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Sample records for tracheal tube cuff

  1. Massive aspiration past the tracheal tube cuff caused by closed tracheal suction system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Mital H; Frotzler, Angela; Madjdpour, Caveh; Koepfer, Nelly; Weiss, Markus

    2011-01-01

    Aspiration past the tracheal tube cuff has been recognized to be a risk factor for the development of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). This study investigated the effect of closed tracheal suctioning on aspiration of fluid past the tracheal tube cuff in an in vitro benchtop model. High-volume low pressure tube cuffs of 7.5 mm internal diameter (ID) were placed in a 22 mm ID artificial trachea connected to a test lung. Positive pressure ventilation (PPV) with 15 cm H₂O peak inspiratory pressure and 5 cm H₂O positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) was used. A closed tracheal suction system (CTSS) catheter (size 14Fr) was attached to the tracheal tube and suction was performed for 5, 10, 15, or 20 seconds under 200 or 300 cm H₂O suction pressures. Amount of fluid (mL) aspirated along the tube cuff and the airway pressure changes were recorded for each suction procedure. Fluid aspiration during different suction conditions was compared using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney test (Bonferroni correction [α = .01]). During 10, 15, and 20 seconds suction, airway pressure consistently dropped down to -8 to -13 cm H₂O (P aspiration was never observed under PPV + PEEP but occurred always during suctioning. Aspiration along the tube cuff was higher with -300 cm H₂O than with -200 cm H₂O suction pressure (P aspiration of fluid occurs along the tracheal tube cuff during suction with the closed tracheal suction system. © SAGE Publications 2011.

  2. To assess the changes of tracheal cuff pressure after a calibrating orogastric tube insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Kuo-Chuan

    2014-02-01

    Insertion of a medical instrument into the esophagus may affect tracheal tube pressure. This study evaluated the potential effect of a calibrating orogastric tube insertion on tracheal cuff pressure in patients undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery. Adult patients who were scheduled for elective bariatric surgery requiring insertion of a calibrating orogastric tube were assessed for eligibility for this study. After successful tracheal intubation, the tracheal tube with a high-volume, low-pressure cuff was adjusted to range from 25 to 30 cmH2O using a manometer. Tracheal cuff pressure was monitored continuously while the calibrating orogastric tube was being advanced. The change of tracheal cuff pressure was recorded after the calibrating orogastric tube had been left in situ for 3 min. After insertion of the calibrating orogastric tube, the median tracheal cuff pressure increased from 28 [27-28 (25-30)] to 36 [30-42 (26-64)] cmH2O (P pressure should be routinely monitored in patients undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery requiring insertion of a calibrating orogastric tube.

  3. Difficulty with cuff deflation of reinforced tracheal tube caused by inflation line occlusion with silk thread ligation and fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotoh, Sayoko; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Imai, Eriko; Kawamata, Mikito

    2015-03-05

    A reinforced tracheal tube, ligated with silk threads, was inserted into a tracheostomy orifice and fixed to the skin. The cuff inflation line of the reinforced tracheal tube became occluded. Reinforced 'armoured' tracheal tubes have a spiral of wire embedded into the wall of the tube to give strength and flexibility, and may be sharply bent without compromising the tube lumen. The tracheal cuff attached to the tube is inflated by injecting air through a narrow-diameter tube welded to the outside of the tracheal tube. When a reinforced tracheal tube is ligated and fixed with silk threads, it should be confirmed whether the tracheal tube cuff can be deflated and inflated after fixation. Moreover, because occlusion can be eliminated by removing all silk threads used to ligate a tracheal tube, they should be removed before extubation. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  4. Tracheal tube and laryngeal mask cuff pressure during anaesthesia - mandatory monitoring is in need

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Møller Ann M

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To prevent endothelium and nerve lesions, tracheal tube and laryngeal mask cuff pressure is to be maintained at a low level and yet be high enough to secure air sealing. Method In a prospective quality-control study, 201 patients undergoing surgery during anaesthesia (without the use of nitrous oxide were included for determination of the cuff pressure of the tracheal tubes and laryngeal masks. Results In the 119 patients provided with a tracheal tube, the median cuff pressure was 30 (range 8 - 100 cm H2O and the pressure exceeded 30 cm H2O (upper recommended level for 54 patients. In the 82 patients provided with a laryngeal mask, the cuff pressure was 95 (10 - 121 cm H2O and above 60 cm H2O (upper recommended level for 56 patients and in 34 of these patients, the pressure exceeded the upper cuff gauge limit (120 cm H2O. There was no association between cuff pressure and age, body mass index, type of surgery, or time from induction of anaesthesia to the time the cuff pressure was measured. Conclusion For maintenance of epithelia flow and nerve function and at the same time secure air sealing, this evaluation indicates that the cuff pressure needs to be checked as part of the procedures involved in induction of anaesthesia and eventually checked during surgery.

  5. Tracheal tube and laryngeal mask cuff pressure during anaesthesia - mandatory monitoring is in need

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokamp, K.Z.; Secher, N.H.; Møller, Ann

    2010-01-01

    patients. In the 82 patients provided with a laryngeal mask, the cuff pressure was 95 (10 - 121) cm H2O and above 60 cm H2O (upper recommended level) for 56 patients and in 34 of these patients, the pressure exceeded the upper cuff gauge limit (120 cm H2O). There was no association between cuff pressure......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To prevent endothelium and nerve lesions, tracheal tube and laryngeal mask cuff pressure is to be maintained at a low level and yet be high enough to secure air sealing. METHOD: In a prospective quality-control study, 201 patients undergoing surgery during anaesthesia (without...... the use of nitrous oxide) were included for determination of the cuff pressure of the tracheal tubes and laryngeal masks. RESULTS: In the 119 patients provided with a tracheal tube, the median cuff pressure was 30 (range 8 - 100) cm H2O and the pressure exceeded 30 cm H2O (upper recommended level) for 54...

  6. Tracheal tube and laryngeal mask cuff pressure during anaesthesia - mandatory monitoring is in need

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rokamp, K.Z.; Secher, N.H.; Møller, Ann

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To prevent endothelium and nerve lesions, tracheal tube and laryngeal mask cuff pressure is to be maintained at a low level and yet be high enough to secure air sealing. METHOD: In a prospective quality-control study, 201 patients undergoing surgery during anaesthesia (without...... the use of nitrous oxide) were included for determination of the cuff pressure of the tracheal tubes and laryngeal masks. RESULTS: In the 119 patients provided with a tracheal tube, the median cuff pressure was 30 (range 8 - 100) cm H2O and the pressure exceeded 30 cm H2O (upper recommended level) for 54...... patients. In the 82 patients provided with a laryngeal mask, the cuff pressure was 95 (10 - 121) cm H2O and above 60 cm H2O (upper recommended level) for 56 patients and in 34 of these patients, the pressure exceeded the upper cuff gauge limit (120 cm H2O). There was no association between cuff pressure...

  7. Strategies to prevent ventilation-associated pneumonia: the effect of cuff pressure monitoring techniques and tracheal tube type on aspiration of subglottic secretions: an in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Eleanor L; Duguid, Alasdair; Ercole, Ari; Matta, Basil; Burnstein, Rowan M; Veenith, Tonny

    2014-03-01

    Ventilation-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the commonest nosocomial infection in intensive care. Implementation of a VAP prevention care bundle is a proven method to reduce its incidence. The UK care bundle recommends maintenance of the tracheal tube cuff pressure at 20 to 30  cmH₂O with 4-hourly pressure checks and use of tracheal tubes with subglottic aspiration ports in patients admitted for more than 72  h. To evaluate the effects of tracheal tube type and cuff pressure monitoring technique on leakage of subglottic secretions past the tracheal tube cuff. Bench-top study. Laboratory. A model adult trachea with simulated subglottic secretions was intubated with a tracheal tube with the cuff inflated to 25  cmH₂O. Experiments were conducted using a Portex Profile Soft Seal tracheal tube with three cuff pressure monitoring strategies and using a Portex SACETT tracheal tube with intermittent cuff pressure checks. Rate of simulated secretion leakage past the tracheal tube cuff. Mean ± SD leakage of fluid past the Profile Soft Seal tracheal tube cuff was 2.25 ± 1.49  ml  min⁻¹ with no monitoring of cuff pressure, 2.98 ± 1.63  ml  min⁻¹ with intermittent cuff pressure monitoring and 3.83 ± 2.17  ml  min⁻¹ with continuous cuff pressure monitoring (P aspiration port and aspirating the simulated secretions prior to intermittent cuff pressure checks reduced the leakage rate to 0.50 ± 0.48  ml  min⁻¹ (P aspiration port. Further evaluation of medical device performance is needed in order to design more effective VAP prevention strategies.

  8. The pressure exerted on the tracheal wall by two endotracheal tube cuffs: A prospective observational bench-top, clinical and radiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blunt Mark

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Lotrach endotracheal tube has a unique low-volume, low-pressure (LVLP cuff, which has been designed to prevent pressure injury to the tracheal wall. We aimed to estimate the pressure exerted on the tracheal wall by the LVLP cuff and a conventional cuff in a bench-top, clinical and radiological study. Method In the bench-top study, a model trachea was intubated with the LVLP cuff and the conventional cuff. The cuff pressure was controlled using a constant pressure device. We assessed the pressure exerted on the tracheal wall by measuring the ability of the cuffs to support a column of water using a standard protocol. In the clinical study, we tested the ability of both cuffs to prevent air leak during a staged recruitment manoeuvre. In the radiological study, we recorded the degree of anatomical distortion of the trachea from both cuffs in the antero-posterior (AP and transverse tracheal diameters. We performed statistical analysis using non-inferiority tests. Results In the bench-top study, the LVLP cuff achieved a plateau at a mean height of 25.2 cmH2O (SD 0.34. In contrast, the conventional cuff failed to maintain any water above the cuff and a plateau could not be measured. In the clinical study, the mean pressure at which air leak occurred was 30.0 +/- 0.8 cmH2O (SD 3.8 using the LVLP cuff and 32.4 +/- 0.7 cmH2O (SD 3.0 using the conventional cuff. In the radiological study, the mean degree of anatomical distortion of the trachea in AP and transverse tracheal diameter was 2.9 +/- 2.2 mm (SD 2.1 and 1.8 +/- 1.4 mm (SD 1.4 using the LVLP cuff and 4.4 +/- 1.3 mm (SD 1.4 and 2.6 +/- 1.5 mm (SD 1.6 using the conventional cuff. Conclusions The bench-top and clinical studies both demonstrated that the LVLP cuff exerted approximately 30 cmH2O of pressure on the tracheal wall. These results are supported by our radiological study. We conclude that the LVLP cuff exerts an acceptable amount of pressure on the tracheal wall when

  9. Endotracheal tube cuff pressure: need for precise measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Reinaldo Cerqueira Braz

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: High compliance endotracheal tubes cuffs are used to prevent gas leak and also pulmonary aspiration in mechanically ventilated patients. However, the use of the usual cuff inflation volumes may cause tracheal damage. OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that endotracheal tube cuff pressures are routinely high (above 40 cmH2O in the Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU or Intensive Care Units (ICU. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Post anesthesia care unit and intensive care unit. PARTICIPANTS: We measured endotracheal tubes cuff pressure in 85 adult patients, as follows: G1 (n = 31 patients from the ICU; G2 (n = 32 patients from the PACU, after anesthesia with nitrous oxide; G3 (n = 22 patients from the PACU, after anesthesia without nitrous oxide. Intracuff pressure was measured using a manometer (Mallinckrodt, USA. Gas was removed as necessary to adjust cuff pressure to 30 cmH2O. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Endotracheal tube cuff pressure. RESULTS: High cuff pressure (> 40 cmH2O was observed in 90.6% patients of G2, 54.8% of G1 and 45.4% of G3 (P < 0.001. The volume removed from the cuff in G2 was higher than G3 (P < 0.05. CONCLUSION: Endotracheal tubes cuff pressures in ICU and PACU are routinely high and significant higher when nitrous oxide is used. Endotracheal tubes cuff pressure should be routinely measured to minimize tracheal trauma.

  10. Handcrafted cuff manometers do not accurately measure endotracheal tube cuff pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annoni, Raquel; de Almeida Junior, Antonio Evanir

    2015-01-01

    To test the agreement between two handcrafted devices and a cuff-specific manometer. The agreement between two handcrafted devices adapted to measure tracheal tube cuff pressure and a cuff-specific manometer was tested on 79 subjects. The cuff pressure was measured with a commercial manometer and with two handcrafted devices (HD) assembled with aneroid sphygmomanometers (HD1 and HD2). The data were compared using Wilcoxon and Spearman tests, the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and limit-of-agreement analysis. Cuff pressures assessed with handcrafted devices were significantly different from commercial device measurements (pressures were higher when measured with HD1 and lower with HD2). The ICCs between the commercial device and HD1 and HD2 were excellent (ICC = 0.8 p manometers do not provide accurate cuff pressure measurements when compared to a cuff-specific device and should not be used to replace the commercial cuff manometers in mechanically ventilated patients.

  11. Use and care of an endotracheal/ tracheostomy tube cuff — are ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    tion of the tracheal wall. The careful monitoring of cuff pres- sures, tube stability and hygiene of an endotracheal or tracheostomy (ET/TT) tube could play an important role in the prevention of tracheal stenosis.3,4. During the past few years an alarming number of patients have presented with acquired tracheal stenosis in the.

  12. Tracheal Stenosis and Cuff Pressure: Comparison of Minimal Occlusive Volume and Palpation Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Totonchi, Ziae; Jalili, Fatemeh; Hashemian, Seyed Mohammadreza; Jabardarjani, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Tracheal stenosis, which has received more emphasis recently, is a common post intubation complication and may develop due to different reasons. One important reason is the endotracheal tube cuff pressure. Therefore, this study sought to examine the accuracy of diagnostic test for palpation and minimal occlusive volume techniques to measure the endotracheal tube cuff pressure. In this cross sectional study, the accuracy of diagnostic tests for palpation and minimal occlusive volume techniques to measure the endotracheal tube cuff pressure was assessed in 101 patients aged over 18 years who had undergone open heart surgery and post-surgical mechanical ventilation in the ICU. In the palpation technique, the cuff pressure of 27 patients (26.7%) was reported to be out of the permissible range and for the rest of them (74 patients, 73.3%) it was within the permissible range. Then, the cuff pressure was checked by the standard method using a manometer and after comparing the results it was found that the cuff pressure of 92 patients (91.1%) was not in the permissible range and only nine patients (8.9%) had a cuff pressure within the permissible range (20-30 cm H2O). In minimal occlusive volume method compared with the standard method, 22 patients (21.7%) had cuff pressure within the permissible range of 20-30 cm H2O, and 79 of them (78.2%) had cuff pressure out of the permissible range and higher than the upper limit. This study recommends that the best way to measure the endotracheal tube cuff pressure is to use a cuff manometer, and when it is not available, the minimal occlusive volume would be a better alternative compared to the palpation technique to keep the cuff pressure within a proper range to avoid tracheotomy complications such as tracheal stenosis.

  13. An in vitro comparison of tracheostomy tube cuffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maguire S

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Seamus Maguire,1 Frances Haury,2 Korinne Jew2 1Research and Development, Covidien Respiratory and Monitoring Solutions, Athlone, Ireland; 2Medical Affairs, Covidien Respiratory and Monitoring Solutions, Boulder, CO, USA Introduction: The Shiley™ Flexible adult tracheostomy tube with TaperGuard™ cuff has been designed through its geometry, materials, diameter, and wall thickness to minimize micro-aspiration of fluids past the cuff and to provide an effective air seal in the trachea while also minimizing the risk of excessive contact pressure on the tracheal mucosa. The cuff also has a deflated profile that may allow for easier insertion through the stoma site. This unique design is known as the TaperGuard™ cuff. The purpose of the observational, in vitro study reported here was to compare the TaperGuard™ taper-shaped cuff to a conventional high-volume low-pressure cylindrical-shaped cuff (Shiley™ Disposable Inner Cannula Tracheostomy Tube [DCT] with respect to applied tracheal wall pressure, air and fluid sealing efficacy, and insertion force.Methods: Three sizes of tracheostomy tubes with the two cuff types were placed in appropriately sized tracheal models and lateral wall pressure was measured via pressure-sensing elements on the inner surface. Fluid sealing performance was assessed by inflating the cuffs within the tracheal models (25 cmH2O, instilling water above the cuff, and measuring fluid leakage past the cuff. To measure air leak, tubes were attached to a test lung and ventilator, and leak was calculated by subtracting the average exhaled tidal volume from the average delivered tidal volume. A tensile test machine was used to measure insertion force for each tube with the cuff deflated to simulate clinical insertion through a stoma site.Results: The average pressure exerted on the lateral wall of the model trachea was lower for the taper-shaped cuff than for the cylindrical cuff under all test conditions (P<0.05. The taper

  14. The effect of transoesophageal echocardiography probe insertion on tracheal cuff pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, P-H; Lin, V-C; Chen, H-S; Hung, K-C

    2011-09-01

    Increased tracheal cuff pressure during mechanical ventilation is associated with reduced mucosal blood flow and ischaemia, as well as postoperative sore throat. We assessed the potential effects of transoesophageal echocardiography probe insertion on the tracheal cuff pressure in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Using a manometer, the cuff pressure of a high-volume, low-pressure tracheal tube (inner diameter 7.0 mm for women and 7.5 mm for men) was adjusted to 25-30 cm H(2)O before blind insertion of a transoesophageal echocardiography probe. The pressure changes were then recorded for 1 min. After probe insertion, the mean (SD) intra-cuff pressure increased from 27.7 (1.5) to 36.2 (6.4) cm H(2)O (p 35 cm H(2)0 in 17/38 patients (45%). Our results suggest that transoesophageal echocardiography probe insertion may increase the tracheal cuff pressure more than that is generally recommended and therefore the latter should be routinely monitored under such circumstances. © 2011 The Authors. Anaesthesia © 2011 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  15. 21 CFR 868.5800 - Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. 868.5800 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5800 Tracheostomy tube and tube cuff. (a) Identification. A tracheostomy tube and tube cuff is a device intended to be placed into a...

  16. Identification of a Very High Cuff Pressure by Manual Palpation of the External Cuff Balloon on an Endotracheal Tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedberg, Pia; Eklund, Carolina; Högqvist, Sandra

    2015-06-01

    The most common complication due to intubation is a high cuff pressure. A high cuff pressure can cause postanesthetic tracheal mucosal injuries in patients undergoing surgery. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to describe whether anesthetic nurses and anesthesiologists identified a very high cuff pressure by manual palpation of the external cuff balloon on an endotracheal tube. An airway device was intubated with an endotracheal tube cuffed to 95 cm H2O. Each participant palpated the external cuff balloon and then filled out a questionnaire, including estimation of the cuff pressure and user frequency of the cuff pressure manometer. The results showed that 89.1% estimated that the cuff pressure was high. Among the participants who rated the cuff pressure as high, 44.8% rated the pressure as quite high and 60.6% rated the pressure as very high. There was no significant relationship between profession and skill in identifying a very high cuff pressure (P = .843) or between work experience and skill in terms of identifying a very high cuff pressure (P = .816). These findings indicate that 10% of patients are at risk of tracheal erosion because of a high cuff pressure.

  17. Evaluation of Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure in Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy and Postoperative Sore Throat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhe, Gajal; Sharma, Surendra Mohan

    2018-01-01

    The use of nitrous oxide and carboperitoneum in laparoscopic cholecystectomy lead to increase in endotracheal tube cuff pressure. It may impair tracheal mucosal perfusion with subsequent tracheal damage. The purpose of this study was to evaluate cuff pressure and incidence of post-operative sore throat in patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy. In this prospective observational study, 128 patients aged 18-65 years of American Society of Anesthesiologist physical status I and II undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy were enrolled and allocated alternately into two groups, Study Group (Maintenance of anesthesia with sevoflurane 1-2%, oxygen/nitrous oxide mixture; 40/60), Control Group (Maintenance of anesthesia with sevoflurane 1-2%, oxygen/air mixture; 40/60) were analysed and comapared. Each group contained 64 patients. Aneroid manometer was used to monitor cuff pressure. Volume of air used to inflate the cuff, baseline cuff pressure, comparison of intraoperative cuff pressure and incidence of post-operative sore throat were measured. The study results demonstrated higher cuff pressure in study group at all times after the creation of carboperitoneum (p=0.00) with increased incidence of sore throat(p=0.004). Increase in endotracheal tube cuff pressure was noted with the use of nitrous oxide in laparoscopic cholecystectomy with subsequent post-operative airway complication. Monitoring of cuff pressure is simple, noninvasive and efficient way of achieving therapeutic cuff pressure of 20-30 cm of H2O and thus recommends its use.

  18. Endotracheal tube cuff pressures and tube position in critically injured patients on arrival at a referral centre: Avoidable harm?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy C. Hardcastle

    2016-03-01

    Conclusion: Most patients, whether intubated on-scene or at hospital have ETT cuff pressures that are excessive, with the potential for ischaemic necrosis of the tracheal mucosa. ETT cuff manometry should be standard of care for all prehospital and in-hospital intubations where the tube will remain in situ for any prolonged period of time. Before inter-facility transfer ETT position should be confirmed radiologically.

  19. Changes in cuff pressure of endotracheal tube during laparoscopic and open abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Zeynep Baysal; Uzunkoy, Ali; Cigdem, Ali; Ganidagli, Suleyman; Ozgonul, Abdullah

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate endotracheal tube cuff pressure alteration in patients during laparoscopic cholecystectomy surgery. Forty patients with ASA I-II physical status, who were scheduled for elective laparoscopic (group I) or open abdominal surgery (group II) were enrolled in the study. Tracheal intubation was always performed by an experienced anesthesiologist. The endotracheal tube cuff was inflated with air through a 10-ml syringe. The cuff was connected to a manometer. The endotracheal cuff pressure was registered every 5 min after tracheal intubation. At the time of discharge from the Post-Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) and 12 h after tracheal extubation, patients were asked about their laryngotracheal condition by an independent observer who was uninformed of the patient allocation groups. We investigated laryngotracheal complaints such as sore throat, dysphasia, and hoarseness. The endotracheal cuff pressures in group I were significantly higher than those in the group II at all time points studied (P pressures exceeded the critical pressure of 30 cmH(2)O after 5 min in the group I (intra-abdominal pneumoperitoneum was started). The incidence of sore throat was higher in group I than in group II in the PACU and at 12 h. This study indicates that the CO(2) pneumoperitoneum and Trendelenburg position used during laparoscopy increase endotracheal cuff pressure and lead to discomfort in the postoperative patient. Measurement of endotracheal cuff pressure is a simple and inexpensive procedure and should be applied in patients under going laparoscopic surgery.

  20. Impact of tracheal cuff shape on microaspiration of gastric contents in intubated critically ill patients: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaillette, Emmanuelle; Brunin, Guillaume; Girault, Christophe; Zerimech, Farid; Chiche, Arnaud; Broucqsault-Dedrie, Céline; Fayolle, Cyril; Minacori, Franck; Alves, Isabelle; Barrailler, Stephanie; Robriquet, Laurent; Tamion, Fabienne; Delaporte, Emmanuel; Thellier, Damien; Delcourte, Claire; Duhamel, Alain; Nseir, Saad

    2015-09-25

    Ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is the most common infection in intubated critically ill patients. Microaspiration of the contaminated gastric and oropharyngeal secretions is the main mechanism involved in the pathophysiology of VAP. Tracheal cuff plays an important role in stopping the progression of contaminated secretions into the lower respiratory tract. Previous in vitro studies suggested that conical cuff shape might be helpful in improving tracheal sealing. However, clinical studies found conflicting results. The aim of this study is to determine the impact of conical tracheal cuff shape on the microaspiration of gastric contents in critically ill patients. This prospective cluster randomized controlled crossover open-label trial is currently being conducted in ten French intensive care units (ICUs). Patients are allocated to intubation with a polyvinyl chloride (PVC) standard (barrel)-shaped or a PVC conical-shaped tracheal tube. The primary objective is to determine the impact of the conical shaped tracheal cuff on abundant microaspiration of gastric contents. Secondary outcomes include the incidence of microaspiration of oropharyngeal secretions, tracheobronchial colonization, VAP and ventilator-associated events. Abundant microaspiration is defined as the presence of pepsin at significant level (>200 ng/ml) in at least 30 % of the tracheal aspirates. Pepsin and amylase are quantitatively measured in all tracheal aspirates during the 48 h following inclusion. Quantitative tracheal aspirate culture is performed at inclusion and twice weekly. We plan to recruit 312 patients in the participating ICUs. BEST Cuff is the first randomized controlled study evaluating the impact of PVC tracheal-cuff shape on gastric microaspirations in patients receiving invasive mechanical ventilation. Enrollment began in June 2014 and is expected to end in October 2015. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01948635 (registered 31 August 2013).

  1. Endotracheal tubes for critically ill patients: an in vivo analysis of associated tracheal injury, mucociliary clearance, and sealing efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li Bassi, Gianluigi; Luque, Nestor; Martí, Joan Daniel; Aguilera Xiol, Eli; Di Pasquale, Marta; Giunta, Valeria; Comaru, Talitha; Rigol, Montserrat; Terraneo, Silvia; De Rosa, Francesca; Rinaudo, Mariano; Crisafulli, Ernesto; Peralta Lepe, Rogelio Cesar; Agusti, Carles; Lucena, Carmen; Ferrer, Miguel; Fernández, Laia; Torres, Antoni

    2015-05-01

    Improvements in the design of the endotracheal tube (ETT) have been achieved in recent years. We evaluated tracheal injury associated with ETTs with novel high-volume low-pressure (HVLP) cuffs and subglottic secretions aspiration (SSA) and the effects on mucociliary clearance (MCC). Twenty-nine pigs were intubated with ETTs comprising cylindrical or tapered cuffs and made of polyvinylchloride (PVC) or polyurethane. In specific ETTs, SSA was performed every 2 h. Following 76 h of mechanical ventilation, pigs were weaned and extubated. Images of the tracheal wall were recorded before intubation, at extubation, and 24 and 96 h thereafter through a fluorescence bronchoscope. We calculated the red-to-green intensity ratio (R/G), an index of tracheal injury, and the green-plus-blue (G+B) intensity, an index of normalcy, of the most injured tracheal regions. MCC was assessed through fluoroscopic tracking of radiopaque markers. After 96 h from extubation, pigs were killed, and a pathologist scored injury. Cylindrical cuffs presented a smaller increase in R/G vs tapered cuffs (P = .011). Additionally, cuffs made of polyurethane produced a minor increase in R/G (P = .012) and less G+B intensity decline (P = .022) vs PVC cuffs. Particularly, a cuff made of polyurethane and with a smaller outer diameter outperformed all cuffs. SSA-related histologic injury ranged from cilia loss to subepithelial inflammation. MCC was 0.9 ± 1.8 and 0.4 ± 0.9 mm/min for polyurethane and PVC cuffs, respectively (P < .001). HVLP cuffs and SSA produce tracheal injury, and the recovery is incomplete up to 96 h following extubation. Small, cylindrical-shaped cuffs made of polyurethane cause less injury. MCC decline is reduced with polyurethane cuffs.

  2. Endotracheal tube cuff pressures – the worrying reality: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Secondary aims were to determine whether the tube size, tube make or place of intubation affected cuff pressure. Method. Endotracheal tube cuff pressures of 91 patients in the trauma centre and 100 patients in the theatre complex were randomly measured using a Mallinckrodt cuff pressure gauge. The measurements ...

  3. Comparison of prophylactic effects of polyurethane cylindrical or tapered cuff and polyvinyl chloride cuff endotracheal tubes on ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ata Mahmoodpoor

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Because microaspiration of contaminated supraglottic secretions past the endotracheal tube cuff is considered to be central in the pathogenesis of pneumonia, improved design of tracheal tubes with new cuff material and shape have reduced the size and number of folds, which together with the addition of suction ports above the cuff to drain pooled subglottic secretions leads to reduced aspiration of oropharyngeal secretions. So we conducted a study to compare the prophylactic effects of polyurethane-cylindrical or tapered cuff and polyvinyl chloride cuff endotracheal tubes (ETT on ventilator-associated pneumonia. This randomized clinical trial was carried out in a 12 bed surgical intensive care unit. 96 patients expected to require mechanical ventilation more than 96 hours were randomly allocated to one of three following groups: Polyvinyl chloride cuff (PCV ETT, Polyurethane (PU cylindrical Sealguard ETT and PU Taperguard ETT. Cuff pressure monitored every three hours 3 days in all patients. Mean cuff pressure didn't have significant difference between three groups during 72 hours. Pneumonia was seen in 11 patients (34% in group PVC, 8 (25% in Sealguard and 7 (21% in Taperguard group. Changes in mean cuff pressure between Sealguard and PVC tubes and also between Taperguard and PVC tubes did not show any significant difference. There was no significant difference in overinflation between three groups. The use of ETT with PU material results in reducing ventilator-associated pneumonia compared to ETT with PVC cuff. In PU tubes Taperguard has less incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia compared to Sealguard tubes.

  4. [Measurement of tube cuff pressure levels in intensive care unit: considerations on the benefits of training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juliano, Silvia Renata Rezek; Juliano, Maria Cecília Rezek; Cividanes, Jose Paulo; Houly, João Geraldo Simões; Gebara, Otavio Celso Eluf; Cividanes, Gil Vicente L; Catão, Elaine C

    2007-09-01

    The tube cuff pressure directly transmitted on the tracheal wall in an irregular form can cause injuries and lead to bronchoaspiration. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that the implementation of routine tube cuff pressure measurements result in a reliable control to maintain the measurements within the parameters considered safe, thus preventing the described complications. A total of 3,195 tube cuff measurements were obtained from 1,194 male and female patients admitted at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and Coronary Unit (CU), who were undergoing mechanical ventilation with endotracheal prosthesis and tracheotomy cannula, during the morning and afternoon periods. From March to August 2005 the follow-up of the measurements obtained by the physical therapy professionals was carried out and it was observed that the measurements were irregular, on average, in 80% of the cases. Thus, a training program was established, which was focused on the Nursing Teams of the ICU and CU, consisting in providing directions for the adequate procedures performed at the bedside (in loco training). The training procedures were carried out at two different periods (morning and afternoon) in order to include the whole team. It is suggested that it is necessary to monitor tube cuff pressure through the implementation of routine measurements in the morning, afternoon and evening periods as a prophylactic measure, in order to prevent the possible complications of tracheal prosthesis balloon pressure.

  5. 21 CFR 868.5795 - Tracheal tube cleaning brush.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheal tube cleaning brush. 868.5795 Section 868.5795 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5795 Tracheal tube cleaning brush. (a...

  6. Severed cuff inflation tubing of endotracheal tube: A novel way to prevent cuff deflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Amrut K; Chaudhuri, Souvik; Joseph, Tim T; Kamble, Deependra; Gotur, Gopal; Venkatesh, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    A well-secured endotracheal tube (ETT) is essential for safe anesthesia. The ETT has to be fixed with the adhesive plasters or with tie along with adhesive plasters appropriately. It is specially required in patients having beard, in intensive care unit (ICU) patients or in oral surgeries. If re-adjustment of the ETT is necessary, we should be cautious while removal of the plasters and tie, as there may be damage to the cuff inflation system. This can be a rare cause of ETT cuff leak, thus making maintenance of adequate ventilation difficult and requiring re-intubation. In a difficult airway scenario, it can be extremely challenging to re-intubate again. We report an incidence where the ETT cuff tubing was severed while attempting to re-adjust and re-fix the ETT and the patient required re-intubation. Retrospectively, we thought of and describe a safe, reliable and novel technique to prevent cuff deflation of the severed inflation tube. The technique can also be used to monitor cuff pressure in such scenarios.

  7. In vitro evaluation of the method effectiveness to limit inflation pressure cuffs of endotracheal tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael de Macedo Coelho

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Cuffs of tracheal tubes protect the lower airway from aspiration of gastric contents and facilitate ventilation, but may cause many complications, especially when the cuff pressure exceeds 30 cm H2O. This occurs in over 30% of conventional insufflations, so it is recommended to limit this pressure. In this study we evaluated the in vitro effectiveness of a method of limiting the cuff pressure to a range between 20 and 30 cm H2O. METHOD: Using an adapter to connect the tested tube to the anesthesia machine, the relief valve was regulated to 30 cm H2O, inflating the cuff by operating the rapid flow of oxygen button. There were 33 trials for each tube of three manufacturers, of five sizes (6.5-8.5, using three times inflation (10, 15 and 20 s, totaling 1485 tests. After inflation, the pressure obtained was measured with a manometer. Pressure >30 cm H2O or <20 cm H2O were considered failures. RESULTS: There were eight failures (0.5%, 95% CI: 0.1-0.9%, with all by pressures <20 cm H2O and after 10 s inflation (1.6%, 95% CI: 0 5-2.7%. One failure occurred with a 6.5 tube (0.3%, 95% CI: -0.3 to 0.9%, six with 7.0 tubes (2%, 95% CI: 0.4-3.6%, and one with a 7.5 tube (0.3%, 95% CI: -0.3 to 0.9%. CONCLUSION: This method was effective for inflating tracheal tube cuffs of different sizes and manufacturers, limiting its pressure to a range between 20 and 30 cm H2O, with a success rate of 99.5% (95% CI: 99.1-99.9%.

  8. Determinação de volumes e pressões de balonetes de tubos traqueais insuflados com ar ambiente ou óxido nitroso Determinación de volúmenes y presiones de balones de tubos traqueales insuflados con aire ambiente u óxido nitroso Volume and pressure of tracheal tube cuffs filled with air or nitrous oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Leonardo Cárpio Peña

    2004-06-01

    balanceada con entubación orotraqueal. El balón fue insuflado conforme criterios clínicos. Las medidas de base fueron realizadas después de 15 minutos del inicio de la anestesia con un manómetro aneróide calibrado en cm de H2O y dieron los valores iniciales de presión y volumen. Los pacientes fueron divididos en dos grupos: balón reinsuflado con aire ambiente, grupo A, o con óxido nitroso, grupo B. Las medidas de presión fueron obtenidas en intervalos hasta la primera hora y los resultados comparados. RESULTADOS: Los grupos se mostraron comparables para edad y sexo. En ambos grupos los valores basales medios para presión fueron próximos de 40 cmH2O con 8 ml de volumen. En el grupo con aire ambiente, las presiones aumentaron hasta 36 cmH2O en una hora. En el grupo de balón insuflado con N2O, las presiones cayeron abajo de 20 cmH2O entre 20 y 30 minutos de anestesia. CONCLUSIONES: El uso de N2O a 100% para insuflación del balón de sonda traqueal no constituye método seguro, acarreando progresiva pérdida de la capacidad de vedación. El uso de aire ambiente promueve aumento de volumen y de presión en el balón, aumentando la posibilidad de lesión de la mucosa traqueal.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Tracheal tube cuff pressure against tracheal wall should to prevent air leaked or pulmonary aspiration, allowing adequate capillary blood flow. This study aimed at determining pressure variations of tracheal tube cuffs filled with air or 100% nitrous oxide. METHODS: Participated in this study 30 patients submitted to balanced general anesthesia with tracheal intubation. Cuff was inflated according to clinical criteria. The intracuff pressure measurements were undertaken after 15 minutes of anesthesia by means of an aneroid manometer gaged in cm of H2O and have provided initial pressure and volume values. The patients was allocated in two groups: cuff inflated with air, group A, and with nitrous oxide, group B. Measurements were recorded during one hour and results were

  9. Efeitos da pressão limite (25 cmH2O e mínima de “selo” do balonete de tubos traqueais sobre a mucosa traqueal do cão Efectos de la presión limite (25 cmH2O y mínima de “sello” del balón de tubos traquéales sobre la mucosa traqueal del can Effects of tracheal tube cuff limit pressure (25 cmH2O and “seal” pressure on tracheal mucosa of dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuel Celice Castilho

    2003-12-01

    ón del tubo traqueal insuflado con volumen de aire suficiente para obtener presión de “sello” o con la presión limite de 25 cmH2O, abajo de la presión crítica de 30 cm de agua para producción de lesión de la mucosa traqueal. MÉTODO: Diez y seis canes fueron sometidos a anestesia venosa y ventilación artificial. Los canes fueron distribuidos aleatoriamente en dos grupos de acuerdo con la presión en el balón del tubo traqueal (Portex Blue-Line, Inglaterra: Gsello (n = 8 balón con presión mínima de “sello” para impedir vaciamiento de aire durante la respiración artificial; G25 (n = 8 balón insuflado hasta la obtención de la presión de 25 cmH2O. La medida de la presión del balón fue realizada por medio de manómetro digital en el inicio (control y después de 60, 120 y 180 minutos. Después del sacrificio de los canes, fueron hechas biopsias en las áreas de la mucosa traqueal adyacentes al balón y al tubo traqueal para análisis de microscopio electrónico de barredura (MEV. RESULTADOS: La presión media del balón en G25 se mantuvo entre 24,8 y 25 cmH2O y en Gsello entre 11,9 y 12,5 cmH2O durante el experimento. Las alteraciones a la MEV fueron pequeñas y no significantemente diferentes en los grupos (p > 0,30, pero ocurrieron lesiones más intensas en las áreas de contacto de la mucosa traqueal con el balón del tubo traqueal, en los dos grupos, en relación a las áreas de la mucosa adyacentes o no al tubo traqueal (p BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Injuries of tracheal mucosa in contact with tracheal tube cuff is a function of cuff pressure and exposure time. This study aimed at analyzing injuries of tracheal mucosa in contact with tracheal tube cuff inflated to reach “seal” pressure or limit 25 cmH2O pressure, below critical 30 cmH2O, to prevent tracheal damage. METHODS: This study involved 16 dogs submitted to intravenous anesthesia and artificial ventilation. Dogs were randomly distributed into two experimental groups according to

  10. Do lower cuff pressures reduce damage to the tracheal mucosa? A scanning electron microscopy study in neonatal pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutter, Annette P N; Bittermann, Anne G; Bettschart-Wolfensberger, Regula; Spielmann, Nelly; Hartnack, Sonja; Ziegler, Urs; Weiss, Markus; Mauch, Jacqueline Y

    2013-02-01

    Modern high volume-low pressure (HVLP) endotracheal tubes (ETT) cuffs can seal the trachea using baseline cuff pressures (CP) lower than peak inspiratory airway pressures (PIP). The aim of the study was to determine whether this technique reduces the damage to the tracheal mucosa compared to constant CP of 20 cmH(2)O. Eighteen piglets were intubated with an ID 4.0 mm HVLP cuffed ETT (Microcuff PET) and artificially ventilated with 20 cmH(2)O PIP and 5 cmH(2)O PEEP. Animals were randomly allocated to two groups of CP: group A (just seal; n = 9) and group B (20 cmH(2)O; n = 9), controlled constantly with a manometer during the following 4-h study period under sevoflurane anesthesia. After euthanasia, cuff position was marked in situ. Damage in the cuff region was evaluated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination by grading of mucosal damage and by estimating percentage of intact mucosal area both by a blinded observer. Maximal CP to seal the trachea in group A ranged from 12 to 18 cmH(2)O (median: 14 cmH(2)O). Using a mixed effects model approach, the estimated mean effect of group B vs group A was an increase of 17.9% (SE 8.1%) higher proportion of pictures with an area of at least 5% intact mucosa (P = 0.042). Minimal sealing pressures with cyclic pressure changes from CP did not result in decreased damage to the tracheal mucosa compared to constant CP of 20 cmH(2)O in this short-term animal trial. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Measurements of endotracheal tube cuff contact pressure using fibre Bragg gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, F. U.; Correia, R.; Korposh, S.; Morgan, S. P.; Hayes-Gill, B. R.; James, S. W.; Evans, D.; Norris, A.

    2015-09-01

    An optical fibre Bragg grating (FBG) was used to measure local strain (due to contact pressure) at the interface of a cuffed endotracheal tube (ETT) tested in a tracheal model. The tracheal model consisted of a corrugated tube. Two FBG sensors written in a single optical fibre were attached to the outside wall of the cuff of the ETT. Intracuff endotracheal pressure was measured using a digital manometer, while the contact pressure between the model trachea and the ETT was measured using Flexiforce sensors. Changes in the Bragg wavelengths in response to the inflation of the cuff of the ETT, and concomitant pressure increase, were observed to be dependent on the location of the FBGs at the corrugations, i.e., the annular peaks and troughs of the corrugated tube. The performance of both contact pressure sensors FBG and Flexiforce suggests that FBG technology is better suited to this application as it allows the measurement of contact pressures on non-uniform surfaces such as in the tracheal model.

  12. Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressures in Patients Intubated Prior to Helicopter EMS Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Tennyson

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Endotracheal intubation is a common intervention in critical care patients undergoing helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS transportation. Measurement of endotracheal tube (ETT cuff pressures is not common practice in patients referred to our service. Animal studies have demonstrated an association between the pressure of the ETT cuff on the tracheal mucosa and decreased blood flow leading to mucosal ischemia and scarring. Cuff pressures greater than 30 cmH2O impede mucosal capillary blood flow. Multiple prior studies have recommended 30 cmH2O as the maximum safe cuff inflation pressure. This study sought to evaluate the inflation pressures in ETT cuffs of patients presenting to HEMS. Methods We enrolled a convenience sample of patients presenting to UMass Memorial LifeFlight who were intubated by the sending facility or emergency medical services (EMS agency. Flight crews measured the ETT cuff pressures using a commercially available device. Those patients intubated by the flight crew were excluded from this analysis as the cuff was inflated with the manometer to a standardized pressure. Crews logged the results on a research form, and we analyzed the data using Microsoft Excel and an online statistical analysis tool. Results We analyzed data for 55 patients. There was a mean age of 57 years (range 18–90. The mean ETT cuff pressure was 70 (95% CI= [61–80] cmH2O. The mean lies 40 cmH2O above the maximum accepted value of 30 cmH2O (p120 cmH2O, the maximum pressure on the analog gauge. Conclusion Patients presenting to HEMS after intubation by the referral agency (EMS or hospital have ETT cuffs inflated to pressures that are, on average, more than double the recommended maximum. These patients are at risk for tracheal mucosal injury and scarring from decreased mucosal capillary blood flow. Hospital and EMS providers should use ETT cuff manometry to ensure that they inflate ETT cuffs to safe pressures.

  13. Endotracheal Tube Cuff Management at Altitude

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-05

    pressure of 20-22 mmHg using a cuff pressure manometer (Rusch Endotest, Teleflex Inc., Limerick, PA) and not manipulated again. 2. Manual – The...ETT cuff was inflated with air to a pressure of 20-22 mmHg using a cuff pressure manometer (Rusch Endotest, Teleflex Inc., Limerick, PA). At a

  14. [Tracheal intubation with Parker Flex-Tip tubes assisted by tube-guiding devices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Ju; Morita, Shigeho; Suzuki, Maya; Arita, Hideko; Hanaoka, Kazuo

    2010-04-01

    In tracheal intubation assisted by tube-guiding devices passing through the tube, such as fiberoptic scopes, bougies, tracheal tube exchange catheters, and light wands, passage of the tube-guiding device, by itself, is often easy. But advancing a tracheal tube with a conventional distal tip over these tube-guiding devices is frequently difficult or impossible, because its rigid, side-beveled tip frequently catches on anatomical features of the airway. A novel tracheal tube, the Parker Flex-Tip tube (Parker Medical, Colorado, USA) has a centered, curved, tapered and flexible distal tip that passes through the airway faster and easier than conventional tracheal tubes. As it is advanced along a tube-guiding device, the tip of the Parker tube travels along the midline of the airway, without the gap that usually exists between the distal edge of a conventional tracheal tube and the tube-guiding device. The gapless, midline travel of the Parker tube leads to a greater incidence of first-attempt intubation success with tube-guiding devices, because there is less risk of tube tip hang-ups on the arytenoids and the vocal cords. Clinically, use of the Parker tube is helpful for oral and nasal intubations, especially in patients with difficult airways.

  15. In vitro evaluation of the method effectiveness to limit inflation pressure cuffs of endotracheal tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Rafael de Macedo; de Paiva, Thiago Trigueiro Morais; da Silva Telles Mathias, Ligia Andrade

    2016-01-01

    Cuffs of tracheal tubes protect the lower airway from aspiration of gastric contents and facilitate ventilation, but may cause many complications, especially when the cuff pressure exceeds 30cm H2O. This occurs in over 30% of conventional insufflations, so it is recommended to limit this pressure. In this study we evaluated the in vitro effectiveness of a method of limiting the cuff pressure to a range between 20 and 30cm H2O. Using an adapter to connect the tested tube to the anesthesia machine, the relief valve was regulated to 30cm H2O, inflating the cuff by operating the rapid flow of oxygen button. There were 33 trials for each tube of three manufacturers, of five sizes (6.5-8.5), using three times inflation (10, 15 and 20s), totaling 1485 tests. After inflation, the pressure obtained was measured with a manometer. Pressure >30cm H2O or pressures pressure to a range between 20 and 30cm H2O, with a success rate of 99.5% (95% CI: 99.1-99.9%). Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure Following Intubation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Powell, Michael A; Duncan, Diana Y; Pojman, David A; Wyatt, Ronald E; Schoneboom, Bruce A; Samolitis, Timothy J

    2005-01-01

    .... Pressure must be high enough to seal the trachea to prevent aspiration of regurgitated stomach contents and avoid air leaks to the atmosphere, yet low enough to allow adequate perfusion of the tracheal mucosa...

  17. [Influence of intermittently monitoring on endotracheal tube cuff pressure using handheld pressure gauge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ling; Xie, Chen; Zhang, Lifeng; Meng, Liying; Li, Guizheng; Li, Yang; Huang, Bing; Pan, Linghui; Tang, Zhanhong

    2017-01-01

    To discuss the influence of intermittently monitoring on endotracheal tube cuff pressure using handheld pressure gauge, and to provide some reference for the clinical work. The experiment was carried out on the model of the glass tube, which was divided into three parts. Each part of the experiment was divided into normal pressure group and high pressure group according to the different inflation pressure target value. The endotracheal tube cuff pressure was determined intermittently by using the transparent tracheal models which had a static diameter of 2 cm. The target press value of normal pressure group was 32 cmH 2 O (1 cmH 2 O = 0.098 kPa) while that of high pressure group was 40 cmH 2 O. The handheld pressure gauge was connected with the indicated cuff through a tee joint, and the pressure in the cuff in both groups was determined. The pressure loss caused by intermittent measurement of the two groups was compared. By switching the tee joint, the pressure loss through the gauge self-structure and the pressure loss when connecting and disconnecting the indicated cuff were determined to analyze the causes of pressure loss caused by intermittent measurement of pressure gauge. The pressure loss caused by intermittent measurement of high pressure group was significantly higher than that of normal pressure group (cmH 2 O: 15.10±0.43 vs. 10.19±0.45) with statistical significance (t = -24.875, P = 0.000). The pressure loss through the gauge self-structure of high pressure group was also significantly higher than that of normal pressure group (cmH 2 O: 13.91±0.48 vs. 8.77±0.53), which showed a statistics significance (t = -22.854, P = 0.000). The pressure loss when connecting and disconnecting the indicated cuff of the normal pressure and high pressure groups were (1.33±0.49) cmH 2 O and (1.23±0.55) cmH 2 O, respectively, without statistics significance (t = 0.445, P = 0.662). It was figured that the total pressure loss caused by intermittent measurement of the

  18. Endotracheal tube cuff pressure in three hospitals, and the volume required to produce an appropriate cuff pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sengupta Papiya

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cuff pressure in endotracheal (ET tubes should be in the range of 20–30 cm H2O. We tested the hypothesis that the tube cuff is inadequately inflated when manometers are not used. Methods With IRB approval, we studied 93 patients under general anesthesia with an ET tube in place in one teaching and two private hospitals. Anesthetists were blinded to study purpose. Cuff pressure in tube sizes 7.0 to 8.5 mm was evaluated 60 min after induction of general anesthesia using a manometer connected to the cuff pilot balloon. Nitrous oxide was disallowed. After deflating the cuff, we reinflated it in 0.5-ml increments until pressure was 20 cmH2O. Results Neither patient morphometrics, institution, experience of anesthesia provider, nor tube size influenced measured cuff pressure (35.3 ± 21.6 cmH2O. Only 27% of pressures were within 20–30 cmH2O; 27% exceeded 40 cmH2O. Although it varied considerably, the amount of air required to achieve a cuff pressure of 20 cmH2O was similar with each tube size. Conclusion We recommend that ET cuff pressure be set and monitored with a manometer.

  19. Technical communication: design and in vitro testing of a pressure-sensing syringe for endotracheal tube cuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, Alexander H; Slocum, Alexander H; Spiegel, Joan E

    2012-05-01

    Endotracheal intubation is a frequently performed procedure in the prehospital setting, intensive care unit, and for patients undergoing surgery. The endotracheal tube cuff must be inflated to a pressure that prevents air leaks without compromising tracheal mucosal blood flow. For simultaneous endotracheal tube cuff inflation and measurement, we designed and tested a novel pressure-sensing syringe in vitro. The prototype was developed using a standard 10-mL polycarbonate syringe body that houses a plunger and a silicone rubber bellows, the pressure-sensing element. Bellow feasibility was determined and modeled using finite element analysis. Repeatability testing at each pressure measurement for each bellows (pressure versus deflection) was within an average standard deviation of 0.3 cm to 1.61 cm (1%-5% error). Using an aneroid manometer for comparison, there was excellent linear correlation with a Spearman rank of 0.99 (P < 0.001), up to 30 cm H(2)O.

  20. Effects of user experience and method in the inflation of endotracheal tube pilot balloon on cuff pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, A B; Demirel, I; Gunduz, G; Erhan, O L

    2013-01-01

    Endotracheal tube cuff pressure (ETCP) is recommended to be maintained between 20-30 cm H2O limits. While insufficient inflation of ETC may cause aspirations, over-inflation of it may lead to damage in tracheal epithelium. We planned to investigate the effects of user experience and cuff pressure inflation method differences following endotracheal tube cuff pressure and complaints about it. Two hundred and fifty patients planned for general anaesthesia were included in this study. ETC was inflated by users with different experience according to leakage or pilot balloon palpation techniques. ETCPs were measured by manometer at three periods (5 and 60 minutes after endotracheal intubation, and before extubation). Complaints about it were recorded in post anaesthetic care unit and 24 hours postoperatively. Though we found experience of user had significant effect on the ETCP regulations, we observed inflation methods did not have any effect. However we found ETCP was higher than normal range with experienced users. A correlation was observed between cuff pressure and anaesthesia duration with postoperative complaints. Our study concluded that the methods used do not have any significant advantage over one another. While ETC inflated at normal pressure increases as user's experience increases, experience alone is not enough in adjusting ETCP. A manometer should be used in routine inflation of ETC instead of conventional methods. CP and anaesthesia duration have correlations with some postoperative complaints.

  1. Tracheal stoma necrosis: a case repor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pak S

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute tracheal dilatation, due to an overinflated cuff, has been reported early in the course of mechanical ventilation through an endotracheal tube. Tracheal stoma necrosis is a rare complication, but such can accompany acute tracheal dilation. Herein, we report a case of tracheal necrosis 9 days following tracheostomy placement in a 71-year old woman associated with overinflation of the tracheal tube cuff. This case report aims to 1 add to the scant body of knowledge about the diagnosis and management for the patients with tracheal stoma necrosis and 2 raise awareness for error-traps in interpreting diagnostic images, specifically satisfaction of search error, inattentional blindness error, and alliterative error.

  2. Linear Correlation of Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure and Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffman, Robert J

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Endotracheal tube cuff (ETTc inflation by standard methods may result in excessive ETTc pressure. Previous studies have indicated that methods of cuff inflation most frequently used to inflate ETTcs include palpation of the tension in the pilot balloon or injection of a predetermined volume of air to inflate the pilot balloon. If a logarithmic relationship exists between ETTc volume and ETTc pressure, small volumes of additional air will result in dramatic pressure increases after a volume threshold is reached. Our goal was to determine whether the relationship between ETTc volume and ETTc pressure is linear or non-linear.Methods: In this Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee-approved study, we recorded ETTc volume and pressure in four anesthetized and mechanically-ventilated canines ranging between 30-40 pounds (mean 34.7lb, SD 3.8lb that were endotracheally intubated with a 7.0 mm ETT. The varying cuff pressures associated with a distribution of 28 progressively increasing volumes of air in the ETTc were recorded. Spearman correlation was performed to determine if a linear or non-linear relationship existed between these variables.Results: The Spearman rho coefficient of correlation between ETTc volume and ETTc pressure was 0.969, or approximately 97%, suggesting near-perfect linear relationship between ETTc volume and ETTc pressure over the range of volumes and pressures tested.Conclusions: Over the range of volumes and pressures tested a linear relationship between volume and pressure results in no precipitous increase in slope of the pressure:volume curve as volume increases.[WestJEM. 2009;10:137-139.

  3. Evaluation of the endotracheal tube cuff pressure resulting from four different methods of inflation in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briganti, Angela; Portela, Diego A; Barsotti, Giovanni; Romano, Marta; Breghi, Gloria

    2012-09-01

    To evaluate the endotracheal tube cuff pressure achieved by four different inflation methods. Prospective clinical study. Eighty client owned dogs. After anaesthesia induction, endotracheal intubation was performed using plastic or silicone tubes. A clinician unaware of tube type inflated the cuff by simple digital palpation (method A), thereafter the cuff was deflated and inflated again by a second clinician who tried to reproduce a previously learned cuff pressure of between 19 and 24 mmHg (method B). During method C the cuff was inflated to the minimum occlusive volume at an airway pressure of 20 cm H(2) O, and in method D the cuff was incrementally deflated until an audible air leak could be heard from the oral cavity at an airway pressure of 25 cm H(2) O. For all the methods, an operator recorded the actual cuff pressure obtained using a manometer. Heart rate, respiratory rate and mean arterial pressure were monitored throughout the procedure. The mean inflation pressure for plastic tubes was 56 ± 28 mmHg for method A, 20 ± 9 mmHg for method B, 35 ± 32 mmHg for method C and 46 ± 39 mmHg for method D. Pressures using silicone tubes were significantly higher than for plastic tubes, the mean registered pressures being 79 ± 39, 33 ± 16, 77 ± 50 and 92 ± 56 mmHg for methods A, B, C and D. None of the methods evaluated in this study can be considered effective for inflating the endotracheal tube cuff to within the optimal range when using silicone tubes. Direct measurement of the cuff pressure with a manometer is therefore recommended. © 2012 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia. © 2012 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesiologists.

  4. Is Anesthesiologist’s experience important while inflating the endotracheal tube cuff with the right pressure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesrin Turan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Cuff pressure in endotracheal tubes should be in the range of 26–30 cm H2O. In this study we aimed to examine whether anesthesiologist’s experience is important while inflating the endotracheal tube correctly after the intubation.Materials and methods: The patients who were included to the study were intubated after the induction of general anesthesia. The patients were divided into 4 groups according to the training year of the anesthesia research assistant resident inflating the endotracheal tube (ET cuff. Group I (n=64 the cuff pressure which were inflated by the first year residents; Group II (n=92 the cuff pressure which were inflated by the 2nd year residents; Group III (n=144 the cuff pressure which were inflated by the 3rd year residents; Group IV (n=93 the cuff pressure which were inflated by the 4th year residents were measured by manometer.Results: When we compared the cases in which the cuff pressure were between 26-30cm H2O we found that the best results were in Group II and respectively in Group III and IV and the worst results were in Group I. The difference between Group II and Group I were statistically significant (p<0.05.Conclusion: We believe that manometer should be used ET for cuff pressure setting and monitoring. J Clin Exp Invest 2010; 1(3: 195-198

  5. Automated Control of Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure during Simulated Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-21

    endotracheal cuff pressure in intubated critically ill patients: prevalence and risk factors . Eur J Anaesthesiol. 2009; 26(3):229-234. 10...of secretions from the oropharynx that are implicated in the development of ventilator-associated pneumonia [4]. Clinically important changes in cuff...related mucosal damage as well as underinflation promoting fluid leakage around the cuff, which is associated with pneumonia . Aeromedical transport

  6. Correlation Between Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure and Tracheal Wall Pressure Using Air and Saline Filled Cuffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-31

    sell any patented invention that may relate to them. Qualified requestors may obtain copies of this report from the Defense Technical Information...been the assumption that the pressure measured at the pilot balloon is equal to the pressure exerted on the TW. We evaluated ETTs at sea level and...Pressure Profile Systems, Los Angeles, CA) and the ETT pilot balloon via a data logger (Sparx Engineering, Manvel, TX). Figure 1

  7. Altitude-Related Change in Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressures in Helicopter EMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisberg, Stacy N; McCall, Jonathan C; Tennyson, Joseph

    2017-06-01

    Over-inflation of endotracheal tube (ETT) cuffs has the potential to lead to scarring and stenosis of the trachea.1, 2,3, 4 The air inside an ETT cuff is subject to expansion as atmospheric pressure decreases, as happens with an increase in altitude. Emergency medical services helicopters are not pressurized, thereby providing a good environment for studying the effects of altitude changes ETT cuff pressures. This study aims to explore the relationship between altitude and ETT cuff pressures in a helicopter air-medical transport program. ETT cuffs were initially inflated in a nonstandardized manner and then adjusted to a pressure of 25 cmH 2 O. The pressure was again measured when the helicopter reached maximum altitude. A final pressure was recorded when the helicopter landed at the receiving facility. We enrolled 60 subjects in the study. The mean for initial tube cuff pressures was 70 cmH 2 O. Maximum altitude for the program ranged from 1,000-3,000 feet above sea level, with a change in altitude from 800-2,480 feet. Mean cuff pressure at altitude was 36.52 ± 8.56 cmH 2 O. Despite the significant change in cuff pressure at maximum altitude, there was no relationship found between the maximum altitude and the cuff pressures measured. Our study failed to demonstrate the expected linear relationship between ETT cuff pressures and the maximum altitude achieved during typical air-medical transportation in our system. At altitudes less than 3,000 feet above sea level, the effect of altitude change on ETT pressure is minimal and does not require a change in practice to saline-filled cuffs.

  8. Altitude-Related Change in Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressures in Helicopter EMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacy N. Weisberg

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Over-inflation of endotracheal tube (ETT cuffs has the potential to lead to scarring and stenosis of the trachea. 1, 2, 3, 4 The air inside an ETT cuff is subject to expansion as atmospheric pressure decreases, as happens with an increase in altitude. Emergency medical services helicopters are not pressurized, thereby providing a good environment for studying the effects of altitude changes ETT cuff pressures. This study aims to explore the relationship between altitude and ETT cuff pressures in a helicopter air-medical transport program. Methods: ETT cuffs were initially inflated in a nonstandardized manner and then adjusted to a pressure of 25 cmH 2O. The pressure was again measured when the helicopter reached maximum altitude. A final pressure was recorded when the helicopter landed at the receiving facility. Results: We enrolled 60 subjects in the study. The mean for initial tube cuff pressures was 70 cmH 2O. Maximum altitude for the program ranged from 1,000–3,000 feet above sea level, with a change in altitude from 800–2,480 feet. Mean cuff pressure at altitude was 36.52 ± 8.56 cmH 2O. Despite the significant change in cuff pressure at maximum altitude, there was no relationship found between the maximum altitude and the cuff pressures measured. Conclusion: Our study failed to demonstrate the expected linear relationship between ETT cuff pressures and the maximum altitude achieved during typical air-medical transportation in our system. At altitudes less than 3,000 feet above sea level, the effect of altitude change on ETT pressure is minimal and does not require a change in practice to saline-filled cuffs.

  9. Endotracheal tube cuff pressure management in adult critical care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    healthcare sectors in the Nelson Mandela Metropole, Eastern Cape, South Africa, using a structured self-administered questionnaire based on a literature review. Results. The survey response was 75% (100/134). Practice variances included the frequency of cuff pressure monitoring: only 52% of respondents performed cuff ...

  10. Management of dogs and cats with endotracheal tube tracheal foreign bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutt, Laura K.; Webb, Jinelle A.; Prosser, Kirsten J.; Defarges, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Two cats and 3 dogs were treated for an endotracheal tube tracheal foreign body (ETFB) during recovery from general anesthesia. Bronchoscopy was used to remove the ETFB. Animals were clinically normal at discharge. While rare, ETFB can occur upon recovery from anesthesia. Bronchoscopy is an effective way to remove ETFB. PMID:24891640

  11. The influence of the endotracheal tube cuff on the occurrence of ventilator-associated pneumonia

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    Marko Kučan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: An endotracheal tube enables patient ventilation, but also presents a risk of complications. The accumulation of subglottic secretions above the cuff may cause ventilatorassociated pneumonia. The purpose of the article is to establish the effect of the endotracheal tube cuff (shape and material, method of inflation, verifying and maintaining pressure on the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia. Methods: A descriptive method with a systematic review of domestic and foreign literature was used. The literature was retrieved from electronic databases and the cooperative bibliographic/catalogue database. According to eligibility criteria, sixteen original scientific articles published in the last ten years were finally used. Data were processed with qualitative content analysis. Results: Cuff inflation control with a manometer and continuous measuring and adjustment of cuff pressure with modern equipment were found to be the safest methods. According to the articles on shape and material, conical polyurethane cuffs provide the best sealing. Discussion and conclusion: Ventilator-associated pneumonia is a serious complication in mechanically ventilated patients. Maintaining appropriate cuff pressure proved to be a very effective preventive measure. The research presented here is limited by the small number of available articles. Further research is needed before practical applications are attempted.

  12. MEASUREMENT OF ENDOTRACHEAL TUBE CUFF PRESSURE IN MECHANICALLYVENTILATED PATIENTS ON ARRIVAL TO INTENSIVE CARE UNIT - A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY

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    Arun Kumar Ajjappa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The monitoring of Endotracheal Tube (ETT cuff pressure in intubated patients on arrival to intensive care unit is very essential. The cuff pressure must be within an optimal range of 20-30cm H2O ensuring ventilation with no complications related to cuff overinflation and underinflation. This can be measured with a cuff pressure manometer. The aim of the study is to measure the endotracheal tube cuff pressure in patients on arrival to intensive care unit and to identify prevalence of endotracheal cuff underinflation and overinflation. MATERIALS AND METHODS A cross-sectional study was done on mechanically-ventilated patients who were intubated in casualty (emergency department on arrival to intensive care unit in S.S. Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Centre, Davangere. About 50 critically-ill patients intubated with a high volume, low pressure endotracheal tube were included in the study. An analogue manometer was used to measure the endotracheal tube cuff pressure. It was compared with the recommended level. The settings of mechanical ventilation, endotracheal tube size and peak airway pressure were recorded. RESULTS It was found that the mean cuff pressure was 64.10 cm of H2O with a standard deviation of 32.049. Of the measured cuff pressures, only 2% had pressures within an optimal range (20-30cm of H2O. 88% had cuff pressures more than 30cm of H2O. The mean peak airway pressure found to be 20.50cm of H2O with a Standard Deviation (SD of 5.064. CONCLUSION This study is done to emphasise the importance of cuff pressure measurement in all mechanically-ventilated patients as cuff pressure is found to be high in most of the patients admitted to intensive care unit. Complications of overinflation and underinflation can only be prevented if the acceptable cuff pressures are achieved.

  13. Endotracheal tubes and fluid aspiration: an in vitro evaluation of new cuff technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariyaselvam, Maryanne Z; Marsh, Lucy L; Bamford, Sarah; Smith, Ann; Wise, Matt P; Williams, David W

    2017-03-04

    Aspiration of subglottic secretions past the endotracheal tube (ETT) cuff is a prerequisite for developing ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Subglottic secretion drainage (SSD) ETTs reduce aspiration of subglottic secretions and have demonstrated lower VAP rates. We compared the performance of seven SSD ETTs against a non-SSD ETT in preventing aspiration below inflated cuffs. ETTs were positioned vertically in 2 cm diameter cylinders. Four ml of a standard microbial suspension was added above inflated cuffs. After 1 h, aspiration was measured and ETTs demonstrating no leakage were subjected to rotational movement and evaluation over 24 h. Collected aspirated fluid was used to inoculate agar media and incubated aerobically at 37 °C for 24 h. The aspiration rate, volume and number of microorganisms that leaked past the cuff was measured. Experiments were repeated (×10) for each type of ETT, with new ETTs used for each repeat. Best performing ETTs were then tested in five different cylinder diameters (1.6, 1.8, 2.0, 2.2 and 2.4 cm). Experiments were repeated as above using sterile water. Volume and time taken for aspiration past the cuff was measured. Experiments were repeated (×10) for each type of ETT. Results were analysed using non-parametric tests for repeated measures. The PneuX ETT prevented aspiration past the cuff in all experiments. All other ETTs allowed aspiration, with considerable variability in performance. The PneuX ETT was statistically superior in reducing aspiration compared to the SealGuard (p aspiration across the range of diameters compared to the SealGuard (p aspiration, relating to cuff material and design. Variability in performance was likely due to the random manner in which involutional folds form in the inflated ETT cuff. The PneuX ETT was the only ETT able to consistently prevent aspiration past the cuff in all experiments.

  14. CO2 driven endotracheal tube cuff control in critically ill patients: A randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pascale, Gennaro; Pennisi, Mariano Alberto; Vallecoccia, Maria Sole; Bello, Giuseppe; Maviglia, Riccardo; Montini, Luca; Di Gravio, Valentina; Cutuli, Salvatore Lucio; Conti, Giorgio; Antonelli, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    To determine the safety and clinical efficacy of an innovative integrated airway system (AnapnoGuard™ 100 system) that continuously monitors and controls the cuff pressure (Pcuff), while facilitating the aspiration of subglottic secretions (SS). This was a prospective, single centre, open-label, randomized, controlled feasibility and safety trial. The primary endpoint of the study was the rate of device related adverse events (AE) and serious AE (SAE) as a result of using AnapnoGuard (AG) 100 during mechanical ventilation. Secondary endpoints were: (1) mechanical complications rate (2) ICU staff satisfaction; (3) VAP occurrence; (4) length of mechanical ventilation; (5) length of Intensive Care Unit stay and mortality; (6) volume of evacuated subglottic secretions. Sixty patients were randomized to be intubated with the AG endotracheal-tube (ETT) and connected to the AG 100 system allowing Pcuff adjustment and SS aspiration; or with an ETT combined with SS drainage and Pcuff controlled manually. No difference in adverse events rate was identified between the groups. The use of AG system was associated with a significantly higher incidence of Pcuff determinations in the safety range (97.3% vs. 71%; paspirated SS secretions: (192.0[64-413] ml vs. 150[50-200], p = 0.19 (total)); (57.8[20-88.7] ml vs. 50[18.7-62] ml, p = 0.11 (daily)). No inter-group difference was detected using AG system vs. controls in terms of post-extubation throat pain level (0 [0-2] vs. 0 [0-3]; p = 0.7), hoarseness (42.9% vs. 75%; p = 0.55) and tracheal mucosa oedema (16.7% vs. 10%; p = 0.65). Patients enrolled in the AG group had a trend to reduced VAP risk of ventilator-associated pneumonia(VAP) (14.8% vs. 40%; p = 0.06), which were more frequently monomicrobial (25% vs. 70%; p = 0.03). No statistically significant difference was observed in duration of mechanical ventilation, ICU stay, and mortality. The use AG 100 system and AG tube in critically ill intubated patients is safe and

  15. CO2 driven endotracheal tube cuff control in critically ill patients: A randomized controlled study.

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    Gennaro De Pascale

    Full Text Available To determine the safety and clinical efficacy of an innovative integrated airway system (AnapnoGuard™ 100 system that continuously monitors and controls the cuff pressure (Pcuff, while facilitating the aspiration of subglottic secretions (SS.This was a prospective, single centre, open-label, randomized, controlled feasibility and safety trial. The primary endpoint of the study was the rate of device related adverse events (AE and serious AE (SAE as a result of using AnapnoGuard (AG 100 during mechanical ventilation. Secondary endpoints were: (1 mechanical complications rate (2 ICU staff satisfaction; (3 VAP occurrence; (4 length of mechanical ventilation; (5 length of Intensive Care Unit stay and mortality; (6 volume of evacuated subglottic secretions. Sixty patients were randomized to be intubated with the AG endotracheal-tube (ETT and connected to the AG 100 system allowing Pcuff adjustment and SS aspiration; or with an ETT combined with SS drainage and Pcuff controlled manually.No difference in adverse events rate was identified between the groups. The use of AG system was associated with a significantly higher incidence of Pcuff determinations in the safety range (97.3% vs. 71%; p<0.01 and a trend to a greater volume of aspirated SS secretions: (192.0[64-413] ml vs. 150[50-200], p = 0.19 (total; (57.8[20-88.7] ml vs. 50[18.7-62] ml, p = 0.11 (daily. No inter-group difference was detected using AG system vs. controls in terms of post-extubation throat pain level (0 [0-2] vs. 0 [0-3]; p = 0.7, hoarseness (42.9% vs. 75%; p = 0.55 and tracheal mucosa oedema (16.7% vs. 10%; p = 0.65. Patients enrolled in the AG group had a trend to reduced VAP risk of ventilator-associated pneumonia(VAP (14.8% vs. 40%; p = 0.06, which were more frequently monomicrobial (25% vs. 70%; p = 0.03. No statistically significant difference was observed in duration of mechanical ventilation, ICU stay, and mortality.The use AG 100 system and AG tube in critically ill

  16. Cuffed endotracheal tubes in infants and children: should we routinely measure the cuff pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobias, Joseph D; Schwartz, Lawrence; Rice, Julie; Jatana, Kris; Kang, D Richard

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 5 years, there has been a change in the clinical practice of pediatric anesthesiology with a transition to the use of cuffed instead of uncuffed endotracheal tubes in infants and children. However, there are few studies evaluating the current practices of inflation of these cuffs and the intracuff pressures. There was no change dictated in clinical practice for these patients. During the first 30 min of the case, the pressure in the cuff was measured using a hand held manometer. Additional data collected included the patient's demographic data (age, weight, and gender), the size of the ETT, whether nitrous oxide was in use, whether the patient was breathing spontaneously or undergoing positive pressure ventilation, and the type of anesthesia provider (resident, fellow, CRNA or SRNA). The cohort for the study included 200 patients ranging in age from 1 month to 17 years and in weight from 3.5 to 99.1 kg. The average cuff pressure was 23 ± 22 cmH(2)O in the total cohort of 200 patients. The cuff pressure was ≥ 30 cmH(2)O in 47 of the 200 patients (23.5%). The average cuff pressure was significantly higher in patients who were 8 years of age or greater compared to younger patients. Additionally, there were significantly more patients with a cuff pressure ≥ 30 cmH(2)O in the ≥ 8 year old age group. Although no difference in the mean cuff pressure was noted when comparing staff anesthesia providers (pediatric anesthesiologist or CRNA) versus trainees (SRNA, anesthesiology resident, medical student or pediatric anesthesiology fellow), the incidence of significantly excessive cuff pressures (≥ 60 cmH(2)O) was higher in the trainee group versus the faculty group (12 of 99 versus 2 of 101, ppressure greater than the generally recommended upper limit of 30 cmH(2)O. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Nitrous oxide use and endotracheal tube rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, E L; Schelkun, P M; Vincent, S K

    1988-01-01

    Nitrous oxide is an important and widely used anesthetic agent. However, during lengthy surgical procedures, significant amounts of nitrous oxide diffuse into the endotracheal tube cuff, causing sequelae that may include increased cuff pressures, tracheal trauma, increased postoperative discomfort, and cuff rupture. In this paper, two cases are presented in which the endotracheal tube cuff used to deliver this anesthetic agent ruptured after more than four hours of surgery. Two simple means of limiting the diffusion of nitrous oxide into the cuff and thus preventing this occurrence are described.

  18. Tracheal rupture after misplacement of Sengstaken-Blakemore tube ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The balloon were immediately deflated and a chest X-ray was performed, showing the tube in the right bronchus airway (A), so it was withdrawn. Right pneumothorax appeared and was treated with an intercostal drainage. The patient required orotracheal intubation and a CT scan was performed to show the rupture level ...

  19. Removal of the stylet from the tracheal tube: effect of lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A M; Hung, O R; Kwofie, K; Hung, C R; Hung, D R; Guzzo, A

    2012-08-01

    We compared the work needed to retract a non-lubricated and a lubricated stylet from a tracheal tube over 24 h. Stylets were lubricated with sterile water, silicone fluid, lidocaine spray, lidocaine gel, MedPro(®) lubricating gel or Lacri-Lube(®). The mean (SD) work in joules needed to retract the stylet by 5 cm from the tracheal tube was recorded immediately (time 0), at 5 and 30 min and at 1, 3 and 24 h. At time 0 lubrication with sterile water (0.53 (0.09); p = 0.001), silicone fluid (0.43 (0.10); p lubrication (0.94 (0.28)). Where a tracheal tube is pre-loaded with a stylet for use at an indeterminate time, silicone fluid was the best choice of lubricant as it performed consistently well up to 24 h. At 24 h only silicone fluid (0.49 (0.01)) outperformed no lubrication (0.77 (0.24); p = 0.04). Anaesthesia © 2012 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  20. Tracheal fluid leakage in benchtop trials: comparison of static versus dynamic ventilation model with and without lubrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Mital H; Koepfer, Nelly; Madjdpour, Caveh; Frotzler, Angela; Weiss, Markus

    2010-04-01

    Longitudinal folds in tracheal tube (TT) cuffs cause leakage of pooled secretions past the tube cuff, and the most common in vitro method to test the efficacy of a new tube is a benchtop model using an artificial rigid trachea. This study compared the potential of a static and dynamic ventilation benchtop model and cuff lubrication in testing the tracheal sealing properties of a given TT cuff. Static trial Six brands of 7.5 mm internal diameter (ID) cuffed TT (n = 8) with high volume-low pressure cuffs were inflated in an artificial trachea (18 mm ID) without and with lubrication. Dynamic trial The same tube cuffs, without lubrication, were subjected to positive pressure ventilation (PPV) + positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 5cmH(2)O or to PPV alone (without PEEP) or to PEEP alone (without PPV). Clear water (5 ml) was placed above the tube cuff, and fluid leakage (ml) was measured up to 60 min. Gel lubrication, PEEP alone and PPV + PEEP completely prevented fluid leakage across the tube cuffs in all six TT brands tested within 60 min when compared to the static unlubricated model (0% leak versus 100% leak; P lubrication, PEEP alone, and PPV + PEEP in the benchtop model had a much stronger protective effect than PPV alone on fluid leakage. Studies testing the fluid sealing efficiency of tube cuffs might be more conclusive in a static benchtop model without lubrication than in a dynamic model.

  1. Linezolid limits burden of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in biofilm of tracheal tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Barat, Laia; Ferrer, Miquel; Sierra, Josep Maria; Soy, Dolors; Guerrero, Laura; Vila, Jordi; Li Bassi, Gianluigi; Cortadellas, Núria; Martínez-Olondris, Pilar; Rigol, Montserrat; Esperatti, Mariano; Luque, Néstor; Saucedo, Lina María; Agustí, Carlos; Torres, Antoni

    2012-08-01

    To evaluate the effects of systemic treatment with linezolid compared with vancomycin on biofilm formation in mechanically ventilated pigs with severe methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus-induced pneumonia. Prospective randomized animal study. Departments of Pneumology, Microbiology, and Pharmacy of the Hospital Clínic, Barcelona, and Scientific and Technological Services of the University of Barcelona. We prospectively analyzed 70 endotracheal tube samples. Endotracheal tubes were obtained from pigs either untreated (controls, n=20), or treated with vancomycin (n=32) or linezolid (n=18). The endotracheal tubes were obtained from a previous randomized study in tracheally intubated pigs with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus severe pneumonia, and mechanically ventilated for 69±16 hrs. Distal and medial hemisections of the endotracheal tube were assessed to quantify methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus burden, antibiotic biofilm concentration by high-performance liquid chromatography or bioassay, and biofilm thickness through scanning electron microscopy. We found a trend toward a significant variation in biofilm methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus burden (log colony-forming unit/mL) among groups (p=.057), and the lowest bacterial burden was found in endotracheal tubes treated with linezolid (1.98±1.68) in comparison with untreated endotracheal tubes (3.72±2.20, p=.045) or those treated with vancomycin (2.97±2.43, p=.286). Biofilm linezolid concentration was 19-fold above the linezolid minimum inhibitory concentration, whereas biofilm vancomycin concentration (1.60±0.91 µg/mL) was consistently below or close to the vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration. Biofilm was thicker in the vancomycin group (p=.077). Systemic treatment with linezolid limits endotracheal tube biofilm development and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus burden. The potential clinical usefulness of linezolid in decreasing the risk of biofilm

  2. Intraoperative Atelectasis Due to Endotracheal Tube Cuff Herniation: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Madineh

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Endotracheal tube (ETT cuff herniation is a rare, and often difficult to diagnose, cause of bronchial obstruction. We present a case of outside cuff herniation of an endotracheal tube that caused pulmonary right lung atelectasis. A 29-year-old man ,a case of car accident with multiple fractures, was admitted to the emergency ward and transferred to the operating room(OR for open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF of all fractures .The procedures were done under general anesthesia (G/A. The past medical history of the patient did not indicate any problem. Anesthesia was induced with thiopental, atracurium and then maintained by propofol and remifentanyl infusions and 100% O2 via orally inserted ETT. The patient was positioned in left lateral decubitus position for operation. Two hours after induction of anesthesia, the oxygen saturation level dropped to 85 % and the breath sounds in the right side of the chest were weakened. The chest x-ray images showed right lung atelectasis especially in the upper lobe. The problem was disappeared after removal of the ETT. In this case, we observed that an ETT cuff herniation can be a cause of airway obstruction. If there is a decreased unilateral breath sounds, we recommend replacement or repositioning of ETT.

  3. Comparative study between benzydamine hydrochloride gel, lidocaine 5% gel and lidocaine 10% spray on endotracheal tube cuff as regards postoperative sore throat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekhemar, Nashwa Abdallah; El-Agwany, Ahmed Samy; Radi, Wafaa Kamel; El-Hady, Sherif Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative sore throat is a common complication after endotracheal intubation. After tracheal intubation, the incidence of sore throat varies from 14.4% to 50%. The aim of the study was to compare between benzydamine hydrochloride gel, lidocaine 5% gel and lidocaine 10% spray on the endotracheal tube cuff as regards postoperative sore throat. The present study was carried out on 124 patients admitted to Alexandria university hospitals for lumbar fixation surgery requiring general anesthesia. Patients were randomly allocated into 4 groups. Benzydamine hydrochloride gel, 5% lidocaine hydrochloride gel, 10% lidocaine hydrochloride spray, or normal saline were applied on endotracheal tube cuffs before endotracheal intubation. The patients were examined for sore throat (none, mild, moderate, or severe) at 0, 1, 6, 12, and 24h after extubation. The results were collected, analyzed and presented in table and figure. The highest incidence of postoperative sore throat occurred at 6h after extubation in all groups. There was a significantly lower incidence of postoperative sore throat in the benzydamine group than 5% lidocaine gel, 10% lidocaine spray, and normal saline groups. The benzydamine group had significantly decreased severity of postoperative sore throat compared with the 10% lidocaine, 5% lidocaine, and normal saline groups at observation time point. Compared with the 5% lidocaine the 10% lidocaine group had significantly increased incidence and severity of postoperative sore throat after extubation. Compared with normal saline the 10% lidocaine group had increased incidence of postoperative sore throat. There were no significant differences among groups in local or systemic side effects. So in conclusion, benzydamine hydrochloride gel on the endotracheal tube cuff is a simple and effective method to reduce the incidence and severity of postoperative sore throat. Application of 10% lidocaine spray should be avoided because of worsening of postoperative sore

  4. A cadaver study comparing three fibreoptic-assisted techniques for converting a supraglottic airway to a cuffed tracheal tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olesnicky, B L; Rehak, A; Bestic, W B; Brock, J T; Watterson, L

    2017-02-01

    After rescuing an airway with a supraglottic airway device, a method to convert it to a cuffed tracheal tube is often needed. The best method to do this has never been directly studied. We compared three techniques for conversion of a standard LMA ® Unique airway to a cuffed endotracheal tube using a fibrescope. The primary endpoint was time to intubation, with secondary endpoints of success rate, perceived difficulty and preferred technique. We also investigated the relationship between level of training and prior training and experience with the techniques on the primary outcome. The mean (95% CI) time to intubation using a direct tracheal tube technique of 37 (31-42) s was significantly shorter than either the Aintree intubation catheter technique at 70 (60-80) s, or a guidewire technique at 126 (110-141) s (p < 0.001). Most (13/24) participants rated the tracheal tube as their preferred technique, while 11/24 preferred the Aintree technique. In terms of perceived difficulty, 23/24, 21/24 and 9/24 participants rated the tracheal tube technique, Aintree technique and guidewire technique, respectively, as either very easy or easy. There was no relationship between prior training, prior experience or level of training on time to completion of any of the techniques. We conclude the tracheal tube and Aintree techniques both provide a rapid and easy method for conversion of a supraglottic airway device to a cuffed tracheal tube. The guidewire technique cannot be recommended. © 2016 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  5. Effect of Nitrous Oxide Anaesthesia on Endotracheal Cuff Pressure

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    Özlem Koşar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: When N2Ois used for general anaesthesia, it diffuses into the air-filled endotracheal cuff causing the cuff pressure to rise by over inflating the cuff, which results in tracheal damage. This study aimed to estimate changes in the endotracheal-cuff pressure with time during oxygen-air- and oxygen-N2O -induced anaesthesia and to determine its sore throat and hoarseness incidence. Methods: Fifty patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status 1-2, aged 18-60 years were icluded to our study. Orotracheal intubation was performed using polyvinyl chloride high volume-low pressure endotracheal tubes. The AIR group 40% O2/60% air and N2O group 40% O2/60% N2O was used. The endotracheal cuff pressure at 5, 10, 15, 20 minutes immediately after intubation and at 10-minute intervals were recorded. When the cuff pressure reached 45 cm H2O, was attenuated to 25-30-cm H2O. At the post operative first and the 24th hour, the patients were queried for sore throat and hoarseness. Results: The N2O -group cuff pressure rose from the fifth minute onwards. Also, the N2O group had a higher incidence of sore throat and hoarseness. Conclusion: N2O results in elevated cuff pressure and tracheal morbidities. Cuff-pressure should be routinely monitored during anaesthesia using N2O.

  6. Achieving the Recommended Endotracheal Tube Cuff Pressure: A Randomized Control Study Comparing Loss of Resistance Syringe to Pilot Balloon Palpation

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    Fred Bulamba

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Both under- and overinflation of endotracheal tube cuffs can result in significant harm to the patient. The optimal technique for establishing and maintaining safe cuff pressures (20–30 cmH2O is the cuff pressure manometer, but this is not widely available, especially in resource-limited settings where its use is limited by cost of acquisition and maintenance. Therefore, anesthesia providers commonly rely on subjective methods to estimate safe endotracheal cuff pressure. This study set out to determine the efficacy of the loss of resistance syringe method at estimating endotracheal cuff pressures. Methods. This was a randomized clinical trial. We enrolled adult patients scheduled to undergo general anesthesia for elective surgery at Mulago Hospital, Uganda. Study participants were randomized to have their endotracheal cuff pressures estimated by either loss of resistance syringe or pilot balloon palpation. The pressures measured were recorded. Results. One hundred seventy-eight patients were analyzed. 66.3% (59/89 of patients in the loss of resistance group had cuff pressures in the recommended range compared with 22.5% (20/89 from the pilot balloon palpation method. This was statistically significant. Conclusion. The loss of resistance syringe method was superior to pilot balloon palpation at administering pressures in the recommended range. This method provides a viable option to cuff inflation.

  7. Respiratory mechanics measured by forced oscillations during mechanical ventilation through a tracheal tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholz, Alexander-Wigbert; Weiler, Norbert; David, Matthias; Markstaller, Klaus

    2011-05-01

    The forced oscillation technique (FOT) allows the measurement of respiratory mechanics in the intensive care setting. The aim of this study was to compare the FOT with a reference method during mechanical ventilation through a tracheal tube. The respiratory impedance spectra were measured by FOT in nine anaesthetized pigs, and resistance and compliance were estimated on the basis of a linear resistance-compliance inertance model. In comparison, resistance and compliance were quantified by the multiple linear regression analysis (LSF) of conventional ventilator waveforms to the equation of motion. The resistance of the sample was found to range from 6 to 21 cmH(2)O s l(-1) and the compliance from 12 to 32 ml cmH(2)O(-1). A Bland-Altman analysis of the resistance resulted in a sufficient agreement (bias -0.4 cmH(2)O s l(-1); standard deviation of differences 1.4 cmH(2)O s l(-1); correlation coefficient 0.93) and test-retest reliability (coefficient of variation of repeated measurements: FOT 2.1%; LSF 1.9%). The compliance, however, was poor in agreement (bias -8 ml cmH(2)O(-1), standard deviation of differences 7 ml cmH(2)O(-1), correlation coefficient 0.74) and repeatability (coefficient of variation: FOT 23%; LSF 1.7%). In conclusion, FOT provides an alternative for monitoring resistance, but not compliance, in tracheally intubated and ventilated subjects.

  8. Respiratory mechanics measured by forced oscillations during mechanical ventilation through a tracheal tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scholz, Alexander-Wigbert; Weiler, Norbert; David, Matthias; Markstaller, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    The forced oscillation technique (FOT) allows the measurement of respiratory mechanics in the intensive care setting. The aim of this study was to compare the FOT with a reference method during mechanical ventilation through a tracheal tube. The respiratory impedance spectra were measured by FOT in nine anaesthetized pigs, and resistance and compliance were estimated on the basis of a linear resistance–compliance inertance model. In comparison, resistance and compliance were quantified by the multiple linear regression analysis (LSF) of conventional ventilator waveforms to the equation of motion. The resistance of the sample was found to range from 6 to 21 cmH 2 O s l −1 and the compliance from 12 to 32 ml cmH 2 O −1 . A Bland–Altman analysis of the resistance resulted in a sufficient agreement (bias −0.4 cmH 2 O s l −1 ; standard deviation of differences 1.4 cmH 2 O s l −1 ; correlation coefficient 0.93) and test–retest reliability (coefficient of variation of repeated measurements: FOT 2.1%; LSF 1.9%). The compliance, however, was poor in agreement (bias −8 ml cmH 2 O −1 , standard deviation of differences 7 ml cmH 2 O −1 , correlation coefficient 0.74) and repeatability (coefficient of variation: FOT 23%; LSF 1.7%). In conclusion, FOT provides an alternative for monitoring resistance, but not compliance, in tracheally intubated and ventilated subjects

  9. Effect of body change positions on endotracheal tube cuff pressure in patients with head injury treated with mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shahrokhi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Maintaining endotracheal tube cuff pressure in the normal range of 25-30 cmH2o plays an important role in the prevention of related complications. Objective: The present study aimed to determine the effect of body change position on level of endotracheal tube cuff pressure in patients with head trauma under mechanical ventilation admitted in ICUs. Methods: This quasi-experimental study was implemented on 30 patients with head injury under mechanical ventilation who admitted in ICUs in 2014. Available method was used for sampling. The mean of endotracheal cuff pressure was measured in 6 different body positions in the two-hour intervals using standard manometer, immediately before, immediately after, 15 minutes and 2 hours after the change positions. Data was analyzed using Chi-square, t and Bonferroni tests. Findings: The mean of endotracheal cuff pressure in the left and right lateral position with an angle of 30 degrees and head to the body (Respectively 31.5±0.68 and 34.1±0.68 cmH2o and also the left and right lateral and a 45-degree angle to the body at the end of the period of 15 minutes and 2 hours after change positions was higher than the normal range (Respectively 31.9±0.92 and 30.4±1.5 cmH2o. In all cases, the mean of pressure differences were statistically significant (p<0.001 Conclusion: According to the unnatural changes in endotracheal tube cuff pressure due to body change positions, it is suggested that after changing position of the patient, measure the cuff pressure and correct it if it’s necessary.

  10. Bench study of a new device to display and maintain stable artificial airway cuff pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, William R

    2011-10-01

    Artificial airway cuff pressure should be maintained within a narrow range. Excessive cuff pressure presents a risk of tracheal damage and stenosis. Insufficient cuff pressure adds the risk of secretion leak past the cuff, tidal-volume leakage, and accidental extubation. The available cuff-inflation devices do not address these problems. In the laboratory I developed and evaluated a new cuff-inflation device that continuously displays the cuff pressure and maintains stable cuff pressure. The cuff-inflation device evaluation included: test the manometer accuracy; compare the displayed pressure to the pressure delivered to the pilot balloon; determine the device's response to cuff-pressure changes with the addition of 5 mL or 10 mL of air after achieving a 30 cm H(2)O baseline; measure the V(T) leak in an intubated artificial trachea by comparing the device results to benchmark measurements; and determine the stability of baseline cuff pressure during routine cuff checks. The mean ± SD bias and precision of device's display, compared to the calibration analyzer, was 1.3 ± 2.6 cm H(2)O. The pressure delivered by the cuff-inflation device's gas-sampling line to the pilot balloon was equal to the pressure displayed by the cuff-inflation device. With the cuff-inflation device the cuff pressure was unchanged, compared to baseline, after adding 5 mL or 10 mL of air. With 2 current cuff methods, cuff pressure increased to means exceeding 160 cm H(2)O and 300 cm H(2)O, respectively. Compared to the benchmark, the difference in exhaled V(T) mean ± SD bias and precision were: cuff-inflation device 1.4 ± 4.8 mL, and syringe-inflation method 2.4 ± 6.2 mL. Representing a single cuff pressure check, disconnecting the endotracheal-tube pilot balloon from the cuff-inflation device's gas-sampling line and then reconnecting it had no effect on baseline cuff pressure at 2 seconds or 60 seconds. The cuff-inflation device demonstrated possible improvements over available cuff

  11. Prevalence and predictors of out-of-range cuff pressure of endotracheal and tracheostomy tubes: a prospective cohort study in mechanically ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Amer R; Al Abbasi, Shatha; Abahoussin, Othman Khalid; Al Shehri, Tariq Othman; Al-Dorzi, Hasan M; Tamim, Hani M; Sadat, Musharaf; Arabi, Yaseen M

    2015-10-15

    Maintaining the cuff pressure of endotracheal tubes (ETTs) within 20-30 cmH2O is a standard practice. The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of standard practice in maintaining cuff pressure within the target range. This was a prospective observational study conducted in a tertiary-care intensive care unit, in which respiratory therapists (RTs) measured the cuff pressure 6 hourly by a handheld manometer. In this study, a research RT checked cuff pressure 2-4 h after the clinical RT measurement. Percentages of patients with cuff pressure levels above and below the target range were calculated. We identified predictors of low-cuff pressure. We analyzed 2120 cuff-pressure measurements. The mean cuff pressure was 27 ± 2 cmH2O by the clinical RT and 21 ± 5 cmH2O by the research RT (p pressures were within the normal range. The research RT found the cuff pressures to be within the normal range in only 41.5 %, below the range in 53 % and above the range in 5.5 %. Low cuff pressure was found more common with lower ETT size (OR, 0.34 per 0.5 unit increase in ETT size; 95 % CI, 0.15-0.79) and with lower peak airway pressure (OR per one cm H2O increment, 0.93; 95 % CI, 0.87-0.99) on multivariate analysis. Cuff pressure is frequently not maintained within the target range with low-cuff pressure being very common approximately 3 h after routine measurements. Low cuff pressure was associated with lower ETT size and lower peak airway pressure. There is a need to redesign the process for maintaining cuff pressure within the target range.

  12. The effect of user experience and inflation technique on endotracheal tube cuff pressure using a feline airway simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Donna M; Redondo, José I; Mair, Alastair R; Martinez-Taboada, Fernando

    2017-09-01

    The effect of user experience and inflation technique on endotracheal tube cuff pressure using a feline airway simulator. Prospective, experimental clinical study. Participants included veterinary students at the beginning (group S1) and end (group S2) of their 2-week anaesthesia rotation and veterinary anaesthetists (group A). The feline airway simulator was designed to simulate an average size feline trachea, intubated with a 4.5 mm low-pressure, high-volume cuffed endotracheal tube, connected to a Bain breathing system with oxygen flow of 2 L minute -1 . Participants inflated the on-endotracheal tube cuff by pilot balloon palpation and by instilling the minimum occlusive volume (MOV) required for loss of airway leaks during manual ventilation. Intracuff pressures were measured by manometers obscured to participants and ideally were 20-30 cm H 2 O. Student t, Fisher exact, and Chi-squared tests were used where appropriate to analyse data (p Experience had no effect on this skill and, as such, a cuff manometer is recommended. Copyright © 2017 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Tracheal tube airleak in clinical practice and impact on tidal volume measurement in ventilated neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Ramadan A; Proquitté, Hans; Fawzy, Naglaa; Bührer, Christoph; Schmalisch, Gerd

    2011-03-01

    To determine the prevalence, size, and factors affecting tracheal tube (TT) leak in clinical practice and their influence on the displayed tidal volume (Vt) in ventilated newborn infants using uncuffed TTs. Monitoring of Vt is important for implementation of lung-protective ventilation strategies but becomes meaningless in the presence of large TT airleaks. Retrospective clinical study. Neonatal intensive care unit. Patient records of 163 neonates ventilated with Babylog 8000 for ≥ 5 hrs with a median (range) gestation age of 31.1 wks (23.3-41.9 wks) and a median birth weight of 1470 g (410-4475 g) were evaluated. : Ventilatory settings, TT leak, and Vt were recorded every 3 hrs. The lowest, median, and highest TT leaks were noted on the day the first TT leak (>5%) occurred, the day on which TT leak peaked, and the day of extubation. A TT leak of >5% was seen in 122 (75%) infants. Neonates with TT leak, compared with those without TT leak, had a longer duration of mechanical ventilation (p 40% commonly seen on the third day of mechanical ventilation. Regression analysis showed that a TT leak of 40% indicated that the displayed Vt was underestimated by 1.2 mL/kg (about 24% of target Vt). TT leak is highly variable, and TT leak of >40% with clinically relevant Vt errors occurred in nearly half of all ventilated neonates. Preterm infants of low birth weight and with small-diameter TTs ventilated for a long period were at greater risk of TT leak.

  14. Highly sensitive contact pressure measurements using FBG patch in endotracheal tube cuff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, R.; Blackman, O. R.; Hernandez, F. U.; Korposh, S.; Morgan, S. P.; Hayes-Gill, B. R.; James, S. W.; Evans, D.; Norris, A.

    2016-05-01

    A method for measuring the contact pressure between an endotracheal tube cuff and the trachea was designed and developed by using a fibre Bragg grating (FBG) based optical fibre sensor. The FBG sensor is encased in an epoxy based UV-cured cuboid patch and transduces the transversely loaded pressure into an axial strain that induces wavelength shift of the Bragg reflection. The polymer patch was created by using a PTFE based mould and increases tensile strength and sensitivity of the bare fibre FBG to pressure to 2.10×10-2 nm/kPa. The characteristics of the FBG patch allow for continuous measurement of contact pressure. The measurement of contact pressure was demonstrated by the use of a 3D printed model of a human trachea. The influence of temperature on the measurements is reduced significantly by the use of a second FBG sensor patch that is not in contact with the trachea. Intracuff pressure measurements performed using a commercial manometer agreed well with the FBG contact pressure measurements.

  15. Multicentre randomised controlled trial to investigate the usefulness of continuous pneumatic regulation of tracheal cuff pressure for reducing ventilator-associated pneumonia in mechanically ventilated severe trauma patients: the AGATE study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanovic, Nicolas; Frasca, Denis; Asehnoune, Karim; Paugam, Catherine; Lasocki, Sigismond; Ichai, Carole; Lefrant, Jean-Yves; Leone, Marc; Dahyot-Fizelier, Claire; Pottecher, Julien; Falcon, Dominique; Veber, Benoit; Constantin, Jean-Michel; Seguin, Sabrina; Guénézan, Jérémy; Mimoz, Olivier

    2017-08-07

    Severe trauma represents the leading cause of mortality worldwide. While 80% of deaths occur within the first 24 hours after trauma, 20% occur later and are mainly due to healthcare-associated infections, including ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). Preventing underinflation of the tracheal cuff is recommended to reduce microaspiration, which plays a major role in the pathogenesis of VAP. Automatic devices facilitate the regulation of tracheal cuff pressure, and their implementation has the potential to reduce VAP. The objective of this work is to determine whether continuous regulation of tracheal cuff pressure using a pneumatic device reduces the incidence of VAP compared with intermittent control in severe trauma patients. This multicentre randomised controlled and open-label trial will include patients suffering from severe trauma who are admitted within the first 24 hours, who require invasive mechanical ventilation to longer than 48 hours. Their tracheal cuff pressure will be monitored either once every 8 hours (control group) or continuously using a pneumatic device (intervention group). The primary end point is the proportion of patients that develop VAP in the intensive care unit (ICU) at day 28. The secondary end points include the proportion of patients that develop VAP in the ICU, early (≤7 days) or late (>7 days) VAP, time until the first VAP diagnosis, the number of ventilator-free days and antibiotic-free days, the length of stay in the ICU, the proportion of patients with ventilator-associated events and that die during their ICU stay. This protocol has been approved by the ethics committee of Poitiers University Hospital, and will be carried out according to the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki and the Good Clinical Practice guidelines. The results of this study will be disseminated through presentation at scientific conferences and publication in peer-reviewed journals. Clinical Trials NCT02534974. © Article author(s) (or

  16. Clinical indicators associated with successful tracheostomy cuff deflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Lee N; Ward, Elizabeth C; Cornwell, Petrea L; O'Connor, Stephanie N; Chapman, Marianne J

    2016-08-01

    Tracheostomy cuff deflation is a necessary stage of the decannulation pathway, yet the optimal clinical indicators to guide successful cuff deflation are unknown. The study aims were to identify (1) the proportion of patients tolerating continuous cuff deflation at first attempt; (2) the clinical observations associated with cuff deflation success or failure, including volume of above cuff secretions and (3) the predictive capacity of these observations within a heterogeneous cohort. A retrospective review of 113 acutely tracheostomised patients with a subglottic suction tube in situ was conducted. Ninety-five percent of patients (n=107) achieved continuous cuff deflation on the first attempt. The clinical observations recorded as present in the 24h preceding cuff deflation included: (1) medical stability, (2) respiratory stability, (3) fraction of inspired oxygen ≤0.4, (4) tracheal suction ≤1-2 hourly, (5) sputum thin and easy to suction, (6) sputum clear or white, (7) ≥moderate cough strength, (8) above cuff secretions ≤1ml per hour and (9) alertness≥eyes open to voice. Using the presence of all 9 indicators as predictors of successful cuff deflation tolerance, specificity and positive predictive value were 100%, although sensitivity was only 77% and negative predictive value 19%. Refinement to a set of 3 clinically driven criteria (medical and respiratory stability, above cuff secretions ≤1ml/h) provided high specificity (100%), sensitivity (95%), positive predictive value (100%) and an improved negative predictive value (55%). Key criteria can help guide clinical decision-making on patient readiness for cuff deflation. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The impact of hospital-wide use of a tapered-cuff endotracheal tube on the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowton, David L; Hite, R Duncan; Martin, R Shayn; Sherertz, Robert

    2013-10-01

    Aspiration of colonized oropharyngeal secretions is a major factor in the pathogenesis of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). A tapered-cuff endotracheal tube (ETT) has been demonstrated to reduce aspiration around the cuff. Whether these properties are efficacious in reducing VAP is not known. This 2-period, investigator-initiated observational study was designed to assess the efficacy of a tapered-cuff ETT to reduce the VAP rate. All intubated, mechanically ventilated patients over the age of 18 were included. During the baseline period a standard, barrel-shaped-cuff ETT (Mallinckrodt Hi-Lo) was used. All ETTs throughout the hospital were then replaced with a tapered-cuff ETT (TaperGuard). The primary outcome variable was the incidence of VAP per 1,000 ventilator days. We included 2,849 subjects, encompassing 15,250 ventilator days. The mean ± SD monthly VAP rate was 3.29 ± 1.79/1,000 ventilator days in the standard-cuff group and 2.77 ± 2.00/1,000 ventilator days in the tapered-cuff group (P = .65). While adherence to the VAP prevention bundle was high throughout the study, bundle adherence was significantly higher during the standard-cuff period (96.5 ± 2.7%) than in the tapered-cuff period (90.3 ± 3.5%, P = .01). In the setting of a VAP rate very near the average of ICUs in the United States, and where there was high adherence to a VAP prevention bundle, the use of a tapered-cuff ETT was not associated with a reduction in the VAP rate.

  18. Randomized intubation with polyurethane or conical cuffs to prevent pneumonia in ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippart, François; Gaudry, Stéphane; Quinquis, Laurent; Lau, Nicolas; Ouanes, Islem; Touati, Samia; Nguyen, Jean Claude; Branger, Catherine; Faibis, Frédéric; Mastouri, Maha; Forceville, Xavier; Abroug, Fekri; Ricard, Jean Damien; Grabar, Sophie; Misset, Benoît

    2015-03-15

    The occurrence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) is linked to the aspiration of contaminated pharyngeal secretions around the endotracheal tube. Tubes with cuffs made of polyurethane rather than polyvinyl chloride or with a conical rather than a cylindrical shape increase tracheal sealing. To test whether using polyurethane and/or conical cuffs reduces tracheal colonization and VAP in patients with acute respiratory failure. We conducted a multicenter, prospective, open-label, randomized study in four parallel groups in four intensive care units between 2010 and 2012. A cohort of 621 patients with expected ventilation longer than 2 days was included at intubation with a cuff composed of cylindrical polyvinyl chloride (n = 148), cylindrical polyurethane (n = 143), conical polyvinyl chloride (n = 150), or conical polyurethane (n = 162). We used Kaplan-Meier estimates and log-rank tests to compare times to events. After excluding 17 patients who secondarily refused participation or had met an exclusion criterion, 604 were included in the intention-to-treat analysis. Cumulative tracheal colonization greater than 10(3) cfu/ml at Day 2 was as follows (median [interquartile range]): cylindrical polyvinyl chloride, 0.66 (0.58-0.74); cylindrical polyurethane, 0.61 (0.53-0.70); conical polyvinyl chloride, 0.67 (0.60-0.76); and conical polyurethane, 0.62 (0.55-0.70) (P = 0.55). VAP developed in 77 patients (14.4%), and postextubational stridor developed in 28 patients (6.4%) (P = 0.20 and 0.28 between groups, respectively). Among patients requiring mechanical ventilation, polyurethane and/or conically shaped cuffs were not superior to conventional cuffs in preventing tracheal colonization and VAP. Clinical trial registered with clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01114022).

  19. [A design and study of a novel electronic device for cuff-pressure monitoring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shupeng; Li, Wei; Li, Wen; Song, Dejing; Chen, Desheng; Duan, Jun; Li, Chen; Li, Gang

    2017-06-01

    To design a novel electronic device for measuring the pressure in the cuff of the artificial airway; and to study the advantage of this device on continuous and intermittent cuff pressure monitoring. (1) a portable electronic device for cuff pressure measurement was invented, which could turn pressure signal into electrical signal through a pressure transducer. Meantime, it was possible to avoid pressure leak from the joint and the inside of the apparatus by modified Luer taper and sophisticated design. If the cuff pressure was out of the normal range, the apparatus could release a sound and light alarm. (2) Six traditional mechanical manometers were used to determine the cuff pressure in 6 tracheal tubes. The cuff pressure was maintain at 30 cmH 2 O (1 cmH 2 O = 0.098 kPa) by the manometer first, and repeated every 30 seconds for 4 times. (3) Study of continuous cuff pressure monitoring: We used a random number generator to randomize 6 tracheal tubes, 6 mechanical manometers and 6 our products by number 1-6, which has the same number of a group. Every group was further randomized into two balanced groups, one group used the mechanical manometer first, and the other used our product first. The baseline pressure was 30 cmH 2 O, measurement was performed every 4 hours for 6 times. When traditional mechanical manometer was used for cuff pressure monitoring, cuff pressure was decreased by an average of 2.9 cmH 2 O for each measurement (F = 728.2, P = 0.000). In study of continually monitoring, at each monitoring point, the pressure measured by electronic manometer was higher than the mechanical manometer. All the pressures measured by mechanical manometer were dropped below 20 cmH 2 O at 8th hour, and there was no pressure decrease below 20 cmH 2 O measured by electronic manometer in 24 hours by contrast. In study of intermittent monitoring, the same result was found. The pressure was dropped significantly with time when measured by mechanical manometer (F = 61.795, P

  20. A study of airway management using the ProSeal LMA laryngeal mask airway compared with the tracheal tube on postoperative analgesia requirements following gynaecological laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohlrieder, M; Brimacombe, J; Eschertzhuber, S; Ulmer, H; Keller, C

    2007-09-01

    In a randomised double blind prospective study, we tested the hypothesis that postoperative pain is lower in patients who receive an ProSeal LMA laryngeal mask airway compared with a tracheal tube. One hundred consecutive female patients (ASA I-II, 18-75 years) undergoing laparoscopic gynaecological surgery were divided into two equal-sized groups for airway management with the ProSeal LMA or tracheal tube. Anaesthesia management was identical for both groups and included induction of anaesthesia using propofol/fentanyl, and maintenance with propofol/remifentanil, muscle relaxation with rocuronium, positive pressure ventilation, gastric tube insertion, dexamethasone/tropisetron for anti-emetic prophylaxis, and diclofenac for pain prophylaxis. All types of postoperative pain were treated using intravenous patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) morphine. Patients and postoperative staff were unaware of the airway device used. Data were collected by a single blinded observer. We found that pain scores were lower for the ProSeal LMA at 2 h and 6 h but not at 24 h. Morphine requirements were lower for the ProSeal LMA by 30.4%, 30.6% and 23.3% at 2, 6 and 24 h, respectively. Nausea was less common with the ProSeal LMA than with the tracheal tube at 2 h and 6 h but not at 24 h. There were no differences in the frequency of vomiting, sore throat, dysphonia or dysphagia. We conclude that postoperative pain is lower for the ProSeal LMA than the tracheal tube in females undergoing gynaecological laparoscopic surgery.

  1. [The source and factors that influence tracheal pulse oximetry signal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiao-hua; Wei, Wei; Wang, Jian; Mu, Ling; Wang, Li

    2010-03-01

    To investigate the source and factors that influence tracheal pulse oximetry signal. The adult mongrel dog was intubated after anesthesia. The tracheal tube was modified by attaching a disposable pediatric pulse oximeter to the cuff. The chest of the dog was cut open and a red light from the tracheal oximeter was aligned with the deeper artery. The changes in tracheal pulse oxygen saturation (SptO2) signal were observed after the deeper artery was blocked temporarily. The photoplethysmography (PPG) and readings were recorded at different intracuff pressures. The influence of mechanical ventilation on the signal was also tested and compared with pulse oxygen saturation (SpO2). The SptO2 signal disappeared after deeper artery was blocked. The SptO2 signal changed with different intracuff pressures (P signal appeared under 20-60 cm H2O of intracuff pressure than under 0-10 cm H2O of intracuff pressure(P signal under a condition with mechanical ventilation differed from that without mechanical ventilation (P signal is primarily derived from deeper arteries around the trachea, not from the tracheal wall. Both intracuff pressures and mechanical ventilation can influence SptO2 signal. The SptO2 signal under 20-60 cm H2O of intracuff pressure is stronger than that under 0-10 em H2O of intracuff pressure. Mechanical ventilation mainly changes PPG.

  2. Tracheal compression by the gastric tube in esophageal cancer with ankylosing spondylitis and an analysis of the mediastinal condition in 84 cases of esophagectomy: report a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Norimasa; Akutsu, Yasunori; Shuto, Kiyohiko; Tohma, Takayuki; Matsubara, Hisahiro

    2013-09-01

    Pneumonia, recurrent nerve injury and anastomotic leakage are common complications occurring after esophagectomy. However, there have so far been few reports on tracheal compression by the gastric tube. The patient was a 66-year-old female with a history of ankylosing spondylitis and esophageal superficial squamous carcinoma treated with endoscopic mucosal resection. The new lesion was located just next to the last treated lesion. Therefore, it was difficult to treat this lesion endoscopically because of severe stenosis and scarring due to the previous treatment. Transhiatal esophagectomy was therefore performed. However, severe tracheal obstruction occurred following extubation after the surgery due to compression caused by the gastric tube. This case was successfully treated with a mediastinal pleural incision through a right thoracotomy. The distance between the sternum and the vertebra in this case was narrower than normal, thereby inducing this rare condition.

  3. Ineffectiveness of using the pressure relief valve technique during cuff inflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annoni, Raquel; Pires-Neto, Ruy Camargo

    2014-01-01

    To test the effectiveness of using a cuff pressure relief valve technique to maintain cuff pressure levels within the normal in vitro range (Phase 1) in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (Phase 2) and to test the reproducibility of the technique using different syringes. In Phase 1, a tracheal tube was inserted into a trachea model. Ten- and 20mL syringes were used to inflate the cuff through the tracheal tube. The cuff was slowly and steadily inflated until the syringe plunger would move in the opposite direction of the application. After the plunger stopped, the cuff pressures were recorded. In Phase 2, the same maneuvers for inflating the cuff were performed on 20 patients using 5, 10, and 20mL syringes and were compared with manometer measurements. The intraclass correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman analysis were employed to determine the reproducibility and agreement between syringes. Data were expressed as medians (interquartile range). There was no reproducibility between syringes with an intraclass correlation coefficient ranging between -0.33 and 0.8 (p>0.05). The pressures generated with the syringes were higher than the pressures generated using a standard manometer: the 5mL syringe pressure was 105cmH2O (82.5-120cmH2O), the 10mL syringe pressure was 69cmH2O (47.5-111.3cmH2O), and the 20mL syringe pressure was 45cmH2O (35-59.5cmH2O). The Bland-Altman analysis confirmed the large bias and variability between the syringes used, compared with the manometer. The use of syringes is not an effective technique for determining the cuff pressure in patients admitted to the intensive care unit.

  4. Influence of changing endotracheal tube cuff management on antibiotic use for ventilator-associated pneumonia in a tertiary intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvall, Jai N; Thevarajan, Irani; Iles, Simon; Rechnitzer, Thomas; Spelman, Tim; Harley, Nerina

    2017-09-01

    Routine deflation of the endotracheal tube (ETT) cuff of critically ill patients receiving MV is common in Australia and New Zealand. Literature about ventilatorassociated pneumonia (VAP) and antibiotic use rates with different ETT cuff maintenance practices is lacking. To determine the impact of a change in ETT cuff maintenance from a minimal leak technique to pressure manometry on the administration of antibiotics for VAP. A prospective, pre- post observational study conducted in a metropolitan tertiary referral intensive care unit. We analysed data from 178 patients receiving MV for > 48 hours during 13 weeks of minimal leak test ETT cuff technique (pre-intervention, n = 92) or 13 weeks of cuff pressure manometry (postintervention, n = 86), separated by 3 weeks' "wash-out". Primary outcome was the number of patients receiving antibiotics for the indication of VAP. Secondary outcomes were incidence of ventilatorassociated surveillance events, lengths of stay (LOSs) and mortality. Antibiotics were administered for VAP in 24 patients (26.1%) in the pre-intervention period compared with 11 post-intervention patients (12.8%). The univariate antibiotic administraion rate per 100 ventilation days was 15.3% (95% CI, 12.6%-18.4%) v 6.8% (95% CI, 4.9%- 9.3%), and the incident rate ratio (IRR) was 0.45 (95% CI, 0.31-0.64); P Antibiotic administration for VAP was associated with increased ICU and hospital LOSs, but not with mortality. ETT cuff pressure manometry is associated with a reduced rate of antibiotic administration for a diagnosis of VAP compared with a minimal leak test technique.

  5. Glidescope versus Airtraq DL for double-lumen tracheal tube insertion in patients with a predicted or known difficult airway: A randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belze, Olivier; Lepage, Evan; Bazin, Yvan; Kerourin, Pierre; Fusciardi, Jacques; Remérand, Francis; Espitalier, Fabien

    2017-07-01

    Double-lumen tracheal tube (DLT) insertion can be managed with videolaryngoscopes such as the Glidescope or indirect laryngoscopes like the Airtraq DL. No study has compared both devices when a difficult intubation is predicted. Our hypothesis was that the Glidescope is superior to the Airtraq for double-lumen tube insertion in patients with a predicted or known difficult airway. Randomised study. Adults scheduled for thoracic elective surgery, requiring one-lung ventilation with a predicted difficult intubation score of at least 7 (Arné risk index). Between March 2014 and March 2015, adult patients, scheduled for elective thoracic surgery, requiring double-lumen tracheal tube placement, and with a predicted risk (evaluated preoperatively using the Arné score) or a history of difficult intubation, were allocated to a Glidescope or an Airtraq group. The primary outcome was the overall success rate of tracheal intubation after two attempts. Secondary outcomes were success rates on the first attempt, duration of intubation, need for laryngeal pressure, Cormack and Lehane grade and side-effects. Of 277 patients, 78 were predicted to have a difficult airway. Finally, 72 patients were enrolled. Neither the overall success rates of tracheal intubation [Glidescope group 31/36 (86%) versus Airtraq group 34/36 (94%), P = 0.43] nor the side-effects differed between groups. There was no difference concerning visualisation of the glottis using the Cormack and Lehane grade (P = 0.18) or intubation time [Glidescope group 67 s (49 to 90) versus Airtraq group 81 s (59 to 101), P = 0.28]. All patients with a previous history of difficult intubation were intubated successfully. There is no difference in success rates of tracheal intubation with a double-lumen tube in patients with a predicted or known difficult airway when using either a Glidescope or Airtraq device. National register of the French National Agency for Medicines and Health Products Safety No. 2014-A

  6. The effect of lidocaine jelly on a taper-shaped cuff of an endotracheal tube on the postoperative sore throat: a prospective randomized study: A CONSORT compliant article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiwon; Lee, Yong-Cheol; Son, Je-Do; Lee, Jae-Yoon; Kim, Hyun-Chang

    2017-09-01

    Postoperative sore throat (POST) following general anesthesia with endotracheal intubation is a common complication. We hypothesized that lidocaine jelly applied to the tapered cuff of the endotracheal tube (ETT) might decrease the incidence of POST most commonly arising from endotracheal intubation. A total of 208 patients under general anesthesia were randomly assigned into 1 of 2 groups. In the lidocaine group (n = 104), the distal part of ETTs with tapered-shaped cuff was lubricated with lidocaine jelly. In the control group (n = 104), the distal part of ETTs with tapered-shaped cuff was lubricated with normal saline. The incidence of POST, hoarseness, and cough in the postanesthesia patients was compared. The overall incidence of POST was higher in the lidocaine group than in the normal saline group [60 (58%) vs 40 (39%), P = .006]. The incidence of POST at 1 hour postoperatively was higher in the lidocaine group than in the normal saline group [53 (51%) vs 32 (31%), P = .003]. The overall incidence of hoarseness for 24 hours postoperatively was comparable (P = .487). The overall incidence of cough for 24 hours postoperatively is higher in the lidocaine group (P = .045). The lidocaine jelly applied at the distal part of ETT with tapered-shaped cuff increased the overall incidence of POST in patients undergoing general anesthesia.

  7. Endotracheal tube resistance and inertance in a model of mechanical ventilation of newborns and small infants—the impact of ventilator settings on tracheal pressure swings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hentschel, Roland; Buntzel, Julia; Guttmann, Josef; Schumann, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    Resistive properties of endotracheal tubes (ETTs) are particularly relevant in newborns and small infants who are generally ventilated through ETTs with a small inner diameter. The ventilation rate is also high and the inspiratory time (ti) is short. These conditions effectuate high airway flows with excessive flow acceleration, so airway resistance and inertance play an important role. We carried out a model study to investigate the impact of varying ETT size, lung compliance and ventilator settings, such as peak inspiratory pressure (PIP), positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP) and inspiratory time (ti) on the pressure–flow characteristics with respect to the resistive and inertive properties of the ETT. Pressure at the Y piece was compared to direct measurement of intratracheal pressure (P trach ) at the tip of the ETT, and pressure drop (ΔP ETT ) was calculated. Applying published tube coefficients (Rohrer's constants and inertance), P trach was calculated from ventilator readings and compared to measured P trach using the root-mean-square error. The most relevant for ΔP ETT was the ETT size, followed by (in descending order) PIP, compliance, ti and PEEP, with gas flow velocity being the principle in common for all these parameters. Depending on the ventilator settings ΔP ETT exceeded 8 mbar in the smallest 2.0 mm ETT. Consideration of inertance as an additional effect in this setting yielded a better agreement of calculated versus measured P trach than Rohrer's constants alone. We speculate that exact tracheal pressure tracings calculated from ventilator readings by applying Rohrer's equation and the inertance determination to small size ETTs would be helpful. As an integral part of ventilator software this would (1) allow an estimate of work of breathing and implementation of an automatic tube compensation, and (2) be important for gentle ventilation in respiratory care, especially of small infants, since it enables the physician to

  8. Medidas dos níveis de pressão do balonete em unidade de terapia intensiva: considerações sobre os benefícios do treinamento Measurement of tube cuff pressure levels in intensive care unit: considerations on the benefits of training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Renata Rezek Juliano

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: A pressão do balonete transmitida diretamente na parede da traquéia de forma irregular pode ocasionar lesões e levar a broncoaspiração. O objetivo deste estudo foi demonstrar que ao implantar uma rotina de mensuração da pressão do balonete, obtém-se controle fidedigno para manter as medidas dentro dos parâmetros considerados seguros, evitando assim, as complicações descritas. MÉTODO: Foram avaliadas 3195 medidas de pressão de balonete em 1194 pacientes dos sexos masculino e feminino, internados nas unidades de terapia intensiva (UTI e coronariana (UC, que estavam sob ventilação mecânica com uso de prótese endotraqueal e cânula de traqueostomia, nos períodos matutino e vespertino. RESULTADOS: Durante o período de março a agosto de 2005 foi realizado acompanhamento das medidas colhidas pelos profissionais de fisioterapia e observou-se que as medidas foram irregulares, em média, em 80% dos casos. Diante desse fato foi elaborado um programa de treinamento, com foco nas Equipes de Enfermagem das UTI e UC, que consistiu na orientação dos procedimentos adequados realizados à beira do leito (treinamento em loco. Os treinamentos foram realizados em dois períodos (matutino e vespertino para abranger toda a equipe. CONCLUSÕES: Sugere-se a necessidade da vigilância das pressões do balonete através da implantação de uma rotina de mensurações matutina, vespertina e noturna, como meio profilático, para prevenir as possíveis complicações da pressão de balão da prótese traqueal.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The tube cuff pressure directly transmitted on the tracheal wall in an irregular form can cause injuries and lead to bronchoaspiration. The aim of this study was to demonstrate that the implementation of routine tube cuff pressure measurements result in a reliable control to maintain the measurements within the parameters considered safe, thus preventing the described complications. METHODS: A

  9. Endotracheal tube cuff pressure assessment maneuver induces drop of expired tidal volume in the postoperative of coronary artery bypass grafting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolzan Douglas W

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous investigations reported that the cuff pressure (CP can decrease secondary to the CP evaluation itself. However is not established in literature if this loss of CP is able to generate alterations on expired tidal volume (ETV. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the potential consequences of the endotracheal CP assessment maneuver on CP levels and ETV in the early postoperative of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG. Methods A total of 488 patients were analyzed. After the operation, the lungs were ventilated in pressure-assist-control mode and the same ventilatory settings were adjusted for all patients. After intensive care unit arrival, the cuff was fully deflated and then progressively inflated by air injection, to promote a minimal volume to occlude the trachea. To assist the cuff inflation and the air leakage identification, the graphical monitoring of the volume-time curve was adopted. After 20 minutes a first cuff pressure evaluation was performed (P1 and a second measurement (P2 was taken after 20 minutes with an analog manometer. ETV was obtained always pre and post P1 measurement. Results The CP assessment maneuver promoted a significant drop of P2 in relation to P1 when the manometer was attached to the pilot balloon (p  Conclusion The CP assessment maneuver promoted a significant decrease in CP values and occurrence of air leakage with reduction of ETV in the early postoperative of CABG.

  10. Intubation in two patients with difficult airway management and tracheal stenosis after tracheostomy in thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granell Gil, M; Solís Albamonte, P; Córdova Hernández, C; Cobo, I; Guijarro, R; de Andrés Ibañez, J A

    2018-02-08

    Lung isolation in thoracic surgery is a challenge, this is even more complex in the presence of unknown tracheal stenosis (TS). We report two cases of unknown TS and its airway management. TS appears most frequently after long term intubation close to the endotracheal tube cuff or in the stoma of tracheostomy that appears as a consequence of the granulation tissue after the surgical opening of the trachea. Clinical history, physical examination, difficult intubating predictors and imaging tests (CT scans) are crucial, however most of tracheal stenosis may be unnoticed and symptoms depend on the degree of obstruction. In our cases, the patients presented anatomical changes due to surgery and previous tracheostomy that led to a TS without symptoms. There is scarce literature about the intubation in patients with previous tracheostomy in thoracic surgery. In the first case, a Univent ® tube was used using a flexible fiberscope but an acute tracheal hemorrhage occurred. In the second case, after intubation with VivaSight SL ® in an awake patient, the insertion of a bronchial blocker was performed through an endotracheal tube guided by its integrated camera without using flexible fiberscopy. Copyright © 2018 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Repeated deflation of a gas-barrier cuff to stabilize cuff pressure during nitrous oxide anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasawa, Fujio; Matsuoka, Nobuhiro; Kodama, Mitsuyoshi; Okuda, Tomohiro; Mori, Tomohisa; Kawatani, Yasushi

    2002-07-01

    Although a nitrous oxide (N(2)O) gas-barrier cuff effectively limits the increase of cuff pressure during N(2)O anesthesia, there are few data assessing whether an N(2)O gas-barrier cuff is more beneficial for stabilizing intracuff pressure than standard endotracheal tubes when cuffs are repeatedly deflated to stabilize pressure during N(2)O anesthesia. In the present study, the pressure of air-filled standard-type cuffs (Trachelon; Terumo, Tokyo, Japan) and N(2)O gas-barrier type endotracheal tube cuffs (Profile Soft-Seal Cuff [PSSC]; Sims Portex, Kent, UK) was measured during 67% N(2)O anesthesia (n = 8 in each), during which the cuffs were repeatedly deflated every 30 min (Trachelon) or 60 min (PSSC) for the first 3 or 4 h. After aspirating the cuffs for 3 h, the cuff pressure exceeded 22 mm Hg in more than half of the patients in both groups. However, aspiration of the cuffs for 4 h decreased the maximal cuff pressure between deflation intervals in both groups (P deflating the cuffs over 4 h, the cuff pressure in both groups never exceeded 22 mm Hg during the subsequent 3 h, and intracuff N(2)O concentrations did not significantly change. Therefore, deflation of cuffs for 4 h during N(2)O anesthesia sufficiently stabilized cuff pressure and equilibrated the intracuff N(2)O concentrations in both groups. The use of the PSSC endotracheal tube might be more practical because of the smaller number of cuff deflations required, but the PSSC does not reduce the duration of cuff deflations to stabilize the pressure. We demonstrated that the N(2)O concentration and pressure in the N(2)O-barrier Profile Soft-Seal Cuff stabilized when the cuff was aspirated once an hour for 4 h during N(2)O anesthesia. The Profile Soft-Seal Cuff might be easier to use in clinical practice than standard endotracheal tubes because of the smaller number of cuff deflations required.

  12. Prevalence of streptococcus group B in tracheal tube secretions of neonates with respiratory distress: a brief report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khosravi N

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infection with group B streptococcus (GBS can present with respiratory distress, Pneumonia, meningitis and Osteomyelitis in neonates. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of GBS colonization in trachea of intubated neonates.Methods: This observational analytic study was performed upon 33 intubated neonates due to respiratory distress in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU Rasoul Hospital in Tehran, Iran during 2010-2012. Tracheal secretions cultured upon TODD-HEWITT BROTH and sheep blood agar 5%., chi-square test was used for compare the qualitative variables. P<0.05 was considered meaningful.Results: Three cases had positive streptococcal culture (9.1% and four cases had posi-tive culture for non-streptococcal organisms. no meaningful relation observed between positive GBS culture and neonatal gender, kind of delivery, PROM.Conclusion: Prevalence of GBS positive results (9% in present study is very close to GBS colonization in pregnant women; although the higher colonization rate of pregnant women are expected.

  13. Advances in tracheal reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haykal, Siba; Salna, Michael; Waddell, Thomas K; Hofer, Stefan O

    2014-07-01

    A recent revival of global interest for reconstruction of long-segment tracheal defects, which represents one of the most interesting and complex problems in head and neck and thoracic reconstructive surgery, has been witnessed. The trachea functions as a conduit for air, and its subunits including the epithelial layer, hyaline cartilage, and segmental blood supply make it particularly challenging to reconstruct. A myriad of attempts at replacing the trachea have been described. These along with the anatomy, indications, and approaches including microsurgical tracheal reconstruction will be reviewed. Novel techniques such as tissue-engineering approaches will also be discussed. Multiple attempts at replacing the trachea with synthetic scaffolds have been met with failure. The main lesson learned from such failures is that the trachea must not be treated as a "simple tube." Understanding the anatomy, developmental biology, physiology, and diseases affecting the trachea are required for solving this problem.

  14. A comparison of the McGrath® Series 5 videolaryngoscope and Macintosh laryngoscope for double-lumen tracheal tube placement in patients with a good glottic view at direct laryngoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, W L; Wan, L; Xu, H; Qian, W; Wang, X R; Tian, Y K; Zhang, C H

    2015-07-01

    We compared the McGrath® Series 5 videolaryngoscope with the Macintosh laryngoscope for double-lumen tracheal tube placement in patients with a predicted good glottic view on assessment of the airway. An initial laryngoscopy was performed using the Macintosh laryngoscope; 96 patients with Cormack and Lehane grade-1 or -2a views were randomly assigned to undergo intubation using either the McGrath or Macintosh device. Compared with the Macintosh laryngoscope, the McGrath videolaryngoscope provided more Cormack and Lehane grade-1 views (47 (97.9%) vs 29 (60.4%), p Cormack and Lehane grade ≥ 2b on initial laryngoscopy using the Macintosh, the glottic view was improved on intubation with the McGrath videolaryngoscope, with a total success rate of double-lumen tube placement of 94.4% and mean (SD) intubation time of 50.0 (18.6) s. We recommend that in patients with a low airway risk index score requiring intubation with a double-lumen tracheal tube, the Macintosh laryngoscope is used as the first device and the McGrath videolaryngoscope is used only if this provides a poor glottic view. © 2015 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  15. Estimation of tracheal pressure and imposed expiratory work of breathing by the endotracheal tube, heat and moisture exchanger, and ventilator during mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Akinori; Yoshida, Takeshi; Yamanaka, Hidenori; Fujino, Yuji

    2013-07-01

    The resistance of the endotracheal tube (ETT), the heat and moisture exchanger (HME), and the ventilator may affect the patient's respiratory status. Although previous studies examined the inspiratory work of breathing (WOB), investigation of WOB in the expiratory phase is rare. We estimated tracheal pressure at the tip of the ETT (Ptrach) and calculated expiratory WOB imposed by the ETT, the HME, and the expiratory valve. We examined imposed expiratory WOB in patients under a continuous mandatory ventilation (CMV) mode and during spontaneous breathing trials (SBTs). We hypothesized that imposed expiratory WOB would increase with heightened ventilatory demand. We measured airway pressure (Paw) and respiratory flow (V). We estimated Ptrach using the equation Ptrach = Paw - K1 × V(K2) - 2.70 × V(L/s)(1.42). K1 and K2 were determined by the inner diameter (ID) of the ETT. Imposed expiratory WOB was calculated from the area of Ptrach above PEEP versus lung volume. We examined imposed expiratory WOB and imposed expiratory resistance in relation to mean expiratory flow. We examined 28 patients under CMV mode, and 29 during SBT. During both CMV and SBT, as mean expiratory flow increased, imposed expiratory WOB increased. The regression curves between mean expiratory flow (x) (L/s) and imposed expiratory WOB (y) (J/L) were y = 1.35x(0.83) (R(2) = 0.79) for 7 mm ID ETT under CMV, y = 1.12x(0.82) (R(2) = 0.73) for 8 mm ID ETT under CMV, y = 1.07x(1.04) (R(2) = 0.85) for 7 mm ID ETT during SBT, and y = 0.84x(0.93) (R(2) = 0.75) for 8 mm ID ETT during SBT. Levels of imposed expiratory WOB were affected by ETT diameter and ventilator mode. The reason for increasing imposed expiratory WOB was an increase in expiratory resistance imposed by the ETT and HME. Under mechanical ventilation, imposed expiratory WOB should be considered in patients with higher minute ventilation.

  16. Conservative management of iatrogenic tracheal injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuković Rade

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The difficulties during airway management can lead to iatrogenic tracheal injury. Conservative and surgical treatments are possible treatments. We present the case of a patient with iatrogenic tracheal injury treated conservatively. Case report: 55 years old female patient was transferred to our intensive care unit from a regional health center. Edema compromised airway as a consequence of anaphylactic shock was difficult to establish. Three days after tracheal injury the patient was transported to our institution. At admission, patient was under sedation with trachea intubated with tracheal tube and mechanically ventilated. Physical examination revealed subcutaneous emphysema in the region of head, neck, chest and upper extremities. Multi slice computerized tomography and tracheo-bronchoscopic exploration revealed longitudinal gap localized at posterior wall of the trachea, approximately 5 cm long, with distal end 1.5 cm above the tracheal carina. Tracheal split was completely closed after 13 days. The patient was discharged from the hospital after 22 days. Conclusion: Iatrogenic tracheal injury can be treated successfully using conservative measures after appropriate patient assessment and treatment planning. .

  17. Tubo en T de Montgomery en el tratamiento de la estenosis isquémica laringotraqueal y traqueal Montgomery T-tube in the treatment of layngotracheal and tracheal ischemic stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edelberto Fuentes Valdés

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN. La colocación de un tubo en T es una alternativa segura en pacientes con estenosis isquémica laringotraqueal y traqueal, para quienes no está indicada la resección y anastomosis. El objetivo del presente estudio fue analizar los resultados obtenidos con esta prótesis. MÉTODOS. Se realizó un estudio prospectivo y descriptivo de 69 pacientes consecutivos, a quienes se colocó un tubo en T entre noviembre de 1991 y septiembre de 2002. Las variables estudiadas fueron promedio de edad, sexo, extensión de la estenosis, práctica de resección y localización de esta: subglótica o traqueal. Las variables de respuesta fueron las complicaciones y la recidiva. El análisis estadístico comprendió técnicas univariadas (prueba de Fisher y ji al cuadrado y multivariadas (modelo de regresión logística. RESULTADOS. El porcentaje de complicaciones fue 33,3 % y las más frecuentes comprendieron granulomas traqueales, infección local, fístula cervical tardía y obstrucción del tubo. El promedio de edad (p = 0,045 y la localización traqueal de la lesión (p = 0,035 se asociaron al fallo de la operación. Con el análisis multivariado se demostró la influencia del promedio de edad (p = 0,036 sobre la aparición de recidivas. Finalmente, 55 pacientes (80,9 % tuvieron resultados buenos o satisfactorios. CONCLUSIONES. El tubo en T de Montgomery fue útil cuando no estuvo indicada la resección y anastomosis término-terminal. En un grupo significativo de pacientes se pueden esperar resultados satisfactorios de su uso como tratamiento único.INTRODUCTION. The placement of a T-tube is a safe alternative in patients with laryngotracheal or tracheal ischemic stenosis for those who have not been indicated resection or anastomosis. The objective of the present study was to analyze the result obtained with this prosthesis. METHODS. A prospective and descriptive study of 69 consecutive patients that were placed a T-tube between November 1991

  18. CT of tracheal agenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strouse, Peter J.; Hernandez, Ramiro J. [C.S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Newman, Beverley [Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Department of Pediatric Radiology; Afshani, Ehsan [Children' s Hospital of Buffalo, NY (United States). Departments of Radiology and Pediatrics; Bommaraju, Mahesh [Women' s and Children' s Hospital of Buffalo, Division of Neonatology, University Pediatrics Associates, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2006-09-15

    Tracheal agenesis is a rare and usually lethal anomaly. In the past, opaque contrast medium was injected via the esophagus to demonstrate the anatomy. To demonstrate the utility of helical and multidetector CT in delineating the aberrant anatomy in newborns with tracheal agenesis. Four newborns with tracheal agenesis were identified from three institutions. Imaging studies and medical records were reviewed. Each child was imaged with chest radiography. One child was imaged on a single-detector helical CT scanner and the other three on multidetector scanners. Helical and multidetector CT with 2D and 3D reconstructions clearly delineated the aberrant tracheobronchial and esophageal anatomy in each infant. Minimum intensity projection reformatted CT images were particularly helpful. One infant each had type I and type II tracheal agenesis. Two infants had type III tracheal agenesis. All four infants died. CT is a useful tool for delineating the aberrant anatomy of newborns with tracheal agenesis and thus helps in making rational clinical decisions. (orig.)

  19. CT of tracheal agenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strouse, Peter J.; Hernandez, Ramiro J.; Newman, Beverley

    2006-01-01

    Tracheal agenesis is a rare and usually lethal anomaly. In the past, opaque contrast medium was injected via the esophagus to demonstrate the anatomy. To demonstrate the utility of helical and multidetector CT in delineating the aberrant anatomy in newborns with tracheal agenesis. Four newborns with tracheal agenesis were identified from three institutions. Imaging studies and medical records were reviewed. Each child was imaged with chest radiography. One child was imaged on a single-detector helical CT scanner and the other three on multidetector scanners. Helical and multidetector CT with 2D and 3D reconstructions clearly delineated the aberrant tracheobronchial and esophageal anatomy in each infant. Minimum intensity projection reformatted CT images were particularly helpful. One infant each had type I and type II tracheal agenesis. Two infants had type III tracheal agenesis. All four infants died. CT is a useful tool for delineating the aberrant anatomy of newborns with tracheal agenesis and thus helps in making rational clinical decisions. (orig.)

  20. Cuff deflation: rehabilitation in critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, John R; Gonçalves, Miguel R; Rodriguez, Pedro Landete; Saporito, Louis; Soares, Luisa

    2014-08-01

    This is a case series of rehabilitation failures that resulted in severe reactive depression from patients unnecessarily bereft of verbal communication by being left to breathe or be ventilated via tracheostomy tubes, with or without inflated cuffs, for months to years.

  1. Iatrogenic tracheal tear.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dias, A

    2010-10-01

    Large post intubation tracheal tears are usually detected intra-operatively due to unstable signs namely impaired ventilation and mediastinal emphysema and often require surgical management. Smaller tracheal tears are often missed during anaesthesia and recognized during the postoperative period. Conservative management should be considered in these latter cases.

  2. Endotracheal tube cufi pressures in adult patients undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    obstructing tracheal mucosal blood flow but high enough to form an effective seal when delivering PPV. Tracheal ... the capillary blood pressure supplying the trachea and is followed by ischaemia with inflammation. ... The aim of this study was to determine the ETT cuff pressures of patients receiving general anaesthesia at ...

  3. Posterior tracheal diverticulosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Karan; Das, Chandan J; Guleria, Randeep

    2014-10-01

    Multiple tracheal diverticulosis is a rare clinical entity. Tracheal diverticula are usually recognized radiologically as solitary right paratracheal air collections on thoracic computed tomography examination. They are usually asymptomatic but can occasionally present with persistent symptoms. We herein report the case of a 50-year-old male patient who underwent extensive evaluation for persistent cough. Multiple posterior right paratracheal air collections were recognized on thoracic multidetector computed tomography examination, which was confirmed as multiple-acquired posterior upper tracheal diverticula on flexible bronchoscopy. The patient improved with conservative medical management.

  4. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia and complete tracheal rings: Repair on ECMO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasha J. Tharakan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A term newborn female presented with prenatally diagnosed congenital diaphragmatic hernia and postnatally diagnosed complete tracheal rings and tracheal stenosis. Initially, the spells associated with tracheal stenosis were misdiagnosed as pulmonary hypertension. Bronchoscopy showed a critically narrowed airway, and veno-arterial ECMO stabilized the baby for further workup. The endotracheal tube was removed while on ECMO to avoid further injury to the airway. Staged CDH repair followed by slide tracheoplasty were performed on ECMO. The multidisciplinary approach included neonatology, general surgery, otolaryngology, cardiac surgery and anesthesiology.

  5. Percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy using the ETView Tracheoscopic Ventilation Tube®: a teaching course in a pig model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorelli, Alfonso; Ferraro, Fausto; Frongillo, Elisabetta; Fusco, Pierluigi; Pierdiluca, Matteo; Nagar, Francesca; Iuorio, Angela; Santini, Mario

    2017-10-01

    We planned a training course for trainees of different specialties with the aim of teaching the skills of a new procedure for performing percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy (PDT) with an ETView tracheoscopic ventilation tube instead of standard bronchoscopy in an ex vivo pig model. The endotracheal tube, with a camera-embedded tip, was used as an alternative to standard bronchoscopy for visualization of patient airways. The procedure was performed on a home-made animal model. The participants were asked to perform PDT in three different sessions to improve their dexterity. The primary endpoint was the reduction of complications seen during the different sessions of the training course. The secondary endpoint was the satisfaction of the participants as assessed by an anonymous survey. Thirty-seven residents in anesthesiology and 7 in thoracic surgery in the first 2 years of their training and without any confidence with percutaneous tracheostomy participated in the study. Tracheal cuff lesions and impalement of the tracheal tube were the most observed complications, and were concentrated in the early sessions. A significant reduction in complications and operative time was seen during the ongoing sessions of the course. No lesions of the posterior tracheal wall and only a ring fracture occurred during the last session of the course. All participants were satisfied with the course. Our course seems to confer the technical skills to perform percutaneous tracheostomy to trainees and instill confidence with the procedure. However, the experience acquired on a training course should be evaluated in clinical practice.

  6. Comparative efficacy of Combination of Propofol or Thiopental with Remifentanil on Tracheal Intubation without Muscle Relaxants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    k Naseri

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: In some medical situations administration of muscle relaxants after intravenous anesthetics for tracheal intubation may be unnecessary or sometimes could be hazardous. In such situations, replacing an alternative drug for the facilitation of tracheal intubation is obvious. Remifentanil is a short acting opioid drug which may be useful in solving this problem. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of propofol or thiopental in combination with remifentanil in the absence of muscle relaxants on larengoscopy and intubation conditions in general anesthesia. Materials & Methods: This is a randomized double-blind clinical trial which was performed in 1386 in Be’sat hospital of Sanandaj. Forty two ASA 1 and 2 patients recruited to receive propofol, 2 Mg/Kg, or thiopental, 5Mg/K. All patients received lidocaine, 1.5 Mg/Kg, and remifentanil, 2.5 µg/Kg, 30 seconds before anesthetics administration. larengoscopy and tracheal intubation were done 90 seconds after induction of anesthesia. On the basis of mask ventilation, jaw relaxation, vocal cords position and patient's response to intubations and endotracheal tube cuff inflation the intubation conditions were assessed and recorded as excellent, good ,acceptable or poor. The mean arterial pressure and heart rate were measured before and after anesthetics administration and also 45 seconds and two and five minutes after intubations. Data were analyzed by X2, fisher exact test ant student T-test using SPSS software. Results: Excellent or good larengoscopy and intubation conditions were observed in 9 (%42.9 of thiopental patients and 20 (%95.2 of propofol patients (p<0.05. Mean arterial pressure and heart rate decreased more significantly in propofol group in comparison with the thiopental group (p<0.05. Conclusion: Combination of remifentanil and propofol or thiopental could facilitate ventilation via face mask in all patients. Although combination of propofol and

  7. Tracheal collapse in two cats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hendricks, J.C.; O'Brien, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Two cats examined bronchoscopically to discover the cause of tracheal collapse were found to have tracheal obstruction cranial to the collapse. Cats with this unusual sign should be examined bronchoscopically to ascertain whether there is an obstruction, as the cause in these 2 cats was distinct from the diffuse airway abnormality that causes tracheal collapse in dogs

  8. Rotator Cuff Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reach around behind your back and underneath to grab the bottom of the towel. Hold for 30 ... Cuff Exercises Last Updated: May 1, 2017 This article was contributed by: familydoctor.org editorial staff Categories: ...

  9. A National Emergency Airway Registry for children: landscape of tracheal intubation in 15 PICUs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishisaki, Akira; Turner, David A; Brown, Calvin A; Walls, Ron M; Nadkarni, Vinay M

    2013-03-01

    To characterize the landscape of process of care and safety outcomes for tracheal intubation across pediatric intensive care units Procedural process of care and safety outcomes of tracheal intubation across pediatric intensive care units has not been described. We hypothesize that the novel National Emergency Airway Registry for Children registry is a feasible tool to capture tracheal intubation process of care and outcomes. Prospective, descriptive. Fifteen academic PICUs in North America. Critically ill children requiring tracheal intubation in PICUs. Tracheal intubation quality improvement data were prospectively collected for all initial tracheal intubation in 15 PICUs from July 2010 to December 2011 using the National Emergency Airway Registry for Children tool with explicit site-specific compliance plans and operational definitions including adverse tracheal intubation associated events. One thousand seven hundred fifteen tracheal intubation encounters were reported (averaging 1/3.4 days, or 1/86 bed days). Ninety-eight percent of primary tracheal intubation were successful; 86% were successful with less than or equal to two attempts. First attempt was by pediatric residents in 23%, pediatric critical care fellows in 41%, and critical care attending physicians in 13%: first attempt success rate was 62%, first provider success rate was 79%. The first method was oral intubation in 1,659 (98%) and nasal in 55 (2%). Direct laryngoscopy was used in 96%. Ninety percent of tracheal intubation were with cuffed tracheal tubes. Adverse tracheal intubation associated events were reported in 20% of intubations (n = 372), with severe tracheal intubation associated events in 6% (n = 115). Esophageal intubation with immediate recognition was the most common tracheal intubation associated events (n = 167, 9%). History of difficult airway, diagnostic category, unstable hemodynamics, and resident provider as first airway provider were associated with occurrence of tracheal

  10. Effects of Fentanyl-lidocaine-propofol and Dexmedetomidine-lidocaine-propofol on Tracheal Intubation Without Use of Muscle Relaxants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volkan Hancı

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effects of fentanyl or dexmedetomidine when used in combination with propofol and lidocaine for tracheal intubation without using muscle relaxants. Sixty patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists stage I risk were randomized to receive 1 mg/kg dexmedetomidine (Group D, n = 30 or 2 mg/kg fentanyl (Group F, n = 30, both in combination with 1.5 mg/kg lidocaine and 3 mg/kg propofol. The requirement for intubation was determined based on mask ventilation capability, jaw motility, position of the vocal cords and the patient's response to intubation and inflation of the endotracheal tube cuff. Systolic arterial pressure, mean arterial pressure, heart rate and peripheral oxygen saturation values were also recorded. Rate pressure products were calculated. Jaw relaxation, position of the vocal cords and patient's response to intubation and inflation of the endotracheal tube cuff were significantly better in Group D than in Group F (p < 0.05. The intubation conditions were significantly more satisfactory in Group D than in Group F (p = 0.01. Heart rate was significantly lower in Group D than in Group F after the administration of the study drugs and intubation (p < 0.05. Mean arterial pressure was significantly lower in Group F than in Group D after propofol injection and at 3 and 5 minutes after intubation (p < 0.05. After intubation, the rate pressure product values were significantly lower in Group D than in Group F (p < 0.05. We conclude that endotracheal intubation was better with the dexmedetomidine–lidocaine–propofol combination than with the fentanyl–lidocaine–propofol combination. However, side effects such as bradycardia should be considered when using dexmedetomidine.

  11. Surgical Treatment for Patients With Tracheal and Subgllotic Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nematollah Mokhtari

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background:Iatrogenic airway injury after endotracheal intubation and tracheotomy remains a serious clinical problem.In this study we reviewed post-intubation and traumatic tracheal stenosis in 47 patients with a special attention to the cause,hense surgical treatment of the stenosis was performed and the results compared with the literatures.Methods:Since February 1995 through January 2005 a total of 47 patients with tracheal stenosis and subgllotic as a result of tracheostomy or intubation in a single   institution, were explored in this study and examined for the outcomes of stenosis   management.There were 39 tracheal and 8 infraglottic stenosis. Our management strategy for stenosis was end-to-end anastomosis, and cartilage graft tracheoplasty. Results: Our management strategy for treatment of tracheal stenosis with resection and end-to-end anastomosis was associated with good outcomes. Patients were   treated by tracheal or partial laryngotracheal resection. The overall success rate was 93% with the complication rate of 18%. A second operation was required on 2 patients (4%.Conclusions: Long term tracheal tubes or intubation tubes and poor quality material tubes were the most common causes of these respiratory strictures .Our current procedures of choice for tracheal stenosis is sleeve resection with end- to -end anastomosis for short- segment stenoses (up to six rings. Cartilaginous homograft was performed when the loss the cartilage limited to the anterior part of trachea. The most common late complication was the formation of the granulations at the suture line.Granulation tissues can usually be managed with Laser or bronchoscopic removal.  

  12. Circumferential tracheal resection with primary anastomosis for post-intubation tracheal stenosis: study of 24 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negm, Hesham; Mosleh, Mohamed; Fathy, Hesham

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the results of circumferential tracheal and cricotracheal resection with primary anastomosis for the treatment of post-intubation tracheal and cricotracheal stenosis. This is a retrospective analytical study. A total number of 24 patients were included in this study. The relevant preoperative, operative and postoperative records were collected and analyzed. Twenty patients were finally symptom-free reflecting an anastomosis success rate of 83.3 %. Variable grades of anastomotic restenosis occurred in 11 (45.8 %) patients, three patients were symptom-free and eight had airway obstructive symptoms. Four out of the eight patients with symptomatic restenosis were symptom-free with endoscopic dilatation while the remaining four patients required a permanent airway appliance (T-tube, tracheostomy) for the relief of airway obstruction and this group was considered as anastomotic failure. Cricoid involvement, associated cricoid resection and the type of anastomosis were the variables that had statistical impact on the occurrence of restenosis (P = 0.017, 0.017, 0.05; respectively). Tracheal resection with primary anastomosis is a safe effective treatment method for post-intubation tracheal stenosis in carefully selected patients. Restenosis does not always mean failure of the procedure since it may be successfully managed with endoscopic dilatation.

  13. Rotator Cuff Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, G. Patrick

    Many baseball players suffer from shoulder injuries related to the rotator cuff muscles. These injuries may be classified as muscular strain, tendonitis or tenosynovitis, and impingement syndrome. Treatment varies from simple rest to surgery, so it is important to be seen by a physician as soon as possible. In order to prevent these injuries, the…

  14. Interposition vein cuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, P; Da Silva, T; How, T

    1996-01-01

    A vein cuff interposed at the distal anastomosis between a prosthetic vascular graft and a recipient infrageniculate artery improves the chances of continued patency of the graft, at least in the short and medium term. The mode of effect appears to be suppression or modification of anastomotic myointimal hyperplasia (MIH). In the event of graft failure the recipient artery and run-off vessels remain free from MIH and their patency is preserved thereby improving the prospects for further vascular reconstruction and limb salvage. The mechanisms by which interposition vein cuffs might modulate MIH are reviewed. Experimental evidence is described to show that the geometry of a cuffed anastomosis promotes a characteristic haemodynamic flow structure with a stable vortex. It is suggested that this vortex exerts greater shear stress upon the wall of the artery than the normal laminar flow observed in conventional anastomoses. High shear stress is known to inhibit MIH.

  15. Canine tracheal collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tappin, S W

    2016-01-01

    Tracheal collapse occurs most commonly in middle-aged, small breed dogs. Clinical signs are usually proportional to the degree of collapse, ranging from mild airway irritation and paroxysmal coughing to respiratory distress and dyspnoea. Diagnosis is made by documenting dynamic airway collapse with radiographs, bronchoscopy or fluoroscopy. Most dogs respond well to medical management and treatment of any concurrent comorbidities. Surgical intervention may need to be considered in dogs that do not respond or have respiratory compromise. A variety of surgical techniques have been reported although extraluminal ring prostheses or intraluminal stenting are the most commonly used. Both techniques have numerous potential complications and require specialised training and experience but are associated with good short- and long-term outcomes. © 2016 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  16. Fiber optic tracheal detection device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souhan, Brian E.; Nawn, Corinne D.; Shmel, Richard; Watts, Krista L.; Ingold, Kirk A.

    2017-02-01

    Poorly performed airway management procedures can lead to a wide variety of adverse events, such as laryngeal trauma, stenosis, cardiac arrest, hypoxemia, or death as in the case of failed airway management or intubation of the esophagus. Current methods for confirming tracheal placement, such as auscultation, direct visualization or capnography, may be subjective, compromised due to clinical presentation or require additional specialized equipment that is not always readily available during the procedure. Consequently, there exists a need for a non-visual detection mechanism for confirming successful airway placement that can give the provider rapid feedback during the procedure. Based upon our previously presented work characterizing the reflectance spectra of tracheal and esophageal tissue, we developed a fiber-optic prototype to detect the unique spectral characteristics of tracheal tissue. Device performance was tested by its ability to differentiate ex vivo samples of tracheal and esophageal tissue. Pig tissue samples were tested with the larynx, trachea and esophagus intact as well as excised and mounted on cork. The device positively detected tracheal tissue 18 out of 19 trials and 1 false positive out of 19 esophageal trials. Our proof of concept device shows great promise as a potential mechanism for rapid user feedback during airway management procedures to confirm tracheal placement. Ongoing studies will investigate device optimizations of the probe for more refined sensing and in vivo testing.

  17. Cuff inflation to aid nasotracheal intubation using the C-mac ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main thrust of the technique is that cuff inflation of the endotracheal tube is used to lift the endotracheal tube off the posterior pharyngeal wall and thus direct it towards the glottis. The technique was used successfully in 5 consecutive patients needing nasotracheal intubation. Indeed a couple of these patients might have ...

  18. Snake Envenomation Causing Distant Tracheal Myonecrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Khimani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Snakebites are often believed to be poisonous. However, this is not always the case. In fact, each bite differs from snake to snake, depending on if the snake is poisonous and if there is envenomation. Venom in pit viper snakebites is often associated with local necrosis. The abundant literature selections and research articles justify local myonecrosis due to envenomation, but there is not much in the literature regarding myonecrosis at a site distant from the snakebite. We hereby present a case of a 42-year-old man who was transferred to our emergency department after a rattlesnake bit him twice. The patient, besides developing local myonecrosis at the site of the snakebite, developed necrosis of the scrotum as well as tracheal pressure myonecrosis at the site of the endotracheal tube balloon. In this review, we will attempt to discuss the myonecrosis pathophysiology and management related to the rattle snakebite.

  19. Tracheal Sounds Acquisition Using Smartphones

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    Bersain A. Reyes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal sounds have received a lot of attention for estimating ventilation parameters in a non-invasive way. The aim of this work was to examine the feasibility of extracting accurate airflow, and automating the detection of breath-phase onset and respiratory rates all directly from tracheal sounds acquired from an acoustic microphone connected to a smartphone. We employed the Samsung Galaxy S4 and iPhone 4s smartphones to acquire tracheal sounds from N = 9 healthy volunteers at airflows ranging from 0.5 to 2.5 L/s. We found that the amplitude of the smartphone-acquired sounds was highly correlated with the airflow from a spirometer, and similar to previously-published studies, we found that the increasing tracheal sounds’ amplitude as flow increases follows a power law relationship. Acquired tracheal sounds were used for breath-phase onset detection and their onsets differed by only 52 ± 51 ms (mean ± SD for Galaxy S4, and 51 ± 48 ms for iPhone 4s, when compared to those detected from the reference signal via the spirometer. Moreover, it was found that accurate respiratory rates (RR can be obtained from tracheal sounds. The correlation index, bias and limits of agreement were r2 = 0.9693, 0.11 (−1.41 to 1.63 breaths-per-minute (bpm for Galaxy S4, and r2 = 0.9672, 0.097 (–1.38 to 1.57 bpm for iPhone 4s, when compared to RR estimated from spirometry. Both smartphone devices performed similarly, as no statistically-significant differences were found.

  20. 21 CFR 878.3720 - Tracheal prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tracheal prosthesis. 878.3720 Section 878.3720...) MEDICAL DEVICES GENERAL AND PLASTIC SURGERY DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 878.3720 Tracheal prosthesis. (a) Identification. The tracheal prosthesis is a rigid, flexible, or expandable tubular device made of a silicone...

  1. Rotator cuff exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... perform activities, including your shoulder joint and your shoulder blade Observe your spine and posture as you stand ... with band Isometric shoulder exercises Wall push-ups Shoulder blade (scapular) retraction - no tubing Shoulder blade (scapular) retraction - ...

  2. Tracheal quadrifurcation associated with congenital heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhat, Venkatraman; Gadabanahalli, Karthik; Ahmad, Ozaire [Narayana Multispeciality Hospital and Mazumdar Shaw Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Bangalore (India)

    2015-08-15

    Tracheal anomalies are known in association with congenital cardiac defects. Some of the well-described anomalies include accessory (displaced) tracheal bronchus with variants, tracheal trifurcation and accessory cardiac bronchus. Here we describe a case of tracheal quadrifurcation associated with complex congenital heart disease. Illustration of complex airway anatomy was simplified by the use of multidetector CT using a variety of image display options. Awareness of this complex anomaly will expand our knowledge of tracheal anomalies and equip the anesthesia and surgical team for better airway management. (orig.)

  3. Tracheal agenesis, a frightening scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, H; West, K; Bewick, J; Wickstead, M

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses three cases of tracheal agenesis that presented within a six-week period to the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital. By reviewing the available literature on tracheal agenesis, the report aims to outline a protocol for future prenatal and postnatal management. A case series and a literature review. Three cases of tracheal agenesis presented in the classical manner, with respiratory distress and unsuccessful intubation following delivery. A literature review confirmed that prenatal diagnosis requires future innovation; survival is rare and is predominately reliant on intubation of the oesophagus when a patent tracheoesophageal fistula is present. In most cases, tracheal agenesis represents part of the 'VATER' association: vertebral defects, anal atresia, tracheoesophageal fistula with oesophageal atresia, and radial or renal dysplasia. Complex, multiple-stage surgical procedures have been described; however, no survival to adolescence is documented. There is a call for improved prenatal diagnosis to allow both adequate counselling of parents and preparation for multi-specialty management at delivery. In addition, these cases highlight the ongoing need for improved congenital anomaly data within the UK, with currently only 49 per cent of England's births being registered.

  4. Teste de permeabilidade de vias aéreas pré-extubação: comparação entre três métodos em ventilação espontânea Cuff leak test preextubation: comparison between three methods in spontaneous ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha da Silva Souza

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: O teste de permeabilidade avalia obstrução de via aérea superior e é classicamente realizado em modo assistido-controlado de ventilação mecânica. O objetivo deste estudo foi analisar este teste em ventilação espontânea, através de três diferentes métodos e compará-los. MÉTODO: Vinte pacientes intubados foram submetidos a três diferentes formas do teste de permeabilidade, todos em ventilação espontânea: com o ventilômetro e o paciente conectado ao ventilador (teste 1; através do display do ventilador mecânico (teste 2; e com o ventilômetro e o paciente desconectado do ventilador (teste 3. O vazamento ao redor do tubo traqueal (TT foi definido como a porcentagem decorrente da diferença entre o volume-corrente inspirado (balonete insuflado e expirado (balonete desinsuflado. Foram avaliadas as diferenças entre os três testes, bem como correlacionado a porcentagem de vazamento entre os testes com três variáveis: pressão do balonete, diâmetro do TT e tempo de intubação. RESULTADOS: Houve diferença significativa (p BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The cuff leak test aims to evaluate the presence of airway obstruction and normally is carried through in the controlled mode of mechanical ventilation. The objective of this study was to evaluate the cuff leak in patients breathing spontaneously, across three different methods, and to compare them. METHODS: Twenty intubated patients had been submitted to three different forms of cuff leak test, all of them in spontaneous respiration: measuring air leak buy using a ventilometer and with the patient connected to the mechanical ventilator (test 1; through the display of the mechanical ventilator (test 2; and with ventilometer and the patient detached from the mechanical ventilator (test 3. The air leak around the tracheal tube (TT was defined as the percentage difference between the inspired tidal volume (insufflated cuff and exhaled (deflated cuff. The air

  5. Use of silicone tracheal stoma stents for temporary tracheostomy in dogs with upper airway obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinterud, T; Nelissen, P; White, R A S

    2014-11-01

    To report the use of silicone tracheal stoma stents for temporary tracheostomy in dogs with upper airway obstruction. Retrospective review of medical records for dogs in which silicone tracheal stoma stents were placed. Eighteen dogs had a silicone tracheal stoma stent placed for maintenance of a tracheostomy stoma for periods ranging from three hours to eight months. No intra-operative or immediate postoperative complications were recorded. In 11 dogs the stent was removed by simple traction after a period ranging from 36 hours to 6 weeks, and the tracheal stoma was left to heal by second intention. Five of the 18 dogs were determined as being tracheostomy dependent and underwent conversion to permanent tracheostomy after a period ranging from five days to eight months following stent placement. One dog was euthanased after three months, with the stent still in place, because of poor respiratory function, and one dog died of unrelated reasons. In 6 of 10 dogs (60%) where the stent was in place for five days or more, granulation tissue formation caused dislodgement of the stent. Silicone tracheal stoma stents may be used as an alternative to conventional tracheostomy tubes in selected dogs with upper airway obstruction. Long-term use of the stent beyond five days is not recommended because of granulation tissue formation. The long-term consequences of partial tracheal ring resection are unknown. © 2014 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  6. Tracheal reconstruction by re-inforced Gore-Tex in esophageal submuscular tunneling: An experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodjati Hossein

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tracheal reconstructions are aimed at rearranging or replacing parts of the tracheal tissue by different techniques. Here we introduce a new technique for tracheal reconstruction. Methods: In 10 adult dogs, after intubation with an endotracheal tube, a segment of trachea including seven tracheal rings was resected circumferentially. A submuscular tunnel was induced between mucosal and muscular layers of the adjacent esophagus lying right next to the trachea. The esophageal submuscular tunnel starts and ends exactly at the level of distal and proximal ends of tracheal resection, respectively. Inforced Gore-Tex passed through the esophageal submuscular tunnel the distal segment of trachea and end-to-end anastomosis were made between distal ends of Gore-Tex and trachea, then endotracheal tube removed and the same procedure was made for proximal ends of Gore-Tex and trachea. Afterward, the proximal and distal ends of the esophageal tunnel were approximated to proximal and distal tracheal parts over the anastomosis. Results: All dogs, except one due to anesthetic problem, survived and tolerated the operation; the first two dogs experienced postoperative fever, aspiration pneumonia, and died due to tracheoesophageal fistula. All survived animals were eating and barking well. We started to scarify dogs at least 6 and 12 weeks after operation for microscopy and pathologic examination. The Gore-Texes were patent and supported externally with fibrous connective tissue in esophageal tunneling, with in growth of respiratory epithelium on inner surfaces. Conclusion: Air tightness, good re-epithelialization, and relatively no limitation of esophageal length and no risk of luminal collapse are advantages of tracheal reconstruction by submuscular esophageal tunneling. This new method is worthy of further investigation, as it is technically feasible and easy to implement.

  7. Tracheal reconstruction by re-inforced Gore-Tex in esophageal submuscular tunneling: An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodjati, Hossein; Baezzat, Saeed Reza; Fazelzadeh, Afsoon; Tanideh, Nader; Geramizadeh, Bita

    2011-01-01

    Tracheal reconstructions are aimed at rearranging or replacing parts of the tracheal tissue by different techniques. Here we introduce a new technique for tracheal reconstruction. In 10 adult dogs, after intubation with an endotracheal tube, a segment of trachea including seven tracheal rings was resected circumferentially. A submuscular tunnel was induced between mucosal and muscular layers of the adjacent esophagus lying right next to the trachea. The esophageal submuscular tunnel starts and ends exactly at the level of distal and proximal ends of tracheal resection, respectively. Inforced Gore-Tex passed through the esophageal submuscular tunnel the distal segment of trachea and end-to-end anastomosis were made between distal ends of Gore-Tex and trachea, then endotracheal tube removed and the same procedure was made for proximal ends of Gore-Tex and trachea. Afterward, the proximal and distal ends of the esophageal tunnel were approximated to proximal and distal tracheal parts over the anastomosis. All dogs, except one due to anesthetic problem, survived and tolerated the operation; the first two dogs experienced postoperative fever, aspiration pneumonia, and died due to tracheoesophageal fistula. All survived animals were eating and barking well. We started to scarify dogs at least 6 and 12 weeks after operation for microscopy and pathologic examination. The Gore-Texes were patent and supported externally with fibrous connective tissue in esophageal tunneling, with in growth of respiratory epithelium on inner surfaces. Air tightness, good re-epithelialization, and relatively no limitation of esophageal length and no risk of luminal collapse are advantages of tracheal reconstruction by submuscular esophageal tunneling. This new method is worthy of further investigation, as it is technically feasible and easy to implement.

  8. Tracheal replacement by autogenous aorta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoosh Farhad

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tracheal defects may occur after trauma or prolonged intubation. Resection of tracheal tumors also poses a major challenge for substitution. In an effort to solve this problem, different techniques have been tried with little success. We report on a new animal model which showed acceptable results with fewer complications. Methods We replaced 5 cm of cervical trachea in 10 dogs with harvested infra-renal aorta and repaired the aortic defect with Dacron graft. Results Necropsy of the grafted aorta and anastomotic site revealed well healed anastomosis in all animals together with ciliated columnar epithelium coverage of grafted aorta and neovascularization of aortic wall. Conclusion Aortic graft is preferable to other substitutes because of less antigenicity, less vascularity, and no mucous secretions or peristalsis

  9. Tracheal replacement by autogenous aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anoosh, Farhad; Hodjati, Hossain; Dehghani, Seifollah; Tanideh, Nader; Kumar, Perikala V

    2009-06-09

    Tracheal defects may occur after trauma or prolonged intubation. Resection of tracheal tumors also poses a major challenge for substitution. In an effort to solve this problem, different techniques have been tried with little success. We report on a new animal model which showed acceptable results with fewer complications. We replaced 5 cm of cervical trachea in 10 dogs with harvested infra-renal aorta and repaired the aortic defect with Dacron graft. Necropsy of the grafted aorta and anastomotic site revealed well healed anastomosis in all animals together with ciliated columnar epithelium coverage of grafted aorta and neovascularization of aortic wall. Aortic graft is preferable to other substitutes because of less antigenicity, less vascularity, and no mucous secretions or peristalsis.

  10. on Guinea Pig Tracheal Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Keyhanmanesh

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: In regard to the high incidence of asthma and the side-effects of the drugs used, finding novel treatments for this disease is necessary. Our previous studies demonstrated the preventive effect of Nigella sativa extract on ovalbumin-induced asthma. In addition, water-soluble substances of N. sativa extract and methanol fraction of this plant were responsible for the relaxant effect of this plant on tracheal chains of guinea pigs. Therefore, for the first time, in the present study, in order to identify main constituents of the methanolic extract, the relaxant effects of five different methanolic fractions (20%, 40%, 60%, 80%, and 100% of N. sativa   on tracheal chains of guinea pigs were examined.     Materials and Methods:     The relaxant effects of four cumulative concentrations of each fraction (0.8, 1.2, 1.6, and 2.0 g% in comparison with saline as negative control and four cumulative concentrations of theophylline (0.2, 0.4, 0.6, and 0.8 mM were examined by their relaxant effects on precontracted tracheal chains of guinea pig by 60 mM KCl (group 1 and 10 μM methacholine (group 2.     Results: In group 1, all concentrations of only theophylline showed significant relaxant effects but all concentrations of these methanolic fractions showed significant contractile effects compared with that of saline (P

  11. Anesthesia for tracheal resection and reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobai, Ion A; Chhangani, Sanjeev V; Alfille, Paul H

    2012-12-01

    Tracheal resection and reconstruction (TRR) is the treatment of choice for most patients with tracheal stenosis or tracheal tumors. Anesthesia for TRR offers distinct challenges, especially for the less experienced practitioner. This article explores the preoperative assessment, strategies for induction and emergence from anesthesia, the essential coordination between the surgical and anesthesia teams during airway excision and anastomosis, and postoperative care. The most common complications are reviewed. Targeted readership is practitioners with less extensive experience in managing airway surgery cases. As such, the article focuses first on the most common proximal tracheal resection. Final sections discuss specific considerations for more complicated cases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Ultrasonography of the Rotator Cuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Yong Cheol [Samsung Medica Center, Sungkyunkwan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-09-15

    The ultrasonography (US) is an important modality in evaluating shoulder disease. It is accurate in diagnosing the various shoulder diseases including tendinosis, calcific tendinitis, and subacromial bursitis as well as rotator cuff tears. This article presents a pictorial review of US anatomy of the shoulder, the technical aspects of shoulder US, major types of shoulder pathology, and interventional procedure under US guidance

  13. Ultrasonography of the Rotator Cuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Yong Cheol

    2006-01-01

    The ultrasonography (US) is an important modality in evaluating shoulder disease. It is accurate in diagnosing the various shoulder diseases including tendinosis, calcific tendinitis, and subacromial bursitis as well as rotator cuff tears. This article presents a pictorial review of US anatomy of the shoulder, the technical aspects of shoulder US, major types of shoulder pathology, and interventional procedure under US guidance

  14. Laryngeal mask airway guided tracheal intubation in a neonate with the Pierre Robin syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, T G; Joensen, H; Henneberg, S W

    1995-01-01

    Endotracheal intubation in infants with the Pierre Robin syndrome may sometimes be impossible to accomplish by conventional means. To aid difficult tracheal intubation many different techniques have been described. We present a case, in which we successfully intubated a small-for-date newborn boy...... with the Pierre Robin syndrome by using a modified laryngeal mask airway (no. 1) as a guide for the endotracheal tube. The technique is easy to perform, less traumatic and less time-consuming than multiple attempts at laryngoscopy or blind tracheal intubation....

  15. Successful airway management in a patient with tracheal stenosis and tracheoesophageal fistula: a case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Reza Davari

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A twenty-year-old girl was referred with tracheal stenosis (TS which was a consequence of prolonged intubation after head injury because of previous car accident. The patient was aphasic and had normal respiration. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy showed complete tracheal obstruction at second tracheal ring level. Distal trachea was normal through tracheostomy tube. Removal of the tracheostomy tube and blind reinsertion with a new one was complicated with hypoxia and respiratory distress. Fibrotic bronchoscopy revealed large tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF below tracheal obstruction. Reinsertion of the tracheostomy tube by fiber optic bronchoscope was successful. Multidetector CT scan was performed on the same day with confirmation of TS combined with TEF. Surgery was performed on the next day. No clinical evidence of TEF was found in back history. Inadequate evaluation of the whole length of the trachea during the first bronchoscopy was the reasons for missing TEF. TEF should be considered in patients with TS in spite of no typical symptom such as food aspiration or pulmonary infections.

  16. Vaginal cuff dehiscence after vaginal cuff brachytherapy for uterine cancer. A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Cattaneo, Richard; Bellon, Maria; Elshaikh, Mohamed A.

    2013-01-01

    Vaginal cuff dehiscence is a rare, but potentially serious complication after total hysterectomy. We report a case of vaginal cuff dehiscence after vaginal cuff brachytherapy. A 62 year old female underwent a robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and was found to have International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) 2009 stage IB endometrioid adenocarcinoma of the uterus. The patient was referred for adjuvant vaginal cuff brachytherapy. D...

  17. Ventilation via the 2.4 mm internal diameter Tritube® with cuff – new possibilities in airway management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, M S; de Wolf, M W P; Rasmussen, L S

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A small tube may facilitate tracheal intubation and improve surgical access. We describe our initial experience with the Tritube®that is a novel cuffed endotracheal tube with a 2.4 mm internal diameter. METHODS: The Tritube®was used in seven adult Ear-Nose-and Throat surgical patients...... of the intubated airway during oral, pharyngeal, laryngeal or tracheal procedures in adults. This technique has the potential to replace temporary tracheostomy, jet-ventilation or extra-corporal membrane oxygenation in selected patients....

  18. First-line tracheal resection and primary anastomosis for postintubation tracheal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayed, H; Mostafa, A M; Soliman, S; Shoukry, T; El-Nori, A A; El-Bawab, H Y

    2016-07-01

    Introduction Tracheal stenosis following intubation is the most common indication for tracheal resection and reconstruction. Endoscopic dilation is almost always associated with recurrence. This study investigated first-line surgical resection and anastomosis performed in fit patients presenting with postintubation tracheal stenosis. Methods Between February 2011 and November 2014, a prospective study was performed involving patients who underwent first-line tracheal resection and primary anastomosis after presenting with postintubation tracheal stenosis. Results A total of 30 patients (20 male) were operated on. The median age was 23.5 years (range: 13-77 years). Seventeen patients (56.7%) had had previous endoscopic tracheal dilation, four (13.3%) had had tracheal stents inserted prior to surgery and one (3.3%) had undergone previous tracheal resection. Nineteen patients (63.3%) had had a tracheostomy. Eight patients (26.7%) had had no previous tracheal interventions. The median time of intubation in those developing tracheal stenosis was 20.5 days (range: 0-45 days). The median length of hospital stay was 10.5 days (range: 7-21 days). The success rate for anastomoses was 96.7% (29/30). One patient needed a permanent tracheostomy. The in-hospital mortality rate was 3.3%: 1 patient died from a chest infection 21 days after surgery. There was no mortality or morbidity in the group undergoing first-line surgery for de novo tracheal lesions. Conclusions First-line tracheal resection with primary anastomosis is a safe option for the treatment of tracheal stenosis following intubation and obviates the need for repeated dilations. Endoscopic dilation should be reserved for those patients with significant co-morbidities or as a temporary measure in non-equipped centres.

  19. Rotator cuff tear: A detailed update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Pandey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotator cuff tear has been a known entity for orthopaedic surgeons for more than two hundred years. Although the exact pathogenesis is controversial, a combination of intrinsic factors proposed by Codman and extrinsic factors theorized by Neer is likely responsible for most rotator cuff tears. Magnetic resonance imaging remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears, but the emergence of ultrasound has revolutionized the diagnostic capability. Even though mini-open rotator cuff repair is still commonly performed, and results are comparable to arthroscopic repair, all-arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tear is now fast becoming a standard care for rotator cuff repair. Appropriate knowledge of pathology and healing pattern of cuff, strong and biological repair techniques, better suture anchors, and gradual rehabilitation of postcuff repair have led to good to excellent outcome after repair. As the healing of degenerative cuff tear remains unpredictable, the role of biological agents such as platelet-rich plasma and stem cells for postcuff repair augmentation is still under evaluation. The role of scaffolds in massive cuff tear is also being probed.

  20. Rotator cuff impingement syndrome: MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieft, G.J.; Obermann, W.R.; Rozing, P.M.; Bloem, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    This paper summarizes the authors' experience using MR as a diagnostic tool in evaluating the rotator cuff empingement syndrome. Twenty patients with clinically suspected rotator cuff impingement syndrome were prospectively evaluated using standard radiography, double-contrast arthrography and MR imaging. MR is capable of demonstrating cuff abnormalities due to impingement. The most important findings is an area of abnormal signal intensity on both relatively T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo images. Surgery confirmed that these areas corresponded with inflamed degenerative supraspinatus tendon. Cuff changes can be depicted with MR in patients with arthrographically and radiographically normal shoulders

  1. Video laryngoscopy for tracheal intubation: an evidence-based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this health technology policy assessment was to determine the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of video-assisted laryngoscopy for tracheal intubation. Video-assisted, rigid laryngoscopes have been recently introduced that allow for the illumination of the airway and the accurate placement of the endotracheal tube. Two such devices are available in Canada: the Bullard® Laryngoscope that relies on fibre optics for illumination and the GlideScope® that uses a video camera and a light source to illuminate the airway. Both are connected to an external monitor so health professionals other than the operator can visualize the insertion of the tube. These devices therefore may be very useful as teaching aids for tracheal intubation. The objective of this review was to examine the effectiveness of the most commonly used video-assisted rigid laryngoscopes used in Canada for tracheal intubation. According to the Medical Advisory Secretariat standard search strategy, a literature search for current health technology assessments and peer-reviewed literature from Medline (full citations, in-process and non-indexed citations) and Embase for was conducted for citations from January 1994 to January 2004. Key words used in the search were as follows: Video-assisted; video; emergency; airway management; tracheal intubation and laryngoscopy. Two video-assisted systems are available for use in Canada. The Bullard® video laryngscope has a large body of literature associated with it and has been used for the last 10 years, although most of the studies are small and not well conducted. The literature on the GlideScope® is limited. In general, these devices provide better views of the airway but are much more expensive than conventional direct laryngoscopes. As with most medical procedures, video-assisted laryngoscopy requires training and skill maintenance for successful use. There seems to be a discrepancy between the seeming advantages of these devices in the

  2. Tracheal resection and anastomosis after traumatic tracheal stenosis in a horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Timothy P; Hawkes, Claire S; Dixon, Padraic M

    2015-02-01

    To report a resection and anastomosis technique to treat trauma-induced tracheal stenosis. Case report. A 9-year-old Warmblood gelding. Endoscopy, radiography, and ultrasonography were used to diagnose a single ring tracheal stenosis; the stenotic region was resected and adjacent tracheal rings anastomosed with an end-to-end technique. The anastomosis healed completely despite formation of a unilateral partial mucosal stenosis "web," which was subsequently removed by transendoscopic laser surgery. During tracheal anastomosis, the left recurrent laryngeal nerve was damaged, causing laryngeal hemiplegia, later treated successfully by laryngoplasty. The horse returned to its previous level of work. This tracheal resection and anastomosis technique successfully provided the horse with a large tracheal lumen, and despite major complications, allowed a return to full athletic work. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  3. Tracheal resection and anastomosis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, R E; Schwartz, A; Buergelt, C D

    1980-01-15

    Resection and end-to-end anastomosis of the trachea is a practical procedure for the correction of various forms of tracheal stenosis. Preplacing retention sutures facilitates manipulation of the trachea and rapid apposition of the tracheal ends. These same sutures then relieve tension on the primary suture line, assuring early epithelialization. Two dogs with tracheal stenosis were treated by use of this technique. Slight narrowing of the trachea was evident postoperatively in both dogs, but neither dyspnea nor coughing occurred during the follow-up period.

  4. Cardiorespiratory arrest secondary to tracheostomy cuff herniation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Ian R; Stotz, Martin

    2013-08-29

    This report details the case of a 67-year-old man who required intubation following a fall and multiple rib fractures and underwent surgical tracheostomy. Postoperatively, he deteriorated on the intensive care unit with airway obstruction. Bronchoscopy demonstrated tracheostomy cuff herniation obstructing airflow necessitating conventional orotracheal reintubation. On inspection of the tracheostomy an unusual cuff deformation was noted.

  5. Treatment alternative for irreparable rotator cuff ruptures ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The treatment of massive irreparable rotator cuff rupture has still no consensus among shoulder surgeons. It is assumed that symptomatic rotator cuff tendon rupture is accepted as irreparable if retraction amount of tendon is Patte stage 3 on MRI; degree of fatty atrophy is Goutallier stage 3 or 4; narrowing of ...

  6. Saccular lung cannulation in a ball python (Python regius) to treat a tracheal obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Debbie A; Wellehan, James F X; Isaza, Ramiro

    2009-03-01

    An adult male ball python (Python regius) presented in a state of severe dyspnea characterized by open-mouth breathing and vertical positioning of the head and neck. The animal had copious discharge in the tracheal lumen acting as an obstruction. A tube was placed through the body wall into the caudal saccular aspect of the lung to allow the animal to breathe while treatment was initiated. The ball python's dyspnea immediately improved. Diagnostics confirmed a bacterial respiratory infection with predominantly Providencia rettgeri. The saccular lung (air sac) tube was removed after 13 days. Pulmonary endoscopy before closure showed minimal damage with a small amount of hemorrhage in the surrounding muscle tissue. Respiratory disease is a common occurrence in captive snakes and can be associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Saccular lung cannulation is a relatively simple procedure that can alleviate tracheal narrowing or obstruction, similar to air sac cannulation in birds.

  7. Cuffed endotracheal tubes in paediatrics | Motiang | Southern ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The basic function of a tracheal tube is to provide a reliable connection between the patient's airway and the anaesthetic circuit (bag or ventilator). Ideally, this connection should allow a leak at 15-20 cmH2 O to prevent pressure-related mucosal perfusion, which varies with age. The anatomy of the paediatric airway differs ...

  8. Flow and oscillations in collapsible tubes: Physiological applications ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... by partial venous collapse, and in arteries, which exhibit self-excited oscillations (Korotkov sounds) when compressed by a blood-pressure cuff. Laboratory experiments are frequently conducted in a Starling resistor, a finite length of flexible tube, mounted between two rigid tubes and contained in a pressurised chamber.

  9. Effects of successive tracheal resection and anastomosis on tracheal diameter and position of lobar bronchi in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello Souza, Carlos Henrique; Reinero, Carol R

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effects of successive large-segment tracheal resection and anastomosis on tracheal diameter and position of lobar bronchi in dogs. ANIMALS 5 adult Beagles. PROCEDURES Right lateral radiographs were obtained for all dogs and used to measure tracheal length. Dogs were then euthanized, and successive segmental tracheal resections (intervals of 10% from 20% to 50% of the tracheal length), each of which was followed by anastomosis, were performed in each cadaver. Tracheobronchoscopy was performed before the first tracheal resection and after each of the anastomoses to evaluate tracheal diameter and changes in position of lobar bronchi. RESULTS Tracheal diameter was minimally affected by resections up to 50% of the tracheal length. Diameter of the trachea and position of bronchi were not affected by resection of 20% of the tracheal length. Changes in the position of various lobar bronchi were detected after resection of 30% of the tracheal length. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINCIAL RELEVANCE In this study, tracheal resections of 20% of the tracheal length were accommodated, possibly as a result of stretching of the annular ligament. Resections of ≥ 30% of the tracheal length altered the position of lobar bronchi. Clinical effects, if any, attributable to these changes in bronchial position remain to be elucidated.

  10. Handcrafted cuff manometers do not accurately measure endotracheal tube cuff pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Annoni, Raquel; de Almeida, Antonio Evanir

    2015-01-01

    RESUMOObjetivo:Testar a concordância entre dispositivos artesanais e um manômetro especificamente projetado para esse fim.Métodos:Testamos em 79 sujeitos a concordância entre as mensurações realizadas com 2 dispositivos artesanalmente adaptados para medir a pressão de balão dos tubos endotraqueais e as obtidas com uso de um manômetro específico para esse fim. A pressão de balão foi medida com um manômetro comercial e com dois dispositivos artesanais montados a partir de esfigmomanômetro anero...

  11. Evaluation of tracheal bronchus in Chinese children using multidetector CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ming, Zhu; Lin, Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Tracheal bronchus is a congenital bronchial anomaly. The diagnosis should be considered early in intubated patients. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) is the newest modality for evaluating tracheal bronchus. To evaluate the utility of 16-slice MDCT in children with tracheal bronchus and to characterize the frequency of tracheal bronchus in children with congenital heart disease. From June 2005 to May 2007, 3,187 consecutive children (1,124 with congenital heart disease and 2,063 without congenital heart disease) underwent MDCT examination. Minimum-intensity projection reconstruction was performed to show the tracheobronchial tree in every case. Tracheal bronchus was found in 42 children (3.74%) with congenital heart disease but in only 6 children (0.29%) without congenital heart disease. Among the 48 children with tracheal bronchus, 45 had right-side tracheal bronchus and 3 had bilateral tracheal bronchi with heterotaxy syndrome. The diagnostic sensitivity of MDCT was 100% (48/48). MDCT is a reliable imaging technique for the diagnosis of tracheal bronchus. Our data showed that right-side tracheal bronchus was more common and bilateral tracheal bronchi usually occurred with heterotaxy syndrome. In addition, tracheal bronchus often occurred with congenital heart disease. The angle between the tracheal bronchus and the trachea is important and should be measured. (orig.)

  12. Variations in endotracheal tube cuff pressure: Is 8-hourly monitoring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intermittent Pcuff was recorded using mechanical manometers, and continuous measurements using pressure transducers. Results. Thirty-five critically ill adult patients were enrolled. The mean study time was 11.1 h. The mean Pcuff was 25.6 (standard deviation 7.1) cmH2O for the intermittent group and 26.6 (8.7) cmH2O ...

  13. Intraoperative Endotracheal Cuff Pressure Study: How Education and Availability of Manometers Help Guide Safer Pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Gregory J; Warfel, Joel W; Aden, James K; Blackwell, Scott D

    2018-02-13

    Endotracheal intubation is a medical procedure that is often indicated in both the perioperative and critical care environments. Cuffed endotracheal tubes (ETT) allow for safer and more efficient delivery of positive pressure ventilation, as well as create a barrier to reduce the risk of micro-aspiration and anesthetic pollution in the operating room environment. Over-inflation of the endotracheal cuff can lead to serious and harmful sequelae. This study aimed to assess if departmental education paired with ready access to a manometer to assess cuff pressure would result in an improvement in the proportion of ETT cuff pressures in the goal range. A quality improvement study was conducted at the San Antonio Military Medical Center (SAMMC; Department of Defense hospital in San Antonio, TX). The initiative was divided into three key periods: pre-implementation, implementation, and post-implementation. During the pre-implementation period, ETT cuff pressures were obtained to assess the baseline state of ETT cuff pressures for patients in the operating room; the proportion of in-range (20-30 cmH2O) pressures was calculated. During the implementation phase, operating rooms were equipped with manometers and anesthesia departmental education was performed regarding the use of the manometers. Three months later, post-implementation cuff pressures were measured in the OR, and the proportion of in-range pressures was again calculated. The pre-implementation data showed an average cuff pressure of 48.92 cmH2O and a median of 38.5 cmH2O. Of the 100 pre-implementation pressures, 20 were in the goal range. Post-implementation data had an average cuff pressure of 41.96 cmH2O and a median of 30 cmH2O. A chi-squared test of pressures in the safe range from the pre-implementation versus post-implementation values yielded a highly significant p-value of 0.0003. The data from this study clearly demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in the proportion of in-range cuff

  14. [Segmental tracheal resection and anastomosis for the treatment of cicatricial stenosis in cervical tracheal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, P C; Luo, J S; Liu, Z; Bian, K; Guo, Z H; Ma, R N

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of segmental tracheal resection with end-to-end anastomosis for cicatricial cervical tracheal stenosis. The clinical outcomes of 40 patients treated with tracheal resection were retrospectively reviewed. There were 28 male patients and 12 female patients with the age ranged from 6 to 64 years (mean 33.7 years). The degree of stenosis was classified according to Myer-Cotton classification as follows: grade Ⅱ (n=7), grade Ⅲ (n=22) and grade Ⅳ (n=11). The stenosis extension ranged from 1.0 to 4.3 cm (mean 2.5 cm). The causes of the stenosis were postintubation (n=33), cervical trauma (n=6) and resection of tracheal neoplasm (n=1). Thirty-four(85.0%) patients were decannulated and 6 failed. Of the 6 patients failed, 4 were decannulated after reoperation with the sternohyoid myocutaneous flap or thyroid alar cartilage graft. Complications occurred in 10 patients. In 8 patients granulation tissues formed at the site of the tracheal anastomosis, which needed endoscopic resction, and in 2 patients anastomosic dehiscence occurred. No injury to recurrent laryngeal nerve or trachoesophageal fistula occurred. Segmental tracheal resection with end-to-end anastomosis is an effective surgical method for tracheal stenosis, which has a higher successful rate for primary operation and shorter therapeutic period.

  15. Interposition vein cuff in infrainguinal prosthetic bypasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Andrea, V; Biancari, F; Catania, A; Di Matteo, F M; Sorrenti, S; Spyrou, M; Dibra, A; Foti, N; Ortensi, A

    1999-01-01

    The Authors describe the interposition vein cuff technique as an adjuvant method to infrainguinal prosthetic bypass grafts. The haemodynamic, mechanical and humoral factors thought to be involved in the beneficial effects of the vein cuff are herein discussed. The results of the main series suggest the use of this method particularly in patients without any available autologous vein conduit requiring a below-knee popliteal or crural reconstruction.

  16. Intrinsic Transient Tracheal Occlusion Training and Myogenic Remodeling of Rodent Parasternal Intercostal Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Barbara K.; Mathur, Sunita; Ye, Fan; Martin, A. Daniel; Truelson, Sara Attia; Vandenborne, Krista; Davenport, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    It is recognized that diaphragm muscle plasticity occurs with mechanical overloads, yet less is known regarding synergistic parasternal intercostal muscle fiber remodeling. We conducted overload training with intrinsic transient tracheal occlusion (ITTO) exercises in conscious animals. We hypothesized ITTO would yield significant fiber hypertrophy and myogenic activation that would parallel diaphragm fiber remodeling. Sprague-Dawley rats underwent placement of a tracheal cuff and were randomly assigned to receive daily ten-minute sessions of conscious ITTO or observation (SHAM) over two weeks. After training, fiber morphology, myosin heavy chain isoform composition, cross-sectional area, proportion of Pax7-positive nuclei, and presence of embryonic myosin (eMHC) were quantified. Type IIx/b fibers were 20% larger after ITTO training than with SHAM training (ITTO: 4431±676 μm2, SHAM: 3689±400 μm2, p<0.05), and type I fibers were more prevalent after ITTO (p<0.01). Expression of Pax7 was increased in ITTO parasternals and diaphragm (p<0.05). In contrast, the proportion of eMHC-positive fibers was increased only in ITTO parasternals (1.2 (3.4-0.6)%, SHAM: 0 (0.6-0%, p<0.05). Although diaphragm and parasternal type II fibers hypertrophy to a similar degree, myogenic remodeling appears to differ between the two muscles. PMID:25509059

  17. MDCT Findings of Tracheal Agenesis: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Yu Mi; Kim, Jee Eun; Son, Dong Woo; Kim, Ha Na; Hwang, Hee Young [Gachon University, Gil Hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-01-15

    Tracheal agenesis is an extremely rare congenital anomaly with fatal consequences. We report a case of tracheal agenesis in a newborn infant who presented with no self-respiration and cyanosis that was confirmed by the use of 64-slice multidetector CT. Coronal and sagittal multiplanar reconstruction images clearly delineated the aberrant anatomy of tracheal agenesis and demonstrated the presence of a tracheoesophageal fistula.

  18. MDCT Findings of Tracheal Agenesis: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Yu Mi; Kim, Jee Eun; Son, Dong Woo; Kim, Ha Na; Hwang, Hee Young

    2009-01-01

    Tracheal agenesis is an extremely rare congenital anomaly with fatal consequences. We report a case of tracheal agenesis in a newborn infant who presented with no self-respiration and cyanosis that was confirmed by the use of 64-slice multidetector CT. Coronal and sagittal multiplanar reconstruction images clearly delineated the aberrant anatomy of tracheal agenesis and demonstrated the presence of a tracheoesophageal fistula

  19. Tracheal Configuration as a Radiographic Predictor of Difficult ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Goiters producing tracheal deviation or tracheal narrowing (TN) or both may cause difficult tracheal intubation (DTI). This study is to determine whether pre-operative assessment of trachea on neck radiograph can serve to predict DTI in goiters. Methods: Pre- thyroidectomy radiographs of 160 patients were ...

  20. The use of a nasogastric tube to facilitate nasotracheal intubation: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, C-W; Min, S-W; Kim, C-S; Chang, J-E; Park, J-E; Hwang, J-Y

    2014-06-01

    During nasotracheal intubation, the tracheal tube passes through either the upper or lower pathway in the nasal cavity, and it has been reported to be safer that the tracheal tube passes though the lower pathway, just below the inferior turbinate. We evaluated the use of a nasogastric tube as a guide to facilitate tracheal tube passage through the lower pathway, compared with the 'conventional' technique (blind insertion of the tracheal tube into the nasal cavity). A total of 60 adult patients undergoing oral and maxillofacial surgery were included in the study. In 20 out of 30 patients (66.7%) with the nasogastric tube-guided technique, the tracheal tube passed through the lower pathway, compared with 8 out of 30 patients (26.7%) with the 'conventional' technique (p = 0.004). Use of the nasogastric tube-guided technique reduced the incidence and severity of epistaxis (p = 0.027), improved navigability (p = 0.034) and required fewer manipulations (p = 0.001) than the 'conventional' technique. © 2014 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  1. Occult Interpositional Rotator Cuff - an Extremely Rare Case of Traumatic Rotator Cuff Tear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Wei Ren; Jou, I Ming [National Cheng Kung University Hospital, Tainan (China); Lin, Cheng Li [Show-Chwan Memorial Hospital, Changhua (China); Chih, Wei Hsing [Chia-Yi Christian Hospital, Chiayi (China)

    2012-01-15

    Traumatic interposition of a rotator cuff tendon in the glenohumeral joint without recognizable glenohumeral dislocation is an unusual complication after shoulder trauma. Here we report the clinical and imaging presentations of a 17-year-old man with trapped rotator cuff tendons in the glenohumeral joint after a bicycle accident. The possible trauma mechanism is also discussed.

  2. Long-term outcomes of four patients with tracheal agenesis who underwent airway and esophageal reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazuke, Yuko; Okuyama, Hiroomi; Uehara, Shuichiro; Ueno, Takehisa; Nara, Keigo; Yamanaka, Hiroaki; Kawahara, Hisayoshi; Kubota, Akio; Usui, Noriaki; Soh, Hideki; Nomura, Motonari; Oue, Takaharu; Sasaki, Takashi; Nose, Satoko; Saka, Ryuta

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term outcomes of four patients with tracheal agenesis who underwent airway and esophageal/alimentary reconstruction. We reviewed the medical records of four long-term survivors of tracheal agenesis and collected the following data: age, sex, type of tracheal agenesis, method of reconstruction, nutritional management, and physical and neurological development. The patients consisted of three boys and one girl, who ranged in age from 77 to 109months. The severity of their condition was classified as Floyd's type I (n=2), II (n=1), or III (n=1). Mechanical respiratory support was not necessary in any of the cases. Esophageal/alimentary reconstruction was performed using the small intestine (n=2), a gastric tube (n=1), and the esophagus (n=1). The age at esophageal reconstruction ranged from 41 to 55months. All of the cases required enteral nutrition via gastrostomy. Three of the patients were able to swallow a small amount of liquid and one was able to take pureed food orally. The physical development of the subjects was moderately delayed-borderline in childhood. Neurological development was normal in two cases and slightly delayed in two cases. None of the long-term survivors of tracheal agenesis required the use of an artificial respirator, and their development was close to normal. Future studies should aim to elucidate the optimal method for performing esophageal reconstruction to allow tracheal agenesis patients to achieve their full oral intake. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Metallic stent implantation in the treatment of malignant tracheal stenosis under general anaesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai Xuming; Jin Yong; Xie Hong; Cheng Long; Gu Xingshi; Chang Liuhui

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of the tracheal stent implantation for treatment of malignant tracheal stenosis under general anaesthesia. Methods: Eighteen patients with malignant tracheal stenosis underwent preoperative 64-slice spiral CT scan and airway reconstruction. The stenotic sites were located in main tracheal trunk (5 patients), in right main bronchus (1 patient), in trachea and left main bronchus (4 patients), in trachea and right main bronchus (3 patients), in main tracheal trunk and bilateral main bronchus (5 patients). The degree of stenosis was rated 51% to 70% in 7 cases, 71% to 90% in 11 cases. All patients, 17 patients of ASA grade Ⅳ and 1 patient of grade Ⅲ, presented with severe dyspnea. Under general anaesthesia, implantation of metallic stent was performed through the sputum aspiration hole of the connecting tubing with DSA guidance. The NBP, ECG, RR, SaO 2 of the patients were recorded and compared with t test during the entire procedure. At the end of the procedure, relief of dyspnea, complications related to anesthesia and operation were recorded. Results: The success rate of stent placement was 18/18, and dyspnea was significantly relived in all patients. Slightly bloody sputum occurred in 7 cases. The stent was obstructed by sputum in 1 case,and the patient was treated with medication. There were no severe complications. The operative course were rated 11 to 9 in 17 cases, and 6 to 8 in 1 case. All 18 patients were cooperative during the procedure. Sixteen patients rated the procedure as very comfortable and 2 rated the procedure as comfortable. Respiratory rate (RR) and heart rate (HR) decreased in all patients after the operation [(37.1 ± 2.8)/min and (106.5 ± 14.2) bpm before the operation respectively, (18.6 ± 1.4)/min and (73.2 ± 7.6) bpm after the operation respectively], t=17.81 and 3.80, P<0.01. Pulse oxygen saturation (SaO 2 ) during the operation [(91.2 ± 1.8)%]increased [(76.3 ± 8.6 )% before the

  4. Tracheal resection for laryngotracheal stenosis: A retrospective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laryngotracheal stenosis develops when scar tissue forms in the trachea and, rarely, in the larynx itself. Symptoms depend on the degree of airway obstruction and can range from asymptomatic to upper airway obstruction severe enough to cause death. We report on 21 patients who underwent tracheal resection for severe ...

  5. [Usefulness of bedside ultrasound compared to capnography and X-ray for tracheal intubation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso Quintela, P; Oulego Erroz, I; Mora Matilla, M; Rodríguez Blanco, S; Mata Zubillaga, D; Regueras Santos, L

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of bedside ultrasound compared to capnography and X-ray for endotracheal intubation in children and newborns. Hemodynamically stable children intubated in pedriatric and neonatal intensive care unit were included. Endotracheal tube insertion was checked after every intubation attempt by tracheal ultrasound and capnography simultaneously. The endotracheal tube insertion depth was then checked by assesment of lung sliding by thoracic ultrasound. Thereafter, Chest X-ray was performed and interpreted as usual. Time to perform each technique was recorded. The study included 31 intubations in 26 patients (15 in PICU and 16 in NICU). There were no statistically significant differences between tracheal ultrasound and capnography or between thoracic ultrasound and x-ray in identifying the correct endotracheal intubation and assessment of endotracheal tube insertion depth, respectively. Sensibility and specificity of ultrasound compared to capnography was 92% and 100%, and 100% and 75% compared to X-ray. Ultrasound was significantly slower compared to capnography [12 (4-16) vs 6 (3-12) seconds; P<.001] and significantly quicker compared to X-ray [0.22 (0.17-0.40) vs. 20 (17-25) minutes, P<.001]. Ultrasound appears to be as effective as capnography, although slower, for identifying endotracheal intubation. Ultrasound may be useful in clinical situations, such as cardiopulmonary resuscitation where capnography is less reliable. Ultrasound is as effective and quicker than X-ray for assessment of endotracheal tube insertion depth, and it may contribute to decrease the routine use of X-ray after tracheal intubation. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Parotid Duct Repair with Intubation Tube: Technical Note

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Muhammed Beşir; Barutca, Seda Asrufoğlu; Keskin, Elif Seda; Atik, Bekir

    2017-01-01

    The parotid duct can be damaged in traumatic injuries and surgical interventions. Early diagnosis and treatment of a duct injury is of great importance because complications such as sialocele and salivary gland fistula may develop if the duct is not surgically repaired. We think the cuff of an intubation tube is an ideal material in parotid duct repair, because of its technical characteristics, easiness of availability, and low-cost. In this paper, we described the use of the cuff cannula of an intubation tube for the diagnosis and treatment of parotid duct laceration, as a low-cost and easy to access material readily available in every operating room. PMID:28713751

  7. Systematics of injuries of the rotator cuff and biceps tendon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, M.J.; Pones, M.; Breitenseher, J.B.

    2015-01-01

    Injuries of the rotator cuff and the biceps tendon demonstrate different patterns, which can be recognized clinically and radiologically. These patterns are impingement syndrome with additional trauma, isolated trauma of the rotator cuff and shoulder dislocation causing rotator cuff tears. Furthermore, it is clinically crucial to evaluate the extent of a rotator cuff injury. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the modality of choice to differentiate these patterns. (orig.) [de

  8. Degenerative full thickness rotator cuff tears : Towards optimal management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambers Heerspink, Frederik

    2016-01-01

    The shoulder is one of the most complex joints in the body. Besides a wide range of motion it also has to be stable. The rotator cuff is a major stabiliser of the glenohumoral joint. With increasing age rotator cuff tears are common. Successful treatment is described following surgical (rotator cuff

  9. 21 CFR 870.1120 - Blood pressure cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Blood pressure cuff. 870.1120 Section 870.1120...) MEDICAL DEVICES CARDIOVASCULAR DEVICES Cardiovascular Diagnostic Devices § 870.1120 Blood pressure cuff. (a) Identification. A blood pressure cuff is a device that has an inflatable bladder in an inelastic...

  10. Medical image of the week: tracheal perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parsa N

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A 45 year old Caucasian man with a history of HIV/AIDS was admitted for septic shock secondary to right lower lobe community acquired pneumonia. The patient’s respiratory status continued to decline requiring emergency intubation in a non-ICU setting. Four laryngoscope intubation attempts were made including an inadvertent esophageal intubation. Subsequent CT imaging revealed a tracheal defect (Figure 1, red arrow with communication to the mediastinum and air around the trachea consistent with pneumomediastinum (Figure 2, orange arrow and figure 3, yellow arrow. Pneumopericardium (figure 4, blue arrow was also evident post-intubation. The patient’s hemodynamic status remained stable. Two days following respiratory intubation subsequent chest imaging revealed resolution of the pneumomediastinum and pneumopericardium and patient continued to do well without hemodynamic compromise or presence of subcutaneous emphysema. Post-intubation tracheal perforation is a rare complication of traumatic intubation and may be managed with surgical intervention or conservative treatment (1.

  11. Successful conservative management of a rare complication of tracheostomy; extensive posterior tracheal false pouch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Jennifer F; Ostwani, Waseem; Green, Glenn

    2016-11-01

    With the advent of improved neonatal and pediatric intensive care management, tracheostomy is increasingly performed in children requiring prolonged ventilation. Even though tracheostomy is generally a safe procedure, there remains mortality and morbidity associated with it. We report a rare complication of a tracheostomy tube resulting in extensive erosion and posterior tracheal false pouch secondary to a large tracheostomy tube and high positive end expiratory pressure in a 12-month-old infant. This was managed successfully with conservative treatment. A former 34-week premature infant was transferred to our pediatrics intensive care unit (PICU) with recurrent episodes of cardiopulmonary arrests due to suspected severe tracheobronchomalacia. The patient has bronchopulomonary dysplasia, severe restrictive lung disease and thoracic insufficiency from skeletal dysplasia requiring tracheostomy tube (TT) at two-month-old and mechanical ventilation. The 3.5 NEO TT was gradually upsized to a 5. The PEEP setting at transfer was 18cmH2O. The direct laryngoscopy and bronchoscopy showed moderate tracheomalacia at the innominate artery with a false pouch in the posterior tracheal wall that was 1.1cm below the tracheostomy stoma. A multi-disciplinary discussion including otolaryngology, PICU, Pulmonary Medicine, and Pediatric Surgery decided on conservative management. The false pouch healed and she was transferred back to referring PICU after a 46-day. Tracheal wall erosion resulting in a pouch formation is a rare complication, but it should be considered in patients with long term tracheostomy with difficulty ventilation and oxygenation with positional change. DLB is a useful tool in its diagnosis and conservative management can be successful. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Orotracheal tube as a risk factor for lower respiratory tract infection: preliminary data from a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzlovic, Igor; Perme, Janja; Stubljar, David

    2018-01-16

    The aim of the study was to investigate whether polyurethane (PU) endotracheal tubes, continuous measurements of cuff pressure and aspiration of the subglottic space as a bundle of parameters could reduce patients' risk for developing ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP). Two groups of patients that differed only in terms of endotracheal tubes and intubation intervention were compared. Group A was ventilated using PU tubes a with conical cuff; they also had continuous cuff pressure measurement and continuous subglottic aspiration. Group B was ventilated using PVC tubes with a cylindrical cuff; the patients underwent intermittent cuff pressure measurement and intermittent subglottic aspiration. Seven patients in group A (13.2%) and 18 in group B (36.0%) out of 103 were diagnosed with VAP. VAP patients were in general older, stayed longer in the ICU and were ventilated significantly longer compared with the patients with no VAP. Eight more patients in group B died compared with group A. Moreover, subjects in group A survived longer. Patient age, hours on mechanical ventilation, and days on an ICU were all positively associated with the occurrence of VAP. Prevention parameters in ventilation (PU cuff, conical cuff, continuous subglottic drainage and continuous cuff pressure measurement) could prevent the incidence of VAP in ICU patients.

  13. Tracheal Constriction In A Growing Dog

    OpenAIRE

    DeArmond, Christina; Niimura del Barrio, Maria Chie; Rosati, Tomasso; McAllister, Hester; Ryan, John

    2017-01-01

    A six-month-old castrated male German Shepherd/Husky cross was presented for investigation of a progressive dyspnoea and regurgitation. A circumferential cervical wound had been identified and closed following debridement by the primary care veterinarian when the dog was three months old. There was an extraluminal tracheal compression on radiographs. Surgical exploration revealed a plastic band tied and embedded in the dorsal musculature of the neck. The band had been increasingly constrictin...

  14. Recurred Post-intubation Tracheal Stenosis Treated with Bronchoscopic Cryotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ye-Ryung; Taek Jeong, Joon; Kyu Lee, Myoung; Kim, Sang-Ha; Joong Yong, Suk; Jeong Lee, Seok; Lee, Won-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Post-intubation tracheal stenosis accounts for the greatest proportion of whole-cause tracheal stenosis. Treatment of post-intubation tracheal stenosis requires a multidisciplinary approach. Surgery or an endoscopic procedure can be used, depending on the type of stenosis. However, the efficacy of cryotherapy in post-intubation tracheal stenosis has not been validated. Here, we report a case of recurring post-intubation tracheal stenosis successfully treated with bronchoscopic cryotherapy that had previously been treated with surgery. In this case, cryotherapy was effective in treating web-like fibrous stenosis, without requiring more surgery. Cryotherapy can be considered as an alternative or primary treatment for post-intubation tracheal stenosis. PMID:27853078

  15. Composition of Muscle Fiber Types in Rat Rotator Cuff Muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Yongjun; Pan, Feng; Mi, Jingyi

    2016-10-01

    The rat is a suitable model to study human rotator cuff pathology owing to the similarities in morphological anatomy structure. However, few studies have reported the composition muscle fiber types of rotator cuff muscles in the rat. In this study, the myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoforms were stained by immunofluorescence to show the muscle fiber types composition and distribution in rotator cuff muscles of the rat. It was found that rotator cuff muscles in the rat were of mixed fiber type composition. The majority of rotator cuff fibers labeled positively for MyHCII. Moreover, the rat rotator cuff muscles contained hybrid fibers. So, compared with human rotator cuff muscles composed partly of slow-twitch fibers, the majority of fast-twitch fibers in rat rotator cuff muscles should be considered when the rat model study focus on the pathological process of rotator cuff muscles after injury. Gaining greater insight into muscle fiber types in rotator cuff muscles of the rat may contribute to elucidate the mechanism of pathological change in rotator cuff muscles-related diseases. Anat Rec, 299:1397-1401, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Characterization of stem-like cells in mucoepidermoid tracheal paediatric tumor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Ling Lim

    Full Text Available Stem cells contribute to regeneration of tissues and organs. Cells with stem cell-like properties have been identified in tumors from a variety of origins, but to our knowledge there are yet no reports on tumor-related stem cells in the human upper respiratory tract. In the present study, we show that a tracheal mucoepidermoid tumor biopsy obtained from a 6 year-old patient contained a subpopulation of cells with morphology, clonogenicity and surface markers that overlapped with bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs. These cells, designated as MEi (mesenchymal stem cell-like mucoepidermoid tumor cells, could be differentiated towards mesenchymal lineages both with and without induction, and formed spheroids in vitro. The MEi cells shared several multipotent characteristics with BM-MSCs. However, they displayed differences to BM-MSCs in growth kinectics and gene expression profiles relating to cancer pathways and tube development. Despite this, the MEi cells did not possess in vivo tumor-initiating capacity, as proven by the absence of growth in situ after localized injection in immunocompromised mice. Our results provide an initial characterization of benign tracheal cancer-derived niche cells. We believe that this report could be of importance to further understand tracheal cancer initiation and progression as well as therapeutic development.

  17. MRI of the rotator cuff and internal derangement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opsha, Oleg [Department of Radiology, Maimonides Medical Center, 4802 10th Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11219 (United States)], E-mail: oopsha@hotmail.com; Malik, Archana [Department of Radiology, Maimonides Medical Center, 4802 10th Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11219 (United States)], E-mail: dr.armal@gmail.com; Baltazar, Romulo [Department of Radiology, Maimonides Medical Center, 4802 10th Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11219 (United States)], E-mail: rbaltazar@gmail.com; Primakov, Denis [Department of Radiology, North Shore University Hospital, 300 Community Drive, Manhasset, NY 11030 (United States)], E-mail: dgprim@yahoo.com; Beltran, Salvador [Dr. Ramon Marti, 2 Albons, Ginrona 17136 (Spain); Miller, Theodore T. [Department of Radiology and Imaging, Hospital for Special Surgery, 535 East 70th Street, New York, NY 10021 (United States)], E-mail: MillerTT@hss.edu; Beltran, Javier [Department of Radiology, Maimonides Medical Center, 4802 10th Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11219 (United States)], E-mail: jbeltran46@msn.com

    2008-10-15

    Disease to the rotator cuff is the most common cause of shoulder pain and dysfunction in adults. This group of muscles performs multiple functions and is often stressed during various activities. The anatomy and physiology of the rotator cuff is complex and interconnected to other muscle groups in the shoulder. One must take the anatomic status of the rotator cuff tendons into account when planning the treatment of the rotator cuff injury. Diagnostic imaging of the rotator cuff, performed by MRI, provides valuable information about the nature of the injury. In this article, we will review the various types and causes of rotator cuff injuries, normal MR anatomy, function, patho-anatomy, and the biomechanics of the rotator cuff. We will also review shoulder impingement syndromes.

  18. MRI of the rotator cuff and internal derangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opsha, Oleg; Malik, Archana; Baltazar, Romulo; Primakov, Denis; Beltran, Salvador; Miller, Theodore T; Beltran, Javier

    2008-10-01

    Disease to the rotator cuff is the most common cause of shoulder pain and dysfunction in adults. This group of muscles performs multiple functions and is often stressed during various activities. The anatomy and physiology of the rotator cuff is complex and interconnected to other muscle groups in the shoulder. One must take the anatomic status of the rotator cuff tendons into account when planning the treatment of the rotator cuff injury. Diagnostic imaging of the rotator cuff, performed by MRI, provides valuable information about the nature of the injury. In this article, we will review the various types and causes of rotator cuff injuries, normal MR anatomy, function, patho-anatomy, and the biomechanics of the rotator cuff. We will also review shoulder impingement syndromes.

  19. MRI of the rotator cuff and internal derangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opsha, Oleg; Malik, Archana; Baltazar, Romulo; Primakov, Denis; Beltran, Salvador; Miller, Theodore T.; Beltran, Javier

    2008-01-01

    Disease to the rotator cuff is the most common cause of shoulder pain and dysfunction in adults. This group of muscles performs multiple functions and is often stressed during various activities. The anatomy and physiology of the rotator cuff is complex and interconnected to other muscle groups in the shoulder. One must take the anatomic status of the rotator cuff tendons into account when planning the treatment of the rotator cuff injury. Diagnostic imaging of the rotator cuff, performed by MRI, provides valuable information about the nature of the injury. In this article, we will review the various types and causes of rotator cuff injuries, normal MR anatomy, function, patho-anatomy, and the biomechanics of the rotator cuff. We will also review shoulder impingement syndromes

  20. Diagnostic imaging of shoulder rotator cuff lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nogueira-Barbosa Marcello Henrique

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder rotator cuff tendon tears were evaluated with ultrasonography (US and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Surgical or arthroscopical correlation were available in 25 cases. Overall costs were also considered. Shoulder impingement syndrome diagnosis was done on a clinical basis. Surgery or arthroscopy was considered when conservative treatment failure for 6 months, or when rotator cuff repair was indicated. Ultrasound was performed in 22 patients and MRI in 17 of the 25 patients. Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were 80%, 100% and 90.9% for US and 90%, 100% and 94.12% for MRI, respectively. In 16 cases both US and MRI were obtained and in this subgroup statistical correlation was excellent (p< 0.001. We concluded that both methods are reliable for rotator cuff full thickness tear evaluation. Since US is less expensive, it could be considered as the screening method when rotator cuff integrity is the main question, and when well trained radiologists and high resolution equipment are available.

  1. Glenohumeral stability in simulated rotator cuff tears

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbrink, F.; Groot, J.H.; Veeger, H.E.J.; Helm, F.C.; Rozing, P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears disrupt the force balance in the shoulder and the glenohumeral joint in particular, resulting in compromised arm elevation torques. The trade-off between glenohumeral torque and glenohumeral stability is not yet understood. We hypothesize that compensation of lost abduction torque

  2. A broken fenestrated tracheostomy tube fragment removed from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aspiration of a broken tracheostomy tube fragment is a relatively rare complication with the potential to result in serious airway complications. Case reports of tracheal fragment aspiration have been documented infrequently in the past, with the earliest documented case in 1960. What follows is a case report of an ...

  3. Airway Management in a Patient With Tracheal Disruption due to Penetrating Neck Trauma With Hollow Point Ammunition: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Angela M; Hill, James L; Zagorski, Dave J; McClain, Joseph M; Maronian, Nicole C

    2018-05-01

    Rapid sequence induction and intubation was performed for a patient in respiratory distress after a gunshot wound to the neck. Resistance was noted distal to vocal cords. With a bronchoscope unavailable, the endotracheal tube was advanced with a corkscrew maneuver. Subcutaneous emphysema had developed. The endotracheal tube was advanced into the right mainstem with adequate ventilation. Imaging illustrated tracheoesophageal injury. The patient was emergently explored. An intraluminal bullet was removed, lateral wall tracheal defect was repaired, and a tracheostomy was placed. The intubating provider should secure the airway by the method they are most comfortable, have high suspicion of airway injury, and prepare to manage airway disruption.

  4. Chronic intrinsic transient tracheal occlusion elicits diaphragmatic muscle fiber remodeling in conscious rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara K Smith

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the prevalence of inspiratory muscle strength training has increased in clinical medicine, its effect on diaphragm fiber remodeling is not well-understood and no relevant animal respiratory muscle strength training-rehabilitation experimental models exist. We tested the postulate that intrinsic transient tracheal occlusion (ITTO conditioning in conscious animals would provide a novel experimental model of respiratory muscle strength training, and used significant increases in diaphragmatic fiber cross-sectional area (CSA as the primary outcome measure. We hypothesized that ITTO would increase costal diaphragm fiber CSA and further hypothesized a greater duration and magnitude of occlusions would amplify remodeling. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sprague-Dawley rats underwent surgical placement of a tracheal cuff and were randomly assigned to receive daily either 10-minute sessions of ITTO, extended-duration, 20-minute ITTO (ITTO-20, partial obstruction with 50% of cuff inflation pressure (ITTO-PAR or observation (SHAM over two weeks. After the interventions, fiber morphology, myosin heavy chain composition and CSA were examined in the crural and ventral, medial, and dorsal costal regions. In the medial costal diaphragm, with ITTO, type IIx/b fibers were 26% larger in the medial costal diaphragm (p<0.01 and 24% larger in the crural diaphragm (p<0.05. No significant changes in fiber composition or morphology were detected. ITTO-20 sessions also yielded significant increases in medial costal fiber cross-sectional area, but the effects were not greater than those elicited by 10-minute sessions. On the other hand, ITTO-PAR resulted in partial airway obstruction and did not generate fiber hypertrophy. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest that the magnitude of the load was more influential in altering fiber cross-sectional area than extended-duration conditioning sessions. The results also indicated that ITTO was

  5. Comparing the efficacy and safety of laryngeal mask airway, streamlined liner of the pharyngeal airway and I-gel following tracheal extubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesameddin Modir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adverse events following surgical operations are common complications due to removal of tracheal tube in contrast to the tracheal intubation. Awareness about the new methods and strategies for tracheal tube extubation is necessary for a safe and successful extubation. Therefore, we aimed to assess the safety and efficacy of laryngeal mask airway (LMA, streamlined liner of the pharyngeal airway (SLIPA and I-gel in extubation time of tracheal tube. A one-single randomized clinical trial was conducted in 105 eligible patients in three groups including LMA, SLIPA and I-gel. The patients were under surgery after general anesthesia with propofol (2–3 mg/kg and fentanyl (1–2 μg/kg. Hemodynamic responses and extubation consequences including coughing rate, laryngospasm, airway obstruction, apnea, breath holding and straining of patients, vomiting, and need for re-intubation were recorded every 5 minutes since inserting of supraglottic airway devices (SADs until patients restore consciousness. Analysis of data was conducted in SPSS software by analysis of variance (ANOVA and ANOVA for repeated measurements tests. The overall successful insertion was 100% for LMA and I-Gel and this rate was 97.1% for SLIPA method. A significant decrease was observed in trend of hemodynamic responses in all three groups. Nevertheless, the MBP was lower in LMA group and lower HR was observed in I-Gel and higher HR occurred in SLIPA (P 0.05. However, the incidence rate of apnea, and laryngospasm, as well as re-intubation need in SLIPA group was 2.9%, respectively. LMA, I-GEL and SLIPA could be considered as useful and safe devices for ventilation control after tracheal tube removal at the end of operation. Three devices were same regarding to sore throat, vomiting, coughing, and breath holding. However, LMA showed lower side effects while SLIPA was related to more occurrences of apnea, laryngospasm, and re-intubation need.

  6. QUALITATIVE ABNORMAL FETAL BREATHING MOVEMENTS, ASSOCIATED WITH TRACHEAL ATRESIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BAARSMA, R; BEKEDAM, DJ; VISSER, GHA

    A case is reported in which qualitatively, grossly abnormal fetal breathing movements turned out to be indicative of complete tracheal atresia. Fetal breathing movements were vigorous and jerky and of large amplitude; similarly abnormal movements were observed after birth. At postmortem tracheal

  7. Haemodynamic response to laryngoscopy with and without tracheal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haemodynamic response to laryngoscopy with and without tracheal intubation. P Smith, F.J Smith, P.J Becker. Abstract. Introduction Tracheal intubation is accompanied by an increased blood pressure and heart rate. The aim of this study was to find the most important source of this haemodynamic response, namely ...

  8. Synchrotron imaging of the grasshopper tracheal system: morphological and physiological components of tracheal hypermetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenlee, K.J.; Henry, J.R.; Kirkton, S.D.; Westneat, M.W.; Fezzaa, K.; Lee, W.; Harrison, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    As grasshoppers increase in size during ontogeny, they have mass specifically greater whole body tracheal and tidal volumes and ventilation than predicted by an isometric relationship with body mass and body volume. However, the morphological and physiological bases to this respiratory hypermetry are unknown. In this study, we use synchrotron imaging to demonstrate that tracheal hypermetry in developing grasshoppers (Schistocerca americana) is due to increases in air sacs and tracheae and occurs in all three body segments, providing evidence against the hypothesis that hypermetry is due to gaining flight ability. We also assessed the scaling of air sac structure and function by assessing volume changes of focal abdominal air sacs. Ventilatory frequencies increased in larger animals during hypoxia (5% O 2 ) but did not scale in normoxia. For grasshoppers in normoxia, inflated and deflated air sac volumes and ventilation scaled hypermetrically. During hypoxia (5% O 2 ), many grasshoppers compressed air sacs nearly completely regardless of body size, and air sac volumes scaled isometrically. Together, these results demonstrate that whole body tracheal hypermetry and enhanced ventilation in larger/older grasshoppers are primarily due to proportionally larger air sacs and higher ventilation frequencies in larger animals during hypoxia. Prior studies showed reduced whole body tracheal volumes and tidal volume in late-stage grasshoppers, suggesting that tissue growth compresses air sacs. In contrast, we found that inflated volumes, percent volume changes, and ventilation were identical in abdominal air sacs of late-stage fifth instar and early-stage animals, suggesting that decreasing volume of the tracheal system later in the instar occurs in other body regions that have harder exoskeleton.

  9. Synchrotron imaging of the grasshopper tracheal system : morphological and physiological components of tracheal hypermetry.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenlee, K. J.; Henry, J. R.; Kirkton, S. D.; Westneat, M. W.; Fezzaa, K.; Lee, W.; Harrison, J. F.; North Dakota State Univ.; Arizona State Univ.; Union Coll.; Field Museum of Natural History

    2009-11-01

    As grasshoppers increase in size during ontogeny, they have mass specifically greater whole body tracheal and tidal volumes and ventilation than predicted by an isometric relationship with body mass and body volume. However, the morphological and physiological bases to this respiratory hypermetry are unknown. In this study, we use synchrotron imaging to demonstrate that tracheal hypermetry in developing grasshoppers (Schistocerca americana) is due to increases in air sacs and tracheae and occurs in all three body segments, providing evidence against the hypothesis that hypermetry is due to gaining flight ability. We also assessed the scaling of air sac structure and function by assessing volume changes of focal abdominal air sacs. Ventilatory frequencies increased in larger animals during hypoxia (5% O{sub 2}) but did not scale in normoxia. For grasshoppers in normoxia, inflated and deflated air sac volumes and ventilation scaled hypermetrically. During hypoxia (5% O{sub 2}), many grasshoppers compressed air sacs nearly completely regardless of body size, and air sac volumes scaled isometrically. Together, these results demonstrate that whole body tracheal hypermetry and enhanced ventilation in larger/older grasshoppers are primarily due to proportionally larger air sacs and higher ventilation frequencies in larger animals during hypoxia. Prior studies showed reduced whole body tracheal volumes and tidal volume in late-stage grasshoppers, suggesting that tissue growth compresses air sacs. In contrast, we found that inflated volumes, percent volume changes, and ventilation were identical in abdominal air sacs of late-stage fifth instar and early-stage animals, suggesting that decreasing volume of the tracheal system later in the instar occurs in other body regions that have harder exoskeleton.

  10. Tracheal agenesis: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A V Desai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal agenesis is an extremely rare congenital anomaly involving the respiratory system. It is generally associated with anomalies of other systems. Antenatal diagnosis of this condition is difficult; therefore, it presents as a medical emergency in the labor room. Intubation in these babies is difficult. As many of these babies are born prematurely, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS adds to the management difficulties. Here, we describe two babies with this lethal anomaly and RDS where esophageal intubation and surfactant therapy proved beneficial. Furthermore, described are other associated anomalies.

  11. Testing Placement of Gastric Feeding Tubes in Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metheny, Norma A; Pawluszka, Ann; Lulic, Melanie; Hinyard, Leslie J; Meert, Kathleen L

    2017-11-01

    Inadvertent positioning of a nasogastric tube in the lung can cause serious complications, so identifying methods to detect improperly inserted tubes is imperative. To compare the sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive values of 4 pH cut points (< 4.0, < 4.5, < 5.0, and < 5.5) in differentiating gastric and tracheal aspirates under various treatment conditions and to explore the utility of a pepsin assay for distinguishing between gastric and tracheal aspirates. Gastric and tracheal aspirates were collected from critically ill infants undergoing mechanical ventilation who had nasogastric or orogastric feeding tubes. Aspirates were tested with colorimetric pH indicators and a rapid pepsin assay. Information about treatment conditions was obtained from medical records. Two hundred twelve gastric aspirates and 60 tracheal aspirates were collected from 212 patients. Sensitivity was highest and specificity was lowest at the gastric aspirate pH cut point of less than 5.5. Positive predictive values were 100% at all pH cut points less than 5.0. Negative predictive values were higher at the pH cut point of less than 5.0 than at cut points less than 4.5. A higher percentage of pepsin-positive readings was found in gastric aspirates (88.3%) than in tracheal aspirates (5.4%). For a desired positive predictive value of 100%, a pH cut point of less than 5.0 provides the best negative predictive values, regardless of gastric acid inhibitor administration and feeding status. The pepsin assay is promising as an additional marker to distinguish gastric from tracheal aspirates. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  12. Cuff inflations do not affect night-time blood pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Emilie H; Theilade, Simone; Hansen, Tine W

    2015-01-01

    Discomfort related to cuff inflation may bias 24 h ambulatory blood pressure (BP) measurements, especially during night-time. We accessed the impact of cuff inflations by comparing 24 h BP recorded with a cuff-less tonometric wrist device and an upper-arm oscillometric cuff device. Fifty.......3±14.6 mmHg, P≤0.01), as was nocturnal BP (6.7±5.3 vs. 10.3±7.6%, P=0.002). In conclusion, nocturnal BP decline was higher when measured with the cuff device, suggesting that cuff inflations did not increase night-time BP. Further evaluation of the tonometric device using the updated European Society...

  13. Anomalous biceps origin from the rotator cuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samik Banerjee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Variations in the origin of the long head of biceps tendon (LHBT have been described in literature; however, its clinical significance remains uncertain. We describe in this report, the history, physical examination and the arthroscopic findings in a patient who had an anomalous origin of the LHBT from the rotator cuff, resulting in restriction of range of motion. This anomalous origin of the long head of biceps tendon causing capsular contracture and restriction of movements leading to secondary internal impingement, has not been extensively reported in the literature. Shoulder arthroscopists should be aware that, although, an uncommon clinical condition, the aberrant congenital origin of the LHBT from the rotator cuff can rarely become pathologic in middle age and lead to shoulder dysfunction. In such cases, release of the anomalous band may be required, along with the treatment of other concomitant intraarticular pathologies in the glenohumeral joint.

  14. Proteomics perspectives in rotator cuff research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejersen, Maria Hee Jung; Frost, Poul; Hansen, Torben Bæk

    2015-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff tendinopathy including tears is a cause of significant morbidity. The molecular pathogenesis of the disorder is largely unknown. This review aimed to present an overview of the literature on gene expression and protein composition in human rotator cuff tendinopathy and other...... tendinopathies, and to evaluate perspectives of proteomics – the comprehensive study of protein composition - in tendon research. Materials and Methods We conducted a systematic search of the literature published between 1 January 1990 and 18 December 2012 in PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science. We included......), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 (4 of 7), and vascular endothelial growth factor (4 of 7), and a decrease in MMP-3 (10 of 12). Fourteen proteomics studies of tendon tissues/cells failed inclusion, mostly because they were conducted in animals or in vitro. Conclusions Based on methods...

  15. What's in a name? Expiratory tracheal narrowing in adults explained

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leong, P.; Bardin, P.G.; Lau, K.K.

    2013-01-01

    Tracheomalacia, tracheobronchomalacia, and excessive dynamic airway collapse are all terms used to describe tracheal narrowing in expiration. The first two describe luminal reduction from cartilage softening and the latter refers to luminal reduction from exaggerated posterior membrane movement. Expiratory tracheal narrowing is a frequent occurrence that can cause symptoms of airway obstruction, such as dyspnoea, wheeze, and exercise intolerance. The accurate diagnosis and quantification of expiratory tracheal narrowing has important aetiological, therapeutic, and prognostic implications. The reference standard for diagnosis has traditionally been bronchoscopy; however, this method has significant limitations. Expiratory tracheal disorders are readily detected by four-dimensional dynamic volume multidetector computed tomography (4D-CT), an emerging, non-invasive method that will potentially enable detection and quantification of these conditions. This review discusses the morphological forms of expiratory tracheal narrowing and demonstrates the utility of 4D-CT in the diagnosis, quantification, and treatment of these important conditions

  16. Open Tracheostomy after Aborted Percutaneous Approach due to Tracheoscopy Revealing Occult Tracheal Wall Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Schweiger

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tracheostomy is a common procedure for intensive care patients requiring prolonged mechanical ventilation. In this case report, we describe a 78-year-old female patient admitted for an aneurysm of the cerebral anterior communicating artery. Following immediate endovascular coiling, she remained ventilated and was transferred to the neurological intensive care unit. On postoperative day ten, a percutaneous tracheostomy (PCT was requested; however, a large ulcer or possible tracheoesophageal fistula was identified on the posterior tracheal wall following bronchoscopic assessment of the trachea. Therefore, the requested PCT procedure was aborted. An open tracheostomy in the operating room was completed; however, due to the position and depth of the ulcer, a reinforced endotracheal tube (ETT was placed via the tracheostomy. Four days later, the reinforced ETT was replaced with a Shiley distal extended tracheostomy tube to bypass the ulceration. Careful inspection and evaluation of the tracheostomy site before PCT prevented a potentially life-threatening issue in our patient.

  17. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in elite rugby players

    OpenAIRE

    Tambe, Amol; Badge, Ravi; Funk, Lennard

    2009-01-01

    Background: Rugby is an increasingly popular collision sport. A wide spectrum of injuries can be sustained during training and match play. Rotator cuff injury is uncommon in contact sports and there is little published literature on the treatment of rotator cuff tears in rugby players. Aims: We therefore reviewed the results and functional outcomes of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in elite rugby players. Materials and Methods: Eleven professional rugby players underwent arthroscopic ...

  18. Glenohumeral interposition of rotator cuff stumps: a rare complication of traumatic rotator cuff tear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Moraes Agnollitto

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present report describes a case where typical findings of traumatic glenohumeral interposition of rotator cuff stumps were surgically confirmed. This condition is a rare complication of shoulder trauma. Generally, it occurs in high-energy trauma, frequently in association with glenohumeral joint dislocation. Radiography demonstrated increased joint space, internal rotation of the humerus and coracoid process fracture. In addition to the mentioned findings, magnetic resonance imaging showed massive rotator cuff tear with interposition of the supraspinatus, infraspinatus and subscapularis stumps within the glenohumeral joint. Surgical treatment was performed confirming the injury and the rotator cuff stumps interposition. It is important that radiologists and orthopedic surgeons become familiar with this entity which, because of its rarity, might be neglected in cases of shoulder trauma.

  19. Feeding Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the TPN. Tubes Used for Enteral Feeds NG (Nasogastric Tube) A flexible tube is placed via the nose, ... portion of the small intestine Naso – nose NG – Nasogastric Tube -ostomy – new opening Percutaneous – through the skin PEJ – ...

  20. Tracheal transplantation for carinal reconstruction in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, K; Inutsuka, K; Hiratsuka, M; Makihata, S; Okabayashi, K; Shiraishi, T; Shirakusa, T

    1998-09-01

    Experimental carinal allotransplantation has been performed with tracheocarinal Y-shaped allografts in dogs. In this study we tried canine carinal reconstruction with cylindrical allografts. Carinal reconstruction was performed with allotransplantation of cylindrical trachea in dogs, and graft healing was evaluated by bronchoscopic observation, mucosal blood flow measurement, and histologic examination. A section of the recipient carina containing five tracheal rings and two main stem bronchi was removed, and a donor trachea seven rings long was inserted between the recipient trachea and the left main stem bronchus; then side-to-end anastomosis was performed between the graft midportion and recipient right main stem bronchus (new carina). The grafts were wrapped with pedicled omentum. Fresh grafts were transplanted into one group of dogs (n=8 ), and grafts cryopreserved for 1 week were transplanted into another group (n=7). No anastomotic leakage occurred in any dog. Excellent healing of grafts and graft anastomoses was observed by fiberoptic bronchoscopy in six dogs (75%) in the fresh graft group and in four dogs (57%) in the cryopreserved graft group. The mucosal blood flow in the new carina decreased remarkably and, although it recovered, mucosal blood flow remained under the preoperative level on day 28 after the operation. Cylindrical tracheal allotransplantation is useful for carinal reconstruction, and the method of side-to-end anastomosis between the donor trachea and recipient bronchus is a feasible and accessible procedure in dogs.

  1. Analysis of failed rotator cuff repair – Retrospective survey of revisions after open rotator cuff repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupert Schupfner

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Rotator cuff defects are frequently occurring shoulder pathologies associated with pain and movement impairment. Aims The aim of the study was to analyse the pathologies that lead to operative revisions after primary open rotator cuff repair. Methods In 216 patients who underwent primary rotator cuff repair and later required operative revision between 1996 to 2005, pathologies found intraoperatively during the primary operation and during revision surgery were collected, analysed and compared. Results The average age at the time of revision surgery was 54.3 years. The right shoulder (61.6 per cent was more often affected than the left, males (63.4 per cent more often than females. At primary operation – apart from rotator cuff repair – there were the following surgical procedures performed: 190 acromioplasty, 86 Acromiclavicular joint resections, 68 tenodesis, 40 adhesiolysis and 1 tenotomy. If an ACJ-resection had been performed in the primary operation, ACJ-problems were rare in revision surgery (p<0.01. Primary gleno-humeral adhesions were associated with a significant rise in re-tearing rate (p=0.049. Primary absence of adhesions went along with a significant lower rate of adhesions found at revision (p=0.018. Primary performed acromioplasty had no influence on re-tearing rate (p=0.408 or on the rate of subacromial impingement at revision surgery (p=0.709. Conclusion To avoid operative revision after rotator cuff repair relevant copathologies of the shoulder have to be identified before or during operation and treated accordingly. Therefore, even during open rotator cuff repair, the surgeon should initially start with arthroscopy of the shoulder joint and subacromial space to recognise co-pathologies.

  2. Comparison of the Ambu Aura-i with the Air-Q Intubating Laryngeal Airway as A Conduit for Fiberoptic-guided Tracheal Intubation in Children with Ear Deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Juan; Deng, Xiao-Ming; Yang, Dong; Wen, Chao; Xu, Wen-Li; Wang, Lei; Xu, Jin

    2016-12-20

    Objective To compare the Ambu Aura-i with the Air-Q intubating laryngeal airway for fiberoptic-guided tracheal intubation in ear deformity children.Methods Totally 120 children who were scheduled for elective auricular reconstruction surgery requiring general anaesthesia with tracheal intubation were enrolled in this prospective study. They were randomized to receive either the Ambu Aura-i (Aura-i group) or Air-Q (Air-Q group). The time for successful tracheal intubation was assessed. The attempts for successful device insertion, leak pressures, cuff pressures, fiberoptic grade of laryngeal view, time for removal of the device after endotracheal intubation, and complications were recorded. Results Device placement, endotracheal intubation, and removal after endotracheal intubation were successful in all patients. The Air-Q group required longer time than the Aura-i group in device placement[(14.1±7.2) s vs. (10.8±5.2) s, PAura-i group). The leak pressure was (20.5±4.8) cmH 2 O in the Air-Q group and (22.2±5.0) cmH 2 O in the Aura-i group (PAura-i group (PAura-i group. Conclusion Both Ambu Aura-i and Air-Q intubating laryngeal airway are effective conduits for beroptic-guided tracheal intubation, with advantages including simple operation, high success rate, and fewer complications, especially the Ambu Aura-i.

  3. Problems in extubation of endotracheal tube in anaesthesia in the West African sub-region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyanwo, O A; Elegbe, E O; Orubo, C N

    1995-01-01

    Three Retrospective Case Studies of the problems often faced with extubation of endotracheal tube during routine endotracheal anaesthesia is reported to alert anaesthetists about endotracheal tubes with intact and inflatable cuffs which could pose potential dangers to safety of patients in Anaesthetic practice, especially in the West-African Sub-region because of our practice of re-using both re-usable and disposable endotracheal tubes.

  4. Treatment of a case of tracheal stenosis in a dog with tracheal resection and anastomosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutlu, Z.; Acar, S.E.; Perk, C.

    2003-01-01

    A case of tracheal stenosis in the cervical portion of the trachea was encountered in a 5.5-month-old St. Bernard-Rottweiler cross dog. Breathing difficulty was seen in the clinical examination and presence of an obvious narrowing between the 3rd-5th cervical tracheal rings was determined in the radiological examination. Under general anesthesia the portion with stenosis was resected and the healthy trachea ends were anastomosed using the split cartilage technique. In the postoperative period the breathing difficulty disappeared and there was no development of a new stenosis in the anastomosis region. In the late period check-up the patient was seen to lead a healthy life

  5. Tracheal growth after resection and anastomosis in puppies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, H; Brochu, P; Bensoussan, A L; Lagacé, G; Khan, A H

    1986-09-01

    Tracheal morphology, morphometric changes, and growth and histologic changes were studied in puppies submitted to tracheal resection and anastomosis. Fifteen mongrel puppies about 12 weeks old and weighing on an average 5.5 kg were operated under general anesthesia using fluothane. A median cervicotomy incision was made in ten puppies (experimental group, EG) and the proximal 14 tracheal rings were resected (average length 5.08 cm or about 35% to 38% of total tracheal length). One layer anastomosis was done using vicryl 4.0 maintaining the average tension of 1,450 g. Five puppies (control group, CG) were submitted to tracheal transection and anastomosis and the following parameters were studied. Tracheal morphology the trachea of the EG was a rounded triangle whereas in the CG it was oval in shape, there was increase in the intercartilageneous spaces in the EG, no granulation tissue was present, two mucous webs were seen in the EG and one in the CG. Morphometric changes average tracheal length EG 13 cm, CG 17.7 cm, intercartilagenous space EG 3.08 mm, CG 1.3 mm, intercricothyroid space EG 1.2 cm, CG 0.53 cm, sagittal and transverse tracheal thickness at the anastomosis EG 2.6 and 3.3 mm, CG 2 and 1.5 mm, sagittal and transverse diameter reduced on an average 2 mm in EG. Histology Moderate fibrosis was found at the level of anastomosis with no modification of chondrocytes at the cartilagenous rings in the EG. Even with high anastomotic tension, the dogs had normal tracheal growth without stenosis; the sagittal and transverse growth at the anastomosis in the EG was 90% and 85%, respectively, when compared with the CG.

  6. Cuff filling volumes for pediatric classic laryngeal mask airways: comparison of clinical end points versus adjusted cuff pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghai, Babita; Sethi, Sameer; Ram, Jagat; Wig, Jyotsna

    2013-02-01

    Clinical end points are often used to guide inflation and adequacy of cuff seal after laryngeal mask airway placement. However, clinical end points for cuff inflation have been shown to have significantly higher intracuff pressure. The adjusted cuff pressure between 55 and 60 cm H(2)O causes significantly better seal of laryngeal mask airway. We prospectively assessed the cuff pressures generated by cuff inflation guided by clinical end points, and the actual volume of air required to achieve cuff pressures between 55 and 60 cm H(2)O for sizes 1-2.5 reusable classic laryngeal mask airway. Two hundred and three ASA I and II children undergoing elective cataract surgery requiring general anesthesia receiving laryngeal mask airway sizes 1-2.5 were recruited to this study. The laryngeal mask airway was placed using standard technique. After insertion of laryngeal mask airway, the cuff was slowly inflated until a slight outward shift of device was noted. Cuff pressures were measured using calibrated hand held Portex Cuff Inflator Pressure Gauge (Portex Limited, Hythe, Kent, UK). If the cuff pressure was >60 cm H(2)O, the cuff was deflated to achieve a cuff pressure of 55-60 cm H(2)O. The volume of air required to achieve this pressure was recorded. The volume of air required to achieve the pressure between 55 and 60 cm H(2)O in laryngeal mask airway size 1, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 were 2.750 ± 0.2565, 4.951 ± 0.5378, 6.927 ± 0.6328, and 10.208 ± 1.4535 ml, respectively. The difference between the initial and the final cuff volumes and pressures in all laryngeal mask airway sizes were statistically significant(P = 0.000). Lower cuff volumes are required to achieve a pressure of 60 cm H(2)O than those required if clinical end points are used as a sole guide for determining cuff inflation for patients receiving pediatric laryngeal mask airways. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Esophageal trachealization: A feature of eosinophilic esophagitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlHussaini, Abdulrahman A; Semaan, Toufic; ElHag, Imad A

    2009-01-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE) is an inflammatory condition characterized by intense eosinophilic infiltration of the esophagus. EE is frequently misdiagnosed as gastroesophageal reflux disease. Here, we present a child with EE and a characteristic endoscopic finding, r inged esophagus . An 11-year-old Saudi boy presented with dysphagia for 1 year. He had experienced an intermittent sensation of solid food sticking in his chest, which was relieved by drinking liquids. A barium swallow excluded anatomical causes of dysphagia, but revealed multiple-ringed esophagus. Endoscopy showed a furrowing and trachealizing appearance of the entire esophagus. Hisologically, extensive eosinophilic infiltration was a feature in biopsies obtained from the esophagus. The child responded well to a 2-month course of inhaled fluticasone. Symptoms recurred 3 months after discontinuation of therapy, which necessitated resumption of inhaled fluticasone. The endoscopic appearance of multiple esophageal rings should raise suspicion of EE and be confirmed by esophageal biopsies. (author)

  8. Excessive pressure in multichambered cuffs used for sequential compression therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, P; Belgrado, JP; Leduc, A; Leduc, O; Verdonck, P

    2002-01-01

    Background and Purpose. Pneumatic compression devices, used as part of the therapeutic strategy for lymphatic drainage, often have cuffs with multiple chambers that are, inflated sequentially. The purpose of this study was to investigate (1) the relationship between cuff chamber pressure

  9. Arthroscopic repair for subacromial incarceration of a torn rotator cuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Nakamizo

    2015-07-01

    Conclusion: Arthroscopic reduction and repair are applicable for inverted flap tears of the rotator cuff. The findings of the present study indicated that patients with a heel-type acromion in the anteroposterior view of radiographs are at greater risk for inverted flap tears of the rotator cuff.

  10. Shouldering the blame for impingement: the rotator cuff continuum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this article was to summarise recent research on shoulder impingement and rotator cuff pathology. A continuum model of rotator cuff pathology is described, and the challenges of accurate clinical diagnosis, imaging and best management discussed. Keywords: shoulder impingement syndrome, subacromial ...

  11. Profilactic role of simvastatin and mitomycin C in tracheal stenosis after tracheal damage: Study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekinci, Adnan; Koc, Sema; Erdoğan, Ahmet Serhat; Kesici, Hakan

    2018-02-01

    We aimed to investigate the prophylactic effect simvastatin of and mitomycin C (MMC) on laryngeal and tracheal stenosis in tracheotomised rats by histopathological evaluation of laryngotracheal segment. Randomized prospective single-blind. Standard vertical tracheotomy was performed on 24 rats. Then the animals were randomly divided into three groups as A, B and C. In group A 0.4 mg/day once daily mitomycin C was injected to the paratracheal region for 14 days. In group B daily 30 mg/kg/day simvastatin was given via gavage to rats for 14 days. In group C 2 cc/day intraperitoneal saline given to rats and the created control group by 14 days follow up. After 10 days, tracheal cannulas were removed. Three weeks later, all animals were euthanized and trachea specimens were harvested. The present study investigates the effects of MMC and Simvastatin on fibrosis, inflammation, stenosis index and tracheal wall thickness in a tracheal injury model. The difference between the groups in terms of degree of inflammation scores was statistically insignificant (P = 0,187). Differences between the groups were found to be insignificant in terms of the preventionof fibrosis (P = 0,993). There was no significant difference between groups in terms of stenosis index (P = 0.645). In terms of wall thickness, control, simvastatin and mitomycin C groups were statistically different (p = 0.038). The difference between post-hoc test results was between Mitomycin C and control groups (p = 0.036). Maximum wall thickness in the MMC group (0,299 mm) was significantly lower compared to the control group (0,382 mm)(P C group (0,160 mm) comparison to the control group (0,200 mm) (P < 0.0001). It was detected that the simvastatin and MMC is not effective in preventing the tracheal stenosis, inflammation and fibrosis formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Arthroscopic repair techniques for massive rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Jeffrey S; Song, Frederick S

    2012-01-01

    Patients with massive rotator cuff tears present with pain, weakness, and loss of function. Candidates for arthroscopic repair include symptomatic, young, active patients; those with an acute tear or tears with early changes of atrophy; and patients willing to comply with recovery and rehabilitation processes after surgery. As massive rotator cuff tears extend, the glenohumeral articulation is destabilized, allowing superior migration. Repair of the force couples and reinforcement of the anterosuperior rotator cuff cable can restore functional elevation via the deltoid. Muscle changes, including rotator cuff atrophy and fatty infiltration, will affect shoulder strength and function. As chronic changes become more extensive (such as the absence of the acromiohumeral interval and degenerative joint changes), other repair options may be more durable. Other arthroscopic options, including partial rotator cuff closure, graft to augment the repair, and use of the long head of the biceps tendon, have been helpful in pain relief and functional gains.

  13. Medialized repair for retracted rotator cuff tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Kyu; Jung, Kyu-Hak; Won, Jun-Sung; Cho, Seung-Hyun

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the functional outcomes of medialized rotator cuff repair and the continuity of repaired tendon in chronic retracted rotator cuff tears. Thirty-five consecutive patients were selected from 153 cases that underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for more than medium-sized posterosuperior rotator cuff tears between July 2009 and July 2012 performed with the medialized repair. All cases were available for at least 2 years of postoperative follow-up. The visual analog scale of pain, muscle strength, Constant score, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score, and University of California-Los Angeles score were evaluated. At the final follow-up, all clinical outcomes were significantly improved. The visual analog scale score for pain improved from 6 ± 1 preoperatively to 2 ± 1 postoperatively. The range of motion increased from preoperatively to postoperatively: active forward elevation, from 134° ± 49° to 150° ± 16°; active external rotation at the side, from 47° ± 15° to 55° ± 10°; and active internal rotation, from L3 to L1. The shoulder score also improved: Constant score, from 53.5 ± 16.7 to 79 ± 10; American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons score, from 51 ± 15 to 82 ± 8; and University of California-Los Angeles score, from 14 ± 4 to 28 ± 4. The retear cases at the final follow-up were 6 (17%). Medialized repair may be useful in cases in which anatomic bone-to-tendon repair would be difficult because of the excessive tension of the repaired tendon and a torn tendon that does not reach the anatomic insertion. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Improvement in Cormack and Lehane grading with laparoscopic assistance during tracheal intubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anjeleena K; Sharma, Bimla; Kumar, Arvind; Sood, Jayashree

    2011-09-01

    To use laparoscope as an easily available and easy to use alternative option to videolaryngoscope. The aim of the study was to assess the improvement in the glottic view using a conventional direct laryngoscope (DL) assisted by a laparoscope with its endovision system along with the time taken for tracheal intubation. A prospective, double blind, randomized, controlled study was conducted in a tertiary care centre. Sixty patients with American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I and II requiring general anaesthesia and tracheal intubation for elective surgery were included in the study. The patients were anaesthetized, paralysed, DL was performed and Cormack and Lehane grade (C and L) noted, followed by the introduction of the laparoscope alongside the flange of the Macintosh laryngoscope and a further C and L grading done as seen on monitor. Demographic data, ASA physical status, airway assessment, mouth opening, modified Mallampatti class, jaw protrusion, thyromental and sternomental distances, optimal external laryngeal manipulation, time taken for intubation, pulse oximetry, blood on; tracheal tube, lip, dentition or mucosal trauma, sore throat, hoarseness of voice, excessive secretions and regurgitation were recorded. Statistical analysis was done using statistics package for social sciences software (17.0 version). A P-value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Eighty-three percent of the patients showed improvement in glottic view after laparoscopic assistance. Eighty-one and 85% of the patients with C and L grade II and III respectively on DL had an improved glottic view with this technique. The mean time to intubate was 37 seconds. Laparoscopic assistance provided a better glottic view than DL in most patients (83%). It has a potential advantage over standard DL in difficult intubation.

  15. New Approaches to Airway Management in Tracheal Resections-A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieren, Mark; Böhmer, Andreas; Dusse, Fabian; Koryllos, Aris; Wappler, Frank; Defosse, Jerome

    2017-08-01

    Although endotracheal intubation, surgical crossfield intubation, and jet ventilation are standard techniques for airway management in tracheal resections, there are also reports of new approaches, ranging from regional anesthesia to extracorporeal support. The objective was to outline the entire spectrum of new airway techniques. The literature databases PubMed/Medline and the Cochrane Library were searched systematically for prospective and retrospective trials as well as case reports on tracheal resections. No restrictions applied to hospital types or settings. Adult patients undergoing surgical resections of noncongenital tracheal stenoses with end-to-end anastomoses. Airway management techniques were divided into conventional and new approaches and analyzed regarding their potential risks and benefits. A total of 59 publications (n = 797 patients) were included. The majority of publications (71.2%) describe conventional airway techniques. Endotracheal tube placement after induction of general anesthesia and surgical crossfield intubation after incision of the trachea were used most frequently without major complications. A total of 7 new approaches were identified, including 4 different regional anesthetic techniques (25 cases), supraglottic airways (4 cases), and new forms of extracorporeal support (25 cases). Overall failure rates of new techniques were low (1.8%). Details on patient selection and procedural specifics are provided. New approaches have several theoretical benefits, yet further research is required to establish criteria for patient selection and evaluate procedural safety. Given the low level of evidence, it currently is impossible to compare methods of airway management regarding outcome-related risks and benefits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Tracheal Stenosis Because of Wegener Granulomatosis Misdiagnosed as Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hear, Kelley E; Ingrande, Jerry; Brodsky, Jay B; Morton, John M; Sung, Chih-Kwang

    2016-05-15

    We describe a patient with Wegener granulomatosis whose complaint of wheezing was incorrectly attributed to asthma. Anesthesiologists must recognize that tracheal stenosis is extremely common in Wegener granulomatosis and can mimic other causes of wheezing.

  17. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC, RADIOGRAPHIC, AND ENDOSCOPIC TRACHEAL DIMENSIONS IN ENGLISH BULLDOGS WITH GRADE 1 CLINICAL SIGNS OF BRACHYCEPHALIC AIRWAY SYNDROME

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaye, Benjamin M; Boroffka, Susanne A E B; Haagsman, Annika N; Haar, Gert Ter

    2015-01-01

    Tracheal hypoplasia is commonly seen in English Bulldogs affected with brachycephalic airway syndrome. Previously published diagnostic criteria for tracheal hypoplasia in this breed have been a radiographic tracheal diameter:tracheal inlet ratio (TD:TI) < 0.12 or a tracheal diameter:third rib

  18. Unilateral pulmonary agenesis associated with tracheal stenosis : a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yong Suk; Yoon, Chong Hyun; Kim, Kyung Sook; Kim, Ki Soo; Pi, Soo Young

    1998-01-01

    Unilateral pulmonary agenesis is a rare congenital anomaly and is frequently associated with other congenital anomalies. We report a case of left pulmonary agenesis associated with congenital tracheal stenosis in a newborn infant. Simple chest radiographs showed an overinflate right lung and mediastinal shifting to the left side. Chest ST and reconstructed three-dimensional images showed left pulmonary agenesis and tracheal stenosis. These anomalies of the tracheobronchial system were confirmed by bronchography. (author). 10 refs., 3 figs

  19. The Efficacy of Polydioxanone Monofilament Absorbable Suture for Tracheal Anastomosis

    OpenAIRE

    Kawahara, Katsunobu; Yamasaki, Naoya; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Nagayasu, Takeshi; Kusano, Hiroyuki; Akamine, Shinji; Takahashi, Takao; Tomita, Masao

    1994-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of polydioxanon absorbable suture for tracheal anastomoses, we performed an experimental study using dose. Eight adult mongrel dogs underwent sleeve resection of the mediastinal trachea. A length of ten to twelve cartilage rings was resected. An end-to-end anastomosis was performed using either interrupted or continuous running 4-0 polydioxanone (PDS) suture. There was no detectable difference bronchoscopically, microangiografically, or histologically, in tracheal ana...

  20. I-gel Laryngeal Mask Airway Combined with Tracheal Intubation Attenuate Systemic Stress Response in Patients Undergoing Posterior Fossa Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoliang Tang

    2015-01-01

    patients. In this study, we proposed that I-gel combined with tracheal intubation could reduce the stress response of posterior fossa surgery patients. Methods. Sixty-six posterior fossa surgery patients were randomly allocated to receive either tracheal tube intubation (Group TT or I-gel facilitated endotracheal tube intubation (Group TI. Hemodynamic and respiratory variables, stress and inflammatory response, oxidative stress, anesthesia recovery parameters, and adverse events during emergence were compared. Results. Mean arterial pressure and heart rate were lower in Group TI during intubation and extubation (P<0.05 versus Group TT. Respiratory variables including peak airway pressure and end-tidal carbon dioxide tension were similar intraoperative, while plasma β-endorphin, cortisol, interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, malondialdehyde concentrations, and blood glucose were significantly lower in Group TI during emergence relative to Group TT. Postoperative bucking and serious hypertensions were seen in Group TT but not in Group TI. Conclusion. Utilization of I-gel combined with endotracheal tube in posterior fossa surgery patients is safe which can yield more stable hemodynamic profile during intubation and emergence and lower inflammatory and oxidative response, leading to uneventful recovery.

  1. Computational modeling of tracheal angioedema due to swelling of the submucous tissue layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, Kun; Pence, Thomas J

    2017-10-01

    Angioedema is a tissue-swelling pathology due to rapid change in soft tissue fluid content. Its occurrence in the trachea is predominantly localized to the soft mucous tissue that forms the innermost tracheal layer. The biomechanical consequences, such as airway constriction, are dependent upon the ensuing mechanical interactions between all of the various tissues that comprise the tracheal tube. We model the stress interactions by treating the trachea organ as a three-tissue system consisting of swellable mucous in conjunction with nonswelling cartilage and nonswelling trachealis musculature. Hyperelastic constitutive modeling is used by generalizing the standard anisotropic, incompressible soft tissue framework to incorporate the swelling effect. Finite element stress analysis then proceeds with swelling of the mucous layer providing the driving factor for the mechanical analysis. The amount of airway constriction is governed by the mechanical interaction between the three predominant tissue types. The detailed stress analysis indicates the presence of stress concentrations near the various tissue junctions. Because of the tissue's nonlinear mechanical behavior, this can lead to material stiffness fluctuations as a function of location on the trachea. Patient specific modeling is presented. The role of the modeling in the interpretation of diagnostic procedures and the assessment of therapies is discussed. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Distinguishing tracheal and esophageal tissues with hyperspectral imaging and fiber-optic sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawn, Corinne D.; Souhan, Brian E.; Carter, Robert, III; Kneapler, Caitlin; Fell, Nicholas; Ye, Jing Yong

    2016-11-01

    During emergency medical situations, where the patient has an obstructed airway or necessitates respiratory support, endotracheal intubation (ETI) is the medical technique of placing a tube into the trachea in order to facilitate adequate ventilation of the lungs. Complications during ETI, such as repeated attempts, failed intubation, or accidental intubation of the esophagus, can lead to severe consequences or ultimately death. Consequently, a need exists for a feedback mechanism to aid providers in performing successful ETI. Our study examined the spectral reflectance properties of the tracheal and esophageal tissue to determine whether a unique spectral profile exists for either tissue for the purpose of detection. The study began by using a hyperspectral camera to image excised pig tissue samples exposed to white and UV light in order to capture the spectral reflectance properties with high fidelity. After identifying a unique spectral characteristic of the trachea that significantly differed from esophageal tissue, a follow-up investigation used a fiber optic probe to confirm the detectability and consistency of the different reflectance characteristics in a pig model. Our results characterize the unique and consistent spectral reflectance characteristic of tracheal tissue, thereby providing foundational support for exploiting spectral properties to detect the trachea during medical procedures.

  3. Family Presence During Pediatric Tracheal Intubations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Ronald C; Nett, Sholeen T; Davis, Katherine Finn; Parker, Margaret M; Bysani, G Kris; Adu-Darko, Michelle; Bird, Geoffrey L; Cheifetz, Ira M; Derbyshire, Ashley T; Emeriaud, Guillaume; Giuliano, John S; Graciano, Ana Lia; Hagiwara, Yusuke; Hefley, Glenda; Ikeyama, Takanari; Jarvis, J Dean; Kamat, Pradip; Krishna, Ashwin S; Lee, Anthony; Lee, Jan Hau; Li, Simon; Meyer, Keith; Montgomery, Vicki L; Nagai, Yuki; Pinto, Matthew; Rehder, Kyle J; Saito, Osamu; Shenoi, Asha N; Taekema, Hester Christianne; Tarquinio, Keiko M; Thompson, Ann E; Turner, David A; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Nishisaki, Akira

    2016-03-01

    Family-centered care, which supports family presence (FP) during procedures, is now a widely accepted standard at health care facilities that care for children. However, there is a paucity of data regarding the practice of FP during tracheal intubation (TI) in pediatric intensive care units (PICUs). Family presence during procedures in PICUs has been advocated. To describe the current practice of FP during TI and evaluate the association with procedural and clinician (including physician, respiratory therapist, and nurse practitioner) outcomes across multiple PICUs. Prospective cohort study in which all TIs from July 2010 to March 2014 in the multicenter TI database (National Emergency Airway Registry for Children [NEAR4KIDS]) were analyzed. Family presence was defined as a family member present during TI. This study included all TIs in patients younger than 18 years in 22 international PICUs. Family presence and no FP during TI in the PICU. The percentage of FP during TIs. First attempt success rate, adverse TI-associated events, multiple attempts (≥ 3), oxygen desaturation (oxygen saturation as measured by pulse oximetry <80%), and self-reported team stress level. A total of 4969 TI encounters were reported. Among those, 81% (n = 4030) of TIs had documented FP status (with/without). The median age of participants with FP was 2 years and 1 year for those without FP. The average percentage of TIs with FP was 19% and varied widely across sites (0%-43%; P < .001). Tracheal intubations with FP (vs without FP) were associated with older patients (median, 2 years vs 1 year; P = .04), lower Paediatric Index of Mortality 2 score, and pediatric resident as the first airway clinician (23%, n = 179 vs 18%, n = 584; odds ratio [OR], 1.4; 95% CI, 1.2-1.7). Tracheal intubations with FP and without FP were no different in the first attempt success rate (OR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.85-1.18), adverse TI-associated events (any events: OR, 1.06; 95% CI, 0.85-1.30 and severe events: OR

  4. Mechanisms of rotator cuff tendinopathy: intrinsic, extrinsic, or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Amee L; McClure, Philip W; Finucane, Sheryl; Boardman, N Douglas; Michener, Lori A

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of rotator cuff tendinopathy is multi-factorial, and has been attributed to both extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms. Extrinsic factors that encroach upon the subacromial space and contribute to bursal side compression of the rotator cuff tendons include anatomical variants of the acromion, alterations in scapular or humeral kinematics, postural abnormalities, rotator cuff and scapular muscle performance deficits, and decreased extensibility of pectoralis minor or posterior shoulder. A unique extrinsic mechanism, internal impingement, is attributed to compression of the posterior articular surface of the tendons between the humeral head and glenoid and is not related to subacromial space narrowing. Intrinsic factors that contribute to rotator cuff tendon degradation with tensile/shear overload include alterations in biology, mechanical properties, morphology, and vascularity. The varied nature of these mechanisms indicates that rotator cuff tendinopathy is not a homogenous entity, and thus may require different treatment interventions. Treatment aimed at addressing mechanistic factors appears to be beneficial for patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy, however, not for all patients. Classification of rotator cuff tendinopathy into subgroups based on underlying mechanism may improve treatment outcomes. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Treatment of postoperative tracheal granulation tissue with inhaled budesonide in congenital tracheal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Akiko; Nakao, Makoto; Bitoh, Yuko; Arai, Hiroshi; Oshima, Yoshihiro; Nishijima, Eiji

    2014-02-01

    Tracheal obstruction by granulation tissue can compromise the postoperative course in congenital tracheal stenosis (CTS). Balloon dilatation and stenting may be required. Budesonide is a corticosteroid with topical anti-inflammatory effects. In 2008, we used inhaled budesonide for treatment of postoperative granulation tissue for the first time in CTS, resulting in significant improvement. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of inhaled budesonide for treatment of postoperative granulation tissue in CTS. Retrospective chart review was conducted. From 2004 through 2011, we performed 39 tracheoplasties. Forced stenting ± balloon dilatation (S/B) was required when airway obstruction with tissue granulation was life-threatening. We compared the requirement for S/B between the early group without budesonide (2004-Nov. 2008, Early) and the late group with budesonide (Dec. 2008-2011, Late). Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher's Exact test. Eleven of 22 in Early and 8 of 17 in Late were successfully extubated, never having had life-threatening tissue granulation. The remaining patients in each group (11 in Early and 9 in Late) required tracheostomies due to postoperative complication. Ten in Early and 5 in Late with tracheostomies developed granulation tissue. Of these patients, the 10 in Early required S/B, while none of the 5 in Late required S/B (P=.0003). Bronchoscopy demonstrated significant regression of granulation tissue in all cases treated with inhaled budesonide. Inhaled budesonide is effective for treatment of tracheal granulation tissue in patients with tracheostomies after repair of CTS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Magnitude of Interfractional Vaginal Cuff Movement: Implications for External Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Daniel J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Michaletz-Lorenz, Martha [Department of Education and Training, Elekta, Maryland Heights, MO (United States); Goddu, S. Murty [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Grigsby, Perry W., E-mail: pgrigsby@wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To quantify the extent of interfractional vaginal cuff movement in patients receiving postoperative irradiation for cervical or endometrial cancer in the absence of bowel/bladder instruction. Methods and Materials: Eleven consecutive patients with cervical or endometrial cancer underwent placement of three gold seed fiducial markers in the vaginal cuff apex as part of standard of care before simulation. Patients subsequently underwent external irradiation and brachytherapy treatment based on institutional guidelines. Daily megavoltage CT imaging was performed during each external radiation treatment fraction. The daily positions of the vaginal apex fiducial markers were subsequently compared with the original position of the fiducial markers on the simulation CT. Composite dose-volume histograms were also created by summing daily target positions. Results: The average ({+-} standard deviation) vaginal cuff movement throughout daily pelvic external radiotherapy when referenced to the simulation position was 16.2 {+-} 8.3 mm. The maximum vaginal cuff movement for any patient during treatment was 34.5 mm. In the axial plane the mean vaginal cuff movement was 12.9 {+-} 6.7 mm. The maximum vaginal cuff axial movement was 30.7 mm. In the craniocaudal axis the mean movement was 10.3 {+-} 7.6 mm, with a maximum movement of 27.0 mm. Probability of cuff excursion outside of the clinical target volume steadily dropped as margin size increased (53%, 26%, 4.2%, and 1.4% for 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 cm, respectively.) However, rectal and bladder doses steadily increased with larger margin sizes. Conclusions: The magnitude of vaginal cuff movement is highly patient specific and can impact target coverage in patients without bowel/bladder instructions at simulation. The use of vaginal cuff fiducials can help identify patients at risk for target volume excursion.

  7. Successful Treatment of Anterior Tracheal Necrosis after Total Thyroidectomy Using Vacuum-Assisted Closure Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grégory Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Total thyroidectomy involving the adjacent structures of the trachea can cause tracheal damage such as early tracheal necrosis. The authors describe the first case of anterior tracheal necrosis following total thyroidectomy treated using vacuum-assisted closure device. After two weeks of VAC  therapy, there was no evidence of ongoing infection and the trachea was partially closed around a tracheotomy cannula, removed after 3 months. The use of a VAC  therapy to reduce and close the tracheal rent and to create a rapid granulation tissue over tracheal structure appeared as a good opportunity after anterior tracheal necrosis.

  8. Reliability of Pain Measurements Using Computerized Cuff Algometry: A DoloCuff Reliability and Agreement Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvistgaard Olsen, Jack; Fener, Dilay Kesgin; Waehrens, Eva Elisabet; Wulf Christensen, Anton; Jespersen, Anders; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Bente; Bartels, Else Marie

    2017-07-01

    Computerized pneumatic cuff pressure algometry (CPA) using the DoloCuff is a new method for pain assessment. Intra- and inter-rater reliabilities have not yet been established. Our aim was to examine the inter- and intrarater reliabilities of DoloCuff measures in healthy subjects. Twenty healthy subjects (ages 20 to 29 years) were assessed three times at 24-hour intervals by two trained raters. Inter-rater reliability was established based on the first and second assessments, whereas intrarater reliability was based on the second and third assessments. Subjects were randomized 1:1 to first assessment at either rater 1 or rater 2. The variables of interest were pressure pain threshold (PT), pressure pain tolerance (PTol), and temporal summation index (TSI). Reliability was estimated by a two-way mixed intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) absolute agreement analysis. Reliability was considered excellent if ICC > 0.75, fair to good if 0.4 TSI was 0.88 (95% CI: 0.69 to 0.95), 0.86 (95% CI: 0.65 to 0.95), and 0.81 (95% CI: 0.42 to 0.94), respectively. The intrarater reliability for PT, PTol, and TSI was 0.81 (95% CI: 0.53 to 0.92), 0.89 (95% CI: 0.74 to 0.96), and 0.75 (95% CI: 0.28 to 0.91), respectively. Inter-rater reliability was excellent for PT, PTol, and TSI. Similarly, the intrarater reliability for PT and PTol was excellent, while borderline excellent/good for TSI. Therefore, the DoloCuff can be used to obtain reliable measures of pressure pain parameters in healthy subjects. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  9. Intense focused ultrasound stimulation of the rotator cuff: evaluation of the source of pain in rotator cuff tears and tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellhorn, Alfred C; Gillenwater, Cody; Mourad, Pierre D

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this preliminary study was to evaluate the ability of individual 0.1-s long pulses of intense focused ultrasound (iFU) emitted with a carrier frequency of 2 MHz to evoke diagnostic sensations when applied to patients whose shoulders have rotator cuff tears or tendinopathy. Patients were adults with painful shoulders and clinical and imaging findings consistent with rotator cuff disease. iFU stimulation of the shoulder was performed using B-mode ultrasound coupled with a focused ultrasound transducer that allowed image-guided delivery of precisely localized pulses of energy to different anatomic areas around the rotator cuff. The main outcome measure was iFU spatial average-temporal average intensity (I_SATA), and location required to elicit sensation. In control patients, iFU produced no sensation throughout the range of stimulation intensities (≤2000 W/cm(2) I_SATA). In patients with rotator cuff disease, iFU was able to induce sensation in the tendons of the rotator cuff, the subacromial bursa, and the subchondral bone in patients with chronic shoulder pain and rotator cuff disease, with an average ± standard deviation intensity equaling 680 ± 281 W/cm(2) I_SATA. This result suggests a primary role for these tissues in the pathogenesis of shoulder pain related to rotator cuff tendinopathy. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of mechanical behaviour of the brachial artery on blood pressure measurement during both cuff inflation and cuff deflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Dingchang; Pan, Fan; Murray, Alan

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of different mechanical behaviour of the brachial artery on blood pressure (BP) measurements during cuff inflation and deflation. BP measurements were taken from each of 40 participants, with three repeat sessions under three randomized cuff deflation/inflation conditions. Cuff pressure was linearly deflated and inflated at a standard rate of 2-3 mmHg/s and also linearly inflated at a fast rate of 5-6 mmHg/s. Manual auscultatory systolic and diastolic BPs, and pulse pressure (SBP, DBP, PP) were measured. Automated BPs were determined from digitally recorded cuff pressures by fitting a polynomial model to the oscillometric pulse amplitudes. The BPs from cuff deflation and inflation were then compared. Repeatable measurements between sessions and between the sequential order of inflation/deflation conditions (all P > 0.1) indicated stability of arterial mechanical behaviour with repeat measurements. Comparing BPs obtained by standard inflation with those from standard deflation, manual SBP was 2.6 mmHg lower (P deflation suggest different arterial mechanical behaviour between arterial opening and closing during BP measurement. We have shown that the mechanical behaviour of the brachial artery during BP measurement differs between cuff deflation and cuff inflation.

  11. The current state of congenital tracheal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, P; Caldarone, C; Forte, V; Campisi, P; Holtby, H; Chait, P; Chiu, P; Cox, P; Yoo, S-J; Manson, D; Kim, P C W

    2007-11-01

    Congenital tracheal stenosis (CTS) is an uncommon condition that has challenged pediatric surgeons for decades. Patients with CTS can present with a wide spectrum of symptoms and varying degrees of severity. In addition, a variety of techniques have been devised to repair this malformation. A review of these procedures and our suggestions for clinical standards and practice guidelines will be presented in this paper. A retrospective review of the literature on CTS from 1964 to 31 March, 2006. There is not one standard technique for the repair of CTS, as individualized approach to each patient and airway lesion is necessary to optimize patient management; nevertheless there is a consensus about segmental resection and anastomosis being best for short segment stenosis while slide tracheoplasty is most effective for the long-segment ones. Conservative management is also an option for select group of patients with careful and close follow up. Survival following surgery over the years has improved, but mortality remained high, particularly in a specific subset of patients presenting at the age less than 1 month with associated cardiac malformations. In conclusion, CTS remains a significant challenge for pediatric surgeons. Additional research is required to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of CTS, and to develop evidence-based treatment protocols for the entire spectrum of presentation including conservative management.

  12. Fetal MRI in experimental tracheal occlusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedegaertner, Ulrike [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, 20251 Hamburg (Germany)]. E-mail: wedegaer@uke.uni-hamburg.de; Schroeder, Hobe J. [Experimental Gynecology, Department of Obstetrics and Prenatal Medicine, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Adam, Gerhard [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany)

    2006-02-15

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is associated with a high mortality, which is mainly due to pulmonary hypoplasia and secondary pulmonary hypertension. In severely affected fetuses, tracheal occlusion (TO) is performed prenatally to reverse pulmonary hypoplasia, because TO leads to accelerated lung growth. Prenatal imaging is important to identify fetuses with pulmonary hypoplasia, to diagnose high-risk fetuses who would benefit from TO, and to monitor the effect of TO after surgery. In fetal imaging, ultrasound (US) is the method of choice, because it is widely available, less expensive, and less time-consuming to perform than magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, there are some limitations for US in the evaluation of CDH fetuses. In those cases, MRI is helpful because of a better tissue contrast between liver and lung, which enables evaluation of liver herniation for the diagnosis of a high-risk fetus. MRI provides the ability to determine absolute lung volumes to detect lung hypoplasia. In fetal sheep with normal and hyperplastic lungs after TO, lung growth was assessed on the basis of cross-sectional US measurements, after initial lung volume determination by MRI. To monitor fetal lung growth after prenatal TO, both MRI and US seem to be useful methods.

  13. Anterior tracheal suspension for tracheobronchomalacia in infants and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Michael E; Rumman, Nisreen; Chun, Robert H; Rao, Aparna; Martin, Timothy; Beste, David J; Berens, Richard J; Parakininkas, Daiva E; Ghanayem, Nancy S; Hubert, Mary J; Uhing, Michael; Simpson, Pippa; Sato, Thomas T; Tweddell, James S; Kerschner, Joseph E

    2014-10-01

    Severe tracheobronchomalacia significantly complicates the postoperative course of infants and children with congenital heart disease, tracheoesophageal fistula, and tracheal stenosis. We have found that traditional approaches, including aortopexy, have been inconsistent in preventing acute life threatening events (ALTEs). In order to directly support the anterior tracheal wall, we have adopted the use of direct anterior tracheal suspension (ATS). Twenty-one children, median age 5 months (35 days to 11 years) and weight 5.0 (2.3 to 28.0) kg have undergone anterior tracheal suspension for severe tracheobronchomalacia through median sternotomy; 15 for inability to ventilate despite mechanical respiratory support, 3 for intermittent ALTEs without mechanical respiratory support, and 3 for recurrent respiratory admissions. Nine procedures were performed as isolated ATS and 12 procedures were combined with at least 1 of the following: repair of ventricular septal defect; vascular ring; atrioventricular canal; tracheal reconstruction or arterial-pexy. Level of respiratory support was graded at preoperative (preop), discharge, and follow-up, and respiratory clinical status was graded at preop and follow-up. Median follow-up was 30.0 months (2.0 to 57.0 months). There was no mortality. Both level of respiratory support and the clinical status improved at all time points studied compared with preoperative score (p < 0.001) after ATS. Whether ATS was performed in isolation or combined with other procedures did not impact these findings. Anterior tracheal suspension is feasible and appears effective in dramatically improving respiratory clinical status. Tracheal suspension is applicable to a wide range of anatomic variants. Additional study is needed to characterize long-term functional outcomes. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Tracheal measurement by computed tomography in Korean adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Deock Hee; Oh, Yeon Hee; Kim, Hong; Woo, Seong Ku; Suh, Soo Jhi

    1988-01-01

    The knowledge of normal tracheal morphology is helpful during endotracheal intubation for anesthesia as well as detecting tracheal and paratracheal disorders. Tracheal measurement by simple X-ray is not accurate due to image imagnification and overlapping of the shoulders in the lateral projection. CT, however, is highly accurate to measure the normal tracheal morphology and paratracheal anatomy. The study was undertaken to obtain standard values of normal Korean tracheae. Healthy cases of 50 males and 50 females who had no neck and mediastinal pathology or respiratory difficult were selected. The trachea was measured by CT. The results were as follows: 1. Tracheal lengths were 126.1mm (SD 11.6) in males and 116.0mm (SD 8.4) in females. 2. AP diameters of trachea were 18.9mm (SD 2.1) in males and 15.5mm (SD 1.3) in females. The transverse diameters were 17.7mm (SD 1.9) in males and 15.3mm (SD 1.2) in females. 3. Tracheal cross-sectional areas were 288mm 2 (SD 54) in males and 204mm 2 (SD 31) in females. Mean cross-sectional area of level 4 was greater in 16.6% than that of level 1. 4. Tracheal cross-sectional areas and diameters were dependent on sex but not on weight and height. And cross-sectional areas and AP diameters were positively correlated with age in male. 5. The shape of the trachea showed that the ovoid shape was most common at the level 1, the C-shape was most common at the level 2 and 3, horizontal oval or D-shape were more common at the level 4.

  15. Tracheal wall thickening is associated with the granulation tissue formation around silicone stents in patients with post-tuberculosis tracheal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Jung Seop; Kim, Hojoong; Jeon, Kyeongman; Um, Sang-Won; Koh, Won-Jung; Suh, Gee Young; Chung, Man Pyo; Kwon, O Jung

    2013-07-01

    Tracheal restenosis due to excessive granulation tissue around a silicone stent requires repeated bronchoscopic interventions in patients with post-tuberculosis tracheal stenosis (PTTS). The current study was conducted to identify the risk factors for granulation tissue formation after silicone stenting in PTTS patients. A retrospective study was conducted between January 1998 and December 2010. Forty-two PTTS patients with silicone stenting were selected. Clinical and radiological variables were retrospectively collected and analyzed. Tracheal restenosis due to granulation tissue formation were found in 20 patients (47.6%), and repeated bronchoscopic interventions were conducted. In multivariate analysis, tracheal wall thickness, measured on axial computed tomography scan, was independently associated with granulation tissue formation after silicone stenting. Furthermore, the degree of tracheal wall thickness was well correlated with the degree of granulation tissue formation. Tracheal wall thickening was associated with granulation tissue formation around silicone stents in patients with post-tuberculosis tracheal stenosis.

  16. Right hypoglossal nerve paralysis after tracheal intubation for aesthetic breast surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sammy Al-Benna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aesthetic and functional complications caused by general anesthesia have been rarely described after aesthetic surgery. We report a case of unilateral right hypoglossal nerve paralysis following the use of a cuffed endotracheal airway in a 24-year-old woman undergoing aesthetic breast surgery. Neurological examination and magnetic resonance imaging of the head failed to provide additional insights into the cause of the nerve injury. Postoperatively, the patient was carefully monitored and made a full recovery within 2 weeks without any pharmacological treatment. The transient hypoglossal nerve paralysis seemed to be due to neuropraxia. In this patient, we postulate that the right hypoglossal nerve was compressed between the endotracheal tube cuff and the hyoid bone, which was inflated with 30 cm H 2 O. Patients undergoing aesthetic surgery must be appropriately and adequately informed that postoperative aesthetic and functional deficits can occur due to anesthesia as well as the surgery.

  17. Effects of tracheal orientation on development of ventilator-associated pneumonia: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanella, Alberto; Cressoni, Massimo; Epp, Myra; Hoffmann, Viktoria; Stylianou, Mario; Kolobow, Theodor

    2012-04-01

    Orientation of the trachea and tracheal tube below horizontal may prevent aspiration of oropharyngeal secretions into the lungs, which is a pivotal pathway in the pathogenesis of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). The incidence of VAP was evaluated in swine with orientation of trachea and tracheal tube above horizontal (model of semirecumbent position, currently recommended in patients) and below horizontal. Twenty-six mini-pigs were randomized into four groups: (A) eight mechanically ventilated with orientation of trachea 45° above horizontal for 72 h. In the remaining groups (B, C, D) the trachea was oriented 10° below horizontal, with (B) six mechanically ventilated for 72 h, (C) six mechanically ventilated for 72 h with enteral feeding, and (D) six mechanically ventilated for 168 h with enteral feeding. At the end of the study period, all pigs were sacrificed and the clinical diagnosis of VAP was microbiologically evaluated. No antibiotics were administered. All eight pigs kept orientated with the trachea 45° above horizontal developed VAP and respiratory failure (PaO(2)/F(i)O(2) = 132 ± 139 mmHg) with a median of 5.5 pulmonary lobes out of 6 colonized with average colonization of 9.3 × 10(7) CFU/g. None of the 18 pigs kept oriented with the trachea below horizontal developed VAP; 16 had sterile lungs, while 2, ventilated for 7 days, developed a low level of colonization. Orientation of the trachea above horizontal was uniformly associated with VAP and respiratory failure; positioning the trachea below horizontal consistently prevented development of VAP.

  18. Shouldering the blame for impingement: the rotator cuff continuum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . ... of rotator cuff pathology is described, and the challenges of accurate clinical diagnosis, imaging and best management discussed. Keywords: shoulder ... actions.10 Extension, abduction and external rotation of the humerus causes ...

  19. Reliability of Pain Measurements Using Computerized Cuff Algometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvistgaard Olsen, Jack; Fener, Dilay Kesgin; Wæhrens, Eva Elisabet

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Computerized pneumatic cuff pressure algometry (CPA) using the DoloCuff is a new method for pain assessment. Intra- and inter-rater reliabilities have not yet been established. Our aim was to examine the inter- and intrarater reliabilities of DoloCuff measures in healthy subjects...... randomized 1:1 to first assessment at either rater 1 or rater 2. The variables of interest were pressure pain threshold (PT), pressure pain tolerance (PTol), and temporal summation index (TSI). Reliability was estimated by a two-way mixed intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) absolute agreement analysis...... for PT, PTol, and TSI. Similarly, the intrarater reliability for PT and PTol was excellent, while borderline excellent/good for TSI. Therefore, the DoloCuff can be used to obtain reliable measures of pressure pain parameters in healthy subjects....

  20. Rotator cuff troublemakers: pitfalls of MRI and ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina M Chingkoe

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Christina M Chingkoe1, Jeremy H White2, Luck J Louis2, Gordon Andrews2, Bruce B Forster21Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, Canada; 2Department of Radiology, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC, CanadaAbstract: Rotator cuff pathology is routinely evaluated in many imaging centers with both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and ultrasound. Despite good diagnostic accuracy using each of these modalities, certain limitations persist. In this pictorial essay, we describe five potential “troublemakers” of rotator cuff pathology which are recurrent themes in our busy shoulder referral center. The comparison of imaging findings on MRI and ultrasound are discussed. An awareness of these potential pitfalls will help improve radiologists’ diagnostic accuracy of rotator cuff pathology, and allow the clinician to optimize imaging referral and better interpret the subsequent report.Keywords: rotator cuff, ultrasound, MRI, correlation, shoulder

  1. Progression from calcifying tendinitis to rotator cuff tear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotoh, Masafumi; Higuchi, Fujio; Suzuki, Ritsu; Yamanaka, Kensuke

    2003-01-01

    This report documents the clinical, radiographic and histologic findings in a 46-year-old man with calcifying tendinitis in his left shoulder which progressed to rotator cuff tear. The patient had a 1-year history of repeated calcifying tendinitis before being referred to our hospital. On the initial visit, radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed calcium deposition localized in the supraspinatus tendon without apparent tear. Three months after the first visit, MRI revealed a partial-thickness rotator cuff tear at the site of calcium deposition. Surgical and histologic findings demonstrated that calcium deposition was the cause of cuff rupture. To our knowledge, based on a review of the English literature, this is the first case report in which the progression from calcifying tendinitis to rotator cuff tear has been serially observed. (orig.)

  2. Postoperative throat complications after tracheal intubation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The use of nasogastric tubes, throat pack, duration of intubation and status of the anaesthetists were also noted. The presence of sore throat and other throat complications were determined within 24 - 36 hours after surgery. Results: One hundred twenty six (63%) patients experienced throat complications. The incidence of ...

  3. Ultrasound of the rotator cuff with MRI and anatomic correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutten, Matthieu J.C.M. [Department of Radiology, Jeroen Bosch Hospital, Nieuwstraat 34, 5211 NL ' s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands)]. E-mail: M.Rutten@JBZ.nl; Maresch, Bas J. [Department of Radiology, Hospital Gelderse Vallei, Willy Brandtlaan 10, 6710 HN Ede (Netherlands)]. E-mail: MareschB@zgv.nl; Jager, Gerrit J. [Department of Radiology, Jeroen Bosch Hospital, Nieuwstraat 34, 5211 NL ' s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands)]. E-mail: G.Jager@JBZ.nl; Blickman, Johan G. [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Nijmegen, Geert Grooteplein Zuid 18, 6500 HB Nijmegen (Netherlands)]. E-mail: J.Blickman@rad.umcn.nl; Holsbeeck, Marnix T. van [Department of Radiology, Henry Ford Hospital, 2799 W Grand Boulevard, Detroit, MI 48202 (United States)]. E-mail: vanholsbeeck@comcast.net

    2007-06-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging and high-resolution ultrasound (US) are frequently used for the detection of rotator cuff tears. The diagnostic yield of US is influenced by several factors as technique, knowledge of the imaging characteristics of anatomic and pathologic findings and of pitfalls. The purpose of this article is to illustrates that the standardized high-resolution US examination of the shoulder covers the entire rotator cuff and correlates with MR imaging and anatomic sections.

  4. Fractured tracheostomy tube – A case report of a 3-year old Ghanaian child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akwasi Antwi-Kusi

    2012-09-01

    Discussion: Fracture of a tracheostomy tube is a rare complication, which should be considered as part of the differential diagnosis in a ventilated patient with a tracheostomy. Wound exploration through the tracheal stoma is an alternative technique that can be adopted in a restricted resource setting.

  5. Total retroperitoneal laparoscopic nephroureterectomy with bladder-cuff resection for upper urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zhenqiang; Li, Longkun; Wang, Xiangwei; Chen, Wei; Jia, Weisheng; He, Fan; Shen, Chongxing; Ye, Gang

    2014-12-01

    Open nephroureterectomy (ONU) and bladder cuff resection (ONU-BCR) has been the gold standard of surgical treatment for upper urinary tract transitional cell carcinoma (UUT-TCC). The aim of this study is to introduce a modified total retroperitoneal laparoscopic nephroureterectomy (LNU) with bladder-cuff resection (LNU-BCR) method for treating UUT-TCC and compare its clinical efficacy with ONU-BCR. Sixty-five patients with UUT-TCC, who underwent ONU-BCR (n = 36) or LNU-BCR (n = 29) between January 2008 and June 2012, were analyzed in this retrospective study. Perioperative data as well as incidence of disease recurrence at the primary site or distant metastasis was compared in patients with at least 6 months follow-up. As compared with patients with ONU-BCR, the patients with LNU-BCR had significantly shorter operative time, lower estimated blood loss, shorter time to oral intake, lower analgesic dose, shorter duration of analgesic use, shorter duration of incision drainage tube, shorter time to ambulation out of bed and reduced postoperative hospital stay (all, p ONU-BCR with the advantages of reduced invasiveness, bleeding and hospitalization.

  6. Cuff leak test and laryngeal survey for predicting post-extubation stridor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anit B; Ani, Chizobam; Feeney, Colin

    2015-02-01

    Evidence for the predictive value of the cuff leak test (CLT) for post-extubation stridor (PES) is conflicting. We evaluated the association and accuracy of CLT alone or combined with other laryngeal parameters with PES. Fifty-one mechanically ventilated adult patients in a medical-surgical intensive care unit were tested prior to extubation using; CLT, laryngeal ultrasound and indirect laryngoscopy. Biometric, laryngeal and endotracheal tube (ETT) parameters were recorded. PES incidence was 4%. CLT demonstrated 'no leak' in 20% of patients. Laryngeal oedema was present in 10% of the patients on indirect laryngoscopy, and 71% of the patients had a Grades 1-3 indirect laryngoscopic view. Mean air column width on laryngeal ultrasound was 0.66 ± 0.15 cm (cuff deflated), mean ratio of ETT to laryngeal diameter was 0.48 ± 0.07, and the calculated CLT and laryngeal survey composite was 0.86 ± 1.25 (range 0-5). CLT and the CLT and Laryngeal survey composite measure were not associated with or predict PES. Age, sex, peri-extubation steroid use, intubation duration and body mass index were not associated with PES. Even including ultrasonographic and indirect laryngoscopic examination of the airway, no single aspect of the CLT or combination with laryngeal parameters accurately predicts PES.

  7. Airway injury during emergency transcutaneous airway access: a comparison at cricothyroid and tracheal sites.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Salah, Nazar

    2009-12-01

    Oxygenation via the cricothyroid membrane (CTM) may be required in emergencies, but inadvertent tracheal cannulation may occur. In this study, we compared airway injury between the tracheal and CTM sites using different techniques for airway access.

  8. [Difficult laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation: observational study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Rebeca Gonelli Albanez da Cunha; Lima, Bruno Luís Soares; Lopes, Douglas Kaíque de Oliveira; Couceiro Filho, Roberto Oliveira; Lima, Luciana Cavalcanti; Couceiro, Tania Cursino de Menezes

    Since anesthesia complications associated with unexpected difficult airway are potentially catastrophic, they should be avoided. The modified Mallampati test and jaw-thrust maneuver enable the identification of difficult airway. The aim of this study was to associate the modified Mallampati test and the jaw-thrust maneuver with laryngoscopy (Cormack-Lehane) in an attempt to identify a better predictor of difficult airway in an adult population undergoing elective surgery. A cross-sectional study in which 133 adult patients undergoing elective surgery requiring tracheal intubation were analyzed. The accuracy and specificity of the modified Mallampati test and jaw-thrust maneuver were assessed by correlating them with difficult laryngoscopy (Cormack-Lehane Degrees 3 and 4). In the 133 patients evaluated the difficult intubation rate found was 0.8%; there was association between the two predictive tests proposed (p=0.012). The values of 94.5% for specificity and 95.4% for accuracy were found for the jaw-thrust maneuver and for the modified Mallampati test, the values found were 81.1% and 81.2%, respectively. Kappa agreement identified a result of 0.240 between jaw-thrust maneuver and Cormarck-Lehane, which was considered reasonable. On the other hand, a poor agreement (κ=0.06) was seen between modified Mallampati test and Cormarck-Lehane test. The jaw-thrust maneuver presented superior accuracy and agreement than the modified Mallampati test, showing the ability to identify a difficult airway. It is necessary to emphasize the association of tests in the evaluation of patients, emphasizing their complementarity to minimize the negative consequences of repeated laryngoscopies. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Relationships between rotator cuff tear types and radiographic abnormalities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Soo Hyun; Chun, Kyung Ah; Lee Soo Jung; Kang, Min Ho; Yi, Kyung Sik; Zhang, Ying [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, College of Medicine, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    To determine relationships between different types of rotator cuff tears and radiographic abnormalities. The shoulder radiographs of 104 patients with an arthroscopically proven rotator cuff tear were compared with similar radiographs of 54 age-matched controls with intact cuffs. Two radiologists independently interpreted all radiographs for; cortical thickening with subcortical sclerosis, subcortical cysts, osteophytes in the humeral greater tuberosity, humeral migration, degenerations of the acromioclavicular and glenohumeral joints, and subacromial spurs. Statistical analysis was performed to determine relationships between each type of rotator cuff tears and radiographic abnormalities. Inter-observer agreements with respect to radiographic findings were analyzed. Humeral migration and degenerative change of the greater tuberosity, including sclerosis, subcortical cysts, and osteophytes, were more associated with full-thickness tears (p < 0.01). Subacromial spurs were more common for full-thickness and bursal-sided tears (p < 0.01). No association was found between degeneration of the acromioclavicular or glenohumeral joint and the presence of a cuff tear. Different types of rotator cuff tears are associated with different radiographic abnormalities.

  10. Improved apparatus for predictive diagnosis of rotator cuff disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Anup; Hall, Brittany N.; Thigpen, Charles A.; Kwartowitz, David M.

    2014-03-01

    Rotator cuff disease impacts over 50% of the population over 60, with reports of incidence being as high as 90% within this population, causing pain and possible loss of function. The rotator cuff is composed of muscles and tendons that work in tandem to support the shoulder. Heavy use of these muscles can lead to rotator cuff tear, with the most common causes is age-related degeneration or sport injuries, both being a function of overuse. Tears ranges in severity from partial thickness tear to total rupture. Diagnostic techniques are based on physical assessment, detailed patient history, and medical imaging; primarily X-ray, MRI and ultrasonography are the chosen modalities for assessment. The final treatment technique and imaging modality; however, is chosen by the clinician is at their discretion. Ultrasound has been shown to have good accuracy for identification and measurement of full-thickness and partial-thickness rotator cuff tears. In this study, we report on the progress and improvement of our method of transduction and analysis of in situ measurement of rotator cuff biomechanics. We have improved the ability of the clinician to apply a uniform force to the underlying musculotendentious tissues while simultaneously obtaining the ultrasound image. This measurement protocol combined with region of interest (ROI) based image processing will help in developing a predictive diagnostic model for treatment of rotator cuff disease and help the clinicians choose the best treatment technique.

  11. Electrotherapy modalities for rotator cuff disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Matthew J; Green, Sally; Mrocki, Marshall A; Surace, Stephen J; Deitch, Jessica; McBain, Brodwen; Lyttle, Nicolette; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2016-06-10

    Management of rotator cuff disease may include use of electrotherapy modalities (also known as electrophysical agents), which aim to reduce pain and improve function via an increase in energy (electrical, sound, light, or thermal) into the body. Examples include therapeutic ultrasound, low-level laser therapy (LLLT), transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), and pulsed electromagnetic field therapy (PEMF). These modalities are usually delivered as components of a physical therapy intervention. This review is one of a series of reviews that form an update of the Cochrane review, 'Physiotherapy interventions for shoulder pain'. To synthesise available evidence regarding the benefits and harms of electrotherapy modalities for the treatment of people with rotator cuff disease. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2015, Issue 3), Ovid MEDLINE (January 1966 to March 2015), Ovid EMBASE (January 1980 to March 2015), CINAHL Plus (EBSCOhost, January 1937 to March 2015), ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO ICTRP clinical trials registries up to March 2015, unrestricted by language, and reviewed the reference lists of review articles and retrieved trials, to identify potentially relevant trials. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-randomised trials, including adults with rotator cuff disease (e.g. subacromial impingement syndrome, rotator cuff tendinitis, calcific tendinitis), and comparing any electrotherapy modality with placebo, no intervention, a different electrotherapy modality or any other intervention (e.g. glucocorticoid injection). Trials investigating whether electrotherapy modalities were more effective than placebo or no treatment, or were an effective addition to another physical therapy intervention (e.g. manual therapy or exercise) were the main comparisons of interest. Main outcomes of interest were overall pain, function, pain on motion, patient-reported global assessment of treatment success

  12. Congenital Complete Tracheal Ring in a Neonate: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra ARUN ÖZER

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abnormalities of the upper airway tract lead to congenital high airway obstruction and may complicate neonatal airway management in the delivery room. Congenital complete tracheal rings are a rare and unusual tracheal anomaly, usually presenting in the neonate or infant as respiratory distress. The clinical presentation can vary from almost asymptomatic patients to near-fatal airway obstruction. It may exist as an isolated entity, or in association with other congenital malformations, in particular, cardiac anomalies along with vascular rings and pulmonary slings. Other associated anomalies have also been reported, for example, chromosomal anomalies, malformation of other parts of the respiratory tract, esophagus and skeletal systems. Here, we report an extreme case of VACTERL/TACRD association presented with congenital complete tracheal ring, encephalocele, bilateral radial agenesis with absent thumbs, equinovalgus deformity on right foot, low-set ears and micrognathia.

  13. Two-piece cryopreserved tracheal allotransplantation: an experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyikesici, Tuncel; Tuncozgur, Bulent; Sanli, Maruf; Isik, Ahmet Feridun; Meteroglu, Fatih; Elbeyli, Levent

    2009-10-01

    For successful reconstruction with tracheal allotransplants following long tracheal resections, problems related to the preservation and vascularisation of the tracheal graft have to be solved. In this study, instead of using a long-segment single-piece graft, we used a graft that has been split into two. The aim was to use this graft after cryopreservation in order to ease neo-vascularisation and to maintain tracheal integrity by transplanting it to two separate regions of the dog cervical trachea. This experimental study was conducted in animal laboratories of the medical school on 11 half-blood dogs. The trachea obtained from the first dog was 8 cm in length; it was split into two pieces of 4 cm each and stored in the preservation solution at -80 degrees C for 4 weeks. Following this, the dog was sacrificed. Two 2 cm portions of cervical trachea were excised from the second dog. These parts were then reconstructed with two tracheal grafts of the same length as the cryopreserved ones. Ten dogs that were grouped into five groups of two dogs each underwent the same procedure. The subjects had a bronchoscopic evaluation on the third postoperative week. Anastomosis regions of the test tracheas were resected to be examined histopathologically. Seven subjects were found to have third-degree obstructions during bronchoscopy; two had close to fourth-degree obstructions. In the histopathological examination, contrary to the findings of the bronchoscopies, 75% of the anastomoses had intact epithelium. The cartilage was seen to have well-preserved structural characteristics in all the anastomoses. Twelve anastomoses had moderate, seven mild and one had severe inflammation. All anastomoses had either good or very good level of vascularisation. The integrity of the tracheal epithelium can be maintained with cryopreservation and split anastomosis technique. The cartilage preserves its structural characteristics despite losing its viability, thereby offering an advantage to

  14. Stent placement for tracheal stenosis in patients with esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Keigo; Hata, Yoshinobu; Sasamoto, Shuichi; Takahashi, Shoji; Sato, Fumitomo; Tamaki, Kazuyoshi; Goto, Hidenori; Yuasa, Rena

    2011-01-01

    Tracheal invasion including tracheal bifurcation due to esophageal cancer can sometimes cause serious complications of the airway, but such cases sometimes improve quickly following chemoradiation treatment. The absolute indications for stent replacement in the airway for this disorder and the optimal choice of stent are herein discussed. Between 1992 and 2010, 28 patients with airway stenosis, including 7 patients with esophago-tracheal fistula, were treated by placement of various stents; namely, 12 patients received Dumon stents, 3 patients had Dynamic stents, 10 patients were given Ultraflex stents, while 3 other patients were treated without the use of stents. Severe dyspnea in the supine position was observed, which mainly originated from invasion to the membranous portion of the trachea. Airway patency was maintained after stent replacement, although the median survival time of such cases was only 4 months. Three patients with severe dyspnea who could lie in a supine position recovered after undergoing chemoradiation treatment without stent replacement. No cases of stent removal were observed after chemoradiation treatment. Chemoradiation treatment for esophageal cancer was found to be effective for the management of airway disturbances, and thus the absolute indications for stent replacement are restricted to patients who cannot lie in a supine position due to severe impairment of ventilation during radiation therapy, as well as patients presenting with tracheobroncho-esophageal fistula. Concerning stent selection, a metal stent should be the first choice for tracheal stenosis due to its ease of insertion, because there is no substantial difference between silicone and metal stents regarding the treatment of tracheal stenosis. However, it is important to note that a silicone Y stent is useful for the treatment of tracheal bifurcation. (author)

  15. Effects of oxymetazoline on isolated rat's tracheal smooth muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsing-Won; Wu, Chi-Chung

    2008-06-01

    Oxymetazoline is often used as a decongestant in rhinitis patients who are suffering from nasal obstruction. It is used as a nasal drop or spray solution. The effect on nasal mucosa in vitro or in vivo is well known. However, the effect of the drug on tracheal smooth muscle has rarely been explored. During administration of the drug to the nose, it might affect the trachea via inhalation. We used our preparation to test the effectiveness of oxymetazoline on isolated rat's tracheal smooth muscle. A 5 mm long portion of rat trachea was submersed in 30 ml Kreb's solution in a muscle bath at 37 degrees C. Changes in tracheal contractility in response to the application of parasympathetic mimetic agents were measured using a transducer connected to a Pentium III computer equipped with polygraphy software. The following assessments were performed: (1) effect on tracheal smooth muscle resting tension; (2) effect on contraction caused by 10(-6)M methacholine as a parasympathetic mimetic; (3) effect of oxymetazoline on electrically induced tracheal smooth muscle contractions. Addition of parasympathetic mimetics to the incubation medium caused the trachea to contract in a dose-dependent manner. Addition of oxymetazoline induced a significant relaxation response when the preparation was up to 10(-4) M. At the same concentration, the drug also could inhibit EFS induced spike contraction. Oxymetazoline had negligible effect on the basal tension of trachea as the concentration increased. The degree of drug-induced tracheal contraction or relaxation was dose-dependent. The study indicated that high concentrations of oxymetazoline might actually antagonize cholinergic receptors of the trachea.

  16. Surgery for postintubation tracheal and tracheosubglottic stenotic lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashour, M.; Al-Kattan, K.; Rafay, M.A.; El-Bakry, A.K.; El-Dawlatly, A.; Naguib, M.; Seraj, M.; Joharjy, I.; Al-Serhani, A.

    1996-01-01

    Postintubation tracheal stenosis is a recognized problem. Although its incidence has recently decreased, it is still a difficult complication to treat. We have reviewed our experience with 10 patients with tracheal stenosis over the last five years between 1990 and 1995. There were seven male and three female patients with an average age of 14.2+-4 years (range 6 to 48 years). Resection and reconstruction with primary anastomosis was performed in seven patients, while conservative treatment with dilation was performed in two patients. One patient refused surgery. Operations performed included resection of tracheocricoid segment with tracheothyroid anastomosis (N=3) and tracheal resection with end-to-end anastomosis (N=4). The resected airway ranged from 3 cm to 6 cm. In view of the intense inflammatory and fibrotic process in and around stenotic segment, the practice of tracheostomy for the relief of postintubation acute tracheal obstruction should not be taken lightly, as it adds not only to the severity of the inflammatory process, but also increases the length of the tracheal segment to be resected. Postoperatively, all patients were extubated; this was accomplished by the end of surgery in six patients, while the seventh patient was extubated three weeks later. There was no mortality in this series. When normal functional activity and airway patency were taken as two parameters to judge the outcome of the surgery, results were good in six (86%) patients and satisfactory in one. These results support the validity of the one-stage reconstruction approach as one alternative for the treatment of postintubation tracheal and tracheosubglottic stenotic lesions. (author)

  17. Thyroidectomy improves tracheal anatomy and airflow in patients with nodular goiter. A prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Roed; Lauridsen, Jeppe Killerich; Døssing, Helle

    Background: A large goiter may cause compression of the trachea and lead to respiratory insufficiency. We aimed at investigating the effects of thyroidectomy on tracheal anatomy and airflow in patients with benign nodular goiter, employing a prospective observational study. Methods: Magnetic reso...... improvement in tracheal compression, but only minor improvements in tracheal airflow. This information is pertinent when counselling patients before choice of treatment....

  18. The societal and economic value of rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Richard C; Koenig, Lane; Acevedo, Daniel; Dall, Timothy M; Gallo, Paul; Romeo, Anthony; Tongue, John; Williams, Gerald

    2013-11-20

    Although rotator cuff disease is a common musculoskeletal problem in the United States, the impact of this condition on earnings, missed workdays, and disability payments is largely unknown. This study examines the value of surgical treatment for full-thickness rotator cuff tears from a societal perspective. A Markov decision model was constructed to estimate lifetime direct and indirect costs associated with surgical and continued nonoperative treatment for symptomatic full-thickness rotator cuff tears. All patients were assumed to have been unresponsive to one six-week trial of nonoperative treatment prior to entering the model. Model assumptions were obtained from the literature and data analysis. We obtained estimates of indirect costs using national survey data and patient-reported outcomes. Four indirect costs were modeled: probability of employment, household income, missed workdays, and disability payments. Direct cost estimates were based on average Medicare reimbursements with adjustments to an all-payer population. Effectiveness was expressed in quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). The age-weighted mean total societal savings from rotator cuff repair compared with nonoperative treatment was $13,771 over a patient's lifetime. Savings ranged from $77,662 for patients who are thirty to thirty-nine years old to a net cost to society of $11,997 for those who are seventy to seventy-nine years old. In addition, surgical treatment results in an average improvement of 0.62 QALY. Societal savings were highly sensitive to age, with savings being positive at the age of sixty-one years and younger. The estimated lifetime societal savings of the approximately 250,000 rotator cuff repairs performed in the U.S. each year was $3.44 billion. Rotator cuff repair for full-thickness tears produces net societal cost savings for patients under the age of sixty-one years and greater QALYs for all patients. Rotator cuff repair is cost-effective for all populations. The results

  19. Imaging diagnosis of primary tracheal adenoid cystic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Qing; Cai Chaoda

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To improve the imaging diagnosis of the primary tracheal adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC). Methods: Clinical manifestations and imaging findings were retrospectively studied in 20 cases of ACC proved by histological examinations. Results: ACC is often found in the posterior wall of trachea in younger patients. ACC grew slowly and lymphatic metastasis was rare. The nodular, diffuse or infiltrative growth of ACC was revealed on tomography, CT, MPR with spiral CT scan and MRI. Conclusion: Like other tracheal tumor, ACC can easily be miss-diagnosed. With further understanding of imaging findings and a clinical concern, the early diagnosis can be obtained in most patients with ACC

  20. Congenital tracheal defects: embryonic development and animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenab Arooj Sher

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal anomalies are potentially catastrophic congenital defects. As a newborn begins to breathe, the trachea needs to maintain an appropriate balance of elasticity and rigidity. If the tracheal cartilages are disorganized or structurally weak, the airways can collapse, obstructing breathing. Cartilage rings that are too small or too rigid can also obstruct breathing. These anomalies are frequently associated with craniofacial syndromes, and, despite the importance, are poorly understood. In this review, we summarize the spectrum of pathological phenotypes of the trachea and correlate them with the molecular events uncovered in mouse models.

  1. A new retrograde transillumination technique for videolaryngoscopic tracheal intubation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biro, P; Fried, E; Schlaepfer, M

    2018-01-01

    This single-centre, prospective trial was designed to assess the efficacy of a new retrograde transillumination device called the 'Infrared Red Intubation System' (IRRIS) to aid videolaryngoscopic tracheal intubation. We included 40 adult patients, who were undergoing elective urological surgery......-10])), credibility (10 (8-10 [5-10])) and ease of use (10 (9-10 [8-10])). Tracheal intubation with the system lasted 26 (16-32 [6-89]) s. No alternative technique of securing the airway was necessary. The lowest SpO2 during intubation was 98 (97-99 [91-100])%. We conclude that this method of retrograde...

  2. Tracheal dimness as a sign of mediastinal pathology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiavon, F.; Nardini, S.; Giannico, S.

    1987-01-01

    Some cases of mediastinal pathology in which the only pathological pattern was a dimness of the tracheal transparency are described. This sign is not described in previous report and is described as a short break in the aerial tracheogram as seen on the frontal roentgenograph. This sign is produced by an increase in the structures outside the trachea or by a decrease in the air column inside the trachea. Conventional and CT anatomic findings which account for the sign are discussed. A short review of the normal causes of tracheal dimness is presented. This sign may be useful expecially in emergency radiology, since it provides additional information to a simple routine chest roentgenograph

  3. Tracheal stent placement for the emergency management of tracheal collapse in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal, Matthew W

    2013-08-01

    Dogs with tracheal collapse may present with life-threatening upper airway obstruction. In most instances, a conservative approach to treatment including oxygen support coupled with sedation and cooling measures will relieve respiratory effort and thus relieve airway obstruction. Dogs that fail this conservative approach require endotracheal intubation to ensure a patent airway. This population of patients would benefit from a more definitive, yet palliative treatment option to acutely relieve upper airway obstruction. Placement of a self-expanding metallic stent that spans the affected portion of the trachea will acutely provide the patient with a sustained patent airway and optimize the likelihood of a positive outcome. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [Treatment of intractable aspiration after partial laryngectomy by cuffed tracheostomy tube with inner cannula].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, P; Liu, Y H; Xu, Q S; Zheng, Z S

    2017-06-07

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of cuffed tracheostomy tube with inner cannula for the treatment of intractable aspiration after partial laryngectomy. Methods: From May 2010 to June 2015, 15 patients with intractable aspiration after partial laryngectomy of laryngeal and hypopharyngeal carcinoma were enrolled. Cuffed tracheostomy tube with inner cannula was used in the 15 patients for treatment of intractable aspiration. The patients and their family were trained to manage the cuffed tracheostomy tube with inner cannula and to eat since the 14th day after surgery. Cuff was initially inflated with 10 ml air and then deflated of 0.5 ml air every 2-3 days. Until the inflation of cuff was no longer required, the cuffed tracheostomy tube was replaced by metal tracheostomy tube. The patients' swallowing function and aspiration were evaluated 6 months after treatment. Results: The 15 cases with intractable aspiration were treated with cuffed tracheostomy tube with inner cannula and after 2-3 months, 14 of them replaced the cuffed tracheostomy tubes with inner cannula by metal tracheostomy tubes and recovered oral eating, and tracheostomy tubes were no longer required for 12 of 14 patients in following 3-6 months, showing a total decannulation rate of 80% in the patients with refractory aspiration. Conclusion: It was safe and effective to treat aspiration after laryngeal and hypopharyngeal surgery with cuffed tracheostomy tube with inner cannula.

  5. Analysis of dynamic autoregulation assessed by the cuff deflation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlatky, Roman; Valadka, Alex B; Robertson, Claudia S

    2006-01-01

    Dynamic testing of cerebral pressure autoregulation is more practical than static testing for critically ill patients. The process of cuff deflation is innocuous in the normal subject, but the systemic and cerebral effects of cuff deflation in severely head-injured patients have not been studied. The purposes of this study were to examine the physiological effects of cuff deflation and to study their impact on the calculation of autoregulatory index (ARI). In 24 severely head-injured patients, 388 thigh cuff deflations were analyzed. The physiological parameters were recorded before, during, and after a transient decrease in blood pressure. Autoregulation was graded by generating an ARI value from 0 to 9. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) dropped rapidly during the first 2-3 seconds, but the nadir MAP was not reached until 8 +/- 7 seconds after the cuff deflation. MAP decreased by an average value of 19 +/- 5 mmHg. Initially the tracings for MAP and cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) were nearly identical, but after 30 seconds, variable increases in intracranial pressure caused some differences between the MAP and CPP curves. The difference between the ARI values calculated twice using MAP as well as CPP was zero for 70% of left-sided studies and 73% for right-sided studies and less than or equal to 1 for 93% of left- and 95% of right-sided cuff deflations. Transient and relatively minor perturbations were detected in systemic physiology induced by dynamic testing of cerebral pressure autoregulation. Furthermore, this study confirms that the early changes in MAP and CPP after cuff deflation are nearly identical. MAP can substitute for CPP in the calculation of ARI even in the severely brain-injured patient.

  6. Comparison of 2 cuff inflation methods before insertion of laryngeal mask airway for safe use without cuff manometer in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Soo; Bai, Sun-Joon; Oh, Jung-Tak; Youm, Seung-Mok; Lee, Jeong-Rim

    2013-02-01

    This prospective, randomized trial was conducted to establish whether the pediatric laryngeal mask airway (LMA) could be used without any concerns for abnormally high intra-cuff pressure when a cuff of the LMA was inflated with half the maximum recommended inflation volume or the resting volume before insertion. Eighty children 0 to 9 years of age and weighing of 5 to 30 kg scheduled for general anesthesia were included. Before insertion, the cuff of the LMA was filled with half the maximum recommended inflation volume in the Half volume group, or the resting volume by opening the pilot balloon valve to atmospheric pressure in the Resting volume group. After insertion of the LMA, intra-cuff pressure, oropharyngeal leak pressure, and leakage volume were investigated. The Half volume group showed lower mean intra-cuff pressure than the Resting volume group (49.6 ± 12.1 cm H(2)O vs 58.1 ± 13.8 cm H(2)O, P = .005). There was no difference in oropharyngeal leak pressure (22.1 ± 5.8 vs 21.7 ± 5.1 cm H(2)O, P = .757) or leakage volume between the Half volume group and the Resting volume group (0.13 ± 0.13 ml/kg vs 0.11 ± 0.12 ml/kg, P = .494) under spontaneous respiration. Both methods of the LMA cuff inflation before insertion provided an acceptable range of intra-cuff pressure with adequate pharyngeal sealing without any intervention after insertion. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Laryngeal Preservation in Managing Advanced Tracheal Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thavakumar Subramaniam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 37-year-old male athlete was diagnosed with primary tracheal adenoid cystic carcinoma following investigation for dyspnea, wheeze, and eventual stridor. Preoperative bronchoscopy revealed a highly vascular tumor 4 cm distal to the cricoid with no gross disease extending to the carina. Imaging revealed circumferential tracheal irregularity immediately inferior to the cricoid, with no definite cricoid invasion. Locoregional extension of disease was noted invading the thyroid and abutment of the carotid approximately 180°. Intraoperative findings identified tracheal mucosal disease extending distal to the carina and proximally at the cricothyroid joints where bilateral functional recurrent nerves were preserved. A decision made to preserve the larynx given the inability to fully resect distal tracheal disease. A 5 cm sleeve resection of the trachea was made with a cricotracheal anastomosis following suprahyoidal muscle release and laryngeal drop-down. The patient was treated with adjuvant radiotherapy including platinum based chemotherapy in an effort to maximise local control. PET scanning three months after therapy revealed no FDG uptake locally or distally.

  8. Haemodynamic response to laryngoscopy with and without tracheal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studio G5

    ABSTRACT. Introduction. Tracheal intubation is accompanied by an increased blood pressure and heart rate. The aim of this study was to find the most important source of this haemodynamic response, namely laryngoscopy or intubation. Method. A standard induction technique was used for all patients. Eighty patients ...

  9. Tracheoesophageal Fistula due to a Damaged Tracheal Stent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kimura

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the management of a tracheoesophageal fistula due to a damaged tracheal stent, which was first inserted to treat tracheal stenosis. A 29-year-old woman with a history of treated epilepsy had a seizure and suffered from smoke inhalation during a fire. Breathing difficulties appeared and gradually worsened; consultation was obtained two years afterward. After undergoing a thorough examination, the patient was diagnosed with tracheal strangulation. A noncovered, metallic stent was inserted. When the patient was 37 years old, she was admitted to our hospital for the treatment of a tracheoesophageal fistula. We diagnosed it as a tracheoesophageal fistula due to the collapse of the damaged tracheal stent toward the esophageal side, and we decided to perform a mediastinal tracheostomy. Granulation may be formed in the circumference of a stent that has been present for a prolonged period, and removal of the stent may become difficult. This case suggests that insertion of a noncovered, metallic stent is contraindicated for a benign disease.

  10. Difficult laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation due to calcified stylohyoid ligaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinyemi, O O; Elegbe, E O

    1981-01-01

    Two cases of difficult laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation caused by calcified stylohyoid ligaments are presented. Neither patient exhibited a skin crease over the hyoid bone. It is suggested that inability to lift up the epiglottis from the posterior pharyngeal wall be taken as a more useful sign of this condition than the presence of the skin crease.

  11. Occlusion cuff for routine measurement of digital blood pressure and blood flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, N A; Krähenbühl, B; Hirai, M

    1977-01-01

    A miniaturized blood pressure cuff made of plastic material and applicable to fingers and toes is described. The cuff was compared to rubber cuffs and to bladder-free cuffs. It was found to be more reliable than the former type and much easier to use than the latter type. It is recommended for us...... in conjunction with a mercury-in-Silastic strain gauge for routine measurement of digital blood pressure and blood flow in patients with arterial disease.......A miniaturized blood pressure cuff made of plastic material and applicable to fingers and toes is described. The cuff was compared to rubber cuffs and to bladder-free cuffs. It was found to be more reliable than the former type and much easier to use than the latter type. It is recommended for use...

  12. Implantation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Tracheal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Masakazu; Imaizumi, Mitsuyoshi; Yoshie, Susumu; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Otsuki, Koshi; Murono, Shigeyuki; Omori, Koichi

    2017-07-01

    Compared with using autologous tissue, the use of artificial materials in the regeneration of tracheal defects is minimally invasive. However, this technique requires early epithelialization on the inner side of the artificial trachea. After differentiation from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), tracheal epithelial tissues may be used to produce artificial tracheas. Herein, we aimed to demonstrate that after differentiation from fluorescent protein-labeled iPSCs, tracheal epithelial tissues survived in nude rats with tracheal defects. Red fluorescent tdTomato protein was electroporated into mouse iPSCs to produce tdTomato-labeled iPSCs. Embryoid bodies derived from these iPSCs were then cultured in differentiation medium supplemented with growth factors, followed by culture on air-liquid interfaces for further differentiation into tracheal epithelium. The cells were implanted with artificial tracheas into nude rats with tracheal defects on day 26 of cultivation. On day 7 after implantation, the tracheas were exposed and examined histologically. Tracheal epithelial tissue derived from tdTomato-labeled iPSCs survived in the tracheal defects. Moreover, immunochemical analyses showed that differentiated tissues had epithelial structures similar to those of proximal tracheal tissues. After differentiation from iPSCs, tracheal epithelial tissues survived in rat bodies, warranting the use of iPSCs for epithelial regeneration in tracheal defects.

  13. [Circular tracheal resection for cicatrical stenosis and functioning tracheostomy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshin, V D; Titov, V A; Parshin, V V; Parshin, A V; Berikkhanov, Z; Amangeldiev, D M

    To analyze the results of tracheal resection for cicatricial stenosis depending on the presence of tracheostomy. 1128 patients with tracheal cicatricial stenosis were treated for the period 1963-2015. The first group consisted of 297 patients for the period 1963-2000, the second group - 831 patients for the period 2001-2015. Most of them 684 (60.6%) were young and able-bodied (age from 21 to 50 years). In the first group 139 (46.8%) out of 297 patients had functioning tracheostomy. For the period 2001-2015 tracheostomy was made in 430 (51.7%) out of 831 patients with cicatricial stenosis. Time of cannulation varied from a few weeks to 21 years. Re-tracheostomy within various terms after decanulation was performed in 68 (15.8%) patients. Tracheal resection with anastomosis was performed in 59 and 330 in both groups respectively. At present time these operations are performed more often in view of their standard fashion in everyday practice. In the second group tracheal resection followed by anastomosis was observed in 110 (25.6%) out of 430 patients with tracheostomy that is 4.4 times more often than in previous years. In total 2 patients died after 330 circular tracheal resections within 2001-2015 including one patient with and one patient without tracheostomy. Mortality was 0.6%. Moreover, this value was slightly higher in patients operated with a functioning tracheostomy compared with those without it - 0.9 vs. 0.5% respectively. The causes of death were bleeding into tracheobronchial lumen and pulmonary embolism. The source of bleeding after tracheal resection was innominate artery. Overall incidence of postoperative complications was 2 times higher in tracheostomy patients compared with those without it - 22 (20%) vs. 26 (11.8%) cases respectively. Convalescence may be achieved in 89.8% patients after circular tracheal resection. Adverse long-term results are associated with postoperative complications. So their prevention and treatment will improve the

  14. An ovine tracheal explant culture model for allergic airway inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abeynaike Latasha

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The airway epithelium is thought to play an important role in the pathogenesis of asthmatic disease. However, much of our understanding of airway epithelial cell function in asthma has been derived from in vitro studies that may not accurately reflect the interactive cellular and molecular pathways active between different tissue constituents in vivo. Methods Using a sheep model of allergic asthma, tracheal explants from normal sheep and allergic sheep exposed to house dust mite (HDM allergen were established to investigate airway mucosal responses ex vivo. Explants were cultured for up to 48 h and tissues were stained to identify apoptotic cells, goblet cells, mast cells and eosinophils. The release of cytokines (IL-1α, IL-6 and TNF-α by cultured tracheal explants, was assessed by ELISA. Results The general morphology and epithelial structure of the tracheal explants was well maintained in culture although evidence of advanced apoptosis within the mucosal layer was noted after culture for 48 h. The number of alcian blue/PAS positive mucus-secreting cells within the epithelial layer was reduced in all cultured explants compared with pre-cultured (0 h explants, but the loss of staining was most evident in allergic tissues. Mast cell and eosinophil numbers were elevated in the allergic tracheal tissues compared to naïve controls, and in the allergic tissues there was a significant decline in mast cells after 24 h culture in the presence or absence of HDM allergen. IL-6 was released by allergic tracheal explants in culture but was undetected in cultured control explants. Conclusions Sheep tracheal explants maintain characteristics of the airway mucosa that may not be replicated when studying isolated cell populations in vitro. There were key differences identified in explants from allergic compared to control airways and in their responses in culture for 24 h. Importantly, this study establishes the potential for the

  15. New CO2 laser waveguide systems: advances in surgery of tracheal stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasche, Norbert; Bernecker, Frank; Hoermann, Karl

    1996-01-01

    The carbon dioxide laser is a well established tool in the surgical treatment of laryngeal and tracheal stenosis. Usually the laser beam is applied by a microscope/micromanipulator device. Different types of rigid laryngoscopes and bronchoscopes provide access to nearly every area of larynx, trachea and main bronchi. In order to be treated with this equipment the target tissue has to be in a straight optical axis with the laser beam output at the micromanipulator. We report about one patient who presented with severe dyspnea due to granulation tissue directly below his left vocal cord. He was suffering from tracheomalacia for several years and was successfully treated by tracheostomy and a Montgomery's silicone T-tube as a stent. Then granulation tissue blocked the upper orifice of the Montgomery's T-tube. First removal by a carbon dioxide laser beam through the laryngoscope would have required sacrificing his intact left vocal cord. We removed the obstructing tissue by using the ArthroLaseTM System: the carbon dioxide laser beam was conducted through a 90 degree bent rigid probe, using the tracheostomy as an access. This ArthroLaseTM System was originally designed for arthroscopic surgery. In this special case however it successfully extends the use of the carbon dioxide laser in otolaryngology.

  16. Effects of user experience and method in the inflation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Endotracheal tube cuff pressure (ETCP) is recommended to be maintained between 20.30 cmH2O limits. While insufficient inflation of ETC may cause aspirations, over.inflation of it may lead to damage in tracheal epithelium. Aims: We planned to investigate the effects of user experience and cuff pressure inflation ...

  17. Tracheal and Crico-Tracheal Resection and Anastomosis for Malignancies Involving the Thyroid Gland and the Airway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Cesare; Del Bon, Francesca; Barbieri, Diego; Grazioli, Paola; Paderno, Alberto; Perotti, Pietro; Lombardi, Davide; Peretti, Giorgio; Nicolai, Piero

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate outcomes in different malignancies involving the thyroid and infiltrating the airway submitted to tracheal (TRA) or crico-tracheal resection and anastomosis (CTRA). Retrospective charts review of 27 patients affected by thyroid malignancies involving the airway treated by TRA/CTRA in a single academic institution. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to evaluate the overall (OS) and disease-specific (DSS) survivals and local (LC) and loco-regional control (LRC). Impact on survival of age, comorbidities, previous radiotherapy, types of TRA/CTRA, Shin's stage (II, III, IV), grading (well vs poorly differentiated), and length of airway resected was calculated by the log-rank test. Overall survival and DSS at 3 and 5 years were 82.3% and 71.6%, respectively. Local control and LRC in the entire group were 82.3% at 3 and 5 years. Crico-tracheal resection and anastomosis involving the cricoid arch and plate (type C) and tumor differentiation significantly affected OS and DSS (both P < .001). Type C CTRA and tumor differentiation significantly impacted on LC (P = .002 and P = .009, respectively). Grading and extension of CTRA to the cricoid plate are the most important factors for oncologic outcomes in thyroid malignancies infiltrating the airway. Except for poorly differentiated tumors, TRA/CTRA allows adequate LC even in advanced stage lesions involving the crico-tracheal junction. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Effect of rotator cuff dysfunction on the initial mechanical stability of cementless glenoid components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Suárez (Daniel); E.R. Valstar (Edward); J.C. Linden (Jacqueline); F. van Keulen (Fred); P.M. Rozing (Piet)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe functional outcome of shoulder replacement is related to the condition of the rotator cuff. Rotator cuff disease is a common problem in candidates for total shoulder arthroplasty; this study relates the functional status of the rotator cuff to the initial stability of a cementless

  19. Effects of Wing-Cuff on NACA 23015 Aerodynamic Performances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meftah S.M.A

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The main subject of this work is the numerical study control of flow separation on a NACA 23015 airfoil by using wing cuff. This last is a leading edge modification done to the wing. The modification consists of a slight extension of the chord on the outboard section of the wings. Different numerical cases are considered for the baseline and modified airfoil NACA 23015 according at different angle of incidence. The turbulence is modeled by two equations k-epsilon model. The results of this numerical investigation showed several benefits of the wing cuff compared with a conventional airfoil and an agreement is observed between the experimental data and the present study. The most intriguing result of this research is the capability for wing cuff to perform short take-offs and landings.

  20. Rotator Cuff Strength Ratio and Injury in Glovebox Workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, Amelia M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-30

    Rotator cuff integrity is critical to shoulder health. Due to the high workload imposed upon the shoulder while working in an industrial glovebox, this study investigated the strength ratio of the rotator cuff muscles in glovebox workers and compared this ratio to the healthy norm. Descriptive statistics were collected using a short questionnaire. Handheld dynamometry was used to quantify the ratio of forces produced in the motions of shoulder internal and external rotation. Results showed this population to have shoulder strength ratios that were significantly different from the healthy norm. The deviation from the normal ratio demonstrates the need for solutions designed to reduce the workload on the rotator cuff musculature of glovebox workers in order to improve health and safety. Assessment of strength ratios can be used to screen for risk of symptom development.

  1. All-Extra-articular Repair of Anterosuperior Rotator Cuff Tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holschen, Malte; Witt, Kai-Axel; Steinbeck, Jörn

    2018-02-01

    Anterosuperior rotator cuff tears involve the subscapularis tendon, supraspinatus tendon, and rotator interval. The long head of the biceps is usually affected and unstable in these complex lesions. Arthroscopic repair of anterosuperior rotator cuff tears often consists of 2 different procedures. Whereas the subscapularis tendon is reconstructed under intra-articular visualization, the supraspinatus tendon is reconstructed under extra-articular visualization. The rotator interval is often sacrificed to improve visualization and instrumentation. The presented technique uses an all-extra-articular approach, which helps to reconstruct these complex rotator cuff lesions in their whole extent without switching from the inside to the outside of the shoulder joint. The preservation of the rotator interval leads to a more stable and anatomic reconstruction.

  2. Respiratory Complications Associated with Insertion of Small-Bore Feeding Tube in Critically Ill Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Am Ryu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Small-bore flexible feeding tubes decrease the risk of ulceration of the nose, pharynx, and stomach compared with large-bore and more rigid tubes. However, small-bore feeding tubes have more respiratory system complications, such as pneumothorax, hydropneumothorax, bronchopleural fistula, and pneumonia, which are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Thus, it is important to confirm the correct position of feeding tubes. Chest X-ray is the gold standard to detect tracheal malpositioning of the feeding tube. We present three cases in which intubated patients exhibited an altered mental state. An assistant guide wire was used at the insertion of small-bore feeding tubes. These conditions are thought to be potential risk factors for tracheobronchial malpositioning of feeding tubes.

  3. Evaluation and nonsurgical management of rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greis, Ari C; Derrington, Stephen M; McAuliffe, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    Rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy is a common finding that accounts for about 7% of patients with shoulder pain. There are numerous theories on the pathogenesis of rotator cuff calcific tendinopathy. The diagnosis is confirmed with radiography, MRI or ultrasound. There are numerous conservative treatment options available and most patients can be managed successfully without surgical intervention. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and multiple modalities are often used to manage pain and inflammation; physical therapy can help improve scapular mechanics and decrease dynamic impingement; ultrasound-guided needle aspiration and lavage techniques can provide long-term improvement in pain and function in these patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Receptor-Type Guanylyl Cyclase at 76C (Gyc76C Regulates De Novo Lumen Formation during Drosophila Tracheal Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monn Monn Myat

    Full Text Available Lumen formation and maintenance are important for the development and function of essential organs such as the lung, kidney and vasculature. In the Drosophila embryonic trachea, lumena form de novo to connect the different tracheal branches into an interconnected network of tubes. Here, we identify a novel role for the receptor type guanylyl cyclase at 76C (Gyc76C in de novo lumen formation in the Drosophila trachea. We show that in embryos mutant for gyc76C or its downsteam effector protein kinase G (PKG 1, tracheal lumena are disconnected. Dorsal trunk (DT cells of gyc76C mutant embryos migrate to contact each other and complete the initial steps of lumen formation, such as the accumulation of E-cadherin (E-cad and formation of an actin track at the site of lumen formation. However, the actin track and E-cad contact site of gyc76C mutant embryos did not mature to become a new lumen and DT lumena did not fuse. We also observed failure of the luminal protein Vermiform to be secreted into the site of new lumen formation in gyc76C mutant trachea. These DT lumen formation defects were accompanied by altered localization of the Arf-like 3 GTPase (Arl3, a known regulator of vesicle-vesicle and vesicle-membrane fusion. In addition to the DT lumen defect, lumena of gyc76C mutant terminal cells were shorter compared to wild-type cells. These studies show that Gyc76C and downstream PKG-dependent signaling regulate de novo lumen formation in the tracheal DT and terminal cells, most likely by affecting Arl3-mediated luminal secretion.

  5. [Comparison of sevoflurane concentration for insertion of proseal laryngeal mask airway and tracheal intubation in children (correlation with BIS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudakanagoudar, Mahantesh S; Santhosh, M C B

    2016-01-01

    Sevoflurane is an inhalational agent of choice in paediatric anaesthesia. For management of airways in children a suitable alternative to ETT is a paediatric proseal laryngeal mask airway (benchmark second generation SAD). Various studies have shown that less sevoflurane concentration is required for LMA insertion in comparison to TI. BIS is a useful monitor of depth of anaesthesia. To compare concentration of sevoflurane (end tidal and MAC value) required for proseal laryngeal mask airway insertion and tracheal intubation in correlation with BIS index. The prospective randomised single blind study was done in children between 2 and 9 years of ASA I and II and they were randomly allocated to Group P (proseal laryngeal mask airway insertion) and Group TI (tracheal intubation). No sedative premedication was given. Induction was done with 8% sevoflurane and then predetermined concentration was maintained for 10min. Airway was secured either by proseal laryngeal mask airway or endotracheal tube without using muscle relaxant. End tidal sevoflurane concentration, MAC, BIS, and other vital parameters were monitored every minute till insertion of an airway device. Insertion conditions were observed. Statistical analysis was done by Anova and Student's t test. Difference between ETLMI (2.49±0.44) and ETTI (2.81±0.65) as well as MACLMI (1.67±0.13) and MACTI (1.77±0.43) was statistically very significant, while BISLMI (49.05±10.76) and BISTI (41.25±3.25) was significant. Insertion conditions were comparable in both the groups. We can conclude that in children airway can be secured safely with proseal laryngeal mask airway using less sevoflurane concentration in comparison to tracheal intubation and this was supported by BIS index. Copyright © 2014. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  6. Comparison of sevoflurane concentration for insertion of proseal laryngeal mask airway and tracheal intubation in children (correlation with BIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahantesh S. Mudakanagoudar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sevoflurane is an inhalational agent of choice in paediatric anaesthesia. For management of airways in children a suitable alternative to ETT is a paediatric proseal laryngeal mask airway (benchmark second generation SAD. Various studies have shown that less sevoflurane concentration is required for LMA insertion in comparison to TI. BIS is a useful monitor of depth of anaesthesia. AIMS: To compare concentration of sevoflurane (end tidal and MAC value required for proseal laryngeal mask airway insertion and tracheal intubation in correlation with BIS index. METHOD: The prospective randomised single blind study was done in children between 2 and 9 years of ASA I and II and they were randomly allocated to Group P (proseal laryngeal mask airway insertion and Group TI (tracheal intubation. No sedative premedication was given. Induction was done with 8% sevoflurane and then predetermined concentration was maintained for 10 min. Airway was secured either by proseal laryngeal mask airway or endotracheal tube without using muscle relaxant. End tidal sevoflurane concentration, MAC, BIS, and other vital parameters were monitored every minute till insertion of an airway device. Insertion conditions were observed. Statistical analysis was done by ANOVA and Students t test. RESULTS: Difference between ETLMI (2.49 ± 0.44 and ETTI (2.81 ± 0.65 as well as MACLMI (1.67 ± 0.13 and MACTI (1.77 ± 0.43 was statistically very significant, while BISLMI (49.05 ± 10.76 and BISTI (41.25 ± 3.25 was significant. Insertion conditions were comparable in both the groups. CONCLUSION: We can conclude that in children airway can be secured safely with proseal laryngeal mask airway using less sevoflurane concentration in comparison to tracheal intubation and this was supported by BIS index.

  7. Comparison of sevoflurane concentration for insertion of proseal laryngeal mask airway and tracheal intubation in children (correlation with BIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudakanagoudar, Mahantesh S; Santhosh, M C B

    2016-01-01

    Sevoflurane is an inhalational agent of choice in paediatric anaesthesia. For management of airways in children a suitable alternative to ETT is a paediatric proseal laryngeal mask airway (benchmark second generation SAD). Various studies have shown that less sevoflurane concentration is required for LMA insertion in comparison to TI. BIS is a useful monitor of depth of anaesthesia. To compare concentration of sevoflurane (end tidal and MAC value) required for proseal laryngeal mask airway insertion and tracheal intubation in correlation with BIS index. The prospective randomised single blind study was done in children between 2 and 9 years of ASA I and II and they were randomly allocated to Group P (proseal laryngeal mask airway insertion) and Group TI (tracheal intubation). No sedative premedication was given. Induction was done with 8% sevoflurane and then predetermined concentration was maintained for 10 min. Airway was secured either by proseal laryngeal mask airway or endotracheal tube without using muscle relaxant. End tidal sevoflurane concentration, MAC, BIS, and other vital parameters were monitored every minute till insertion of an airway device. Insertion conditions were observed. Statistical analysis was done by ANOVA and Students t test. Difference between ETLMI (2.49 ± 0.44) and ETTI (2.81 ± 0.65) as well as MACLMI (1.67 ± 0.13) and MACTI (1.77 ± 0.43) was statistically very significant, while BISLMI (49.05 ± 10.76) and BISTI (41.25 ± 3.25) was significant. Insertion conditions were comparable in both the groups. We can conclude that in children airway can be secured safely with proseal laryngeal mask airway using less sevoflurane concentration in comparison to tracheal intubation and this was supported by BIS index. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. The use of tracheal sounds for the diagnosis of sleep apnoea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penzel, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Tracheal sounds have been the subject of many research studies. In this review, we describe the state of the art, original work relevant to upper airways obstruction during sleep, and ongoing research concerning the methods used when analysing tracheal sounds. Tracheal sound sensors are a simple and noninvasive means of measurement and are more reliable than other breathing sensors. Developments in acoustic processing techniques and enhancements in tracheal sound signals over the past decade have led to improvements in the accuracy and clinical relevance of diagnoses based on this technology. Past and current research suggests that they may have a significant role in the diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnoea. Key points Tracheal sounds are currently a topic of significant interest but are not yet used in most routine sleep study systems. Measured at the suprasternal notch, tracheal sounds can provide reliable information on breathing sounds, snoring sounds and respiratory efforts. Tracheal sounds may be used as a noninvasive method of studying abnormalities of the upper airways during wakefulness. Educational aims To understand the principles of tracheal sound measurement and analysis. To highlight the importance of tracheal sounds for the diagnosis of sleep apnoea–hypopnoea syndrome. To present the most relevant clinical studies that have validated the use of tracheal sound sensors and to make future clinical validation studies possible. PMID:29184596

  9. Ear Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the ear drum or eustachian tube, Down Syndrome, cleft palate, and barotrauma (injury to the middle ear caused by a reduction of air pressure, ... specialist) may be warranted if you or your child has experienced repeated ... fluid in the middle ear, barotrauma, or have an anatomic abnormality that ...

  10. Impingement syndrome and rotator cuff tears: US findings in 140 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malvestiti, Oreste; Scorsolini, Alessandro; Ratti, Francesco; Ferraris, Giuseppe; Columbaro, Guido; Mariani, Claudio

    1997-01-01

    The authors investigated the role of rotator cuff impingement in causing tears of supraspinatus and biceps tendons and the comparative reliability of plain radiography and sonography (US). One hundred forty patients with symtoms referrable to the rotator cuff were examined with plain radiography and US of the shoulder. The differential diagnosis must distinguish all these common causes of shoulder dysfunction and cuff problems from other conditions. The authors conclude that US and plain radiography are accurate routine tests of rotator cuff integrity and rotator cuff impingement

  11. Xanthomatous Infiltration of the Rotator Cuff and Long Head of Biceps with Rotator Cuff Tear in a Patient with Mixed Hyperlipidemia: A Case Report with MRI Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelley S. Bath

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Xanthomatous infiltration may rarely affect the rotator cuff muscles and long head of the biceps tendon. It is the deposition of cholesterol within the rotator cuff muscles and long head of the biceps tendon resulting from hyperlipidemia, specifically high triglyceride and total cholesterol levels. As more commonly seen with xanthomatous infiltration and tear of the Achilles tendon, there may also be an association with rotator cuff tendon deposition and tear. MRI images of xanthomatous infiltration with rotator cuff tear in a 77 year old man with hyperlipidemia are detailed in the following case report.

  12. LB03.04: SPHYGMOMANOMETER CUFF CONSTRUCTION AND MATERIALS AFFECT TRANSMISSION OF PRESSURE FROM CUFF TO ARTERIAL WALL. FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF HUMAN PRESSURE MEASUREMENTS AND DICOM DATA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, P; Naqvi, S; Mandal, P; Potluri, P

    2015-06-01

    Sphygmomanometer cuff pressure during deflation is assumed to equal systolic arterial pressure at the point of resumption of flow. Previous studies demonstrated that pressure decreases with increasing depth of soft tissues whilst visco-elastic characteristics of the arm tissue cause spatial and temporal variation in pressure magnitude. These generally used non-anatomical axisymmetrical arm simulations without incorporating arterial pressure variation. We used data from a volunteer's Magnetic Resonance (MR) arm scan and investigated the effect of variations in cuff materials and construction on the simulated transmission of pressure from under the cuff to the arterial wall under sinusoidal flow conditions. Pressure was measured under 8 different cuffs using Oxford Pressure Monitor Sensors placed at 90 degrees around the mid upper arm of a healthy male. Each cuff was inflated 3 times to 155 mmHg and then deflated to zero with 90 seconds between inflations. Young's modulus, flexural rigidity and thickness of each cuff was measured.Using DICOM data from the MR scan of the arm, a 3D model was derived using ScanIP and imported into Abaqus for Finite Element Analysis (FEA). Published mechanical properties of arm tissues and geometric non-linearity were assumed. The measured sub-cuff pressures were applied to the simulated arm and pressure was calculated around the brachial arterial wall. which was loaded with a sinusoidal pressure of 125/85 mmHg. FEA estimates of pressure around the brachial artery cuffs varied by up to 27 mmHg SBP and 17 mmHg DBP with different cuffs. Pressures within the cuffs varied up to 27 mmHg. Pressure transmission from the cuff to the arterial surface achieved a 95% transmission ratio with one rubber-bladdered cuff but varied between 76 and 88% for the others. Non-uniform pressure distribution around the arterial wall was strongly related to cuff fabric elastic modulus. Identical size cuffs with a separate rubber bladder produced peri

  13. Rotator cuff tears in luxatio erecta: an arthroscopic perspective of two cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Vivek; Madi, Sandesh; Tapashetti, Sandeep; Acharya, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Luxatio erecta accounts for only 0.5% of all shoulder dislocations. More than 150 cases have been described in the literature, focusing mainly on the method of reduction and/or associated complications. Some of the well-described complications include injuries to the humeral head, glenoid, clavicle, rotator cuff, capsules and ligaments, brachial plexus and axillary artery/vein. Among these, rotator cuff injuries are reported to occur in about 80% of cases. However, in the majority of instances, cuff injuries have been managed conservatively and have been reported to apparently provide optimal functional outcomes. We report our experience with two cases of luxatio erecta associated with massive rotator cuff injuries, which were evaluated and further managed by arthroscopic repair. The emphasis in these cases is to define cuff injuries and proceed based on patients’ age, demands and characteristics of the cuff tears. Arthroscopic evaluation and cuff repairs should be contemplated in these patients, to improve shoulder functions. PMID:26561229

  14. Drosophila syndecan regulates tracheal cell migration by stabilizing Robo levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Joachim G; Ceulemans, Helga; Caussinus, Emmanuel; Baietti, Maria F; Affolter, Markus; Hassan, Bassem A; David, Guido

    2011-01-01

    Here we identify a new role for Syndecan (Sdc), the only transmembrane heparan sulphate proteoglycan in Drosophila, in tracheal development. Sdc is required cell autonomously for efficient directed migration and fusion of dorsal branch cells, but not for dorsal branch formation per se. The cytoplasmic domain of Sdc is dispensable, indicating that Sdc does not transduce a signal by itself. Although the branch-specific phenotype of sdc mutants resembles those seen in the absence of Slit/Robo2 signalling, genetic interaction experiments indicate that Sdc also helps to suppress Slit/Robo2 signalling. We conclude that Sdc cell autonomously regulates Slit/Robo2 signalling in tracheal cells to guarantee ordered directional migration and branch fusion. PMID:21836636

  15. Tracheal stenting under flexible bronchoscopy for large tracheoesophageal malignant lymphadenopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayub, Irfan Ismail; Kannan, Kalaichelvi; Dhenesh, R; Thiagarajan, Anand

    2017-01-01

    A 67-year-old man with poorly controlled chronic obstructive pulmonary disease presented with progressive dysphagia and was diagnosed with locally advanced carcinoma of the esophagus. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography staging showed mediastinal lymphadenopathy including a large lymph node in the tracheoesophageal groove with moderate tracheal compression. He was advised chemoradiotherapy but was reluctant to proceed with the same. He developed stridor 2 months later and repeat imaging showed increased size of the tracheoesophageal lymph node with critical airway narrowing. Since he was not fit for general anesthesia, he was subjected to tracheal stenting with self-expandable metal stent under flexible bronchoscopy. Following stent placement, there was relief of dyspnea, and stridor and the patient was discharged. PMID:28474657

  16. Effect of aging on tracheal mucociliary clearance in Beagle dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whaley, S.L.; Muggenburg, B.A.; Wolff, R.K.

    1985-01-01

    Tracheal mucous velocity measurements were made in 24 Beagle dogs, in 5 age groups, using a gamma camera to detect movement on instilled radiolabeled material. Age groups were defined as immature, young adult, middle-aged, mature, and aged dogs. Mean velocities (+/- SE) were 3.6 +/- 0.4 mm/min in the immature dogs, 9.8 +/- 0.7 mm/min in the young adults, 6.9 +/- 0.5 mm/min in the middle-aged dogs, 3.6 +/- 1.1 mm/min in the mature dogs, and 2.8 +/- 0.6 mm/min in the aged dogs. Tracheal mucous velocity was significantly faster in the young adult and middle-aged groups than in the immature, mature, and aged dog groups. 4 references, 1 figure, 1 table

  17. Transoral tracheal intubation of rodents using a fiberoptic laryngoscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, D L; Lehmann, J R; Harold, W M; Drew, R T

    1986-06-01

    A fiberoptic laryngoscope which allows direct visualization of the deep pharynx and epiglottis has been developed for transoral tracheal intubation of small laboratory mammals. The device has been employed in the intubation and instillation of a variety of substances into the lungs of rats, and with minor modification, has had similar application in mice, hamsters, and guinea pigs. The simplicity and ease of handling of the laryngoscope permits one person to intubate large numbers of enflurane anesthetized animals either on an open counter top or in a glove-box, as may be required for administration of carcinogenic materials. Instillation of 7Be-labeled carbon particles into the lungs of mice, hamsters, rats, and guinea pigs resulted in reasonably consistent interlobal distribution of particles for each test animal species with minimal tracheal deposition. However, actual lung tissue doses of carbon exhibited some species dependence.

  18. Massive cuff tears treated with arthroscopically assisted latissimus dorsi transfer. Surgical technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cupis, Vincenzo; De Cupis, Mauro

    2012-01-01

    Summary Latissimus dorsi transfer is our preferred treatment for active disabled patients with a posterosuperior massive cuff tear. We present an arthroscopically assisted technique which avoids an incision through the deltoid obtaining a better and faster clinical outcome. The patient is placed in lateral decubitus. After the arthroscopic evaluation of the lesion through a posterior and a posterolateral portal, with the limb in traction we perform the preparation of the greater tuberosity of the humerus. We place the arm in abduction and internal rotation and we proceed to the harvest of the latissimus dorsi and the tendon preparation by stitching the two sides using very resistant sutures. After restoring limb traction, under arthroscopic visualization, we pass a curved grasper through the posterolateral portal by going to the armpit in the space between the teres minor and the posterior deltoid. Once the grasper has exited the access at the level of the axilla we fix two drainage transparent tubes, each with a wire inside, and, withdrawing it back, we shuttle the two tubes in the subacromial space. After tensioning the suture wires from the anterior portals these are assembled in a knotless anchor of 5.5 mm that we place in the prepared site on the greater tuberosity of the humerus. A shoulder brace at 15° of abduction and neutral rotation protect the patient for the first month post-surgery but physical therapy can immediately start. PMID:23738290

  19. Correlation between Rotator Cuff Tears and Systemic Atherosclerotic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Donovan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the association of aortic arch calcification, a surrogate marker of atherosclerosis, with rotator cuff tendinosis and tears given the hypothesis that decreased tendon vascularity is a contributing factor in the etiology of tendon degeneration. A retrospective review was performed to identify patients ages 50 to 90 years who had a shoulder MRI and a chest radiograph performed within 6 months of each other. Chest radiographs and shoulder MRIs from 120 patients were reviewed by two sets of observers blinded to the others' conclusions. Rotator cuff disease was classified as tendinosis, partial thickness tear, and full thickness tear. The presence or absence of aortic arch calcification was graded and compared with the MRI appearance of the rotator cuff. The tendon tear grading was positively correlated with patient age. However, the tendon tear grading on MRI was not significantly correlated with the aorta calcification scores on chest radiographs. Furthermore, there was no significant correlation between aorta calcification severity and tendon tear grading. In conclusion, rotator cuff tears did not significantly correlate with aortic calcification severity. This suggests that tendon ischemia may not be associated with the degree of macrovascular disease.

  20. Compensatory muscle activation in patients with glenohumeral cuff tears

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbrink, Franciscus

    2010-01-01

    Patients suffering tendon tears in the glenohumeral cuff muscles show activation of muscles which pull the arm downwards during arm elevation tasks. This so-called co-activation deviates from healthy controls and is triggered by pain. Goal of this thesis was to demonstrate that deviating muscle

  1. Release of obstructing rectal cuff following transanal endorectal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rectal cuff in the second, both treated by laparoscopic approach after the approval of the review board. ... developed constipation and needed suppositories for rectal evacuation and he developed abdominal distension .... multicenter experience with 141 children. Ann Surg 2003; 238:569–576. 3 Langer JC, Seifert M, ...

  2. Ultrasonography and arthrography in rotator cuff lesions: algorithmic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eui Jong; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Lee, Sun Wha; Lim, Jae Hoon; Rhee, Yong Girl [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Pil Mun [Dankuk University College of Medicine, Chenona (Korea, Republic of)

    1992-11-15

    Twenty-six patients with chief complaint of shoulder pain who underwent both ultrasonographic examination and arthrography of the shoulder were analyzed. Ten out of 12 cases with clinical impression of frozen shoulder, showed normal findings on the ultrasonographic examination of the shoulder. Among these ten cases, nine cases showed adhesive capsulitis and one case showed rotator cuff tear on arthrography. Among six cases with the clinical impression of rotator cuff tear, five cases showed rotator cuff tear and one case showed combined calcific tendinitis and adhesive capsulitis on ultrasonographic examination. In arthrography, four cases of rotator cuff tear, one case of calcific tendinitis and biceps tendinitis and one case of normal finding were diagnosed. For the remaining eight cases in the ultrasonographic examination, normal finding or biceps tendinitis were found and for the remaining of the cases in arthrography adhesive capsulitis were found. With the above results, we recommend that the shoulder ultrasonography as the first line diagnostic modality for a patient with chief complaint of shoulder pain.

  3. A comparative study of the identification of rotator cuff calcifications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With ultrasound calcifications were detected in 9 patients; in 6 of these patients the calcification was located in the supraspinatus tendon and in 3 patients in the infraspinatus tendon. This study indicated that calcifications in the rotator cuff were more often seen on x-ray examination than on ultrasound, though the difference ...

  4. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for the elderly (over 75-years)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Rintaro; Furukawa, Keizo; Kajiyama, Shiro; Sakimura, Toshiyuki; Shindo, Hiroyuki; Eto, Masao

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the surgical results of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair (ARCR) and investigate the interoperative complications for elderly people (over 75-years). We evaluated nine patients 75 and over who underwent rotator cuff repair, followed up for more than 12 months, and underwent MRI six months or more after the operation which was performed between December 2004 to July 2008. Their average age was 77.3 years. The control patients were 61 patients less than 75 who underwent ARCR during same term. Their average age was 59.9 years. Clinical outcome was evaluated based on interoperative complications, the Japanese Orthopaedic Association score (JOA score), and cuff integrity using MRI Sugaya's classification. In the over 75 patients, anchors came out from the tuberosity in three patients. Postoperative complications were not seen in both groups. No differences were observed in JOA score and cuff integrity using MRI Sugaya's classification compared with patients under 75. The surgical outcome of ARCR for elderly people (over 75-years) was satisfactory, and ARCR for elderly people (over 75-years) shoud be performed with caution because of the coming out of anchors. (author)

  5. Open versus arthroscopic treatment of chronic rotator cuff impingement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schröder, J.; van Dijk, C. N.; Wielinga, A.; Kerkhoffs, G. M.; Marti, R. K.

    2001-01-01

    We report the results of 238 consecutive patients who underwent in total 261 acromioplasties because of chronic rotator cuff impingement. The procedure was performed either in conventional open technique (80) or arthroscopically (181). Two years (1-10) after the operation 68% of the patients treated

  6. Ultrasonography and arthrography in rotator cuff lesions: algorithmic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eui Jong; Ryu, Kyung Nam; Lee, Sun Wha; Lim, Jae Hoon; Rhee, Yong Girl; Yu, Pil Mun

    1992-01-01

    Twenty-six patients with chief complaint of shoulder pain who underwent both ultrasonographic examination and arthrography of the shoulder were analyzed. Ten out of 12 cases with clinical impression of frozen shoulder, showed normal findings on the ultrasonographic examination of the shoulder. Among these ten cases, nine cases showed adhesive capsulitis and one case showed rotator cuff tear on arthrography. Among six cases with the clinical impression of rotator cuff tear, five cases showed rotator cuff tear and one case showed combined calcific tendinitis and adhesive capsulitis on ultrasonographic examination. In arthrography, four cases of rotator cuff tear, one case of calcific tendinitis and biceps tendinitis and one case of normal finding were diagnosed. For the remaining eight cases in the ultrasonographic examination, normal finding or biceps tendinitis were found and for the remaining of the cases in arthrography adhesive capsulitis were found. With the above results, we recommend that the shoulder ultrasonography as the first line diagnostic modality for a patient with chief complaint of shoulder pain

  7. Atrophy of the deltoid muscle following rotator cuff surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Yukihiko; Saitoh, Satoru; Murakami, Narumichi; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Takaoka, Kunio

    2004-07-01

    Less invasive procedures have recently been introduced to facilitate an earlier return to sports or work activities after rotator cuff repair. Few reports, however, have verified whether such procedures are really less invasive than conventional open repair. The purpose of this study was to compare the postoperative thickness of the deltoid muscle in patients treated with either conventional or mini-open rotator cuff repair. Conventional open repair was performed from 1994 through 1997 in forty-three patients with rotator cuff tears. The mini-open deltoid-splitting approach was introduced in 1997, and the cases of thirty-five patients who underwent that procedure were reviewed. The two groups were compared with respect to the thickness of the anterior fibers of the deltoid muscle measured on the transverse magnetic resonance images, the degree of active forward flexion, and the times required for return to work and sports activities. The thickness of the anterior deltoid fibers did not change significantly after surgery in the mini-open repair group, whereas it was significantly decreased in the open repair group at six months as well as at twelve months postoperatively (p atrophy of the deltoid muscle than did the conventional open rotator cuff repair, and patients treated with the mini-open repair recovered more quickly.

  8. Gene expression profiling of Drosophila tracheal fusion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Rachana R; Iordanou, Ekaterini; Ajja, Crystal; Wille, Michael; Jiang, Lan

    2014-07-01

    The Drosophila trachea is a premier genetic system to investigate the fundamental mechanisms of tubular organ formation. Tracheal fusion cells lead the branch fusion process to form an interconnected tubular network. Therefore, fusion cells in the Drosophila trachea will be an excellent model to study branch fusion in mammalian tubular organs, such as kidneys and blood vessels. The fusion process is a dynamic cellular process involving cell migration, adhesion, vesicle trafficking, cytoskeleton rearrangement, and membrane fusion. To understand how these cellular events are coordinated, we initiated the critical step to assemble a gene expression profile of fusion cells. For this study, we analyzed the expression of 234 potential tracheal-expressed genes in fusion cells during fusion cell development. 143 Tracheal genes were found to encode transcription factors, signal proteins, cytoskeleton and matrix proteins, transporters, and proteins with unknown function. These genes were divided into four subgroups based on their levels of expression in fusion cells compared to neighboring non-fusion cells revealed by in situ hybridization: (1) genes that have relative high abundance in fusion cells, (2) genes that are dynamically expressed in fusion cells, (3) genes that have relative low abundance in fusion cells, and (4) genes that are expressed at similar levels in fusion cells and non-fusion tracheal cells. This study identifies the expression profile of fusion cells and hypothetically suggests genes which are necessary for the fusion process and which play roles in distinct stages of fusion, as indicated by the location and timing of expression. These data will provide the basis for a comprehensive understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of branch fusion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Mucus glycoprotein secretion by tracheal explants: effects of pollutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Last, J.A.; Kaizu, T.

    1980-01-01

    Tracheal slices incubated with radioactive precursors in tissue culture medium secrete labeled mucus glycoproteins into the culture medium. We have used an in vivtro approach, a combined method utilizing exposure to pneumotoxins in vivo coupled with quantitation of mucus secretion rates in vitro, to study the effects of inhaled pollutants on mucus biosynthesis by rat airways. In addition, we have purified the mucus glycoproteins secreted by rat tracheal explants in order to determine putative structural changes that might by the basis for the observed augmented secretion rates after exposure of rats to H2SO4 aerosols in combination with high ambient levels of ozone. After digestion with papain, mucus glycoproteins secreted by tracheal explants may be separated into five fractions by ion-exchange chromatography, with recovery in high yield, on columns of DEAE-cellulose. Each of these five fractions, one neutral and four acidic, migrates as a single unique spot upon cellulose acetate electrophoresis at pH values of 8.6 and 1.2. The neutral fraction, which is labeled with [3H] glucosamine, does not contain radioactivity when Na2 35SO4 is used as the precursor. Acidic fractions I to IV are all labeled with either 3H-glucosamine or Na2 35SO4 as precursor. Acidic fraction II contains sialic acid as the terminal sugar on its oligosaccharide side chains, based upon its chromatographic behavior on columns of wheat-germ agglutinin-Agarose. Treatment of this fraction with neuraminidase shifts its elution position in the gradient to a lower salt concentration, coincident with acidic fraction I. After removal of terminal sialic acid residues with either neuraminidase or low pH treatment, the resultant terminal sugar on the oligosaccharide side chains is fucose. These results are identical with those observed with mucus glycoproteins secreted by cultured human tracheal explants and purified by these same techniques

  10. Cigarette smoke causes rapid lipid peroxidation of rat tracheal epithelium.

    OpenAIRE

    Churg, A.; Cherukupalli, K.

    1993-01-01

    Cigarette smoke-induced lipid peroxidation may be an important mechanism of smoke toxicity, but attempts to demonstrate peroxidation of pulmonary tissues after smoke exposure have yielded conflicting results. To examine this question, we exposed rat tracheal explants to whole smoke for 10 minutes followed by air recovery for periods up to 50 minutes (test), or to air alone (controls) and measured conjugated diene levels in the tissue. A dose-related increase in conjugated diene levels was see...

  11. Arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in elite rugby players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambe, Amol; Badge, Ravi; Funk, Lennard

    2009-01-01

    Rugby is an increasingly popular collision sport. A wide spectrum of injuries can be sustained during training and match play. Rotator cuff injury is uncommon in contact sports and there is little published literature on the treatment of rotator cuff tears in rugby players. We therefore reviewed the results and functional outcomes of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair in elite rugby players. Eleven professional rugby players underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair at our hospital over a 2-year period. We collected data on these patients from the operative records. The patients were recalled for outcome scoring and ultrasound scans. There were seven rugby league players and four rugby union players, including six internationals. Their mean age was 25.7 years. All had had a traumatic episode during match play and could not return to the game after the injury. The mean time to surgery was 5 weeks. The mean width of the cuff tear was 1.8 cm. All were full- thickness cuff tears. Associated injuries included two Bankart lesions, one bony Bankart lesion, one posterior labral tear, and two 360 degrees labral tears. The biceps was involved in three cases. Two were debrided and a tenodesis was performed in one. Repair was with suture anchors. Following surgery, all patients underwent a supervised accelerated rehabilitation programme. The final follow-up was at 18 months (range: 6-31 months) post surgery. The Constant scores improved from 44 preoperatively to 99 at the last follow-up. The mean score at 3 months was 95. The Oxford shoulder score improved from 34 to 12, with the mean third month score being 18. The mean time taken to return to full match play at the preinjury level was 4.8 months. There were no complications in any of the patients and postoperative scans in nine patients confirmed that the repairs had healed. We conclude that full-thickness rotator cuff tears in the contact athlete can be addressed successfully by arthroscopic repair, with a rapid return to

  12. Muscle gene expression patterns in human rotator cuff pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Alexander; McCarthy, Meagan; Pichika, Rajeswari; Sato, Eugene J; Lieber, Richard L; Schenk, Simon; Lane, John G; Ward, Samuel R

    2014-09-17

    Rotator cuff pathology is a common source of shoulder pain with variable etiology and pathoanatomical characteristics. Pathological processes of fatty infiltration, muscle atrophy, and fibrosis have all been invoked as causes for poor outcomes after rotator cuff tear repair. The aims of this study were to measure the expression of key genes associated with adipogenesis, myogenesis, and fibrosis in human rotator cuff muscle after injury and to compare the expression among groups of patients with varied severities of rotator cuff pathology. Biopsies of the supraspinatus muscle were obtained arthroscopically from twenty-seven patients in the following operative groups: bursitis (n = 10), tendinopathy (n = 7), full-thickness rotator cuff tear (n = 8), and massive rotator cuff tear (n = 2). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed to characterize gene expression pathways involved in myogenesis, adipogenesis, and fibrosis. Patients with a massive tear demonstrated downregulation of the fibrogenic, adipogenic, and myogenic genes, indicating that the muscle was not in a state of active change and may have difficulty responding to stimuli. Patients with a full-thickness tear showed upregulation of fibrotic and adipogenic genes; at the tissue level, these correspond to the pathologies most detrimental to outcomes of surgical repair. Patients with bursitis or tendinopathy still expressed myogenic genes, indicating that the muscle may be attempting to accommodate the mechanical deficiencies induced by the tendon tear. Gene expression in human rotator cuff muscles varied according to tendon injury severity. Patients with bursitis and tendinopathy appeared to be expressing pro-myogenic genes, whereas patients with a full-thickness tear were expressing genes associated with fatty atrophy and fibrosis. In contrast, patients with a massive tear appeared to have downregulation of all gene programs except inhibition of myogenesis. These data highlight the

  13. Recurrent Obstructive Fibrinous Tracheal Pseudomembranes in a Young English Bulldog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, E; Guieu, L V; Le Boedec, K

    2017-03-01

    Endotracheal intubation is a common procedure, rarely associated with life-threatening complications (e.g., tracheal rupture, necrosis, foreign body). A 1.5-year-old English Bulldog was presented for respiratory distress, with increased respiratory efforts and stridor, 2 days after endotracheal intubation. Cervical and thoracic radiographs disclosed a severe narrowing of the tracheal lumen associated with an intraluminal soft-tissue structure at the thoracic inlet. Tracheoscopy confirmed the presence of an obstructive fibrinous tracheal pseudomembrane (OFTP) creating a 1-way valve obstruction. Removal of the OFTP dramatically improved the dog's respiratory function, but the lesion reformed twice despite corticosteroid and antibiotic therapy PO, warranting repeated endoscopic removal of the OFTP. No additional recurrences were observed after treatment with inhaled heparin and N-acetylcysteine q4h. No respiratory signs were reported 9 months after discharge. Postintubation OFTP has been reported rarely in humans and never described in dogs. Unexplained signs of upper airway obstruction shortly after endotracheal intubation should prompt consideration of OFTP in dogs, even if intubation was uneventful. Unlike its counterpart in humans, OFTP in dogs can reoccur after endoscopic removal, warranting repeated endoscopic extraction. A combination of corticosteroid therapy PO and heparin and N-acetylcysteine inhalation q4h may be attempted if recurrence is observed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  14. Multimodal non-surgical treatment of a feline tracheal adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Azevedo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Case summary A 10-year-old, castrated male domestic shorthair cat presented with a 2–3 month history of weight loss, lethargy and coughing. Thoracic radiographs revealed a soft tissue opacity overlying the dorsal trachea from the first rib to second rib and the ventral aspect of the trachea extending from the second rib to approximately the fourth rib. CT confirmed a mass involving the dorsal, right lateral and ventral aspects of the trachea narrowing the lumen and extending from vertebra C7 through T4. Bronchoscopy revealed a partially circumferential irregular and multilobulated tracheal mass, which was biopsied. The histopathological diagnosis was tracheal adenocarcinoma. The cat was treated with a definitive course of external beam radiation therapy (RT; 3 Gy × 18, cytotoxic chemotherapy, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor and palliative RT. The cat remained asymptomatic for 2 months and the mass remained stable radiographically for 11 months after RT. Relevance and novel information With multimodal treatment the cat had a survival time of 755 days. Initial treatment included definitive RT, carboplatin and piroxicam, followed by toceranib phosphate and palliative RT when the mass recurred. This case report describes the first documented use of non-surgical treatment and long-term outcome of tracheal adenocarcinoma in a cat. This case report is an indication that prolonged survival can be achieved with multimodal therapy.

  15. Successful Healing of Tracheal Radionecrosis: Role of Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariza-Prota, Miguel; Morales, Arturo; Grajeda, Jose; López-Lisbona, Rosa; Cubero, Noelia; Dorca, Jordi; Rosell, Antoni

    2016-12-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen therapy, the administration of 100% oxygen at pressures > 1 atm, is believed to promote wound healing by increasing angiogenesis and collagen synthesis. To our knowledge, this treatment modality has never been described in patients with tracheal radionecrosis. Here, we report the case of a 55-year-old man diagnosed with stage IIIB lung adenocarcinoma who was treated with chemotherapy and concomitant external intensity-modulated radiotherapy involving the left lung and mediastinum. Nine months later, he presented with neck pain, cough with mucopurulent sputum, and fever. A PET-CT scan revealed a fissure in the posterior wall of the left upper trachea. Flexible bronchoscopy showed a tracheal ulceration with a small left posterior wall fissure that extended into the mediastinum. To our knowledge, this is the first report in the literature that suggests that treatment with hyperbaric oxygen therapy, local debridement, and antibiotics is a feasible and successful management option for patients with complicated tracheal radionecrosis. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Neutron tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Ka-Ngo [Hercules, CA; Lou, Tak Pui [Berkeley, CA; Reijonen, Jani [Oakland, CA

    2008-03-11

    A neutron tube or generator is based on a RF driven plasma ion source having a quartz or other chamber surrounded by an external RF antenna. A deuterium or mixed deuterium/tritium (or even just a tritium) plasma is generated in the chamber and D or D/T (or T) ions are extracted from the plasma. A neutron generating target is positioned so that the ion beam is incident thereon and loads the target. Incident ions cause D-D or D-T (or T-T) reactions which generate neutrons. Various embodiments differ primarily in size of the chamber and position and shape of the neutron generating target. Some neutron generators are small enough for implantation in the body. The target may be at the end of a catheter-like drift tube. The target may have a tapered or conical surface to increase target surface area.

  17. Hippocrates (ca 460-375 bc), Introducing Thoracotomy Combined With a Tracheal Intubation for the Parapneumonic Pleural Effusions and Empyema Thoracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoucalas, Gregory; Sgantzos, Markos

    2016-12-01

    Hippocrates was the first physician to describe in accuracy pleural effusion and pneumonia. To treat empyema thoracis he had introduced a combined method of tracheal intubation with a simultaneously thoracotomy. The surgical incision was used for the pus to be progressively drainaged. If the patient was too weak to eat, he had suggested for nutritional mixtures to be administered through an oral-gastric tube. Thus Hippocrates composed in his operating theatre, an icon similar to modern surgical operations. © The Author(s) 2016.

  18. Partial rotator cuff injury in athletes: bursal or articular?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassiano Diniz Carvalho

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTA painful shoulder is a very common complaint among athletes, especially in the case of those in sports involving throwing. Partial lesions of the rotator cuff may be very painful and cause significant functional limitation to athletes' sports practice. The incidence of partial lesions of the cuff is variable (13-37%. It is difficult to make the clinical and radiological diagnosis, and this condition should be borne in mind in the cases of all athletes who present symptoms of rotator cuff syndrome, including in patients who are diagnosed only with tendinopathy. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the epidemiological behavior of partial lesions of the rotator cuff in both amateur and professional athletes in different types of sports. METHODS: We evaluated 720 medical files on athletes attended at the shoulder service of the Discipline of Sports Medicine at the Sports Traumatology Center, Federal University of São Paulo. The majority of them were men (65%. Among all the patients, 83 of them were diagnosed with partial lesions of the rotator cuff, by means of ultrasonography or magnetic resonance, or in some cases using both. We applied the binomial test to compare the proportions found. RESULT: It was observed that intra-articular lesions predominated (67.6% and that these occurred more frequently in athletes in sports involving throwing (66%. Bursal lesions occurred in 32.4% of the athletes, predominantly in those who did muscle building (75%. CONCLUSION: Intra-articular lesions are more frequent than bursal lesions and they occur predominantly in athletes in sports involving throwing, while bursal lesions were more prevalent in athletes who did muscle building.

  19. Partial rotator cuff injury in athletes: bursal or articular?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Cassiano Diniz; Cohen, Carina; Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Figueiredo, Eduardo Antônio; Monteiro, Gustavo Cará; de Castro Pochini, Alberto; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Ejnisman, Benno

    2015-01-01

    A painful shoulder is a very common complaint among athletes, especially in the case of those in sports involving throwing. Partial lesions of the rotator cuff may be very painful and cause significant functional limitation to athletes' sports practice. The incidence of partial lesions of the cuff is variable (13-37%). It is difficult to make the clinical and radiological diagnosis, and this condition should be borne in mind in the cases of all athletes who present symptoms of rotator cuff syndrome, including in patients who are diagnosed only with tendinopathy. To evaluate the epidemiological behavior of partial lesions of the rotator cuff in both amateur and professional athletes in different types of sports. We evaluated 720 medical files on athletes attended at the shoulder service of the Discipline of Sports Medicine at the Sports Traumatology Center, Federal University of São Paulo. The majority of them were men (65%). Among all the patients, 83 of them were diagnosed with partial lesions of the rotator cuff, by means of ultrasonography or magnetic resonance, or in some cases using both. We applied the binomial test to compare the proportions found. It was observed that intra-articular lesions predominated (67.6%) and that these occurred more frequently in athletes in sports involving throwing (66%). Bursal lesions occurred in 32.4% of the athletes, predominantly in those who did muscle building (75%). Intra-articular lesions are more frequent than bursal lesions and they occur predominantly in athletes in sports involving throwing, while bursal lesions were more prevalent in athletes who did muscle building.

  20. Dose-Response Evaluation of Braslet-M Occlusion Cuffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Douglas; Garcia, Kathleen; Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Ham, David; Hamilton, Douglas; Dulchavsky, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Braslet-M is a set of special elasticized thigh cuffs used by the Russian space agency to reduce the effects of the head-ward fluid shift during early adaptation to microgravity by sequestering fluid in the lower extremities. Currently, no imaging modalities are used in the calibration of the device, and the pressure required to produce a predictable physiological response is unknown. This investigation intends to relate the pressure exerted by the cuffs to the extent of fluid redistribution and commensurate physiological effects. Materials and Methods: Ten healthy subjects with standardized fluid intake participated in the study. Data collection included femoral and internal jugular vein imaging in two orthogonal planes, pulsed Doppler of cervical and femoral vessels and middle cerebral artery, optic nerve imaging, and echocardiography. Braslet-M cuff pressure was monitored at the skin interface using pre-calibrated pressure sensors. Using 6 and 30 head-down tilt in two separate sessions, the effect of Braslet-M was assessed while incrementally tightening the cuffs. Cuffs were then simultaneously released to document the resulting hemodynamic change. Results: Preliminary analysis shows correlation between physical pressure exerted by the Braslet-M device and several parameters such as jugular and femoral vein cross-sections, resistivity of the lower extremity vascular bed, and others. A number of parameters reflect blood redistribution and will be used to determine the therapeutic range of the device and to prevent unsafe application. Conclusion: Braslet-M exerts a physical effect that can be measured and correlated with many changes in central and peripheral hemodynamics. Analysis of the full data set will be required to make definitive recommendations regarding the range of safe therapeutic application. Objective data and subjective responses suggest that a safer and equally effective use of Braslet can be achieved when compared with the current

  1. Thyroidectomy improves tracheal anatomy and airflow in patients with nodular goiter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Roed; Lauridsen, Jeppe Killerich; Døssing, Helle

    Objectives: A large goiter may cause compression of the trachea and lead to respiratory insufficiency. We aimed at investigating the effects of thyroidectomy on tracheal anatomy and airflow in patients with benign nodular goiter, employing a prospective observational study. Methods: Magnetic reso...... to substantial improvement in tracheal compression, but only minor improvements in tracheal airflow. This information is pertinent when counselling patients before choice of treatment....

  2. Severe hypoxaemia in field-anaesthetised white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum and effects of using tracheal insufflation of oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bush

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available White rhinoceros anaesthetised with etorphine and azaperone combination develop adverse physiological changes including hypoxia, hypercapnia, acidosis, tachycardia and hypertension. These changes are more marked in field-anaesthetised rhinoceros. This study was designed to develop a technique to improve safety for field-anaesthetised white rhinoceros by tracheal intubation and oxygen insufflation. Twenty-five free-ranging white rhinoceros were anaesthetised with an etorphine and azaperone combination for translocation or placing microchips in their horns. Once anaesthetised the rhinoceros were monitored prior to crating for transportation or during microchip placement. Physiological measurements included heart and respiratory rate, blood pressure and arterial blood gas samples. Eighteen rhinoceros were intubated using an equine nasogastric tube passed nasally into the trachea and monitored before and after tracheal insufflation with oxygen. Seven rhinoceros were not intubated or insufflated with oxygen and served as controls. All anaesthetised rhinoceros were initially hypoxaemic (percentage arterial haemoglobin oxygen saturation (% O2Sa = 49 % + 16 (mean + SD and PaO2 = 4.666 + 1.200 kPa (35 + 9 mm Hg, hypercapnic (PaCO2 = 8.265 + 1.600 kPa (62 + 12 mm Hg and acidaemic (pHa = 7.171 + 0.073 . Base excess was -6.7 + 3.9 mmol/ℓ, indicating a mild to moderate metabolic acidosis. The rhinoceros were also hypertensive (systolic blood pressure = 21.861 + 5.465 kPa (164 + 41 mm Hg and tachycardic (HR = 107 + 31/min. Following nasal tracheal intubation and insufflation, the % O2Sa and PaO2 increased while blood pHa and PaCO2 remained unchanged.Tracheal intubation via the nose is not difficult, and when oxygen is insufflated, the PaO2 and the % O2Sa increases, markedly improving the safety of anaesthesia, but this technique does not correct the hypercapnoea or acidosis. After regaining their feet following reversal of the anaesthesia, the animals

  3. Severe hypoxaemia in field-anaesthetised white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum) and effects of using tracheal insufflation of oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, M; Raath, J P; Grobler, D; Klein, L

    2004-06-01

    White rhinoceros anaesthetised with etorphine and azaperone combination develop adverse physiological changes including hypoxia, hypercapnia, acidosis, tachycardia and hypertension. These changes are more marked in field-anaesthetised rhinoceros. This study was designed to develop a technique to improve safety for field-anaesthetised white rhinoceros by tracheal intubation and oxygen insufflation. Twenty-five free-ranging white rhinoceros were anaesthetised with an etorphine and azaperone combination for translocation or placing microchips in their horns. Once anaesthetised the rhinoceros were monitored prior to crating for transportation or during microchip placement. Physiological measurements included heart and respiratory rate, blood pressure and arterial blood gas samples. Eighteen rhinoceros were intubated using an equine nasogastric tube passed nasally into the trachea and monitored before and after tracheal insufflation with oxygen. Seven rhinoceros were not intubated or insufflated with oxygen and served as controls. All anaesthetised rhinoceros were initially hypoxaemic (percentage arterial haemoglobin oxygen saturation (%O2Sa) = 49% +/- 16 (mean +/- SD) and PaO2 = 4.666 +/- 1.200 kPa (35 +/- 9 mm Hg)), hypercapnic (PaCO2 = 8.265 +/- 1.600 kPa (62 +/- 12 mm Hg)) and acidaemic (pHa = 7.171 +/- 0.073 ). Base excess was -6.7 +/- 3.9 mmol/l, indicating a mild to moderate metabolic acidosis. The rhinoceros were also hypertensive (systolic blood pressure = 21.861 +/- 5.465 kPa (164 +/- 41 mm Hg)) and tachycardic (HR = 107 +/- 31/min). Following nasal tracheal intubation and insufflation, the %O2Sa and PaO2 increased while blood pHa and PaCO2 remained unchanged. Tracheal intubation via the nose is not difficult, and when oxygen is insufflated, the PaO2 and the %O2Sa increases, markedly improving the safety of anaesthesia, but this technique does not correct the hypercapnoea or acidosis. After regaining their feet following reversal of the anaesthesia, the

  4. Teaching tracheal intubation: Airtraq is superior to Macintosh laryngoscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Tracheal intubation with Macintosh laryngoscope is taught to medical students as it is a lifesaving procedure. However, it is a difficult technique to learn and the consequences of intubation failure are potentially serious. The Airtraq optical laryngoscope is a relatively novel intubation device, which allows visualization of the glottic plane without alignment of the oral, pharyngeal, and tracheal axes, possessing advantages over Macintosh for novice personnel. We introduced a teaching mode featured with a progressive evaluation scheme for preparation and performance of tracheal intubation with medical students in this prospective randomized crossover trial who had no prior airway management experience to find the superior one. Methods Twenty-six medical students of the 8-year programme in the 6th year participated in this trial, when they did their one-week rotation in the department of anaesthesiology. Each of the students intubated 6 patients, who were scheduled for surgeries under general anaesthesia, each laryngoscope for 3 patients respectively. One hundred and forty-nine consecutive patients scheduled for surgical procedures requiring tracheal intubation were enrolled. Patients were randomly allocated to undergo tracheal intubation using Macintosh (n = 75) or Airtraq (n =74) laryngoscope. The progressive evaluation scheme was applied to each intubation attempt. Results Intubation success rate was significantly higher in Airtraq group than Macintosh group (87.8% vs. 66.7%, P Cormack and Lehane glottic view was obtained in 94.6% of patients in the Airtraq group versus 32% of patients in the Macintosh group (P <0.001). Duration of intubation in Airtraq group was significantly shorter (68 ± 21 s vs. 96 ± 22 s, P < 0.05) compared to Macintosh group. Conclusions Airtraq laryngoscope is easier to master for novice personnel with a higher intubation success rate and shorter intubation duration compared with the Macintosh

  5. Huge Tracheal Diverticulum in a Patient with Mounier-Kuhn Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Mondoni

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal diverticulum is a rare benign entity. Tracheobronchomegaly (TBM, also known as Mounier-Kuhn syndrome, is a rare disorder characterized by marked dilation of the trachea and main bronchi, associated with thinning or atrophy of the elastic tissue. Because of the weakened trachea and increased intraluminal pressure related to chronic cough, some patients may develop mucosal herniation leading to tracheal diverticulosis. We report the case of a patient with TBM with a huge tracheal diverticulum, diagnosed by bronchoscopy and computed tomography with three-dimensional reconstruction. To our knowledge this is the largest tracheal diameter described in a patient affected by this syndrome.

  6. Tracheal Penetration and Tracheoesophageal Fistula Caused by an Esophageal Self-Expanding Metallic Stent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madan, Karan; Venuthurimilli, Arun; Ahuja, Vineet; Mohan, Anant; Guleria, Randeep

    2014-01-01

    Tracheal penetration of esophageal self-expanding metallic stents (SEMS) with/without tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF) formation is a rare occurrence. We report the case of a 66-year-old female patient with advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma who had undergone palliative esophageal stenting on three occasions for recurrent esophageal stent obstruction. On evaluation of symptoms of breathing difficulty and aspiration following third esophageal stent placement, tracheal erosion and TEF formation due to the tracheal penetration by esophageal stent were diagnosed. The patient was successfully managed by covered tracheal SEMS placement under flexible bronchoscopy. PMID:25276461

  7. Tracheal Penetration and Tracheoesophageal Fistula Caused by an Esophageal Self-Expanding Metallic Stent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karan Madan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal penetration of esophageal self-expanding metallic stents (SEMS with/without tracheoesophageal fistula (TEF formation is a rare occurrence. We report the case of a 66-year-old female patient with advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma who had undergone palliative esophageal stenting on three occasions for recurrent esophageal stent obstruction. On evaluation of symptoms of breathing difficulty and aspiration following third esophageal stent placement, tracheal erosion and TEF formation due to the tracheal penetration by esophageal stent were diagnosed. The patient was successfully managed by covered tracheal SEMS placement under flexible bronchoscopy.

  8. Transtendon rotator-cuff repair of partial-thickness articular surface tears can lead to medial rotator-cuff failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woods TC

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Tom C Woods,4 Michael J Carroll,1 Atiba A Nelson,2 Kristie D More,2 Randa Berdusco,1 Stephen Sohmer,3 Richard S Boorman,1,2 Ian KY Lo1,21Department of Surgery, 2Sport Medicine Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 3Department of Orthopaedics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, 4St Joseph's Hospital, Comox, BC, CanadaPurpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical and anatomic outcomes of patients following transtendon rotator-cuff repair of partial articular supraspinatus tendon avulsion (PASTA lesions.Patients and methods: Patients in the senior author's practice who had isolated PASTA lesions treated by transtendon rotator-cuff repair were included (n=8 and retrospectively reviewed. All patients were evaluated preoperatively and at a mean of 21.2 months (±9.7 months postoperatively using standardized clinical evaluation (physical exam, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, and Simple Shoulder Test. All patients underwent postoperative imaging with a magnetic resonance imaging arthrogram.Results: There was a significant improvement in American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (42.7±17.5 to 86.9±25.2 and Simple Shoulder Test (4.6±3.2 to 10.1±3.8 scores from pre- to postoperative, respectively. Postoperative imaging demonstrated full-thickness medial cuff tearing in seven patients, and one patient with a persistent partial articular surface defect.Conclusion: Transtendon repair of PASTA lesions may lead to improvements in clinical outcome. However, postoperative imaging demonstrated a high incidence of full-thickness rotator-cuff defects following repair.Keywords: rotator cuff, PASTA lesion, transtendon repair

  9. Comparison of 2 cuff inflation methods of laryngeal mask airway Classic for safe use without cuff manometer in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Soo; Lee, Jeong-Rim; Shin, Yang-Sik; Chung, Ji-Won; Lee, Kyu-Ho; Ahn, Ki Ryang

    2014-03-01

    This single-center, prospective, randomized, double-blind, 2-arm, parallel group comparison trial was performed to establish whether the adult-sized laryngeal mask airway (LMA) Classic (The Laryngeal Mask Company Ltd, Henley-on-Thames, UK) could be used safely without any consideration of cuff hyperinflation when a cuff of the LMA Classic was inflated using half the maximum inflation volume or the resting volume before insertion of device. Eighty patients aged 20 to 70 years scheduled for general anesthesia using the LMA Classic were included. Before insertion, the cuff was partially filled with half the maximum inflation volume in the half volume group or the resting volume created by opening the pilot balloon valve to equalize with atmospheric pressure in the resting volume group. Several parameters regarding insertion, intracuff pressure, airway leak pressure, and leakage volume/fraction were collected after LMA insertion. The LMA Classic with a partially inflated cuff was successfully inserted in all enrolled patients. Both groups had the same success rate of 95% at the first insertion attempt. The half volume group had a lower mean intracuff pressure compared with the resting volume group (54.5 ± 16.1 cm H2O vs 61.8 ± 16.1 cm H2O; P = .047). There was no difference in airway leak pressure or leakage volume/fraction between the 2 groups under mechanical ventilation. The partially inflated cuff method using half the maximum recommended inflation volume or the resting volume is feasible with the adult-sized LMA Classic, resulting in a high success rate of insertion and adequate range of intracuff pressures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Unanticipated endotracheal tube displacement in a short-neck patient with a history of chronic rheumatoid arthritis: a comparison of three kinds of endotracheal tubes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takara, Itaru; Fukuda, Akiko; Koja, Hiroki; Tomiyama, Hiroshi; Tokumine, Joho; Sugahara, Kazuhiro

    2004-10-01

    Endotracheal tubes are known to have a risk of being displaced at neck extension or flexion or rotation. However, the displacement seldom causes clinical problems. An 74-year-old patient suffering from chronic rheumatoid arthritis underwent debridement in the infected knee under general anesthesia. Mechanical ventilation had to be continued because of poor oxygenation after the operation. She had been intubated with Hi Lo Evac endotracheal tube (HLE) for 3 days, then extubated. However, she again needed mechanical ventilation because of aggravated oxygenation. At that time, Profile cuff siliconised endotracheal tube (PCS) was placed for 3 days. We encountered dangerous displacement of HLE during the first mechanical ventilation, but did not have any clinically dangerous displacement of PCS during the second mechanical ventilation. Therefore, we compared the hardness of the three popular endotracheal tubes. We found the hardness of HLE was higher than the others. This might be one of the reasons for dangerous displacement of the endotracheal tube in our case.

  11. photomultiplier tubes

    CERN Multimedia

    photomultiplier tubes. A device to convert light into an electric signal (the name is often abbreviated to PM). Photomultipliers are used in all detectors based on scintillating material (i.e. based on large numbers of fibres which produce scintillation light at the passage of a charged particle). A photomultiplier consists of 3 main parts: firstly, a photocathode where photons are converted into electrons by the photoelectric effect; secondly, a multiplier chain consisting of a serie of dynodes which multiply the number of electron; finally, an anode, which collects the resulting current.

  12. photomultiplier tube

    CERN Multimedia

    photomultiplier tubes. A device to convert light into an electric signal (the name is often abbreviated to PM). Photomultipliers are used in all detectors based on scintillating material (i.e. based on large numbers of fibres which produce scintillation light at the passage of a charged particle). A photomultiplier consists of 3 main parts: firstly, a photocathode where photons are converted into electrons by the photoelectric effect; secondly, a multiplier chain consisting of a serie of dynodes which multiply the number of electron; finally, an anode, which collects the resulting current.

  13. Vitamin D and the immunomodulation of rotator cuff injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dougherty KA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Kaitlin A Dougherty,1 Matthew F Dilisio,2 Devendra K Agrawal1 1Department of Clinical & Translational Science, 2Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Creighton University School of Medicine, Omaha, NE, USA Abstract: Tendon-to-bone healing after rotator cuff repair surgery has a failure rate of 20%–94%. There has been a recent interest to determine the factors that act as determinants between successful and unsuccessful rotator cuff repair. Vitamin D level in patients is one of the factors that have been linked to bone and muscle proliferation and healing, and it may have an effect on tendon-to-bone healing. The purpose of this article is to critically review relevant published research that relates to the effect of vitamin D on rotator cuff tears and subsequent healing. A review of the literature was conducted to identify all studies that investigate the relationship between vitamin D and tendon healing, in addition to its mechanism of action. The data were then analyzed in order to summarize what is currently known about vitamin D, rotator cuff pathology, and tendon-to-bone healing. The activated metabolite of vitamin D, 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, affects osteoblast proliferation and differentiation. Likewise, vitamin D plays a significant role in the tendon-to-bone healing process by increasing the bone mineral density and strengthening the skeletal muscles. The 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 binds to vitamin D receptors on myocytes to stimulate growth and proliferation. The form of vitamin D produced by the liver, calcifediol, is a key initiator of the myocyte healing process by moving phosphate into myocytes, which improves function and metabolism. Investigation into the effect of vitamin D on tendons has been sparse, but limited studies have been promising. Matrix metalloproteinases play an active role in remodeling the extracellular matrix (ECM of tendons, particularly deleterious remodeling of the collagen fibers. Also, the levels of

  14. [Tracheal intubation quality under remifentanil-propofol with sevoflurane compared with remifentanil-propofol with rocuronium: a randomized double-blind clinical trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Obregón, M P; Rivera Díaz, R C; Ordóñez Molina, J E; Rivera Díaz, J S; Velásquez Ossa, L F; Pineda Ibarra, C; Serna Gutiérrez, J; Franco Botero, V

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether intubation conditions under remifentanil-propofol plus sevoflurane rather than a nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocker are similar to those obtained when a neuromuscular blocker is used. In this double-blind controlled trial, 100 patients undergoing outpatient surgery were randomized to 2 groups. Intubation in one group was performed under remifentanil, propofol and sevoflurane. In the other, intubation was performed under remifentanil, propofol, and the nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocker rocuronium. We recorded dysphonia at 24 hours, Cormack-Lehane classification at laryngoscopy, mandibular relaxation, vocal cord position and mobility, and cough or movement during laryngoscopy, on intubation and on cuff inflation. Blood pressure and heart rate before and after tracheal intubation were also recorded. No significant between-group differences were observed in dysphonia 24 hours after surgery, Cormack-Lehane classification at laryngoscopy, mandibular relaxation, the position or mobility of vocal cords, or cough or movement during laryngoscopy, intubation or cuff inflation. After intubation the mean (SD) systolic blood pressure was 119.7 (75.4) mm Hg in the rocuronium group and 97.5 (54.5) mm Hg in the sevoflurane group. Mean heart rate was 80.7 beats/min in the rocuronium group and 66.7 beats/min in the sevoflurane group. The differences were significant (P < .05). Adequate doses of remifentanil, propofol, and sevoflurane provide intubation conditions that are similar to those achieved by using a nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocker, without exposing patients to additional risk. Avoiding use of a neuromuscular blocker would circumvent the development of complications associated with use of these agents or their antagonists and costs would be lower.

  15. Functional and magnetic resonance imaging evaluation after single-tendon rotator cuff reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, H B; Gelineck, J; Søjbjerg, Jens Ole

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate tendon integrity after surgical repair of single-tendon rotator cuff lesions. In 31 patients, 31 single-tendon repairs were evaluated. Thirty-one patients were available for clinical assessment and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at follow-up. A standard...... series of MR images was obtained for each. The results of functional assessment were scored according to the system of Constant. According to MRI evaluation, 21 (68%) patients had an intact or thinned rotator cuff and 10 (32%) had recurrence of a full-thickness cuff defect at follow-up. Patients...... with an intact or thinned rotator cuff had a median Constant score of 75.5 points; patients with a full-thickness cuff defect had a median score of 62 points. There was no correlation between tendon integrity on postoperative MR images and functional outcome. Patients with intact or thinned cuffs did not have...

  16. Laryngeal mask airway vs the endotracheal tube in paediatric airway management: A meta-analysis of prospective randomised controlled trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhiruchi Patki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A meta-analysis was performed on prospective randomised controlled trials to assess whether the laryngeal mask airway (LMA offered any advantage over the conventional endotracheal tube in the paediatric age group. Using the Cochrane methodology, a literature search was carried out through peer-reviewed indexed journals in three medical databases to obtain all publications comparing the LMA with the endotracheal tube in the paediatric age group (age less than 12 years, available till December 2010. Data from 16 randomised controlled clinical trials were selected for analysis. A null hypothesis was formed against each of the seven issues tested using the Fisher′s method of combining P values. The LMA was seen to have three advantages over the tracheal tube in the form of lower incidence of cough during emergence, lower incidence of postoperative sore throat and lower incidence of postoperative vomiting (P<0.05. It was seen to offer no advantage over the tracheal tube in incidence of bronchospasm or laryngospasm during emergence; also, it did not offer any advantage in increasing the efficacy of the airway seal. The only disadvantage the LMA had over the tracheal tube was its greater incidence of placement failure in the first attempt.

  17. Biceps tendinitis in chronic rotator cuff tears: a histologic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singaraju, Vamsi M; Kang, Richard W; Yanke, Adam B; McNickle, Allison G; Lewis, Paul B; Wang, Vincent M; Williams, James M; Chubinskaya, Susan; Romeo, Anthony A; Cole, Brian J

    2008-01-01

    Patients with chronic rotator cuff tears frequently have anterior shoulder pain attributed to the long head of the biceps brachii (LHBB) tendon. In this study, tenodesis or tenotomy samples and cadaveric controls were assessed by use of immunohistochemical and histologic methods to quantify inflammation, vascularity, and neuronal plasticity. Patients had moderate pain and positive results on at least 1 clinical test of shoulder function. The number of axons in the distal LHBB was significantly less in patients with biceps tendinitis. Calcitonin gene-related peptide and substance P immunostaining was predominantly within nerve roots and blood vessels. A moderate correlation (R = 0.5) was identified between LHBB vascularity and pain scores. On the basis of these results, we conclude that, in the context of rotator cuff disease, the etiology of anterior shoulder pain with macroscopic changes in the biceps tendon is related to the complex interaction of the tendon and surrounding soft tissues, rather than a single entity.

  18. Fetoscopic tracheal occlusion for severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia: retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica de Fátima de Assunção Braga

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and objectives: The temporary fetal tracheal occlusion performed by fetoscopy accelerates lung development and reduces neonatal mortality. The aim of this paper is to present an anesthetic experience in pregnant women, whose fetuses have diaphragmatic hernia, undergoing fetoscopic tracheal occlusion (FETO. Method: Retrospective, descriptive study, approved by the Institutional Ethics Committee. Data were obtained from medical and anesthetic records. Results: FETO was performed in 28 pregnant women. Demographic characteristics: age 29.8 ± 6.5; weight 68.64 ± 12.26; ASA I and II. Obstetric: IG 26.1 ± 1.10 weeks (in FETO; 32.86 ± 1.58 (reversal of occlusion; 34.96 ± 2.78 (delivery. Delivery: cesarean section, vaginal delivery. Fetal data: Weight (g in the occlusion and delivery times, respectively (1045.82 ± 222.2 and 2294 ± 553; RPC in FETO and reversal of occlusion: 0.7 ± 0.15 and 1.32 ± 0.34, respectively. Preoperative maternal anesthesia included ranitidine and metoclopramide, nifedipine (VO and indomethacin (rectal. Preanesthetic medication with midazolam IV. Anesthetic techniques: combination of 0.5% hyperbaric bupivacaine (5-10 mg and sufentanil; continuous epidural predominantly with 0.5% bupivacaine associated with sufentanil, fentanyl, or morphine; general. In 8 cases, there was need to complement via catheter, with 5 submitted to PC and 3 to BC. Thirteen patients required intraoperative sedation; ephedrine was used in 15 patients. Fetal anesthesia: fentanyl 10-20 mg.kg-1 and pancuronium 0.1-0.2 mg.kg-1 (IM. Neonatal survival rate was 60.7%. Conclusion: FETO is a minimally invasive technique for severe congenital diaphragmatic hernia repair. Combined blockade associated with sedation and fetal anesthesia proved safe and effective for tracheal occlusion.

  19. CHARACTERISTICS OF TRACHEAL SOUNDS PRECEDING, DURING AND FOLLOWING HYPOPNEA IN PATIENTS WITH OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA--HYPOPNEA SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    大西, 徳信

    2000-01-01

    The author analyzed night tracheal sounds of hypopnea events in 12 patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS). Tracheal sounds were recorded on a video tape recorder through a microphone attached to the anterior neck over the trachea during overnight polysomnography. In each patient ten hypopnea episodes were selected for analysis. Tracheal sounds were analyzed using sound-spectrogram and power spectra. Mean power spectra of inspiratory and expiratory tracheal sounds with...

  20. Use of the covered Y-shaped metallic stent in the treatment of airway stenoses involving the lower trachea and the tracheal carina: preliminary clinical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Ruimin; Li Fenbao; Zhang Mingqiu; Wu Gang; Han Xinwei

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To describe a new kind of Y-shaped metallic stent delivery system and evaluate its feasibility and preliminary effect for managing multiple airway stenoses involving the lower trachea and the tracheal carina. Methods: The Y-shaped metallic stent delivery system consisted of three-tier structure. The inner-tier was composed of four parallel guiding tubes, which was used for two guidewires and two threads passing through, the middle-tier was delivery catheter, which contained the four guiding tubes, and the outer-tier was introducer sheath. Under the fluoroscopic guidance, 15 patients with multiple stenoses involving the lower trachea and the tracheal carina were treated with the new covered self-expandable Y-shaped metallic stents. Results: Stent placement in the tracheo-bronchial tree was technically successful in all patients with obliteration of the dyspnea immediately after stent placement, and SaO2 was increased form preoperative 75%-89% to postoperative 96%-99%. During follow-up a period of 3-58 weeks (M 22 weeks), all stenosis were resolved without stent-related complications, and the general physical of all 15 patents was improved with no occurrence of obviously dyspnea and bleeding. Karnofsky performance status (KPS) was improved from preoperative 26%-45% to postoperative 72%-95%. Five patients died of the following causes unrelated to stent insertion: multiple organ failure (n=3), cachexia (n=1) and pulmonary infection caused by gastrobronehial fistula (n=1), and the remaining 10 patients were alive with no evidence of dyspnea at the time of this report. Conclusion: Deployment of the covered Y-shaped metallic stent with the use of Y metallic stent delivery system in the management of airway stenoses involving the lower trachea and the tracheal carina was a simple and safe procedure and with a good short-term clinical efficacy. (authors)

  1. Reconstruction of a large tracheal defect using Gore-Tex and external wire stent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Huiqing; Huang, Jie; Hu, Hao; Geng, Qing

    2013-01-01

    Reconstruction of a tracheal defect remains to be one of the biggest challenges in thoracic surgery. We present a case in which we used Gore-Tex and an external wire stent to reconstruct 7 cm of the trachea and obtained satisfactory outcomes. Gore-Tex appears to be a biocompatible, stable, and reversible material that can be safely used to reconstruct tracheal defects.

  2. Incidence and treatment of tracheal cancer: a nationwide study in the Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honings, J.; Dijck, J.A.A.M. van; Verhagen, A.F.T.M.; Heijden, H.F.M. van der; Marres, H.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to assess the incidence, characteristics, treatment, and survival of patients with tracheal malignancies in the Netherlands. METHODS: All cases of tracheal cancer entered into the database of the Netherlands Cancer Registry in the period 1989-2002 were selected.

  3. Tracheal involvement of bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohn, Kyung Sik; Jeon, Kyung Neough; Kang, Duk Sik

    2002-01-01

    Primary malignant tumors of the trachea are rare, the most prevalent histologies beeing squamous cell and adenoid cystic carcinoma. A review of the literature revealed only ten cases of primary tracheal or bronchial non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. We describe a case in which tracheal involvement of bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma, a subtype of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, occurred

  4. Medical image of the week: severe atelectasis with tracheal shift

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poojary I

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A 59-year-old woman with severe oxygen dependent COPD presented with acute respiratory distress requiring intubation and was found to have left lower lobe collapse with tracheal shift. Her past medical history consists of severe malnutrition, alcohol abuse, and emphysema with recurrent pneumonias associated with acute respiratory failure often requiring intubation. She has greater than a 50-pack year history of tobacco use. She has undergone bronchoscopy and multiple CT Chest imaging without evidence of an endobronchial lesion or malignancy. Postural drainage and percussion along with antibiotics and inhaled bronchodilators resulted in marked improvement in the left lower lobe.

  5. Repopulation of denuded tracheal grafts with alveolar type II cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, N.F.

    1988-01-01

    Repopulation of denuded heterotopic tracheal grafts with populations of specific epithelial cell types is one approach to study the differentiation potential of various cell types. This technique has been adopted to delineate the differentiation pathways of alveolar type II cells isolated from rat lungs. Under the conditions of this experiment, the reestablished epithelial lining was alveolar-like, however, ultrastructural analysis of the cells showed them to be like Clara cells. These preliminary results suggest that the secretary cells of the lung parenchyma and terminal airways may share a common ancestry. (author)

  6. COMPARISON OF ASTYM THERAPY AND KINESIOTAPING FOR ROTATOR CUFF TENDINOPATHY IN DIABETIC PATIENTS: RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    OpenAIRE

    Azza Atya; Mahmoud Nasser; Aisha Hagag

    2017-01-01

    Background: Rotator cuff tendinopathy is a significant problem among diabetics that frequently restricts patient’s activity in terms of pain and disability. The purpose of this study was to compare between the effect of Astym therapy and kinesiotaping in treating diabetic patients with chronic rotator cuff tendinopathy. Methods: 56 diabetic patients diagnosed with chronic rotator cuff tendinopathy were randomly assigned into Astym therapy group (n=28) or kinesiotaping group (n= 28). All pa...

  7. Increased Upper Trapezius Muscle Stiffness in Overhead Athletes with Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Leong, Hio Teng; Hug, Fran?ois; Fu, Siu Ngor

    2016-01-01

    Although excessive tension of the upper trapezius (UT) is thought to contribute to rotator cuff tendinopathy, no study examined UT tension in athletes with and without rotator cuff tendinopathy. Here we used UT shear modulus measured using ultrasound shear wave elastography as an index of muscle stiffness/tension. The aims of this study were twofold: 1) to determine whether the UT muscle shear modulus is altered in athletes with rotator cuff tendinopathy compared to asymptomatic athletes, and...

  8. Early postoperative fluoroquinolone use is associated with an increased revision rate after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancienne, Jourdan M; Brockmeier, Stephen F; Rodeo, Scott A; Young, Chris; Werner, Brian C

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the association of postoperative fluoroquinolone use following arthroscopic primary rotator cuff repair with failure requiring revision rotator cuff repair. An insurance database was queried for patients undergoing rotator cuff repair from 2007 to 2015. These patients were divided into three groups: (1) patients prescribed fluoroquinolones within 6 months postoperatively (divided into 0-2, 2-4, and 4-6 months), (2) a matched negative control cohort of patients not prescribed fluoroquinolones, and (3) a matched positive control cohort of patients prescribed fluoroquinolones between 6 and 18 months following rotator cuff repair. Rates of failure requiring revision rotator cuff repair were compared within 2 years. A total of 1292 patients were prescribed fluoroquinolones within 6 months after rotator cuff repair, including 442 within 2 months, 433 within 2 to 4 months, and 417 within 4 to 6 months, and were compared to 5225 matched negative controls and 1597 matched positive controls. The rate of revision rotator cuff repair was significantly higher in patients prescribed fluoroquinolones within 2 months (6.1 %) compared to matched negative (2.2 %, P = 0.0009) and positive controls (2.4 %, P = 0.0026). There were no significant differences in the rate of revision rotator cuff repair when fluoroquinolones were prescribed >2 months after rotator cuff repair. Early use of fluoroquinolones following rotator cuff repair was independently associated with significantly increased rates of failure requiring revision rotator cuff repair. This is the first clinical study examining the association of postoperative fluoroquinolone use with failure following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. III.

  9. Increased Occurrence of Tracheal Intubation-Associated Events During Nights and Weekends in the PICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehder, Kyle J; Giuliano, John S; Napolitano, Natalie; Turner, David A; Nuthall, Gabrielle; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Nishisaki, Akira

    2015-12-01

    Adverse tracheal intubation-associated events are common in PICUs. Prior studies suggest provider and practice factors are important contributors to tracheal intubation-associated events. Little is known about how the incidence of tracheal intubation-associated events is affected by the time of day, day of the week, or presence of in-hospital attending-level intensivists. We hypothesize that tracheal intubations occurring during nights and weekends are associated with a higher frequency of tracheal intubation-associated events. Retrospective observational cohort study. Twenty international PICUs. Critically ill children requiring tracheal intubation. None. We analyzed 5,096 tracheal intubation courses from July 2010 to March 2014 from the prospective multicenter National Emergency Airway Registry for Children. Frequency of a priori-defined tracheal intubation-associated events was the primary outcome. Occurrence of any tracheal intubation-associated events and severe tracheal intubation-associated events were more common during nights (19:00 to 06:59) and weekends compared with weekdays (19% vs 16%, p = 0.01; 7% vs 6%, p = 0.05, respectively). This difference was significant in emergent intubations after adjusting for site-level clustering and patient factors: for any tracheal intubation-associated events: adjusted odds ratio, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.02-1.41; p = 0.03; but not significant in nonemergent intubations: adjusted odds ratio, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.63-1.40; p = 0.75. For emergent intubations, PICUs with home-call attending coverage had a significantly higher frequency of tracheal intubation-associated events during nights and weekends (adjusted odds ratio, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.01-1.66; p = 0.04), and this difference was attenuated in PICUs with in-hospital attending coverage (adjusted odds ratio, 1.12; 95% CI, 0.91-1.39; p = 0.28). Higher occurrence of tracheal intubation-associated events was observed during nights and weekends. This difference was primarily attributed to

  10. Tracheal restoration in dogs with umbilical cord membrane of bovine preserved in glicerin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Mazzanty

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The viability of the use the bovine umbilical membrane preserved in 98% glycerin implanted in the cervical trachea was studied. Seven adult mongrel dogs, three males and four females weighting 6 to 14 kg, were used. After the usual anesthesia protocol and asseptic technique, three tracheal rings were partially removed for implantation of a segment of the umbilical membrane. The animals were observed during 30 days and then reoperated for macroscopic observations and for fragment collection for histological evaluation. It occurred a repair of the tracheal lesion, with formation of granulation tissue rich in collagen fibers linking the extremities of the tracheal cartilages. Epithelial migration over the tracheal surface was also seen. It is concluded that the segment of the bovine umbilical cord preserved in 98% glycerin can be used in the repair of tracheal defects. It offers a temporary support for granulation tissue formation and epithelization in the implanted area.

  11. Use of tracheal stenting in the palliation of anaplastic thyroid carcinoma: tertiary centre experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadharajan, K; Mathew, R; Odutoye, B; Williamson, P; Madden, B

    2015-06-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma is rare but carries a poor prognosis. Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma leads to tracheal compression, airway compromise and eventually death. Airway compromise, a particularly distressing symptom, can be palliated with tracheal stenting. A retrospective case note analysis was conducted of patients diagnosed with anaplastic thyroid carcinoma between July 2003 and July 2013. Twelve patients with anaplastic thyroid carcinoma were identified. Four patients underwent palliative tracheal stenting. Three patients had no dyspnoea at the time of stenting. Two stented patients subsequently developed dyspnoea secondary to stent migration; this was managed successfully with stent exchange. The other stented patient remained asymptomatic with regards to dyspnoea. All non-stented patients died with or from airway compromise. Tracheal stenting is a relatively safe and effective method for palliation of distressing airway symptoms in patients with anaplastic thyroid carcinoma. Early prophylactic tracheal stenting in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma may be an effective option to prevent development of airway compromise as the disease progresses.

  12. Development of a Quality Improvement Bundle to Reduce Tracheal Intubation-Associated Events in Pediatric ICUs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Simon; Rehder, Kyle J; Giuliano, John S; Apkon, Michael; Kamat, Pradip; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Napolitano, Natalie; Thompson, Ann E; Tucker, Craig; Nishisaki, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Advanced airway management in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) is hazardous, with associated adverse outcomes. This report describes a methodology to develop a bundle to improve quality and safety of tracheal intubations. A prospective observational cohort study was performed with expert consensus opinion of 1715 children undergoing tracheal intubation at 15 PICUs. Baseline process and outcomes data in tracheal intubation were collected using the National Emergency Airway Registry for Children reporting system. Univariate analysis was performed to identify risk factors associated with adverse tracheal intubation-associated events. A multidisciplinary quality improvement committee was formed. Workflow analysis of tracheal intubation and pilot testing were performed to develop the Airway Bundle Checklist with 4 parts: (1) risk factor assessment, (2) plan generation, (3) preprocedure time-out to ensure that providers, equipment, and plans are prepared, (4) postprocedure huddle to identify improvement opportunities. The Airway Bundle Checklist developed may lead to improvement in airway management. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Development of a patient specific artificial tracheal prosthesis: design, mechanical behavior analysis and manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua C H, Matthew; Chui, Chee Kong; Rai, Bina; Lau D P, David

    2013-01-01

    There is a need to create patient specific organ replacements as there are differences in the anatomical dimensions among individuals. High failure rates in tracheal prosthesis are attributed to the lack of mechanical strength and flexibility, slow rate of growth of ciliated epithelium and leakage of interstitial fluid into the lumen. This paper proposes a methodology of design, simulations and fabrication of a patient specific artificial tracheal prosthesis for implantation to closely mimic the biomechanical properties of the natural trachea, and describes the prototype device and its materials. Results show that the patient-specific trachea prosthesis has mechanical properties approximate that of normal tracheal rings. The user centric tracheal prosthesis is demonstrated to be a promising candidate for tracheal replacement.

  14. Penicillium species as a rare isolate in tracheal granulation tissue: a case series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randhawa, Premjit S; Nouraei, SA Reza; Howard, David J; Sandhu, Gurpreet S; Petrou, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Granulation tissue formation is a major problem complicating the treatment of upper airway stenosis. We present two cases of recurrent tracheal granulation tissue colonisation by Penicillium species in patients undergoing laryngotracheal reconstructive surgery for post-intubation tracheal stenosis. We believe that although most Penicillium species do not cause invasive disease they can be a contributory factor to the occurrence of upper airway stenosis. Case presentation A microbiological and mycological study of tracheal granulation tissue in two patients with recurrent laryngotracheal stenosis was carried out. Penicillium species was seen microscopically and cultured from tracheal granulation tissue. Neither patient grew any bacteria known to be associated with airway granulation tissue formation. Amphotericin B, itraconazole, flucytosine voriconazole and caspofungin were highly active against both isolates. Conclusion A search for a fungal cause should form part of the investigation for recurrent tracheal granulation tissue during laryngotracheal reconstruction. PMID:18346276

  15. Standard sonography and arthrosonography in the study of rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Dalati, Ghassan; Martone, Enrico; Caffarri, Sabrina; Fusaro, Michele; Pozzi Mucelli, Roberto; Castellarin, Gianluca; Ricci, Matteo; Vecchini, Eugenio

    2005-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of ultrasonography, integrating standard ultrasound and arthrosonography after injecting a saline solution into the glenohumeral cavity in cases of suspected rotator cuff tears. Materials and methods. We respectively examinated 40 patients awaiting shoulder arthroscopy for suspected or diagnosed tears of the rotator cuff. A radiologist, unaware of the pre-operative diagnosis, performed an ultrasound scan on all the patients before and after the injection of saline solution into the glenohumeral cavity. The parameters considered were presence or absence of a rotator cuff injury; type of injury according to Snyder and its extent along the longitudinal and transverse planes; presence or absence of effusion into the articular cavity; subacromial/subdeltoid bursal distension. All the patients underwent arthroscopy either the same day of the day after the ultrasound examination. Results. Standard sonography showed 26 complete rotator cuff tears (type C according to Snyder), 2 partial tears (type B according to Snyder) and 12 intact rotator cuffs. Arthrosonography detected 31 complete rotator cuff tears (type C according to Snyder), 1 partial tear (type B according to Snyder) and 8 intact rotator cuffs. Arthroscopy identified 32 complete rotator cuff tears (type C according to Snyder), 1 partial tear (type B according to Snyder) and 8 intact rotator cuffs. Analysis of the results shows that, taking arthroscopy as the gold standard, the sensitivity of normal sonography is 81.2%, whereas that of arthosonography is 96.8% (p [it

  16. Use of cuff tear arthroplasty head prosthesis for rotator cuff arthropathy treatment in elderly patients with comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Cassiano Diniz; Andreoli, Carlos Vicente; Pochini, Alberto de Castro; Ejnisman, Benno

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical and functional behavior of patients undergoing cuff tear arthroplasty at different stages of the disease. Cuff tear arthroplasty hemiarthroplasties were performed in 34 patients with rotator cuff arthropathy and associated comorbidities, classified according to Seebauer. The mean age was 76.3 years, and the sample comprised 23 females (67.6%) and 11 males (32.4%). The mean follow-up period was 21.7 months, and evaluations were performed using the Visual Analog Scale for pain and the Constant scale. There were no statistically significant differences in the mean reduction in the Visual Analog Scale or in the Constant scale increase between the female and male groups. The variation between the pre- and postoperative Visual Analog Scale and Constant scale evaluations was significant. There was also no statistically significant difference between the Seebauer classification groups regarding the mean Visual Analog Scale reduction, or the mean Constant scale increase. Cuff tear arthroplasty shoulder hemiarthroplasty is a good option for rotator cuff arthropathy in patients with comorbidities. Avaliar o comportamento clínico e funcional dos pacientes submetidos à artroplastia do tipo cuff tear arthroplasty para o tratamento da artropatia do manguito rotador em diferentes estágios da afecção. Foram realizadas 34 hemiartroplastias do tipo cuff tear arthroplasty em 34 pacientes com artropatia do manguito rotador e comorbidades associadas, classificadas de acordo com Seebauer. A média de idade foi de 76,3 anos, sendo 23 pacientes do sexo feminino (67,6%) e 11 do sexo masculino (32,4%). O seguimento médio foi de 21,7 meses e a avaliação foi realizada por meio da Escala Visual Analógica da dor e pela escala de Constant. Não houve diferença estatisticamente significante entre os grupos feminino e masculino, tanto nas médias de redução na Escala Visual Analógica quanto nas de aumento na escala de Constant. A variação entre as avalia

  17. Effects of hydration and physical therapy on tracheal transport velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, S.K.; Taplin, G.V.; Simmons, D.H.; Coulson, A.; Elam, D.

    1976-01-01

    A new tracer method for quantitative measurements of tracheal transport velocity (TTV) in mm/min in dogs has been described recently. Using the same technique, the effects of dehydration, hydration, postural drainage and physical therapy on TTV were studied. There was a significant (p < 0.05) reduction in TTV following dehydration and these values reverted to normal with hydration in all ten dogs. Tracheal transport velocity increased on the average of 39.7 percent with a mean change of 7.7 mm/min (p < 0.01) following postural drainage in seven dogs. On the other hand, TTV increased on the average of 51 percent with a mean change of 8.2 mm/min (p <0.01) following chest percussion in six dogs. Postural drainage and chest percussion each increased TTV significantly beyond the base-line values. However, hydration only restored TTV to base-line values when applied to dogs in the hydropenic state. These therapeutic measures have been used empirically in the past. The present study gives objective evidence of their beneficial effects in dogs and suggests that such treatments may have a definite scientific basis for clinical application in chronic obstructive airways disease

  18. Tratamento cirúrgico das estenoses traqueais congênitas Surgical treatment of congenital tracheal stenoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Mingarini Terra

    2009-06-01

    pericardial patch tracheoplasty in three patients, resection and anastomosis in two, slide tracheoplasty in one and vascular ring correction in one. One patient died during surgery due to hypoxia and hemodynamic instability, and one died from septic shock on postoperative day 11. Other complications included pneumonia, arrhythmia, stenosis at the anastomosis level, residual stenosis, granuloma formation and malacia. The mean follow-up period was 31 months; four patients were cured, and one required the use of a T tube to maintain airway patency. CONCLUSIONS: Congenital tracheal stenosis is a curable disease. However, its repair is complex and is associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality.

  19. Association of tracheal mucus or blood and airway neutrophilia with racing performance in Thoroughbred horses in an Australian racing yard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salz, R O; Ahern, B J; Boston, R; Begg, L M

    2016-04-01

    To determine the variation of tracheal mucus scores, tracheal blood scores and transendoscopic tracheal wash (TW) cytology in a population of Thoroughbred (TB) racehorses and assess their association with racing performance. A total of 220 endoscopic examinations were performed and TWs obtained from 155 TB racehorses. Samples were collected 60-120 min following gallop work. Tracheal mucus score, tracheal blood score and TW cytology were analysed and their association with racing performance assessed. Of the total examinations and samples, 194 from 135 horses fitted the criteria for inclusion. The overall prevalence of visible tracheal mucus was 2.5% (5/194) and of increased tracheal mucus was 0%. The prevalence of visible tracheal blood was 8.8% (17/194) and of increased tracheal blood was 4.6% (9/194). A total of 36% (70/194) of TWs contained elevated percentages of neutrophils and of these, 96% (67/70) occurred in the absence of any visible tracheal mucus. There was no significant association between tracheal mucus score or TW cytology and subsequent racing performance. There was a statistically significant association (P = 0.004) between increased tracheal blood scores and poor racing performance. Visible tracheal blood seen after strenuous exercise in clinically normal TB racehorses was a risk factor for poor racing performance, but the presence of airway neutrophilia was not. No horses in this study were found to have increased tracheal mucus, so the association of increased tracheal mucus with racing performance could not be assessed. © 2016 Australian Veterinary Association.

  20. Estudo comparativo entre uma e duas doses efetivas (DE95 de rocurônio para a intubação traqueal Estudio comparativo entre una y de los dosis efectivas (DE95 de rocuronio para la intubación traqueal A comparative study between one and two effective doses (ED95 of rocuronium for tracheal intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Carlos Gomes de Miranda

    2008-06-01

    and compare the conditions of tracheal intubation with one and two effective doses (ED95 of rocuronium, following the criteria of the Copenhagen Consensus Conference. METHODS: Sixty patients of both genders, ages 20 to 60 years, physical status ASA I and II, Mallampati 1 and 2, body mass index (BMI < 35, who underwent general anesthesia, randomly divided in two groups of 30 patients, were evaluated. Group 1 (G1 received 0.3 mg.kg-1 of rocuronium (1 ED95, and Group 2 (G2 received 0.6 mg.kg-1 (2 DE95. Parameters used to evaluate TI were based on the criteria of the Copenhagen Consensus Conference (Good Clinical Research Practice: laryngoscopy, vocal cords (position and movements, reaction to the insertion of the tube and/or filling of the cuff (movements of limbs and cough. RESULTS: All intubations were considered excellent or good (acceptable; therefore, there were no cases of failure or any intubation considered bad (unacceptable. The results of the statistical analysis were not significant. Consequently, we did not observe any clinically significant differences in the parameters evaluated. CONCLUSIONS: Both doses of rocuronium, 0.3 mg.kg-1 and 0.6 mg.kg-1 ED95, provided clinically satisfactory parameters of TI in elective procedures.

  1. Tracheostomy tube - eating

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000464.htm Tracheostomy tube - eating To use the sharing features on ... when you swallow foods or liquids. Eating and Tracheostomy Tubes When you get your tracheostomy tube, or ...

  2. Eustachian tube patency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eustachian tube patency refers to how much the eustachian tube is open. The eustachian tube runs between the middle ear and the throat. It controls the pressure behind the eardrum and middle ear space. This helps keep ...

  3. HIGH-RESOLUTION ULTRASONOGRAPHY OF SHOULDER FOR ROTATOR CUFF TEAR: CORRELATION WITH ARTHROSCOPIC FINDINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnumurthy H. Y

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Rotator cuff disease is the most common cause of shoulder pain. Ultrasonography being non-invasive, widely available, more cost-effective method and is the first choice in imaging of rotator cuff tears. Arthroscopy of shoulder is considered as the gold standard for diagnosis of rotator cuff tears. Objective of this study was to compare the diagnostic accuracy of high-resolution ultrasonography of shoulder for rotator cuff tears with arthroscopy of shoulder. METHODS Thirty patients clinically suspected to have rotator cuff tear who underwent ultrasonography and arthroscopy of shoulder were included in the study. Duration of study was for two years. All ultrasonography examinations were conducted in ultrasound machine using GE Voluson 730 PRO high frequency (10-12 MHz linear array transducer done by two experienced radiologists. Arthroscopies were done by two experienced shoulder arthroscopic surgeons. RESULTS Age of the patients with rotator cuff tears ranged from 40 to 80 years. 57% were females and 43% were males among the patients who had rotator cuff tears. 71.43% of the rotator cuff tears were found in the dominant arm. 64.28% of patients with rotator cuff tear had given history of fall or trauma to the corresponding shoulder within 6 months prior to presentation. 39.28% of patients who had rotator cuff tears were known diabetics. Supraspinatus tendon was the most commonly affected tendon, followed by infraspinatus and subscapularis tendons. For overall detection of rotator cuff tears, ultrasonography in comparison with the arthroscopy has sensitivity and specificity of 92.85% and 100%. For detection of full thickness rotator cuff tear, its sensitivity and specificity was 94.73% and 100% and for partial thickness rotator cuff tears 76.92% and 100%. Ultrasonography has 100% sensitivity and specificity for detection of supraspinatus full thickness tear. For supraspinatus partial thickness tear, sensitivity and specificity was 88

  4. Heat exchanger tube mounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolowodiuk, W.; Anelli, J.; Dawson, B.E.

    1974-01-01

    A heat exchanger in which tubes are secured to a tube sheet by internal bore welding is described. The tubes may be moved into place in preparation for welding with comparatively little trouble. A number of segmented tube support plates are provided which allow a considerable portion of each of the tubes to be moved laterally after the end thereof has been positioned in preparation for internal bore welding to the tube sheet. (auth)

  5. Predicting rotator cuff tears using data mining and Bayesian likelihood ratios.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsueh-Yi Lu

    Full Text Available Rotator cuff tear is a common cause of shoulder diseases. Correct diagnosis of rotator cuff tears can save patients from further invasive, costly and painful tests. This study used predictive data mining and Bayesian theory to improve the accuracy of diagnosing rotator cuff tears by clinical examination alone.In this retrospective study, 169 patients who had a preliminary diagnosis of rotator cuff tear on the basis of clinical evaluation followed by confirmatory MRI between 2007 and 2011 were identified. MRI was used as a reference standard to classify rotator cuff tears. The predictor variable was the clinical assessment results, which consisted of 16 attributes. This study employed 2 data mining methods (ANN and the decision tree and a statistical method (logistic regression to classify the rotator cuff diagnosis into "tear" and "no tear" groups. Likelihood ratio and Bayesian theory were applied to estimate the probability of rotator cuff tears based on the results of the prediction models.Our proposed data mining procedures outperformed the classic statistical method. The correction rate, sensitivity, specificity and area under the ROC curve of predicting a rotator cuff tear were statistical better in the ANN and decision tree models compared to logistic regression. Based on likelihood ratios derived from our prediction models, Fagan's nomogram could be constructed to assess the probability of a patient who has a rotator cuff tear using a pretest probability and a prediction result (tear or no tear.Our predictive data mining models, combined with likelihood ratios and Bayesian theory, appear to be good tools to classify rotator cuff tears as well as determine the probability of the presence of the disease to enhance diagnostic decision making for rotator cuff tears.

  6. Eccentric versus conventional exercise therapy in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy: a randomized, single blinded, clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dejaco, B.; Habets, B.; Loon, C.J.M. van; Grinsven, S. van; Cingel, R.E. van

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effectiveness of isolated eccentric versus conventional exercise therapy in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy. METHODS: Thirty-six patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy, diagnosed by an orthopaedic surgeon, were included and randomly allocated to an isolated

  7. Comparison of muscle sizes and moment arms of two rotator cuff muscles measured by ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul-Kristensen, B.; Bojsen-Møller, Finn; Holst, E.

    2000-01-01

    Anatomy, biomechanics, cross-section, magnetic resonance imaging, method comparison, rotator cuff muscles, ultrasound......Anatomy, biomechanics, cross-section, magnetic resonance imaging, method comparison, rotator cuff muscles, ultrasound...

  8. Use of extraglottic airways in patients undergoing ambulatory laparoscopic surgery without the need for tracheal intubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Suhitharan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Second generation extraglottic airway devices with gastric access and separate breathing channels have ushered in a new era where their use is increasingly prevalent in surgical patients who would have been traditionally intubated for general anesthesia. New innovations like the i-gel, which is constructed of a thermoplastic elastomer, provide an airtight seal around patient′s perilaryngeal anatomy without the inflatable cuff mechanism found in the laryngeal mask airway supreme (LMAS. Methods: We conducted a randomized controlled trial comparing the LMAS with the i-gel in 70 anesthetized paralyzed patients undergoing laparoscopic female sterilization. Our primary outcome measure was the oropharyngeal leak pressure (OLP. We studied secondary outcomes of successful first attempt insertion rates, time and ease of the airway and gastric tube insertion, leak fractions and pharyngeal morbidity. Results: We found no difference in the OLP between LMAS and i-gel, 25.9 (4.2 versus 24.4 (4.3 s, P=0.153. Both devices had similar first attempt insertion rates (LMAS 94% vs. i-gel 91% with similar ease and comparable times to achieve an effective airway, LMAS 14.7 (2.7 versus i-gel 16.5 (9.6 s, P=0.306, although gastric tube insertion was easier and faster for the LMAS, 7.9 (1.9 versus i-gel 14.8 (7.7 s, P<0.005. Intraoperatively, there was a significantly greater leak fraction with the i-gel of 0.06 (0.03 versus 0.04 (0.02 with the LMAS, P=0.013. Three patients (8.6% with LMAS had mild sore throat; one patient (2.9% had mucosal injury. No complications were documented in the i-gel group. Conclusions: Both these extraglottic airway devices offer similar OLPs, high insertion success rates at the first attempt with similar ease and insertion times (albeit longer gastric tube insertion with i-gel. Both provided effective ventilation despite a higher leak fraction with i-gel that was clinically inconsequential.

  9. Tube holding system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, R.C.

    1978-01-01

    A tube holding rig is described for the lateral support of tubes arranged in tight parcels in a heat exchanger. This tube holding rig includes not less than two tube supporting assemblies, with a space between them, located crosswise with respect to the tubes, each supporting assembly comprising a first set of parallel components in contact with the tubes, whilst a second set of components is also in contact with the tubes. These two sets of parts together define apertures through which the tubes pass [fr

  10. COMPARISON OF FLUOROSCOPY AND COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY FOR TRACHEAL LUMEN DIAMETER MEASUREMENT AND DETERMINATION OF INTRALUMINAL STENT SIZE IN HEALTHY DOGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jackie M; Krebs, Ingar A; Riedesel, Elizabeth A; Zhao, Qianqian

    2016-05-01

    Tracheal collapse is a progressive airway disease that can ultimately result in complete airway obstruction. Intraluminal tracheal stents are a minimally invasive and viable treatment for tracheal collapse once the disease becomes refractory to medical management. Intraluminal stent size is chosen based on the maximum measured tracheal diameter during maximum inflation. The purpose of this prospective, cross-sectional study was to compare tracheal lumen diameter measurements and subsequent selected stent size using both fluoroscopy and CT and to evaluate inter- and intraobserver variability of the measurements. Seventeen healthy Beagles were anesthetized and imaged with fluoroscopy and CT with positive pressure ventilation to 20 cm H2 O. Fluoroscopic and CT maximum tracheal diameters were measured by three readers. Three individual measurements were made at eight predetermined tracheal sites for dorsoventral (height) and laterolateral (width) dimensions. Tracheal diameters and stent sizes (based on the maximum tracheal diameter + 10%) were analyzed using a linear mixed model. CT tracheal lumen diameters were larger compared to fluoroscopy at all locations (P-value fluoroscopy compared to CT, both within and among observers. The greater tracheal diameter measured with CT and lower measurement variability has clinical significance, as this may be the imaging modality of choice for appropriate stent selection to minimize complications in veterinary patients. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  11. Tracheal rupture caused by blunt chest trauma: radiological and clinical features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunisch-Hoppe, M.; Rauber, K.; Rau, W.S. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Justus Liebig Univ., Giessen (Germany); Hoppe, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, Philipps University, Marburg (Germany); Popella, C. [Dept. of ENT, Justus Liebig University, Giessen (Germany)

    2000-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess radiomorphologic and clinical features of tracheal rupture due to blunt chest trauma. From 1992 until 1998 the radiomorphologic and clinical key findings of all consecutive tracheal ruptures were retrospectively analyzed. The study included ten patients (7 men and 3 women; mean age 35 years); all had pneumothoraces which were persistent despite suction drainage. Seven patients developed a pneumomediastinum as well as a subcutaneous emphysema on conventional chest X-rays. In five patients, one major hint leading to the diagnosis was a cervical emphysema, discovered on the lateral cervical spine view. Contrast-media-enhanced thoracic CT was obtained in all ten cases and showed additional injuries (atelectasis n = 5; lung contusion n = 4; lung laceration n = 2; hematothorax n = 2 and hematomediastinum n = 4). The definite diagnosis of tracheal rupture was made by bronchoscopy, which was obtained in all patients. Tracheal rupture due to blunt chest trauma occurs rarely. Key findings were all provided by conventional chest X-ray. Tracheal rupture is suspected in front of a pneumothorax, a pneumomediastinum, or a subcutaneous emphysema on lateral cervical spine and chest films. Routine thoracic CT could also demonstrate these findings but could not confirm the definite diagnosis of an tracheal rupture except in one case; in the other 9 cases this was done by bronchoscopy. Thus, bronchoscopy should be mandatory in all suspicious cases of tracheal rupture and remains the gold standard. (orig.)

  12. Tracheal foreign bodies in the cat and the use of fluoroscopy for removal: 12 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tivers, M S; Moore, A Hotston

    2006-03-01

    To gather information to support the use of fluoroscopically guided removal of tracheal foreign bodies in cats. It was also the intent to produce a case series and look at the long-term outcome following tracheal foreign body removal. A retrospective study was performed. This looked at cases of tracheal foreign bodies in cats seen at the University of Bristol veterinary school at Langford over an eight-year period. Outcome was assessed via telephone conversations with the owners. Twelve cats were presented with tracheal foreign bodies during this time. Ten of these foreign bodies were successfully removed using fluoroscopy and two using bronchoscopy. All cats survived. Follow-up was available for nine cats and showed no long-term complications. Forceps removal under fluoroscopic guidance is a rapid, safe, and effective method for removal of tracheal foreign bodies in cats. It should be considered as an alternative to bronchoscopy for removal of tracheal foreign bodies in cats. Indeed, in cases where bronchoscopy has failed, it can be attempted to avoid thoracotomy. Successful removal of tracheal foreign bodies in cats is associated with a good long-term outcome.

  13. Awake tracheal intubation using Pentax airway scope in 30 patients: A Case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payal Kajekar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Pentax airway scope (AWS has been successfully used for managing difficult intubations. In this case series, we aimed to evaluate the success rate and time taken to complete intubation, when AWS was used for awake tracheal intubation. Methods: We prospectively evaluated the use of AWS for awake tracheal intubation in 30 patients. Indication for awake intubation, intubation time, total time to complete tracheal intubation, laryngoscopic view (Cormack and Lehane grade, total dose of local anaesthetic used, anaesthetists rating and patient′s tolerance of the procedure were recorded. Results: The procedure was successful in 25 out of the 30 patients (83%. The mean (standard deviation intubation time and total time to complete the tracheal intubation was 5.4 (2.4 and 13.9 (3.7 min, respectively in successful cases. The laryngeal view was grade 1 in 24 and grade 2 in one of 25 successful intubations. In three out of the five patients where the AWS failed, awake tracheal intubation was successfully completed with the assistance of flexible fibre optic scope (FOS. Conclusion: Awake tracheal intubation using AWS was successful in 83% of patients. Success rate can be further improved using a combination of AWS and FOS. Anaesthesiologists who do not routinely use FOS may find AWS easier to use for awake tracheal intubation using an oral route.

  14. Cell autonomy of HIF effects in Drosophila: tracheal cells sense hypoxia and induce terminal branch sprouting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centanin, Lázaro; Dekanty, Andrés; Romero, Nuria; Irisarri, Maximiliano; Gorr, Thomas A; Wappner, Pablo

    2008-04-01

    Drosophila tracheal terminal branches are plastic and have the capacity to sprout out projections toward oxygen-starved areas, in a process analogous to mammalian angiogenesis. This response involves the upregulation of FGF/Branchless in hypoxic tissues, which binds its receptor Breathless on tracheal cells. Here, we show that extra sprouting depends on the Hypoxia-Inducible Factor (HIF)-alpha homolog Sima and on the HIF-prolyl hydroxylase Fatiga that operates as an oxygen sensor. In mild hypoxia, Sima accumulates in tracheal cells, where it induces breathless, and this induction is sufficient to provoke tracheal extra sprouting. In nontracheal cells, Sima contributes to branchless induction, whereas overexpression of Sima fails to attract terminal branch outgrowth, suggesting that HIF-independent components are also required for full induction of the ligand. We propose that the autonomous response to hypoxia that occurs in tracheal cells enhances tracheal sensitivity to increasing Branchless levels, and that this mechanism is a cardinal step in hypoxia-dependent tracheal sprouting.

  15. Clinical application of self-expandable metallic stents in the treatment of malignant tracheal stenosis under general anesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Weitao; Shi Haibin; Yang Zhengqiang; Liu Sheng; Zhou Chungao; Zhao Linbo; Xia Jinguo; Li Linsun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of self-expandable metallic stent placement for the treatment of malignant tracheal stenosis under general anesthesia and fluoroscopic guidance. Methods: Under general anesthesia the placement of self-expandable metallic stent was performed in 10 patients with malignant tracheal stenosis, the procedure was completed under fluoroscopic guidance in all patients. Results: Successful tracheal stenting was achieved in all 10 patients. In one patient, a Y-shaped stent was used as the tracheal carina was involved in the airway stenosis. The symptoms of dyspnea and asthma were markedly improved immediately after the implantation of stent in all patients. Conclusion: Tracheal implantation of self-expandable metallic stent under general anesthesia and fluoroscopic guidance is a safe and effective treatment for malignant tracheal stenosis, it can promptly relieve various symptoms caused by malignant tracheal stenosis and obviously improve patient's living quality, therefore,t his technique is of great value in clinical practice. (authors)

  16. Use of the peritracheal fold in the dog tracheal transplantation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, P J; Costantino, P D; Lueg, E A; Chaplin, J M; Brandwein, M S; Passalaqua, P J; Fliegelman, L J; Laitman, J T; Marquez, S; Urken, M L

    1999-09-01

    To investigate the technical aspects of the canine model of human tracheal transplantation for potential application to reconstruction of extremely long tracheal defects (> 10 cm). In phase 1, long tracheal segments were skeletonized and pedicled with the thyroid glands, cranial thyroid arteries and veins, and internal jugular vein branches. The segments were elevated completely, attached to the vascular pedicle only, and replaced with primary tracheal anastomoses. In phase 2, long segments were elevated along with a diffuse soft tissue "blanket" that envelops the trachea and thyroid glands. Because this study was designed to primarily address, in situ, tracheal perfusion territories of a cranially located vascular pedicle, microvascular anastomoses were not conducted. Two small-bodied beagles (10-15 kg) and 5 large-bodied mixed-breed dogs (20-30 kg) were humanely killed 2 to 41 days after surgery, and anatomic and histological analyses were conducted. Unlike that of humans, the thyroid gland complex of dogs is not intimately associated with the trachea but is conjoined with a peritracheal soft tissue "fold." Within this fold, blood is transmitted to the trachea via a diffuse, segmental vascular plexus. In phase 1, pronounced tracheal necrosis occurred within 2 to 5 days. In phase 2, extremely long tracheal segments (10-12 cm), based only on a cranially located pedicle, were still viable at 2 to 6 weeks. Preservation of the "peritracheal fold" in the dog model of tracheal transplantation is critical to the onset and maintenance of vascular perfusion in a long tracheal segment. Furthermore, the use of large-bodied dogs is necessary to provide for a usable venous efflux component.

  17. Designing a tissue-engineered tracheal scaffold for preclinical evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Cameron A; Pepper, Victoria K; Ohst, Devan; Bodnyk, Kyle; Heuer, Eric; Onwuka, Ekene A; King, Nakesha; Strouse, Robert; Grischkan, Jonathan; Breuer, Christopher K; Johnson, Jed; Chiang, Tendy

    2018-01-01

    Recent efforts to tissue engineer long-segment tracheal grafts have been complicated by stenosis and malacia. It has been proposed that both the mechanical characteristics and cell seeding capacity of TETG scaffolds are integral to graft performance. Our aim was to design a tracheal construct that approximates the biomechanical properties of native sheep trachea and optimizes seeding with bone marrow derived mononuclear cells prior to preclinical evaluation in an ovine model. A solution of 8% polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and 3% polyurethane (PU) was prepared at a ratio of either 8:2 or 2:8 and electrospun onto a custom stainless steel mandrel designed to match the dimensional measurements of the juvenile sheep trachea. 3D-printed porous or solid polycarbonate C-shaped rings were embedded within the scaffolds during electrospinning. The scaffolds underwent compression testing in the anterior-posterior and lateral-medial axes and the biomechanical profiles compared to that of a juvenile ovine trachea. The most biomimetic constructs then underwent vacuum seeding with ovine bone marrow derived mononuclear cells. Fluorometric DNA assay was used to quantify scaffold seeding. Both porous and solid rings approximated the biomechanics of the native ovine trachea, but the porous rings were most biomimetic. The load-displacement curve of scaffolds fabricated from a ratio of 2:8 PET:PU most closely mimicked that of native trachea in the anterior-posterior and medial-lateral axes. Solid C-ringed scaffolds had a greater cell seeding efficiency when compared to porous ringed scaffolds (Solid: 19 × 10 4 vs. Porous: 9.6 × 10 4  cells/mm 3 , p = 0.0098). A long segment tracheal graft composed of 2:8 PET:PU with solid C-rings approximates the biomechanics of the native ovine trachea and demonstrates superior cell seeding capacity of the two prototypes tested. Further preclinical studies using this graft design in vivo would inform the rational design of an optimal TETG

  18. Critical period and risk factors for retear following arthroscopic repair of the rotator cuff

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barth, J.; Andrieu, K.; Fotiadis, E.; Hannink, G.J.; Barthelemy, R.; Saffarini, M.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: The incidence of retear following rotator cuff repair remains a major concern, and the cause and timing of retear remain unclear. The aim of this study was to prospectively investigate the timing of retears following rotator cuff repair at multiple time intervals. The hypothesis was that

  19. Characteristics and Clinical Outcomes in Overhead Sports Athletes after Rotator Cuff Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Muto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rotator cuff tears in young overhead sports athletes are rare. The pathomechanism causing rotator cuff tears in young overhead athletes is different from that in aged patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate rotator cuff tear characteristics in young overhead sports athletes to reveal the pathomechanism causing these injuries. This study included 25 overhead sports athletes less than 30 years old with atraumatic rotator cuff tears necessitating repair. Rotator cuff tear characteristics were evaluated intraoperatively, including rotator cuff tear shape and injured rotator cuff tendon. Clinical outcome measures were assessed before surgery and at the final follow-up. In this study, 22 patients reported minimal to no shoulder pain and returned to sports without significant complaints at last follow-up. The isolated infraspinatus tendon was most often injured; the incidence rate of the tear at this site was 32% (8 cases. In the deceleration phase of overhead motion, the eccentric contraction force of the ISP (infraspinatus tendon peaks and the increased load leads to injury at the ISP tendon. The pathomechanism of rotator cuff injuries in young overhead athletes might be not only internal or subacromial impingement, but also these mechanisms.

  20. Pain, Disability and Sleep Quality in Patients With Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy and Concurrent Myofascial Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Morteza Nakhaei Amroodi; Hadi Sedghi Asl; Mostafa Salariyeh; Mir Bahram Safari

    2016-01-01

    Background Rotator cuff tendinopathy and concurrent myofascial pain may result in sleep disturbances, poor quality of life, and social dysfunction along with chronic annoying pain and progressive physical disability. Objectives The present study aimed to assess severity of pain, physical disability, and sleep quality in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy and concurrent myofascial pain. Pat...

  1. Role of ultrasound in the evaluation of rotator cuff muscle quality: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The evaluation of the quality of rotator cuff muscles has become an important part of the preoperative ultrasound examination. ... A number of studies have been directed at the ultrasound assessment of muscle atrophy and fatty infiltration of the rotator cuff, however, no quantitative method or grading systems have been ...

  2. Reproducibility of the Dutch version of the Western Ontario rotator cuff Index

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiertsema, S.H.; Rietberg, M.B.; Hekman, K.M.; Schothorst, M.; Steultjens, M.P.; Dekker, J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Western Ontario Rotator Cuff Index (WORC) is a disease-specific shoulder questionnaire, originally developed at the University of Western Ontario, to measure quality of life in patients with rotator cuff disease (RCD). The aim of the present study was to cross-culturally adapt the

  3. Comparing surgical repair with conservative treatment for degenerative rotator cuff tears : a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambers Heerspink, Okke; van Raay, Jos J. A. M.; Koorevaar, Rinco C. T.; van Eerden, Pepijn J. M.; Westerbeek, Robin E.; van 't Riet, Esther; van den Akker-Scheek, Inge; Diercks, Ronald L.

    Background: Good clinical results have been reported for both surgical and conservative treatment of rotator cuff tears. The primary aim of this randomized controlled trial was to compare functional and radiologic improvement after surgical and conservative treatment of degenerative rotator cuff

  4. From the RSNA refresher courses - US of the rotator cuff : Pitfalls, limitations, and artifacts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, Matthieu J. C. M.; Jager, Gerrit J.; Blickman, Johan G.

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution ultrasonography (US) has gained increasing popularity as a diagnostic tool for assessment of the soft tissues in shoulder impingement syndrome. US is a powerful and accurate method for diagnosis of rotator cuff tears and other rotator cuff abnormalities, provided the examiner has a

  5. From the RSNA refresher courses: US of the rotator cuff: pitfalls, limitations, and artifacts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, M.J.C.M.; Jager, G.J.; Blickman, J.G.

    2006-01-01

    High-resolution ultrasonography (US) has gained increasing popularity as a diagnostic tool for assessment of the soft tissues in shoulder impingement syndrome. US is a powerful and accurate method for diagnosis of rotator cuff tears and other rotator cuff abnormalities, provided the examiner has a

  6. Pathological muscle activation patterns in patients with massive rotator cuff tears, with and without subacromial anaesthetics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbrink, F.; Groot, J.H.; Veeger, H.E.J.; Meskers, C.G.M.; van de Sande, M.A.; Rozing, P.M.

    2006-01-01

    A mechanical deficit due to a massive rotator cuff tear is generally concurrent to a pain-induced decrease of maximum arm elevation and peak elevation torque. The purpose of this study was to measure shoulder muscle coordination in patients with massive cuff tears, including the effect of

  7. Vicks VapoRub induces mucin secretion, decreases ciliary beat frequency, and increases tracheal mucus transport in the ferret trachea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abanses, Juan Carlos; Arima, Shinobu; Rubin, Bruce K

    2009-01-01

    Vicks VapoRub (VVR) [Proctor and Gamble; Cincinnati, OH] is often used to relieve symptoms of chest congestion. We cared for a toddler in whom severe respiratory distress developed after VVR was applied directly under her nose. We hypothesized that VVR induced inflammation and adversely affected mucociliary function, and tested this hypothesis in an animal model of airway inflammation. [1] Trachea specimens excised from 15 healthy ferrets were incubated in culture plates lined with 200 mg of VVR, and the mucin secretion was compared to those from controls without VVR. Tracheal mucociliary transport velocity (MCTV) was measured by timing the movement of 4 microL of mucus across the trachea. Ciliary beat frequency (CBF) was measured using video microscopy. [2] Anesthetized and intubated ferrets inhaled a placebo or VVR that was placed at the proximal end of the endotracheal tube. We evaluated both healthy ferrets and animals in which we first induced tracheal inflammation with bacterial endotoxin (a lipopolysaccharide [LPS]). Mucin secretion was measured using an enzyme-linked lectin assay, and lung water was measured by wet/dry weight ratios. [1] Mucin secretion was increased by 63% over the controls in the VVR in vitro group (p < 0.01). CBF was decreased by 35% (p < 0.05) in the VVR group. [2] Neither LPS nor VVR increased lung water, but LPS decreased MCTV in both normal airways (31%) and VVR-exposed airways (30%; p = 0.03), and VVR increased MCTV by 34% in LPS-inflamed airways (p = 0.002). VVR stimulates mucin secretion and MCTV in the LPS-inflamed ferret airway. This set of findings is similar to the acute inflammatory stimulation observed with exposure to irritants, and may lead to mucus obstruction of small airways and increased nasal resistance.

  8. Anesthetic management of a large mediastinal mass for tracheal stent placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Rajagopalan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The anesthetic management of patients with large mediastinal masses can be complicated due to the pressure effects of the mass on the airway or major vessels. We present the successful anesthetic management of a 64-year-old female with a large mediastinal mass that encroached on the great vessels and compressed the trachea. A tracheal stent was placed to relieve the tracheal compression under general anesthesia. Spontaneous ventilation was maintained during the perioperative period with the use of a classic laryngeal mask airway. We discuss the utility of laryngeal mask airway for anesthetic management of tracheal stenting in patients with mediastinal masses.

  9. Intraoperative Extracorporeal Carbon Dioxide Removal During Apneic Oxygenation with an EZ-Blocker in Tracheal Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rispoli, Marco; Nespoli, Moana Rossella; Mattiacci, Dario Maria; Esposito, Marianna; Corcione, Antonio; Buono, Salvatore

    2016-06-01

    Tracheal surgery requires continued innovation to manage the anesthetic during an open airway phase. A common approach is apneic oxygenation with continuous oxygen flow, but the lack of effective ventilation causes hypercapnia, with respiratory acidosis. We used extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal for intraoperative decapneization during apneic oxygenation in a 64-year-old woman who was scheduled for tracheal surgery because of tracheal stenosis caused by long-term intubation. Our findings demonstrate that even after 40 minutes of total apnea, using an EZ-blocker for oxygenation and external decapneization, hemodynamic and gas exchange variables never demonstrated any dangerous alterations.

  10. Speed of recovery after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurowicki, Jennifer; Berglund, Derek D; Momoh, Enesi; Disla, Shanell; Horn, Brandon; Giveans, M Russell; Levy, Jonathan C

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to delineate the time taken to achieve maximum improvement (plateau of recovery) and the degree of recovery observed at various time points (speed of recovery) for pain and function after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. An institutional shoulder surgery registry query identified 627 patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair between 2006 and 2015. Measured range of motion, patient satisfaction, and patient-reported outcome measures were analyzed for preoperative, 3-month, 6-month, 1-year, and 2-year intervals. Subgroup analysis was performed on the basis of tear size by retraction grade and number of anchors used. As an entire group, the plateau of maximum recovery for pain, function, and motion occurred at 1 year. Satisfaction with surgery was >96% at all time points. At 3 months, 74% of improvement in pain and 45% to 58% of functional improvement were realized. However, only 22% of elevation improvement was achieved (P < .001). At 6 months, 89% of improvement in pain, 81% to 88% of functional improvement, and 78% of elevation improvement were achieved (P < .001). Larger tears had a slower speed of recovery for Single Assessment Numeric Evaluation scores, forward elevation, and external rotation. Smaller tears had higher motion and functional scores across all time points. Tear size did not influence pain levels. The plateau of maximum recovery after rotator cuff repair occurred at 1 year with high satisfaction rates at all time points. At 3 months, approximately 75% of pain relief and 50% of functional recovery can be expected. Larger tears have a slower speed of recovery. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Reversed total shoulder arthroplasty in rotator cuff defect arthropathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzer, T

    2018-03-07

    In a progredient rotator cuff tear with tendon retraction, fatty infiltration and atrophy of rotator cuff muscles the humerus cannot be centered and stabilized sufficiently in the glenohumeral joint. This leads to rotator cuff defect arthropathy as an eccentric osteoarthritis with acetabularization and wear of the acromion, as well as of the glenoid. A painful pseudoparalysis of the shoulder indicates the implantation of a reversed total shoulder arthroplasty (rTSA) to reduce pain and restore active motion. The rTSA improves the motoric function of the deltoid muscle by medialization and caudalization of the center of rotation via an optimized lever arm and is also indicated in cranio-caudally centered osteoarthritis with static posterior humeral decentration due to a bi-concavely eroded glenoid. Currently, humeral anatomical resection with an inclination of 135° and a humeral retrotorsion of 20-40°, in rTSA in contrast to 155° inclination, has been shown to lead to better glenohumeral motion without loss of stability. Additionally, a reduced glenohumeral offset should be restored by especially bony lateral augmentation of the glenoid. In a pre-operatively positive lag sign for external rotation caused by a rupture of the infraspinatus/teres minor tendon, a lateral latissimus/teres major muscle tendon transfer in rTSA can optimize active external rotation. The tendon of the subscapularis muscle should be re-fixated in the deltopectoral approach for rTSA whenever possible for better anterior stability of the glenohumeral joint. Larger diameters of the glenospheres have been shown to have more stability and better motion. Humeral metaphyseal metal liners with corresponding polyethylene glenospheres can avoid osteolysis of the inferior scapular neck caused by polyethylene debris due to impingement of the humeral liner at the scapular neck.

  12. NMR of the rotator cuff. An update; MRT der Rotatorenmanschette. Ein Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Maehringer-Kunz, Aline [Universitaetsmedizin Mainz (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2016-03-15

    The rotator cuff consists of the tendons of the supscapularis, supraspinatus, infraspinatus and teres minor muscles. This group of muscles performs multiple functions and is often stressed during various activities. This explains, why rotator cuff disease is common and the most often cause of shoulder pain and dysfunction in adults. MR imaging still is the most important imaging modality in assessment of rotator cuff disease. It enables the radiologist to make an accurate diagnosis, the basis for an appropriate management. In this article, current concepts with regard to anatomy and imaging diagnosis will be reviewed. The discussion of the complex anatomy is followed by normal and pathologic MR imaging appearances of the rotator cuff including tendinopathy and tearing, and concluding with a review of the postoperative cuff.

  13. [MRI in the pre-operative evaluation of lesions of the rotator cuff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagey, N; Desmoineaux, P; Gagey, O; Idy-Peretti, I; Mazas, F

    1993-01-01

    The authors report a series of 38 patients who had been examined by MRI and then operated for a rotator cuff syndrome. The correlation between the description of the cuff lesions after MRI and the surgical observations were excellent for 37 patients. In one case MRI showed a false image of tear of the supra spinatus m. on its anterior edge. This was due to a bad knowledge of the anatomy of the muscle and tendon and to a poor orientation of the frontal cut plane. This study was complete with MRI and anatomic study of 12 non embalmed cadaveric shoulders. The results showed that MRI was very sensitive (0.93) and specific (0.94) for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears. MRI allowed also to show partial tears of the tendons of the rotator cuff. The authors propose a MRI classification of cuff lesions which permits to establish a good surgical planning.

  14. [Contribution of MRI to the preoperative evaluation of rotator cuff tears].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagey, N; Desmoineaux, P; Gagey, O; Idy-Peretti, I; Mazas, F

    1991-01-01

    The authors report a series of 38 patients who had been examined by MRI and then operated for a rotator cuff syndrome. The correlation between the description of the cuff lesions after MRI and the surgical observations were excellent for 37 patients. In one case MRI showed a false image of tear of the supra spinatus m. on its anterior edge. This was due to a bad knowledge of the anatomy of the muscle and tendon and to a poor orientation of the frontal cut plane. This study was completed with MRI and anatomic study of 12 non embalmed cadaveric shoulders. The results showed that MRI was very sensitive (0.93) and specific (0.94) for the diagnosis of rotator cuff tears. MRI allowed also to show partial tears of the tendons of the rotator cuff. The authors propose a MRI classification of cuff lesions which permits to establish a good surgical planning.

  15. Dextrose Prolotherapy Versus Control Injections in Painful Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, Helene; Reeves, Kenneth Dean; Bennett, Cameron J; Bicknell, Simon; Cheng, An-Lin

    2016-01-01

    To compare the effect of dextrose prolotherapy on pain levels and degenerative changes in painful rotator cuff tendinopathy against 2 potentially active control injection procedures. Randomized controlled trial, blinded to participants and evaluators. Outpatient pain medicine practice. Persons (N=73) with chronic shoulder pain, examination findings of rotator cuff tendinopathy, and ultrasound-confirmed supraspinatus tendinosis/tear. Three monthly injections either (1) onto painful entheses with dextrose (Enthesis-Dextrose), (2) onto entheses with saline (Enthesis-Saline), or (3) above entheses with saline (Superficial-Saline). All solutions included 0.1% lidocaine. All participants received concurrent programmed physical therapy. Primary: participants achieving an improvement in maximal current shoulder pain ≥2.8 (twice the minimal clinically important difference for visual analog scale pain) or not. Secondary: improvement in the Ultrasound Shoulder Pathology Rating Scale (USPRS) and a 0-to-10 satisfaction score (10, completely satisfied). The 73 participants had moderate to severe shoulder pain (7.0±2.0) for 7.6±9.6 years. There were no baseline differences between groups. Blinding was effective. At 9-month follow-up, 59% of Enthesis-Dextrose participants maintained ≥2.8 improvement in pain compared with Enthesis-Saline (37%; P=.088) and Superficial-Saline (27%; P=.017). Enthesis-Dextrose participants' satisfaction was 6.7±3.2 compared with Enthesis-Saline (4.7±4.1; P=.079) and Superficial-Saline (3.9±3.1; P=.003). USPRS findings were not different between groups (P=.734). In participants with painful rotator cuff tendinopathy who receive physical therapy, injection of hypertonic dextrose on painful entheses resulted in superior long-term pain improvement and patient satisfaction compared with blinded saline injection over painful entheses, with intermediate results for entheses injection with saline. These differences could not be attributed to a

  16. Preliminary Results of a Consecutive Series of Large & Massive Rotator Cuff Tears Treated with Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repairs Augmented with Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Consigliere

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recurrence rate of rotator cuff tears is still high despite the improvements of surgical techniques, materials used and a better knowledge of the healing process of the rotator cuff tendons. Large to massive rotator cuff tears are particularly associated with a high failure rate, especially in elderly. Augmentation of rotator cuff repairs with extracellular matrix or synthetic patches has gained popularity in recent years with the aim of reducing failure.The aim of this study was to investigate the outcome of rotator cuff repairs augmented with denatured extracellular matrix in a series of patients who underwent arthroscopic rotator cuff repair for large to massive tears.Methods: Ten consecutive patients, undergoing arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with extracellular matrix augment for large and massive tears, were prospectively enrolled into this single surgeon study. All repairs were performed arthroscopically with a double row technique augmented with extracellular matrix. Oxford Shoulder Score, Constant Score and pain visual analogue scale (VAS were used to monitor the shoulder function and outcome pre-operatively and at three, six and 12-month follow-up. Minimum follow up was tree months. Mean follow up was 7 months.Results: Mean Constant score improved from 53 (SD=4 pre-operatively to 75 (SD=11 at final follow up. Mean Oxford score also increased from 30 (SD=8 pre-operatively to 47 (SD=10 at the final follow up. The visual analogue scale (VAS improved from seven out of 10 (SD=2 preoperatively to 0.6 (SD=0.8 at final follow up. Additionally, there was significant improvement at three months mark in Constant score. Conclusion: Arthroscopic repair and augmentation of large and massive rotator cuff tears with extracellular matrix patch has good early outcome.

  17. Effects of preoperative irradiation on primary tracheal anastomosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsubota, N.; Simpson, W.J.; Van Nostrand, A.W.P.; Pearson, F.G.

    1975-01-01

    Preoperative radiotherapy was used in the management of selected patients with cancer of the lung or trachea who might subsequently require segmental resection of bronchus or trachea and reconstruction by primary anastomosis. This study was designed to determine the effects of varying dosages of preoperative irradiation on anastomotic healing. Two rings were resected from the cervical trachea of 20 dogs following irradiation with varying doses of cesium. There were no important adverse effects on healing of the trachea or adjacent organs in dogs receiving up to 3,500 rads. All dogs receiving a higher dose than this developed some anastomotic stenosis, which was severe in 6 of 8 animals. Similar adverse effects were observed in 2 patients managed by preoperative radiotherapy (4,000 rads in three weeks) and tracheal resection with primary anastomosis

  18. Effects of preoperative irradiation on primary tracheal anastomosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsubota, N.; Simpson, W.J.; Van Nostrand, A.W.P.; Pearson, F.G.

    1975-08-01

    Preoperative radiotherapy was used in the management of selected patients with cancer of the lung or trachea who might subsequently require segmental resection of bronchus or trachea and reconstruction by primary anastomosis. This study was designed to determine the effects of varying dosages of preoperative irradiation on anastomotic healing. Two rings were resected from the cervical trachea of 20 dogs following irradiation with varying doses of cesium. There were no important adverse effects on healing of the trachea or adjacent organs in dogs receiving up to 3,500 rads. All dogs receiving a higher dose than this developed some anastomotic stenosis, which was severe in 6 of 8 animals. Similar adverse effects were observed in 2 patients managed by preoperative radiotherapy (4,000 rads in three weeks) and tracheal resection with primary anastomosis.

  19. Diagnosis of tracheomalacia using tracheal dynamic respiratory-scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Teruo; Watabe, Hideki; Ikeda, Sadao

    1995-01-01

    We performed tracheal-dynamic respiratory scan (T-DRS) in 54 cases which were thought to be tracheomalacia clinically. T-DRS was performed by TOSHIBA TCT-900S at the level of the aortic arch under the condition of 120 kV (140 kV), 100 mA, 5 mm of slice width for 20 seconds when the patient was directed to breath rapidly or slowly. In 19 cases, which underwent both T-DRS and bronchoscopy, could evaluate the results. Only one case was overestimated by T-DRS than bronchoscopic findings, while 9 cases were underestimated and 9 cases were equal. Though T-DRS tended to underestimate the degree of the stenosis of tracheomalacia than bronchoscopic finding. T-DRS can do more objective evaluation than bronchoscopy non-invasively and thought to be useful for the evaluation of tracheomalalcia. (author)

  20. Difficult Tracheal Intubation in Obese Gastric Bypass patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dohrn, Niclas; Sommer, Thorbjørn; Bisgaard, J.

    2016-01-01

    index (BMI) 2, ASA scores > 2, and male gender were risk factors of DTI. Males generally had higher CLC, MLP, and ASA scores compared to females, but no difference in BMI. There was no difference in quantities of anesthetics used between the two groups with or without DTI. Intra......Endotracheal intubation is commonly perceived to be more difficult in obese patients than in lean patients. Primarily, we investigated the association between difficult tracheal intubation (DTI) and obesity, and secondarily, the association between DTI and validated scoring systems used to assess...... the airways, the association between DTI and quantities of anesthetics used to induce general anesthesia, and the association between DTI and difficulties with venous and arterial cannulation. This is a monocentric prospective observational clinical study of a consecutive series of 539 obese patients...

  1. Controlled release of carcinogens in heterotopic tracheal grafts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pal, B.C.; Klein-Szanto, A.J.P.

    1981-01-01

    A major drawback of the conventional approaches to the study of the respiratory tract carcinogenesis by intratracheal injection or instillation is that neither the dose nor the target site can be accurately defined. The tracheal transplant model has been developed in our group to provide a solution to this problem. In this model, rodent tracheas are transplanted under the skin in the scapular region of the isogenic host. The transplants re-establish themselves in the host in 3 to 4 weeks and survive indefinitely. These tracheas can then be exposed to carcinogens in a controlled and quantitative fashion by using monolithic cylindrical pellets. The model has a good potential for establishing a more realistic dose-response relationship in respiratory tract carcinogenesis. However, the success of the model depends on the development of devices for release of carcinogens at a reproducible and predictable rate. This paper describes the various approaches to the solution of this problem.

  2. Failure to predict difficult tracheal intubation for emergency caesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basaranoglu, Gokcen; Columb, Malachy; Lyons, Gordon

    2010-11-01

    Difficult tracheal intubation following induction of general anaesthesia for caesarean section is a cause of morbidity and mortality. Our aim was to evaluate five bedside predictors that might identify women with potential intubation difficulty immediately prior to emergency caesarean section. Women requiring emergency caesarean section with general anaesthesia and tracheal intubation who had been assessed by the same experienced anaesthesiologist preoperatively were included in this study. Mallampati score, sternomental distance, thyromental distance, interincisor gap and atlantooccipital extension were all measured. The same anaesthesiologist performed laryngoscopy and graded the laryngeal view according to Cormack and Lehane. Exact logistic regression was used to identify significant independent predictors for difficult intubation (Cormack and Lehane grades ≥ 3) with two-sided P value less than 0.05 considered as significant. In 3 years, 239 women were recruited. Cormack and Lehane grades of 2 or less (easy) were found in 225 and grade of at least 3 (difficult) in 14 women. Patients' characteristics (age, height, weight, BMI or weight gain) were not significantly associated with difficulty of intubation. The incidence of difficult intubation was 1/17 women [95% confidence interval (CI) from 1/31 to 1/10]. A positive result from any of the five predictors combined had a sensitivity of 0.21 (95%CI 0.05-0.51), a specificity of 0.92 (95%CI 0.88-0.96), a positive predictive value of 0.15 (95%CI 0.032-0.38) and a negative predictive value of 0.95 (95%CI 0.91-0.97) for a Cormack and Lehane grade of at least 3 at laryngoscopy. Airway assessment using these tests cannot be relied upon to predict a difficult intubation at emergency caesarean section as the low sensitivity means that 79% (95%CI 49-95) of difficult intubations will be missed.

  3. Neovascularization prevalence in the supraspinatus of patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardouni, Joseph R; Seitz, Amee L; Walsworth, Matthew K; Michener, Lori A

    2013-11-01

    A high prevalence of neovascularity in lower extremity tendinopathies has been reported. Neovascularity in those with rotator cuff tendinopathy exclusively has not been examined. The objective was to determine the prevalence of neovascularization in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy compared with asymptomatic controls. Single-blind cross-sectional study. Research laboratory. Participants (n = 40; age = 44.9 years, 23-62 years; 20 females) with rotator cuff tendinopathy (n = 20) but without full-thickness rotator cuff tears, and asymptomatic controls that were age, gender, and hand dominance matched (n = 20) to the patients. The participants laying in supine had their shoulder positioned in internal rotation and extension. Ultrasound images were collected of the supraspinatus tendon and subacromial bursae in the transverse and longitudinal planes using a linear transducer in color Doppler mode. Images were assessed for neovascularization by 2 trained raters who were blinded to group (rotator cuff tendinopathy or asymptomatic group). No statistically significant difference in neovascularization was identified between participants with and without rotator cuff tendinopathy (χ = 0.13, df = 1, P = 0.72). Neovascularization was identified in 6 of 20 patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy (30%) and 5 of 20 asymptomatic control participants (25%). The authors found no differences in neovascularization rate in patients with rotator cuff tendinopathy (30%) and asymptomatic controls (25%). The study indicates that neovascularization is not related to presence of symptomatic tendinopathy in those with rotator cuff tendinopathy. Neovascularization may not be a relevant sonographic finding to aid the clinical assessment of those with rotator cuff tendinopathy.

  4. What do standard radiography and clinical examination tell about the shoulder with cuff tear arthropathy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Favard Luc

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study evaluates the preoperative conventional anteroposterior radiography and clinical testing in non-operated patients with cuff tear arthropathy. It analyses the radiological findings in relation to the status of the rotator cuff and clinical status as also the clinical testing in relation to the rotator cuff quality. The aim of the study is to define the usefulness of radiography and clinical examination in cuff tear arthropathy. Methods This study analyses the preoperative radiological (AP-view, (Artro-CT-scan or MRI-scan and clinical characteristics (Constant-Murley-score plus active and passive mobility testing and the peroperative findings in a cohort of 307 patients. These patients were part of a multicenter, retrospective, consecutive study of the French Orthopaedic Society (SOFCOT-2006. All patients had no surgical antecedents and were all treated with prosthetic shoulder surgery for a painful irreparable cuff tear arthropathy (reverse-(84% or hemi-(8% or double cup-bipolar prosthesis (8%. Results A positive significancy could be found for the relationship between clinical testing and the rotator cuff quality; between acromiohumeral distance and posterior rotator cuff quality; between femoralization and posterior rotator cuff quality. Conclusion A conventional antero-posterior radiograph can not provide any predictive information on the clinical status of the patient. The subscapular muscle can be well tested by the press belly test and the teres minor muscle can be well tested by the hornblower' sign and by the exorotation lag signs. The upward migration index and the presence of femoralization are good indicators for the evaluation of the posterior rotator cuff. An inferior coracoid tip positioning suggests rotator cuff disease.

  5. A comparison of simple continuous versus simple interrupted suture patterns for tracheal anastomosis after large-segment tracheal resection in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fingland, R B; Layton, C I; Kennedy, G A; Galland, J C

    1995-01-01

    Two suture techniques for tracheal anastomosis after large-segment tracheal resection were compared. Eight cartilages were resected from the trachea of each of 12 dogs; anastomoses with 4-0 polydioxanone suture were created using a simple continuous suture technique in six dogs and a simple interrupted suture technique in six dogs. Surgical time was shorter but apposition of tracheal segments at the time of surgery was less precise with the simple continuous suture technique. The dogs were evaluated for 150 days after surgery. Clinical abnormalities after tracheal resection and anastomosis were not observed. Percent dorsoventral luminal stenosis was calculated by measuring the tracheal lumen diameter on lateral cervical radiographs. Percent luminal stenosis was calculated planimetrically using a computerized digitizing tablet. Anastomotic stenosis was mild in all dogs; however, the mean percent.luminal stenosis determined planimetrically was significantly greater for dogs that had the simple continuous suture technique. Planimetric measurements of cross-sectional area made before and after formalin fixation were not significantly different. Radiographic determination of percent dorsoventral luminal stenosis was a poor predictor of diminution of cross-sectional area determined planimetrically.

  6. Can Submandibular Tracheal Intubation Be an Alternative to Tracheotomy During Surgery for Major Maxillofacial Fractures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanein, Ahmed Gaber; Abdel Mabood, Ahmed M A

    2017-03-01

    During surgery for major maxillofacial fractures, orotracheal intubation can interfere with some surgical procedures and nasal intubation can be contraindicated or impossible. That is why tracheotomy is presented as a solution, although it carries a relatively high incidence of complications. In this study, the use of submandibular tracheal intubation is basically evaluated as an alternative to tracheotomy in such circumstances. This prospective study was performed in patients undergoing surgery for major maxillofacial fractures in which oral intubation and/or nasal intubation have been unsuitable, impossible, or contraindicated. The technique of submandibular intubation was assessed intraoperatively and in the postoperative period. The outcomes and complications are presented. The study included 26 patients aged between 14 and 57 years. All patients had mandibular fractures, with 19 midface fractures (73.1%), 11 nasal bone fractures (42.3%), 10 zygomatic bone fractures (38.5%), 9 naso-orbito-ethmoidal fractures (34.6%), and 9 frontobasilar fractures (34.6%). The procedure time ranged from 5 to 12 minutes (mean, 7 minutes 4.6 seconds). Delayed extubation was performed in 15 cases (57.7%) in which the tube was left in place for a period ranging from 8 to 50 hours (mean, 30 hours 24 minutes). The technique has proved to be straightforward and satisfactory. A postoperative superficial infection occurred in 2 patients, whereas hypertrophic scars occurred in another 2 patients. Submandibular endotracheal intubation is straightforward, safe, and quick to carry out. It can be an alternative to tracheotomy as it allows operative techniques and postoperative airway protection without the risks and side effects of tracheotomy. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Double-lumen endotracheal tube positioning: Bag compliance Vs. fiberoptic bronchoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noyan Ashraf MA

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lung separation is the basis of thoracic anesthesia, which is performed by different instruments. Checking probable malpositioning of tracheal tube needs fiberoptic bronchoscopy. The aim of this study was to compare respirator suggested compliance with fiberoptic findings in detecting major tracheal tube malpositioning.Methods: A total of 256 patients undergoing thoracic surgery with double-lumen tracheal tube insertion in Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran, Iran, during 2010-11 were divided into three groups (n=86. We used left-sided double-lumen tube (DLT for left or right-sided surgeries (groups 1 and 2, and right-sided DLT for left-sided surgeries (group 3. The position of the tubes was evaluated and compared using bag compliance versus fiberoptic bronchoscopy.Results: The mean age of the study population was 44.7±13.4 (16-73 years, while 155 (59.9% were male. The sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and the accuracy of bag compliance test for left-sided DLT in supine position were 40% (95% CI: 20-60%, 99% (95% CI: 96-99%, 84% (95% CI: 54-94% 92% (95% CI: 88-95% and 92% (95% CI: 87-95%, respectively. The above-mentioned variables for lateral decubitus position respectively were 27%, 98%, 76%, 89%, and 88%. Malpositioning was more prevalent in right-sided DLTs (P=0.02.Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, and the high specificity, positive predictive value, and accuracy of bag compliance test, its use is encouraged as an alternative to fiberoptic bronchoscopy for checking DLT position, specially, in emergent surgeries or when fiberoptic bronchoscopy is unreachable due to lack of expertise or personnel.

  8. Transtendon rotator-cuff repair of partial-thickness articular surface tears can lead to medial rotator-cuff failure

    OpenAIRE

    Woods TC; Carroll MJ; Nelson AA; More KD; Berdusco R; Sohmer S; Boorman RS; Lo IKY

    2014-01-01

    Tom C Woods,4 Michael J Carroll,1 Atiba A Nelson,2 Kristie D More,2 Randa Berdusco,1 Stephen Sohmer,3 Richard S Boorman,1,2 Ian KY Lo1,21Department of Surgery, 2Sport Medicine Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 3Department of Orthopaedics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, 4St Joseph's Hospital, Comox, BC, CanadaPurpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical and anatomic outcomes of patients following transtendon rotator-cuff repair of partial ar...

  9. Tracheal left mainstem bronchus and obstructive gastric mucosal intussusception associated with esophageal atresia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, C. J.; Aronson, D. C.; Ekkelkamp, S.; van de Heide-Jalving, M.; Vos, A.

    1995-01-01

    A tracheal left mainstem bronchus and gastric outlet obstruction owing to gastric mucosal intussusception occurred in a child who had esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula. Bronchography and bronchoscopy, indicated because of persisting atelectasis and ventilation dependency, showed a

  10. A grossly abnormal trachea- severe tracheal diverticulosis and Mounier-Kuhn syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, O D; Gilmartin, J J

    2014-03-01

    A 53-year-old smoker presented with a history of recurrent lower respiratory tract infections. A diagnosis of Tracheal Diverticulosis due to Tracheobronchomegaly (Mounier-Kuhn Syndrome) was made. The clinical history, diagnosis and treatment options are discussed.

  11. Computed tomographic findings in a Bluetick Coonhound with a longitudinal thoracic tracheal tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dancer, Sumari C; Van Der Zee, Johannes; Kirberger, Robert M

    2018-02-11

    A 9-year-old intact male Bluetick Coonhound presented for progressive subcutaneous emphysema of 5 days' duration due to a suspected tracheal tear. Cervical computed tomography (CT) and thoracic CT were performed after failure to identify the tracheal tear with tracheoscopy. A longitudinal tracheal tear was identified starting 4.3 cm cranial to the tracheal bifurcation and extending caudally over a distance of 3.6 cm. Severe pneumomediastinum, subcutaneous emphysema, and retroperitoneal gas were also present. A follow-up CT 7 days postoperatively confirmed the successful repair of the tear with partial resolution of the presurgical secondary pathology and the patient recovered uneventfully. © 2018 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  12. Association of two respiratory congenital anomalies: tracheal diverticulum and cystic adenomatoid malformation of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo, S.; Villamil, M.A.; Rojas, I.C.; Lemos, D.F.; Echeverri, S.; Angarita, M.; Triana, G.

    2004-01-01

    Many associations of congenital anomalies of the respiratory system have been reported, but the combination of tracheal diverticulum and cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) is unique. We present a patient with these two anomalies and analyze their embryological correlation. (orig.)

  13. Diagnosis of tracheal instability: inspiratory and expiratory spiral CT and cine CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heussel, C.P.; Thelen, M.; Kauczor, H.U.; Hafner, B.; Lill, J.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: In tracheo- and bronchomalacia, localization and determination of collapse is necessary for planning a surgical procedure. We compared inspiratory and spiral CT, cine CT, and bronchoscopy and evaluated the relevance of each method. Methods: Seventeen patients with suspected or verified tracheal stonosis or collapse underwent paired inspiratory and exspiratory spiral CT and cine CT during continuous respiration (temporal increment 100 ms). The tracheal cross-sectional area was calculated and compared. Results: In addition to bronchoscopy, further information concerning localization, extent, collapse, stability of the tracheal wall, distal portions of the stenosis, and extraluminal compressions was obtained. A significantly higher degree of tracheal collapse was seen using cine CT compared to paired spiral CT (p [de

  14. Nebulized Lidocaine to Attenuate the Cardiovascular Response to Direct Laryngoscopy and Tracheal Intubation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bock, Judith

    1996-01-01

    This study described the use of 120 mg nebulized lidocaine to attenuate the cardiovascular response to direct laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation in ASA I and ASA II patients undergoing various surgical procedures...

  15. Incidence of familial tendon dysfunction in patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tashjian RZ

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Robert Z Tashjian, Erik G Saltzman, Erin K Granger, Man Hung Department of Orthopedics, University of Utah Orthopaedic Center, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, UT, USA Background: A familial predisposition to the development of rotator cuff tearing has been previously reported. Very little information exists on the development of global tendon dysfunction in patients with rotator cuff tears. The purpose of the current study was to determine the incidence of global tendon dysfunction as well as the need for surgery for tendon dysfunction in patients with rotator cuff tears and their family members and compare them to age-matched controls. Methods: Ninety two patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears and 92 age-matched controls with no history of shoulder dysfunction or surgery responded to several questions regarding tendon diseases in themselves as well as their family members. Individuals were queried regarding the presence of tendon diseases other than the rotator cuff, the need for surgery on these other tendinopathies, the presence of family members having tendinopathies including rotator cuff disease, and the need for family members to have surgery for these problems. Chi-square analysis was performed to compare the incidences between cases and controls (P<0.05 was considered significant. Results: The average age of patients in the rotator cuff tear group and control groups were 58.24±7.4 and 58.42±8.5 years, respectively (P=0.876. Results showed 32.3% of patients in the rotator cuff tear group reported that family members had a history of rotator cuff problems or surgery compared to only 18.3% of the controls (P=0.035, and 38.7% of patients in the rotator cuff tear group reported they had a history of other tendon problems compared to only 19.3% of individuals in the control group (P=0.005. Conclusion: Individuals with rotator cuff tears report a higher incidence of family members having rotator cuff problems

  16. Calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachewar, Sushil G; Kulkarni, Devidas S

    2013-07-01

    Calcifying tendinitis of the rotator cuff is a common disorder; its underlying mechanism still remains unknown. Although details of the clinical presentation(s) and pathological changes which are associated with calcific tendinitis are available, conservative management of this condition remains a topic of debate. About 90% of the patients can be treated non - operatively, but as some are resistant to conservative treatment; newer techniques or surgery should be indicated. Rheumatologists and radiologists have often described this shoulder abnormality, leading to its progressive differentiation from other painful shoulder syndromes. The conservative treatment includes the use of non - steroidal anti - inflammatory agents, roentegen therapy, physical modalities for controlling the pain and for preventing loss of joint mobility, local steroid injections, and open or arthroscopic surgeries. Results of non - operative treatments have also been satisfactory. These include heat, cold, range of motion and pendulum exercises, diathermy, short - wave, and radiation therapy. Rest, immobilization with a sling, and oral non - steroidal and steroid anti - inflammatory medications have also been mentioned. This review aimed at looking at calcific tendinitis of the rotator cuff with a wide vision in the light of modern advances; while at the same time, not disregarding the past experiences.

  17. Gene expression analysis in calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Oliva

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the expression of several genes involved in tissue remodelling and bone development in patients with calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff. Biopsies from calcified and non-calcified areas were obtained from 10 patients (8 women and 2 men; average age: 55 years; range: 40-68 with calcific tendinopathy of the rotator cuff. To evaluate the expression of selected genes, RNA extraction, cDNA synthesis and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR were performed. A significantly increased expression of tissue transglutaminase (tTG2 and its substrate, osteopontin, was detected in the calcific areas compared to the levels observed in the normal tissue from the same subject with calcific tendinopathy, whereas a modest increase was observed for catepsin K. There was also a significant decrease in mRNA expression of Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP4 and BMP6 in the calcific area. BMP-2, collagen V and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF did not show significant differences. Collagen X and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9 were not detectable. A variation in expression of these genes could be characteristic of this form tendinopathy, since an increased level of these genes has not been detected in other forms of tendon lesions.

  18. Evaluation of post-exercise magnetic resonance images of the rotator cuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahoy, P.M.; Orwin, J.F.; Tuite, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Objective. To examine the effect of strenuous exercise on the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics of the rotator cuff tendon. A second objective was to define an optimal time to image the rotator cuff and possibly eliminate exercise-induced false positives. Design and patients. Five male subjects from 24 to 38 years old with normal rotator cuffs by history, physical examination, and screening MRI underwent a rotator cuff exercise session on the Biodex System 2 (Biodex, Shirley, New York). The exercise sessions were followed by sequential MRI scans of the exercised shoulder. These were performed immediately and at 8 h and 24 h after exercise. Results and conclusions. The rotator cuff tendon and subacromial-subdeltoid bursal signal remained unchanged from the pre-exercise through the 24-h post-exercise scans. The rotator cuff muscle signal was increased in five of five subjects on the immediate post-exercise fat-suppressed T2-weighted images. This signal returned to baseline by the 8-h scan. Positive findings of rotator cuff pathology on MRI after strenuous athletic activity should not be discounted as normal exercise-induced changes. Also, diagnostic MRI scanning may take place after a practice session without an increased risk of false positives. (orig.). With 1 fig

  19. Comparison of nonabsorbable polymer ligating and standard titanium clips with and without a vascular cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellison, Forrest C; Baldwin, D Duane; Berger, Kenneth A; Maynes, Lincoln J; Desai, Premal J

    2005-09-01

    To compare the efficacy of nonabsorbable polymer ligating (NPL) and titanium clips applied with and without a 1-mm vascular cuff at physiologic and supraphysiologic pressures. An in vitro equine-vessel model was created to test clip occlusion strength. Ten-millimeter NPL and standard Ti clips were applied to veins (10 mm) and arteries (10, 6, and 5 mm) with and without a 1-mm cuff and tested until they held a pressure of 300 mm Hg (veins) or 760 mm Hg (arteries) for 2 minutes or leaked. The NPL clip was statistically more secure on 10-mm veins with and without a cuff, 10-mm arteries with and without a cuff, and 6-mm arteries with a cuff than was the Ti clip. Leaving a 1-mm cuff resulted in a statistically higher leak point in all vessels tested except the 6-mm arteries secured with the Ti clip. The NPL clip was more secure than the Ti clip on larger arteries and veins. A 1-mm vascular cuff enhances the security of both NPL and Ti clips in vessels of all sizes. The NPL clip is secure and reliable in securing both arteries and veins.

  20. The global percutaneous shuttling technique tip for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan G. Vopat

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Most arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs utilize suture passing devices placed through arthro- scopic cannulas. These devices are limited by the size of the passing device where the suture is passed through the tendon. An alternative technique has been used in the senior author’s practice for the past ten years, where sutures are placed through the rotator cuff tendon using percutaneous passing devices. This technique, dubbed the global percutaneous shuttling technique of rotator cuff repair, affords the placement of sutures from nearly any angle and location in the shoulder, and has the potential advantage of larger suture bites through the tendon edge. These advantages may increase the area of tendon available to compress to the rotator cuff footprint and improve tendon healing and outcomes. The aim of this study is to describe the global percutaneous shuttling (GPS technique and report our results using this method. The GPS technique can be used for any full thickness rotator cuff tear and is particularly useful for massive cuff tears with poor tissue quality. We recently followed up 22 patients with an average follow up of 32 months to validate its usefulness. American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons scores improved significantly from 37 preoperatively to 90 postoperatively (P<0.0001. This data supports the use of the GPS technique for arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Further biomechanical studies are currently being performed to assess the improvements in tendon footprint area with this technique.

  1. The relevance of long head biceps degeneration in the presence of rotator cuff tears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakemeier Stefan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long head biceps (LHB degeneration in combination with rotator cuff tears can be a source of chronic shoulder pain. LHB tenotomy is an approved surgical procedure for pain reduction and improvement of joint function, however, the pathophysiology of LHB degeneration is not fully understood. In the literature, neoangiogenesis in tendon tissue has previously been shown to be associated with tendon degeneration. Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF is an important inducer of neoangiogenesis. The hypotheses are first that an elevated VEGF expression and vessel density can be found in degenerated LHB tissue and second that there is a relation between VEGF expression, vessel density and the different types of rotator cuff tears. Methods LHB samples of 116 patients with degenerative rotator cuff tears were harvested during arthroscopic tenotomy. The samples were dehydrated and paraffin embedded. VEGF expression was determined using immunohistochemistry. Vessel density and vessel size were determined on Masson-Goldner stained tissue sections. On the basis of intraoperative findings, patients were assigned to 4 different groups (control group, partial thickness rotator cuff tear, full thickness rotator cuff tear and cuff arthropathy. Partial thickness rotator cuff tears were classified according to Ellman grade I-III, full thickness rotator cuff tears according to Bateman's classification (grade I-IV. The control group consisted of eight healthy tendon samples. Results VEGF expression in the LHB was significantly higher in the presence of rotator cuff tears than in healthy tendons (p Conclusion Elevated VEGF expression can be detected in degenerated LHB tissue. The quantity of VEGF expression and vessels are related to the extent of LHB degeneration.

  2. Dynamic Three-Dimensional Shoulder Mri during Active Motion for Investigation of Rotator Cuff Diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Tempelaere

    Full Text Available MRI is the standard methodology in diagnosis of rotator cuff diseases. However, many patients continue to have pain despite treatment, and MRI of a static unloaded shoulder seems insufficient for best diagnosis and treatment. This study evaluated if Dynamic MRI provides novel kinematic data that can be used to improve the understanding, diagnosis and best treatment of rotator cuff diseases.Dynamic MRI provided real-time 3D image series and was used to measure changes in the width of subacromial space, superior-inferior translation and anterior-posterior translation of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active abduction. These measures were investigated for consistency with the rotator cuff diseases classifications from standard MRI.The study included: 4 shoulders with massive rotator cuff tears, 5 shoulders with an isolated full-thickness supraspinatus tear, 5 shoulders with tendinopathy and 6 normal shoulders. A change in the width of subacromial space greater than 4mm differentiated between rotator cuff diseases with tendon tears (massive cuff tears and supraspinatus tear and without tears (tendinopathy (p = 0.012. The range of the superior-inferior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears group (6.4mm than in normals (3.4mm (p = 0.02. The range of the anterior-posterior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears (9.2 mm and supraspinatus tear (9.3 mm shoulders compared to normals (3.5mm and tendinopathy (4.8mm shoulders (p = 0.05.The Dynamic MRI enabled a novel measure; 'Looseness', i.e. the translation of the humeral head on the glenoid during an abduction cycle. Looseness was better able at differentiating different forms of rotator cuff disease than a simple static measure of relative glenohumeral position.

  3. Dynamic Three-Dimensional Shoulder Mri during Active Motion for Investigation of Rotator Cuff Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempelaere, Christine; Pierrart, Jérome; Lefèvre-Colau, Marie-Martine; Vuillemin, Valérie; Cuénod, Charles-André; Hansen, Ulrich; Mir, Olivier; Skalli, Wafa; Gregory, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    MRI is the standard methodology in diagnosis of rotator cuff diseases. However, many patients continue to have pain despite treatment, and MRI of a static unloaded shoulder seems insufficient for best diagnosis and treatment. This study evaluated if Dynamic MRI provides novel kinematic data that can be used to improve the understanding, diagnosis and best treatment of rotator cuff diseases. Dynamic MRI provided real-time 3D image series and was used to measure changes in the width of subacromial space, superior-inferior translation and anterior-posterior translation of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active abduction. These measures were investigated for consistency with the rotator cuff diseases classifications from standard MRI. The study included: 4 shoulders with massive rotator cuff tears, 5 shoulders with an isolated full-thickness supraspinatus tear, 5 shoulders with tendinopathy and 6 normal shoulders. A change in the width of subacromial space greater than 4mm differentiated between rotator cuff diseases with tendon tears (massive cuff tears and supraspinatus tear) and without tears (tendinopathy) (p = 0.012). The range of the superior-inferior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears group (6.4mm) than in normals (3.4mm) (p = 0.02). The range of the anterior-posterior translation was higher in the massive cuff tears (9.2 mm) and supraspinatus tear (9.3 mm) shoulders compared to normals (3.5mm) and tendinopathy (4.8mm) shoulders (p = 0.05). The Dynamic MRI enabled a novel measure; 'Looseness', i.e. the translation of the humeral head on the glenoid during an abduction cycle. Looseness was better able at differentiating different forms of rotator cuff disease than a simple static measure of relative glenohumeral position.

  4. Pulley lesions in rotator cuff tears: prevalence, etiology, and concomitant pathologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawi, Nael; Liodakis, Emmanouil; Garving, Christina; Habermeyer, Peter; Tauber, Mark

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to demonstrate the prevalence of lesions in the biceps pulley complex in a representative, consecutive series of rotator cuff tears and rotator cuff interval treatments. We also analyzed associated tear pattern of rotator cuff injuries and superior labrum anterior-posterior (SLAP) lesions. We evaluated the relationships of these lesions to traumatic genesis and the prevalence of pulley lesions in revision cases. This retrospective study analyzed all pre- and intra-operative documentation on arthroscopic rotator cuff reconstructions and isolated pulley lesion treatments performed by a single surgeon over 2 consecutive years. According to Habermeyer et al., we classified cases into four groups, based on the presence of additional or related complete or partial rotator cuff tears, SLAP lesions, trauma, and primary or revision surgery. Among 382 patients with rotator cuff tears, 345 (90.3%) had an injured pulley system; 151 (43.8%) had partial tears of the rotator cuff; out of these, 106 (30.6%) were articular-sided. All of these articular-sided partial tears showed extension into the pulley complex. In 154 cases (44.6%), history of shoulder trauma was associated with the beginning of symptoms. In addition, concomitant SLAP lesions occurred in 25-62% of pulley lesions, correlating with the severity of pulley lesions. Among the 345 cases, there have been 32 (9.3%) revision cases where a pulley lesion was intra-operatively identified and addressed. Pulley complex lesions are present in 90.3% of surgically treated rotator cuff lesions, particularly in articular-sided injuries. In addition, we found a significant relationship between the incidence of SLAP lesions and the severity of pulley lesions. It seems reasonable to assume an important role of pulley system injuries in the pathogenesis of rotator cuff lesions.

  5. Influence of cuff material on blood flow restriction stimulus in the upper body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckner, Samuel L; Dankel, Scott J; Counts, Brittany R; Jessee, Matthew B; Mouser, J Grant; Mattocks, Kevin T; Laurentino, Gilberto C; Abe, Takashi; Loenneke, Jeremy P

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the acute skeletal muscle and perceptual responses to blood flow restriction (BFR) exercise to failure between narrow nylon and elastic inflatable cuffs at rest and during exercise. Torque and muscle thickness was measured pre, post, and 5, 20, 40, and 60 min post-exercise with muscle activation being measured throughout exercise. Resting arterial occlusion pressure was different between the nylon [139 (14) mmHg] and elastic [246 (71) mmHg, p material but similar width resulted in the same acute muscular response when the cuffs were inflated to a pressure relative to each individual cuff.

  6. Functional Recovery After Rotator Cuff Repair: The Role of Biceps Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gialanella, Bernardo; Grossetti, Francesco; Mazza, Marina; Danna, Laura; Comini, Laura

    2018-01-01

    Surgical cuff repair is recommended in a full-thickness rotator cuff tear when nonoperative treatment fails. Surgical cuff repair can include surgery of the long head of the biceps when concomitant biceps pathology is present. However, the studies executed up till now have not yet clearly defined if additional biceps surgery affects the shoulder functionality in patients who underwent rotator cuff repair. To verify if the concomitant biceps surgery prejudices shoulder functionality during the short-term period in rotator cuff repair patients. Prospective and observational study. Outpatient service for rehabilitation. Ninety-three consecutive patients who had undergone surgery for full-thickness symptomatic rotator cuff tear were enrolled for rehabilitation; 25 underwent rotator cuff repair and tendon biceps surgery (ABS), while 68 underwent rotator cuff repair only (RCR). Motor rehabilitation after surgical treatment of rotator cuff repair. Final Constant score was used as primary outcome measure, and efficiency and effectiveness in Constant score were evaluated both at the end of the last cycle of rehabilitation and 6 mo postsurgery. Patients with rotator cuff repair and tendon biceps surgery had lower final scores (36.5 ± 12.0 vs 49.3 ± 13.0, P < .001), effectiveness (40.6 ± 18.0 vs 60.3 ± 20.0, P < .001), and efficiency (0.80 ± 0.5 vs 1.19 ± 0.6, P = .010) in Constant score than those with rotator cuff repair only at the end of rehabilitation. Moreover, they had a lower final score (53.3 ± 14.0 vs 64.5 ± 10.0, P < .001) and effectiveness (66.9 ± 21.0 vs 84.0 ± 16, P < .001) in Constant score 6 mo postsurgery. Gender was a determinant of final score, efficiency, and effectiveness in Constant score at the end of the rehabilitation period, while tendon biceps surgery was a determinant of final score and effectiveness in Constant score at the end of the rehabilitation period and at 6

  7. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING EVALUATION OF ROTATOR CUFF IMPINGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrakanth K. S

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Shoulder pain is a common clinical problem. Impingement syndrome of the shoulder is believed to be the most common cause of shoulder pain. The term ‘impingement syndrome’ was first used by Neer to describe a condition of shoulder pain associated with chronic bursitis and partial thickness tear of Rotator Cuff (RC. The incidence of Rotator Cuff (RC tear is estimated to be about 20.7% in the general population. This study is intended to analyse various extrinsic and intrinsic causes of shoulder impingement. MATERIALS AND METHODS 110 consecutive patients referred for MRI with clinical suspicion of shoulder impingement were prospectively studied. All the patients were evaluated for Rotator Cuff (RC degeneration and various extrinsic factors that lead to degeneration like acromial shape, down-sloping acromion, Acromioclavicular (AC joint degeneration and acromial enthesophyte. Intrinsic factors like degeneration and its correlation with age of the patients were evaluated. RESULTS Of the total 110 patients, 19 (17.3% patients had FT RC tear and 31 (28.2% had PT (both bursal and articular surface tears. There was no statistically significant correlation (p=0.76 between acromion types and RC tear. Down-sloping acromion and enthesophytes had statistically significant association with RC tear (p=0.008 and 0.008, respectively. Statistically significant (0.008 correlation between the severity of AC joint degeneration and RC tears was noted. AC joint degeneration and RC pathologies also showed a correlation with the age of the patients with p values of <0.001 and 0.001, respectively. CONCLUSION No statistically significant correlation between RC pathologies with hooked acromion was found, that makes the role played by hooked acromion in FT RC tear questionable. AC joint degeneration association with RC tear is due to the association of both RC tear and AC joint degeneration with age of the patient. Down-sloping acromion, AC joint degeneration

  8. Traumatic tracheal diverticulum corrected with resection and anastomosis during one-lung ventilation and total intravenous anesthesia in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayre, Rebecca S; Lepiz, Mauricio; Wall, Corey; Thieman-Mankin, Kelley; Dobbin, Jennifer

    2016-11-01

    This report describes the clinical findings and diagnostic images of a traumatic intrathoracic tracheal avulsion with a tracheal diverticulum in a cat. Furthermore, a complete description of the tracheal resection and anastomosis using one-lung ventilation (OLV) with total and partial intravenous anesthesia is made. A 3-year-old neutered male domestic shorthair cat weighing 6.8 kg was presented to the University Teaching Hospital for evaluation of increased respiratory noise 3 months following unknown trauma. Approximately 12 weeks prior to presentation, the cat had been seen by the primary care veterinarian for respiratory distress. At that time, the cat had undergone a tracheal ballooning procedure for a distal tracheal stricture diagnosed by tracheoscopy. The tracheal ballooning had provided only temporary relief. At presentation to our institution, the cat had increased respiratory effort with harsh upper airway noise auscultated during thoracic examination. The remainder of the physical examination was normal. Diagnostics included a tracheoscopy and a thoracic computed tomographic examination. The cat was diagnosed with tracheal avulsion, pseudotrachea with a tracheal diverticulum, and stenosis of the avulsed tracheal ends. Surgical correction of the tracheal stricture via a thoracotomy was performed using OLV with total and partial intravenous anesthesia. The cat recovered uneventfully and at last follow-up was active and doing well. This case report describes OLV using standard anesthesia equipment that is available at most private practices. Furthermore, this case describes the computed tomographic images of the intrathoracic tracheal avulsion and offers a positive outcome for tracheal resection and anastomosis. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2015.

  9. Tracheostomy tube - speaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000465.htm Tracheostomy tube - speaking To use the sharing features on ... are even speaking devices that can help you. Tracheostomy Tubes and Speaking Air passing through vocal cords ( ...

  10. X-ray tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    A form of x-ray tube is described which provides satisfactory focussing of the electron beam when the beam extends for several feet from gun to target. Such a tube can be used for computerised tomographic scanning. (UK)

  11. Neural Tube Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neural tube defects are birth defects of the brain, spine, or spinal cord. They happen in the ... that she is pregnant. The two most common neural tube defects are spina bifida and anencephaly. In ...

  12. Jejunostomy feeding tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may replace the tube every now and then. Cleaning the Skin Around the J-tube To clean ... this important distinction for online health information and services. Learn more about A.D.A.M.'s editorial ...

  13. A portable Halbach magnet that can be opened and closed without force: The NMR-CUFF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windt, Carel W.; Soltner, Helmut; Dusschoten, Dagmar van; Blümler, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Portable equipment for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is becoming increasingly attractive for use in a variety of applications. One of the main scientific challenges in making NMR portable is the design of light-weight magnets that possess a strong and homogeneous field. Existing NMR magnets can provide such magnetic fields, but only for small samples or in small regions, or are rather heavy. Here we show a simple yet elegant concept for a Halbach-type permanent magnet ring, which can be opened and closed with minimal mechanical force. An analytical solution for an ideal Halbach magnet shows that the magnetic forces cancel if the structure is opened at an angle of 35.3° relative to its poles. A first prototype weighed only 3.1 kg, and provided a flux density of 0.57 T with a homogeneity better than 200 ppm over a spherical volume of 5 mm in diameter without shimming. The force needed to close it was found to be about 20 N. As a demonstration, intact plants were imaged and water (xylem) flow measured. Magnets of this type (NMR-CUFF = Cut-open, Uniform, Force Free) are ideal for portable use and are eminently suited to investigate small or slender objects that are part of a larger or immobile whole, such as branches on a tree, growing fruit on a plant, or non-metallic tubing in industrial installations. This new concept in permanent-magnet design enables the construction of openable, yet strong and homogeneous magnets, which aside from use in NMR or MRI could also be of interest for applications in accelerators, motors, or magnetic bearings.

  14. A portable Halbach magnet that can be opened and closed without force: the NMR-CUFF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windt, Carel W; Soltner, Helmut; van Dusschoten, Dagmar; Blümler, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Portable equipment for nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is becoming increasingly attractive for use in a variety of applications. One of the main scientific challenges in making NMR portable is the design of light-weight magnets that possess a strong and homogeneous field. Existing NMR magnets can provide such magnetic fields, but only for small samples or in small regions, or are rather heavy. Here we show a simple yet elegant concept for a Halbach-type permanent magnet ring, which can be opened and closed with minimal mechanical force. An analytical solution for an ideal Halbach magnet shows that the magnetic forces cancel if the structure is opened at an angle of 35.3° relative to its poles. A first prototype weighed only 3.1 kg, and provided a flux density of 0.57 T with a homogeneity better than 200 ppm over a spherical volume of 5mm in diameter without shimming. The force needed to close it was found to be about 20 N. As a demonstration, intact plants were imaged and water (xylem) flow measured. Magnets of this type (NMR-CUFF = Cut-open, Uniform, Force Free) are ideal for portable use and are eminently suited to investigate small or slender objects that are part of a larger or immobile whole, such as branches on a tree, growing fruit on a plant, or non-metallic tubing in industrial installations. This new concept in permanent-magnet design enables the construction of openable, yet strong and homogeneous magnets, which aside from use in NMR or MRI could also be of interest for applications in accelerators, motors, or magnetic bearings. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Large-segment tracheal resection and interannular anastomosis with a tension-release technique in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallman, M J; Bojrab, M J

    1982-02-01

    Tracheal resection and anastomosis were done on 7 dogs, and a modified procedure to provide optimum first-intention healing, minimum connective tissue proliferation, and optimum epithelialization was used. To test the integrity of the technique at high incision-line tensile forces, 15 to 17 tracheal rings were excised. Excessive tracheal manipulation resulted in an increased amount of lamina propria and submucosa collagenous tissue, increased size and number of blood vessels, and increased leukocytic invasion. Criteria for a successful anastomosis were minimum postoperative coughing, good mucosal apposition and epithelialization, and tracheal lumen diameters that were at least 80% of the preoperative measurement.

  16. Tracheal ulcer due to Epstein-Barr virus-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takeo; Fujisaki, Hideaki; Nishio, Suehiro; Hiroshige, Shigeo; Miyazaki, Eishi; Kadota, Jun-ichi

    2014-03-01

    A 74-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of a tracheal stenosis circumscribed with soft tissue density and a left pulmonary nodule. Open biopsy of a right submandibular lymph node revealed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and the malignant cells were positive for Epstein-Barr virus gene products. Bronchofiberscopy revealed a tracheal necrotizing ulcer. After chemotherapy, the tracheal ulcer resolved. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of Epstein-Barr virus-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the elderly with a tracheal ulcer. © 2013 Published by The Japanese Respiratory Society on behalf of The Japanese Respiratory Society.

  17. Tracheal intubation in the ICU: Life saving or life threatening?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jigeeshu V Divatia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal intubation (TI is a routine procedure in the intensive care unit (ICU, and is often life saving. However, life-threatening complications occur in a significant proportion of procedures, making TI perhaps one the most common but underappreciated airway emergencies in the ICU. In contrast to the controlled conditions in the operating room (OR, the unstable physiologic state of critically ill patients along with underevaluation of the airways and suboptimal response to pre-oxygenation are the major factors for the high incidence of life-threatening complications like severe hypoxaemia and cardiovascular collapse in the ICU. Studies have shown that strategies planned for TI in the OR can be adapted and extrapolated for use in the ICU. Non-invasive positive-pressure ventilation for pre-oxygenation provides adequate oxygen stores during TI for patients with precarious respiratory pathology. The intubation procedure should include not only airway management but also haemodynamic, gas exchange and neurologic care, which are often crucial in critically ill patients. Hence, there is a necessity for the implementation of an Intubation Bundle during routine airway management in the ICU. Adherence to a plan for difficult airway management incorporating the use of intubation aids and airway rescue devices and strategies is useful.

  18. Nasogastric and feeding tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharib, Ahmed M; Stern, Eric J; Sherbin, Vandy L; Rohrmann, Charles A

    1996-05-01

    Preview The authors' experience in a radiology department suggested to them that there is a wide range of beliefs among practitioners regarding proper placement of nasogastric and feeding tubes. Improper positioning can cause serious problems, as they explain. Indications for different tube positions, complications of incorrect tube placement, and directions for proper positioning are discussed and illustrated.

  19. Repair of rotator cuff injuries using different composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopiz, Y; Arvinius, C; García-Fernández, C; Rodriguez-Bobada, M C; González-López, P; Civantos, A; Marco, F

    Rotator cuff repairs have shown a high level of re-ruptures. It is hypothesised that the use of rhBMP-2 in a carrier could improve the biomechanical and histological properties of the repair. Controlled experimental study conducted on 40 rats with section and repair of the supraspinatus tendon and randomisation to one of five groups: Group 1 (control) only suture; Group 2 (double control), suture and alginate-chitin carrier; Group 3 (alginate-control), the rhBMP-2 was added to the alginate; Group 4 (chitin-control) application of the rhBMP-2 to the chitin, and Group 5 (double sample): The two components of the carrier (alginate and chitin) have rhBMP-2. A biomechanical and histological analysis was performed at 4 weeks. A gap was observed in all cases 4 weeks after supraspinatus detachment. The re-rupture rate was 7.5%, with 20% of them in the control-alginate Group. Histologically the best results were obtained in the double sample group: 4.5 (3.3-5.0). Double sample were also able to support higher loads to failure: 62.9N (59.8 to 69.4) with lower rigidity 12.7 (9.7 to 15.9). The use of alginate-chitin carrier with rhBMP-2 improves the biomechanical and histological properties of the repair site in a chronic rotator cuff tear. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Cuff inflation during ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and heart rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Skov-Madsen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Mia Skov-Madsen, My Svensson, Jeppe Hagstrup ChristensenDepartment of Nephrology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg, DenmarkIntroduction: Twenty four-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring is a clinically validated procedure in evaluation of blood pressure (BP. We hypothesised that the discomfort during cuff inflation would increase the heart rate (HR measured with 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring compared to a following HR measurement with a 24-h Holter monitor.Methods: The study population (n = 56 were recruited from the outpatient’s clinic at the Department of Nephrology, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus University Hospital at Aalborg, Denmark. All the patients had chronic kidney disease (CKD. We compared HR measured with a 24-h Holter monitor with a following HR measured by a 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring.Results: We found a highly significant correlation between the HR measured with the Holter monitor and HR measured with 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (r = 0.77, p < 0.001. Using the Bland-Altman plot, the mean difference in HR was only 0.5 beat/min during 24 hours with acceptable limits of agreement for both high and low HR levels. Dividing the patients into groups according to betablocker treatment, body mass index, age, sex, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor treatment, statins treatment, diuretic treatment, or calcium channel blocker treatment revealed similar results as described above.Conclusion: The results indicate that the discomfort induced by cuff inflation during 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring does not increase HR. Thus, 24-h ambulatory BP monitoring may be a reliable measurement of the BP among people with CKD.Keywords: ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, Holter monitoring, heart rate, chronic kidney disease, hypertension

  1. Rotator cuff-quality of life scale: adaptation to Turkish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunes, Taner; Erkorkmaz, Unal; Kurnaz, Recep; Bilgic, Erkal; Asci, Murat

    2015-02-01

    The adaptation of scales to the native language and cultural setting of the patient is essential for obtaining more reliable results in scientific studies. In this study, the rotator cuff-quality of life scale (RC-QoLS) was translated into Turkish, and validity and reliability testing was performed on the scale. The scale was first translated into Turkish and then from Turkish to English by another language specialist. Subsequently, the two translations were evaluated by two orthopaedic surgeons who had comprehensive knowledge of English to create the final Turkish version of RC-QoLS. The scale was used for the assessment of 54 patients (average age 56 years) with rotator cuff tear scheduled for surgery. The scale was completed by each patient two times with 1-week interval. The Cronbach's alpha coefficients ranged between 0.895 and 0.980 and intraclass correlation coefficients ranged between 0.807 and 0.976, this rendered all domains reliable. The scale gave results very near to those obtained by the original questionnaire with respect to the constructed validity and internal consistency as well as domain relationships. In general, the Turkish version of the RC-QoLS is a valid and reliable test with high differentiating power that may be used in the evaluation the quality of life of patients with RC tear in patients who are native Turkish speaker. The use of the Turkish version of RC-QoLS may contribute to the making of a more reliable evaluation in the studies on RC problems in the Turkish society.

  2. Tracheal Intubation with Aura-i and aScope-2: How to Minimize Apnea Time in an Unpredicted Difficult Airway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Pavoni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The supraglottic airway’s usefulness as a dedicated airway is the subject of continuing development. We report the case of an obese patient with unpredicted difficult airway management in which a new “continuous ventilation technique” was used with the Aura-i laryngeal mask and the aScope-2 devices. The aScope-2/Aura-i system implemented airway devices for the management of predictable/unpredictable difficult airway. The original technique required the disconnection of the mount catheter from Aura-i, the introduction of the aScope-2 into the laryngeal mask used as a conduit for video assisted intubation and then towards the trachea, followed by a railroading of the tracheal tube over the aScope-2. This variation in the technique guarantees mechanical ventilation during the entire procedure and could prevent the risk of hypoventilation and/or hypoxia.

  3. Experimental study of different nickel-titanium memory tracheal stents in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang Xu; He Nengshu; Fan Hailun

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Since membrane -covered metal tracheal stent was applied successfully to treat the airway stenosis, it has been widely used and obtained satisfactory result during the past years. The purpose of our study was provide theoretical rational for treatment with membrane-covered tracheal stent by using animal experiment. Methods: The nickel- titanium memory stents of 22 mm in diameter and 6 cm in length were deployed in 18 dogs. The dogs were grouped into full- length membrane-covered group (n=6), partial-length membrane-covered group (membrane was covered for 4 cm in the medial part of the stent, n=6), and naked stent group (n=6). After the stent placement dysphagia or dysphonia was monitored daily. Twenty-four weeks later, the dogs were executed. Speiments were taken from the cephalic, medial, and caudal trachea under the stent. HE stain and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) were evaluated. Results: After the stent placement, no dyspnea, dysphagia or dysphonia but cough was present in each dog. There was no significant difference in symptom between the three groups. Inflammation reaction, metaplasia from low columnar epithelium to spuamous epithelium, and mild granulation tissue hyperplasia in the underlying mucosa were present in each group. However, fibrosis and tracheal straitness were present only in the non-membrane-covered area, but not in the membrane-covered area. More PCNA expression was observed in the non-membrane -covered area than in the membrane-covered area. Conclusion: Both membrane-covered and non-membrane-covered stents can cause similar symptoms. However, the membrane -covered tracheal stent has good biological compatibility and would not induce tracheal straitness. The non-membrane -covered tracheal stent could induce a severe pathologic reaction and tracheal straitness. (authors)

  4. Cuff size influences blood pressure measurement in obese children and adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muhamed, P. K.; Olsen, M. H.; Holm, Jens-Christian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Recently, we established that a group ofobese children and adolescents had a higher blood pressure(BP) than a healthy control group. In the present study, weinvestigate whether the higher BP in the obese group wasinfluenced by BP cuff sizes.Methods: A total of 104 obese patients aged...... sizes had a significant impact on BP measurements.Despite the influence of cuff size, multiple regressionanalyses revealed that systolic BP was 68 mmHg higherand diastolic BP 32 mmHg higher in the obese groupthan in the control group. A step function, i.e. a sudden fallin BP, was seen at the point...... of switching from small to mediumcuff size in the control group, which suggests that systolicBP was overestimated when using small cuff size andunderestimated when using medium cuff size in subjectswith an AC near 23 cm.Conclusions: BP was higher in the obese group than inthe control group although BP...

  5. Rotator cuff tears in children and adolescents: experience at a large pediatric hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zbojniewicz, Andrew M.; Emery, Kathleen H.; Maeder, Matthew E.; Salisbury, Shelia R.

    2014-01-01

    Prior literature, limited to small case series and case reports, suggests that rotator cuff tears are rare in adolescents. However, we have identified rotator cuff tears in numerous children and adolescents who have undergone shoulder MRI evaluation. The purpose of this study is to describe the prevalence and characteristics of rotator cuff tears in children and adolescents referred for MRI evaluation of the shoulder at a large pediatric hospital and to correlate the presence of rotator cuff tears with concurrent labral pathology, skeletal maturity and patient activity and outcomes. We reviewed reports from 455 consecutive non-contrast MRI and magnetic resonance arthrogram examinations of the shoulder performed during a 2-year period, and following exclusions we yielded 205 examinations in 201 patients (ages 8-18 years; 75 girls, 126 boys). Rotator cuff tears were classified by tendon involved, tear thickness (partial or full), surface and location of tear (when partial) and presence of delamination. We recorded concurrent labral pathology when present. Physeal patency of the proximal humerus was considered open, closing or closed. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate for a relationship between rotator cuff tears and degree of physeal patency. We obtained patient activity at the time of injury, surgical reports and outcomes from clinical records when available. Twenty-five (12.2%) rotator cuff tears were identified in 17 boys and 7 girls (ages 10-18 years; one patient had bilateral tears). The supraspinatus tendon was most frequently involved (56%). There were 2 full-thickness and 23 partial-thickness tears with articular-side partial-thickness tears most frequent (78%). Insertional partial-thickness tears were more common (78%) than critical zone tears (22%) and 10 (43%) partial-thickness tears were delamination tears. Nine (36%) patients with rotator cuff tears had concurrent labral pathology. There was no statistically significant relationship between

  6. Rotator cuff tears in children and adolescents: experience at a large pediatric hospital

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zbojniewicz, Andrew M.; Emery, Kathleen H. [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Maeder, Matthew E. [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lenox Hill Hospital, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Salisbury, Shelia R. [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Division of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Prior literature, limited to small case series and case reports, suggests that rotator cuff tears are rare in adolescents. However, we have identified rotator cuff tears in numerous children and adolescents who have undergone shoulder MRI evaluation. The purpose of this study is to describe the prevalence and characteristics of rotator cuff tears in children and adolescents referred for MRI evaluation of the shoulder at a large pediatric hospital and to correlate the presence of rotator cuff tears with concurrent labral pathology, skeletal maturity and patient activity and outcomes. We reviewed reports from 455 consecutive non-contrast MRI and magnetic resonance arthrogram examinations of the shoulder performed during a 2-year period, and following exclusions we yielded 205 examinations in 201 patients (ages 8-18 years; 75 girls, 126 boys). Rotator cuff tears were classified by tendon involved, tear thickness (partial or full), surface and location of tear (when partial) and presence of delamination. We recorded concurrent labral pathology when present. Physeal patency of the proximal humerus was considered open, closing or closed. Statistical analysis was performed to evaluate for a relationship between rotator cuff tears and degree of physeal patency. We obtained patient activity at the time of injury, surgical reports and outcomes from clinical records when available. Twenty-five (12.2%) rotator cuff tears were identified in 17 boys and 7 girls (ages 10-18 years; one patient had bilateral tears). The supraspinatus tendon was most frequently involved (56%). There were 2 full-thickness and 23 partial-thickness tears with articular-side partial-thickness tears most frequent (78%). Insertional partial-thickness tears were more common (78%) than critical zone tears (22%) and 10 (43%) partial-thickness tears were delamination tears. Nine (36%) patients with rotator cuff tears had concurrent labral pathology. There was no statistically significant relationship between

  7. Difference between early versus delayed postoperative physical rehabilitation protocol following arthroscopic rotator cuff repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samar M Fawzy

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion Significant improvement in pain, ROM, and function after arthroscopic rotator cuff repair was seen at 1 year postoperatively, regardless of early or delayed postoperative rehabilitation protocols. However, early motion increases pain scores and may increase the possibility of rotator cuff retear but with early regain of ROM. A delayed rehabilitation protocol with immobilization for 6 weeks would be better for tendon healing without risk for retear or joint stiffness and easily convalescence with less postoperative pain.

  8. Living with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear 'bad days, bad nights': a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minns Lowe, Catherine J; Moser, Jane; Barker, Karen

    2014-07-09

    Rotator cuff tears are a common cause of shoulder pain. There is an absence of information about symptomatic rotator cuffs from the patients' perspective; this limits the information clinicians can share with patients and the information that patients can access via sources such as the internet. This study describes the experiences of people with a symptomatic rotator cuff, their symptoms, the impact upon their daily lives and the coping strategies utilised by study participants. An interpretive phenomenological analysis approach was used. 20 participants of the UKUFF trial (The United Kingdom Rotator Cuff Surgery Trial) agreed to participate in in-depth semi-structured interviews about their experiences about living with a symptomatic rotator cuff tear. Interviews were digitally recorded and fully transcribed. Field notes, memos and a reflexive diary were used. Data was coded in accordance with interpretive phenomenological analysis. Peer review, code-recode audits and constant comparison of data, codes and categories occurred throughout. The majority of patients described intense pain and severely disturbed sleep. Limited movement and reduced muscle strength were described by some participants. The predominantly adverse impact that a symptomatic rotator cuff tear had upon activities of daily living, leisure activities and occupation was described. The emotional and financial impact and impact upon caring roles were detailed. Coping strategies included attempting to carry on as normally as possible, accepting their condition, using their other arm, using analgesics, aids and adaptions. Clinicians need to appreciate and understand the intensity and shocking nature of pain that may be experienced by participants with known rotator cuff tears and understand the detrimental impact tears can have upon all areas of patient's lives. Clinicians also need to be aware of the potential emotional impact caused by cuff tears and to ensure that patients needing help for

  9. Effectiveness of shock wave therapy as an alternative to the rotator cuff injury treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto Joaquín Del Gordo-D´Amato; Guillermo Orlando Trout-Guardiola; José Acuña-Pinilla

    2016-01-01

    Rotator cuff injuries are reason for consultation frequent in elderly patients. Most of the time there are no background traumatic acute generating progressive limitations in activities of daily living (ADLS). The objective of this study is to show results in tendonitis of the rotator cuff, in patients treated with extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT). It is a prospective descriptive observational study which presents clinical and functional outcomes in patients with described lesion, tre...

  10. MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING (MRI) SPECTRUM OF Rotator Cuff Tears, with Arthroscopic – MRI Contextualizations

    OpenAIRE

    Batista, Alexandre; Bagulho, Cecília

    2017-01-01

    Our understanding of rotator cuff (RC) pathogenesis and the optimal management of RC pathology is evolving and shoulder magnetic imaging (MRI) has a crucial role in this development, as it functionally depicts pathology in the painful shoulder patient, conveys optimal sensitivity and specificity rates in rotator cuff tear evaluation and characterization, and allows useful additional information in terms of patient management, namely regarding muscle atrophy, reducing unnecessary arthroscopic ...

  11. Delivered growth factor therapy to improve healing after rotator cuff repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie V Cheung

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Emilie V Cheung, Luz Silverio, Jeffrey YaoDepartment of Orthopedic Surgery, Stanford University, Redwood City, CA, USABackground: Degenerative rotator cuff tears are a significant cause of shoulder pain in the aging population. Rotator cuff repair surgery may be more successful when growth factors are delivered to the repair site. This study was designed to determine the cellular processes involved in normal bone-to-tendon healing and the current approaches used for biologic augmentation of rotator cuff repair.Methods: This review focuses on animal studies of rotator cuff repair and early human trials.Results: Regular bone-to-tendon healing forms a fibrous junction between tendon and bone that is markedly different from the original bone-to-tendon junction. Tendon augmentation with cellular components serves as scaffolding for endogenous fibroblastic cells and a possible source of growth factors and fibroblastic cells. Extracellular matrices provide a scaffold for incoming fibroblastic cells. However, research in extracellular matrices is not conclusive due to intermanufacturer variation and the lack of human subject research. Growth factors and platelet-rich plasma are established in other fields of research and show promise, but have not yet been rigorously tested in rotator cuff repair augmentation.Conclusions: Rotator cuff repair can benefit from biologic augmentation. However, research in this field is still young and has not yet demonstrated that the benefits in healing rates are significant enough to merit regular clinical use. Randomized controlled trials will elucidate the use of biologic augmentation in rotator cuff repairs.Keywords: rotator cuff, shoulder pain, growth factors, repair

  12. The laryngeal mask in infants and children: what is the cuff pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloss, Bryan; Rice, Julie; Tobias, Joseph D

    2012-02-01

    Unintended hyperinflation of the cuff of a laryngeal mask airway (LMA) has been associated with increased airway morbidity and postoperative pain. While the manufacturers recommend a cuff pressure of less than 60 cmH(2)O, in usual clinical practice, there is no method used to determine intracuff pressure of an LMA. The purpose of this prospective quality assurance study is to evaluate the incidence of LMA hyperinflation and excessive intracuff pressure in a busy tertiary care pediatric hospital. There was no change dictated in clinical practice for these patients. Per our usual practice, the LMA was removed from the package and inserted with the cuff partially inflated. The cuff was further inflated as needed to ensure a seal during positive pressure ventilation to a peak inflating pressure of 20-25 cmH(2)O. During the first 30 min of the case, the pressure in the cuff of the LMA was measured using a hand held manometer. Additional data collected included the patient's demographic data (age, weight, and gender), the size of the ETT, and whether nitrous oxide was in use. Of the 200 subjects in the current study, 106 had an LMA cuff pressure ≥ 60 cmH(2)O (53%). Patients who were greater than 8 years of age had significantly higher average cuff pressures and significantly more LMAs with an intracuff pressure ≥ 60 cmH(2)O when compared to patients younger than 4 years of age and patients 4-8 years of age. Similarly, larger LMAs were found to have significantly higher intracuff pressures. Using current clinical practice to inflate the cuff of the LMA, a significant percentage of pediatric patients have an intracuff pressure greater than the generally recommended upper limit of 60 cmH(2)O. Risk factors identified in our study included age of the patient and the size of the LMA. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The impact of faulty posture on rotator cuff tears with and without symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Atsushi; Takagishi, Kenji; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Shitara, Hitoshi; Ichinose, Tsuyoshi; Takasawa, Eiji; Shimoyama, Daisuke; Osawa, Toshihisa

    2015-03-01

    We hypothesized that the prevalence of rotator cuff tears would be higher among individuals with poor posture, regardless of the presence of symptoms. The study initially comprised 525 residents of a mountain village who participated in an annual health check. Participants completed a background questionnaire, and physical examinations were performed to evaluate shoulder function. Ultrasonographic examinations were also performed to identify rotator cuff tears, and participants were grouped according to the presence or absence of tears. Posture was classified by 2 observers into 4 types according to the classification of Kendall, as follows: ideal alignment, kyphotic-lordotic posture, flat-back posture, and sway-back posture. Univariate analyses were performed to compare differences in background characteristics between groups, then multivariate analysis was performed to identify those factors associated with rotator cuff tears. Final analysis was performed for 379 participants (135 men, 244 women; mean age, 62.0 years; range, 31-94 years) showing the same posture classification from both observers. Of these, 93 (24.5%) showed rotator cuff tear in one shoulder and 45 (11.9%) showed tears in both. Prevalence of rotator cuff tears was 2.9% with ideal alignment, 65.8% with kyphotic-lordotic posture, 54.3% with flat-back posture, and 48.9% with sway-back posture. Logistic regression analysis identified increased age, abnormal posture, and past pain as factors associated with rotator cuff tears. Postural abnormality represented an independent predictor of both symptomatic and asymptomatic rotator cuff tears. These results may help define preventive measures for rotator cuff tears and in design ing rehabilitation therapies for shoulder disease. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. EGR1 Induces Tenogenic Differentiation of Tendon Stem Cells and Promotes Rabbit Rotator Cuff Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Tao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The rate of healing failure after surgical repair of chronic rotator cuff tears is considerably high. The aim of this study was to investigate the function of the zinc finger transcription factor early growth response 1 (EGR1 in the differentiation of tendon stem cells (TSCs and in tendon formation, healing, and tendon tear repair using an animal model of rotator cuff repair. Methods: Tenocyte, adipocyte, osteocyte, and chondrocyte differentiation as well as the expression of related genes were determined in EGR1-overexpressing TSCs (EGR1-TSCs using tissue-specific staining, immunofluorescence staining, quantitative PCR, and western blotting. A rabbit rotator cuff repair model was established, and TSCs and EGR1-TSCs in a fibrin glue carrier were applied onto repair sites. The rabbits were sacrificed 8 weeks after repair operation, and tissues were histologically evaluated and tenocyte-related gene expression was determined. Results: EGR1 induced tenogenic differentiation of TSCs and inhibited non-tenocyte differentiation of TSCs. Furthermore, EGR1 promoted tendon repair in a rabbit model of rotator cuff injury. The BMP12/Smad1/5/8 signaling pathway was involved in EGR1-induced tenogenic differentiation and rotator cuff tendon repair. Conclusion: EGR1 plays a key role in tendon formation, healing, and repair through BMP12/Smad1/5/8 pathway. EGR1-TSCs is a promising treatment for rotator cuff tendon repair surgeries.

  15. Is the Supraspinatus Muscle Atrophy Truly Irreversible after Surgical Repair of Rotator Cuff Tears?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Seok Won; Kim, Sae Hoon; Tae, Suk-Kee; Yoon, Jong Pil; Choi, Jung-Ah

    2013-01-01

    Background Atrophy of rotator cuff muscles has been considered an irreversible phenomenon. The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether atrophy is truly irreversible after rotator cuff repair. Methods We measured supraspinatus muscle atrophy of 191 patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears on preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and postoperative multidetector computed tomography images, taken at least 1 year after operation. The occupation ratio was calculated using Photoshop CS3 software. We compared the change between pre- and postoperative occupation ratios after modifying the preoperative occupation ratio. In addition, possible relationship between various clinical factors and the change of atrophy, and between the change of atrophy and cuff integrity after surgical repair were evaluated. Results The mean occupation ratio was significantly increased postoperatively from 0.44 ± 0.17 to 0.52 ± 0.17 (p < 0.001). Among 191 patients, 81 (42.4%) showed improvement of atrophy (more than a 10% increase in occupation ratio) and 33 (17.3%) worsening (more than a 10% decrease). Various clinical factors such as age tear size, or initial degree of atrophy did not affect the change of atrophy. However, the change of atrophy was related to repair integrity: cuff healing failure rate of 48.5% (16 of 33) in worsened atrophy; and 22.2% (18 of 81) in improved atrophy (p = 0.007). Conclusions The supraspinatus muscle atrophy as measured by occupation ratio could be improved postoperatively in case of successful cuff repair. PMID:23467404

  16. Tissue Engineering for Rotator Cuff Repair: An Evidence-Based Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Maffulli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this systematic review was to address the treatment of rotator cuff tears by applying tissue engineering approaches to improve tendon healing, specifically platelet rich plasma (PRP augmentation, stem cells, and scaffolds. Our systematic search was performed using the combination of the following terms: “rotator cuff”, “shoulder”, “PRP”, “platelet rich plasma”, “stemcells”, “scaffold”, “growth factors”, and “tissue engineering”. No level I or II studies were found on the use of scaffolds and stem cells for rotator cuff repair. Three studies compared rotator cuff repair with or without PRP augmentation. All authors performed arthroscopic rotator cuff repair with different techniques of suture anchor fixation and different PRP augmentation. The three studies found no difference in clinical rating scales and functional outcomes between PRP and control groups. Only one study showed clinical statistically significant difference between the two groups at the 3-month followup. Any statistically significant difference in the rates of tendon rerupture between the control group and the PRP group was found using the magnetic resonance imaging. The current literature on tissue engineering application for rotator cuff repair is scanty. Comparative studies included in this review suggest that PRP augmented repair of a rotator cuff does not yield improved functional and clinical outcome compared with non-augmented repair at a medium and long-term followup.

  17. An unusual tracheal foreign body in a neonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horimoto, Y.; Kasuya, T.; Yoshizawa, M.; Okazaki, A.; Ito, H.; Shimura, K.

    1986-01-01

    Tracheobronchial foreign bodies are still a major problem in infancy. Eighty percent of them are observed in children below the age of 3 years, but they are quite rare in neonates. The extraction of the tube tip, which had been used as a means of medical management during respiratory care, is reported. (orig.)

  18. Fracture of an endoluminal nitinol stent used in the treatment of tracheal collapse in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittleman, Elise; Weisse, Chick; Mehler, Stephen J; Lee, Justine A

    2004-10-15

    A 5-year-old castrated male Pomeranian was evaluated because of severe dyspnea and coughing, and a diagnosis of complete, static collapse of the trachea at the thoracic inlet was made. After failure to improve with medical management alone, an endoluminal tracheal stent was placed, which resulted in resolution of signs. Ten weeks after stent placement, the dog underwent tracheal resection and anastomosis because the stent had fractured at the level of the thoracic inlet. One year after surgery, the dog was doing well and required treatment with hydrocodone infrequently. Compared with other surgical treatment options, placement of an endoluminal tracheal stent is a relatively noninvasive intervention that can provide effective relief from the clinical signs associated with tracheal collapse in dogs. Implantation of endoluminal tracheal stents may be associated with complications; therefore, the procedure may best be regarded as a salvage procedure for dogs with end-stage disease that are refractory to appropriate medical management, have extensive collapse of the intrathoracic portion of the trachea, or are poor candidates for surgery.

  19. Evaluation of the Airtraq and Macintosh laryngoscopes in patients at increased risk for difficult tracheal intubation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maharaj, C H

    2008-02-01

    The Airtraq, a novel single use indirect laryngoscope, has demonstrated promise in the normal and simulated difficult airway. We compared the ease of intubation using the Airtraq with the Macintosh laryngoscope, in patients at increased risk for difficult tracheal intubation, in a randomised, controlled clinical trial. Forty consenting patients presenting for surgery requiring tracheal intubation, who were deemed to possess at least three characteristics indicating an increased risk for difficulty in tracheal intubation, were randomly assigned to undergo tracheal intubation using a Macintosh (n = 20) or Airtraq (n = 20) laryngoscope. All patients were intubated by one of three anaesthetists experienced in the use of both laryngoscopes. Four patients were not successfully intubated with the Macintosh laryngoscope, but were intubated successfully with the Airtraq. The Airtraq reduced the duration of intubation attempts (mean (SD); 13.4 (6.3) vs 47.7 (8.5) s), the need for additional manoeuvres, and the intubation difficulty score (0.4 (0.8) vs 7.7 (3.0)). Tracheal intubation with the Airtraq also reduced the degree of haemodynamic stimulation and minor trauma compared to the Macintosh laryngoscope.

  20. Association between pathogens from tracheal aspirate and oral biofilm of patients on mechanical ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Carneiro Diniz SOUZA

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to detect possible associations between respiratory pathogens from tracheal aspirate and oral biofilm samples in intubated patients in an intensive care unit (ICU, and to identify the most common respiratory pathogens in oral biofilm, particularly in patients that developed ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP. Two oral biofilm samples were collected from the tongue of intubated patients (at admission and after 48 hours and analyzed by culture with the Antibiotic Sensitivity Test. The results from the tongue biofilm samples were compared with the tracheal secretions samples. A total of 59.37% of patients exhibited the same species of pathogens in their tracheal aspirate and oral biofilm, of which 8 (42.1% developed VAP, 10 (52.63% did not develop pneumonia and one (5.26% had aspiration pneumonia. There was a statistically significant association between presence of microorganisms in the tracheal and mouth samples for the following pathogens: Klebsiella pneumoniae, Candida albicans, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter gergoviae, Streptococcus spp and Serratia marcescens (p < 0.05. Pathogens that are present in tracheal aspirates of intubated patients can be detected in their oral cavity, especially in those who developed VAP or aspiration pneumonia. Thus, the results indicate that an improved oral care in these patients could decrease ICU pneumonia rates.

  1. Tracheal Agenesis: A Challenging Prenatal Diagnosis—Contribution of Fetal MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charline Bertholdt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tracheal agenesis is a rare congenital anomaly. The prevalence is less than 1 : 50 000 with a male to female ratio of 2 : 1. This anomaly may be isolated but, in 93% of cases, it is part of polymalformative syndrome. The most evocative diagnosis situation is the ultrasonographic congenital high airway obstruction syndrome. Dilated airways, enlarged lungs with flattened diaphragm, fetal ascites and severe nonimmune hydrops can be observed. In the absence of a congenital high airway obstruction syndrome, the antenatal diagnosis of tracheal agenesis is difficult. Tracheal agenesis should be suspected in the presence of an unexplained polyhydramnios associated with congenital malformations. The fetal airway exploration should then be systematically performed by fetal thoracic magnetic resonance imaging. A case of Floyd’s type II tracheal agenesis, detected during the postnatal period, is reported here. The retrospective reexamination of fetal magnetic resonance images showed that the antenatal diagnosis would have been easy if a systematical examination of upper airways had been performed. Prenatal diagnosis of tracheal agenesis is possible with fetal MRI but the really challenge is to think about this pathology.

  2. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... YouTube Videos >> NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia Listen NEI YouTube Videos YouTube Videos Home Age-Related Macular Degeneration ... Retinopathy of Prematurity Science Spanish Videos Webinars NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia Embedded video for NEI YouTube Videos: ...

  3. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... YouTube Videos > NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia NEI YouTube Videos YouTube Videos Home Age-Related Macular Degeneration Amblyopia ... of Prematurity Science Spanish Videos Webinars NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia Embedded video for NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia ...

  4. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NEI YouTube Videos > NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia NEI YouTube Videos YouTube Videos Home Age-Related Macular Degeneration ... Retinopathy of Prematurity Science Spanish Videos Webinars NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia Embedded video for NEI YouTube Videos: ...

  5. The Burden of Craft in Arthroscopic Rotator Cuff Repair: Where Have We Been and Where We Are Going.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Stephen S

    2015-08-01

    The rather turbulent history of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair went through stages of innovation, conflict, disruption, assimilation, and transformation that might be anticipated when a new and advanced technology (arthroscopic cuff repair) displaces an entrenched but outdated discipline (open cuff repair). The transition from open to arthroscopic rotator cuff repair has been a major paradigm shift that has greatly benefited patients. However, this technical evolution/revolution has also imposed a higher "burden of craft" on the practitioners of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Technological advancements in surgery demand that surgeons accept this burden of craft and master the advanced technology for the benefit of their patients. This article outlines the author's involvement in the development of arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, and it also explores the surgeon's obligation to accept the burden of craft that is imposed by this discipline.

  6. Using King Vision video laryngoscope with a channeled blade prolongs time for tracheal intubation in different training levels, compared to non-channeled blade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Kriege

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that using a video laryngoscope is associated with an improved visualization of the glottis. However, correctly placing the endotracheal tube might be challenging. Channeled video laryngoscopic blades have an endotracheal tube already pre-loaded, allowing to advance the tube once the glottis is visualized. We hypothesized that use of a channel blade with pre-loaded endotracheal tube results in a faster intubation, compared to a curved Macintosh blade video laryngoscope.After ethical approval and informed consent, patients were randomized to receive endotracheal Intubation with either the King Vision® video laryngoscope with curved blade (control or channeled blade (channeled. Success rate, evaluation of the glottis view (percentage of glottic opening (POGO, Cormack&Lehane (C&L and intubating time were evaluated.Over a two-month period, a total of 46 patients (control n = 23; channeled n = 23 were examined. The first attempt success rates were comparable between groups (control 100% (23/23 vs. channeled 96% (22/23; p = 0.31. Overall intubation time was significantly shorter with control (median 40 sec; IQR [24-58], compared to channeled (59 sec [40-74]; p = 0.03. There were no differences in glottis visualization between groups.Compared with the King Vision channeled blade, time for tracheal intubation was shorter with the control group using a non-channeled blade. First attempt success and visualization of the glottis were comparable. These data do not support the hypothesis that a channeled blade is superior to a curved video laryngoscopic blade without tube guidance.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02344030.

  7. Nucleoside transport in primary cultured rabbit tracheal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Neil R; Wu, Sharon K; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Lee, Vincent H L

    2005-01-01

    The present study aimed at elucidating the mechanisms of nucleoside transport in primary cultured rabbit tracheal epithelial cells (RTEC) grown on a permeable filter support. Uptake of (3)H-uridine, the model nucleoside substrate, from the apical fluid of primary cultured RTEC was examined with respect to its dependence on Na(+), substrate concentration, temperature and its sensitivity to inhibitors, other nucleosides and antiviral nucleoside analogs. Apical (3)H-uridine uptake in primary cultured RTEC was strongly dependent on an inward Na(+) gradient and temperature. Ten micromolar nitro-benzyl-mercapto-purine-ribose (NBMPR) (an inhibitor of es-type nucleoside transport in the nanomolar range) did not further inhibit this process. (3)H-uridine uptake from apical fluid was inhibited by basolateral ouabain (10 microM) and apical phloridzin (100 microM), indicating that uptake may involve a secondary active transport process. Uridine uptake was saturable with a K(m) of 3.4 +/- 1.8 microM and the V(max) of 24.3 +/- 5.2 pmoles/mg protein/30 s. Inhibition studies indicated that nucleoside analogs that have a substitution on the nucleobase competed with uridine uptake from apical fluid, but those with modifications on the ribose sugar including acyclic analogs were ineffective. The pattern of inhibition of apical (3)H-uridine, (3)H-inosine and (3)H-thymidine uptake into RTEC cells by physiological nucleosides was consistent with multiple systems: A pyrimidine-selective transport system (CNT1); a broad nucleoside substrate transport system that excludes inosine (CNT4) and an equilibrative NBMPR-insensitive nucleoside transport system (ei type). These results indicate that the presence of apically located nucleoside transporters in the epithelial cells lining the upper respiratory tract can lead to a high accumulation of nucleosides in the trachea. At least one Na(+)-dependent, secondary, active transport process may mediate the apical absorption of nucleosides or

  8. Tracheal intubation related complications in the prehospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruana, Emmanuel; Duchateau, François-Xavier; Cornaglia, Carole; Devaud, Marie-Laure; Pirracchio, Romain

    2015-11-01

    Prehospital tracheal intubation (TI) is associated with morbidity and mortality, particularly in cases of difficult intubation. The goal of the present study was to describe factors associated with TI related complications in the prehospital setting. This was a prospective cohort study including all patients intubated on scene in a prehospital emergency medical service over a 4 year period. TI related complications included oxygen desaturation, aspiration, vomiting, bronchospasm and/or laryngospasm, and mechanical complications (mainstem intubation, oesophageal intubation and airway lesion- that is, dental or laryngeal trauma caused by the laryngoscope). Difficult intubation was defined as >2 failed laryngoscopic attempts, or the need for any alternative TI method. A multivariate logistic regression was used to identify the risk factors for TI related complications. 1251 patients were included; 208 complications occurred in 165 patients (13.1%). Among the 208 complications, the most frequent were oesophageal intubation (n=69, 29.7%), desaturation (n=58, 25.0%) and mainstem intubation (n=37, 15.9%). In multivariate analysis, difficult intubation (OR=6.13, 3.93 to 9.54), Cormack and Lehane grades 3 and 4 (OR=2.23, 1.26 to 3.96 for Cormack and Lehane grade 3 and OR=2.61, 1.28 to 5.33 for Cormack and Lehane grade 4 compared with Cormack and Lehane grade 1) and a body mass index >30 kg/m(2) (OR=2.22, 1.38 to 3.56) were significantly associated with TI related complications. Despite specific guidelines, TI related complications are more frequent in the prehospital setting when intubation is deemed difficult, the Cormack and Lehane grade is greater than grade 1 and the patient is overweight. In such situations, particular attention is needed to avoid complications. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. Mucosal adenosine stimulates chloride secretion in canine tracheal epithelium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratt, A.D.; Clancy, G.; Welsh, M.J.

    1986-08-01

    Adenosine is a local regulator of a variety of physiological functions in many tissues and has been observed to stimulate secretion in several Cl-secreting epithelia. In canine tracheal epithelium the authors found that adenosine stimulates Cl secretion from both the mucosal and submucosal surfaces. Addition of adenosine, or its analogue 2-chloroadenosine, to the mucosal surface potently stimulated Cl secretion with no effect on the rate of Na absorption. Stimulation resulted from an interaction of adenosine with adenosine receptors, because it was blocked by the adenosine receptor blocker, 8-phenyltheophylline. The adenosine receptor was a stimulatory receptor as judged by the rank-order potency of adenosine and its analogues and by the increase in cellular adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate levels produced by 2-chloroadenosine. Adenosine also stimulated Cl secretion when it was added to the submucosal surface, although the maximal increase in secretion was less and it was much less potent. The observation that mucosal 8-phenyletheophylline blocked the effect of submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, whereas submucosal 8-phenyltheophylline did not prevent a response to mucosal or submucosal 2-chloroadenosine, suggests that adenosine receptors are located on the mucosal surface. Thus submucosal adenosine may stimulate secretion by crossing the epithelium and interacting with receptors located on the mucosal surface. Because adenosine can be released from mast cells located in the airway lumen in response to inhaled material, and because adenosine stimulated secretion from the mucosal surface, it may be in a unique position to control the epithelium on a regional level.

  10. Development of a 3D bellows tracheal graft: mechanical behavior analysis, fabrication and an in vivo feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Hun; Jung, Jin Woo; Lee, Jung-Seob; Cho, Dong-Woo; Kang, Hyun-Wook; Joo, Young Hoon

    2012-01-01

    Artificial tracheal grafts should have not only enough compressive strength to maintain an open tracheal lumen, but also sufficient flexibility for stable mechanical behavior, similar to the native trachea at the implant site. In this study, we developed a new 3D artificial tracheal graft using a bellows design for considering its mechanical behavior. To investigate the mechanical behavior of the bellows structure, finite element method (FEM) analysis in terms of longitudinal tension/compression, bending and radial compression was conducted. The bellows structure was then compared with the cylinder structure generally used for artificial tracheal grafts. The FEM analysis showed that the bellows had outstanding flexibility in longitudinal tension/compression and bending. Moreover, the bellows kept the lumen open without severe luminal deformation in comparison with the cylinder structure. A three-dimensional artificial tracheal graft with a bellows design was fabricated using indirect solid freeform fabrication technology, and the actual mechanical test was conducted to investigate the actual mechanical behavior of the bellows graft. The fabricated bellows graft was then applied to segmental tracheal reconstruction in a rabbit model to assess its applicability. The bellows graft was completely incorporated into newly regenerated connective tissue and no obstruction at the implanted site was observed for up to 8 weeks after implantation. The data suggested that the developed bellows tracheal graft could be a promising alternative for tracheal reconstruction. (paper)

  11. Management of a case of left tracheal sleeve pneumonectomy under cardiopulmonary bypass: Anesthesia perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aman Jyoti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The lung tumors with carinal involvement are frequently managed with tracheal sleeve pneumonectomy and tracheobronchial anastomosis without use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB. Various modes of ventilation have been described during tracheal resection and anastomosis. Use of CPB during this period allows the procedure to be conducted in a more controlled way. We performed tracheal sleeve pneumonectomy for adenoid cystic carcinoma of left lung involving carina. The surgery was performed in two stages. In the first stage, left pneumonectomy was performed and in the second stage after 48 h, tracheobronchial resection and anastomosis was performed under CPB. Second stage was delayed to avoid excessive bleeding (due to heparinization from the extensive vascular raw area left after pneumonectomy. Meticulous peri-operative planning and optimal post-operative care helped in successful management of a complex case, which is associated with high morbidity and mortality.

  12. Tracheal injury during extraction of an esophageal foreign body: Repair utilizing venovenous ECMO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shunpei Okochi, MD

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO is a form of life support with an ever-expanding range of indications. Veno-venous (VV ECMO is often utilized to support children with respiratory compromise, and has been employed successfully in the acute setting of traumatic tracheobronchial injury as well as during elective tracheal surgery. We present a successful case of VV ECMO used in the perioperative management of a tracheal repair for a traumatic laceration caused by attempts to retrieve an esophageal foreign body. While this mechanism of injury appears to be rare, we believe that VV-ECMO allowed for the optimal management of this child and should be considered for other extensive tracheal injuries in children.

  13. Tracheal stenosis after treatment with metallic stent: a situation worse than the initial problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barreto, Jaime; Mejia, Bibiana; Nino, Federico; Garavito, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    Stens are a tubular device for use in trachea, carina or main bronchus to provide a support and maintain the permeability of these structures. There are two groups: Metallic and Silicone stent. Either metallic and silicone stents has a special properties. Metallic stent are very attractive option due to relative easy in their placement. The accumulated experience in this therapy has allowed to recognize several complications to take into consideration mainly in patients with tracheal benign stenosis. FDA has recommended don't use metallic stents, covered and not covered in benign diseases. We report a case of a tracheal stenosis secondary to prolonged ortho tracheal intubation that required extensive interventions to control symptoms of central airway obstruction, between April and July of 2005.

  14. What is the prevalence of senior-athlete rotator cuff injuries and are they associated with pain and dysfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Patrick J; Prasad, Amitesh; Francis, Kimberly A

    2014-08-01

    Older individuals with rotator cuff injuries may have difficulties not only with activities of daily living, but also with sports activities. (1) How frequent and severe are rotator cuff abnormalities, as identified by ultrasound, in senior athletes? (2) To what degree does the severity of ultrasound-identified rotator cuff pathology correlate with pain and shoulder dysfunction? We assessed pain and shoulder function in 141 elite athletes older than 60 years of age (median age, 70 years; range 60-84) at the Senior Olympics who volunteered to participate. An ultrasound evaluation of the rotator cuff of the dominant shoulder was performed by an experienced musculoskeletal radiologist in all of these elite athletes. We then determined the relationship between ultrasound findings and shoulder pain and shoulder function as assessed with the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) scores. There were 20 shoulders with a normal cuff (14.2% [20 of 141], of which 5% [one of 20] were painful), 23 with tendinosis (16.3% [23 of 141], of which 30% [six of 20] were painful), 68 with a partial-thickness rotator cuff tear (48.2% [68 of 141], of which 32% [20 of 63] were painful), and 30 with a full-thickness rotator cuff tear (21.3% [30 of 141], of which 25% [seven of 28] were painful). Only 5% of athletes (one of 20) with a normal cuff on ultrasound evaluation reported shoulder pain, whereas 30% of athletes (33 of 111) with any degree of rotator cuff damage on ultrasound evaluation reported shoulder pain, This resulted in an odds ratio of 8.0 (95% confidence interval, 1.0-62.5). The proportion of patients who had pain was not different in those with different severities of rotator cuff pathology. Neither the ASES nor the DASH was different in those with different severities. The frequency of full-thickness rotator cuff tears in senior athletes was 21.3% (30 of 141). Pain was a predictor of rotator cuff injury but not of its

  15. Efficacy of surgery for rotator cuff tendinopathy: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toliopoulos, Panagiota; Desmeules, François; Boudreault, Jennifer; Roy, Jean-Sébastien; Frémont, Pierre; MacDermid, Joy C; Dionne, Clermont E

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to review randomized controlled trials evaluating the efficacy of surgery for the treatment of rotator cuff (RC) tendinopathy. Studies up to August 2013 were located in the PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, and PEDro databases using relevant keywords. Studies were included if: (1) participants had rotator cuff tendinopathy, (2) the trials were conducted on an adult population (≥18 years old), (3) at least one of the interventions studied was a surgical procedure, (4) study design was a randomized controlled trial (RCT), and (5) the article was written in English or French. Characteristics of the included studies were extracted using a standardized form. Two independent raters reviewed the methodological quality of the studies using the Risk of Bias Assessment tool developed by the Cochrane Collaboration Group. Differences were resolved by consensus. Fifteen trials met our inclusion criteria. After consensus, the mean methodological quality for all studies was 58.9 ± 10.8 %. In three out of four RCTs of moderate or low methodological quality, no significant difference in treatment effectiveness was observed between open or arthroscopic acromioplasty compared to exercises in the treatment of RC tendinopathy. Based on two studies of low or moderate methodological quality, no difference in treatment effectiveness was observed between arthroscopic and open acromioplasty. Two other RCTs of low to moderate quality, however, found that arthroscopic acromioplasty yielded better results in the short-term for shoulder range of motion in flexion but that both procedures were comparable in the long-term. One additional study favored open acromioplasty over arthroscopic acromioplasty for the treatment of RC tendinopathy. Based on low- to moderate-quality evidence, acromioplasty, be it open or arthroscopic, is no more effective than exercises for the treatment of RC tendinopathy. Low-grade evidence also suggests that arthroscopic acromioplasty may

  16. MR imaging of delamination tears of the rotator cuff tendons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walz, Daniel M.; Chen, Steven [North Shore University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Manhasset, NY (United States); Miller, Theodore T. [Hospital for Special Surgery, Department of Radiology and Imaging, New York, NY (United States); Hofman, Josh [Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY (United States)

    2007-05-15

    The objective was to describe the imaging appearances and location of delamination tears of the rotator cuff tendons on non-contrast conventional MR imaging. This study was reviewed and approved by our Institutional Review Board. The reports of 548 consecutive MR examinations of the shoulder were reviewed, looking for mention or description of delamination tears of the rotator cuff. The images of the identified cases were then reviewed by two radiologists to confirm the findings. Correlation with surgical and arthroscopic information was then performed. Delamination tears were defined as horizontal retraction of either the bursal or articular surface of the tendon, manifest as thickening of the torn retracted edge, and/or interstitial splitting of the tendon, manifest as fluid-like high signal intensity on fat-suppressed T2-weighted oblique coronal images. Fourteen cases of delamination tears were identified in 13 patients. Ten of the cases involved the supraspinatus tendon, all with articular surface involvement. Nine of these supraspinatus cases were isolated tears and one occurred as part of a full thickness tear. All 10 of these supraspinatus cases showed medial retraction of the articular surface of the tendon, with thickening of the retracted edge, and 5 of the 10 had a demonstrable horizontal cleft in the interstitium. Four cases involved the subscapularis tendon, with articular surface disruption in three and pure interstitial delamination in one. Medial subluxation of the tendon of the long head of the biceps was present in all four cases. No delamination tears occurred on the bursal surface. Only three of the 14 shoulders underwent surgical repair with one confirmation of supraspinatus delamination, one confirmation of a subscapularis tear that had become a full thickness tear 10 months after initial imaging and another interstitial subscapularis delamination that was not identified arthroscopically. Delamination tears occur most often in the

  17. Neoglottis reconstruction with sternohyoid muscles on upper-tracheal orifice after laryngectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chang Jiang; Cheng, Lei; Wu, Haitao; Tao, Lei; Zhou, Liang

    2017-01-01

    Ideal speech restoration remains a difficult challenge for patients undergoing laryngectomy so far. Our aim was to explore the feasibility of neoglottic reconstruction with sternohyoid muscles on upper-tracheal orifice after total laryngectomy which can obtain relatively ideal voice rehabilitation. Fifteen male patients are laryngectomized, of whom eight with standard total laryngectomy and seven underwent nonstandard total laryngectomy with epiglottis conserved. After laryngectomy, the upper margin of the anterior hypopharyngeal mucosa (postcricoid mucosa) was stitched to the posterior margin of upper-tracheal orifice and a triangle-shaped neoglottis on upper-tracheal orifice was reconstructed using bilateral sternohyoid muscles near the hyoid bone which were sutured to the posterior wall and bilateral of upper-tracheal orifice. Then tracheolingual root anastomosis was done and reconstruction surgery was completed. Finally, a satisfactory voice was achieved in 14 of 15 patients except one whose neoglottis is stenosed and 11 cases had no severe complications including aspiration erroneous deglutition. The stomach catheters were removed successfully from 4 to 6 weeks after surgery in 11 cases, respectively. The neoglottis had to be closed in three patients because of aspiration problem. One neoglottis was closed 3 weeks after surgical reconstruction because of tracheal rings tear which created a bigger neoglottis. One neoglottis was removed 32 moths after total laryngectomy due to big neoglottis. Another one was closed 3 weeks after surgery by reason of the fear of aspiration without psychological preparation. Therefore, it is feasible to use the sternohyoid muscles for creation of a neoglottis on upper-tracheal orifice and provide an alternative surgical method of the voice restoration for the patients after laryngectomy.

  18. Lunar Lava Tube Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Cheryl Lynn; Walden, Bryce; Billings, Thomas L.; Reeder, P. Douglas

    1992-01-01

    Large (greater than 300 m diameter) lava tube caverns appear to exist on the Moon and could provide substantial safety and cost benefits for lunar bases. Over 40 m of basalt and regolith constitute the lava tube roof and would protect both construction and operations. Constant temperatures of -20 C reduce thermal stress on structures and machines. Base designs need not incorporate heavy shielding, so lightweight materials can be used and construction can be expedited. Identification and characterization of lava tube caverns can be incorporated into current precursor lunar mission plans. Some searches can even be done from Earth. Specific recommendations for lunar lava tube search and exploration are (1) an Earth-based radar interferometer, (2) an Earth-penetrating radar (EPR) orbiter, (3) kinetic penetrators for lunar lava tube confirmation, (4) a 'Moon Bat' hovering rocket vehicle, and (5) the use of other proposed landers and orbiters to help find lunar lava tubes.

  19. Steam generator tube performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatone, O.S.; Pathania, R.S.

    1983-08-01

    A review of the performance of steam generator tubes in 110 water-cooled nuclear power reactors showed that tubes were plugged at 46 (42 percent) of the reactors. The number of tubes removed from service increased from 1900 (0.14 percent) in 1980 to 4692 (0.30 percent) in 1981. The leading causes of tube failures were stress corrosion cracking from the primary side, stress corrosion cracking (or intergranular attack) from the secondary side and pitting corrosion. The lowest incidence of corrosion-induced defects from the secondary side occurred in reactors that used all-volatile treatment since start-up. At one reactor a large number of degraded tubes were repaired by sleeving which is expected to become an important method of tube repair in the future

  20. Leakage Characteristics of Dual-Cannula Fenestrated Tracheostomy Tubes during Positive Pressure Ventilation: A Bench Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Berlet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study compared the leakage characteristics of different types of dual-cannula fenestrated tracheostomy tubes during positive pressure ventilation. Fenestrated Portex® Blue Line Ultra®, TRACOE® twist, or Rüsch® Traceofix® tracheostomy tubes equipped with nonfenestrated inner cannulas were tested in a tracheostomy-lung simulator. Transfenestration pressures and transfenestration leakage rates were measured during positive pressure ventilation. The impact of different ventilation modes, airway pressures, temperatures, and simulated static lung compliance settings on leakage characteristics was assessed. We observed substantial differences in transfenestration pressures and transfenestration leakage rates. The leakage rates of the best performing tubes were <3.5% of the delivered minute volume. At body temperature, the leakage rates of these tracheostomy tubes were <1%. The tracheal tube design was the main factor that determined the leakage characteristics. Careful tracheostomy tube selection permits the use of fenestrated tracheostomy tubes in patients receiving positive pressure ventilation immediately after stoma formation and minimises the risk of complications caused by transfenestration gas leakage, for example, subcutaneous emphysema.

  1. A retropharyngeal-mediastinal hematoma with supraglottic and tracheal obstruction: The role of multidisciplinary airway management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birkholz Torsten

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 77-year-old man suffered hypoxemic cardiac arrest by supraglottic and tracheal airway obstruction in the emergency department. A previously unknown cervical fracture had caused a traumatic retropharyngeal-mediastinal hematoma. A lifesaving surgical emergency tracheostomy succeeded. Supraglottic and tracheal obstruction by a retropharyngeal-mediastinal hematoma with successful resuscitation via emergency tracheostomy after hypoxemic cardiac arrest has never been reported in a context of trauma. This clinically demanding case outlines the need for multidisciplinary airway management systems with continuous training and well-implemented guidelines. Only multidisciplinary staff preparedness and readily available equipments for the unanticipated difficult airway solved the catastrophic clinical situation.

  2. [Tracheal Injury Successfully Treated without Surgery;Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Toshihiro; Nakano, Jun; Yokomise, Hiroyasu

    2018-02-01

    A 73-year-old man was injured after crashing his automobile into a concrete wall, and was admitted to our hospital with breathing difficulties. Chest computed tomography showed extensive mediastinal emphysema, right traumatic pneumothorax, and a suspected tracheal injury at the membranous region. Because of the associated tracheomalacia, the site of the tracheal injury was difficult to find by bronchoscopy. In addition, as the patient's respiratory condition was stable, surgical treatment was not chosen. Due to the continuous air leakage from the right lung, the patient underwent surgery after mediastinal and subcutaneous emphysema improved. The postoperative course was uneventful.

  3. Cricoid pressure in emergency department rapid sequence tracheal intubations: a risk-benefit analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Daniel Y; Harris, Tim; Zideman, David

    2007-12-01

    Cricoid pressure is considered an integral part of patient safety in rapid sequence tracheal intubation and emergency airway management. Cricoid pressure is applied to prevent the regurgitation of gastric contents into the pharynx and subsequent aspiration into the pulmonary tree. This review analyzes the published evidence supporting cricoid pressure, along with potential problems, including increased difficulty with tracheal intubation and ventilation. According to the evidence available, the universal and continuous application of cricoid pressure during emergency airway management is questioned. An awareness of the benefits and potential problems with technique allows the practitioner to better judge when cricoid pressure should be used and instances in which it should be removed.

  4. Is intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility correlated to clinical phenotypes and sex in patients with COPD?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camiciottoli G

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Gianna Camiciottoli,1 Stefano Diciotti,2 Francesca Bigazzi,1 Simone Lombardo,3 Maurizio Bartolucci,4 Matteo Paoletti,1 Mario Mascalchi,3 Massimo Pistolesi1 1Section of Respiratory Medicine, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy; 2Department of Electrical, Electronic, and Information Engineering “Guglielmo Marconi,” University of Bologna, Cesena, Italy; 3Radiodiagnostic Section, Department of Clinical and Experimental Biomedical Sciences, University of Florence, Florence, Italy; 4Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Careggi University Hospital, Florence, Italy Abstract: A substantial proportion of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD develops various degree of intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility. We studied whether the magnitude of intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility could be different across clinical phenotypes and sex in COPD. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility measured at paired inspiratory–expiratory low dose computed tomography (CT and its correlation with clinical, functional, and CT-densitometric data were investigated in 69 patients with COPD according to their predominant conductive airway or emphysema phenotypes and according to sex. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility was higher in patients with predominant conductive airway disease (n=28 and in females (n=27. Women with a predominant conductive airway phenotype (n=10 showed a significantly greater degree of collapsibility than women with predominant emphysema (28.9%±4% versus 11.6%±2%; P<0.001. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility was directly correlated with inspiratory–expiratory volume variation at CT and with forced expiratory volume (1 second, and inversely correlated with reduced CT lung density and functional residual capacity. Intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility was not correlated with cough and wheezing; however, intrathoracic tracheal collapsibility and clinical phenotypes of COPD

  5. Successfully repaired traumatic tracheal disruption and cardiac rupture with cardiopulmonary support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daitoku, Kazuyuki; Sakai, Takehiro; Yamada, Yoshitsugu; Tsushima, Takao; Koyama, Masayuki; Takaya, Shunichi

    2002-02-01

    A 19-year-old man suffering from dyspnea associated with tracheal and cardiac rupture from a traffic accident was found by bronchoscopy to have a 7.5 cm longitudinal tear in the membranous portion of the trachea. Right posterolateral thoracotomy was conducted and open ventilation through the left main bronchus initiated with standby cardiopulmonary bypass cannulation of the right femoral artery and vein. When oxygenation was poor, extracorporeal circulation was initiated through the cannulated artery and vein. Under the cardiopulmonary bypass, we safely repaired the tracheal laceration and cardiac rupture.

  6. Disability and satisfaction after Rotator Cuff decompression or repair: a sex and gender analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Aileen M

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rotator-cuff pathology is the most common cause of pain and disability in the shoulder. Examining the combined effect of biological and societal factors on disability would potentially identify existing differences between men and women with rotator cuff pathology which would help to provide suggestions for better models of care. Purpose of this study was to determine the overall differences in disability between men and women and to examine the relationship between factors that represent sex (biological factors and gender (non-biological factors with disability and satisfaction with surgical outcome 6 months after rotator cuff surgery. Methods Patients with impingement syndrome and/or rotator cuff tear who underwent rotator cuff surgery completed the Western Ontario Rotator Cuff (WORC index, the American Shoulder & Elbow Surgeons (ASES assessment form, and the Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (QuickDASH outcome measures prior to surgery and 6 months post-operatively. They also rated their satisfaction with surgery at their follow-up appointment. Results and Discussion One hundred and seventy patients entered into the study (85 men and 85 women. One hundred and sixty patients (94% completed the 6-month assessment. Women reported more disability both prior to and after surgery. Disability at 6 months was associated with pain-limited range of motion, participation limitation, age and strength. Satisfaction with surgery was associated with level of reported disability, expectations for improved pain, pain-limited range of motion and strength. Conclusions The results of this study indicate that women with rotator cuff pathology suffer from higher levels of pre- and post-operative disability and sex and gender qualities contribute to these differences. Gender-sensitive approach will help to identify existing differences between men and women which will help to promote more effective and tailored care by health

  7. Trabecular microstructure and surface changes in the greater tuberosity in rotator cuff tears

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Yebin; Zhao, Jenny; Ouyang, Xiaolong; Genant, Harry K.; Holsbeeck, Marnix T. van; Flynn, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Objective. When planning surgery in patients with rotator cuff tear, strength of bone at the tendon insertion and trabecular bone structure in the greater tuberosity are usually taken into consideration. We investigated radiographic changes in bone structure of the greater tuberosity in rotator cuff tears.Design. Twenty-two human cadaveric shoulders from subjects ranging from 55 to 75 years of age were obtained. The integrity of the rotator cuff was examined by sonography to determine if it is intact without any tear, or torn partially or completely. The humeral head was sectioned in 3 mm thick coronal slab sections and microradiographed. After digitization of the microradiographs and imaging processing with in-house semi-automated image processing software tools developed using software interfaces on a Sun workstation, the trabecular histomorphometrical structural parameters and connectivity in the greater tuberosity were quantified. The degenerative changes on the surface of the greater tuberosity were interpreted blindly by 2 independent readers.Results. Among the 22 shoulder specimens, the rotator cuff was found intact in 10 shoulders, partially in 7 and fully torn in 5. Statistically significant loss in apparent trabecular bone volume fraction, number of trabecular nodes, and number of trabecular branches, and a statistically significant increase in apparent trabecular separation and number of trabecular free ends were found in the greater tuberosity of the shoulders with tears. The loss was greater in association with full tear than in partial tear. Thickening of the cortical margin of the enthesis, irregularity of its surface, and calcification beyond the tidemark were observed in 2 (20%) shoulders with intact rotator cuff, in 6 (86%) shoulders with partial tear, and in 5 (100%) shoulders with full tear.Conclusions. Rotator cuff tears are associated with degenerative changes on the bone surface and with disuse osteopenia of the greater tuberosity

  8. Effects of age and pathology on shear wave speed of the human rotator cuff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumer, Timothy G; Dischler, Jack; Davis, Leah; Labyed, Yassin; Siegal, Daniel S; van Holsbeeck, Marnix; Moutzouros, Vasilios; Bey, Michael J

    2018-01-01

    Rotator cuff tears are common and often repaired surgically, but post-operative repair tissue healing, and shoulder function can be unpredictable. Tear chronicity is believed to influence clinical outcomes, but conventional clinical approaches for assessing tear chronicity are subjective. Shear wave elastography (SWE) is a promising technique for assessing soft tissue via estimates of shear wave speed (SWS), but this technique has not been used extensively on the rotator cuff. Specifically, the effects of age and pathology on rotator cuff SWS are not well known. The objectives of this study were to assess the association between SWS and age in healthy, asymptomatic subjects, and to compare measures of SWS between patients with a rotator cuff tear and healthy, asymptomatic subjects. SWE images of the supraspinatus muscle and intramuscular tendon were acquired from 19 asymptomatic subjects and 11 patients with a rotator cuff tear. Images were acquired with the supraspinatus under passive and active (i.e., minimal activation) conditions. Mean SWS was positively associated with age in the supraspinatus muscle and tendon under passive and active conditions (p ≤ 0.049). Compared to asymptomatic subjects, patients had a lower mean SWS in their muscle and tendon under active conditions (p ≤ 0.024), but no differences were detected under passive conditions (p ≥ 0.783). These findings identify the influences of age and pathology on SWS in the rotator cuff. These preliminary findings are an important step toward evaluating the clinical utility of SWE for assessing rotator cuff pathology. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 36:282-288, 2018. © 2017 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Validation of a conical cuff on the forearm for estimating radial artery blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, Lawrence T; Sesing, Jean C; Luczyk, William J; Friedman, Bruce A; Zhou, Shanggen; Batchelder, Paul B

    2014-02-01

    There has been a growing need for and interest in measuring noninvasive blood pressure (NIBP) in obese patients. In many situations, available rectangular upper arm blood pressure cuffs do not fit properly, closing in a crisscross manner or overlapping the elbow. To address this issue, GE Healthcare has designed a conically shaped cuff for use on the forearm to estimate radial arterial blood pressure. This study evaluated using this forearm cuff with an oscillometric NIBP algorithm compared with an invasive radial arterial blood pressure reference. Thirty-four patients were enrolled in the study with an aim to acquire a minimum of 150 paired measurements. Blood pressure was measured and recorded invasively from the radial artery of each patient, while noninvasive oscillometric measurements were acquired from the same limb using a conically shaped cuff placed on the patient's forearm. NIBP values were compared with the invasive blood pressure values acquired in the combined 30-s period preceding cuff inflation and the 30-s period following cuff deflation. The acceptance criteria for measurement accuracy were defined in accordance with the ANSI/AAMI/ISO 81060-2:2009 standard, which requires an absolute average error of 5 mmHg or less, with an SD of 8 mmHg or less. The systolic mean error (-0.82 mmHg) and SD (6.08 mmHg) and the diastolic mean error (1.53 mmHg) and SD (3.83 mmHg) were within the 81060-2 acceptance criteria. The statistical results show that oscillometric NIBP measurements taken with the conically shaped cuff placed on the forearm give an accurate estimation of radial arterial blood pressure.

  10. Urethral Stricture Outcomes After Artificial Urinary Sphincter Cuff Erosion: Results From a Multicenter Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Martin S; Broghammer, Joshua A; Kaufman, Melissa R; Milam, Douglas F; Brant, William O; Cleves, Mario A; Dum, Travis W; McClung, Christopher; Jones, LeRoy A; Brady, Jeffrey D; Pryor, Michael B; Henry, Gerard D

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the influence of both repair type and degree of cuff erosion on postoperative urethral stricture rate. Sparse literature exists regarding patient outcomes after artificial urinary sphincter (AUS) cuff erosion. Surgeons from 6 high-volume male continence centers compiled a comprehensive database of post-erosion patients to examine outcomes. This retrospective multi-institution study included 80 patients treated for AUS cuff erosions. Seventy-eight patients had specific information regarding post-cuff erosion urethral strictures. Erosion patients were categorized into 1 of 3 repair types at the time of explant surgery: catheter only, single-layer capsule-to-capsule repair (urethrorrhaphy), and formal urethroplasty. Operative notes and available medical records were extensively reviewed to collect study data. Twenty-five of 78 patients manifested a urethral stricture after AUS cuff erosion (32%). More strictures occurred among patients who underwent urethrorrhaphy (40% vs 29% for catheter only and 14% for urethroplasty). Stricture rates did not vary significantly by repair type (P = .2). Strictures occurred significantly more frequently in patients with complete cuff erosions (58%) as compared to partial erosions (25%, P = .037). A trend was detected regarding increased percentage of erosion correlating with increased stricture rate, but this did not reach statistical significance (P = .057). Partially eroded patients were more likely to undergo urethrorrhaphy repair (60%, P = .002). Urethral stricture was more likely to occur after complete cuff erosion as opposed to partial erosion in this multicenter retrospective population. Repair type, whether catheter only, urethrorrhaphy, or formal urethroplasty, did not appear to influence postoperative stricture rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Manual tube welding torch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, J.H.; Smith, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    In a welding torch which fits over a tube intermediate the ends thereof for welding the juncture between the tube and a boss on the back side of a tube plate, a split housing encloses a tungsten electrode, a filler wire duct and a fiber optic bundle arranged to observe the welding process. A shielding gas duct is provided in the housing. A screw is provided for setting electrode/work distance. Difficult remote tube welding operations can be performed with the apparatus. (author)

  12. Steam generator tube performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatone, O.S.; Pathania, R.S.

    1984-10-01

    A review of the performance of steam generator tubes in 116 water-cooled nuclear power reactors showed that tubes were plugged at 54 (46 percent) of the reactors. The number of tubes removed from service decreased from 4 692 (0.30 percent) in 1981 to 3 222 (0.20 percent) in 1982. The leading causes of tube failures were stress corrosion cracking from the primary side, stress corrosion cracking (or intergranular attack) from the secondary side and pitting corrosion. The lowest incidence of corrosion-induced defects from the secondary side occurred in reactors that have used only volatile treatment, with or without condensate demineralization

  13. Wound tube heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1983-01-01

    What is disclosed is a wound tube heat exchanger in which a plurality of tubes having flattened areas are held contiguous adjacent flattened areas of tubes by a plurality of windings to give a double walled heat exchanger. The plurality of windings serve as a plurality of effective force vectors holding the conduits contiguous heat conducting walls of another conduit and result in highly efficient heat transfer. The resulting heat exchange bundle is economical and can be coiled into the desired shape. Also disclosed are specific embodiments such as the one in which the tubes are expanded against their windings after being coiled to insure highly efficient heat transfer.

  14. Sapphire tube pressure vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Outwater, John O.

    2000-01-01

    A pressure vessel is provided for observing corrosive fluids at high temperatures and pressures. A transparent Teflon bag contains the corrosive fluid and provides an inert barrier. The Teflon bag is placed within a sapphire tube, which forms a pressure boundary. The tube is received within a pipe including a viewing window. The combination of the Teflon bag, sapphire tube and pipe provides a strong and inert pressure vessel. In an alternative embodiment, tie rods connect together compression fittings at opposite ends of the sapphire tube.

  15. Fuel nozzle tube retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cihlar, David William; Melton, Patrick Benedict

    2017-02-28

    A system for retaining a fuel nozzle premix tube includes a retention plate and a premix tube which extends downstream from an outlet of a premix passage defined along an aft side of a fuel plenum body. The premix tube includes an inlet end and a spring support feature which is disposed proximate to the inlet end. The premix tube extends through the retention plate. The spring retention feature is disposed between an aft side of the fuel plenum and the retention plate. The system further includes a spring which extends between the spring retention feature and the retention plate.

  16. Rotator cuff injuries and factors associated with reoperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Litchina Carvalho

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence of rotator cuff tears and describe the profile of reoperated patients, causes of repeated tendon tears, tear evolution and range of times between surgical procedures. METHOD: This was a cross-sectional study involving 604 surgical procedures performed at two regional referral hospitals between January 2006 and December 2012. After approval by the ethics committee, data describing the patients' epidemiological profile were gathered at a single time, using Cofield's classification to measure the extent of the tears, all of which underwent arthroscopic surgery. The data were entered into Epi Info 3.5.3 and were analyzed using SPSS version 18.0. RESULTS: Among the 604 surgical procedures, females were affected in more cases (351; 58.1%. When the dominant limb was the right limb, it was affected in 90% of the cases (p < 0.05. The supraspinatus tendon was affected in 574 cases (95% and the tears were of medium size in 300 cases (49.7%. Eighteen reoperations were performed (2.98% and the upper right limb was the most affected (66.6%. The cause was non-traumatic in 12 patients. The repeated tears were mostly smaller (44%, and the length of time between the two surgical procedures ranged from 6 to 298 weeks. CONCLUSION: Female gender, smaller extent in the second procedure and non-traumatic cause were found in most of the cases analyzed.

  17. Acromial Findings Associated with Rotator cuff's Lesions in Magnetic Resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avila, Mercedes; Atencio, Elizabeth; Moreno, Franklin

    2008-01-01

    The objective is to evaluate by means of magnetic resonance the acromial alterations associated to rotator cuff (RC) lesions (MR). Materials and methods: A prospective, descriptive and cross-sectional type study was performed in 30 patients aged between 40 and 70 years who attended the Resomer imaging center during the period comprised between October-December 2007, with clinical diagnosis of RC lesion, using a 1.5 T magnet. Results: Most of the studied population were females (66.67%), the mean age being of 56.93 years with a typical deviation of 8.75, with partial lesions in 63.33%, Type II acromion was the dominant acromion in 50%, of anterior orientation (90%), with absent os acromiale (96.66%). Likewise, clavicular and acromial articular hypertrophy was demonstrated in 93.33% of cases. The glenoid-acromion distance had a mean value of 3.15 cm and a typical deviation of 0.55 while the glenoid-humeral distance was 4.65 cm with a typical deviation of 0.46 and the acromial index of 0.67. The humeral-acromion space exhibited a mean value of 6.3 mm with a typical deviation of 1.72. Conclusion: The predominantly degenerative acromial alterations are a conditioning factor of compression resulting from incarceration in the clamp form with a larger > supraspinous tendon wear-out with later affectation to the remaining tendons of the RC as the exposure evolves.

  18. Use of grafts in rotator cuff re-rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Martín, A; Santos-Yubero, F J; Najarro-Cid, F J; Navarro-Martínez, S; Zurera-Carmona, M; Pérez-Hidalgo, S

    2016-01-01

    Rotator cuff re-ruptures appear in 38-65% of cases. In order to reduce this rate, many studies have been performed using different types of biomaterial for purely mechanical aims (re-inforce the suture) and/or biological agents (growth factor transporterts). The aim of this study is to review 22 cases treated with xenografts and analyse various current alternatives. A descriptive and retrospective study was conducted using the variables of age, sex, laterality, time of surgery, involvement in MRI, number of anchors, and final mobility results on the Constant and the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) validated scales. The study included 22 patients, with a mean age of 51.7±4.6 years. A mean of 2 anchors were used and 13 patients were treated with a porcine intestinal submucosa implant, 6 with equine pericardium, and 3 with porcine dermis. Final results were: 37.6±13 points for the Constant test, and 16.9±3.9 points on the UCLA scale. The follow up was 36±10.2 months. In our experience, xenografts could provide good functional results and they would be a surgical alternative to tendon transfers in cases of massive tears. Further studies should be conducted with other biomaterials. Copyright © 2016 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Assessment and characterization of in situ rotator cuff biomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trent, Erika A.; Bailey, Lane; Mefleh, Fuad N.; Raikar, Vipul P.; Shanley, Ellen; Thigpen, Charles A.; Dean, Delphine; Kwartowitz, David M.

    2013-03-01

    Rotator cuff disease is a degenerative disorder that is a common, costly, and often debilitating, ranging in severity from partial thickness tear, which may cause pain, to total rupture, leading to loss in function. Currently, clinical diagnosis and determination of disease extent relies primarily on subjective assessment of pain, range of motion, and possibly X-ray or ultrasound images. The final treatment plan however is at the discretion of the clinician, who often bases their decision on personal experiences, and not quantitative standards. The use of ultrasound for the assessment of tissue biomechanics is established, such as in ultrasound elastography, where soft tissue biomechanics are measured. Few studies have investigated the use of ultrasound elastography in the characterization of musculoskeletal biomechanics. To assess tissue biomechanics we have developed a device, which measures the force applied to the underlying musculotendentious tissue while simultaneously obtaining the related ultrasound images. In this work, the musculotendinous region of the infraspinatus of twenty asymptomatic male organized baseball players was examined to access the variability in tissue properties within a single patient and across a normal population. Elastic moduli at percent strains less than 15 were significantly different than those above 15 percent strain within the normal population. No significant difference in tissue properties was demonstrated within a single patient. This analysis demonstrated elastic moduli are variable across individuals and incidence. Therefore threshold elastic moduli will likely be a function of variation in local-tissue moduli as opposed to a specific global value.

  20. Reverse Fosbury Flop Tear of the Rotator Cuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Tirefort

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. “Fosbury flop” tear is an avulsion of the posterosuperior rotator cuff from the bone with reversal healing on its medial bursal-side. This case report describes a unique variant of Fosbury flop tear with a lesion of the musculotendinous junction that healed, for its tendon part, on the anterior humerus and coracoid process. Case Presentation. A 62-year-old man developed a posttraumatic painful shoulder with active loss of range of motion. Magnetic resonance arthrography demonstrated a lesion of the musculotendinous junction of the supraspinatus with healing of the tendon on the above-mentioned structures (reverse Fosbury flop. During arthroscopic evaluation, tendon repair was not possible and a debridement to avoid subacromial and anterior impingement associated with a tenotomy of the long head of the biceps were carried out. One year postoperatively, the patient had complete range of motion and was satisfied with the clinical results. Discussion and Conclusion. Different Fosbury flop tears exist. Radiologists and orthopedic surgeons should be aware of these tear patterns as failure to recognize them may lead to inadequate treatment.