WorldWideScience

Sample records for toxic gas releases

  1. TOXRISK, Toxic Gas Release Accident Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, D.E.; Chanin, D.I.; Shiver, A.W.

    1993-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: TOXRISK is an interactive program developed to aid in the evaluation of nuclear power plant control room habitability in the event of a nearby toxic material release. The program uses a model which is consistent with the approach described in the NRC Regulatory Guide 1.78. Release of the gas is treated as an initial puff followed by a continuous plume. The relative proportions of these as well as the plume release rate are supplied by the user. Transport of the gas is modeled as a Gaussian distribution and occurs through the action of a constant velocity, constant direction wind. Great flexibility is afforded the user in specifying the release description, meteorological conditions, relative geometry of the accident and plant, and the plant ventilation system characteristics. Two types of simulation can be performed: multiple case (parametric) studies and probabilistic analyses. Upon execution, TOXRISK presents a menu, and the user chooses between the Data Base Manager, the Multiple Case program, and the Probabilistic Study Program. The Data Base Manager provides a convenient means of storing, retrieving, and modifying blocks of data required by the analysis programs. The Multiple Case program calculates resultant gas concentrations inside the control room and presents a summary of information that describes the event for each set of conditions given. Optimally, a time history profile of inside and outside concentrations can also be produced. The Probabilistic Study program provides a means for estimating the annual probability of operator incapacitation due to toxic gas accidents on surrounding transportation routes and storage sites. 2 - Method of solution: Dispersion or diffusion of the gas during transport is described by modified Pasquill-Gifford dispersion coefficients

  2. An approach for estimating toxic releases of H2S-containing natural gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jianwen, Zhang; Da, Lei; Wenxing, Feng

    2014-01-15

    China is well known being rich in sulfurous natural gas with huge deposits widely distributed all over the country. Due to the toxic nature, the release of hydrogen sulfide-containing natural gas from the pipelines intends to impose serious threats to the human, society and environment around the release sources. CFD algorithm is adopted to simulate the dispersion process of gas, and the results prove that Gaussian plume model is suitable for determining the affected region of the well blowout of sulfide hydrogen-containing natural gas. In accordance with the analysis of release scenarios, the present study proposes a new approach for estimating the risk of hydrogen sulfide poisoning hazards, as caused by sulfide-hydrogen-containing natural gas releases. Historical accident-statistical data from the EGIG (European Gas Pipeline Incident Data Group) and the Britain Gas Transco are integrated into the approach. Also, the dose-load effect is introduced to exploit the hazards' effects by two essential parameters - toxic concentration and exposure time. The approach was applied to three release scenarios occurring on the East-Sichuan Gas Transportation Project, and the individual risk and societal risk are classified and discussed. Results show that societal risk varies significantly with different factors, including population density, distance from pipeline, operating conditions and so on. Concerning the dispersion process of hazardous gas, available safe egress time was studied from the perspective of individual fatality risks. The present approach can provide reliable support for the safety management and maintenance of natural gas pipelines as well as evacuations that may occur after release incidents. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. An approach for estimating toxic releases of H{sub 2}S-containing natural gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jianwen, Zhang, E-mail: zhangjw@mail.buct.edu.cn [Lab of Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Institute of Safety Management, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Da, Lei [Lab of Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Wenxing, Feng [Pipeline Research Center of PetroChina Company Lmited, 51 Golden Road, Langfang 065000 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Behavior of H{sub 2}S-containing natural gas exhibits appearance of neutral gas by CFD. • The poisoning hazards of H{sub 2}S by gas pipeline releases are successfully estimated. • An assessment method for available safe egress time is proposed. -- Abstract: China is well known being rich in sulfurous natural gas with huge deposits widely distributed all over the country. Due to the toxic nature, the release of hydrogen sulfide-containing natural gas from the pipelines intends to impose serious threats to the human, society and environment around the release sources. CFD algorithm is adopted to simulate the dispersion process of gas, and the results prove that Gaussian plume model is suitable for determining the affected region of the well blowout of sulfide hydrogen-containing natural gas. In accordance with the analysis of release scenarios, the present study proposes a new approach for estimating the risk of hydrogen sulfide poisoning hazards, as caused by sulfide-hydrogen-containing natural gas releases. Historical accident-statistical data from the EGIG (European Gas Pipeline Incident Data Group) and the Britain Gas Transco are integrated into the approach. Also, the dose-load effect is introduced to exploit the hazards’ effects by two essential parameters – toxic concentration and exposure time. The approach was applied to three release scenarios occurring on the East-Sichuan Gas Transportation Project, and the individual risk and societal risk are classified and discussed. Results show that societal risk varies significantly with different factors, including population density, distance from pipeline, operating conditions and so on. Concerning the dispersion process of hazardous gas, available safe egress time was studied from the perspective of individual fatality risks. The present approach can provide reliable support for the safety management and maintenance of natural gas pipelines as well as evacuations that may occur after

  4. Toxic releases from power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, E.S.

    1999-01-01

    Beginning in 1998, electric power plants burning coal or oil must estimate and report their annual releases of toxic chemicals listed in the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) published by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This paper identifies the toxic chemicals of greatest significance for the electric utility sector and develops quantitative estimates of the toxic releases reportable to the TRI for a representative coal-fired power plant. Key factors affecting the magnitude and types of toxic releases for individual power plants also are discussed. A national projection suggests that the magnitude of electric utility industry releases will surpass those of the manufacturing industries which current report to the TRI. Risk communication activities at the community level will be essential to interpret and provide context for the new TRI results

  5. Allegheny County Toxics Release Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) data provides information about toxic substances released into the environment or managed through recycling, energy recovery, and...

  6. Toxic fluoride gas emissions from lithium-ion battery fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Fredrik; Andersson, Petra; Blomqvist, Per; Mellander, Bengt-Erik

    2017-08-30

    Lithium-ion battery fires generate intense heat and considerable amounts of gas and smoke. Although the emission of toxic gases can be a larger threat than the heat, the knowledge of such emissions is limited. This paper presents quantitative measurements of heat release and fluoride gas emissions during battery fires for seven different types of commercial lithium-ion batteries. The results have been validated using two independent measurement techniques and show that large amounts of hydrogen fluoride (HF) may be generated, ranging between 20 and 200 mg/Wh of nominal battery energy capacity. In addition, 15-22 mg/Wh of another potentially toxic gas, phosphoryl fluoride (POF 3 ), was measured in some of the fire tests. Gas emissions when using water mist as extinguishing agent were also investigated. Fluoride gas emission can pose a serious toxic threat and the results are crucial findings for risk assessment and management, especially for large Li-ion battery packs.

  7. Toxics Release Inventory (TRI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) is a dataset compiled by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It contains information on the release and waste...

  8. Toxic Release Inventory Chemicals by Groupings

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) makes available information for more than 600 toxic chemicals that are being used, manufactured, treated, transported, or released...

  9. Toxic chemical considerations for tank farm releases. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Keuren, J.C.

    1995-11-01

    This document provides a method of determining the toxicological consequences of accidental releases from Hanford Tank Farms. A determination was made of the most restrictive toxic chemicals that are expected to be present in the tanks. Concentrations were estimated based on the maximum sample data for each analyte in all the tanks in the composite. Composite evaluated were liquids and solids from single shell tanks, double shell tanks, flammable gas watch list tanks, as well as all solids, all liquids, head space gases, and 241-C-106 solids. A sum of fractions of the health effects was computed for each composite for unit releases based emergency response planning guidelines (ERPGs). Where ERPGs were not available for chemical compounds of interest, surrogate guidelines were established. The calculation method in this report can be applied to actual release scenarios by multiplying the sum of fractions by the release rate for continuous releases, or the release amount for puff releases. Risk guidelines are met if the product is less than for equal to one.

  10. Toxic chemical considerations for tank farm releases. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Keuren, J.C.

    1995-11-01

    This document provides a method of determining the toxicological consequences of accidental releases from Hanford Tank Farms. A determination was made of the most restrictive toxic chemicals that are expected to be present in the tanks. Concentrations were estimated based on the maximum sample data for each analyte in all the tanks in the composite. Composite evaluated were liquids and solids from single shell tanks, double shell tanks, flammable gas watch list tanks, as well as all solids, all liquids, head space gases, and 241-C-106 solids. A sum of fractions of the health effects was computed for each composite for unit releases based emergency response planning guidelines (ERPGs). Where ERPGs were not available for chemical compounds of interest, surrogate guidelines were established. The calculation method in this report can be applied to actual release scenarios by multiplying the sum of fractions by the release rate for continuous releases, or the release amount for puff releases. Risk guidelines are met if the product is less than for equal to one

  11. Minimizing employee exposure to toxic chemical releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plummer, R.W.; Stobbe, T.J.; Mogensen, J.E.; Jeram, L.K.

    1987-01-01

    This book describes procedures for minimizing employee exposure to toxic chemical releases and suggested personal protective equipment (PPE) to be used in the event of such chemical release. How individuals, employees, supervisors, or companies perceive the risks of chemical exposure (risk meaning both probability of exposure and effect of exposure) determines to a great extent what precautions are taken to avoid risk. In Part I, the authors develop and approach which divides the project into three phases: kinds of procedures currently being used; the types of toxic chemical release accidents and injuries that occur; and, finally, integration of this information into a set of recommended procedures which should decrease the likelihood of a toxic chemical release and, if one does occur, will minimize the exposure and its severity to employees. Part II covers the use of personal protective equipment. It addresses the questions: what personal protective equipment ensembles are used in industry in situations where the release of a toxic or dangerous chemical may occur or has occurred; and what personal protective equipment ensembles should be used in these situations

  12. Exploring Environmental Inequity in South Korea: An Analysis of the Distribution of Toxic Release Inventory (TRI Facilities and Toxic Releases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Yoon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Recently, location data regarding the Toxic Release Inventory (TRI in South Korea was released to the public. This study investigated the spatial patterns of TRIs and releases of toxic substances in all 230 local governments in South Korea to determine whether spatial clusters relevant to the siting of noxious facilities occur. In addition, we employed spatial regression modeling to determine whether the number of TRI facilities and the volume of toxic releases in a given community were correlated with the community’s socioeconomic, racial, political, and land use characteristics. We found that the TRI facilities and their toxic releases were disproportionately distributed with clustered spatial patterning. Spatial regression modeling indicated that jurisdictions with smaller percentages of minorities, stronger political activity, less industrial land use, and more commercial land use had smaller numbers of toxic releases, as well as smaller numbers of TRI facilities. However, the economic status of the community did not affect the siting of hazardous facilities. These results indicate that the siting of TRI facilities in Korea is more affected by sociopolitical factors than by economic status. Racial issues are thus crucial for consideration in environmental justice as the population of Korea becomes more racially and ethnically diverse.

  13. Investigation of delayed fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cayet, Nicolas

    1996-05-01

    The study of the fission gas release process in the high burnup rig IFA-562 has revealed a particular fuel behaviour: a delay in the fission gas release process. It appeared that an important release of gas was measured by the pressure transducers once the power had decreased, whereas, during steady-state operation, the pressure did not increase very much. After examinations, the gap size has been concluded to be the main parameter involving this delay. However the burnup could have been a potential factor, its role is mainly to close the gap by swelling. The observations of low burnup rods have shown the same delayed fission gas release, the gap being small by design and closed essentially by thermal expansion. The study of the kinetics has demonstrated the time-independency of the phenomenon. Thus the proposed mechanism driving this delayed fission gas release would involve three consecutives stages. During steady-state, the gas is released into the interlinkage network of grain boundary bubbles and cracks. Due to the closed gap, the gas is trapped in some void volumes, unable to escape the pellet. During power reduction, the gap and some old/new cracks open, immediately providing a path for the gas to the pressure transducers and explaining this delay in the fission gas release. (author)

  14. Morphology of Gas Release in Physical Simulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Richard C.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Crawford, Amanda D.; Hylden, Laura R.; Bryan, Samuel A.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.

    2014-07-03

    This report documents testing activities conducted as part of the Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Project (DSGREP). The testing described in this report focused on evaluating the potential retention and release mechanisms of hydrogen bubbles in underground radioactive waste storage tanks at Hanford. The goal of the testing was to evaluate the rate, extent, and morphology of gas release events in simulant materials. Previous, undocumented scoping tests have evidenced dramatically different gas release behavior from simulants with similar physical properties. Specifically, previous gas release tests have evaluated the extent of release of 30 Pa kaolin and 30 Pa bentonite clay slurries. While both materials are clays and both have equivalent material shear strength using a shear vane, it was found that upon stirring, gas was released immediately and completely from bentonite clay slurry while little if any gas was released from the kaolin slurry. The motivation for the current work is to replicate these tests in a controlled quality test environment and to evaluate the release behavior for another simulant used in DSGREP testing. Three simulant materials were evaluated: 1) a 30 Pa kaolin clay slurry, 2) a 30 Pa bentonite clay slurry, and 3) Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) Simulant (a simulant designed to support DSGREP RT instability testing. Entrained gas was generated in these simulant materials using two methods: 1) application of vacuum over about a 1-minute period to nucleate dissolved gas within the simulant and 2) addition of hydrogen peroxide to generate gas by peroxide decomposition in the simulants over about a 16-hour period. Bubble release was effected by vibrating the test material using an external vibrating table. When testing with hydrogen peroxide, gas release was also accomplished by stirring of the simulant.

  15. Toxic release consequence analysis tool (TORCAT) for inherently safer design plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shariff, Azmi Mohd; Zaini, Dzulkarnain

    2010-01-01

    Many major accidents due to toxic release in the past have caused many fatalities such as the tragedy of MIC release in Bhopal, India (1984). One of the approaches is to use inherently safer design technique that utilizes inherent safety principle to eliminate or minimize accidents rather than to control the hazard. This technique is best implemented in preliminary design stage where the consequence of toxic release can be evaluated and necessary design improvements can be implemented to eliminate or minimize the accidents to as low as reasonably practicable (ALARP) without resorting to costly protective system. However, currently there is no commercial tool available that has such capability. This paper reports on the preliminary findings on the development of a prototype tool for consequence analysis and design improvement via inherent safety principle by utilizing an integrated process design simulator with toxic release consequence analysis model. The consequence analysis based on the worst-case scenarios during process flowsheeting stage were conducted as case studies. The preliminary finding shows that toxic release consequences analysis tool (TORCAT) has capability to eliminate or minimize the potential toxic release accidents by adopting the inherent safety principle early in preliminary design stage.

  16. 77 FR 13061 - Electronic Reporting of Toxics Release Inventory Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-05

    ...--Reporting Year SIC--Standard Industrial Code TRI--Toxics Release Inventory TRI-ME--TRI-Made Easy Desktop... EPA to ``publish a uniform toxic chemical release form for facilities covered'' by the TRI Program. 42... practicable. Similarly, EPA's Cross-Media Electronic Reporting Regulation (CROMERR) (40 CFR Part 3), published...

  17. Fission gas release of MOX with heterogeneous structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakae, N.; Akiyama, H.; Kamimura, K; Delville, R.; Jutier, F.; Verwerft, M.; Miura, H.; Baba, T.

    2015-01-01

    It is very useful for fuel integrity evaluation to accumulate knowledge base on fuel behavior of uranium and plutonium mixed oxide (MOX) fuel used in light water reactors (LWRs). Fission gas release is one of fuel behaviors which have an impact on fuel integrity evaluation. Fission gas release behavior of MOX fuels having heterogeneous structure is focused in this study. MOX fuel rods with a heterogeneous fuel microstructure were irradiated in Halden reactor (IFA-702) and the BR-3/BR-2 CALLISTO Loop (CHIPS program). The 85 Kr gamma spectrometry measurements were carried out in specific cycles in order to examine the concerned LHR (Linear Heat Rate) for fission gas release in the CHIPS program. The concerned LHR is defined in this paper to be the LHR at which a certain additional fission gas release thermally occurs. Post-irradiation examination was performed to understand the fission gas release behavior in connection with the pellet microstructure. The followings conclusions can be made from this study. First, the concerned LHR for fission gas release is estimated to be in the range of 20-23 kW/m with burnup over 37 GWd/tM. It is moreover guessed that the concerned LHR for fission gas release tends to decrease with increasing burnup. Secondly It is observed that FGR (fission gas release rate) is positively correlated with LHR when the LHR exceeds the concerned value. Thirdly, when burnup dependence of fission gas release is discussed, effective burnup should be taken into account. The effective burnup is defined as the burnup at which the LHR should be exceed the concerned value at the last time during all the irradiation period. And fourthly, it appears that FGR inside Pu spots is higher than outside and that retained (not released) fission gases mainly exist in the fission gas bubbles. Since fission gases in bubbles are considered to be easily released during fuel temperature increase, this information is very important to estimate fission gas release behavior

  18. Gas Release as a Deformation Signal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Stephen J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Radiogenic noble gases are contained in crustal rock at inter and intra granular sites. The gas composition depends on lithology, geologic history, fluid phases, and the aging effect by decay of U, Th, and K. The isotopic signature of noble gases found in rocks is vastly different than that of the atmosphere which is contributed by a variety of sources. When rock is subjected to stress conditions exceeding about half its yield strength, micro-cracks begin to form. As rock deformation progresses a fracture network evolves, releasing trapped noble gases and changing the transport properties to gas migration. Thus, changes in gas emanation and noble gas composition from rocks could be used to infer changes in stress-state and deformation. The purpose of this study has been to evaluate the effect of deformation/strain rate upon noble gas release. Four triaxial experiments were attempted for a strain rate range of %7E10-8 /s (180,000s) to %7E 10-4/s (500s); the three fully successful experiments (at the faster strain rates) imply the following: (1) helium is measurably released for all strain rates during deformation, this release is in amounts 1-2 orders of magnitude greater than that present in the air, and (2) helium gas release increases with decreasing strain rate.

  19. Modelling isothermal fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uffelen, P. van

    2002-01-01

    The present paper presents a new fission gas release model consisting of two coupled modules. The first module treats the behaviour of the fission gas atoms in spherical grains with a distribution of grain sizes. This module considers single atom diffusion, trapping and fission induced re-solution of gas atoms associated with intragranular bubbles, and re-solution from the grain boundary into a few layers adjacent to the grain face. The second module considers the transport of the fission gas atoms along the grain boundaries. Four mechanisms are incorporated: diffusion controlled precipitation of gas atoms into bubbles, grain boundary bubble sweeping, re-solution of gas atoms into the adjacent grains and gas flow through open porosity when grain boundary bubbles are interconnected. The interconnection of the intergranular bubbles is affected both by the fraction of the grain face occupied by the cavities and by the balance between the bubble internal pressure and the hydrostatic pressure surrounding the bubbles. The model is under validation. In a first step, some numerical routines have been tested by means of analytic solutions. In a second step, the fission gas release model has been coupled with the FTEMP2 code of the Halden Reactor Project for the temperature distribution in the pellets. A parametric study of some steady-state irradiations and one power ramp have been simulated successfully. In particular, the Halden threshold for fission gas release and two simplified FUMEX cases have been computed and are summarised. (author)

  20. Experimental and theoretical investigations on the release and propagation of heavy gas; Experimentelle und theoretische Untersuchungen zur Schwergasfreisetzung und -ausbreitung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauchegger, Christian

    2013-06-01

    The hazardous potential of accidental heavy gas releases, especially those involving flammable and toxic gases, is widely known. In order to predict the area in which these gases are in hazardous concentrations, an estimation of the dispersion of these gases must be carried out. While the hazardous area for flammable heavy gases is determined by the lower explosion limit (ca. > 1 vol.%), the release of toxic heavy gases can result in a much larger hazardous area, as toxic gases, even in very low concentrations (ca. < 3000 ppm), have the potential to be highly damaging. The VDI guideline 3783, which is considered as state-of-the-art in Germany, can be used to estimate the dispersion of heavy gases. However, VDI 3783 gives no method for the prediction of the height and width of a heavy gas cloud, which are both required for quantitative risk analysis as well as for a possible coupling of a Lagrangian particle model with the VDI 3783 heavy gas dispersion model. Therefore, further calculation methods were used to describe these dimensions and were evaluated against, experimental studies of the length, width and height of the heavy and neutral gas field. The influence of the source height on the heavy gas dispersion was also investigated. It was found that elevating the source leads to a reduction of the length of the heavy gas area. Once the source reaches a critical height, a heavy gas area at ground level no longer exists. Therefore, for release heights above the critical height, heavy gas dispersion effects can be neglected and the calculation of the heavy gas area according to VDI 3783 part 2 is therefore no longer necessary. The release of heavy gases can occur from a process plant as well as from a standard gas bottle. For the release of heavy gases from standard gas bottles, a mathematical model has been developed to predict the time-dependent mass flow. This model takes into account the time-dependent temperature distribution of the bottle wall, and contains a

  1. Noble Gas Release Signal as a Precursor to Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, S. J.; Lee, H.; Gardner, W. P.

    2017-12-01

    We present empirical results of rock strain, microfracturing, acoustic emissions, and noble gas release from laboratory triaxial experiments for a granite, basalt, shale and bedded rock salt. Noble gases are released and measured real-time during deformation using mass spectrometry. The gas release represents a precursive signal to macrofracture. Gas release is associated with increased acoustic emissions indicating that microfracturing is required to release gas and create pathways for the gas to be sensed. The gas released depends on initial gas content, pore structure and its evolution during deformation, the deformation amount, matrix permeability, deformation style and the stress/strain history. Gases are released from inter and intracrystalline sites; release rate increases as strain and microfracturing increases. The gas composition depends on lithology, geologic history and age, fluids present, and radioisotope concentrations that affect radiogenic noble gas isotope (e.g. 4He,40Ar) production. Noble gas emission and its relationship to crustal processes such as seismicity and volcanism, tectonic velocities, qualitative estimates of deep permeability, age dating of groundwater, and a signature of nuclear weapon detonation. Our result show that mechanical deformation of crustal materials is an important process controlling gas release from rocks and minerals, and should be considered in techniques which utilize gas release and/or accumulation. We propose using noble gas release to signal rock deformation in boreholes, mines and waste repositories. We postulate each rock exhibits a gas release signature which is microstructure, stress, strain, and/or permanent deformation dependent. Calibration of such relationships, for example relating gas release per rock unit volume to strain may be used to quantify rock deformation and develop predictive models.Sandia National Laboratories is a multimission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and

  2. A proposal for a test method for assessment of hazard property HP 12 ("Release of an acute toxic gas") in hazardous waste classification - Experience from 49 waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennebert, Pierre; Samaali, Ismahen; Molina, Pauline

    2016-12-01

    A stepwise method for assessment of the HP 12 is proposed and tested with 49 waste samples. The hazard property HP 12 is defined as "Release of an acute toxic gas": waste which releases acute toxic gases (Acute Tox. 1, 2 or 3) in contact with water or an acid. When a waste contains a substance assigned to one of the following supplemental hazards EUH029, EUH031 and EUH032, it shall be classified as hazardous by HP 12 according to test methods or guidelines (EC, 2014a, 2014b). When the substances with the cited hazard statement codes react with water or an acid, they can release HCl, Cl 2 , HF, HCN, PH 3 , H 2 S, SO 2 (and two other gases very unlikely to be emitted, hydrazoic acid HN 3 and selenium oxide SeO 2 - a solid with low vapor pressure). Hence, a method is proposed:For a set of 49 waste, water addition did not produce gas. Nearly all the solid waste produced a gas in contact with hydrochloric acid in 5 min in an automated calcimeter with a volume >0.1L of gas per kg of waste. Since a plateau of pressure is reached only for half of the samples in 5 min, 6 h trial with calorimetric bombs or glass flasks were done and confirmed the results. Identification of the gases by portable probes showed that most of the tested samples emit mainly CO 2 . Toxic gases are emitted by four waste: metallic dust from the aluminum industry (CO), two air pollution control residue of industrial waste incinerator (H 2 S) and a halogenated solvent (organic volatile(s) compound(s)). HF has not been measured in these trials started before the present definition of HP 12. According to the definition of HP 12, only the H 2 S emission of substances with hazard statement EUH031 is accounted for. In view of the calcium content of the two air pollution control residue, the presence of calcium sulphide (EUH031) can be assumed. These two waste are therefore classified potentially hazardous for HP 12, from a total of 49 waste. They are also classified as hazardous for other properties (HP 7

  3. 2004 Toxic Release Inventory Sites in Louisiana, Geographic NAD83, EPA (2006) [toxic_release_inventory_site_LA_EPA_2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    Louisiana Geographic Information Center — Data extracted from the EPA Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) system for reporting year 2004. The dataset contains facility identification, submitted and/or preferred...

  4. 2015 TRI National Analysis: Toxics Release Inventory Releases at Various Summary Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    The TRI National Analysis is EPA's annual interpretation of TRI data at various summary levels. It highlights how toxic chemical wastes were managed, where toxic chemicals were released and how the 2015 TRI data compare to data from previous years. This dataset reports US state, county, large aquatic ecosystem, metro/micropolitan statistical area, and facility level statistics from 2015 TRI releases, including information on: number of 2015 TRI facilities in the geographic area and their releases (total, water, air, land); population information, including populations living within 1 mile of TRI facilities (total, minority, in poverty); and Risk Screening Environmental Indicators (RSEI) model related pounds, toxicity-weighted pounds, and RSEI score. The source of administrative boundary data is the 2013 cartographic boundary shapefiles. Location of facilities is provided by EPA's Facility Registry Service (FRS). Large Aquatic Ecosystems boundaries were dissolved from the hydrologic unit boundaries and codes for the United States, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. It was revised for inclusion in the National Atlas of the United States of America (November 2002), and updated to match the streams file created by the USGS National Mapping Division (NMD) for the National Atlas of the United States of America.

  5. Using random event simulation to evaluate the effectiveness of indoor sheltering during a sour gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.

    2003-01-01

    In the event of sour gas releases to the atmosphere, there is a strong bias toward evacuation rather than sheltering-in-place. This paper described the critical factors in decision-making for shelter-in-place versus evacuation. These include: delay time expected before release begins; size of potential release, explosion or fire; expected duration; direction to safety for evacuation; the air tightness of the building; and, the number of people in the emergency response zone. A shelter-in-place decision chart developed by the Canadian Association of Fire Chiefs was presented. It shows the usual bias toward evacuation as the default position. It also shows the greatest drawbacks of sheltering-in-place. The main factor in maintaining the effectiveness of the building shelter is the rate of air infiltration into the building. Other issues to consider include: reactive versus passive chemicals in the release; light versus heavy gas releases; building type (houses, high-rise apartments, office buildings, or warehouses); tightness of building construction; whether to turn the house heating and air conditioning on or off during shelter; daytime versus nighttime conditions; and, cost factors. Equations for calculating indoor and outdoor toxic exposure to decide on shelter versus evacuation were also presented. It was concluded that the absence of peak concentrations dramatically reduce the risk of fatality to people sheltering indoors. Keeping people indoors is the best way to assure their safety for the first hour following a toxic release. 8 refs., 6 figs

  6. 76 FR 7841 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collections; Toxic Chemical Release Reporting...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-11

    ... agencies, and others to promote reductions in toxic chemical releases. Industrial facilities use the TRI... Activities; Proposed Collections; Toxic Chemical Release Reporting; Request for Comments on Proposed Renewal... the individual listed in the preceding FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section. Title: Toxic Chemical...

  7. Transient fission gas release during direct electrical heating experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.R.; Emerson, J.E.; Savoie, F.E.

    1983-12-01

    The gas release behavior of irradiated EBR-II fuel was observed to be dependent on several factors: the presence of cladding, the retained gas content, and the energy absorbed. Fuel that retained in excess of 16 to 17 μmoles/g of fission gas underwent spallation as the cladding melted and released 22 to 45% of its retained gas, while fuel with retained gas levels below approx. 15 to 16 μmoles/g released less than approx. 9% of its gas as the cladding melted. During subsequent direct electrical heating ramps, fuel that did not spall released an additional quantity of gas (up to 4 μmoles/g), depending on the energy absorbed

  8. Considerations in modeling fission gas release during normal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumble, E.T.; Lim, E.Y.; Stuart, R.G.

    1977-01-01

    The EPRI LWR fuel rod modeling code evaluation program analyzed seven fuel rods with experimental fission gas release data. In these cases, rod-averged burnups are less than 20,000 MWD/MTM, while the fission gas release fractions range roughly from 2 to 27%. Code results demonstrate the complexities in calculating fission gas release in certain operating regimes. Beyond this work, the behavior of a pre-pressurized PWR rod is simulated to average burnups of 40,000 MWD/MTM using GAPCON-THERMAL-2. Analysis of the sensitivity of fission gas release to power histories and release correlations indicate the strong impact that LMFBR type release correlations induce at high burnup. 15 refs

  9. Gas release from pressurized closed pores in nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, P.; Donnelly, S.E.; Armour, D.G.; Matzke, H.

    1988-01-01

    Gas release from the nuclear fuels UO 2 and UN out of pressurized closed pores produced by autoclave anneals has been studied by Thermal Desorption Spectrometry (TDS). Investigation of gas release during heating and cooling has indicated stress related mechanical effects leading to gas release. This release occurred in a narrow temperature range between about 1000 and 1500 K for UO 2 , but it continued down to ambient temperature for UN. No burst release was observed above 1500 K for UO 2 . (orig.)

  10. Dispersion modeling of accidental releases of toxic gases - utility for the fire brigades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, S.; Baumann-Stanzer, K.

    2009-09-01

    Several air dispersion models are available for prediction and simulation of the hazard areas associated with accidental releases of toxic gases. The most model packages (commercial or free of charge) include a chemical database, an intuitive graphical user interface (GUI) and automated graphical output for effective presentation of results. The models are designed especially for analyzing different accidental toxic release scenarios ("worst-case scenarios”), preparing emergency response plans and optimal countermeasures as well as for real-time risk assessment and management. The research project RETOMOD (reference scenarios calculations for toxic gas releases - model systems and their utility for the fire brigade) was conducted by the Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG) in cooperation with the Viennese fire brigade, OMV Refining & Marketing GmbH and Synex Ries & Greßlehner GmbH. RETOMOD was funded by the KIRAS safety research program of the Austrian Ministry of Transport, Innovation and Technology (www.kiras.at). The main tasks of this project were 1. Sensitivity study and optimization of the meteorological input for modeling of the hazard areas (human exposure) during the accidental toxic releases. 2. Comparison of several model packages (based on reference scenarios) in order to estimate the utility for the fire brigades. For the purpose of our study the following models were tested and compared: ALOHA (Areal Location of Hazardous atmosphere, EPA), MEMPLEX (Keudel av-Technik GmbH), Trace (Safer System), Breeze (Trinity Consulting), SAM (Engineering office Lohmeyer). A set of reference scenarios for Chlorine, Ammoniac, Butane and Petrol were proceed, with the models above, in order to predict and estimate the human exposure during the event. Furthermore, the application of the observation-based analysis and forecasting system INCA, developed in the Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG) in case of toxic release was

  11. A dynamic approach for the impact of a toxic gas dispersion hazard considering human behaviour and dispersion modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovreglio, Ruggiero; Ronchi, Enrico; Maragkos, Georgios; Beji, Tarek; Merci, Bart

    2016-11-15

    The release of toxic gases due to natural/industrial accidents or terrorist attacks in populated areas can have tragic consequences. To prevent and evaluate the effects of these disasters different approaches and modelling tools have been introduced in the literature. These instruments are valuable tools for risk managers doing risk assessment of threatened areas. Despite the significant improvements in hazard assessment in case of toxic gas dispersion, these analyses do not generally include the impact of human behaviour and people movement during emergencies. This work aims at providing an approach which considers both modelling of gas dispersion and evacuation movement in order to improve the accuracy of risk assessment for disasters involving toxic gases. The approach is applied to a hypothetical scenario including a ship releasing Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) on a crowd attending a music festival. The difference between the results obtained with existing static methods (people do not move) and a dynamic approach (people move away from the danger) which considers people movement with different degrees of sophistication (either a simple linear path or more complex behavioural modelling) is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Fission gas release from fuel at high burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.O.; Beyer, C.E.; Voglewede, J.C.

    1978-03-01

    The release of fission gas from fuel pellets at high burnup is reviewed in the context of the safety analysis performed for reactor license applications. Licensing actions are described that were taken to correct deficient gas release models used in these safety analyses. A correction function, which was developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff and its consultants, is presented. Related information, which includes some previously unpublished data, is also summarized. The report thus provides guidance for the analysis of high burnup gas release in licensing situations

  13. Showcasing Sustainability in Your Toxics Release Inventory Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    From a June 2012 webinar, these slides contain guidance for reporting Pollution Prevention and Source Reduction data on the Toxics Release Inventory Form R and a synopsis of EPA's use of this information.

  14. The gas release programs to increase competition in the European gas market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clastres, Cedric

    2005-01-01

    Regulators have implemented asymmetric regulation measures, such as gas release programs and market share targets, because of European gas supply features and gas market specificities. Empirical experiences show in line with economic theory that these regulation measures favour entry and competition without deterring investments. If we look at impacts on competition, they are mitigated. Some positive effects result from the increase in consumption or in importation and transportation infrastructure developments. But these regulations can also encourage anti-competitive behaviours like collusion, cream-skimming, reverse cherry picking or inefficient entries. Gas release measures establish a link between the incumbent and its competitors. A system of constraints on operators capacities can also appear. Thus, pricing or quantity strategies are more complex. Equilibrium prices are more volatile and very different of competition mark-up. The incumbent, for high gas release quantities and low supplies, can increase its costs to make more profit. This Raising Rivals' Costs strategy often occur if the gas release price is closer to supply costs. This strategy does not impact on consumers surplus but decreases welfare. The regulator can restore incentives to efficiency by setting gas release proportion function of incumbent's supplies. This proportion must be high enough to have a positive impact on the market because of incumbent's incentives to efficiency and greater total quantities sold by the two operators. But, on another way, it must not be too high as it could, thus, increase the probability of Raising Rivals' Costs or favour collusive strategies. (author) [fr

  15. HABIT, Toxic and Radioactive Release Hazards in Reactor Control Room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stage, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: HABIT is a package of computer codes designed to be used for the evaluation of control room habitability in the event of an accidental release of toxic chemicals or radioactive materials. 2 - Methods: Given information about the design of a nuclear power plant, a scenario for the release of toxic or radionuclides, and information about the air flows and protection systems of the control room, HABIT can be used to estimate the chemical exposure or radiological dose to control room personnel

  16. 76 FR 64022 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Lifting of Administrative Stay for Hydrogen Sulfide. SUMMARY: EPA is announcing... (EPCRA) section 313 toxic chemical release reporting requirements for hydrogen sulfide (Chemical...

  17. Gas retention and release behavior in Hanford single-shell waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, C.W.; Brewster, M.E.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Mahoney, L.A.; Meyer, P.A.; Recknagle, K.P.; Reid, H.C.

    1996-12-01

    This report describes the current understanding of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford single-shell waste tanks based on theory, experimental results, and observations of tank behavior. The single-shell tanks likely to pose a flammable gas hazard are listed and described, and photographs of core extrusions and the waste surface are included. The credible mechanisms for significant flammable gas releases are described, and release volumes and rates are quantified as much as possible. The only mechanism demonstrably capable of producing large (∼100 m 3 ) spontaneous gas releases is the buoyant displacement, which occurs only in tanks with a relatively deep layer of supernatant liquid. Only the double-shell tanks currently satisfy this condition. All release mechanisms believed plausible in single-shell tanks have been investigated, and none have the potential for large spontaneous gas releases. Only small spontaneous gas releases of several cubic meters are likely by these mechanisms. The reasons several other postulated gas release mechanisms are implausible or incredible are also given

  18. Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Analytical Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sams, Terry L.

    2013-01-01

    Long Abstract. Full Text. The purpose of the Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Analytical Evaluation (DSGRE-AE) is to evaluate the postulated hypothesis that a hydrogen GRE may occur in Hanford tanks containing waste sludges at levels greater than previously experienced. There is a need to understand gas retention and release hazards in sludge beds which are 200 -300 inches deep. These sludge beds are deeper than historical Hanford sludge waste beds, and are created when waste is retrieved from older single-shell tanks (SST) and transferred to newer double-shell tanks (DST).Retrieval of waste from SSTs reduces the risk to the environment from leakage or potential leakage of waste into the ground from these tanks. However, the possibility of an energetic event (flammable gas accident) in the retrieval receiver DST is worse than slow leakage. Lines of inquiry, therefore, are (1) can sludge waste be stored safely in deep beds; (2) can gas release events (GRE) be prevented by periodically degassing the sludge (e.g., mixer pump); or (3) does the retrieval strategy need to be altered to limit sludge bed height by retrieving into additional DSTs? The scope of this effort is to provide expert advice on whether or not to move forward with the generation of deep beds of sludge through retrieval of C-Farm tanks. Evaluation of possible mitigation methods (e.g., using mixer pumps to release gas, retrieving into an additional DST) are being evaluated by a second team and are not discussed in this report. While available data and engineering judgment indicate that increased gas retention (retained gas fraction) in DST sludge at depths resulting from the completion of SST 241-C Tank Farm retrievals is not expected and, even if gas releases were to occur, they would be small and local, a positive USQ was declared (Occurrence Report EM-RP--WRPS-TANKFARM-2012-0014, 'Potential Exists for a Large Spontaneous Gas Release Event in Deep Settled Waste Sludge'). The purpose of this technical

  19. U.S./Mexico Border environmental study toxics release inventory data, 1988--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Brien, R.F.; LoPresti, C.A.

    1996-02-01

    This is a report on industrial toxic chemical releases and transfers based on information reported to the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI), a database maintained by the USEPA. This document discusses patterns of toxic chemical releases to the atmosphere, to water, to the land, and to underground injection; and transfers of toxic chemicals to Publicly Owned Treatment Works (POTW), and for disposal, treatment and other off-site transfers during the TRI reporting years 1988--1992. Geographic coverage is limited to the US side of the ``Border Area``, the geographic area situated within 100 km of the US/Mexico international boundary. A primary purpose of this study is to provide background information that can be used in the future development of potential ``indicator variables`` for tracking environmental and public health status in the Border Area in conjunction with the implementation of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

  20. Gas retention and release behavior in Hanford single-shell waste tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, C.W.; Brewster, M.E.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Mahoney, L.A.; Meyer, P.A.; Recknagle, K.P.; Reid, H.C.

    1996-12-01

    This report describes the current understanding of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford single-shell waste tanks based on theory, experimental results, and observations of tank behavior. The single-shell tanks likely to pose a flammable gas hazard are listed and described, and photographs of core extrusions and the waste surface are included. The credible mechanisms for significant flammable gas releases are described, and release volumes and rates are quantified as much as possible. The only mechanism demonstrably capable of producing large ({approximately}100 m{sup 3}) spontaneous gas releases is the buoyant displacement, which occurs only in tanks with a relatively deep layer of supernatant liquid. Only the double-shell tanks currently satisfy this condition. All release mechanisms believed plausible in single-shell tanks have been investigated, and none have the potential for large spontaneous gas releases. Only small spontaneous gas releases of several cubic meters are likely by these mechanisms. The reasons several other postulated gas release mechanisms are implausible or incredible are also given.

  1. Comparison of FISGAS swelling and gas release predictions with experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostensen, R.W.

    1979-01-01

    FISGAS calculations were compared to fuel swelling data from the FD1 tests and to gas release data from the FGR39 test. Late swelling and gas release predictions are satisfactory if vacancy depletion effects are added to the code. However, early swelling predictions are not satisfactory, and early gas release predictions are very poor. Explanation of these discrepancies is speculative

  2. Role of fission gas release in reactor licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-11-01

    The release of fission gases from oxide pellets to the fuel rod internal voidage (gap) is reviewed with regard to the required safety analysis in reactor licensing. Significant analyzed effects are described, prominent gas release models are reviewed, and various methods used in the licensing process are summarized. The report thus serves as a guide to a large body of literature including company reports and government documents. A discussion of the state of the art of gas release analysis is presented

  3. 2008 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory 2008 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecology and Air Quality Group

    2009-10-01

    For reporting year 2008, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) submitted a Form R report for lead as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to- Know Act (EPCRA) Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2008 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2008, as well as to provide background information about data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999, EPA promulgated a final rule on persistent bioaccumulative toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R.

  4. A fission gas release model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denis, A; Piotrkowski, R [Argentine Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1997-08-01

    The hypothesis contained in the model developed in this work are as follows. The UO{sub 2} is considered as a collection of spherical grains. Nuclear reactions produce fission gases, mainly Xe and Kr, within the grains. Due to the very low solubility of these gases in UO{sub 2}, intragranular bubbles are formed, of a few nanometers is size. The bubbles are assumed to be immobile and to act as traps which capture gas atoms. Free atoms diffuse towards the grain boundaries, where they give origin to intergranular, lenticular bubbles, of the order of microns. The gas atoms in bubbles, either inter or intragranular, can re-enter the matrix through the mechanism of resolution induced by fission fragment impact. The amount of gas stored in intergranular bubbles grows up to a saturation value. Once saturation is reached, intergranular bubbles inter-connect and the gas in excess is released through different channels to the external surface of the fuel. The resolution of intergranular bubbles particularly affects the region of the grain adjacent to the grain boundary. During grain growth, the grain boundary traps the gas atoms, either free or in intragranular bubbles, contained in the swept volume. The grain boundary is considered as a perfect sink, i.e. the gas concentration is zero at that surface of the grain. Due to the spherical symmetry of the problem, the concentration gradient is null at the centre of the grain. The diffusion equation was solved using the implicit finite difference method. The initial solution was analytically obtained by the Laplace transform. The calculations were performed at different constant temperatures and were compared with experimental results. They show the asymptotic growth of the grain radius as a function of burnup, the gas distribution within the grain at every instant, the growth of the gas content at the grain boundary up to the saturation value and the fraction of gas released by the fuel element referred to the total gas generated

  5. Relative Release-to-Birth Indicators for Investigating TRISO Fuel Fission Gas Release Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harp, Jason M.; Hawari, Ayman I.

    2008-01-01

    TRISO microsphere fuel is the fundamental fuel unit for Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTR). A single TRISO particle consists of an inner kernel of uranium dioxide or uranium oxycarbide surrounded by layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide. If the silicon carbide layer fails, fission products, especially the noble fission gases Kr and Xe, will begin to escape the failed particle. The release of fission gas is usually quantified by measuring the ratio of the released activity (R) to the original birth activity (B), which is designated as the R/B ratio. In this work, relative Release-to-Birth indicators (I) are proposed as a technique for interpreting the results of TRISO irradiation experiments. By implementing a relative metric, it is possible to reduce the sensitivity of the indicators to instrumental uncertainties and variations in experimental conditions. As an example, relative R/B indicators are applied to the interpretation of representative data from the Advanced Gas Reactor-1 TRISO fuel experiment that is currently taking place at the Advanced Test Reactor of Idaho National Laboratory. It is shown that the comparison of measured to predicted relative R/B indicators (I) gives insight into the physics of release and helps validate release models. Different trends displayed by the indicators are related to the mechanisms of fission gas release such as diffusion and recoil. The current analysis shows evidence for separate diffusion coefficients for Kr and Xe and supports the need to account for recoil release. (authors)

  6. Towards a mechanistic understanding of transient fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, J.R.; Small, G.J.

    1989-01-01

    Recent experimental results on transient fission gas release from oxide fuels are briefly reviewed. These together with associated microstructural observations are compared with the main models for fission gas behaviour. Single gas atom diffusion, bubble migration, heterogeneous percolation and grain boundary sweeping are examined as possible release mechanisms. The role of gas trapping in bubbles and re-solution by irradiation and thermal processes are included in the comparison. As much of the data, and the main range of interest for light water reactor fuels, is for release during mild transients in fuel with a burn-up below 4%, the role of gas retention on grain boundaries is very important and in some cases dominant. The grain boundaries are found to respond very differently to various gas arrival rates and to local temperature conditions. This can lead to early interlinkage and release in some cases, but retention with accompanying large swelling in others. The role of fission products and the local oxygen content of the fuel are found to be important. The effective fuel stoichiometry is likely to change significantly during transients with substantial effects on the transport processes controlling fission gas behaviour. The results of the evaluation of the models are summarized in mechanism maps for intragranular and grain boundary behaviour. (author). 36 refs, 8 figs

  7. The effects of fission gas release on PWR fuel rod design and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leech, W.J.; Kaiser, R.S.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effects of fission gas release on PWR fuel rod design and performance. Empirical models were developed from fission gas release data. Fission gas release during normal operation is a function of burnup. There is little additional fission gas release during anticipated transients. The empirical models were used to evaluate Westinghouse fuel rod designs. It was determined that fission gas release is not a limiting parameter for obtaining rod average burnups in the range of 50,000 to 60,000 MWD/MTU. Fission gas release during anticipated transients has a negligible effect on the margins to rod design limits. (author)

  8. Toxics Release Inventory Chemical Hazard Information Profiles (TRI-CHIP) Dataset

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Chemical Hazard Information Profiles (TRI-CHIP) dataset contains hazard information about the chemicals reported in TRI. Users can...

  9. The Impact of Pollution Prevention on Toxic Environmental Releases from U.S. Manufacturing Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranson, Matthew; Cox, Brendan; Keenan, Cheryl; Teitelbaum, Daniel

    2015-11-03

    Between 1991 and 2012, the facilities that reported to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) Program conducted 370,000 source reduction projects. We use this data set to conduct the first quasi-experimental retrospective evaluation of how implementing a source reduction (pollution prevention) project affects the quantity of toxic chemicals released to the environment by an average industrial facility. We use a differences-in-differences methodology, which measures how implementing a source reduction project affects a facility's releases of targeted chemicals, relative to releases of (a) other untargeted chemicals from the same facility, or (b) the same chemical from other facilities in the same industry. We find that the average source reduction project causes a 9-16% decrease in releases of targeted chemicals in the year of implementation. Source reduction techniques vary in effectiveness: for example, raw material modification causes a large decrease in releases, while inventory control has no detectable effect. Our analysis suggests that in aggregate, the source reduction projects carried out in the U.S. since 1991 have prevented between 5 and 14 billion pounds of toxic releases.

  10. Fission gas release from fuels at high burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kauffmann, Yves; Pointud, M.L.; Vignesoult, Nicole; Atabek, Rosemarie; Baron, Daniel.

    1982-04-01

    Determinations of residual gas concentrations by heating and by X microanalysis were respectively carried out on particles (TANGO program) and on sections of fuel rods, perfectly characterized as to fabrication and irradiation history. A threshold release temperature of 1250 0 C+-100 0 C was determined irrespective of the type of oxide and the irradiation history in the 18,000-45,000 MWdt -1 (U) specific burnup field. The overall analyses of gas released from the fuel rods show that, in the PWR operating conditions, the fraction released remains less than 1% up to a mean specific burnup of 35000 MWdt -1 (U). The release of gases should not be a limiting factor in the increase of specific burnups [fr

  11. Fission gas release behaviour in MOX fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viswanathan, U.K.; Anantharaman, S.; Sahoo, K.C.

    2002-01-01

    As a part of plutonium recycling programme MOX (U,Pu)O 2 fuels will be used in Indian boiling water reactors (BWR) and pressurised heavy water reactors (PHWR). Based on successful test irradiation of MOX fuel in CIRUS reactor, 10 MOX fuel assemblies have been loaded in the BWR of Tarapur Atomic Power Station (TAPS). Some of these MOX fuel assemblies have successfully completed the initial target average burnup of ∼16,000 MWD/T. Enhancing the burnup target of the MOX fuels and increasing loading of MOX fuels in TAPS core will depend on the feedback information generated from the measurement of released fission gases. Fission gas release behaviour has been studied in the experimental MOX fuel elements (UO 2 - 4% PuO 2 ) irradiated in pressurised water loop (PWL) of CIRUS. Eight (8) MOX fuel elements irradiated to an average burnup of ∼16,000 MWD/T have been examined. Some of these fuel elements contained controlled porosity pellets and chamfered pellets. This paper presents the design details of the experimental set up for studying fission gas release behaviour including measurement of gas pressure, void volume and gas composition. The experimental data generated is compared with the prediction of fuel performance modeling codes of PROFESS and GAPCON THERMAL-3. (author)

  12. Reduction of prostate intrafraction motion using gas-release rectal balloons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su Zhong; Zhao Tianyu; Li Zuofeng; Hoppe, Brad; Henderson, Randy; Mendenhall, William; Nichols, R. Charles; Marcus, Robert; Mendenhall, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze prostate intrafraction motion using both non-gas-release (NGR) and gas-release (GR) rectal balloons and to evaluate the ability of GR rectal balloons to reduce prostate intrafraction motion. Methods: Twenty-nine patients with NGR rectal balloons and 29 patients with GR balloons were randomly selected from prostate patients treated with proton therapy at University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute (Jacksonville, FL). Their pretreatment and post-treatment orthogonal radiographs were analyzed, and both pretreatment setup residual error and intrafraction-motion data were obtained. Population histograms of intrafraction motion were plotted for both types of balloons. Population planning target-volume (PTV) margins were calculated with the van Herk formula of 2.5Σ+ 0.7σ to account for setup residual errors and intrafraction motion errors. Results: Pretreatment and post-treatment radiographs indicated that the use of gas-release rectal balloons reduced prostate intrafraction motion along superior–inferior (SI) and anterior–posterior (AP) directions. Similar patient setup residual errors were exhibited for both types of balloons. Gas-release rectal balloons resulted in PTV margin reductions from 3.9 to 2.8 mm in the SI direction, 3.1 to 1.8 mm in the AP direction, and an increase from 1.9 to 2.1 mm in the left–right direction. Conclusions: Prostate intrafraction motion is an important uncertainty source in radiotherapy after image-guided patient setup with online corrections. Compared to non-gas-release rectal balloons, gas-release balloons can reduce prostate intrafraction motion in the SI and AP directions caused by gas buildup.

  13. Reduction of prostate intrafraction motion using gas-release rectal balloons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su Zhong; Zhao Tianyu; Li Zuofeng; Hoppe, Brad; Henderson, Randy; Mendenhall, William; Nichols, R. Charles; Marcus, Robert; Mendenhall, Nancy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute, Jacksonville, Florida 32206 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To analyze prostate intrafraction motion using both non-gas-release (NGR) and gas-release (GR) rectal balloons and to evaluate the ability of GR rectal balloons to reduce prostate intrafraction motion. Methods: Twenty-nine patients with NGR rectal balloons and 29 patients with GR balloons were randomly selected from prostate patients treated with proton therapy at University of Florida Proton Therapy Institute (Jacksonville, FL). Their pretreatment and post-treatment orthogonal radiographs were analyzed, and both pretreatment setup residual error and intrafraction-motion data were obtained. Population histograms of intrafraction motion were plotted for both types of balloons. Population planning target-volume (PTV) margins were calculated with the van Herk formula of 2.5{Sigma}+ 0.7{sigma} to account for setup residual errors and intrafraction motion errors. Results: Pretreatment and post-treatment radiographs indicated that the use of gas-release rectal balloons reduced prostate intrafraction motion along superior-inferior (SI) and anterior-posterior (AP) directions. Similar patient setup residual errors were exhibited for both types of balloons. Gas-release rectal balloons resulted in PTV margin reductions from 3.9 to 2.8 mm in the SI direction, 3.1 to 1.8 mm in the AP direction, and an increase from 1.9 to 2.1 mm in the left-right direction. Conclusions: Prostate intrafraction motion is an important uncertainty source in radiotherapy after image-guided patient setup with online corrections. Compared to non-gas-release rectal balloons, gas-release balloons can reduce prostate intrafraction motion in the SI and AP directions caused by gas buildup.

  14. Supercritical carbon dioxide extraction as a predictor of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon bioaccumulation and toxicity by earthworms in manufactured-gas plant site soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitinger, Joseph P; Quiñones-Rivera, Antonio; Neuhauser, Edward F; Alexander, Martin; Hawthorne, Steven B

    2007-09-01

    The toxicity and uptake of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) by earthworms were measured in soil samples collected from manufactured-gas plant sites having a wide range in PAH concentrations (170-42,000 mg/kg) and soil characteristics. Samples varied from vegetated soils to pure lampblack soot and had total organic carbon contents ranging from 3 to 87%. The biota-soil accumulation factors (BSAFs) observed for individual PAHs in field-collected earthworms (Aporrectodea caliginosa) were up to 50-fold lower than the BSAFs predicted using equilibrium-partitioning theory. Acute toxicity to the earthworm Eisenia fetida was unrelated to total PAH concentration: Mortality was not observed in some soils having high concentrations of total PAHs (>42,000 mg/kg), whereas 100% mortality was observed in other soils having much lower concentrations of total PAHs (1,520 mg/kg). Instead, toxicity appeared to be related to the rapidly released fraction of PAHs determined by mild supercritical CO2 extraction (SFE). The results demonstrate that soils having approximately 16,000 mg rapidly released total PAH/kg organic carbon can be acutely toxic to earthworms and that the concentration of PAHs in soil that is rapidly released by SFE can estimate toxicity to soil invertebrates.

  15. Fission gas release and pellet microstructure change of high burnup BWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itagaki, N.; Ohira, K.; Tsuda, K.; Fischer, G.; Ota, T.

    1998-01-01

    UO 2 fuel, with and without Gadolinium, irradiated for three, five, and six irradiation cycles up to about 60 GWd/t pellet burnup in a commercial BWR were studied. The fission gas release and the rim effect were investigated by the puncture test and gas analysis method, OM (optical microscope), SEM (scanning electron microscope), and EPMA (electron probe microanalyzer). The fission gas release rate of the fuel rods irradiated up to six cycles was below a few percent; there was no tendency for the fission gas release to increase abruptly with burnup. On the other hand, microstructure changes were revealed by OM and SEM examination at the rim position with burnup increase. Fission gas was found depleted at both the rim position and the pellet center region using EPMA. There was no correlation between the fission gas release measured by the puncture test and the fission gas depletion at the rim position using EPMA. However, the depletion of fission gas in the center region had good correlation with the fission gas release rate determined by the puncture test. In addition, because the burnup is very large at the rim position of high burnup fuel and also due to the fission rate of the produced Pu, the Xe/Kr ratio at the rim position of high burnup fuel is close to the value of the fission yield of Pu. The Xe/Kr ratio determined by the gas analysis after the puncture test was equivalent to the fuel average but not to the pellet rim position. From the results, it was concluded that fission gas at the rim position was released from the UO 2 matrix in high burnup, however, most of this released fission gas was held in the porous structure and not released from the pellet to the free volume. (author)

  16. Gas retention and release behavior in Hanford double-shell waste tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, P.A.; Brewster, M.E.; Bryan, S.A. [and others

    1997-05-01

    This report describes the current understanding of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford double-shell waste tanks AN-103, AN-104, AN-105, AW-101, SY-101, and SY-103. This knowledge is based on analyses, experimental results, and observations of tank behavior. The applicable data available from the void fraction instrument, retained gas sampler, ball rheometer, tank characterization, and field monitoring are summarized. Retained gas volumes and void fractions are updated with these new data. Using the retained gas compositions from the retained gas sampler, peak dome pressures during a gas burn are calculated as a function of the fraction of retained gas hypothetically released instantaneously into the tank head space. Models and criteria are given for gas generation, initiation of buoyant displacement, and resulting gas release; and predictions are compared with observed tank behavior.

  17. Gas retention and release behavior in Hanford double-shell waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, P.A.; Brewster, M.E.; Bryan, S.A.

    1997-05-01

    This report describes the current understanding of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford double-shell waste tanks AN-103, AN-104, AN-105, AW-101, SY-101, and SY-103. This knowledge is based on analyses, experimental results, and observations of tank behavior. The applicable data available from the void fraction instrument, retained gas sampler, ball rheometer, tank characterization, and field monitoring are summarized. Retained gas volumes and void fractions are updated with these new data. Using the retained gas compositions from the retained gas sampler, peak dome pressures during a gas burn are calculated as a function of the fraction of retained gas hypothetically released instantaneously into the tank head space. Models and criteria are given for gas generation, initiation of buoyant displacement, and resulting gas release; and predictions are compared with observed tank behavior

  18. A Discussion of SY-101 Crust Gas Retention and Release Mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza, D.P.; Mahoney, L.A.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Rassat, S.D.; Caley, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    The flammable gas hazard in Hanford waste tanks was made an issue by the behavior of double-shell Tank (DST) 241-SY-101 (SY-101). Shortly after SY-101 was filled in 1980, the waste level began rising periodically, due to the generation and retention of gases within the slurry, and then suddenly dropping as the gases were released. An intensive study of the tank's behavior revealed that these episodic releases posed a safety hazard because the released gas was flammable, and, in some cases, the volume of gas released was sufficient to exceed the lower flammability limit (LFL) in the tank headspace (Alleinann et al. 1993). A mixer pump was installed in SY-101 in late 1993 to prevent gases from building up in the settled solids layer, and the large episodic gas releases have since ceased (Allemann et al. 1994; Stewart et al. 1994; Brewster et al. 1995). However, the surface level of SY-101 has been increasing since at least 1995, and in recent months the level growth has shown significant and unexpected acceleration. Based on a number of observations and measurements, including data from the void fraction instrument (VFI), we have concluded that the level growth is caused largely by increased gas retention in the floating crust. In September 1998, the crust contained between about 21 and 43% void based on VFI measurements (Stewart et al. 1998). Accordingly, it is important to understand the dominant mechanisms of gas retention, why the gas retention is increasing, and whether the accelerating level increase will continue, diminish or even reverse. It is expected that the retained gas in the crust is flammable, with hydrogen as a major constituent. This gas inventory would pose a flammable gas hazard if it were to release suddenly. In May 1997, the mechanisms of bubble retention and release from crust material were the subject of a workshop. The evaluation of the crust and potential hazards assumed a more typical void of roughly 15% gas. It could be similar to

  19. A Discussion of SY-101 Crust Gas Retention and Release Mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SD Rassat; PA Gauglitz; SM Caley; LA Mahoney; DP Mendoza

    1999-02-23

    The flammable gas hazard in Hanford waste tanks was made an issue by the behavior of double-shell Tank (DST) 241-SY-101 (SY-101). Shortly after SY-101 was filled in 1980, the waste level began rising periodically, due to the generation and retention of gases within the slurry, and then suddenly dropping as the gases were released. An intensive study of the tank's behavior revealed that these episodic releases posed a safety hazard because the released gas was flammable, and, in some cases, the volume of gas released was sufficient to exceed the lower flammability limit (LFL) in the tank headspace (Allemann et al. 1993). A mixer pump was installed in SY-101 in late 1993 to prevent gases from building up in the settled solids layer, and the large episodic gas releases have since ceased (Allemann et al. 1994; Stewart et al. 1994; Brewster et al. 1995). However, the surface level of SY-101 has been increasing since at least 1995, and in recent months the level growth has shown significant and unexpected acceleration. Based on a number of observations and measurements, including data from the void fraction instrument (VFI), we have concluded that the level growth is caused largely by increased gas retention in the floating crust. In September 1998, the crust contained between about 21 and 43% void based on VFI measurements (Stewart et al. 1998). Accordingly, it is important to understand the dominant mechanisms of gas retention, why the gas retention is increasing, and whether the accelerating level increase will continue, diminish or even reverse. It is expected that the retained gas in the crust is flammable, with hydrogen as a major constituent. This gas inventory would pose a flammable gas hazard if it were to release suddenly. In May 1997, the mechanisms of bubble retention and release from crust material were the subject of a workshop. The evaluation of the crust and potential hazards assumed a more typical void of roughly 15% gas. It could be similar to

  20. Degassing, gas retention and release in Fe(0) permeable reactive barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhl, Aki S; Jekel, Martin

    2014-04-01

    Corrosion of Fe(0) has been successfully utilized for the reductive treatment of multiple contaminants. Under anaerobic conditions, concurrent corrosion leads to the generation of hydrogen and its liberation as a gas. Gas bubbles are mobile or trapped within the irregular pore structure leading to a reduction of the water filled pore volume and thus decreased residence time and permeability (gas clogging). With regard to the contaminant transport to the reactive site, the estimation of surface properties of the reactive material indicated that individual gas bubbles only occupied minor contact areas of the reactive surface. Quantification of gas entrapment by both gravimetrical and tracer investigations revealed that development of preferential flow paths was not significant. A novel continuous gravimetrical method was implemented to record variations in gas entrapment and gas bubble releases from the reactive filling. Variation of grain size fractions revealed that the pore geometry had a significant impact on gas release. Large pores led to the release of comparably large gas amounts while smaller volumes were released from finer pores with a higher frequency. Relevant processes are explained with a simplified pictorial sequence that incorporates relevant mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. 2001 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act SEC 313

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZALOUDEK, D.E.

    2002-01-01

    Pursuant to section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act of 1986 (EPCRA), and Executive Order 13148, Greening the Government Through Leadership in Environmental Management, the US Department of Energy has prepared and submitted a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory for the Hanford Site covering activities performed during calendar year 2001. EPCRA Section 313 requires facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use listed toxic chemicals in quantities exceeding established threshold levels to report total annual releases of those chemicals. During calendar year 2001, Hanford Site activities resulted in one chemical used in amounts exceeding an activity threshold. Accordingly, the Hanford Site 2001 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory, DOE/RL-2002-37, includes total annual amount of lead released to the environment, transferred to offsite locations, and otherwise managed as waste

  2. Fission gas release from oxide fuels at high burnups (AWBA development program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dollins, C.C.

    1981-02-01

    The steady state gas release, swelling and densification model previously developed for oxide fuels has been modified to accommodate the slow transients in temperature, temperature gradient, fission rate and pressure that are encountered in normal reactor operation. The gas release predictions made by the model were then compared to gas release data on LMFBR-EBRII fuels obtained by Dutt and Baker and reported by Meyer, Beyer, and Voglewede. Good agreement between the model and the data was found. A comparison between the model and three other sets of gas release data is also shown, again with good agreement

  3. Effectiveness and reaction networks of H2O2 vapor with NH3 gas for decontamination of the toxic warfare nerve agent, VX on a solid surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gon Ryu, Sam; Wan Lee, Hae

    2015-01-01

    The nerve agent, O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothioate (VX) must be promptly eliminated following its release into the environment because it is extremely toxic, can cause death within a few minutes after exposure, acts through direct skin contact as well as inhalation, and persists in the environment for several weeks after release. A mixture of hydrogen peroxide vapor and ammonia gas was examined as a decontaminant for the removal of VX on solid surfaces at ambient temperature, and the reaction products were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR). All the VX on glass wool filter disks was found to be eliminated after 2 h of exposure to the decontaminant mixtures, and the primary decomposition product was determined to be non-toxic ethyl methylphosphonic acid (EMPA); no toxic S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothioic acid (EA-2192), which is usually produced in traditional basic hydrolysis systems, was found to be formed. However, other by-products, such as toxic O-ethyl S-vinyl methylphosphonothioate and (2-diisopropylaminoethyl) vinyl disulfide, were detected up to 150 min of exposure to the decontaminant mixture; these by-products disappeared after 3 h. The two detected vinyl byproducts were identified first in this study with the decontamination system of liquid VX on solid surfaces using a mixture of hydrogen peroxide vapor and ammonia gas. The detailed decontamination reaction networks of VX on solid surfaces produced by the mixture of hydrogen peroxide vapor and ammonia gas were suggested based on the reaction products. These findings suggest that the mixture of hydrogen peroxide vapor and ammonia gas investigated in this study is an efficient decontaminant mixture for the removal of VX on solid surfaces at ambient temperature despite the formation of a toxic by-product in the reaction process.

  4. Local Fission Gas Release and Swelling in Water Reactor Fuel during Slow Power Transients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg; Walker, C.T.; Ray, I.L.F.

    1985-01-01

    Gas release and fuel swelling caused by a power increase in a water reactor fuel (burn-up 2.7–4.5% FIMA) is described. At a bump terminal level of about 400 W/cm (local value) gas release was 25–40%. The formation of gas bubbles on grain boundaries and their degree of interlinkage are the two...... factors that determine the level of fission gas release during a power bump. Release begins when gas bubbles on grain boundaries start o interlink. This occurred at r/r0 ~ 0.75. Release tunnels were fully developed at r/r0 ~ 0.55 with the result that gas release was 60–70% at this position....

  5. 78 FR 52860 - Electronic Reporting of Toxics Release Inventory Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    ... only exception to this electronic reporting requirement is for the few facilities that submit trade... rulemaking process later to require the electronic reporting of trade secrets. The EPA recognizes the... Electronic Reporting of Toxics Release Inventory Data AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION...

  6. Conditions for the formation and atmospheric dispersion of a toxic, heavy gas layer during thermal metamorphism of coal and evaporite deposits by sill intrusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Michael; Hankin, Robin K. S.

    2010-05-01

    There is compelling evidence for massive discharge of volatiles, including toxic species, into the atmosphere at the end of the Permian. It has been argued that most of the gases were produced during thermal metamorphism of coal and evaporite deposits in the East Siberia Tunguska basin following sill intrusion (Retallack and Jahren, 2008; Svensen et al., 2009). The release of the volatiles has been proposed as a major cause of environmental and extinction events at the end of the Permian, with venting of carbon gases and halocarbons to the atmosphere leading to global warming and atmospheric ozone depletion (Svensen et al., 2009) Here we consider the conditions required for the formation and dispersion of toxic, heavier than air, gas plumes, made up of a mixture of CO2, CH4, H2S and SO2 and formed during the thermal metamorphism of C- and S- rich sediments. Dispersion models and density considerations within a range of CO2/CH4 ratios and volatile fluxes and temperatures, for gas discharge by both seepage and from vents, allow the possibility that following sill emplacement much of the vast East Siberia Tunguska basin was - at least intermittently - covered by a heavy, toxic gas layer that was unfavorable for life. Dispersion scenarios for a heavy gas layer beyond the Siberian region during end-Permian times will be presented. REFERENCES G. J. Retallack and A. H. Jahren, Methane release from igneous intrusion of coal during Late Permian extinction events, Journal of Geology, volume 116, 1-20, 2008 H. Svensen et al., Siberian gas venting and the end-Permian environmental crisis, Earth and Planetary Science Letters, volume 277, 490-500, 2009

  7. Multi-objective evacuation routing optimization for toxic cloud releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gai, Wen-mei; Deng, Yun-feng; Jiang, Zhong-an; Li, Jing; Du, Yan

    2017-01-01

    This paper develops a model for assessing the risks associated with the evacuation process in response to potential chemical accidents, based on which a multi-objective evacuation routing model for toxic cloud releases is proposed taking into account that the travel speed on each arc will be affected by disaster extension. The objectives of the evacuation routing model are to minimize travel time and individual evacuation risk along a path respectively. Two heuristic algorithms are proposed to solve the multi-objective evacuation routing model. Simulation results show the effectiveness and feasibility of the model and algorithms presented in this paper. And, the methodology with appropriate modification is suitable for supporting decisions in assessing emergency route selection in other cases (fires, nuclear accidents). - Highlights: • A model for assessing and visualizing the risks is developed. • A multi-objective evacuation routing model is proposed for toxic cloud releases. • A modified Dijkstra algorithm is designed to obtain an solution of the model. • Two heuristic algorithms have been developed as the optimization tool.

  8. Simulation experiments on the radial pool growth in gas-releasing melting system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhadieh, R.; Purviance, R.; Carlson, N.

    1983-01-01

    Following an HCDA, molten core-debris can contact the concrete foundation of the reactor building resulting in a molten UO 2 /concrete interaction and considerable gas release. The released gas can pressurize the containment building potentially leading to radiological releases. Furthermore, directional growth of the molten core-debris pool can reduce the reactor building structural integrity. To implement design changes that insure structural integrity, an understanding of the thermal-hydraulic and mass-transfer process associated with such a growth is most desirable. Owing to the complex nature of the combined heat, mass, and hydrodynamic processes associated with the two-dimensional problem of gas release and melting, the downward and radial penetration problems have been investigated separately. The present experimental study addresses the question of sideward penetration of the molten core debris into a gas-releasing, meltable, miscible solid

  9. iQOS: evidence of pyrolysis and release of a toxicant from plastic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Barbara; Williams, Monique; Talbot, Prue

    2018-03-13

    To evaluate performance of the I quit original smoking (iQOS) heat-not-burn system as a function of cleaning and puffing topography, investigate the validity of manufacturer's claims that this device does not burn tobacco and determine if the polymer-film filter is potentially harmful. iQOS performance was evaluated using five running conditions incorporating two different cleaning protocols. Heatsticks were visually and stereomicroscopically inspected preuse and postuse to determine the extent of tobacco plug charring (from pyrolysis) and polymer-film filter melting, and to elucidate the effects of cleaning on charring. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry headspace analysis was conducted on unused polymer-film filters to determine if potentially toxic chemicals are emitted from the filter during heating. For all testing protocols, pressure drop decreased as puff number increased. Changes in testing protocols did not affect aerosol density. Charring due to pyrolysis (a form of organic matter thermochemical decomposition) was observed in the tobacco plug after use. When the manufacturer's cleaning instructions were followed, both charring of the tobacco plug and melting of the polymer-film filter increased. Headspace analysis of the polymer-film filter revealed the release of formaldehyde cyanohydrin at 90°C, which is well below the maximum temperature reached during normal usage. Device usage limitations may contribute to decreases in interpuff intervals, potentially increasing user's intake of nicotine and other harmful chemicals. This study found that the tobacco plug does char and that charring increases when the device is not cleaned between heatsticks. Release of formaldehyde cyanohydrin is a concern as it is highly toxic at very low concentrations. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. A new mechanistic and engineering fission gas release model for a uranium dioxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chan Bock; Yang, Yong Sik; Kim, Dae Ho; Kim, Sun Ki; Bang, Je Geun

    2008-01-01

    A mechanistic and engineering fission gas release model (MEGA) for uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) fuel was developed. It was based upon the diffusional release of fission gases from inside the grain to the grain boundary and the release of fission gases from the grain boundary to the external surface by the interconnection of the fission gas bubbles in the grain boundary. The capability of the MEGA model was validated by a comparison with the fission gas release data base and the sensitivity analyses of the parameters. It was found that the MEGA model correctly predicts the fission gas release in the broad range of fuel burnups up to 98 MWd/kgU. Especially, the enhancement of fission gas release in a high-burnup fuel, and the reduction of fission gas release at a high burnup by increasing the UO 2 grain size were found to be correctly predicted by the MEGA model without using any artificial factor. (author)

  11. Dispersion modeling of accidental releases of toxic gases - Comparison of the models and their utility for the fire brigades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, S.; Baumann-Stanzer, K.

    2009-04-01

    Dispersion modeling of accidental releases of toxic gases - Comparison of the models and their utility for the fire brigades. Sirma Stenzel, Kathrin Baumann-Stanzer In the case of accidental release of hazardous gases in the atmosphere, the emergency responders need a reliable and fast tool to assess the possible consequences and apply the optimal countermeasures. For hazard prediction and simulation of the hazard zones a number of air dispersion models are available. The most model packages (commercial or free of charge) include a chemical database, an intuitive graphical user interface (GUI) and automated graphical output for display the results, they are easy to use and can operate fast and effective during stress situations. The models are designed especially for analyzing different accidental toxic release scenarios ("worst-case scenarios"), preparing emergency response plans and optimal countermeasures as well as for real-time risk assessment and management. There are also possibilities for model direct coupling to automatic meteorological stations, in order to avoid uncertainties in the model output due to insufficient or incorrect meteorological data. Another key problem in coping with accidental toxic release is the relative width spectrum of regulations and values, like IDLH, ERPG, AEGL, MAK etc. and the different criteria for their application. Since the particulate emergency responders and organizations require for their purposes unequal regulations and values, it is quite difficult to predict the individual hazard areas. There are a quite number of research studies and investigations coping with the problem, anyway the end decision is up to the authorities. The research project RETOMOD (reference scenarios calculations for toxic gas releases - model systems and their utility for the fire brigade) was conducted by the Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG) in cooperation with the Vienna fire brigade, OMV Refining & Marketing GmbH and

  12. A simple operational gas release and swelling model. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, M.H.; Matthews, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    A new and simple model of fission gas release and swelling has been developed for oxide nuclear fuel under operational conditions. The model, which is to be incorporated into a fuel element behaviour code, is physically based and applicable to fuel at both thermal and fast reactor ratings. In this paper we present that part of the model describing the behaviour of intragranular gas: a future paper will detail the treatment of the grain boundary gas. The results of model calculations are compared with recent experimental observations of intragranular bubble concentrations and sizes, and gas release from fuel irradiated under isothermal conditions. Good agreement is found between experiment and theory. (orig.)

  13. Effect of gas release in hot molding on flexural strength of composite friction brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusdja, Andy Permana; Surojo, Eko; Muhayat, Nurul; Raharjo, Wijang Wisnu

    2018-02-01

    Composite friction brake is a vital part of braking system which serves to reduce the speed of vehicle. To fulfill the requirement of brake performance, composite friction brake must have friction and mechanical characteristic as required. The characteristics of composite friction brake are affected by brake material formulation and manufacturing parameter. In the beginning of hot molding, intermittent hot pressing was carried out to release the gases that consist of ammonia gas and water vapor. In composite friction brake, phenolic resin containing hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) is often used as a binder. During hot molding, the reaction of phenolic resin and HMTA forms ammonia gas. Hot molding also generates water vapor because raw materials absorb moisture from environment when they are placed in storage. The gas release in hot molding is supposed affecting mechanical properties because it avoid entrapped gas in composite, so that this research investigated effect of gas release on flexural strength. Manufacturing of composite specimen was carried out as follow: mixing of raw materials, cold molding, and hot molding. In this research, duration of intermittent hot pressing and number of gas release were varied. The flexural strength of specimen was measured using three point bending test. The results showed that flexural strength specimens that were manufactured without gas release, using 4 times gas release with intermittent hot pressing for 5 and 10 seconds were not remarkably different. Conversely, hot molding using 4 times gas release with intermittent hot pressing for 15 seconds decreased flexural strength of composite. Hot molding using 2, 4, and 8 times gas release with intermittent hot pressing for 10 seconds also had no effect on increasing flexural strength. Increasing of flexural strength of composite was obtained only by using 6 times gas release with intermittent hot pressing for 10 seconds.

  14. SPEAR-BETA fuel-performance code system: fission-gas-release module. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, R.

    1983-03-01

    The original SPEAR-BETA general description manual covers both mechanistic and statistical models for fuel reliability, but only mechanistic modeling of fission gas release. This addendum covers the SPEAR-BETA statistical model for fission gas release

  15. Radionuclide toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galle, P.

    1982-01-01

    The aim of this symposium was to review the radionuclide toxicity problems. Five topics were discussed: (1) natural and artificial radionuclides (origin, presence or emission in the environment, human irradiation); (2) environmental behaviour of radionuclides and transfer to man; (3) metabolism and toxicity of radionuclides (radioiodine, strontium, rare gas released from nuclear power plants, ruthenium-activation metals, rare earths, tritium, carbon 14, plutonium, americium, curium and einsteinium, neptunium, californium, uranium) cancerogenous effects of radon 222 and of its danghter products; (4) comparison of the hazards of various types of energy; (5) human epidemiology of radionuclide toxicity (bone cancer induction by radium, lung cancer induction by radon daughter products, liver cancer and leukaemia following the use of Thorotrast, thyroid cancer; other site of cancer induction by radionuclides) [fr

  16. Maryland air toxics regulation applicable to a natural gas compressor station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidemann, H.A.; Hoffman, P.M.

    1992-01-01

    Columbia Gas Transmission Corporation submitted an air permit application to the Maryland Department of the Environment to construct a natural gas compressor station near Rutledge, Maryland. The station consists of three natural gas-fueled internal combustion reciprocating engines, each rated at 3200 horsepower. Maximum potential pollutant emissions associated with the station operation did not trigger Prevention of Significant Deterioration review or nonattainment area New Source review. However, a minor source air permit cannot be issued without addressing Maryland's toxic air regulations. Columbia initiated a detailed investigation of toxic air pollutants, including a stack test of an identical engine. Based on this information, the proposed station was subject to the toxic air regulation for acetaldehyde, acrolein, benzene, crotonaldehyde, and formaldehyde. Compliance with the toxic air regulation for crotonaldehyde was demonstrated by having an emission rate less than the threshold emission rate, specified in the regulation. The ambient air quality impact of the other four pollutants was determined using the Industrial Source Complex dispersion model and resulted in predicted concentrations below the pollutant-specific acceptable ambient level. A carcinogenic impact analysis was performed for acetaldehyde, benzene, and formaldehyde to demonstrate compliance with the accepted risk of one in one hundred thousand

  17. Experience of iodine, caesium and noble gas release from AGR failures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, C.J.; Harris, A.M.; Phillips, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    In the event of a fuel failure in an Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (AGR), the quantity of fission products available for release to the environment is determined by the transport of fission products in the UO 2 fuel, by the possible retention of fission products in the fuel can interspace and by the deposition of fission products on gas circuit surfaces ('plate-out'). The fission products of principal radiological concern are radioactive caesium (Cs-137 and Cs-134) and iodine (principally I-131). Results are summarised of a number of experiments which were designed to study the release of these fission products from individual fuel failures in the prototype AGR at Windscale. Results are also presented of fission product release from failures in commercial AGRs. Comparisons of measured releases of caesium and iodine relative to the release of the noble gas fission products show that, for some fuel failures, there is a significant retention of caesium and iodine within the fuel can interspace. Under normal conditions circuit deposition reduces caesium and iodine gas concentrations by several orders of magnitude. Differing release behaviour of caesium and iodine from the failures is examined together with subsequent deposition within the sampling equipment. These observations are important factors which must be considered in developing an understanding of the mechanisms involved in circuit deposition. (author)

  18. Transition of a Combined Toxic Gas Lethality Model to an Injury Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stuhmiller, James

    1997-01-01

    Acute exposure to toxic gases under militarily relevant conditions differs dramatically from the long-term, low-dose exposure conditions for which most toxic gas injury criteria have been developed...

  19. A design of toxic gas detecting security robot car based on wireless path-patrol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Ho-Chih

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Because a toxic gas detecting/monitoring system in a chemical plant is not movable, a gas detecting/monitoring system will be passive and the detecting range will also be constrained. This invention is an active multi-functional wireless patrol car that can substitute for humans that inspect a plant's security. In addition, to widen the monitoring vision within the environment, two motors used to rotate a wireless IPCAM with two axes are presented. Also, to control the robot car's movement, two axis motors used to drive the wheel of the robot car are also installed. Additionally, a toxic gas detector is linked to the microcontroller of the patrol car. The detected concentration of the gas will be fed back to the server pc. To enhance the robot car's patrolling duration, a movable electrical power unit in conjunction with a wireless module is also used. Consequently, this paper introduces a wireless path-patrol and toxic gas detecting security robot car that can assure a plant's security and protect workers when toxic gases are emitted.

  20. Fundamental Study of Disposition and Release of Methane in a Shale Gas Reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yifeng [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Waste Disposal Research and Analysis; Xiong, Yongliang [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Repository Performance; Criscenti, Louise J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Geochemistry; Ho, Tuan Ahn [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Geochemistry; Weck, Philippe F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Storage and Transportation Technology; Ilgen, Anastasia G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Geochemistry; Matteo, Edward [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Waste Disposal Research and Analysis; Kruichak, Jessica N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Waste Disposal Research and Analysis; Mills, Melissa M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Waste Disposal Research and Analysis; Dewers, Thomas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Geomechanics; Gordon, Margaret E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Materials, Devices and Energy Technologies; Akkutlu, Yucel [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Petroleum Engineering

    2016-09-01

    The recent boom in shale gas production through hydrofracturing has reshaped the energy production landscape in the United States. Wellbore production rates vary greatly among the wells within a single field and decline rapidly with time, thus bring up a serious concern with the sustainability of shale gas production. Shale gas production starts with creating a fracture network by injecting a pressurized fluid in a wellbore. The induced fractures are then held open by proppant particles. During production, gas releases from the mudstone matrix, migrates to nearby fractures, and ultimately reaches a production wellbore. Given the relatively high permeability of the induced fractures, gas release and migration in low-permeability shale matrix is likely to be a limiting step for long-term wellbore production. Therefore, a clear understanding of the underlying mechanisms of methane disposition and release in shale matrix is crucial for the development of new technologies to maximize gas production and recovery. Shale is a natural nanocomposite material with distinct characteristics of nanometer-scale pore sizes, extremely low permeability, high clay contents, significant amounts of organic carbon, and large spatial heterogeneities. Our work has shown that nanopore confinement plays an important role in methane disposition and release in shale matrix. Using molecular simulations, we show that methane release in nanoporous kerogen matrix is characterized by fast release of pressurized free gas (accounting for ~ 30 - 47% recovery) followed by slow release of adsorbed gas as the gas pressure decreases. The first stage is driven by the gas pressure gradient while the second stage is controlled by gas desorption and diffusion. The long-term production decline appears controlled by the second stage of gas release. We further show that diffusion of all methane in nanoporous kerogen behaves differently from the bulk phase, with much smaller diffusion coefficients. The MD

  1. Glycopyrrolate in toxic exposure to ammonia gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhalla A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia (NH 3 is a highly water-soluble, colorless, irritant gas with a unique pungent odor. Liquid ammonia stored under high pressure is still widely used for refrigeration in cold stores used for storing grains. Severe toxicity may occur following accidental exposure. We report an interesting case of accidental exposure to ammonia treated with glycopyrrolate along with other supportive measures.

  2. Safety barriers to prevent release of hydrocarbons during production of oil and gas

    OpenAIRE

    Sklet, Snorre; Hauge, Stein

    2004-01-01

    This report documents a set of scenarios related to release of hydrocarbons during production on oil and gas platforms. For each release scenario, initiating events, barrier functions aimed to prevent loss of containment, and barrier systems that realize these barrier functions are identified and described. Safety barriers to prevent release of hydrocarbons during production of oil and gas

  3. Steady-state and transient fission gas release and swelling model for LIFE-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villalobos, A.; Liu, Y.Y.; Rest, J.

    1984-06-01

    The fuel-pin modeling code LIFE-4 and the mechanistic fission gas behavior model FASTGRASS have been coupled and verified against gas release data from mixed-oxide fuels which were transient tested in the TREAT reactor. Design of the interface between LIFE-4 and FASTGRASS is based on an earlier coupling between an LWR version of LIFE and the GRASS-SST code. Fission gas behavior can significantly affect steady-state and transient fuel performance. FASTGRASS treats fission gas release and swelling in an internally consistent manner and simultaneously includes all major mechanisms thought to influence fission gas behavior. The FASTGRASS steady-state and transient analysis has evolved through comparisons of code predictions with fission-gas release and swelling data from both in- and ex-reactor experiments. FASTGRASS was chosen over other fission-gas behavior models because of its availability, its compatibility with the LIFE-4 calculational framework, and its predictive capability

  4. Fission gas release at high burn-up: beyond the standard diffusion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Landskron, H.; Sontheimer, F.; Billaux, M.R.

    2002-01-01

    At high burn-up standard diffusion models describing the release of fission gases from nuclear fuel must be extended to describe the experimental loss of xenon observed in the fuel matrix of the rim zone. Marked improvements of the prediction of integral fission gas release of fuel rods as well as of radial fission gas profiles in fuel pellets are achieved by using a saturation concept to describe fission gas behaviour not only in the pellet rim but also as an additional fission gas path in the whole pellet. (author)

  5. 1997 toxic chemical release inventory. Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act, Section 313

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaloudek, D.E.

    1998-01-01

    Two listed toxic chemicals were used at the Hanford Site above established activity thresholds: phosphoric acid and chlorine. Because total combined quantities of chlorine released, disposed, treated, recovered through recycle operations, co-combusted for energy recovery, and transferred to off-site locations for the purpose of recycle, energy recovery, treatment, and/or disposal, amounted to less than 500 pounds, the Hanford Site qualified for the alternate one million pound threshold for chlorine. Accordingly, this Toxic Chemical Release Inventory includes a Form A for chlorine, and a Form B for phosphoric acid

  6. Hot and toxic: Temperature regulates microcystin release from cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, Jeremy T; Wyatt, Kevin H; Doll, Jason C; Rubenstein, Eric M; Rober, Allison R

    2018-01-01

    The mechanisms regulating toxin release by cyanobacteria are poorly understood despite the threat cyanotoxins pose to water quality and human health globally. To determine the potential for temperature to regulate microcystin release by toxin-producing cyanobacteria, we evaluated seasonal patterns of water temperature, cyanobacteria biomass, and extracellular microcystin concentration in a eutrophic freshwater lake dominated by Planktothrix agardhii. We replicated seasonal variation in water temperature in a concurrent laboratory incubation experiment designed to evaluate cause-effect relationships between temperature and toxin release. Lake temperature ranged from 3 to 27°C and cyanobacteria biomass increased with warming up to 18°C, but declined rapidly thereafter with further increases in temperature. Extracellular microcystin concentration was tightly coupled with temperature and was most elevated between 20 and 25°C, which was concurrent with the decline in cyanobacteria biomass. A similar trend was observed in laboratory incubations where productivity-specific microcystin release was most elevated between 20 and 25°C and then declined sharply at 30°C. We applied generalized linear mixed modeling to evaluate the strength of water temperature as a predictor of cyanobacteria abundance and microcystin release, and determined that warming≥20°C would result in a 36% increase in microcystin release when Chlorophyll a was ≤50μgl -1 . These results show a temperature threshold for toxin release in P. agardhii, which demonstrates a potential to use water temperature to forecast bloom severity in eutrophic lakes where blooms can persist year-round with varying degrees of toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Natural gas as an automotive fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritsenko, A I; Vasiliev, Y N; Jankiewicz, A [VPO ' Soyuzgastekhnologiya' All-Union Scientific Research Inst. of Natural gases (VNIIGAS) (SU)

    1990-02-01

    The review presented covers mass production of gas-petrol and gas-diesel automobiles in the USSR, second generation auto gas filling compressor stations, principal exhaust toxicants, and tests indicating natural gas fired autos emit >5 times less NO{sub x} and 10 times less hydrocarbons excluding methane. The switch over to gas as auto fuel and ensuing release of petrol and diesel for other uses are discussed. (UK).

  8. Simulation of pellet-cladding thermomechanical interaction and fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, A.; Soba, A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper summarizes the present status of a computer code that describes some of the main phenomena occurring in a nuclear fuel element throughout its life. Temperature distribution, thermal expansion, elastic and plastic strains, creep, mechanical interaction between pellet and cladding, fission gas release, swelling and densification are modelized. The code assumes an axi-symmetric rod and hence, cylindrical finite elements are employed for the discretization. Due to the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity, the heat conduction problem is non-linear. Thermal expansion gives origin to elastic or plastic strains, which adequately describe the bamboo effect. Plasticity renders the stress-strain problem non linear. The fission gas inventory is calculated by means of a diffusion model, which assumes spherical grains and uses a finite element scheme. In order to reduce the calculation time, the rod is divided into five cylindrical rings where the temperature is averaged. In each ring the gas diffusion problem is solved in one grain and the results are then extended to the whole ring. The pressure, increased by the released gas, interacts with the stress field. Densification and swelling due to solid and gaseous fission products are also considered. Experiments, particularly those of the FUMEX series, are simulated with this code. A good agreement is obtained for the fuel center line temperature, the inside rod pressure and the fractional gas release. (author)

  9. Preventing Buoyant Displacement Gas Release Events in Hanford Double-Shell Waste Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Perry A.; Stewart, Charles W.

    2001-01-01

    This report summarizes the predictive methods used to ensure that waste transfer operations in Hanford waste tanks do not create waste configurations that lead to unsafe gas release events. The gas release behavior of the waste in existing double-shell tanks has been well characterized, and the flammable gas safety issues associated with safe storage of waste in the current configuration are being formally resolved. However, waste is also being transferred between double-shell tanks and from single-shell tanks into double-shell tanks by saltwell pumping and sluicing that create new wastes and waste configurations that have not been studied as well. Additionally, planning is underway for various waste transfer scenarios to support waste feed delivery to the proposed vitrification plant. It is critical that such waste transfers do not create waste conditions with the potential for dangerous gas release events.

  10. Effect of axial diffusional delays on the overall fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, N.K.

    1983-01-01

    In fission gas release modeling, it is normally assumed that any locally released gas mixes instantly and perfectly with other gases throughout the internal rod void volume. The present work investigates the consequences of the assumption that perfect mixing is dependent on diffusion, although the subassumption is maintained that pressure equilibrium is instantly achieved. In other words, when a burst of gas release occurs at any axial location, sufficient local accommodation takes place throughout the rod to eliminate any pressure gradients, but due to the narrowness of the passages through fuel cracks and fuel-cladding gap, concentration gradients may still prevail. Diffusion coefficients for the subsequent concentration equilibration are derived from classical theories. Application of one-dimensional diffusion theory is straightforward, but the lack of knowledge of the effective width of the axial passage introduces an uncertainty

  11. Modeling fission gas release in high burnup ThO2-UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Y.; Yuan, Y.; Pilat, E.E.; Rim, C.S.; Kazimi, M.S.

    2001-01-01

    A preliminary fission gas release model to predict the performance of thoria fuel using the FRAPCON-3 computer code package has been formulated. The following modeling changes have been made in the code: - Radial power/burnup distribution; - Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion; - Rim porosity and fuel density; - Diffusion coefficient of fission gas in ThO 2 -UO 2 fuel and low temperature fission gas release model. Due to its lower epithermal resonance absorption, thoria fuel experiences a much flatter distribution of radial fissile products and radial power distribution during operation as compared to uranian fuel. The rim effect and its consequences in thoria fuel, therefore, are expected to occur only at relatively high burnup levels. The enhanced conductivity is evident for ThO 2 , but for a mixture the thermal conductivity enhancement is small. The lower thermal fuel expansion tends to negate these small advantages. With the modifications above, the new version of FRAPCON-3 matched the measured fission gas release data reasonably well using the ANS 5.4 fission gas release model. (authors)

  12. The toxicity of sulfolane and DIPA from sour gas plants to aquatic species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lintott, D.R.; Goudey, J.S.; Wilson, J.; Swanson, S.; Drury, C.

    1997-01-01

    The ecological effects of sulfolane and diisopropanolamine (DIPA), which are used to remove sulfur compounds from natural gas, were studied to establish risk-based cleanup criteria and to evaluate effective remedial measures. Toxicity tests were conducted on both the parent compounds and the thermal and biological degradation products. Toxicity testing focused on aquatic species because surface outlets, such as creeks, were found to be the major pathways for the water soluble DIPA and sulfolane chemicals. Sulfolane proved to be relatively non-toxic to aquatic species, with the exception of bacteria. DIPA was relatively toxic to algae at pH found in ground and surface waters. Aqueous and methanol reclaimer bottom extracts from five different gas plant sites were also tested using modified acute toxicity screening tests with different species. The reclaimer bottoms were found to be highly toxic to all species tested. DIPA and sulfolane did not entirely account for the toxicity of the reclaimer bottoms. Inorganic salts and metals present in reclaimer bottoms were found not to contribute to toxicity directly. The same was true for DIPA and sulfolane degradation products. 3 refs., 7 tabs., 8 figs

  13. The toxicity of sulfolane and DIPA from sour gas plants to aquatic species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lintott, D.R.; Goudey, J.S. [HydroQual Consultants, Inc., Calgary, AB (Canada); Wilson, J.; Swanson, S. [Golder Associates, Calgary, AB (Canada); Drury, C. [Shell Canada Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada). Calgary Research Centre

    1997-12-31

    The ecological effects of sulfolane and diisopropanolamine (DIPA), which are used to remove sulfur compounds from natural gas, were studied to establish risk-based cleanup criteria and to evaluate effective remedial measures. Toxicity tests were conducted on both the parent compounds and the thermal and biological degradation products. Toxicity testing focused on aquatic species because surface outlets, such as creeks, were found to be the major pathways for the water soluble DIPA and sulfolane chemicals. Sulfolane proved to be relatively non-toxic to aquatic species, with the exception of bacteria. DIPA was relatively toxic to algae at pH found in ground and surface waters. Aqueous and methanol reclaimer bottom extracts from five different gas plant sites were also tested using modified acute toxicity screening tests with different species. The reclaimer bottoms were found to be highly toxic to all species tested. DIPA and sulfolane did not entirely account for the toxicity of the reclaimer bottoms. Inorganic salts and metals present in reclaimer bottoms were found not to contribute to toxicity directly. The same was true for DIPA and sulfolane degradation products. 3 refs., 7 tabs., 8 figs.

  14. A fission gas release model for MOX fuel and its verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, Y.H.; Sohn, D.S.; Strijov, P.

    2000-01-01

    A fission gas release model for MOX fuel has been developed based on a model for UO 2 fuel. Using the concept of equivalent cell, the model considers the uneven distribution of Pu within the fuel matrix and a number of Pu-rich particles that could lead to a non-uniform fission rate and fission gas distribution across the fuel pellet. The model has been incorporated into a code, COSMOS, and some parametric studies were made to analyze the effect of the size and Pu content of Pu-rich agglomerates. The model was then applied to the experimental data obtained from the FIGARO program, which consisted of the base irradiation of MOX fuels in the BEZNAU-1 PWR and the subsequent irradiation of four refabricated fuel segments in the Halden reactor. The calculated gas releases show good agreement with the measured ones. In addition, the present analysis indicates that the microstructure of the MOX fuel used in the FIGARO program is such that it has produced little difference in terms of gas release compared with UO 2 fuel. (author)

  15. On-Line Fission Gas Release Monitoring System in the High Flux Reactor Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurie, M.; Fuetterer, M. A.; Appelman, K.H.; Lapetite, J.-M.; Marmier, A.; Knol, S.; Best, J.

    2013-06-01

    For HTR fuel irradiation tests in the HFR Petten a specific installation was designed and installed dubbed the 'Sweep Loop Facility' (SLF). The SLF is tasked with three functions, namely temperature control by gas mixture technique, surveillance of safety parameters (temperature, pressure, radioactivity etc.) and analysis of fission gas release for three individual capsules in two separate experimental rigs. The SLF enables continuous and independent surveillance of all gas circuits. The release of volatile fission products (FP) from the in-pile experiments is monitored by continuous gas purging. The fractional release of these FP, defined as the ratio between release rate of a gaseous fission isotope (measured) to its instantaneous birth rate (calculated), is a licensing-relevant test for HTR fuel. The developed gamma spectrometry station allows for higher measurement frequencies, thus enabling follow-up of rapid and massive release transients. The designed stand-alone system was tested and fully used through the final irradiation period of the HFR-EU1 experiment which was terminated on 18 February 2010. Its robustness allowed the set up to be used as extra safety instrumentation. This paper describes the gas activity measurement technique based on HPGe gamma spectrometry and illustrates how qualitative and quantitative analysis of volatile FP can be performed on-line. (authors)

  16. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) Facility Points, Region 9, 2012, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A federal law called the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act (EPCRA) gives the public the right to know about toxic chemicals being released into the...

  17. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) Facility Points, Region 9, 2014, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A federal law called the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act (EPCRA) gives the public the right to know about toxic chemicals being released into the...

  18. Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) Facility Points, Region 9, 2011, US EPA Region 9

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A federal law called the Emergency Planning and Community Right to Know Act (EPCRA) gives the public the right to know about toxic chemicals being released into the...

  19. Production and release of the fission gas in (Th U)O2 fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dias, Marcio S.

    1982-06-01

    The volume, composition and release of the fission gas products were caculated for (Th, U)O 2 fuel rods. The theorectical calculations were compared with experimental results available on the literature. In ThO 2 + 5% UO 2 fuel rods it will be produced approximated 5% more fission gas as compared to UO 2 fuel rods. The fission gas composition or Xe to Kr ratio has showed a decreasing fuel brunup dependence, in opposition to that of UO 2 . Under the same fuel rod operational conditions, the (Th, U)O 2 fission gas release will be smaller as compared to UO 2 . This behaviour of (Th, U)O 2 fuel comes from smallest gas atom difusivity and higher activation energies of the processes that increase the fission gas release. (Author) [pt

  20. Etiology and radiologic findings of anoxia occurred at Dan-Mu-Ji(Salted radish in rice bran) manufacture: A case report and results of gas analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Choong Ki; Kim, Heung Cheol; Ahn, Bum Gyu; Park, Man Soo; Hwang, Woo Cheol; Choi, Cheol Soon; Kang, Ik Won [College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chunchon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Man Goo [Kangwon National University, Chunchon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-15

    To identify the main toxic gas released from salted radish in rice bran(Dan-Mu-Ji) and to introduce the radiological findings of the patient who was exposed to the gas. Chest radiographs and CT scans of one survivor among three men who were exposed to the gas from Dan-Mu-Ji were reviewed. Gas obtained from the closed bottle containing Dan-Mu-Ji was analyzed by using the gas chromatography. The radiographic examinations of the survivor were suggestive of pulmonary edema with it's rapidly improving consideration in both lung. The headspace gas within the bottle containing Dan-Mu-Ji was mainly composed with carbon dioxide, ethyl alcohol and hydrogen sulfide, of which hydrogen sulfide was considered the main toxic gas released. Under the anaerobic condition, Dan-Mu-Ji released toxic hydrogen sulfide. Inhalation of hydrogen sulfide might produce non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema.

  1. Specialists' meeting on fission product release and transport in gas-cooled reactors. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1985-07-01

    The purpose of the Meeting on Fission Product Release and Transport in Gas-Cooled Reactors was to compare and discuss experimental and theoretical results of fission product behaviour in gas-cooled reactors under normal and accidental conditions and to give direction for future development. The technical part of the meeting covered operational experience and laboratory research, activity release, and behaviour of released activity.

  2. Specialists' meeting on fission product release and transport in gas-cooled reactors. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of the Meeting on Fission Product Release and Transport in Gas-Cooled Reactors was to compare and discuss experimental and theoretical results of fission product behaviour in gas-cooled reactors under normal and accidental conditions and to give direction for future development. The technical part of the meeting covered operational experience and laboratory research, activity release, and behaviour of released activity

  3. Delignification and Enhanced Gas Release from Soil Containing Lignocellulose by Treatment with Bacterial Lignin Degraders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Goran M M; Duran-Pena, Maria Jesus; Rahmanpour, Rahman; Sapsford, Devin; Bugg, Timothy D H

    2017-04-10

    The aim of the study was to isolate bacterial lignin-degrading bacteria from municipal solid waste soil, and to investigate whether they could be used to delignify lignocellulose-containing soil, and enhance methane release. A set of 20 bacterial lignin degraders, including 11 new isolates from municipal solid waste soil, were tested for delignification and phenol release in soil containing 1% pine lignocellulose. A group of 7 strains were then tested for enhancement of gas release from soil containing 1% lignocellulose in small-scale column tests. Using an aerobic pre-treatment, aerobic strains such as Pseudomonas putida showed enhanced gas release from the treated sample, but four bacterial isolates showed 5-10 fold enhancement in gas release in an in situ experiment under microanaerobic conditions: Agrobacterium sp., Lysinibacillus sphaericus, Comamonas testosteroni, and Enterobacter sp.. The results show that facultative anaerobic bacterial lignin degraders found in landfill soil can be used for in situ delignification and enhanced gas release in soil containing lignocellulose. The study demonstrates the feasibility of using an in situ bacterial treatment to enhance gas release and resource recovery from landfill soil containing lignocellulosic waste. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. IFPE/RISOE-II, Fuel Performance Data from Transient Fission Gas Release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnbull, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    Description: The RISO National Laboratory in Denmark have carried out three irradiation programs of slow ramp and hold tests, so called 'bump tests' to investigate fission gas release and fuel microstructural changes. The second project took place between 1982 and 1986 and was called 'The RISO Transient Fission Gas Project'. The fuel used in the project was from: IFA-161 irradiated in the Halden BWR (27 to 42 MWd/kgUO 2 ) and GE BWR fuel irradiated in the Millstone 1 reactor 14 to 29 MWd/kgUO 2 . Using the re-fabrication technique, it was possible to back fill the test segment with a choice of gas and gas pressure and to measure the time dependence of fission gas release by continuous monitoring of the plenum pressure. The short length of the test segment was an advantage because, depending on where along the original rod the section was taken, burnup could be chosen variable, and during the test the fuel experienced a single power

  5. 76 FR 69136 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-08

    ... Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Lifting of Administrative Stay for Hydrogen Sulfide; Correction. SUMMARY: The... Administrative Stay of the reporting requirements for hydrogen sulfide. The Office of the Federal Register...

  6. On the fission gas release from oxide fuels during normal grain growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paraschiv, M.C.; Paraschiv, A.; Glodeanu, F.

    1997-01-01

    A mathematical formalism for calculating the fission gas release from oxide fuels considering an arbitrary distribution of fuel grain size with only zero boundary condition for gas diffusion at the grain boundary is proposed. It has also been proved that it becomes unnecessary to consider the grain volume distribution function for fission products diffusion when the grain boundary gas resolution is considered, if thermodynamic forces on grain boundaries are only time dependent. In order to highlight the effect of the normal grain growth on fission gas release from oxide fuels Hillert's and Lifshitz and Slyozov's theories have been selected. The last one was used to give an adequate treatment of normal grain growth for the diffusion-controlled grain boundary movement in oxide fuels. It has been shown that during the fuel irradiation, the asymptotic form of the grain volume distribution functions given by Hillert and Lifshitz and Slyozov models can be maintained but the grain growth rate constant becomes time dependent itself. Experimental results have been used to correlate the two theoretical models of normal grain growth to the fission gas release from oxide fuels. (orig.)

  7. Childhood lead toxicity and impaired release of thyrotropin-stimulating hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huseman, C.A.; Moriarty, C.M.; Angle, C.R.

    1987-01-01

    Decreased stature of children is epidemiologically associated with increased blood lead independent of multiple socioeconomic and nutritional variables. Since endocrine dysfunction occurs in adult lead workers, they studied two girls, 2 years of age, before and after calcium disodium edetate chelation for blood leads (PbB) of 19-72 μg/dl. The height of both children had crossed from the 50th to below the 10th percentile during the course of chronic lead toxicity. Basal free T 4 , T 4 , T 3 , cortisol, somatomedin C, and sex steroids were normal. A decrease in the growth hormone response and elevation of basal prolcatin and gonadotropins were noted in one. Both children demonstrated blunted thyrotropin-stimulating hormone (TSH) responses to thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) in six of seven challenges. This prompted in vitro studies of cultured cells from rat pituitarities. After incubation of pituitary cells with 0.1-10 μM Pb 2+ for 2 hr, followed by the addition of TRH, there was a dose-dependent inhibition of TSH release Lead did not interfere with the assay of TSH. To investigate the interaction of lead and calcium, 45 Ca 2+ kinetic analyses were done on rat pituitary slices after 1 hr incubation with 1.0 μM lead. The impaired late efflux was consistent with a decrease in the size and exchangeability of the tightly bound pool of intracellular microsomal or mitochondrial calcium. The rat pituitary cell model provides a model for the decreased TSH release of lead poisoning, supports the biological plausibility of a neuroendocrine effect on growth, and suggests that interference with calcium-mediated intracellular responses is a basic mechanism of lead toxicity

  8. In-pile observation of gas release from sodium-joint carbide pins irradiated in Osiris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colin, M.; Faugere, J.L.; Rouault, J.

    1978-01-01

    Gas release is studied in three sodium-joint carbide pins irradiated in the reactor Osiris at a nominal linear power of 900 W/cm to burn-ups ranging from 4 to 13%. The overall activity, stable gases and radioactive gases are measured. It is found that most of the gas is released in busts, that the release of stable gases speeds up sharply after an incubation time, that the initial bursts are very large and that for each mode of release observed and for each class of nuclide the radioactive gases follow a law R/B=A/lambda.n. An attempt is made to interpret the results in terms of either the formation of gas bubbles in the sodium joint, the existence of a large bubble above the fissile column or the simultaneous release of a large number of smaller bubbles [fr

  9. Toxic chemical considerations for tank farm releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Keuren, J.C.; Davis, J.S., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-01

    This topical report contains technical information used to determine the accident consequences of releases of toxic chemical and gases for the Tank Farm Final Safety Analysis report (FSAR).It does not provide results for specific accident scenarios but does provide information for use in those calculations including chemicals to be considered, chemical concentrations, chemical limits and a method of summing the fractional contributions of each chemical. Tank farm composites evaluated were liquids and solids for double shell tanks, single shell tanks, all solids,all liquids, headspace gases, and 241-C-106 solids. Emergency response planning guidelines (ERPGs) were used as the limits.Where ERPGs were not available for the chemicals of interest, surrogate ERPGs were developed. Revision 2 includes updated sample data, an executive summary, and some editorial revisions.

  10. The effect of gas release on column separator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kranenburg, C.

    1974-01-01

    A mathematical model has been considered in which the influence of gas release on transient cavitating flow and column separation in pipel ines is taken into account. A rei iable numerical method has been developed for the computation of the wave propagation and cavitation phenomena following pump

  11. Modelling of fission gas release in rods from the International DEMO-RAMP-II Project at Studsvik

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malen, K.

    1983-01-01

    The DEMO-RAMP-II rods had a burn-up of 25-30 MWd/kg U. They were ramped to powers in the range 40-50 kW/m with hold times between 10 s and 4.5 minutes. In spite of the short hold times the fission gas release at the higher powers was more than 1%. With these short hold times it is natural to assume that mixing of released gas with plenum gas is limited. Modelling has been performed using GAPCONSV (a modified GAPCON-THERMAL-2) both with and without mixing of released gas with plenum gas. In particular for the high power-short duration ramps only the ''no mixing'' modelling yields release fractions comparable to the experimental values. (author)

  12. Rethink potential risks of toxic emissions from natural gas and oil mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingmin

    2018-09-01

    Studies have showed the increasing environmental and public health risks of toxic emissions from natural gas and oil mining, which have become even worse as fracking is becoming a dominant approach in current natural gas extraction. However, governments and communities often overlook the serious air pollutants from oil and gas mining, which are often quantified lower than the significant levels of adverse health effects. Therefore, we are facing a challenging dilemma: how could we clearly understand the potential risks of air toxics from natural gas and oil mining. This short study aims at the design and application of simple and robust methods to enhance and improve current understanding of the becoming worse toxic air emissions from natural gas and oil mining as fracking is becoming the major approach. Two simple ratios, the min-to-national-average and the max-to-national-average, are designed and applied to each type of air pollutants in a natural gas and oil mining region. The two ratios directly indicate how significantly high a type of air pollutant could be due to natural gas and oil mining by comparing it to the national average records, although it may not reach the significant risks of adverse health effects according to current risk screening methods. The min-to-national-average and the max-to-national-average ratios can be used as a direct and powerful method to describe the significance of air pollution by comparing it to the national average. The two ratios are easy to use for governments, stakeholders, and the public to pay enough attention on the air pollutants from natural gas and oil mining. The two ratios can also be thematically mapped at sampled sites for spatial monitoring, but spatial mitigation and analysis of environmental and health risks need other measurements of environmental and demographic characteristics across a natural gas and oil mining area. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Do Industries Pollute More in Poorer Neighborhoods? Evidence From Toxic Releasing Plants in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Lopamudra Chakraborti; José Jaime Sainz Santamaría

    2015-01-01

    Studies on industrial pollution and community pressure in developing countries are rare. We employ previously unused, self-reported toxics pollution data from Mexico to show that there exists some evidence of environmental justice concerns and community pressure in explaining industrial pollution behavior. We obtain historical data on toxic releases into water and land for the time period 2004 to 2012. We focus on 7 major pollutants including heavy metals and cyanide. To address endogeneity c...

  14. The release code package REVOLS/RENONS for fission product release from a liquid sodium pool into an inert gas atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starflinger, J.; Scholtyssek, W.; Unger, H.

    1994-12-01

    For aerosol source term considerations in the field of nuclear safety, the investigation of the release of volatile and non-volatile species from liquid surfaces into a gas atmosphere is important. In case of a hypothetical liquid metal fast breeder reactor accident with tank failure, primary coolant sodium with suspended or solved fuel particles and fission products may be released into the containment. The computer code package REVOLS/RENONS, based on a theoretical mechanistic model with a modular structure, has been developed for the prediction of sodium release as well as volatile and non-volatile radionuclide release from a liquid pool surface into the inert gas atmosphere of the inner containment. Hereby the release of sodium and volatile fission products, like cesium and sodium iodide, is calculated using a theoretical model in a mass transfer coefficient formulation. This model has been transposed into the code version REVOLS.MOD1.1, which is discussed here. It enables parameter analysis under highly variable user-defined boundary conditions. Whereas the evaporative release of the volatile components is governed by diffusive and convective transport processes, the release of the non-volatile ones may be governed by mechanical processes which lead to droplet entrainment from the wavy pool surface under conditions of natural or forced convection into the atmosphere. The mechanistic model calculates the liquid entrainment rate of the non-volatile species, like the fission product strontium oxide and the fuel (uranium dioxide) from a liquid pool surface into a parallel gas flow. The mechanistic model has been transposed into the computer code package REVOLS/RENONS, which is discussed here. Hereby the module REVOLS (RElease of VOLatile Species) calculates the evaporative release of the volatile species, while the module RENONS (RElease of NON-Volatile Species) computes the entrainment release of the non-volatile radionuclides. (orig./HP) [de

  15. Ultrasound-induced Gas Release from Contrast Agent Microbubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postema, M.A.B.; Postema, Michiel; Bouakaz, Ayache; Versluis, Michel; de Jong, N.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated gas release from two hard-shelled ultrasound contrast agents by subjecting them to high-mechanical index (MI) ultrasound and simultaneously capturing high-speed photographs. At an insonifying frequency of 1.7 MHz, a larger percentage of contrast bubbles is seen to crack than at 0.5

  16. Transient fission gas release from UO2 fuel for high temperature and high burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szuta, M.

    2001-01-01

    In the present paper it is assumed that the fission gas release kinetics from an irradiated UO 2 fuel for high temperature is determined by the kinetics of grain growth. A well founded assumption that Vitanza curve describes the change of uranium dioxide re-crystallization temperature and the experimental results referring to the limiting grain size presented in the literature are used to modify the grain growth model. Algorithms of fission gas release due to re-crystallization of uranium dioxide grains are worked out. The defect trap model of fission gas behaviour described in the earlier papers is supplemented with the algorithms. Calculations of fission gas release in function of time, temperature, burn-up and initial grain sizes are obtained. Computation of transient fission gas release in the paper is limited to the case where steady state of irradiation to accumulate a desired burn-up is performed below the temperature of re-crystallization then the subsequent step temperature increase follows. There are considered two kinds of step temperature increase for different burn-up: the final temperature of the step increase is below and above the re-crystallization temperature. Calculations show that bursts of fission gas are predicted in both kinds. The release rate of gas liberated for the final temperature above the re-crystallization temperature is much higher than for final temperature below the re-crystallization temperature. The time required for the burst to subside is longer due to grain growth than due to diffusion of bubbles and knock-out release. The theoretical results explain qualitatively the experimental data but some of them need to be verified since this sort of experimental data are not found in the available literature. (author)

  17. A review of selected aspects of the effect of water vapor on fission gas release from uranium oxycarbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, B.F.

    1994-04-01

    A selective review is presented of previous measurements and the analysis of experiments on the effect of water vapor on fission gas release from uranium oxycarbide. Evidence for the time-dependent composition of the uranium oxycarbide fuel; the diffusional release of fission gas; and the initial, rapid and limited release of stored fission gas is discussed. In regard to the initial, rapid release of fission gas, clear restrictions on mechanistic hypotheses can be deduced from the experimental data. However, more fundamental experiments may be required to establish the mechanism of the rapid release

  18. Macroscopic calculational model of fission gas release from water reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Masaki

    1993-01-01

    Existing models for estimating fission gas release rate usually have fuel temperature as independent variable. Use of fuel temperature, however, often brings an excess ambiguity in the estimation because it is not a rigorously definable quantity as a function of heat generation rate and burnup. To derive a mathematical model that gives gas release rate explicitly as a function of design and operational parameters, the Booth-type diffusional model was modified by changing the character of the diffusion constant from physically meaningful quantity into a mere mathematical parameter, and also changing its temperature dependency into power dependency. The derived formula was found, by proper choice of arbitrary constants, to satisfactorily predict the release rates under a variety of irradiation histories up to a burnup of 60,000 MWd/t. For simple power histories, the equation can be solved analytically by defining several transcendental functions, which enables simple calculation of release rate using graphs. (author)

  19. 1992 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory: Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know-Act of 1986 Section 313

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act of 1986 (EPCRA) requires the annual submittal of toxic chemical release information to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The following document is the July 1993 submittal of the EPCRA Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R). Included is a Form R for chlorine and for lead, the two chemicals used in excess of the established regulatory thresholds at the Hanford Site by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office and its contractors during calendar year 1992

  20. An advanced model for spreading and evaporation of accidentally released hazardous liquids on land

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trijssenaar-Buhre, I.J.M.; Sterkenburg, R.P.; Wijnant-Timmerman, S.I.

    2009-01-01

    Pool evaporation modelling is an important element in consequence assessment of accidentally released hazardous liquids. The evaporation rate determines the amount of toxic or flammable gas released into the atmosphere and is an important factor for the size of a pool fire. In this paper a

  1. An advanced model for spreading and evaporation of accidentally released hazardous liquids on land

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trijssenaar-Buhre, I.J.M.; Wijnant-Timmerman, S.L.

    2008-01-01

    Pool evaporation modelling is an important element in consequence assessment of accidentally released hazardous liquids. The evaporation rate determines the amount of toxic or flammable gas released into the atmosphere and is an important factor for the size of a pool fire. In this paper a

  2. The present status of rare gas release control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Hiroshi

    1974-01-01

    Of the rare gases Ar, Kr and Xe released from nuclear facilities, the problem of release control can be confined to 41 Ar, 85 Kr and 133 Xe. The cases of the latter two are described, as 41 Ar is not much significant. 133 Xe, having relatively short half-life, can be dealt sufficiently by holding-up in case of light water reactors. 85 Kr of long half-life must be removed : the methods are low temperature adsorption, liquefaction distillation, absorption and diaphragm method. As for future problem, there is disposal of concentrated rare gas. (Mori, K.)

  3. Toxicity of Sodium Bicarbonate to Fish from Coal-Bed Natural Gas Production in the Tongue and Powder River Drainages, Montana and Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluates the sensitivity of aquatic life to sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), a major constituent of coal-bed natural gas-produced water. Excessive amounts of sodium bicarbonate in the wastewater from coal-bed methane natural gas production released to freshwater streams and rivers may adversely affect the ability of fish to regulate their ion uptake. The collaborative study focuses on the acute and chronic toxicity of sodium bicarbonate on select fish species in the Tongue and Powder River drainages in southeastern Montana and northeastern Wyoming. Sodium bicarbonate is not naturally present in appreciable concentrations within the surface waters of the Tongue and Powder River drainages; however, the coal-bed natural gas wastewater can reach levels over 1,000 milligrams per liter. Large concentrations have been shown to be acutely toxic to native fish (Mount and others, 1997). In 2003, with funding and guidance provided by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Montana Fish, Wildlife, and Parks and the U.S. Geological Survey initiated a collaborative study on the potential effects of coal-bed natural gas wastewater on aquatic life. A major goal of the study is to provide information to the State of Montana Water Quality Program needed to develop an aquatic life standard for sodium bicarbonate. The standard would allow the State, if necessary, to establish targets for sodium bicarbonate load reductions.

  4. Safety barriers on oil and gas platforms. Means to prevent hydrocarbon releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sklet, Snorre

    2005-12-15

    The main objective of the PhD project has been to develop concepts and methods that can be used to define, illustrate, analyse, and improve safety barriers in the operational phase of offshore oil and gas production platforms. The main contributions of this thesis are; Clarification of the term safety barrier with respect to definitions, classification, and relevant attributes for analysis of barrier performance Development and discussion of a representative set of hydrocarbon release scenarios Development and testing of a new method, BORA-Release, for qualitative and quantitative risk analysis of hydrocarbon releases Safety barriers are defined as physical and/or non-physical means planned to prevent, control, or mitigate undesired events or accidents. The means may range from a single technical unit or human actions, to a complex socio-technical system. It is useful to distinguish between barrier functions and barrier systems. Barrier functions describe the purpose of safety barriers or what the safety barriers shall do in order to prevent, control, or mitigate undesired events or accidents. Barrier systems describe how a barrier function is realized or executed. If the barrier system is functioning, the barrier function is performed. If a barrier function is performed successfully, it should have a direct and significant effect on the occurrence and/or consequences of an undesired event or accident. It is recommended to address the following attributes to characterize the performance of safety barriers; a) functionality/effectiveness, b) reliability/ availability, c) response time, d) robustness, and e) triggering event or condition. For some types of barriers, not all the attributes are relevant or necessary in order to describe the barrier performance. The presented hydrocarbon release scenarios include initiating events, barrier functions introduced to prevent hydrocarbon releases, and barrier systems realizing the barrier functions. Both technical and human

  5. Gas release during salt well pumping: model predictions and comparisons to laboratory experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peurrung, L.M.; Caley, S.M.; Bian, E.Y.; Gauglitz, P.A.

    1996-09-01

    The Hanford Site has 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. Some of these wastes are known to generate mixtures of flammable gases, including hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Nineteen of these SSTs have been placed on the Flammable Gas Watch List (FGWL) because they are known or suspected, in all but one case, to retain these flammable gases. Salt well pumping to remove the interstitial liquid from SSTs is expected to cause the release of much of the retained gas, posing a number of safety concerns. Research at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has sought to quantify the release of flammable gases during salt well pumping operations. This study is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company as part of the PNNL Flammable Gas Project. Understanding and quantifying the physical mechanisms and waste properties that govern gas release during salt well pumping will help to resolve the associated safety issues

  6. Effects of Operating Conditions on Gas Release Thermal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The gas release rates and the flame length of the potential jet fires were initially estimated using Simplex Source Term Models which pay limited attention to operating conditions. Finally a more detailed follow-up study, accounting for a range of practical factors was conducted. A number of useful risk management metrics ...

  7. Tritium release reduction and radiolysis gas formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batifol, G.; Douche, Ch.; Sejournant, Ch. [CEA Valduc, 21 - Is-sur-Tille (France)

    2008-07-15

    At CEA Valduc, the usual tritiated waste container is the steel drum. It allows good release reduction performance for middle activity waste but in some cases tritium outgassing from the waste drums is too high. It was decided to over-package each drum in a tighter container called the over-drum. According to good safety practices it was also decided to measure gas composition evolution into the over-drum in order to defect hydrogen formation over time. After a few months, a significant release reduction was observed. Additionally there followed contamination reduction in the roof storage building rainwater. However hydrogen was also observed in some over-drums, in addition to other radiolysis products. Catalyst will be added to manage the hydrogen risk in the over-drums. (authors)

  8. Defect Functionalization of MoS2 nanostructures as toxic gas sensors: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, A. A.

    2018-02-01

    Toxic gas sensing plays an important role in many parts of our life from environmental protection, human health, agriculture to biomedicine. The importance of detecting toxic gases in the environment cannot be minimised in today’s highly polluted world and the reality of global warming. Carbon monoxide and NO gas are highly toxic air pollutants and can cause serious health problems. Therefore, materials able to detect these toxic gases are urgently needed. Doping and defect substitution is a versatile and new tool for changing the chemical and electronic properties of 2D layered materials and boosting the applications of these materials. Molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) as a 2D layered material has unique properties and applications due its semiconducting nature, bandgap and layered structure. In the past decade, although, extensive research of Graphene as a gas sensor was conducted, the zero bandgap limited its potential and applicability. This is overcome in MoS2 nanostructures (MSNs) and the current focus is defect engineering of MSNs. The large surface to volume ratio, bandgap and cheapness makes MSNs very attractive for gas sensor applications. The idea is fuelled by the recent finding of Ding et al [16] of successful doping strategies on monolayer MoS2 for enhanced NO detection. Moreover, the work of Luo et al [17] shows that substitutional doping is the new way of boosting and engineering the properties of ML MoS2. A short and focused report in this exciting field is presented in this review.

  9. Simulation of pellet-cladding thermomechanical interaction and fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, Alicia; Soba, Alejandro

    2003-01-01

    This paper summarizes the present status of a computer code that describes some of the main phenomena occurring in a nuclear fuel rod throughout its life. Temperature distribution, thermal expansion, elastic and plastic strains, creep, mechanical interaction between pellet and cladding, fission gas release, gas mixing, swelling, and densification are modeled. The modular structure of the code allows for the incorporation of models to simulate different phenomena and material properties. Collapsible rods can be also simulated. The code is bidimensional, assumes cylindrical symmetry for the rod and uses the finite element method to integrate the differential equations. The stress-strain and heat conduction problems are nonlinear due to plasticity and to the temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity. The fission gas inventory is calculated with a diffusion model, assuming spherical grains and using a one-dimensional finite element scheme. Pressure increase, swelling and densification are coupled with the stress field. Good results are obtained for the simulation of the irradiation tests of the first argentine prototypes of MOX fuels, where the bamboo effect is clearly observed, and of the FUMEX series for the fuel centerline temperature, the inside rod pressure and the fractional gas release.

  10. Release, transport and toxicity of engineered nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Deepika; Naoghare, Pravin K; Saravanadevi, Sivanesan; Pandey, Ram Avatar

    2015-01-01

    Recent developments in nanotechnology have facilitated the synthesis of novel engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) that possess new and different physicochemical properties. These ENPs have been ex tensive ly used in various commercial sectors to achieve both social and economic benefits. However. the increasing production and consumption of ENPs by many different industries has raised concerns about their possible release and accumulation in the environment. Released EN Ps may either remain suspended in the atmosphere for several years or may accumulate and eventually be modified int o other substances. Settled nanoparticles can he easily washed away during ra in s. and therefore may easily enter the food chain via water and so il. Thus. EN Ps can contaminate air. water and soil and can subsequently pose adverse risks to the health of different organisms. Studies to date indicate that ENP transport to and within the ecosystem depend on their chemical and physical properties (viz .. size. shape and solubility) . Therefore. the EN Ps display variable behavior in the environment because of their individual properties th at affect their tendency for adsorption, absorption, diffusional and colloidal interaction. The transport of EN Ps also influences their fate and chemical transformation in ecosystems. The adsorption, absorption and colloidal interaction of ENPs affect their capacity to be degraded or transformed, whereas the tendency of ENPs to agglomerate fosters their sedimentation. How widely ENPs are transported and their environmental fate influence how tox ic they may become to environmental organisms. One barrier to fully understanding how EN Ps are transformed in the environment and how best to characterize their toxicity, is related to the nature of their ultrafine structure. Experiments with different animals, pl ants, and cell lines have revealed that ENPs induce toxicity via several cellular pathways that is linked to the size. shape. surface area

  11. Toxic vapor concentrations in the control room following a postulated accidental release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wing, J.

    1979-05-01

    An acceptable method is presented for calculating the vapor concentrations in a control room as a function of time after a postulated accidental release. Included are the mathematical formulas for computing the rates of vaporization and evaporation of liquid spills, the vapor dispersion in air, and the control room air exchange. A list of toxic chemicals and their physical properties is also given

  12. Unit mechanisms of fission gas release: Current understanding and future needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonks, Michael; Andersson, David; Devanathan, Ram; Dubourg, Roland; El-Azab, Anter; Freyss, Michel; Iglesias, Fernando; Kulacsy, Katalin; Pastore, Giovanni; Phillpot, Simon R.; Welland, Michael

    2018-06-01

    Gaseous fission product transport and release has a large impact on fuel performance, degrading fuel properties and, once the gas is released into the gap between the fuel and cladding, lowering gap thermal conductivity and increasing gap pressure. While gaseous fission product behavior has been investigated with bulk reactor experiments and simplified analytical models, recent improvements in experimental and modeling approaches at the atomistic and mesoscales are being applied to provide unprecedented understanding of the unit mechanisms that define the fission product behavior. In this article, existing research on the basic mechanisms behind the various stages of fission gas release during normal reactor operation are summarized and critical areas where experimental and simulation work is needed are identified. This basic understanding of the fission gas behavior mechanisms has the potential to revolutionize our ability to predict fission product behavior during reactor operation and to design fuels that have improved fission product retention. In addition, this work can serve as a model on how a coupled experimental and modeling approach can be applied to understand the unit mechanisms behind other critical behaviors in reactor materials.

  13. Safety assessment of VHTR hydrogen production system against fire, explosion and acute toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Tomoyuki; Nishihara, Tetsuo; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2008-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency has been developing a nuclear hydrogen production system by using heat from the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). This system will handle a large amount of combustible gas and toxic gas. The risk from fire, explosion and acute toxic exposure caused by an accident involving chemical material release in a hydrogen production system is assessed. It is important to ensure the safety of the nuclear plant, and the risks for public health should be sufficiently small. This report provides the basic policy for the safety evaluation in cases of accident involving fire, explosion and toxic material release in a hydrogen production system. Preliminary safety analysis of a commercial-sized VHTR hydrogen production system, GTHTR300C, is performed. This analysis provides us with useful information on the separation distance between a nuclear plant and a hydrogen production system and a prospect that an accident in a hydrogen production system does not significantly increase the risks of the public. (author)

  14. Environmental risks due to radionuclide releases Environmental Risks Due To Radionuclide Releases From The Oil And Gas Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinhausler, F.

    2005-01-01

    Full text : Exploration and transport in the oil- and gas industry result in the release of elevated levels of natural radioactivity into the environment. This has the following impact: Due to the large volumes of water needed during the extraction of gas and oil the resulting waste water can contain increased concentration of natural radionuclides, such as radium (Ra 226) and its decay products; At the oil/water interface waste water and sludge precipitate and form scalings, containing elevated levels of radium (Ra 226); At oil- and gas extraction sites tanks and equipment can be coated with long-lived radon (Rn 222) decay products; Along oil- and gas pipelines (e.g., at compressor stations) radon (Rn 222) decay products can be deposited internally on metal surfaces, such as valves. Typical U 238-series concentration values in production water range from 8 to 42 kBq/ m3, respectively in scale from 1 to 1 000 kBq/kg. In addition, oil- and gas extraction results in significant releases of natural radionuclides to the atmosphere (Rn 222) and to the water (Th 228, Ra 226, Rn 222, Pb 210, Po 210); for example, about 0.15 GBq/a of Rn 222 are released to the atmosphere per 106 m3 of oil extracted. The disposal of large amounts of contaminated wastes (scales, sludges) represents an environmental problem for the scrap metal industry (recycling of steel pipes containing scales) and the housing industry (use of sludge for landfill below a residential area). Using data from the oil- and gas industry in Latin America, Europe and the Asia-Pacific region, the various exposure pathways are reviewed. Furthermore, the current efforts in defining a suitable regulatory framework are discussed

  15. The influence of cladding on fission gas release from irradiated U-Mo monolithic fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkes, Douglas E., E-mail: Douglas.Burkes@pnnl.gov; Casella, Amanda J.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2017-04-01

    The monolithic uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy has been proposed as a fuel design capable of converting the world's highest power research reactors from use of high enriched uranium to low enriched uranium. However, a zirconium (Zr) diffusion barrier must be used to eliminate interactions that form between the U-Mo monolith and aluminum alloy 6061 (AA6061) cladding during fabrication and are enhanced during irradiation. One aspect of fuel development and qualification is to demonstrate an appropriate understanding of the extent of fission product release from the fuel under anticipated service environments. An exothermic reaction has previously been observed between the AA6061 cladding and Zr diffusion layer. In this paper, two fuel segments with different irradiation history were subjected to specified thermal profiles under a controlled atmosphere using a thermogravimetric/differential thermal analyzer coupled with a mass spectrometer inside a hot cell. Samples from each segment were tested with cladding and without cladding to investigate the effect, if any, that the exothermic reaction has on fission gas release mechanisms. Measurements revealed there is an instantaneous effect of the cladding/Zr exothermic reaction, but not necessarily a cumulative effect above approximately 973 K (700 °C). The mechanisms responsible for fission gas release events are discussed. - Highlights: •Complementary fission gas release events are reported for U-Mo fuel with and without cladding. •Exothermic reaction between Zr diffusion layer and cladding influences fission gas release. •Mechanisms responsible for fission gas release are similar, but with varying timing and magnitude. •Behavior of samples is similar after 800 °C signaling the onset of superlattice destabilization.

  16. Utilization of ''CONTACT'' experiments to improve the fission gas release knowledge in PWR fuel rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles, M; Abassin, J J; Bruet, M; Baron, D; Melin, P

    1983-03-01

    The CONTACT experiments, which were carried out by the French CEA, within the framework of a CEA-FRAMATOME collaboration agreement, bear on the behaviour of in-pile irradiated PWR fuel rods. We will focus here upon their results dealing with fission gas release. The experimental device is briefly described, then the following results are given: the kinetics of stable fission gas release for various linear ratings; the instantaneous fractional release rates of radioactive gases versus their decay constant in the range 1.5 10/sup -6/-3.6 10/sup -3/s/sup -1/, for various burnups, as also the influence of fuel temperature. Moreover, the influence of the nature and the pressure of the filling gas upon the release is presented for various linear ratings. The experimental results are discussed and analysed with the purpose to model various physical phenomena involved in the release (low-temperature mechanisms, diffusion).

  17. Utilization of ''CONTACT'' experiments to improve the fission gas release knowledge in PWR fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charles, M.; Abassin, J.J.; Bruet, M.

    1983-01-01

    The CONTACT experiments, which were carried out by the French CEA, within the framework of a CEA-FRAMATOME collaboration agreement, bear on the behaviour of in-pile irradiated PWR fuel rods. We will focus here upon their results dealing with fission gas release. The experimental device is briefly described, then the following results are given: the kinetics of stable fission gas release for various linear ratings; the instantaneous fractional release rates of radioactive gases versus their decay constant in the range 1.5 10 -6 -3.6 10 -3 s -1 , for various burnups, as also the influence of fuel temperature. Moreover, the influence of the nature and the pressure of the filling gas upon the release is presented for various linear ratings. The experimental results are discussed and analysed with the purpose to model various physical phenomena involved in the release (low-temperature mechanisms, diffusion)

  18. Six-month low level chlorine dioxide gas inhalation toxicity study with two-week recovery period in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akamatsu Akinori

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlorine dioxide (CD gas has a potent antimicrobial activity at extremely low concentration and may serve as a new tool for infection control occupationally as well as publicly. However, it remains unknown whether the chronic exposure of CD gas concentration effective against microbes is safe. Therefore, long-term, low concentration CD gas inhalation toxicity was studied in rats as a six-month continuous whole-body exposure followed by a two-week recovery period, so as to prove that the CD gas exposed up to 0.1 ppm (volume ratio is judged as safe on the basis of a battery of toxicological examinations. Methods CD gas at 0.05 ppm or 0.1 ppm for 24 hours/day and 7 days/week was exposed to rats for 6 months under an unrestrained condition with free access to chow and water in a chamber so as to simulate the ordinary lifestyle in human. The control animals were exposed to air only. During the study period, the body weight as well as the food and water consumptions were recorded. After the 6-month exposure and the 2-week recovery period, animals were sacrificed and a battery of toxicological examinations, including biochemistry, hematology, necropsy, organ weights and histopathology, were performed. Results Well regulated levels of CD gas were exposed throughout the chamber over the entire study period. No CD gas-related toxicity sign was observed during the whole study period. No significant difference was observed in body weight gain, food and water consumptions, and relative organ weight. In biochemistry and hematology examinations, changes did not appear to be related to CD gas toxicity. In necropsy and histopathology, no CD gas-related toxicity was observed even in expected target respiratory organs. Conclusions CD gas up to 0.1 ppm, exceeding the level effective against microbes, exposed to whole body in rats continuously for six months was not toxic, under a condition simulating the conventional lifestyle in human.

  19. Operational experience in mitigating flammable gas releases from Hanford Site Tank 241-SY-101

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentsch, J.W.; Babad, H.; Kirch, N.W.

    1995-01-01

    Flammable gases consisting of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, ammonia, and methane are periodically released from Hanford Site waste tank 241-SY-101 at concentrations above the flammable limit. A large mixer pump installed in the tank in 1993 has effectively mitigated this problem by continuously releasing small amounts of the flammable gases at the rate they are generated. Tank 241-SY-101 is also equipped with multiple high-sensitivity gas monitoring systems and level detection systems to measure the quantity of gas that is retained in and released from the waste

  20. Gas generation in SFL 3-5 and effects on radionuclide release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skagius, K.; Lindgren, M.; Pers, K.

    1999-12-01

    A deep repository, SFL 3-5, is presently planned for disposing of long-lived low- and intermediate-level waste. In this study the amounts of gas that can be generated in the waste packages and in the vaults are estimated. The potential gas pressure build-up, the displacement of contaminated water and the consequences on radionuclide release from the engineered barriers in the repository are also addressed. The study is focussed on the repository design and waste inventory that was defined for the prestudy of SFL 3-5. Since the reporting of the prestudy the design of the repository has been modified and the waste inventory has been updated and a preliminary safety assessment of the repository has been carried out based on the new design and updated waste inventory. The implications on gas generation and release of these modifications in design and waste inventory are briefly addressed in this study

  1. Gas generation in SFL 3-5 and effects on radionuclide release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skagius, K.; Lindgren, M.; Pers, K. [Kemakta Konsult AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1999-12-01

    A deep repository, SFL 3-5, is presently planned for disposing of long-lived low- and intermediate-level waste. In this study the amounts of gas that can be generated in the waste packages and in the vaults are estimated. The potential gas pressure build-up, the displacement of contaminated water and the consequences on radionuclide release from the engineered barriers in the repository are also addressed. The study is focussed on the repository design and waste inventory that was defined for the prestudy of SFL 3-5. Since the reporting of the prestudy the design of the repository has been modified and the waste inventory has been updated and a preliminary safety assessment of the repository has been carried outbased on the new design and updated waste inventory. The implications on gas generation and release of these modifications in design and waste inventory are briefly addressed in this study.

  2. Fission gas release and grain growth in THO2-UO2 fuel irradiated at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, I.; Waldman, L.A.; Giovengo, J.F.; Campbell, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    Data are presented on fission gas release and grain growth in ThO 2 -UO 2 fuels irradiated as part of the LWBR fuel element development program. These data for rods that experienced peak linear power outputs ranging from 15 to 22 KW/ft supplement fission gas release data previously reported for 51 rods containing ThO 2 and ThO 2 -UO 2 fuel irradiated at peak linear powers predominantly below 14 KW/ft. Fission gas release was relatively high (up to 15.0 percent) for the rods operated at high power in contrast to the relatively low fission gas release (0.1 to 5.2 percent) measured for the rods operated at lower power. Metallographic examination revealed extensive equiaxed grain growth in the fuel at the high power axial locations of the three rods

  3. 1995 Toxic chemical release inventory: Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Section 313

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mincey, S.L.

    1996-08-01

    Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-To-Know Act (EPCRA) requires the annual submittal of toxic chemical release information to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.Executive Order 12856, 'Federal Compliance With Right-to-Know Laws and Pollution Prevention Requirements' extends the requirements of EPCRA to all Federal agencies. The following document is the August 1996 submittal of the Hanford Site Toxic Chemical Release Inventory report. Included is a Form R for ethylene glycol, the sole chemical used in excess of the established regulatory thresholds at the Hanford Site by the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office and its contractors during Calendar Year 1995

  4. Acoustic sensor for in-pile fuel rod fission gas release measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourmentel, D.; Villard, J. F.; Ferrandis, J. Y.; Augereau, F.; Rosenkrantz, E.; Dierckx, M.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a specific acoustic sensor to improve the knowledge of fission gas release in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel rods when irradiated in materials testing reactors. In order to perform experimental programs related to the study of the fission gas release kinetics, the CEA (French Nuclear Energy Commission) acquired the ability to equip a pre-irradiated PWR fuel rod with three sensors, allowing the simultaneous on-line measurements of the following parameters: - fuel temperature with a centre-line thermocouple type C, - internal pressure with a specific counter-pressure sensor, - fraction of fission gas released in the fuel rod with an innovative acoustic sensor. The third detector is the subject of this paper. This original acoustic sensor has been designed to measure the molar mass and pressure of the gas contained in the fuel rod plenum. For in-pile instrumentation, the fraction of fission gas, such as Krypton and Xenon, in Helium, can be deduced online from this measurement. The principle of this acoustical sensor is the following: a piezoelectric transducer generates acoustic waves in a cavity connected to the fuel rod plenum. The acoustic waves are propagated and reflected in this cavity and then detected by the transducer. The data processing of the signal gives the velocity of the acoustic waves and their amplitude, which can be related respectively to the molar mass and to the pressure of the gas. The piezoelectric material of this sensor has been qualified in nuclear conditions (gamma and neutron radiations). The complete sensor has also been specifically designed to be implemented in materials testing reactors conditions. For this purpose some technical points have been studied in details: - fixing of the piezoelectric sample in a reliable way with a suitable signal transmission, - size of the gas cavity to avoid any perturbation of the acoustic waves, - miniaturization of the sensor because of narrow in-pile experimental devices

  5. 14 CFR Appendix I to Part 417 - Methodologies for Toxic Release Hazard Analysis and Operational Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Quotient/Hazard Index (HQ/HI) formulation to determine the toxic concentration threshold for mixtures of... cloud center of mass altitude. (vi) Worst case initial source term assuming instantaneous release of...

  6. 1998 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockton, Marjorie B.

    1999-01-01

    The Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) of 1986 [also known as the Superfund Amendment and Reauthorization Act (SARA), Title III], as modified by Executive Order 12856, requires that all federal facilities evaluate the need to submit an annual Toxic Chemical Release Inventory report as prescribed in Title III, Section 313 of this Act. This annual report is due every July for the preceding calendar year. Owners and operators who manufacture, process, or otherwise use certain toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities are required to report their toxic chemical releases to all environmental mediums (air, water, soil, etc.). At Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), no EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 1998 above the reportable threshold limits of 10,000 lb or 25,000 lb. Therefore LANL was not required to submit any Toxic Chemical Release Inventory reports (Form Rs) for 1998. This document was prepared to provide a detailed description of the evaluation on chemical usage and EPCRA Section 313 threshold determinations for LANL for 1998

  7. Numerical algorithms for intragranular diffusional fission gas release incorporated in the Transuranus code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassmann, K.

    2002-01-01

    Complicated physical processes govern diffusional fission gas release in nuclear fuels. In addition to the physical problem there exists a numerical problem, as some solutions of the underlying diffusion equation contain numerical errors that by far exceed the physical details. In this paper the two algorithms incorporated in the TRANSURANUS code, the URGAS and the new FORMAS algorithm are compared. The previously reported deficiency of the most elegant and mathematically sound FORMAS algorithm at low release could be overcome. Both algorithms are simple, fast, without numerical problems, insensitive to time step lengths and well balanced over the entire range of fission gas release. They can be made available on request as FORTRAN subroutines. (author)

  8. A description of bubble growth and gas release of helium implanted tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharafat, S.; Hu, Q.; Ghoniem, N.; Tkahashi, A.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Bubble growth and gas release during annealing of helium implanted tungsten is described using a Kinetic Monte Carlo approach. The implanted spatial profiles of stable bubble nuclei are first determined using the Kinetic Rate Theory based helium evolution code, HEROS. The effects of implantation energy, temperature, and bias forces, such as temperature- and stress gradients on bubble migration and coalescence are investigated to explain experimental gas release measurements. This comprehensive helium bubble evolution and release model, demonstrates the impact of near surface (< 1 um) versus deep helium implantation on bubble evolution. Near surface implanted helium bubbles readily attain large equilibrium sizes, while matrix bubbles remain small with high helium pressures. Using the computer simulation, the various stages of helium bubble nucleation, growth, coalescence, and migration are demonstrated and compared with available experimental results. (authors)

  9. Toxic releases and risk disparity: a spatiotemporal model of industrial ecology and social empowerment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Hannah; Ogunseitan, Oladele A

    2015-06-02

    Information-based regulations (IBRs) are founded on the theoretical premise that public participation in accomplishing policy goals is empowered by open access to information. Since its inception in 1988, the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) has provided the framework and regulatory impetus for the compilation and distribution of data on toxic releases associated with industrial development, following the tenets of IBR. As TRI emissions are reputed to disproportionately affect low-income communities, we investigated how demographic characteristics are related to change in TRI emissions and toxicity risks between 1989 and 2002, and we sought to identify factors that predict these changes. We used local indicators of spatial association (LISA) maps and spatial regression techniques to study risk disparity in the Los Angeles urban area. We also surveyed 203 individuals in eight communities in the same region to measure the levels of awareness of TRI, attitudes towards air pollution, and general environmental risk. We discovered, through spatial lag models, that changes in gross and toxic emissions are related to community ethnic composition, poverty level, home ownership, and base 1989 emissions (R-square=0.034-0.083). We generated a structural equation model to explain the determinants of social empowerment to act on the basis of environmental information. Hierarchical confirmatory factor analysis (HCFA) supports the theoretical model that individual empowerment is predicted by risk perception, worry, and awareness (Chi-square=63.315, p=0.022, df=42). This study provides strong evidence that spatiotemporal changes in regional-scale environmental risks are influenced by individual-scale empowerment mediated by IBRs.

  10. Toxic Releases and Risk Disparity: A Spatiotemporal Model of Industrial Ecology and Social Empowerment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Aoyagi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Information-based regulations (IBRs are founded on the theoretical premise that public participation in accomplishing policy goals is empowered by open access to information. Since its inception in 1988, the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI has provided the framework and regulatory impetus for the compilation and distribution of data on toxic releases associated with industrial development, following the tenets of IBR. As TRI emissions are reputed to disproportionately affect low-income communities, we investigated how demographic characteristics are related to change in TRI emissions and toxicity risks between 1989 and 2002, and we sought to identify factors that predict these changes. We used local indicators of spatial association (LISA maps and spatial regression techniques to study risk disparity in the Los Angeles urban area. We also surveyed 203 individuals in eight communities in the same region to measure the levels of awareness of TRI, attitudes towards air pollution, and general environmental risk. We discovered, through spatial lag models, that changes in gross and toxic emissions are related to community ethnic composition, poverty level, home ownership, and base 1989 emissions (R-square = 0.034–0.083. We generated a structural equation model to explain the determinants of social empowerment to act on the basis of environmental information. Hierarchical confirmatory factor analysis (HCFA supports the theoretical model that individual empowerment is predicted by risk perception, worry, and awareness (Chi-square = 63.315, p = 0.022, df = 42. This study provides strong evidence that spatiotemporal changes in regional-scale environmental risks are influenced by individual-scale empowerment mediated by IBRs.

  11. Analysis of fission gas release-to-birth ratio data from the AGR irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einerson, Jeffrey J.; Pham, Binh T.; Scates, Dawn M.; Maki, John T.; Petti, David A.

    2016-01-01

    A series of advanced gas reactor (AGR) irradiation tests is being conducted in the advanced test reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in support of development and qualification of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel used in the High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). Each AGR test consists of multiple independent capsules containing fuel compacts placed in a graphite cylinder shrouded by a steel shell. These capsules are instrumented with thermocouples (TC) embedded in the graphite enabling temperature control. For AGR-1, the first US irradiation of modern TRISO fuel completed in 2009, there were no particle failures detected. For AGR-2, a few exposed kernels existed in the fuel compacts based upon quality control data. For the AGR-3/4 experiment, particle failures in all capsules were expected because of the use of designed-to-fail (DTF) fuel particles whose kernels are identical to the driver fuel kernels and whose coatings are designed to fail under irradiation. The release-rate-to-birth-rate ratio (R/B) for each of krypton and xenon isotopes is calculated from release rates measured by the germanium detectors used in the AGR fission product monitoring (FPM) system installed downstream from each irradiated capsule. Birth rates are calculated based on the fission power in the experiment and fission product generation models. Thus, this R/B is a measure of the ability of fuel particle coating layers and compact matrix to retain fission gas atoms preventing their release into the sweep gas flow. The major factors that govern gaseous diffusion and release processes are found to be fuel material diffusion coefficient, temperature, and isotopic decay constant. To compare the release behavior among the AGR capsules and historic experiments, the R/B per failed particle is used. HTGR designers use this parameter in their fission product behavior models. For the U.S. TRISO fuel, a regression analysis is performed to establish functional relationships

  12. Analysis of Fission Gas Release-to-Birth Ratio Data from the AGR Irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einerson, Jeffrey J.; Pham, Binh T.; Scates, Dawn M.; Maki, John T.; Petti, David A.

    2014-01-01

    A series of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) irradiation tests is being conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in support of development and qualification of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel used in the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR). Each AGR test consists of multiple independent capsules containing fuel compacts placed in a graphite cylinder shrouded by a steel shell. These capsules are instrumented with thermocouples (TC) embedded in the graphite enabling temperature control. For AGR-1, the first US irradiation of modern TRISO fuel completed in 2009, there were no particle failures detected. For AGR-2, a few exposed kernels existed in the fuel compacts based upon quality control data. For the AGR-3/4 experiment, particle failures in all capsules were expected because of the use of designed-to-fail (DTF) fuel particles whose kernels are identical to the driver fuel kernels and whose coatings are designed to fail under irradiation. The release-rate-to-birth-rate ratio (R/B) for each of krypton and xenon isotopes is calculated from release rates measured by the germanium detectors used in the AGR Fission Product Monitoring (FPM) System installed downstream from each irradiated capsule. Birth rates are calculated based on the fission power in the experiment and fission product generation models. Thus, this R/B is a measure of the ability of fuel particle coating layers and compact matrix to retain fission gas atoms preventing their release into the sweep gas flow. The major factors that govern gaseous diffusion and release processes are found to be fuel material diffusion coefficient, temperature, and isotopic decay constant. To compare the release behavior among the AGR capsules and historic experiments, the R/B per failed particle is used. HTGR designers use this parameter in their fission product behavior models. For the U.S. TRISO fuel, a regression analysis is performed to establish functional relationships

  13. Analysis of fission gas release-to-birth ratio data from the AGR irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einerson, Jeffrey J., E-mail: jeffrey.einerson@inl.gov; Pham, Binh T.; Scates, Dawn M.; Maki, John T.; Petti, David A.

    2016-09-15

    A series of advanced gas reactor (AGR) irradiation tests is being conducted in the advanced test reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in support of development and qualification of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) fuel used in the High temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). Each AGR test consists of multiple independent capsules containing fuel compacts placed in a graphite cylinder shrouded by a steel shell. These capsules are instrumented with thermocouples (TC) embedded in the graphite enabling temperature control. For AGR-1, the first US irradiation of modern TRISO fuel completed in 2009, there were no particle failures detected. For AGR-2, a few exposed kernels existed in the fuel compacts based upon quality control data. For the AGR-3/4 experiment, particle failures in all capsules were expected because of the use of designed-to-fail (DTF) fuel particles whose kernels are identical to the driver fuel kernels and whose coatings are designed to fail under irradiation. The release-rate-to-birth-rate ratio (R/B) for each of krypton and xenon isotopes is calculated from release rates measured by the germanium detectors used in the AGR fission product monitoring (FPM) system installed downstream from each irradiated capsule. Birth rates are calculated based on the fission power in the experiment and fission product generation models. Thus, this R/B is a measure of the ability of fuel particle coating layers and compact matrix to retain fission gas atoms preventing their release into the sweep gas flow. The major factors that govern gaseous diffusion and release processes are found to be fuel material diffusion coefficient, temperature, and isotopic decay constant. To compare the release behavior among the AGR capsules and historic experiments, the R/B per failed particle is used. HTGR designers use this parameter in their fission product behavior models. For the U.S. TRISO fuel, a regression analysis is performed to establish functional relationships

  14. Advancing Knowledge on Fugitive Natural Gas from Energy Resource Development at a Controlled Release Field Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, A. G.; Chao, J.; Forde, O.; Prystupa, E.; Mayer, K. U.; Black, T. A.; Tannant, D. D.; Crowe, S.; Hallam, S.; Mayer, B.; Lauer, R. M.; van Geloven, C.; Welch, L. A.; Salas, C.; Levson, V.; Risk, D. A.; Beckie, R. D.

    2017-12-01

    Fugitive gas, comprised primarily of methane, can be unintentionally released from upstream oil and gas development either at surface from leaky infrastructure or in the subsurface through failure of energy well bore integrity. For the latter, defective cement seals around energy well casings may permit buoyant flow of natural gas from the deeper subsurface towards shallow aquifers, the ground surface and potentially into the atmosphere. Concerns associated with fugitive gas release at surface and in the subsurface include contributions to greenhouse gas emissions, subsurface migration leading to accumulation in nearby infrastructure and impacts to groundwater quality. Current knowledge of the extent of fugitive gas leakage including how to best detect and monitor over time, and particularly its migration and fate in the subsurface, is incomplete. We have established an experimental field observatory for evaluating fugitive gas leakage in an area of historic and ongoing hydrocarbon resource development within the Montney Resource Play of the Western Canadian Sedimentary Basin, British Columbia, Canada. Natural gas will be intentionally released at surface and up to 25 m below surface at various rates and durations. Resulting migration patterns and impacts will be evaluated through examination of the geology, hydrogeology, hydro-geochemistry, isotope geochemistry, hydro-geophysics, vadose zone and soil gas processes, microbiology, and atmospheric conditions. The use of unmanned aerial vehicles and remote sensors for monitoring and detection of methane will also be assessed for suitability as environmental monitoring tools. Here we outline the experimental design and describe initial research conducted to develop a detailed site conceptual model of the field observatory. Subsequently, results attained from pilot surface and sub-surface controlled natural gas releases conducted in late summer 2017 will be presented as well as results of numerical modelling conducted

  15. Apollo Soyuz mission, toxic gas entered cabin during earth landing sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    A postflight analysis is presented of the sequence which caused toxic gas to enter the cabin during repressurization for 30 seconds from manual deployment of the drogue parachutes at 18,550 feet to disabling of the reaction control system at 9600 feet. Results and conclusions are discussed.

  16. Simulation of the thermomechanical interaction between pellet and cladding and fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, Alicia C.; Soba, Alejandro

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes the present status of a computer code that simulates some of the main phenomena occurring in a fuel element of a nuclear power reactor throughout its life. Temperature distribution, thermal expansion, elastic and plastic strains, creep, mechanical interaction between pellet and cladding, fission gas release, swelling and densification are modeled. Thermal expansion gives origin to elastic or plastic strains, which adequately describe the bamboo effect. The code assumes an axial symmetric rod and hence, cylindrical finite elements are employed for the discretization. The fission gas inventory is calculated by means of a diffusion model, which assumes spherical grains and uses also a finite element scheme. Once the temperature distribution in the pellet and the cladding is obtained and in order to reduce the calculation time, the rod is divided into five cylindrical rings where the temperature is averaged. In each ring the gas diffusion problem is solved in one representative grain and the results are then extended to the whole ring. The pressure, increased by the released gas, interacts with the stress field. Densification and swelling due to solid and gaseous fission products are also considered. Experiments, particularly those of the FUMEX series, are simulated with this code. A good agreement is obtained for the fuel center line temperature, the inside rod pressure and the fractional gas release. (author)

  17. Novel Solid Encapsulation of Ethylene Gas Using Amorphous α-Cyclodextrin and the Release Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Binh T; Bhandari, Bhesh R

    2016-05-04

    This research investigated the encapsulation of ethylene gas into amorphous α-cyclodextrins (α-CDs) at low (LM) and high (HM) moisture contents at 1.0-1.5 MPa for 24-120 h and its controlled release characteristics at 11.2-52.9% relative humidity (RH) for 1-168 h. The inclusion complexes (ICs) were characterized using X-ray diffractometry (XRD), nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (CP-MAS (13)C NMR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Ethylene concentrations in the ICs were from 0.45 to 0.87 mol of ethylene/mol CD and from 0.42 to 0.54 mol of ethylene/mol CD for LM and HM α-CDs, respectively. Ethylene gas released from the encapsulated powder at higher rates with increasing RH. An analysis of release kinetics using Avrami's equation showed that the LM and HM amorphous α-CDs were not associated with significant differences in release constant k and parameter n for any given RH condition. NMR spectra showed the presence of the characteristic carbon-carbon double bond of ethylene gas in the encapsulated α-CD powder.

  18. Analysis of fuel centre temperatures and fission gas release data from the IFPE Database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schubert, A.; Lassmann, K.; Van Uffelen, P.; Van de Laar, J.; Elenkov, D.; Asenov, S.; Boneva, S.; Djourelov, N.; Georgieva, M.

    2003-01-01

    The present work has continued the analysis of fuel centre temperatures and fission gas release, calculated with standard options of the TRANSURANUS code. The calculations are compared to experimental data from the International Fuel Performance Experiments (IFPE) database. It is reported an analysis regarding UO 2 fuel for Western-type reactors: Fuel centre temperatures measured in the experiments Contact 1 and Contact 2 (in-pile tests of 2 rods performed at the Siloe reactor in Grenoble, France, closely simulating commercial PWR conditions); Fission gas release data derived from post-irradiation examinations of 9 fuel rods belonging to the High-Burnup Effects Programme, task 3 (HBEP3). The results allow for a comparison of predictions by TRANSURANUS for the mentioned Western-type fuels with those done previously for Russian-type WWER fuel. The comparison has been extended to include fuel centre temperatures as well as fission gas release. The present version of TRANSURANUS includes a model that calculates the production of Helium. The amount of produced Helium is compared to the measured and to the calculated release of the fission gases Xenon and Krypton

  19. 76 FR 60781 - Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) Reporting for Facilities Located in Indian Country and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-30

    ... increase awareness of toxic releases within Tribal communities, thereby increasing the understanding of potential human health and ecological impacts from these hazardous chemicals. DATES: Comments must be... 212221, 212222, 212231, 212234, 212299 (correspond to SIC 10, Metal Mining (except 1011, 1081, and 1094...

  20. Finite element simulation of fission gas release and swelling in UO2 fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denis, Alicia C.

    1999-01-01

    A fission gas release model is presented, which solves the atomic diffusion problem with xenon and krypton elements tramps produced by uranium fission during UO 2 nuclear fuel irradiation. The model considers intra and intergranular precipitation bubbles, its re dissolution owing to highly energetic fission products impact, interconnection of intergranular bubbles and gas sweeping by grain border in movement because of grain growth. In the model, the existence of a thermal gradient in the fuel pellet is considered, as well as temporal variations of fission rate owing to changes in the operation lineal power. The diffusion equation is solved by the finite element method and results of gas release and swelling calculation owing to gas fission are compared with experimental data. (author)

  1. Fission gas release from UO2 pellet fuel at high burn-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitanza, C.; Kolstad, E.; Graziani, U.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of in-reactor measurements of fuel center temperature and rod internal pressure at the OECD Halden Reactor Project has led to the development of an empirical fission gas release model, which is described. The model originally derived from data obtained in the low and intermediate burn-up range, appears to give good predictions for rods irradiated to high exposures as well. PIE puncturing data from seven fuel rods, operated at relatively constant powers and peak center temperatures between 1900 and 2000 0 C up to approx. 40,000 MWd/t UO 2 , did not exhibit any burn-up enhancement on the fission gas release rate

  2. Control of accidental releases of hydrogen selenide in vented storage cabinets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fthenakis, V. M.; Moskowitz, P. D.; Sproull, R. D.

    1988-07-01

    Highly toxic hydrogen selenide and hydrogen sulfide gases are used in the production of copper-indium-diselenide photovoltaic cells by reactive sputtering. In the event of an accident, these gases may be released to the atmosphere and pose hazards to public and occupational safety and health. This paper outlines an approach for designing systems for the control of these releases given the uncertainty in release conditions and lack of data on the chemical systems involved. Accidental releases of these gases in storage cabinets can be controlled by either a venturi and packed-bed scrubber and carbon adsorption bed, or containment scrubbing equipment followed by carbon adsorption. These systems can effectively reduce toxic gas emissions to levels needed to protect public health. The costs of these controls (˜0.012/Wp) are samll in comparison with current (˜6/Wp) and projected (˜I/Wp) production costs.

  3. Identifying Toxic Impacts of Metals Potentially Released during Deep-Sea Mining—A Synthesis of the Challenges to Quantifying Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Hauton

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In January 2017, the International Seabed Authority released a discussion paper on the development of Environmental Regulations for deep-sea mining (DSM within the Area Beyond National Jurisdiction (the “Area”. With the release of this paper, the prospect for commercial mining in the Area within the next decade has become very real. Moreover, within nations' Exclusive Economic Zones, the exploitation of deep-sea mineral ore resources could take place on very much shorter time scales and, indeed, may have already started. However, potentially toxic metal mixtures may be released at sea during different stages of the mining process and in different physical phases (dissolved or particulate. As toxicants, metals can disrupt organism physiology and performance, and therefore may impact whole populations, leading to ecosystem scale effects. A challenge to the prediction of toxicity is that deep-sea ore deposits include complex mixtures of minerals, including potentially toxic metals such as copper, cadmium, zinc, and lead, as well as rare earth elements. Whereas the individual toxicity of some of these dissolved metals has been established in laboratory studies, the complex and variable mineral composition of seabed resources makes the a priori prediction of the toxic risk of DSM extremely challenging. Furthermore, although extensive data quantify the toxicity of metals in solution in shallow-water organisms, these may not be representative of the toxicity in deep-sea organisms, which may differ biochemically and physiologically and which will experience those toxicants under conditions of low temperature, high hydrostatic pressure, and potentially altered pH. In this synthesis, we present a summation of recent advances in our understanding of the potential toxic impacts of metal exposure to deep-sea meio- to megafauna at low temperature and high pressure, and consider the limitation of deriving lethal limits based on the paradigm of exposure to

  4. Probabilistic consequence model of accidenal or intentional chemical releases.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y.-S.; Samsa, M. E.; Folga, S. M.; Hartmann, H. M.

    2008-06-02

    In this work, general methodologies for evaluating the impacts of large-scale toxic chemical releases are proposed. The potential numbers of injuries and fatalities, the numbers of hospital beds, and the geographical areas rendered unusable during and some time after the occurrence and passage of a toxic plume are estimated on a probabilistic basis. To arrive at these estimates, historical accidental release data, maximum stored volumes, and meteorological data were used as inputs into the SLAB accidental chemical release model. Toxic gas footprints from the model were overlaid onto detailed population and hospital distribution data for a given region to estimate potential impacts. Output results are in the form of a generic statistical distribution of injuries and fatalities associated with specific toxic chemicals and regions of the United States. In addition, indoor hazards were estimated, so the model can provide contingency plans for either shelter-in-place or evacuation when an accident occurs. The stochastic distributions of injuries and fatalities are being used in a U.S. Department of Homeland Security-sponsored decision support system as source terms for a Monte Carlo simulation that evaluates potential measures for mitigating terrorist threats. This information can also be used to support the formulation of evacuation plans and to estimate damage and cleanup costs.

  5. The application of release models to the interpretation of rare gas coolant activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wise, C.

    1985-01-01

    Much research is carried out into the release of fission products from UO 2 fuel and from failed pins. A significant application of this data is to define models of release which can be used to interpret measured coolant activities of rare gas isotopes. Such interpretation is necessary to extract operationally relevant parameters, such as the number and size of failures in the core and the 131 I that might be released during depressurization faults. The latter figure forms part of the safety case for all operating CAGRs. This paper describes and justifies the models which are used in the ANAGRAM program to interpret CAGR coolant activities, highlighting any remaining uncertainties. The various methods by which the program can extract relevant information from the measurements are outlined, and examples are given of the analysis of coolant data. These analyses point to a generally well understood picture of fission gas release from low temperature failures. Areas of higher temperature release are identified where further research would be beneficial to coolant activity analysis. (author)

  6. Analysis of explosion-induced releases of toxic materials at an environmental restoration project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, S.G.; Moon, W.H. Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Prior to 1988, a variety of materials were buried on the US DOE Oak Ridge Reservation. Records of the disposal operations are incomplete and toxic materials may have been placed adjacent to potential explosives. One of the safety concerns in conducting an environmental restoration project at the burial sites, is the possibility of an explosion which could release toxic materials to the atmosphere. A safety analysis examined the consequences of such releases by first postulating an upper bound for the strength of an explosive. A correlation, developed by Steindler and Seefeldt of Argonne National Laboratory, was then used to estimate the amount and particle-size distribution of the material that could become airborne from the explosion. The estimated amount of airborne material was the source term in an atmospheric dispersion model which was used to calculate infinite-time, concentration-time integrals and 5-minute, time- weighted average concentrations at locations down-wind from the explosion. The dispersion model includes particle deposition as a function of particle-size distribution class. The concentration-time integrals and average concentrations were compared to published guidelines to assess the consequences of an accidental explosion

  7. On-line mass spectrometry measurement of fission gas release from nuclear fuel submitted to thermal transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guigues, E.; Janulyte, A.; Zerega, Y.; Pontillon, Y.

    2013-06-01

    The work presented in this paper has been performed in the framework of a joint research program between Aix-Marseille University and CEA Cadarache. The aim is to develop a mass spectrometer (MS) device for the MERARG facility. MERARG is devoted to the study of fission gas release measurement, from nuclear fuels submitted to annealing tests in high activity laboratory such as LECA-STAR, thanks to gamma spectrometry. The mass spectrometer will then extend the measurement capability from the γ-emitters gases to all the gases involved in the release in order to have a better understanding of the fission gas release dynamics from fuel during thermal transients. Furthermore, the mass spectrometer instrument combines the capabilities and performances of both on-line (for release kinetic) and off-line implementations (for delayed accurate analysis of capacities containing total release gas). The paper deals with two main axes: (1) the modelling of gas sampling inlet device and its performance and (2) the first MS qualification/calibration results. The inlet device samples the gas and also adapts the pressure between MERARG sweeping line at 1.2 bar and mass spectrometer chamber at high vacuum. It is a two-stage device comprising a capillary at inlet, an intermediate vacuum chamber, a molecular leak inlet and a two-stage pumping device. Pressure drops, conductance and throughputs are estimated both for mass spectrometer operation and for exhaust gas recovery. Possible gas segregation is also estimated and device modification is proposed to attain a more accurate calibration. First experimental results obtained from a standard gas bottle show that the quantitative analysis at a few ppm level can be achieved for all isotopes of Kr and Xe, as well as masses 2 and 4 u. (authors)

  8. EQUATIONS FOR GAS RELEASING PROCESS FROM PRESSURIZED VESSELS IN ODH EVALUATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JIA, L.X.; WANG, L.

    2001-01-01

    IN THE EVALUATION OF ODH, THE CALCULATION OF THE SPILL RATE FROM THE PRESSURIZED VESSEL IS THE CENTRAL TASK. THE ACCURACY OF THE ENGINEERING ESTIMATION BECOMES ONE OF THE SAFETY DESIGN ISSUES. THIS PAPER SUMMARIZES THE EQUATIONS FOR THE OXYGEN CONCENTRATION CALCULATION IN DIFFERENT CASES, AND DISCUSSES THE EQUATIONS FOR THE GAS RELEASE PROCESS CALCULATION BOTH FOR THE HIGH-PRESSURE GAS TANK AND THE LOW-TEMPERATURE LIQUID CONTAINER

  9. GRSIS program to predict fission gas release and swelling behavior of metallic fast reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chan Bock; Lee, Byung Ho; Nam, Cheol; Sohn, Dong Seong

    1999-03-01

    A mechanistic model of fission gas release and swelling for the U-(Pu)-Zr metallic fuel in the fast reactor, GRSIS (Gas Release and Swelling in ISotropic fuel matrix) was developed. Fission gas bubbles are assumed to nucleate isotropically from the gas atoms in the metallic fuel matrix since they can nucleate at both the grain boundaries and the phase boundaries which are randomly distributed inside the grain. Bubbles can grow to larger size by gas diffusion and coalition with other bubbles so that they are classified as three classes depending upon their sizes. When bubble swelling reaches the threshold value, bubbles become interconnected each other to make the open channel to the external free space, that is, the open bubbles and then fission gases inside the interconnected open bubbles are released instantaneously. During the irradiation, fission gases are released through the open bubbles. GRSIS model can take into account the fuel gap closure by fuel bubble swelling. When the fuel gap is closed by fuel swelling, the contact pressure between fuel and cladding in relation to the bubble swelling and temperature is calculated. GRSIS model was validated by comparison with the irradiation test results of U-(Pu)-Zr fuels in ANL as well as the parametric studies of the key variable in the model. (author). 13 refs., 1 tab., 22 figs

  10. GRSIS program to predict fission gas release and swelling behavior of metallic fast reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chan Bock; Lee, Byung Ho; Nam, Cheol; Sohn, Dong Seong

    1999-03-01

    A mechanistic model of fission gas release and swelling for the U-(Pu)-Zr metallic fuel in the fast reactor, GRSIS (Gas Release and Swelling in ISotropic fuel matrix) was developed. Fission gas bubbles are assumed to nucleate isotropically from the gas atoms in the metallic fuel matrix since they can nucleate at both the grain boundaries and the phase boundaries which are randomly distributed inside the grain. Bubbles can grow to larger size by gas diffusion and coalition with other bubbles so that they are classified as three classes depending upon their sizes. When bubble swelling reaches the threshold value, bubbles become interconnected each other to make the open channel to the external free space, that is, the open bubbles and then fission gases inside the interconnected open bubbles are released instantaneously. During the irradiation, fission gases are released through the open bubbles. GRSIS model can take into account the fuel gap closure by fuel bubble swelling. When the fuel gap is closed by fuel swelling, the contact pressure between fuel and cladding in relation to the bubble swelling and temperature is calculated. GRSIS model was validated by comparison with the irradiation test results of U-(Pu)-Zr fuels in ANL as well as the parametric studies of the key variable in the model. (author). 13 refs., 1 tab., 22 figs.

  11. Fission gas release during power change by means of re-irradiation of spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Jinichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    A full length rod irradiated at Tsuruga unit 1 was refabricated to short length rods, and rod inner pressure gauges were re-instrumented to the rods. Re-irradiation tests to study the fission gas release during power change were carried out by means of BOCA/OSF-1 facility at JMTR. In the tests, steady state operation at 40kW/m, power cycling and daily load follow operations between 20 and 40kW/m were conducted for the same high power holding time, and the rod inner pressure change during the tests was measured. The rod inner pressure increase was observed during power change, especially during power reduction. The rod inner pressure increase during a power cycling depended on the length of the high power operation just before the power cycling. The width of the rod inner pressure increase during a power cycling decreased gradually as the power cycling was repeated continuously. When steady state operation and power cycling were repeated at the power levels of 30, 35 and 40kW/m, the power cycling accelerated the fission gas release compared with the steady state operation. The fission gas release during power reduction is estimated to be the release from FP gas bubbles on the grain boundary caused by the thermal stress in the pellet during power reduction. (author)

  12. The Relationship between Toxics Release Inventory Discharges and Mortality Rates in Rural and Urban Areas of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendryx, Michael; Fedorko, Evan

    2011-01-01

    Background: Potential environmental exposures from chemical manufacturing or industrial sites have not been well studied for rural populations. The current study examines whether chemical releases from facilities monitored through the Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) program are associated with population mortality rates for both rural and urban…

  13. Prediction of the UO/sub 2/ fission gas release data of Bellamy and Rich using a model recently developed by Combustion Engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeburn, H.R.; Pati, S.R.

    1983-01-01

    The trend in the light water reactor industry to higher discharge burnups of UO/sub 2/ fuel rods has initiated the modification of existing fuel rod models to better account for high burnup effects. The degree to which fission gas release from UO/sub 2/ fuel is enhanced at higher burnup is being addressed in the process. Fission gas release modeling should include the separation of the individual effects of thermal diffusion and any burnup enhancement on the release. Although some modelers have interpreted the Bellamy and Rich data on fission gas release from UO/sub 2/ fuel in this fashion, they have assumed that below about 1250 0 C the gas release is not temperature-dependent, and this has led them to predict a very strong burnup enhancement of gas release above 20 MWd/kgU. More recent data, however, suggest that an appreciable amount of fission gas is released by a thermal diffusion mechanism at even lower temperatures and will add to the fission gas released due to the temperature-independent mechanisms of knockout and recoil

  14. Inventory of LCIA selection methods for assessing toxic releases. Methods and typology report part B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Henrik Fred; Birkved, Morten; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    method(s) in Work package 8 (WP8) of the OMNIITOX project. The selection methods and the other CRS methods are described in detail, a set of evaluation criteria are developed and the methods are evaluated against these criteria. This report (Deliverable 11B (D11B)) gives the results from task 7.1d, 7.1e......This report describes an inventory of Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) selection methods for assessing toxic releases. It consists of an inventory of current selection methods and other Chemical Ranking and Scoring (CRS) methods assessed to be relevant for the development of (a) new selection...... and 7.1f of WP 7 for selection methods. The other part of D11 (D11A) is reported in another report and deals with characterisation methods. A selection method is a method for prioritising chemical emissions to be included in an LCIA characterisation of toxic releases, i.e. calculating indicator scores...

  15. Calculation of burnup and power dependence on fission gas released from PWR type reactor fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edy-Sulistyono

    1996-01-01

    Burn up dependence of fission gas released and variation power analysis have been conducted using FEMXI-IV computer code program for Pressure Water Reactor Fuel During steady-state condition. The analysis result shows that the fission gas release is sensitive to the fuel temperature, the increasing of burn up and power in the fuel element under irradiation experiment

  16. GRASS-SST, Fission Products Gas Release and Fuel Swelling in Steady-State and Transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zawadzki, S.

    2001-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: GRASS-SST is a comprehensive, mechanistic model for the prediction of fission-gas behaviour in UO 2 -base fuels during steady-state and transient conditions. GRASS-SST treats fission-gas release and fuel swelling on an equal basis and simultaneously treats all major mechanisms that influence fission-gas behaviour. Models are included for intra- and inter-granular fission-gas bubble behaviour as well as a mechanistic description of the role of grain-edge inter-linked porosity on fission-gas release and swelling. GRASS-SST calculations include the effects of gas production from fissioning uranium atoms, bubble nucleation, a realistic equation of state for xenon, lattice bubble diffusivities based on experimental observations, bubble migration, bubble coalescence, re-solution, temperature and temperature gradients, inter-linked porosity, and fission-gas interaction with structural defects (dislocations and grain boundaries) on both the distribution of fission-gas within the fuel and on the amount of fission-gas released from the fuel. GRASS-SST includes the effects of the degree of nonequilibrium in the UO 2 lattice on fission-gas bubble mobility and bubble coalescence and also accounts for the observed formation of grain-surface channels. GRASS-SST also includes mechanistic models for grain-growth/grain boundary sweeping and for the behaviour of fission gas during liquefaction/dissolution and fuel melting conditions. 2 - Method of solution: A system of coupled equations for the evolution of the fission-gas bubble-size distributions in the lattice, on dislocations, on grain faces, and grain edges is derived based on the GRASS-SST models. Given a set of operating conditions, GRASS-SST calculates the bubble radii for the size classes of bubbles under consideration using a realistic equation of state for xenon as well as a generalised capillary relation. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Maxima of : 1 axial section

  17. Physical mechanisms contributing to the episodic gas release from Hanford tank 241-SY-101

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allemann, R.T.

    1992-04-01

    Volume growth of contents in a waste storage tank at Hanford is accompanied by episodic releases of gas and a rise in the level of tank contents. A theory is presented to describe how the gas is retained in the waste and how it is released. The theory postulates that somewhat cohesive gobs of sludge rise from the lower regions of the tank and buoyancy overcomes the cohesive strength of the slurry; this quantitatively explains several of the measured phenomena and qualitatively explains other observations

  18. In-reactor measurements of thermo mechanical behaviour and fission gas release of water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolstad, E.; Vitanza, C.

    1983-01-01

    the fuel performance during and after a power ramp can be investigated by direct in-pile measurements related to the thermal, mechanical and fission gas release behaviour. The thermal response is examined by thermocouples placed at the centre of the fuel. Such measurements allow the determination of thermal feedback effects induced by the simultaneous liberation of fission gases. The thermal feedback effect is also being separately studied out-of-pile in a specially designed rod where the fission gas release is simulated by injecting xenon in known quantities at different axial positions within the rod. Investigations on the mechanical behaviour are based on axial and diametral cladding deformation measurements. This enables the determination of the amount of local cladding strain and ridging during ramping, the extent of relaxation during the holding time and the amount of residual (plastic) deformation. Gap width measurements are also performed in operating fuel rods using a cladding deflection technique. Fission gas release data are obtained, besides from post-irradiation puncturing, by continuous measurements of the rod internal pressure. This type of measurement leads to the description of the kinetics of the fission gas release process at different powers. The data tend to indicate that the time-dependent release can be reasonably well described by simple diffusion. The paper describes measuring techniques developed and currently in use in Halden, and presents and discusses selected experimental results obtained during various power ramps and transients. (author)

  19. Risk from a pressurized toxic gas system: Part 2, Dispersal consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brereton, S.J.; Altenbach, T.J.; Lane, S.G.; Martin, D.W.

    1995-02-01

    During the preparation of a Safety Analysis Report at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. we studied the release of chlorine from a compressed gas experimental apparatus. This paper presents the second pan in a series of two papers on this topic. The first paper focuses on the frequency of an unmitigated release from the system; paper focuses the consequences of the release. The release of chlorine from the experimental apparatus was modeled as an unmitigated blowdown through a 0.25 inch (0.006.4 m) outside diameter tube. The physical properties of chlorine were considered as were the dynamics of the fluid flow problem. The calculated release rate was used as input for the consequence assessment. Downwind concentrations as a function of time were evaluated and then compared to suggested guidelines. For comparison purposes, a typical water treatment plant was briefly studied. The lower hazard presented by the LLNL operation becomes evident when its release is compared to the release of material from a water treatment plant, a hazard which is generally accepted by the public

  20. Risk from a pressurized toxic gas system: Part 2, Dispersal consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brereton, S.J.; Martin, D.; Lane, S.G.; Altenbach, T.J.

    1995-04-01

    During the preparation of a Safety Analysis Report at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we studied the release of chlorine from a compressed gas experimental apparatus. This paper presents the second part in a series of two papers on this topic. The first paper focuses on the frequency of an unmitigated release from the system; this paper discusses the consequences of the release. The release of chlorine from the experimental apparatus was modeled as an unmitigated blowdown through a 0.25 inch (0.0064 m) outside diameter tube. The physical properties of chlorine were considered as were the dynamics of the fluid flow problem. The calculated release rate was used as input for the consequence assessment. Downwind concentrations as a function of time were evaluated and then compared to suggested guidelines. For comparison purposes, a typical water treatment plant was briefly studied. The lower hazard presented by the LLNL operation becomes evident when its release is compared to the release of material from a water treatment plant, a hazard which is generally accepted by the public

  1. Toxic chemical release inventory reporting form R and instructions. Revised 1992 version. Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Reporting is required to provide the public with information on the releases of listed toxic chemicals in their communities and to provide EPA with release information to assist the Agency in determining the need for future regulations. Facilities must report the quantities of both routine and accidental releases of listed toxic chemicals, as well as the maximum amount of the listed toxic chemical on-site during the calendar year and the amount contained in wastes transferred off-site. These instructions supplement and elaborate on the requirements in the reporting rule (40 CFR Part 372). Together with the reporting rule, they constitute the reporting requirements. All references in these instructions are to sections in the reporting rule unless otherwise indicated

  2. FEBEX. Investigations on gas generation, release and migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jockwer, Norbert; Wieczorek, Klaus

    2008-06-01

    The FEBEX project is based on the Spanish reference concept for the disposal of radioactive waste in crystalline rock, which considers the emplacement of the canisters enclosing the conditioned waste surrounded by clay barriers constructed of high-compacted bentonite blocks in horizontal drifts /ENR 957. The whole project consisted of an experimental and a modelling part. The experimental part itself was divided into the in-situ test, a mock-up test performed at the CIEMAT laboratory, and various small-scale laboratory tests. In the modelling part it was expected to develop and validate the thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) and the thermo-hydro-chemical (THC) processes for the performance assessment of the near-field behaviour. GRS was only involved in the in-situ test and some additional laboratory work with regard to gas generation, gas migration, and pore pressure build-up in the buffer constructed of high-compacted bentonite blocks around the electrical heaters simulating the waste containers. The following topics are covered: installation and dismantling of the heater pipes; methods of gas generation and release measurement, summary of results and discussion

  3. Toxics release inventory: List of toxic chemicals within the polychlorinated alkanes category and guidance for reporting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    Section 313 of the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986 (EPCRA) requires certain facilities manufacturing, processing, or otherwise using listed toxic chemicals to report their environmental releases of such chemicals annually. On November 30, 1994 EPA added 286 chemicals and chemical categories. Six chemical categories (nicotine and salts, strychnine and salts, polycyclic aromatic compounds, water dissociable nitrate compounds, diisocyanates, and polychlorinated alkanes) are included in these additions. At the time of the addition, EPA indicated that the Agency would develop, as appropriate, interpretations and guidance that the Agency determines are necessary to facilitate accurate reporting for these categories. This document constitutes such guidance for the polychlorinated alkanes category.

  4. Environmental release of carbon-14 gas from a hypothetical nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehto, M.A.; Merrell, G.B.

    1994-01-01

    Radioisotopes may form gases in a spent nuclear fuel waste package due to elevated temperatures or degradation of the fuel rods. Radioactive carbon-14, as gaseous carbon dioxide, is one of the gaseous radioisotopes of concern at an underground disposal facility for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Carbon-14 dioxide may accumulate inside an intact waste container. Upon breach of the container, a potentially large pulse of carbon-14 dioxide gas may be released to the surrounding environment, followed by a lower, long-term continuous release. If the waste were disposed of in an unsaturated geologic environment, the carbon-14 gas would begin to move through the unsaturated zone to the accessible environment. This study investigates the transport of radioactive carbon-14 gas in geologic porous media using a one-dimensional analytical solution. Spent nuclear fuel emplaced in a deep geologic repository located at a generic unsaturated tuff site is analyzed. The source term for the carbon-14 gas and geologic parameters was obtained from previously published materials. The one-dimensional analytical solution includes diffusion, advection, radionuclide retardation, and radioactive decay terms. Two hypothetical sites are analyzed. One is dominated by advective transport, and the other is dominated by diffusive transport. The dominant transport mechanism at an actual site depends on the site characteristics. Results from the simulations include carbon-14 dioxide travel times to the accessible environment and the total release to the environment over a 10,000-year period. The results are compared to regulatory criteria

  5. PolyPole-1: An accurate numerical algorithm for intra-granular fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizzocri, D.; Rabiti, C.; Luzzi, L.; Barani, T.; Van Uffelen, P.; Pastore, G.

    2016-01-01

    The transport of fission gas from within the fuel grains to the grain boundaries (intra-granular fission gas release) is a fundamental controlling mechanism of fission gas release and gaseous swelling in nuclear fuel. Hence, accurate numerical solution of the corresponding mathematical problem needs to be included in fission gas behaviour models used in fuel performance codes. Under the assumption of equilibrium between trapping and resolution, the process can be described mathematically by a single diffusion equation for the gas atom concentration in a grain. In this paper, we propose a new numerical algorithm (PolyPole-1) to efficiently solve the fission gas diffusion equation in time-varying conditions. The PolyPole-1 algorithm is based on the analytic modal solution of the diffusion equation for constant conditions, combined with polynomial corrective terms that embody the information on the deviation from constant conditions. The new algorithm is verified by comparing the results to a finite difference solution over a large number of randomly generated operation histories. Furthermore, comparison to state-of-the-art algorithms used in fuel performance codes demonstrates that the accuracy of PolyPole-1 is superior to other algorithms, with similar computational effort. Finally, the concept of PolyPole-1 may be extended to the solution of the general problem of intra-granular fission gas diffusion during non-equilibrium trapping and resolution, which will be the subject of future work. - Highlights: • A new numerical algorithm (PolyPole-1) for intra-granular fission gas release in time-varying conditions is developed. • The concept combines the modal analytic solution for constant conditions and a polynomial correction. • PolyPole-1 is extensively verified and compared to other state-of-the-art algorithms. • PolyPole-1 exhibits a superior accuracy and a similar computational time relative to other algorithms. • The PolyPole-1 algorithm can be

  6. PolyPole-1: An accurate numerical algorithm for intra-granular fission gas release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzocri, D. [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Energy, Nuclear Engineering Division, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Rabiti, C. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Luzzi, L.; Barani, T. [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Energy, Nuclear Engineering Division, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Van Uffelen, P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Pastore, G., E-mail: giovanni.pastore@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    The transport of fission gas from within the fuel grains to the grain boundaries (intra-granular fission gas release) is a fundamental controlling mechanism of fission gas release and gaseous swelling in nuclear fuel. Hence, accurate numerical solution of the corresponding mathematical problem needs to be included in fission gas behaviour models used in fuel performance codes. Under the assumption of equilibrium between trapping and resolution, the process can be described mathematically by a single diffusion equation for the gas atom concentration in a grain. In this paper, we propose a new numerical algorithm (PolyPole-1) to efficiently solve the fission gas diffusion equation in time-varying conditions. The PolyPole-1 algorithm is based on the analytic modal solution of the diffusion equation for constant conditions, combined with polynomial corrective terms that embody the information on the deviation from constant conditions. The new algorithm is verified by comparing the results to a finite difference solution over a large number of randomly generated operation histories. Furthermore, comparison to state-of-the-art algorithms used in fuel performance codes demonstrates that the accuracy of PolyPole-1 is superior to other algorithms, with similar computational effort. Finally, the concept of PolyPole-1 may be extended to the solution of the general problem of intra-granular fission gas diffusion during non-equilibrium trapping and resolution, which will be the subject of future work. - Highlights: • A new numerical algorithm (PolyPole-1) for intra-granular fission gas release in time-varying conditions is developed. • The concept combines the modal analytic solution for constant conditions and a polynomial correction. • PolyPole-1 is extensively verified and compared to other state-of-the-art algorithms. • PolyPole-1 exhibits a superior accuracy and a similar computational time relative to other algorithms. • The PolyPole-1 algorithm can be

  7. Contribution to the study of the fission-gas release in metallic nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryger, B.

    1969-10-01

    In order to study the effect of an external pressure on the limitation of swelling due to fission-gas precipitation, some irradiations have been carried out at burn-ups of about 35.000 MWd/ton, and at average sample temperatures of 575 Celsius degrees, of non-alloyed uranium and uranium 8 per cent molybdenum gained in a thick stainless steel can. A cylindrical central hole allows a fuel swelling from 20 to 33 per cent according to the experiment. After irradiation, the uranium samples showed two types of can rupture: one is due to the fuel swelling, and the other, to the pressure of the fission gases, released through a network of microcracks. The cans of the uranium-molybdenum samples are all undamaged and it is shown that the gas release occurs by interconnection of the bubbles for swelling values higher than those obtained in the case of uranium. For each type of fuel, a swelling-fission gas release relationship is established. The results suggest that good performances with a metallic fuel intended for use in fast reactor conditions can be obtained. (author) [fr

  8. Effect of power change on fission gas release. Re-irradiation tests of spent fuel at JMTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Jinichi; Shimizu, Michio; Ishii, Tadahiko; Endo, Yasuichi; Ohwada, Isao; Nabeya, Hideaki; Uetsuka, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    A full length rod irradiated at Tsuruga unit 1 was refabricated to short length rods, and rod inner pressure gauges were re-instrumented to the rods. Re-irradiation tests to study the fission gas release during power change were carried out by means of BOCA/OSF-1 facility at the JMTR. In the tests, steady state operation at 40 kW/m and power cycling operations between 20 and 40 kW/m were conducted for the same high power holding time, and the rod inner pressure change during the tests was measured. The rod inner pressure increase was observed during power change, especially during power reduction. The rod inner pressure increase during a power cycling depended on the length of the high power operation just before the power cycling. The fission gas release during power reduction is estimated to be the release from fission gas bubbles on the grain boundary caused by the thermal stress in the pellet during power reduction. When steady state operation and power cycling were repeated at the power levels of 30, 35 and 40 kW/m, the power cycling accelerated the fission gas release compared with the steady state operation. (author)

  9. Estimating particle release through gas leaks in dry powder shipping containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwendiman, L.C.

    1977-06-01

    Information is presented from which an estimate can be made of the release of plutonium oxide from shipping containers. The leak diameter is estimated from gas leak tests of the container and an estimate is made of gas leak rate as a function of pressure over the time of interest in the accident. These calculations are limited in accuracy because of assumptions regarding leak geometry and the basic formulations of hydrodynamic flow for the assumed conditions. Sonic flow is assumed to be the limiting gas flow rate. Particles leaking from the air space above the powder will be limited by the low availability of particles due to rapid settling, the very limited driving force (pressure buildup) during the first minute, and the deposition in the leak channel. Equations are given to estimate deposition losses. Leaks of particles occurring below the level of the bulk powder will be limited by mechanical interference when leaks are of dimension smaller than particle sizes present. Some limiting cases can be calculated. When the leak dimension is large compared to the particle sizes present, maximum particle releases can be estimated, but will be very conservative. Further theoretical and experimental studies are needed to better define the hydrodynamics of gas flow in leaks of the size being considered, and to establish particle transport rates through known geometry leak paths

  10. 75 FR 19319 - Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting; Extension of Comment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    ... Hydrogen Sulfide; Community Right-to-Know Toxic Chemical Release Reporting; Extension of Comment Period... reporting requirements for hydrogen sulfide (Chemical Abstracts Service Number (CAS No.) 7783-06-4) (75 FR... may be potentially affected by this action if you manufacture, process, or otherwise use hydrogen...

  11. Increasing of MERARG experimental performances: on-line fission gas release measurement by mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontillon, Y.; Capdevila, H.; Clement, S. [CEA, DEN, DEC, SA3C, LAMIR, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance, (France); Guigues, E.; Janulyte, A.; Zerega, Y.; Andre, J. [Aix-Marseille Universite, LISA EA 4672, 13397 MARSEILLE cedex 20, (France)

    2015-07-01

    The MERARG device - implemented at the LECASTAR Hot Laboratory, at the CEA Cadarache - allows characterizing nuclear fuels with respect to the behaviour of fission gases during thermal transients representative of normal or off normal operating nuclear power plant conditions. The fuel is heated in order to extract a part or the total gas inventory it contains. Fission Gas Release (FGR) is actually recorded by mean of both on-line gamma spectrometry station and micro gas chromatography. These two devices monitor the quantity and kinetics of fission gas release rate. They only address {sup 85}Kr radioactive isotope and the elemental quantification of Kr, Xe and He (with a relatively low detection limit in the latter case, typically 5-10 ppm). In order to better estimate the basic mechanisms that promote fission gas release from irradiated nuclear fuels, the CEA fuel study department decided to improve its experimental facility by modifying MERARG to extend the studies of gamma emitter fission gases to all gases (including Helium) with a complete isotopic distribution capability. To match these specifications, a Residual Gas Analyser (RGA) has been chosen as mass spectrometer. This paper presents a review of the main aspects of the qualification/calibration phase of the RGA type analyser. In particular, results recorded over three mass ranges 1-10 u, 80-90 u and 120-140 u in the two classical modes of MERARG, i.e. on-line and off-line measurements are discussed. Results obtained from a standard gas bottle show that the quantitative analysis at a few ppm levels can be achieved for all isotopes of Kr and Xe, as well as masses 2 and 4 u. (authors)

  12. Unit mechanisms of fission gas release: Current understanding and future needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonks, Michael; Andersson, David; Devanathan, Ram; Dubourg, Roland; El-Azab, Anter; Freyss, Michel; Iglesias, Fernando; Kulacsy, Katalin; Pastore, Giovanni; Phillpot, Simon R.; Welland, Michael

    2018-06-01

    Gaseous fission product transport and release has a large impact on fuel performance, degrading fuel and gap properties. While gaseous fission product behavior has been investigated with bulk reactor experiments and simplified analytical models, recent improvements in experimental and modeling approaches at the atomistic and mesoscales are beginning to reveal new understanding of the unit mechanisms that define fission product behavior. Here, existing research on the basic mechanisms of fission gas release during normal reactor operation are summarized and critical areas where work is needed are identified. This basic understanding of the fission gas behavior mechanisms has the potential to revolutionize our ability to predict fission product behavior and to design fuels with improved performance. In addition, this work can serve as a model on how a coupled experimental and modeling approach can be applied to understand the unit mechanisms behind other critical behaviors in reactor materials.

  13. An evaluation of gas release modelling approaches as to their applicability in fuel behaviour models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattila, L.J.; Sairanen, R.T.

    1980-01-01

    The release of fission gas from uranium oxide fuel to the voids in the fuel rod affects in many ways the behaviour of LWR fuel rods both during normal operating conditions including anticipated transients and during off-normal and accident conditions. The current trend towards significantly increased discharge burnup of LWR fuel will increase the importance of fission gas release considerations both from the design and safety viewpoints. In the paper fission gas release models are classified to 5 categories on the basis of complexity and physical sophistication. For each category, the basic approach common to the models included in the category is described, a few representative models of the category are singled out and briefly commented in some cases, the advantages and drawbacks of the approach are listed and discussed and conclusions on the practical feasibility of the approach are drawn. The evaluation is based on both literature survey and our experience in working with integral fuel behaviour models. The work has included verification efforts, attempts to improve certain features of the codes and engineering applications. The classification of fission gas release models regarding their applicability in fuel behaviour codes can of course be done only in a coarse manner. The boundaries between the different categories are vague and a model may be well refined in a way which transfers it to a higher category. Some current trends in fuel behaviour research are discussed which seem to motivate further extensive efforts in fission product release modelling and are certain to affect the prioritizing of the efforts. (author)

  14. Canadian pollutant releases and transfers : NPRI data 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-03-01

    A large, two-sided fold-out poster showing pollution hotspots throughout Canada, has been released by the Canadian Institute for Environmental Law and Policy (CIELAP). The poster is based on the maps and tables of the National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI) 1998. It presents the top on-site releases and off-site transfers of pollutants by facilities across Canada, and provides a summary of releases, transfers and recycling of pollutants by province. The map depicts the facilities with the five largest quantities of individual pollutants released to each medium, i. e. water, air, land, underground. The crude oil and gas, other utilities, primary metal, paper and chemical industrial sectors are responsible for the largest on-site releases, while the business services, fabricated metal. primary metal and chemical industrial sectors account for the largest off-site transfers. Twenty-five of the 176 substances whose releases and transfers are reported under the NPRI are classified as 'toxic' or 'carcinogenic'. tabs., maps

  15. Emergency planning and preparedness for the deliberate release of toxic industrial chemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, David; Simpson, John

    2010-03-01

    Society in developed and developing countries is hugely dependent upon chemicals for health, wealth, and economic prosperity, with the chemical industry contributing significantly to the global economy. Many chemicals are synthesized, stored, and transported in vast quantities and classified as high production volume chemicals; some are recognized as being toxic industrial chemicals (TICs). Chemical accidents involving chemical installations and transportation are well recognized. Such chemical accidents occur with relative frequency and may result in large numbers of casualties with acute and chronic health effects as well as fatalities. The large-scale production of TICs, the potential for widespread exposure and significant public health impact, together with their relative ease of acquisition, makes deliberate release an area of potential concern. The large numbers of chemicals, together with the large number of potential release scenarios means that the number of possible forms of chemical incident are almost infinite. Therefore, prior to undertaking emergency planning and preparedness, it is necessary to prioritize risk and subsequently mitigate. This is a multi-faceted process, including implementation of industrial protection layers, substitution of hazardous chemicals, and relocation away from communities. Residual risk provides the basis for subsequent planning. Risk-prioritized emergency planning is a tool for identifying gaps, enhancing communication and collaboration, and for policy development. It also serves to enhance preparedness, a necessary prelude to preventing or mitigating the public health risk to deliberate release. Planning is an iterative and on-going process that requires multi-disciplinary agency input, culminating in the formation of a chemical incident plan complimentary to major incident planning. Preparedness is closely related and reflects a state of readiness. It is comprised of several components, including training and exercising

  16. IFPE/IFA-432, Fission Gas Release, Mechanical Interaction BWR Fuel Rods, Halden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnbull, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    Description: It contains data from experiments that have been performed at the IFE/OECD Halden Reactor Project, available for use in fuel performance studies. It covers experiments on thermal performance, fission product release, clad properties and pellet clad mechanical interaction. It includes also experimental data relevant to high burn-up behaviour. IFA-432: Measurements of fuel temperature response, fission gas release and mechanical interaction on BWR-type fuel rods up to high burn-ups. The assembly featured several variations in rod design parameters, including fuel type, fuel/cladding gap size, fill gas composition (He and Xe) and fuel stability. It contained 6 BWR-type fuel rods with fuel centre thermocouples at two horizontal planes, rods were also equipped with pressure transducers and cladding extensometers. Only data from 6 rods are compiled here

  17. Fission gas release and fuel rod chemistry related to extended burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to review the state of the art in fission gas release and fuel rod chemistry related to extended burnup. The meeting was held in a time when national and international programmes on water reactor fuel irradiated in experimental reactors were still ongoing or had reached their conclusion, and when lead test assemblies had reached high burnup in power reactors and been examined. At the same time, several out-of-pile experiments on high burnup fuel or with simulated fuel were being carried out. As a result, significant progress has been registered since the last meeting, particularly in the evaluation of fuel temperature, the degradation of the global thermal conductivity with burnup and in the understanding of the impact on fission gas release. Fifty five participants from 16 countries and one international organization attended the meeting. 28 papers were presented. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the papers. Refs, figs, tabs and photos

  18. Influence of additives and impurities in sweep gas and solid tritium release behaviour from lithium ceramics (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Satoru

    1991-01-01

    Tritium release from solid breeding material is affected by small amounts of additives or impurities in the sweep gas or solid itself. Addition of hydrogen or water vapor to the sweep gas is reported to enhance the surface reaction of tritium release. Doping to solid breeder with elements of different valence from lithium has a possibility to improve tritium diffusion in the solid. Surface reaction and migration behavior in bulk are believed to be also affected by impurities in the sweep gas and in the solid. In order to model tritium release behavior in the blanket of fusion reactor, the mechanism of interaction with these additives or impurities must be quantitatively formulated. However, the mechanism of these remains to be elucidated. In this paper effects of these additives and impurities on tritium migration are reviewed. The mechanism of surface reaction for He+H 2 sweep gas is also discussed. (orig.)

  19. Mechanisms of gas retention and release: Experimental results for Hanford waste tanks 241-AW-101 and 241-AN-103

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rassat, S.D.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Bredt, P.R.; Mahoney, L.A.; Forbes, S.V.; Tingey, S.M.

    1997-09-01

    The 177 storage tanks at Hanford contain a vast array of radioactive waste forms resulting, primarily, from nuclear materials processing. Through radiolytic, thermal, and other decomposition reactions of waste components, gaseous species including hydrogen, ammonia, and the oxidizer nitrous oxide are generated within the waste tanks. Many of these tanks are known to retain and periodically release quantities of these flammable gas mixtures. The primary focus of the Flammable Gas Project is the safe storage of Hanford tank wastes. To this end, we strive to develop an understanding of the mechanisms of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford tanks through laboratory investigations on actual tank wastes. These results support the closure of the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) on the safe storage of waste tanks known to retain flammable gases and support resolution of the broader Flammable Gas Safety Issue. The overall purpose of this ongoing study is to develop a comprehensive and thorough understanding of the mechanisms of flammable gas retention and release. The first objective of the current study was to classify bubble retention and release mechanisms in two previously untested waste materials from Tanks 241-AN-103 (AN-103) and 241-AW-101 (AW-101). Results were obtained for retention mechanisms, release characteristics, and the maximum gas retention. In addition, unique behavior was also documented and compared with previously studied waste samples. The second objective was to lengthen the duration of the experiments to evaluate the role of slowing bubble growth on the retention and release behavior. Results were obtained for experiments lasting from a few hours to a few days.

  20. Mechanisms of gas retention and release: Experimental results for Hanford waste tanks 241-AW-101 and 241-AN-103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassat, S.D.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Bredt, P.R.; Mahoney, L.A.; Forbes, S.V.; Tingey, S.M.

    1997-09-01

    The 177 storage tanks at Hanford contain a vast array of radioactive waste forms resulting, primarily, from nuclear materials processing. Through radiolytic, thermal, and other decomposition reactions of waste components, gaseous species including hydrogen, ammonia, and the oxidizer nitrous oxide are generated within the waste tanks. Many of these tanks are known to retain and periodically release quantities of these flammable gas mixtures. The primary focus of the Flammable Gas Project is the safe storage of Hanford tank wastes. To this end, we strive to develop an understanding of the mechanisms of flammable gas retention and release in Hanford tanks through laboratory investigations on actual tank wastes. These results support the closure of the Flammable Gas Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) on the safe storage of waste tanks known to retain flammable gases and support resolution of the broader Flammable Gas Safety Issue. The overall purpose of this ongoing study is to develop a comprehensive and thorough understanding of the mechanisms of flammable gas retention and release. The first objective of the current study was to classify bubble retention and release mechanisms in two previously untested waste materials from Tanks 241-AN-103 (AN-103) and 241-AW-101 (AW-101). Results were obtained for retention mechanisms, release characteristics, and the maximum gas retention. In addition, unique behavior was also documented and compared with previously studied waste samples. The second objective was to lengthen the duration of the experiments to evaluate the role of slowing bubble growth on the retention and release behavior. Results were obtained for experiments lasting from a few hours to a few days

  1. Executive Order 12898 and Social, Economic, and Sociopolitical Factors Influencing Toxic Release Inventory Facility Location in EPA Region 6: A Multi-Scale Spatial Assessment of Environmental Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Andrea Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Toxic Release Inventory facilities are among the many environmental hazards shown to create environmental inequities in the United States. This project examined four factors associated with Toxic Release Inventory, specifically, manufacturing facility location at multiple spatial scales using spatial analysis techniques (i.e., O-ring statistic and…

  2. Probabilistic consequence assessment of hydrogen sulphide releases from a heavy water plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    This report is the second in a series concerned with the evaluation of the consequences to the public of an accidental release of hydrogen sulphide (H 2 S) to the atmosphere following a pipe or pressure envelope failure, or some other process upset, at a heavy water plant. It consists of documentation of the code GASPROB, which has been developed to provide consequence probabilities for a range of postulated releases. The code includes mathematical simulations of initial gas behaviour upon release to the atmosphere, such as gravitational settling of a cold release and the rise of jets and flares, subsequent atmospheric dispersion under a range of weather conditions, and the toxic effects on the exposed population. The code makes use of the site-specific dispersion climatology, topography and population distribution, as well as the probabilistic lethal dose data for the released gas. Output for a given postulated release can be provided in terms of the concentration of the gas at ground level around the point of release, projected numbers of fatalities within specified areas and the projected total fatalities regardless of location. This report includes a general description of GASPROB, and specifics of the code structure, the function of each subroutine, input and output data, and the permanent data files established. Three appendices to the report contain a complete code listing, detailed subroutine descriptions and a sample output

  3. Examining the antimicrobial activity and toxicity to animal cells of different types of CO-releasing molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobre, Lígia S; Jeremias, Hélia; Romão, Carlos C; Saraiva, Lígia M

    2016-01-28

    Transition metal carbonyl complexes used as CO-releasing molecules (CORMs) for biological and therapeutic applications may exhibit interesting antimicrobial activity. However, understanding the chemical traits and mechanisms of action that rule this activity is required to establish a rationale for the development of CORMs into useful antibiotics. In this work the bactericidal activity, the toxicity to eukaryotic cells, and the ability of CORMs to deliver CO to bacterial and eukaryotic cells were analysed for a set of seven CORMs that differ in the transition metal, ancillary ligands and the CO release profile. Most of these CORMs exhibited bactericidal properties that decrease in the following order: CORM-2 > CORM-3 > ALF062 > ALF850 > ALF186 > ALF153 > [Fe(SBPy3)(CO)](BF4)2. A similar yet not entirely coincident decreasing order was found for their induction of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in E. coli. In contrast, studies in model animal cells showed that for any given CORM, the level of intracellular ROS generated was negligible when compared with that measured inside bacteria. Importantly, these CORMs were in general not toxic to eukaryotic cells, namely murine macrophages, kidney LLC-PK1 epithelial cells, and liver cell line HepG2. CORM-2 and CORM-3 delivered CO to the intracellular space of both E. coli and the two types of tested eukaryotic cells, yet toxicity was only elicited in the case of E. coli. CO delivered by ALF186 into the intercellular space did not enter E. coli cells and the compound was not toxic to either bacteria or to eukaryotic cells. The Fe(ii) carbonyl complex [Fe(SBPy3)(CO)](2+) had the reverse, undesirable toxicity profile, being unexpectedly toxic to eukaryotic cells and non-toxic to E. coli. ALF153, the most stable complex in the whole set, was essentially devoid of toxicity or ROS induction ability in all cells. These results suggest that CORMs have a relevant therapeutic potential as antimicrobial drugs since (i) they

  4. Analysis of hydrogen sulfide releases in heavy water production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croitoru, Cornelia; Dumitrescu, Maria; Preda, Irina; Lazar, Roxana

    1996-01-01

    Safety analyses conducted at ICIS concern primarily the heavy water production installations. The quantitative risk assessment needs the frequency calculation of accident sequences and consequences. In heavy water plants which obtain primary isotopic concentration of water by H 2 O - H 2 S exchange, large amounts of hydrogen sulfide which is a toxic, inflammable and explosive gas, are circulated. The first stage in calculating the consequences consists in potential analysis of H 2 S release. This work presents a study of this types of releases for pilot installations of the heavy water production at ICIS (Plant 'G' at Rm. Valcea). The installations which contain and maneuver large quantities of H 2 S and the mathematical models for different types of releases are presented. The accidents analyzed are: catastrophic column, container, spy-hole failures or gas-duct rupture and wall cracks in the installation. The main results are given as tables while the time variations of the flow rate and quantities of H 2 O released by stack disposal are plotted

  5. Models for recurrent gas release event behavior in hazardous waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.N.; Arnold, B.C.

    1994-08-01

    Certain radioactive waste storage tanks at the United States Department of Energy Hanford facilities continuously generate gases as a result of radiolysis and chemical reactions. The congealed sludge in these tanks traps the gases and causes the level of the waste within the tanks to rise. The waste level continues to rise until the sludge becomes buoyant and ''rolls over'', changing places with heavier fluid on top. During a rollover, the trapped gases are released, resulting, in a sudden drop in the waste level. This is known as a gas release event (GRE). After a GRE, the wastes leading to another GRE. We present nonlinear time waste re-congeals and gas again accumulates leading to another GRE. We present nonlinear time series models that produce simulated sample paths that closely resemble the temporal history of waste levels in these tanks. The models also imitate the random GRE, behavior observed in the temporal waste level history of a storage tank. We are interested in using the structure of these models to understand the probabilistic behavior of the random variable ''time between consecutive GRE's''. Understanding the stochastic nature of this random variable is important because the hydrogen and nitrous oxide gases released from a GRE, are flammable and the ammonia that is released is a health risk. From a safety perspective, activity around such waste tanks should be halted when a GRE is imminent. With credible GRE models, we can establish time windows in which waste tank research and maintenance activities can be safely performed

  6. Calculation of gas release from DC and AC arc furnaces in a foundry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutyanskii, M. M.; Nekhamin, S. M.; Rebikov, E. M.

    2016-12-01

    A procedure for the calculation of gas release from arc furnaces is presented. The procedure is based on the stoichiometric ratios of the oxidation of carbon in liquid iron during the oxidation heat period and the oxidation of iron from a steel charge by oxygen in the period of solid charge melting during the gas exchange of the furnace cavity with the external atmosphere.

  7. Sediment porewater toxicity assessment studies in the vicinity of offshore oil and gas production in the Gulf of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, R. S.; Chapman, D. C.; Presley, B. J.; Biedenbach, J. M.; Robertson, L.

    1996-01-01

    Sediment chemical analyses and porewater toxicity tests were conducted in the vicinity of five offshore oil and gas platforms in the Gulf of Mexico to determine the potential long-term environmental impacts of offshore oil and gas exploration and production. Evidence of toxicity was obtained from four of the five platforms from data on sea urchin fertilization and embryonic development. The majority of toxic samples were collected within 150 m of the platform. Sediment concentrations of several metals were well in excess of sediment quality assessment guidelines at a number of stations. Porewater metal concentrations were found to be high enough to account for the observed toxicity. The general conclusion reached from these toxicity tests was that the contaminant-induced impacts from the offshore platforms were confined to a limited area in the immediate vicinity of the platform. 23 refs., 8 tabs., 2 figs

  8. Pressure pulses generated by gas released from a breached fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, T.S.

    1979-01-01

    In experimental measurements of liquid pressure pulses generated by rapid release of gas from breached fuel elements in a nuclear reactor, different peak pressures were observed at locations equidistant from the origin of the release. Using the model of a submerged spherical bubble with a nonstationary center, this analysis predicts not only that the peak pressure would be higher at a point in front of the advancing bubble than that at a point the same distance behind the bubble origin, but also that the pressure pulse in front of the bubble reaches its peak later than the pulse behind the origin

  9. Parametric Analysis of the Exergoeconomic Operation Costs, Environmental and Human Toxicity Indexes of the MF501F3 Gas Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar Vicente Torres-González

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This work presents an energetic, exergoeconomic, environmental, and toxicity analysis of the simple gas turbine M501F3 based on a parametric analysis of energetic (thermal efficiency, fuel and air flow rates, and specific work output, exergoeconomic (exergetic efficiency and exergoeconomic operation costs, environmental (global warming, smog formation, acid rain indexes, and human toxicity indexes, by taking the compressor pressure ratio and the turbine inlet temperature as the operating parameters. The aim of this paper is to provide an integral, systematic, and powerful diagnostic tool to establish possible operation and maintenance actions to improve the gas turbine’s exergoeconomic, environmental, and human toxicity indexes. Despite the continuous changes in the price of natural gas, the compressor, combustion chamber, and turbine always contribute 18.96%, 53.02%, and 28%, respectively, to the gas turbine’s exergoeconomic operation costs. The application of this methodology can be extended to other simple gas turbines using the pressure drops and isentropic efficiencies, among others, as the degradation parameters, as well as to other energetic systems, without loss of generality.

  10. Gas chromatography/sniffing port analysis evaluated for aroma release from rehydrated French beans (Phaseolus vulgaris).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruth, van S.M.; Roozen, J.P.; Cozijnsen, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    The technique of gas chromatography/sniffing port analysis was evaluated for studying the release of aroma compounds from rehydrated diced French beans. The aroma compounds 2-—methylbutanal and hexanal were released at a constant rate over time. An identical selection of odour active compounds was

  11. Thermal ramp rate effects on mixed-oxide fuel swelling/gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hinman, C.A.; Randklev, E.H.

    1979-01-01

    Macroscopic swelling behavior of PNL-10 was compared to that of PNL-2 fuel and it was found that the swelling-threshold behavior is similar for similar thermal conditions. Transient fission gas release for the PNL-10 fuel is very similar to that observed for the PNL-2 fuel for similar thermal conditions

  12. Performance and heat release analysis of a pilot-ignited natural gas engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishnan, S.R.; Biruduganti, M.; Mo, Y.; Bell, S.R.; Midkiff, K.C. [Alabama Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

    2002-09-01

    The influence of engine operating variables on the performance, emissions and heat release in a compression ignition engine operating in normal diesel and dual-fuel modes (with natural gas fuelling) was investigated. Substantial reductions in NO{sub x} emissions were obtained with dual-fuel engine operation. There was a corresponding increase in unburned hydrocarbon emissions as the substitution of natural gas was increased. Brake specific energy consumption decreased with natural gas substitution at high loads but increased at low loads. Experimental results at fixed pilot injection timing have also established the importance of intake manifold pressure and temperature in improving dual-fuel performance and emissions at part load. (Author)

  13. A method to evaluate fission gas release during irradiation testing of spherical fuel - HTR2008-58184

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Der Merwet, H.; Venter, J.

    2008-01-01

    The evaluation of fission gas release from spherical fuel during irradiation testing is critical to understand expected fuel performance under real reactor conditions. Online measurements of Krypton and Xenon fission products explain coated particle performance and contributions from graphitic matrix materials used in fuel manufacture and irradiation rig materials. Methods that are being developed to accurately evaluate fission gas release are described here together with examples of evaluations performed on irradiation tests HFR-K5, -K6 and EU1bis. (authors)

  14. Formulation and evaluation of gas release scenarios for the silo in Swedish Final Repository for Radioactive Waste (SFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, J.; Moreno, L.

    1992-01-01

    The Swedish Final Repository for Radioactive Waste (SFR) has been in operation since 1988 and is located in the crystalline rock, 60 m below the Baltic Sea. In the licensing procedure for the SFR the safety assessment has been complemented with a detailed scenario analysis of the performance of the repository. The scenarios include the influence on radionuclide release by gas formation and gas transport processes in the silo. The overall conclusion is that the release of most radionuclides from the silo is only marginally affected by the formation and release of gas, even for scenarios considering unexpected events. The largest effects were found for short-lived radionuclides and radionuclides that have no or low sorption ability. Except for very extreme scenarios for the silo the overall impact from repository on the environment is by far dominated by the release of radionuclides from the rock vaults. 10 refs., 6 figs

  15. Release of volatile and semi-volatile toxicants during house fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Fiona; Christou, Antonis; Dickens, Kathryn; Walker, Richard; Stec, Anna A

    2017-04-01

    Qualitative results are presented from analysis of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds (VOCs/SVOCs) obtained through sampling of gaseous effluent and condensed particulates during a series of experimental house fires conducted in a real house. Particular emphasis is given to the 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) listed by the Environmental Protection Agency due to their potentially carcinogenic effects. The initial fuel packages were either cooking oil or a single sofa; these were burned both alone, and in furnished surroundings. Experiments were performed at different ventilation conditions. Qualitative Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis found VOC/SVOC releases in the developing stages of the fires, and benzo(a)pyrene - the most carcinogenic PAH - was found in at least one sampling interval in the majority of fires. A number of phosphorus fire retardants were detected, in both the gaseous effluent and particulates, from fires where the initial fuel source was a sofa. Their release during the fire is significant as they pose toxicological concerns separate from those presented by the PAHs. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Swelling and gas release of grain-boundary pores in uranium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrire, D.I.

    1983-12-01

    The swelling and gas release of overpressured grain boundary pores is sintered unirradiated uranium dioxide were investigated under isothermal conditions. The pores became overpressured when the ambient pressure was reduced, and the excess pressure driving force caused growth and interconnection of the pores, leading to eventual gas release. Swelling was measured continuously by a linear variable differential transformer, and open and closed porosity fractions were determined after the tests by immersion density and quantitative microscopy measurements. The sinter porosity consisted of pores situated on grain faces, grain edges, and grain corners. Isolated pores maintained their equilibrium shape while growing, without any measurable change in dihedral angle. Interconnection occurred predominantly along grain edges, without any evidence of pore sharpening or crack propagation at low driving forces. Extensive open porosity occurred at a threshold density of about 85% TD. There was an almost linear dependence of the initial swelling rate on the driving force, with an activation energy of 200+- 8 kJ/mole, in good agreement with published values of the activation energy for grain boundary diffusion

  17. Gas chromatography/sniffing port analysis of aroma compounds released under mouth conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruth, van S.M.; Roozen, J.P.

    2000-01-01

    The release of aroma compounds from rehydrated French beans in an artificial mouth system and in the mouths of 12 assessors was studied by gas chromatography combined with flame ionisation detection and sniffing port detection. In an artificial mouth system, volatile compounds were isolated under

  18. A method for simulating the release of natural gas from the rupture of high-pressure pipelines in any terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yajun; Hu, Hongbing; Yu, Bo; Sun, Dongliang; Hou, Lei; Liang, Yongtu

    2018-01-15

    The rupture of a high-pressure natural gas pipeline can pose a serious threat to human life and environment. In this research, a method has been proposed to simulate the release of natural gas from the rupture of high-pressure pipelines in any terrain. The process of gas releases from the rupture of a high-pressure pipeline is divided into three stages, namely the discharge, jet, and dispersion stages. Firstly, a discharge model is established to calculate the release rate of the orifice. Secondly, an improved jet model is proposed to obtain the parameters of the pseudo source. Thirdly, a fast-modeling method applicable to any terrain is introduced. Finally, based upon these three steps, a dispersion model, which can take any terrain into account, is established. Then, the dispersion scenarios of released gas in four different terrains are studied. Moreover, the effects of pipeline pressure, pipeline diameter, wind speed and concentration of hydrogen sulfide on the dispersion scenario in real terrain are systematically analyzed. The results provide significant guidance for risk assessment and contingency planning of a ruptured natural gas pipeline. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Fission gas release during post irradiation annealing of large grain size fuels from Hinkley point B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killeen, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    A series of post-irradiation anneals has been carried out on fuel taken from an experimental stringer from Hinkley Point B AGR. The stringer was part of an experimental programme in the reactor to study the effect of large grain size fuel. Three differing fuel types were present in separate pins in the stringer. One variant of large grain size fuel had been prepared by using an MgO dopant during fuel manufactured, a second by high temperature sintering of standard fuel and the third was a reference, 12μm grain size fuel. Both large grain size variants had similar grain sizes around 35μm. The present experiments took fuel samples from highly rated pins from the stringer with local burn-up in excess of 25GWd/tU and annealed these to temperature of up to 1535 deg. C under reducing conditions to allow a comparison of fission gas behaviour at high release levels. The results demonstrate the beneficial effect of large grain size on release rate of 85 Kr following interlinkage. At low temperatures and release rates there was no difference between the fuel types, but at temperatures in excess of 1400 deg. C the release rate was found to be inversely dependent on the fuel grain size. The experiments showed some differences between the doped and undoped large grains size fuel in that the former became interlinked at a lower temperature, releasing fission gas at an increased rate at this temperature. At higher temperatures the grain size effect was dominant. The temperature dependence for fission gas release was determined over a narrow range of temperature and found to be similar for all three types and for both pre-interlinkage and post-interlinkage releases, the difference between the release rates is then seen to be controlled by grain size. (author). 4 refs, 7 figs, 3 tabs

  20. Fission gas release during post irradiation annealing of large grain size fuels from Hinkley point B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killeen, J C [Nuclear Electric plc, Barnwood (United Kingdom)

    1997-08-01

    A series of post-irradiation anneals has been carried out on fuel taken from an experimental stringer from Hinkley Point B AGR. The stringer was part of an experimental programme in the reactor to study the effect of large grain size fuel. Three differing fuel types were present in separate pins in the stringer. One variant of large grain size fuel had been prepared by using an MgO dopant during fuel manufactured, a second by high temperature sintering of standard fuel and the third was a reference, 12{mu}m grain size fuel. Both large grain size variants had similar grain sizes around 35{mu}m. The present experiments took fuel samples from highly rated pins from the stringer with local burn-up in excess of 25GWd/tU and annealed these to temperature of up to 1535 deg. C under reducing conditions to allow a comparison of fission gas behaviour at high release levels. The results demonstrate the beneficial effect of large grain size on release rate of {sup 85}Kr following interlinkage. At low temperatures and release rates there was no difference between the fuel types, but at temperatures in excess of 1400 deg. C the release rate was found to be inversely dependent on the fuel grain size. The experiments showed some differences between the doped and undoped large grains size fuel in that the former became interlinked at a lower temperature, releasing fission gas at an increased rate at this temperature. At higher temperatures the grain size effect was dominant. The temperature dependence for fission gas release was determined over a narrow range of temperature and found to be similar for all three types and for both pre-interlinkage and post-interlinkage releases, the difference between the release rates is then seen to be controlled by grain size. (author). 4 refs, 7 figs, 3 tabs.

  1. Results of Large-Scale Testing on Effects of Anti-Foam Agent on Gas Retention and Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Charles W.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Arm, Stuart T.; Butcher, Mark G.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Jagoda, Lynette K.; Park, Walter R.; Slaugh, Ryan W.; Su, Yin-Fong; Wend, Christopher F.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Alzheimer, James M.; Bailey, Jeffrey A.; Cooley, Scott K.; Hurley, David E.; Johnson, Christian D.; Reid, Larry D.; Smith, Harry D.; Wells, Beric E.; Yokuda, Satoru T.

    2008-01-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection’s Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) will process and treat radioactive waste that is stored in tanks at the Hanford Site. The waste treatment process in the pretreatment facility will mix both Newtonian and non-Newtonian slurries in large process tanks. Process vessels mixing non-Newtonian slurries will use pulse jet mixers (PJMs), air sparging, and recirculation pumps. An anti-foam agent (AFA) will be added to the process streams to prevent surface foaming, but may also increase gas holdup and retention within the slurry. The work described in this report addresses gas retention and release in simulants with AFA through testing and analytical studies. Gas holdup and release tests were conducted in a 1/4-scale replica of the lag storage vessel operated in the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Applied Process Engineering Laboratory using a kaolin/bentonite clay and AZ-101 HLW chemical simulant with non-Newtonian rheological properties representative of actual waste slurries. Additional tests were performed in a small-scale mixing vessel in the PNNL Physical Sciences Building using liquids and slurries representing major components of typical WTP waste streams. Analytical studies were directed at discovering how the effect of AFA might depend on gas composition and predicting the effect of AFA on gas retention and release in the full-scale plant, including the effects of mass transfer to the sparge air. The work at PNNL was part of a larger program that included tests conducted at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) that is being reported separately. SRNL conducted gas holdup tests in a small-scale mixing vessel using the AZ-101 high-level waste (HLW) chemical simulant to investigate the effects of different AFAs, their components, and of adding noble metals. Full-scale, single-sparger mass transfer tests were also conducted at SRNL in water and AZ-101 HLW simulant to provide data for PNNL

  2. Evaporation release behavior of volatile fission products from liquid sodium pool to the inert cover gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagiri, T; Miyahara, S [Oarai Engineering Center, Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oaraimachi, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-12-01

    In fuel failure of sodium cooled fast breeder reactors, released volatile fission products (VFPs) such as iodine and cesium from the fuel will be dissolved into the liquid sodium coolant and transferred to the cover vaporization. In the cover gas system of the reactor, natural convection occurs due to temperature differences between the sodium pool and the gas phase. The release rates of VFPs together with sodium vaporization are considered to be controlled by the convection. In this study, three analytical models are developed and examined to calculate the transient release rates using the equilibrium partition coefficients of VFPs. The calculated release rates are compared with experimental results for sodium and sodium iodide. The release rate of sodium is closest to the calculation by the heterogeneous nucleation theory. The release rate of sodium iodide obtained from the experiment is between the release rates calculated by the model based on heat-and-mass transfer analogy and the Hill`s theory. From this study, it is confirmed that the realistic release rate of sodium is able to be calculated by the model based on the heterogeneous nucleation theory. The conservative release rate of sodium iodide is able to be calculated by the model based on the Hill`s theory using the equilibrium partition coefficient of sodium iodide. (author) 7 figs., 1 tab., 3 refs.

  3. Fission gas release modelling: developments arising from instrumented fuel assemblies, out-of-pile experiments and microstructural observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leech, N.A.; Smith, M.R.; Pearce, J.H.; Ellis, W.E.; Beatham, N.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of fission gas release modelling in thermal reactor fuel (both steady-state and transient) and in particular, illustrates the way in which experimental data have been, and continue to be, the main driving force behind model development. To illustrate this point various aspects of fuel performance are considered: temperature calculation, steady-state and transient fission gas release, grain boundary gas atom capacity and microstructural phenomena. The sources of experimental data discussed include end-of-life fission gas release measurements, instrumented fuel assemblies (e.g. rods with internal pressure transducers, fuel centre thermocouples), swept capsule experiments, out-of-pile annealing experiments and microstructural techniques applied during post-irradiation evaluation. In the case of the latter, the benefit of applying many observation and analysis techniques on the same fuel samples (the approach adopted at NRL Windscale) is emphasized. This illustrates a shift of emphasis in the modelling field from the development of large, complex thermo-mechanical computer codes to the assessment of key experimental data in order to develop and evaluate sub-models which correctly predict the observed behaviour. (author)

  4. 2015 TRI National Analysis: Toxics Release Inventory Releases at Various Summary Levels

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The TRI National Analysis is EPA's annual interpretation of TRI data at various summary levels. It highlights how toxic chemical wastes were managed, where toxic...

  5. Cyclophosphamide-induced pulmonary toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemann, D.W.; Macler, L.; Penney, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    Unlike radiation effects, pulmonary toxicity following drug treatments may develop soon after exposure. The dose-response relationship between Cyclophosphamide and lung toxicity was investigated using increased breathing frequency assays used successfully for radiation induced injury. The data indicate that release of protein into the alveolus may play a significant role in Cy induced pulmonary toxicity. Although the mechanism responsible for the increased alveolar protein is as yet not identified, the present findings suggest that therapeutic intervention to inhibit protein release may be an approach to protect the lungs from toxic effects. (UK)

  6. LOFC fission product release and circulating activity calculations for gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apperson, C.E. Jr.; Carruthers, L.M.; Lee, C.E.

    1977-01-01

    The inventories of fission products in a gas-cooled reactor under accident and normal steady state conditions are time and temperature dependent. To obtain a reasonable estimate of these inventories it is necessary to consider fuel failure, a temperature dependent variable, and radioactive decay, a time dependent variable. Using arbitrary radioactive decay chains and published fuel failure models for the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR), methods have been developed to evaluate the release of fission products during the Loss of Forced Circulation (LOFC) accident and the circulating and plateout fission product inventories during steady state non-accident operation. The LARC-2 model presented here neglects the time delays in the release from the HTGR due to diffusion of fission products from particles in the fuel rod through the graphite matrix. It also neglects the adsorption and evaporation process of metallics at the fuel rod-graphite and graphite-coolant hole interfaces. Any time delay due to the finite time of transport of fission products by convection through the coolant to the outside of the prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) is also neglected. This model assumes that all fission products released from fuel particles are immediately deposited outside the PCRV with no time delay

  7. Effect of cracks in coating on gas release from a fuel microparticle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarenko, A.G.; Gudkov, A.N.; Tselishchev, Yu.V.

    1988-01-01

    Effect of cracks in protective coating on gas release from a fuel microparticle is investigated in a general form. A fuel microparticle comprizing a kern, a buffer layer and an external protective coating is considered. The pressure of radioactive inert gases in the microparticle buffer layer is evaluated within the 1000-1800 K temperature range on the base of diffusion-defect-trap transport theory. It is shown that the process of radionuclide adsorption interaction with the coating material leads to a more abrupt than by exponent, weakening of mass transfer coefficient. In this case for long-living isotopes the effect of adsorption processes manifests weaker than for short-living ones. Mass transfer coefficient for the crack system depends sufficiently on the total pressure of gas mixture under the coating while for a single cracks such dependence is not observed. A conclusion is drawn that the obtained ratios can be applied for evaluating the character of fuel microparticle protective coating destruction (single non-intersecting cracks or a crack system) using the data on various nuclide release. These ratios can be also applied for the choice of the coating thichness under which gaseous fission product release from the fuel microparticle in case of its protective coating failure does not exceed the acceptable limits

  8. Hazards to nuclear plants from off-site release of toxic vapors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornyik, K.

    1976-01-01

    A method for the assessment of risk involved in shipping toxic compounds past nuclear power plants uses a postulated chain of events, starting with a traffic accident causing instantaneous release of the compound as vapor, and leading to incapacitation of control operators in the nuclear plant, described by deterministic and statistical models as appropriate to the respective event. Statistical treatment of relevant atmospheric conditions is a major improvement over more conservative assumptions commonly made in current analyses of this problem. Consequently, one obtains a substantial reduction in the estimated risk expressed in usual terms of the annual probability of an unacceptable event, in spite of the fact that no credit is taken for protective measures other than potential control room isolation

  9. Fission gas release from ThO2 and ThO2--UO2 fuels (LWBR development program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldberg, I.; Spahr, G.L.; White, L.S.; Waldman, L.A.; Giovengo, J.F.; Pfennigwerth, P.L.; Sherman, J.

    1978-08-01

    Fission gas release data are presented from 51 fuel rods irradiated as part of the LWBR irradiations test program. The fuel rods were Zircaloy-4 clad and contained ThO 2 or ThO 2 -UO 2 fuel pellets, with UO 2 compositions ranging from 2.0 to 24.7 weight percent and fuel densities ranging from 77.8 to 98.7 percent of theoretical. Rod diameters ranged from 0.25 to 0.71 inches and fuel active lengths ranged from 3 to 84 inches. Peak linear power outputs ranged from 2 to 22 kw/ft for peak fuel burnups up to 56,000 MWD/MTM. Measured fission gas release was quite low, ranging from 0.1 to 5.2 percent. Fission gas release was higher at higher temperature and burnup and was lower at higher initial fuel density. No sensitivity to UO 2 composition was evidenced

  10. Both released silver ions and particulate Ag contribute to the toxicity of AgNPs to earthworm Eisenia fetida

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, L.; , van, Gestel C.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    To disentangle the contribution of ionic and nanoparticulate Ag to the overall toxicity to the earthworm Eisenia fetida, a semi-permeable membrane strategy was used to separate Ag+ released from silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in an aqueous exposure. Internal Ag fractionation, activities of antioxidant

  11. Management of gas releases with greenhouse effect: which economical tools?; Maitriser les emissions de gaz a effet de serre: quels instruments economiques?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepeltier, Serge [Senat, Paris (France)

    2000-06-09

    The climatic change represents the most severe danger to the durable world development, public health and future prosperity. This document concerning the gas releases with greenhouse effect is a report of the Senate Planning delegation regarding the economic and fiscal tools envisaging abatement of releases of gases with greenhouse effect. These issues are presented in four chapters titled as follows: 1. Since the scientific evidencing, requirement of managing the releases of gas with greenhouse effect has been unanimously recognized at the summits of Rio (1992) and Kyoto (1997); 2. The economic theory suggests instruments for reducing the gas releases with greenhouse effect at a minimum cost; 3. Challenges and ways of international cooperation in the field of climatic change; 4. Joining the political will with the pragmatic use of the economic instruments at national scale. The document contains a synthesis of proposals directed towards the following goals: international negotiations relating to climatic change; creating the community framework of managing the gas releases resulting in greenhouse effect; establishing national measures for managing the gas releases leading to greenhouse effect; actions to be undertaken by the territorial collectivities.

  12. Bubble development and fission gas release during rapid heating of 18 GWd/TeU UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    Small samples (approximately 50 mg) of UO 2 irradiated to 18 GWd/TeU have been heated rapidly in an out-of-pile furnace. Ramp rates were in the range 10-80 deg. C.s -1 , peak temperatures varied from 1400 deg. C to 2500 deg. C and dwell times from one to fifteen min. The specimens were sealed in small capsules which were subsequently pierced to determine the total amount of fission gas ( 85 Kr) released during each test. Changes in the size and number of gas bubbles on grain boundaries were examined using SEM, TEM, replication and fractography techniques will be employed later. In this paper are reported the first series of gas release results and some metallography. The results are compared with related experiments and some qualitative conclusions are drawn regarding the mechanisms and kinetics of transient fission gas behaviour. (author)

  13. The unique field experiments on the assessment of accident consequences at industrial enterprises of gas-chemical complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, N.S.; Trebin, I.S.; Sorokovikova, O.

    1998-01-01

    Sour natural gas fields are the unique raw material base for setting up such large enterprises as gas chemical complexes. The presence of high toxic H 2 S in natural gas results in widening a range of dangerous and harmful factors for biosphere. Emission of such gases into atmosphere during accidents at gas wells and gas pipelines is of especial danger for environment and first of all for people. Development of mathematical forecast models for assessment of accidents progression and consequences is one of the main elements of works on safety analysis and risk assessment. The critical step in development of such models is their validation using the experimental material. Full-scale experiments have been conducted by the All-Union Scientific-Research institute of Natural Gases and Gas Technology (VNIIGAZ) for grounding of sizes of hazard zones in case of the severe accidents with the gas pipelines. The source of emergency gas release was the working gas pipelines with 100 mm dia. And 110 km length. This pipeline was used for transportation of natural gas with significant amount of hydrogen sulphide. During these experiments significant quantities of the gas including H 2 S were released into the atmosphere and then concentrations of gas and H 2 S were measured in the accident region. The results of these experiments are used for validation of atmospheric dispersion models including the new Lagrangian trace stochastic model that takes into account a wide range of meteorological factors. This model was developed as a part of computer system for decision-making support in case of accident release of toxic gases into atmosphere at the enterprises of Russian gas industry. (authors)

  14. Comparison of the relative sensitivity of Arctic species to dispersed oil using total petroleum and PAH measures of toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extended periods of open water have expanded the potential opportunities for petroleum and gas exploration and production in the Arctic, increasing the focus on understanding the potential impacts of released oil on aquatic organisms. However, information regarding the toxicity o...

  15. Fission gas release in LWR fuel measured during nuclear operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appelhans, A.D.; Skattum, E.; Osetek, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    A series of fuel behavior experiments are being conducted in the Heavy Boiling Water Reactor in Halden, Norway, to measure the release of Xe, Kr, and I fission products from typical light water reactor design fuel pellets. Helium gas is used to sweep the Xe and Kr fission gases out of two of the Instrumented Fuel Assembly 430 fuel rods and to a gamma spectrometer. The measurements of Xe and Kr are made during nuclear operation at steady state power, and for 135 I following reactor scram. The first experiments were conducted at a burnup of 3000 MWd/t UO 2 , at bulk average fuel temperatures of approx. 850 K and approx. 23 kW/m rod power. The measured release-to-birth ratios (R/B) of Xe and Kr are of the same magnitude as those observed in small UO 2 specimen experiments, when normalized to the estimated fuel surface-to-volume ratio. Preliminary analysis indicates that the release-to-birth ratios can be calculated, using diffusion coefficients determined from small specimen data, to within a factor of approx. 2 for the IFA-430 fuel. The release rate of 135 I is shown to be approximately equal to that of 135 Xe

  16. Acoustic mapping of shallow water gas releases using shipborne multibeam systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Peter; Köser, Kevin; Weiß, Tim; Greinert, Jens

    2015-04-01

    Water column imaging (WCI) shipborne multibeam systems are effective tools for investigating marine free gas (bubble) release. Like single- and splitbeam systems they are very sensitive towards gas bubbles in the water column, and have the advantage of the wide swath opening angle, 120° or more allowing a better mapping and possible 3D investigations of targets in the water column. On the downside, WCI data are degraded by specific noise from side-lobe effects and are usually not calibrated for target backscattering strength analysis. Most approaches so far concentrated on manual investigations of bubbles in the water column data. Such investigations allow the detection of bubble streams (flares) and make it possible to get an impression about the strength of detected flares/the gas release. Because of the subjective character of these investigations it is difficult to understand how well an area has been investigated by a flare mapping survey and subjective impressions about flare strength can easily be fooled by the many acoustic effects multibeam systems create. Here we present a semi-automated approach that uses the behavior of bubble streams in varying water currents to detect and map their exact source positions. The focus of the method is application of objective rules for flare detection, which makes it possible to extract information about the quality of the seepage mapping survey, perform automated noise reduction and create acoustic maps with quality discriminators indicating how well an area has been mapped.

  17. Nondestructive fission gas release measurement and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Leary, P.M.; Packard, D.R.

    1993-01-01

    Siemens Power Corporation (SPC) has performed reactor poolside gamma scanning measurements of fuel rods for fission gas release (FGR) detection for more than 10 yr. The measurement system has been previously described. Over the years, the data acquisition system, the method of spectrum analysis, and the means of reducing spectrum interference have been significantly improved. A personal computer (PC)-based multichannel analyzer (MCA) package is used to collect, display, and store high-resolution gamma-ray spectra measured in the fuel rod plenum. A PC spread sheet is used to fit the measured spectra and compute sample count rates after Compton background subtraction. A Zircaloy plenum spacer is often used to reduce positron annihilation interference that can arise from the INCONEL reg-sign plenum spring used in SPC-manufactured fuel rods

  18. Surfacing behavior and gas release of the physostome sprat (Sprattus sprattus) in ice-free and ice-covered waters

    KAUST Repository

    Solberg, Ingrid

    2013-10-04

    Upward-facing echosounders that provided continuous, long-term measurements were applied to address the surfacing behavior and gas release of the physostome sprat (Sprattus sprattus) throughout an entire winter in a 150-m-deep Norwegian fjord. During ice-free conditions, the sprat surfaced and released gas bubbles at night with an estimated surfacing rate of 3.5 times per fish day-1. The vertical swimming speeds during surfacing were considerably higher (~10 times) than during diel vertical migrations, especially when returning from the surface, and particularly when the fjord was not ice covered. The sprat released gas a few hours after surfacing, suggesting that the sprat gulped atmospheric air during its excursions to the surface. While the surface activity increased after the fjord became ice covered, the records of gas release decreased sharply. The under-ice fish then displayed a behavior interpreted as "searching for the surface" by repeatedly ascending toward the ice, apparently with limited success of filling the swim bladder. This interpretation was supported by lower acoustic target strength in ice-covered waters. The frequent surfacing behavior demonstrated in this study indicates that gulping of atmospheric air is an important element in the life of sprat. While at least part of the population endured overwintering in the ice-covered habitat, ice covering may constrain those physostome fishes that lack a gas-generating gland in ways that remain to be established. 2013 The Author(s).

  19. Gas generation and release from the VLJ repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieno, T.; Valkiainen, M.

    1992-01-01

    The VLJ repository is an underground disposal facility located at the Olkiluoto nuclear power plant site on the west coast of Finland. The repository will house low (LLW) and intermediate level radioactive wastes (MLW) from the TVO I and TVO II BWR's and the spent fuel interim store at Olkiluoto. The disposal rooms have been excavated at a depth of 60... 100 meters in the crystalline bedrock. They consist of two rock silos - one for the LLW and the other for MLW. Low level waste is usually packed in steel drums and steel boxes. Medium level wastes consists of bituminized resins in steel drums. Wastes packages are emplaced in concrete boxes before transportation into the repository. Low level wastes are emplaced in the shotcreted rock silo where no backfilling will used. For medium level wastes, a separate silo of reinforced concrete has been constructed inside the rock silo. No backfilling will be used inside the concrete silo and an opening will be made in the lid of the concrete silo for gas release. The microbial degradation of low level wastes is the principle gas generation process in the repository. The gas transport though the bedrock covering the repository is evaluated with the help of ground water flow study. It is recommended that the shotcrete lining on the ceiling of the repository cavern is partly removed before the final sealing of the repository. Provided that dissipation of gases from the disposal cavern into the rock can been assured, the overall effects of gas generation on the long-term safety of the repository are insignificant. 10 refs., 6 figs

  20. Lander based hydroacoustic monitoring of marine single bubble releases in Eckernförde Bay utilizing the multibeam based GasQuant II system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Peter; Schneider von Deimling, Jens; Greinert, Jens

    2015-04-01

    The GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel is currently developing a Imagenex Delta T based lander system for monitoring and quantifying marine gas release (bubbles). The GasQuant II is built as the successor of the GasQuant I system (Greinert, 2008), that has been successfully used for monitoring tempo-spatial variability of gas release in the past (Schneider von Deimling et al., 2010). The new system is lightweight (40 kg), energy efficient, flexible to use and built for ROV deployment with autonomous operation of up to three days. A prototype has been successfully deployed in Eckernförde Bay during the R/V ALKOR cruise AL447 in October/November 2014 to monitor the tempo-spatial variability of gas bubble seepage and to detect a possible correlation with tidal variations. Two deployments, one in forward- and one in upward looking mode, reveal extensive but scattered single bubble releases rather than distinct and more continuous sources. While these releases are difficult to detect in forward looking mode, they can unambiguously be detected in the upward looking mode even for minor gas releases, bubble rising speeds can be determined. Greinert, J., 2008. Monitoring temporal variability of bubble release at seeps: The hydroacoustic swath system GasQuant. J. Geophys. Res. Oceans Vol. 113 Issue C7 CiteID C07048 113, 7048. doi:10.1029/2007JC004704 Schneider von Deimling, J., Greinert, J., Chapman, N.R., Rabbel, W., Linke, P., 2010. Acoustic imaging of natural gas seepage in the North Sea: Sensing bubbles controlled by variable currents. Limnol. Oceanogr. Methods 8, 155. doi:10.4319/lom.2010.8.155

  1. Uncertainties in gas dispersion at the Bruce heavy water plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alp, E.; Ciccone, A.

    1995-07-01

    There have been concerns regarding the uncertainties in atmospheric dispersion of gases released from the Bruce Heavy Water Plant (BHWP). The concern arises due to the toxic nature of H 2 S, and its combustion product SO 2 . In this study, factors that contribute to the uncertainties, such as the effect of the shoreline setting, the potentially heavy gas nature of H 2 S releases, and concentration fluctuations, have been investigated. The basic physics of each of these issues has been described along with fundamental modelling principles. Recommendations have been provided on available computer models that would be suitable for modelling gas dispersion in the vicinity of the BHWP. (author). 96 refs., 4 tabs., 25 figs

  2. Uncertainties in gas dispersion at the Bruce heavy water plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alp, E; Ciccone, A [Concord Environmental Corp., Downsview, ON (Canada)

    1995-07-01

    There have been concerns regarding the uncertainties in atmospheric dispersion of gases released from the Bruce Heavy Water Plant (BHWP). The concern arises due to the toxic nature of H{sub 2}S, and its combustion product SO{sub 2}. In this study, factors that contribute to the uncertainties, such as the effect of the shoreline setting, the potentially heavy gas nature of H{sub 2}S releases, and concentration fluctuations, have been investigated. The basic physics of each of these issues has been described along with fundamental modelling principles. Recommendations have been provided on available computer models that would be suitable for modelling gas dispersion in the vicinity of the BHWP. (author). 96 refs., 4 tabs., 25 figs.

  3. Modelling intragranular fission gas release in irradiation of sintered LWR UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loesoenen, Pekka

    2002-01-01

    A model for the release of stable fission gases by diffuion from sintered LWR UO 2 fuel grains is presented. The model takes into account intragranular gas bubble behaviour as a function of grain radius. The bubbles are assumed to be immobile and the gas migrates to grain boundaries by diffusion of single gas atoms. The intragranular bubble population in the model at low burn-ups or temperatures consists of numerous small bubbles. The presence of the bubbles attenuates the effective gas atom diffusion coefficient. Rapid coarsening of the bubble population in increased burn-up at elevated temperatures weakens significantly the attenuation of the effective diffusion coefficient. The solution method introduced in earlier papers, locally accurate method, is enhanced to allow accurate calculation of the intragranular gas behaviour in time varying conditions without excessive computing time. Qualitatively the detailed model can predict the gas retention in the grain better than a more simple model

  4. Life cycle of petroleum biodegradation metabolite plumes, and implications for risk management at fuel release sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemo, Dawn A; O'Reilly, Kirk T; Mohler, Rachel E; Magaw, Renae I; Espino Devine, Catalina; Ahn, Sungwoo; Tiwary, Asheesh K

    2017-07-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a 5-y research study of the nature and toxicity of petroleum biodegradation metabolites in groundwater at fuel release sites that are quantified as diesel-range "Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons" (TPH; also known as TPHd, diesel-range organics (DRO), etc.), unless a silica gel cleanup (SGC) step is used on the sample extract prior to the TPH analysis. This issue is important for site risk management in regulatory jurisdictions that use TPH as a metric; the presence of these metabolites may preclude site closure even if all other factors can be considered "low-risk." Previous work has shown that up to 100% of the extractable organics in groundwater at petroleum release sites can be biodegradation metabolites. The metabolites can be separated from the hydrocarbons by incorporating an SGC step; however, regulatory agency acceptance of SGC has been inconsistent because of questions about the nature and toxicity of the metabolites. The present study was conducted to answer these specific questions. Groundwater samples collected from source and downgradient wells at fuel release sites were extracted and subjected to targeted gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and nontargeted two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC-MS) analyses, and the metabolites identified in each sample were classified according to molecular structural classes and assigned an oral reference dose (RfD)-based toxicity ranking. Our work demonstrates that the metabolites identified in groundwater at biodegrading fuel release sites are in classes ranked as low toxicity to humans and are not expected to pose significant risk to human health. The identified metabolites naturally attenuate in a predictable manner, with an overall trend to an increasingly higher proportion of organic acids and esters, and a lower human toxicity profile, and a life cycle that is consistent with the low-risk natural attenuation paradigm adopted

  5. Innovation of fission gas release and thermal conductivity measurement methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Meer, K.; Soboler, V.

    1998-01-01

    This presentation described two innovative measurement methods being currently developed at SCK-CEN in order to support the modeling of fuel performance. The first one is an acoustic method to measure the fission gas release in a fuel rod in a non destructive way. The total rod pressure is determined by generating a heat pulse causing a pressure wave that propagates through the gas to an ultrasound transducer. The final pulse width being proportional to the pressure, the latter can thus be determined. The measurement of the acoustic resonance frequency at fixed temperatures enables the distinction between different gas components. The second method is a non-stationary technique to investigate the thermal properties of the fuel rod, like thermal conductivity, diffusivity and heat capacity. These properties are derived from the amplitude and the phase shift of the fuel centre temperature response induced by a periodic temperature variation. These methods did not reveal any physical limitations for the practical applicability. Furthermore, they are rather simple. Preliminary investigations have proven both methods to be more accurate than techniques usually utilized. (author)

  6. On the rate determining step in fission gas release from high burn-up water reactor fuel during power transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, C.T.; Mogensen, M.

    1987-01-01

    The radial distribution of grain boundary gas in a PWR and a BWR fuel is reported. The measurements were made using a new approach involving X-ray fluorescence analysis and electron probe microanalysis. In both fuels the concentration of grain boundary gas was much higher than hitherto suspected. The gas was mainly contained in the bubble/pore structure. The factors that determined the fraction of gas released from the grains and the level of gas retention on the grain boundaries are identified and discussed. The variables involved are the local fuel stoichiometry, the amount of open porosity, the magnitude of the local compressive hydrostatic stress and the interaction of metallic precipitates with gas bubbles on the grain faces. It is concluded that under transient conditions the interlinkage of gas bubbles on the grain faces and the subsequent formation of grain edge tunnels is the rate determining step for gas release; at least when high burn-up fuel is involved. (orig.)

  7. Sensitivity studies on parameters affecting gas release from an underground rock cavern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlueter, E.; Pruess, K.

    1990-01-01

    A series of numerical simulation experiments is performed to quantify the effects of the release and migration of non-condensible gas in water-saturated fractured rock formations. The relative importance of multiphase parameters such as relative permeability, capillary pressure, intrinsic permeability, and porosity on system behavior is studied. 10 refs., 28 figs., 5 tabs

  8. Fission Gas Release in LWR Fuel Rods Exhibiting Very High Burn-Up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, H.

    1980-01-01

    Two UO2Zr BWR type test fuel rods were irradiated to a burn-up of about 38000 MWd/tUO2. After non-destructive characterization, the fission gas released to the internal free volume was extracted and analysed. The irradiation was simulated by means of the Danish fuel performance code WAFER-2, which...

  9. Hot Experiment on Fission Gas Release Behavior from Voloxidation Process using Spent Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Geun Il; Park, J. J.; Jung, I. H.; Shin, J. M.; Cho, K. H.; Yang, M. S.; Song, K. C.

    2007-08-01

    Quantitative analysis of the fission gas release characteristics during the voloxidation and OREOX processes of spent PWR fuel was carried out by spent PWR fuel in a hot-cell of the DFDF. The release characteristics of 85 Kr and 14 C fission gases during voloxidation process at 500 .deg. C is closely linked to the degree of conversion efficiency of UO 2 to U 3 O 8 powder, and it can be interpreted that the release from grain-boundary would be dominated during this step. Volatile fission gases of 14 C and 85 Kr were released to near completion during the OREOX process. Both the 14 C and 85 Kr have similar release characteristics under the voloxidation and OREOX process conditions. A higher burn-up spent fuel showed a higher release fraction than that of a low burn-up fuel during the voloxidation step at 500 .deg. C. It was also observed that the release fraction of semi-volatile Cs was about 16% during a reduction at 1,000 .deg. C of the oxidized powder, but over 90% during the voloxidation at 1,250 .deg. C

  10. Artificial saliva effect on toxic substances release from acrylic resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostić Milena

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Acrylic-based resins are intensively used in dentistry practice as restorative or denture-base materials. The purpose of this study was to analyze the surface structure of denture base resins and the amount of released potentially toxic substances (PTS immediately upon polymerization and incubation in different types of artificial saliva. Methods. Storage of acrylic samples in two models of artificial saliva were performed in a water bath at the temperature of 37 ± 1°C. Analysis of the surface structure of samples was carried out using scanning electronic microscopy analysis immediately after polymerization and after the 30-day incubation. The amounts of PTS per day, week and month extracts were measured using high-pressure liquid chromatography. Results. Surface design and amount of PTS in acrylic materials were different and depended on the types and duration of polymerization. The surfaces of tested acrylates became flatter after immersing in solutions of artificial saliva. The degree of acrylic materials release was not dependent on the applied model of artificial saliva. Conclusion. In order to improve biological features of acrylic resin materials, it was recommended that dentures lined with soft or hard coldpolymerized acrylates should be kept at least 1 to 7 days in water before being given to a patient. So, as to reach high degree of biocompatibility preparation of prosthetic restorations from heat-polymerized acrylate was unnecessary. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 41017

  11. LCIA selection methods for assessing toxic releases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Henrik Fred; Birkved, Morten; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    2002-01-01

    the inventory that contribute significantly to the impact categories on ecotoxicity and human toxicity to focus the characterisation work. The reason why the selection methods are more important for the chemical-related impact categories than for other impact categories is the extremely high number......Characterization of toxic emissions in life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) is in many cases severely limited by the lack of characterization factors for the emissions mapped in the inventory. The number of substances assigned characterization factors for (eco)toxicity included in the dominating LCA....... The methods are evaluated against a set of pre-defined criteria (comprising consistency with characterization and data requirement) and applied to case studies and a test set of chemicals. The reported work is part of the EU-project OMNIITOX....

  12. The toxic and radiological risk equivalence approach in UF6 transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringot, C.; Hamard, J.

    1988-12-01

    After a brief description of the safety in transport of UF 6 , we discuss the equivalence of the radioactive and chemical risks in UF 6 transport regulations. As the concept of low specific activity appears to be ill-suited for a toxic gas, we propose a quantity of material limit designated T 2 (equivalent to A 2 for radioactive substances) for packagings unable to withstand accident conditions (9 m drop, 800 0 C fire environment for 30 minutes). It is proposed that this limit be chosen for the amount of release acceptable after AIEA tests. Different possible scenarios are described, with fire assumed to be the most severe toxic risk situation

  13. Development of a cost efficient methodology to perform allocation of flammable and toxic gas detectors applying CFD tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Storch, Rafael Brod; Rocha, Gean Felipe Almeida [Det Norske Veritas (DNV), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Nalvarte, Gladys Augusta Zevallos [Det Norske Veritas (DNV), Novik (Norway)

    2012-07-01

    This paper is aimed to present a computational procedure for flammable and toxic gas detector allocation and quantification developed by DNV. The proposed methodology applies Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations as well as operational and safety characteristics of the analyzed region to assess the optimal number of toxic and flammable gas detectors and their optimal location. A probabilistic approach is also used when applying the DNV software ThorEXPRESSLite, following NORSOK Z013 Annex G and presented in HUSER et al. 2000 and HUSER et al. 2001, when the flammable gas detectors are assessed. A DNV developed program, DetLoc, is used to run in an iterative way the procedure described above leading to an automatic calculation of the gas detectors location and number. The main advantage of the methodology presented above is the independence of human interaction in the gas detector allocation leading to a more precise and free of human judgment allocation. Thus, a reproducible allocation is generated when comparing several different analyses and a global criteria appliance is guaranteed through different regions in the same project. A case study is presented applying the proposed methodology. (author)

  14. Hydrogen gas alleviates oxygen toxicity by reducing hydroxyl radical levels in PC12 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junchao Yu

    Full Text Available Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO therapy through breathing oxygen at the pressure of above 1 atmosphere absolute (ATA is useful for varieties of clinical conditions, especially hypoxic-ischemic diseases. Because of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, breathing oxygen gas at high pressures can cause oxygen toxicity in the central nervous system, leading to multiple neurological dysfunction, which limits the use of HBO therapy. Studies have shown that Hydrogen gas (H2 can diminish oxidative stress and effectively reduce active ROS associated with diseases. However, the effect of H2 on ROS generated from HBO therapy remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the effect of H2 on ROS during HBO therapy using PC12 cells. PC12 cells cultured in medium were exposed to oxygen gas or mixed oxygen gas and H2 at 1 ATA or 5 ATA. Cells viability and oxidation products and ROS were determined. The data showed that H2 promoted the cell viability and inhibited the damage in the cell and mitochondria membrane, reduced the levels of lipid peroxidation and DNA oxidation, and selectively decreased the levels of •OH but not disturbing the levels of O2•-, H2O2, or NO• in PC12 cells during HBO therapy. These results indicated that H2 effectively reduced •OH, protected cells against oxygen toxicity resulting from HBO therapy, and had no effect on other ROS. Our data supported that H2 could be potentially used as an antioxidant during HBO therapy.

  15. Fission gas release and swelling in the fuel pins M1-3 and F9-3: Risoe Fission Gas Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, C T; Ray, I L.F.; Coquerelle, M; Blank, H

    1982-01-01

    This report presents results for the microscopic swelling local swelling and local gas release in the pin sections M1-3-11 and F9-3-44. The local gas release was derived from the concentration of retained xenon which was measured with the electron microprobe. In addition to xenon, the radial distributions of caesium and neodymium were also determined by EMPA. Caesium is assumed to contribute to microscopic swelling because it results mainly from the decay of /sup 133/Xe, /sup 135/Xe and /sup 137/Xe and, therefore, is trapped together with xenon in bubbles and pores. Neodymium, on the other hand, is soluble in UO/sub 2/ and does not migrate under the influence of the temperature gradients that exist during irradiation. Therefore, the radial distribution of this fission product is an indelible imprint of the burn-up from which the average flux depression can be deduced. 1 ref., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Modelling of oceanic gas hydrate instability and methane release in response to climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reagan, M.T.; Moridis, G.J.

    2008-01-01

    Methane releases from oceanic hydrates are thought to have played a significant role in climatic changes that have occurred in the past. In this study, gas hydrate accumulations subjected to temperature changes were modelled in order to assess their potential for future methane releases into the ocean. Recent ocean and atmospheric chemistry studies were used to model 2 climate scenarios. Two types of hydrate accumulations were used to represent dispersed, low-saturation deposits. The 1-D multiphase thermodynamic-hydrological model considered the properties of benthic sediments; ocean depth; sea floor temperature; the saturation and distribution of the hydrates; and the effect of benthic biogeochemical activity. Results of the simulations showed that shallow deposits undergo rapid dissociation and are capable of producing methane fluxes of 2 to 13 mol m 3 per year over a period of decades. The fluxes exceed the ability of the anaerobic sea floor environment to sequester or consume the methane. A large proportion of the methane released in the scenarios emerged in the gas phase. Arctic hydrates may pose a threat to regional and global ecological systems. It was concluded that results of the study will be coupled with global climate models in order to assess the impact of the methane releases in relation to global climatic change. 39 refs., 5 figs

  17. Surface characteristics, copper release, and toxicity of nano- and micrometer-sized copper and copper(II) oxide particles: a cross-disciplinary study.

    OpenAIRE

    Midander, Klara; Cronholm, Pontus; Karlsson, Hanna L.; Elihn, Karine; Moller, Lennart; Leygraf, Christofer; Wallinder, Inger Odnevall

    2009-01-01

    An interdisciplinary and multianalytical research effort is undertaken to assess the toxic aspects of thoroughly characterized nano- and micrometer-sized particles of oxidized metallic copper and copper(II) oxide in contact with cultivated lung cells, as well as copper release in relevant media. All particles, except micrometer-sized Cu, release more copper in serum-containing cell medium (supplemented Dulbecco's minimal essential medium) compared to identical exposures in phosphate-buffered ...

  18. Conceptual Design of Portable Filtered Air Suction Systems For Prevention of Released Radioactive Gas under Severe Accidents of NPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Beom W.; Choi, Su Y.; Yim, Man S.; Rim, Chun T. [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    It becomes evident that severe accidents may occur by unexpected disasters such as tsunami, heavy flood, or terror. Once radioactive material is released from NPP through severe accidents, there are no ways to prevent the released radioactive gas spreading in the air. As a remedy for this problem, the idea on the portable filtered air suction system (PoFASS) for the prevention of released radioactive gas under severe accidents was proposed. In this paper, the conceptual design of a PoFASS focusing on the number of robot fingers and robot arm rods are proposed. In order to design a flexible robot suction nozzle, mathematical models for the gaps which represent the lifted heights of extensible covers for given convex shapes of pipes and for the covered areas are developed. In addition, the system requirements for the design of the robot arms of PoFASS are proposed, which determine the accessible range of leakage points of released radioactive gas. In this paper, the conceptual designs of the flexible robot suction nozzle and robot arm have been conducted. As a result, the minimum number of robot fingers and robot arm rods are defined to be four and three, respectively. For further works, extensible cover designs on the flexible robot suction nozzle and the application of the PoFASS to the inside of NPP should be studied because the radioactive gas may be released from connection pipes between the containment building and auxiliary buildings.

  19. Integrated biomass gasification using the waste heat from hot slags: Control of syngas and polluting gas releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Yongqi; Seetharaman, Seshadri; Liu, Qianyi; Zhang, Zuotai; Liu, Lili; Wang, Xidong

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the thermodynamics of a novel strategy, i.e., biomass/CO 2 gasification integrated with heat recovery from hot slags in the steel industry, were systemically investigated. Both the target syngas yield and the polluting gas release were considered where the effect of gasifying conditions including temperature, pressure and CO 2 reacted was analyzed and then the roles of hot slags were further clarified. The results indicated that there existed an optimum temperature for the maximization of H 2 production. Compared to blast furnace slags, steel slags remarkably increased the CO yield at 600–1400 °C due to the existence of iron oxides and decreased the S-containing gas releases at 400–700 °C, indicating potential desulfurizing ability. The identification of biomass/CO 2 gasification thermodynamics in presence of slags could thus provide important clues not only for the deep understanding of biomass gasification but also for the industrial application of this emerging strategy from the viewpoint of syngas optimization and pollution control. - Highlights: • Biomass/CO 2 gasification was integrated with the heat recovery from hot slags. • Both syngas yield and polluting gas release during gasification were determined. • There existed an optimum temperature for the maximization of H 2 production. • Steel slags increased CO yield at 600–1400 °C due to the existence of iron oxides. • Steel slags remarkably decreased the releases of S-containing gas at 400–700 °C.

  20. Characterization of the gas releasing behaviors of catalytic pyrolysis of rice husk using potassium over a micro-fluidized bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yuan; Wang, Yan; Guo, Feiqiang; Li, Xiaolei; Li, Tiantao; Guo, Chenglong; Chang, Jiafu

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Releasing propensity of CO, CO 2 , CH 4 and H 2 was studied in a micro-fluidized bed. • Gas releasing pattern was influenced by temperature and potassium concentration. • Variations in gas forming E a are indicative of catalytic performance of potassium. - Abstract: Influence of potassium on the gas releasing behaviors during rice husk high-temperature pyrolysis was investigated under isothermal conditions in a two stage micro-fluidized bed reactor. Reaction kinetics for generating H 2 , CO, CO 2 and CH 4 was investigated based on the Friedman and model-fitting approaches. Results indicated that different gas species had different times to start and end the gas release process, particularly at 600 °C, representing different chemical routes and mechanics for generating these gas components. The resulting apparent activation energies for H 2 , CO, and CO 2 decreased from 23.10 to 12.00 kJ/mol, 15.48 to 14.03 kJ/mol and 10.14 to 7.61 kJ/mol respectively with an increase in potassium concentration from 0 to 0.5 mol/kg, while that for CH 4 increased from 16.85 to 19.40 kJ/mol. The results indicated that the addition of potassium could promote the generation reactions of H 2 , CO and CO 2 while hinder the generation reactions of CH 4 . The pyrolysis reaction was further found to be subject to the three-dimensional diffusion model for all the samples.

  1. A magnetic nanoparticle stabilized gas containing emulsion for multimodal imaging and triggered drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wei; Li, Diancheng; Zhu, Jia-an; Wei, Xiaohui; Men, Weiwei; Yin, Dazhi; Fan, Mingxia; Xu, Yuhong

    2014-06-01

    To develop a multimodal imaging guided and triggered drug delivery system based on a novel emulsion formulation composed of iron oxide nanoparticles, nanoscopic bubbles, and oil containing drugs. Iron oxide paramagnetic nanoparticles were synthesized and modified with surface conjugation of polyethylenimide (PEI) or Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA). Both particles were used to disperse and stabilize oil in water emulsions containing coumarin-6 as the model drug. Sulfur hexafluoride was introduced into the oil phase to form nanoscopic bubbles inside the emulsions. The resulted gas containing emulsions were evaluated for their magnetic resonance (MR) and ultrasound (US) imaging properties. The drug release profile triggered by ultrasound was also examined. We have successfully prepared the highly integrated multi-component emulsion system using the surface modified iron oxide nanoparticles to stabilize the interfaces. The resulted structure had distinctive MR and US imaging properties. Upon application of ultrasound waves, the gas containing emulsion would burst and encapsulated drug could be released. The integrated emulsion formulation was multifunctional with paramagnetic, sono-responsive and drug-carrying characteristics, which may have potential applications for disease diagnosis and imaging guided drug release.

  2. Tritium release from advanced beryllium materials after loading by tritium/hydrogen gas mixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakin, Vladimir, E-mail: vladimir.chakin@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Rolli, Rolf; Moeslang, Anton; Kurinskiy, Petr; Vladimirov, Pavel [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Applied Materials, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Dorn, Christopher [Materion Beryllium & Composites, 6070 Parkland Boulevard, Mayfield Heights, OH 44124-4191 (United States); Kupriyanov, Igor [Bochvar Russian Scientific Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, Rogova str., 5, 123098 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-15

    Highlights: • A major tritium release peak for beryllium samples occurs at temperatures higher than 1250 K. • A beryllium grade with comparatively smaller grain size has a comparatively higher tritium release compared to the grade with larger grain size. • The pebbles of irregular shape with the grain size of 10–30 μm produced by the crushing method demonstrate the highest tritium release rate. - Abstract: Comparison of different beryllium samples on tritium release and retention properties after high-temperature loading by tritium/hydrogen gas mixture and following temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) tests has been performed. The I-220-H grade produced by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) having the smallest grain size, the pebbles of irregular shape with the smallest grain size (10–30 μm) produced by the crushing method (CM), and the pebbles with 1 mm diameter produced by the fluoride reduction method (FRM) having a highly developed inherent porosity show the highest release rate. Grain size and porosity are considered as key structural parameters for comparison and ranking of different beryllium materials on tritium release and retention properties.

  3. NC-6301, a polymeric micelle rationally optimized for effective release of docetaxel, is potent but is less toxic than native docetaxel in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harada M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitsunori Harada,1 Caname Iwata,2 Hiroyuki Saito,1 Kenta Ishii,1 Tatsuyuki Hayashi,1 Masakazu Yashiro,3 Kosei Hirakawa,3 Kohei Miyazono,2 Yasuki Kato,1 Mitsunobu R Kano21Research Division, NanoCarrier Co, Ltd, Chiba, Japan; 2Department of Molecular Pathology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; 3Department of Surgical Oncology, Osaka City University, Osaka, JapanAbstract: Drug release rate is an important factor in determining efficacy and toxicity of nanoscale drug delivery systems. However, optimization of the release rate in polymeric micellar nanoscale drug delivery systems has not been fully investigated. In this study NC-6301, a poly(ethylene glycol-poly(aspartate block copolymer with docetaxel (DTX covalently bound via ester link, was synthesized with various numbers of DTX molecules bound to the polymer backbone. The number of DTX molecules was determined up to 14 to achieve an optimal release rate, based upon the authors' own pharmacokinetic model using known patient data. Efficacy and toxicity of the formulation was then tested in animals. When administered three times at 4-day intervals, the maximum tolerated doses of NC-6301 and native DTX were 50 and 10 mg/kg, respectively, in nude mice. Tissue distribution studies of NC-6301 in mice at 50 mg/kg revealed prolonged release of free DTX in the tumor for at least 120 hours, thus supporting its effectiveness. Furthermore, in cynomolgus monkeys, NC-6301 at 6 mg/kg three times at 2-week intervals showed marginal toxicity, whereas native DTX, at 3 mg/kg with the same schedule, induced significant decrease of food consumption and neutrophil count. NC-6301 at 50 mg/kg in mice also regressed a xenografted tumor of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer. Native DTX, on the other hand, produced only transient and slight regression of the same tumor xenograft. NC-6301 also significantly inhibited growth of OCUM-2MLN human scirrhous gastric carcinoma in an orthotopic mouse

  4. Assessing and Projecting Greenhouse Gas Release due to Abrupt Permafrost Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, K.; Ohno, H.; Yokohata, T.; Iwahana, G.; Machiya, H.

    2017-12-01

    Permafrost is a large reservoir of frozen soil organic carbon (SOC; about half of all the terrestrial storage). Therefore, its degradation (i.e., thawing) under global warming may lead to a substantial amount of additional greenhouse gas (GHG) release. However, understanding of the processes, geographical distribution of such hazards, and implementation of the relevant processes in the advanced climate models are insufficient yet so that variations in permafrost remains one of the large source of uncertainty in climatic and biogeochemical assessment and projections. Thermokarst, induced by melting of ground ice in ice-rich permafrost, leads to dynamic surface subsidence up to 60 m, which further affects local and regional societies and eco-systems in the Arctic. It can also accelerate a large-scale warming process through a positive feedback between released GHGs (especially methane), atmospheric warming and permafrost degradation. This three-year research project (2-1605, Environment Research and Technology Development Fund of the Ministry of the Environment, Japan) aims to assess and project the impacts of GHG release through dynamic permafrost degradation through in-situ and remote (e.g., satellite and airborn) observations, lab analysis of sampled ice and soil cores, and numerical modeling, by demonstrating the vulnerability distribution and relative impacts between large-scale degradation and such dynamic degradation. Our preliminary laboratory analysis of ice and soil cores sampled in 2016 at the Alaskan and Siberian sites largely underlain by ice-rich permafrost, shows that, although gas volumes trapped in unit mass are more or less homogenous among sites both for ice and soil cores, large variations are found in the methane concentration in the trapped gases, ranging from a few ppm (similar to that of the atmosphere) to hundreds of thousands ppm We will also present our numerical approach to evaluate relative impacts of GHGs released through dynamic

  5. The Jarvis gas release incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manocha, J.

    1992-01-01

    On 26 September, 1991, large volumes of natural gas were observed to be leaking from two water wells in the Town of Jarvis. Gas and water were being ejected from a drilled water well, at which a subsequent gas explosion occurred. Measurements of gas concentrations indicated levels far in excess of the lower flammability limit at several locations. Electrical power and natural gas services were cut off, and residents were evacuated. A state of emergency was declared, and gas was found to be flowing from water wells, around building foundations, and through other fractures in the ground. By 27 September the volumes of gas had reduced substantially, and by 30 September all residents had returned to their homes and the state of emergency was cancelled. The emergency response, possible pathways of natural gas into the aquifer, and public relations are discussed. It is felt that the likelihood of a similar incident occurring in the future is high. 11 figs

  6. Manufacturing and test of a low cost polypropylene bag to reduce the radioactive gas released by a radiopharmaceutical production facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, Jose Carlos Freitas; Lacerda, Marco Aurelio de Sousa, E-mail: jcft@cdtn.b, E-mail: masl@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (SEPRA/ CDTN/CNEN-MG) Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Protecao Radiologica; Nascimento, Leonardo Tafas Constantino do; Silva, Juliana Batista da, E-mail: ltcn@cdtn.b, E-mail: silvajb@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (SECPRA/ CDTN/CNEN-MG) Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Secao de Producao de Radiofarmacos

    2011-07-01

    The main objective of this work was to evaluate the efficiency of a plastic gas storage bag to reduce the radioactive gas released by the chimney of a radiopharmaceutical production facility during the 2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-2- deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 18}FDG) synthesis. The studied facility was the Development Centre of Nuclear Technology (CDTN/CNEN) in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. The bag was manufactured utilizing foils of polypropylene of 360 x 550 x 0.16 mm and disposable components of the cassette of the synthesizer. Two synthesis of {sup 18}FDG were done using the same hot cell and synthesizer to evaluate the efficiency of the bag. The manufactured bag was put in the gas exit of the synthesizer and the activity reported by the online radiation monitoring system in the first synthesis. These results were compared to the activity released in a synthesis performed without the bag. We observed when the bag was used the amount released was about 0.2% in 270 minutes. The second synthesis was performed without the bag, about 7,1% of the input activity was released by the exhaust of the facility in the same time interval. The bag presented a very good efficiency in the reducing of the radioactive gas released by the chimney of the radiopharmaceutical production facility. (author)

  7. Manufacturing and test of a low cost polypropylene bag to reduce the radioactive gas released by a radiopharmaceutical production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, Jose Carlos Freitas; Lacerda, Marco Aurelio de Sousa; Nascimento, Leonardo Tafas Constantino do; Silva, Juliana Batista da

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this work was to evaluate the efficiency of a plastic gas storage bag to reduce the radioactive gas released by the chimney of a radiopharmaceutical production facility during the 2-[ 18 F]fluoro-2- deoxy-D-glucose ( 18 FDG) synthesis. The studied facility was the Development Centre of Nuclear Technology (CDTN/CNEN) in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. The bag was manufactured utilizing foils of polypropylene of 360 x 550 x 0.16 mm and disposable components of the cassette of the synthesizer. Two synthesis of 18 FDG were done using the same hot cell and synthesizer to evaluate the efficiency of the bag. The manufactured bag was put in the gas exit of the synthesizer and the activity reported by the online radiation monitoring system in the first synthesis. These results were compared to the activity released in a synthesis performed without the bag. We observed when the bag was used the amount released was about 0.2% in 270 minutes. The second synthesis was performed without the bag, about 7,1% of the input activity was released by the exhaust of the facility in the same time interval. The bag presented a very good efficiency in the reducing of the radioactive gas released by the chimney of the radiopharmaceutical production facility. (author)

  8. Calculations of Fission Gas Release During Ramp Tests Using Copernic Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, Liu [Nuclear Fuel R and D Center, China Nuclear Power Technology Research Institute (CNPRI) (China)

    2013-03-15

    The report performed under IAEA research contract No.15951 describes the results of fuel performance evaluation of LWR fuel rods operated at ramp conditions using the COPERNIC code developed by AREVA. The experimental data from the Third Riso Fission Gas Project and the Studsvik SUPER-RAMP Project presented in the IFPE database of the OECD/NEA has been utilized for assessing the code itself during simulation of fission gas release (FGR). Standard code models for LWR fuel were used in simulations with parameters set properly in accordance with relevant test reports. With the help of data adjustment, the input power histories are restructured to fit the real ones, so as to ensure the validity of FGR prediction. The results obtained by COPERNIC show that different models lead to diverse predictions and discrepancies. By comparison, the COPERNIC V2.2 model (95% Upper bound) is selected as the standard FGR model in this report and the FGR phenomenon is properly simulated by the code. To interpret the large discrepancies of some certain PK rods, the burst effect of FGR which is taken into consideration in COPERNIC is described and the influence of the input power histories is extrapolated. In addition, the real-time tracking capability of COPERNIC is tested against experimental data. In the process of investigation, two main dominant factors influencing the measured gas release rate are described and different mechanisms are analyzed. With the limited predicting capacity, accurate predictions cannot be carried out on abrupt changes of FGR during ramp tests by COPERNIC and improvements may be necessary to some relevant models. (author)

  9. Analysis of fission gas release in LWR fuel using the BISON code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Pastore; J.D. Hales; S.R. Novascone; D.M. Perez; B.W. Spencer; R.L. Williamson

    2013-09-01

    Recent advances in the development of the finite-element based, multidimensional fuel performance code BISON of Idaho National Laboratory are presented. Specifically, the development, implementation and testing of a new model for the analysis of fission gas behavior in LWR-UO2 fuel during irradiation are summarized. While retaining a physics-based description of the relevant mechanisms, the model is characterized by a level of complexity suitable for application to engineering-scale nuclear fuel analysis and consistent with the uncertainties pertaining to some parameters. The treatment includes the fundamental features of fission gas behavior, among which are gas diffusion and precipitation in fuel grains, growth and coalescence of gas bubbles at grain faces, grain growth and grain boundary sweeping effects, thermal, athermal, and transient gas release. The BISON code incorporating the new model is applied to the simulation of irradiation experiments from the OECD/NEA International Fuel Performance Experiments database, also included in the IAEA coordinated research projects FUMEX-II and FUMEX-III. The comparison of the results with the available experimental data at moderate burn-up is presented, pointing out an encouraging predictive accuracy, without any fitting applied to the model parameters.

  10. Modeling of Oceanic Gas Hydrate Instability and Methane Release in Response to Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reagan, Matthew; Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.

    2008-04-15

    Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating global climate, implicating global oceanic deposits of methane gas hydrate as the main culprit in instances of rapid climate change that have occurred in the past. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those predicted under future climate change scenarios, is poorly understood. To determine the fate of the carbon stored in these hydrates, we performed simulations of oceanic gas hydrate accumulations subjected to temperature changes at the seafloor and assessed the potential for methane release into the ocean. Our modeling analysis considered the properties of benthic sediments, the saturation and distribution of the hydrates, the ocean depth, the initial seafloor temperature, and for the first time, estimated the effect of benthic biogeochemical activity. The results show that shallow deposits--such as those found in arctic regions or in the Gulf of Mexico--can undergo rapid dissociation and produce significant methane fluxes of 2 to 13 mol/yr/m{sup 2} over a period of decades, and release up to 1,100 mol of methane per m{sup 2} of seafloor in a century. These fluxes may exceed the ability of the seafloor environment (via anaerobic oxidation of methane) to consume the released methane or sequester the carbon. These results will provide a source term to regional or global climate models in order to assess the coupling of gas hydrate deposits to changes in the global climate.

  11. The effect of UO2 density on fission product gas release and sheath expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notley, M.J.F.; MacEwan, J.R.

    1965-03-01

    The effect of UO 2 density on fission product gas release and sheath expansion has been determined in an irradiation experiment in which the performance of fuel elements with densities between 10.42 and 10.74 g/cm 3 was compared at ∫λdθ values of 39 and 42 W/cm. The elements were irradiated as clusters of four in a pressurized water loop, hence their irradiation histories were identical. Fission product gas release and the extend of grain growth were greater for the lower density elements. Both effects can be attributed solely to the variation of the thermal conductivity of the fuel with the fractional porosity p, if λ p λ [1 - (2.6 ± 0.8) p] where λ is the thermal conductivity of fully dense UO 2 and λ p is that of the porous UO 2 . This expression is in agreement with laboratory findings. A correlation between the extent of grain growth in the UO 2 and the fractional gas release was found to exist in this test and was shown to apply in a large number of other fuel irradiations. Diametral sheath strain was lower for the low density fuel elements than for those of high density, although the former were deduced to have operated with higher central temperatures. It is supposed that the thermal expansion of the fuel can be partially accommodated by elimination of some of the original porosity. The data are consistent with the assumption that approximately half the porosity in the region of the fuel undergoing grain growth is eliminated. (author)

  12. Fission gas and iodine release measured up to 15 GWd/t UO2 burnup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appelhans, A.D.

    1983-01-01

    A summary is presented of the measured release of xenon, krypton and iodine up to 15 GWd/t UO 2 burnup for fuel centerline temperatures ranging from 950 to 1800 K, at average linear heat ratings of 15 to 35 kW/m. The IFA-430 is composed of four 1.28-m-long fuel rods containing 10% enriched UO 2 pellet fuel. Two of the fuel rods are connected, top and bottom, to a gas flow system that permits the fission gases released from the fuel pellets to be swept out of the rods during irradiation and measured via gamma spectrometry. The release/burnup increased significantly between 10 and 15 GWd/t burnup. Fuel temperature did not change. Increased releases were due to physical changes in the fuel-surface area. Changes appeared to be due to higher power operation and burnup

  13. Interaction of the carbon monoxide-releasing molecule Ru(CO)3Cl(glycinate) (CORM-3) with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium: in situ measurements of carbon monoxide binding by integrating cavity dual-beam spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Namrata; McLean, Samantha; Mann, Brian E; Poole, Robert K

    2014-12-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a toxic gas that binds to haems, but also plays critical signalling and cytoprotective roles in mammalian systems; despite problems associated with systemic delivery by inhalation of the gas, it may be employed therapeutically. CO delivered to cells and tissues by CO-releasing molecules (CO-RMs) has beneficial and toxic effects not mimicked by CO gas; CO-RMs are also attractive candidates as novel antimicrobial agents. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is an enteropathogen causing gastroenteritis in humans. Recent studies have implicated haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1), the protein that catalyses the degradation of haem into biliverdin, free iron and CO, in the host immune response to Salmonella infection. In several studies, CO administration via CO-RMs elicited many of the protective roles of HO-1 induction and so we investigated the effects of a well-characterized water-soluble CO-RM, Ru(CO)3Cl(glycinate) (CORM-3), on Salmonella. CORM-3 exhibits toxic effects at concentrations significantly lower than those reported to cause toxicity to RAW 264.7 macrophages. We demonstrated here, through oxyhaemoglobin assays, that CORM-3 did not release CO spontaneously in phosphate buffer, buffered minimal medium or very rich medium. CORM-3 was, however, accumulated to high levels intracellularly (as shown by inductively coupled plasma MS) and released CO inside cells. Using growing Salmonella cultures without prior concentration, we showed for the first time that sensitive dual-beam integrating cavity absorption spectrophotometry can detect directly the CO released from CORM-3 binding in real-time to haems of the bacterial electron transport chain. The toxic effects of CO-RMs suggested potential applications as adjuvants to antibiotics in antimicrobial therapy. © 2014 The Authors.

  14. Estimating Emissions of Toxic Hydrocarbons from Natural Gas Production Sites in the Barnett Shale Region of Northern Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, Josette E; Townsend-Small, Amy; Lyon, David R; Tsai, Tracy R; Meinardi, Simone; Blake, Donald R

    2016-10-04

    Oil and natural gas operations have continued to expand and move closer to densely populated areas, contributing to growing public concerns regarding exposure to hazardous air pollutants. During the Barnett Shale Coordinated Campaign in October, 2013, ground-based whole air samples collected downwind of oil and gas sites revealed enhancements in several potentially toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) when compared to background values. Molar emissions ratios relative to methane were determined for hexane, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX compounds). Using methane leak rates measured from the Picarro mobile flux plane (MFP) system and a Barnett Shale regional methane emissions inventory, the rates of emission of these toxic gases were calculated. Benzene emissions ranged between 51 ± 4 and 60 ± 4 kg h -1 . Hexane, the most abundantly emitted pollutant, ranged from 642 ± 45 to 1070 ± 340 kg h -1 . While observed hydrocarbon enhancements fall below federal workplace standards, results may indicate a link between emissions from oil and natural gas operations and concerns about exposure to hazardous air pollutants. The larger public health risks associated with the production and distribution of natural gas are of particular importance and warrant further investigation, particularly as the use of natural gas increases in the United States and internationally.

  15. Hydrogen Gas Retention and Release from WTP Vessels: Summary of Preliminary Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bontha, Jagannadha R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Daniel, Richard C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mahoney, Lenna A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rassat, Scot D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wells, Beric E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bao, Jie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Boeringa, Gregory K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Buchmiller, William C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Burns, Carolyn A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chun, Jaehun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Karri, Naveen K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Li, Huidong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tran, Diana N. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-07-01

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is currently being designed and constructed to pretreat and vitrify a large portion of the waste in the 177 underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. A number of technical issues related to the design of the pretreatment facility (PTF) of the WTP have been identified. These issues must be resolved prior to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection (ORP) reaching a decision to proceed with engineering, procurement, and construction activities for the PTF. One of the issues is Technical Issue T1 - Hydrogen Gas Release from Vessels (hereafter referred to as T1). The focus of T1 is identifying controls for hydrogen release and completing any testing required to close the technical issue. In advance of selecting specific controls for hydrogen gas safety, a number of preliminary technical studies were initiated to support anticipated future testing and to improve the understanding of hydrogen gas generation, retention, and release within PTF vessels. These activities supported the development of a plan defining an overall strategy and approach for addressing T1 and achieving technical endpoints identified for T1. Preliminary studies also supported the development of a test plan for conducting testing and analysis to support closing T1. Both of these plans were developed in advance of selecting specific controls, and in the course of working on T1 it was decided that the testing and analysis identified in the test plan were not immediately needed. However, planning activities and preliminary studies led to significant technical progress in a number of areas. This report summarizes the progress to date from the preliminary technical studies. The technical results in this report should not be used for WTP design or safety and hazards analyses and technical results are marked with the following statement: “Preliminary Technical Results for Planning – Not to be used for WTP Design

  16. 2004 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Stockton

    2006-01-15

    Section 313 of Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. For reporting year 2004, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) submitted Form R reports for lead compounds, nitric acid, and nitrate compounds as required under the EPCRA Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2004 above the reportable thresholds. This document provides a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2004, as well as background information about data included on the Form R reports.

  17. Strategies of an incumbent constrained to supply entrants: the case of European gas release programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clastres, Cedric; David, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    To accelerate the development of competition in gas markets, some European regulators (in United Kingdom or in France) have decided to implement gas release programs. These programs compel the incumbent to sell gas that is no longer sold to its customers to its competitors. A first intuition would suggest that such a measure could give the incumbent an incentive to let its own costs rise in order to raise its rival's ones. With a duo-poly model, we found some cases where incentives to raise costs do exist but, in most of the cases there is no such incentives. (authors)

  18. Detection of low-level environmental exposure rates due to noble gas releases from the Muehleberg nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czarnecki, J.; Volkle, H.; Pretre, S.

    1980-01-01

    The increase of radiation doses in the vicinity of the Swiss Nuclear Power Stations due to airborne releases is generally expected to be below one mrem/year (about one percent of the natural radiation dose). To prove this expected rate, long term measurements with pressure ionization chambers in the vicinity of the Muhleberg plant (BWR) were conducted. Two of these chambers were installed at places where the greatest dose rates from the noble gas plumes were expected in the two prevailing wind directions. The local dose rates were continuously registered on magnetic tape to allow minicomputer evaluation. After the fuel change in the summer of 1976 the noble gas releases from Muhleberg dropped considerably. From that time the noble gas releases consisted of a very low continuous component and some rare short-time spike compoments resulting from turbine and reactor trips. The dose due to the low continuous component was determined by correlating the dose rates at the measuring points with the release measure--ments at the stack and with weather conditions, and by subtracting the natural background. The short noble gas spikes lasted from minutes to some hours and caused small dose rate increases which were easily measured with the ionization chambers, and usually amounted to doses of some microroentgens. By further correlating these dose peaks with wind direction and stack emission measurements, determination of short time atmospheric dilution factors for existing weather situations became possible. By this process, the very low annual environmental doses in the range of 1 mrem per year were determined. (author)

  19. Taking inventory on VOC releases from Amoco's Yorktown refinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klee, H.H. Jr.; Schmitt, R.E.; Harrass, M.C.; Podar, M.K.

    1996-01-01

    Amoco's Yorktown, Virginia, refinery is a 35-year-old, 53,000 bbl/day facility that manufacturers gasoline, heating oil, liquid petroleum gas, sulfur, and coke. In a cooperative and voluntary effort, Amoco Corporation and the US Environmental Protection Agency conducted a joint project to study pollution prevention opportunities at an operating industrial facility. Source reduction efforts--key to pollution prevention strategies--require knowledge of specific sources of releases. However, data on releases from individual process units are limited in favor of data to monitor existing end-of-pipe pollution control requirements. The study's sampling program sought to portray the distribution of releases within the refinery, their management within the refinery, and ultimate releases leaving the refinery. Subsequent tests of blowdown stack and fugitive emissions further improved total release estimates. The initial study estimated that the refinery generates about 25,000 metric tons (t)/year of potential pollutants. Of these, about half are released from the refinery as airborne, waterborne, or land-disposed releases. Airborne releases comprise the majority of releases by mass, about 12,000 t/year. Most of the airborne releases are volatile organic compound hydrocarbons. The inventory sampling project and subsequent work identified differences with Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) values and standard emission factors (AP-42). The inventory and other data provided an opportunity to consider options for, and limitations of, specific pollution prevention or source reduction strategies

  20. Gas-controlled dynamic vacuum insulation with gas gate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1994-06-07

    Disclosed is a dynamic vacuum insulation comprising sidewalls enclosing an evacuated chamber and gas control means for releasing hydrogen gas into a chamber to increase gas molecule conduction of heat across the chamber and retrieving hydrogen gas from the chamber. The gas control means includes a metal hydride that absorbs and retains hydrogen gas at cooler temperatures and releases hydrogen gas at hotter temperatures; a hydride heating means for selectively heating the metal hydride to temperatures high enough to release hydrogen gas from the metal hydride; and gate means positioned between the metal hydride and the chamber for selectively allowing hydrogen to flow or not to flow between said metal hydride and said chamber. 25 figs.

  1. Fission gas release behavior of MOX fuels under simulated daily-load-follow operation condition. IFA-554/555 test evaluation with FASTGRASS code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikusawa, Yoshihisa; Ozawa, Takayuki

    2008-03-01

    IFA-554/555 load-follow tests were performed in HALDEN reactor (HBWR) to study the MOX fuel behavior under the daily-load-follow operation condition in the framework of ATR-MOX fuel development in JAEA. IFA-554/555 rig had the instruments of rod inner pressure, fuel center temperature, fuel stack elongation, and cladding elongation. Although the daily-load-follow operation in nuclear power plant is one of the available options for economical improvement, the power change in a short period in this operation causes the change of thermal and mechanical irradiation conditions. In this report, FP gas release behavior of MOX fuel rod was evaluated under the daily-load-follow operation condition with the examination data from IFA-554/555 by using the computation code 'FASTGRASS'. From the computation results of FASTGRASS code which could compute the FP gas release behavior under the transient condition, it could be concluded that FP gas was released due to the relaxation of fuel pellet inner stress and pellet temperature increase, which were caused by the cyclic power change during the daily-load-follow operation. In addition, since the amount of released FP gas decreased during the steady operation after the daily-load-follow, it could be mentioned that the total of FP gas release at the end of life with the daily-load-follow is not so much different from that without the daily-load-follow. (author)

  2. Effluents of toxic and corrosion-active components at coke-oven gas combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhajlov, G.S.; Afanas'ev, Yu.O.; Plotnikov, V.A.; Iskhakov, Kh.A.; Tikhov, S.D.; Gaus, A.I.; Nagibin, P.D.

    1996-01-01

    Various modes of coke-coal gas combustion are studied and dependence of concentration of nitrogen sulfur oxides and carbon monoxides originating in smoke gases on the air excess delivered to the combustion chamber is determined. The lowest summary releases of hazardous substances are achieved by the excess air coefficients α > 1.2 relative to modes of coke-coal gas combustion with smoke gases recirculation. The quantity of sulfur does not depend on the mode of fuel combustion and is determined by the total sulfur content in the fuel. To prevent the corrosion of low-temperature heat exchange surfaces it is necessary to heat up the feed-water up to the temperature exceeding the temperature of the coal gases dew point by 10-15 deg C. 10 refs

  3. Impact of Dissociation and Sensible Heat Release on Pulse Detonation and Gas Turbine Engine Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinelli, Louis A.

    2001-01-01

    A thermodynamic cycle analysis of the effect of sensible heat release on the relative performance of pulse detonation and gas turbine engines is presented. Dissociation losses in the PDE (Pulse Detonation Engine) are found to cause a substantial decrease in engine performance parameters.

  4. Recent improvements in modelling fission gas release and rod deformation on metallic fuel in LMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Woan; Lee, Byoung-Oon; Kim, Young Jin

    2000-01-01

    Metallic fuel design is a key feature to assure LMR core safety goals. To date, a large effort has been devoted to the development of the MACSIS code for metallic fuel rod design and the evaluation of operational limits under irradiation conditions. The updated models of fission gas release, fuel core swelling, and rod deformation are incorporated into the correspondence routines in MACSIS MOD1. The MACSIS MOD1 which is a new version of MACSIS, has been partly benchmarked on FGR, fuel swelling and rod deformation comparing with the results of U-Zr and U-Pu-Zr metal fuels irradiated in LMRs. The MACSIS MOD1 predicts, relatively well, the absolute magnitudes and trends of the gas release and rod deformations depending on burn-up, and it gives better agreement with the experimental data than the previous predictions of MACSIS and the results of the empirical model

  5. Chemical identities of radioiodine released from U3O8 in oxygen and inert gas atmospheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachikawa, E.; Nakashima, M.

    1977-01-01

    Irradiated U 3 O 8 was heated from room temperature to 1100 0 C in a temperature-programmed oven (5 0 C/min) in a flow of carrier gas. The iodine released to an inert gas was deposited in the temperature range from 200 to 300 0 C with a peak at 250 0 C (speciesA). This species is neither in a form combined with other fission products nor in elemental form. It is possibly a chemical combination with uranium. It reacts with oxygen, yielding species B characterized by its deposition at a temperature close to room temperature. The activation energy of this oxidation reaction was determined to be 6.0 +-0.5 Kcal/mol. Comparing the deposition-profile with those obtained with carrier-free I 2 and HI indicated that species B was I 2 . As for the formation of organic iodides accompanying the release in an inert gas, it was concluded that these were produced in radical reactions. Thus, in a presence of oxygen, organic iodides were formed in competition with the reactions of organic radicals with oxygen. (author)

  6. Non-Volcanic release of CO2 in Italy: quantification, conceptual models and gas hazard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiodini, G.; Cardellini, C.; Caliro, S.; Avino, R.

    2011-12-01

    Central and South Italy are characterized by the presence of many reservoirs naturally recharged by CO2 of deep provenance. In the western sector, the reservoirs feed hundreds of gas emissions at the surface. Many studies in the last years were devoted to (i) elaborating a map of CO2 Earth degassing of the region; (ii) to asses the gas hazard; (iii) to develop methods suitable for the measurement of the gas fluxes from different types of emissions; (iv) to elaborate the conceptual model of Earth degassing and its relation with the seismic activity of the region and (v) to develop physical numerical models of CO2 air dispersion. The main results obtained are: 1) A general, regional map of CO2 Earth degassing in Central Italy has been elaborated. The total flux of CO2 in the area has been estimated in ~ 10 Mt/a which are released to the atmosphere trough numerous dangerous gas emissions or by degassing spring waters (~ 10 % of the CO2 globally estimated to be released by the Earth trough volcanic activity). 2) An on line, open access, georeferenced database of the main CO2 emissions (~ 250) was settled up (http://googas.ov.ingv.it). CO2 flux > 100 t/d characterise 14% of the degassing sites while CO2 fluxes from 100 t/d to 10 t/d have been estimated for about 35% of the gas emissions. 3) The sites of the gas emissions are not suitable for life: the gas causes many accidents to animals and people. In order to mitigate the gas hazard a specific model of CO2 air dispersion has been developed and applied to the main degassing sites. A relevant application regarded Mefite d'Ansanto, southern Apennines, which is the largest natural emission of low temperature CO2 rich gases, from non-volcanic environment, ever measured in the Earth (˜2000 t/d). Under low wind conditions, the gas flows along a narrow natural channel producing a persistent gas river which has killed over a period of time many people and animals. The application of the physical numerical model allowed us to

  7. Fission Product Release Behavior of Individual Coated Fuel Particles for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minato, Kazuo; Sawa, Kazuhiro; Koya, Toshio; Tomita, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Akiyoshi; Baldwin, Charles A.; Gabbard, William Alexander; Malone, Charlie M.

    2000-01-01

    Postirradiation heating tests of TRISO-coated UO 2 particles at 1700 and 1800degC were performed to understand fission product release behavior at accident temperatures. The inventory measurements of the individual particles were carried out before and after the heating tests with gamma-ray spectrometry to study the behavior of the individual particles. The time-dependent release behavior of 85 Kr, 110m Ag, 134 Cs, 137 Cs, and 154 Eu were obtained with on-line measurements of fission gas release and intermittent measurements of metallic fission product release during the heating tests. The inventory measurements of the individual particles revealed that fission product release behavior of the individual particles was not uniform, and large particle-to-particle variations in the release behavior of 110m Ag, 134 Cs, 137 Cs, and 154 Eu were found. X-ray microradiography and ceramography showed that the variations could not be explained by only the presence or absence of cracks in the SiC coating layer. The SiC degradation may have been related to the variations

  8. A prediction of the UO2 fission gas release data of Bellamy and Rich using a model recently developed by combustion engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeburn, H.R.; Pati, S.R.

    1983-01-01

    The trend in the Light Water Reactor industry to higher discharge burnups of UO 2 fuel rods has initiated the modification of existing fuel rod models to better account for high burnup effects. A model recently developed by Combustion Engineering, Inc. (C-E) for fission gas release from UO 2 fuel recognizes the separate effects of temperature-dependent and temperature-independent release mechanisms. This model accounts for a moderate burnup enhancement that is based on a concept of a saturation inventory existing for the intra- and inter-grannular storage of fission gas within the fuel pellet. The saturation inventory, as modelled, is strongly dependent on the local temperature and the changing grain size of the fuel with burnup. Although the fitting constants of the model were determined solely from more current gas release data from fuel more typical of the C-E product line, the model, nonetheless, provides an excellent prediction of the Bellamy and Rich data over the entire burnup range represented by the data (+-1.6% gas release at a 1σ level). The ability to obtain a good comparison with this data base provides additional support for the use of the particular separation of the effects of thermal diffusion and burnup enhancement on fission gas release that is embodied in the model. Furthermore, the degree of burnup enhancement in the model is believed to be moderate enough to suggest that this high burnup effect should not impede the extension of discharge burnup limits associated with current design fuel rods for Pressurized Water Reactors

  9. A proposal for a test method for assessment of hazard property HP 12 (“Release of an acute toxic gas”) in hazardous waste classification - Experience from 49 waste

    OpenAIRE

    Hennebert , Pierre; Samaali , Ismahen; Molina , Pauline

    2016-01-01

    International audience; A stepwise method for assessment of the HP 12 is proposed and tested with 49 waste samples. The hazard property HP 12 is defined as “Release of an acute toxic gas”: waste which releases acute toxic gases (Acute Tox. 1, 2 or 3) in contact with water or an acid. When a waste contains a substance assigned to one of the following supplemental hazards EUH029, EUH031 and EUH032, it shall be classified as hazardous by HP 12 according to test methods or guidelines (EC, 2014a, ...

  10. Optimization of organic contaminant and toxicity testing analytical procedures for estimating the characteristics and environmental significance of natural gas processing plant waste sludges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, N.

    1990-10-01

    The Gas Plant Sludge Characterization Phase IIB program is a continuation of the Canadian Petroleum Association's (CPA) initiatives to characterize sludge generated at gas processing plants. The objectives of the Phase IIB project were to develop an effective procedure for screening waste sludges or centrifuge/leachate generated from sludge samples for volatile, solvent-soluble and water-soluble organics; verify the reproducibility of the three aquatic toxicity tests recommended as the battery of tests for determining the environmental significance of sludge centrifugates or leachates; assess the performance of two terrestrial toxicity tests in determining the environmental significance of whole sludge samples applied to soil; and to assess and discuss the reproducibility and cost-effectiveness of the sampling and analytical techniques proposed for the overall sludge characterization procedure. Conclusions and recommendations are provided for sludge collection, preparation and distribution, organic analyses, toxicity testing, project management, and procedure standardization. The three aquatic and two terrestrial toxicity tests proved effective in indicating the toxicity of complex mixtures. 27 refs., 3 figs., 59 tabs

  11. Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Part 5. Accidental Releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, S

    2007-08-15

    Over the course of fifty-three years, LLNL had six acute releases of tritiated hydrogen gas (HT) and one acute release of tritiated water vapor (HTO) that were too large relative to the annual releases to be included as part of the annual releases from normal operations detailed in Parts 3 and 4 of the Tritium Dose Reconstruction (TDR). Sandia National Laboratories/California (SNL/CA) had one such release of HT and one of HTO. Doses to the maximally exposed individual (MEI) for these accidents have been modeled using an equation derived from the time-dependent tritium model, UFOTRI, and parameter values based on expert judgment. All of these acute releases are described in this report. Doses that could not have been exceeded from the large HT releases of 1965 and 1970 were calculated to be 43 {micro}Sv (4.3 mrem) and 120 {micro}Sv (12 mrem) to an adult, respectively. Two published sets of dose predictions for the accidental HT release in 1970 are compared with the dose predictions of this TDR. The highest predicted dose was for an acute release of HTO in 1954. For this release, the dose that could not have been exceeded was estimated to have been 2 mSv (200 mrem), although, because of the high uncertainty about the predictions, the likely dose may have been as low as 360 {micro}Sv (36 mrem) or less. The estimated maximum exposures from the accidental releases were such that no adverse health effects would be expected. Appendix A lists all accidents and large routine puff releases that have occurred at LLNL and SNL/CA between 1953 and 2005. Appendix B describes the processes unique to tritium that must be modeled after an acute release, some of the time-dependent tritium models being used today, and the results of tests of these models.

  12. Use of toxicity assessment to develop site specific remediation criteria for oil and gas facilities : guidance manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The results of a two year study into the evaluation of toxicity-based methods to develop site-specific, risk-based cleanup objectives for the decommissioning of oil and gas facilities were compiled into a manual of guidance. The two basic approaches used in determining remediation criteria for contaminated sites are: (1) comparison of the concentrations of chemicals found on-site with broad regional or national soil and water quality objectives developed for the chemicals involved, and (2) site-specific risk assessment. Toxicity tests are used to test organisms such as earthworms, lettuce seeds, or larval fish directly in the soil, water or sediment suspected of being contaminated. The effects of any contamination on the survival, growth, reproduction, and behaviour of the test organisms are then evaluated. The manual provides guidance in: (1) using toxicity assessments within the regulatory framework of site decommissioning, (2) performing a toxicity assessment, and (3) developing site-specific criteria for a risk assessment. 18 refs., 3 tabs., 5 figs

  13. 2002 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stockton, M.

    2003-01-01

    For reporting year 2002, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) submitted Form R reports for lead compounds and mercury as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA), Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2002 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical usage and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2002 as well as provide background information about the data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999 EPA promulgated a final rule on Persistent Bioaccumulative Toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable under EPCRA Section 313. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R

  14. 2006 Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report for the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act of 1986, Title III, Section 313

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecology and Air Quality Group (ENV-EAQ)

    2007-12-12

    For reporting year 2006, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) submitted Form R reports for lead as required under the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) Section 313. No other EPCRA Section 313 chemicals were used in 2006 above the reportable thresholds. This document was prepared to provide a description of the evaluation of EPCRA Section 313 chemical use and threshold determinations for LANL for calendar year 2006, as well as to provide background information about data included on the Form R reports. Section 313 of EPCRA specifically requires facilities to submit a Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Report (Form R) to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies if the owners and operators manufacture, process, or otherwise use any of the listed toxic chemicals above listed threshold quantities. EPA compiles this data in the Toxic Release Inventory database. Form R reports for each chemical over threshold quantities must be submitted on or before July 1 each year and must cover activities that occurred at the facility during the previous year. In 1999, EPA promulgated a final rule on persistent bioaccumulative toxics (PBTs). This rule added several chemicals to the EPCRA Section 313 list of toxic chemicals and established lower reporting thresholds for these and other PBT chemicals that were already reportable. These lower thresholds became applicable in reporting year 2000. In 2001, EPA expanded the PBT rule to include a lower reporting threshold for lead and lead compounds. Facilities that manufacture, process, or otherwise use more than 100 lb of lead or lead compounds must submit a Form R.

  15. Method for optical 15N analysis of small amounts of nitrogen gas released from an automatic nitrogen analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arima, Yasuhiro

    1981-01-01

    A method of optical 15 N analysis is proposed for application to small amounts of nitrogen gas released from an automatic nitrogen analyzer (model ANA-1300, Carlo Erba, Milano) subjected to certain set modifications. The ANA-1300 was combined with a vacuum line attached by a molecular sieve 13X column. The nitrogen gas released from the ANA-1300 was introduced with a carrier gas of helium into the molecular sieve column which was pre-evacuated at 10 -4 Torr and cooled with outer liquid nitrogen. After removal of the helium by evacuation, the nitrogen gas fixed on the molecular sieve was released by warming the column, and then, it was sealed into pre-evacuated pyrex glass tubes at 4.5 - 5.0 Torr. In the preparation of discharge tubes, contamination of unlabelled nitrogen occurred from the carrier gas of standard grade helium, and the relative lowering of the 15 N value by it was estimated to be less than 1% when over 700 μg nitrogen was charged on the ANA-1300; when 200 μg nitrogen was charged, it was about 3.5%. However, the effect of the contamination could be corrected for by knowing the amount of contaminant nitrogen. In the analysis of plant materials by the proposed method, the coefficient of variation was less than 2%, and no significant difference was observed between results given by the present method and by the ordinary method in which samples were directly pyrolyzed in the discharge tubes by the Dumas method. The present method revealed about 1.5 μg of cross-contaminated nitrogen and was applicable to more than 200 μg of sample nitrogen. (author)

  16. Gas release during salt-well pumping: Model predictions and laboratory validation studies for soluble and insoluble gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peurrung, L.M.; Caley, S.M.; Gauglitz, P.A.

    1997-08-01

    The Hanford Site has 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs) containing radioactive wastes that are complex mixes of radioactive and chemical products. Of these, 67 are known or suspected to have leaked liquid from the tanks into the surrounding soil. Salt-well pumping, or interim stabilization, is a well-established operation for removing drainable interstitial liquid from SSTs. The overall objective of this ongoing study is to develop a quantitative understanding of the release rates and cumulative releases of flammable gases from SSTs as a result of salt-well pumping. The current study is an extension of the previous work reported by Peurrung et al. (1996). The first objective of this current study was to conduct laboratory experiments to quantify the release of soluble and insoluble gases. The second was to determine experimentally the role of characteristic waste heterogeneities on the gas release rates. The third objective was to evaluate and validate the computer model STOMP (Subsurface Transport over Multiple Phases) used by Peurrung et al. (1996) to predict the release of both soluble (typically ammonia) and insoluble gases (typically hydrogen) during and after salt-well pumping. The fourth and final objective of the current study was to predict the gas release behavior for a range of typical tank conditions and actual tank geometry. In these models, the authors seek to include all the pertinent salt-well pumping operational parameters and a realistic range of physical properties of the SST wastes. For predicting actual tank behavior, two-dimensional (2-D) simulations were performed with a representative 2-D tank geometry

  17. Effect of surfactant in mitigating cadmium oxide nanoparticle toxicity: Implications for mitigating cadmium toxicity in environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balmuri, Sricharani Rao; Selvaraj, Uthra; Kumar, Vadivel Vinod; Anthony, Savarimuthu Philip; Tsatsakis, Aristides Michael; Golokhvast, Kirill Sergeevich; Raman, Thiagarajan

    2017-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd), classified as human carcinogen, is an extremely toxic heavy metal pollutant, and there is an increasing environmental concern for cadmium exposure through anthropogenic sources including cigarette smoke. Though Cd based nanoparticles such as cadmium oxide (CdO) are being widely used in a variety of clinical and industrial applications, the toxicity of CdO nanoparticles has not been well characterized. Herein we report the toxicity of CdO nanoparticles employing zebrafish as a model. Two different CdO nanoparticles were prepared, calcination of Cd(OH) 2 without any organic molecule (CdO-1) and calcination of Cd-citrate coordination polymer (CdO-2), to evaluate and compare the toxicity of these two different CdO nanoparticles. Results show that zebrafish exposed to CdO-2 nanoparticles expressed reduced toxicity as judged by lower oxidative stress levels, rescue of liver carboxylesterases and reduction in metallothionein activity compared to CdO-1 nanoparticles. Histopathological observations also support our contention that CdO-1 nanoparticles showed higher toxicity relative to CdO-2 nanoparticles. The organic unit of Cd-citrate coordination polymer might have converted into carbon during calcination that might have covered the surface of CdO nanoparticles. This carbon surface coverage can control the release of Cd 2+ ions in CdO-2 compared to non-covered CdO-1 nanoparticles and hence mitigate the toxicity in the case of CdO-2. This was supported by atomic absorption spectrophotometer analyses of Cd 2+ ions release from CdO-1 and CdO-2 nanoparticles. Thus the present study clearly demonstrates the toxicity of CdO nanoparticles in an aquatic animal and also indicates that the toxicity could be substantially reduced by carbon coverage. This could have important implications in terms of anthropogenic release and environmental pollution caused by Cd and human exposure to Cd 2+ from sources such as cigarette smoke. - Highlights: • Toxicity of Cd

  18. Effect of surfactant in mitigating cadmium oxide nanoparticle toxicity: Implications for mitigating cadmium toxicity in environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balmuri, Sricharani Rao [Department of Bioengineering, School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur 613401 (India); Selvaraj, Uthra [Department of Biotechnology, School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur 613401 (India); Kumar, Vadivel Vinod [Department of Chemistry, School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur 613401 (India); Anthony, Savarimuthu Philip, E-mail: philip@biotech.sastra.edu [Department of Chemistry, School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur 613401 (India); Tsatsakis, Aristides Michael [Department of Forensic Sciences and Toxicology, Medical School, University of Crete, Heraklion 71003 (Greece); Scientific Educational Center of Nanotechnology, Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok 690990 (Russian Federation); Golokhvast, Kirill Sergeevich [Scientific Educational Center of Nanotechnology, Far Eastern Federal University, Vladivostok 690990 (Russian Federation); Raman, Thiagarajan, E-mail: raman@biotech.sastra.edu [Department of Bioengineering, School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur 613401 (India); Centre for Research in Infectious Diseases (CRID), School of Chemical & Biotechnology, SASTRA University, Thanjavur 613401 (India)

    2017-01-15

    Cadmium (Cd), classified as human carcinogen, is an extremely toxic heavy metal pollutant, and there is an increasing environmental concern for cadmium exposure through anthropogenic sources including cigarette smoke. Though Cd based nanoparticles such as cadmium oxide (CdO) are being widely used in a variety of clinical and industrial applications, the toxicity of CdO nanoparticles has not been well characterized. Herein we report the toxicity of CdO nanoparticles employing zebrafish as a model. Two different CdO nanoparticles were prepared, calcination of Cd(OH){sub 2} without any organic molecule (CdO-1) and calcination of Cd-citrate coordination polymer (CdO-2), to evaluate and compare the toxicity of these two different CdO nanoparticles. Results show that zebrafish exposed to CdO-2 nanoparticles expressed reduced toxicity as judged by lower oxidative stress levels, rescue of liver carboxylesterases and reduction in metallothionein activity compared to CdO-1 nanoparticles. Histopathological observations also support our contention that CdO-1 nanoparticles showed higher toxicity relative to CdO-2 nanoparticles. The organic unit of Cd-citrate coordination polymer might have converted into carbon during calcination that might have covered the surface of CdO nanoparticles. This carbon surface coverage can control the release of Cd{sup 2+} ions in CdO-2 compared to non-covered CdO-1 nanoparticles and hence mitigate the toxicity in the case of CdO-2. This was supported by atomic absorption spectrophotometer analyses of Cd{sup 2+} ions release from CdO-1 and CdO-2 nanoparticles. Thus the present study clearly demonstrates the toxicity of CdO nanoparticles in an aquatic animal and also indicates that the toxicity could be substantially reduced by carbon coverage. This could have important implications in terms of anthropogenic release and environmental pollution caused by Cd and human exposure to Cd{sup 2+} from sources such as cigarette smoke. - Highlights:

  19. Fission Product Release Behavior of Individual Coated Fuel Particles for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minato, Kazuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Sawa, Kazuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Koya, Toshio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Tomita, Takeshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Ishikawa, Akiyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan); Baldwin, Charles A; Gabbard, William Alexander [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States); Malone, Charlie M [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States)

    2000-07-15

    Postirradiation heating tests of TRISO-coated UO{sub 2} particles at 1700 and 1800degC were performed to understand fission product release behavior at accident temperatures. The inventory measurements of the individual particles were carried out before and after the heating tests with gamma-ray spectrometry to study the behavior of the individual particles. The time-dependent release behavior of {sup 85}Kr, {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 154}Eu were obtained with on-line measurements of fission gas release and intermittent measurements of metallic fission product release during the heating tests. The inventory measurements of the individual particles revealed that fission product release behavior of the individual particles was not uniform, and large particle-to-particle variations in the release behavior of {sup 110m}Ag, {sup 134}Cs, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 154}Eu were found. X-ray microradiography and ceramography showed that the variations could not be explained by only the presence or absence of cracks in the SiC coating layer. The SiC degradation may have been related to the variations.

  20. Stimuli-Responsive NO Release for On-Demand Gas-Sensitized Synergistic Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenpei; Yung, Bryant C; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2018-03-08

    Featuring high biocompatibility, the emerging field of gas therapy has attracted extensive attention in the medical and scientific communities. Currently, considerable research has focused on the gasotransmitter nitric oxide (NO) owing to its unparalleled dual roles in directly killing cancer cells at high concentrations and cooperatively sensitizing cancer cells to other treatments for synergistic therapy. Of particular note, recent state-of-the-art studies have turned our attention to the chemical design of various endogenous/exogenous stimuli-responsive NO-releasing nanomedicines and their biomedical applications for on-demand NO-sensitized synergistic cancer therapy, which are discussed in this Minireview. Moreover, the potential challenges regarding NO gas therapy are also described, aiming to advance the development of NO nanomedicines as well as usher in new frontiers in this fertile research area. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Analysis of Induced Gas Releases During Retrieval of Hanford Double-Shell Tank Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, Beric E.; Cuta, Judith M.; Hartley, Stacey A.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Stewart, Charles W.

    2002-01-01

    Radioactive waste is scheduled to be retrieved from Hanford double-shell tanks AN-103, AN-104, AN-105, and AW-101 to the vitrification plant beginning about 2009. Retrieval may involve decanting the supernatant liquid and/or mixing the waste with jet pumps. In these four tanks, which contain relatively large volumes of retained gas, both of these operations are expected to induce buoyant displacement gas releases that can potentially raise the tank headspace hydrogen concentration to very near the lower flammability limit. This report describes the theory and detailed physical models for both the supernatant decant and jet mixing processes and presents the results from applying the models to these operations in the four tanks. The technical bases for input parameter distributions are elucidated

  2. Bio-testing integral toxicity of corrosion inhibitors, biocides and oil hydrocarbons in oil-and gas-processing industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chugunov, V.A.; Kholodenko, V.P.; Irkhina, I.A.; Fomchenkov, V.M.; Novikov, I.A. [State Research Center for Applied Microbiology, Obolensk, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    In recent years bioassays have been widely used for assessing levels of contamination of the environment. This is due to the fact that test-organisms provide a general response to toxicants present in samples. Based on microorganisms as test objects, it is possible to develop cheap, sensitive and rapid assays to identify environmental xenobiotics and toxicants. The objective of the research was to develop different microbiological assays for assessing integral toxicity of water environments polluted with corrosion inhibitors, biocides and hydrocarbons in oil- and gas-processing industry. Bio-luminescent, electro-orientational, osmo-optic and microorganism reducing activity assays were used for express evaluation of integral toxicity. They are found to determine promptly integral toxicity of water environments containing various pollutants (oil, oil products, corrosion inhibitors, biocides). Results conclude that the assays may be used for analyzing integral toxicity of water polluted with hydrocarbons, as well as for monitoring of water changes as a result of biodegradation of pollutants by microorganisms and their associations. Using a kit of different assays, it is also possible to evaluate ecological safety of biocides, corrosion inhibitors, and their compositions. Bioassays used as a kit are more effective than each assay individually, allowing one to get complete characterization of a reaction of bacterial test organisms to different environments. (authors)

  3. The Industrial Toxics Project: Targeting chemicals for environmental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burch, W.M.

    1991-01-01

    In September, 1990, the Administrator of the US Environmental Protection Agency committed the Agency to a program of targeting chemicals for multi-media risk reduction activities through pollution prevention. The Industrial Toxics Project will place emphasis on obtaining voluntary commitments from industry to reduce releases of toxic chemicals to the air, water, and land with a goal of reducing releases nationwide by 33% by 1992 and 50% by 1995. An initial list of 18 chemicals have been selected based on recommendations from each Agency program. The chemicals selected are subject to reporting under the Toxic Chemical Release Inventory Program which will provide the basis for tracking progress. The chemicals are characterized by high production volume, toxicity and releases and present the potential for significant risk reduction through pollution prevention. This presentation will discuss the focus and direction of this new initiative

  4. Fission gas release behaviour of a 103 GWd/t{sub HM} fuel disc during a 1200 °C annealing test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noirot, J., E-mail: jean.noirot@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DEC, Cadarache, F-13108 St. Paul Lez Durance (France); Pontillon, Y. [CEA, DEN, DEC, Cadarache, F-13108 St. Paul Lez Durance (France); Yagnik, S. [EPRI, P.O. Box 10412, Palo Alto, CA 94303-0813 (United States); Turnbull, J.A. [Independent Consultant (United Kingdom); Tverberg, T. [IFE, P.O. Box 173, NO-1751 Halden (Norway)

    2014-03-15

    Within the Nuclear Fuel Industry Research (NFIR) program, several fuel variants, in the form of thin circular discs, were irradiated in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR) to a range of burn-ups ∼100 GWd/t{sub HM}. The design of the assembly was similar to that used in other HBWR programs: the assembly contained several rods with fuel discs sandwiched between Mo discs, which limited temperature gradients within the fuel discs. One such rod contained standard grain UO{sub 2} discs (3D grain size = 18 μm) reaching a burn-up of 103 GWd/t{sub HM}. After the irradiation, the gas release upon rod puncturing was measured to be 2.9%. Detailed characterizations of one of these irradiated UO{sub 2} discs, using electron probe microanalysis (EPMA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), were performed in a CEA Cadarache hot laboratory. Examination revealed the high burn-up structure (HBS) formation throughout the whole of the disc, also the fission gas distribution within this HBS, with a very high proportion of the gas in the HBS bubbles. A sibling disc was submitted to a temperature transient up to 1200 °C in the out-of-pile (OOP) annealing test device “Merarg” at a relatively low temperature ramp rate (0.2 °C/s). In addition to the total gas release during this annealing test, the release peaks throughout the temperature range were monitored. The fuel was then characterized with the same microanalysis techniques as before the annealing test to investigate the effects of this test on the microstructure of the fuel and on the fission gases. It provided valuable insights into fission gas localization and the release behaviour in UO{sub 2} fuel with high burn-up structure (HBS)

  5. Studies on the toxic effects of periodontal sustained release drug containing ornidazole and pefloxacin mesylate on early embryonic development of SD rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-mou DONG

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To evaluate the toxic effects of periodontal sustained release drug containing ornidazole and pefloxacin mesylate on early embryonic development of SD rats.Methods A total of 100female SD rats were randomly divided into negative control,low-,medium-,high-dose group and intervention group(20each.Rats in low-,medium-and high-dose group were fed daily with the sustained release drug at 1,4,and 8g/kg respectively;those in negative control group were fed daily with distilled water from the 14th day before mating to the 7th day of pregnancy continuously,and those in intervention group received cyclophosphamide(40mg/kgby intraperitoneal injection for 5successive days.During this period,the general status,mating,pregnancy,coefficient of ovary and uterus,the numbers of corpus luteum,nidation,live births,stillbirths,absorbed embryo,prenidatory and postnidatory mortality,serum testosterone(Tand estradiol(E2were determined respectively.Histopathologic examination of the ovary and uterus,immunohistochemical observation of ovaries for proliferating cell nuclear antigen(PCNAand Bcl-2associated X protein(Baxwere also performed respectively.Results The general status of those rats was good except one in the low-dose group and one in the intervention group died on the 14th day of administration,and one in negative control and one in high dose group died on the 5th day of pregnancy,respectively.The body weight of animals decreased significantly(P 0.05.The serum T level in medium-and high-dose group and the E2level in high-dose group declined compared to that in negative control group(P < 0.05.Conclusions Although the periodontal sustained release drug containing ornidazole and pefloxacin mesylate shows no toxicity to the early embryonic development of SD rats,the high dose drug has certain toxicity to ovary.Declined serum concentrations of T and E2,reduced expression of PCNA,and increased Bax may be the causes of the toxicity.

  6. Airborne uranium, its concentration and toxicity in uranium enrichment facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.; Mauro, J.; Ryniker, J.; Fellman, R.

    1979-02-01

    The release of uranium hexafluoride and its hydrolysis products into the work environment of a plant for enriching uranium by means of gas centrifuges is discussed. The maximum permissible mass and curie concentration of airborne uranium (U) is identified as a function of the enrichment level (i.e., U-235/total U), and chemical and physical form. A discussion of the chemical and radiological toxicity of uranium as a function of enrichment and chemical form is included. The toxicity of products of UF 6 hydrolysis in the atmosphere, namely, UO 2 F 2 and HF, the particle size of toxic particulate material produced from this hydrolysis, and the toxic effects of HF and other potential fluoride compounds are also discussed. Results of an investigation of known effects of humidity and temperature on particle size of UO 2 F 2 produced by the reaction of UF 6 with water vapor in the air are reported. The relationship of the solubility of uranium compounds to their toxic effects was studied. Identification and discussion of the standards potentially applicable to airborne uranium compounds in the working environment are presented. The effectiveness of High Efficiency Particulate (HEPA) filters subjected to the corrosive environment imposed by the presence of hydrogen fluoride is discussed

  7. Fission-gas release in fuel performing to extended burnups in Ontario Hydro nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Floyd, M.R.; Novak, J.; Truant, P.T.

    1992-06-01

    The average discharge burnup of CANDU fuel is about 200 MWh/kgU. A significant number of 37-element bundles have achieved burnups in excess of 400 MWh/kgU. Some of these bundles have experienced failures related to their extended operation. To date, hot-cell examinations have been performed on fuel elements from nine 37-element bundles irradiated in Bruce NGS-A that have burnups in the range of 300-800 MWh/kgU. 1 Most of these have declining power histories from peak powers of up to 59 kW/m. Fission-gas releases of up to 26% have been observed and exhibit a strong dependence on fuel power. This obscures any dependence on burnup. The extent of fission-gas release at extended burnups was not predicted by low-burnup code extrapolations. This is attributed primarily to a reduction in fuel thermal conductivity which results in elevated operating temperatures. Reduced conductivity is due, at least in part, to the buildup of fission products in the fuel matrix. Some evidence of hyperstoichiometry exists, although this needs to be further investigated along with any possible relation to CANLUB graphite coating behaviour and sheath oxidation. Residual tensile sheath strains of up to 2% have been observed and can be correlated with fuel power/fission-gas release. SCC 2 -related defects have been observed in the sheath and endcaps of elements from bundles experiencing declining power histories to burnups in excess of 500 MWh/kgU. This indicates that the current recommended burnup limit of 450 MWh/kgU is justified. SCC-related defects have also been observed in ramped bundles having burnups < 450 MWh/kgU. Hence, additional guidelines are in place for power ramping extended-burnup fuel

  8. Release behavior and toxicity profiles towards A549 cell lines of ciprofloxacin from its layered zinc hydroxide intercalation compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Latip, Ahmad Faiz; Hussein, Mohd Zobir; Stanslas, Johnson; Wong, Charng Choon; Adnan, Rohana

    2013-01-01

    Layered hydroxides salts (LHS), a layered inorganic compound is gaining attention in a wide range of applications, particularly due to its unique anion exchange properties. In this work, layered zinc hydroxide nitrate (LZH), a family member of LHS was intercalated with anionic ciprofloxacin (CFX), a broad spectrum antibiotic via ion exchange in a mixture solution of water:ethanol. Powder x-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) confirmed the drug anions were successfully intercalated in the interlayer space of LZH. Specific surface area of the obtained compound was increased compared to that of the host due to the different pore textures between the two materials. CFX anions were slowly released over 80 hours in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) solution due to strong interactions that occurred between the intercalated anions and the host lattices. The intercalation compound demonstrated enhanced antiproliferative effects towards A549 cancer cells compared to the toxicity of CFX alone. Strong host-guest interactions between the LZH lattice and the CFX anion give rise to a new intercalation compound that demonstrates sustained release mode and enhanced toxicity effects towards A549 cell lines. These findings should serve as foundations towards further developments of the brucite-like host material in drug delivery systems.

  9. Up the stack : coal-fired electricity's toxic impact : an OCAA air quality report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rang, S.

    2002-07-01

    Ontario Power Generation (OPG) must report annually its releases and transfers of 268 chemicals to the federal National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI). Each OPG facility reports the amount of chemicals released to the air, land, water and injected under ground at the facility site. The facilities must also report the amount of chemicals that are transferred off-site for treatment, sewage, disposal, recycling or energy recovery. In 1999 and 2000, atmospheric releases from OPG's coal-fired plants accounted for a significant percentage of the total pollutants released for Ontario and Canada. OPG's facilities are often in the top 5 in Ontario and Canada for releases of various chemicals, including persistent toxic chemicals. In 1999, the Nanticoke coal-fired power plant on Lake Erie was ranked first in Canada for releases to the air. Data reported for the 1999 and 2000 reporting period for dioxins and furans, hexachlorobenzene, mercury, metals (chromium, nickel and arsenic), and acid gases such as hydrochloric acid, hydrogen fluoride, and sulphuric acid clearly indicates that OPG coal-fired plants are a leading source of air pollution in Canada and Ontario. The Ontario Clean Air Alliance suggests the data is sufficient to phase-out the use of coal for power generation in Ontario. It recommends conserving energy and replacing coal-fired power with renewable energy sources such as wind and water power. Converting coal facilities to high-efficiency natural gas units would also reduce the toxic impacts of OPG's coal-fired power plants. As an immediate first step, it was recommended that the government should ban non-emergency exports of coal-fired electricity during smog-alert periods in Ontario. 11 tabs

  10. Coal fired flue gas mercury emission controls

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang; Pan, Weiguo; Pan, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is one of the most toxic heavy metals, harmful to both the environment and human health. Hg is released into the atmosphere from natural and anthropogenic sources and its emission control has caused much concern. This book introduces readers to Hg pollution from natural and anthropogenic sources and systematically describes coal-fired flue gas mercury emission control in industry, especially from coal-fired power stations. Mercury emission control theory and experimental research are demonstrated, including how elemental mercury is oxidized into oxidized mercury and the effect of

  11. Development of a code to simulate dispersion of atmospheric released tritium gas in the environmental media and to evaluate doses. TRIDOSE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Mikio; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Sumi

    2000-11-01

    A computer code (TRIDOSE) was developed to assess the environmental impact of atmospheric released tritium gas (T 2 ) from nuclear fusion related facilities. The TRIDOSE simulates dispersion of T 2 and resultant HTO in the atmosphere, land, plant, water and foods in the environment, and evaluates contamination concentrations in the media and exposure doses. A part of the mathematical models in TRIDOSE were verified by comparison of the calculation with the results of the short range (400 m) dispersion experiment of HT gas performed in Canada postulating a short-time (30 minutes) accidental release. (author)

  12. Oxidation of siloxanes during biogas combustion and nanotoxicity of Si-based particles released to the atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansel, Berrin; Surita, Sharon C

    2014-01-01

    Siloxanes have been detected in the biogas produced at municipal solid waste landfills and wastewater treatment plants. When oxidized, siloxanes are converted to silicon oxides. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the transformation of siloxanes and potential nanotoxicity of Si-based particles released to the atmosphere from the gas engines which utilize biogas. Data available from nanotoxicity studies were used to assess the potential health risks associated with the inhalation exposure to Si-based nanoparticles. Silicon dioxide formed from siloxanes can range from 5 nm to about 100 nm in diameter depending on the combustion temperature and particle clustering characteristics. In general, silicon dioxide particles formed during from combustion process are typically 40-70 nm in diameter and can be described as fibrous dusts and as carcinogenic, mutagenic, astmagenic or reproductive toxic (CMAR) nanoparticles. Nanoparticles deposit in the upper respiratory system, conducting airways, and the alveoli. Size ranges between 5 and 50 nm show effective deposition in the alveoli where toxic effects are higher. In this study the quantities for the SiO₂ formed and release during combustion of biogas were estimated based on biogas utilization characteristics (gas compositions, temperature). The exposure to Si-based particles and potential effects in humans were analyzed in relation to their particle size, release rates and availability in the atmosphere. The analyses showed that about 54.5 and 73 kg/yr of SiO₂ can be released during combustion of biogas containing D4 and D5 at 14.1 mg/m(3) (1 ppm) and 15.1 mg/m(3) (1ppm), respectively, per MW energy yield. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluation of the potential for significant ammonia releases from Hanford waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, B.J.; Anderson, C.M.; Chen, G.; Cuta, J.M.; Ferryman, T.A.; Terrones, G.

    1996-07-01

    Ammonia is ubiquitous as a component of the waste stored in the Hanford Site single-shell tanks (SSTs) and double-shell tanks (DSTs). Because ammonia is both flammable and toxic, concerns have been raised about the amount of ammonia stored in the tanks and the possible mechanisms by which it could be released from the waste into the head space inside the tanks as well as into the surrounding atmosphere. Ammonia is a safety issue for three reasons. As already mentioned, ammonia is a flammable gas and may contribute to a flammability hazard either directly, if it reaches a high enough concentration in the tank head space, or by contributing to the flammability of other flammable gases such as hydrogen (LANL 1994). Ammonia is also toxic and at relatively low concentrations presents a hazard to human health. The level at which ammonia is considered Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health (IDLH) is 300 ppm (WHC 1993, 1995). Ammonia concentrations at or above this level have been measured inside the head space in a number of SSTs. Finally, unlike hydrogen and nitrous oxide, ammonia is highly soluble in aqueous solutions, and large amounts of ammonia can be stored in the waste as dissolved gas. Because of its high solubility, ammonia behaves in a qualitatively different manner from hydrogen or other insoluble gases. A broader range of scenarios must be considered in modeling ammonia storage and release

  14. The calculating methods of the release of airborne radionuclides to environment during the normal operation of a module high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yuanzhong

    1993-01-01

    The calculations of the release of radionuclides to environment are the basis of environmental impact assessment during the normal operation of a module high temperature gas-cooled reactor of the Institute of Nuclear Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, China. According to the features of the reactor it is pointed out that only five sources of the airborne radioactive materials released to environment are important. They are: (1) the activation of the air in the reactor cavity; (2) the escape from the primary coolant systems; (3) the release of radioactively contaminated helium from storage tanks; (4) the release of radioactively contaminated helium from the gas evacuation system of fuel load and unload system; (5) the leakage of the vapour from water-steam loop. In accordance with five release sources the calculating methods of radionuclides released to environment are worked out respectively and the respective calculating formulas are derived for the normal operation of the reactor

  15. The critical release rates for the dissociating gas N204/N02/N0

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, W.H.L.

    1979-03-01

    Dissociating vapour systems have certain characteristics which make them attractive as coolants, notably a large effective specific heat which is significantly greater than that for the individual components of the gas mixture, and also an enhanced boundary layer heat transfer coefficient resulting from the physical characteristics of thermal dissociation. In part these effects ensure that a dissociating gas has a greatly improved thermal capacity and heat transfer capability when compared with most inert gases. In this report the critical release rates for the dissociating vapour system N 2 0 4 -N0 2 -N0 are established, principally in the two phase region, and the thermodynamics of nitrogen tetroxide are examined. (U.K.)

  16. Waste isolation pilot plant performance assessment: Radionuclide release sensitivity to diminished brine and gas flows to/from transuranic waste disposal areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, Brad A.; Camphouse, R. C.; Zeitler, Todd R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad (United States)

    2017-03-15

    Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository releases are evaluated through the application of modified parameters to simulate accelerated creep closure, include capillary pressure effects on relative permeability, and increase brine and gas saturation in the operations and experimental (OPS/EXP) areas. The modifications to the repository model result in increased pressures and decreased brine saturations in waste areas and increased pressures and brine saturations in the OPS/EXP areas. Brine flows up the borehole during a hypothetical drilling intrusion are nearly identical and brine flows up the shaft are decreased. The modified parameters essentially halt the flow of gas from the southern waste areas to the northern nonwaste areas, except as transported through the marker beds and anhydrite layers. The combination of slightly increased waste region pressures and very slightly decreased brine saturations result in a modest increase in spallings and no significant effect on direct brine releases, with total releases from the Culebra and cutting and caving releases unaffected. Overall, the effects on total high-probability mean releases from the repository are insignificant, with total low-probability mean releases minimally increased. It is concluded that the modified OPS/EXP area parameters have an insignificant effect on the prediction of total releases.

  17. Endogenous gas formation--an in vitro study with relevance to gas microemboli during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholm, Lena; Engström, Karl Gunnar

    2012-09-01

    Gas embolism is an identified problem during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Our aim was to analyze the potential influence from gas solubility based on simple physical laws, here called endogenous gas embolism. Gas solubility decreases at higher temperature and gas bubbles are presumably formed at CPB warming. An experimental model to measure gas release was designed. Medium (water or blood retrieved from mediastinal drains, 14.6 mL) was incubated and equilibrated with gas (air, 100% oxygen, or 5% carbon dioxide in air) at low temperature (10 degrees C or 23 degrees C). At warming to 37 degrees C, gas release was digitally measured. Also, the effect of fluid motion was evaluated. At warming, the medium became oversaturated with dissolved gas. When fluid motion was applied, gas was released to form bubbles. This was exemplified by a gas release of .45% (.31/.54, medians and quartile range, volume percent, p = .007) and 1.26% (1.14/ 1.33, p = .003) when blood was warmed from 23 degrees C or 10 degrees C to 37 degrees C, respectively (carbon dioxide 5% in air). Consistent findings were seen for water and with the other types of gas exposure. The theory of endogenous gas embolization was confirmed with gas being released at warming. The endogenous gas formation demonstrated a dynamic pattern with oversaturation and with rapid gas released at fluid motion. The gas release at warming was substantial, in particular when the results were extrapolated to full-scale CPB conditions. The interference from endogenous gas formation should be considered in parallel to external sources of gas microemboli. cardiopulmonary bypass, gas embolization, microemboli, gas solubility, temperature.

  18. Comparison of the ENIGMA code with experimental data on thermal performance, stable fission gas and iodine release at high burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killeen, J C [Nuclear Electric plc, Barnwood (United Kingdom)

    1997-08-01

    The predictions of the ENIGMA code have been compared with data from high burn-up fuel experiments from the Halden and RISO reactors. The experiments modelled were IFA-504 and IFA-558 from Halden and the test II-5 from the RISO power burnup test series. The code has well modelled the fuel thermal performance and has provided a good measure of iodine release from pre-interlinked fuel. After interlinkage the iodine predictions remain a good fit for one experiment, but there is significant overprediction for a second experiment (IFA-558). Stable fission gas release is also well modelled and the predictions are within the expected uncertainly band throughout the burn-up range. This report presents code predictions for stable fission gas release to 40GWd/tU, iodine release measurements to 50GWd/tU and thermal performance (fuel centre temperature) to 55GWd/tU. Fuel ratings of up to 38kW/m were modelled at the high burn-up levels. The code is shown to accurately or conservatively predict all these parameters. (author). 1 ref., 6 figs.

  19. Development and evaluation of a new prototype P&T system to determine in-heading gas release rate.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Zyl, FJ

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to quantify the potential methane hazard in underground coal mines, it is necessary to determine the in-seam methane content and an expected gas release rate during production. Various methods for estimating this have been proposed, ranging...

  20. Impact of production and release of gas in a L/ILW repository. A summary of the work performed within the Nagra programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuidema, P.; Hoglund, L.O.

    1988-01-01

    In a repository for low- and intermediate-level radioactive wastes, gases will be formed due to corrosion of metals, microbial degradation of organic materials and radiolytic decomposition of water and organic materials. The predominant source of gas is calculated to be anaerobic corrosion of metals, particularly iron. Gas pressure will build up in the near-field until it is released through the system of engineered barriers into the geosphere at a rate equivalent to the production rate. Excessive gas pressures may damage the engineered barriers if no precautions are taken. Radionuclide transport both through the host rock and near-field may be influenced by such gas releases. Water will be displaced and local hydrology will be altered. The significance of these alterations are site-specific; theoretical studies as well as field investigations are underway to clarify the role of the different processes involved

  1. Overview on international experimental programmes on power ramping and fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knaab, H.; Lang, P.M.; Mogard, H.

    1983-01-01

    During the last years a number of internationally sponsored experimental programmes were initiated to study the LWR fuel behaviour during ramping and fission gas release at higher burnup levels. Common interest and the limited availability of experimental facilities and appropriate test fuel rods have led to valuable cooperation of many organizations throughout the nuclear community. These programmes are performed by the experimental staff from research centers with their experimental facilities. Fuel vendors and several utilities contribute by supply and irradiation of test fuel rods. The aim of this paper is to provide a synopsis of the following programmes: Studsvik Projects: Interramp, Overramp, Superramp, Demoramp I and II; Petten, High Burnup PWR Ramp Test Programme; Mol, Tribulation Programme; BNWL, High Burnup Effects Programme; Risoe Fission Gas Project; Related tasks within the OECD Halden Reactor Project. The objectives of the programme, their work scope and main results will be summarized on the basis of presently available information. An outlook to future proposed programmes will be given. (author)

  2. Overview on international experimental programmes on power ramping and fission gas release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knaab, H.; Lang, P.M.

    1985-01-01

    During the last few years a number of internationally sponsored experimental programmes have been initiated to study LWR fuel behaviour during ramping and fission gas release at high burnup levels. Common interest and the limited availability of experimental facilities and appropriate test fuel rods have led to valuable cooperation between many organizations throughout the nuclear community. These programmes are carried out by experienced staff from research centres using the centres' experimental facilities. Fuel vendors and several utilities contribute by supplying and irradiating the test fuel rods. The aim of this paper is to provide a synopsis of the following programmes: (a) Studsvik Projects: Interramp, Demoramp I and II, Overramp, Superramp; (b) Petten, High Burnup PWR Ramp Test Programme; (c) Mol, Tribulation Programme; (d) BNWL, High Burnup Effects Programme; (e) Riso Fission Gas Project; and (f) related tasks within the OECD Halden Reactor Project. The objectives of the programmes, their scope and the main results will be summarized. An overview of proposed future programmes will be given. (author)

  3. Surfacing behavior and gas release of the physostome sprat (Sprattus sprattus) in ice-free and ice-covered waters

    KAUST Repository

    Solberg, Ingrid; Kaartvedt, Stein

    2013-01-01

    Upward-facing echosounders that provided continuous, long-term measurements were applied to address the surfacing behavior and gas release of the physostome sprat (Sprattus sprattus) throughout an entire winter in a 150-m-deep Norwegian fjord

  4. Determination of Source Term for an Annual Stack Release of Gas Reactor G.A. Siwabessy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudiyati; Syahrir; Unggul Hartoyo; Nugraha Luhur

    2008-01-01

    Releases of radionuclide from the reactor are noble gases, halogenides and particulates. The measurements were carried out directly on the air monitoring system of the stack. The results of these measurements are compared with the annual Source-Term data from the Safety Analyses report (SAR) of RSG-GAS. The measurement results are smaller than the data reported in SAR document. (author)

  5. Biodegradable chitosan and polylactic acid-based intraocular micro-implant for sustained release of methotrexate into vitreous: analysis of pharmacokinetics and toxicity in rabbit eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Soumyarwit; Banerjee, Rupak K; Augsburger, James J; Al-Rjoub, Marwan F; Donnell, Anna; Correa, Zelia M

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics and toxicity of a chitosan (CS) and polylactic acid (PLA) based methotrexate (MTX) intravitreal micro-implant in an animal model using rabbit eyes. CS- and PLA-based micro-implants containing 400 μg of MTX were fabricated using lyophilization and dip-coating techniques. The micro-implants were surgically implanted in the vitreous of eight New Zealand rabbits employing minimally invasive technique. The PLA-coated CS-MTX micro-implant was inserted in the right eye and the placebo micro-implant in the left eye of each rabbit. Two rabbits were euthanized at each pre-determined time point post-implantation (days 5, 12, 19, and 33) for pharmacokinetics and histopathology evaluation. A therapeutic concentration of MTX (0.1-1.0 μM) in the vitreous was detected in the rabbit eyes studied for 33 days. The MTX release from the coated micro-implants followed a first order kinetics (R (2) ~ 0.88), implying that MTX release depends on the concentration of MTX in the micro-implant. Histopathological analysis of the enucleated eyes failed to show any signs of infection or tissue toxicity in any of the specimens. The PLA-coated CS-MTX micro-implants were able to deliver therapeutic release of MTX for a period of more than 1 month without detectable toxicity in a rabbit model. The micro-implants can be further investigated as a prospective alternative to current treatment protocols of repeated intravitreal MTX injections in intraocular disorders such as primary intraocular lymphoma, and selected cases of non-microbial intraocular inflammation.

  6. Release to the gas phase of metals, S and Cl during combustion of dedicated waste fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anne Juul; van Lith, Simone Cornelia; Frandsen, Flemming

    2010-01-01

    The release to the gas phase of inorganic elements such as alkali metals. Cl, S, and heavy metals in Waste-to-Energy (WtE) boilers is a challenge. Besides the risk of harmful emissions to the environment, inorganic elements released from the grate may cause severe ash deposition and corrosion...... and the link to the formation of fly ash and aerosols in full-scale waste incinerators. The release of metals, S and Cl from four dedicated waste fractions was quantified as a function of temperature in a lab-scale fixed-bed reactor. The waste fractions comprised chromated copper arsenate (CCA) impregnated....... The lab-scale release results were then compared with results from a related, full-scale partitioning study, in which test runs with the addition of similar, dedicated waste fractions to a base-load waste had been performed in a grate-fired WtE boiler. In general, the elements Al, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Si...

  7. Development of a code to simulate dispersion of atmospheric released tritium gas in the environmental media and to evaluate doses. TRIDOSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Mikio [Nuclear Engineering Co., Ltd., Hitachi, Ibaraki (Japan); Noguchi, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Sumi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2000-11-01

    A computer code (TRIDOSE) was developed to assess the environmental impact of atmospheric released tritium gas (T{sub 2}) from nuclear fusion related facilities. The TRIDOSE simulates dispersion of T{sub 2} and resultant HTO in the atmosphere, land, plant, water and foods in the environment, and evaluates contamination concentrations in the media and exposure doses. A part of the mathematical models in TRIDOSE were verified by comparison of the calculation with the results of the short range (400 m) dispersion experiment of HT gas performed in Canada postulating a short-time (30 minutes) accidental release. (author)

  8. Beyond platinum: synthesis, characterization, and in vitro toxicity of Cu(II-releasing polymer nanoparticles for potential use as a drug delivery vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Alesha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The field of drug delivery focuses primarily on delivering small organic molecules or DNA/RNA as therapeutics and has largely ignored the potential for delivering catalytically active transition metal ions and complexes. The delivery of a variety of transition metals has potential for inducing apoptosis in targeted cells. The chief aims of this work were the development of a suitable delivery vector for a prototypical transition metal, Cu2+, and demonstration of the ability to impact cancer cell viability via exposure to such a Cu-loaded vector. Carboxylate-functionalized nanoparticles were synthesized by free radical polymerization and were subsequently loaded with Cu2+ via binding to particle-bound carboxylate functional groups. Cu loading and release were characterized via ICP MS, EDX, XPS, and elemental analysis. Results demonstrated that Cu could be loaded in high weight percent (up to 16 wt.% and that Cu was released from the particles in a pH-dependent manner. Metal release was a function of both pH and the presence of competing ligands. The toxicity of the particles was measured in HeLa cells where reductions in cell viability greater than 95% were observed at high Cu loading. The combined pH sensitivity and significant toxicity make this copper delivery vector an excellent candidate for the targeted killing of disease cells when combined with an effective cellular targeting strategy.

  9. Spatial and Temporal Variability in Biogenic Gas Accumulation and Release in The Greater Everglades at Multiple Scales of Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, M. D.; Cornett, C.; Schaffer, L.; Comas, X.

    2017-12-01

    Wetlands play a critical role in the carbon (C) cycle by producing and releasing significant amounts of greenhouse biogenic gasses (CO2, CH4) into the atmosphere. Wetlands in tropical and subtropical climates (such as the Florida Everglades) have become of great interest in the past two decades as they account for more than 20% of the global peatland C stock and are located in climates that favor year-round C emissions. Despite the increase in research involving C emission from these types of wetlands, the spatial and temporal variability involving C production, accumulation and release is still highly uncertain, and is the focus of this research at multiple scales of measurement (i.e. lab, field and landscape). Spatial variability in biogenic gas content, build up and release, at both the lab and field scales, was estimated using a series of ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys constrained with gas traps fitted with time-lapse cameras. Variability in gas content was estimated at the sub-meter scale (lab scale) within two extracted monoliths from different wetland ecosystems at the Disney wilderness Preserve (DWP) and the Blue Cypress Preserve (BCP) using high frequency GPR (1.2 GHz) transects across the monoliths. At the field scale (> 10m) changes in biogenic gas content were estimated using 160 MHz GPR surveys collected within 4 different emergent wetlands at the DWP. Additionally, biogenic gas content from the extracted monoliths was used to developed a landscape comparison of C accumulation and emissions for each different wetland ecosystem. Changes in gas content over time were estimated at the lab scale at high temporal resolution (i.e. sub-hourly) in monoliths from the BCP and Water Conservation Area 1-A. An autonomous rail system was constructed to estimate biogenic gas content variability within the wetland soil matrix using a series of continuous, uninterrupted 1.2 GHz GPR transects along the samples. Measurements were again constrained with an array

  10. Release of Inorganic Elements during Wood Combustion. Release to the Gas Phase of Inorganic Elements during: Wood Combustion. Part 1: Development and Evaluation of Quantification Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Lith, Simone Cornelia; Alonso-Ramírez, Violeta; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2006-01-01

    During wood combustion, inorganic elements such as alkali metals, sulfur, chlorine, and some heavy metals are partly released to the gas phase, which may cause problems in combustion facilities because of deposit formation and corrosion. Furthermore, it may cause harmful emissions of gases......) in this reactor, whereas methods B and C involved initial pyrolysis and combustion, respectively, of a large fuel sample (~5 kg) in a bench-scale fixed-bed reactor at 500 C. The methods were evaluated by comparing the data on the release of Cl, S, K, Na, Zn, and Pb from fiber board obtained by the three methods...

  11. The approach of toxic and radiological risk equivalence in UF6 transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringot, C.; Hamard, J.

    1989-01-01

    After a brief description of the present situation concerning the safety of the transport of UF6 and the new regulation project which is being developed under the behalf of IAEA, the equivalence of radioactive and chemical risks is considered for UF6 transport regulations. The concept of low specific activity appearing misfitting to toxic gas, it is proposed a quantity limit of material, T 2 (equivalent to A 2 for radioactive materials), for packagings which do not resist to accidental conditions, (9 m drop, 800 0 C, 30 minutes fire environment). It is proposed that this limit is chosen as the release rate which is acceptable after the IAEA tests for packages having a capacity higher than T 2 kilograms. The fire being considered as the most severe situation for the toxic risk, different possible scenarios are described. This approach of risk equivalence leads to impose that the packaging resists a 800 0 C - 30 minutes fire and that in this condition the release is less than T 2 . The problem of the behaviour of the shell and the openings (in particular the valve) is raised in this context [fr

  12. A general mechanism for intracellular toxicity of metal-containing nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabella, Stefania; Carney, Randy P.; Brunetti, Virgilio; Malvindi, Maria Ada; Al-Juffali, Noura; Vecchio, Giuseppe; Janes, Sam M.; Bakr, Osman M.; Cingolani, Roberto; Stellacci, Francesco; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2014-05-01

    The assessment of the risks exerted by nanoparticles is a key challenge for academic, industrial, and regulatory communities worldwide. Experimental evidence points towards significant toxicity for a range of nanoparticles both in vitro and in vivo. Worldwide efforts aim at uncovering the underlying mechanisms for this toxicity. Here, we show that the intracellular ion release elicited by the acidic conditions of the lysosomal cellular compartment - where particles are abundantly internalized - is responsible for the cascading events associated with nanoparticles-induced intracellular toxicity. We call this mechanism a ``lysosome-enhanced Trojan horse effect'' since, in the case of nanoparticles, the protective cellular machinery designed to degrade foreign objects is actually responsible for their toxicity. To test our hypothesis, we compare the toxicity of similar gold particles whose main difference is in the internalization pathways. We show that particles known to pass directly through cell membranes become more toxic when modified so as to be mostly internalized by endocytosis. Furthermore, using experiments with chelating and lysosomotropic agents, we found that the toxicity mechanism for different metal containing NPs (such as metallic, metal oxide, and semiconductor NPs) is mainly associated with the release of the corresponding toxic ions. Finally, we show that particles unable to release toxic ions (such as stably coated NPs, or diamond and silica NPs) are not harmful to intracellular environments.The assessment of the risks exerted by nanoparticles is a key challenge for academic, industrial, and regulatory communities worldwide. Experimental evidence points towards significant toxicity for a range of nanoparticles both in vitro and in vivo. Worldwide efforts aim at uncovering the underlying mechanisms for this toxicity. Here, we show that the intracellular ion release elicited by the acidic conditions of the lysosomal cellular compartment - where

  13. An assessment of whole effluent toxicity testing as a means of regulating waters produced by the oil and gas industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, S.L.; Bergman, H.L.

    1993-01-01

    Approximately 500 million barrels of produced water are discharged to Wyoming's surface waters by the oil and gas industry. This discharges are of two types: direct and indirect. The direct discharges have been issued NPDES permits requiring whole effluent toxicity testing. Toxicity testing requirements have not been incorporated into permits written for indirect discharges because of the applicability of toxicity testing for regulating these waters has not been determined. Preliminary testing has shown that most produced waters are toxic at the point of discharge because of high concentrations of hydrogen sulfide, but that the toxicity of an indirect discharge is often lost before it reaches a receiving stream. Thus, whole effluent toxicity testing of an indirect discharge may be overly stringent, resulting in treatment or reinjection of the water or closure of the well. Any of these options would have severe economic consequences for oil producers and the state's agricultural industry. The purpose of this study was to determine whether whole effluent toxicity testing actually predicts the in-stream effects of indirect discharges on water quality and benthic invertebrate populations. The authors will report the results of short-term ambient toxicity tests and in-stream bioassessments performed upstream and downstream of six indirect discharges located in four drainages in Wyoming

  14. Removal of CO2 in closed loop off-gas treatment systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clemens, M.K.; Nelson, P.A.; Swift, W.M.

    1994-01-01

    A closed loop test system has been installed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to demonstrate off-gas treatment, absorption, and purification systems to be used for incineration and vitrification of hazardous and mixed waste. Closed loop systems can virtually eliminate the potential for release of hazardous or toxic materials to the atmosphere during both normal and upset conditions. In initial tests, a 250,000 Btu/h (75 kW thermal) combustor was operated in an open loop to produce a combustion product gas. The CO 2 in these tests was removed by reaction with a fluidized bed of time to produce CaCO 3 . Subsequently, recirculation system was installed to allow closed loop operation with the addition of oxygen to the recycle stream to support combustion. Commercially marketed technologies for removal of CO 2 can be adapted for use on closed loop incineration systems. The paper also describes the Absorbent Solution Treatment (AST) process, based on modifications to commercially demonstrated gas purification technologies. In this process, a side loop system is added to the main loop for removing CO 2 in scrubbing towers using aqueous-based CO 2 absorbents. The remaining gas is returned to the incinerator with oxygen addition. The absorbent is regenerated by driving off the CO 2 and water vapor, which are released to the atmosphere. Contaminants are either recycled for further treatment or form precipitates which are removed during the purification and regeneration process. There are no direct releases of gases or particulates to the environment. The CO 2 and water vapor go through two changes of state before release, effectively separating these combustion products from contaminants released during incineration. The AST process can accept a wide range of waste streams. The system may be retrofitted to existing Facilities or included in the designs for new installations

  15. ERCB investigation report : Daylight Energy Amalgamation Co Ltd. sour gas release surface location 06-23-047-10W5M December 16, 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temple, B.; Schlager, J.; Wilkes, J.; Saulnier, P.; Mayall, J.; Duben, A.; Ravensdale, C.

    2010-07-21

    This report discussed a sour gas release that occurred at a well located near the town of Lodgepole. The well had a hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) concentration of 29.19 per cent, with an emergency planning zone (EPZ) of 570 m. The owner of the well contacted stakeholders in the region, and road blocks were set up north of the well. Three mobile air monitoring units were dispatched to the site, and service contractors were hired to kill the well. The road blocks were removed after a review of the air monitoring data. Prior to the release, a heat tape assembly had been installed in the well as a result of ongoing hydrate formation problems. An investigation of the well after the release showed damage to the connectors in the heat tape assembly. A failure analysis showed that the damage was caused by excessive temperatures created by a short circuit in the wires located in each connector. The heat allowed downhole gas pressure to push the wire to the surface. Gas was released from the damaged assembly seal. An outline of all steps taken to address the emergency was provided. 4 figs.

  16. Petroleum and hazardous material releases from industrial facilities associated with Hurricane Katrina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santella, Nicholas; Steinberg, Laura J; Sengul, Hatice

    2010-04-01

    Hurricane Katrina struck an area dense with industry, causing numerous releases of petroleum and hazardous materials. This study integrates information from a number of sources to describe the frequency, causes, and effects of these releases in order to inform analysis of risk from future hurricanes. Over 200 onshore releases of hazardous chemicals, petroleum, or natural gas were reported. Storm surge was responsible for the majority of petroleum releases and failure of storage tanks was the most common mechanism of release. Of the smaller number of hazardous chemical releases reported, many were associated with flaring from plant startup, shutdown, or process upset. In areas impacted by storm surge, 10% of the facilities within the Risk Management Plan (RMP) and Toxic Release Inventory (TRI) databases and 28% of SIC 1311 facilities experienced accidental releases. In areas subject only to hurricane strength winds, a lower fraction (1% of RMP and TRI and 10% of SIC 1311 facilities) experienced a release while 1% of all facility types reported a release in areas that experienced tropical storm strength winds. Of industrial facilities surveyed, more experienced indirect disruptions such as displacement of workers, loss of electricity and communication systems, and difficulty acquiring supplies and contractors for operations or reconstruction (55%), than experienced releases. To reduce the risk of hazardous material releases and speed the return to normal operations under these difficult conditions, greater attention should be devoted to risk-based facility design and improved prevention and response planning.

  17. A microstructure-dependent model for fission product gas release and swelling in UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notley, M.J.F.; Hastings, I.J.

    1979-06-01

    A model for the release of fission gas from irradiated UO2 fuel is presented. It incorporates fission gas diffusion bubble and grain boundary movement,intergranular bubble formation and interlinkage. In addition, the model allows estimates of the extent of structural change and fuel swelling. In the latter, contributions of thermal expansion, densification, solid fission products, and gas bubbles are considered. When included in the ELESIM fuel performance code, the model yields predictions which are in good agreement with data from UO2 fuel elements irradiated over a range of water-cooled reactor conditions: linear power outputs between 40 and 120 kW/m, burnups between 10 and 300 MW.h/kg U and power histories including constant, high-to-low and low-to-high power periods. The predictions of the model are shown to be most sensitive to fuel power (temperature), the selection of diffusion coefficient for fission gas in UO2 and burnup. The predictions are less sensitive to variables such as fuel restraint, initial grain size and the rate of grain growth. (author)

  18. Code of practice for the release of hydrostatic test water from hydrostatic testing of petroleum liquid and gas pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This booklet describes a series of administrative procedures regarding the code of practice in Alberta for the release of hydrostatic test water from hydrostatic testing of petroleum liquid and gas pipelines. The topics covered include the registration process, the type and quality of water to use during the test, and the analytical methods to be used. Reporting schedule and record keeping information are also covered. Schedule 1 discusses the requirements for the release of hydrostatic test water to land, while Schedule 2 describes the requirements for the release of hydrostatic test water to receiving water. 3 tabs

  19. A method of surface area measurement of fuel materials by fission gas release at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaimal, K.N.G.; Naik, M.C.; Paul, A.R.; Venkateswarlu, K.S.

    1989-01-01

    The present report deals with the development of a method for surface area measurement of nuclear fuel as well as fissile doped materials by fission gas release study at low temperature. The method is based on the evaluation of knock-out release rate of fission 133 Xe from irradiated fuel after sufficient cooling to decay the short lived activity. The report also describes the fabrication of an ampoule breaker unit for such study. Knock-out release rate of 133 Xe has been studied from UO 2 powders having varying surface area 'S' ranging from 270 cm 2 /gm to 4100 cm 2 /gm at two fissioning rates 10 12 f/cm 3 . sec. and 3.2x10 10 f/cm.sec. A relation between K and A has been established and discussed in this report. (author). 6 refs

  20. Ultraviolet degradation of procymidone -structuralcharacterization by gas chromatography coupled with masss spectrometry and potential toxicity of photoproducts using in silico tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rifai, A.; Jaber, F.; Souissi, Y.; Genty, Ch.; Bourcier, S.; Bouchonnet, S.; Clavaguera, C.

    2013-01-01

    RATIONALE: Procymidone is a dicarboximide fungicide mainly used for vineyard protection but also for different crops. The structural elucidation of by-products arising from the UV-visible photodegradation of procymidone has been investigated by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry. The potential toxicities of photoproducts were estimated by in silico tests. METHODS: Aqueous solutions of procymidone were irradiated for up to 90 min in a self-made reactor equipped with a mercury lamp. Analyses were carried out on a gas chromatograph coupled with an ion trap mass spectrometer operated in electron ionization and methanol positive chemical ionization. Multistage collision-induced dissociation (CID) experiments were performed to establish dissociation pathways of ions. Toxicities of byproducts were estimated using the QSAR T.E.S.T. program. RESULTS: Sixteen photoproducts were investigated. Chemical structures were proposed mainly based on the interpretation of multistage CID experiments, but also on their relative retention times and kinetics data. These structures enabled photodegradation pathways to be suggested. Only three photoproducts remain present after 90 min of irradiation. Among them, 3,5-dichloroaniline presents a predicted rat LD50 toxicity about ten times greater than that of procymidone. CONCLUSIONS: 3,5-Dichloroaniline is the only photoproduct reported in previous articles. Eight by-products among the sixteen characterized might be as toxic, if not more, than procymidone itself considering the QSAR-predicted rat LD 50. (author)

  1. Toxicity of sediments potentially contaminated by coal mining and natural gas extraction to unionid mussels and commonly tested benthic invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Kunz, James L.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Kane, Cindy M.; Evans, R. Brian; Alexander, Steven; Walker, Craig; Bakaletz, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Sediment toxicity tests were conducted to assess potential effects of contaminants associated with coal mining or natural gas extraction activities in the upper Tennessee River basin and eastern Cumberland River basin in the United States. Test species included two unionid mussels (rainbow mussel, Villosa iris, and wavy-rayed lampmussel, Lampsilis fasciola, 28-d exposures), and the commonly tested amphipod, Hyalella azteca (28-d exposure) and midge, Chironomus dilutus (10-d exposure). Sediments were collected from seven test sites with mussel communities classified as impacted and in proximity to coal mining or gas extraction activities, and from five reference sites with mussel communities classified as not impacted and no or limited coal mining or gas extraction activities. Additional samples were collected from six test sites potentially with high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and from a test site contaminated by a coal ash spill. Mean survival, length, or biomass of one or more test species was reduced in 10 of 14 test samples (71%) from impacted areas relative to the response of organisms in the five reference samples. A higher proportion of samples was classified as toxic to mussels (63% for rainbow mussels, 50% for wavy-rayed lampmussels) compared with amphipods (38%) or midge (38%). Concentrations of total recoverable metals and total PAHs in sediments did not exceed effects-based probable effect concentrations (PECs). However, the survival, length, or biomasses of the mussels were reduced significantly with increasing PEC quotients for metals and for total PAHs, or with increasing sum equilibrium-partitioning sediment benchmark toxic units for PAHs. The growth of the rainbow mussel also significantly decreased with increasing concentrations of a major anion (chloride) and major cations (calcium and magnesium) in sediment pore water. Results of the present study indicated that (1) the findings from laboratory tests were generally

  2. Exposure to potentially toxic hydrocarbons and halocarbons released from the dialyzer and tubing set during hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Ji Julie; Meinardi, Simone; Pahl, Madeleine V; Vaziri, Nostratola D; Blake, Donald R

    2012-10-01

    Although much is known about the effect of chronic kidney failure and dialysis on the composition of solutes in plasma, little is known about their impact on the composition of gaseous compounds in exhaled breath. This study was designed to explore the effect of uremia and the hemodialysis (HD) procedure on the composition of exhaled breath. Breath samples were collected from 10 dialysis patients immediately before, during, and after a dialysis session. To determine the potential introduction of gaseous compounds from dialysis components, gasses emitted from dialyzers, tubing set, dialysate, and water supplies were collected. Prospective cohort study. 10 HD patients and 10 age-matched healthy individuals. Predictors include the dialyzers, tubing set, dialysate, and water supplies before, during, and after dialysis. Changes in the composition of exhaled breath. A 5-column/detector gas chromatography system was used to measure hydrocarbon, halocarbon, oxygenate, and alkyl nitrate compounds. Concentrations of 14 hydrocarbons and halocarbons in patients' breath rapidly increased after the onset of the HD treatment. All 14 compounds and 5 others not found in patients' breath were emitted from the dialyzers and tubing sets. Contrary to earlier reports, exhaled breath ethane concentrations in our dialysis patients were virtually unchanged during the HD treatment. Single-center study with a small sample size may limit the generalizability of the findings. The study documented the release of several potentially toxic hydrocarbons and halocarbons to patients from the dialyzer and tubing sets during the HD procedure. Because long-term exposure to these compounds may contribute to the morbidity and mortality in dialysis population, this issue should be considered in the manufacturing of the new generation of dialyzers and dialysis tubing sets. Copyright © 2012 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. National Toxic Substance Incidents Program (NTSIP)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-02-03

    This podcast gives an overview of the three components of the National Toxic Substance Incidents Program: state surveillance, national database, and response teams.  Created: 2/3/2011 by Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry.   Date Released: 2/3/2011.

  4. Sediment porewater toxicity assessment studies in the vicinity of offshore oil and gas production platforms in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, R.S.; Chapman, D.C.; Presley, B.J.; Biedenbach, J.M.; Robertson, L.; Boothe, P.; Kilada, R.; Wade, T.; Montagna, P.

    1996-01-01

    As part of a multidisciplinary program to assess the potential long-term impacts of offshore oil and gas exploration and production activities in the Gulf of Mexico, sediment chemical analyses and porewater toxicity tests were conducted in the vicinity of five offshore platforms. Based on data from sea urchin fertilization and embryological development assays, toxicity was observed near four of the five platforms sampled; the majority of the toxic samples were collected within 150 m of a platform. There was excellent agreement among the results of porewater tests with three different species (sea urchin embryological development, polychaete reproduction, and copepod nauplii survival). The sediment concentrations of several metals were well in excess of sediment quality assessment guidelines at a number of stations, and good agreement was observed between predicted and observed toxicity. Porewater metal concentrations compared with EC50, LOEC, and NOEC values generated for water-only exposures indicated that the porewater concentrations for several metals were high enough to account for the observed toxicity. Results of these studies utilizing highly sensitive toxicity tests suggest that the contaminant-induced impacts from offshore platforms are limited to a localized area in the immediate vicinity of the platforms. 

  5. Persistent toxic substances released from uncontrolled e-waste recycling and actions for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Man, Ming; Naidu, Ravi; Wong, Ming H.

    2013-01-01

    The Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movement of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal was adopted on March 22, 1989 and enforced on May 5, 1992. Since then, the USA, one of the world's largest e-waste producers, has not ratified this Convention or the Basel Ban Amendment. Communities are still debating the legal loophole, which permits the export of whole products to other countries provided it is not for recycling. In January 2011, China's WEEE Directive was implemented, providing stricter control over e-waste imports to China, including Hong Kong, while emphasizing that e-waste recycling is the producers' responsibility. China is expected to supersede the USA as the principal e-waste producer, by 2020, according to the UNEP. Uncontrolled e-waste recycling activities generate and release heavy metals and POPs into the environment, which may be re-distributed, bioaccumulated and biomagnified, with potentially adverse human health effects. Greater efforts and scientific approaches are needed for future e-product designs of minimal toxic metal and compound use, reaping greater benefits than debating the definition and handling responsibilities of e-waste recycling. - Highlights: ► We recommended to ban uses of deca-BDE in addition to penta- and octa-BDEs. ► We suggested to replace PVC in electronic products with non-chlorinated polymers. ► Spend less time on debating responsibilities and definition of e-waste and recycling. ► Proposed to work more on eliminating sources and potentials of toxic substances

  6. Volatile organic compounds released from Microcystis flos-aquae under nitrogen sources and their toxic effects on Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qinghuan; Yang, Lin; Yang, Wangting; Bai, Yan; Hou, Ping; Zhao, Jingxian; Zhou, Lv; Zuo, Zhaojiang

    2017-01-01

    Eutrophication promotes massive growth of cyanobacteria and algal blooms, which can poison other algae and reduce biodiversity. To investigate the differences in multiple nitrogen (N) sources in eutrophicated water on the emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from cyanobacteria, and their toxic effects on other algal growth, we analyzed VOCs emitted from Microcystis flos-aquae with different types and concentrations of nitrogen, and determined the effects under Normal-N and Non-N conditions on Chlorella vulgaris. M. flos-aquae released 27, 22, 20, 27, 19, 25 and 17 compounds, respectively, with NaNO 3 , NaNO 2 , NH 4 Cl, urea, Ser, Lys and Arg as the sole N source. With the reduction in N amount, the emission of VOCs was increased markedly, and the most VOCs were found under Non-N condition. C. vulgaris cell propagation, photosynthetic pigment and Fv/Fm declined significantly following exposure to M. flos-aquae VOCs under Non-N condition, but not under Normal-N condition. When C. vulgaris cells were treated with two terpenoids, eucalyptol and limonene, the inhibitory effects were enhanced with increasing concentrations. Therefore, multiple N sources in eutrophicated water induce different VOC emissions from cyanobacteria, and reduction in N can cause nutrient competition, which can result in emissions of more VOCs. Those VOCs released from M. flos-aquae cells under Non-N for nutrient competition can inhibit other algal growth. Among those VOCs, eucalyptol and limonene are the major toxic agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Determination of fission gas release of spent nuclear fuel in puncturing test and in leaching experiments under anoxic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González-Robles, E., E-mail: ernesto.gonzalez-robles@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (KIT-INE), P.O. Box 3640, D-76021, Karlsruhe (Germany); Metz, V. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (KIT-INE), P.O. Box 3640, D-76021, Karlsruhe (Germany); Wegen, D.H. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements (JRC-ITU), P.O. Box 2340, 76125, Karlsruhe (Germany); Herm, M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (KIT-INE), P.O. Box 3640, D-76021, Karlsruhe (Germany); Papaioannou, D. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements (JRC-ITU), P.O. Box 2340, 76125, Karlsruhe (Germany); Bohnert, E. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (KIT-INE), P.O. Box 3640, D-76021, Karlsruhe (Germany); Gretter, R. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements (JRC-ITU), P.O. Box 2340, 76125, Karlsruhe (Germany); Müller, N. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (KIT-INE), P.O. Box 3640, D-76021, Karlsruhe (Germany); Nasyrow, R.; Weerd, W. de; Wiss, T. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements (JRC-ITU), P.O. Box 2340, 76125, Karlsruhe (Germany); Kienzler, B. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (KIT-INE), P.O. Box 3640, D-76021, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    During reactor operation the fission gases Kr and Xe are formed within the UO{sub 2} matrix of nuclear fuel. Their quantification is important to evaluate their impact on critical parameters regarding the fuel behaviour during irradiation and (long-term) interim storage, such as internal pressure of the fuel rod and fuel swelling. Moreover the content of Kr and Xe in the plenum of a fuel rod and their content in the UO{sub 2} fuel itself are widely used as indicators for the release properties of {sup 129}I, {sup 137}Cs, and other safety relevant radionuclides with respect to final disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The present study deals with the fission gas release from spent nuclear fuel exposed to simulated groundwater in comparison with the fission gas previously released to the fuel rod plenum during irradiation in reactor. In a unique approach we determined both the Kr and Xe inventories in the plenum by means of a puncturing test and in leaching experiments with a cladded fuel pellet and fuel fragments in bicarbonate water under 3.2 bar H{sub 2} overpressure. The fractional inventory of the fission gases released during irradiation into the plenum was (8.3 ± 0.9) %. The fraction of inventory of fission gases released during the leaching experiments was (17 ± 2) % after 333 days of leaching of the cladded pellet and (25 ± 2) % after 447 days of leaching of the fuel fragments, respectively. The relatively high release of fission gases in the experiment with fuel fragments was caused by the increased accessibility of water to the Kr and Xe occluded in the fuel.

  8. Release of copper from sintered tungsten-bronze shot under different pH conditions and its potential toxicity to aquatic organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Vernon G.; Santore, Robert C.; McGill, Ian

    2007-01-01

    Sintered tungsten-bronze is a new substitute for lead shot, and is about to be deposited in and around the wetlands of North America. This material contains copper in the alloyed form of bronze. This in vitro study was performed according to U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service criteria to determine the dissolution rate of copper from the shot, and to assess the toxic risk that it may present to aquatic organisms. The dissolution of copper from tungsten-bronze shot, pure copper shot, and glass beads was measured in a buffered, moderately hard, synthetic water of pH 5.5, 6.6, and 7.8 over a 28-day period. The dissolution of copper from both the control copper shot and the tungsten-bronze shot was affected significantly by the pH of the water and the duration of dissolution (all p values < 0.000). The rate of copper release from tungsten bronze shot was 30 to 50 times lower than that from the copper shot, depending on pH (p < 0.0000). The observed expected environmental concentration of copper released from tungsten-bronze shot after 28 days was 0.02 μg/L at pH 7.8, and 0.4 μg/L at pH 5.6, using a loading and exposure scenario specific in a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service protocol. Ratio Quotient values derived from the highest EEC observed in this study (0.4 μg/L), and the copper toxic effect levels for all aquatic species listed in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ambient water quality criteria database, were all far less than the 0.1 criterion value. Given the conditions stipulated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, heavy loading from discharged tungsten-bronze shot would not pose a toxic risk to potable water, or to soil. Consequently, it would appear that no toxic risks to aquatic organisms will attend the use of tungsten-bronze shot of the approved composition. Given the likelihood that sintered tungsten-bronze of the same formula will be used for fishing weights, bullets, and wheel balance weights, it is

  9. Mechanisms of gas retention and release: Experimental results for Hanford single-shell waste tanks 241-A-101, 241-S-106, and 241-U-103

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassat, S.D.; Caley, S.M.; Bredt, P.R.; Gauglitz, P.A.; Rinehart, D.E.; Forbes, S.V.

    1998-09-01

    The 177 underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site contain millions of gallons of radioactive waste resulting from the purification of nuclear materials and related processes. Through various mechanisms, flammable gas mixtures of hydrogen, ammonia, methane, and nitrous oxide are generated and retained in significant quantities within the waste in many (∼25) of these tanks. The potential for large releases of retained gas from these wastes creates a flammability hazard. It is a critical component of the effort to understand the flammability hazard and a primary goal of this laboratory investigation to establish an understanding of the mechanisms of gas retention and release in these wastes. The results of bubble retention experimental studies using waste samples from several waste tanks and a variety of waste types support resolution of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue. Gas bubble retention information gained in the pursuit of safe storage will, in turn, benefit future waste operations including salt-well pumping, waste transfers, and sluicing/retrieval

  10. Molecular toxicity mechanism of nanosilver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle McShan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Silver is an ancient antibiotic that has found many new uses due to its unique properties on the nanoscale. Due to its presence in many consumer products, the toxicity of nanosilver has become a hot topic. This review summarizes recent advances, particularly the molecular mechanism of nanosilver toxicity. The surface of nanosilver can easily be oxidized by O2 and other molecules in the environmental and biological systems leading to the release of Ag+, a known toxic ion. Therefore, nanosilver toxicity is closely related to the release of Ag+. In fact, it is difficult to determine what portion of the toxicity is from the nano-form and what is from the ionic form. The surface oxidation rate is closely related to the nanosilver surface coating, coexisting molecules, especially thiol-containing compounds, lighting conditions, and the interaction of nanosilver with nucleic acids, lipid molecules, and proteins in a biological system. Nanosilver has been shown to penetrate the cell and become internalized. Thus, nanosilver often acts as a source of Ag+ inside the cell. One of the main mechanisms of toxicity is that it causes oxidative stress through the generation of reactive oxygen species and causes damage to cellular components including DNA damage, activation of antioxidant enzymes, depletion of antioxidant molecules (e.g., glutathione, binding and disabling of proteins, and damage to the cell membrane. Several major questions remain to be answered: (1 the toxic contribution from the ionic form versus the nano-form; (2 key enzymes and signaling pathways responsible for the toxicity; and (3 effect of coexisting molecules on the toxicity and its relationship to surface coating.

  11. A general mechanism for intracellular toxicity of metal-containing nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Sabella, Stefania

    2014-04-09

    The assessment of the risks exerted by nanoparticles is a key challenge for academic, industrial, and regulatory communities worldwide. Experimental evidence points towards significant toxicity for a range of nanoparticles both in vitro and in vivo. Worldwide efforts aim at uncovering the underlying mechanisms for this toxicity. Here, we show that the intracellular ion release elicited by the acidic conditions of the lysosomal cellular compartment-where particles are abundantly internalized-is responsible for the cascading events associated with nanoparticles-induced intracellular toxicity. We call this mechanism a "lysosome-enhanced Trojan horse effect" since, in the case of nanoparticles, the protective cellular machinery designed to degrade foreign objects is actually responsible for their toxicity. To test our hypothesis, we compare the toxicity of similar gold particles whose main difference is in the internalization pathways. We show that particles known to pass directly through cell membranes become more toxic when modified so as to be mostly internalized by endocytosis. Furthermore, using experiments with chelating and lysosomotropic agents, we found that the toxicity mechanism for different metal containing NPs (such as metallic, metal oxide, and semiconductor NPs) is mainly associated with the release of the corresponding toxic ions. Finally, we show that particles unable to release toxic ions (such as stably coated NPs, or diamond and silica NPs) are not harmful to intracellular environments. The Royal Society of Chemistry 2014.

  12. A general mechanism for intracellular toxicity of metal-containing nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Sabella, Stefania; Carney, Randy P.; Brunetti, Virgilio; Malvindi, Maria Ada; Al-Juffali, Noura; Vecchio, Giuseppe; Janes, Sam M.; Bakr, Osman; Cingolani, Roberto; Stellacci, Francesco; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of the risks exerted by nanoparticles is a key challenge for academic, industrial, and regulatory communities worldwide. Experimental evidence points towards significant toxicity for a range of nanoparticles both in vitro and in vivo. Worldwide efforts aim at uncovering the underlying mechanisms for this toxicity. Here, we show that the intracellular ion release elicited by the acidic conditions of the lysosomal cellular compartment-where particles are abundantly internalized-is responsible for the cascading events associated with nanoparticles-induced intracellular toxicity. We call this mechanism a "lysosome-enhanced Trojan horse effect" since, in the case of nanoparticles, the protective cellular machinery designed to degrade foreign objects is actually responsible for their toxicity. To test our hypothesis, we compare the toxicity of similar gold particles whose main difference is in the internalization pathways. We show that particles known to pass directly through cell membranes become more toxic when modified so as to be mostly internalized by endocytosis. Furthermore, using experiments with chelating and lysosomotropic agents, we found that the toxicity mechanism for different metal containing NPs (such as metallic, metal oxide, and semiconductor NPs) is mainly associated with the release of the corresponding toxic ions. Finally, we show that particles unable to release toxic ions (such as stably coated NPs, or diamond and silica NPs) are not harmful to intracellular environments. The Royal Society of Chemistry 2014.

  13. The evaluation of failure stress and released amount of fission product gas of power ramped rod by fuel behaviour analysis code 'FEMAXI-III'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagisawa, Kazuaki; Fujita, Misao

    1984-01-01

    Pellet-Cladding Interaction(PCI) related in-pile failure of Zircaloy sheathed fuel rod is in general considered to be caused by combination of pellet-cladding mechanical interaction(PCMI) with fuel-cladding chemical interaction(FCCI). An understanding of a basic mechanism of PCI-related fuel failure is therefore necessary to get actual cladding hoop stress from mechanical interaction and released amounts of fission product(FP) gas of aggressive environmental agency from chemical interaction. This paper describes results of code analysis performed on fuel failure to cladding hoop stress and amounts of FP gas released under the condition associated with power ramping. Data from Halden(HBWR) and from Studsvik(R2) are used for code analysis. The fuel behaviour analysis code ''FEMAXI-III'' is used as an analytical tool. The followings are revealed from the study: (1) PCI-related fuel failure is dependent upon cladding hoop stress and released amounts of FP gas at power ramping. (2) Preliminary calculated threshold values of hoop stress and of released amounts of FP gas to PCI failure are respectively 330MPa, 10% under the Halden condition, 190MPa, 5% under the Inter ramp(BWR) condition, and 270MPa, 14% under the Over ramp(PWR) condition. The values of hoop stress calculated are almost in the similar range of those obtained from ex-reactor PCI simulated tests searched from references published. (3) The FEMAXI-III code verification is made in mechanical manner by using in-pile deformation data(diametral strain) obtained from power ramping test undertaken by JAERI. While, the code verification is made in thermal manner by using punctured FP gas data obtained from post irradiation examination performed on non-defected power ramped fuel rods. The calculations are resulted in good agreements to both, mechanical and thermal experimental data suggesting the validity of the code evaluation. (J.P.N.)

  14. The Role of Deposition in Limiting the Hazard Extent of Dense-Gas Plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dillon, M B

    2008-05-11

    Accidents that involve large (multi-ton) releases of toxic industrial chemicals and form dense-gas clouds often yield far fewer fatalities, casualties and environmental effects than standard assessment and emergency response models predict. This modeling study, which considers both dense-gas turbulence suppression and deposition to environmental objects (e.g. buildings), demonstrates that dry deposition to environmental objects may play a significant role in reducing the distance at which adverse impacts occur - particularly under low-wind, stable atmospheric conditions which are often considered to be the worst-case scenario for these types of releases. The degree to which the released chemical sticks to (or reacts with) environmental surfaces is likely a key parameter controlling hazard extents. In all modeled cases, the deposition to vertical surfaces of environmental objects (e.g. building walls) was more efficient in reducing atmospheric chemical concentrations than deposition to the earth's surface. This study suggests that (1) hazard extents may vary widely by release environment (e.g. grasslands vs. suburbia) and release conditions (e.g. sunlight or humidity may change the rate at which chemicals react with a surface) and (2) greenbelts (or similar structures) may dramatically reduce the impacts of large-scale releases. While these results are demonstrated to be qualitatively consistent with the downwind extent of vegetation damage in two chlorine releases, critical knowledge gaps exist and this study provides recommendations for additional experimental studies.

  15. Barrier and operational risk analysis of hydrocarbon releases (BORA-Release)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sklet, Snorre; Vinnem, Jan Erik; Aven, Terje

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents results from a case study carried out on an offshore oil and gas production platform with the purpose to apply and test BORA-Release, a method for barrier and operational risk analysis of hydrocarbon releases. A description of the BORA-Release method is given in Part I of the paper. BORA-Release is applied to express the platform specific hydrocarbon release frequencies for three release scenarios for selected systems and activities on the platform. The case study demonstrated that the BORA-Release method is a useful tool for analysing the effect on the release frequency of safety barriers introduced to prevent hydrocarbon releases, and to study the effect on the barrier performance of platform specific conditions of technical, human, operational, and organisational risk influencing factors (RIFs). BORA-Release may also be used to analyse the effect on the release frequency of risk reducing measures

  16. Do 16 Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Represent PAH Air Toxicity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samburova, Vera; Zielinska, Barbara; Khlystov, Andrey

    2017-08-15

    Estimation of carcinogenic potency based on analysis of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) ranked by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is the most popular approach within scientific and environmental air quality management communities. The majority of PAH monitoring projects have been focused on particle-bound PAHs, ignoring the contribution of gas-phase PAHs to the toxicity of PAH mixtures in air samples. In this study, we analyzed the results of 13 projects in which 88 PAHs in both gas and particle phases were collected from different sources (biomass burning, mining operation, and vehicle emissions), as well as in urban air. The aim was to investigate whether 16 particle-bound U.S. EPA priority PAHs adequately represented health risks of inhalation exposure to atmospheric PAH mixtures. PAH concentrations were converted to benzo(a)pyrene-equivalent (BaPeq) toxicity using the toxic equivalency factor (TEF) approach. TEFs of PAH compounds for which such data is not available were estimated using TEFs of close isomers. Total BaPeq toxicities (∑ 88 BaPeq) of gas- and particle-phase PAHs were compared with BaPeq toxicities calculated for the 16 particle-phase EPA PAH (∑ 16EPA BaPeq). The results showed that 16 EPA particle-bound PAHs underrepresented the carcinogenic potency on average by 85.6% relative to the total (gas and particle) BaPeq toxicity of 88 PAHs. Gas-phase PAHs, like methylnaphthalenes, may contribute up to 30% of ∑ 88 BaPeq. Accounting for other individual non-EPA PAHs (i.e., benzo(e)pyrene) and gas-phase PAHs (i.e., naphthalene, 1- and 2-methylnaphthalene) will make the risk assessment of PAH-containing air samples significantly more accurate.

  17. Tests for oil/dispersant toxicity: In situ laboratory assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, D.A.; Coelho, G.M.; Aurand, D.V.

    1995-01-01

    As part of its readiness program in oil spill response, the Marine Pollution Control Unit (MPCU), Department of Transport, U.K. conducts annual field trials in the North Sea, approximately 30 nautical miles from the southeast coast of England. The trials take the form of controlled releases of crude oil or Medium Fuel/Gas Oil mix (MFO), with and without the application of Corexit 9527 dispersant. In 1994 and 1995 the authors conducted a series of in situ toxicity bioassays in association with these spills with included 48h LC50 tests for turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) and oyster (Crassostrea gigas) larvae, a 48 h oyster (C. gigas) embryonic development test and two full life-cycle assays using the copepods Acartia tonsa and Tisbe battagliai. Tests were also conducted in the Chesapeake Bay laboratory using estuarine species including the copepod Eurytemora affinis and the inland silverside Menidia beryllina. Here, the authors report on the results of these assays, together with 1996 in situ toxicity data resulting from Norwegian field trials in the northern North Sea

  18. Methodology for flammable gas evaluations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopkins, J.D., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-12

    There are 177 radioactive waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site. The waste generates flammable gases. The waste releases gas continuously, but in some tanks the waste has shown a tendency to trap these flammable gases. When enough gas is trapped in a tank`s waste matrix, it may be released in a way that renders part or all of the tank atmosphere flammable for a period of time. Tanks must be evaluated against previously defined criteria to determine whether they can present a flammable gas hazard. This document presents the methodology for evaluating tanks in two areas of concern in the tank headspace:steady-state flammable-gas concentration resulting from continuous release, and concentration resulting from an episodic gas release.

  19. Analytical methods for toxic gases from thermal degradation of polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, M.-T. S.

    1977-01-01

    Toxic gases evolved from the thermal oxidative degradation of synthetic or natural polymers in small laboratory chambers or in large scale fire tests are measured by several different analytical methods. Gas detector tubes are used for fast on-site detection of suspect toxic gases. The infrared spectroscopic method is an excellent qualitative and quantitative analysis for some toxic gases. Permanent gases such as carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane and ethylene, can be quantitatively determined by gas chromatography. Highly toxic and corrosive gases such as nitrogen oxides, hydrogen cyanide, hydrogen fluoride, hydrogen chloride and sulfur dioxide should be passed into a scrubbing solution for subsequent analysis by either specific ion electrodes or spectrophotometric methods. Low-concentration toxic organic vapors can be concentrated in a cold trap and then analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The limitations of different methods are discussed.

  20. Persistent toxic substances released from uncontrolled e-waste recycling and actions for the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Man, Ming [Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, Hong Kong Baptist University (Hong Kong); Naidu, Ravi [Cooperative Research Centre for Contamination Assessment and Remediation of Environments (CRC CARE), University of South Australia (Australia); Wong, Ming H., E-mail: mhwong@hkbu.edu.hk [Croucher Institute for Environmental Sciences, Hong Kong Baptist University (Hong Kong)

    2013-10-01

    The Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movement of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal was adopted on March 22, 1989 and enforced on May 5, 1992. Since then, the USA, one of the world's largest e-waste producers, has not ratified this Convention or the Basel Ban Amendment. Communities are still debating the legal loophole, which permits the export of whole products to other countries provided it is not for recycling. In January 2011, China's WEEE Directive was implemented, providing stricter control over e-waste imports to China, including Hong Kong, while emphasizing that e-waste recycling is the producers' responsibility. China is expected to supersede the USA as the principal e-waste producer, by 2020, according to the UNEP. Uncontrolled e-waste recycling activities generate and release heavy metals and POPs into the environment, which may be re-distributed, bioaccumulated and biomagnified, with potentially adverse human health effects. Greater efforts and scientific approaches are needed for future e-product designs of minimal toxic metal and compound use, reaping greater benefits than debating the definition and handling responsibilities of e-waste recycling. - Highlights: ► We recommended to ban uses of deca-BDE in addition to penta- and octa-BDEs. ► We suggested to replace PVC in electronic products with non-chlorinated polymers. ► Spend less time on debating responsibilities and definition of e-waste and recycling. ► Proposed to work more on eliminating sources and potentials of toxic substances.

  1. Adequate Measuring Technology and System of Fission Gas release Behavior from Voloxidation Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Geun Il; Park, J. J.; Jung, I. H.; Shin, J. M.; Yang, M. S.; Song, K. C.

    2006-09-01

    Based on the published literature and an understanding of available hot cell technologies, more accurate measuring methods for each volatile fission product released from voloxidation process were reviewed and selected. The conceptual design of an apparatus for measuring volatile and/or semi-volatile fission products released from spent fuel was prepared. It was identified that on-line measurement techniques can be applied for gamma-emitting fission products, and off-line measurement such as chemical/or neutron activation analysis can applied for analyzing beta-emitting fission gases. Collection methods using appropriate material or solutions were selected to measure the release fraction of beta-emitting gaseous fission products at IMEF M6 hot cell. Especially, the on-line gamma-ray counting system for monitoring of 85Kr and the off-line measuring system of 14C was established. On-line measuring system for obtaining removal ratios of the semi-volatile fission products, mainly gamma-emitting fission products such as Cs, Ru etc., was also developed at IMEF M6 hot cell which was based on by measuring fuel inventory before and after the voloxidation test through gamma measuring technique. The development of this measurement system may enable basic information to be obtained to support design of the off-gas treatment system for the voloxidation process at INL, USA

  2. Release characteristics of tritium from high-purity lithium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Kula, K.R.; Vogelsang, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    Rates of tritium release from neutronirradiated lithium oxide were determined from isothermal release experiments. High-purity, monocrystalline lithium oxide was purged ex-reactor with helium and helium-hydrogen gas streams. Overall release was found to be controlled by solid-phase diffusion, and was predominantly in the form of condensible species. The result of an independent concentration profile analysis at 923 K was in agreement with the gas release diffusion coefficient. Sweeping the Li 2 O with hydrogen-containing gas was found to enhance tritium removal during the early stage of each run

  3. The potential for buoyant displacement gas release events in Tank 241-SY-102 after waste transfer from Tank 241-SY-101

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, BE; Meyer, P.E.; Chen, G.

    2000-01-01

    Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101) is a double-shell, radioactive waste storage tank with waste that, before the recent transfer and water back-dilution operations, was capable of retaining gas and producing buoyant displacement (BD) gas release events (GREs). Some BD GREs caused gas concentrations in the tank headspace to exceed the lower flammability limit (LFL). A BD GRE occurs when a portion of the nonconvective layer retains enough gas to become buoyant, rises to the waste surface, breaks up, and releases some of its stored gas. The installation of a mixer pump in 1993 successfully mitigated gas retention in the settled solids layer in SY-101 and has since prevented BD GREs. However, operation of the mixer pump over the years caused gas retention in the floating crust layer and a corresponding accelerated waste level growth. The accelerating crust growth trend observed in 1997--98 led to initiation of sequences of waste removal and water back-dilutions in December 1999. Waste is removed from the mixed slurry layer in Tank SY-101 and transferred into Tank 241-Sy-102 (SY-102). Water is then added back to dissolve soluble solids that retain gas. The initial transfer of 89,500 gallons of SY-101 waste, diluted in-line at 0.94:1 by volume with water, to SY-102 was conducted in December 1999. The second transfer of 230,000 gallons of original SY-101 waste, diluted approximately 0.9:1, was completed in January 2000, and the third transfer of 205,500 gallons of original SY-101 waste diluted at 0.9:1 was completed in March 2000

  4. Action of coal gas on plants. II. Action on green plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehmer, C

    1917-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the effects of coal gas on cress. Although the seeds are not killed by coal gas, they are prevented from germinating. Cress will grow in as much as 30% coal gas, but it will not survive higher concentrations. Coal gas contains both toxic and non-toxic constituents. CO, C/sub 2/H/sub 4/, C/sub 2/H/sub 2/, CS/sub 2/, H/sub 2/S are not toxic at concentrations found in coal gas. The toxic effects of coal gas are not caused by the lack of O/sub 2/, but by minor impurities in the gas.

  5. Release and Degradation of Microencapsulated Spinosad and Emamectin Benzoate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bin Bin; Zhang, Shao Fei; Chen, Peng Hao; Wu, Gang

    2017-09-07

    The dynamics of release and degradation of the microencapsulation formulation containing spinosad (SP) and emamectin benzoate (EM) were evaluated in the present study. SP and EM were microencapsulated using biodegradable poly-lactic acid (PLA) as the wall material. Their release from and degradation within the prepared SP and EM microspheres (SP-EM-microspheres) were studied. It was found that the encapsulation significantly prolonged the insecticide release. The release could be further extended if the external aqueous phase was pre-saturated with the insecticides and the microspheres were additionally coated with gelatin. On the other hand, increasing the water content of the emulsion or the hydrophilic polycaprolactone (PCL) content in the PLA/PCL mixture accelerated the release. Due to the photolysis and hydrolysis of SP and EM by sunlight, the toxicity of the non-encapsulated insecticides in water declined continuously from 0 through the 9 th day (d), and dissipated in 13 d. In contrast, an aqueous suspension containing 5% SP-EM-microspheres maintained a mostly constant toxicity to Plutella xylostella for 17 d. The biodegradable SP-EM-microspheres showed significantly higher long-term toxicity to P. xylostella due to lower release, reduced photolysis and hydrolysis of the encapsulated insecticides, which were affected by the varied preparation conditions.

  6. Removal potential of toxic 2378-substituted PCDD/F from incinerator flue gases by waste-derived activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajizadeh, Yaghoub; Onwudili, Jude A; Williams, Paul T

    2011-06-01

    The application of activated carbons has become a commonly used emission control protocol for the removal or adsorption of persistent organic pollutants from the flue gas streams of waste incinerators. In this study, the 2378-substituted PCDD/F removal efficiency of three types of activated carbons derived from the pyrolysis of refuse derived fuel, textile waste and scrap tyre was investigated and compared with that of a commercial carbon. Experiments were carried out in a laboratory scale fixed-bed reactor under a simulated flue gas at 275°C with a reaction period of four days. The PCDD/F in the solid matrices and exhaust gas, were analyzed using gas chromatography coupled with a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. In the absence of activated carbon adsorbent, there was a significant increase in the concentration of toxic PCDD/F produced in the reacted flyash, reaching up to 6.6 times higher than in the raw flyash. In addition, there was a substantial release of PCDD/F into the gas phase, which was found in the flue gas trapping system. By application of the different commercial, refuse derived fuel, textile and tyre activated carbons the total PCDD/F toxic equivalent removal efficiencies in the exhaust gas stream were 58%, 57%, 64% and 52%, respectively. In general, the removal of the PCDDs was much higher with an average of 85% compared to PCDFs at 41%. Analysis of the reacted activated carbons showed that there was some formation of PCDD/F, for instance, a total of 60.6 μg I-TEQ kg(-1) toxic PCDD/F was formed in the refuse derived fuel activated carbon compared to 34 μg I-TEQ kg(-1) in the commercial activated carbon. The activated carbons derived from the pyrolysis of waste, therefore, showed good potential as a control material for PCDD/F emissions in waste incinerator flue gases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Coal fired flue gas mercury emission controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jiang; Pan, Weiguo; Cao, Yan; Pan, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is one of the most toxic heavy metals, harmful to both the environment and human health. Hg is released into the atmosphere from natural and anthropogenic sources and its emission control has caused much concern. This book introduces readers to Hg pollution from natural and anthropogenic sources and systematically describes coal-fired flue gas mercury emission control in industry, especially from coal-fired power stations. Mercury emission control theory and experimental research are demonstrated, including how elemental mercury is oxidized into oxidized mercury and the effect of flue gas contents on the mercury speciation transformation process. Mercury emission control methods, such as existing APCDs (air pollution control devices) at power stations, sorbent injection, additives in coal combustion and photo-catalytic methods are introduced in detail. Lab-scale, pilot-scale and full-scale experimental studies of sorbent injection conducted by the authors are presented systematically, helping researchers and engineers to understand how this approach reduces the mercury emissions in flue gas and to apply the methods in mercury emission control at coal-fired power stations.

  8. Coal fired flue gas mercury emission controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jiang; Pan, Weiguo [Shanghai Univ. of Electric Power (China); Cao, Yan; Pan, Weiping [Western Kentucky Univ., Bowling Green, KY (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Mercury (Hg) is one of the most toxic heavy metals, harmful to both the environment and human health. Hg is released into the atmosphere from natural and anthropogenic sources and its emission control has caused much concern. This book introduces readers to Hg pollution from natural and anthropogenic sources and systematically describes coal-fired flue gas mercury emission control in industry, especially from coal-fired power stations. Mercury emission control theory and experimental research are demonstrated, including how elemental mercury is oxidized into oxidized mercury and the effect of flue gas contents on the mercury speciation transformation process. Mercury emission control methods, such as existing APCDs (air pollution control devices) at power stations, sorbent injection, additives in coal combustion and photo-catalytic methods are introduced in detail. Lab-scale, pilot-scale and full-scale experimental studies of sorbent injection conducted by the authors are presented systematically, helping researchers and engineers to understand how this approach reduces the mercury emissions in flue gas and to apply the methods in mercury emission control at coal-fired power stations.

  9. DsbA-L prevents obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance by suppressing the mtDNA release-activated cGAS-cGAMP-STING pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Juli; Cervantes, Christopher; Liu, Juan; He, Sijia; Zhou, Haiyan; Zhang, Bilin; Cai, Huan; Yin, Dongqing; Hu, Derong; Li, Zhi; Chen, Hongzhi; Gao, Xiaoli; Wang, Fang; O'Connor, Jason C; Xu, Yong; Liu, Meilian; Dong, Lily Q; Liu, Feng

    2017-11-14

    Chronic inflammation in adipose tissue plays a key role in obesity-induced insulin resistance. However, the mechanisms underlying obesity-induced inflammation remain elusive. Here we show that obesity promotes mtDNA release into the cytosol, where it triggers inflammatory responses by activating the DNA-sensing cGAS-cGAMP-STING pathway. Fat-specific knockout of disulfide-bond A oxidoreductase-like protein (DsbA-L), a chaperone-like protein originally identified in the mitochondrial matrix, impaired mitochondrial function and promoted mtDNA release, leading to activation of the cGAS-cGAMP-STING pathway and inflammatory responses. Conversely, fat-specific overexpression of DsbA-L protected mice against high-fat diet-induced activation of the cGAS-cGAMP-STING pathway and inflammation. Taken together, we identify DsbA-L as a key molecule that maintains mitochondrial integrity. DsbA-L deficiency promotes inflammation and insulin resistance by activating the cGAS-cGAMP-STING pathway. Our study also reveals that, in addition to its well-characterized roles in innate immune surveillance, the cGAS-cGAMP-STING pathway plays an important role in mediating obesity-induced metabolic dysfunction.

  10. Mechanistic analysis of double-shell tank gas release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allemann, R.T.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Friley, J.R.; Haines, C.E.; Liljegren, L.M.; Somasundaram, S.

    1991-12-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is studying possible mechanisms and fluid dynamics contributing to the periodic release of gases from the double-shell waste storage tanks at Hanford. This study is being conducted for Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), a contractor for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This interim report discusses the work done through November 1990. Safe management of the wastes at Hanford depends on an understanding of the chemical and physical mechanisms that take place in the waste tanks. An example of the need to understand these mechanisms is tank 101-SY. The waste in this tank is generating and periodically releasing potentially flammable gases into the tank vent system according to observations of the tank. How these gases are generated and become trapped, the causes of periodic release, and the mechanism of the release are not known in detail. In order to develop a safe mitigation strategy, possible physical mechanisms for the periodic release of flammable gases need to be understood.

  11. Breeding blanket development. Tritium release from breeder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Kawamura, Hiroshi; Nagao, Yoshiharu

    2006-01-01

    Engineering data on neutron irradiation performance of tritium breeders are needed to design the breeding blanket of fusion reactor. In this study, tritium release experiments of the breeders were carried out to examine the effects of various parameters (such as sweep gas flow rate, hydrogen content in sweep gas, irradiation temperature and thermal neutron flux) on tritium generation and release behavior. Lithium titanate (Li 2 TiO 3 ) is considered as a candidate tritium breeder in the blanket design of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). As for the shape of the breeder material, a small spherical form is preferred to reduce the thermal stress induced in the breeder. Li 2 TiO 3 pebbles of about 170g in total weight and with 0.3 and 2 mm in diameter were manufactured by a wet process, and an assembly packed with the binary Li 2 TiO 3 pebbles was irradiated in Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). The tritium was generated in the Li 2 TiO 3 pebble bed and released from the pebble bed, and was swept downstream using the sweep gas for on-line analysis of tritium content. Concentration of total tritium and gaseous tritium (HT or T 2 gas) released from the Li 2 TiO 3 pebble bed were measured by ionization chambers, and the ratio of (gaseous tritium)/(total tritium) was evaluated. The sweep gas flow rate was changed from 100 to 900cm 3 /min, and hydrogen content in the sweep gas was changed from 100 to 10000 ppm. Furthermore, thermal neutron flux was changed using a window made of hafnium (Hf) neutron absorber. The irradiation temperature at an outer region of the Li 2 TiO 3 pebble bed was held between 200 and 400degC. The main results of this experiment are summarized as follows. 1) When the temperature at the outside edge of the Li 2 TiO 3 pebble bed exceeded 100degC, the tritium release from the Li 2 TiO 3 pebble bed started. The ratio of the tritium release rate and the tritium generation rate (normalized tritium release rate: R/G) reached

  12. Release of segregated nuclides from spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L.H.; Tait, J.C. [Atomic Energy Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Laboratories

    1997-10-01

    The potential release of fission and activation products from spent nuclear fuel into groundwater after container failure in the Swedish deep repository is discussed. Data from studies of fission gas release from representative Swedish BWR fuel are used to estimate the average fission gas release for the spent fuel population. Information from a variety of leaching studies on LWR and CANDU fuel are then reviewed as a basis for estimating the fraction of the inventory of key radionuclides that could be released preferentially (the Instant Release Fraction of IRF) upon failure of the fuel cladding. The uncertainties associated with these estimates are discussed. 33 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs.

  13. Air toxics provisions of the Clean Air Act: Potential impacts on energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hootman, H.A.; Vernet, J.E.

    1991-11-01

    This report provides an overview of the provisions of the Clean Air Act and its Amendments of 1990 that identify hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions and addresses their regulation by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It defines the major energy sector sources of these HAPs that would be affected by the regulations. Attention is focused on regulations that would cover coke oven emissions; chromium emission from industrial cooling towers and the electroplating process; HAP emissions from tank vessels, asbestos-related activities, organic solvent use, and ethylene oxide sterilization; and emissions of air toxics from municipal waste combustors. The possible implications of Title III regulations for the coal, natural gas, petroleum, uranium, and electric utility industries are examined. The report discusses five major databases of HAP emissions: (1) TRI (EPA's Toxic Release Inventory); (2) PISCES (Power Plant Integrated Systems: Chemical Emissions Studies developed by the Electric Power Research Institute); (3) 1985 Emissions Inventory on volatile organic compounds (used for the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program); (4) Particulate Matter Species Manual (EPA); and (5) Toxics Emission Inventory (National Aeronautics and Space Administration). It also offers information on emission control technologies for municipal waste combustors

  14. Quantitative Analysis of Kr-85 Fission Gas Release from Dry Process for the Treatment of Spent PWR Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Geun Il; Cho, Kwang Hun; Lee, Dou Youn; Lee, Jung Won; Park, Jang Jin; Song, Kee Chan

    2007-01-01

    As spent UO 2 fuel oxidizes to U 3 O 8 by air oxidation, a corresponding volume expansion separate grains, releasing the grain-boundary inventory of fission gases. Fission products in spent UO 2 fuel can be distributed in three major regions : the inventory in fuel-sheath gap, the inventory on grain boundaries and the inventory in UO 2 matrix. Release characteristic of fission gases depends on its distribution amount in three regions as well as spent fuel burn-up. Oxidation experiments of spent fuel at 500 .deg. C gives the information of fission gases inventory in spent fuel, and further annealing experiments at higher temperature produces matrix inventory of fission gases on segregated grain. In previous study, fractional release characteristics of Kr- 85 during OREOX (Oxidation and REduction of Oxide fuel) treatment as principal key process for recycling spent PWR fuel via DUPIC cycle have already evaluated as a function of fuel burn-up with 27.3, 35 and 65 MWd/tU. In this paper, new release experiment results of Kr-85 using spent fuel with burn- up of 58 GWd/tU are included to evaluate the fission gas release behavior. As a point of summary in fission gases release behavior, the quantitative analysis of Kr- 85 release characteristics from various spent fuels with different burn-up during voloxidation and OREOX process were reviewed

  15. The stability of CaS in circulating fluidized bed boiler residue and the possible release of H2S gas to the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattisson, T.; Lyngfelt, A.

    1995-01-01

    During the combustion of coal, SO 2 is released to the atmosphere. Because of environmental concerns with acid rain, the capture of SO 2 is an important issue. In fluidized bed combustion SO 2 is captured in-situ by limestone or dolomite to form CaSO 4 . This product is stable and can be disposed of or reused as gypsum. In order to capture the sulphur as CaSO 4 oxidizing conditions are necessary. In a fluidized bed boiler (FBB) CaS may form in regions with reducing conditions, and FBB ashes sampled under irregular operating conditions may contain as much as 50 % of the captured sulphur as CaS. The stability of CaS in a landfill environment is thus very important. It is possible that the sulphide decomposes in the presence of moisture or runoff leachate with the subsequent release of H 2 S gas. This re-release of captured sulphur could have a substantial effect on the overall sulphur capture efficiency, with more sulphur released to the atmosphere than previously thought. In this study the stability of CaS in bed ashes from a 12 MW circulating FBB combusting coal has been investigated, with focus on the release of H 2 S gas. (orig.)

  16. Irradiated fuel behavior under accident heating conditions and correlation with fission gas release and swelling model (Chicago)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kryger, B.; Ducamp, F.; Combette, P.

    1981-08-01

    We analyse the mixed oxide fast fuel response to off normal conditions obtained by means of an out-of-pile transient simulation apparatus designed to provide direct observations (temperature, pressure, fuel motion) of fuel fission gas phenomena that might occur during the transients. The results are concerning fast transient tests (0,1 to 1 second) obtained with high gas concentration irradiated fuel (4 to 7 at % burn up, 0,4 cm 3 Xe + Kr /g.UPuO 2 ). The kinetics of fission gas release during the transients have been directly measured and then compared with the calculated results issued of the Chicago model. This model agrees, quite well, with other experiments done in the silene prompt reactor. Other gases than xenon and krypton (such as hydrogen and carbon monoxide) do not play any role in fuel behavior, since they have been completely ruled out

  17. TOXIC METAL EMISSIONS FROM INCINERATION: MECHANISMS AND CONTROL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxic metals appear in the effluents of many combustion processes, and their release into the environment has come under regulatory scrutiny. This paper reviews the nature of the problems associated with toxic metals in combustion processes, and describes where these problems occ...

  18. In-vitro Release Study of Carvedilol Phosphate Matrix Tablets ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    decreased while Starch 1500 and lactose monohydrate increased drug release. Drug release mechanism ... case of antihypertensive agents to maintain constant blood levels ... systems because of their low toxicity, pH- independent swelling ...

  19. Experiments to investigate the effects of small changes in fuel stoichiometry on fission gas release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, P S; Smith, R C [Windscale Lab., AEA Technology, Seascale, Cumbria (United Kingdom)

    1997-08-01

    Fuel pin failure in-reactor leads to fission product and in the case of a PWR fuel debris release to the coolant. For economic reasons immediate shutdown and discharge of failed fuel needs to be avoided but this needs to be counter-balanced against the increasing dose to operators. PWR practice is to continue running wit failed rods, monitoring coolant activity, and only shutting down the reactor and discharging the fuel when circuit activity levels become unacceptable. The rate of fission product release under failed fuel conditions is of key importance and considerable effort has been directed towards establishing the dependency of release on temperature, heating rate, burn-up, and also the extent of fuel oxidation. As a precursor to a possible wider investigation of this area, a small programme was mounted during 1992/1993 to confirm whether small changes in the oxidation state of the fuel, for example those caused by minor cladding defects, would significantly effect fuel behaviour during postulated design basis faults. The objective of the programme was to determine the effects of small departures from stoichiometric fuel composition on fission gas release, and to compare the results with the current methodology for calculating releases under fault conditions. A total of eight experiments was performed. Two were intended as baseline tests to provide a reference with which to compare the effect of oxidation state influenced behaviour with that of thermal effects. It was found that small changes in stoichiometry of {sup {approx}}1 x 10{sup -6} had little or no effect on release but that changes of {sup {approx}} 1 x 10{sup -4} were observed to increase the diffusion coefficient, for {sup 85}Kr, by up to an order of magnitude and hence greatly increase the release rate. The stoichiometry of the sample used in these tests was, for convenience, adjusted using He/H{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O atmospheres. (Abstract Truncated)

  20. Transient fission product release during reactor shutdown and startup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, C.E.L.; Lewis, B.J.

    1995-01-01

    Sweep gas experiments performed at CRL from 1979 to 1985 have been analysed to determine the fraction of the fission product gas inventory that is released on reactor shutdown and startup. Empirical equations were derived and applied to calculate the xenon release from companion fuel elements and from a well documented experimental fuel bundle irradiated in the NRU reactor. The measured gas release could be matched to within about a factor of two for an experimental irradiation with a burnup of 217 MWh/kgU. (author)

  1. A pressure-amplifying framework material with negative gas adsorption transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Simon; Bon, Volodymyr; Senkovska, Irena; Stoeck, Ulrich; Wallacher, Dirk; Többens, Daniel M; Zander, Stefan; Pillai, Renjith S; Maurin, Guillaume; Coudert, François-Xavier; Kaskel, Stefan

    2016-04-21

    Adsorption-based phenomena are important in gas separations, such as the treatment of greenhouse-gas and toxic-gas pollutants, and in water-adsorption-based heat pumps for solar cooling systems. The ability to tune the pore size, shape and functionality of crystalline porous coordination polymers--or metal-organic frameworks (MOFs)--has made them attractive materials for such adsorption-based applications. The flexibility and guest-molecule-dependent response of MOFs give rise to unexpected and often desirable adsorption phenomena. Common to all isothermal gas adsorption phenomena, however, is increased gas uptake with increased pressure. Here we report adsorption transitions in the isotherms of a MOF (DUT-49) that exhibits a negative gas adsorption; that is, spontaneous desorption of gas (methane and n-butane) occurs during pressure increase in a defined temperature and pressure range. A combination of in situ powder X-ray diffraction, gas adsorption experiments and simulations shows that this adsorption behaviour is controlled by a sudden hysteretic structural deformation and pore contraction of the MOF, which releases guest molecules. These findings may enable technologies using frameworks capable of negative gas adsorption for pressure amplification in micro- and macroscopic system engineering. Negative gas adsorption extends the series of counterintuitive phenomena such as negative thermal expansion and negative refractive indices and may be interpreted as an adsorptive analogue of force-amplifying negative compressibility transitions proposed for metamaterials.

  2. Estimating release of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from coal-tar contaminated soil at manufactured gas plant sites. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, L.S.

    1998-04-01

    One of EPRI's goals regarding the environmental behavior of organic substances consists of developing information and predictive tools to estimate the release potential of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from contaminated soils at manufactured gas (MGP) plant sites. A proper assessment of the distribution of contaminants under equilibrium conditions and the potential for mass-transfer constraints is essential in evaluating the environmental risks of contaminants in the subsurface at MGP sites and for selecting remediation options. The results of this research provide insights into estimating maximum release concentrations of PAHs from MGP soils that have been contaminated by direct contact with the tar or through years of contact with contaminated groundwater. Attention is also given to evaluating the use of water-miscible cosolvents for estimating aqueous phase concentrations, and assessing the role of mass-transfer constraints in the release of PAHs from MGP site soils

  3. Flammable gas project topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, G.D.

    1997-01-29

    The flammable gas safety issue was recognized in 1990 with the declaration of an unreviewed safety question (USQ) by the U. S. Department of Energy as a result of the behavior of the Hanford Site high-level waste tank 241-SY-101. This tank exhibited episodic releases of flammable gas that on a couple of occasions exceeded the lower flammability limit of hydrogen in air. Over the past six years there has been a considerable amount of knowledge gained about the chemical and physical processes that govern the behavior of tank 241-SY-1 01 and other tanks associated with the flammable gas safety issue. This report was prepared to provide an overview of that knowledge and to provide a description of the key information still needed to resolve the issue. Items covered by this report include summaries of the understanding of gas generation, retention and release mechanisms, the composition and flammability behavior of the gas mixture, the amounts of stored gas, and estimated gas release fractions for spontaneous releases. `Me report also discusses methods being developed for evaluating the 177 tanks at the Hanford Site and the problems associated with these methods. Means for measuring the gases emitted from the waste are described along with laboratory experiments designed to gain more information regarding rates of generation, species of gases emitted and modes of gas storage and release. Finally, the process for closing the USQ is outlined as are the information requirements to understand and resolve the flammable gas issue.

  4. Physiologically available cyanide (PAC) in manufactured gas plant waste and soil samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magee, B.; Taft, A.; Ratliff, W.; Kelley, J.; Sullivan, J.; Pancorbo, O.

    1995-01-01

    Iron-complexed cyanide compounds, such as ferri-ferrocyanide (Prussian Blue), are wastes associated with former manufactured gas plant (MGP) facilities. When tested for total cyanide, these wastes often show a high total cyanide content. Because simple cyanide salts are acutely toxic, cyanide compounds can be the subject of concern. However, Prussian Blue and related species are known to have a low order of human and animal toxicity. Toxicology data on complexed cyanides will be presented. Another issue regarding Prussian Blue and related species is that the total cyanide method does not accurately represent the amount of free cyanide released from these cyanide species. The method involves boiling the sample in an acidic solution under vacuum to force the formation of HCN gas. Thus, Prussian Blue, which is known to be low in toxicity, cannot be properly evaluated with current methods. The Massachusetts Natural Gas Council initiated a program with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection to develop a method that would define the amount of cyanide that is able to be converted into hydrogen cyanide under the pH conditions of the stomach. It is demonstrated that less than 1% of the cyanide present in Prussian Blue samples and soils from MGP sites can be converted to HCN under the conditions of the human stomach. The physiologically available cyanide method has been designed to be executed at a higher temperature for one hour. It is shown that physiologically available cyanide in MGP samples is < 5--15% of total cyanide

  5. Comparing rankings of selected TRI organic chemicals for two environments using a level III fugacity model and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, F.G.; Egemen, E.; Nirmalakhandan, N.

    1998-01-01

    The Toxics Release Inventory, TRI (USEPA, 1995) is a comprehensive listing of chemicals, mass released, source of releases, and other related information for chemicals which are released into the environment in the US. These chemicals are then ranked according to the mass released as a indication of their environmental impact. Industries have been encouraged to adopt production methods to decrease the release of chemicals which are ranked highly in the TRI. Clearly, this ranking of the chemicals based upon the mass released fails to take into account very important environmental aspects. The first and most obvious aspect is the wide range of toxicity's of the chemicals released. Numerous researchers have proposed systems to rank chemicals according to their toxicity. The second aspect, which a mass released based ranking does not take into account, is the fate and transport of each chemical within the environment. Cohen and Ryan (1985) and Mackay and Paterson (1991) have proposed models to evaluate the fate and transport of chemicals released into the environment. Some authors have incorporated the mass released and toxicity with some fate and transport aspects to rank the impact of released chemicals. But, due to the complexities of modeling the environment, the lack of published data on properties of chemicals, and the lack of information on the speciation of chemicals in complex systems, modeling the fate and transport of toxic chemicals in the environment remains difficult. To provide an indication of the need to rank chemicals according to their environmental impact instead of the mass released, the authors have utilized a subset of 45 organic chemicals from the TRI, modeled the fate and transport of the chemicals using a Level III fugacity model, and compared those equilibrium concentrations with toxicity data to yield a hazard value for each chemical

  6. Sub-100 nm biodegradable nanoparticles: in vitro release features and toxicity testing in 2D and 3D cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biondi, Marco; Guarnieri, Daniela; Yu Hui; Belli, Valentina; Netti, Paolo Antonio

    2013-01-01

    A big challenge in tumor targeting by nanoparticles (NPs), taking advantage of the enhanced permeability and retention effect, is the fabrication of small size devices for enhanced tumor penetration, which is considered fundamental to improve chemotherapy efficacy. The purposes of this study are (i) to engineer the formulation of doxorubicin-loaded poly(d,l-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)–block–poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) NPs to obtain <100 nm devices and (ii) to translate standard 2D cytotoxicity studies to 3D collagen systems in which an initial step gradient of the NPs is present. Doxorubicin release can be prolonged for days to weeks depending on the NP formulation and the pH of the release medium. Sub-100 nm NPs are effectively internalized by HeLa cells in 2D and are less cytotoxic than free doxorubicin. In 3D, <100 nm NPs are significantly more toxic than larger ones towards HeLa cells, and the cell death rate is affected by the contributions of drug release and device transport through collagen. Thus, the reduction of NP size is a fundamental feature from both a technological and a biological point of view and must be properly engineered to optimize the tumor response to the NPs. (paper)

  7. Fission gas release from the sintered UO{sub 2} fuel; Oslobadjanje fisionih gasova iz goriva od sinterovanog UO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigulinski, F; Stevanovic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Yugoslavia)

    1966-11-15

    This paper shoes the phenomena which control fission gases release from the sintered UO{sub 2} dependent of the burnup rate: ejection, release, diffusion, increased fission gas accumulation causing structural changes in the fuel. release of fission gases from the fuel for power reactors was studied as well. The influence of factors as temperature, characteristics of fuel, burnup rate and burnup level was analyzed. Prikazani su mehanizmi koji kontrolisu izdvajanje fisionih gasova iz sinterovanog UO{sub 2} pri razlicitim brzinama izgaranja: izletanje, izbijanje, difuzija, povecano izdvajanje fisionih gasova koje prati strukturne promene u gorivu. Razmatrano je proucavanje izdvajanja fisionih gasova iz goriva za reaktore snage. Analiziran je uticaj faktora kao sto su temperatura, karakteristike goriva, brzina i stepen izgaranja (author)

  8. Gas Release Behavior of Cu-TiH2 Composite Powder and Its Application as a Blowing Agent to Fabricate Aluminum Foams with Low Porosity and Small Pore Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ying; Li, Yanxiang; Chen, Xiang; Liu, Zhiyong; Zhou, Xu; Wang, Ningzhen

    2018-03-01

    Compared to traditional pore structure with high porosity (≥ 80 pct) and large pore size (≥ 3 mm), aluminum foams with low porosity (60 to 70 pct) and small pore size (≤ 2 mm) possess higher compressive property and formability. In order to achieve the goal of reducing pore size, Cu-TiH2 composite powder prepared by ball milling preoxidized TiH2 with Cu powder was used as a blowing agent. Its gas release behavior was characterized by thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. The results show that the ball milling treatment can advance the gas release process and slow the gas release rate at the same time. All these changes are favorable to the reduction of porosity and pore size. Such Cu-TiH2 composite powder provides an alternative way to fabricate aluminum foams with low porosity and small pore size.

  9. Gas Release Behavior of Cu-TiH2 Composite Powder and Its Application as a Blowing Agent to Fabricate Aluminum Foams with Low Porosity and Small Pore Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ying; Li, Yanxiang; Chen, Xiang; Liu, Zhiyong; Zhou, Xu; Wang, Ningzhen

    2018-06-01

    Compared to traditional pore structure with high porosity (≥ 80 pct) and large pore size (≥ 3 mm), aluminum foams with low porosity (60 to 70 pct) and small pore size (≤ 2 mm) possess higher compressive property and formability. In order to achieve the goal of reducing pore size, Cu-TiH2 composite powder prepared by ball milling preoxidized TiH2 with Cu powder was used as a blowing agent. Its gas release behavior was characterized by thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. The results show that the ball milling treatment can advance the gas release process and slow the gas release rate at the same time. All these changes are favorable to the reduction of porosity and pore size. Such Cu-TiH2 composite powder provides an alternative way to fabricate aluminum foams with low porosity and small pore size.

  10. Flammable gas tank safety program: Technical basis for gas analysis and monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, D.J.

    1995-01-01

    Flammable gases generated in radioactive liquids. Twenty-five high level radioactive liquid waste storage tanks located underground at the Hanford Site are on a Flammable Gas Watch List because they contain waste which tends to retain the gases generated in it until rather large quantities are available for sudden release to the tank head space; if a tank is full it has little dome space, and a flammable concentration of gases could be produced--even if the tank is ventilated. If the waste has no tendency to retain gas generated in it then a continual flammable gas concentration in the tank dome space is established by the gas production rate and the tank ventilation rate (or breathing rate for unventilated tanks); this is also a potential problem for Flammable Gas Watch List tanks, and perhaps other Hanford tanks too. All Flammable Gas Watch List tanks will be fitted with Standard Hydorgen Monitoring Systems so that their behavior can be observed. In some cases, such as tank 241-SY-101, the data gathered from such observations will indicate that tank conditions need to be mitigated so that gas release events are either eliminated or rendered harmless. For example, a mixer pump was installed in tank 241-SY-101; operating the pump stirs the waste, replacing the large gas release events with small releases of gas that are kept below twenty-five percent of the lower flammability limit by the ventilation system. The concentration of hydrogen measured in Hanford waste tanks is greater than that of any other flammable gas. Hydrogen levels measured with a Standard Hydrogen Monitoring System in excess of 0.6 volume percent will cause Westinghouse Hanford Company to consider actions which will decrease the amount of flammable gas in the tank

  11. Protein alkylation, transcriptional responses and cytochrome c release during acrolein toxicity in A549 cells: influence of nucleophilic culture media constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Colin A; Burcham, Philip C

    2008-06-01

    Acrolein is a toxic combustion product that elicits apoptotic and/or necrotic cell death depending on the conditions under which exposure occurs. As a strong electrophile, side-reactions with nucleophilic media constituents seem likely to accompany study of its toxicity in vitro, but these reactions are poorly characterized. We have thus examined the effect of media composition on the toxicity of acrolein in A549 cells. Cells were exposed to acrolein in either Dulbecco's buffered saline (DBS) or F12 supplemented with various concentrations of fetal bovine serum. Cell viability was assessed using the MTT assay, while heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and cytoplasmic cytochrome c were measured as respective markers of transcriptional response and apoptosis. Protein damage was evaluated using the protein carbonyl assay. Compared to F12 media (with or without serum), maximal cell death as evaluated using the MTT assay, as well as adduction of intracellular proteins, occurred when cells were exposed to acrolein in DBS. In contrast, cytochrome c release was maximal in cells exposed to acrolein in serum-containing F12, conditions which inhibited protein modification and overt cell death. These findings highlight the need for careful attention to experimental conditions when conducting in vitro toxicological studies of reactive substances.

  12. NC-6301, a polymeric micelle rationally optimized for effective release of docetaxel, is potent but is less toxic than native docetaxel in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Kano, Mitsunobu; Harada,; Iwata,; Saito,; Ishii,; Hayashi,; Yashiro,; Hirakawa,; Miyazono,Kohei; Kato,Yasuki; Kano,Mitsunobu

    2012-01-01

    Mitsunori Harada,1 Caname Iwata,2 Hiroyuki Saito,1 Kenta Ishii,1 Tatsuyuki Hayashi,1 Masakazu Yashiro,3 Kosei Hirakawa,3 Kohei Miyazono,2 Yasuki Kato,1 Mitsunobu R Kano21Research Division, NanoCarrier Co, Ltd, Chiba, Japan; 2Department of Molecular Pathology, Graduate School of Medicine, University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; 3Department of Surgical Oncology, Osaka City University, Osaka, JapanAbstract: Drug release rate is an important factor in determining efficacy and toxicity of nanoscale dru...

  13. Fission gas retention in irradiated metallic fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.R.; Gruber, E.E.; Kramer, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical calculations and experimental measurements of the quantity of retained fission gas in irradiated metallic fuel (U-5Fs) are presented. The calculations utilize the Booth method to model the steady-state release of gases from fuel grains and a simplified grain-boundary gas model to predict the gas release from intergranular regions. The quantity of gas retained in as-irradiated fuel was determined by collecting the gases released from short segments of EBR-II driver fuel that were melted in a gas-tight furnace. Comparison of the calculations to the measurements shows quantitative agreement with both the magnitude and the axial variation of the retained gas content

  14. A review of fission gas release data within the Nea/IAEA IFPE database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnbull, J.A.; Menut, P.; Sartori, E.

    2002-01-01

    The paper describes the International Fuel Performance Experimental (IFPE) database on nuclear fuel performance. The aim of the project is to provide a comprehensive and well-qualified database on Zr clad UO 2 fuel for model development and code validation in the public domain. The data encompass both normal and off-normal operation and include prototypic commercial irradiations as well as experiments performed in material testing reactors. To date, the database contains some 380 individual cases, the majority of which provide data on FGR either from in-pile pressure measurements or PIE techniques including puncturing, electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) measurements. The paper outlines parameters affecting fission gas release and highlights individual datasets addressing these issues. (authors)

  15. MODELING DISPERSION FROM CHEMICALS RELEASED AFTER A TRAIN COLLISION IN GRANITEVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, R; Chuck Hunter, C; Robert Addis, R; Matt Parker, M

    2006-08-07

    The Savannah River National Laboratory's (SRNL) Weather INformation and Display (WIND) System was used to provide meteorological and atmospheric modeling/consequence assessment support to state and local agencies following the collision of two Norfolk Southern freight trains on the morning of January 6, 2005. This collision resulted in the release of several toxic chemicals to the environment, including chlorine. The dense and highly toxic cloud of chlorine gas that formed in the vicinity of the accident was responsible for nine fatalities, and caused injuries to more than five hundred others. Transport model results depicting the forecast path of the ongoing release were made available to emergency managers in the county's Unified Command Center shortly after SRNL received a request for assistance. Support continued over the ensuing two days of the active response. The SRNL also provided weather briefings and transport/consequence assessment model results to responders from South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Emergency Operations Center (EOC), Department of Energy Headquarters, and hazmat teams dispatched from the SRS. Although model-generated forecast winds used in consequence assessments conducted during the incident were provided at 2-km horizontal grid spacing during the accident response, a high-resolution Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS, version 4.3.0) simulation was later performed to examine potential influences of local topography on plume migration. The detailed RAMS simulation was used to determine meteorology using multiple grids with an innermost grid spacing of 125 meters. Results from the two simulations are shown to generally agree with meteorological observations at the time; consequently, local topography did not significantly affect wind in the area. Use of a dense gas dispersion model to simulate localized plume behavior using the higher resolution

  16. Tritium and helium retention and release from irradiated beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderl, R.A.; Longhurst, G.R.; Oates, M.A.; Pawelko, R.J. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports the results of an experimental effort to anneal irradiated beryllium specimens and characterize them for steam-chemical reactivity experiments. Fully-dense, consolidated powder metallurgy Be cylinders, irradiated in the EBR-II to a fast neutron (>0.1 MeV) fluence of {approx}6 x 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}, were annealed at temperatures from 450degC to 1200degC. The releases of tritium and helium were measured during the heat-up phase and during the high-temperature anneals. These experiments revealed that, at 600degC and below, there was insignificant gas release. Tritium release at 700degC exhibited a delayed increase in the release rate, while the specimen was at 700degC. For anneal temperatures of 800degC and higher, tritium and helium release was concurrent and the release behavior was characterized by gas-burst peaks. Essentially all of the tritium and helium was released at temperatures of 1000degC and higher, whereas about 1/10 of the tritium was released during the anneals at 700degC and 800degC. Measurements were made to determine the bulk density, porosity and specific surface area for each specimen before and after annealing. These measurements indicated that annealing caused the irradiated Be to swell, by as much as 14% at 700degC and 56% at 1200degC. Kr gas adsorption measurements for samples annealed at 1000degC and 1200degC determined specific surface areas between 0.04 m{sup 2}/g and 0.1 m{sup 2}/g for these annealed specimens. The tritium and helium gas release measurements and the specific surface area measurements indicated that annealing of irradiated Be caused a porosity network to evolve and become surface-connected to relieve internal gas pressure. (author)

  17. Calculation of tritium release from reactor's stack

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhadi, M.

    1996-01-01

    Method for calculation of tritium release from nuclear to environment has been discussed. Part of gas effluent contain tritium in form of HTO vapor released from reactor's stack was sampled using silica-gel. The silica-gel was put in the water to withdraw HTO vapor absorbed by silica-gel. Tritium concentration in the water was measured by liquid scintillation counter of Aloka LSC-703. Tritium concentration in the gas effluent and total release of tritium from reactor's stack during certain interval time were calculated using simple mathematic formula. This method has examined for calculation of tritium release from JRR-3M's stack of JAERI, Japan. From the calculation it was obtained the value of tritium release as much as 4.63 x 10 11 Bq during one month. (author)

  18. Releases of radioactive substances from Swedish nuclear power plants (RAKU)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingemansson, T.; Bergstroem, C. [ALARA Engineering AB, Skultuna (Sweden)

    1997-04-01

    Releases of radioactivity to air and water from Swedish nuclear power plants have been studied and compared with those from foreign reactors. Averaged over the years from commissioning of the reactors to the last year data are available, the release of radioactive noble gas from the Swedish BWRs has been about the same as from comparable foreign reactors. The oldest Swedish BWRs, Oskarshamn 1 and 2 (O1 and O2) and Ringhals 1 (R1), have simple off-gas systems with only one delay volume. All BWRs in US, Germany, Japan and Switzerland are equipped with more sophisticated off-gas systems. It can be expected that O1, O2 and R1 therefore will have the highest release of noble gas activity at an international comparison if they do not modernize their off-gas system. BWRs in US, Germany and Japan are today equipped with recombiners and with one exception also charcoal columns. Japanese BWRs report zero releases to air. Releases of radioactivity to water after commissioning was about the same for most of the studied reactors. Some of the newest German plants have had low annual releases already at commissioning. Improvements of the treatment systems at old German, Swiss and US reactors have significantly lowered the releases. For most of the Swedish plants the annual releases to water have remained at the initial level. Forsmark 3 has succeeded in decreasing the release of radionuclides to water by a factor of almost one hundred compared to other Swedish reactors. Also O3 has managed to decrease the liquid effluents. Japanese plants have zero release of radioactivity excluding tritium to water. The release of tritium is about the same for all reactors of the same type in the world. 35 refs, 31 figs, 24 tabs.

  19. Toxicity of jet fuel aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon mixtures on human epidermal Keratinocytes: evaluation based on in vitro cytotoxicity and interleukin-8 release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jen-Hung (Chung-Shan Medical University Hospital, Department of Dermatology, Taichung, Taiwan, R.O.C); Lee, Chia-Hue; Tsang, Chau-Loong [National Chung-Hsing University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Taichung (Taiwan); Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.; Riviere, Jim E. [North Carolina State University, Center for Chemical Toxicology Research and Pharmacokinetics (CCTRP), Raleigh, NC (United States); Chou, Chi-Chung [National Chung-Hsing University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Taichung (Taiwan); National Chung-Hsing University, College of Veterinary Medicine, Taichung (Taiwan)

    2006-08-15

    Jet fuels are complex mixtures of aliphatic (ALI) and aromatic (ARO) hydrocarbons that vary significantly in individual cytotoxicity and proinflammatory activity in human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK). In order to delineate the toxicological interactions among individual hydrocarbons in a mixture and their contributions to cutaneous toxicity, nine ALI and five ARO hydrocarbons were each divided into five (high/medium/low cytotoxic and strong/weak IL-8 induction) groups and intra/inter-mixed to assess for their mixture effects on HEK mortality and IL-8 release. Addition of single hydrocarbon to JP-8 fuel was also evaluated for their changes in fuel dermatotoxicity. The results indicated that when hydrocarbons were mixed, HEK mortality and IL-8 release were not all predictable by their individual ability affecting these two parameters. The lowest HEK mortality (7%) and the highest IL-8 production were induced with mixtures including high cytotoxic and weak IL-8 inductive ARO hydrocarbons. Antagonistic reactions not consistently correlated with ALI carbon chain length and ARO structure were evident and carried different weight in the overall mixture toxicities. Single addition of benzene, toluene, xylene or ethylbenzene for up to tenfold in JP-8 did not increase HEK mortality while single addition of ALI hydrocarbons exhibited dose-related differential response in IL-8. In an all ALI environment, no single hydrocarbon is the dominating factor in the determination of HEK cytotoxicity while deletion of hexadecane resulted in a 2.5-fold increase in IL-8 production. Overall, decane, undecane and dodecane were the major hydrocarbons associated with high cytotoxicity while tetradecane, pentadecane and hexadecane were those which had the greatest buffering effect attenuating dermatotoxicity. The mixture effects must be considered when evaluating jet fuel toxicity to HEK. (orig.)

  20. Diffusion and release of noble gas and halogen fission products with several days half-life in UO2 particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Chao

    2013-01-01

    The exact solutions of diffusion and release model of noble gas and halogen fission products in UO 2 particle of HTGR were built under the conditions of adsorption effect and other physical processes. The corresponding release fractions (F(t)) and the ratio of release and productive amounts (R(t)/B (t)) of fission products were also derived. Furthermore, the F(t) and R(t)/B(t) of 131 I, 131 IXe m , 133 Xe and 133 Xe m whose half-lifes are several days in UO 2 particle with the exact solutions, approximate solutions and corresponding numerical solutions under different temperature histories of reactor core were investigated. The results show that the F(t) and R(t)/B(t) are different in numerical values unless the time of release is long enough. The properties of conservation of exact solutions are much more reasonable than the ones of approximate solutions. It is also found that the results of exact solutions approach the actual working conditions more than the approximate and numerical solutions. (author)

  1. Toxicity of ozone and nitrogen dioxide to alveolar macrophages: comparative study revealing differences in their mechanism of toxic action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietjens, I. M.; Poelen, M. C.; Hempenius, R. A.; Gijbels, M. J.; Alink, G. M.

    1986-01-01

    The toxicity of ozone and nitrogen dioxide is generally ascribed to their oxidative potential. In this study their toxic mechanism of action was compared using an intact cell model. Rat alveolar macrophages were exposed by means of gas diffusion through a Teflon film. In this in vitro system, ozone

  2. Biochars mitigate greenhouse gas emissions and bioaccumulation of potentially toxic elements and arsenic speciation in Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Muhammad; Li, Gang; Khan, Sardar; Chi, Qiaoqiao; Xu, Yaoyang; Zhu, Yongguan

    2017-08-01

    Anthropogenic and natural activities can lead to increased greenhouse gas emissions and discharge of potentially toxic elements (PTEs) into soil environment. Biochar amendment to soils is a cost-effective technology and sustainable approach used to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions, improve phytoremediation, and minimize the health risks associated with consumption of PTE-contaminated vegetables. Greenhouse pot experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of peanut shell biochar (PNB) and sewage sludge biochar (SSB) on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, plant growth, PTE bioaccumulation, and arsenic (As) speciation in bean plants. Results indicated that amendments of PNB and SSB increased plant biomass production by increasing soil fertility and reducing bioavailability of PTEs. Addition of biochars also increased soil pH, total nitrogen (TN), total carbon (TC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and ammonium-nitrogen (NH 4 -N) but decreased available concentrations of PTEs such as cadmium (Cd), lead (Pb), and As. The concentration of nitrate-nitrogen (NO 3 - -N) was also decreased in biochar-amended soils. In addition, PNB and SSB amendments significantly (P Greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and methane (CH 4 ) emissions were significantly (P greenhouse gas emissions and PTE bioaccumulation as well as arsenic speciation in P. vulgaris L.

  3. Mechanisms of Phosphine Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisa S. Nath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fumigation with phosphine gas is by far the most widely used treatment for the protection of stored grain against insect pests. The development of high-level resistance in insects now threatens its continued use. As there is no suitable chemical to replace phosphine, it is essential to understand the mechanisms of phosphine toxicity to increase the effectiveness of resistance management. Because phosphine is such a simple molecule (PH3, the chemistry of phosphorus is central to its toxicity. The elements above and below phosphorus in the periodic table are nitrogen (N and arsenic (As, which also produce toxic hydrides, namely, NH3 and AsH3. The three hydrides cause related symptoms and similar changes to cellular and organismal physiology, including disruption of the sympathetic nervous system, suppressed energy metabolism and toxic changes to the redox state of the cell. We propose that these three effects are interdependent contributors to phosphine toxicity.

  4. Persistent toxic substances released from uncontrolled e-waste recycling and actions for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Ming; Naidu, Ravi; Wong, Ming H

    2013-10-01

    The Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movement of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal was adopted on March 22, 1989 and enforced on May 5, 1992. Since then, the USA, one of the world's largest e-waste producers, has not ratified this Convention or the Basel Ban Amendment. Communities are still debating the legal loophole, which permits the export of whole products to other countries provided it is not for recycling. In January 2011, China's WEEE Directive was implemented, providing stricter control over e-waste imports to China, including Hong Kong, while emphasizing that e-waste recycling is the producers' responsibility. China is expected to supersede the USA as the principal e-waste producer, by 2020, according to the UNEP. Uncontrolled e-waste recycling activities generate and release heavy metals and POPs into the environment, which may be re-distributed, bioaccumulated and biomagnified, with potentially adverse human health effects. Greater efforts and scientific approaches are needed for future e-product designs of minimal toxic metal and compound use, reaping greater benefits than debating the definition and handling responsibilities of e-waste recycling. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact of methanol and CNG fuels on motor-vehicle toxic emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, F.; Gabele, P.

    1991-01-01

    The 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments require that the Environmental Protection Agency investigate the need for reduction of motor vehicle toxic emissions such as formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, benzene, 1,3-butadiene, and polycyclic organic matter. Toxic organic emissions can be reduced by utilizing the control technologies employed for regulated THC (NMHC) and CO emissions, and by changing fuel composition. The paper examines emissions associated with the use of methanol and compressed natural gas fuels. Both tailpipe and evaporative emissions are examined at varied ambient temperatures ranging from 20 C to 105 F. Tailpipe emissions are also examined over a variety of driving cycles with average speeds ranging from 7 to 48 mph. Results suggest that an equivalent ambient temperatures and average speeds, motor vehicle toxic emissions are generally reduced with methanol and compressed natural gas fuels relative to those with gasoline, except for formaldehyde emissions, which may be elevated. As with gasoline, tailpipe toxic emissions with methanol and compressed natural gas fuels generally increase when ambient temperature or average speed decreases (the sensitivity to these variables is greater with methanol than with compressed natural gas). Evaporative emissions generally increase when fuel volatility or ambient temperature increases (however, the relative contribution of evaporative sources to the aggregate toxic compound emissions is small)

  6. Analysis of accidental UF6 releases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Yumao; Tan Rui; Gao Qifa

    2012-01-01

    As interim substance in the nuclear fuel enrichment process, Uranium Hexafluoride (UF 6 ) is widely applied in nuclear processing, enrichment and fuel fabrication plants. Because of its vivid chemical characteristics and special radiological hazard and chemical toxicity, great attention must be paid to accident of UF 6 leakage. The chemical reactions involved in UF 6 release processes were introduced, therewith potential release styles, pathways and characteristics of diffusion were analyzed. The results indicated that the accidental release process of UF 6 is not a simple passive diffusion. So, specific atmospheric diffusion model related to UF 6 releases need be used in order to analyze and evaluate accurately the accidental consequences. (authors)

  7. Comparing PAH availability from manufactured gas plant soils and sediments with chemical and biological tests. 1. PAH release during water desorption and supercritical carbon dioxide extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawthorne, S.B.; Poppendieck, D.G.; Grabanski, C.B.; Loehr, R.C. [University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND (US). Energy and Environmental Research Center

    2002-11-15

    Soil and sediment samples from OG (oil gas) and CG (coal gas) manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites in the United States that had been closed for about 50 years were selected to represent a range of PAH concentrations and sample matrix compositions. Samples varied from vegetated soils to lampblack soot and had carbon contents from 3 to 87 wt%. Supercritical carbon dioxide, SFE desorption and water/XAD{sub 2} desorption curves were determined and fit with a simple two-site model to determine the rapid-released fraction (F) for PAHs ranging from naphthalene to benzo-(ghi)perylene. F values varied greatly among the samples. Release rates did not correlate with sample matrix characteristics including PAH concentrations, elemental composition or 'hard' and 'soft' organic carbon, indicating that PAH release cannot easily be estimated on the basis of sample matrix composition. F values for CG site samples obtained with SFE and water desorption agreed well but SFE yielded higher F values for the OG samples. These behaviors were attributed to the stronger ability of carbon dioxide than water to desorb PAHs from the highly aromatic (hard) carbon of the OG matrixes, while carbon dioxide and water showed similar abilities to desorb PAHs from the more polar (soft) carbon of the CG samples. The combined SFE and water desorption approaches should improve the understanding of PAH sequestration and release from contaminated soils and sediments and provide the basis for subsequent studies, using the same samples to compare PAH release with PAH availability to earthworms. 46 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Environmental effects of a tritium gas release from the Savannah River Plant on December 31, 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobsen, W.R.

    1976-03-01

    At 10:00 p.m. EST on December 31, 1975, 182,000 Ci of tritium gas was released within about 1.5 min from a tritium processing facility at the Savannah River Plant. The release was caused by the failure of a vacuum gage and was exhausted to the atmosphere by way of a 200-ft-high stack. Winds averaging 20 mph carried the tritium offplant toward the east. Calculations indicate that the puff passed out to sea about 35 miles north of Charleston, South Carolina, about 7 hr after the release occurred. Samples from the facility exhaust system indicated that 99.4 percent of the tritium was in elemental form and 0.6 percent was in the more biologically active oxide (water) form. The maximum potential dose to a person (from inhalation and skin absorption) at the puff centerline on the plant boundary was calculated to be 0.014 mrem, or about 0.01 percent of the annual dose received from natural radioactivity. The integrated dose to the population under the release path was calculated to be 0.2 man-rem before the tritium passed out to sea. Over 300 environmental samples were collected and analyzed following the release. These samples included air moisture, atmospheric hydrogen, vegetation, soil, surface water, milk, and human urine. Positive results were obtained in some onplant and plant perimeter samples; these results aided in confirming the close-in puff trajectory. Tritium concentrations in nearly all samples taken beyond the plant perimeter fell within normal ranges; no urine samples indicated any tritium uptakes as a result of the release. Two milk samples did indicate a measurable tritium uptake; the maximum potential dose to an individual drinking this milk was calculated to be about 0.1 mrem. Because calculated doses from assumed exposure to the tritium are low and analyses of environmental samples indicated no significant accumulation of tritium, it is concluded that no significant environmental effects resulted from the December 31, 1975, tritium release

  9. Linking Volcanism and Gas Release from the North East Atlantic Volcanic Province to the PETM: Challenges and Updates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensen, H.; Jones, M. T.; Jerram, D. A.; Planke, S.; Kjoberg, S.; Schmid, D. W.; Iyer, K.; Tegner, C.

    2016-12-01

    The main phase of the development of the North East Atlantic Volcanic Province took place about 56 Ma and coincides with the Paleocene Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). The volcanic activity was characterized by voluminous flood basalts, large plutonic complexes, sub-marine eruptions, widespread tephra deposition, and emplacement of sills and dikes along the continental margins of Norway, Greenland, Ireland, and the UK. Here we review the style and tempo of volcanism during this important period of Earth's history and discuss the sources and volumes of the carbon gases emitted to the ocean and atmosphere. Moreover, we present new data and models from 1) West Greenland showing the impact on sill intrusions on gas generation from heated Cretaceous mudstones, 2) a 3D seismic survey of gas release structures offshore Norway, and 3) Paleocene-Eocene tephra layers from Svalbard and Denmark. Gas migrated out of the contact aureoles by either explosive venting or by slower seepage towards the seafloor as demonstrated by 3D seismic data. Some of the gas was permanently trapped (dry gas and CO2-rich gas) in the source rocks and aureoles. Combined with high-precision zircon ages and a time model for the PETM, our approach may give robust fluxes that can explain both the onset and the body of the PETM.

  10. Gas explosions and thermal runaways during external heating abuse of commercial lithium-ion graphite-LiCoO2 cells at different levels of ageing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, Fredrik; Bertilsson, Simon; Furlani, Maurizio; Albinsson, Ingvar; Mellander, Bengt-Erik

    2018-01-01

    Commercial 6.8 Ah lithium-ion cells with different ageing/status have been abused by external heating in an oven. Prior to the abuse test, selected cells were aged either by C/2 cycling up to 300 cycles or stored at 60 °C. Gas emissions were measured by FTIR and three separate vents were identified, two well before the thermal runaway while the third occurred simultaneously with the thermal runaway releasing heavy smoke and gas. Emissions of toxic carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen fluoride (HF) and phosphorous oxyfluoride (POF3) were detected in the third vent, regardless if there was a fire or not. All abused cells went into thermal runaway and emitted smoke and gas, the working cells also released flames as well as sparks. The dead cells were however less reactive but still underwent thermal runaway. For about half of the working cells, for all levels of cycle ageing, ignition of the accumulated battery released gases occurred about 15 s after the thermal runaway resulting in a gas explosion. The thermal runaway temperature, about 190 °C, varied somewhat for the different cell ageing/status where a weak local minimum was found for cells cycled between 100 and 200 times.

  11. Iodine release from sodium pool combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagawa, N.; Fukushima, Y.; Yokota, N.; Akagane, K.; Mochizuki, K.

    1979-01-01

    Iodine release associated with sodium pool combustion was determined by heating 20 gr sodium containing sodium iodide, which was labelled with 131 I and dissolved in the sodium in concentration of 1∼1,000 ppm, to burn on a nickel crucible in conditioned atmosphere in a closed vessel of 0.4 m 3 . Oxygen concentration was changed in 5∼21% and humidity in 0∼89% by mixing nitrogen gas and air. Combustion products were trapped by a Maypack filter composed of particle filters, copper screens and activated charcoal beds and by a glass beads pack cooled by liquid argon. Iodine collected on these filter elements was determined by radio-gas chromatography. When the sodium sample burned in the atmosphere of air at room temperature, the release fractions observed were 6∼33% for sodium and 1∼20% for iodine added in the sodium. The release iodine was present in aerosol at a ratio of 98%, and the remainder in the gas form. The release fraction of iodine trended to decrease as oxygen concentration and humidity in the atmosphere increased. No organic iodide was detected in the combustion products. (author)

  12. Source strength and dispersion of CO2 releases from high-pressure pipelines: CFD model using real gas equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xiong; Godbole, Ajit; Lu, Cheng; Michal, Guillaume; Venton, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Validated CFD models for decompression and dispersion of CO 2 releases from pipelines. • Incorporation of real gas EOS into CFD code for source strength estimation. • Demonstration of better performance of SST k–ω turbulence model for jet flow. • Demonstration of better performance of real gas EOS compared to ideal gas EOS. • Demonstration of superiority of CFD models over a commercial risk assessment package. - Abstract: Transportation of CO 2 in high-pressure pipelines forms a crucial link in the ever-increasing application of Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technologies. An unplanned release of CO 2 from a pipeline presents a risk to human and animal populations and the environment. Therefore it is very important to develop a deeper understanding of the atmospheric dispersion of CO 2 before the deployment of CO 2 pipelines, to allow the appropriate safety precautions to be taken. This paper presents a two-stage Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) study developed (1) to estimate the source strength, and (2) to simulate the subsequent dispersion of CO 2 in the atmosphere, using the source strength estimated in stage (1). The Peng–Robinson (PR) EOS was incorporated into the CFD code. This enabled accurate modelling of the CO 2 jet to achieve more precise source strength estimates. The two-stage simulation approach also resulted in a reduction in the overall computing time. The CFD models were validated against experimental results from the British Petroleum (BP) CO 2 dispersion trials, and also against results produced by the risk management package Phast. Compared with the measurements, the CFD simulation results showed good agreement in both source strength and dispersion profile predictions. Furthermore, the effect of release direction on the dispersion was studied. The presented research provides a viable method for the assessment of risks associated with CCS

  13. Nanostructural control of methane release in kerogen and its implications to wellbore production decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Tuan Anh; Criscenti, Louise J.; Wang, Yifeng

    2016-06-01

    Despite massive success of shale gas production in the US in the last few decades there are still major concerns with the steep decline in wellbore production and the large uncertainty in a long-term projection of decline curves. A reliable projection must rely on a mechanistic understanding of methane release in shale matrix-a limiting step in shale gas extraction. Using molecular simulations, we here show that methane release in nanoporous kerogen matrix is characterized by fast release of pressurized free gas (accounting for ~30-47% recovery) followed by slow release of adsorbed gas as the gas pressure decreases. The first stage is driven by the gas pressure gradient while the second stage is controlled by gas desorption and diffusion. We further show that diffusion of all methane in nanoporous kerogen behaves differently from the bulk phase, with much smaller diffusion coefficients. The MD simulations also indicate that a significant fraction (3-35%) of methane deposited in kerogen can potentially become trapped in isolated nanopores and thus not recoverable. Our results shed a new light on mechanistic understanding gas release and production decline in unconventional reservoirs. The long-term production decline appears controlled by the second stage of gas release.

  14. Performance Evaluation of the Scent Transfer Unit (STU) for Organic Compound Collection and Release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckenrode, Brian A. [Federal Bureau of Investigation; Ramsey, Scott A. [Federal Bureau of Investigation; StockhamMFS, Rex A. [Federal Bureau of Investigation; Van Berkel, Gary J [ORNL; Asano, Keiji G [ORNL; Wolf, Dennis A [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    The Scent Transfer UnitTM (STU-100) is a portable vacuum that uses airflow through a sterile gauze pad to capture a volatiles profile over evidentiary items for subsequent canine presentation to assist law enforcement personnel. This device was evaluated to determine its ability to trap and release organic compounds at ambient temperature under controlled laboratory conditions. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses using a five-component volatiles mixture in methanol injected directly into a capture pad indicated that compound release could be detected initially and three days after time of collection. Additionally, fifteen compounds of a 39-component toxic organics gaseous mixture (10-1,000 ppbv) were trapped, released, and detected in the headspace of a volatiles capture pad after being exposed to this mixture using the STU-100 with analysis via GC-MS. Component release efficiencies at ambient temperature varied with the analyte; however, typical values of approximately 10 percent were obtained. Desorption at elevated temperatures of reported human odor/scent chemicals and colognes trapped by the STU-100 pads was measured and indicated that the STU-100 has a significant trapping efficiency at ambient temperature. Multivariate statistical analysis of subsequent mass spectral patterns was also performed.

  15. Device provides controlled gas leaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kami, S. K.; King, H. J.

    1968-01-01

    Modified palladium leak device provides a controlled release /leak/ of very small quantities of gas at low or medium pressures. It has no moving parts, requires less than 5 watts to operate, and is capable of releasing the gas either continuously or in pulses at adjustable flow rates.

  16. Field experiments with subsurface releases of oil and and dyed water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rye, H.; Brandvik, P.J.; Strom, T.

    1998-01-01

    A field experiment with a subsurface release of oil and air was carried out in June 1996 close to the Frigg Field in the North Sea area. One of the purposes of this sea trial was to increase the knowledge concerning the behaviour of the oil and gas during a subsurface blowout. This was done by releasing oil and air at 106 meters depth with a realistic gas oil ratio (GOR=67) and release velocity of the oil. In addition to the oil release, several releases with dyed water and gas (GOR=7 - 65) were performed. Important and unique data were collected during these subsurface releases. In particular, the experiments with the dyed water releases combined with air turned out to be an efficient way of obtaining field data for the behaviour of subsurface plumes. The main conclusions from analysis for the data collected are: the field methodology used to study blowout releases in the field appears to be appropriate. The use of dyed water to determine the performance of the subsurface plume proved out to be an efficient way to obtain reliable and useful data. The behaviour of the subsurface plume is very sensitive to gas flow rates. For low gas flow rates, the plume did not reach the sea surface at all due to the presence of stratification in the ambient water. Some discrepancies were found between a numerical model for subsurface releases and field results. These discrepancies are pointed out, and recommendations for possible model improvements are given. (author)

  17. A modified commercial gas chromatograph for the continuous monitoring of the thermal degradation of sunflower oil and off-line solid phase extraction gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry characterization of released volatiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontañon, I; Sanz, J; Escudero, A; de Marcos, S; Ferreira, V; Galbán, J

    2015-04-03

    A homemade flow cell attached to a commercial Gas Chromatograph equipped with a Flame Ionization Detector (FID) has been designed for the continuous monitoring of volatile compounds released during heating edible oils. Analytical parameters such as mass of sample, temperature and flow rates have been optimized and the obtained results have been compared with the corresponding thermographs from standard TG systems. Results show that under optimum conditions, the profiles of volatiles released upon heating are comparable to the profiles of TG curves, suggesting that the FID based system could be an alternative to TGA. Additionally, volatiles have been retained in a Lichrolut EN(®) resin, eluted and analyzed by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry. In this case, forty five compounds have been identified (acids, alcohols, alkanes, aldehydes, ketones and furans) and compared with the FID signals, working both in air or nitrogen atmosphere. It has been concluded that the oxidative thermal degradation is prevented in the presence of a nitrogen atmosphere. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Measurement of fission gas release, internal pressure and cladding creep rate in the fuel pins of PHWR bundle of normal discharge burnup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viswanathan, U.K. [Post Irradiation Examination Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Sah, D.N., E-mail: dnsah@barc.gov.i [Post Irradiation Examination Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Rath, B.N.; Anantharaman, S. [Post Irradiation Examination Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2009-08-01

    Fuel pins of a Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) fuel bundle discharged from Narora Atomic Power Station unit no. 1 after attaining a fuel burnup of 7528 MWd/tU have been subjected to two types of studies, namely (i) puncture test to estimate extent of fission gas release and internal pressure in the fuel pin and (ii) localized heating of the irradiated fuel pin to measure the creep rate of the cladding in temperature range 800 deg. C - 900 deg. C. The fission gas release in the fuel pins from the outer ring of the bundle was found to be about 8%. However, only marginal release was found in fuel pins from the middle ring and the central fuel pin. The internal gas pressure in the outer fuel pin was measured to be 0.55 +- 0.05 MPa at room temperature. In-cell isothermal heating of a small portion of the outer fuel pins was carried out at 800 deg. C, 850 deg. C and 900 deg. C for 10 min and the increase in diameter of the fuel pin was measured after heat treatment. Creep rates of the cladding obtained from the measurement of the diameter change of the cladding due to heating at 800 deg. C, 850 deg. C and 900 deg. C were found respectively to be 2.4 x 10{sup -5} s{sup -1}, 24.6 x 10{sup -5} s{sup -1} and 45.6 x 10{sup -5} s{sup -1}.

  19. Yellow phosphorus process to convert toxic chemicals to non-toxic products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, S.G.

    1994-07-26

    The present invention relates to a process for generating reactive species for destroying toxic chemicals. This process first contacts air or oxygen with aqueous emulsions of molten yellow phosphorus. This contact results in rapid production of abundant reactive species such as O, O[sub 3], PO, PO[sub 2], etc. A gaseous or liquid aqueous solution organic or inorganic chemicals is next contacted by these reactive species to reduce the concentration of toxic chemical and result in a non-toxic product. The final oxidation product of yellow phosphorus is phosphoric acid of a quality which can be recovered for commercial use. A process is developed such that the byproduct, phosphoric acid, is obtained without contamination of toxic species in liquids treated. A gas stream containing ozone without contamination of phosphorus containing species is also obtained in a simple and cost-effective manner. This process is demonstrated to be effective for destroying many types of toxic organic, or inorganic, compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), aromatic chlorides, amines, alcohols, acids, nitro aromatics, aliphatic chlorides, polynuclear aromatic compounds (PAH), dyes, pesticides, sulfides, hydroxyamines, ureas, dithionates and the like. 20 figs.

  20. Comparison of Acute Toxicity of Algal Metabolites Using Bioluminescence Inhibition Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansa Jeswani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae are reported to degrade hazardous compounds. However, algae, especially cyanobacteria are known to produce secondary metabolites which may be toxic to flora, fauna and human beings. The aim of this study was selection of an appropriate algal culture for biological treatment of biomass gasification wastewater based on acute toxicity considerations. The three algae that were selected were Spirulina sp., Scenedesmus abundans and a fresh water algal consortium. Acute toxicity of the metabolites produced by these algal cultures was tested at the end of log phase using the standard bioluminescence inhibition assay based on Vibrio fischeri NRRLB 11174. Scenedesmus abundans and a fresh water algal consortium dominated by cyanobacteria such as Phormidium, Chroococcus and Oscillatoria did not release much toxic metabolites at the end of log phase and caused only about 20% inhibition in bioluminescence. In comparison, Spirulina sp. released toxic metabolites and caused 50% bioluminescence inhibition at 3/5 times dilution of the culture supernatant (EC50.

  1. TOXICITY TESTING IN THE 21ST CENTURY: A VISION AND A STRATEGY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krewski, D.; Acosta, D.; Andersen, M.

    2010-01-01

    With the release of the landmark report Toxicity Testing in the 21st Century: A Vision and a Strategy, the U. S. National Academy of Sciences, in 2007, precipitated a major change in the way toxicity testing is conducted. It envisions increased efficiency in toxicity testing and decreased animal ...

  2. TOXIC LEADERSHIP: A SYSTEMIC APPROACH TO SHIFT FROM REACTIVE TO PROACTIVE SOLUTIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY TOXIC LEADERSHIP: A SYSTEMIC APPROACH TO SHIFT FROM REACTIVE TO PROACTIVE SOLUTIONS...DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release: distribution unlimited. Toxic Leadership: A Systemic Approach to Shift From Reactive to Proactive Solutions 1...US military loses valuable personnel when it is too late to implement corrective action and after those toxic Toxic Leadership: A Systemic Approach

  3. Impacts of select organic ligands on the colloidal stability, dissolution dynamics, and toxicity of silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhrel, Lok R; Dubey, Brajesh; Scheuerman, Phillip R

    2013-11-19

    Key understanding of potential transformations that may occur on silver nanoparticle (AgNP) surface upon interaction with naturally ubiquitous organic ligands (e.g., -SH (thoil), humic acid, or -COO (carboxylate)) is limited. Herein we investigated how dissolved organic carbon (DOC), -SH (in cysteine, a well-known Ag(+) chelating agent), and -COO (in trolox, a well-known antioxidant) could alter the colloidal stability, dissolution rate, and toxicity of citrate-functionalized AgNPs (citrate-AgNPs) against a keystone crustacean Daphnia magna. Cysteine, DOC, or trolox amendment of citrate-AgNPs differentially modified particle size, surface properties (charge, plasmonic spectra), and ion release dynamics, thereby attenuating (with cysteine or trolox) or promoting (with DOC) AgNP toxicity. Except with DOC amendment, the combined toxicity of AgNPs and released Ag under cysteine or trolox amendment was lower than of AgNO3 alone. The results of this study show that citrate-AgNP toxicity can be associated with oxidative stress, ion release, and the organism biology. Our evidence suggests that specific organic ligands available in the receiving waters can differentially surface modify AgNPs and alter their environmental persistence (changing dissolution dynamics) and subsequently the toxicity; hence, we caveat to generalize that surface modified nanoparticles upon environmental release may not be toxic to receptor organisms.

  4. Implementing process safety management in gas processing operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodman, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standard entitled Process Safety Management of Highly Hazardous Chemicals; Explosives and Blasting Agents was finalized February 24, 1992. The purpose of the standard is to prevent or minimize consequences of catastrophic releases of toxic, flammable, or explosive chemicals. OSHA believes that its rule will accomplish this goal by requiring a comprehensive management program that integrates technologies, procedures, and management practices. Gas Processors Association (GPA) member companies are significantly impacted by this major standard, the requirements of which are extensive and complex. The purpose of this paper is to review the requirements of the standard and to discuss the elements to consider in developing and implementing a viable long term Process Safety Management Program

  5. A recommended approach to the National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI) for the upstream oil and gas industry : 2002 : CAC emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-04-01

    The National Pollutant Release Inventory (NPRI) is a database of annual releases to air, water, land and off-site transfers of 273 specified pollutants. Environment Canada requires that the NPRI be reported annually. Criteria Air Contaminants (CAC) had to be reported for the first time in 2002. Air pollutants that contribute to the formation of ground level ozone and smog are included in the definition of CAC, along with any eye or respiratory irritants to both humans and animals. The substances of special interest to the petroleum industry are: oxides of nitrogen, sulphur dioxide, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, total particulate matter, and particulate matters. This guide is intended to provide member companies of Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP), operating upstream oil and gas facilities, with readily available data to determine the amount of CAC emissions released from their processes and equipment. Companies using these guidelines will be able to compare the performance of various upstream oil and gas companies more readily because the data is consistent. The scope of the project was described in section 1, and the sources of CAC emissions were identified in section 2. The reporting threshold was discussed in section 3. Data required for collection was outlined in section 4. Section 5 outlines how CAC emission quantities are determined. Calculation examples were provided in section 6 and definitions provided in section 7. 11 tabs., 1 fig

  6. Emission quantification using the tracer gas dispersion method: The influence of instrument, tracer gas species and source simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delre, Antonio; Mønster, Jacob; Samuelsson, Jerker

    2018-01-01

    The tracer gas dispersion method (TDM) is a remote sensing method used for quantifying fugitive emissions by relying on the controlled release of a tracer gas at the source, combined with concentration measurements of the tracer and target gas plumes. The TDM was tested at a wastewater treatment...... plant for plant-integrated methane emission quantification, using four analytical instruments simultaneously and four different tracer gases. Measurements performed using a combination of an analytical instrument and a tracer gas, with a high ratio between the tracer gas release rate and instrument...... precision (a high release-precision ratio), resulted in well-defined plumes with a high signal-to-noise ratio and a high methane-to-tracer gas correlation factor. Measured methane emission rates differed by up to 18% from the mean value when measurements were performed using seven different instrument...

  7. Vasorelaxing effects and inhibition of nitric oxide in macrophages by new iron-containing carbon monoxide-releasing molecules (CO-RMs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motterlini, Roberto; Sawle, Philip; Hammad, Jehad; Mann, Brian E; Johnson, Tony R; Green, Colin J; Foresti, Roberta

    2013-02-01

    Carbon monoxide-releasing molecules (CO-RMs) are a class of organometallo carbonyl complexes capable of delivering controlled quantities of CO gas to cells and tissues thus exerting a broad spectrum of pharmacological effects. Here we report on the chemical synthesis, CO releasing properties, cytotoxicity profile and pharmacological activities of four novel structurally related iron-allyl carbonyls. The major difference among the new CO-RMs tested was that three compounds (CORM-307, CORM-308 and CORM-314) were soluble in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), whereas a fourth one (CORM-319) was rendered water-soluble by reacting the iron-carbonyl with hydrogen tetrafluoroborate. We found that despite the fact all compounds liberated CO, CO-RMs soluble in DMSO caused a more pronounced toxic effect both in vascular and inflammatory cells as well as in isolated vessels. More specifically, iron carbonyls soluble in DMSO released CO with a fast kinetic and displayed a marked cytotoxic effect in smooth muscle cells and RAW 247.6 macrophages despite exerting a rapid and pronounced vasorelaxation ex vivo. In contrast, CORM-319 that is soluble in water and liberated CO with a slower rate, preserved smooth muscle cell viability, relaxed aortic tissue and exerted a significant anti-inflammatory effect in macrophages challenged with endotoxin. These data suggest that iron carbonyls can be used as scaffolds for the design and synthesis of pharmacologically active CO-RMs and indicate that increasing water solubility and controlling the rate of CO release are important parameters for limiting their potential toxic effects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Retained Gas Sampling Results for the Flammable Gas Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, J.M.; Mahoney, L.A.; Dahl, M.E.; Antoniak, Z.I.

    1999-01-01

    The key phenomena of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue are generation of the gas mixture, the modes of gas retention, and the mechanisms causing release of the gas. An understanding of the mechanisms of these processes is required for final resolution of the safety issue. Central to understanding is gathering information from such sources as historical records, tank sampling data, tank process data (temperatures, ventilation rates, etc.), and laboratory evaluations conducted on tank waste samples

  9. Retained Gas Sampling Results for the Flammable Gas Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.M. Bates; L.A. Mahoney; M.E. Dahl; Z.I. Antoniak

    1999-11-18

    The key phenomena of the Flammable Gas Safety Issue are generation of the gas mixture, the modes of gas retention, and the mechanisms causing release of the gas. An understanding of the mechanisms of these processes is required for final resolution of the safety issue. Central to understanding is gathering information from such sources as historical records, tank sampling data, tank process data (temperatures, ventilation rates, etc.), and laboratory evaluations conducted on tank waste samples.

  10. Correlation of BTEX levels and toxicity of condensate contaminated groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Headley, J.; Goudey, S.; Birkholz, D.; Hardisty, P.

    1995-01-01

    The concentration of BTEX was determined for 60 groundwater samples collected from 6 gas plants in Western Canada, using conventional purge-and-trap GC/MS procedures. The gas plants were selected to cover different types of operations with different amine process chemicals employed for the sweetening of the raw sour-gas condensates. Aliquots of the ground water samples were subjected to toxicity screening tests, specifically, (a) bacterial luminescence (microtox); (b) daphnia mortality and (c) fathead minnow mortality. For the toxicity tests, sample handling procedures were developed to minimize the loss of volatile organics during the experiments. To account for possible losses, the levels of BTEX were monitored at the start and upon completion of these tests. The results indicated that the toxicity of the groundwater was in general, well correlated to the concentration of BTEX (primarily xylene). Approximately 5% of the samples, however, were observed to be toxic although the concentration of BTEX were below the method detection limit (1 microg/1). Thiophenic volatile organics were implicated for the latter. Based on the laboratory results, the remediation of BTEX is expected to correlate with the removal of the toxicity of the groundwater. These findings are of direct relevance to present technologies employed for remediation of ground water at the Sourgas plants

  11. Fission-gas-bubble mobility in oxide fuel: a critical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tam, S.W.; Johnson, C.E.

    1983-08-01

    The available volatile fission product release data has confirmed the general viability of the scaling model of volatile fission product release in which the fractional release rates of the volatile fission products scale as that of the fission gas. The question of whether fission gas bubbles can move sufficiently fast to be a significant mechanism responsible for fission gas release from the fuel is considered. The mean jump distance per jump of the hopping process in gas bubble motion is analyzed. Surface roughness is also considered

  12. Performance evaluation of the Scent Transfer Unit (STU-100) for organic compound collection and release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckenrode, Brian A; Ramsey, Scott A; Stockham, Rex A; Van Berkel, Gary J; Asano, Keiji G; Wolf, Dennis A

    2006-07-01

    The Scent Transfer Unit (STU-100) is a portable vacuum that uses airflow through a sterile gauze pad to capture a volatiles profile over evidentiary items for subsequent canine presentation to assist law enforcement personnel. This device was evaluated to determine its ability to trap and release organic compounds at ambient temperature under controlled laboratory conditions. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses using a five-component volatiles mixture in methanol injected directly into a capture pad indicated that compound release could be detected initially and 3 days after the time of collection. Additionally, 15 compounds of a 39-component toxic organic gaseous mixture (10-1000 parts per billion by volume [p.p.b.(v)]) were trapped, released, and detected in the headspace of a volatiles capture pad after being exposed to this mixture using the STU-100 with analysis via GC-MS. Component release efficiencies at ambient temperature varied with the analyte; however, typical values of c. 10% were obtained. Desorption at elevated temperatures of reported human odor/scent chemicals and colognes trapped by the STU-100 pads was measured and indicated that the STU-100 has a significant trapping efficiency at ambient temperature. Multivariate statistical analysis of subsequent mass spectral patterns was also performed.

  13. 40 CFR 68.25 - Worst-case release scenario analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CHEMICAL ACCIDENT PREVENTION PROVISIONS Hazard Assessment § 68.25 Worst-case release... processes, one worst-case release scenario for each Program 1 process; (2) For Program 2 and 3 processes: (i... toxic substances from covered processes under worst-case conditions defined in § 68.22; (ii) One worst...

  14. In situ rheology and gas volume in Hanford double-shell waste tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, C.W.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Brewster, M.E.; Chen, G.; Reid, H.C.; Shepard, C.L.; Terrones, G.; Mendoza, R.E.

    1996-09-01

    This report is a detailed characterization of gas retention and release in 6 Hanford DS waste tanks. The results came from the ball rheometer and void fraction instrument in (flammable gas watch list) tanks SY-101, SY-103, AW-101, AN-103, AN-104, and AN-105 are presented. Instrument operation and derivation of data reduction methods are presented. Gas retention and release information is summarized for each tank and includes tank fill history and instrumentation, waste configuration, gas release, void fraction distribution, gas volumes, rheology, and photographs of the waste column from extruded core samples. Potential peak burn pressure is computed as a function of gas release fraction to portray the 'hazard signature' of each tank. It is shown that two tanks remain well below the maximum allowable pressure, even if the entire gas content were released and ignited, and that none of the others present a hazard with their present gas release behavior

  15. The footprint of CO2 leakage in the water-column: Insights from numerical modeling based on a North Sea gas release experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vielstädte, L.; Linke, P.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, S.; Wallmann, K.; McGinnis, D. F.; Haeckel, M.

    2013-12-01

    Assessing the environmental impact of potential CO2 leakage from offshore carbon dioxide storage sites necessitates the investigation of the corresponding pH change in the water-column. Numerical models have been developed to simulate the buoyant rise and dissolution of CO2 bubbles in the water-column and the subsequent near-field dispersion of dissolved CO2 in seawater under ocean current and tidal forcing. In order to test and improve numerical models a gas release experiment has been conducted at 80 m water-depth within the Sleipner area (North Sea). CO2 and Kr (used as inert tracer gas) were released on top of a benthic lander at varying gas flows (impact of such leakage rates is limited to the near-field bottom waters, due to the rapid dissolution of CO2 bubbles in seawater (CO2 is being stripped within the first two to five meters of bubble rise). In particular, small bubbles, which will dissolve close to the seafloor, may cause a dangerous low-pH environment for the marine benthos. However, on the larger scale, the advective transport by e.g. tidal currents, dominates the CO2 dispersal in the North Sea and dilutes the CO2 peak quickly. The model results show that at the small scales (impact on the marine environment, thereby reducing pH substantially (by 0.4 units) within a diameter of less than 50 m around the release spot (depending on the duration of leakage and the current velocities). Strong currents and tidal cycles significantly reduce the spreading of low-pH water masses into the far-field by efficiently diluting the amount of CO2 in ambient seawater.

  16. Fission gas retention in irradiated metallic fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenske, G.R.; Gruber, E.; Kramer, J.M.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical calculations and experimental measurements of the quantity of retained fission gas in irradiated metallic fuel (U-5 wt. % Fs) are presented. (The symbol 'Fs' designates fissium, a 'pseudo-element' which, in reality, is an alloy whose composition is representative of fission products that remain in reprocessed fuel). The calculations utilize the Booth method to model the steady-state release of gases from fuel grains and a simplified grain-boundary gas model to predict the gas release from intergranular regions. The quantity of gas retained in as-irradiated fuel was determined by collecting the gases released from short segments of EBR-II driver fuel that were melted in a gas-tight furnace. Comparison of the calculations with the measurements shows quantitative agreement in both the magnitude and the axial variation of the retained gas content. (orig.)

  17. Energy market review releases draft report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2002-01-01

    The Energy Market Review Releases draft report has made recommendations consistent with the Australian Gas Association (AGA)'s submissions in a number of areas. In particular, it has endorsed: 1. the need for an independent review of the gas access regime, to address the deficiencies with current access regulation identified by the Productivity Commission's Review of the National Access Regime; 2. the need for greater upstream gas market competition; 3. the principle that significant regulatory decisions should be subject to clear merits and judicial review; and 4. the need to avoid restrictions on retail energy prices. The report also endorses the need for a 'technology neutral' approach to greenhouse emissions abatement policy. It states that 'many of the current measures employed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions are poorly targeted', and that they 'target technologies or fuel types rather than greenhouse gas abatement.' Additionally, it explicitly recognises the key conclusions of the AGA's recently-released Research Paper, Reducing Greenhouse Emissions from Water Heating: Natural Gas as a Cost-effective Option. The draft report recommends the development of an economy-wide emissions trading system, to achieve a more cost-effective approach to greenhouse abatement

  18. Electron beam treatment of toxic volatile organic compounds and dioxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Takuji

    2006-01-01

    Considerations of wastes based on the reduction, reuse and recycle in daily life are primary measures to conserve our environment, but the control technology is necessary to support these measures. The electron beam (EB) process is promising as an advanced purification process having advantages such as a quick treatment of big volume gas, applicability even for very low concentration pollutants as the further purification at the downstream of existing process, and decomposition of pollutants into non-toxic substances by one process. The EB technology has been developed for treatment of toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ventilation gas and dioxins in solid waste incineration flue gas. (author)

  19. Toxicity and management in CAR T-cell therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Challice L Bonifant

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available T cells can be genetically modified to target tumors through the expression of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR. Most notably, CAR T cells have demonstrated clinical efficacy in hematologic malignancies with more modest responses when targeting solid tumors. However, CAR T cells also have the capacity to elicit expected and unexpected toxicities including: cytokine release syndrome, neurologic toxicity, “on target/off tumor” recognition, and anaphylaxis. Theoretical toxicities including clonal expansion secondary to insertional oncogenesis, graft versus host disease, and off-target antigen recognition have not been clinically evident. Abrogating toxicity has become a critical step in the successful application of this emerging technology. To this end, we review the reported and theoretical toxicities of CAR T cells and their management.

  20. Comparing PAH availability from manufactured gas plant soils and sediments with chemical and biological tests. 1. PAH release during water desorption and supercritical carbon dioxide extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, Steven B; Poppendieck, Dustin G; Grabanski, Carol B; Loehr, Raymond C

    2002-11-15

    Soil and sediment samples from oil gas (OG) and coal gas (CG) manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites were selected to represent a range of PAH concentrations (150-40,000 mg/kg) and sample matrix compositions. Samples varied from vegetated soils to lampblack soot and had carbon contents from 3 to 87 wt %. SFE desorption (120 min) and water/XAD2 desorption (120 days) curves were determined and fit with a simple two-site model to determine the rapid-released fraction (F) for PAHs ranging from naphthalene to benzo[ghi]perylene. F values varied greatly among the samples, from ca. 10% to >90% for the two- and three-ring PAHs and from <1% to ca. 50% for the five- and six-ring PAHs. Release rates did not correlate with sample matrix characteristics including PAH concentrations, elemental composition (C, H, N, S), or "hard" and "softs" organic carbon, indicating that PAH release cannot easily be estimated on the basis of sample matrix composition. Fvalues for CG site samples obtained with SFE and water desorption agreed well (linear correlation coefficient, r2 = 0.87, slope = 0.93), but SFE yielded higher F values for the OG samples. These behaviors were attributed to the stronger ability of carbon dioxide than water to desorb PAHs from the highly aromatic (hard) carbon of the OG matrixes, while carbon dioxide and water showed similar abilities to desorb PAHs from the more polar (soft) carbon of the CG samples. The combined SFE and water desorption approaches should improve the understanding of PAH sequestration and release from contaminated soils and sediments and provide the basis for subsequent studies using the same samples to compare PAH release with PAH availability to earthworms.

  1. Geochemical evidence of water-soluble gas accumulation in the Weiyuan gas field, Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengfei Qin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, there are several different opinions on the formation process of the Weiyuan gas field in the Sichuan Basin and the source of its natural gas. In view of the fact that the methane carbon isotope of the natural gas in the Weiyuan gas field is abnormally heavy, the geologic characteristics of gas reservoirs and the geochemical characteristics of natural gas were first analyzed. In the Weiyuan gas field, the principal gas reservoirs belong to Sinian Dengying Fm. The natural gas is mainly composed of methane, with slight ethane and trace propane. The gas reservoirs are higher in water saturation, with well preserved primary water. Then, it was discriminated from the relationship of H2S content vs. methane carbon isotope that the heavier methane carbon isotope of natural gas in this area is not caused by thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR. Based on the comparison of methane carbon isotope in this area with that in adjacent areas, and combined with the tectonic evolution background, it is regarded that the natural gas in the Weiyuan gas field is mainly derived from water-soluble gas rather than be migrated laterally from adjacent areas. Some conclusions are made. First, since methane released from water is carbon isotopically heavier, the water-soluble gas accumulation after degasification results in the heavy methane carbon isotope of the gas produced from Weiyuan gas field. Second, along with Himalayan movement, great uplift occurred in the Weiyuan area and structural traps were formed. Under high temperature and high pressure, the gas dissolved in water experienced decompression precipitation, and the released natural gas accumulated in traps, consequently leading to the formation of Weiyuan gas field. Third, based on calculation, the amount of natural gas released from water which is entrapped in the Weiyuan gas field after the tectonic uplift is basically equal to the proved reserves of this field, confirming the opinion of water

  2. Theranostic gas-generating nanoparticles for targeted ultrasound imaging and treatment of neuroblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jangwook; Min, Hyun-Su; You, Dong Gil; Kim, Kwangmeyung; Kwon, Ick Chan; Rhim, Taiyoun; Lee, Kuen Yong

    2016-02-10

    The development of safe and efficient diagnostic/therapeutic agents for treating cancer in clinics remains challenging due to the potential toxicity of conventional agents. Although the annual incidence of neuroblastoma is not that high, the disease mainly occurs in children, a population vulnerable to toxic contrast agents and therapeutics. We demonstrate here that cancer-targeting, gas-generating polymeric nanoparticles are useful as a theranostic tool for ultrasound (US) imaging and treating neuroblastoma. We encapsulated calcium carbonate using poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) and created gas-generating polymer nanoparticles (GNPs). These nanoparticles release carbon dioxide bubbles under acidic conditions and enhance US signals. When GNPs are modified using rabies virus glycoprotein (RVG) peptide, a targeting moiety to neuroblastoma, RVG-GNPs effectively accumulate at the tumor site and substantially enhance US signals in a tumor-bearing mouse model. Intravenous administration of RVG-GNPs also reduces tumor growth in the mouse model without the use of conventional therapeutic agents. This approach to developing theranostic agents with disease-targeting ability may provide useful strategy for the detection and treatment of cancers, allowing safe and efficient clinical applications with fewer side effects than may occur with conventional agents. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Toxicity of tire wear particle leachate to the marine macroalga, Ulva lactuca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Andrew, E-mail: aturner@plymouth.ac.u [School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom); Rice, Lynsey [School of Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Plymouth, Drake Circus, Plymouth PL4 8AA (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    Tire wear particles filed from the treads of end-of-life vehicle tires have been added to sea water to examine the release of Zn and the toxicity of the resulting leachate and dilutions thereof to the marine macroalga, Ulva lactuca. Zinc release appeared to be diffusion-controlled, with a conditional rate constant of 5.4 {mu}g[L(h){sup 1/2}]{sup -1}, and about 1.6% of total Zn was released after 120 h incubation. Exposure to increasing concentrations of leachate resulted in a non-linear reduction in the efficiency of photochemical energy conversion of U. lactuca and, with the exception of the undiluted leachate, increasing accumulation of Zn. Phototoxicity was significantly lower on exposure to equivalent concentrations of Zn added as Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, suggesting that organic components of leachate are largely responsible for the overall toxicity to the alga. Given the ubiquity and abundance of TWP in urban coastal sediments, the generation, biogeochemistry and toxicity of tire leachate in the marine setting merit further attention. - Tire wear leachate is toxic to Ulva lactuca and zinc is a potential bioindicator of leachate contamination in urban marine systems.

  4. Released radioactivity reducing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Takeaki.

    1992-01-01

    Upon occurrence of a reactor accident, penetration portions of a reactor container, as a main leakage source from a reactor container, are surrounded by a plurality of gas-tight chambers, the outside of which is surrounded by highly gas-tightly buildings. Branched pipelines of an emergency gas processing system are introduced to each of the gas-tight chambers and they are joined and in communication with an emergency gas processing device. With such a constitution, radioactive materials are prevented from leaking directly from the buildings. Further, pipeline openings of the emergency gas processing facility are disposed in the plurality highly gas-tight penetration chambers. If the radioactive materials are leaked from the reactor to elevate the pressure in the penetration chambers, the radioactive materials are introduced to a filter device in the emergency gas processing facility by way of the branched pipelines, filtered and then released to the atmosphere. Accordingly, the reliability and safety of the system can be improved. (T.M.)

  5. Role of Bioadsorbents in Reducing Toxic Metals

    OpenAIRE

    Mathew, Blessy Baby; Jaishankar, Monisha; Biju, Vinai George; Krishnamurthy Nideghatta Beeregowda

    2016-01-01

    Industrialization and urbanization have led to the release of increasing amounts of heavy metals into the environment. Metal ion contamination of drinking water and waste water is a serious ongoing problem especially with high toxic metals such as lead and cadmium and less toxic metals such as copper and zinc. Several biological materials have attracted many researchers and scientists as they offer both cheap and effective removal of heavy metals from waste water. Therefore it is urgent to st...

  6. Zippered release from polymer-gated carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Mashat, Afnan

    2012-01-01

    A thermosensitive drug delivery system based on polymer-gated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) that are loaded with the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) is herein reported. The development of carbon nanotubes for various biomedical applications is the research focus of many research groups and holds great promise. The major drawback of these materials is the toxicity that is associated with conjugated carbon systems. Functionalization of CNTs with polymers has proved very successful in lowering the toxicity and improving the pharmacokinetic profile. In this work, CNTs are coated with polyethylenimine (PEI) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) via the "zipper effect" that provides both support and control over drug release. PEI/PVA provides excellent support to increase DOX loading on the nanocarrier. The system is controlled by changes in temperature due to the complexation (low temperature) and decomplexation (high temperature) of PEI and PVA via hydrogen bonding. The release of DOX was tested in three cell lines (Lung fibroblast (LF), Breast Adenocarcinoma (BA), and HeLa). It was further tested in primary cell lines (Human Dermal Fibroblast adult (HDFa) and Human Dermal Fibroblast neonatal (HDFn)). When the bonds between PEI and PVA are decomplexed at high temperature (≥40 °C), drug release was observed as verified by fluorescence microscopy. There was no drug release at room temperature (25 °C) and a slow release at normal body temperature (37 °C). This system represents a promising method for incorporating stimuli triggered polymer-gated CNTs in future controlled release applications. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  7. Assessment of nanoparticle release and associated health effect of polymer-silicon composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, H; Irfan, A; Sachse, S; Njuguna, J

    2012-01-01

    Little information is currently available on possible release of nanomaterials or/and nanoparticles (NP) from conventional and novel products and associated health effect. This study aimed to assess the possible release of NP during the application stage of conventional and nanoproducts. NP release was monitored during physical processing of polymer-silicon composites, and the toxicity of both the released NP and the raw silica nanomaterials that were used as fillers in the nanocomposites was assessed in vitro using human lung epithelial A549 cells. This study suggests that 1) NP can be released from the conventional and novel polymer-silicon composites under certain application scenario; 2) the level of NP release from polymer composites could be altered by different reinforcement materials; e.g. nanostructured MMT could reduce the release while SiO2 NP could increase the release; 3) working with polymer composites under certain conditions could risk inhalation of high level of polymer NP; 4) raw nanomaterials appeared to be toxic in the chosen in vitro system. Further study of the effect of novel filler materials on NP release from final polymer products and the effect of released NP on environment and human health will inform design of safe materials and minimization of negative impact on the environment and human health.

  8. Screening of inorganic gases released from firework-rockets by a gas chromatography/whistle-accelerometer method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Fu; Wu, Hui-Hsin; Lin, Chien-Hung; Lin, Cheng-Huang

    2013-08-30

    The use of an accelerometer for detecting inorganic gases in gas chromatography (GC) is described. A milli-whistle was connected to the outlet of the GC capillary and was used instead of a classical GC detector. When the GC carrier gases and the sample gases pass through the milli-whistle, a sound is produced, leading to vibrational changes, which can be recorded using an accelerometer. Inorganic gases, including SO2, N2 and CO2, which are released from traditional Chinese firework-rockets at relatively high levels as the result of burning the propellant and explosive material inside could be rapidly determined using the GC/whistle-accelerometer system. The method described herein is safe, the instrumentation is compact and has potential to be modified so as to be portable for use in the field. It also can be used in conjunction with FID (flame ionization detector) or TCD (thermal conductivity detector), in which either no response for FID (CO2, N2, NO2, SO2, etc.) or helium gas is needed for TCD, respectively. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Is the extent of glaciation limited by marine gas-hydrates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paull, Charles K.; Ussler, William; Dillon, William P.

    1991-01-01

    Methane may have been released to the atmosphere during the Quaternary from Arctic shelf gas-hydrates as a result of thermal decomposition caused by climatic warming and rising sea-level; this release of methane (a greenhouse gas) may represent a positive feedback on global warming [Revelle, 1983; Kvenvolden, 1988a; Nisbet, 1990]. We consider the response to sea-level changes by the immense amount of gas-hydrate that exists in continental rise sediments, and suggest that the reverse situation may apply—that release of methane trapped in the deep-sea sediments as gas-hydrates may provide a negative feedback to advancing glaciation. Methane is likely to be released from deep-sea gas-hydrates as sea-level falls because methane gas-hydrates decompose with pressure decrease. Methane would be released to sediment pore space at shallow sub-bottom depths (100's of meters beneath the seafloor, commonly at water depths of 500 to 4,000 m) producing zones of markedly decreased sediment strength, leading to slumping [Carpenter, 1981; Kayen, 1988] and abrupt release of the gas. Methane is likely to be released to the atmosphere in spikes that become larger and more frequent as glaciation progresses. Because addition of methane to the atmosphere warms the planet, this process provides a negative feedback to glaciation, and could trigger deglaciation.

  10. LCA and economic evaluation of landfill leachate and gas technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damgaard, Anders; Manfredi, Simone; Merrild, Hanna; Stensøe, Steen; Christensen, Thomas H

    2011-07-01

    Landfills receiving a mix of waste, including organics, have developed dramatically over the last 3-4 decades; from open dumps to engineered facilities with extensive controls on leachate and gas. The conventional municipal landfill will in most climates produce a highly contaminated leachate and a significant amount of landfill gas. Leachate controls may include bottom liners and leachate collection systems as well as leachate treatment prior to discharge to surface water. Gas controls may include oxidizing top covers, gas collection systems with flares or gas utilization systems for production of electricity and heat. The importance of leachate and gas control measures in reducing the overall environmental impact from a conventional landfill was assessed by life-cycle-assessment (LCA). The direct cost for the measures were also estimated providing a basis for assessing which measures are the most cost-effective in reducing the impact from a conventional landfill. This was done by modeling landfills ranging from a simple open dump to highly engineered conventional landfills with energy recovery in form of heat or electricity. The modeling was done in the waste LCA model EASEWASTE. The results showed drastic improvements for most impact categories. Global warming went from an impact of 0.1 person equivalent (PE) for the dump to -0.05 PE for the best design. Similar improvements were found for photochemical ozone formation (0.02 PE to 0.002 PE) and stratospheric ozone formation (0.04 PE to 0.001 PE). For the toxic and spoiled groundwater impact categories the trend is not as clear. The reason for this was that the load to the environment shifted as more technologies were used. For the dump landfill the main impacts were impacts for spoiled groundwater due to lack of leachate collection, 2.3 PE down to 0.4 PE when leachate is collected. However, at the same time, leachate collection causes a slight increase in eco-toxicity and human toxicity via water (0.007 E to 0

  11. Ru(CO)3Cl(Glycinate) (CORM-3): A Carbon Monoxide–Releasing Molecule with Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial and Photosensitive Activities Against Respiration and Cation Transport in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Jayne Louise; Jesse, Helen E.; Hughes, Bethan; Lund, Victoria; Naylor, Kathryn; Davidge, Kelly S.; Cook, Gregory M.; Mann, Brian E.; Poole, Robert K.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: Carbon monoxide (CO) delivered to cells and tissues by CO-releasing molecules (CO-RMs) has beneficial\\ud and toxic effects not mimicked by CO gas. The metal carbonyl Ru(CO)3Cl(glycinate) (CORM-3) is a novel, potent\\ud antimicrobial agent. Here, we established its mode of action. Results: CORM-3 inhibits respiration in several\\ud bacterial and yeast pathogens. In anoxic Escherichia coli suspensions, CORM-3 first stimulates, then inhibits\\ud respiration, but much higher concentrations of ...

  12. Toxicity of effluents from gasoline stations oil-water separators to early life stages of zebrafish Danio rerio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Romulo Nepomuceno; Mariz, Célio Freire; Paulo, Driele Ventura de; Carvalho, Paulo S M

    2017-07-01

    Used petroleum hydrocarbons and gasoline stations runoff are significant sources of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to aquatic ecosystems. Samples of the final effluent of oil-water-separators were collected at gasoline stations in the metropolitan region of Recife, Brazil, before release to sewage or rainwater systems. Effluent soluble fractions (ESF) were prepared and bioassays were performed according to the Fish Embryo Toxicity Test. The test involved exposing zebrafish Danio rerio embryos to dilutions of the ESFs for 96 h, with daily examination of lethality and sublethal morphological effects integrated through the General Morphology Score (GMS), based on the achievement of developmental hallmarks. Frequencies of abnormalities were recorded after exposures. ESF LC50-96h (lethal concentration to 50% of exposed embryos) in the most toxic effluent achieved 8.9% (v/v), equivalent to 11 μg phenanthrene equivalents L -1 . GMS scores indicated significantly delayed embryo-larval development at ESF dilutions of 10% and 20% from effluents of all gas stations. Major abnormalities detected after the 96 h exposure included the presence of a yolk sac not fully absorbed coupled with the lack of an inflated swim bladder, lack of both pectoral fins, and the failure to develop a protruding mouth. Effective equivalent PAH concentrations that induce a 50% frequency of larvae without an inflated swim bladder (EC50) were 4.9 μg phenanthrene L -1 , 21.8 μg naphthalene L -1 , and 34.1 μg chrysene L -1 . This study shows that PAHs in ESFs from gas stations oil water separators are toxic to zebrafish, contributing to the toxicity of urban storm waters. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) Chemical Release Modeling Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stirrup, Timothy Scott [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-12-20

    This evaluation documents the methodology and results of chemical release modeling for operations at Building 518, Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) Core Facility. This evaluation is intended to supplement an update to the CINT [Standalone] Hazards Analysis (SHA). This evaluation also updates the original [Design] Hazards Analysis (DHA) completed in 2003 during the design and construction of the facility; since the original DHA, additional toxic materials have been evaluated and modeled to confirm the continued low hazard classification of the CINT facility and operations. This evaluation addresses the potential catastrophic release of the current inventory of toxic chemicals at Building 518 based on a standard query in the Chemical Information System (CIS).

  14. Methane release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, M.

    1999-01-01

    The Swiss Gas Industry has carried out a systematic, technical estimate of methane release from the complete supply chain from production to consumption for the years 1992/1993. The result of this survey provided a conservative value, amounting to 0.9% of the Swiss domestic output. A continuation of the study taking into account new findings with regard to emission factors and the effect of the climate is now available, which provides a value of 0.8% for the target year of 1996. These results show that the renovation of the network has brought about lower losses in the local gas supplies, particularly for the grey cast iron pipelines. (author)

  15. Monitoring of the release of gaseous and aerosol-bound radioactive materials. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    KTA 1503 contains requirements on technical installations and supplementary organizational measures considered necessary in order to monitor the release of gaseous and aerosol-bound radioactive materials. It consists of part 1: Monitoring of the release of radioactive materials together with stack gas during normal operation; part 2: Monitoring of the release of radioactive materials together with stack gas in the event of incidents; part 3: Monitoring of radioactive materials not released together with stack gas. The concept on which this rule is based is to ensure that in the case of incidents during which the result of effluent monitoring remains meaningful, such monitoring can be reliably performed. (orig./HSCH) [de

  16. Accident for natural gas well with hydrogen sulfide in relation to nuclear power plant siting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Chengjun; Shangguang Zhihong; Sha Xiangdong

    2010-01-01

    In order to make assessment to the potential impact from accident of natural gas wells with hydrogen sulfide on the habitability of main control room of nuclear power plant (NPP), several assumptions such as source terms of maximum credible accident, conservative atmospheric conditions and release characteristics were proposed in the paper, and the impact on the habitability of main control room was evaluated using toxicity thresholds recommended by foreign authority. Case results indicate that the method can provide the reference for the preliminary assessment to external human-induced events during the siting phrase of NPP. (authors)

  17. Fission gas behaviour modelling in plate fuel during a power transient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Portier, S.

    2003-01-01

    This thesis is dedicated to the identification and modelization of the phenomena which are at the origin of the release of the fission gas formed in UO 2 plate fuels during the irradiation in a power transient. In the first experimental part, samples of plate fuels, irradiated at 36 GWj/tU, have been annealed to temperatures from 1100 C to 1500 C in a device that enabled the measurement of gas release in real time. At 1300 C, post-annealing observations demonstrated a link between the measured gas releases to a rapid formation of labyrinths at the grain surface. These labyrinths, which were formed by intergranular bubble interconnection, create release paths for the gas atoms which reach the grain surface. At this stage, the available experimental results (annealing and observations) were interpreted considering that it is the spreading of the gas atoms from the grains to the grain boundaries that is at the origin of the observed releases. This interpretation generates the hypothesis that a) at the end of the basic irradiation, the gas is at the atomic state and b) during the annealing, the spreading is reduced by the intragranular bubbles of the gas atoms. The last part of the work is dedicated to the modelization of the main phenomena at the origin of the gas release. The model developed, based on the model of the gas behaviour in MARGARET PWR, highlighted the great influence of the irradiation conditions on the gas distribution at the end of the irradiation and also its influence on the fission gas release during the power transient. (author) [fr

  18. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry based metabolomic approach for optimization and toxicity evaluation of earthworm sub-lethal responses to carbofuran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohana Krishna Reddy Mudiam

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances in understanding mechanism of toxicity, the development of biomarkers (biochemicals that vary significantly with exposure to chemicals for pesticides and environmental contaminants exposure is still a challenging task. Carbofuran is one of the most commonly used pesticides in agriculture and said to be most toxic carbamate pesticide. It is necessary to identify the biochemicals that can vary significantly after carbofuran exposure on earthworms which will help to assess the soil ecotoxicity. Initially, we have optimized the extraction conditions which are suitable for high-throughput gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS based metabolomics for the tissue of earthworm, Metaphire posthuma. Upon evaluation of five different extraction solvent systems, 80% methanol was found to have good extraction efficiency based on the yields of metabolites, multivariate analysis, total number of peaks and reproducibility of metabolites. Later the toxicity evaluation was performed to characterize the tissue specific metabolomic perturbation of earthworm, Metaphire posthuma after exposure to carbofuran at three different concentration levels (0.15, 0.3 and 0.6 mg/kg of soil. Seventeen metabolites, contributing to the best classification performance of highest dose dependent carbofuran exposed earthworms from healthy controls were identified. This study suggests that GC-MS based metabolomic approach was precise and sensitive to measure the earthworm responses to carbofuran exposure in soil, and can be used as a promising tool for environmental eco-toxicological studies.

  19. Defining Moments in MMWR History: Toxic-Shock Syndrome -- 1980

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-11-03

    In the late 1970s and early 1980s, an outbreak of a disease called Toxic Shock Syndrome made healthy women sick. CDC’s disease detectives helped unravel the link between Toxic Shock Syndrome and high-absorbency tampons. MMWR was the first scientific publication to break the news of these cases. In this podcast, Dr. Kathy Shands, former chief of CDC’s Toxic Shock Syndrome Task Force, recalls her experience working with state epidemiologists to identify the link between toxic shock syndrome and tampon use.  Created: 11/3/2017 by MMWR.   Date Released: 11/3/2017.

  20. Trichothecenes: structure-toxic activity relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qinghua; Dohnal, Vlastimil; Kuca, Kamil; Yuan, Zonghui

    2013-07-01

    Trichothecenes comprise a large family of structurally related toxins mainly produced by fungi belonging to the genus Fusarium. Among trichothecenes, type A and type B are of the most concern due to their broad and highly toxic nature. In order to address structure-activity relationships (SAR) of trichothecenes, relationships between structural features and biological effects of trichothecene mycotoxins in mammalian systems are summarized in this paper. The double bond between C-9-C-10 and the 12,13-epoxide ring are essential structural features for trichothecene toxicity. Removal of these groups results in a complete loss of toxicity. A hydroxyl group at C-3 enhances trichothecene toxicity, while this activity decreases gradually when C-3 is substituted with either hydrogen or an acetoxy group. The presence of a hydroxyl group at C-4 promotes slightly lower toxicity than an acetoxy group at the same position. The toxicity for type B trichothecenes decreases if the substituent at C-4 is changed from acetoxy to hydroxyl or hydrogen at C-4 position. The presence of hydroxyl and hydrogen groups on C-15 decreases the trichothecene toxicity in comparison with an acetoxy group attached to this carbon. Trichothecenes toxicity increases when a macrocyclic ring exists between the C-4 and C-15. At C-8 position, an oxygenated substitution at C-8 is essential for trichothecene toxicity, indicating a decrease in the toxicity if substituent change from isovaleryloxy through hydrogen to the hydroxyl group. The presence of a second epoxy ring at C-7-C-8 reduces the toxicity, whereas epoxidation at C-9-C-10 of some macrocyclic trichothecenes increases the activity. Conjugated trichothecenes could release their toxic precursors after hydrolysis in animals, and present an additional potential risk. The SAR study of trichothecenes should provide some crucial information for a better understanding of trichothecene chemical and biological properties in food contamination.

  1. [Advance in study on zearalenone's toxicity and determination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qing-Hua; Xu, Yang

    2005-07-01

    The article is intended to introduce the zearalenone's toxicity, determination methods and prevention. Zearalenone is one of the most widely distributed mycotoxins produces by Fusarium Species, it is harm to animals and human. And it can induce human liver cancer,carcinoma of tesis esophagus cancer. Now we use high-performance liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, thin layer chromatography, non-toxicity determinations to detect it.

  2. Transient fission-product release during reactor shutdown and startup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, C.E.L.; Lewis, B.J.; Dickson, L.W.

    1997-12-01

    Sweep-gas experiments performed at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories from 1979 to 1985 have been further analysed to determine the fraction of the gaseous fission-product inventory that is released on reactor shutdown and startup. Empirical equations were derived and applied to calculate the stable xenon release from companion fuel elements and from a well-documented experimental fuel bundle irradiated in the NRU reactor. The calculated gas release could be matched to the measured values within about a factor of two for an experimental irradiation with a burnup of 217 MWh/kgU. There was also limited information on the fraction of the radioactive iodine that was exposed, but not released, on reactor shutdown. An empirical equation is proposed for calculating this fraction. (author)

  3. Measurements of potato tubers gamma-ray irradiated in nitrogen gas or carbondioxide gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, Tadashi; Ohnishi, Tokuhiro; Dohmaru, Takaaki; Kanazawa, Tamotsu; Hiraoka, Eiichi; Furuta, Jun-ichiro.

    1984-01-01

    In this report the respiration of the potato tubers irradiated in nitrogen gas or carbondioxide gas was studied. Potato tubers of common Japanese variety, ''Danshaku'' were used for the examination. Potato tubers of about 2kg were put into each of Triple-Nylon bags and the bags were sealed after replacement of air in bags with nitrogen or carbondioxide gases. More than 16 hours after sealing of bags, the γ-dose ( 60 Co) of 150 Gy or 250 Gy were given to the potato tubers in bags at the dose rate of 10 4 R/h. After irradiation, all bags were opened in air and amounts of CO 2 released by respiration of tubers were measured with Hitachi gas chromatograph analyser Type 023. The amounts of CO 2 released from the potato tubers irradiated in open air is shown in Fig. 2. The results show that there is an initial lag period of several hours, followed by a rapid increase in the respiration, after which the CO 2 release was gradually decreased. Potato tubers irradiated in nitrogen gas show a similar release of CO 2 on time scale to the potato tubers irradiated in open air, but the total amounts of CO 2 are approximately half of those of the potato tubers irradiated in open air (Figs. 3 and 4). (J.P.N.)

  4. Evaluation of metals, metalloids, and ash mixture toxicity using sediment toxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojak, Amber; Bonnevie, Nancy L; Jones, Daniel S

    2015-01-01

    In December 2008, a release of 4.1 million m(3) of coal ash from the Tennessee Valley Authority Kingston Fossil Plant occurred. Ash washed into the Emory River and migrated downstream into the Clinch and Tennessee Rivers. A Baseline Ecological Risk Assessment evaluated risks to ecological receptors from ash in the river system post-dredging. This article describes the approach used and results from sediment toxicity tests, discussing any causal relationships between ash, metals, and toxicity. Literature is limited in the realm of aquatic coal combustion residue (CCR) exposures and the potential magnitude of effects on benthic invertebrates. Sediment samples along a spectrum of ash content were used in a tiered toxicity testing approach and included a combination of 10 day sediment toxicity acute tests and longer-term, partial life cycle "definitive" tests with 2 species (Hyalella azteca and Chironomus dilutus). Arsenic, and to a lesser extent Se, in the ash was the most likely toxicant causing observed effects in the laboratory toxicity tests. Sites in the Emory River with the greatest statistical and biologically significant effects had As concentrations in sediments twice the probable effects concentration of 33 mg/kg. These sites contained greater than 50% ash. Sites with less than approximately 50% ash in sediments exhibited fewer significant toxic responses relative to the reference sediment in the laboratory. The results discussed here present useful evidence of only limited effects occurring from a worst-case exposure pathway. These results provided a valuable line of evidence for the overall assessment of risks to benthic invertebrates and to other ecological receptors, and were crucial to risk management and development of project remediation goals. © 2014 SETAC.

  5. Protein Nanoscaffolds for Delivering Toxic Inorganic Cargo to Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cioloboc, Daniela

    Targeted delivery of anticancer drugs or prodrugs to tumors can minimize systemic toxicity and side effects. This study develops platforms for targeted delivery of two potentially less systemically toxic prodrugs by exploiting the native and/or bioinorganic properties of two ferritins, both of which function naturally as iron storage proteins. Two delivery approaches were investigated. The first system was designed to serve as either an enhancement or alternative to traditional photodynamic therapy by generating hydroxyl radical in addition to singlet oxygen as the toxic reactive oxygen species. This system used Escherichia coli bacterioferritin (Bfr) loaded with 2,500 irons and multiple zinc-porphyrin (ZnP) photosensitizers. Ferrous iron was released by photoreduction of ferric iron stored within the Bfr protein shell. Hydroxyl radicals were generated via the Fenton reaction between hydrogen peroxide and the released ferrous iron. The outer surface of the Bfr protein shell was coated with peptides that specifically bind to a receptor known to be overexpressed in many tumor cells and tumor vasculature. The iron-loaded peptide-ZnP-Bfr was endocytosed by melanoma cells, where it showed photo-triggered release of iron and light-dependent cytotoxicity. The second system, built around human heavy chain ferritin (HFn), was loaded with arsenate as a less toxic "prodrug" and designed to release arsenic in its toxic, therapeutically effective reduced form, arsenic trioxide (ATO). The Hfn shell was coated with peptides targeting receptors that are hyperexpressed in triple negative breast cancers. The arsenate/iron-loaded-Hfn was endocytosed by a breast cancer cell line and showed cytotoxicity equivalent to that of free ATO on an arsenic basis, whereas the "empty" or iron-only loaded Hfn showed no cytotoxicity. Although HFn has previously been used to deliver organic drugs and imaging agents, these new results demonstrate that both Bfr and HFn can be manipulated to function

  6. Evaluation of Gas Retention in Waste Simulants: Tall Column Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schonewill, Philip P.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Shimskey, Rick W.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Powell, Michael R.; Boeringa, Gregory K.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Karri, Naveen K.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Tran, Diana N.; Sande, Susan; Heldebrant, David J.; Meacham, Joseph E.; Smet, Dave; Bryan, Wesley E.; Calmus, Ronald B.

    2014-05-16

    Gas generation in Hanford’s underground waste storage tanks can lead to gas accumulation within the layer of settled solids (sludge) at the tank bottom. The gas, which typically has hydrogen as the major component together with other flammable species, is formed principally by radiation-driven chemical reactions. Accumulation of these gases within the sludge in a waste tank is undesirable and limits the amount of tank volume for waste storage. Further, accumulation of large amounts of gas in the sludge may potentially result in an unacceptable release of the accumulated gas if the sludge-layer density is reduced to less than that of the overlying sludge or that of the supernatant liquid. Rapid release of large amounts of flammable gases could endanger personnel and equipment near the tank. For this reason, a thorough understanding of the circumstances that can lead to a potentially problematic gas accumulation in sludge layers is needed. To respond to this need, the Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Program (DSGREP) was commissioned to examine gas release behavior in sludges.

  7. Toxicity and Immunogenicity in Murine Melanoma following Exposure to Physical Plasma-Derived Oxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sander Bekeschus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic melanoma is an aggressive and deadly disease. Therapeutic advance has been achieved by antitumor chemo- and radiotherapy. These modalities involve the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, affecting cellular viability, migration, and immunogenicity. Such species are also created by cold physical plasma, an ionized gas capable of redox modulating cells and tissues without thermal damage. Cold plasma has been suggested for anticancer therapy. Here, melanoma cell toxicity, motility, and immunogenicity of murine metastatic melanoma cells were investigated following plasma exposure in vitro. Cells were oxidized by plasma, leading to decreased metabolic activity and cell death. Moreover, plasma decelerated melanoma cell growth, viability, and cell cycling. This was accompanied by increased cellular stiffness and upregulation of zonula occludens 1 protein in the cell membrane. Importantly, expression levels of immunogenic cell surface molecules such as major histocompatibility complex I, calreticulin, and melanocortin receptor 1 were significantly increased in response to plasma. Finally, plasma treatment significantly decreased the release of vascular endothelial growth factor, a molecule with importance in angiogenesis. Altogether, these results suggest beneficial toxicity of cold plasma in murine melanomas with a concomitant immunogenicity of potential interest in oncology.

  8. 75 FR 5261 - Waybill Data Reporting for Toxic Inhalation Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-02

    ... monitor traffic flows and rate trends in the industry, and to develop evidence in Board proceedings. The... humans as to pose a hazard to health in the event of a release during transportation. These materials... so toxic to humans as to pose a hazard to health in the event of a release during transportation...

  9. Detection of cold gas releases in space via low energy neutral atom imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McComas, D.J.; Funsten, H.O.; Moore, K.R.; Scime, E.E.; Thomsen, M.F.

    1993-01-01

    Low energy neutral atoms (LENAs) are produced in space plasmas by charge exchange between the ambient magnetospheric plasma ions and cold neutral atoms. Under normal conditions these cold neutrals come from the terrestrial geocorona, a shroud of few-eV hydrogen atoms surrounding the Earth. As a consequence of this charge exchange, it has become possible to remotely image many regions of the magnetosphere for the first time utilizing recently developed LENA imaging technology. In addition to the natural hydrogen geocorona, conventional explosions and maneuvering thruster firings can also introduce large amounts of cold gas into the space environment. In this paper the authors examine whether such potentially clandestine activities could also be remotely observed for the first time via LENA imaging. First, they examine the fluxes of LENAs produced in the space environment from a conventional explosion. Then they review the present state of the art in the emerging field of LENA detection and imaging. Recent work has shown that LENAs can be imaged by first converting the neutrals to ions with ultra-thin (10s of angstrom) foils and then electrostatically analyzing these newly created ions to reject the large (> 10 10 cm -2 s -1 ) UV background to which the low energy detectors are sensitive. They conclude that the sensitivities for present LENA imager designs may be just adequate for detecting some man-made releases. With additional improvements in LENA detection capabilities, this technique could become an important new method for monitoring for conventional explosions, as well as other man-made neutral releases, in the space environment

  10. Polymeric membrane materials: new aspects of empirical approaches to prediction of gas permeability parameters in relation to permanent gases, linear lower hydrocarbons and some toxic gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malykh, O V; Golub, A Yu; Teplyakov, V V

    2011-05-11

    Membrane gas separation technologies (air separation, hydrogen recovery from dehydrogenation processes, etc.) use traditionally the glassy polymer membranes with dominating permeability of "small" gas molecules. For this purposes the membranes based on the low free volume glassy polymers (e.g., polysulfone, tetrabromopolycarbonate and polyimides) are used. On the other hand, an application of membrane methods for VOCs and some toxic gas recovery from air, separation of the lower hydrocarbons containing mixtures (in petrochemistry and oil refining) needs the membranes with preferable penetration of components with relatively larger molecular sizes. In general, this kind of permeability is characterized for rubbers and for the high free volume glassy polymers. Data files accumulated (more than 1500 polymeric materials) represent the region of parameters "inside" of these "boundaries." Two main approaches to the prediction of gas permeability of polymers are considered in this paper: (1) the statistical treatment of published transport parameters of polymers and (2) the prediction using model of ≪diffusion jump≫ with consideration of the key properties of the diffusing molecule and polymeric matrix. In the frames of (1) the paper presents N-dimensional methods of the gas permeability estimation of polymers using the correlations "selectivity/permeability." It is found that the optimal accuracy of prediction is provided at n=4. In the frames of the solution-diffusion mechanism (2) the key properties include the effective molecular cross-section of penetrating species to be responsible for molecular transportation in polymeric matrix and the well known force constant (ε/k)(eff i) of {6-12} potential for gas-gas interaction. Set of corrected effective molecular cross-section of penetrant including noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, Xe), permanent gases (H(2), O(2), N(2), CO), ballast and toxic gases (CO(2), NO(,) NO(2), SO(2), H(2)S) and linear lower hydrocarbons (CH(4

  11. The influence of short-term concentration peaks on exposure risks in the vicinity of an episodic release of hydrogen sulphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    In order to propose a methodology by which the influence of short-term concentration peaks on exposure risks could be estimated in the vicinity of an atmospheric release of hydrogen sulphide (H 2 S), an extensive and up-to-date review of H 2 S toxicity was conducted, with emphasis on acute and sub-acute poisoning. The literature on animal studies and cases of human exposure were used to derive a lethal dose relationship(concentration-exposure time) appropriate for the general population. A statistical model was developed which calculates the probability of short-term concentrations exceeding the lethal level given the downwind range from the release, the short-term averaging time of interest, the long-term average concentration, and metereological and terrain conditions . Results were obtained for passive releases of H 2 S under a range of hypothetical conditions. Interpretation of these results is given in terms of the overall probability of lethal exposure during a 30-minute episode. The likely influence of heavy water plant gas dispersion systems is also addressed. (author)

  12. Estimating the threshold levels of uranium and fluorine for the development of pulmonitis and toxic lung edema resultant from accidents involving uranium hexafluoride release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasteva, G.N.; Antipin, E.B.; Bad'in, V.I.; Molokanov, A.A.; Mordasheva, V.V.; Mirkhajdarov, A.Kh.; Sorokin, A.V.; Savinova, I.A.

    1999-01-01

    Threshold doses of uranium and fluorine for the development of pulmonitis and toxic edema of the lung with lethal outcome are estimated. The levels of UF 6 entry under emergency conditions are evaluated and bronchopulmonary disease is described in subjects involved in three accidents with UF 6 release which occurred in the seventies and eighties, as shown by records. The results deny the previous assumption on the leading role of uranium in a single exposure to uranium hexafluoride. Fluorine ion triggering the mechanism of reactions in systems which determine the disease outcome is vitally important [ru

  13. Adsorption and dissociation of sulfur-based toxic gas molecules on silicene nanoribbons: a quest for high-performance gas sensors and catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walia, Gurleen Kaur; Randhawa, Deep Kamal Kaur

    2018-03-16

    The adsorption behavior of sulfur-based toxic gases (H 2 S and SO 2 ) on armchair silicene nanoribbons (ASiNRs) was investigated using first-principles density functional theory (DFT). Being a zero band gap material, application of bulk silicene is limited in nanoelectronics, despite its high carrier mobility. By restricting its dimensions into one dimension, construction of nanoribbons, and by introduction of a defect, its band gap can be tuned. Pristine armchair silicene nanoribbons (P-ASiNRs) have a very low sensitivity to gas molecules. Therefore, a defect was introduced by removal of one Si atom, leading to increased sensitivity. To deeply understand the impact of the aforementioned gases on silicene nanoribbons, electronic band structures, density of states, charge transfers, adsorption energies, electron densities, current-voltage characteristics and most stable adsorption configurations were calculated. H 2 S is dissociated completely into HS and H species when adsorbed onto defective armchair silicene nanoribbons (D-ASiNRs). Thus, D-ASiNR is a likely catalyst for dissociation of the H 2 S gas molecule. Conversely, upon SO 2 adsorption, P-ASiNR acts as a suitable sensor, whereas D-ASiNR provides enhanced sensitivity compared with P-ASiNR. On the basis of these results, D-ASiNR can be expected to be a disposable sensor for SO 2 detection as well as a catalyst for H 2 S reduction. Graphical abstract Comparison of I-V characteristics of pristine and defective armchair silicene nanoribbons with H 2 S and SO 2 adsorbed on them.

  14. Development of filter module for passive filtration and accident gas release confinement system for NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yelizarov, P.G.; Efanov, A.D.; Martynov, P.N.; Masalov, D.P.; Osipov, V.P.; Yagodkin, I.V.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: One of the urgent problems of the safe NPP operation is air cleaning from radioactive aerosols and volatile iodine compounds under the accident operation conditions of NPP. A principally new passive accident gas release confinement system is used as the basis of the designs of new generation reactor power blocks under the-beyond-design-basis accident conditions with total loss of current. The basic structural component of the passive filtration system (PFS) is the filter-sorber being heated up to 300 deg. C. The filter-sorber represents a design consisting of 150 connected in parallel two-step filtering modules. The first step is intended to clean air from radioactive aerosols, the second one - to clean air from radioactive iodine and its volatile compounds. The filter-sorber is located in the upper point of the exterior protection shell. Due to natural convection, it provides confinement of r/a impurities and controlled steam-gas release from the inter-shell space into atmosphere. The basic specific design feature is the two-section design of the PFS filter module consisting of a coarse-cleaning section and a fine-cleaning section. A combination of layer-by-layer put filtering materials on the basis of glass fiber and metal fiber. The pilot PFS filter module specimen tests run in conditions modeling accident situation indicated that at a filtration rate of 0,3 cm/s the aerodynamic resistance of the module does not exceed 12 Pa, the filtration effectiveness equals 99,99 % in terms of aerosol, no less than 99,9% in terms of radioactive 131 I and no less than 99,0% in terms of organic compounds of iodine (CH 3 131 I); the dust capacity amounts to a value above 50 g/m 2 . The obtained results of tests comply with the design requirements imposed on the PFS filter-sorber module. (authors)

  15. Fission product release from fuel of water-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strupczewski, A.; Marks, P.; Klisinska, M.

    1997-01-01

    The report contains a review of theoretical models and experimental works of gaseous and volatile fission products from uranium dioxide fuel. The experimental results of activity release at low burnup and the model of fission gas behaviour at initial stage of fuel operational cycle are presented. Empirical models as well as measured results of transient fission products release rate in the temperature up to UO 2 melting point, with consideration of their chemical reactions with fu