonic and cyclic loading are conducted to understand the influence of stress triaxiality and Lode parameter on the void growth phase of ductile fracture. Based on monotonic analyses, an uncoupled micromechanical void growth model is proposed to predict ductile fracture. This model is then incorporated in to finite element program as a weakly coupled model to simulate the loss of load carrying capacity in the post microvoid coalescence regime for high triaxialities. Based on the cyclic analyses, an uncoupled micromechanics based cyclic void growth model is developed to predict the ULCF life of ASTM A992 steels subjected to high stress triaxialities. Furthermore, a computational fracture locus for ASTM A992 steels is developed and incorporated in to finite element program as an uncoupled ductile fracture model. This model can be used to predict the ductile fracture initiation under monotonic loading in a wide range of triaxiality and Lode parameters. Finally, a coupled microvoid elongation and dilation based continuum damage model is proposed, implemented, calibrated and validated. This model is capable of simulating the local softening caused by the various phases of ductile fracture process under

  14. Modeling the Structure and Effectiveness of Intelligence Organizations: Dynamic Information Flow Simulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Behrman, Robert; Carley, Kathleen

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the Dynamic Information Flow Simulation (DIFS), an abstract model for analyzing the structure and function of intelligence support organizations and the activities of entities within...

  15. Direct numerical simulation of complex multi-fluid flows using a combined front tracking and immersed boundary method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deen, N.G.; van Sint Annaland, M.; Kuipers, J.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a simulation model is presented for the Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of complex multi-fluid flows in which simultaneously (moving) deformable (drops or bubbles) and non-deformable (moving) elements (particles) are present, possibly with the additional presence of free surfaces.

  16. Validation of Molecular Dynamics Simulations for Prediction of Three-Dimensional Structures of Small Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Koichi; Nakayoshi, Tomoki; Fukuyoshi, Shuichi; Kurimoto, Eiji; Oda, Akifumi

    2017-10-12

    Although various higher-order protein structure prediction methods have been developed, almost all of them were developed based on the three-dimensional (3D) structure information of known proteins. Here we predicted the short protein structures by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations in which only Newton's equations of motion were used and 3D structural information of known proteins was not required. To evaluate the ability of MD simulationto predict protein structures, we calculated seven short test protein (10-46 residues) in the denatured state and compared their predicted and experimental structures. The predicted structure for Trp-cage (20 residues) was close to the experimental structure by 200-ns MD simulation. For proteins shorter or longer than Trp-cage, root-mean square deviation values were larger than those for Trp-cage. However, secondary structures could be reproduced by MD simulations for proteins with 10-34 residues. Simulations by replica exchange MD were performed, but the results were similar to those from normal MD simulations. These results suggest that normal MD simulations can roughly predict short protein structures and 200-ns simulations are frequently sufficient for estimating the secondary structures of protein (approximately 20 residues). Structural prediction method using only fundamental physical laws are useful for investigating non-natural proteins, such as primitive proteins and artificial proteins for peptide-based drug delivery systems.

  17. Structure and logical organization of current studies in track and field sports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Bobrovnik

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to develop a system of assessment and prediction of technical skill athletes-athletes. Material : the study involved 450 athletes qualifications. Results : in the process of preparing members of the Ukrainian national team implemented a system of assessment of mental state. It includes: a set of informative indicators biomechanical laws and their changes; biomechanical model of motor actions; technology operational biomechanical modeling, changes in the functional state of the viscoelastic properties of skeletal muscle vestibulomotornoy system and speed- force readiness, evaluation and prediction of physical condition of athletes qualified. And complex pedagogical tests and scorecards. For the evaluation of the functional state of the autonomic nervous, cardiovascular system, external respiration system by analyzing the electrocardiogram, heart rate variability, the definition of autonomic balance, state of the myocardium, cardiac arrhythmias, spirometric studies, system performance evaluation of the athlete in extreme conditions by identifying the type and properties of temperament, level of personal anxiety and psychological evaluation reliability athletes. Conclusions : the structure and logical organization of modern studies of different primary focus, based on the assessment of technical skills, physical fitness, functional and mental state of highly skilled athletes.

  18. Tracking dynamics of plant biomass composting by changes in substrate structure, microbial community, and enzyme activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Hui

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the dynamics of the microbial communities that, along with their secreted enzymes, are involved in the natural process of biomass composting may hold the key to breaking the major bottleneck in biomass-to-biofuels conversion technology, which is the still-costly deconstruction of polymeric biomass carbohydrates to fermentable sugars. However, the complexity of both the structure of plant biomass and its counterpart microbial degradation communities makes it difficult to investigate the composting process. Results In this study, a composter was set up with a mix of yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera wood-chips and mown lawn grass clippings (85:15 in dry-weight and used as a model system. The microbial rDNA abundance data obtained from analyzing weekly-withdrawn composted samples suggested population-shifts from bacteria-dominated to fungus-dominated communities. Further analyses by an array of optical microscopic, transcriptional and enzyme-activity techniques yielded correlated results, suggesting that such population shifts occurred along with early removal of hemicellulose followed by attack on the consequently uncovered cellulose as the composting progressed. Conclusion The observed shifts in dominance by representative microbial groups, along with the observed different patterns in the gene expression and enzymatic activities between cellulases, hemicellulases, and ligninases during the composting process, provide new perspectives for biomass-derived biotechnology such as consolidated bioprocessing (CBP and solid-state fermentation for the production of cellulolytic enzymes and biofuels.

  19. Time line cell tracking for the approximation of lagrangian coherent structures with subgrid accuracy

    KAUST Repository

    Kuhn, Alexander

    2013-12-05

    Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) have become a widespread and powerful method to describe dynamic motion patterns in time-dependent flow fields. The standard way to extract LCS is to compute height ridges in the finite-time Lyapunov exponent field. In this work, we present an alternative method to approximate Lagrangian features for 2D unsteady flow fields that achieve subgrid accuracy without additional particle sampling. We obtain this by a geometric reconstruction of the flow map using additional material constraints for the available samples. In comparison to the standard method, this allows for a more accurate global approximation of LCS on sparse grids and for long integration intervals. The proposed algorithm works directly on a set of given particle trajectories and without additional flow map derivatives. We demonstrate its application for a set of computational fluid dynamic examples, as well as trajectories acquired by Lagrangian methods, and discuss its benefits and limitations. © 2013 The Authors Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Amphibian DNA shows marked genetic structure and tracks pleistocene climate change in northeastern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnaval, Ana Carolina; Bates, John M

    2007-12-01

    The glacial refugia paradigm has been broadly applied to patterns of species dynamics and population diversification. However, recent geological studies have demonstrated striking Pleistocene climate changes in currently semiarid northeastern Brazil at time intervals much more frequent than the climatic oscillations associated with glacial and interglacial periods. These geomorphic data documented recurrent pulses of wet regimes in the past 210,000 years that correlate with climate anomalies affecting multiple continents. While analyzing DNA sequences of two mitochondrial genes (cytochrome b and NADH-dehydrogenase subunit 2) and one nuclear marker (cellular-myelocytomatosis proto-oncogene) in the forest-associated frogs Proceratophrys boiei and Ischnocnema gr. ramagii, we found evidence of biological responses consistent with these pluvial maxima events. Sampled areas included old, naturally isolated forest enclaves within the semiarid Caatinga, as well as recent man-made fragments of humid coastal Atlantic forest. Results show that mtDNA lineages in enclave populations are monophyletic or nearly so, whereas nonenclave populations are polyphyletic and more diverse. The studied taxa show evidence of demographic expansions at times that match phases of pluvial maxima inferred from geological data. Divergence times between several populations fall within comparatively drier intervals suggested by geomorphology. Mitochondrial and nuclear data show local populations to be genetically structured, with some high levels of differentiation that suggest the need of further taxonomic work.

  1. Tracking dynamics of plant biomass composting by changes in substrate structure, microbial community, and enzyme activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Understanding the dynamics of the microbial communities that, along with their secreted enzymes, are involved in the natural process of biomass composting may hold the key to breaking the major bottleneck in biomass-to-biofuels conversion technology, which is the still-costly deconstruction of polymeric biomass carbohydrates to fermentable sugars. However, the complexity of both the structure of plant biomass and its counterpart microbial degradation communities makes it difficult to investigate the composting process. Results In this study, a composter was set up with a mix of yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipifera) wood-chips and mown lawn grass clippings (85:15 in dry-weight) and used as a model system. The microbial rDNA abundance data obtained from analyzing weekly-withdrawn composted samples suggested population-shifts from bacteria-dominated to fungus-dominated communities. Further analyses by an array of optical microscopic, transcriptional and enzyme-activity techniques yielded correlated results, suggesting that such population shifts occurred along with early removal of hemicellulose followed by attack on the consequently uncovered cellulose as the composting progressed. Conclusion The observed shifts in dominance by representative microbial groups, along with the observed different patterns in the gene expression and enzymatic activities between cellulases, hemicellulases, and ligninases during the composting process, provide new perspectives for biomass-derived biotechnology such as consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) and solid-state fermentation for the production of cellulolytic enzymes and biofuels. PMID:22490508

  2. Pascal’s wager: tracking an intended reader in the structure of the argument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva SVAČINOVÁ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pascal’s wager is the name of an argument in favor of belief in God presented by Blaise Pascal in §233 of Thoughts. Ian Hacking (1972 pointed out that Pascal’s text involves three different versions of the argument. This paper proceeds from this identification, but it concerns an examination of the rhetorical strategy realized by Pascal’s argumentation. The final form of Pascal’s argument is considered as a product that could be established only through a specific process of persuasion led with respect to an intended reader with a particular set of initial beliefs. The text uses insights from the pragma‑dialectical approach to argumentation, especially the concept of rhetorical effectiveness of particular choices from the topical potential. The argumentation structure of Pascal’s wager is considered to be a reflection of the anticipated course of dialogue with the reader critically testing the sustainability of Pascal’s standpoint “You should believe in God”. Based on the argumentation reconstruction of three versions of the argument, Pascal’s idea of opponent/audience is identified. A rhetorical analysis of the effects of his argumentative strategy is proposed. The analysis is based on two perspectives on Pascal’s argument: it examines the strategy implemented consistently by all arguments and the strategy of a formulation of different versions of the wager.

  3. Fluid, solid and fluid-structure interaction simulations on patient-based abdominal aortic aneurysm models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sinead; O'Rourke, Malachy

    2012-04-01

    This article describes the use of fluid, solid and fluid-structure interaction simulations on three patient-based abdominal aortic aneurysm geometries. All simulations were carried out using OpenFOAM, which uses the finite volume method to solve both fluid and solid equations. Initially a fluid-only simulation was carried out on a single patient-based geometry and results from this simulation were compared with experimental results. There was good qualitative and quantitative agreement between the experimental and numerical results, suggesting that OpenFOAM is capable of predicting the main features of unsteady flow through a complex patient-based abdominal aortic aneurysm geometry. The intraluminal thrombus and arterial wall were then included, and solid stress and fluid-structure interaction simulations were performed on this, and two other patient-based abdominal aortic aneurysm geometries. It was found that the solid stress simulations resulted in an under-estimation of the maximum stress by up to 5.9% when compared with the fluid-structure interaction simulations. In the fluid-structure interaction simulations, flow induced pressure within the aneurysm was found to be up to 4.8% higher than the value of peak systolic pressure imposed in the solid stress simulations, which is likely to be the cause of the variation in the stress results. In comparing the results from the initial fluid-only simulation with results from the fluid-structure interaction simulation on the same patient, it was found that wall shear stress values varied by up to 35% between the two simulation methods. It was concluded that solid stress simulations are adequate to predict the maximum stress in an aneurysm wall, while fluid-structure interaction simulations should be performed if accurate prediction of the fluid wall shear stress is necessary. Therefore, the decision to perform fluid-structure interaction simulations should be based on the particular variables of interest in a given

  4. Quality of Slab Track Construction – Track Alignment Design and Track Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šestáková Janka

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The slab track superstructure design (without ballast is a perspective construction especially for building tunnels and bridges in the modernized sections of railway tracks in Slovakia. Monitoring of the structure described in this article is focused on the transition areas between standard structure with ballast and slab track construction.

  5. Quality of Slab Track Construction - Track Alignment Design and Track Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šestáková, Janka

    2015-05-01

    The slab track superstructure design (without ballast) is a perspective construction especially for building tunnels and bridges in the modernized sections of railway tracks in Slovakia. Monitoring of the structure described in this article is focused on the transition areas between standard structure with ballast and slab track construction.

  6. Persistent Aerial Tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Mueller, Matthias

    2016-04-13

    In this thesis, we propose a new aerial video dataset and benchmark for low altitude UAV target tracking, as well as, a photo-realistic UAV simulator that can be coupled with tracking methods. Our benchmark provides the rst evaluation of many state of-the-art and popular trackers on 123 new and fully annotated HD video sequences captured from a low-altitude aerial perspective. Among the compared trackers, we determine which ones are the most suitable for UAV tracking both in terms of tracking accuracy and run-time. We also present a simulator that can be used to evaluate tracking algorithms in real-time scenarios before they are deployed on a UAV "in the field", as well as, generate synthetic but photo-realistic tracking datasets with free ground truth annotations to easily extend existing real-world datasets. Both the benchmark and simulator will be made publicly available to the vision community to further research in the area of object tracking from UAVs. Additionally, we propose a persistent, robust and autonomous object tracking system for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) called Persistent Aerial Tracking (PAT). A computer vision and control strategy is applied to a diverse set of moving objects (e.g. humans, animals, cars, boats, etc.) integrating multiple UAVs with a stabilized RGB camera. A novel strategy is employed to successfully track objects over a long period, by \\'handing over the camera\\' from one UAV to another. We integrate the complete system into an off-the-shelf UAV, and obtain promising results showing the robustness of our solution in real-world aerial scenarios.

  7. Tracking the Structural and Electronic Configurations of a Cobalt Proton Reduction Catalyst in Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moonshiram, Dooshaye; Gimbert-Suriñach, Carolina [Institute; Guda, Alexander [International; Picon, Antonio; Lehmann, C. Stefan; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Doumy, Gilles; March, Anne Marie; Benet-Buchholz, Jordi [Institute; Soldatov, Alexander [International; Llobet, Antoni [Institute; Departament; Southworth, Stephen H.

    2016-08-09

    Time resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy (X-TAS) has been used to study the light induced hydrogen evolution reaction catalyzed by a highly stable cobalt complex, [Ru(bpy)3]2+ photosensitizer and an equimolar mixture of sodium ascorbate/ascorbic acid electron donor in pure water. XANES and EXAFS analysis of a binary mixture of the octahedral Co(III) pre-catalyst and [Ru(bpy)3]2+ after illumination, revealed in-situ formation of a square pyramidal Co(II) intermediate, with electron transfer kinetics of 51 ns. On the other hand, X-TAS experiments of the complete photocatalytic system in the presence of the electron donor showed the formation of a square planar Co(I) intermediate species within a few nanoseconds followed by its decay in the microsecond timescales. The Co(I) structural assignment is supported by calculations based on density functional theory (DFT). At longer reaction times, we observe the formation of the initial Co(III) species concomitant to the decay of Co(I), thus closing the catalytic cycle. The experimental X-ray absorption spectra of the molecular species formed along the catalytic cycle are modeled using a combination of molecular orbital DFT calculations (DFT-MO) and Finite Difference Method (FDM). These findings allowed us to unequivocally assign the full mechanistic pathway followed by the catalyst as well as to determine the rate limiting step of the process, which consists in the protonation of the Co(I). This study provides a complete kinetics scheme for the hydrogen evolution reaction by a cobalt catalyst, revealing unique information for the development of better catalysts for the reductive side of hydrogen fuel cells.

  8. The Effectiveness of Simulator Motion in the Transfer of Performance on a Tracking Task Is Influenced by Vision and Motion Disturbance Cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grundy, John G; Nazar, Stefan; O'Malley, Shannon; Mohrenshildt, Martin V; Shedden, Judith M

    2016-06-01

    To examine the importance of platform motion to the transfer of performance in motion simulators. The importance of platform motion in simulators for pilot training is strongly debated. We hypothesized that the type of motion (e.g., disturbance) contributes significantly to performance differences. Participants used a joystick to perform a target tracking task in a pod on top of a MOOG Stewart motion platform. Five conditions compared training without motion, with correlated motion, with disturbance motion, with disturbance motion isolated to the visual display, and with both correlated and disturbance motion. The test condition involved the full motion model with both correlated and disturbance motion. We analyzed speed and accuracy across training and test as well as strategic differences in joystick control. Training with disturbance cues produced critical behavioral differences compared to training without disturbance; motion itself was less important. Incorporation of disturbance cues is a potentially important source of variance between studies that do or do not show a benefit of motion platforms in the transfer of performance in simulators. Potential applications of this research include the assessment of the importance of motion platforms in flight simulators, with a focus on the efficacy of incorporating disturbance cues during training. © 2016, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society.

  9. Multisensor Distributed Track Fusion AlgorithmBased on Strong Tracking Filter and Feedback Integration1)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGGuo-Sheng; WENCheng-Lin; TANMin

    2004-01-01

    A new multisensor distributed track fusion algorithm is put forward based on combiningthe feedback integration with the strong tracking Kalman filter. Firstly, an effective tracking gateis constructed by taking the intersection of the tracking gates formed before and after feedback.Secondly, on the basis of the constructed effective tracking gate, probabilistic data association andstrong tracking Kalman filter are combined to form the new multisensor distributed track fusionalgorithm. At last, simulation is performed on the original algorithm and the algorithm presented.

  10. Simulations of full multivariate Tweedie with flexible dependence structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cuenin, Johann; Jørgensen, Bent; Kokonendji, Célestin C.

    2016-01-01

    The paper introduces a variables-in-common method for constructing and simulating multivariate Tweedie distribution, based on linear combinations of independent univariate Tweedie variables. The method is facilitated by the convolution and scaling properties of the Tweedie distributions, using....... The method allows simulation of multivariate distributions from many known, including the Gaussian, Poisson, non-central gamma, gamma and inverse Gaussian distributions....

  11. On-Track Testing as a Validation Method of Computational Fluid Dynamic Simulations of a Formula SAE Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weingart, Robert

    This thesis is about the validation of a computational fluid dynamics simulation of a ground vehicle by means of a low-budget coast-down test. The vehicle is built to the standards of the 2014 Formula SAE rules. It is equipped with large wings in the front and rear of the car; the vertical loads on the tires are measured by specifically calibrated shock potentiometers. The coast-down test was performed on a runway of a local airport and is used to determine vehicle specific coefficients such as drag, downforce, aerodynamic balance, and rolling resistance for different aerodynamic setups. The test results are then compared to the respective simulated results. The drag deviates about 5% from the simulated to the measured results. The downforce numbers show a deviation up to 18% respectively. Moreover, a sensitivity analysis of inlet velocities, ride heights, and pitch angles was performed with the help of the computational simulation.

  12. Analysis of Interactions of Logistics Elements of K-1 Tracked Vehicles in Republic Of Korea Army by Using Simulation Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Park, Si-Won

    2007-01-01

    ...: component failure rate, repair rate, inventory service level, and logistics delays. The model with these logistics elements is simulated for the acquirement of data and the results provide guidance...

  13. A computationally efficient simulator for three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulation of ion implantation into complex structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Di; Wang Geng; Chen Yang; Li Lin; Shrivastav, Gaurav; Oak, Stimit; Tasch, Al; Banerjee, Sanjay; Obradovic, Borna

    2001-01-01

    A physically-based three-dimensional Monte Carlo simulator has been developed within UT-MARLOWE, which is capable of simulating ion implantation into multi-material systems and arbitrary topography. Introducing the third dimension can result in a severe CPU time penalty. In order to minimize this penalty, a three-dimensional trajectory replication algorithm has been developed, implemented and verified. More than two orders of magnitude savings of CPU time have been observed. An unbalanced Octree structure was used to decompose three-dimensional structures. It effectively simplifies the structure, offers a good balance between modeling accuracy and computational efficiency, and allows arbitrary precision of mapping the Octree onto desired structure. Using the well-established and validated physical models in UT-MARLOWE 5.0, this simulator has been extensively verified by comparing the integrated one-dimensional simulation results with secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS). Two options, the typical case and the worst scenario, have been selected to simulate ion implantation into poly-silicon under various scenarios using this simulator: implantation into a random, amorphous network, and implantation into the worst-case channeling condition, into (1 1 0) orientated wafers

  14. The effect of early radiation in N-body simulations of cosmic structure formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamek, Julian; Brandbyge, Jacob; Fidler, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Newtonian N-body simulations have been employed successfully over the past decades for the simulation of the cosmological large-scale structure. Such simulations usually ignore radiation perturbations (photons and massless neutrinos) and the impact of general relativity (GR) beyond the background...

  15. Modelling how drivers respond to a bicyclist crossing their path at an intersection: How do test track and driving simulator compare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boda, Christian-Nils; Dozza, Marco; Bohman, Katarina; Thalya, Prateek; Larsson, Annika; Lubbe, Nils

    2018-02-01

    Bicyclist fatalities are a great concern in the European Union. Most of them are due to crashes between motorized vehicles and bicyclists at unsignalised intersections. Different countermeasures are currently being developed and implemented in order to save lives. One type of countermeasure, active safety systems, requires a deep understanding of driver behaviour to be effective without being annoying. The current study provides new knowledge about driver behaviour which can inform assessment programmes for active safety systems such as Euro NCAP. This study investigated how drivers responded to bicyclists crossing their path at an intersection. The influences of car speed and cyclist speed on the driver response process were assessed for three different crossing configurations. The same experimental protocol was tested in a fixed-base driving simulator and on a test track. A virtual model of the test track was used in the driving simulator to keep the protocol as consistent as possible across testing environments. Results show that neither car speed nor bicycle speed directly influenced the response process. The crossing configuration did not directly influence the braking response process either, but it did influence the strategy chosen by the drivers to approach the intersection. The point in time when the bicycle became visible (which depended on the car speed, the bicycle speed, and the crossing configuration) and the crossing configuration alone had the largest effects on the driver response process. Dissimilarities between test-track and driving-simulator studies were found; however, there were also interesting similarities, especially in relation to the driver braking behaviour. Drivers followed the same strategy to initiate braking, independent of the test environment. On the other hand, the test environment affected participants' strategies for releasing the gas pedal and regulating deceleration. Finally, a mathematical model, based on both experiments

  16. Structure formation by a fifth force: N-body versus linear simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Baojiu; Zhao, Hongsheng

    2009-08-01

    We lay out the frameworks to numerically study the structure formation in both linear and nonlinear regimes in general dark-matter-coupled scalar field models, and give an explicit example where the scalar field serves as a dynamical dark energy. Adopting parameters of the scalar field which yield a realistic cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectrum, we generate the initial conditions for our N-body simulations, which follow the spatial distributions of the dark matter and the scalar field by solving their equations of motion using the multilevel adaptive grid technique. We show that the spatial configuration of the scalar field tracks well the voids and clusters of dark matter. Indeed, the propagation of scalar degree of freedom effectively acts as a fifth force on dark matter particles, whose range and magnitude are determined by the two model parameters (μ,γ), local dark matter density as well as the background value for the scalar field. The model behaves like the ΛCDM paradigm on scales relevant to the CMB spectrum, which are well beyond the probe of the local fifth force and thus not significantly affected by the matter-scalar coupling. On scales comparable or shorter than the range of the local fifth force, the fifth force is perfectly parallel to gravity and their strengths have a fixed ratio 2γ2 determined by the matter-scalar coupling, provided that the chameleon effect is weak; if on the other hand there is a strong chameleon effect (i.e., the scalar field almost resides at its effective potential minimum everywhere in the space), the fifth force indeed has suppressed effects in high density regions and shows no obvious correlation with gravity, which means that the dark-matter-scalar-field coupling is not simply equivalent to a rescaling of the gravitational constant or the mass of the dark matter particles. We show these spatial distributions and (lack of) correlations at typical redshifts (z=0,1,5.5) in our multigrid million-particle simulations

  17. Structure formation by a fifth force: N-body versus linear simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Baojiu; Zhao Hongsheng

    2009-01-01

    We lay out the frameworks to numerically study the structure formation in both linear and nonlinear regimes in general dark-matter-coupled scalar field models, and give an explicit example where the scalar field serves as a dynamical dark energy. Adopting parameters of the scalar field which yield a realistic cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectrum, we generate the initial conditions for our N-body simulations, which follow the spatial distributions of the dark matter and the scalar field by solving their equations of motion using the multilevel adaptive grid technique. We show that the spatial configuration of the scalar field tracks well the voids and clusters of dark matter. Indeed, the propagation of scalar degree of freedom effectively acts as a fifth force on dark matter particles, whose range and magnitude are determined by the two model parameters (μ,γ), local dark matter density as well as the background value for the scalar field. The model behaves like the ΛCDM paradigm on scales relevant to the CMB spectrum, which are well beyond the probe of the local fifth force and thus not significantly affected by the matter-scalar coupling. On scales comparable or shorter than the range of the local fifth force, the fifth force is perfectly parallel to gravity and their strengths have a fixed ratio 2γ 2 determined by the matter-scalar coupling, provided that the chameleon effect is weak; if on the other hand there is a strong chameleon effect (i.e., the scalar field almost resides at its effective potential minimum everywhere in the space), the fifth force indeed has suppressed effects in high density regions and shows no obvious correlation with gravity, which means that the dark-matter-scalar-field coupling is not simply equivalent to a rescaling of the gravitational constant or the mass of the dark matter particles. We show these spatial distributions and (lack of) correlations at typical redshifts (z=0,1,5.5) in our multigrid million

  18. Effect of neutron irradiation on etching, optical and structural properties of microscopic glass slide used as a solid state nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Surinder; Kaur Sandhu, Amanpreet; Prasher, Sangeeta; Prakash Pandey, Om

    2007-01-01

    Microscopic glass slides are soda-lime glasses which are readily available and are easy to manufacture with low production cost. The application of these glasses as nuclear track detector will help us to make use of these glasses as solid-state nuclear track detector. The present paper describes the variation in the etching, optical and structural properties of the soda-lime microscopic glass slides due to neutron irradiation of different fluences. The color transformation and an increase in the optical absorption with neutron irradiation are observed. Both the bulk and track etch rates are found to increase with neutron fluence, thus showing a similar dependence on neutron fluence, but the sensitivity remains almost constant

  19. Statistical Exploration of Electronic Structure of Molecules from Quantum Monte-Carlo Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhat, Mr; Zubarev, Dmitry; Lester, Jr., William A.

    2010-12-22

    In this report, we present results from analysis of Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) simulation data with the goal of determining internal structure of a 3N-dimensional phase space of an N-electron molecule. We are interested in mining the simulation data for patterns that might be indicative of the bond rearrangement as molecules change electronic states. We examined simulation output that tracks the positions of two coupled electrons in the singlet and triplet states of an H2 molecule. The electrons trace out a trajectory, which was analyzed with a number of statistical techniques. This project was intended to address the following scientific questions: (1) Do high-dimensional phase spaces characterizing electronic structure of molecules tend to cluster in any natural way? Do we see a change in clustering patterns as we explore different electronic states of the same molecule? (2) Since it is hard to understand the high-dimensional space of trajectories, can we project these trajectories to a lower dimensional subspace to gain a better understanding of patterns? (3) Do trajectories inherently lie in a lower-dimensional manifold? Can we recover that manifold? After extensive statistical analysis, we are now in a better position to respond to these questions. (1) We definitely see clustering patterns, and differences between the H2 and H2tri datasets. These are revealed by the pamk method in a fairly reliable manner and can potentially be used to distinguish bonded and non-bonded systems and get insight into the nature of bonding. (2) Projecting to a lower dimensional subspace ({approx}4-5) using PCA or Kernel PCA reveals interesting patterns in the distribution of scalar values, which can be related to the existing descriptors of electronic structure of molecules. Also, these results can be immediately used to develop robust tools for analysis of noisy data obtained during QMC simulations (3) All dimensionality reduction and estimation techniques that we tried seem to

  20. Numerical simulation of the fluid-structure interaction between air blast waves and soil structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, S.; Risby, M. S.; Albert, A. Luthfi; Norazman, M.; Ariffin, I.; Alias, Y. Muhamad

    2014-03-01

    Normally, an explosion threat on free field especially from high explosives is very dangerous due to the ground shocks generated that have high impulsive load. Nowadays, explosion threats do not only occur in the battlefield, but also in industries and urban areas. In industries such as oil and gas, explosion threats may occur on logistic transportation, maintenance, production, and distribution pipeline that are located underground to supply crude oil. Therefore, the appropriate blast resistances are a priority requirement that can be obtained through an assessment on the structural response, material strength and impact pattern of material due to ground shock. A highly impulsive load from ground shocks is a dynamic load due to its loading time which is faster than ground response time. Of late, almost all blast studies consider and analyze the ground shock in the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) because of its influence on the propagation and interaction of ground shock. Furthermore, analysis in the FSI integrates action of ground shock and reaction of ground on calculations of velocity, pressure and force. Therefore, this integration of the FSI has the capability to deliver the ground shock analysis on simulation to be closer to experimental investigation results. In this study, the FSI was implemented on AUTODYN computer code by using Euler-Godunov and the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE). Euler-Godunov has the capability to deliver a structural computation on a 3D analysis, while ALE delivers an arbitrary calculation that is appropriate for a FSI analysis. In addition, ALE scheme delivers fine approach on little deformation analysis with an arbitrary motion, while the Euler-Godunov scheme delivers fine approach on a large deformation analysis. An integrated scheme based on Euler-Godunov and the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian allows us to analyze the blast propagation waves and structural interaction simultaneously.

  1. Structural Sparse Tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tianzhu; Yang, Ming-Hsuan; Ahuja, Narendra; Ghanem, Bernard; Yan, Shuicheng; Xu, Changsheng; Liu, Si

    2015-01-01

    candidate. We show that our SST algorithm accommodates most existing sparse trackers with the respective merits. Both qualitative and quantitative evaluations on challenging benchmark image sequences demonstrate that the proposed SST algorithm performs

  2. Track Loading Vehicle - TLV

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The TLV is designed to apply forces close to the strength limits of the rails and other track structure components, such as ties, rail fasteners, and ballast, while...

  3. LHCb on track

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    On 7 and 8 June 2006, the last large component of the LHCb experiment was lowered into the cavern. This 10-tonne, 18-metre long metal structure known as 'the bridge' will support the LHCb tracking system.

  4. ARDressCode: Augmented Dressing Room with Tag-based Motion Tracking and Real-Time Clothes Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærside, Krista; Kortbek, Karen Johanne; Møller, Henrik Hedegaard

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces a new augmented reality concept for dressing rooms enabling a customer to combine a tactile experience of the fabrics with easy simulated try-on. The dressing room has a camera and a projection surface instead of a mirror. The customers stick a few visual tags to their normal...

  5. An integral time series on simulated labeling using fractal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djainal, D.D.

    1997-01-01

    This research deals with the detection of time series of vertical two-phase flow, in attempt to developed an objective indicator of time series flow patterns. One of new method is fractal analysis which can complement conventional methods in the description of highly irregular fluctuations. in the present work, fractal analysis applied to analyze simulated boiling coolant signal. this simulated signals built by sum random elements in small subchannels of the coolant channel. Two modes are defined and both modes are characterized by their void fractions. in the case of unimodal-PDF signals, the difference between these modes is relative small. on other hand, bimodal-PDF signals have relative large range. in this research, fractal dimension can indicate the characters of that signals simulation

  6. Simulation of therapeutic electron beam tracking through a non-uniform magnetic field using finite element method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmasebibirgani, Mohammad Javad; Maskani, Reza; Behrooz, Mohammad Ali; Zabihzadeh, Mansour; Shahbazian, Hojatollah; Fatahiasl, Jafar; Chegeni, Nahid

    2017-04-01

    In radiotherapy, megaelectron volt (MeV) electrons are employed for treatment of superficial cancers. Magnetic fields can be used for deflection and deformation of the electron flow. A magnetic field is composed of non-uniform permanent magnets. The primary electrons are not mono-energetic and completely parallel. Calculation of electron beam deflection requires using complex mathematical methods. In this study, a device was made to apply a magnetic field to an electron beam and the path of electrons was simulated in the magnetic field using finite element method. A mini-applicator equipped with two neodymium permanent magnets was designed that enables tuning the distance between magnets. This device was placed in a standard applicator of Varian 2100 CD linear accelerator. The mini-applicator was simulated in CST Studio finite element software. Deflection angle and displacement of the electron beam was calculated after passing through the magnetic field. By determining a 2 to 5cm distance between two poles, various intensities of transverse magnetic field was created. The accelerator head was turned so that the deflected electrons became vertical to the water surface. To measure the displacement of the electron beam, EBT2 GafChromic films were employed. After being exposed, the films were scanned using HP G3010 reflection scanner and their optical density was extracted using programming in MATLAB environment. Displacement of the electron beam was compared with results of simulation after applying the magnetic field. Simulation results of the magnetic field showed good agreement with measured values. Maximum deflection angle for a 12 MeV beam was 32.9° and minimum deflection for 15 MeV was 12.1°. Measurement with the film showed precision of simulation in predicting the amount of displacement in the electron beam. A magnetic mini-applicator was made and simulated using finite element method. Deflection angle and displacement of electron beam were calculated. With

  7. Identification of Storm Surge Vulnerable Areas in the Philippines Through Simulations of Typhoon Haiyan-Induced Storm Surge Using Tracks of Historical Tropical Cyclones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapidez, John Phillip; Suarez, John Kenneth; Tablazon, Judd; Dasallas, Lea; Gonzalo, Lia Anne; Santiago, Joy; Cabacaba, Krichi May; Ramos, Michael Marie Angelo; Mahar Francisco Lagmay, Alfredo; Malano, Vicente

    2014-05-01

    Super Typhoon Haiyan entered the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) 07 November 2013, causing tremendous damage to infrastructure and loss of lives mainly due to the typhoon's storm surge and strong winds. Storm surges up to a height of 7 meters were reported in the hardest hit areas. The threat imposed by this kind of natural calamity compelled researchers of the Nationwide Operational Assessment of Hazards, the flagship disaster mitigation program of the Department of Science and Technology, Government of the Philippines, to undertake a study to determine the vulnerability of all Philippine coastal communities to storm surges of the same magnitude as those generated by Haiyan. This study calculates the maximum probable storm surge height for every coastal locality by running simulations of Haiyan-type conditions but with tracks of tropical cyclones that entered PAR from 1948-2013. DOST-Project NOAH used the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) Storm Surge Model, a numerical code that simulates and predicts storm surges spawned by tropical cyclones. Input parameters for the storm surge model include bathymetric data, storm track, central atmospheric pressure, and maximum wind speed. The simulations were made using Haiyan's pressure and wind speed as the forcing parameters. The simulated storm surge height values were added to the maximum tide level obtained from WXTide, software that contains a catalogue of worldwide astronomical tides, to come up with storm tide levels. The resulting water level was used as input to FLO-2D to generate the storm tide inundation maps. One product of this study is a list of the most vulnerable coastal areas that can be used as basis for choosing priority sites for further studies to implement appropriate site-specific solutions. Another product is the storm tide inundation maps that the local government units can use to develop a Risk-Sensitive Land Use Plan for identifying appropriate areas to build residential buildings

  8. A quasi-3-dimensional simulation method for a high-voltage level-shifting circuit structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jizhi; Chen Xingbi

    2009-01-01

    A new quasi-three-dimensional (quasi-3D) numeric simulation method for a high-voltage level-shifting circuit structure is proposed. The performances of the 3D structure are analyzed by combining some 2D device structures; the 2D devices are in two planes perpendicular to each other and to the surface of the semiconductor. In comparison with Davinci, the full 3D device simulation tool, the quasi-3D simulation method can give results for the potential and current distribution of the 3D high-voltage level-shifting circuit structure with appropriate accuracy and the total CPU time for simulation is significantly reduced. The quasi-3D simulation technique can be used in many cases with advantages such as saving computing time, making no demands on the high-end computer terminals, and being easy to operate. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  9. A quasi-3-dimensional simulation method for a high-voltage level-shifting circuit structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Jizhi; Chen Xingbi, E-mail: jzhliu@uestc.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)

    2009-12-15

    A new quasi-three-dimensional (quasi-3D) numeric simulation method for a high-voltage level-shifting circuit structure is proposed. The performances of the 3D structure are analyzed by combining some 2D device structures; the 2D devices are in two planes perpendicular to each other and to the surface of the semiconductor. In comparison with Davinci, the full 3D device simulation tool, the quasi-3D simulation method can give results for the potential and current distribution of the 3D high-voltage level-shifting circuit structure with appropriate accuracy and the total CPU time for simulation is significantly reduced. The quasi-3D simulation technique can be used in many cases with advantages such as saving computing time, making no demands on the high-end computer terminals, and being easy to operate. (semiconductor integrated circuits)

  10. Plasticity effects in subsequent simulations of car structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kose, Kim; Rietman, Bert

    2003-01-01

    In order to further reduce the weight of car components while at the same time maintaining performance and safe life it is necessary to enhance the simulation process. This is especially important for chassis parts which have not only a high dynamic load but are also partly undamped. To reach this

  11. Materials for the nuclear - Modelling and simulation of structure materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthoud, Georges; Ducros, Gerard; Feron, Damien; Guerin, Yannick; Latge, Christian; Limoge, Yves; Santarini, Gerard; Seiler, Jean-Marie; Vernaz, Etienne; Cappelaere, Chantal; Andrieux, Catherine; Athenes, Manuel; Baldinozzi, Guido; Bechade, Jean-Luc; Bonin, Bernard; Boutard, Jean-Louis; Brechet, Yves; Bruneval, Fabien; Carassou, Sebastien; Castelier, Etienne; Chartier, Alain; Clouet, Emmanuel; Marinica, Mihai-Cosmin; Crocombette, Jean-Paul; Dupuy, Laurent; Forget, Pierre; Fu, Chu Chun; Garnier, Jerome; Gelebart, Lionel; Henry, Jean; Jourdan, Thomas; Luneville, Laurence; Marini, Bernard; Meslin, Estelle; Nastar, Maylise; Onimus, Fabien; Poussard, Christophe; Proville, Laurent; Ribis, Joel; Robertson, Christian; Rodney, David; Roma, Guido; Sauzay, Maxime; Simeone, David; Soisson, Frederic; Tanguy, Benoit; Toffolon-Masclet, Caroline; Trocellier, Patrick; Van Brutzel, Laurent; Ventelon, Usa; Vincent, Ludovic; Willaime, Francois; Yvon, Pascal; Behar, Christophe; Provitina, Olivier; Lecomte, Michael; Forestier, Alain; Bender, Alexandra; Parisot, Jean-Francois; Finot, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    This collective publication proposes presentations of scientific approaches implemented to model and simulate the behaviour of materials submitted to irradiation, of associated experimental methods, and of some recent important results. After an introduction presenting the various materials used in different types of nuclear reactors (PWR, etc.), the effects of irradiation at the macroscopic or at the atomic scale, and the multi-scale (time and space) approach to the modelling of these materials, a chapter proposes an overview of modelling tools: multi-scale approach, electronic calculations for condensed matter, inter-atomic potentials, molecular dynamics simulation, thermodynamic and medium force potentials, phase diagrams, simulation of primary damages in reactor materials, kinetic models, dislocation dynamics, production of microstructures for simulation, crystalline visco-plasticity, homogenization methods in continuum mechanics, local approach and probabilistic approach in material fracture. The next part presents tools for experimental validation: tools for microscopic characterization or for mechanical characterization, experimental reactors and tests in atomic pile, tools for irradiation by charged particles. The next chapters presents different examples of thermodynamic and kinetic modelling in the case of various alloys (zirconium alloys, iron-chromium alloys, silicon carbide, austenitic alloys), of plasticity and failure modelling

  12. Sampling Enrichment toward Target Structures Using Hybrid Molecular Dynamics-Monte Carlo Simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kecheng Yang

    Full Text Available Sampling enrichment toward a target state, an analogue of the improvement of sampling efficiency (SE, is critical in both the refinement of protein structures and the generation of near-native structure ensembles for the exploration of structure-function relationships. We developed a hybrid molecular dynamics (MD-Monte Carlo (MC approach to enrich the sampling toward the target structures. In this approach, the higher SE is achieved by perturbing the conventional MD simulations with a MC structure-acceptance judgment, which is based on the coincidence degree of small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS intensity profiles between the simulation structures and the target structure. We found that the hybrid simulations could significantly improve SE by making the top-ranked models much closer to the target structures both in the secondary and tertiary structures. Specifically, for the 20 mono-residue peptides, when the initial structures had the root-mean-squared deviation (RMSD from the target structure smaller than 7 Å, the hybrid MD-MC simulations afforded, on average, 0.83 Å and 1.73 Å in RMSD closer to the target than the parallel MD simulations at 310K and 370K, respectively. Meanwhile, the average SE values are also increased by 13.2% and 15.7%. The enrichment of sampling becomes more significant when the target states are gradually detectable in the MD-MC simulations in comparison with the parallel MD simulations, and provide >200% improvement in SE. We also performed a test of the hybrid MD-MC approach in the real protein system, the results showed that the SE for 3 out of 5 real proteins are improved. Overall, this work presents an efficient way of utilizing solution SAXS to improve protein structure prediction and refinement, as well as the generation of near native structures for function annotation.

  13. THE SIMULATION OF SCATTERING OF ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES ON ANGULAR STRUCTURES.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Preobrazhensky

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the characteristics of scattering of electromagnetic waves on the angular diffraction structures. The solution of the problem is based on the method of integral equations. A comparative analysis of the scattering characteristics of structures with different shape is carried out.

  14. Simulation and design of the photonic crystal microwave accelerating structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Ruiying; Wu Congfeng; He Xiaodong; Dong Sai

    2007-01-01

    The authors have derived the global band gaps for general two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal microwave accelerating structures formed by square or triangular arrays of metal posts. A coordinate-space, finite-difference code was used to calculate the complete dispersion curves for the lattices. The fundamental and higher frequency global photonic band gaps were determined numerically. The structure formed by triangular arrays of metal posts with a missing rod at the center has advantages of higher-order-modes (HOM) suppression and main mode restriction under the condition of a/b<0.2. The relationship between the RF properties and the geometrical parameters have been studied for the 9.37 GHz photonic crystal accelerating structure. The Rs, Q, Rs/Q of the new structure may be comparable to the disk-loaded accelerating structure. (authors)

  15. Model structure of the stream salmonid simulator (S3)—A dynamic model for simulating growth, movement, and survival of juvenile salmonids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Russell W.; Plumb, John M.; Jones, Edward C.; Som, Nicholas A.; Hetrick, Nicholas J.; Hardy, Thomas B.

    2018-04-06

    Fisheries and water managers often use population models to aid in understanding the effect of alternative water management or restoration actions on anadromous fish populations. We developed the Stream Salmonid Simulator (S3) to help resource managers evaluate the effect of management alternatives on juvenile salmonid populations. S3 is a deterministic stage-structured population model that tracks daily growth, movement, and survival of juvenile salmon. A key theme of the model is that river flow affects habitat availability and capacity, which in turn drives density dependent population dynamics. To explicitly link population dynamics to habitat quality and quantity, the river environment is constructed as a one-dimensional series of linked habitat units, each of which has an associated daily time series of discharge, water temperature, and usable habitat area or carrying capacity. The physical characteristics of each habitat unit and the number of fish occupying each unit, in turn, drive survival and growth within each habitat unit and movement of fish among habitat units.The purpose of this report is to outline the underlying general structure of the S3 model that is common among different applications of the model. We have developed applications of the S3 model for juvenile fall Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the lower Klamath River. Thus, this report is a companion to current application of the S3 model to the Trinity River (in review). The general S3 model structure provides a biological and physical framework for the salmonid freshwater life cycle. This framework captures important demographics of juvenile salmonids aimed at translating management alternatives into simulated population responses. Although the S3 model is built on this common framework, the model has been constructed to allow much flexibility in application of the model to specific river systems. The ability for practitioners to include system-specific information for the

  16. Tracking by Machine Learning Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Jofrehei, Arash

    2015-01-01

    Current track reconstructing methods start with two points and then for each layer loop through all possible hits to find proper hits to add to that track. Another idea would be to use this large number of already reconstructed events and/or simulated data and train a machine on this data to find tracks given hit pixels. Training time could be long but real time tracking is really fast Simulation might not be as realistic as real data but tacking has been done for that with 100 percent efficiency while by using real data we would probably be limited to current efficiency.

  17. Using Discrete Event Simulation for Programming Model Exploration at Extreme-Scale: Macroscale Components for the Structural Simulation Toolkit (SST).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilke, Jeremiah J [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Kenny, Joseph P. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Discrete event simulation provides a powerful mechanism for designing and testing new extreme- scale programming models for high-performance computing. Rather than debug, run, and wait for results on an actual system, design can first iterate through a simulator. This is particularly useful when test beds cannot be used, i.e. to explore hardware or scales that do not yet exist or are inaccessible. Here we detail the macroscale components of the structural simulation toolkit (SST). Instead of depending on trace replay or state machines, the simulator is architected to execute real code on real software stacks. Our particular user-space threading framework allows massive scales to be simulated even on small clusters. The link between the discrete event core and the threading framework allows interesting performance metrics like call graphs to be collected from a simulated run. Performance analysis via simulation can thus become an important phase in extreme-scale programming model and runtime system design via the SST macroscale components.

  18. Simulating nonlinear cosmological structure formation with massive neutrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Arka; Dalal, Neal, E-mail: abanerj6@illinois.edu, E-mail: dalaln@illinois.edu [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801-3080 (United States)

    2016-11-01

    We present a new method for simulating cosmologies that contain massive particles with thermal free streaming motion, such as massive neutrinos or warm/hot dark matter. This method combines particle and fluid descriptions of the thermal species to eliminate the shot noise known to plague conventional N-body simulations. We describe this method in detail, along with results for a number of test cases to validate our method, and check its range of applicability. Using this method, we demonstrate that massive neutrinos can produce a significant scale-dependence in the large-scale biasing of deep voids in the matter field. We show that this scale-dependence may be quantitatively understood using an extremely simple spherical expansion model which reproduces the behavior of the void bias for different neutrino parameters.

  19. Dislocation-like Structures in a Simulated Liquid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cotterill, Rodney M J

    1979-01-01

    The free-volume distribution in a simulated Lennard-Jones liquid is heterogeneous. Chains of holes, appearing as segments rather than a continuous network, have lifetimes that are brief compared with the mean vibration period of the atoms. Larger isolated holes persist for longer times. If the ch......The free-volume distribution in a simulated Lennard-Jones liquid is heterogeneous. Chains of holes, appearing as segments rather than a continuous network, have lifetimes that are brief compared with the mean vibration period of the atoms. Larger isolated holes persist for longer times....... If the chains are interpreted as dislocation cores, the observed dislocation density is 1.0×1014 cm-2, but the actual density is probably higher....

  20. Structure Analysis of the Graphic Simulator for the PRIDE Equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Hoi; Kim, Seong Hyun; Park, Byung Suk; Lee, Jong Kwang; Lee, Hyo Jik; Kim, Ki Ho

    2010-12-01

    Simulation technology based on the computer graphics is able to minimize the trial and error and reduce the development cost and period dramatically at the design stage of the pyroprocessing facility construction and the equipment development. For this purpose, the 3D graphic simulation program named HotCell has been developed. HotCell has continuously updated for the functional addition and the bug fix, and now it reaches version third. The Digital mockup of PRIDE is furnished with the MSM(matster-slave manipulator), BDSM(bridge transported dual arm servo manipulator) and Crane in order to remote handling the processing equipment. HotCell program can be interface with the 3D mouse, the haptic device and the joystick for the realistic operation of above device. The posture of MSM can be recorded with the simple keyboard operation in order to reproduce the behavior of the MSM

  1. Simulating nonlinear cosmological structure formation with massive neutrinos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Arka; Dalal, Neal

    2016-01-01

    We present a new method for simulating cosmologies that contain massive particles with thermal free streaming motion, such as massive neutrinos or warm/hot dark matter. This method combines particle and fluid descriptions of the thermal species to eliminate the shot noise known to plague conventional N-body simulations. We describe this method in detail, along with results for a number of test cases to validate our method, and check its range of applicability. Using this method, we demonstrate that massive neutrinos can produce a significant scale-dependence in the large-scale biasing of deep voids in the matter field. We show that this scale-dependence may be quantitatively understood using an extremely simple spherical expansion model which reproduces the behavior of the void bias for different neutrino parameters.

  2. ARDressCode: Augmented Dressing Room with Tag-based Motion Tracking and Real-Time Clothes Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærside, Krista; Kortbek, Karen Johanne; Møller, Henrik Hedegaard

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces a new augmented reality concept for dressing rooms enabling a customer to combine a tactile experience of the fabrics with easy simulated try-on. The dressing room has a camera and a projection surface instead of a mirror. The customers stick a few visual tags to their normal...... clothes. Then the ARDressCode application features motion capture and provides an AR video stream on the AR “mirror ” with the selected piece of clothes mixed in and fitted to the customer body. Design issues and technical implementation as well as the prospects of further development of the techniques...

  3. Molecular dynamics simulation of nanocrystalline nickel: structure and mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swygenhoven, H. van [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Caro, A. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina). Centro Atomico Bariloche

    1997-09-01

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations of low temperature elastic and plastic deformation of Ni nanophase samples (3-7 nm) are performed. The samples are polycrystals nucleated from different seeds, with random locations and orientations. Bulk and Young`s modulus, onset of plastic deformation and mechanism responsible for the plastic behaviour are studied and compared with the behaviour of coarse grained samples. (author) 1 fig., 3 refs.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of nanocrystalline nickel: structure and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swygenhoven, H. van; Caro, A.

    1997-01-01

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations of low temperature elastic and plastic deformation of Ni nanophase samples (3-7 nm) are performed. The samples are polycrystals nucleated from different seeds, with random locations and orientations. Bulk and Young's modulus, onset of plastic deformation and mechanism responsible for the plastic behaviour are studied and compared with the behaviour of coarse grained samples. (author) 1 fig., 3 refs

  5. Simulation of Protein Structure, Dynamics and Function in Organic Media

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Daggett, Valerie

    1998-01-01

    The overall goal of our ONR-sponsored research is to pursue realistic molecular modeling strudies pertinnent to the related properties of protein stability, dynamics, structure, function, and folding in aqueous solution...

  6. Simulating Nonlinear Dynamics of Deployable Space Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To support NASA's vital interest in developing much larger solar array structures over the next 20 years, MotionPort LLC's Phase I SBIR project will strengthen...

  7. Tuned liquid dampers for multi-storey structure: numerical simulation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Eswaran

    Abstract. Wind-induced and earthquake-induced vibrations of structures such as super-tall towers and bridges ... A TLD is liquid confined in a container that uses the sloshing energy ... lation and handling, easy maintenance and lower cost,.

  8. Trajectory tracking control for underactuated stratospheric airship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zewei; Huo, Wei; Wu, Zhe

    2012-10-01

    Stratospheric airship is a new kind of aerospace system which has attracted worldwide developing interests for its broad application prospects. Based on the trajectory linearization control (TLC) theory, a novel trajectory tracking control method for an underactuated stratospheric airship is presented in this paper. Firstly, the TLC theory is described sketchily, and the dynamic model of the stratospheric airship is introduced with kinematics and dynamics equations. Then, the trajectory tracking control strategy is deduced in detail. The designed control system possesses a cascaded structure which consists of desired attitude calculation, position control loop and attitude control loop. Two sub-loops are designed for the position and attitude control loops, respectively, including the kinematics control loop and dynamics control loop. Stability analysis shows that the controlled closed-loop system is exponentially stable. Finally, simulation results for the stratospheric airship to track typical trajectories are illustrated to verify effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  9. Relation between track structure and LET effect on free radical formation for ion beam-irradiated alanine dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krushev, V.V.; Koizumi, Hitoshi; Ichikawa, Tsuneki; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Shibata, Hiromi; Tagawa, Seiichi; Yoshida, Yoichi

    1994-01-01

    The yield and local concentration of free radicals generated from alanine (α-aminopropionic acid) by irradiation with 3 MeV H + and He + ions were examined by means of electron spin resonance (ESR) and ESR power saturation methods at room temperature. The G-value of the radical formation showed a marked dependence on linear energy transfer (LET) of the ions. The G-value for the H + ion (average LET: 28 eV/nm) was almost the same as that for γ-irradiation and it was smaller by a factor of 1/4.7 for the He + ion (average LET: 225eV/nm). Combining the local concentration of the free radicals along the ion tracks with the G-values and the reported ion range, the radius of a track filled with free radicals was estimated to be 4 ∼ 5 nm by assuming a simple rod-shaped track with a constant radius and homogeneous distribution of the free radicals in it. The track radius scarcely depends on the LET within the range examined. The radiation energy deposited in the core region of the ion track was concluded to spread over the rod to generate free radicals. (author)

  10. Evolution of the Chos Malal and Agrio fold and thrust belts, Andes of Neuquén: Insights from structural analysis and apatite fission track dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Vera, E. A.; Mescua, J.; Folguera, A.; Becker, T. P.; Sagripanti, L.; Fennell, L.; Orts, D.; Ramos, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Chos Malal and Agrio fold and thrust belts are located in the western part of the Neuquén basin, an Andean retroarc basin of central-western Argentina. Both belts show evidence of tectonic inversion at the western part during Late Cretaceous times. The eastern part is dominated by late Miocene deformation which also partially reactivated the western structures. This work focuses on the study of the regional structure and the deformational event that shaped the relief of this part of the Andes. Based on new field work and structural data and previously published works a detailed map of the central part of the Neuquén basin is presented. Three regional structural cross sections were surveyed and balanced using the 2d Move™ software. In order to define a more accurate uplift history, new apatite fission track analyses were carried on selected structures. These data was used for new thermal history modeling of the inner part of the Agrio and Chos Malal fold and thrust belts. The results of the fission track analyses improve the knowledge of how these fold and thrust belts have grown trough time. Two main deformational events are defined in Late Cretaceous to Paleocene and Late Miocene times. Based on this regional structural analysis and the fission track data the precise location of the orogenic front for the Late Cretaceous-Paleocene times is reconstructed and it is proposed a structural evolution of this segment of the Andes. This new exhumation data show how the Late Cretaceous to Paleocene event was a continuous and uninterrupted deformational event.

  11. The Biological Effectiveness of Accelerated Particles for the Induction of Chromosome Damage: Track Structure Effects and Cytogenetic Signatures of High-LET Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, K.; Hada, M.; Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2012-01-01

    Track structure models predict that at a fixed value of LET, particles with lower charge number, Z will have a higher biological effectiveness compared to particles with a higher Z. In this report we investigated how track structure effects induction of chromosomal aberration in human cells. Human lymphocytes were irradiated in vitro with various energies of accelerated iron, silicon, neon, or titanium ions and chromosome damage was assessed in using three color FISH chromosome painting in chemically induced PCC samples collected a first cell division post irradiation. The LET values for these ions ranged from 30 to 195 keV/micrometers. Of the particles studied, Neon ions have the highest biological effectiveness for induction of total chromosome damage, which is consistent with track structure model predictions. For complex-type exchanges 64 MeV/ u Neon and 450 MeV/u Iron were equally effective and induced the most complex damage. In addition we present data on chromosomes exchanges induced by six different energies of protons (5 MeV/u to 2.5 GeV/u). The linear dose response term was similar for all energies of protons suggesting that the effect of the higher LET at low proton energies is balanced by the production of nuclear secondaries from the high energy protons. All energies of protons have a much higher percentage of complex-type chromosome exchanges than gamma rays, signifying a cytogenetic signature for proton exposures.

  12. New robust algorithm for tracking cells in videos of Drosophila morphogenesis based on finding an ideal path in segmented spatio-temporal cellular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellaïche, Yohanns; Bosveld, Floris; Graner, François; Mikula, Karol; Remesíková, Mariana; Smísek, Michal

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel algorithm for tracking cells in time lapse confocal microscopy movie of a Drosophila epithelial tissue during pupal morphogenesis. We consider a 2D + time video as a 3D static image, where frames are stacked atop each other, and using a spatio-temporal segmentation algorithm we obtain information about spatio-temporal 3D tubes representing evolutions of cells. The main idea for tracking is the usage of two distance functions--first one from the cells in the initial frame and second one from segmented boundaries. We track the cells backwards in time. The first distance function attracts the subsequently constructed cell trajectories to the cells in the initial frame and the second one forces them to be close to centerlines of the segmented tubular structures. This makes our tracking algorithm robust against noise and missing spatio-temporal boundaries. This approach can be generalized to a 3D + time video analysis, where spatio-temporal tubes are 4D objects.

  13. Monte Carlo Simulation of Ferroelectric Domain Structure and Applied Field Response in Two Dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, Jr., B.G.; Tikare, V.; Tuttle, B.A.

    1999-06-30

    A 2-D, lattice-Monte Carlo approach was developed to simulate ferroelectric domain structure. The model currently utilizes a Hamiltonian for the total energy based only upon electrostatic terms involving dipole-dipole interactions, local polarization gradients and the influence of applied electric fields. The impact of boundary conditions on the domain configurations obtained was also examined. In general, the model exhibits domain structure characteristics consistent with those observed in a tetragonally distorted ferroelectric. The model was also extended to enable the simulation of ferroelectric hysteresis behavior. Simulated hysteresis loops were found to be very similar in appearance to those observed experimentally in actual materials. This qualitative agreement between the simulated hysteresis loop characteristics and real ferroelectric behavior was also confirmed in simulations run over a range of simulation temperatures and applied field frequencies.

  14. Introducing galactic structure finder: the multiple stellar kinematic structures of a simulated Milky Way mass galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obreja, Aura; Macciò, Andrea V.; Moster, Benjamin; Dutton, Aaron A.; Buck, Tobias; Wang, Gregory S. Stinson Liang

    2018-04-01

    We present the first results of applying Gaussian Mixture Models in the stellar kinematic space of normalized angular momentum and binding energy on NIHAO high resolution galaxies to separate the stars into multiple components. We exemplify this method using a simulated Milky Way analogue, whose stellar component hosts: thin and thick discs, classical and pseudo bulges, and a stellar halo. The properties of these stellar structures are in good agreement with observational expectations in terms of sizes, shapes and rotational support. Interestingly, the two kinematic discs show surface mass density profiles more centrally concentrated than exponentials, while the bulges and the stellar halo are purely exponential. We trace back in time the Lagrangian mass of each component separately to study their formation history. Between z ˜ 3 and the end of halo virialization, z ˜ 1.3, all components lose a fraction of their angular momentum. The classical bulge loses the most (˜95%) and the thin disc the least (˜60%). Both bulges formed their stars in-situ at high redshift, while the thin disc formed ˜98% in-situ, but with a constant SFR ˜ 1.5M⊙yr-1 over the last ˜ 11 Gyr. Accreted stars (6% of total stellar mass) are mainly incorporated to the thick disc or the stellar halo, which formed ex-situ 8% and 45% of their respective masses. Our analysis pipeline is freely available at https://github.com/aobr/gsf.

  15. Simulation of laser detection and ranging (LADAR) and forward-looking infrared (FLIR) data for autonomous tracking of airborne objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Gavin; Markham, Keith C.; Marshall, David

    2000-06-01

    This paper presents the results of an investigation leading into an implementation of FLIR and LADAR data simulation for use in a multi sensor data fusion automated target recognition system. At present the main areas of application are in military environments but systems can easily be adapted to other areas such as security applications, robotics and autonomous cars. Recent developments have been away from traditional sensor modeling and toward modeling of features that are external to the system, such as atmosphere and part occlusion, to create a more realistic and rounded system. We have implemented such techniques and introduced a means of inserting these models into a highly detailed scene model to provide a rich data set for later processing. From our study and implementation we are able to embed sensor model components into a commercial graphics and animation package, along with object and terrain models, which can be easily used to create a more realistic sequence of images.

  16. Laboratory-Scale Simulation and Real-Time Tracking of a Microbial Contamination Event and Subsequent Shock-Chlorination in Drinking Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Besmer

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Rapid contamination of drinking water in distribution and storage systems can occur due to pressure drop, backflow, cross-connections, accidents, and bio-terrorism. Small volumes of a concentrated contaminant (e.g., wastewater can contaminate large volumes of water in a very short time with potentially severe negative health impacts. The technical limitations of conventional, cultivation-based microbial detection methods neither allow for timely detection of such contaminations, nor for the real-time monitoring of subsequent emergency remediation measures (e.g., shock-chlorination. Here we applied a newly developed continuous, ultra high-frequency flow cytometry approach to track a rapid pollution event and subsequent disinfection of drinking water in an 80-min laboratory scale simulation. We quantified total (TCC and intact (ICC cell concentrations as well as flow cytometric fingerprints in parallel in real-time with two different staining methods. The ingress of wastewater was detectable almost immediately (i.e., after 0.6% volume change, significantly changing TCC, ICC, and the flow cytometric fingerprint. Shock chlorination was rapid and detected in real time, causing membrane damage in the vast majority of bacteria (i.e., drop of ICC from more than 380 cells μl-1 to less than 30 cells μl-1 within 4 min. Both of these effects as well as the final wash-in of fresh tap water followed calculated predictions well. Detailed and highly quantitative tracking of microbial dynamics at very short time scales and for different characteristics (e.g., concentration, membrane integrity is feasible. This opens up multiple possibilities for targeted investigation of a myriad of bacterial short-term dynamics (e.g., disinfection, growth, detachment, operational changes both in laboratory-scale research and full-scale system investigations in practice.

  17. Simulation of chloride transport based description soil structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmood-ul-Hassan, M.; Akhtar, M.S.; Gill, S.M.; Nabi, G.

    2003-01-01

    There is a need of environmental implications of rapid appearance of surface by applying chemical at depths below the vadose zone (tile line or shallow groundwater) for developing better insight into solute flow mechanism through the arable lands. Transport of chloride, a representative non-adsorbing solute, through a moderately structured silty clay loam soil (Gujranwala series, Typic Ustochrepts) and an un-structured sandy loam soil (Nabipur series, Typic Camborthid) was characterized and two existing models viz. convection dispersion equation (CDE) and preferential flow models were tested. The flux average of solute concentration in the outflow as a function of cumulative drainage was fitted to the models. The CDE fitted, relatively, better in the non-structured soil than in the moderately structured soil. Dispersivity value determined by CDE was very high for the structured soil which is physically not possible. The preferential flow model fitted well in the Gujranwala soil, but not in the Nabipur soil. The breakthrough characteristics i.e. drainage to peak concentration (Dp), symmetry coefficient (SC), skewness, and kurtosis were compared. Chloride breakthrough was earlier than expected based on piston flow. It indicated preferential flow in both the soils, yet, immediate appearance of the tracer in the Gujranwala soil demonstrated even larger magnitude of the preferential flow. Breakthrough curves' parameters indicated a large amount of the solute movement through the preferred pathways by passing the soil matrix in the Gujranwala soil. The study suggests that some soil structure parameters (size/shape and degree of aggregation) should be incorporated in the solute transport models.(author)

  18. FDTD method using for electrodynamic simulation of resonator accelerating structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vorogushin, M.F.; Svistunov, Yu.A.; Chetverikov, I.O.; Malyshev, V.N.; Malyukhov, M.V.

    2000-01-01

    The finite difference method in the time area (FDTD) makes it possible to model both stationary and nonstationary processes, originating by the beam and field interaction. Possibilities of the method by modeling the fields in the resonant accelerating structures are demonstrated. The possibility of considering the transition processes is important besides the solution of the problem on determination of frequencies and distribution in the space of the resonators oscillations proper types. The program presented makes it possible to obtain practical results for modeling accelerating structures on personal computers [ru

  19. Simulations and Vacuum Tests of a CLIC Accelerating Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Garion, C

    2011-01-01

    The Compact LInear Collider, under study, is based on room temperature high gradient structures. The vacuum specificities of these cavities are low conductance, large surface areas and a non-baked system. The main issue is to reach UHV conditions (typically 10-7 Pa) in a system where the residual vacuum is driven by water outgassing. A finite element model based on an analogy thermal/vacuum has been built to estimate the vacuum profile in an accelerating structure. Vacuum tests are carried out in a dedicated set-up, the vacuum performances of different configurations are presented and compared with the predictions.

  20. Simulations of the structure and dynamics of nanoparticle-based ionic liquids

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Bingbing; Chremos, Alexandros; Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.

    2012-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations over microsecond time scales to study the structure and dynamics of coarse-grained models for nanoparticle-based ionic liquids. The systems of interest consist of particles with charged surface groups and linear

  1. Nonlinear Aerodynamics-Structure Time Simulation for HALE Aircraft Design/Analysis, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Time simulation of a nonlinear aerodynamics model (NA) developed at Virginia Tech coupled with a nonlinear structure model (NS) is proposed as a design/analysis...

  2. Structure and Interface Properties of Nanophase Ceramics: Multimillion Particle Molecular-Dynamics Simulations on Parallel Computer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kalia, Rajiv

    1997-01-01

    Large-scale molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to investigate: (1) sintering process, structural correlations, and mechanical behavior including dynamic fracture in microporous and nanophase Si3N4...

  3. Experimental simulation techniques for the evaluation of structural changes in metals and alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucki, Georgi

    1992-01-01

    In this work, high-doses irradiation in nuclear reactor were simulated using a cyclotron in order to study mechanical, electric, magnetic and structural changes in materials. Results of such simulations for portland cement, binary alloys and stainless steels are presented and discussed. 15 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  4. Instructional Support and Implementation Structure during Elementary Teachers' Science Education Simulation Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonczi, Amanda L.; Chiu, Jennifer L.; Maeng, Jennifer L.; Bell, Randy L.

    2016-01-01

    This investigation sought to identify patterns in elementary science teachers' computer simulation use, particularly implementation structures and instructional supports commonly employed by teachers. Data included video-recorded science lessons of 96 elementary teachers who used computer simulations in one or more science lessons. Results…

  5. METAL STRUCTURES SURVIVABILITY ASSESSMENT WHEN SIMULATING SERVICE CONDITIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. M. Gibalenko

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The research is aimed at improving the quality and reliability of measures of primary and secondary protection of metal structures at manufacturing companies, to prolong the service life of cyclically loaded structures of production facilities taking into account the corrosion level of danger. Methodology. Authors proposed to use the principles of process approach for statement and realization of management problems of operational service life in corrosion environments. The principles of ensuring reliability on the level of corrosion danger include justification of stages sequence for survivability assessment of a structural metalwork based on the strategy of DMAIC (define, measure, analyze, improve, control: definitions, measurements, analysis, improvement and monitoring of measures of primary and secondary corrosion protection. Findings. Providing control measures from corrosion according to the criterion of corrosion danger allows providing requirements of reliability of structural metalwork based on calculated provisions of the limiting conditions method and solving the problems of management in technological safety during the expected service life of structural objects. Originality. The developed strategy of maintenance of the industrial facilities on an actual state includes the process approach to resource management by creation of system for the account and the functional controlling, risk analysis and regulation of technological safety in production facilities of the enterprises. Realization of the principles of process approach to management of technological safety at the object level is directed to perfecting of tools and methods of anticorrosive protection, extension of a resource taking into account indexes of survivability (, and justification of program measures to ensure the reliability of enterprises(PER. Practical value. On the basis of process approach to quality and reliability management, generalizations of the

  6. Initial condition effects on large scale structure in numerical simulations of plane mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullan, W. A.; Garrett, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, Large Eddy Simulations are performed on the spatially developing plane turbulent mixing layer. The simulated mixing layers originate from initially laminar conditions. The focus of this research is on the effect of the nature of the imposed fluctuations on the large-scale spanwise and streamwise structures in the flow. Two simulations are performed; one with low-level three-dimensional inflow fluctuations obtained from pseudo-random numbers, the other with physically correlated fluctuations of the same magnitude obtained from an inflow generation technique. Where white-noise fluctuations provide the inflow disturbances, no spatially stationary streamwise vortex structure is observed, and the large-scale spanwise turbulent vortical structures grow continuously and linearly. These structures are observed to have a three-dimensional internal geometry with branches and dislocations. Where physically correlated provide the inflow disturbances a "streaky" streamwise structure that is spatially stationary is observed, with the large-scale turbulent vortical structures growing with the square-root of time. These large-scale structures are quasi-two-dimensional, on top of which the secondary structure rides. The simulation results are discussed in the context of the varying interpretations of mixing layer growth that have been postulated. Recommendations are made concerning the data required from experiments in order to produce accurate numerical simulation recreations of real flows.

  7. Computer modeling and simulation analysis of bearing capacity after reinforcement of underground frame structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yan

    2018-04-01

    With the increasing development of urban scale, the application of the underground frame structure is becoming more and more extensive. But because of the unreasonable setup, it hinders public transportation. Therefore, it is an effective solution to reinforce the underground frame structure and make it bear the traffic load. The simulation calculation of the reinforced underground frame structure is carried out in this paper. The conclusion is obtained that the structure satisfies the load of vehicle and the load of the crowd.

  8. Slepian Simulations of Plastic Displacements of Randomly Excited Hysteretic Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarov, Boyan Stefanov

    2003-01-01

    The object of the study is a fast simulation method for generation and analysis of the plastic response of a randomly excited MDOF oscillatro with several potential elements with elasto-plastic constitutive behavior. The oscillator is statically determinate with linear damping. The external...... approximately as a stationary Gaussian process. This requires that the standard deviation of the stationary response is not too large as compared to the plastic yield limits. The Slepian model process for the behavior of the linear response is then simply the conditional mean (linear regression) of the process...... noise excited linear oscillator obtained from the elasto-plastic oscillator by totally removing the plastic domain. Thus the key to the applicability of the method is that the oscillator has a linear domain within which the response stays for a sufficiently long time to make the random response behave...

  9. Simulation and Experimental Investigation of Structural Dynamic Frequency Characteristics Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Li

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In general, mechanical equipment such as cars, airplanes, and machine tools all operate with constant frequency characteristics. These constant working characteristics should be controlled if the dynamic performance of the equipment demands improvement or the dynamic characteristics is intended to change with different working conditions. Active control is a stable and beneficial method for this, but current active control methods mainly focus on vibration control for reducing the vibration amplitudes in the time domain or frequency domain. In this paper, a new method of dynamic frequency characteristics active control (DFCAC is presented for a flat plate, which can not only accomplish vibration control but also arbitrarily change the dynamic characteristics of the equipment. The proposed DFCAC algorithm is based on a neural network including two parts of the identification implement and the controller. The effectiveness of the DFCAC method is verified by several simulation and experiments, which provide desirable results.

  10. Bond slip model for the simulation of reinforced concrete structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casanova, A.; Jason, L.; Davenne, L.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a new finite element approach to model the steel-concrete bond effects. This model proposes to relate steel, represented by truss elements, with the surrounding concrete in the case where the two meshes are not necessary coincident. The theoretical formulation is described and the model is applied on a reinforced concrete tie. A characteristic stress distribution is observed, related to the transfer of bond forces from steel to concrete. The results of this simulation are compared with a computation in which a perfect relation between steel and concrete is supposed. It clearly shows how the introduction of the bond model can improve the description of the cracking process (finite number of cracks). (authors)

  11. Implementation of Grid-computing Framework for Simulation in Multi-scale Structural Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Data Iranata

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A new grid-computing framework for simulation in multi-scale structural analysis is presented. Two levels of parallel processing will be involved in this framework: multiple local distributed computing environments connected by local network to form a grid-based cluster-to-cluster distributed computing environment. To successfully perform the simulation, a large-scale structural system task is decomposed into the simulations of a simplified global model and several detailed component models using various scales. These correlated multi-scale structural system tasks are distributed among clusters and connected together in a multi-level hierarchy and then coordinated over the internet. The software framework for supporting the multi-scale structural simulation approach is also presented. The program architecture design allows the integration of several multi-scale models as clients and servers under a single platform. To check its feasibility, a prototype software system has been designed and implemented to perform the proposed concept. The simulation results show that the software framework can increase the speedup performance of the structural analysis. Based on this result, the proposed grid-computing framework is suitable to perform the simulation of the multi-scale structural analysis.

  12. Models, simulation, and experimental issues in structural mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Maceri, Franco; Vairo, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    The reader aware in Structural Mechanics will find in this book a source of fruitful knowledge and effective tools useful for imagining, creating, and promoting novel and challenging developments. It addresses a wide range of topics, such as mechanics and geotechnics, vibration and damping, damage and friction, experimental methods, and advanced structural materials. It also discusses analytical, experimental and numerical findings, focusing on theoretical and practical issues, and leading to innovations in the field. Collecting some of the latest results from the Lagrange Laboratory, a European scientific research group, mainly consisting of Italian and French engineers, mechanicians and mathematicians, the book presents the most recent example of the long-term scientific cooperation between well-established French and Italian Mechanics, Mathematics and Engineering Schools. .

  13. Detailed electromagnetic simulation for the structural color of butterfly wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, R Todd; Smith, Glenn S

    2009-07-20

    Many species of butterflies exhibit interesting optical phenomena due to structural color. The physical reason for this color is subwavelength features on the surface of a single scale. The exposed surface of a scale is covered with a ridge structure. The fully three-dimensional, periodic, finite-difference time-domain method is used to create a detailed electromagnetic model of a generic ridge. A novel method for presenting the three-dimensional observed color pattern is developed. Using these tools, the change in color that is a result of varying individual features of the scale is explored. Computational models are developed that are similar to three butterflies: Morpho rhetenor, Troides magellanus, and Ancyluris meliboeus.

  14. Practical design of magnetostatic structure using numerical simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Qiuliang

    2013-01-01

    Covers the practical numerical method for the analysis and design of magnets Extensively covers the magnet design and computation aspects from theories to practical applications, emphasizing design methods of practical structures such as superconducting, electromagnetic and permanent magnet for use in various scientific instruments, industrial processing, biomedicine and special electrical equipments. The computations cover a wide range of numerical techniques and analytical derivation to efficiently provide solutions to complicated problems that are often encountered in practice, where simple analytical calculations are no longer adequate. Chapters include: Introduction of Magnet Technology, Magnetostatic Equation for the Magnet Structure, Finite Element Analysis for Magnetostatic Field, Integral Method for Magnetostatic Field, Numerical Method of Solenoid Coils Design, Series Analysis of Axially Symmetric Magnetic Field, Magnets with High Magnetic Field and High Homogeneity, Permanent Magnet and its App...

  15. Monitoring multi-year macro ocean litter dynamics and backward-tracking simulation of litter origins on a remote island in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Chia-Ying; Hsin, Yi-Chia; Yu, Teng-Lang; Liu, Kuo-Lieh; Shiah, Fuh-Kwo; Jeng, Ming-Shiou

    2018-04-01

    Ocean litter has accumulated rapidly and is becoming a major environmental concern, yet quantitative and regular observations and exploration that track litter origins are limited. By implementing monthly sample collections over five years (2012–2016) at Dongsha Island, a remote island in the northern South China Sea (SCS), we assessed macro ocean litter dynamics, identified source countries of individual plastic bottles, and analyzed the origins of the litter by a backward-tracking model simulation considering both the effects of current velocity and windage. The results showed that large amounts of litter, which varied monthly and annually in weight and quantity, reached the island during the study years, and there were spatial differences in accumulation patterns between the north and south coasts. Styrofoam and plastic bottles were the two primary sources of macro ocean litter both annually and monthly, and most of the litter collected on the island originated from China and Vietnam, which were collectively responsible for approximately 47.5%–63.7% per month. The simulation indicated that current advection at the near-surface depths and low windage at the sea surface showed similar patterns, while medium to high windage exhibited comparable expression patterns in response to potential source regions and drifting time experiments. At either the surface with low windage or current advection at depths of 0.5 m and 1 m, macro ocean litter in the Western Philippine Sea, i.e. through the Luzon Strait between Taiwan and the Philippines, was an important contributor to the litter bulk from October to March, whereas the litter was predicted to mainly originate from the southwestern SCS from April to September. With an increasing windage effect, litter in the Taiwan Strait was predicted to be an additional major potential source. Surprisingly, a small proportion of the macro ocean litter was predicted to continuously travel in the northern SCS for a long duration

  16. Simulations for irradiation of silicon-based structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagatova, A.; Pavlovic, M.; Sedlackova, K.; Necas, V.; Hybler, P.; Zatko, B.

    2013-01-01

    The software ModePEB for modelling of electron beam processing in multilayer flat objects was shown to be a very useful tool for optimization of the irradiation of silicon based structures. Except its significant help in setting-up the accelerator parameters corresponding to a desired dose, its proven reliability and consistency with the measured data makes the ModePEB an inevitable instrument for design and optimization of electron irradiation experiments. (authors)

  17. Design and simulation of origami structures with smooth folds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peraza Hernandez, E A; Hartl, D J; Lagoudas, D C

    2017-04-01

    Origami has enabled new approaches to the fabrication and functionality of multiple structures. Current methods for origami design are restricted to the idealization of folds as creases of zeroth-order geometric continuity. Such an idealization is not proper for origami structures of non-negligible fold thickness or maximum curvature at the folds restricted by material limitations. For such structures, folds are not properly represented as creases but rather as bent regions of higher-order geometric continuity. Such fold regions of arbitrary order of continuity are termed as smooth folds . This paper presents a method for solving the following origami design problem: given a goal shape represented as a polygonal mesh (termed as the goal mesh ), find the geometry of a single planar sheet, its pattern of smooth folds, and the history of folding motion allowing the sheet to approximate the goal mesh. The parametrization of the planar sheet and the constraints that allow for a valid pattern of smooth folds are presented. The method is tested against various goal meshes having diverse geometries. The results show that every determined sheet approximates its corresponding goal mesh in a known folded configuration having fold angles obtained from the geometry of the goal mesh.

  18. Numerical simulation of fluid structure interaction in two flexible tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Zhipeng; Zang Fenggang; Zhang Yixiong

    2014-01-01

    In order to further investigate fluid structure interaction problems, occurring in the nuclear field such as the behavior of PWR fuel rods, steam generator and other heat exchanger tubes, a numerical model was presented. It is a three-dimensional fully coupled approach with solving the fluid flow and the structure vibration simultaneously, for the tube bundles in cross flow. The unsteady three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equation and LES turbulence model were solved with finite volume approach on structured grids combined with the technique of dynamic mesh. The dynamic equilibrium equation was discretized according to the finite element theory. The vibration response of a single tube in cross flow was calculated by the numerical model. Both the amplitude and frequency were compared with experimental data and existing models in the literature. It is shown that the present model is reasonable. The flow induced vibration characteristics, for both inline and parallel sets in cross flow, were investigated by the numerical model. The dynamic response and flow characteristics, for both inline tubes and parallel tubes with pitch ratio of 1.2, 1.6, 2, 3 and 4 under different incident velocities, were studied. Critical pitch and critical velocity were obtained. (authors)

  19. Effect of suspension systems on the physiological and psychological responses to sub-maximal biking on simulated smoothand bumpy tracks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titlestad, John; Fairlie-Clarke, Tony; Whittaker, Arthur; Davie, Mark; Watt, Ian; Grant, Stanley

    2006-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the physiological and psychological responses of cyclists riding on a hard tail bicycle and on a full suspension bicycle. Twenty males participated in two series of tests. A test rig held the front axle of the bicycle steady while the rear wheel rotated against a heavy roller with bumps (or no bumps) on its surface. In the first series of tests, eight participants (age 19-27 years, body mass 65-82 kg) were tested on both the full suspension and hard tail bicycles with and without bumps fitted to the roller. The second series of test repeated the bump tests with a further six participants (age 22-31 years, body mass 74-94 kg) and also involved an investigation of familiarization effects with the final six participants (age 21-30 years, body mass 64-80 kg). Heart rate, oxygen consumption (VO(2)), rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and comfort were recorded during 10 min sub-maximal tests. Combined data for the bumps tests show that the full suspension bicycle was significantly different (P < 0.001) from the hard tail bicycle on all four measures. Oxygen consumption, heart rate and RPE were lower on average by 8.7 (s = 3.6) ml . kg(-1) . min(-1), 32.1 (s = 12.1) beats . min(-1) and 2.6 (s = 2.0) units, respectively. Comfort scores were higher (better) on average by 1.9 (s = 0.8) units. For the no bumps tests, the only statistically significant difference (P = 0.008) was in VO(2), which was lower for the hard tail bicycle by 2.2 (s = 1.7) ml . kg(-1) . min(-1). The results indicate that the full suspension bicycle provides a physiological and psychological advantage over the hard tail bicycle during simulated sub-maximal exercise on bumps.

  20. Particle tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mais, H.; Ripken, G.; Wrulich, A.; Schmidt, F.

    1986-02-01

    After a brief description of typical applications of particle tracking in storage rings and after a short discussion of some limitations and problems related with tracking we summarize some concepts and methods developed in the qualitative theory of dynamical systems. We show how these concepts can be applied to the proton ring HERA. (orig.)