WorldWideScience

Sample records for total power required

  1. Monopolist requires totally liberalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janoska, J.

    2003-01-01

    Slovenske elektrarne (SE), a.s, Bratislava in present time operates some sources, which would be off at normal conditions. It was caused by high electricity price on European markets. It is possible to sell 1 MWh for 12 thousands Slovak crowns abroad in last months. It is also advantageous to initialise thermal sources for power plant, where variable expenses are higher - from 1200 to 1300 Slovak crowns per MWh. SE are mainly trying to sell most of electricity on domestic market because returnability of dominant nuclear power plants was projected for this market. Utilizing capacities profit via domestic market covers fixed costs of power plants. Besides, power plant can demand regulated price 1272 Slovak crowns per 1 MWh. SE sources have capacity of 6800 MW, but maximal daily load uses for example in December approximately 4000 MW. Overflows are more higher in the summer - load dropped to 2200 MW in the beginning of September in last year. It is noted in issue that price increase in Europe is noticed. Price of primary power electricity will remain at liquid markets at 28 Euro (1176 Slovak crowns) in the following year prices fluctuate from 38 to 40 Euro (to 1700 Slovak crowns) per 1 MW at load peaks. Price increase is caused by lack of sources - it does not keep up to satisfy demand increase. Sources are gradually laid up and no new sources are built. Production capacities will decrease also in SE - by laying up of two 440 MW blocks of Bohunice NPP V-1. Price increase trend will continue according to SE businessmen till it is advantageous to build new source. Present price trend can be accelerated by decision about completing of Mochovce NPP 3-4

  2. Military power requirements and backup power considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botts, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    All US Air Force (USAF) facilities have certain critical power requirements that must be met in order to carry out their mission successfully. Internal USAF studies have shown that the mission can degrade precipitously as the available power decreases below the mission critical level. Now, more than ever before, the military and private industry are finding that certain functions, such as automated data processing and automated process control, respond catastrophically to power reductions. Furthermore, increased reliance on electrical power means, in the case of the Air Force, that critical power requirements are anticipated to increase by half over the next 15 yr. For these reasons and others, the USAF is investigating several means of improving the availability of electric power under adverse conditions above that which can be provided by an off-base supplier. Among the approaches to this problem being pursued at this time are a program to improve all sorts of generator sets on a service-wide basis and the Multimegawatt Terrestrial Power (MTP) Program, which is pursuing the design and testing of a small dedicated nuclear power source to provide critical mission power. The purpose of this paper is to provide some insight into some of the issues associated with USAF power programs

  3. Predicting thyroxine requirements following total thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistry, Dipan; Atkin, Stephen; Atkinson, Helen; Gunasekaran, Sinnappa; Sylvester, Deborah; Rigby, Alan S; England, R James

    2011-03-01

    Optimal thyroxine replacement following total thyroidectomy is critical to avoid symptoms of hypothyroidism. The aim of this study was to determine the best formula to determine the initiated replacement dose of levothyroxine immediately following total thyroidectomy. Prospective study. All patients were initiated on 100 μg levothyroxine and titrated to within the reference range for TSH and free T4. Correlations to height, weight, age, lean body mass (LBM), body surface area (BSA) and body mass index (BMI) were calculated. One hundred consecutive adult patients underwent total thyroidectomy for non-malignant disease. Comparison between three methods of levothyroxine dose prediction, aiming for a levothyroxine dose correct to within 25 μg of actual dose required. Correlations were seen between levothyroxine dose and patient age (r=-0.346, Pregression equation was calculated (predicted levothyroxine dose=[0·943 × bodyweight] + [-1.165 × age] + 125.8), simplified to (levothyroxine dose= bodyweight - age + 125) pragmatically. Initiating patients empirically on 100 μg post-operatively showed that 40% of patients achieved target within 25 μg of their required dose; this increased to 59% when using a weight-only dose calculation (1.6 μg/kg) and to 72% using the simplified regression equation. A simple calculated regression equation gives a more accurate prediction of initiated levothyroxine dose following total thyroidectomy, reducing the need for outpatient attendance for dose titration. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Utility requirements for fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeBellis, R.J.

    1977-03-01

    A four-man month study was undertaken to identify utility requirements of fusion power and define a role for the utilities in the fusion development process during the 1980s. This report, preliminary in nature, serves mainly as a planning document for future requirements analyses. A requirements organization was defined to consist of three major chronological phases: research and development, plant installation, and plant operation. Thirty-seven requirements were identified, covering all categories. In addition, training, environment, safety, licensing, and utility model were identified as five matrix-type requirements. As the requirement definition process continued during the study period, comments received from utility representatives revealed a consistency of key issues in the fusion development process. These issues form the basis for the eventual establishment of definitive roles for the utilities during the 1980s. The issues are not meant to reflect a negative view of fusion, but are items that must be solved before fusion can be introduced commercially as an electrical power source. As a result of this requirements study, preliminary candidate roles for the utilities in the fusion development process during the 1980s were identified as public education, commercialization studies, industry investment analyses, training plan implementation, alternate reactor concept development, ERDA concept design review, and requirements refinement

  5. Utility requirements for fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeBellis, R.J.

    1977-03-01

    A four-man-month study, jointly funded by EPRI and McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company-EAST, was undertaken to identify the utility requirements of fusion power and define a role for the utilities in the fusion development process during the 1980's. This report, preliminary in nature, serves mainly as a planning document for future requirements analyses. A requirements organization was defined to consist of three major chronological phases: research and development, plant installation, and plant operation. Thirty-seven requirements were identified, covering all categories. In addition, training, environment, safety, licensing, and utility model were identified as five matrix-type requirements. As the requirement definition process continued during the study period, comments received from utility representatives revealed a consistency of key issues in the fusion development process. These issues form the basis for the eventual establishment of definitive roles for the utilities during the 1980's. The issues are not meant to reflect a negative view of fusion, but are items which must be solved before fusion can be introduced commercially as an electrical power source. As a result of this requirements study, preliminary candidate roles for the utilities in the fusion development process during the 1980's were identified as public education, commercialization studies, industry investment analyses, training plan implementation, alternate reactor concept development, ERDA concept design review, and requirements refinement

  6. 12 CFR 932.2 - Total capital requirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Total capital requirement. 932.2 Section 932.2 Banks and Banking FEDERAL HOUSING FINANCE BOARD FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK RISK MANAGEMENT AND CAPITAL STANDARDS FEDERAL HOME LOAN BANK CAPITAL REQUIREMENTS § 932.2 Total capital requirement. (a) Each Bank shall...

  7. Power requirements for commercial communications spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billerbeck, W. J.

    1985-01-01

    Historical data on commercial spacecraft power systems are presented and their power requirements to the growth of satellite communications channel usage are related. Some approaches for estimating future power requirements of this class of spacecraft through the year 2000 are proposed. The key technology drivers in satellite power systems are addressed. Several technological trends in such systems are described, focusing on the most useful areas for research and development of major subsystems, including solar arrays, energy storage, and power electronics equipment.

  8. Nuclear plant requirements during power system restoration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamski, G.; Jenkins, R.; Gill, P.

    1995-01-01

    This paper is one of a series presented on behalf of the System Operation Subcommittee with the intent of focusing industry attention on power system restoration issues. This paper discusses a number of nuclear power plant requirements that require special attention during power system restoration

  9. Nuclear power strategy: requirements for technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlov, V.V.; Rachkov, V.I.

    2001-01-01

    The possible role of nuclear power in sustainable development demands answers to at least three questions: Is large-scale nuclear power essential to future development? - Is it feasible to have modern nuclear power transformed for large-scale deployment? - When will large-scale nuclear power be practically needed? The questions are analysed with the requirements to be fulfilled concerning present-day technologies

  10. Propulsion element requirements using electrical power system unscheduled power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Frank; Hodge, Kathy

    1989-01-01

    The suitability of using the electrical energy from the Space Station's Electrical Power System (EPS) during the periods of peak solar insolation which is currently not specifically allocated (unscheduled power) to produce propulsion propellants, gaseous hydrogen, and oxygen by electrolyzing water is investigated. Reboost propellant requirements are emphasized, but the results are more generally relevant because the balance of recurring propellant requirements are an order of magnitude smaller and the nonrecurring requirements are not significant on an average basis.

  11. Total Magnetic Field Signatures over Submarine HVDC Power Cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. M.; Tchernychev, M.; Johnston, J. M.; Tryggestad, J.

    2013-12-01

    Mikhail Tchernychev, Geometrics, Inc. Ross Johnson, Geometrics, Inc. Jeff Johnston, Geometrics, Inc. High Voltage Direct Current (HVDC) technology is widely used to transmit electrical power over considerable distances using submarine cables. The most commonly known examples are the HVDC cable between Italy and Greece (160 km), Victoria-Tasmania (300 km), New Jersey - Long Island (82 km) and the Transbay cable (Pittsburg, California - San-Francisco). These cables are inspected periodically and their location and burial depth verified. This inspection applies to live and idle cables; in particular a survey company could be required to locate pieces of a dead cable for subsequent removal from the sea floor. Most HVDC cables produce a constant magnetic field; therefore one of the possible survey tools would be Marine Total Field Magnetometer. We present mathematical expressions of the expected magnetic fields and compare them with fields observed during actual surveys. We also compare these anomalies fields with magnetic fields produced by other long objects, such as submarine pipelines The data processing techniques are discussed. There include the use of Analytic Signal and direct modeling of Total Magnetic Field. The Analytic Signal analysis can be adapted using ground truth where available, but the total field allows better discrimination of the cable parameters, in particular to distinguish between live and idle cable. Use of a Transverse Gradiometer (TVG) allows for easy discrimination between cable and pipe line objects. Considerable magnetic gradient is present in the case of a pipeline whereas there is less gradient for the DC power cable. Thus the TVG is used to validate assumptions made during the data interpretation process. Data obtained during the TVG surveys suggest that the magnetic field of a live HVDC cable is described by an expression for two infinite long wires carrying current in opposite directions.

  12. Beam heating requirements for a tokamak experimental power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertoncini, P.J.; Brooks, J.N.; Fasolo, J.A.; Stacey, W.M. Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Typical beam heating requirements for effective tokamak experimental power reactor (TEPR) operation have been studied in connection with the Argonne preliminary conceptual TEPR design. For an ignition level plasma (approximately 100 MWt fusion power) for the nominal case envisioned, the neutral beam is only used to heat the plasma to ignition. This typically requires a beam power output of 40 MW at 180 keV for about 3 sec with a total energy of 114 MJ supplied to the plasma. The beam requirements for an ignition device are not very sensitive to changes in wall-sputtered impurity levels or plasma resistivity. For a plasma that must be driven due to poor confinement, the beam must remain on for most of the burn cycle. For representative cases, beam powers of approximately 23 MW are required for a total on-time of 20 to 50 sec. Reqirements on power level, beam energy, on-time, and beam-generation efficiency all represent considerable advances over present technology. For the Argonne TEPR design, a total of 16 to 32 beam injectors is envisioned. For a 40-MW, 180-keV, one-component beam, each injector supplies about 7 to 14 A of neutrals to the plasma. For positive ion sources, about 50 to 100 A of ions are required per injector and some form of particle and/or energy recycling appears to be essential in order to meet the power and efficiency requirements

  13. Nuclear Space Power Systems Materials Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckman, R.W. Jr.

    2004-01-01

    High specific energy is required for space nuclear power systems. This generally means high operating temperatures and the only alloy class of materials available for construction of such systems are the refractory metals niobium, tantalum, molybdenum and tungsten. The refractory metals in the past have been the construction materials selected for nuclear space power systems. The objective of this paper will be to review the past history and requirements for space nuclear power systems from the early 1960's through the SP-100 program. Also presented will be the past and present status of refractory metal alloy technology and what will be needed to support the next advanced nuclear space power system. The next generation of advanced nuclear space power systems can benefit from the review of this past experience. Because of a decline in the refractory metal industry in the United States, ready availability of specific refractory metal alloys is limited

  14. Grid Code Requirements for Wind Power Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiuwei

    2018-01-01

    This chapter reviews the grid code requirements for integration of wind power plants (WPPs). The grid codes reviewed are from the UK, Ireland, Germany, Denmark, Spain, Sweden, the USA, and Canada. Transmission system operators (TSOs) around the world have specified requirements for WPPs under...

  15. Standby battery requirements for telecommunications power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, G.J. [The Focus Partnership, 126 Main Street, Swithland, Loughborough, Leics LE12 8TJ (United Kingdom)

    2006-08-25

    The requirements for standby power for telecommunications are changing as the network moves from conventional systems to Internet Protocol (IP) telephony. These new systems require higher power levels closer to the user but the level of availability and reliability cannot be compromised if the network is to provide service in the event of a failure of the public utility. Many parts of these new networks are ac rather than dc powered with UPS systems for back-up power. These generally have lower levels of reliability than dc systems and the network needs to be designed such that overall reliability is not reduced through appropriate levels of redundancy. Mobile networks have different power requirements. Where there is a high density of nodes, continuity of service can be reasonably assured with short autonomy times. Furthermore, there is generally no requirement that these networks are the provider of last resort and therefore, specifications for continuity of power are directed towards revenue protection and overall reliability targets. As a result of these changes, battery requirements for reserve power are evolving. Shorter autonomy times are specified for parts of the network although a large part will continue to need support for hours rather minutes. Operational temperatures are increasing and battery solutions that provide longer life in extreme conditions are becoming important. Different battery technologies will be discussed in the context of these requirements. Conventional large flooded lead/acid cells both with pasted and tubular plates are used in larger central office applications but the majority of requirements are met with valve-regulated lead/acid (VRLA) batteries. The different types of VRLA battery will be described and their suitability for various applications outlined. New developments in battery construction and battery materials have improved both performance and reliability in recent years. Alternative technologies are also being proposed

  16. Grid code requirements for wind power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djagarov, N.; Filchev, S.; Grozdev, Z.; Bonev, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper production data of wind power in Europe and Bulgaria and plans for their development within 2030 are reviewed. The main characteristics of wind generators used in Bulgaria are listed. A review of the grid code in different European countries, which regulate the requirements for renewable sources, is made. European recommendations for requirements harmonization are analyzed. Suggestions for the Bulgarian gird code are made

  17. International power projections and capital requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ann, H.

    1989-01-01

    This work is related to the international power projections and capital requirements of all kinds of energy and the share of electricity. It is also related to the so-called greenhouse effect carbon dioxide concentration in atmosphere. (A.C.A.S.)

  18. FLECH PowerMax Service Requirement Specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    It is expected that in the future, ancillary services will be required at distribution level. This work describes how one of these ancillary services, the PowerMax service, must be spec ified within a market framework. The basis of this work is the Flexibility Clearing House (FLE CH) platform...... and the Distribution System Operator (DSO) services defined in [1]. The PowerMax service has been further discussed in [2], and this technical report seeks to clarify the implementation details first discussed in that paper. The aim of the PowerMax service it to relieve congestion issue s in the distribution system...... by establishing a maximum power that a cluster of consumer devices may draw from the syste m. The consumers will receive a payment for providing this service, and the DSO will be able to postpone grid reinfo rcement...

  19. Safety requirements for a nuclear power plant electric power system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouad, L F; Shinaishin, M A

    1988-06-15

    This work aims at identifying the safety requirements for the electric power system in a typical nuclear power plant, in view of the UNSRC and the IAEA. Description of a typical system is provided, followed by a presentation of the scope of the information required for safety evaluation of the system design and performance. The acceptance and design criteria that must be met as being specified by both regulatory systems, are compared. Means of implementation of such criteria as being described in the USNRC regulatory guides and branch technical positions on one hand and in the IAEA safety guides on the other hand are investigated. It is concluded that the IAEA regulations address the problems that may be faced with in countries having varying grid sizes ranging from large stable to small potentially unstable ones; and that they put emphasis on the onsite standby power supply. Also, in this respect the Americans identify the grid as the preferred power supply to the plant auxiliaries, while the IAEA leaves the possibility that the preferred power supply could be either the grid or the unit main generator depending on the reliability of each. Therefore, it is found that it is particularly necessary in this area of electric power supplies to deal with the IAEA and the American sets of regulations as if each complements and not supplements the other. (author)

  20. National Maglev initiative: California line electric utility power system requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Save, Phil

    1994-01-01

    The electrical utility power system requirements were determined for a Maglev line from San Diego to San Francisco and Sacramento with a maximum capacity of 12,000 passengers an hour in each direction at a speed of 300 miles per hour, or one train every 30 seconds in each direction. Basically the Maglev line requires one 50-MVA substation every 12.5 miles. The need for new power lines to serve these substations and their voltage levels are based not only on equipment loading criteria but also on limitations due to voltage flicker and harmonics created by the Maglev system. The resulting power system requirements and their costs depend mostly on the geographical area, urban or suburban with 'strong' power systems, or mountains and rural areas with 'weak' power systems. A reliability evaluation indicated that emergency power sources, such as a 10-MW battery at each substation, were not justified if sufficient redundancy is provided in the design of the substations and the power lines serving them. With a cost of $5.6 M per mile, the power system requirements, including the 12-kV DC cables and the inverters along the Maglev line, were found to be the second largest cost component of the Maglev system, after the cost of the guideway system ($9.1 M per mile), out of a total cost of $23 M per mile.

  1. Requirement profile for nuclear power station personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeglin, H.C.

    1984-01-01

    The starting point in deriving the requirement profile for the shift personnel in the control rooms of nuclear power stations is information of a technical, organisational and ergonomic kind. The technique used, the distribution of work to different work areas and the configuration of the workplace is determined by the tasks and the environmental conditions in which they have to be done. (orig./DG) [de

  2. Nuclear power manpower and training requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whan, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    A broad spectrum of technical personnel is required to conduct a national nuclear power program, predominantly electrical, mechanical, and nuclear engineers and health physicists. The need for nuclear education and training, even in the early planning states, is the topic of this paper. Experience gained in the United States can provide useful information to Asia-Pacific countries developing nuclear power programs. Including both on-site and off-site personnel, U.S. plants average about 570 workers for BWRs and 700 for PWRs. The need for an additional 57,000 technical employees over the next decade is projected. The technical backgrounds of the manpower required to operate and support a nuclear power plant are distinctly different from those used by non-nuclear utilities. Manpower cannot be transferred from fossil fuel plants without extensive training. Meeting the demand for nuclear education and training must be a friendly partnership among universities, government, and industry. The long-term supply of nuclear-educated personnel requires strong, government-supported universities. Most specific training, however, must be provided by industry. (author)

  3. Power plant project success through total productive generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaivola, R.; Tamminen, L.

    1996-11-01

    The Total Productive Generation concept (TPG) defines the lines of action adopted by IVO Generation Services Ltd (IGS) for the operation and maintenance of power plants. The TPG concept is based on procedures tested in practice. The main idea of TPG is continuous development of quality, which is a joint effort of the entire staff. Its objective is to benefit IGS`s own staff and, in particular, the company`s customers. (orig.)

  4. Probabilistic safety analysis of DC power supply requirements for nuclear power plants. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranowsky, P.W.; Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Fedele, M.A.

    1981-04-01

    A probabilistic safety assessment was performed as part of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission generic safety task A-30, Adequacy of Safety Related DC Power Supplies. Event and fault tree analysis techniques were used to determine the relative contribution of DC power related accident sequences to the total core damage probability due to shutdown cooling failures. It was found that a potentially large DC power contribution could be substantially reduced by augmenting the minimum design and operational requirements. Recommendations included (1) requiring DC power divisional independence, (2) improved test, maintenance, and surveillance, and (3) requiring core cooling capability be maintained following the loss of one DC power bus and a single failure in another system

  5. Generating units performances: power system requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourment, C; Girard, N; Lefebvre, H

    1994-08-01

    The part of generating units within the power system is more than providing power and energy. Their performance are not only measured by their energy efficiency and availability. Namely, there is a strong interaction between the generating units and the power system. The units are essential components of the system: for a given load profile the frequency variation follows directly from the behaviour of the units and their ability to adapt their power output. In the same way, the voltage at the units terminals are the key points to which the voltage profile at each node of the network is linked through the active and especially the reactive power flows. Therefore, the customer will experience the frequency and voltage variations induced by the units behaviour. Moreover, in case of adverse conditions, if the units do not operate as well as expected or trip, a portion of the system, may be the whole system, may collapse. The limitation of the performance of a unit has two kinds of consequences. Firstly, it may result in an increased amount of not supplied energy or loss of load probability: for example if the primary reserve is not sufficient, a generator tripping may lead to an abnormal frequency deviation, and load may have to be shed to restore the balance. Secondly, the limitation of a unit performance results in an economic over-cost for the system: for instance, if not enough `cheap` units are able to load-following, other units with higher operating costs have to be started up. We would like to stress the interest for the operators and design teams of the units on the one hand, and the operators and design teams of the system on the other hand, of dialog and information exchange, in operation but also at the conception stage, in order to find a satisfactory compromise between the system requirements and the consequences for the generating units. (authors). 11 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Total life cycle cost model for electric power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardullo, M.W.

    1995-01-01

    The Total Life Cycle Cost (TLCC) model for electric power stations was developed to provide a technology screening model. The TLCC analysis involves normalizing cost estimates with respect to performance standards and financial assumptions and preparing a profile of all costs over the service life of the power station. These costs when levelized present a value in terms of a utility electricity rate. Comparison of cost and the pricing of the electricity for a utility shows if a valid project exists. Cost components include both internal and external costs. Internal costs are direct costs associated with the purchase, and operation of the power station and include initial capital costs, operating and maintenance costs. External costs result from societal and/or environmental impacts that are external to the marketplace and can include air quality impacts due to emissions, infrastructure costs, and other impacts. The cost stream is summed (current dollars) or discounted (constant dollars) to some base year to yield a overall TLCC of each power station technology on a common basis. While minimizing life cycle cost is an important consideration, it may not always be a preferred method for some utilities who may prefer minimizing capital costs. Such consideration does not always result in technology penetration in a marketplace such as the utility sector. Under various regulatory climates, the utility is likely to heavily weigh initial capital costs while giving limited consideration to other costs such as societal costs. Policy makers considering external costs, such as those resulting from environmental impacts, may reach significantly different conclusions about which technologies are most advantageous to society. The TLCC analysis model for power stations was developed to facilitate consideration of all perspectives

  7. Space nuclear power requirements for ozone layer modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolan, T.J.

    1991-01-01

    This work estimates the power requirements for using photochemical processes driven by space nuclear power to counteract the Earth's ozone layer depletion. The total quantity of ozone (O 3 ) in the Earth's atmosphere is estimated to be about 4.7 x 10 37 molecules. The ozone production and destruction rates in the stratosphere are both on the order of 4.9 x 10 31 molecules/s, differing by a small fraction so that the net depletion rate is about 0.16 to 0.26% per year. The delivered optical power requirement for offsetting this depletion is estimated to be on the order of 3 GW. If the power were produced by satellite reactors at 800 km altitude (orbit decay time ∼ 300 years), some means of efficient power beaming would be needed to deliver the power to stratospheric levels (10--50 km). Ultraviolet radiation at 140--150 nm could have higher absorption rates in O 2 (leading to production of atomic oxygen, which can combine with O 2 to form O 3 ) than in ozone (leading to photodissociation of O 3 ). Potential radiation sources include H 2 lasers and direct nuclear pumping of ultraviolet fluorescers. 5 refs

  8. Estimates of power requirements for a Manned Mars Rover powered by a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, Nicholas J.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Cataldo, Robert; Bloomfield, Harvey

    1991-01-01

    This paper assesses the power requirement for a Manned Mars Rover vehicle. Auxiliary power needs are fulfilled using a hybrid solar photovoltaic/regenerative fuel cell system, while the primary power needs are meet using an SP-100 type reactor. The primary electric power needs, which include 30-kW(e) net user power, depend on the reactor thermal power and the efficiency of the power conversion system. Results show that an SP-100 type reactor coupled to a Free Piston Stirling Engine yields the lowest total vehicle mass and lowest specific mass for the power system. The second lowest mass was for a SP-100 reactor coupled to a Closed Brayton Cycle using He/Xe as the working fluid. The specific mass of the nuclear reactor power system, including a man-rated radiation shield, ranged from 150-kg/kW(e) to 190-kg/KW(e) and the total mass of the Rover vehicle varied depend upon the cruising speed.

  9. Power feature required for PEFC powered electric propulsion ship

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Isao [NKK Corp., Yokohama (Japan); Oka, Masaru [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Nagasaki (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    This report covers part of a joint study on a PEFC system for ship propulsion, summarized in a presentation to this Seminar, entitled {open_quote}Study on a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell (PEFC) Propulsion System for Surface Ships{close_quotes}, and which envisages application to a 1,500 DWT cargo vessel. The aspect treated here concerns an analysis of the load-following performance required and estimated of a PEFC system to power the envisaged ship. The analysis proved that difficulty should be expected of the fuel supply circuit in following with adequate rapidity the sharp changes of load on fuel cell under certain conditions. Further integrated experiments and simulation exercises are currently in progress to further analyze the response characteristics of the fuel supply circuit-particularly of the methanol reformer and gas reservoir-to determine the best measure to be adopted for overcoming the expected difficulty.

  10. Solid-state fast voltage compensator for pulsed power applications requiring constant AC power consumption

    CERN Document Server

    Magallanes, Francisco Cabaleiro; Viarouge, Philippe; Cros, Jérôme

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel topological solution for pulsed power converters based on capacitor-discharge topologies, integrating a Fast Voltage Compensator which allows an operation at constant power consumption from the utility grid. This solution has been retained as a possible candidate for the CLIC project under study at CERN, which requires more than a thousand synchronously-operated klystron modulators producing a total pulsed power of almost 40 GW. The proposed Fast Voltage Compensator is integrated in the modulator such that it only has to treat the capacitor charger current and a fraction of the charging voltage, meaning that its dimensioning power and cost are minimized. This topology can be used to improve the AC power quality of any pulsed converters based on capacitor-discharge concept. A prototype has been built and exploited to validate the operating principle and demonstrate the benefits of the proposed solution.

  11. Cooling water requirements and nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, T.S.

    2010-01-01

    Indian nuclear power programme is poised to scuttle the energy crisis of our time by proposing joint ventures for large power plants. Large fossil/nuclear power plants (NPPs) rely upon water for cooling and are therefore located near coastal areas. The amount of water a power station uses and consumes depends on the cooling technology used. Depending on the cooling technology utilized, per megawatt existing NPPs use and consume more water (by a factor of 1.25) than power stations using other fuel sources. In this context the distinction between 'use' and 'consume' of water is important. All power stations do consume some of the water they use; this is generally lost as evaporation. Cooling systems are basically of two types; Closed cycle and Once-through, of the two systems, the closed cycle uses about 2-3% of the water volumes used by the once-through system. Generally, water used for power plant cooling is chemically altered for purposes of extending the useful life of equipment and to ensure efficient operation. The used chemicals effluent will be added to the cooling water discharge. Thus water quality impacts on power plants vary significantly, from one electricity generating technology to another. In light of massive expansion of nuclear power programme there is a need to develop new ecofriendly cooling water technologies. Seawater cooling towers (SCT) could be a viable option for power plants. SCTs can be utilized with the proper selection of materials, coatings and can achieve long service life. Among the concerns raised about the development of a nuclear power industry, the amount of water consumed by nuclear power plants compared with other power stations is of relevance in light of the warming surface seawater temperatures. A 1000 MW power plant uses per day ∼800 ML/MW in once through cooling system; while SCT use 27 ML/MW. With the advent of new marine materials and concrete compositions SCT can be constructed for efficient operation. However, the

  12. Review of the total system related to operation of nuclear-powered ship

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takamasa, Tomoji; Miyashita, Kunio

    2000-01-01

    It is essential to establish a marine reactor having excellent safety and reliability, which is capable of competing economically with conventional ships, and which can be accepted by international society, in order to be prepared for practical application of future nuclear-powered ships. For this purpose, it is important not only to demonstrate a marine reactor using a model or test device to simulate actual operation, but also to establish the environmental requirements for operation of a nuclear-powered ship, such as safety standards that are operationally and internationally common for ships, and to establish a repair base for nuclear-powered ships. Systems research for the practical application of nuclear-powered ships was conducted for five years, fiscal years 1992 through 1996, by a group in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), under the project title 'Review of the total system related to operation of nuclear-powered ships.' The project sought to summarize requirements for the practical application of nuclear-powered ships from the standpoint of the need side, e.g., what nuclear-powered ships will be requested, and what functions will be provided under the expected future social environment; to show a complete system concept for the operation of nuclear-powered ships; and to clarify the situations creating demand for nuclear-powered ships, as well as the system and environmental conditions to be established for operation of practical nuclear-powered ships. Study considerations included the size of the operation system for a nuclear-powered ship, a scenario for introducing a nuclear-powered container ship, and economic evolution from the effects on the whole shipping system, based on container ships, of introducing a nuclear-powered ship. The results of these considerations were made the framework for constructing an entire system and evaluating its economy. The treatment and disposal of radioactive waste from a nuclear-powered ship, and the

  13. 46 CFR 111.10-4 - Power requirements, generating sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... ELECTRIC SYSTEMS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Power Supply § 111.10-4 Power requirements, generating sources. (a) The aggregate capacity of the electric ship's service generating sources required in § 111.10-3 must... or sources must be sufficient to supply those services necessary to provide normal operational...

  14. Environmental requirements at hydroelectric power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cada, G.F.

    1993-01-01

    Hydroelectric power is the most mature and widely implemented of the renewable energy technologies. The energy of flowing water has been used to perform work directly since ancient times, and the use of hydropower turbines to generate electricity traces back to the 19th century. Two commonly used turbine types, the Francis and Kaplan turbines, are essentially refinements of the simple reaction turbine of Hero of Alexandria, dating from about 100 B.C. (NAS 1976). Hydroelectric power production provides over 10% of the net electrical generation in the US, more than petroleum or natural gas and far more than the other renewable energy technologies combined. On a regional basis, hydroelectric power represents 14% of the net electrical power generation in the Rocky Mountain states and nearly 63% along the Pacific Coast. Those states that have the largest percentages of their electricity generated by hydropower (e.g., Idaho, Oregon, Montana, and Washington) also tend to have the lowest average cost of electricity per kilowatt-hour

  15. A computerized total-radiation management system for Shikoku Electric Power's Ikata nuclear-power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirao, Toshiyuki; Sakakihara, Tetsuro; Tanabe, Shozo; Kano, Mamoru; Hoshi, Jun-ichi.

    1985-01-01

    This system allows on-line, real-time radiation management at nuclear-power plants. It increases management precision, decreases management workloads, and saves labor in operations that previously required specialized technicians to expend great amounts of time and effort on radiation management at facilities and their environments, environmental radiation evaluation, and control of radioactive waste. The article outlines the already installed system. (author)

  16. QA manpower requirement for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Link, M.

    1980-01-01

    To ensure the quality of the plant, QA activities are to be performed by the owner, the main contractor, the subcontractors and the Licensing Authority. The responsibilities of the QA-personnel of these organizations comprise as a minimum the control of the quality assurance systems and the proof of the quality requirements. Numbers of the required QA-personnel, designated for different tasks and recommended educational levels and professional qualifications will be given. (orig./RW)

  17. Forecasting manpower requirements for nuclear power plant construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seltzer, N.; Schriver, W.R.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents both the methodology and results of a segment of a comprehensive construction manpower demand forecasting system aimed at forecasting virtually all construction manpower requirements in the United States of America. The part of the system dealing with the demand for construction workers needed to build nuclear powered electricity generating plants is discussed here. The object of the system is to forecast manpower construction needs for each of 29 construction crafts on a monthly basis in each of 10 geographical regions of the United States. The method used is to establish profiles of the types of workers and time phasing required in the past. Profiling was done for different types of plants, different capacity classes, and different geographical locations. An appropriate worker profile matrix cannot simply be multiplied by the capacity of the proposed plant if the number of man-hours required per kilowatt of generating capacity is not constant. The value of this latter variable has changed considerably recently - presumably because of an increased awareness of environmental and safety considerations. Econometric techniques are used to forecast values for man-hours per kilowatt which are then multiplied by projected new capacity to be put in place. The resulting total man-hour requirement is then allocated over time and by craft through use of a worker profile matrix. The summary results indicate that 20 percent increases in man-hours required per kilowatt of capacity can be expected between 1977 and 1981. Total construction labour demand will rise from 65,700 work-years in 1977 to nearly 96,600 work-years in 1981. Forecasts of the actual number of different types of workers to be demanded in each month and in each region are available from the system. (author)

  18. Total energy analysis of nuclear and fossil fueled power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, W.D.; Mutsakis, M.; Ort, R.G.

    1971-01-01

    The overall thermal efficiencies of electrical power generation were determined for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder, High Temperature Gas Cooled, Boiling Water, and Pressurized Water Reactors and for coal-, oil-, and gas-fired systems. All important energy consuming steps from mining through processing, transporting, and reprocessing the fuels were included in the energy balance along with electrical transmission and thermal losses and energy expenditures for pollution abatement. The results of these studies show that the overall fuel cycle efficiency of the light water nuclear fueled reactors is less than the efficiency of modern fossil fuel cycles. However, the nuclear fuel cycle based on the fast breeder reactors should produce power more efficiently than the most modern supercritical fossil fuel cycles. The high temperature gas cooled reactor has a cycle efficiency comparable to the supercritical coal fuel cycle

  19. 18 CFR 35.37 - Market power analysis required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Market power analysis required. 35.37 Section 35.37 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... Wholesale Sales of Electric Energy, Capacity and Ancillary Services at Market-Based Rates § 35.37 Market...

  20. Cost Savings of Nuclear Power with Total Fuel Reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solbrig, Charles W.; Benedict, Robert W.

    2006-01-01

    The cost of fast reactor (FR) generated electricity with pyro-processing is estimated in this article. It compares favorably with other forms of energy and is shown to be less than that produced by light water reactors (LWR's). FR's use all the energy in natural uranium whereas LWR's utilize only 0.7% of it. Because of high radioactivity, pyro-processing is not open to weapon material diversion. This technology is ready now. Nuclear power has the same advantage as coal power in that it is not dependent upon a scarce foreign fuel and has the significant additional advantage of not contributing to global warming or air pollution. A jump start on new nuclear plants could rapidly allow electric furnaces to replace home heating oil furnaces and utilize high capacity batteries for hybrid automobiles: both would reduce US reliance on oil. If these were fast reactors fueled by reprocessed fuel, the spent fuel storage problem could also be solved. Costs are derived from assumptions on the LWR's and FR's five cost components: 1) Capital costs: LWR plants cost $106/MWe. FR's cost 25% more. Forty year amortization is used. 2) The annual O and M costs for both plants are 9% of the Capital Costs. 3) LWR fuel costs about 0.0035 $/kWh. Producing FR fuel from spent fuel by pyro-processing must be done in highly shielded hot cells which is costly. However, the five foot thick concrete walls have the advantage of prohibiting diversion. LWR spent fuel must be used as feedstock for the FR initial core load and first two reloads so this FR fuel costs more than LWR fuel. FR fuel costs much less for subsequent core reloads ( 6 /MWe. The annual cost for a 40 year licensed plant would be 2.5 % of this or less if interest is taken into account. All plants will eventually have to replace those components which become radiation damaged. FR's should be designed to replace parts rather than decommission. The LWR costs are estimated to be 2.65 cents/kWh. FR costs are 2.99 cents/kWh for the first

  1. Technological implications of fusion power: requirements and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, D.

    1978-01-01

    The major technological requirements for fusion power, as implied by current conceptual designs of fusion power plants, are identified and assessed relative to the goals of existing technology programs. The focus of the discussion is on the tokamak magnetic confinement concept; however, key technological requirements of mirror magnetic confinement systems and of inertial confinement concepts will also be addressed. The required technology is examined on the basis of three general areas of concern: (a) the power balance, that is, the unique power handling requirements associated with the production of electrical power by fusion; (b) reactor design, focusing primarily on the requirements imposed by a tritium-based fuel cycle, thermal hydraulic considerations, and magnet systems; and (c) materials considerations, including radiation damage effects, neutron-induced activation, and resource limitations

  2. Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design. Specific Safety Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of the principles included in the Fundamental Safety Principles, IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, this Safety Requirements publication establishes requirements applicable to the design of nuclear power plants. It covers the design phase and provides input for the safe operation of the power plant. It elaborates on the safety objective, safety principles and concepts that provide the basis for deriving the safety requirements that must be met for the design of a nuclear power plant. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Applying the safety principles and concepts; 3. Management of safety in design; 4. Principal technical requirements; 5. General plant design; 6. Design of specific plant systems.

  3. Analysis of Power Network for Line Reactance Variation to Improve Total Transmission Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikram Ullah

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The increasing growth in power demand and the penetration of renewable distributed generations in competitive electricity market demands large and flexible capacity from the transmission grid to reduce transmission bottlenecks. The bottlenecks cause transmission congestion, reliability problems, restrict competition, and limit the maximum dispatch of low cost generations in the network. The electricity system requires efficient utilization of the current transmission capability to improve the Available Transfer Capability (ATC. To improve the ATC, power flow among the lines can be managed by using Flexible AC Transmission System (FACTS devices as power flow controllers, which alter the parameters of power lines. It is important to place FACTS devices on suitable lines to vary the reactance for improving Total Transmission Capacity (TTC of the network and provide flexibility in the power flow. In this paper a transmission network is analyzed based on line parameters variation to improve TTC of the interconnected system. Lines are selected for placing FACTS devices based on real power flow Performance Index (PI sensitivity factors. TTC is computed using the Repeated Power Flow (RPF method using the constraints of lines thermal limits, bus voltage limits and generator limits. The reactance of suitable lines, selected on the basis of PI sensitivity factors are changed to divert the power flow to other lines with enough transfer capacity available. The improvement of TTC using line reactance variation is demonstrated with three IEEE test systems with multi-area networks. The results show the variation of the selected lines’ reactance in improving TTC for all the test networks with defined contingency cases.

  4. A cost effective total power radiometer package for atmospheric research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyons, B.N.; Kelly, W.M.; Vizard, D.R.; Lidholm, U.S.

    1993-01-01

    Millimeter wave radiometers are being increasingly used for plasma diagnostics and remote sensing applications. To date however the widespread use of such systems, particularly for applications requiring frequency coverage above 100 GHz, have been inhibited by the lack of availability of an appropriately specified commercial package. This paper outlines the design and construction of such a radiometer package and gives details of results obtained to date

  5. Training Requirements and Training Delivery in the Total Army School System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Winkler, John

    1999-01-01

    This report analyzes training requirements and school delivery of training in the Total Army School System, focusing on the system's ability to meet its training requirements in Reserve Component Training Institutions...

  6. Requirements Specication for Ampliers and Power Supplies in Active Loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Henrik; Jensen, Lasse Crone; Petersen, Lars Press

    2014-01-01

    This work aims to provide designers with a method to develop a requirements specication for power supplies and ampliers in active loudspeakers. The motivation is to avoid over-sizing and unnecessary cost. A realistic estimation of the power supplied during playback of audio in a given loudspeaker...... is obtained by considering a wide range of audio source material, loudness normalization of the source material, crossover ltering, driver characteristics as well as a perceived maximum loudness/volume level. The results from analysing a sub-woofer and a woofer reveals the peak power, peak voltage, peak...... current and apparent power - thus providing a solid foundation for a requirement specication....

  7. Controlling total spot power from holographic laser by superimposing a binary phase grating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang; Zhang, Jian; Gan, Yu; Wu, Liying

    2011-04-25

    By superimposing a tunable binary phase grating with a conventional computer-generated hologram, the total power of multiple holographic 3D spots can be easily controlled by changing the phase depth of grating with high accuracy to a random power value for real-time optical manipulation without extra power loss. Simulation and experiment results indicate that a resolution of 0.002 can be achieved at a lower time cost for normalized total spot power.

  8. VGB-requirements regarding technical data for power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richnow, Joerg

    2009-01-01

    Much of the technical plant data resulting from the planning, construction and start-up of power plants is needed for subsequent management and maintenance. Because of this, VGB has taken the initiative and has defined standard minimum requirements from power plant operators for technical plant data. They relate to the details and structure of this data, the definition of material classes and characteristics for the main power plant components and IT implementation for delivery of the technical plant data. (orig.)

  9. Reduction of wind power induced reserve requirements by advanced shortest-term forecasts and prediction intervals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobschinski, Jan; Wessel, Arne; Lange, Bernhard; Bremen, Lueder von [Fraunhofer Institut fuer Windenergie und Energiesystemtechnik (IWES), Kassel (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    In electricity systems with large penetration of wind power, the limited predictability of the wind power generation leads to an increase in reserve and balancing requirements. At first the present study concentrates on the capability of dynamic day-ahead prediction intervals to reduce the wind power induced reserve and balancing requirements. Alternatively the reduction of large forecast errors of the German wind power generation by using advanced shortest-term predictions has been evaluated in a second approach. With focus on the allocation of minute reserve power the aim is to estimate the maximal remaining uncertainty after trading activities on the intraday market. Finally both approaches were used in a case study concerning the reserve requirements induced by the total German wind power expansion in 2007. (orig.)

  10. Lift and Power Required for Flapping Wing Hovering Flight on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohly, Jeremy; Sridhar, Madhu; Bluman, James; Kang, Chang-Kwon; Landrum, D. Brian; Fahimi, Farbod; Aono, Hikaru; Liu, Hao

    2017-11-01

    Achieving flight on Mars is challenging due to the ultra-low density atmosphere. Bio-inspired flapping motion can generate sufficient lift if bumblebee-inspired wings are scaled up between 2 and 4 times their nominal size. However, due to this scaling, the inertial power required to sustain hover increases and dominates over the aerodynamic power. Our results show that a torsional spring placed at the wing root can reduce the flapping power required for hover by efficiently storing and releasing energy while operating at its resonance frequency. The spring assisted reduction in flapping power is demonstrated with a well-validated, coupled Navier-Stokes and flight dynamics solver. The total power is reduced by 79%, whereas the flapping power is reduced by 98%. Such a reduction in power paves the way for an efficient, realizable micro air vehicle capable of vertical takeoff and landing as well as sustained flight on Mars. Alabama Space Grant Consortium Fellowship.

  11. Safety and regulatory requirements of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, S.V.; Bhardwaj, S.A.

    2000-01-01

    A pre-requisite for a nuclear power program in any country is well established national safety and regulatory requirements. These have evolved for nuclear power plants in India with participation of the regulatory body, utility, research and development (R and D) organizations and educational institutions. Prevailing international practices provided a useful base to develop those applicable to specific system designs for nuclear power plants in India. Their effectiveness has been demonstrated in planned activities of building up the nuclear power program as well as with unplanned activities, like those due to safety related incidents etc. (author)

  12. Power system requirements and selection for the space exploration initiative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biringer, K.L.; Bartine, D.E.; Buden, D.; Foreman, J.; Harrison, S.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) seeks to reestablish a US program of manned and unmanned space exploration. The President has called for a program which includes a space station element, a manned habitation of the moon, and a human exploration of Mars. The NASA Synthesis Group has developed four significantly different architectures for the SEI program. One key element of a space exploration effort is the power required to support the missions. The Power Speciality Team of the Synthesis Group was tasked with assessing and evaluating the power requirements and candidate power technologies for such missions. Inputs to the effort came from existing NASA studies as well as other governments agency inputs such as those from DOD and DOE. In addition, there were industry and university briefings and results of solicitations from the AIAA and the general public as part of the NASA outreach effort. Because of the variety of power needs in the SEI program, there will be a need for multiple power system technologies including solar, nuclear and electrochemical. Due to the high rocket masses required to propel payloads to the moon and beyond to Mars, there is great emphasis placed on the need for high power density and high energy density systems. Power system technology development work is needed results will determine the ultimate technology selections. 23 refs., 10 figs

  13. Power supply requirements for a tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, J.N.; Kustom, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    The power supply requirements for a 7-m major radius commerical tokamak reactor have been examined, using a system approach combining models of the reactor and poloidal coil set, plasma burn cycle and magnetohydrodynamics calculations, and power supply characteristics and cost data. A conventional system using a motor-generator flywheel set and solid-state rectifier-inverter power supplies was studied in addition to systems using a homopolar generator, superconducting energy storage inductor, and dump resistors. The requirements and cost of the power supplies depend on several factors but most critically on the ohmic heating ramp time used for startup. Long ramp times (greater than or equal to 8 s) seem to be feasible, from the standpoint of resistive volt-second losses, and would appear to make conventional systems quite competitive with nonconventional ones, which require further research and development

  14. Power supply requirements for a tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brooks, J.N.; Kustom, R.L.

    1979-02-01

    The power supply requirements for a 7-M major radius commercial tokamak reactor have been examined, using a system approach combining models of the reactor and poloidal coil set, plasma burn cycle and MHD calculations, and power supply characteristics and cost data. A conventional system using an MGF set and solid-state rectifier/inverter power supplies was studied in addition to systems using a homopolar generator, superconducting energy storage inductor, and dump resistors. The requirements and cost of the power supplies depend on several factors but most critically on the ohmic heating ramp time used for startup. Long ramp times (approx. > 8 s) seems to be feasible, from the standpoint of resistive volt-second losses, and would appear to make conventional systems quite competitive with nonconventional ones, which require further research and development

  15. Resistive vs. total power depositions by Alfven modes in pre-heated low aspect ratio tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuperman, S.; Bruma, C.; Komoshvili, K.

    2004-01-01

    The power deposition of fast waves launched by a LFS located antenna in a pre-heated, strongly non-uniform low aspect ratio tokamak (START) is investigated. The rigorous computational results indicate a total power deposition by far larger than that predicted for Alfven continuum eigenmodes in cylindrical plasmas. For toroidal wave numbers |N| > 1, the resistive and total power depositions are almost equal. (author)

  16. Electrofishing power requirements in relation to duty cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, L.E.; Dolan, C.R.

    2004-01-01

    Under controlled laboratory conditions we measured the electrical peak power required to immobilize (i.e., narcotize or tetanize) fish of various species and sizes with duty cycles (i.e., percentage of time a field is energized) ranging from 1.5% to 100%. Electrofishing effectiveness was closely associated with duty cycle. Duty cycles of 10-50% required the least peak power to immobilize fish; peak power requirements increased gradually above 50% duty cycle and sharply below 10%. Small duty cycles can increase field strength by making possible higher instantaneous peak voltages that allow the threshold power needed to immobilize fish to radiate farther away from the electrodes. Therefore, operating within the 10-50% range of duty cycles would allow a larger radius of immobilization action than operating with higher duty cycles. This 10-50% range of duty cycles also coincided with some of the highest margins of difference between the electrical power required to narcotize and that required to tetanize fish. This observation is worthy of note because proper use of duty cycle could help reduce the mortality associated with tetany documented by some authors. Although electrofishing with intermediate duty cycles can potentially increase effectiveness of electrofishing, our results suggest that immobilization response is not fully accounted for by duty cycle because of a potential interaction between pulse frequency and duration that requires further investigation.

  17. Implications of fusion power plant studies for materials requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, Ian; Ward, David; Dudarev, Sergei

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses the key requirements for fusion materials, as these have emerged from studies of commercial fusion power plants. The objective of the international fusion programme is the creation of power stations that will have very attractive safety and environmental features and viable economics. Fusion power plant studies have shown that these objectives may be achieved without requiring extreme advances in materials. But it is required that existing candidate materials perform at least as well as envisaged in the environment of fusion neutrons, heat fluxes and particle fluxes. The development of advanced materials would bring further benefits. The work required entails the investigation of many intellectually exciting physics issues of great scientific interest, and of wider application than fusion. In addition to giving an overview, selected aspects of the science, of particular physics interest, are illustrated

  18. Requirements for the support power systems of CANDU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-08-01

    This Standard covers principal criteria and requirements for design, fabrication, installation, qualification, inspection, and documentation for assurance that support power will be available as required. The minimum requirements for support power are determined by the special safety systems and other safety-related systems that must function to ensure that the public health risk is acceptably low. Support power systems of a CANDU nuclear power plant include those parts of the electrical systems and instrument air systems that are necessary for the operation of safety-related systems

  19. Nuclear space power and propulsion requirements and issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swerdling, M.; Isenberg, L.

    1995-01-01

    The use of nuclear power in space is going through a low point. The kinds of missions that would use nuclear power are expensive and there are few new expensive missions. Both NASA and DoD are in a mode of cheaper, faster, better, which means using what is available as much as possible and only incorporating new technology to reduce mission cost. NASA is performing Mission to Planet Earth and detailed exploration missions of Mars. These NASA missions can be done with solar-battery power subsystems and there is no need for nuclear power. The NASA mission to Pluto does require nuclear radioisotope power. Ways to reduce the power subsystem cost and the power level are being investigated. NASA is studying ways to explore beyond Mars with solar-battery power because of the cost and uncertainty in the availability and launchability of nuclear space power systems. The DoD missions are all in earth orbit and can be done with solar-battery systems. The major DoD requirement at present is to reduce costs of all their space missions. One way to do this is to develop highly efficient upper stage boosters that can be integrated with lower cost Earth to low orbit stages and still place their payloads in to higher orbits. One attractive upper stage is a nuclear bimodal (propulsion and power) engine to accomplished lower booster cost to place space assets in GEO. However this is not being pursued because of DOE's new policy not to fund nuclear space power research and development as well as the difficulty in obtaining launch approval for nuclear propulsion and power systems

  20. Mathematically modelling the power requirement for a vertical shaft mowing machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Simón Pérez de Corcho Fuentes

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This work describes a mathematical model for determining the power demand for a vertical shaft mowing machine, particularly taking into account the influence of speed on cutting power, which is different from that of other models of mowers. The influence of the apparatus’ rotation and translation speeds was simulated in determining power demand. The results showed that no chan-ges in cutting power were produced by varying the knives’ angular speed (if translation speed was constant, while cutting power became increased if translation speed was increased. Variations in angular speed, however, influenced other parameters deter-mining total power demand. Determining this vertical shaft mower’s cutting pattern led to obtaining good crop stubble quality at the mower’s lower rotation speed, hence reducing total energy requirements.

  1. Application of Total Quality Management (TQM) Requirements in Risk Management in Construction Projects in Iraq

    OpenAIRE

    Entisar K. Al-Geelawee; Anfal Nadhel Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Total quality management considers one of the modern scientific entrances which practiced by productivity service organizations alike to provide appropriate quality required outputs according to the needs and desires of customers manage , enable the organization seeking to continue and grow in light of the increasing competition from the satisfy and provide the appropriate total quality management requirements whenever led to face risks that they may have in a manner in which they can be a...

  2. Forecast of wind energy production and ensuring required balancing power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merkulov, M.

    2010-01-01

    The wind energy is gaining larger part of the energy mix around the world as well as in Bulgaria. Having in mind the irregularity of the wind, we are in front of a challenge for management of the power grid in new unknown conditions. The world's experience has proven that there could be no effective management of the grid without forecasting tools, even with small scale of wind power penetration. Application of such tools promotes simple management of large wind energy production and reduction of the quantities of required balancing powers. The share of the expenses and efforts for forecasting of the wind energy is incomparably small in comparison with expenses for keeping additional powers in readiness. The recent computers potential allow simple and rapid processing of large quantities of data from different sources, which provides required conditions for modeling the world's climate and producing sophisticated forecast. (author)

  3. Safety of nuclear power plants: Operation. Safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The safety of a nuclear power plant is ensured by means of its proper siting, design, construction and commissioning, followed by the proper management and operation of the plant. In a later phase, proper decommissioning is required. This Safety Requirements publication supersedes the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation, which was issued in 1988 as Safety Series No. 50-C-O (Rev. 1). The purpose of this revision was: to restructure Safety Series No. 50-C-O (Rev. 1) in the light of the basic objectives, concepts and principles in the Safety Fundamentals publication The Safety of Nuclear Installations. To be consistent with the requirements of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources. And to reflect current practice and new concepts and technical developments. Guidance on fulfillment of these Safety Requirements may be found in the appropriate Safety Guides relating to plant operation. The objective of this publication is to establish the requirements which, in the light of experience and the present state of technology, must be satisfied to ensure the safe operation of nuclear power plants. These requirements are governed by the basic objectives, concepts and principles that are presented in the Safety Fundamentals publication The Safety of Nuclear Installations. This publication deals with matters specific to the safe operation of land based stationary thermal neutron nuclear power plants, and also covers their commissioning and subsequent decommissioning

  4. Safety of nuclear power plants: Operation. Safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The safety of a nuclear power plant is ensured by means of its proper siting, design, construction and commissioning, followed by the proper management and operation of the plant. In a later phase, proper decommissioning is required. This Safety Requirements publication supersedes the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation, which was issued in 1988 as Safety Series No. 50-C-O (Rev. 1). The purpose of this revision was: to restructure Safety Series No. 50-C-O (Rev. 1) in the light of the basic objectives, concepts and principles in the Safety Fundamentals publication The Safety of Nuclear Installations. To be consistent with the requirements of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources. And to reflect current practice and new concepts and technical developments. Guidance on fulfillment of these Safety Requirements may be found in the appropriate Safety Guides relating to plant operation. The objective of this publication is to establish the requirements which, in the light of experience and the present state of technology, must be satisfied to ensure the safe operation of nuclear power plants. These requirements are governed by the basic objectives, concepts and principles that are presented in the Safety Fundamentals publication The Safety of Nuclear Installations. This publication deals with matters specific to the safe operation of land based stationary thermal neutron nuclear power plants, and also covers their commissioning and subsequent decommissioning

  5. Safety of nuclear power plants: Operation. Safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The safety of a nuclear power plant is ensured by means of its proper siting, design, construction and commissioning, followed by the proper management and operation of the plant. In a later phase, proper decommissioning is required. This Safety Requirements publication supersedes the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation, which was issued in 1988 as Safety Series No. 50-C-O (Rev. 1). The purpose of this revision was: to restructure Safety Series No. 50-C-O (Rev. 1) in the light of the basic objectives, concepts and principles in the Safety Fundamentals publication The Safety of Nuclear Installations; to be consistent with the requirements of the International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources; and to reflect current practice and new concepts and technical developments. Guidance on fulfillment of these Safety Requirements may be found in the appropriate Safety Guides relating to plant operation. The objective of this publication is to establish the requirements which, in the light of experience and the present state of technology, must be satisfied to ensure the safe operation of nuclear power plants. These requirements are governed by the basic objectives, concepts and principles that are presented in the Safety Fundamentals publication The Safety of Nuclear Installations. This publication deals with matters specific to the safe operation of land based stationary thermal neutron nuclear power plants, and also covers their commissioning and subsequent decommissioning

  6. Overall quality assurance program requirements for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    This standard contains the requirements for the owner's overall quality assurance program for a nuclear power plant. This program encompasses all phases of a nuclear power plant life cycle, including site evaluation, design, procurement, manufacturing, construction and installation, commissioning, operation, and decommissioning. It covers the activities associated with specifying, directing, and administering the work to be done during these phases, and the evaluation and integrated of the activities and programs of participants

  7. Regulatory requirement of the Juragua nuclear Power Plant PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valhuerdi Debesa, C.

    1996-01-01

    Probabilistic Safety Assessment has proved to be a powerful tool for improving the knowledge of the safety insides of Nuclear Power Plants and increasing the efficiency of the safety measures adopted by both operators and regulators. In this paper the regulatory approach adopted in Cuba with regard to the PSA , the scope of the requirement and the basis and proposal of this decision are presented

  8. International environmental issues and requirements for new power projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, J.R. [Golder Associates Inc., Gainesville, FL (United States); Maltby, J.H. [Golder Associates Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of this presentation was to discuss the emerging role of financial entities in determining environmental requirements for international power projects. The paper outlines the following: emerging conditions; examples of announced privatization energy projects by country; types of government and international financial entity sources; problems for IPPs; similarity and differences between the World Bank and the USEPA; comparison of the international standards and regulations for power plants; recent trends/issues involving international power project approval; and recommendations for understanding/expediting the financial entities` environmental approval process and how to expedite this process.

  9. Manpower requirements for nuclear power in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csik, B.J.

    1980-01-01

    It is recognized that each country has its individual unique characteristics and that there is no typical or average developing country. Common conditions represent exceptions, rather than the rule. Manpower requirements, however, are created by the tasks to be performed and activities to be carried out at each definite stage of a nuclear power project or programme. These tasks and activities, as well as the manpower requirements they create, are of a similar nature for any country, subject to the influence of prevailing local conditions. First, successive stages of the evolution of a nuclear power programme are defined. These are: pre-planning, planning, study and procurement, construction, operation of the first plant, confirmed and self-sufficient in implementing nuclear power projects. The developing countries are then classified according to the present stage of their evolution. Finally, the present and future manpower requirements of each country or group of countries are estimated. No attempt has been made to try to establish any precise data for any country in particular. The results obtained are global estimates, intended as indications of trends and of orders of magnitude. It is found that the developing world's present manpower requirements for nuclear power are of the order of 100,000 people, of which about 20,000 need specialized nuclear training. By the year 2000, for an installed nuclear capacity of 150 to 200 GW, overall manpower requirements should increase to more than 500,000 which would include 130,000 with specialized nuclear training. (author)

  10. Application of Total Quality Management (TQM Requirements in Risk Management in Construction Projects in Iraq

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Entisar K. Al-Geelawee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Total quality management considers one of the modern scientific entrances which practiced by productivity service organizations alike to provide appropriate quality required outputs according to the needs and desires of customers manage , enable the organization seeking to continue and grow in light of the increasing competition from the satisfy and provide the appropriate total quality management requirements whenever led to face risks that they may have in a manner in which they can be addressed and find ways to avoid them in the future when repeated. The research has consist of two main parts firstly have included a review of the most important concepts of total quality management in addition to the concept of risk analysis and management in construction projects and how to apply the concept of total quality management in the risk analysis and management. Second part included the practical part of the research, which was open and closed questionnaire for experts in the construction industry to obtain required informations for the application of total quality management requirements in risk management in construction projects in Iraq. One of the main findings of the research is that top management support has a high impact on risk management in addition to continuous improvement, training and education, while the participation of all employees in the organization and constant stimulation and focusing on the customer as one of the total quality management requirements had a moderate impact on risk management.

  11. Safety of nuclear power plants: Design. Safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The present publication supersedes the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design (Safety Series No. 50-C-D (Rev. 1), issued in 1988). It takes account of developments relating to the safety of nuclear power plants since the Code on Design was last revised. These developments include the issuing of the Safety Fundamentals publication, The Safety of Nuclear Installations, and the present revision of various safety standards and other publications relating to safety. Requirements for nuclear safety are intended to ensure adequate protection of site personnel, the public and the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation arising from nuclear power plants. It is recognized that technology and scientific knowledge advance, and nuclear safety and what is considered adequate protection are not static entities. Safety requirements change with these developments and this publication reflects the present consensus. This Safety Requirements publication takes account of the developments in safety requirements by, for example, including the consideration of severe accidents in the design process. Other topics that have been given more detailed attention include management of safety, design management, plant ageing and wearing out effects, computer based safety systems, external and internal hazards, human factors, feedback of operational experience, and safety assessment and verification. This publication establishes safety requirements that define the elements necessary to ensure nuclear safety. These requirements are applicable to safety functions and the associated structures, systems and components, as well as to procedures important to safety in nuclear power plants. It is expected that this publication will be used primarily for land based stationary nuclear power plants with water cooled reactors designed for electricity generation or for other heat production applications (such as district heating or desalination). It is recognized that in the case of

  12. Safety of nuclear power plants: Design. Safety requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The present publication supersedes the Code on the Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design (Safety Series No. 50-C-D (Rev. 1), issued in 1988). It takes account of developments relating to the safety of nuclear power plants since the Code on Design was last revised. These developments include the issuing of the Safety Fundamentals publication, The Safety of Nuclear Installations, and the present revision of various safety standards and other publications relating to safety. Requirements for nuclear safety are intended to ensure adequate protection of site personnel, the public and the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation arising from nuclear power plants. It is recognized that technology and scientific knowledge advance, and nuclear safety and what is considered adequate protection are not static entities. Safety requirements change with these developments and this publication reflects the present consensus. This Safety Requirements publication takes account of the developments in safety requirements by, for example, including the consideration of severe accidents in the design process. Other topics that have been given more detailed attention include management of safety, design management, plant ageing and wearing out effects, computer based safety systems, external and internal hazards, human factors, feedback of operational experience, and safety assessment and verification. This publication establishes safety requirements that define the elements necessary to ensure nuclear safety. These requirements are applicable to safety functions and the associated structures, systems and components, as well as to procedures important to safety in nuclear power plants. It is expected that this publication will be used primarily for land based stationary nuclear power plants with water cooled reactors designed for electricity generation or for other heat production applications (such as district heating or desalination). It is recognized that in the case of

  13. Manpower requirements in the nuclear power industry, 1982-1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, R.C.

    1982-09-01

    The objective of this study is to project occupational employment needs, created by growth and employee turnover, for the nuclear power industry over the next decade. Employment data for 1981 were collected in a survey conducted by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations of its 60 member utilities. The data were analyzed statistically to identify factors that account for variations in power plant staffing and the number of off-site nuclear support personnel employed by a utility. Total employment in the nuclear power industry is predicted to increase from 54,400 in 1981 to 73,600 in 1991. Nuclear generating capacity will increase from 58 to 124 gigawatts, based on the midline forecast of the Energy Information Administration. The projections assume that current regulations will remain in effect and no new plans for additional generating facilities will be initiated

  14. When the test of mediation is more powerful than the test of the total effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Holly P; MacKinnon, David P

    2015-06-01

    Although previous research has studied power in mediation models, the extent to which the inclusion of a mediator will increase power has not been investigated. To address this deficit, in a first study we compared the analytical power values of the mediated effect and the total effect in a single-mediator model, to identify the situations in which the inclusion of one mediator increased statistical power. The results from this first study indicated that including a mediator increased statistical power in small samples with large coefficients and in large samples with small coefficients, and when coefficients were nonzero and equal across models. Next, we identified conditions under which power was greater for the test of the total mediated effect than for the test of the total effect in the parallel two-mediator model. These results indicated that including two mediators increased power in small samples with large coefficients and in large samples with small coefficients, the same pattern of results that had been found in the first study. Finally, we assessed the analytical power for a sequential (three-path) two-mediator model and compared the power to detect the three-path mediated effect to the power to detect both the test of the total effect and the test of the mediated effect for the single-mediator model. The results indicated that the three-path mediated effect had more power than the mediated effect from the single-mediator model and the test of the total effect. Practical implications of these results for researchers are then discussed.

  15. Validation of Power Requirement Model for Active Loudspeakers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Henrik; Madsen, Anders Normann; Bjerregaard, Ruben

    2015-01-01

    . There are however many advantages that could be harvested from such knowledge like size, cost and efficiency improvements. In this paper a recently proposed power requirement model for active loudspeakers is experimentally validated and the model is expanded to include the closed and vented type enclosures...

  16. Laser requirements for a laser fusion energy power plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephen; E.Bodner; Andrew; J.Schmitt; John; D.Sethian

    2013-01-01

    We will review some of the requirements for a laser that would be used with a laser fusion energy power plant, including frequency, spatial beam smoothing, bandwidth, temporal pulse shaping, efficiency, repetition rate, and reliability. The lowest risk and optimum approach uses a krypton fluoride gas laser. A diode-pumped solid-state laser is a possible contender.

  17. Nuclear power technology requirements for NASA exploration missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloomfield, H.S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses how future exploration of the Moon and Mars will mandate developments in many areas of technology. In particular, major advances will be required in planet surface power systems and space transportation systems. Critical nuclear technology challenges that can enable strategic self-sufficiency, acceptable operational costs and cost-effective space transportation goals for NASA exploration missions have been identified. Critical technologies for surface power systems include stationary and mobile nuclear reactor and radio-isotope heat sources coupled to static and dynamic power conversion devices. These technologies can provide dramatic reductions in mass leading to operational and transportation cost savings. Critical technologies for space transportation systems include nuclear thermal rocket and nuclear electric propulsion options which present compelling concepts for significantly reducing mass, cost or travel time required for Earth-Mars transport

  18. Assessment of tritium breeding requirements for fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, J.

    1983-12-01

    This report presents an assessment of tritium-breeding requirements for fusion power reactors. The analysis is based on an evaluation of time-dependent tritium inventories in the reactor system. The method presented can be applied to any fusion systems in operation on a steady-state mode as well as on a pulsed mode. As an example, the UWMAK-I design was analyzed and it has been found that the startup inventory requirement calculated by the present method significantly differs from those previously calculated. The effect of reactor-parameter changes on the required tritium breeding ratio is also analyzed for a variety of reactor operation scenarios

  19. The total release of xenon-133 from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stohl, Andreas; Seibert, Petra; Wotawa, Gerhard

    2012-01-01

    The accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (FD-NPP) on 11 March 2011 released large amounts of radioactivity into the atmosphere. We determine the total emission of the noble gas xenon-133 ( 133 Xe) using global atmospheric concentration measurements. For estimating the emissions, we used three different methods: (i) using a purely observation-based multi-box model, (ii) comparisons of dispersion model results driven with GFS meteorological data with the observation data, and (iii) such comparisons with the dispersion model driven by ECMWF data. From these three methods, we have obtained total 133 Xe releases from FD-NPP of (i) 16.7 ± 1.9 EBq, (ii) 14.2 ± 0.8 EBq, and (iii) 19.0 ± 3.4 EBq, respectively. These values are substantially larger than the entire 133 Xe inventory of FD-NPP of about 12.2 EBq derived from calculations of nuclear fuel burn-up. Complete release of the entire 133 Xe inventory of FD-NPP and additional release of 133 Xe due to the decay of iodine-133 ( 133 I), which can add another 2 EBq to the 133 Xe FD-NPP inventory, is required to explain the atmospheric observations. Two of our three methods indicate even higher emissions, but this may not be a robust finding given the differences between our estimates. - Highlights: ► We determine the total release of xenon-133 from the Fukushima nuclear accident. ► We used global measurements and a box model, as well as dispersion model estimates. ► Total 133 Xe release is about 14.2-19 EBq, more than Fukushima 133 Xe inventory. ► Additional release of iodine-133 and decay into 133 Xe needed to explain results.

  20. Load following operation of nuclear power plants for meeting power system requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isoda, Hachiro

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a calculating program on the availability factors of nuclear, thermal and pumed storage hydro power stations and some calculated results for typical three load factors, 55 %, 60 % and 71 %, are provided when the share of the nuclea power station in the generation facilities is increased. The load following requirement of the nuclear power station is also provided. Load following requirement: If there is a 10 % pumped storage hydro power station, the nuclear power station enables to be operated with its rated output up to 30 % - 35 % of its share. Its daily load following operation for 40 % and 50 % nuclear power station needs every weekend and every day respectively. Availability factor: The availability factor of the nuclear power station manages to get 80 % (maximum availability factor of the nuclear power station in this study) up to 30 % share of it with 10 % pumpued storage hydro power station. When the nuclear power station shares 40 % and 50 %, its availability factor decreases down 1 % and 5 % respectively. (author)

  1. Neutronics requirements for a DEMO fusion power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, U., E-mail: ulrich.fischer@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Bachmann, C. [EUROfusion Consortium , Boltzmannstraße 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Palermo, I. [Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), Madrid (Spain); Pereslavtsev, P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Villari, R. [ENEA UT-FUS C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Discussion and specification of neutronic requirements for a DEMO power plant. • TBR uncertainties are reviewed/discussed and design margins are elaborated. • Limits are given for radiation loads to super-conducting magnets and steel structural components. • Available DEMO results are compared to recommended limits and TBR design target. - Abstract: This paper addresses the neutronic requirements a DEMO fusion power plant needs to fulfil for a reliable and safe operation. The major requirement is to ensure Tritium self-sufficiency taking into account the various uncertainties and plant-internal losses that occur during DEMO operation. A further major requirement is to ensure sufficient protection of the superconducting magnets against the radiation penetrating in-vessel components and vessel. Reliable criteria for the radiation loads need to be defined and verified to ensure the reliable operation of the magnets over the lifetime of DEMO. Other issues include radiation induced effects on structural materials such as the accumulated displacement damage, the generation of gases such as helium which may deteriorate the material performance. The paper discusses these issues and their impact on design options for DEMO taking into account results obtained in the frame of European Power Plant Physics and Technology (PPPT) 2013 programme activities with DEMO models employing the helium cooled pebble bed (HCPB), the helium cooled lithium lead (HCLL), and the water-cooled (WCLL) blanket concepts.

  2. Effect of power system technology and mission requirements on high altitude long endurance aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colozza, Anthony J.

    1994-01-01

    An analysis was performed to determine how various power system components and mission requirements affect the sizing of a solar powered long endurance aircraft. The aircraft power system consists of photovoltaic cells and a regenerative fuel cell. Various characteristics of these components, such as PV cell type, PV cell mass, PV cell efficiency, fuel cell efficiency, and fuel cell specific mass, were varied to determine what effect they had on the aircraft sizing for a given mission. Mission parameters, such as time of year, flight altitude, flight latitude, and payload mass and power, were also altered to determine how mission constraints affect the aircraft sizing. An aircraft analysis method which determines the aircraft configuration, aspect ratio, wing area, and total mass, for maximum endurance or minimum required power based on the stated power system and mission parameters is presented. The results indicate that, for the power system, the greatest benefit can be gained by increasing the fuel cell specific energy. Mission requirements also substantially affect the aircraft size. By limiting the time of year the aircraft is required to fly at high northern or southern latitudes, a significant reduction in aircraft size or increase in payload capacity can be achieved.

  3. Manpower requirements of quality assurance personnel for the nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aly, A.E.; El-sayed, A.A.; Shabaan, I.H.

    1987-01-01

    Basic principles for structuring and staffing of the quality assurance (Q.A.)organisation in the nuclear power plant (NPP) are presented. the manpower requirements of the Q.A.organisation in the NPP during both construction and operational stages are determined. the manpower requirements for Q.A./Q.C. functions in a NPP are found to be proportional to the number of craft workers needed to perform the required level of the construction. The Q.A./Q.C. personnel are about 15% of the total number of the craft workers required during construction

  4. Recommended general safety requirements for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    This report presents recommendations for a set of general safety requirements that could form the basis for the licensing of nuclear power plants by the Atomic Energy Control Board. In addition to a number of recommended deterministic requirements the report includes criteria for the acceptability of the design of such plants based upon the calculated probability and consequence (in terms of predicted radiation dose to members of the public) of potential fault sequences. The report also contains a historical review of nuclear safety principles and practices in Canada

  5. Compiling Utility Requirements For New Nuclear Power Plant Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patrakka, Eero

    2002-01-01

    Teollisuuden Voima Oy (TVO) submitted in November 2000 to the Finnish Government an application for a Decision-in-Principle concerning the construction of a new nuclear power plant in Finland. The actual investment decision can be made first after a positive decision has been made by the Government and the Parliament. Parallel to the licensing process, technical preparedness has been upheld so that the procurement process can be commenced without delay, when needed. This includes the definition of requirements for the plant and preliminary preparation of bid inquiry specifications. The core of the technical requirements corresponds to the specifications presented in the European Utility Requirement (EUR) document, compiled by major European electricity producers. Quite naturally, an amount of modifications to the EUR document are needed that take into account the country- and site-specific conditions as well as the experiences gained in the operation of the existing NPP units. Along with the EUR-related requirements concerning the nuclear island and power generation plant, requirements are specified for scope of supply as well as for a variety of issues related to project implementation. (author)

  6. RF Power Requirements for PEFP SRF Cavity Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Han Sung; Seol, Kyung Tae; Kwon, Hyeok Jung; Cho, Yong Sub

    2011-01-01

    For the future extension of the PEFP (Proton Engineering Frontier Project) Proton linac, preliminary study on the SRF (superconducting radio-frequency) cavity is going on including a five-cell prototype cavity development to confirm the design and fabrication procedures and to check the RF and mechanical properties of a low-beta elliptical cavity. The main parameters of the cavity are like followings. - Frequency: 700 MHz - Operating mode: TM010 pi mode - Cavity type: Elliptical - Geometrical beta: 0.42 - Number of cells: 5 - Accelerating gradient: 8 MV/m - Epeak/Eacc: 3.71 - Bpeak/Eacc: 7.47 mT/(MV/m) - R/Q: 102.3 ohm - Epeak: 29.68 MV/m (1.21 Kilp.) - Geometrical factor: 121.68 ohm - Cavity wall thickness: 4.3 mm - Stiffening structure: Double ring - Effective length: 0.45 m For the test of the cavity at low temperature of 4.2 K, many subsystems are required such as a cryogenic system, RF system, vacuum system and radiation shielding. RF power required to generate accelerating field inside cavity depends on the RF coupling parameters of the power coupler and quality factor of the SRF cavity and the quality factor itself is affected by several factors such as operating temperature, external magnetic field level and surface condition. Therefore, these factors should be considered to estimate the required RF power for the SRF cavity test

  7. Future CANDU nuclear power plant design requirements document executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Duk Su; Chang, Woo Hyun; Lee, Nam Young; S. A. Usmani

    1996-03-01

    The future CANDU Requirements Document (FCRED) describes a clear and complete statement of utility requirements for the next generation of CANDU nuclear power plants including those in Korea. The requirements are based on proven technology of PHWR experience and are intended to be consistent with those specified in the current international requirement documents. Furthermore, these integrated set of design requirements, incorporate utility input to the extent currently available and assure a simple, robust and more forgiving design that enhances the performance and safety. The FCRED addresses the entire plant, including the nuclear steam supply system and the balance of the plant, up to the interface with the utility grid at the distribution side of the circuit breakers which connect the switchyard to the transmission lines. Requirements for processing of low level radioactive waste at the plant site and spent fuel storage requirements are included in the FCRED. Off-site waste disposal is beyond the scope of the FCRED. 2 tabs., 1 fig. (Author) .new

  8. Fukushima, two years later, modification requirements in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez J, J.; Camargo C, R.; Nunez C, A.; Mendoza F, J. E.; Salmeron V, J. A.

    2013-10-01

    The occurred events in the nuclear power plant of Fukushima Daiichi as consequence of the strong earthquake of 9 grades in the Richter scale and the later tsunami with waves estimated in more than 14 meters high began a series of important questions about the safety of the nuclear power plants in operation and of the new designs. Firstly, have allowed to be questioned on the magnitudes and consequences of the extreme external natural events; that can put in risk the integrity of the safety barriers of a nuclear power plant when being presented in a multiple way. As consequence of the events of the Fukushima Daiichi NPP, the countries with NPPs in operation and /or construction carried out evaluations about their safety operation. They have also realized evaluations about accidents and their impact in the safety, analysis and studies too that have forced to the regulatory bodies to continue a systematic and methodical revision of their procedures and regulations, to identify the possible improvements to the safety in response to the events happened in Japan; everything has taken it to determine the necessity to incorporate additional requirements to the nuclear power plants to mitigate events Beyond the Design Base. Due to Mexico has the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, with two units of BWR-5 type with contention Mark III, some the modifications can be applicable to these units to administrate and/or to mitigate the consequences of the possible occurrence of an accident Beyond the Design Base and that could generate a severe accident. In this work an exposition is presented on the modification requirements to confront external natural events Beyond the Design Base, and its application in our country. (Author)

  9. Research on prediction of agricultural machinery total power based on grey model optimized by genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yan; Li, Mu; Zhou, Jin; Zheng, Chang-zheng

    2009-07-01

    Agricultural machinery total power is an important index to reflex and evaluate the level of agricultural mechanization. It is the power source of agricultural production, and is the main factors to enhance the comprehensive agricultural production capacity expand production scale and increase the income of the farmers. Its demand is affected by natural, economic, technological and social and other "grey" factors. Therefore, grey system theory can be used to analyze the development of agricultural machinery total power. A method based on genetic algorithm optimizing grey modeling process is introduced in this paper. This method makes full use of the advantages of the grey prediction model and characteristics of genetic algorithm to find global optimization. So the prediction model is more accurate. According to data from a province, the GM (1, 1) model for predicting agricultural machinery total power was given based on the grey system theories and genetic algorithm. The result indicates that the model can be used as agricultural machinery total power an effective tool for prediction.

  10. Human Resources Requirements for New Nuclear Power Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodnight, Charles T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Planning to Meet HR Requirements for New Nuclear Power Programs Must Begin Early. Many years of preparation are required before the “Right Number of the Right People” … will be … “In the Right Place at the Right Time”. • Seven key steps which must be taken include: 1) Identify detailed Human Resources requirements, based on the selected site and reactor design; 2) Conduct an assessment of national capacity to develop and/or provide those resources; 3) Conduct a Gap Analysis to determine what additional steps will be needed to fill any capacity shortfalls; 4) Develop initial and recurring recruiting and training plans; 5) Begin recruiting and training; 6) Review and adjust as personnel move and/or leave; 7) Ensure adequate relationships are in place for sources of future recruiting

  11. International requirements for life extension of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wernicke, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Lifetime extension or long-term operation of nuclear facilities are topics of great international significance against the backdrop of a fleet of nuclear power plants of which many have reached 2/3 of their planned life. The article deals with the conditions for, and the specific requirements of, seeking long-term operation of nuclear power plants as established internationally and on the basis of IAEA collections. Technically, long-term operation is possible for many of the nuclear power plants in the world because, normally, they were built on the basis of conservative rules and regulations and, as a consequence, incorporate significant additional safety. Application of requirements to specific plants implies assessments of technical safety which show that conservative design philosophies created reserves and, as a consequence, there is an adequate level of safety also in long-term plant operation. For this purpose, the technical specifications must be revised, necessary additions made, and (international) operating experience taken into account and management of aging established. Two examples are presented to show how the approach to long-term plant operation is put into practice on a national level. (orig.)

  12. Facing the facts: the suspension of a design requirement applicable to nuclear power reactor effluents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amado, Valeria; Biaggio, Alfredo; Canoba, Analia; Curti, Adriana

    2008-01-01

    A design requirement aimed at limiting the discharge of globally dispersed long-lived radionuclides released by nuclear power reactors was in force in Argentine since 1979 till recently. The practical results of such regulatory measure was the need to retain C-14 in the PHWR under construction, as well as in furniture heavy water reactors to be built in the country. This paper explains the basis of such requirement, which was formulated as a collective dose constraint per unit of energy generated, and the main assumptions that triggered it. The differences between the assumptions made at the time and the reality of nuclear power generation at the beginning of the 21 st century, as well as their implications in relation to the requirement are described, including the Suess effect and its impact in the total dose due to C-14. Finally, the facts that made no longer reasonable to keep in force the above mentioned requirement are presented. (author)

  13. Total Quality Education: Profiles of Schools That Demonstrate the Power of Deming's Management Principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmoker, Michael J.; Wilson, Richard B.

    This book presents profiles of schools that have demonstrated the power of Deming's Total Quality Management (TQM) principles. It describes schools that have successfully applied those strategies for change. The book explores what public education needs most--a compelling but flexible action plan for improvement. Chapter 1 offers a rationale for…

  14. Current USAEC seismic requirements for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, D.S.

    1975-01-01

    The principal seismic and geologic considerations which guide the USAEC in its evaluation of the suitability of proposed sites for nuclear power plants and plant design bases are set forth as design criteria in the AEC regulatory guides. The basic requirements of seismic design and analysis for seismic Category I structures, components, and systems important to public safety have been established in the USAEC regulatory guides and Code of Federal Regulations. It is pointed out that the current state-of-art techniques, best available technology, and additional studies in the field of earthquake engineering can be utilized to resolve seismic concerns. The seismic design requirements for nuclear plants to withstand postulated earthquakes can be standardized and this will be a significant milestone in the continuation of the Nuclear Standardization Program. (author)

  15. Minimum power requirement for environmental control of aircraft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ordonez, Juan Carlos; Bejan, Adrian

    2003-01-01

    This paper addresses two basic issues in the thermodynamic optimization of environmental control systems (ECS) for aircraft: realistic limits for the minimal power requirement, and design features that facilitate operation at minimal power consumption. Four models are proposed and optimized. In the first, the ECS operates reversibly, the air stream in the cabin is mixed to one temperature, and the cabin experiences heat transfer with the ambient, across its insulation. The cabin temperature is fixed. In the second model, the fixed cabin temperature is assigned to the internal solid surfaces of the cabin, and a thermal resistance separates these surfaces from the air mixed in the cabin. In the third model, the ECS operates irreversibly, based on the bootstrap air cycle. The fourth model combines the ECS features of the third model with the cabin-environment interaction features of the second model. It is shown that in all models the temperature of the air stream that the ECS delivers to the cabin can be optimized for operation at minimal power. The effect of other design parameters and flying conditions is documented. The optimized air delivery temperature is relatively insensitive to the complexity of the model; for example, it is insensitive to the size of the heat exchanger used in the bootstrap air cycle. This study adds to the view that robustness is a characteristic of optimized complex flow systems, and that thermodynamic optimization results can be used for orientation in the pursuit of more complex and realistic designs

  16. Ideal MHD Stability Prediction and Required Power for EAST Advanced Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junjie; Li, Guoqiang; Qian, Jinping; Liu, Zixi

    2012-11-01

    The Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) is the first fully superconducting tokamak with a D-shaped cross-sectional plasma presently in operation. The ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability and required power for the EAST advanced tokamak (AT) scenario with negative central shear and double transport barrier (DTB) are investigated. With the equilibrium code TOQ and stability code GATO, the ideal MHD stability is analyzed. It is shown that a moderate ratio of edge transport barriers' (ETB) height to internal transport barriers' (ITBs) height is beneficial to ideal MHD stability. The normalized beta βN limit is about 2.20 (without wall) and 3.70 (with ideal wall). With the scaling law of energy confinement time, the required heating power for EAST AT scenario is calculated. The total heating power Pt increases as the toroidal magnetic field BT or the normalized beta βN is increased.

  17. Ideal MHD Stability Prediction and Required Power for EAST Advanced Scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Junjie; Li Guoqiang; Qian Jinping; Liu Zixi

    2012-01-01

    The Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) is the first fully superconducting tokamak with a D-shaped cross-sectional plasma presently in operation. The ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability and required power for the EAST advanced tokamak (AT) scenario with negative central shear and double transport barrier (DTB) are investigated. With the equilibrium code TOQ and stability code GATO, the ideal MHD stability is analyzed. It is shown that a moderate ratio of edge transport barriers' (ETB) height to internal transport barriers' (ITBs) height is beneficial to ideal MHD stability. The normalized beta β N limit is about 2.20 (without wall) and 3.70 (with ideal wall). With the scaling law of energy confinement time, the required heating power for EAST AT scenario is calculated. The total heating power P t increases as the toroidal magnetic field B T or the normalized beta β N is increased. (magnetically confined plasma)

  18. Supplying the power requirements to a sensor network using radio frequency power transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, Steven; Knight, Chris; Cooray, Francis; Smart, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Wireless power transmission is a method of supplying power to small electronic devices when there is no wired connection. One way to increase the range of these systems is to use a directional transmitting antenna, the problem with this approach is that power can only be transmitted through a narrow beam and directly forward, requiring the transmitter to always be aligned with the sensor node position. The work outlined in this article describes the design and testing of an autonomous radio frequency power transfer system that is capable of rotating the base transmitter to track the position of sensor nodes and transferring power to that sensor node. The system's base station monitors the node's energy levels and forms a charge queue to plan charging order and maintain energy levels of the nodes. Results show a radio frequency harvesting circuit with a measured S11 value of -31.5 dB and a conversion efficiency of 39.1%. Simulation and experimentation verified the level of power transfer and efficiency. The results of this work show a small network of three nodes with different storage types powered by a central base node.

  19. Supplying the Power Requirements to a Sensor Network Using Radio Frequency Power Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Percy

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Wireless power transmission is a method of supplying power to small electronic devices when there is no wired connection. One way to increase the range of these systems is to use a directional transmitting antenna, the problem with this approach is that power can only be transmitted through a narrow beam and directly forward, requiring the transmitter to always be aligned with the sensor node position. The work outlined in this article describes the design and testing of an autonomous radio frequency power transfer system that is capable of rotating the base transmitter to track the position of sensor nodes and transferring power to that sensor node. The system’s base station monitors the node’s energy levels and forms a charge queue to plan charging order and maintain energy levels of the nodes. Results show a radio frequency harvesting circuit with a measured S11 value of −31.5 dB and a conversion efficiency of 39.1%. Simulation and experimentation verified the level of power transfer and efficiency. The results of this work show a small network of three nodes with different storage types powered by a central base node.

  20. Total gamma activity measurements for determining the radioactivity of residual materials from nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auler, I.; Meyer, M.; Stickelmann, J.

    1995-01-01

    Large amounts of residual materials from retrofitting measures and from decommissioning of nuclear power stations shows such a weak level of radioactivity that they could be released after decision measurements. Expenses incurred with complex geometry cannot be taken with common methods. NIS developed a Release Measurement Facility (RMF) based on total gamma activity measurements especially for these kind of residual materials. The RMF has been applied for decision measurements in different nuclear power plants. Altogether about 2,000 Mg of various types of materials have been measured up to now. More than 90 % of these materials could be released 0 without any restriction after decision measurements

  1. TOKMINA, Toroidal Magnetic Field Minimization for Tokamak Fusion Reactor. TOKMINA-2, Total Power for Tokamak Fusion Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatch, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: TOKMINA finds the minimum magnetic field, Bm, required at the toroidal coil of a Tokamak type fusion reactor when the input is beta(ratio of plasma pressure to magnetic pressure), q(Kruskal-Shafranov plasma stability factor), and y(ratio of plasma radius to vacuum wall radius: rp/rw) and arrays of PT (total thermal power from both d-t and tritium breeding reactions), Pw (wall loading or power flux) and TB (thickness of blanket), following the method of Golovin, et al. TOKMINA2 finds the total power, PT, of such a fusion reactor, given a specified magnetic field, Bm, at the toroidal coil. 2 - Method of solution: TOKMINA: the aspect ratio(a) is minimized, giving a minimum value for Bm. TOKMINA2: a search is made for PT; the value of PT which minimizes Bm to the required value within 50 Gauss is chosen. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Input arrays presently are dimensioned at 20. This restriction can be overcome by changing a dimension card

  2. Measurement of total ultrasonic power using thermal expansion and change in buoyancy of an absorbing target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, P K; Kumar, Yudhisther; Gupta, Reeta; Jain, Anshul; Gohiya, Chandrashekhar

    2014-05-01

    The Radiation Force Balance (RFB) technique is well established and most widely used for the measurement of total ultrasonic power radiated by ultrasonic transducer. The technique is used as a primary standard for calibration of ultrasonic transducers with relatively fair uncertainty in the low power (below 1 W) regime. In this technique, uncertainty comparatively increases in the range of few watts wherein the effects such as thermal heating of the target, cavitations, and acoustic streaming dominate. In addition, error in the measurement of ultrasonic power is also caused due to movement of absorber at relatively high radiated force which occurs at high power level. In this article a new technique is proposed which does not measure the balance output during transducer energized state as done in RFB. It utilizes the change in buoyancy of the absorbing target due to local thermal heating. The linear thermal expansion of the target changes the apparent mass in water due to buoyancy change. This forms the basis for the measurement of ultrasonic power particularly in watts range. The proposed method comparatively reduces uncertainty caused by various ultrasonic effects that occur at high power such as overshoot due to momentum of target at higher radiated force. The functionality of the technique has been tested and compared with the existing internationally recommended RFB technique.

  3. Measurement of total ultrasonic power using thermal expansion and change in buoyancy of an absorbing target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, P. K.; Kumar, Yudhisther; Gupta, Reeta; Jain, Anshul; Gohiya, Chandrashekhar

    2014-05-01

    The Radiation Force Balance (RFB) technique is well established and most widely used for the measurement of total ultrasonic power radiated by ultrasonic transducer. The technique is used as a primary standard for calibration of ultrasonic transducers with relatively fair uncertainty in the low power (below 1 W) regime. In this technique, uncertainty comparatively increases in the range of few watts wherein the effects such as thermal heating of the target, cavitations, and acoustic streaming dominate. In addition, error in the measurement of ultrasonic power is also caused due to movement of absorber at relatively high radiated force which occurs at high power level. In this article a new technique is proposed which does not measure the balance output during transducer energized state as done in RFB. It utilizes the change in buoyancy of the absorbing target due to local thermal heating. The linear thermal expansion of the target changes the apparent mass in water due to buoyancy change. This forms the basis for the measurement of ultrasonic power particularly in watts range. The proposed method comparatively reduces uncertainty caused by various ultrasonic effects that occur at high power such as overshoot due to momentum of target at higher radiated force. The functionality of the technique has been tested and compared with the existing internationally recommended RFB technique.

  4. Measurement of total ultrasonic power using thermal expansion and change in buoyancy of an absorbing target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubey, P. K.; Kumar, Yudhisther; Gupta, Reeta; Jain, Anshul; Gohiya, Chandrashekhar

    2014-01-01

    The Radiation Force Balance (RFB) technique is well established and most widely used for the measurement of total ultrasonic power radiated by ultrasonic transducer. The technique is used as a primary standard for calibration of ultrasonic transducers with relatively fair uncertainty in the low power (below 1 W) regime. In this technique, uncertainty comparatively increases in the range of few watts wherein the effects such as thermal heating of the target, cavitations, and acoustic streaming dominate. In addition, error in the measurement of ultrasonic power is also caused due to movement of absorber at relatively high radiated force which occurs at high power level. In this article a new technique is proposed which does not measure the balance output during transducer energized state as done in RFB. It utilizes the change in buoyancy of the absorbing target due to local thermal heating. The linear thermal expansion of the target changes the apparent mass in water due to buoyancy change. This forms the basis for the measurement of ultrasonic power particularly in watts range. The proposed method comparatively reduces uncertainty caused by various ultrasonic effects that occur at high power such as overshoot due to momentum of target at higher radiated force. The functionality of the technique has been tested and compared with the existing internationally recommended RFB technique

  5. Comparison of isokinetic peak force and power in adults with partial and total blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, Michael; Ray, Christopher; Nocera, Joe; Croce, Ron

    2006-08-01

    For many populations the ability to move efficiently is compromised by an impaired muscular functioning. Strength development is necessary to overcome the effects of gravity to maintain posture and generate movement responses for mobility. The strength and power capabilities of individuals with total blindness (n = 12) were compared to those with partial vision (n = 12) to evaluate effects of vision on performance. Results indicate that (1) no significant differences were apparent between total blindness and partial vision, (2) significant sex differences were evident in each group, and (3) better performance was apparent at lower velocities. It was concluded that physical performance in individuals with blindness and partial vision are equally deficient.

  6. Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsden, T.

    2013-04-01

    This report discusses an analysis of the total cost of ownership of fuel cell-powered and traditional battery-powered material handling equipment (MHE, or more typically 'forklifts'). A number of fuel cell MHE deployments have received funding support from the federal government. Using data from these government co-funded deployments, DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been evaluating the performance of fuel cells in material handling applications. NREL has assessed the total cost of ownership of fuel cell MHE and compared it to the cost of ownership of traditional battery-powered MHE. As part of its cost of ownership assessment, NREL looked at a range of costs associated with MHE operation, including the capital costs of battery and fuel cell systems, the cost of supporting infrastructure, maintenance costs, warehouse space costs, and labor costs. Considering all these costs, NREL found that fuel cell MHE can have a lower overall cost of ownership than comparable battery-powered MHE.

  7. Full-sky formulae for weak lensing power spectra from total angular momentum method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamauchi, Daisuke; Taruya, Atsushi; Namikawa, Toshiya

    2013-01-01

    We systematically derive full-sky formulae for the weak lensing power spectra generated by scalar, vector and tensor perturbations from the total angular momentum (TAM) method. Based on both the geodesic and geodesic deviation equations, we first give the gauge-invariant expressions for the deflection angle and Jacobi map as observables of the CMB lensing and cosmic shear experiments. We then apply the TAM method, originally developed in the theoretical studies of CMB, to a systematic derivation of the angular power spectra. The TAM representation, which characterizes the total angular dependence of the spatial modes projected along a line-of-sight, can carry all the information of the lensing modes generated by scalar, vector, and tensor metric perturbations. This greatly simplifies the calculation, and we present a complete set of the full-sky formulae for angular power spectra in both the E-/B-mode cosmic shear and gradient-/curl-mode lensing potential of deflection angle. Based on the formulae, we give illustrative examples of non-vanishing B-mode cosmic shear and curl-mode of deflection angle in the presence of the vector and tensor perturbations, and explicitly compute the power spectra

  8. Power plant allocation in East Kalimantan considering total cost and emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muslimin; Utomo, D. S.

    2018-04-01

    The fulfillment of electricity need in East Kalimantan is the responsibility of State Electricity Company/Perusahaan Listrik Negara (PLN). But PLN faces constraints in the lack of generating capacity it has. So the allocation of power loads in East Kalimantan has its own challenges. Additional power supplies from other parties are required. In this study, there are four scenarios tested to meet the electricity needs in East Kalimantan with the goal of minimizing costs and emissions. The first scenario is only by using PLN power plant. The second scenario is by combining PLN + Independent Power Producer (IPP) power plants. The third scenario is by using PLN + Rented power plants. The fourth scenario is by using PLN + Excess capacity generation. Numerical experiment using nonlinear programming is conducted with the help of the solver. The result shows that in the peak load condition, the best combination is scenario 2 (PLN + IPP). While at the lowest load condition, the cheapest scenario is PLN + IPP while the lowest emission is PLN + Rent.

  9. Prediction equation for estimating total daily energy requirements of special operations personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barringer, N D; Pasiakos, S M; McClung, H L; Crombie, A P; Margolis, L M

    2018-01-01

    Special Operations Forces (SOF) engage in a variety of military tasks with many producing high energy expenditures, leading to undesired energy deficits and loss of body mass. Therefore, the ability to accurately estimate daily energy requirements would be useful for accurate logistical planning. Generate a predictive equation estimating energy requirements of SOF. Retrospective analysis of data collected from SOF personnel engaged in 12 different SOF training scenarios. Energy expenditure and total body water were determined using the doubly-labeled water technique. Physical activity level was determined as daily energy expenditure divided by resting metabolic rate. Physical activity level was broken into quartiles (0 = mission prep, 1 = common warrior tasks, 2 = battle drills, 3 = specialized intense activity) to generate a physical activity factor (PAF). Regression analysis was used to construct two predictive equations (Model A; body mass and PAF, Model B; fat-free mass and PAF) estimating daily energy expenditures. Average measured energy expenditure during SOF training was 4468 (range: 3700 to 6300) Kcal·d- 1 . Regression analysis revealed that physical activity level ( r  = 0.91; P  plan appropriate feeding regimens to meet SOF nutritional requirements across their mission profile.

  10. Feedback Blunting: Total Sleep Deprivation Impairs Decision Making that Requires Updating Based on Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Paul; Hinson, John M.; Jackson, Melinda L.; Van Dongen, Hans P.A.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To better understand the sometimes catastrophic effects of sleep loss on naturalistic decision making, we investigated effects of sleep deprivation on decision making in a reversal learning paradigm requiring acquisition and updating of information based on outcome feedback. Design: Subjects were randomized to a sleep deprivation or control condition, with performance testing at baseline, after 2 nights of total sleep deprivation (or rested control), and following 2 nights of recovery sleep. Subjects performed a decision task involving initial learning of go and no go response sets followed by unannounced reversal of contingencies, requiring use of outcome feedback for decisions. A working memory scanning task and psychomotor vigilance test were also administered. Setting: Six consecutive days and nights in a controlled laboratory environment with continuous behavioral monitoring. Subjects: Twenty-six subjects (22–40 y of age; 10 women). Interventions: Thirteen subjects were randomized to a 62-h total sleep deprivation condition; the others were controls. Results: Unlike controls, sleep deprived subjects had difficulty with initial learning of go and no go stimuli sets and had profound impairment adapting to reversal. Skin conductance responses to outcome feedback were diminished, indicating blunted affective reactions to feedback accompanying sleep deprivation. Working memory scanning performance was not significantly affected by sleep deprivation. And although sleep deprived subjects showed expected attentional lapses, these could not account for impairments in reversal learning decision making. Conclusions: Sleep deprivation is particularly problematic for decision making involving uncertainty and unexpected change. Blunted reactions to feedback while sleep deprived underlie failures to adapt to uncertainty and changing contingencies. Thus, an error may register, but with diminished effect because of reduced affective valence of the feedback

  11. Feedback Blunting: Total Sleep Deprivation Impairs Decision Making that Requires Updating Based on Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Paul; Hinson, John M; Jackson, Melinda L; Van Dongen, Hans P A

    2015-05-01

    To better understand the sometimes catastrophic effects of sleep loss on naturalistic decision making, we investigated effects of sleep deprivation on decision making in a reversal learning paradigm requiring acquisition and updating of information based on outcome feedback. Subjects were randomized to a sleep deprivation or control condition, with performance testing at baseline, after 2 nights of total sleep deprivation (or rested control), and following 2 nights of recovery sleep. Subjects performed a decision task involving initial learning of go and no go response sets followed by unannounced reversal of contingencies, requiring use of outcome feedback for decisions. A working memory scanning task and psychomotor vigilance test were also administered. Six consecutive days and nights in a controlled laboratory environment with continuous behavioral monitoring. Twenty-six subjects (22-40 y of age; 10 women). Thirteen subjects were randomized to a 62-h total sleep deprivation condition; the others were controls. Unlike controls, sleep deprived subjects had difficulty with initial learning of go and no go stimuli sets and had profound impairment adapting to reversal. Skin conductance responses to outcome feedback were diminished, indicating blunted affective reactions to feedback accompanying sleep deprivation. Working memory scanning performance was not significantly affected by sleep deprivation. And although sleep deprived subjects showed expected attentional lapses, these could not account for impairments in reversal learning decision making. Sleep deprivation is particularly problematic for decision making involving uncertainty and unexpected change. Blunted reactions to feedback while sleep deprived underlie failures to adapt to uncertainty and changing contingencies. Thus, an error may register, but with diminished effect because of reduced affective valence of the feedback or because the feedback is not cognitively bound with the choice. This has important

  12. Special safety requirements applied to Brazilian nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepecki, W.P.S.; Hamel, H.J.E.; Koenig, N.; Vieira, P.C.R.; Fritzsche, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    Some safety aspects of the Angra 2 and 3 nuclear power plants are presented. An analysis of the civil and mechanical project of these nuclear power plant having in view a safety analysis is done. (E.G.) [pt

  13. Total quality control: the deming management philosophy applied to nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heising, C.D.; Wetherell, D.L.; Melhem, S.A.; Sato, M.

    1987-01-01

    In recent years, a call has come for the development of inherently safe nuclear reactor systems that cannot have large-scale accidents. In the search for the perfect inherently safe reactor system, some are calling for the institution of computerized automated control of reactors eliminating most human operators from the control room. A different approach to the problem of the control of inherently safe reactors is that both future and present nuclear power plants need to institute total quality control (TQC) to plant operations and management. The Deming management philosophy of TQC has been implemented in a wide range of industries - particularly in Japan and the US. Specific attention is given, however, to TQC implementation in the electric power industry as applied to nuclear plants. The Kansai Electric Power Company and Florida Power and Light Company have recently implemented TQC. Statistical quality control methods have been applied to monitor and control reactor variables (for example, to the steam generator water level important to start-up operations of pressurized water reactors)

  14. Eddy current and total power loss separation in the iron-phosphate-polyepoxy soft magnetic composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taghvaei, A.H.; Shokrollahi, H.; Janghorban, K.; Abiri, H.

    2009-01-01

    This work investigates the magnetic properties of iron-phosphate-polyepoxy soft magnetic composite materials. FTIR spectra, EDX analysis, distribution maps, X-ray diffraction pattern and density measurements show that the particles surface layer contains a thin layer of nanocrystalline/amorphous phosphate with high coverage of powders surface. In this paper, a formula for calculating the eddy current loss and total loss components by loss separation method is presented and finally the different parts of power losses are calculated. The results show that, the contribution of eddy current in the bulk material for single coating layer (k b = 0.18) is higher in comparison with double coating layer (k b = 0.09). Moreover, iron-phosphate-polyepoxy composites (P = 0.000004f 2 ) have lower power loss in comparison with iron-phosphate composites (P = 0.00002f 2 ).

  15. Distributed Flexibility Management Targeting Energy Cost and Total Power Limitations in Electricity Distribution Grids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bessler, Sanford; Kemal, Mohammed Seifu; Silva, Nuno

    2018-01-01

    Demand Management uses the interaction and information exchange between multiple control functions in order to achieve goals that can vary in different application contexts. Since there are several stakeholders involved, these may have diverse objectives and even use different architectures...... to actively manage power demand. This paper utilizes an existing distributed demand management architecture in order to provide the following contributions: (1) It develops and evaluates a set of algorithms that combine the optimization of energy costs in scenarios of variable day-ahead prices with the goal...... to improve distribution grid operation reliability, here implemented by a total Power limit. (2) It evaluates the proposed scheme as a distributed system where flexibility information is exchanged with the existing industry standard OpenADR. A Hardware-in-the-Loop testbed realization demonstrates...

  16. Wind Farms’ Spatial Distribution Effect on Power System Reserves Requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Poul Ejnar; Cutululis, Nicolaos Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The wind power development during last millennium was typically based on small wind turbines dispersed over large areas, leading to a significant smoothing of the wind power fluctuations in a power system balancing area. The present development goes towards much larger wind farms, concentrated...

  17. The Effect of Aortic Compliance on Left Ventricular Power Requirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahlevan, Niema; Gharib, Morteza

    2009-11-01

    Aortic compliance depends on both geometry and mechanical properties of the aorta. Reduction in arterial compliance has been associated with aging, smoking, and multiple cardiovascular diseases. Increased stiffness of the aorta affects the wave dynamics in the aorta by increasing both pulse pressure amplitude and wave speed. We hypothesized that decreased aortic compliance leads to an increased left ventricular power requirement for a fixed cardiac output due to altered pulse pressure and pulse wave velocity. We used a computational approach using the finite element method for solid and fluid domains coupled to each other by using the direct coupling method. A nonlinear material model was used for the solid wall. The fluid flow model was considered to be Newtonian, incompressible, and laminar. The simulation was performed for a heart rate of 75 beats per minute for six different compliances while keeping the cardiac output and the peripheral resistance constant. The results show a trend towards increased left ventricular energy expenditure per cycle with decreased compliance. The relevance of these findings to clinical observations will be discussed.

  18. Power requirements reducing of FBG based all-optical switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholtz, Ľubomír.; Solanská, Michaela; Ladányi, Libor; Müllerová, Jarmila

    2017-12-01

    Although Fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are well known devices, their using as all-optical switching elements has been still examined. Current research is focused on optimization of their properties for their using in future all-optical networks. The main problem are high switching intensities needed for achieving the changes of the transmission state. Over several years switching intensities have been reduced from hundreds of GW/cm2 to tens of MW/cm2 by selecting appropriate gratings and signal parameters or using suitable materials. Two principal nonlinear effects with similar power requirements can result in the bistable transmission/reflection of an input optical pulse. In the self-phase modulation (SPM) regime switching is achieved by the intense probe pulse itself. Using cross-phase modulation (XPM) a strong pump alters the FBG refractive index experienced by a weak probe pulse. As a result of this the detuning of the probe pulse from the center of the photonic band gap occurs. Using of XPM the effect of modulation instability is reduced. Modulation instability which is the main SPM degradation mechanism. We focused on nonlinear FBGs based on chalcogenide glasses which are very often used in various applications. Thanks to high nonlinear parameters chalcogenide glasses are suitable candidates for reducing switching intensities of nonlinear FBGs.

  19. Safety related requirements on future nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niehaus, F.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear power has the potential to significantly contribute to the future energy supply. However, this requires continuous improvements in nuclear safety. Technological advancements and implementation of safety culture will achieve a safety level for future reactors of the present generation of a probability of core-melt of less than 10 -5 per year, and less than 10 -6 per year for large releases of radioactive materials. There are older reactors which do not comply with present safety thinking. The paper reviews findings of a recent design review of WWER 440/230 plants. Advanced evolutionary designs might be capable of reducing the probability of significant off-site releases to less than 10 -7 per year. For such reactors there are inherent limitations to increase safety further due to the human element, complexity of design and capability of the containment function. Therefore, revolutionary designs are being explored with the aim of eliminating the potential for off-site releases. In this context it seems to be advisable to explore concepts where the ultimate safety barrier is the fuel itself. (orig.) [de

  20. Total diffusing power of perturbed lattices and dissymmetry of reflections. Case of groups of defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tournarie, Max

    1959-01-01

    The total diffusing power for a crystallite of any form containing a centrosymmetric defect has been established. The antisymmetrical part of the deformation potential only contributes very slightly to the primary dissymmetry. We then go on to study the case of a group of defects of the same type. The calculation converges sufficiently to describe the thermal agitation of an infinite crystal. Reprint of a paper published in 'Comptes Rendus des Seances de l'Academie des Sciences', t. 248, p. 2103-2105, sitting of April 6, 1959 [fr

  1. A new algorithm to determine the total radiated power at ASDEX upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gloeggler, Stephan; Bernert, Matthias; Eich, Thomas [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Collaboration: The ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-07-01

    Radiation is an essential part of the power balance in a fusion plasma. In future fusion devices about 90% of the power will have to be dissipated, mainly by radiation. For the development of an appropriate operational scenario, information about the absolute level of plasma radiation (P{sub rad,tot}) is crucial. Bolometers are used to measure the radiated power, however, an algorithm is required to derive the absolute power out of many line-integrated measurements. The currently used algorithm (BPD) was developed for the main chamber radiation. It underestimates the divertor radiation as its basic assumptions are not satisfied in this region. Therefore, a new P{sub rad,tot} algorithm is presented. It applies an Abel inversion on the main chamber and uses empirically based assumptions for poloidal asymmetries and the divertor radiation. To benchmark the new algorithm, synthetic emissivity profiles are used. On average, the new Abel inversion based algorithm deviates by only 10% from the nominal synthetic value while BPD is about 25% too low. With both codes time traces of ASDEX Upgrade discharges are calculated. The analysis of these time traces shows that the underestimation of the divertor radiation can have significant consequences on the accuracy of BPD while the new algorithm is shown to be stable.

  2. An energy harvesting converter to power sensorized total human knee prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luciano, V; Sardini, E; Serpelloni, M; Baronio, G

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring the internal loads acting in a total knee prosthesis (TKP) is fundamental aspect to improve their design. One of the main benefits of this improvement is the longer duration of the tibial inserts. In this work, an electromagnetic energy harvesting system, which is implantable in a TKP, is presented. This is conceived for powering a future implantable system that is able to monitor the loads (and, possibly, other parameters) that could influence the working conditions of a TKP in real-time. The energy harvesting system (EHS) is composed of two series of NdFeB magnets, positioned into each condyle, and a coil that is placed in a pin of the tibial insert and connected to an implantable power management circuit. The magnetic flux variation and the induced voltage are generated by the knee's motion. A TKP prototype has been realized in order to reproduce the knee mechanics and to test the EHS performance. In the present work, the experimental results are obtained by adopting a resistive load of 2.2 kΩ, in order to simulate a real implanted autonomous system with a current consumption of 850 µA and voltage of 2 V. The tests showed that, after 7 to 30 s of walking with a gait cycle frequency of about 1.0 Hz, the EHS can generate an energy of about 70 μJ, guaranteeing a voltage between 2 and 1.4 V every 7.6 s. With this prototype we can verify that it is possible to power for 16 ms a circuit having a power consumption of 1.7 mW every 7.6 s. The proposed generator is a viable solution to power an implanted electronic system that is conceived for measuring and transmitting the TKP load parameters. (paper)

  3. Studies on total polyphenols and reducing power of aqueous extracts from selected lamiaceae species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cioroi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Certain phytochemicals in species are attracting increased attention because of a wide range of biological activities especially the possible cancer preventive properties. Polyphenols, the naturalantioxidants are present in plant extracts and they play a key role in antioxidative defence mechanisms in biological systems and they act as free radicals scavenging agents. Polyphenols might thereforeinhibit development of coronary heart disease and cancers. Basil, oregano and sage are highly fragrant plants whose leaves are used as a seasoning herb for many different types of foods. Aqueous extractswere prepared from basil (Ocimum basilicum L., oregano (Origanum vulgare L. and sage (Salvia officinalis L.. To check the phenols presence, the UV-VIS spectrum was made. The amount of polyphenolic compounds from selected Lamiaceae species was determined by spectrophotometry method using the Folin - Ciocalteau reagent and gallic acid as standard. The range of polyphenols total was between 516,352 mg/100g dried species and 859,617 mg/100g dried species.Reducing power has been established by measuring the redox potential of aqueous extracts. Antioxidant activity was directly correlated with the total amount of polyphenols in the species extracts.The free reducing sugars in aqueous extracts from species were analyzed and correlated to the total content of polyphenols.

  4. Institutional innovations required for widespread use of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.R.

    1992-01-01

    The social and economic benefits of additional electrical generating capacity in lesser developed countries are unquestioned, and a case can be made from economic and environmental considerations that much of this capacity should be nuclear powered. Obstacles to the introduction of nuclear power in the developing world include lack of a technical infrastructure and capital cost. Manpower shortage also detracts from a country's ability to effectively regulate a nuclear power enterprise. Two variations on the traditional institutional methods for supplying and regulating nuclear electric power are proposed. The first would be independent international companies that would design, finance, build, operate and maintain nuclear power stations, and sell electricity to local systems. The second would be an international safety regulatory system that could offer uniform, effective regulations and enforcement of the entire nuclear power enterprise at a level consistent with accepted world standards. These proposals coupled with the modular Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor based on Integral Fast Reactor technology would make possible a safe, economically feasible nuclear power operation that could be located anywhere in the world. (author). 7 refs

  5. Integrating total quality management principles with the requirements of DOE Order 5700.6C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hedges, D. [Scientific Ecology Group, Inc. (United States)

    1993-03-01

    The Department of Energy has recently required its field offices, contractors, and subcontractors to implement DOE Order 5700.6C, ``Quality Assurance,`` for all work on waste management contracts. The order restructures the 18 criteria of NQA-1 and focuses on the role of management in achieving and assuring quality, performance of activities to achieve and assure quality, and management`s assessment of its performance for the purpose of identifying improvements to be made. The DOE order also introduces elements of the total quality management (TQM) philosophy, which were not present in DOE Order 5700.6B. The research community within DOE has recently issued a document entitled DOE Order 5700.6C Implementation Guide, which is more explicit about the integration of TQM principles with the implementation of DOE Order 5700.6C in research facilities. The Environmental Protection Agency is sponsoring a quality assurance standard (ANSI/ASQC E-4) to replace EPA`s QAMS 005/80. The new standard is consistent with DOE Order 5700.6C, and it also stresses the integration of TQM principles within the quality assurance process. This paper discusses the intent and philosophy of the 10 criteria of the new DOE order, the status of ANSI/ASQC E-4, and how to effectively integrate TQM principles into the quality assurance process as the conversion is made from NQA-1 to DOE Order 5700.6C. The purpose and value of DOE Order 5700.6C Implementation Guide for research will also be discussed.

  6. Exoskeleton Power and Torque Requirements Based on Human Biomechanics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Crowell, Harrison

    2002-01-01

    .... In providing design guidance, the authors had two goals. The first goal was to provide estimates of the angles, torques, and powers for the ankles, knees, and hips of an exoskeleton based on data collected from humans...

  7. Innovation by the wind power industry to meet government requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badger, D.

    2001-01-01

    This introductory paper to the Conference summarises suggestions for innovation in the wind power industry generally. Such innovation is needed as governments world-wide grapple with the demands of abating fossil fuel use in the face of the threat of Global Climate Change. As the major sponsor of the BWEA 22 Conference, Enron Wind Corp is conscious of the corporate responsibility of the modern wind power industry. (Author)

  8. Education and training requirements of nuclear power plant personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donato, R.; Perlas, C.A.; Conti, E.

    1978-01-01

    This bibliography was compiled by the Scientific Library staff to help in the intensified training program being undertaken by the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission (PAEC) for the nuclear power plant personnel of the Philippines' first nuclear power reactor. This bibliography covers the period 1955 - 1976 of the Nuclear Science Abstracts and is composed of 281 entries. Arrangement of these entries is by broad subject category

  9. Investigation of the transportation requirements for fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhoads, R.E.; Davis, D.K.

    1976-09-01

    This report presents a general investigation of the transport requirements associated with the construction and operation of conceptual fusion reactors. Projections of amounts of construction and operating materials requiring transportation are presented for several proposed designs. The material to be shipped is described along with the shipping containers that might be used, the transport modes and the expected impact of transporting these materials. Transportation of both radioactive and nonradioactive materials will be required. Most of these materials are routinely shipped by the transportation industry. Transportation requirements of a representative fusion reactor are also compared with Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) requirements

  10. 10 CFR 73.58 - Safety/security interface requirements for nuclear power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... requirements for nuclear power reactors. (a) Each operating nuclear power reactor licensee with a license... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety/security interface requirements for nuclear power reactors. 73.58 Section 73.58 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF...

  11. Requirements under decree 430 UJD for unit outlet and standby power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanco, K.

    2012-01-01

    At present, the nuclear power plants are only sufficient resources, which can cover a huge demand for electricity. Concentration so huge power in one place require adequate security from the perspective lead power outlet and standby power supply of reactor unit. (Author)

  12. 18 CFR 284.504 - Standard requirements for market-power authorizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Commission within 10 days of acquiring knowledge of significant changes occurring in its market power status... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Standard requirements for market-power authorizations. 284.504 Section 284.504 Conservation of Power and Water Resources...

  13. The requirements and specific features related to power supply in telecommunications of Ukraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lubashenko, T. [Inst. Giprosvijaz, Kiev (Ukraine); Gordon, A. [ProElectro Ltd., Kiev (Ukraine)

    2000-07-01

    The article deals with the description of trends of power supplies in the telecommunication sector. The basic normative documents regarding the design of the power supplies are pointed out. The requirements concerning the design of the power supplies are outlined. The peculiarities of the power supplies in Ukrainian telecommunications are given. (orig.)

  14. Neutral beam energy and power requirements for expanding radius and full bore startup of tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.A.; Mense, A.T.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1979-09-01

    Natural beam power and energy requirements are compared for full density full bore and expanding radius startup scenarios in an elongated plasma, The Next Step (TNS), as a function of beam pulse time and plasma density. Because of the similarity of parameters, the results should also be applicable to Engineering Test Facility (ETF) and International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR) studies. A transport model consisting of neoclassical ion conduction and anomalous electron conduction and diffusion based on ALCATOR scaling leads to average densities in the range approx. 0.8 to 1.2 x 10 14 cm -3 being sufficient for ignition. Neutral deuterium beam energies in the range 120 to 180 keV are adequate for penetration, with the required power injected into the plasma decreasing with increasing beam energy. The neutral beam power decreases strongly with increasing beam pulse length b/sub b/ until t/sub b/ exceeds a few total energy confinement times, yielding b/sub b/ approx. = 4 to 6 s for the TNS plasma

  15. Lithuanian requirements for ageing management of systems and components important to safety of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanauskiene, A.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper the Lithuanian requirements for ageing management of systems and components important to safety of Ignalina nuclear power plant (two RBMK-1500 water-cooled graphite moderated channel-type power reactors) are presented

  16. Design considerations of a total energy power system for a rural health centre in Nigeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chendo, M A.C. [Lagos Univ. (NG). Dept. of Physics; Salawu, R I [Lagos Univ. (NG). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1989-01-01

    A conceptual total energy (hybrid) system design considerations are presented for a Rural Health Centre in a remote village in Nigeria. The design uses a spectrally selective beam splitting technique. The system provides both electrical and thermal energy with electrical needs of the centre being provided by the photoquantum convertor while the hot water and sterilization requirements are met by the spectrally selective heat transfer liquid in the thermally decoupled loop. A critical analysis of the electrical and thermal energy requirements of the health centre including its laboratories, water supply, refrigeration, lighting, etc. and its technoeconomic aspects is also discussed. With appropriate sizing of panels, storage, choice of the spectrally selective heat transfer liquid and other accessories, the PV/PT system using moderately concentrated sunlight is attractive for such application in areas with no national grid lines and normally considered uneconomical for electrification by the extension of the national grid or by the provision of generators which require constant supply of fuel and servicing. (author).

  17. Requirements for a Hydrogen Powered All-Electric Manned Helicopter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Anubhav

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to set propulsion system targets for an all-electric manned helicopter of ultra-light utility class to achieve performance comparable to combustion engines. The approach is to begin with a current two-seat helicopter (Robinson R 22 Beta II-like), design an all-electric power plant as replacement for its existing piston engine, and study performance of the new all-electric aircraft. The new power plant consists of high-pressure Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cells, hydrogen stored in 700 bar type-4 tanks, lithium-ion batteries, and an AC synchronous permanent magnet motor. The aircraft and the transmission are assumed to remain the same. The paper surveys the state of the art in each of these areas, synthesizes a power plant using best available technologies in each, examines the performance achievable by such a power plant, identifies key barriers, and sets future technology targets to achieve performance at par with current internal combustion engines.

  18. Power quality requirements and responsibilities at the point of connection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhattacharyya, S.

    2011-01-01

    In the present power delivery environment, electricity as a product has become more competitive than before. Modern electrical devices are complex in terms of their functionalities and are more sensitive to the quality of the supplied electricity. A disturbance in supply voltage can cause

  19. An analysis of cross-sectional variations in total household energy requirements in India using micro survey data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pachauri, Shonali

    2004-01-01

    Using micro level household survey data from India, we analyse the variation in the pattern and quantum of household energy requirements, both direct and indirect, and the factors causing such variation. An econometric analysis using household survey data from India for the year 1993-1994 reveals that household socio-economic, demographic, geographic, family and dwelling attributes influence the total household energy requirements. There are also large variations in the pattern of energy requirements across households belonging to different expenditure classes. Results from the econometric estimation show that total household expenditure or income level is the most important explanatory variable causing variation in energy requirements across households. In addition, the size of the household dwelling and the age of the head of the household are related to higher household energy requirements. In contrast, the number of members in the household and literacy of the head are associated with lower household energy requirements

  20. An analysis of cross-sectional variations in total household energy requirements in India using micro survey data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pachauri, Shonali E-mail: shonali.pachauri@cepe.mavt.ethz.ch

    2004-10-01

    Using micro level household survey data from India, we analyse the variation in the pattern and quantum of household energy requirements, both direct and indirect, and the factors causing such variation. An econometric analysis using household survey data from India for the year 1993-1994 reveals that household socio-economic, demographic, geographic, family and dwelling attributes influence the total household energy requirements. There are also large variations in the pattern of energy requirements across households belonging to different expenditure classes. Results from the econometric estimation show that total household expenditure or income level is the most important explanatory variable causing variation in energy requirements across households. In addition, the size of the household dwelling and the age of the head of the household are related to higher household energy requirements. In contrast, the number of members in the household and literacy of the head are associated with lower household energy requirements.

  1. Improvement of uranium production efficiency to meet China's nuclear power requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, R.

    1997-01-01

    Recently China put the Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant, with an installed capacity of 300 MW, in the province of Zhejiang and the Daya Bay Nuclear Power Plant, with a total installed capacity of 2 x 900 MW, in commercial operation. China plans a rapid growth in nuclear power from 1995 to 2010. China's uranium production will therefore also enter a new period with nuclear power increasing. In order to meet the demand of nuclear power for uranium special attention has been paid to both technical progress improvement using management with the aim of reducing the cost of uranium production. The application of the trackless mining technique has enhanced the uranium mining productivity significantly. China has produced a radiometric sorter, model 5421-2 for pre-concentrating uranium run-of-mine ore. This effectively increases the uranium content in mill feed and decreases the operating cost of hydrometallurgical treatment. The in situ leach technique after blasting is applied underground in the Lantian Mine, in addition to the surface heap leaching, and has obtained a perfect result. The concentrated acid-curing, and ferric sulphate trickle leaching process, will soon be used in commercial operation for treating uranium ore grading -5 to -7 mm in size. The annual production capability of the Yining Mine will be extended to 100 tonnes U using improving in situ leaching technology. For the purpose of improving the uranium production efficiency much work has been done optimizing the distribution of production centres. China plans to expand its uranium production to meet the uranium requirements of the developing nuclear power plants. (author). 4 tabs

  2. Requirements for containment system components in CANDU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-02-01

    This Standard specifies the requirements and establishes the rules for design, fabrication, and installation of pressure-retaining containment system components. In this Standard the term 'components' includes non registered items

  3. Requirements for containment system components in CANDU nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1988-02-01

    This Standard specifies the requirements and establishes the rules for design, fabrication, and installation of pressure-retaining containment system components. In this Standard the term `components` includes non registered items.

  4. Overview of systems requirements for impact fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, J.M.; Booth, L.A.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1979-01-01

    The development of impact fusion power reactor concepts is very limited at this time. Key systems factors in arriving at practical concepts will be conception of credible systems and subsystems which promise an acceptable overall energy balance and development of target/projectile designs and gain versus projectile energy curves which allow system design tradeoffs to be accomplished. Important system parameters will be subsystem efficiencies (particularly the accelerator), target/projectile gain as a function of target design, circulating power fraction or engineering gain, system pulse repetition rate, size/cost scaling of components, containment cavity design limits, maximum yield, minimum economical yield, minimum projectile velocity and energy, and overall economics. When more detailed conceptual designs are available, then system tradeoffs and performance optimization will be possible

  5. Optimal Power Allocation for Downstream xDSL With Per-Modem Total Power Constraints: Broadcast Channel Optimal Spectrum Balancing (BC-OSB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Nir, Vincent; Moonen, Marc; Verlinden, Jan; Guenach, Mamoun

    2009-02-01

    Recently, the duality between Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO) Multiple Access Channels (MAC) and MIMO Broadcast Channels (BC) has been established under a total power constraint. The same set of rates for MAC can be achieved in BC exploiting the MAC-BC duality formulas while preserving the total power constraint. In this paper, we describe the BC optimal power allo- cation applying this duality in a downstream x-Digital Subscriber Lines (xDSL) context under a total power constraint for all modems over all tones. Then, a new algorithm called BC-Optimal Spectrum Balancing (BC-OSB) is devised for a more realistic power allocation under per-modem total power constraints. The capacity region of the primal BC problem under per-modem total power constraints is found by the dual optimization problem for the BC under per-modem total power constraints which can be rewritten as a dual optimization problem in the MAC by means of a precoder matrix based on the Lagrange multipliers. We show that the duality gap between the two problems is zero. The multi-user power allocation problem has been solved for interference channels and MAC using the OSB algorithm. In this paper we solve the problem of multi-user power allocation for the BC case using the OSB algorithm as well and we derive a computational efficient algorithm that will be referred to as BC-OSB. Simulation results are provided for two VDSL2 scenarios: the first one with Differential-Mode (DM) transmission only and the second one with both DM and Phantom- Mode (PM) transmissions.

  6. 47 CFR 73.211 - Power and antenna height requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... must operate with a minimum effective radiated power (ERP) as follows: (i) The minimum ERP for Class A stations is 0.1 kW. (ii) The ERP for Class B1 stations must exceed 6 kW. (iii) The ERP for Class B stations must exceed 25 kW. (iv) The ERP for Class C3 stations must exceed 6 kW. (v) The ERP for Class C2...

  7. Economic requirements for competitive laser fusion power production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, W.J.; Meier, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    An economic model of a laser fusion commercial power plant is used to identify the design and operating regimes of the driver, target and reaction chamber that will result in economic competitiveness with future fission and coal plants. The authors find that, for a plant with a net power of 1 GW/sub e/, the cost of the driver must be less than $0.4 to 0.6 B, and the recirculating power fraction must be less than 25%. Target gain improvements at low driver energy are the most beneficial but also the most difficult to achieve. The optimal driver energy decreases with increasing target technology. The sensitivity of the cost of electricity to variations in cost and performance parameters decreases with increasing target technology. If chamber pulse rates of a few Hz can be achieved, then gains of 80-100 are sufficient, and higher pulse rates do not help much. Economic competitiveness becomes more difficult with decreasing plant size. Finally, decreasing the cost of the balance of plant has the greatest beneficial effect on economic competitiveness

  8. The state of the art in Japan's telecommunications energy systems - Strategy for Total Power Management -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muroyama, Seiichi [NTT Power and Building Facilities Inc., Midori-cho, Musashino-shi, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    The ''strategy for total power management (STPM)'' was developed for managing problems in relation to energy for multimedia services in a comprehensive manner from the viewpoints of risk, cost, and environment. To provide integrated services based on STPM, a DC power supply system, a highly reliable UPS, and a co-generation system have been developed. (orig.)

  9. Cultural Changes Required in the Army to Truly Achieve a Total Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-16

    tailored to achieve anticipated objectives.”1 Honorable John M. McHugh , Secretary of the Army Army Directive 2012-08 (Army Total Force Policy...United States Soldier. 16 End Notes 1 McHugh , John M. “Army Directive 2012-08 (Army Total Force Policy).” Secretary of the Army, September 4...1 (February 2006): 40–42. McCullough, Amy. “Out of Reserve (Air Force Reserve Command)” 94, no. 12 (2011): 40. McHugh , John M. “Army Directive 2012

  10. The power of cross-functional teams in driving total quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcclung, Tim M.; Mcmaster, Tom J.

    1992-01-01

    Garrett Canada, a Division of Allied-Signal Aerospace Canada, has been a member of the Canadian aerospace industry for 40 years. Although Garrett Canada has always been a profitable division with a solid market share, the changing and turbulent business environment and globalization of the aerospace industry has created new demands and challenges. The marketplace is demanding faster introduction of new products, as well as shorter leadtimes for repairs and spares. It was recognized that reducing cycle times for new products and for ongoing production would not only satisfy our customers, it would also enhance our business performance through reduced inventories, lower past due, and more responsiveness to change. It was evident that drastic function changes were required if we were to maintain our position as a premier aerospace supplier. The challenge was to convert a stable, somewhat slow-paced work environment with strong functional boundaries into a boundaryless world class team functioning in a total quality environment and focused on customer satisfaction. Complete and uncompromised customer satisfaction has become our driving force, with Total Quality being our engine to continuously improve our processes and increase our speed. The way in which this transition has been brought about is the subject of this presentation.

  11. Safety of power transformers, power supplies, reactors and similar products - Part 1: General requirements and tests

    CERN Document Server

    International Electrotechnical Commission. Geneva

    1998-01-01

    This International Standard deals with safety aspects of power transformers, power supplies, reactors and similar products such as electrical, thermal and mechanical safety. This standard covers the following types of dry-type transformers, power supplies, including switch mode power supplies, and reactors, the windings of which may be encapsulated or non-encapsulated. It has the status of a group safety publication in accordance with IEC Guide 104.

  12. NASA requirements and applications environments for electrical power wiring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stavnes, M.W.; Hammond, A.N.

    1992-01-01

    Serious problems can occur from insulation failures in the wiring harnesses of aerospace vehicles. In most recorded incidents, the failures have been identified to be the result of arc tracking, the propagation of an arc along wiring bundles through degradation of insulation. Propagation of the arc can lead to the loss of the entire wiring harness and the functions which it supports. While an extensive database of testing for arc track resistant wire insulations have been developed for aircraft applications, the counterpart requirements for spacecraft are very limited. This paper presents the electrical, thermal, mechanical, chemical, and operational requirements for specification and testing of candidate wiring systems for spacecraft applications

  13. Potential refractory alloy requirements for space nuclear power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, R.H. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    In reviewing design requirements for refractory alloys for space nuclear applications, several key points are identified. First, the successful utilization of refractory alloys is considered an enabling requirement for the successful deployment of high efficiency, lightweight, and small space nuclear systems. Second, the recapture of refractory alloy nuclear technology developed in the 1960s and early 1970s appears to be a pacing activity in the successful utilization of refractory alloys. Third, the successful application of refractory alloys for space nuclear applications will present a significant challenge to both the materials and the systems design communities

  14. Discussion of important safety requirements for new nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Lin; Jia Xiang; Yan Tianwen; Li Wenhong; Li Chun

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the analysis of several important safety requirements and improvement direction. Technical view of security goals on site safety evaluation, internal and external events fortification, serious accident prevention and mitigation, as well as the core, containment system and instrument control system design and engineering optimization, and etc are indicated. It will be useful for new plant design, construction and safety improvement. (authors)

  15. The method of the correlation and dispersion defining of the total power components in the electric transport devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Nikitenko

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Development and theoretical ground of the analytical method for the calculation of the active, reactive and total powers in the electric traction devices, taking into consideration the non-stationary character of the stochastic processes change of the voltage and current in the elements of these systems. Methodology. The mathematical methods of the random processes theory and the “discrete electrical engineering” methods are used for solving the main problem of this paper. Findings. The Method of the Correlation and Dispersion is developed for definition of the active power, the reactive power by Fryse and the total power of the devices in the elements of the electric traction system of the main-line railways. The method is based on the well-known concepts of auto- and inter-correlation functions of the random processes which govern the feeder voltages and the currents in the traction power supply subsystem as well as the currents and voltages of the electric rolling stock. The method developed in this paper allows estimating the powers of both stationary and non-stationary processes. This method can be used for the analysis of both the traction mode and the regenerative braking mode of the electric rolling stock. The total power components were calculated for the one of the feeder areas of the Prydniprovsk railway using this method. The results show the significant flow of the reactive power in the traction power supply system. This fact is also confirmed by the high values of the reactive power coefficient. Originality. Scientific novelty of the research is consisted in the following. Firstly, for defining the active and reactive powers in elements of the traction power supply system the new method (the Method of Correlation and Dispersion is created and grounded. This method is different from other existing methods because it takes into consideration the varying non-stationary character of the chance processes of the feeder and

  16. 77 FR 62396 - Annual Company-Run Stress Test Requirements for Banking Organizations With Total Consolidated...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-12

    ... minimum risk-based capital requirements.\\3\\ Stress testing is one tool that helps both bank supervisors... the FDIC and the OCC to help to ensure that the company-run stress testing regulations are consistent... purposes of the annual company-run stress tests so that the same set of scenarios can be used to conduct...

  17. Power requirements assessment for lunar and Mars scientific and experimental payloads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotas, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on an evaluation of prospective scientific payloads and surface experiments for future manned missions to the moon and Mars which determined that overall mission objectives and requirements influence the selection of candidate power systems. A generic classification of these science missions was developed to examine these relationships. Scientific missions were defined for the four Synthesis Report architectures and cumulative power load and payload mix computed. Approximately half of all deployed science payloads were sited within the main surface outpost and powered by the central power generation facility. The remaining remote science payloads require either autonomous or smaller central power facilities

  18. 12 CFR 714.6 - Are you required to retain salvage powers over the leased property?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Are you required to retain salvage powers over the leased property? 714.6 Section 714.6 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS LEASING § 714.6 Are you required to retain salvage powers over the leased...

  19. 42 CFR 84.146 - Method of measuring the power and torque required to operate blowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Method of measuring the power and torque required... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.146 Method of measuring the power and torque.... These are used to facilitate timing. To determine the torque or horsepower required to operate the...

  20. Reduced power processor requirements for the 30-cm diameter HG ion thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlin, V. K.

    1979-01-01

    The characteristics of power processors strongly impact the overall performance and cost of electric propulsion systems. A program was initiated to evaluate simplifications of the thruster-power processor interface requirements. The power processor requirements are mission dependent with major differences arising for those missions which require a nearly constant thruster operating point (typical of geocentric and some inbound planetary missions) and those requiring operation over a large range of input power (such as outbound planetary missions). This paper describes the results of tests which have indicated that as many as seven of the twelve power supplies may be eliminated from the present Functional Model Power Processor used with 30-cm diameter Hg ion thrusters.

  1. Our response to climate change requires nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.

    2007-01-01

    Australian politicians and environmental activists who reject nuclear power as the pivotal technology to combat climate change stand compromised before the court of international scientific opinion and informed global realism. The content of their rhetoric on nuclear matters comprises pseudo-science, innuendo and ideological prejudice communicated through the politics of fear and risk. The recent report of the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) calls for urgent major reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, without which the natural feedback mechanisms that control global temperatures might be overwhelmed. It points out that presently human activity produces around 23.6 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide per annum, about one half of which can be absorbed by soil and ocean. However this capacity is being rapidly destroyed by rising soil and ocean surface temperatures. The report points out that if global warming cannot be kept between manageable limits, it could lead to the destruction of the Great Barrier Reef and the Amazon rainforest, and lead to the forced migration of hundreds of millions of people from equatorial regions and the loss of vast tracts of land as ice caps melt and sea levels rise. For many scientists and engineers concerned with energy and environmental issues it is a matter of deep regret that, the IPCC meetings at Kyoto and Paris have not explicitly endorsed the central role, which could be played by nuclear energy in combating greenhouse gas production and climate change. The environmental benefits from switching to nuclear fuels are striking. The IPCC delegates attending Kyoto in 1997 must have known that light and air-conditioning for the modern International Convention Centre were obtained from an electricity grid supplied partly from a network of 54 nuclear power stations. The greenhouse gas emissions saved by the use of this network and the uranium fuel cycle is around 287 million tonnes of carbon dioxide per

  2. Metrics required for Power System Resilient Operations and Protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eshghi, K.; Johnson, B. K.; Rieger, C. G.

    2016-08-01

    Today’s complex grid involves many interdependent systems. Various layers of hierarchical control and communication systems are coordinated, both spatially and temporally to achieve gird reliability. As new communication network based control system technologies are being deployed, the interconnected nature of these systems is becoming more complex. Deployment of smart grid concepts promises effective integration of renewable resources, especially if combined with energy storage. However, without a philosophical focus on resilience, a smart grid will potentially lead to higher magnitude and/or duration of disruptive events. The effectiveness of a resilient infrastructure depends upon its ability to anticipate, absorb, adapt to, and/or rapidly recover from a potentially catastrophic event. Future system operations can be enhanced with a resilient philosophy through architecting the complexity with state awareness metrics that recognize changing system conditions and provide for an agile and adaptive response. The starting point for metrics lies in first understanding the attributes of performance that will be qualified. In this paper, we will overview those attributes and describe how they will be characterized by designing a distributed agent that can be applied to the power grid.

  3. Empirical Models for Power and Energy Requirements II : A Powered Implement Operation in Serdang Sandy Clay Loam, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. Kheiralla

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Power and energy requirements were measured with an instrumented tractor for rotary tilling in Serdang sandy clay loam soil.  The effects of travel speed and rotor speed upon the measured data were investigated.  Power model from orthogonal regression analysis was formulated based on linear and quadratic functions of travel speed and bite length.  Fuel consumption model from regression analysis was formulated based on linear tractor PTO power as well as linear equivalent tractor PTO power.  Fuel consumption rates predicted by ASAE D497.3 were found to be 25% to 28% overestimates of the values predicted by the model developed.  However, fuel consumption rates reported by OECD Tractor Test were found to be 1% to 9% lower than the fuel consumption rates predicted by the model developed.  A comparison of power and energy requirements for both powered and draught implements showed that the disk harrow was the most energy efficient implement in terms of fuel consumption and specific energy followed by the rotary tiller, disk plough and mouldboard.  Finally, average PTO power, fuel consumption, wheel slip, wheel power and specific energy for a powered implement are presented.

  4. IMPLEMENTASI DISTRIBUSI REQUIREMENT PLANNING DAN SAVING MATRIX UNTUK MEMINIMASI TOTAL BIAYA DISTRIBUSI DI INDUSTRI BAHAN KIMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Oscar Ong

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Planning and scheduling of the distribution of goods in PT. Senatama Laboranusa are not well coordinated, so the demand for each product is out of control, which results in deficiency or excess of inventories in both of the factories and each warehouse. This problem will affect the distribution cost incurred by the company. In this study, the distribution data process is done by using Distribution Requirement Planning method and route distribution processing by using Saving Matrix, in which both of these methods can group the delivery schedule and flow of distribution route regularly. PO Release, which contains time, order amount of each area, and lot size EOQ (Economic Order Quantity method used; will be generated from the calculation of DRP. From the calculation of Saving Matrix, route order sequence is applied by using Nearest Neighbor method. After the implementation of Distribution Requirement Planning, the cost reduction resulted is 29.75% and the difference in distance after the application of Saving Matrix is 983.3 Km. With a good distribution activity planning and scheduling, the success rate in meeting the customer demand would be more optimal, while sales performance increases in fulfilling orders in a timely manner and  appropriate amount, hence the distribution costs can be kept as minimum as possible.

  5. In-core power sharing and fuel requirement study for a decommissioning Boiling Water Reactor using the linear reactivity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Chung-Yuan; Tung, Wu-Hsiung; Yaur, Shung-Jung; Kuo, Weng-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Linear reactivity model (LRM) was modified and applied to Boiling Water Reactor. • The power sharing and fuel requirement study of the last cycle and two cycles before decommissioning was implemented. • The loading pattern design concept for the cycles before decommissioning is carried out. - Abstract: A study of in-core power sharing and fuel requirement for a decommissioning BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) was carried out using the linear reactivity model (LRM). The power sharing of each fuel batch was taken as an independent variable, and the related parameters were set and modified to simulate actual cases. Optimizations of the last cycle and two cycles before decommissioning were both implemented; in the last-one-cycle optimization, a single cycle optimization was carried out with different upper limits of fuel batch power, whereas, in the two-cycle optimization, two cycles were optimized with different cycle lengths, along with two different optimization approaches which are the simultaneous optimization of two cycles (MO) and two successive single-cycle optimizations (SO). The results of the last-one-cycle optimization show that it is better to increase the fresh fuel power and decrease the thrice-burnt fuel power as much as possible. It also shows that relaxing the power limit is good to the fresh fuel requirement which will be reduced under lower power limit. On the other hand, the results of the last-two-cycle (cycle N-1 and N) optimization show that the MO is better than SO, and the power of fresh fuel batch should be decreased in cycle N-1 to save its energy for the next cycle. The results of the single-cycle optimization are found to be the same as that in cycle N of the multi-cycle optimization. Besides that, under the same total energy requirement of two cycles, a long-short distribution of cycle length design can save more fresh fuel

  6. Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design. Specific Safety Requirements (Chinese Ed.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of the principles included in the Fundamental Safety Principles, IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, this Safety Requirements publication establishes requirements applicable to the design of nuclear power plants. It covers the design phase and provides input for the safe operation of the power plant. It elaborates on the safety objective, safety principles and concepts that provide the basis for deriving the safety requirements that must be met for the design of a nuclear power plant. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Applying the safety principles and concepts; 3. Management of safety in design; 4. Principal technical requirements; 5. General plant design; 6. Design of specific plant systems.

  7. Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design. Specific Safety Requirements (French Ed.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of the principles included in the Fundamental Safety Principles, IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, this Safety Requirements publication establishes requirements applicable to the design of nuclear power plants. It covers the design phase and provides input for the safe operation of the power plant. It elaborates on the safety objective, safety principles and concepts that provide the basis for deriving the safety requirements that must be met for the design of a nuclear power plant. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Applying the safety principles and concepts; 3. Management of safety in design; 4. Principal technical requirements; 5. General plant design; 6. Design of specific plant systems.

  8. Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design. Specific Safety Requirements (Arabic Ed.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of the principles included in the Fundamental Safety Principles, IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, this Safety Requirements publication establishes requirements applicable to the design of nuclear power plants. It covers the design phase and provides input for the safe operation of the power plant. It elaborates on the safety objective, safety principles and concepts that provide the basis for deriving the safety requirements that must be met for the design of a nuclear power plant. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Applying the safety principles and concepts; 3. Management of safety in design; 4. Principal technical requirements; 5. General plant design; 6. Design of specific plant systems.

  9. Physical-resource requirements and the power of quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caves, Carlton M; Deutsch, Ivan H; Blume-Kohout, Robin

    2004-01-01

    The primary resource for quantum computation is the Hilbert-space dimension. Whereas Hilbert space itself is an abstract construction, the number of dimensions available to a system is a physical quantity that requires physical resources. Avoiding a demand for an exponential amount of these resources places a fundamental constraint on the systems that are suitable for scalable quantum computation. To be scalable, the number of degrees of freedom in the computer must grow nearly linearly with the number of qubits in an equivalent qubit-based quantum computer. These considerations rule out quantum computers based on a single particle, a single atom, or a single molecule consisting of a fixed number of atoms or on classical waves manipulated using the transformations of linear optics

  10. Fuel processing requirements and techniques for fuel cell propulsion power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Yu, M.

    Fuels for fuel cells in transportation systems are likely to be methanol, natural gas, hydrogen, propane, or ethanol. Fuels other than hydrogen will need to be reformed to hydrogen on-board the vehicle. The fuel reformer must meet stringent requirements for weight and volume, product quality, and transient operation. It must be compact and lightweight, must produce low levels of CO and other byproducts, and must have rapid start-up and good dynamic response. Catalytic steam reforming, catalytic or noncatalytic partial oxidation reforming, or some combination of these processes may be used. This paper discusses salient features of the different kinds of reformers and describes the catalysts and processes being examined for the oxidation reforming of methanol and the steam reforming of ethanol. Effective catalysts and reaction conditions for the former have been identified; promising catalysts and reaction conditions for the latter are being investigated.

  11. Plug and Process Loads Capacity and Power Requirements Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppy, M.; Gentile-Polese, L.

    2014-09-01

    This report addresses gaps in actionable knowledge that would help reduce the plug load capacities designed into buildings. Prospective building occupants and real estate brokers lack accurate references for plug and process load (PPL) capacity requirements, so they often request 5-10 W/ft2 in their lease agreements. Limited initial data, however, suggest that actual PPL densities in leased buildings are substantially lower. Overestimating PPL capacity leads designers to oversize electrical infrastructure and cooling systems. Better guidance will enable improved sizing and design of these systems, decrease upfront capital costs, and allow systems to operate more energy efficiently. The main focus of this report is to provide industry with reliable, objective third-party guidance to address the information gap in typical PPL densities for commercial building tenants. This could drive changes in negotiations about PPL energy demands.

  12. Power Requirements Determined for High-Power-Density Electric Motors for Electric Aircraft Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Dexter; Brown, Gerald V.

    2005-01-01

    Future advanced aircraft fueled by hydrogen are being developed to use electric drive systems instead of gas turbine engines for propulsion. Current conventional electric motor power densities cannot match those of today s gas turbine aircraft engines. However, if significant technological advances could be made in high-power-density motor development, the benefits of an electric propulsion system, such as the reduction of harmful emissions, could be realized.

  13. Rest Interval Required for Power Training With Power Load in the Bench Press Throw Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Davó, Jose L; Solana, Rafael Sabido; Sarabia Marín, Jose M; Fernández Fernández, Jaime; Moya Ramón, Manuel

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to test the influence of various rest interval (RI) durations used between sets on power output performance and physiological and perceptual variables during a strength training session using 40% of the 1 repetition maximum (1RM) in the bench press throw exercise. Thirty-one college students (18 males and 13 females) took part in the study. The experimental protocol consists of 5 sets of 8 repetitions of the bench press throw exercise with a load representing 40% of 1RM. Subjects performed the experimental protocol on 3 different occasions, differing by the RI between sets (1, 2, or 3 minutes). During the sessions, power data (mean power and peak power), physiological (lactate concentration [La]) and perceptual (rating of perceived exertion) variables were measured. In addition, delayed onset muscular soreness was reported 24 and 48 hours after the training session. One-way repeated-measures analysis of variance showed that 1-minute RI entailed higher power decreases and greater increases in values of physiological and perceptual variables compared with both 2- and 3-minute RIs. Nevertheless, no differences were found between 2- and 3-minute RIs. Therefore, this study showed that, when training with 40% of 1RM in the bench press throw exercise, a 2-minute RI between sets can be enough to avoid significant decreases in power output. Consequently, training sessions' duration could be reduced without causing excessive fatigue, allowing additional time to focus on other conditioning priorities.

  14. Accuracy requirements on operational measurements in nuclear power plants with regard to balance methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holecek, C.

    1986-01-01

    Accurate in-service measurement is necessary for power balancing of nuclear power plants, i.e., the determination of fuel consumption, electric power generation, heat delivery and the degree of fuel power utilization. The only possible method of determining the input of total consumed energy from the fuel is the balance of the primary coolant circuit. This is because for the purposes of power balancing it is not possible to measure the amount of power generated from nuclear fuel. Relations are presented for the calculation of basic indices of the power balance. It is stated that for the purposes of power balancing and analyses the precision of measuring instrument at the input and output of balancing circuits is of primary importance, followed by the precision of measuring instruments inside balancing circuits and meters of auxiliary parameters. (Z.M.). 7 refs., 1 tab

  15. Design of a Solid-State Fast Voltage Compensator for klystron modulators requiring constant AC power consumption

    CERN Document Server

    Aguglia, Davide; Viarouge, Philippe; Cros, Jerome

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel topological solution for klystron modulators integrating a Fast Voltage Compensator which allows an operation at constant power consumption from the utility grid. This kind of solution is mandatory for the CLIC project under study, which requires several hundreds of synchronously operated klystron modulators for a total pulsed power of 39 GW. The topology is optimized for the challenging CLIC specifications, which require a very precise output voltage flat-top as well as fast rise and fall times (3µs). The Fast Voltage Compensator is integrated in the modulator such that it only has to manage the capacitor charger current and a fraction of the charging voltage. Consequently, its dimensioning power and cost is minimized.

  16. Current trends in codal requirements for safety in operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srivasista, K.; Shah, Y.K.; Gupta, S.K.

    2006-01-01

    The Code of practice on safety in nuclear power plant operation states the requirements to be met during operation of a nuclear power plant for assuring safety. Among various stages of authorization, regulatory body issues authorization for operation of a nuclear power plant, monitors and enforces regulatory requirements. The responsible organization shall have overall responsibility and the plant management shall have the primary responsibility for ensuring safe and efficient operation of its nuclear power plants. A set of codal requirements covering technical and administrative aspects are mandatory for the plant management to implement to ensure that the nuclear power plant is operated in accordance with the design intent. Requirements on operating procedures and instructions establish operation and maintenance, inspection and testing of the plant in a planned and systematic way. The requirements on emergency preparedness programme establish with a reasonable assurance that, in the event of an emergency situation, appropriate measures can be taken to mitigate the consequences. Commissioning requirements verify performance criteria during commissioning to ensure that the design intent and QA requirements are met. Several modifications in systems important to safety required during operation of a nuclear power plant are regulated. However new operational codal requirements arising out of periodic safety review, operational experience feedback, life management, probabilistic safety assessment, physical security, safety convention and obligations and decommissioning are not covered in the present code of practice for safety in nuclear power plant operation. Codal provisions on 'Review by operating organization on aspects of design having implications on operability' are also required to be addressed. The merits in developing such a methodology include acceptance of the design by operating organization, ensuring maintainability, proper layout etc. in the new designs

  17. Energy transmission and power sources for mechanical circulatory support devices to achieve total implantability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jake X; Smith, Joshua R; Bonde, Pramod

    2014-04-01

    Left ventricular assist device therapy has radically improved congestive heart failure survival with smaller rotary pumps. The driveline used to power today's left ventricular assist devices, however, continues to be a source of infection, traumatic damage, and rehospitalization. Previous attempts to wirelessly power left ventricular assist devices using transcutaneous energy transfer systems have been limited by restrictions on separation distance and alignment between the transmit and receive coils. Resonant electrical energy transfer allows power delivery at larger distances without compromising safety and efficiency. This review covers the efforts to wirelessly power mechanical circulatory assist devices and the progress made in enhancing their energy sources. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Safety and reliability in nuclear power plants operation using total range simulators for operators training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gleason, E.; Espinosa, G.; Rodriguez, S.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a methodology developed for the management of the configuration simulator, unit 1 of Laguna Verde's nucleoelectric power station. This methodology has the purchase to conclude the simulator modernization and to have interaction with the power station's administration. The validation and the application of this methodology is also presented as well as the up-to-date results. (B.C.A.). 12 refs, 01 fig

  19. Total-system expertise in economically efficient operation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Siemens Nuclear Power GmbH can look back on well over 40 years of experience in developing and constructing nuclear power plants. 23 Power plant units of Siemens design are in operation in five countries, and in autumn this year, another one will start commercial operation, while yet another one is under construction. In comparative international power plant surveys, the Siemens-design systems usually rank in top positions when it comes to comparing systems availability and electric power generation, and Siemens have build a reputation in manufacturing power plants up to the highest safety standards worldwide. Our experience as a manufacturer of turnkey PWR and BWR type reactors, as well as our profound knowledge of international nuclear standardisation, engineering codes and safety guides, has been used and processed to the benefit of the services offered by Siemens, resulting in well-devised service packages, and enhancements and optimisation of our machinery and equipment. Siemens has of course obtained the relevant licenses and certification for all its services and products according to DIN ISO 9001, KTA and ASME standards [de

  20. A modular Space Station/Base electrical power system - Requirements and design study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliason, J. T.; Adkisson, W. B.

    1972-01-01

    The requirements and procedures necessary for definition and specification of an electrical power system (EPS) for the future space station are discussed herein. The considered space station EPS consists of a replaceable main power module with self-contained auxiliary power, guidance, control, and communication subsystems. This independent power source may 'plug into' a space station module which has its own electrical distribution, control, power conditioning, and auxiliary power subsystems. Integration problems are discussed, and a transmission system selected with local floor-by-floor power conditioning and distribution in the station module. This technique eliminates the need for an immediate long range decision on the ultimate space base power sources by providing capability for almost any currently considered option.

  1. Requirements and operation of decentralised power plants in the changing power market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoenings, Norbert; Hornig, Niels; Steinbach, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    E.ON plans and realises distributed industrial power plants on the basis of contracting schemes. Target is to reduce energy costs without investment by the customer himself. Gas turbine CHP plants are very flexible and offer many possibilities for the operator to adjust optimally to a constantly changing energy market. This aspect is becoming increasingly important due to the increasing share of renewables. However, the economic situation for CHP plants has deteriorated significantly, due to the current market situation distorted by the subsidised renewable power generation. (orig.)

  2. Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design. Specific Safety Requirements (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This publication is a revision of Safety Requirements No. NS-R-1, Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design. It establishes requirements applicable to the design of nuclear power plants and elaborates on the safety objective, safety principles and concepts that provide the basis for deriving the safety requirements that must be met for the design of a nuclear power plant. It will be useful for organizations involved in the design, manufacture, construction, modification, maintenance, operation and decommissioning of nuclear power plants, as well as for regulatory bodies. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Applying the safety principles and concepts; 3. Management of safety in design; 4. Principal technical requirements; 5. General plant design; 6. Design of specific plant systems.

  3. Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design. Specific Safety Requirements (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    This publication establishes requirements applicable to the design of nuclear power plants and elaborates on the safety objective, safety principles and concepts that provide the basis for deriving the safety requirements that must be met for the design of a nuclear power plant. It will be useful for organizations involved in design, manufacture, construction, modification, maintenance, operation and decommissioning of nuclear power plants, as well as for regulatory bodies. A review of Safety Requirements publications was commenced in 2011 following the accident in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. The review revealed no significant areas of weakness and resulted in just a small set of amendments to strengthen the requirements and facilitate their implementation, which are contained in the present publication.

  4. Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design. Specific Safety Requirements (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This publication establishes requirements applicable to the design of nuclear power plants and elaborates on the safety objective, safety principles and concepts that provide the basis for deriving the safety requirements that must be met for the design of a nuclear power plant. It will be useful for organizations involved in design, manufacture, construction, modification, maintenance, operation and decommissioning of nuclear power plants, as well as for regulatory bodies. A review of Safety Requirements publications was commenced in 2011 following the accident in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. The review revealed no significant areas of weakness and resulted in just a small set of amendments to strengthen the requirements and facilitate their implementation, which are contained in the present publication.

  5. Guideline on radiation protection requirements for ionizing radiation shielding in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The guideline which entered into force on 1 May 1988 stipulates the radiation protection requirements for shielding against ionizing radiation to be met in the design, construction, commissioning, operation, and decommissioning of nuclear power plants

  6. Underwater Cycle Ergometry: Power Requirements With and Without Diver Thermal Dress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shykoff, B

    2009-01-01

    .... An ongoing problem has been that, although the power requirement of cycling in the water is known to be greater than that in air for the same ergometer setting, the magnitude of the difference...

  7. International comparison of requirements for connection of wind turbines to power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jauch, C. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark). Dept. of Wind Energy; Matevosyan, J.; Ackermann, T. [Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Bolik, S. [Vestas Wind Systems A/S, Ringkoebing (Denmark)

    2005-07-01

    Power production from wind turbines has increased considerably during the last decade. Therefore today's wind turbines, which are typically set up in wind farms, have a significant influence on the operation of power systems. The efficient and secure operation of power systems is supported by grid codes, which are sets of requirements for all network users (suppliers, customers, etc.). In Europe, several transmission network operators have introduced special grid connection requirements for wind farms. These requirements are mainly based on existing grid codes, initially written for conventional power plants usually equipped with synchronous generators. This article presents a comparison of grid connection requirements for wind farms issued, or proposed as a draft, by transmission network operators in Denmark, Sweden, Germany, Scotland and Ireland. (author)

  8. Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design. Specific Safety Requirements (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    This publication is a revision of Safety Requirements No. NS-R-1, Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design. It establishes requirements applicable to the design of nuclear power plants and elaborates on the safety objective, safety principles and concepts that provide the basis for deriving the safety requirements that must be met for the design of a nuclear power plant. It will be useful for organizations involved in the design, manufacture, construction, modification, maintenance, operation and decommissioning of nuclear power plants, as well as for regulatory bodies. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Applying the safety principles and concepts; 3. Management of safety in design; 4. Principal technical requirements; 5. General plant design; 6. Design of specific plant systems.

  9. Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design. Specific Safety Requirements (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    This publication establishes requirements applicable to the design of nuclear power plants and elaborates on the safety objective, safety principles and concepts that provide the basis for deriving the safety requirements that must be met for the design of a nuclear power plant. It will be useful for organizations involved in design, manufacture, construction, modification, maintenance, operation and decommissioning of nuclear power plants, as well as for regulatory bodies. A review of Safety Requirements publications was commenced in 2011 following the accident in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. The review revealed no significant areas of weakness and resulted in just a small set of amendments to strengthen the requirements and facilitate their implementation, which are contained in the present publication.

  10. General requirements for pressure-retaining systems and components in CANDU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    This standard specifies the general requirements for the design, fabrication and installation of pressure-retaining systems, components, and their supports in CANDU nuclear power plants. (16 figs., 2 tabs., 25 refs.)

  11. 10 CFR 50.72 - Immediate notification requirements for operating nuclear power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Immediate notification requirements for operating nuclear power reactors. 50.72 Section 50.72 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC LICENSING OF... systems. (8) Emergency ac electrical power systems, including: Emergency diesel generators (EDGs...

  12. Design requirements, criteria and methods for seismic qualification of CANDU power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, N.; Duff, C.G.

    1979-10-01

    This report describes the requirements and criteria for the seismic design and qualification of systems and equipment in CANDU nuclear power plants. Acceptable methods and techniques for seismic qualification of CANDU nuclear power plants to mitigate the effects or the consequences of earthquakes are also described. (auth)

  13. Parameterized Flight Mission for Secondary Power Requirement Estimations of Commercial Transport Aircraft

    OpenAIRE

    Lampl, Thomas; Muschkorgel, Sandra; Hornung, Mirko;

    2018-01-01

    The trend towards More-Electric Aircraft (MEA) and the introduction of new system technologies lead to considerable changes at the system level of commercial transport aircraft. Because the number of systems and power requirements are increasing, the consideration and integration of aircraft systems in early aircraft design phases is important. The objective of this contribution is to develop a characteristic flight mission with modelled aircraft systems to estimate the secondary power requir...

  14. Comparative cost analyses: total flow vs other power conversion systems for the Salton Sea Geothermal Resource

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, G.W.

    1978-09-18

    Cost studies were done for Total Flow, double flash, and multistage flash binary systems for electric Energy production from the Salton Sea Geothermal Resource. The purpose was to provide the Department of energy's Division of Geothermal Energy with information by which to judge whether to continue development of the Total Flow system. Results indicate that the Total Flow and double flash systems have capital costs of $1,135 and $1,026 /kW with energy costs of 40.9 and 39.7 mills/kW h respectively. The Total Flow and double flash systems are not distinguishable on a cost basis alone; the multistage flash binary system, with capital cost of $1,343 /kW and energy cost of 46.9 mills/kW h, is significantly more expensive. If oil savings are considered in the total analysis, the Total Flow system could save 30% more oil than the double flash system, $3.5 billion at 1978 oil prices.

  15. Flexibility in Europe's power sector — An additional requirement or an automatic complement?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertsch, Joachim; Growitsch, Christian; Lorenczik, Stefan; Nagl, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    By 2050, the European Union aims to reduce greenhouse gases by more than 80%. The EU member states have therefore declared to strongly increase the share of renewable energy sources (RES-E) in the next decades. Given a large deployment of wind and solar capacities, there are two major impacts on electricity systems: First, the electricity system must be flexible enough to cope with the volatile RES-E generation, i.e., ramp up supply or ramp down demand on short notice. Second, sufficient back-up capacities are needed during times with low feed-in from wind and solar capacities. This paper analyzes whether there is a need for additional incentive mechanisms for flexibility in electricity markets with a high share of renewables. For this purpose, we simulate the development of the European electricity markets up to the year 2050 using a linear investment and dispatch optimization model. Flexibility requirements are implemented in the model via ramping constraints and provision of balancing power. We found that an increase in fluctuating renewables has a tremendous impact on the volatility of the residual load and consequently on the flexibility requirements. However, any market design that incentivizes investments in least (total system) cost generation investment does not need additional incentives for flexibility. The main trigger for investing in flexible resources is the achievable full load hours and the need for backup capacity. In a competitive market, the cost-efficient technologies that are most likely to be installed, i.e., gas-fired power plants or flexible CCS plants, provide flexibility as a by-product. Under the condition of system adequacy, flexibility never poses a challenge in a cost-minimal capacity mix. Therefore, any market design incentivizing investments in efficient generation thus provides flexibility as an inevi complement. - Highlights: • We analyze flexibility in electricity systems with a high share of renewables. • For scenario

  16. Specification for a total quality assurance programme for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This British Standard specifies principles for the establishment and implementation of quality assurance programmes during all phases of design, procurement, fabrication, construction, commissioning, operation, maintenance and decommissioning of structures, systems and components of nuclear power plants. These principles apply to activities affecting the quality of items, such as designing, purchasing, fabricating, handling, shipping, storing, cleaning, erecting, installing, testing, commissioning, operating, inspecting, maintaining, repairing, refuelling, modifying and, eventually decommissioning. (author)

  17. High total dose proton irradiation effects on silicon NPN rf power transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bharathi, M. N.; Praveen, K. C.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana; Pushpa, N.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of 3 MeV proton irradiation on the I-V characteristics of NPN rf power transistors were studied in the dose range of 100 Krad to 100 Mrad. The different electrical characteristics like Gummel, current gain and output characteristics were systematically studied before and after irradiation. The recovery in the I-V characteristics of irradiated NPN BJTs were studied by isochronal and isothermal annealing methods

  18. High total dose proton irradiation effects on silicon NPN rf power transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharathi, M. N.; Praveen, K. C.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana, E-mail: gnanaprakash@physics.uni-mysore.ac.in [Department of Studies in Physics, University of Mysore, Manasagangotri, Mysore-570006, Karnataka (India); Pushpa, N. [Department of PG Studies in Physics, JSS College, Ooty Road, Mysore-570025, Karnataka (India)

    2014-04-24

    The effects of 3 MeV proton irradiation on the I-V characteristics of NPN rf power transistors were studied in the dose range of 100 Krad to 100 Mrad. The different electrical characteristics like Gummel, current gain and output characteristics were systematically studied before and after irradiation. The recovery in the I-V characteristics of irradiated NPN BJTs were studied by isochronal and isothermal annealing methods.

  19. Hypothetical requirements on number of personnel in Czechoslovak nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halik, J.

    1990-01-01

    The structural changes of Czechoslovak power prevent prediction of labor force development by extrapolating the existing development trends. Nuclear power demands a different qualification and occupation structure of the labor force than conventional power generation. The prediction of the number of personnel is based on data on the expected installed capacity and on its commissioning. The following organizational structures are envisaged for a nuclear power plant: the divisions of the Director, of production, maintenance, radiation safety and quality control, technology and investment, economics and personnel. A total of 15,654 personnel are envisaged for nuclear power plants in 2005. A brief comparison is submitted of labor demands in nuclear power plants in Czechoslovakia and in the world. (M.D.). 1 fig., 4 tabs., 3 refs

  20. Energy Storage Requirements for PV Power Ramp Rate Control in Northern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius Schnabel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Photovoltaic (PV generators suffer from fluctuating output power due to the highly fluctuating primary energy source. With significant PV penetration, these fluctuations can lead to power system instability and power quality problems. The use of energy storage systems as fluctuation compensators has been proposed as means to mitigate these problems. In this paper, the behavior of PV power fluctuations in Northern European climatic conditions and requirements for sizing the energy storage systems to compensate them have been investigated and compared to similar studies done in Southern European climate. These investigations have been performed through simulations that utilize measurements from the Tampere University of Technology solar PV power station research plant in Finland. An enhanced energy storage charging control strategy has been developed and tested. Energy storage capacity, power, and cycling requirements have been derived for different PV generator sizes and power ramp rate requirements. The developed control strategy leads to lesser performance requirements for the energy storage systems compared to the methods presented earlier. Further, some differences on the operation of PV generators in Northern and Southern European climates have been detected.

  1. Use of fuel cells to meet military requirements for mobile power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrukaitis, E.

    2004-01-01

    'Full text:' The use of fuel cell technology in military applications will depend on safe, high energy density systems being developed. An important part of using this technology is also the development of alternative hydrogen producing fuels with high energy densities and are easy to transport. Fuel cells are now a very large R and D effort for several military applications around the world. The major reason is because of the high power demands needed requires electrical energy sources that far exceed the capabilities of batteries currently being fielded for portable applications. Fuel cells are regarded as highly efficient, tactical energy converters that can be adapted for wide range of power requirements. They are potentially the lowest weight power source when coupled with batteries or capacitors to form hybrid systems. Generally electrical power is needed to support a number of applications from ultra-high power for electrical pulses (radios, sensors) to reliable, conditioned power for command and control systems. In the future, sustained power for electric drive systems, will also be required. Some of the promising applications in the military and the R and D challenges that remain to reach performance and reliability targets suitable for military requirements will be discussed. (author)

  2. Precipitation and total power consumption in the ionosphere: Global MHD simulation results compared with Polar and SNOE observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Palmroth

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available We compare the ionospheric electron precipitation morphology and power from a global MHD simulation (GUMICS-4 with direct measurements of auroral energy flux during a pair of substorms on 28-29 March 1998. The electron precipitation power is computed directly from global images of auroral light observed by the Polar satellite ultraviolet imager (UVI. Independent of the Polar UVI measurements, the electron precipitation energy is determined from SNOE satellite observations on the thermospheric nitric oxide (NO density. We find that the GUMICS-4 simulation reproduces the spatial variation of the global aurora rather reliably in the sense that the onset of the substorm is shown in GUMICS-4 simulation as enhanced precipitation in the right location at the right time. The total integrated precipitation power in the GUMICS-4 simulation is in quantitative agreement with the observations during quiet times, i.e., before the two substorm intensifications. We find that during active times the GUMICS-4 integrated precipitation is a factor of 5 lower than the observations indicate. However, we also find factor of 2-3 differences in the precipitation power among the three different UVI processing methods tested here. The findings of this paper are used to complete an earlier objective, in which the total ionospheric power deposition in the simulation is forecasted from a mathematical expression, which is a function of solar wind density, velocity and magnetic field. We find that during this event, the correlation coefficient between the outcome of the forecasting expression and the simulation results is 0.83. During the event, the simulation result on the total ionospheric power deposition agrees with observations (correlation coefficient 0.8 and the AE index (0.85.

  3. Conditions and requirements for a potential application of solar power satellites /SPS/ for Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westphal, W. (Berlin, Technische Universitaet, Berlin, West Germany); Ruth, J. (ESA, European Space Research and Technology Centre, Noordwijk, Netherlands)

    1980-12-01

    The potential problems of a future introduction of Solar Power Satellites (SPS) as baseload power plants for Western European countries are considered, emphasizing the differences of SPS utilization in Europe compared with that in the USA as a result of geographical, orbital organizational, and industrial conditions. If estimated SPS safety zone areas are required, then the SPS system incorporating the 2.45 GHz microwave power transmission appears crucial for utilization in Western Europe in order to eliminate the large rectenna area requirements of an SPS 5 GW power system. A frequency variation of up to 5 or 10 GHz, and the application of either laser power transmission or solid state devices which could alleviate rectenna siting problems and restrictions on the use of the geosynchronous orbit are discussed.

  4. Evaluation of the energy required for constructing and operating a fusion power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buende, R.

    1982-09-01

    The energy required for constructing and operating a tokamak fusion power plant is appraised with respect to the energy output during the lifetime of the plant. A harvesting factor is deduced as a relevant figure of energetic merit and is used for a comparison between fusion, fission, and coal-fired power plants. Because fusion power plants involve considerable uncertainties the comparison is supplemented by a sensitivity analysis. In comparison with Light Water Reactor plants fusion power plants appear to be rather favourable in this respect. The energy required for providing the fuel is relatively low for fusion plants, thus overcompensating the considerable higher amount of energy necessary for constructing the fusion power plant. (orig.)

  5. Bruce Power's nuclear pressure boundary quality assurance program requirements, implementation and transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krane, J.C.

    2009-01-01

    The development of a full scope nuclear pressure boundary quality assurance program in Canada requires extensive knowledge of the structure and detailed requirements of codes and standards published by the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) and American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). Incorporation into company governance documents and implementation of these requirements while managing the transition to more recent revisions of these codes and standards represents a significant challenge for Bruce Power, Canada's largest independent nuclear operator. This paper explores the key developments and innovative changes that are used to ensure successful regulatory compliance and effective implementation of the Bruce Power Pressure Boundary Quality Assurance Program. Challenges and mitigating strategies to sustain this large compliance based program at Bruce Power's 8 unit nuclear power plant site will also be detailed. (author)

  6. Patient outcomes using Wii-enhanced rehabilitation after total knee replacement - the TKR-POWER study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negus, J J; Cawthorne, D P; Chen, J S; Scholes, C J; Parker, D A; March, L M

    2015-01-01

    Home-based rehabilitation following total knee replacement surgery can be as effective as clinic-based or in-patient rehabilitation. The use of the Nintendo Wii has been postulated as a novel rehabilitation tool that adds an additional focus on balance and proprioception into the recovery protocol. The aim of the proposed clinical trial is to investigate the effectiveness of this novel rehabilitation tool, used at home for three months after total knee replacement surgery and to assess any lasting improvements in functional outcome at one year. This will be a randomised controlled trial of 128 patients undergoing primary total knee replacement. The participants will be recruited preoperatively from three surgeons at a single centre. There will be no change to the usual care provided until 6 weeks after the operation. Then participants will be randomised to either the Wii-Fit group or usual rehabilitative care group. Outcomes will be assessed preoperatively, a 6-week post surgery baseline and then at 18 weeks, 6 months and 1 year. The primary outcome is the change in self-reported WOMAC total score from week 6 to 18 weeks. Secondary outcomes include objective measures of strength, function and satisfaction scores. The results of this clinical trial will be directly relevant for implementation into clinical practice. If beneficial, this affordable technology could be used by many patients to rehabilitate at home. Not only could it optimize the outcomes from their total knee replacement surgery but decrease the need for clinic-based or outpatient therapy for the majority. (ACTRN12611000291987). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Commissioning and Operation. Specific Safety Requirements (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This publication describes the requirements to be met to ensure the safe operation of nuclear power plants. It takes into account developments in areas such as long term operation of nuclear power plants, plant ageing, periodic safety review, probabilistic safety analysis and risk informed decision making processes. In addition, the requirements are governed by, and must apply, the safety objective and safety principles that are established in the IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, Fundamental Safety Principles. A review of Safety Requirements publications was commenced in 2011 following the accident in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. The review revealed no significant areas of weakness and resulted in just a small set of amendments to strengthen the requirements and facilitate their implementation, which are contained in the present publication.

  8. Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Commissioning and Operation. Specific Safety Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This publication describes the requirements to be met to ensure the safe operation of nuclear power plants. It takes into account developments in areas such as long term operation of nuclear power plants, plant ageing, periodic safety review, probabilistic safety analysis and risk informed decision making processes. In addition, the requirements are governed by, and must apply, the safety objective and safety principles that are established in the IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, Fundamental Safety Principles. A review of Safety Requirements publications was commenced in 2011 following the accident in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan. The review revealed no significant areas of weakness and resulted in just a small set of amendments to strengthen the requirements and facilitate their implementation, which are contained in the present publication

  9. Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Engineering Test Facility (ETF) 200 MWe power plant. Design Requirements Document (DRD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigo, H. S.; Bercaw, R. W.; Burkhart, J. A.; Mroz, T. S.; Bents, D. J.; Hatch, A. M.

    1981-01-01

    A description and the design requirements for the 200 MWe (nominal) net output MHD Engineering Test Facility (ETF) Conceptual Design, are presented. Performance requirements for the plant are identified and process conditions are indicated at interface stations between the major systems comprising the plant. Also included are the description, functions, interfaces and requirements for each of these major systems. The lastest information (1980-1981) from the MHD technology program are integrated with elements of a conventional steam electric power generating plant.

  10. A Use Case Methodology to Handle Conflicting Controller Requirements for Future Power Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heussen, Kai; Uslar, Mathias; Tornelli, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a standards based requirements elicitation and analysis strategy tailored for smart grid control structure development. Control structures in electric power systems often span across several systems and stakeholders. Requirements elicitation for such control systems therefore...... requires coordination across many stakeholders and it is challenging to achieve a consistent design. To enable an iterative and distributed development we suggest a conflict management approach as a modular element of the design strategy, focusing on conflict identification and tracing. The idea...

  11. EUR, an European utility requirements documents for future LWR power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berbey, Pierre; Lienard, Michel; Redon, Ramon; Essmann, Juergen; Taylor, David T.

    2004-01-01

    A group of the major European utilities are developing a common requirement document which will be used for the LWR nuclear power plants to be built in Europe from the beginning of the next century. This document provides harmonised policies and technical requirements that will allow the implementation of a design developed in one country into another one. The objectives and contents of the document, the organisation set up for its production and the main requirements are summarised in the paper. (author)

  12. THREE-PHASE ENERGY SUPPLY SYSTEMS SIMULATION FOR THE TOTAL POWER LOSSES COMPONENTS ASSESSMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.V. Tugay

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The goal is to optimize a structure of Matlab-model of the three-phase energy supply system with power active filter. The mathematical model that describes the energy supply system modes of operation which contains additional losses is proposed. Methodology. We have applied concepts of the electrical circuits theory, mathematical modeling elements based on linear algebra and vector calculus, mathematical simulation in Matlab package. Results. We have developed two models of three-phase energy supply system. The first one is based on a vector representation, and the second one on the matrix representation of energy processes. Using these models we have solved the problem of maintaining unchanged the average useful power for 279 cases of energy supply system modes of operation. Originality. We have developed methods of mathematical analysis of a three-phase energy supply systems with polyharmonic voltages and currents in the symmetric and asymmetric modes. Practical value. We have created Matlab-model of a three-phase energy supply system with automated calculation of a correction factor. It allows reducing more than one order the time for energy processes elucidation in multiphase systems.

  13. Calculations of total fusion power and spatial distribution of emissivity for a D-T thermal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batistoni, P.; Pillon, M.

    1987-01-01

    The preliminary project of a diagnostic tool to measure the neutron emissivity profile for NET (Next European Torus) with an array of collimators is presented. With the help of a neutron transport code the maximum possible number of collimators, compatible with the crosstalk noise and the space available in the NET 2.2.B is determined within these constraints. An array of 17 collimators can be used, and some experimental results are simulated using a Monte Carlo code. These results are analyzed and an inversion procedure is used to obtain the emissivity profile and evaluate the total fusion power. The results show that the total fusion power can be measured within 10% for different emission profiles

  14. Analysis of power and frequency control requirements in view of increased decentralized production and market liberalization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roffel, B.; Boer, W.W. de

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a systematic approach of the analysis of the minimum control requirements that are imposed on power producing units in the Netherlands, especially in the case when decentralized production increases. Also some effects of the liberalization on the control behavior are analyzed. First an overview is given of the amount and type of power production in the Netherlands, followed by a review of the control requirements. Next models are described, including a simplified model for the UCTE power system. The model was tested against frequency and power measurements after failure of a 558 MW production unit in the Netherlands. Agreement between measurements and model predictions proved to be good. The model was subsequently used to analyze the primary and secondary control requirements and the impact of an increase in decentralized power production on the fault restoration capabilities of the power system. Since the latter production units are not actively participating in primary and secondary control, fault restoration takes longer and becomes unacceptable when only 35% of the power producing units participate in secondary control. Finally, the model was used to study the impact of deregulation, especially the effect of 'block scheduling', on additional control actions of the secondary control. (Author)

  15. Incidence of Severe Osteonecrosis Requiring Total Joint Arthroplasty in Children and Young Adults Treated for Leukemia or Lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niinimäki, Riitta; Hansen, Lene Mølgaard; Niinimäki, Tuukka

    2013-01-01

    diagnosis codes given before the age of 40 were also retrieved. Results: The estimated cumulative incidence of TJA was 4.5% at 20 years for patients treated for chronic myeloid leukemia, followed by 2.1% for patients treated for acute myeloid leukemia. It was considerably lower in patients with acute...... the age of 10 (HR=24; 95% CI: 3.1-176 and HR=26; 95% CI: 3.6-192 respectively). Conclusion: The incidence of ON requiring TJA was highest among patients with myeloid leukemias and lowest in patients treated for ALL. Allo-SCT and age ≥10 years at diagnosis were the most important risk factors......Purpose: The population-based incidence of severe osteonecrosis (ON) necessitating total joint arthroplasty (TJA) in patients with hematological cancer is unknown. This study assessed the incidence of ON requiring primary TJA in children and young adults treated for leukemia or lymphoma. Methods...

  16. Power Consumption and Calculation Requirement Analysis of AES for WSN IoT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chung-Wen; Hsu, Wen-Ting

    2018-05-23

    Because of the ubiquity of Internet of Things (IoT) devices, the power consumption and security of IoT systems have become very important issues. Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is a block cipher algorithm is commonly used in IoT devices. In this paper, the power consumption and cryptographic calculation requirement for different payload lengths and AES encryption types are analyzed. These types include software-based AES-CB, hardware-based AES-ECB (Electronic Codebook Mode), and hardware-based AES-CCM (Counter with CBC-MAC Mode). The calculation requirement and power consumption for these AES encryption types are measured on the Texas Instruments LAUNCHXL-CC1310 platform. The experimental results show that the hardware-based AES performs better than the software-based AES in terms of power consumption and calculation cycle requirements. In addition, in terms of AES mode selection, the AES-CCM-MIC64 mode may be a better choice if the IoT device is considering security, encryption calculation requirement, and low power consumption at the same time. However, if the IoT device is pursuing lower power and the payload length is generally less than 16 bytes, then AES-ECB could be considered.

  17. Normalized knee-extension strength or leg-press power after fast-track total knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalund, Peter K; Larsen, Kristian; Hansen, Torben Bæk

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: (s): To investigate which of the two muscle-impairment measures for the operated leg, normalized knee extension strength or leg press power, is more closely associated to performance-based and self-reported measures of function shortly following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). DESIGN...... and dynamic leg presses to determine their body-mass normalized knee extension strength and leg press power, respectively. The 10-m fast speed walking and 30-s chair stand tests were used to determine performance-based function, while the Western Ontario McMaster University Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC......) and Oxford Knee scores were used to determine self-reported function. RESULTS: Normalized leg press power was more closely associated to both performance-based (r=.82, P...

  18. [Intra-Articular Application of Tranexamic Acid Significantly Reduces Blood Loss and Transfusion Requirement in Primary Total Knee Arthroplasty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lošťák, J; Gallo, J; Špička, J; Langová, K

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF THE STUDY The aim of this prospective study was to investigate the effect of topical application of tranexamic acid (TXA, Exacyl) on the amount of post-operative blood loss, and blood transfusion requirement in patients undergoing primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Attention was paid to early complications potentially associated with TXA administration, such as haematoma, wound exudate, or knee swelling. In addition, the economic benefit of TXA treatment was also taken into account. MATERIAL AND METHODS The study included 238 patients (85 men and 153 women) who underwent primary total knee arthroplasty (TKA) at our department between January 2013 and November 2015. A group of 119 patients (41 men and 78 women) received intraarticular TXA injections according to the treatment protocol (TXA group). A control group matched in basic characteristics to the TXA group also consisted of 119 patients. The average age in the TXA group was 69.8 years, and the most frequent indication for TKA surgery was primary knee osteoarthritis (81.5%). In each patient, post-operative volume of blood lost from drains and total blood loss including hidden blood loss were recorded, as well as post-operative haemoglobin and haematocrit levels. On discharge of each patient from hospital, the size and site of a haematoma; wound exudate, if present after post-operative day 4; joint swelling; range of motion and early revision surgery, if performed, were evaluated. Requirements of analgesic drugs after surgery were also recorded. RESULTS In the TXA group, blood losses from drains were significantly lower than in the control group (456.7 ± 270.8 vs 640.5 ±448.2; p = 0.004). The median value for blood losses from drains was lower by 22% and the average value for total blood loss, including hidden losses, was also lower than in the control group (762.4 ± 345.2 ml vs 995.5 ± 457.3 ml). The difference in the total amount of blood loss between the two groups was significant (p = 0

  19. Analysis of Valve Requirements for High-Efficiency Digital Displacement Fluid Power Motors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rømer, Daniel; Johansen, Per; Pedersen, Henrik C.

    2013-01-01

    Digital displacement fluid power motors have been shown to enable high-efficiency operation in a wide operation range, including the part load range where conventional fluid power motors suffers from poor efficiencies. The use of these digital displacement motors set new requirements for the valve...... transition time and flow-pressure coefficient are normalized, leading to a presentation of the general efficiency map of the digital displacement motor. Finally the performance of existing commercial valves with respect to digital motors is commented....

  20. EPPRD: An Efficient Privacy-Preserving Power Requirement and Distribution Aggregation Scheme for a Smart Grid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Jing

    2017-08-07

    A Smart Grid (SG) facilitates bidirectional demand-response communication between individual users and power providers with high computation and communication performance but also brings about the risk of leaking users' private information. Therefore, improving the individual power requirement and distribution efficiency to ensure communication reliability while preserving user privacy is a new challenge for SG. Based on this issue, we propose an efficient and privacy-preserving power requirement and distribution aggregation scheme (EPPRD) based on a hierarchical communication architecture. In the proposed scheme, an efficient encryption and authentication mechanism is proposed for better fit to each individual demand-response situation. Through extensive analysis and experiment, we demonstrate how the EPPRD resists various security threats and preserves user privacy while satisfying the individual requirement in a semi-honest model; it involves less communication overhead and computation time than the existing competing schemes.

  1. Total-Factor Energy Efficiency (TFEE Evaluation on Thermal Power Industry with DEA, Malmquist and Multiple Regression Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Peng Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Under the background of a new round of power market reform, realizing the goals of energy saving and emission reduction, reducing the coal consumption and ensuring the sustainable development are the key issues for thermal power industry. With the biggest economy and energy consumption scales in the world, China should promote the energy efficiency of thermal power industry to solve these problems. Therefore, from multiple perspectives, the factors influential to the energy efficiency of thermal power industry were identified. Based on the economic, social and environmental factors, a combination model with Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA and Malmquist index was constructed to evaluate the total-factor energy efficiency (TFEE in thermal power industry. With the empirical studies from national and provincial levels, the TFEE index can be factorized into the technical efficiency index (TECH, the technical progress index (TPCH, the pure efficiency index (PECH and the scale efficiency index (SECH. The analysis showed that the TFEE was mainly determined by TECH and PECH. Meanwhile, by panel data regression model, unit coal consumption, talents and government supervision were selected as important indexes to have positive effects on TFEE in thermal power industry. In addition, the negative indexes, such as energy price and installed capacity, were also analyzed to control their undesired effects. Finally, considering the analysis results, measures for improving energy efficiency of thermal power industry were discussed widely, such as strengthening technology research and design (R&D, enforcing pollutant and emission reduction, distributing capital and labor rationally and improving the government supervision. Relative study results and suggestions can provide references for Chinese government and enterprises to enhance the energy efficiency level.

  2. Prediction of requirements on labor force in the fuel and power generation sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaveckova, R.

    1990-01-01

    One of the aspects of socio-economic assessment of development is quantification of the expected requirements on the number of personnel. Predictions are discussed for the period before the year 2005 for solid fuel mining and treatment, gas production and bitumen mining, power and heat generation and also for the production of electricity and heat by nuclear power plants. They are based on an analysis of past development and the present state, on presumed implementation of various concept variants, on the type structure of nuclear power plants, on the rules of the electric power supply system, and also on foreign materials. It is expected that in 2005, nuclear power will employ 15,654 personnel. (M.D.). 4 tabs., 16 refs

  3. Accelerating an Ordered-Subset Low-Dose X-Ray Cone Beam Computed Tomography Image Reconstruction with a Power Factor and Total Variation Minimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsuan-Ming; Hsiao, Ing-Tsung

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increased interest in low-dose X-ray cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in many fields, including dentistry, guided radiotherapy and small animal imaging. Despite reducing the radiation dose, low-dose CBCT has not gained widespread acceptance in routine clinical practice. In addition to performing more evaluation studies, developing a fast and high-quality reconstruction algorithm is required. In this work, we propose an iterative reconstruction method that accelerates ordered-subsets (OS) reconstruction using a power factor. Furthermore, we combine it with the total-variation (TV) minimization method. Both simulation and phantom studies were conducted to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. Results show that the proposed method can accelerate conventional OS methods, greatly increase the convergence speed in early iterations. Moreover, applying the TV minimization to the power acceleration scheme can further improve the image quality while preserving the fast convergence rate.

  4. Flood control design requirements and flood evaluation methods of inland nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ailing; Wang Ping; Zhu Jingxing

    2011-01-01

    Effect of flooding is one of the key safety factors and environmental factors in inland nuclear power plant sitting. Up to now, the rule of law and standard systems are established for the selection of nuclear power plant location and flood control requirements in China. In this paper flood control standards of China and other countries are introduced. Several inland nuclear power plants are taken as examples to thoroughly discuss the related flood evaluation methods. The suggestions are also put forward in the paper. (authors)

  5. Statement on safety requirements concerning the long-term operation of the Muehleberg nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-12-01

    This report published by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate ENSI investigates the safety requirements with respect to the long-term operation of the Muehleberg nuclear power station in Switzerland. Relevant international requirements and Swiss legal stipulations concerning the long-term operation of the power station are stated. The management of aging processes is looked at. The regular verification of the integrity of various plant components such as containments, piping, steam generation system, etc. is looked at in detail. The state-of-the-art concerning deterministic accident analyses and refitting technology are discussed, as are automated safety systems. The applicable laws, decrees and guidelines are listed in appendices

  6. Total Sulfur Amino Acid Requirements Are Not Altered in Children with Chronic Renal Insufficiency, but Minimum Methionine Needs Are Increased.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elango, Rajavel; Humayun, Mohammad A; Turner, Justine M; Rafii, Mahroukh; Langos, Veronika; Ball, Ronald O; Pencharz, Paul B

    2017-10-01

    Background: The total sulfur amino acid (TSAA) and minimum Met requirements have been previously determined in healthy children. TSAA metabolism is altered in kidney disease. Whether TSAA requirements are altered in children with chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) is unknown. Objective: We sought to determine the TSAA (Met in the absence of Cys) requirements and minimum Met (in the presence of excess Cys) requirements in children with CRI. Methods: Five children (4 boys, 1 girl) aged 10 ± 2.6 y with CRI were randomly assigned to receive graded intakes of Met (0, 5, 10, 15, 25, and 35 mg · kg -1 · d -1 ) with no Cys in the diet. Four of the children (3 boys, 1 girl) were then randomly assigned to receive graded dietary intakes of Met (0, 2.5, 5, 7.5, 10, and 15 mg · kg -1 · d -1 ) with 21 mg · kg -1 · d -1 Cys. The mean TSAA and minimum Met requirements were determined by measuring the oxidation of l-[1- 13 C]Phe to 13 CO 2 (F 13 CO 2 ). A 2-phase linear-regression crossover analysis of the F 13 CO 2 data identified a breakpoint at minimal F 13 CO 2 Urine samples collected from all study days and from previous studies of healthy children were measured for sulfur metabolites. Results: The mean and population-safe (upper 95% CI) intakes of TSAA and minimum Met in children with CRI were determined to be 12.6 and 15.9 mg · kg -1 · d -1 and 7.3 and 10.9 mg · kg -1 · d -1 , respectively. In healthy school-aged children the mean and upper 95% CI intakes of TSAA and minimum Met were determined to be 12.9 and 17.2 mg · kg -1 · d -1 and 5.8 and 7.3 mg · kg -1 · d -1 , respectively. A comparison of the minimum Met requirements between healthy children and children with CRI indicated significant ( P < 0.05) differences. Conclusion: These results suggest that children with CRI have a similar mean and population-safe TSAA to that of healthy children, suggesting adequate Cys synthesis via transsulfuration, but higher minimum Met requirement, suggesting reduced

  7. Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Commissioning and Operation. Specific Safety Requirements (Arabic Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    This publication is a revision of IAEA Safety Standards Series No. NS-R-2, Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation, and has been extended to cover the commissioning stage. It describes the requirements to be met to ensure the safe commissioning, operation, and transition from operation to decommissioning of nuclear power plants. Over recent years there have been developments in areas such as long term operation of nuclear power plants, plant ageing, periodic safety review, probabilistic safety analysis review and risk informed decision making processes. It became necessary to revise the IAEA’s Safety Requirements in these areas and to correct and/or improve the publication on the basis of feedback from its application by both the IAEA and its Member States. In addition, the requirements are governed by, and must apply, the safety objective and safety principles that are established in the IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, Fundamental Safety Principles. A review of Safety Requirements publications, initiated in 2011 following the accident in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan, revealed no significant areas of weakness but resulted in a small set of amendments to strengthen the requirements and facilitate their implementation. These are contained in the present publication.

  8. Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Commissioning and Operation. Specific Safety Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    This publication is a revision of IAEA Safety Standards Series No. NS-R-2, Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Operation, and has been extended to cover the commissioning stage. It describes the requirements to be met to ensure the safe commissioning, operation, and transition from operation to decommissioning of nuclear power plants. Over recent years there have been developments in areas such as long term operation of nuclear power plants, plant ageing, periodic safety review, probabilistic safety analysis review and risk informed decision making processes. It became necessary to revise the IAEA’s Safety Requirements in these areas and to correct and/or improve the publication on the basis of feedback from its application by both the IAEA and its Member States. In addition, the requirements are governed by, and must apply, the safety objective and safety principles that are established in the IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SF-1, Fundamental Safety Principles. A review of Safety Requirements publications, initiated in 2011 following the accident in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan, revealed no significant areas of weakness but resulted in a small set of amendments to strengthen the requirements and facilitate their implementation. These are contained in the present publication.

  9. How wing kinematics affect power requirements and aerodynamic force production in a robotic bat wing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahlman, Joseph W; Swartz, Sharon M; Breuer, Kenneth S

    2014-01-01

    Bats display a wide variety of behaviors that require different amounts of aerodynamic force. To control and modulate aerodynamic force, bats change wing kinematics, which, in turn, may change the power required for wing motion. There are many kinematic mechanisms that bats, and other flapping animals, can use to increase aerodynamic force, e.g. increasing wingbeat frequency or amplitude. However, we do not know if there is a difference in energetic cost between these different kinematic mechanisms. To assess the relationship between mechanical power input and aerodynamic force output across different isolated kinematic parameters, we programmed a robotic bat wing to flap over a range of kinematic parameters and measured aerodynamic force and mechanical power. We systematically varied five kinematic parameters: wingbeat frequency, wingbeat amplitude, stroke plane angle, downstroke ratio, and wing folding. Kinematic values were based on observed values from free flying Cynopterus brachyotis, the species on which the robot was based. We describe how lift, thrust, and power change with increases in each kinematic variable. We compare the power costs associated with generating additional force through the four kinematic mechanisms controlled at the shoulder, and show that all four mechanisms require approximately the same power to generate a given force. This result suggests that no single parameter offers an energetic advantage over the others. Finally, we show that retracting the wing during upstroke reduces power requirements for flapping and increases net lift production, but decreases net thrust production. These results compare well with studies performed on C. brachyotis, offering insight into natural flight kinematics. (paper)

  10. New requirements on safety of nuclear power plants according to the IAEA safety standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misak, J.

    2005-01-01

    In this presentation author presents new requirements on safety of nuclear power plants according to the IAEA safety standards. It is concluded that: - New set of IAEA Safety Standards is close to completion: around 40 standards for NPPs; - Different interpretation of IAEA Safety Standards at present: best world practices instead of previous 'minimum common denominator'; - A number of safety improvements required for NPPs; - Requirements related to BDBAs and severe accidents are the most demanding due to degradation of barriers: hardware modifications and accident management; - Large variety between countries in implementation of accident management programmes: from minimum to major hardware modifications; -Distinction between existing and new NPPs is essential from the point of view of the requirements; WWER 440 reactors have potential to reflect IAEA Safety Standards for existing NPPs; relatively low reactor power offers broader possibilities

  11. Day-ahead optimal dispatch for wind integrated power system considering zonal reserve requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Fan; Bie, Zhaohong; Liu, Shiyu; Ding, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Analyzing zonal reserve requirements for wind integrated power system. • Modeling day-ahead optimal dispatch solved by chance constrained programming theory. • Determining optimal zonal reserve demand with minimum confidence interval. • Analyzing numerical results on test and large-scale real-life power systems. - Abstract: Large-scale integration of renewable power presents a great challenge for day-ahead dispatch to manage renewable resources while provide available reserve for system security. Considering zonal reserve is an effective way to ensure reserve deliverability when network congested, a random day-ahead dispatch optimization of wind integrated power system for a least operational cost is modeled including zonal reserve requirements and N − 1 security constraints. The random model is transformed into a deterministic one based on the theory of chance constrained programming and a determination method of optimal zonal reserve demand is proposed using the minimum confidence interval. After solving the deterministic model, the stochastic simulation is conducted to verify the validity of solution. Numerical tests and results on the IEEE 39 bus system and a large-scale real-life power system demonstrate the optimal day-ahead dispatch scheme is available and the proposed method is effective for improving reserve deliverability and reducing load shedding after large-capacity power outage.

  12. Integrated approach for power quality requirements at the point of connection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cobben, J.F.G.; Bhattacharyya, S.; Myrzik, J.M.A.; Kling, W.L.

    2007-01-01

    Given the nature of electricity, every party connected to the power system influences voltage quality, which means that every party also should meet requirements. In this field, a sound coordination among technical standards (system-related, installation-related and product-related) is of paramount

  13. Manpower and training requirements for operation and maintenance of Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, J.C.

    1975-01-01

    The experience in India with regard to the staffing of nuclear power station operations and maintenance is encouraging in the sense that given the effort and time, developing countries should not find it unduly difficult to meet their requirements. (orig.) [de

  14. General requirements for concrete containment structures for CANDU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    This standard provides the general requirements used in the design, construction, testing, and commissioning of concrete containment structures for CANDU nuclear power plants designated as class containment and is directed to the owners, designers, manufacturers, fabricators, and constructors of the concrete components and parts

  15. Quality assurance requirements for the operation of Swedish nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    An adaption of NRC's 10 CFR 50, Appendis B (Quality Assurance Criteria for Nuclear Power and Fuel Reprocessing Plants) to Swedish conditions is presented. No references are given to regulations standards etc that influence the requirements and their adaption to local conditions. (Aa)

  16. Requirements for auditing of quality assurance programs for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Requirements and guidance are provided for establishing and implementing a system of internal and external audits of quality assurance programs for nuclear power plants, including the preparation, performance, reporting and follow-up of audits by both the auditing and the audited organizations. This standard is to be used in conjunction with ANSI N45.2

  17. 78 FR 69543 - Record Requirements in the Mechanical Power Presses Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-20

    ... program). In such cases, OSHA would treat the weekly inspection as part of the periodic inspection.... OSHA-2013-0010] RIN 1218-AC80 Record Requirements in the Mechanical Power Presses Standard AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Direct final rule; request for comments...

  18. 78 FR 69606 - Record Requirements in the Mechanical Power Presses Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-20

    ... the inspection program). In such cases, OSHA would treat the weekly inspection as part of the periodic.... OSHA-2013-0010] RIN 1218-AC80 Record Requirements in the Mechanical Power Presses Standard AGENCY: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), Labor. ACTION: Proposed rule; request for comments...

  19. Requirement analysis for autonomous systems and intelligent agents in future Danish electric power systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saleem, Arshad; Lind, Morten

    2010-01-01

    we review innovative control architectures in electric power systems such as Microgrids, Virtual power plants and Cell based systems. We evaluate application of autonomous systems and intelligent agents in each of these control architectures particularly in the context of Denmark's strategic energy...... plans. The second part formulates a flexible control architecture for electric power systems with very high penetration of distributed generation. This control architecture is based upon the requirements identified in the first part. We also present development of a software framework to test......Denmark has already achieved a record of 20% penetration of wind power and now moving towards even higher targets with an increasing part of the electricity produced by distributed generators (DGs). In this paper we report work from a sub activity "subgrid design" of the EcoGrid.dk project. First...

  20. A framework for regulatory requirements and industry standards for new nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, Felicia A.; Camp, Allen L.; Apostolakis, George E.; Golay, Michael W.

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes the development of a framework for risk-based regulation and design for new nuclear power plants. Probabilistic risk assessment methods and a rationalist approach to defense in depth are used to develop a framework that can be applied to identify systematically the regulations and standards required to maintain the desired level of safety and reliability. By implementing such a framework, it is expected that the resulting body of requirements will provide a regulatory environment that will ensure protection of the public, will eliminate the burden of requirements that do not contribute significantly to safety, and thereby will improve the market competitiveness of new plants. (author)

  1. Power Control and Monitoring Requirements for Thermal Vacuum/Thermal Balance Testing of the MAP Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Chris; Hinkle, R. Kenneth (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The specific heater control requirements for the thermal vacuum and thermal balance testing of the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Observatory at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland are described. The testing was conducted in the 10m wide x 18.3m high Space Environment Simulator (SES) Thermal Vacuum Facility. The MAP thermal testing required accurate quantification of spacecraft and fixture power levels while minimizing heater electrical emissions. The special requirements of the MAP test necessitated construction of five (5) new heater racks.

  2. 18 CFR 292.209 - Exceptions from requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. 292.209... Exceptions from requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or... the Federal Power Act, at which non-Federal hydroelectric development is permissible; or (2) An...

  3. Report of the Committee to review safeguards requirements at power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-05-01

    In October 1982, NRC's Executive Director for Operations appointed a five-member Committee to review NRC security requirements at nuclear power plants with a view toward evaluating the impact of these requirements on operational safety. During visits to five power reactor sites and more than a dozen days of meetings over a period of four months, the Committee observed plant operating conditions and obtained views from abut 100 persons representing 16 nuclear utilities and industry organizations. They also interviewed about 40 NRC employees, including Resident Inspectors, and members of the Regional and Headquarters staffs. Overall, the Committee did not identify any clear operational safety problems associated with implementation of the NRC's security requirements. However, they did find that the potential existed, to varying degrees, at licensed facilities. The Committee's report, dated February 28, 1983, contains five basic findings and a number of associated recommendations intended to minimize the potential impact of security on safety

  4. Environmental radiation monitoring during visits of nuclear powered warships to Australian ports: requirements, arrangements and procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    The Commonwealth Government has determined conditions to be met when nuclear powered warships visit Australian ports. These conditions include a requirement that appropriate State/Territory and Commonwealth authorities provide a radiation monitoring program to determine whether any radioactivity has been discharged or accidently released from a nuclear powered warship in port; to determine actual or potential levels of any consequent exposure to radiation of members of the public; and to provide this information within a timescale that allows remedial action to be taken. Part 1 of this document sets out the requirements of a radiation monitoring program capable of meeting these objectives. The fundamental arrangements and procedures for implementing the requirements are presented at Part 2 and provide a basis for the development of fully detailed, port specific, radiation monitoring programs

  5. Power requirements for superior H-mode confinement on Alcator C-Mod: experiments in support of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, J.W.; Reinke, M.L.; Terry, J.L.; Brunner, D.; Greenwald, M.; Hubbard, A.E.; LaBombard, B.; Lipschultz, B.; Ma, Y.; Wolfe, S.; Wukitch, S.J.; Loarte, A.

    2011-01-01

    Power requirements for maintaining sufficiently high confinement (i.e. normalized energy confinement time H 98 ≥ 1) in H-mode and its relation to H-mode threshold power scaling, P th , are of critical importance to ITER. In order to better characterize these power requirements, recent experiments on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak have investigated H-mode properties, including the edge pedestal and global confinement, over a range of input powers near and above P th . In addition, we have examined the compatibility of impurity seeding with high performance operation, and the influence of plasma radiation and its spatial distribution on performance. Experiments were performed at 5.4 T at ITER relevant densities, utilizing bulk metal plasma facing surfaces and an ion cyclotron range of frequency waves for auxiliary heating. Input power was scanned both in stationary enhanced D α (EDA) H-modes with no large edge localized modes (ELMs) and in ELMy H-modes in order to relate the resulting pedestal and confinement to the amount of power flowing into the scrape-off layer, P net , and also to the divertor targets. In both EDA and ELMy H-mode, energy confinement is generally good, with H 98 near unity. As P net is reduced to levels approaching that in L-mode, pedestal temperature diminishes significantly and normalized confinement time drops. By seeding with low-Z impurities, such as Ne and N 2 , high total radiated power fractions are possible, along with substantial reductions in divertor heat flux (>4x), all while maintaining H 98 ∼ 1. When the power radiated from the confined versus unconfined plasma is examined, pedestal and confinement properties are clearly seen to be an increasing function of P net , helping to unify the results with those from unseeded H-modes. This provides increased confidence that the power flow across the separatrix is the correct physics basis for ITER extrapolation. The experiments show that P net /P th of one or greater is likely to lead to H

  6. Structural materials requirements for in-vessel components of fusion power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaaf, B. van der

    2000-01-01

    The economic production of fusion energy is determined by principal choices such as using magnetic plasma confinement or generating inertial fusion energy. The first generation power plants will use deuterium and tritium mixtures as fuel, producing large amounts of highly energetic neutrons resulting in radiation damage in materials. In the far future the advanced fuels, 3 He or 11 B, determine power plant designs with less radiation damage than in the first generation. The first generation power plants design must anticipate radiation damage. Solid sacrificing armour or liquid layers could limit component replacements costs to economic levels. There is more than radiation damage resistance to determine the successful application of structural materials. High endurance against cyclic loading is a prominent requirement, both for magnetic and inertial fusion energy power plants. For high efficiency and compactness of the plant, elevated temperature behaviour should be attractive. Safety and environmental requirements demand that materials have low activation potential and little toxic effects under both normal and accident conditions. The long-term contenders for fusion power plant components near the plasma are materials in the range from innovative steels, such as reduced activation ferritic martensitic steels, to highly advanced ceramic composites based on silicon carbide, and chromium alloys. The steels follow an evolutionary path to basic plant efficiencies. The competition on the energy market in the middle of the next century might necessitate the riskier but more rewarding development of SiCSiC composites or chromium alloys

  7. Calculus of the Power Spectral Density of Ultra Wide Band Pulse Position Modulation Signals Coded with Totally Flipped Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DURNEA, T. N.

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available UWB-PPM systems were noted to have a power spectral density (p.s.d. consisting of a continuous portion and a line spectrum, which is composed of energy components placed at discrete frequencies. These components are the major source of interference to narrowband systems operating in the same frequency interval and deny harmless coexistence of UWB-PPM and narrowband systems. A new code denoted as Totally Flipped Code (TFC is applied to them in order to eliminate these discrete spectral components. The coded signal transports the information inside pulse position and will have the amplitude coded to generate a continuous p.s.d. We have designed the code and calculated the power spectral density of the coded signals. The power spectrum has no discrete components and its envelope is largely flat inside the bandwidth with a maximum at its center and a null at D.C. These characteristics make this code suited for implementation in the UWB systems based on PPM-type modulation as it assures a continuous spectrum and keeps PPM modulation performances.

  8. Outlook for the power requirements by the northeast U.S. power pool: Who will serve this market?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, E.P.

    1993-01-01

    The size of the potential natural gas market in the northeast U.S. and how it will be served are discussed. One of the most promising markets for natural gas in this area is for power generation, using combined-cycle generating units that are efficient and have low environmental impact. It is estimated that by 2002 natural gas requirements for electrical power generation in the northeast could reach 750 billion cubic feet per year. This market will be served through several new gas pipelines and through expansion of the existing pipeline capacity. Projections for electricity production for the northeast, including the New York Power pool, show an increase from 236,423 GWh in 1992 to 275,558 GWh in 2002, an increase of ca 17%. Non-utility generation will increase its share from 14% in 1992 to 26% in 2002. Utility switching to natural gas during summer months to control nitrogen oxide emissions will give natural gas more flexibility to compete with other options to reduce air pollution. Pipeline capacity additions planned for the northeast are reviewed, including the Liberty pipeline, Empire State pipeline, Portland gas transmission system, Minuteman delivery system and Mayflower gas transmission system. There will be more than adequate reliable and flexible pipeline capacity created to meet the future demand for natural gas in this region. 14 figs

  9. Technical evaluation of RETS-required reports for Kewaunee Nuclear Power Plant for 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magleby, E.H.; Young, T.E.

    1985-01-01

    A review of the reports required by Federal regulations and the plant-specific Radiological Effluent Technical Specifications (RETS) for operations conducted at the Kewaunee Nuclear Power Plant during 1983 was performed. The periodic reports reviewed were the two Semiannual Effluent Release Reports for 1983 and the annual Kewaunee Environmental Radioactivity Survey. The principal review guidelines were the plant's specific RETS and NRC guidance given in NUREG-0133, ''Preparation of Radiological Effluent Technical Specifications for Nuclear Power Plants.'' The Licensee's submitted reports were found to be reasonably complete and consistent with the review guidelines

  10. Nutrient Intake and Contribution of Home Enteral Nutrition to Meeting Nutritional Requirements after Oesophagectomy and Total Gastrectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Melanie L; Halliday, Vanessa; Robinson, Pauline; Smith, Karen; Bowrey, David J

    2017-01-01

    Background/Objectives This study evaluated nutrition after oesophago-gastric resection and the influence of home jejunostomy feeding in the six months after surgery. Subjects/Methods Data on nutritional intake and physiologic measures were collected as part of a randomised trial with measurements taken before and up to six months after surgery. Results 41 participants (32 oesophagectomy, 9 total gastrectomy) received home jejunostomy feeding (n=18) or usual care without feeding (n=23). At hospital discharge, oral intakes were adequate for energy and protein in 9% and 6% respectively. By three and six months, these values had increased to 61% & 55%, 94% & 77% respectively. Six participants (26%) who received usual care required rescue feeding. Six weeks after hospital discharge, energy intakes were met in those who received jejunal feeding due to the contribution of enteral nutrition. Jejunal feeding did not affect oral intake, being similar in both groups (fed: 77% estimated need, usual care: 79%). At three months, inadequate micronutrient intakes were seen in over one third. Compared to baseline values, six weeks after surgery, weight loss exceeding 5% was seen in 5/18 (28%) who received feeding, 14/17 (82%) who received usual care and 5/6 (83%) of those who required rescue feeding, p=0.002. Weight loss averaged 4.1% (fed), 10.4% (usual care) and 9.2% (rescue fed), p=0.004. These trends persisted out to six months. Conclusions Supplementary jejunostomy feeding made an important contribution to meeting nutrition after oesophago-gastric resection. Importantly, oral nutritional intake was not compromised dispelling the assertion that jejunal feeding deincentivises patients from eating. PMID:28656968

  11. Manpower requirements for nuclear power programmes in nations of intermediate capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantarell, I.; Cerrolaza, J.A.; Llado, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    A study is made of the manpower required for initiating and carrying out a nuclear power programme in countries which have not developed their own nuclear technology but where the technical and economic level is such to permit a substantial input from local industry. The discussion is based on Spanish experience. The three basic elements in a nuclear programme are taken to be the operating company, the regulating authority and the engineering firm involved. The role of each of these is briefly considered and the manpower requirements during the design, construction and operational phases of a power station are evaluated. A short account is also given of the manpower requirements of other enterprises such as those involved in the civil engineering, the assembly and construction control. The variations in the labour force are described with the aim of deriving estimates of the number of people involved in the development of a nuclear power programme as a function of time: actual numbers are given for the case of the Spanish national energy plan. A brief description is given of the various courses on nuclear science and engineering provided in Spain and the requirements laid down by the regulations. A short account is given of Spanish nuclear development, with emphasis on the work carried out by the Nuclear Energy Board, not only as a research organization but also in its promotional and training capacities and as a source of personnel for industry. Finally, some comments are made on the possibilities opened up by international co-operation. (author)

  12. Design requirements document for the phase 1 privatization electrical power system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, G.

    1997-10-31

    The electrical system for the Phase 1 privatization facilities will support the TWRS mission by providing the electrical power to the Phase 1 privatized facilities. This system will receive power from the Department of Energy-Richland Operations (RL) A4-8 230 kV transmission system powered from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Ashe and Midway 230 kV Substations. The existing RL 230 kV transmission line will be modified and looped 1021 into the new 230 kV substation bus. The new substation will be located in the vicinity of the privatized facilities, approximately 3.2 km (2 mi) south of the existing RL A4-8 230 kV transmission line. The substation will be capable of providing up to 40 MW of electrical power to support the Phase 1 privatization facilities and has space for accommodating future expansions. The substation will require at least two 230-13.8 kV transformers, 13.8 kV split bus switchgear, switchgear building, grounding transformers, instrument transformers, control and monitoring equipment, associated protection and isolation devices, lightning protection, yard lighting, cable and raceways, and infrastructure needed to provide desired availability and reliability. The power from the 13.8 kV switchgear located in the switchgear building will be delivered at the privatization facilities site boundaries. The 13.8 kV distribution system inside the privatization facilities site boundaries is the responsibility of the privatization contract.

  13. Design requirements document for the phase 1 privatization electrical power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, G.

    1997-01-01

    The electrical system for the Phase 1 privatization facilities will support the TWRS mission by providing the electrical power to the Phase 1 privatized facilities. This system will receive power from the Department of Energy-Richland Operations (RL) A4-8 230 kV transmission system powered from Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Ashe and Midway 230 kV Substations. The existing RL 230 kV transmission line will be modified and looped 1021 into the new 230 kV substation bus. The new substation will be located in the vicinity of the privatized facilities, approximately 3.2 km (2 mi) south of the existing RL A4-8 230 kV transmission line. The substation will be capable of providing up to 40 MW of electrical power to support the Phase 1 privatization facilities and has space for accommodating future expansions. The substation will require at least two 230-13.8 kV transformers, 13.8 kV split bus switchgear, switchgear building, grounding transformers, instrument transformers, control and monitoring equipment, associated protection and isolation devices, lightning protection, yard lighting, cable and raceways, and infrastructure needed to provide desired availability and reliability. The power from the 13.8 kV switchgear located in the switchgear building will be delivered at the privatization facilities site boundaries. The 13.8 kV distribution system inside the privatization facilities site boundaries is the responsibility of the privatization contract

  14. Analysis of the Possibility of Required Resources Estimation for Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning Applying BIM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Insu [Korea Institute of construction Technology, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woojung [KHNP-Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Estimation of decommissioning cost, decommissioning strategy, and decommissioning quantity at the time when entering into any decommissioning plans are some elements whose inputs are mandatory for nuclear power plant decommissioning. Ways to estimate decommissioning of required resources in the past have imposed great uncertainty since they analyze required resources at the construction stage, analyzing and consulting decommissioning required resources of overseas nuclear power plants. This study aims at analyzing whether required resources for decommissioning nuclear power plants can be estimated, applying BIM. To achieve this goal, this study analyzed the status quo of BIM such as definition, characteristics, and areas applied, and made use of them when drawing out study results by examining types and features of the tools realizing BIM. In order to review how BIM could be used for decommissioning nuclear power plants, the definition, characteristics and applied areas of BIM were discussed. BIM designs objects of the structures (walls, slabs, pillars, stairs, windows and doors, etc.) by 3D technology and endows attribute (function, structure and usage) information for each object, thereby providing visualized information of structures for participants in construction projects. Major characteristics of BIM attribute information are as follows: - Geometry: The information of objects is represented by measurable geometric information - Extensible object attributes: Objects include pre-defined attributes, and allow extension of other attributes. Any model that includes these attributes forms relationships with other various attributes in order to perform analysis and simulation. - All information including the attributes are integrated to ensure continuity, accuracy and accessibility, and all information used during the life cycle of structures are supported. This means that when information of required resources is added as another attributes other than geometric

  15. Water requirement and total body water estimation as affected by species, pregnancy and lactation using tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamal, T.H.; El Banna, I.M.; Ayad, M.A.; Kotby, E.A.

    1978-01-01

    Radiotracer dilution technique was used to determine total body water (TBW) and the water turnover rate (WTR) estimate of water requirements in water buffaloe, Red Dannish cattle, fat tailed Osemi sheep and Camellus Dromedarius. Water buffaloes were found to have highest TBW, followed by camels, sheep and cattle in a descending order. The WTR ranking was highest for sheep followed by water buffaloe endurance to heat was found inseperable to high water usage, while in camels, an intericate water retention mechanism help animals to thrive in deserts. Fat tailled Osemi sheep and cattle failed to cope with high environmental temperature resulting in temporary dehydration. TBW was 17% and 6% higher in pregnant cattle and sheep than non-pregnant animals respectively, while there was no observed change in pregnant buffaloes. Water retention of pregnant cattle was associated with an appriciable increase in WTR, which was not noticable in buffaloe or sheep. Lactating buffaloe have had a higher TBW and WTR than lactating cattle. Milk yield per day during the period of measurement was higher in buffalo than cattle. Wallowing of buffalo in water pools during grazing, represents a behavioural adaptation for life in hot regions, aside of tendency for higher WTR with concomitant water retention

  16. Donor hematopoiesis in mice following total lymphoid irradiation requires host T-regulatory cells for durable engraftment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Antonia M. S.; Poyser, Jessica; Küpper, Natascha J.; Burnett, Cassandra; Ko, Rose M.; Kohrt, Holbrook E.K.; Florek, Mareike; Zhang, Pei; Negrin, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) with antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is a unique regimen that prepares recipients for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation by targeting lymph nodes, while sparing large areas of the bone marrow. TLI is reported to increase the frequency of CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ T-regulatory cells (Treg) relative to conventional T cells. In this study, barriers to hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) engraftment following this nonmyeloablative conditioning were evaluated. TLI/ATG resulted in profound lymphoablation but endogenous host HSC remained. Initial donor HSC engraftment occurred only in radiation exposed marrow sites, but gradually distributed to bone marrow outside the radiation field. Sustained donor engraftment required host lymphoid cells insofar as lymphocyte deficient Rag2γc−/− recipients had unstable engraftment compared with wild-type. TLI/ATG treated wild-type recipients had increased proportions of Treg that were associated with increased HSC frequency and proliferation. In contrast, Rag2γc−/− recipients who lacked Treg did not. Adoptive transfer of Treg into Rag2γc−/− recipients resulted in increased cell cycling of endogenous HSC. Thus, we hypothesize that Treg influence donor engraftment post-TLI/ATG by increasing HSC cell cycling, thereby promoting the exit of host HSC from the marrow niche. Our study highlights the unique dynamics of donor hematopoiesis following TLI/ATG, and the effect of Treg on HSC activity. PMID:24591203

  17. Considerations on the need for electricity storage requirements: Power versus energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belderbos, Andreas; Virag, Ana; D’haeseleer, William; Delarue, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • General storage principles are analyzed. • Storage units have different limitations (power versus energy). • Storage power and energy are required, dependent on residual profile. • Relationship between residual profile and optimal storage portfolio is derived. • Broadly applicable rules regarding optimal storage investments are presented. - Abstract: Different storage technologies enable an increasing share of variable renewable generation in the electricity system by reducing the temporal mismatch between generation and demand. Two storage ratings are essential to time-shift delivery of electricity to loads: electric power, or instantaneous electricity flow [W], and electric energy, or power integrated over time [Wh]. An optimal storage portfolio is likely composed of multiple technologies, each having specific power and energy ratings. This paper derives and explains the link between the shape of the time-varying demand and generation profiles and the amount of desirably installed storage capacity, both energy and power. An analysis is performed for individual storage technologies first, showing a link between the necessary power and energy capacity and the demand and generation profile. Then combinations of storage technologies are analyzed to reveal their mutual interaction in a storage portfolio. Results show an increase in desirability for storage technologies with low cost power ratings when the mismatch between generation and demand occurs in daily to weekly cycles. Storage technologies with low cost energy ratings are preferred when this mismatch occurs in monthly to seasonal cycles. The findings of this work can help energy system planners and policy makers to explain results from generation expansion planning studies and to isolate the storage benefits accountable to temporal arbitrage in broader electricity storage studies.

  18. Requirements on future energy supply. Analysis on the demand of future power plant capacity and strategy for a sustainable power utilization in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    This strategy paper was drawn up with a view to maximum ecological compatibility of pwer plant modernization and sustainable power generation and use. The first part of the paper analyzes the power plants to be decommissioned on a medium-term basis and - against the background of several different scenarios for future power demand - an estimate of power plant capacities required by 2020. The second part describes the goals and concrete requirements of sustainable energy use. In the final part, the available instruments are presented, and those instruments are recommended that will be best suited for making power demand and supply efficient, sustainable and environment-friend.y [de

  19. Regulatory requirements for nuclear power plant site selection in Malaysia-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basri, N A; Hashim, S; Ramli, A T; Bradley, D A; Hamzah, K

    2016-12-01

    Malaysia has initiated a range of pre-project activities in preparation for its planned nuclear power programme. Clearly one of the first steps is the selection of sites that are deemed suitable for the construction and operation of a nuclear power plant. Here we outline the Malaysian regulatory requirements for nuclear power plant site selection, emphasizing details of the selection procedures and site characteristics needed, with a clear focus on radiation safety and radiation protection in respect of the site surroundings. The Malaysia Atomic Energy Licensing Board (AELB) site selection guidelines are in accord with those provided in International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and United Stated Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) documents. To enhance the suitability criteria during selection, as well as to assist in the final decision making process, possible assessments using the site selection characteristics and information are proposed.

  20. Neural net based determination of generator-shedding requirements in electric power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djukanovic, M [Electrical Engineering Inst. ' Nikola Tesla' , Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Sobajic, D J; Pao, Y -H [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Applied Physics Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Computer Engineering and Science AI WARE Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    1992-09-01

    This paper presents an application of artificial neural networks (ANN) in support of a decision-making process by power system operators directed towards the fast stabilisation of multi-machine systems. The proposed approach considers generator shedding as the most effective discrete supplementary control for improving the dynamic performance of faulted power systems and preventing instabilities. The sensitivity of the transient energy function (TEF) with respect to changes in the amount of dropped generation is used during the training phase of ANNs to assess the critical amount of generator shedding required to prevent the loss of synchronism. The learning capabilities of neural nets are used to establish complex mappings between fault information and the amount of generation to be shed, suggesting it as the control signal to the power system operator. (author)

  1. How Many Model Evaluations Are Required To Predict The AEP Of A Wind Power Plant?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murcia Leon, Juan Pablo; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan; Natarajan, Anand

    2015-01-01

    (AEP) predictions expensive. The objective of the present paper is to minimize the number of model evaluations required to capture the wind power plant's AEP using stationary wind farm flow models. Polynomial chaos techniques are proposed based on arbitrary Weibull distributed wind speed and Von Misses...... distributed wind direction. The correlation between wind direction and wind speed are captured by defining Weibull-parameters as functions of wind direction. In order to evaluate the accuracy of these methods the expectation and variance of the wind farm power distributions are compared against...... the traditional binning method with trapezoidal and Simpson's integration rules. The wind farm flow model used in this study is the semi-empirical wake model developed by Larsen [1]. Three test cases are studied: a single turbine, a simple and a real offshore wind power plant. A reduced number of model...

  2. Uranium requirements for advanced fuel cycles in expanding nuclear power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, S.; Tamm, H.

    1978-01-01

    When considering advanced fuel cycle strategies in rapidly expanding nuclear power systems, equilibrium analyses do not apply. A computer simulation that accounts for system delay times and fissile inventories has been used to study the effects of different fuel cycles and different power growth rates on uranium consumption. The results show that for a given expansion rate of installed capacity, the main factors that affect resource requirements are the fissile inventory needed to introduce the advanced fuel cycle and the conversion (or breeding) ratio. In rapidly expanding systems, the effect of fissile inventory dominates, whereas in slowly expanding systems, conversion or breeding ratio dominates. Heavy-water-moderated and -cooled reactors, with their high conversion ratios, appear to be adaptable vehicles for accommodating fuel cycles covering a wide range of initial fissile inventories. They are therefore particularly suitable for conserving uranium over a wide range of nuclear power system expansion rates

  3. Discussion on several important safety requirements for the new nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Tianwen; Li Jigen; Zhang Lin; Feng Youcai; Jia Xiang; Li Wenhong

    2013-01-01

    Post the Fukushima nuclear accident, the Chinese government raised higher safety goals and safety requirements for the new nuclear power plant to be constructed. The paper expounded the important indicators of safety requirements and the aspects of safety modification that had been developed for the new NPPs. It also discussed and analyzed the main fields required by the new NPPs safety requirements in the safety goals, safety evaluation of sites, defenses of internal and external events, severe accident prevention and mitigation, design of reactor core, containment system and I and C system, and optimization of engineering measure, which gave some references to the design, construction and safety modifications of new NPPs in China. (authors)

  4. Policy planning for nuclear power: an overview of the main issues and requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    The report contains information on the political, governmental, economic, financial and technical issues and requirements associated with planning and implementing a safe, economic and reliable nuclear power programme. It highlights the main areas in which policies must be developed and decisions taken, as well as the role and responsibilities of government, the plant owner and national industry. Also presented are the main criteria to assist policy planners in defining options and strategies which can achieve a balance among such objectives as cost effective and efficient electricity production, realistic and acceptable financing arrangements, national development requirements, safety and environmental protection. (NHA)

  5. Systems required during and after an earthquake. Summary report. WWER-1000 nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monette, P.

    1995-01-01

    The scope of this document is to list the mechanical, instrumentation and electrical components required during and after earthquake, in order to achieve and maintain safe shutdown conditions of a WWER-1000 type nuclear power plant. The main objective pursued in establishing the systems and equipment list is to provide guidance for the design and implementation of the backfits which are necessary to increase seismic resistance of the components required after earthquake. The presented list is established on generic basis, i.e. it is applicable to any specific WWER-1000

  6. Design of a requirements system for decommissioning of a nuclear power plant based on systems engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hee Seong; Park, Seung Kook; Jin, Hyung Gon; Song, Chan Ho; Choi, Jong won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The nuclear industry has required an advanced system that can manage decommissioning information ever since the Korean government decide to decommission the Gori No.1 nuclear power plant. The D and D division at KAERI has been developing a system that can secure the reliability and sustainability of the decommissioning project based on the engineering system of the KRR-2 (Korean Research Reactor-2). To establish a decommissioning information system, a WBS that needs to be managed for the decommissioning of an NPP has been extracted, and requirements management research composed of system engineering technology has progressed. This paper propose a new type of system based on systems engineering technology. Even though a decommissioning engineering system was developed through the KRR-2, we are now developing an advanced decommissioning information system because it is not easy to apply this system to a commercial nuclear power plant. An NPP decommissioning is a project requiring a high degree of safety and economic feasibility. Therefore, we have to use a systematic project management at the initial phase of the decommissioning. An advanced system can manage the decommissioning information from preparation to remediation by applying a previous system to the systems engineering technology that has been widely used in large-scale government projects. The first phase of the system has progressed the requirements needed for a decommissioning project for a full life cycle. The defined requirements will be used in various types of documents during the decommissioning preparation phase.

  7. Reactive power interconnection requirements for PV and wind plants : recommendations to NERC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDowell, Jason (General Electric, Schenectady, NY); Walling, Reigh (General Electric, Schenectady, NY); Peter, William (SunPower, Richmond, CA); Von Engeln, Edi (NV Energy, Reno, NV); Seymour, Eric (AEI, Fort Collins, CO); Nelson, Robert (Siemens Wind Turbines, Orlando, FL); Casey, Leo (Satcon, Boston, MA); Ellis, Abraham; Barker, Chris. (SunPower, Richmond, CA)

    2012-02-01

    Voltage on the North American bulk system is normally regulated by synchronous generators, which typically are provided with voltage schedules by transmission system operators. In the past, variable generation plants were considered very small relative to conventional generating units, and were characteristically either induction generator (wind) or line-commutated inverters (photovoltaic) that have no inherent voltage regulation capability. However, the growing level of penetration of non-traditional renewable generation - especially wind and solar - has led to the need for renewable generation to contribute more significantly to power system voltage control and reactive power capacity. Modern wind-turbine generators, and increasingly PV inverters as well, have considerable dynamic reactive power capability, which can be further enhanced with other reactive support equipment at the plant level to meet interconnection requirements. This report contains a set of recommendations to the North-America Electricity Reliability Corporation (NERC) as part of Task 1-3 (interconnection requirements) of the Integration of Variable Generation Task Force (IVGTF) work plan. The report discusses reactive capability of different generator technologies, reviews existing reactive power standards, and provides specific recommendations to improve existing interconnection standards.

  8. How Many Model Evaluations Are Required To Predict The AEP Of A Wind Power Plant?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murcia, J P; Réthoré, P E; Natarajan, A; Sørensen, J D

    2015-01-01

    Wind farm flow models have advanced considerably with the use of large eddy simulations (LES) and Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) computations. The main limitation of these techniques is their high computational time requirements; which makes their use for wind farm annual energy production (AEP) predictions expensive. The objective of the present paper is to minimize the number of model evaluations required to capture the wind power plant's AEP using stationary wind farm flow models. Polynomial chaos techniques are proposed based on arbitrary Weibull distributed wind speed and Von Misses distributed wind direction. The correlation between wind direction and wind speed are captured by defining Weibull-parameters as functions of wind direction. In order to evaluate the accuracy of these methods the expectation and variance of the wind farm power distributions are compared against the traditional binning method with trapezoidal and Simpson's integration rules.The wind farm flow model used in this study is the semi-empirical wake model developed by Larsen [1]. Three test cases are studied: a single turbine, a simple and a real offshore wind power plant. A reduced number of model evaluations for a general wind power plant is proposed based on the convergence of the present method for each case. (paper)

  9. ASDEX Upgrade-JT-60U comparison and ECRH power requirements for NTM stabilization in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urso, L.; Zohm, H.; Maraschek, M.; Poli, E.; Isayama, A.

    2010-01-01

    Neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) are experimentally controlled with local electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) and the island width decay during NTM stabilization is modelled using the so-called modified Rutherford equation (MRE). In this paper, a modelling of the MRE is carried out and simulations of the island width decay are compared with the experimentally observed ones in order to fit the two free machine-independent parameters present in the equation. A systematic study on a database of NTM stabilization discharges from ASDEX Upgrade and JT-60U is done for extrapolating the ECCD power requirements for ITER. The extrapolation to ITER of the NTM stabilization results from ASDEX Upgrade and JT-60U shows that 10 MW of ECCD power are enough to stabilize large NTMs. The 10 MW power estimate for ITER is based on the assumption that the free parameters in the MRE are machine independent. Indeed, this assumption is verified in this paper for ASDEX Upgrade and JT-60U. An interesting consequence of the relatively modest power requirement for ITER is that the installed 20 MW will suffice for simultaneous 2/1 and 3/2 NTM stabilization.

  10. Power system reliability impacts of wind generation and operational reserve requirements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esteban Gil

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to its variability, wind generation integration presents a significant challenge to power system operators in order to maintain adequate reliability levels while ensuring least cost operation. This paper explores the trade-off between the benefits associated to a higher wind penetration and the additional operational reserve requirements that they impose. Such exploration is valued in terms of its effect on power system reliability, measured as an amount of unserved energy. The paper also focuses on how changing the Value of Lost Load (VoLL can be used to attain different reliability targets, and how wind power penetration and the diversity of the wind energy resource will impact quality of supply (in terms of instances of unserved energy. The evaluation of different penetrations of wind power generation, different wind speed profiles, wind resource diversity, and different operational reserve requirements, is conducted on the Chilean Northern Interconnected System (SING using statistical modeling of wind speed time series and computer simulation through a 24-hour ahead unit commitment algorithm and a Monte Carlo simulation scheme. Results for the SING suggest that while wind generation can significantly reduce generation costs, it can also imply higher security costs to reach acceptable reliability levels.

  11. Substantial reductions of input energy and peak power requirements in targets for heavy ion fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mark, J.W.K.; Pan, Y.L.

    1986-01-01

    Two ways of reducing the requirements of the heavy ion driver for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target implosion are described. Compared to estimates of target gain not using these methods, the target input energy and peak power may be reduced by about a factor of two with the use of the hybrid-implosion concept. Another factor of two reduction in input energy may be obtained with the use of spin-polarized DT fuel in the ICF target

  12. The role of advanced nuclear power technologies in developing countries: Criteria and design requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-02-01

    The document includes the papers presented at the following two technical committee meetings organized by the IAEA: Technical Committee Meeting and Workshop on Criteria for the Introduction of Advanced Nuclear Power Technologies for Specific Applications in Developing Countries, Vienna, 27-30 June 1988 (14 papers) and Technical Committee Meeting and Workshop on Design Requirements for the Application of Advanced Concepts in Developing Countries, Vienna, 6-9 December 1988 (16 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  13. Policy planning for nuclear power: An overview of the main issues and requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    This special report, Policy Planning for Nuclear Power: An Overview of the Main Issues and Requirements, has been prepared in response to the express request of a number of IAEA Member States for a document to assist makers in developing countries on the introduction of nuclear power. The report contains information on the political, governmental, economic, financial and technical issues and requirements associated with planning and implementing a safe, economic and reliable nuclear power programme. It highlights the main areas in which policies must be developed and decisions taken, as well as the role and responsibilities of government, the plant owner and national industry. Also presented are the main criteria to assist policy planners in defining options and strategies which can achieve a balance among such objectives as cost effective and efficient electricity production, realistic and acceptable financing arrangements, national development requirements, safety and environmental protection. Further information and details on the technical and other issues presented in this report are given in the list of related IAEA publications and documents at the end of this report

  14. Impact of extreme load requirements and quality assurance on nuclear power plant costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    Definitive costs, applicable to nuclear power plant concrete structures, as a function of National Regulatory Requirements, standardization, the effect of extreme load design associated with both design basis accidents and extreme external events and quality assurance are difficult to develop since such effects are interrelated and not only differ widely from country to country, project to project but also vary in time. Table 1 shows an estimate of the of the overall plant cost effects of external event extreme load design on nuclear power plant design for the U.S -and selected foreign countries for which experience with LWRs exist- Germany is the most expensive primarily due to a military aircraft crash resistance. However, the German requirement for 4 safeguards trains rather than 2 and the containment design requirement to consider one Steam Generator blowdown concurrent with a RCS blowdown. This presentation will concentrate on the direct current impact extreme load design and quality assurance have on concrete structures, systems and components for nuclear plants. This presentation is considered timely due to the increased interest in the c potential backfit of Eastern European nuclear power stations of the WWER 440 and WWER 1000 types which typically did not consider the extreme loads identified in Table 1 and accident loads in Table 3 and quality assurance in Table 5 in their original design. Concrete structures in particular are highlighted because they typically form the last barrier to radioactive release from the containment and other Safety Related Structures

  15. Assessment of infrastructure development requirements for embarking on nuclear power program in Macedonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, N.; Ilijovski, I.; Popovski, V.

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades nuclear energy has been proven as reliable and economical energy supply that is capable of meeting demanding energy market requirements. Many countries around the world consider entering into new nuclear energy programs and building new power reactors for satisfying their increasing electrical energy needs. A nuclear power program is a major undertaking requiring careful planning, preparation and investment, and human resources for building adequate nuclear infrastructure. Preparations for making a decision to enter into a new nuclear energy program requires a significant amount of financial and human resources, time, and assistance from already developed countries and international nuclear organizations. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) from Vienna provides technical help, financial assistance, and documented knowledge that are important for countries facing the challenge of entering nuclear programs for the first time. The IAEA organizes technical courses and information exchange meetings for new countries at which experiences and lessons learned are provided to new countries. This paper describes the key activities in the process for making a decision to enter a new nuclear energy program. It describes the efforts currently being conducted in the Republic of Macedonia in the direction of collecting information, performing various feasibility studies, and engaging in regional cooperation for utilizing experiences of the regional countries in performing such activities, and in developing their nuclear power programs. This paper also provides an overview of the IAEA documents and recommendations that are relevant for this topic

  16. Possibilities and consequences of the Total Cumulative Exergy Loss method in improving the sustainability of power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stougie, Lydia; Kooi, Hedzer J. van der

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The TCExL method can be applied to all kinds of technological systems. • All exergy losses during the lifetime of a technological system are considered. • The results of the TCExL method are independent of time and weighting factors. • Applying the TCExL method can improve the sustainability of power generation. • The system with the lowest TCExL score is not always economically favourable. - Abstract: It is difficult to decide which power generation system is the most sustainable when environmental, economic and social sustainability aspects are taken into account. Problems with conventional environmental sustainability assessment methods are that no consensus exists about the applied models and weighting factors and that exergy losses are not considered. Economic sustainability assessment methods do not lead to results that are independent of time because they are influenced by market developments, while social sustainability assessment methods suffer from the availability and qualitative or semi-quantitative nature of data. Existing exergy analysis methods do not take into account all exergy losses and/or are extended with factors or equations that are not commonly accepted. The new Total Cumulative Exergy Loss (TCExL) method is based on fundamental thermodynamic equations and takes into account all exergy losses caused by a technological system during its life cycle, i.e. internal exergy losses, exergy losses caused by emission abatement and exergy losses related to land use. The development of the TCExL method is presented as well as the application of this method and environmental, economic and social sustainability assessment methods to two case studies: power generation in combination with LNG evaporation and Fossil versus renewable energy sources for power generation. According to the results of the assessments, large differences exist between the environmental sustainability assessment and TCExL methods in the sense that different

  17. Risk-informed assessment of regulatory and design requirements for future nuclear power plants. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    OAK B188 Risk-informed assessment of regulatory and design requirements for future nuclear power plants. Annual report. The overall goal of this research project is to support innovation in new nuclear power plant designs. This project is examining the implications, for future reactors and future safety regulation, of utilizing a new risk-informed regulatory system as a replacement for the current system. This innovation will be made possible through development of a scientific, highly risk-formed approach for the design and regulation of nuclear power plants. This approach will include the development and/or confirmation of corresponding regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major impediment to long term competitiveness of new nuclear plants in the U.S. is the capital cost component--which may need to be reduced on the order of 35% to 40% for Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRS) such as System 80+ and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). The required cost reduction for an ALWR such as AP600 or AP1000 would be expected to be less. Such reductions in capital cost will require a fundamental reevaluation of the industry standards and regulatory bases under which nuclear plants are designed and licensed. Fortunately, there is now an increasing awareness that many of the existing regulatory requirements and industry standards are not significantly contributing to safety and reliability and, therefore, are unnecessarily adding to nuclear plant costs. Not only does this degrade the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy, it results in unnecessary costs to the American electricity consumer. While addressing these concerns, this research project will be coordinated with current efforts of industry and NRC to develop risk-informed, performance-based regulations that affect the operation of the existing nuclear plants; however, this project will go further by focusing on the design of new plants

  18. Risk-informed assessment of regulatory and design requirements for future nuclear power plants. Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-08-01

    OAK B188 Risk-informed assessment of regulatory and design requirements for future nuclear power plants. Annual report. The overall goal of this research project is to support innovation in new nuclear power plant designs. This project is examining the implications, for future reactors and future safety regulation, of utilizing a new risk-informed regulatory system as a replacement for the current system. This innovation will be made possible through development of a scientific, highly risk-formed approach for the design and regulation of nuclear power plants. This approach will include the development and/or confirmation of corresponding regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major impediment to long term competitiveness of new nuclear plants in the U.S. is the capital cost component--which may need to be reduced on the order of 35% to 40% for Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRS) such as System 80+ and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). The required cost reduction for an ALWR such as AP600 or AP1000 would be expected to be less. Such reductions in capital cost will require a fundamental reevaluation of the industry standards and regulatory bases under which nuclear plants are designed and licensed. Fortunately, there is now an increasing awareness that many of the existing regulatory requirements and industry standards are not significantly contributing to safety and reliability and, therefore, are unnecessarily adding to nuclear plant costs. Not only does this degrade the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy, it results in unnecessary costs to the American electricity consumer. While addressing these concerns, this research project will be coordinated with current efforts of industry and NRC to develop risk-informed, performance-based regulations that affect the operation of the existing nuclear plants; however, this project will go further by focusing on the design of new plants.

  19. Postoperative Stiffness Requiring Manipulation Under Anesthesia Is Significantly Reduced After Simultaneous Versus Staged Bilateral Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, John P; Monazzam, Shafagh; Miles, Troy; Danielsen, Beate; White, Richard H

    2017-12-20

    For patients with symptomatic bilateral knee arthritis, it is unknown whether the risk of developing stiffness requiring manipulation under anesthesia postoperatively is higher or lower for those undergoing simultaneous bilateral total knee arthroplasty (TKA) compared with those having staged bilateral TKA. Therefore, we undertook this study to evaluate the risk of requiring manipulation under anesthesia in staged versus simultaneous bilateral TKA as well as patients undergoing unilateral TKA. We utilized the California Patient Discharge Database, which is linked with the California Emergency Department, Ambulatory Surgery, and master death file databases. Using a literature-based estimate of the number of patients who failed to undergo the second stage of a staged bilateral TKA, replacement cases were randomly selected from patients who had unilateral TKA and were matched on 8 clinical characteristics of the patients who had staged bilateral TKA. Hierarchical multivariate logistic regression was performed to determine the risk-adjusted odds of manipulation in patients undergoing unilateral TKA, staged bilateral TKA, and simultaneous bilateral TKA using yearly hospital TKA volume as a random effect. Adjustment was made to allow fair comparison of the outcome at 90 and 180 days of follow-up after staged compared with simultaneous bilateral TKA. During the time period from 2005 through 2013, the cumulative incidence of manipulation within 90 days was 2.14% for unilateral TKA (4,398 events per 205,744 patients), 2.11% for staged bilateral TKA (724 events per 34,352 patients), and 1.62% for simultaneous bilateral TKA (195 events per 12,013 patients). At 180 days of complete follow-up, the cumulative incidence of manipulation was 3.07% after unilateral TKA (6,313 events per 205,649 patients), 2.89% after staged bilateral TKAs (957 events per 33,169 patients), and 2.29% after simultaneous bilateral TKA (267 events per 11,653 patients). With multivariate analyses used to

  20. A Total Cost of Ownership Model for Low Temperature PEM Fuel Cells in Combined Heat and Power and Backup Power Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    University of California, Berkeley; Wei, Max; Lipman, Timothy; Mayyas, Ahmad; Chien, Joshua; Chan, Shuk Han; Gosselin, David; Breunig, Hanna; Stadler, Michael; McKone, Thomas; Beattie, Paul; Chong, Patricia; Colella, Whitney; James, Brian

    2014-06-23

    A total cost of ownership model is described for low temperature proton exchange membrane stationary fuel cell systems for combined heat and power (CHP) applications from 1-250kW and backup power applications from 1-50kW. System designs and functional specifications for these two applications were developed across the range of system power levels. Bottom-up cost estimates were made for balance of plant costs, and detailed direct cost estimates for key fuel cell stack components were derived using design-for-manufacturing-and-assembly techniques. The development of high throughput, automated processes achieving high yield are projected to reduce the cost for fuel cell stacks to the $300/kW level at an annual production volume of 100 MW. Several promising combinations of building types and geographical location in the U.S. were identified for installation of fuel cell CHP systems based on the LBNL modelling tool DER CAM. Life-cycle modelling and externality assessment were done for hotels and hospitals. Reduced electricity demand charges, heating credits and carbon credits can reduce the effective cost of electricity ($/kWhe) by 26-44percent in locations such as Minneapolis, where high carbon intensity electricity from the grid is displaces by a fuel cell system operating on reformate fuel. This project extends the scope of existing cost studies to include externalities and ancillary financial benefits and thus provides a more comprehensive picture of fuel cell system benefits, consistent with a policy and incentive environment that increasingly values these ancillary benefits. The project provides a critical, new modelling capacity and should aid a broad range of policy makers in assessing the integrated costs and benefits of fuel cell systems versus other distributed generation technologies.

  1. Licensing evaluation of CANDU-PHW nuclear power plants relative to U.S. regulatory requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erp, J.B. van

    1978-01-01

    Differences between the U.S. and Canadian approach to safety and licensing are discussed. U.S. regulatory requirements are evaluated as regards their applicability to CANDU-PHW reactors; vice-versa the CANDU-PHW reactor is evaluated with respect to current Regulatory Requirements and Guides. A number of design modifications are proposed to be incorporated into the CANDU-PHW reactor in order to facilitate its introduction into the U.S. These modifications are proposed solely for the purpose of maintaining consistency within the current U.S. regulatory system and not out of a need to improve the safety of current-design CANDU-PHW nuclear power plants. A number of issues are identified which still require resolution. Most of these issues are concerned with design areas not (yet) covered by the ASME code. (author)

  2. Ergonomic requirements on computer-based information- and handling engineering in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fassmann, W.

    2002-01-01

    This project provides regulatory authorities with a set of criteria for evaluating hybrid man-machine interfaces in nuclear power plant control rooms from a human factors point of view. Such standards are necessary for two reasons: (1) More and more computerised information and control systems have been and will be introduced in nuclear power plant control rooms. One possible result of this trend will be the creation of hybrid man machine interfaces which will provide both conventional and computer-based display and control devices. (2) Available rules and regulations do not contain detailed requirements on how to integrate both types of interface in such a way that plant operation by means of hybrid interfaces will be performed at least as reliably and safely as by means of conventional ones. To fill this gap, criteria and methods were developed which support practical checks of requirements to be applied to hybrid control rooms. This approach is based on state of the art methods and criteria in ergonomics. It makes it possible to analyse and to describe personnel's actions in a consistent and structured way in order to provide the information which is necessary for evaluating human reliability of task performance. Reliability can be evaluated with respect to - accuracy of required information on displays, - networking of tasks, - possibilities of interrupting and cancelling measures which have already been initiated, - possibility to carry out required manuel actions, - level of mental work-strain, - workload level, - probability of erroneous actions. This method is part of a catalogue of recommendations for evaluating hybrid nuclear power plant control rooms. The catalogue also contains recommendations for the design of computerised parts of the man-machine-interface. Application of these design recommendations will help create favourable conditions for an acceptable level of work-strain and for reliable task performance. (orig.) [de

  3. 18 CFR 292.208 - Special requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. 292.208 Section... requirements for hydroelectric small power production facilities located at a new dam or diversion. (a) A hydroelectric small power production facility that impounds or diverts the water of a natural watercourse by...

  4. International requirements for life extension of nuclear power plants; Internationale Anforderungen zur Lebensdauerverlaengerung von Kernkraftwerken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wernicke, Robert [TUeV NORD SysTec GmbH und Co. KG, Abt. Festigkeit und Konstruktion, Hamburg (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    Lifetime extension or long-term operation of nuclear facilities are topics of great international significance against the backdrop of a fleet of nuclear power plants of which many have reached 2/3 of their planned life. The article deals with the conditions for, and the specific requirements of, seeking long-term operation of nuclear power plants as established internationally and on the basis of IAEA collections. Technically, long-term operation is possible for many of the nuclear power plants in the world because, normally, they were built on the basis of conservative rules and regulations and, as a consequence, incorporate significant additional safety. Application of requirements to specific plants implies assessments of technical safety which show that conservative design philosophies created reserves and, as a consequence, there is an adequate level of safety also in long-term plant operation. For this purpose, the technical specifications must be revised, necessary additions made, and (international) operating experience taken into account and management of aging established. Two examples are presented to show how the approach to long-term plant operation is put into practice on a national level. (orig.)

  5. Nuclear power of the coming century and requirements to the nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlov, V.; Leonov, V.; Sila-Novitski, A.; Smirnov, V.; Tsikunov, V.; Filin, A.

    2001-01-01

    Current state of nuclear power in the world has been considered and the reasons for its falling short of the great expectations relating to its vigorous development in the outgoing century are considered. Anticipated energy demand of mankind in the next century is evaluated, suggesting that with exhausted resources of cheap fossil fuel and ecological restrictions it can be satisfied by means of a new nuclear technology meeting the requirements of large-scale power generation in terms of safety and economic indices, moreover, the technology can be elaborated in the context of achievements made in civil and military nuclear engineering. Since the developing countries are the most interested parties, it is just their initiative in the development of nuclear technology at the next stage that could provide an impetus for its actual advance. It is shown that large-scale development of nuclear power, being adequate to increase in energy demand, is possible even if solely large NPP equipped with breeders providing BR≥1 are constructed. Requirements for the reactor and fuel cycle technologies are made, their major aspects being: efficient utilization of Pu accumulated and reduction of U specific consumption by at least an order of magnitude; natural inherent safety and deterministic elimination of accidents involving high radioactive releases; assurance of a balance between radiation hazard posed by radioactive wastes disposed and uranium extracted from the ground; nuclear weapons nonproliferation due to fuel reprocessing ruling out potentiality of Pu diversion; reduction of the new generation reactor costs below the costs of today's LWR. (author)

  6. Considerations on the Application of the IAEA Safety Requirements for the Design of Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-05-01

    Revised to take into consideration findings from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident, IAEA Safety Standards Series No. SSR-2/1 (Rev. 1), Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design, has introduced some new concepts with respect to the earlier safety standard published in the year 2000. The preparation of SSR-2/1 (Rev. 1) was carried out with constant and intense involvement of IAEA Member States, but some new requirements, because of the novelty of the concepts introduced and the complexity of the issues, are not always interpreted in a unique way. The IAEA is confident that a complete clarification and a full understanding of the new requirements will be available when the supporting safety guides for design and safety assessment of nuclear power plants are prepared. The IAEA expects that the effort devoted to the preparation of this publication, which received input and comments from several Member States and experts, will also facilitate and harmonize the preparation or revision of these supporting standards

  7. Research on Simulation Requirements and Business Architecture of Automated Demand Response in Power Sales Side Market Liberalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yiqun; Zhou, Pengcheng; Zeng, Ming; Chen, Songsong

    2018-01-01

    With the gradual reform of the electricity market, the power sale side liberalization has become the focus of attention as the key task of reform. The open power market provides a good environment for DR (Demand Response). It is of great significance to research the simulation requirements and business architecture of ADR (Automatic Demand Response) in power sale side market liberalization. Firstly, this paper analyzes the simulation requirements of ADR. Secondly, it analyzes the influence factors that the business development of ADR from five aspects after power sale side market liberalization. Finally, Based on ADR technology support system, the business architecture of ADR after power sale side market liberalization is constructed.

  8. 10 CFR 503.8 - No alternate power supply-general requirement for certain exemptions for new powerplants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false No alternate power supply-general requirement for certain exemptions for new powerplants. 503.8 Section 503.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES General Requirements for Exemptions § 503.8 No alternate power supply—general...

  9. Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ong, S.; Campbell, C.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Heath, G.

    2013-06-01

    This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with utility-scale ground-mounted solar facilities, defined as installations greater than 1 MW. We begin by discussing standard land-use metrics as established in the life-cycle assessment literature and then discuss their applicability to solar power plants. We present total and direct land-use results for various solar technologies and system configurations, on both a capacity and an electricity-generation basis. The total area corresponds to all land enclosed by the site boundary. The direct area comprises land directly occupied by solar arrays, access roads, substations, service buildings, and other infrastructure. As of the third quarter of 2012, the solar projects we analyze represent 72% of installed and under-construction utility-scale PV and CSP capacity in the United States.

  10. Comparison of Standards and Technical Requirements of Grid-Connected Wind Power Plants in China and the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, David Wenzhong [Alternative Power Innovations, LLC; Muljadi, Eduard [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tian, Tian [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Miller, Mackay [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wang, Weisheng [China Electric Power Research Inst. (China)

    2016-09-01

    The rapid deployment of wind power has made grid integration and operational issues focal points in industry discussions and research. Compliance with grid connection standards for wind power plants (WPPs) is crucial to ensuring the reliable and stable operation of the electric power grid. This report compares the standards for grid-connected WPPs in China to those in the United States to facilitate further improvements in wind power standards and enhance the development of wind power equipment. Detailed analyses of power quality, low-voltage ride-through capability, active power control, reactive power control, voltage control, and wind power forecasting are provided to enhance the understanding of grid codes in the two largest markets of wind power. This study compares WPP interconnection standards and technical requirements in China to those in the United States.

  11. Requirements and criteria for choosing sites suitable for the construction of nuclear installations and power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-05-01

    The present document explains the selection criteria for areas in Italy suitable for the installation of nuclear power stations to be included in the 'National Site Map' provided for in Section 23 of Act No 393 of 2 August 1975. It represents the results of a thorough investigation into the various aspects of the problem of siting nuclear power stations, at the present stage of technology, taking into account the effect of the installations on the environment and the effect of the environment on the installations. The essential aim is to demonstrate that the requirements derived from these analyses, and on which there was full consultation with the other controlling bodies of European countries (in particular, France, Great Britain and West Germany) ensure the optimum choice of areas from the point of view of safety and public health. (author)

  12. Energy Requirement and Comfort of Gas- and Electric-powered Hot-water Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luedemann, B.; Schmitz, G.

    1999-01-01

    In view of the continuous reduction in the specific heating energy demand of new buildings the power demand for hot-water supply increasingly dominates the heating supply of residential buildings. Furthermore, the German energy-savings-regulation 2000 (ESVO) is intended to evaluate the techniques installed such as domestic heating or hot-water supply within an overall energetic view of the building. Planning advice for domestic heating, ventilation and hot-water systems in gas-heated, low-energy buildings has therefore been developed in a common research project of the Technical University of Hamburg Harburg (TUHH) and four energy supply companies. In this article different gas-or electricity-based hot-water systems in one family houses and multiple family houses are compared with one another with regard to the aspects of comfort and power requirements considering the user's behaviour. (author)

  13. New requirements, rules and regulations, and vested rights of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raetzke, C.

    2006-01-01

    The article deals with the question whether new requirements can be imposed on existing nuclear power plants. It was promoted by the fact that the German Federal Ministry for the Environment currently is working on a thorough revision of German nuclear regulations. When looking at backfitting requirements, the all-important question is whether new findings show that the provisions taken in the license to guarantee the 'necessary precautions' (as defined in the German Atomic Energy Act) contain errors or omissions; only in this case can the authority demand that remedial measures, including backfitting, be taken. Beyond that, German nuclear law contains no obligation for operators to improve and develop safety still further. This applies regardless of whether new requirements are justified by new technical possibilities or new scientific analyses or whether they are prompted by a mere abstract re-evaluation of the safety level to be achieved. In the former case, if there are good technical or scientific reasons, the operators, as a rule, will perform backfitting voluntarily. Pursuant to these criteria, the article covers three categories of backfitting requirements and illustrates them by examples. These general principles are also valid when a new set of regulations - as planned by the BMU - are put into effect and applied. They may lead to existing plants not having to comply fully with the requirements contained in new regulations. (orig.)

  14. A PLC generic requirements and specification for safety-related applications in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Jea Bok; Lee, C. K.; Lee, D. Y.

    2001-12-01

    This report presents the requirements and specification to be applied to the generic qualification of programmable Logic Controller(PLC), which is being developed as part of the KNICS project, 'Development of the Digital Reactor Safety Systems' of which purpose is the application to safety-related instrumentation and control systems in nuclear power plants. This report defines the essential and critical characteristics that shall be included as part of a PLC design for safety-related application. The characteristics include performance, reliability, accuracy, the overall response time from an input to the PLC exceeding it trip condition to the resulting outputs, and the specification of processors and memories in digital controller. It also specifies the quality assurance process for software development, dealing with executive software, firmware, application software tools for developing the application software, and human machine interface(HMI). In addition, this report reviews the published standards and guidelines that are required for the PLC development and the quality assurance processes such as environment requirements, seismic withstand requirements, EMI/RFI withstand requirements, and isolation test

  15. ALSTOM supercritical steam plants meet Polish market challenges and power generator's requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Twardowski, A.

    2007-07-01

    From the early 1990s the age and technical performance of most of the Polish power plants required urgent investment including rehabilitation and/or replacement. This was necessary as power demand was increasing continuously in parallel with country GDP growth. Poland's joining the EU in May 2005 caused additional obligations related to limitation of emissions by Poland as a country and specifically by the Polish power sector. The first big project focussed on replacement of old equipment, improvement of electricity production efficiency and reduction of environmental impact by rehabilitation of Units 1-6 in Turow power plant. This is briefly described in the presentation. The latest and the biggest project is the construction of a new supercritical, lignite fired 833 MW unit in BOT Belchatow PP awarded to ALSTOM in December 2004 as a full term key contract. In addition to a new power block the project included: a new desulfurisation plant; a complete close circle cooling system; a new electrical system control system, and water treatment system; a coal handling system connecting the new unit with lignite transportation system from the open mine to the existing plant; hydraulic ash and slug systems; and an electrostatic precipitator. The unit has reduced NOx emissions to the level below 200 mg/Nm{sup 3} thanks to low emission burners. Particulate emissions are below 30 mg/Nm{sup 3}, SOx emissions are below 220 mg/Nm{sup 3}; CO{sub 2} emissions are lowered and cooling water consumption reduced. Special noise protection systems and special design of some systems has greatly reduced the noise level. 2 photos.

  16. Consideration of the legal system required for achievement of current nuclear power plant construction programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellon Fernandez, E.; Forum Atomico Espanol, Madrid)

    1976-01-01

    The extensive nuclear power plant construction programmes currently in progress in western countries require updating of the legislation in force in this field, especially as regards the following: acquisition of the sites necessary by means of a national planning programme of available sites; simplification of formalities concerning issuance of administrative licenses; revision of the principle of absolute and exclusive liability of the nuclear operator which forms the basis of the third party liability system for nuclear damage; radioactive waste management and decommissioning of nuclear plants. Furthermore, this new legislation should be harmonized between the different countries concerned. (N.E.A.) [fr

  17. Verification of voltage/ frequency requirement for emergency diesel generator in nuclear power plant using dynamic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, J.S.; Roh, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: One major cause of the plant shutdown is the loss of electrical power. The study is to comprehend the coping action against station blackout including emergency diesel generator, sequential loading of safety system and to ensure that the emergency diesel generator should meet requirements, especially voltage and frequency criteria using modeling tool. This paper also considered the change of the sequencing time and load capacity only for finding electrical design margin. However, the revision of load list must be verified with safety analysis. From this study, it is discovered that new load calculation is a key factor in EDG localization and in-house capability increase. (author)

  18. Analysis of Plug Load Capacities and Power Requirements in Commercial Buildings: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppy, M.; Torcellini, P.; Gentile-Polese, L.

    2014-08-01

    Plug and process load power requirements are frequently overestimated because designers often use estimates based on 'nameplate' data, or design assumptions are high because information is not available. This generally results in oversized heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning systems; increased initial construction costs; and increased energy use caused by inefficiencies at low, part-load operation. Rightsizing of chillers in two buildings reduced whole-building energy use by 3%-4%. If an integrated design approach could enable 3% whole-building energy savings in all U.S. office buildings stock, it could save 34 TBtu of site energy per year.

  19. Interpreting Space-Mission LET Requirements for SEGR in Power MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauenstein, J. M.; Ladbury, R. L.; Batchelor, D. A.; Goldsman, N.; Kim, H. S.; Phan, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    A Technology Computer Aided Design (TCAD) simulation-based method is developed to evaluate whether derating of high-energy heavy-ion accelerator test data bounds the risk for single-event gate rupture (SEGR) from much higher energy on-orbit ions for a mission linear energy transfer (LET) requirement. It is shown that a typical derating factor of 0.75 applied to a single-event effect (SEE) response curve defined by high-energy accelerator SEGR test data provides reasonable on-orbit hardness assurance, although in a high-voltage power MOSFET, it did not bound the risk of failure.

  20. Application of total quality tools in the operational process modernization and optimization of large hydroelectric power plants; Aplicacao de ferramentas da qualidade total na modernizacao e otimizacao de processos operacionais de grandes usinas hidreletricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potenza, Luiz Frederico; Kassem, Faisal Ali; Medlo, Gerson Ricardo; Santos, Valdemir Chalito dos [Companhia Paranaense de Energia (COPEL), Capitao Leonidas Marques, PR (Brazil). Superintendencia de Gerencia da Manutencao. Area de Operacao e Manutencao Salto Caxias]. E-mail: potenza@mail.copel.br

    1998-07-01

    This work highlights a practical example of Total Quality tools application, and as the institutional changes advances, the necessity of being better and more competitive becomes evident. By using Total Quality Control tools in the modernization and optimization of operational processes for large hydroelectric power plants of the COPEL-Brazil this work contributes for the continuous increasing of the customers satisfaction and the profitability of the company.

  1. Analysis of Balancing Requirements in Future Sustainable and Reliable Power Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frunt, J.

    2011-06-01

    This thesis elaborates on the rules for power balancing, provides a method for quantifying balancing requirements and examines the effect of future changes on balancing. Chapter 2 elaborates on system balancing and the different actors and entities in the electricity delivery system. The necessity and implementation of power balancing are explained. Also different subsequent markets (i.e., day-ahead markets, intraday markets and imbalance settlement systems) and options to trade electricity are discussed. As the research focusses mainly on the Netherlands, properties of the Dutch imbalance settlement system are analyzed. Based on this framework an in-depth analysis of imbalances and calls for balancing capacity with the corresponding prices is given. This shows the incentives to minimize the amount of imbalance in the system and to participate in the imbalance settlement system. Chapter 3 elaborates on the level of aggregation that the entities, involved in the imbalance settlement system, in electricity markets can have. Based on current market rules, incentives to either grow or shrink and by aggregating more or less entities are discussed. The level of aggregation will directly influence the functioning of the imbalance settlement system. It is shown that larger aggregations benefit more from the canceling out of imbalances. The imbalances of the Netherlands and Belgium have been aggregated to illustrate the possible benefits of aggregating multiple national imbalance settlement systems. The increased penetration of renewable generation strongly influences the planning and operation of the power system. As many renewable energy generators have a fluctuating power output, several methods are discussed in chapter 4 that can be used to classify and quantify the balancing requirements to counteract these fluctuations. Chapter 4 discusses the multiple existing classes of balancing capacity and the corresponding methods to quantify their needs. Due to the

  2. Analysis of Balancing Requirements in Future Sustainable and Reliable Power Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frunt, J.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis elaborates on the rules for power balancing, provides a method for quantifying balancing requirements and examines the effect of future changes on balancing. Chapter 2 elaborates on system balancing and the different actors and entities in the electricity delivery system. The necessity and implementation of power balancing are explained. Also different subsequent markets (i.e., day-ahead markets, intraday markets and imbalance settlement systems) and options to trade electricity are discussed. As the research focusses mainly on the Netherlands, properties of the Dutch imbalance settlement system are analyzed. Based on this framework an in-depth analysis of imbalances and calls for balancing capacity with the corresponding prices is given. This shows the incentives to minimize the amount of imbalance in the system and to participate in the imbalance settlement system. Chapter 3 elaborates on the level of aggregation that the entities, involved in the imbalance settlement system, in electricity markets can have. Based on current market rules, incentives to either grow or shrink and by aggregating more or less entities are discussed. The level of aggregation will directly influence the functioning of the imbalance settlement system. It is shown that larger aggregations benefit more from the canceling out of imbalances. The imbalances of the Netherlands and Belgium have been aggregated to illustrate the possible benefits of aggregating multiple national imbalance settlement systems. The increased penetration of renewable generation strongly influences the planning and operation of the power system. As many renewable energy generators have a fluctuating power output, several methods are discussed in chapter 4 that can be used to classify and quantify the balancing requirements to counteract these fluctuations. Chapter 4 discusses the multiple existing classes of balancing capacity and the corresponding methods to quantify their needs. Due to the

  3. Total algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tel, G.

    We define the notion of total algorithms for networks of processes. A total algorithm enforces that a "decision" is taken by a subset of the processes, and that participation of all processes is required to reach this decision. Total algorithms are an important building block in the design of

  4. Determination of Power Required through Accelerated Flight with Application to Unmanned Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltmann, Lars Michael

    Power required analysis is an important element of aircraft performance. The primary method for measuring this parameter is the classic PIW-VIW (power and velocity independent of weight) method which was developed in the first half of the 20th century. This method was originally developed for use with manned aircraft and therefore has some shortcomings when applied to unmanned aircraft, specifically those that are remotely piloted. The proposed method estimates the lift and drag models using the maximum likelihood technique which was applied to data acquired through acceleration and deceleration runs under the assumption that the pitch rate and lateral dynamics are negligible. The acceleration runs were performed by applying full throttle while the aircraft was flying just above the stall velocity and allowing it to naturally accelerate to maximum level flight velocity. The deceleration runs were performed in the opposite manner where the throttle was set to zero while the aircraft was ying at maximum velocity and allowed to naturally slow down until stall was reached. The collected data is reduced using the PIW-VIW technique whereby a single power curve is generated that is independent of aircraft weight and air density. Simulations indicate that deviations from the designed maneuvers, such as altitude changes and low pitch rates, are acceptable and do not change the resulting power curves. A hard limit on what constitutes low pitch rate was difficult to establish as system noise played a large role in determining the signal-to-noise ratio limit on the pitch rate. However, based on a model analysis it was concluded that the pitch rate could be safely ignored without consequences to the results. A low cost Raspberry Pi data collection system was designed for use on two test aircraft, the commercially available Nexstar and a reconfigurable research aircraft called Astraeus. Data points using the classic PIW-VIW method were collected during the flight test program

  5. Investigation of high-alpha lateral-directional control power requirements for high-performance aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, John V.; Ross, Holly M.; Ashley, Patrick A.

    1993-01-01

    Designers of the next-generation fighter and attack airplanes are faced with the requirements of good high angle-of-attack maneuverability as well as efficient high speed cruise capability with low radar cross section (RCS) characteristics. As a result, they are challenged with the task of making critical design trades to achieve the desired levels of maneuverability and performance. This task has highlighted the need for comprehensive, flight-validated lateral-directional control power design guidelines for high angles of attack. A joint NASA/U.S. Navy study has been initiated to address this need and to investigate the complex flight dynamics characteristics and controls requirements for high angle-of-attack lateral-directional maneuvering. A multi-year research program is underway which includes groundbased piloted simulation and flight validation. This paper will give a status update of this program that will include a program overview, description of test methodology and preliminary results.

  6. Energy management system for power distribution. Interfaces and data communication requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koponen, P.; Lemstroem, B.; Ikonen, J.

    1995-01-01

    The opening of the electricity market for competition in Finland creates new requirements for the information systems and data communication in distribution utilities. Energy management systems for distribution utilities are needed with interfaces that make it possible to separate the network business from the energy trade business. However, these interfaces should also support optimization of the whole energy supply system of the country. In this report the interfaces and data communication requirements of the energy management system of the electricity trade business are analyzed. To support this subfunctions of the energy management have been analyzed. It was realized that the amount of necessary data transfer and optimization of the national power system both depend strongly on the general rules of the energy markets. (author)

  7. Active power control strategies for inverter-based distributed power generation adapted to grid-fault ride-through requirements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, F.; Duarte, J.L.; Hendrix, M.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Distributed power generation is expected to deliver power into the grid without interruption during voltage dips. To improve system ride-through capabilities, a generalized active power control strategy is proposed for grid-interfacing inverters. Specifically, a current reference generation strategy

  8. CRISP. Requirements Specifications of Intelligent ICT Simulation Tools for Power Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warmer, C.J.; Kester, J.C.P.; Kamphuis, I.G. [ECN Energy in the Built Environment and Networks, Petten (Netherlands); Carlsson, P [EnerSearch, Malmoe (Sweden); Fontela, M. [Laboratory of Electrical Engineering LEG, Grenoble (France); Gustavsson, R. [Blekinge Institute of Technology BTH, Karlskrona (Sweden)

    2003-10-15

    This report, deliverable D2.1 in the CRISP project, serves as a preparation report for the development of simulation tools and prototype software which will be developed in forthcoming stages of the CRISP project. Application areas for these simulations are: fault detection and diagnosis, supply and demand matching and intelligent load shedding. The context in which these applications function is the power network with a high degree of distributed generation, including renewables. In order to control a so called distributed grid we can benefit from a high level of distributed control and intelligence. This requires, on top of the power system network, an information and communication network.. We argue that such a network should be seen as an enabler of distributed control and intelligence. The applications, through which control and intelligence is implemented, then form a third network layer, the service oriented network. Building upon this three-layered network model we derive in this report the requirements for a simulation tool and experiments which study new techniques for fault detection and diagnostics and for simulation tools and experiments implementing intelligent load shedding and supply and demand matching scenarios. We also look at future implementation of these services within the three-layered network model and the requirements that follow for the core information and communication network and for the service oriented network. These requirements, supported by the studies performed in the CRISP Workpackage 1, serve as a basis for development of the simulation tools in the tasks 2.2 to 2.4.

  9. CRISP. Requirements Specifications of Intelligent ICT Simulation Tools for Power Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warmer, C.J.; Kester, J.C.P.; Kamphuis, I.G.; Carlsson, P; Fontela, M.; Gustavsson, R.

    2003-10-01

    This report, deliverable D2.1 in the CRISP project, serves as a preparation report for the development of simulation tools and prototype software which will be developed in forthcoming stages of the CRISP project. Application areas for these simulations are: fault detection and diagnosis, supply and demand matching and intelligent load shedding. The context in which these applications function is the power network with a high degree of distributed generation, including renewables. In order to control a so called distributed grid we can benefit from a high level of distributed control and intelligence. This requires, on top of the power system network, an information and communication network.. We argue that such a network should be seen as an enabler of distributed control and intelligence. The applications, through which control and intelligence is implemented, then form a third network layer, the service oriented network. Building upon this three-layered network model we derive in this report the requirements for a simulation tool and experiments which study new techniques for fault detection and diagnostics and for simulation tools and experiments implementing intelligent load shedding and supply and demand matching scenarios. We also look at future implementation of these services within the three-layered network model and the requirements that follow for the core information and communication network and for the service oriented network. These requirements, supported by the studies performed in the CRISP Workpackage 1, serve as a basis for development of the simulation tools in the tasks 2.2 to 2.4

  10. Site infrastructure as required during the construction and erection of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, K.F.; Wagner, H.

    1978-01-01

    In general, in an exchange of experience on constructing nuclear power plants priority is given to design and lay-out, financing, quality assurance etc., but in this paper an attempt has been made to describe range and type of site infrastructure required during construction and erection. Site infrastructure will make considerable demands on the planning, supply of material and maintenance that may result from the frequently very isolated location of power plant sites. Examples for specific values and experiences are given for a nuclear power plant with two units on the 1300-MW type at present under construction of the Persian Gulf in Iran. Data concerning the site infrastructure, including examples, are given and explained on the basis of graphs. The site is split up into a technical and a social infrastructure. The main concern of the technical site infrastructure is the timely provision and continuous availability of electric energy, water, communication grids, workshops, warehouses, offices, transport and handling facilities, as well as the provision of heavy load roads, harbour facilities, etc. The social site infrastructure in general comprises accommodation, food supplies and the care and welfare of all site personnel, which includes a hospital, school, self-service shop, and sport and recreation facilities. (author)

  11. The contribution of nuclear energy to the meeting of Italy's electric power requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelini, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    The paper discusses ENEL's policy in the development of nuclear energy, which assigns to this source the role of meeting almost all of Italy's additional future power requirements. This is a position taken some time ago and already outlined on the occasion of the Geneva Conference of 1971. The policy is based on a number of factors, reviewed in the paper, which differentiate, at least in quantitative terms, Italy's situation from that of most industrialized countries. Among these factors stand out the scarcity of natural resources, including energy sources available in Italy. An extensive recourse to nuclear energy is the best way to achieve that diversification of energy supplies vital to the Italian economy which, because of the very lack of natural resources, is predominantly based on processing. While the Caorso Nuclear Power Plant (840 MW) is due to go into service soon, ENEL's nuclear plan, recently approved by the Government, calls for the construction of the four 1,000-MW units already on order and of 16 additional units, of the same size, divided into two 8-units blocks, to be decided on respectively in the very near future and before the end of 1977. The necessary flexibility of the plan concerning the nuclear units that will go into service by the 1986 is ensured by the subdivision into blocks, with provision for the postponement of the second, 8-units block in the country's economy development requires a revision in electric power forecasts. The paper then considers in particular the integration between the nuclear plan and ENEL's extensive plan for pumped-storage hydro-electric power plants and the related technical and economic advantages which also extend to an international scope. The paper concludes the review of Italy's nuclear plan by stressing two essential problems: financing and the availability of sites for nuclear power plants. Upon their timely and satisfactory solution depends the actual construction of the plants by the scheduled dates

  12. Power requirements and battery life measurement for wireless transmission between two nodes in different mediums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radouane Karli

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important roles of the wireless sensor networks (WSN is to avoid wiring costs, be self-sustainable and be able to function for several years. However, due to the slow progress in battery technology, power continues to be a limited resource in wireless sensor communication and electric energy storage remains to be an important issue. On the other hand, if batteries must be replaced often, many remote sensing applications may become impractical. Therefore, batteries with long life on the order of several years are needed. This paper is an extension of work originally presented in The 5th International Conference on Electronic Devices, Systems and Applications to investigate further the power requirements for wireless data transfer between two nodes using batteries with different capacities (55 mAh, 550 mAh and 5500 mAh. In particular, the effect of a propagation medium such as air, distilled water and engine oil on the wireless communication inside a one meter long metallic pipe was investigated. Our first result shows a successful transmission of wireless signal through air, distilled water and oil medium with very low transmission losses. The second result shows that an increase in the battery capacity will increase the two-node wireless sensor operation time even in different propagation medium. This result can be used to determine the required battery capacity for extending the WSN operation time.

  13. The role of elastic energy in activities with high force and power requirements: a brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jacob M; Flanagan, Eamonn P

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide strength and conditioning practitioners with an understanding of the role of elastic energy in activities with high force and power requirements. Specifically, the article covers 1) the nature of elasticity and its application to human participants, 2) the role of elastic energy in activities requiring a stretch-shorten cycle such as the vertical jump, 3) the role of muscular stiffness in athletic performance, 4) the control of muscular stiffness through feedforward and feedback mechanisms, and 5) factors affecting muscular stiffness. Finally, practical applications are provided. In this section, it is suggested that the storage and reuse of elastic energy is optimized at relatively higher levels of stiffness. Because stiffness decreases as fatigue ensues as well as with stretching before an event, the article emphasizes the need for proper preparation phases in a periodized cycle and the avoidance of long static stretches before high-force activities. The importance of teaching athletes to transition from eccentric to concentric movements with minimal time delays is also proposed due to the finding that time delays appear to decrease the reuse of elastic energy. In addition to teaching within the criterion tasks, evidence is provided that minimizing transitions in plyometric training, a technique demonstrated to increase musculotendinous stiffness, can optimize power output in explosive movements. Finally, evidence is provided that training and teaching programs designed to optimize muscular stiffness may protect athletes against sports-related injuries.

  14. Requirements for, and training and certification of, quality assurance technicians for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saiz, A.; Mir, A.; Serrano, J.

    1982-01-01

    The paper examines the requirements for, and training and certification of, technicians working in a quality assurance department at periods when the site, the main supplier and the engineering firm are being selected for construction, commissioning and operation of a light-water nuclear power plant with an output of approximately 1000 MW(e). In determining the system to be applied for the present work, account is taken of the special fields of engineering, supply, commissioning and operation. To this end, an analysis is made of the necessary organization, pointing out the number of technicians in each of the phases mentioned, and the necessary experience and knowledge required for discharging the functions indicated and for obtaining the appropriate certification. The second generation of Spanish nuclear power stations - about 7500MW(e) - demonstrated the need for quality assurance technicians. The Spanish Atomic Forum, a member of Foratom, is the first Spanish body to deal with the problem of training of such technicians at the national level through holding of seminars. This led to the appearance (in April 1974) of the first publication in Spanish on these techniques, a document which is still being used for teaching purposes. Later, it was the university and the professional associations which, with the support of the State Administration, undertook to provide this instruction. The paper also analyses Spanish experience in the teaching of quality assurance techniques during the period 1975-80, describing the programmes and contents of the courses

  15. Operating requirements for power plants in the liberalised electricity market; Einsatzanforderungen an Kraftwerke im liberalisierten Strommarkt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzbach, G. [Vereinigte Energiewerke AG, Berlin (Germany)

    2000-07-01

    The onset of liberalisation in the German electricity market now dates back one and a half years. All processes related to this event are still in a process of rapid change. These developments have already led to a substantial drop in electricity prices, especially for large customers, leaving suppliers with modest margins. Power supply companies such as VEAG, whose operations in East Germany include power transmission, electricity production from brown coal and wholesale trade, are taking measures to meet the new demands placed on them. Unbundling regulations and market processes are forcing companies to review their organisational and operational structures. Risk management, controlling and DP support for processes are indispensable. Profit centre structures and internal performance accounting systems are being used to distribute the market pressure evenly across the company's divisions. Companies' future success will be determined by their success in trading and selling. These developments will also have an impact on power plants, i.e. on the first stage of the supply chain. For one thing, the costs of power plant operation have to be reduced significantly. Reductions in staff costs will necessitate a review of technological processes. Furthermore, maintenance strategies and availability goals have to be reassessed. Another crucial factor is to be seen in power plants' operational flexibility, and this will also have an impact on fuel supply contracts. A particular concern of single-plant companies and small generation systems will be how to deal with strong fluctuations in demand and meet the hourly supply schedules agreed on with the customer without having to resort to the expensive regulating services of the grid operators. Electricity produced in excess of demand will find not always find buyers, not even after the establishment of physical electricity exchanges. Another factor which will increase the volatility of required power generation

  16. The transport sectors potential contribution to the flexibility in the power sector required by large-scale wind power integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Per Bromand; Lund, H.; Mathiesen, B.V.

    2007-01-01

    -scale integration of renewable energy in the power system – in specific wind power. In the plan, 20 % of the road transport is based on electricity and 20 % on bio- fuels. This, together with other initiatives allows for up to 55-60 % wind power penetration in the power system. A fleet of 0.5 mio electrical...... vehicles in Denmark in 2030 connected to the grid 50 % of the time represents an aggregated flexible power capacity of 1- 1.5 GW and an energy capacity of 10-150 GWh.......In 2006, the Danish Society of Engineers developed a visionary plan for the Danish energy system in 2030. The paper presents and qualifies selected part of the analyses, illustrating the transport sectors potential to contribute to the flexibility in the power sector, necessary for large...

  17. Impact of New Radiation Safety Standards on Licensing Requirements of Nuclear Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohal, P.; Subasic, D.; Valcic, I.

    1996-01-01

    As the outcomes of the newly introduced safety philosophies, new and more strict safety design requirements for nuclear installation are expected to be introduced. New in-depth defence measures should be incorporated into the design and operation procedure for a nuclear installation, to compensate for potential failures in protection or safety measures. The new requirements will also apply to licensing of NPP's operation as well as to licensing of nuclear sites, especially for radioactive waste disposal sites. This paper intends to give an overview of possible impacts of new internationally agreed basic safety standards with respect to NPP and related technologies. Recently issued new basic safety standards for radiation protection are introducing some new safety principles which may have essential impact on future licensing requirements regarding nuclear power plants and radioactive waste installations. These new standards recognize exposures under normal conditions ('practices') and intervention conditions. The term interventions describes the human activities that seek to reduce the existing radiation exposure or existing likelihood of incurring exposure which is not part of a controlled practice. The other new development in safety standards is the introduction of so called potential exposure based on the experience gained from a number of radiation accidents. This exposure is not expected to be delivered with certainty but it may result from an accident at a source or owing to an event or sequence of events of a probabilistic nature, including equipment failures and operating errors. (author)

  18. Land Use Requirements of Modern Wind Power Plants in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denholm, P.; Hand, M.; Jackson, M.; Ong, S.

    2009-08-01

    This report provides data and analysis of the land use associated with modern, large wind power plants (defined as greater than 20 megawatts (MW) and constructed after 2000). The analysis discusses standard land-use metrics as established in the life-cycle assessment literature, and then discusses their applicability to wind power plants. The report identifies two major 'classes' of wind plant land use: 1) direct impact (i.e., disturbed land due to physical infrastructure development), and 2) total area (i.e., land associated with the complete wind plant project). The analysis also provides data for each of these classes, derived from project applications, environmental impact statements, and other sources. It attempts to identify relationships among land use, wind plant configuration, and geography. The analysts evaluated 172 existing or proposed projects, which represents more than 26 GW of capacity. In addition to providing land-use data and summary statistics, they identify several limitations to the existing wind project area data sets, and suggest additional analysis that could aid in evaluating actual land use and impacts associated with deployment of wind energy.

  19. Survey on maintenance skills required for nuclear power plant periodic inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamasaki, Kenichi

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we conducted a trend survey regarding the problem of passing on senior workers' skills and knowledge to young employees in industries in general, and an interview survey of skilled workers engaged in maintenance work during periodic inspections at a nuclear power plant. These surveys aimed to obtain useful information for maintaining and improving the quality of future maintenance work during nuclear power plant periodic inspections. The trend survey of industries found that the 'Year 2007 Problem (difficulties associated with the start of mass retirements of baby-boomers)' was often takenup in various fields and that many companies were concerned about losing their accumulated skills and know-how. To ensure that skills are smoothly passed on to the younger generation, companies have taken various measures, such as development of plans for passing on skills and knowledge, introduction of the Meister system and implementation of workshops by skilled workers. The interview survey of skilled workers engaged in maintenance work of mechanical equipment during periodic inspections at Nuclear Power Plant A found that various skills were required in maintenance work. Regarding perceived differences between skilled and unskilled maintenance workers, many respondents believed that the largest difference was in terms of time taken to carry out specific procedures. Some maintenance companies have increasingly fewer skilled workers than before or face aging of skilled personnel. As future concerns, respondents cited the loss of skills that have been acquired through experience in construction and in handling of troubles and failures. Differences were observed among companies in the degree to which skills have been passed on to the younger generation. As a reason why skills are not successfully passed on, respondents cited communication problems due to age differences between senior and young workers and other problems that were also observed in other industries

  20. Fault ride-through requirements for onshore wind power plants in Europe: the needs of the power system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boemer, J.C.; Meer, van der A.A.; Rawn, B.G.; Hendriks, R.L.; Ciupuliga, A.R.; Gibescu, M.; Kling, W.L.; Ferreira, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    Wind power plants show different behavior than conventional (synchronous) generators. As the traditional power systems mainly consisted of centralized generation by synchronous machines feeding passive loads, it was well-understood how the system reacted in normal operation as well as during

  1. Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design. Specific Safety Requirements (Russian Edition); Bezopasnost' atomnykh ehlektrostantsij: proektirovanie. Konkretnye trebovaniya bezopasnosti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-04-15

    This publication is a revision of Safety Requirements No. NS-R-1, Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design. It establishes requirements applicable to the design of nuclear power plants and elaborates on the safety objective, safety principles and concepts that provide the basis for deriving the safety requirements that must be met for the design of a nuclear power plant. It will be useful for organizations involved in the design, manufacture, construction, modification, maintenance, operation and decommissioning of nuclear power plants, as well as for regulatory bodies. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Applying the safety principles and concepts; 3. Management of safety in design; 4. Principal technical requirements; 5. General plant design; 6. Design of specific plant systems.

  2. Economic analysis vs. capital-recovery requirements of power reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, J.S.

    1980-01-01

    As a consultant to electric utilities the author often becomes involved in the development of policy for capital recovery and in the determination of depreciation rates that will implement the policy. Utility capital recovery is controlled by generally accepted depreciation accounting practices and by regulatory commission accounting rules and, as a result, can differ significantly from engineering economics. Those involved with decommissioning of power reactors should be aware of the depreciation accounting and regulatory framework that dictates capital recovery requirements, whether their involvement is related to engineering economics or capital recovery. This presentation defines that framework, points out several significant implications (particularly tax), describes several conforming capital-recovery methods, describes several techniques that have been used with the decommissioning component in economic analysis of alternative energy sources, and discusses why those involved in economic analysis should learn the accounting and regulatory framework for capital recovery

  3. Main phases of siting for nuclear power plants with review of required investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malbasa, N.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of the article is a short description of the main phases in the process of siting for nuclear power plants as interpreted and applied by the Institut za elektroprivredu, Zagreb in the screening, comparison and evaluation of the sites for NPPs in the SR of Croatia. The scope and purpose, as well as review of required data and investigations for each particular phase are given. Common used methods for the comparison of sites are described and example of rejection criteria applicable for early phases of the siting is proposed. It is given a list of the most important activities which detailed analysis id indispensable for ending of the evaluation and getting a site permit from the regulatory body. A legal and regulatory basis for carrying out the siting process is also described. (author)

  4. Investigative study on the technical code requirements of natural events hazards for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Kunio; Aoki, Takayuki

    2012-01-01

    Technical codes and standards on natural phenomena, in particular, earthquake and tsunami for nuclear power plants in the other developed countries including IAEA safety standards were investigated. Then, the results were compared with the corresponding Japanese technical codes and standards. As a results, it was found that: (1) technical codes and standards on natural phenomena, especially those for earthquakes and tsunami/flooding in those foreign countries and their requirements are all included in the Japanese technical codes and standards. (2) Nevertheless, the actual measures against tsunami/flooding in those foreign countries are more advanced than those in Japan which had been taken before Fukushima accident. Therefore, further investigation is needed to clarify the reason why there are such differences by investigating the details of the basic ideas and evaluation methods for the protection of tsunami/flooding. (author)

  5. Legislative framework and regulatory requirements for the introduction of nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha-Vinh, Phuong

    1975-01-01

    The adoption of appropriate legislation is to be considered as a prerequisite to the introduction of nuclear power in view of the issues that need to be regulated. Preparatory steps should be started at the earliest stage in conjunction with the planning of nuclear power projects. The primary objectives of a licensing scheme are to ensure safety, public health and environmental protection as well as financial protection for third parties in case of nuclear incident. For licensing purposes, a legislative framework and regulatory determinations are required. Within such a framework and pursuant to such regulatory determinations, the elaboration of safety standards, rules, guides and enforcement procedures is to be considered of paramount importance. To this end a number of international recommendations and advisory material prepared by the IAEA provide useful guidance. A licensing process would normally be split into several stages relating to site approval, construction permit, pre-operational tests, and operating licence, each stage being subject to safety assessments and reviews as determined by regulations. Financial protection against nuclear damage has also to be insured. A special regime of nuclear liability has been established by international conventions, based on the principle of strict liability of the operator of a nuclear installation. As a result of such channelling of liability to him, his liability is limited in amount and time. This liability system has the dual purpose of ensuring appropriate protection for potential victims and of relieving the nuclear industry from unlimited liability risks, which would impede practical applications of atomic energy. For the elaboration of nuclear legislation and specialized regulations the Agency's advisory services have proved to be of help to countries embarking on a nuclear power programme. (author)

  6. Licensing requirements regarding the qualification of operating personnel in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fechner, J.B.

    1981-01-01

    The legal requirements regarding the qualifications of operating personnel in nuclear power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany are outlined as in article 7 of the Atomic Energy Act. For the responsible operating personnel the requisite competence and reliability are legally required; for subordinate personnel the law requires only the necessary knowledge. The requisite competence and the necessary knowledge have been further specified in a set of guidelines by the authorities; work on specification of reliability requirements is under way. Essential elements of the requisite competence of responsible operating personnel are their professional qualification, their safety-related knowledge, their abilities, their practical experience, and - for the responsible shift personnel - their nuclear, plant-related training as well as a written and oral examination. Requalification is indispensible for keeping the requisite competence on a level in accordance with the current state of science and technology. Facts concerning the personal reliability of the responsible operating personnel are assessed by the competent authorities on the basis of information available at other state institutions. For the responsible shift personnel, physical and psychological fitness are important factors contributing to their reliability. The necessary knowledge subordinate operating personnel must possess with respect to plant safety and safety of the personnel is assured via instruction on safety and via special briefings at the working place. Lack of safety-related knowledge has to be compensated for by assigning an experienced permanent supervisor for each activity in question. Current work on qualification of operating personnel concentrates on training, including simulator training, of responsible shift personnel. (author)

  7. Influence of regulatory requirements for nuclear power plants on the backfitting of Austrian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.; Hammer, J.

    1985-01-01

    In general the licensing and backfitting activities have once more demonstrated the fact that safety assessment of a research reactor is by no means just a scaled-down version of a nuclear power plant licensing procedure. Naturally the risk potential is much lower, however, the very nature of research calls for much more flexibility in operation, for temporary installations and for experimental methods which cannot be covered by detailed regulations in advance. Therefore the application of nuclear power reactor criteria to such facilities has to be considered with extreme caution. If NPP standards are applicable at all, they have to be carefully interpreted in each individual case. It is interesting to compare the original reactor safety reports with their modern versions: emphasis has shifted from reactivity accident calculations to thermal-hydraulic considerations, to better instrumentation (both in quality and quantity) and to more effort in reducing, measuring and documenting all radioactive effluents. This tendency is also reflected in most of the backfitting requirements. In summary, the result of the lengthy licensing and backfitting process is certainly a considerable improvement in performance and safety of the Austrian research reactors

  8. Safety requirement of the nuclear power plants, after TMI-2 accident and their possible implementation on Bushehr NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirhabibi, N.; Tochai, M.T.M.; Ashrafi, A.; Farnoudi, E.

    1985-01-01

    Based on the lessons learned from the TMI-2 accident and other research and developments, many improvements have been required for the design, manufacturing and operation of nuclear power plants in recent years. These requirements have already been implemented to the plants in operation and considered as new safety requirements for new plants. In the present paper these requirements and their possible implementation on Bushehr NPP are discussed. (Author)

  9. Evaluation of the level of skill required of operators of a computer-assisted radiologic total lung capacity measurement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazzeo, J.

    1985-01-01

    This research was conducted to obtain information regarding the feasibility of using non-medical personnel to obtain measurements of radiologic total lung capacity (TLC). Operators from each of four groups (general undergraduates, nursing students, medical students, radiologists) differing in the amount of medical training and/or experience reading x-rays, performed each of two tasks. The first task was the measurement of radiologic TLC for a set of twenty x-rays. The second task consisted of tracing the outline of the anatomical structures that must be identified in the execution of the radiologic TLC measurement task. Data from the radiologic TLC measurement task were used to identify possible group differences in the reliability and validity of the measures. The reliability analyses were performed within the framework of Generalizability Theory. While the results are not conclusive, due to small sizes, the analyses suggest that group differences in reliability of the measures, if they exist, are small

  10. Ochronosis of the knee with secondary osteoarthritis requiring total knee replacement in a patient with cryptogenic organising pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, Jorrit; Metsaars, Wieneke; Jansen, Joris

    2016-05-20

    Ochronosis is a rare autosomal recessive metabolic disease caused by homogentisic acid oxidase enzyme deficiency. High homogentisic acid levels will eventually result in black deposits in skin, sclerae, connective tissues and urine (alkaptonuria). It can lead to early degeneration of connective tissues and cartilage. Ochronosis can damage normal cartilage, leading to secondary osteoarthritis. The diagnosis is often delayed because of its low prevalence and non-specific early symptoms. In our patient, the secondary osteoarthritis due to ochronosis deposits in the cartilage was treated by total knee arthroplasty, with good clinical outcome. This article reports the first case of ochronosis with secondary osteoarthritis of the knee in a patient previously diagnosed with cryptogenic organising pneumonia (COP). 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  11. High power valve regulated lead-acid batteries for new vehicle requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinidad, Francisco; Sáez, Francisco; Valenciano, Jesús

    The performance of high power VRLA ORBITAL™ batteries is presented. These batteries have been designed with isolated cylindrical cells, providing high reliability to the recombination process, while maintaining, at the same time, a very high compression (>80 kPa) over the life of the battery. Hence, the resulting VRLA modules combine a high rate capability with a very good cycle performance. Two different electrochemically active material compositions have been developed: high porosity and low porosity for starting and deep cycle applications, respectively (depending on the power demand and depth of discharge). Although, the initial performance of the starting version is higher, after a few cycles the active material of the deep cycle version is fully developed, and this achieves the same high rate capability. Both types are capable of supplying the necessary reliability for cranking at the lowest temperature (-40°C). Specific power of over 500 W/kg is achievable at a much lower cost than for nickel-metal hydride systems. Apart from the initial performance, an impressive behaviour of the cycling version has been found in deep cycle applications, due to the highly compressed and high density active material. When submitted to continuous discharge-charge cycles at 75% (IEC 896-2 specification) and 100% (BCI deep cycle) DoD, it has been found that the batteries are still healthy after more than 1000 and 700 cycles, respectively. However, it has been proven that the application of an IUi algorithm (up to 110% of overcharging) with a small constant current charging period at the end of the charge is absolutely necessary to achieve the above results. Without the final boosting period, the cycle life of the battery could be substantially shortened. The high specific power and reliability observed in the tests carried out, would allow ORBITAL™ batteries to comply with the more demanding requirements that are being introduced in conventional and future hybrid electric

  12. Power requirements at the VHTR/HTE interface for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilim, R.B.

    2007-01-01

    The power requirements at the interface between the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) process and the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) were investigated. The study was performed using a network systems code that linked together individual component models for boiler, condenser, turbine, compressor, pump, gas-to-gas heat exchanger, electrolyser, and reactor and properties for water, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and helium. A species mixture model supported the use of mixtures of gases in each component model. The requirements for a reference design with a dedicated high temperature process heat loop are given. In general the quantity and quality of the process heat needed by the HTE process is a function of how the electrolyser is operated. Operating at higher voltage increases throughput and resistive heating providing the opportunity to recuperate this heat and supplant a large fraction of high temperature reactor heat. Any shortfall can be added by electrical heaters in the HTE plant. Eliminating the associated high temperature heat exchanger from the nuclear plant in this manner would significantly improve safety and maintainability. Low temperature process heat is still needed to vaporize water for the HTE process but this can be obtained at very low cost from VHTR waste heat rejected to the ultimate heat sink. (author)

  13. Survey of extreme load design regulatory agency licensing requirements for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevenson, J D

    1976-04-01

    Since 1965, when extreme load requirements began to be considered explicitly in nuclear power plant design, there has been a gradual divergence in requirements imposed by national regulatory agencies. However, nuclear plant safety is an international problem because of the potential international effects of any postulated plant failure. For this reason this paper has been prepared in an attempt to highlight the differences in national criteria currently used in the extreme load design of nuclear plant facilities. No attempt has been made to evaluate the relative merit of the criteria established by the various national regulatory agencies. This paper presents the results of a recent survey made of national atomic energy regulatory agencies and major nuclear steam supply design agencies, which requested a summary of current licensing criteria associated with earthquake, extreme wind (tornado), flood, airplane crash and accident (pipe break) loads applicable within the various national jurisdictions. Also presented are a number of comparisons which are meant to illustrate the differences in national regulatory criteria.

  14. Survey of extreme load design regulatory agency licensing requirements for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    Since 1965, when extreme load requirements began to be considered explicitly in nuclear power plant design, there has been a gradual divergence in requirements imposed by national regulatory agencies. However, nuclear plant safety is an international problem because of the potential international effects of any postulated plant failure. For this reason this paper has been prepared in an attempt to highlight the differences in national criteria currently used in the extreme load design of nuclear plant facilities. No attempt has been made to evaluate the relative merit of the criteria established by the various national regulatory agencies. This paper presents the results of a recent survey made of national atomic energy regulatory agencies and major nuclear steam supply design agencies, which requested a summary of current licensing criteria associated with earthquake, extreme wind (tornado), flood, airplane crash and accident (pipe break) loads applicable within the various national jurisdictions. Also presented are a number of comparisons which are meant to illustrate the differences in national regulatory criteria. (Auth.)

  15. Evaluation of the Painful Dual Taper Modular Neck Stem Total Hip Arthroplasty: Do They All Require Revision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Young-Min

    2016-07-01

    Although dual taper modular-neck total hip arthroplasty (THA) design with additional neck-stem modularity has the potential to optimize hip biomechanical parameters by facilitating adjustments of leg length, femoral neck version and offset, there is increasing concern regarding this stem design as a result of the growing numbers of adverse local tissue reactions due to fretting and corrosion at the neck-stem taper junction. Implant factors such as taper cone angle, taper surface roughness, taper contact area, modular neck taper metallurgy, and femoral head size play important roles in influencing extent of taper corrosion. There should be a low threshold to conduct a systematic clinical evaluation of patients with dual-taper modular-neck stem THA using systematic risk stratification algorithms as early recognition and diagnosis will ensure prompt and appropriate treatment. Although specialized tests such as metal ion analysis and cross-sectional imaging modalities such as metal artifact reduction sequence magnetic resonance imaging (MARS MRI) are useful in optimizing clinical decision-making, overreliance on any single investigative tool in the clinical decision-making process for revision surgery should be avoided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Report on achievements in fiscal 1999 of New Sunshine Project. Development of superconductor power applied technologies. Research on total system; 1999 nendo chodendo denryoku oyo gijutsu kaihatsu gyomu seika hokokusho. Total system nado no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    To deal effectively with problems being actualized in electric power systems, it is necessary to introduce superconductor technologies into power devices, and achieve higher efficiency, density and stability in the power systems. To achieve the goal, development is being made on superconductor power applied technologies, whereas investigative researches are given on the effects of introducing the superconductor power applied devices to proceed the development effectively and smoothly. This project is also given evaluations on its research achievements. In the practical application of superconductor generators, all of the verification tests have been completed, with the model generator system linkage test as the final test. Design and fabrication technologies were established on a 200,000-kW class pilot generator after having gone through analyses made after the tests. Not only having achieved the initial technical value targets, the result presented reliability required for practical use of the superconductor generator, having exceeded the expectation. The research and development of the superconductor generator technologies under this project is concluded successful. The AC superconductor devices were developed by effectively utilizing the results of the leading researches on fundamental technologies for AC superconductor power device technologies as well as other results of the world's highest levels. (NEDO)

  17. 47 CFR 15.216 - Disclosure requirements for wireless microphones and other low power auxiliary stations capable...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Intentional Radiators Radiated Emission Limits, Additional Provisions § 15.216 Disclosure requirements for... following disclosure requirements: (1) Such persons must display the consumer disclosure text, as specified... point of sale or lease of each such low power auxiliary station. The text must be displayed in a clear...

  18. From the world and asian energy demand and environmental requirement to foresee the prospect of Guangdong nuclear power development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu Wenfeng

    1999-01-01

    The world economy development depends on the development of energy resource. The general energy resource which is mainly fossil fuel will bring damage to the global environment. To stop the global environment becoming worse, cleaner energy will be used in the twenty-first century. The situation which the Guangdong economic growth rate is higher than that of inland average will not change in short period. Economic development requires the suitable electric power supply. The foreground of Guangdong electric power development will be hopeful. To develop electric power is to develop coal, oil, gas, nuclear, hydroelectric and the other renewable power. As to Guangdong, because the environmental pollution is quite serious, it is impossible to develop much more coal-fired power plants. Our country is oil net importer, oil-fired power plants are also restricted. It is acceptable to import natural gas in appropriate degree to generate electricity in the near future to improve environment. To develop hydraulic power is more and more difficult in Guangdong. The hydraulic power from the southwest of China is only as the complement of the Guangdong energy resource, and it is impossible to primarily solve the energy shortage problem. Sunlight, wind, ocean power and terrestrial heat etc. are clean renewable energy, but they can't be used as the wholesale stable industry power. So to develop nuclear power is the certain selection to solve the energy shortage problem and reduce the environmental pollution in Guangdong. (author)

  19. A fresh look at electron cyclotron current drive power requirements for stabilization of tearing modes in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Haye, R. J., E-mail: lahaye@fusion.gat.com [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States)

    2015-12-10

    ITER is an international project to design and build an experimental fusion reactor based on the “tokamak” concept. ITER relies upon localized electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) at the rational safety factor q=2 to suppress or stabilize the expected poloidal mode m=2, toroidal mode n=1 neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) islands. Such islands if unmitigated degrade energy confinement, lock to the resistive wall (stop rotating), cause loss of “H-mode” and induce disruption. The International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) on MHD, Disruptions and Magnetic Control joint experiment group MDC-8 on Current Drive Prevention/Stabilization of Neoclassical Tearing Modes started in 2005, after which assessments were made for the requirements for ECCD needed in ITER, particularly that of rf power and alignment on q=2 [1]. Narrow well-aligned rf current parallel to and of order of one percent of the total plasma current is needed to replace the “missing” current in the island O-points and heal or preempt (avoid destabilization by applying ECCD on q=2 in absence of the mode) the island [2-4]. This paper updates the advances in ECCD stabilization on NTMs learned in DIII-D experiments and modeling during the last 5 to 10 years as applies to stabilization by localized ECCD of tearing modes in ITER. This includes the ECCD (inside the q=1 radius) stabilization of the NTM “seeding” instability known as sawteeth (m/n=1/1) [5]. Recent measurements in DIII-D show that the ITER-similar current profile is classically unstable, curvature stabilization must not be neglected, and the small island width stabilization effect from helical ion polarization currents is stronger than was previously thought [6]. The consequences of updated assumptions in ITER modeling of the minimum well-aligned ECCD power needed are all-in-all favorable (and well-within the ITER 24 gyrotron capability) when all effects are included. However, a “wild card” may be broadening of the localized

  20. Development of safety-related regulatory requirements for nuclear power in developing countries. Key issue paper no. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, K.I.

    2000-01-01

    In implementing a national nuclear power program, balanced regulatory requirements are necessary to ensure nuclear safety and cost competitive nuclear power, and to help gain public acceptance. However, this is difficult due to the technology-intensive nature of the nuclear regulatory requirements, the need to reflect evolving technology and the need for cooperation among multidisciplinary technical groups. This paper suggests approaches to development of balanced nuclear regulatory requirements in developing countries related to nuclear power plant safety, radiation protection and radioactive waste management along with key technical regulatory issues. It does not deal with economic or market regulation of electric utilities using nuclear power. It suggests that national regulatory requirements be developed using IAEA safety recommendations as guidelines and safety requirements of the supplier country as a main reference after careful planning, manpower buildup and thorough study of international and supplier country's regulations. Regulation making is not recommended before experienced manpower has been accumulated. With an option that the supplier country's regulations may be used in the interim, the lack of complete national regulatory requirements should not deter introduction of nuclear power in developing countries. (author)

  1. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program summary, Project No. 669

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    The staff of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has prepared Volume 1 of a safety evaluation report (SER), ''NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document -- Program Summary,'' to document the results of its review of the Electric Power Research Institute's ''Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document.'' This SER provides a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff's review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review

  2. Requirements and operation of decentralised power plants in the changing power market; Anforderungen und Einsatz dezentraler Kraftwerke im veraenderten Strommarkt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoenings, Norbert; Hornig, Niels; Steinbach, Sebastian [E.ON Energy Projects GmbH, Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-08-01

    E.ON plans and realises distributed industrial power plants on the basis of contracting schemes. Target is to reduce energy costs without investment by the customer himself. Gas turbine CHP plants are very flexible and offer many possibilities for the operator to adjust optimally to a constantly changing energy market. This aspect is becoming increasingly important due to the increasing share of renewables. However, the economic situation for CHP plants has deteriorated significantly, due to the current market situation distorted by the subsidised renewable power generation. (orig.)

  3. Impact of Total Ionizing Dose Radiation Testing and Long-Term Thermal Cycling on the Operation of CMF20120D Silicon Carbide Power MOSFET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Scheidegger, Robert J.; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Scheick, Leif; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Power systems designed for use in NASA space missions are required to work reliably under harsh conditions including radiation, thermal cycling, and extreme temperature exposures. Silicon carbide devices show great promise for use in future power electronics systems, but information pertaining to performance of the devices in the space environment is very scarce. A silicon carbide N-channel enhancement-mode power MOSFET called the CMF20120 is of interest for use in space environments. Samples of the device were exposed to radiation followed by long-term thermal cycling to address their reliability for use in space applications. The results of the experimental work are presentd and discussed.

  4. Reassessment and suspension of the nuclear power plant design requirement of the constraint of collective dose per unit of practice. (Requirement 6 (b), Standard AR 3.1.2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amado, Valeria A.; Canoba, Analia C.; Curti, Adriana R.; Biaggio, Alfredo L.

    2009-01-01

    By the middle of 2005, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) decided to re-assess the basis of a design requirement applicable to the limitation of nuclear power reactor radioactive discharges. Such requirement, aimed at restricting the discharge of globally dispersed long-lived radionuclides, was in force in Argentina since 1979 and was expressed as a limitation of the collective dose commitment per unit of electrical energy generated. The practical result of such regulatory action was the need to retain C-14 in the Atucha II power reactor under construction as well as in future heavy water reactors to be built in the country, and, later on, to manage it as to assure its isolation from the biosphere during an appropriate period of time. For the above-mentioned reassessment, an ad hoc task group was created and an internal report was presented to the Board of Directors by the middle of 2007. Because of such report the ARN decided to suspend the application of the requirement (i.e. it is not more mandatory, even for Atucha II). The present work presents the main aspects of that report. In particular, it explains the basis of the design requirement and the most important assumptions that triggered it. The differences between the assumptions made at that time and the reality of nuclear power generation at the beginning of the 21st Century, as well as their implications in relation to the requirement are described, including the Suess effect and its impact in the total dose due to C-14. Finally, after explaining in detail the facts that made no longer reasonable to keep in force the above mentioned requirement, the work presents the conclusions that lead the ARN to the suspension of this requirement. (author) [es

  5. Pulse power requirements for large aperture optical switches based on plasma electrode Pockels cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhodes, M.A.; Taylor, J.

    1992-06-01

    We discuss very large-aperture optical switches (greater than 30 x 30 cm) as an enabling technology for inertial confinement fusion drivers based on multipass laser amplifiers. Large-scale laser fusion drivers such as the Nova laser have been based on single-pass amplifier designs in part because of the unavailability of a suitable large-aperture switch. We are developing an optical switch based on a Pockels cell employing plasma-electrodes. A plasma-electrode Pockels cell (PEPC) is a longitudinal-mode Pockels cell in which a plasma discharge is formed on each side of an electro-optic crystal (typically KDP or deuterated KDP, often designated KD*P). The plasmas formed on either side of the crystal act as transparent electrodes for a switching-pulse and are intended to allow uniform charging of the entire crystal. The switching-pulse is a nominally rectangular high-voltage pulse equal to the half-wave voltage V x ( 8 kV for KD*P or 17 kV for KDP) and is applied across the crystal via the plasma-electrodes. When the crystal is charged to V x , the polarization of an incoming, linearly polarized, laser beam is rotated by 90 degree. When used in conjunction with an appropriate, passive polarizer, an optical switch is thus realized. A switch with a clear aperture of 37 x 37 cm is now in construction for the Beamlet laser which will serve as a test bed for this switch as well as other technologies required for an advanced NOVA laser design. In this paper, we discuss the unique power electronics requirements of PEPC optical switches

  6. Effect of variable power levels on the yield of total aerosol mass and formation of aldehydes in e-cigarette aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillman, I G; Kistler, K A; Stewart, E W; Paolantonio, A R

    2016-03-01

    The study objective was to determine the effect of variable power applied to the atomizer of refillable tank based e-cigarette (EC) devices. Five different devices were evaluated, each at four power levels. Aerosol yield results are reported for each set of 25 EC puffs, as mass/puff, and normalized for the power applied to the coil, in mass/watt. The range of aerosol produced on a per puff basis ranged from 1.5 to 28 mg, and, normalized for power applied to the coil, ranged from 0.27 to 1.1 mg/watt. Aerosol samples were also analyzed for the production of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein, as DNPH derivatives, at each power level. When reported on mass basis, three of the devices showed an increase in total aldehyde yield with increasing power applied to the coil, while two of the devices showed the opposite trend. The mass of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein produced per gram of total aerosol produced ranged from 0.01 to 7.3 mg/g, 0.006 to 5.8 mg/g, and acrolein from EC aerosols from specific devices, and were compared to estimated exposure from consumption of cigarettes, to occupational and workplace limits, and to previously reported results from other researchers. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. 10 CFR 50.65 - Requirements for monitoring the effectiveness of maintenance at nuclear power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... maintenance at nuclear power plants. 50.65 Section 50.65 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC..., including normal shutdown operations. (a)(1) Each holder of an operating license for a nuclear power plant... corrective action shall be taken. For a nuclear power plant for which the licensee has submitted the...

  8. Evaluation of Required Water Sources during Extended Loss of All AC Power for CANDU NPPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Woo Jae; Lee, Kyung Jin; Kim, Min Ki; Kim, Keon Yeop; Park, Da Hee; Oh, Seo Bin [FNC Technology Co., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Young Jin; Byun, Choong Seop [KHNP, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Fukushima accident was caused by lasting long hours of Station Black-Out (SBO) triggered from natural disaster. This accident had resulted in the reactor core damage. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the required water sources to maintain hot standby conditions until 72 hours during ELAP situation. The analysis was performed with CATHENA code. CATHENA code has been developed for the best-estimated transient simulation of CANDU plants. This study was carried out to evaluate the strategy to maintain hot standby conditions during ELAP situation in CANDU reactors. In this analysis, water was supplied to SG by MSSV open and by the gravity feed. It can cool the core without damage until the dousing tank depletion. Before dousing tank depletion, the emergency water supply pump was available by emergency power restoration. The pump continuously fed water to SG. So it is expected that the reactor core can be cooled down without damage for 72 hours if water source is enough to feed. This result is useful to make a strategy against SBO including ELAP situation.

  9. Effect of increased regulation on capital costs and manual labor requirements of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paik, S.; Schriver, W.R.

    1981-01-01

    An attempt is made to explain the impact of increasing governmental regulation on capital costs and labor requirements for constructing light water reactor (LWR) electric power plants. The principal factors contributing to these increases are: (1) market conditions and (2) increased regulation. General market conditions include additional costs attributable to price inflation of equipment, material, labor, and the increased cost of money. The central objective of this work is to estimate the impact of increasing regulation on plant costs and, conversely, on output. To do this it is necessary to isolate two opposing sets of forces which have been in operation during the period of major regulatory expansion: learning based upon plant design experience and economies of scale with increasing size (generating capacity) of newer plants. Conceptual models are specified to capture the independent effects of increasing regulation, learning, and economies of scale. Empirical results were obtained by estimating the models on data collected from industry experience during the 1967-1980 period. 23 refs

  10. Power requirements of biogas upgrading by water scrubbing and biomethane compression: Comparative analysis of various plant configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budzianowski, Wojciech M.; Wylock, Christophe E.; Marciniak, Przemysław A.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Insights into power requirements of biomethane production from biogas are provided. • Process model is constructed, validated and simulated. • High-pressure and low-pressure plant operation in different configurations is compared. - Abstract: Biogas upgrading by water scrubbing followed by biomethane compression is an environmentally benign process. It may be achieved using various plant configurations characterised by various power requirements with associated effects on biomethane sustainability. Therefore, the current study has been undertaken to systematically investigate the power requirements of a range of water scrubbing options. Two groups of water scrubbing are analysed: (1) high pressure water scrubbing (HPWS) and (2) near-atmospheric pressure water scrubbing (NAPWS). A water scrubbing plant model is constructed, experimentally validated and simulated for seven upgrading plant configurations. Simulation results show that the power requirement of biogas upgrading in HPWS plants is mainly associated with biogas compression. In contrast, in NAPWS plants the main power is required for water pumping. In both plants the compression of the biomethane from atmosphereic pressure to 20 MPa also contributes remarkably. It is observed that the lowest specific power requirement can be obtained for a NAPWS plant without water regeneration (0.24 kW h/Nm"3 raw biogas) but this plant requires cheap water supply, e.g. outlet water from a sewage treatment plant or river. The second is HPWS without flash (0.29 kW h/Nm"3 raw biogas). All other HPWS with flash and NAPWS with water regeneration plants have specific power requirements between 0.30 and 0.33 kW h/Nm"3 raw biogas. Biogas compression without upgrading requires about 0.29 kW h/Nm"3 raw biogas. The thermodynamic efficiency of biogas upgrading is between 2.2% and 9.8% depending on the plant configuration while biomethane compression efficiency is higher, about 55%. This result implies that the

  11. A study for the establishment of regulatory requirement and evaluation guide for station blackout in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, J. H.; Koo, C. S.; Joo, W. P.; Oh, S. H.; Shin, W. K.

    1999-01-01

    The consequence of SBO event could be a severe accident unless AC power was restored within a proper time, because many safety systems depend upon AC power. Based on the severity, the SBO has been extensively studied since it was identified as Unresolved Safety Issue at USNRC. The resolution of those studies is a rule-making such as 10 CFR 50.63 and Regulatory Guide 1.155. But there is no regulatory requirements of SBO for an operating domestic nuclear power plant up to the present time. This tudy has established SBO rule(regulatory requirements and evaluation guides) for an operating PWR type of the operating nuclear power plants in Korea

  12. Requirements and analysis of electromagnetic compatibility of safety-related instrumentation and control system in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Sujuan

    2002-01-01

    The state-of-the-art instrumentation and control system and the influence of their application to the electromagnetic compatibility is analyzed. Based on the present situation of nuclear safety in China and relevant experiences from other countries, the author tries to probe into the requirements and test methods about how safety-related instrument and control system to accommodate electromagnetic interference, radio-frequency interference and power surges in the environments of nuclear power plant so as to develop Chinese safety standards

  13. Determination of total tritium in urine from residents living in the vicinity of nuclear power plants in Qinshan, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Bao-Ming; Ji, Yan-Qin; Tian, Qing; Shao, Xiang-Zhang; Yin, Liang-Liang; Su, Xu

    2015-01-16

    To estimate the tritium doses of the residents living in the vicinity of a nuclear power plant, urine samples of 34 adults were collected from residents living near the Qinshan nuclear power plant. The tritium-in-urine (HTO plus OBT) was measured by liquid scintillation counting. The doses of tritium-in-urine from participants living at 2, 10 and 22 km were in a range of 1.26-6.73 Bq/L, 1.31-3.09 Bq/L and 2.21-3.81 Bq/L, respectively, while the average activity concentrations of participants from the three groups were 3.53 ± 1.62, 2.09 ± 0.62 and 2.97 ± 0.78 Bq/L, respectively. The personal committed effective doses for males were 2.5 ± 1.7 nSv and for females they were 2.9 ± 1.3 nSv. These results indicate that tritium concentrations in urine samples from residents living at 2 km from a nuclear power plant are significantly higher than those at 10 km. It may be the downwind direction that caused a higher dose in participants living at 22 km. All the measured doses of tritium-in-urine are in a background level range.

  14. Requirements for the coatings of a nuclear power plant containment building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orantie, K.; Kuosa, H.; Haekkae-Roennholm, E.

    2001-06-01

    The report presents the criteria for the inside coatings of nuclear power plant containment buildings including: radiation resistance, decontamination, chemical resistance in accident situations and fire resistance

  15. Impact of the filtered venting system design upon the total radioactive release in case of a severe accident and a comparison of European requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cederqvist, H.; Elisson, K.; Loewenhielm, G.; Appelgren, E.

    1991-01-01

    Filtered containment venting systems have been introduced in several nuclear power plants in Europe. The objective is to relieve the containment overpressure in a controlled way during a severe accident involving core-melt. The release of fission products when operating the venting system has been compared to that resulting from diffuse leakage from the containment. The conclusion is that the diffuse leakage of gaseous and particulate species can not be neglected in comparison to that resulting from operating the filtered containment venting system. Representative European requirements related to filtered containment venting have been analyzed and compared

  16. Closing the sky. The total dismantling of the Jose Cabrera nuclear power plant demonstrates maturity in the nuclear sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, A.

    2015-01-01

    This article aims to put the situation of the decommissioning of nuclear power plants in the world into perspective as an already consolidated activity and with an important future of industrial activity. The decommissioning project that Enresa is currently performing in the old Jose Cabrera plant is being explained in detail, by providing data of the newest and most relevant technical aspects as well as the lessons learned to be reusable in other decommissioning projects. The previous background, the project planning, the activities performed and those still to be done as well as their timing are being explained in detail. (Author)

  17. Fuel requirements (without reprocessing) for Iran 1, 2, 3 and 4 nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peroomian, M.; Roustayian, S.

    1976-10-01

    By use of a computer program written by the Nuclear Power Plant Management of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, the Yellow Cake, natural uranium and separative work unit (SWU) for the first core and ten reloads of the Iran 1, 2, 3 and 4 Nuclear Power Plants have been calculated for different tail assays. (author)

  18. Efficient design and simulation of an expandable hybrid (wind-photovoltaic) power system with MPPT and inverter input voltage regulation features in compliance with electric grid requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skretas, Sotirios B.; Papadopoulos, Demetrios P. [Electrical Machines Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Democritos University of Thrace (DUTH), 12 V. Sofias, 67100 Xanthi (Greece)

    2009-09-15

    In this paper an efficient design along with modeling and simulation of a transformer-less small-scale centralized DC - bus Grid Connected Hybrid (Wind-PV) power system for supplying electric power to a single phase of a three phase low voltage (LV) strong distribution grid are proposed and presented. The main components of the hybrid system are: a PV generator (PVG); and an array of horizontal-axis, fixed-pitch, small-size, variable-speed wind turbines (WTs) with direct-driven permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG) having an embedded uncontrolled bridge rectifier. An overview of the basic theory of such systems along with their modeling and simulation via Simulink/MATLAB software package are presented. An intelligent control method is applied to the proposed configuration to simultaneously achieve three desired goals: to extract maximum power from each hybrid power system component (PVG and WTs); to guarantee DC voltage regulation/stabilization at the input of the inverter; to transfer the total produced electric power to the electric grid, while fulfilling all necessary interconnection requirements. Finally, a practical case study is conducted for the purpose of fully evaluating a possible installation in a city site of Xanthi/Greece, and the practical results of the simulations are presented. (author)

  19. An overview of some basic design features of Koeberg Nuclear Power Station highlighting how regulatory requirements can influence design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrison, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    The paper attempts to show that licensing requirements significantly influence the design of nuclear power plants. The French designed Pressurised Water Reactor system adopted by Escom at Koeberg has its origins in the General Design Criteria set out in the American Code of Federal Regulations document 10CFR50. Three of the General Design Criteria have been selected for illustrating how the requirements have influenced Koeberg in terms of design, both from a hardware and software view point. The requirements of the criteria on quality standard and records are to a certain extent reflected in the Licensing Branch Guide developed by the Atomic Energy Corporation to address quality assurance. The criterion on containment design sets requirements in respect of containment design which are incorporated in the Koeberg design. The criterion on electric power systems sets many of the basic design requirements for the electrical power supply systems inside and outside the station. The existence of the criterion led Escom to introduce changes in the transmission network to meet the requirements in respect of the independent criteria for the grid connections

  20. Report on research and development achievements in fiscal 1980 in Sunshine Project. Development of a total flow electric power plant(Two-phase rotation inflator); 1980 nendo total flow hatsuden plant no kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Niso kaiten bochoki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1981-03-01

    Out of the development of a total flow power plant in the Sunshine Project, this paper describes a two-phase rotatry inflator. It reports the achievements in fiscal 1980. It is intended to utilize effectively the energy of gas-liquid two-phase fluid (containing a great amount of hot water) often seen in geothermal resources in Japan. Therefore, development is considered on a two-phase rotary inflator as a total flow power generation technology to inflate the gas-liquid fluid as it is without performing separation thereof, and convert it to an external work to draw out output. The inflator is a volume type rotary engine, which has the highest efficiency theoretically, but has not been put into practical use worldwide. Based on the result obtained in the previous fiscal year, development is made on a most suitable seal to be applied to circumferential seal of an external rotor, apex seal, and intake port seal. A rotary inflation performance testing machine is fabricated to study inflation of the gas-liquid two-phase fluid. Setting the engine efficiency of 60% or higher as the target, detailed design, fabrication and assembly shall be completed on two-phase rotation inflators of volume type and self-rotation type of 300 kW class. (NEDO)

  1. Fiscal 1998 research report (New Sunshine Project). Research on the total system for development of superconductor power application technology; 1998 nendo seika hokokusho (new sunshine keikaku). Chodendo denryoku oyo gijutsu kaihatsu total system no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal 1998 research promoted as a part of New Sunshine Project 'R and D project on development of superconductor power application technology.' This project is composed of R and D of superconductor power application technology (Rank 1), study on the total system (Rank 2), and study on review of introduction effects (Rank 3). The project is promoting R and D of the prototype superconducting generator model and elementary technologies based on the basic plan mainly by the research association. The combination test of the developed armature and the multi- cylindrical rotor model or slow response excitation rotor model was finished, and the test of the quick response excitation rotor model is in promotion. Together with R and D of hardware, this project is also promoting R and D of software through review of the introduction effects of superconducting power equipment. In fiscal 1998, the pre- final review was carried out by the project review sub- committee. 2 times of the committee, 12 times of the sub- committee, and several times of the working group were held until March, 1999. (NEDO)

  2. New formulas for interferometric crosstalk penalty as a function of total crosstalk power, number of crosstalk contributions and signal extinction ratio

    OpenAIRE

    Rasmussen, Christian Jørgen; Jeppesen, Palle

    2000-01-01

    Interferometric crosstalk, also called incoherent crosstalk, occurs when reception of a desired signal is disturbed by undesired crosstalk contributions having the same wavelength as the desired signal but independent amplitudes and phases. This crosstalk type is known to be among the most destructive phenomena in optical networks owing to its accumulative nature and strong impact on the transmission quality. New formulas state the crosstalk penalty as a function of the total crosstalk power,...

  3. Silicon Nanowire/Polymer Hybrid Solar Cell-Supercapacitor: A Self-Charging Power Unit with a Total Efficiency of 10.5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruiyuan; Wang, Jie; Sun, Teng; Wang, Mingjun; Wu, Changsheng; Zou, Haiyang; Song, Tao; Zhang, Xiaohong; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Wang, Zhong Lin; Sun, Baoquan

    2017-07-12

    An integrated self-charging power unit, combining a hybrid silicon nanowire/polymer heterojunction solar cell with a polypyrrole-based supercapacitor, has been demonstrated to simultaneously harvest solar energy and store it. By efficiency enhancement of the hybrid nanowire solar cells and a dual-functional titanium film serving as conjunct electrode of the solar cell and supercapacitor, the integrated system is able to yield a total photoelectric conversion to storage efficiency of 10.5%, which is the record value in all the integrated solar energy conversion and storage system. This system may not only serve as a buffer that diminishes the solar power fluctuations from light intensity, but also pave its way toward cost-effective high efficiency self-charging power unit. Finally, an integrated device based on ultrathin Si substrate is demonstrated to expand its feasibility and potential application in flexible energy conversion and storage devices.

  4. Updated of the events tree of total loss of power at the site, SBO, taking into account the results of stress tests and methodological updates, convolution, and hydraulic power recovery from model RCPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Lorenzo, M. A.; Perez Martin, F.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, is described a tree of events to an accident loss total power at the site (SBO) considering, first the results of stress tests arising from the Fukushima accident and moreover, various methodological updates related to this initiating event.

  5. Design studies on staffing requirements for the new generation nuclear power units of WWER-640 and BN-800 reactor types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solovyov, D.F.

    2001-01-01

    The paper outlines the main staffing requirements for the new generation power units with nuclear reactors. These requirements were developed taking into account IAEA recommendations. NPP staffing structure is described, including the main and auxiliary personnel. The main principles of personnel number determination are given. Special attention is taken to the issues of personnel skill and training, including both theoretical education and practical work on the power units in operation. The use of simulators, system of knowledge control and structure of training are considered. ''Shopless'' staffing structure approach is proposed for the NPP, assuming that the main scope of repair work is performed by the central repair organization, thus increasing the quality of repair and decreasing the number of personnel on the plant. Data are given on the personnel number for the WWER-640 and the BN-800 reactor designs. Specialists of the ''ATOMENERGOPROJECT'' Institute started their work on staffing on the early development stage of the basic design of WWER-640 reactor power unit which is the forerunner of the new generation reactors. This work was based on the approaches taken by the chief engineers of NPPs in operation during their meeting held in 1989 in Kalinin NPP. At this meeting definite decision was taken on changing over to involving manufacturer in the repair work of NPP components using manufacturer's technology. In 1992 the meeting of representatives of suppliers of the main components was held where representatives of ''ATOMENERGOREMONT'' and ''LENENERGOREMONT'' were present. The suppliers agreed on carrying out repair works on the components they produced. For this purpose special departments were set up having some experience. This repair work is already carried out by ''ATOMENERGOREMONT'' on some nuclear power plants. ''LENENERGOREMONT'' has gained considerable experience in this kind of repair work on the turbines of LO-1 and LO-2 NPP in Finland. Within the

  6. Rechargeable Battery Auto-Cycler Requiring Lower Power and Dissipating Reduced Waste Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Thomas David (Inventor)

    2018-01-01

    A battery charger system includes a power supply and a switch connected to the power supply wherein the switch has a first switch half and a second switch half. First and second batteries are selectively connected to the power supply via the switch. The first and second switch halves are moved between a plurality of operational positions to fully charge the first battery, discharge the first battery into the second battery, discharge the second battery into the first battery, and fully charge the second battery.

  7. Status for seismic design requirements of nuclear power plants in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, H.

    1977-01-01

    The fundamental purpose for the aseismic design of the nuclear power plants is to protect the inhabitants near the plant from radiation accidents during and after earthquake vibrations. In order to achieve the above purpose, the following considerations have been made. All buidlings, structures, system and components are classified into three Classes A, B and C according to their degree of importance for plant safety, and are designed to meet the requirements specified for each class, respectively. Magnitude and epicenter of the design basis earthquake are determined based upon seismological and geological investigations and observation of ground motion in the site, and the maximum ground acceleration which could be expected can be calculated empirically. With respect to time history waves, more than three are selected referring to dynamic characteristic of base rock in the site, observed ground motion records in the site or other strong motion seismographs.The figures of horizontal seismic coefficients to be used in determining design forces on Class A buildings and structures are 3 Co (where Co. is as defined in the Japan Building Standard Law). On the other hand the horizontal design force should not be less than those determined as the results of the dynamic analyses based on DEGM (Design Earthquake Ground Motion). The figures of horizontal seismic coefficient and forces for Class A system and components are usually determined based on the dynamic analyses for DEGM. The buildings and structures treated as an elastic column system with masses, and the bottom mass is supported by elastic springs representing the soil-foundation interaction characteristics. DEGM is used as the input disturbance in the dynamic response analysis, and the model analysis or time history method is worked out. System and components are modeled as elastic bars with lumped masses of 3 dimensional degree of freedom, and the response analysis is carried out using floor respone spectra

  8. IEEE standard requirements for reliability analysis in the design and operation of safety systems for nuclear power generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of this standard is to provide uniform, minimum acceptable requirements for the performance of reliability analyses for safety-related systems found in nuclear-power generating stations, but not to define the need for an analysis. The need for reliability analysis has been identified in other standards which expand the requirements of regulations (e.g., IEEE Std 379-1972 (ANSI N41.2-1972), ''Guide for the Application of the Single-Failure Criterion to Nuclear Power Generating Station Protection System,'' which describes the application of the single-failure criterion). IEEE Std 352-1975, ''Guide for General Principles of Reliability Analysis of Nuclear Power Generating Station Protection Systems,'' provides guidance in the application and use of reliability techniques referred to in this standard

  9. Geothermal power development in Hawaii. Volume II. Infrastructure and community-services requirements, Island of Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, G.A.; Buevens, W.R.

    1982-06-01

    The requirements of infrastructure and community services necessary to accommodate the development of geothermal energy on the Island of Hawaii for electricity production are identified. The following aspects are covered: Puna District-1981, labor resources, geothermal development scenarios, geothermal land use, the impact of geothermal development on Puna, labor resource requirments, and the requirements for government activity.

  10. Man as a protective barrier in nuclear power technology: the requirements, viewed by the Federal Minister for Home Affairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fechner, J.B.

    1981-06-01

    Evaluation of nuclear power plant incidents frequently reveals man as a major element of risk. Yet, in a nuclear power plant man has the function of an important protective barrier, either by maintaining the plant, by detecting and limiting faults or incidents, or by taking proper measures in accidents. This is true despite, or perhaps because of, the high degree of plant automation. For this reason, it is indispensable that a high level of engineered plant safeguards be accompanied by a minimum of faults contributed by human action. This implies that the staff and their working conditions must meet the same stringent safety requirements as the nuclear power plant proper. Reactor manufacturers, nuclear power plant operators and the responsible authorities try to optimize this human contribution. The Federal Ministry of the Interior, through its Special Technical Guidelines and its continuation training measures, occupies an important position in this respect. Further measures and ordinances are being prepared by that Ministry

  11. A study of thermal-hydraulic requirements for increasing the power rates for natural-circulation boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuo, A.; Inada, F.; Hidaka, M.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the feasibility of higher power rates for natural-circulation boiling water reactors (BWRs) is studied with the objective of examining the flexibility of the plant power rate in constructing such plants to cope with the increasing demand for electricity. By applying existing one-dimensional design codes, the riser heights necessary to meet two major thermal-hydraulic requirements, i.e., critical power and core stability, are systematically calculated. Several restrictions on the maximum diameter and height of the pressure vessel are also considered because these restrictions could make construction impossible or drastically increase the construction costs. A very simple map of the dominant parameters for higher power rates is obtained. It is concluded that natural-circulation BWRs of >1000 MW (electric) will be feasible within the restrictions considered here

  12. A comparison of energy conversion systems for meeting the power requirements of manned rover for Mars missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Morley, N.; Cataldo, R.; Bloomfield, H.

    1990-01-01

    Minimizing system mass for interplanetary missions is of utmost importance in order to keep launch cost within reasonable bounds. For a manned Mars rover, powered by a nuclear reactor power system, the choice of the energy conversion system can play a significant role in lowering the overall system mass. Not only is the mass of the conversion unit affected by the choice, but also the masses of the reactor core, waste heat rejection system, and the radiation shield which are strongly influenced by the system conversion efficiency and operating condition. Several types of conversion systems are of interest for a nuclear reactor Mars manned application. These conversion systems include: free piston Stirling engines, He/XE closed Brayton cycle (CBC), CO 2 open Brayton, and SiGe/GaP thermoelectric. Optimization studies are conducted to determine the impact of the conversion system on the overall mass of the nuclear power system as well as the mobility power requirement of the Rover vehicle

  13. Line voltage distortions due to operation of the power supply devices required for plasma heating and magnetic field generation in the W7X thermonuclear fusion experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, F.

    1997-03-01

    The operation of the W7-X plasma heating devices requires high voltage DC power supplies with a total electrical power of 40 MVA. For this purpose twelve-pulse AC/DC converters are projected. These converters enforce a non sinusoidal line current, whose harmonics are causing corresponding line voltage distortions. To evaluate the extent of these distortions, the reaction of the harmonic currents on the AC line, is investigated by numerical network analysis. This is done for both, the 20 kV-junction point of the converters and the 110 kV-line terminal of the electricity supply company. Furthermore the design of LC series-resonant circuits, projected for power factor correction and damping of the harmonic content of the line voltage, has been verified. The additional operation of the 1.5 MVA magnet power supplies also contributes, even though to a much smaller extent, to the line voltage distortion. The influence of these twelve-pulse AC/DC converters was investigated too. The numerical calculations have been done with the aid of the network simulation program 'Pspice'. In an equivalent circuit the transmission line network and the transformers are represented by their inductances respectively equivalent inductances. The rectifier units are simulated by a number of current sources, producing the current harmonics in amplitude, frequency and phase. The harmonics amplitudes of the plasma heating power supplies are frequency and phase. The harmonics amplitudes of the plasma heating power supplies are measured values given by the manufacturer. For the magnet power supplies, the harmonics are derived from the theoretical step like I(t) current shape by Fourier series decomposition. Due to the action of the LC circuits the achieved characteristic voltage quality values are far below the permissible values corresponding to the recommendations of VDE 0160. (orig.) [de

  14. Fire protection requirements of the insurance industry and their impact on nuclear power plant design and construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deitchman, J.V.; King, W.T. Jr.; Nashman, T.A.

    1976-01-01

    The insurance industry, with its wealth of knowledge and experience in the fire protection area and with preservation of its funds at stake, has always been heavily involved in the fire protection programs of nuclear power plants. Since it was concerned with property preservation in addition to nuclear safety, the insurance industry placed more detailed emphasis on fire protection requirements than did the nuclear regulatory bodies. Since the Browns Ferry fire, however, the insurance industry, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards and the utilities themselves have re-examined their approaches to fire protection. A more coordinated approach seems to have emerged, which is based largely upon insurance industry specifications and guidelines. The paper briefly summarizes the fire protection requirements of the insurance industry as they apply to nuclear power plants. Some of the ways these requirements affect project planning, plant design, and construction timing are reviewed, as well as some of the more controversial fire protection areas

  15. Direction for the Estimation of Required Resources for Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning based on BIM via Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Insu [Korea Institute of Construction Technology, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woojung [KHNP-Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Ways to estimate decommissioning of required resources in the past have imposed great uncertainty since they analyze required resources at the construction stage, analyzing and consulting decommissioning required resources of overseas nuclear power plants. As demands on efficient management and use of complicated construction information increased these days, demands on the introduction of Building Information Modeling (herein after referred to as BIM) technology has increased. In the area of quotation, considerable effects are expected as to the accuracy and reliability predicting construction costs through the characteristics that can automatically estimate quantities by using attribute information of BIM model. BIM-based estimation and quotation of required resources is more accurate than the existing 2D-based quotations and have many advantages such as reviews over constructability and interference. It can be desirable to estimate decommissioning required resources in nuclear power plants using BIM as well as using tools that are compatible with usual international/industrial standards. As we looked into the cases where required resources were estimated, using BIM in Korea and abroad, they dealt with estimation of required resources, estimation of construction cost and process management at large. In each area, methodologies, classification systems, BIM, and realization tests have been used variably. Nonetheless, several problems have been reported, and among them, it is noticeable that although BIM standard classification system exists, no case was found that has used standard classification system. This means that no interlink among OBS (Object Breakdown Structure), WBS (Work Breakdown Structure) and CBS (Cost Breakdown Structure) was possible. Thus, for nuclear power plant decommissioning, decommissioning method and process, etc. shall be defined clearly in the stage of decommissioning strategy establishment, so that classification systems must be set up

  16. Direction for the Estimation of Required Resources for Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning based on BIM via Case Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Insu; Kim, Woojung

    2014-01-01

    Ways to estimate decommissioning of required resources in the past have imposed great uncertainty since they analyze required resources at the construction stage, analyzing and consulting decommissioning required resources of overseas nuclear power plants. As demands on efficient management and use of complicated construction information increased these days, demands on the introduction of Building Information Modeling (herein after referred to as BIM) technology has increased. In the area of quotation, considerable effects are expected as to the accuracy and reliability predicting construction costs through the characteristics that can automatically estimate quantities by using attribute information of BIM model. BIM-based estimation and quotation of required resources is more accurate than the existing 2D-based quotations and have many advantages such as reviews over constructability and interference. It can be desirable to estimate decommissioning required resources in nuclear power plants using BIM as well as using tools that are compatible with usual international/industrial standards. As we looked into the cases where required resources were estimated, using BIM in Korea and abroad, they dealt with estimation of required resources, estimation of construction cost and process management at large. In each area, methodologies, classification systems, BIM, and realization tests have been used variably. Nonetheless, several problems have been reported, and among them, it is noticeable that although BIM standard classification system exists, no case was found that has used standard classification system. This means that no interlink among OBS (Object Breakdown Structure), WBS (Work Breakdown Structure) and CBS (Cost Breakdown Structure) was possible. Thus, for nuclear power plant decommissioning, decommissioning method and process, etc. shall be defined clearly in the stage of decommissioning strategy establishment, so that classification systems must be set up

  17. Assessment of the technology required to develop photovoltaic power system for large scale national energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutwack, R.

    1974-01-01

    A technical assessment of a program to develop photovoltaic power system technology for large-scale national energy applications was made by analyzing and judging the alternative candidate photovoltaic systems and development tasks. A program plan was constructed based on achieving the 10 year objective of a program to establish the practicability of large-scale terrestrial power installations using photovoltaic conversion arrays costing less than $0.50/peak W. Guidelines for the tasks of a 5 year program were derived from a set of 5 year objectives deduced from the 10 year objective. This report indicates the need for an early emphasis on the development of the single-crystal Si photovoltaic system for commercial utilization; a production goal of 5 x 10 to the 8th power peak W/year of $0.50 cells was projected for the year 1985. The developments of other photovoltaic conversion systems were assigned to longer range development roles. The status of the technology developments and the applicability of solar arrays in particular power installations, ranging from houses to central power plants, was scheduled to be verified in a series of demonstration projects. The budget recommended for the first 5 year phase of the program is $268.5M.

  18. Reactive Power Injection Strategies for Single-Phase Photovoltaic Systems Considering Grid Requirements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yongheng; Wang, Huai; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2014-01-01

    .g. Germany and Italy. Those advanced features can be provided by next generation PV systems, and will be enhanced in the future to ensure an even efficient and reliable utilization of PV systems. In light of this, Reactive Power Injection (RPI) strategies for single-phase PV systems are explored...... in this paper. The RPI possibilities are: a) constant average active power control, b) constant active current control, c) constant peak current control and d) thermal optimized control strategy. All those strategies comply with the currently active grid codes, but are with different objectives. The proposed...... RPI strategies are demonstrated firstly by simulations and also tested experimentally on a 1 kW singe-phase grid-connected system in LVRT operation mode. Those results show the effectiveness and feasibilities of the proposed strategies with reactive power control during LVRT operation. The design...

  19. On Aggregation Requirements for Harmonic Stability Analysis in Wind Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dowlatabadi, Mohammadkazem Bakhshizadeh; Hjerrild, Jesper; Kocewiak, Łukasz

    2017-01-01

    In harmonic stability studies, stable operation of a power system must be ensured at any possible configuration. This leads to a large number of cases due to the high number of components in a power system. An aggregated model can be used to lower the complexity and to reduce the number...... of different cases. In other words, several similar converters (e.g. Wind Turbine Generators) can be replaced by a converter with larger ratings. In most cases, aggregated models work well for stability studies, however, in some cases the aggregation might result in a wrong evaluation of stability...

  20. Near and long term pulse power requirements for laser driven inertial confinement fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagnon, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    At the Lawrence Livermore Laboraory, major emphasis has been placed upon the development of large, ND:glass laser systems in order to address the basic physics issues associated with light driven fusion targets. A parallel program is directed toward the development of lasers which exhibit higher efficiencies and shorter wavelengths and are thus more suitable as drivers for fusion power plants. This paper discusses the pulse power technology which has been developed to meet the near and far term needs of the laser fusion program at Livermore

  1. Nuclear power plant's safety and risk (requirements of safety and reliability)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzen, L.F.

    1977-01-01

    Starting out from the given safety objectives as they have evolved during the past few years and from the present legal and regulatory provisions for the construction and operation of nuclear power plants, the hazards involved in regular operation, accidents and emergency situations are discussed. In compliance with the positive safety balance of nuclear power plants in the FRG, special attention is focused on the preventive safety analysis within the frame of the nuclear licensing procedure. Reference is made to the beginnings of a comprehensive hazard concept for an unbiased plant assessment. Emergency situations are discussed from the point of view of general hazard comparisons. (orig.) [de

  2. Fair chance required for nuclear power. Plea of the European Nuclear Industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2005-01-01

    The first Euroatom European nuclear conference was held in Brussels on November 25/26, 2004 was attended by more than 250 renowned experts, including more than 20 managers of the board from a dozen European countries. They all agreed that the construction of new nuclear power plants will depend on the public opinion, i.e. it will be a political and communication problem rather than a technical problem. A swing of public opinion is difficult as rational arguments do not apply when emotions are high. The economic efficiency of nuclear power was proved again by the new reactor constructed in Finland. (orig.)

  3. Technical evaluation of RETS-required reports for Zion Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2 for 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, T.E.; Magleby, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    A review was performed on the reports required by Federal regulations and the plant-specific Radiological Effluent Technical Specifications (RETS) for operations conducted at Commonwealth Edison's Zion Nuclear Power Station during 1983. The two periodic reports reviewed: (1) were the Effluent and Waste Disposal Semiannual Report, July-December 1983, and (2) the Radioactive Waste and Environmental Monitoring Annual Report - 1983. The principal review guidelines were the plant's specific RETS and NRC guidance given in NUREG-0133, ''Preparation of Radiological Effluent Technical Specifications for Nuclear Power Plants.'' The Licensee's submitted reports were found to be reasonably complete and consistent with the review guidelines

  4. Power requirements for cosmic ray propagation models involving diffusive reacceleration; estimates and implications for the damping of interstellar turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Luke O.'C.; Strong, Andrew W.

    2017-01-01

    We make quantitative estimates of the power supplied to the Galactic cosmic ray population by second-order Fermi acceleration in the interstellar medium, or as it is usually termed in cosmic ray propagation studies, diffusive reacceleration. Using recent results on the local interstellar spectrum, following Voyager 1's crossing of the heliopause, we show that for parameter values, in particular the Alfvén speed, typically used in propagation codes such as GALPROP to fit the B/C ratio, the power contributed by diffusive reacceleration is significant and can be of order 50% of the total Galactic cosmic ray power. The implications for the damping of interstellar turbulence are briefly considered.

  5. Radium-based estimates of cesium isotope transport and total direct ocean discharges from the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charette, M.A.; Breier, C.F.; Henderson, P.B.; Pike, S.M.; Buesseler, K.O. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA (United States). Dept. of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry; Rypina, I.I.; Jayne, S.R. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA (United States). Dept. of Physical Oceanography

    2013-07-01

    Radium has four naturally occurring isotopes that have proven useful in constraining water mass source, age, and mixing rates in the coastal and open ocean. In this study, we used radium isotopes to determine the fate and flux of runoff-derived cesium from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP). During a June 2011 cruise, the highest cesium (Cs) concentrations were found along the eastern shelf of northern Japan, from Fukushima south, to the edge of the Kuroshio Current, and in an eddy ∝ 130 km from the FNPP site. Locations with the highest cesium also had some of the highest radium activities, suggesting much of the direct ocean discharges of Cs remained in the coastal zone 2-3 months after the accident. We used a short-lived Ra isotope ({sup 223}Ra, t{sub 1/2} = 11.4 d) to derive an average water mass age (T{sub r}) in the coastal zone of 32 days. To ground-truth the Ra age model, we conducted a direct, station-by-station comparison of water mass ages with a numerical oceanographic model and found them to be in excellent agreement (model avg. T{sub r} = 27 days). From these independent T{sub r} values and the inventory of Cs within the water column at the time of our cruise, we were able to calculate an offshore {sup 134}Cs flux of 3.9-4.6 x 10{sup 13} Bq d{sup -1}. Radium-228 (t{sub 1/2} = 5.75 yr) was used to derive a vertical eddy diffusivity (K{sub z}) of 0.7 m{sup 2} d{sup -1} (0.1 cm{sup 2} s{sup -1}); from this K{sub z} and {sup 134}Cs inventory, we estimated a {sup 134}Cs flux across the pycnocline of 1.8 x 10{sup 4} Bq d{sup -1} for the same time period. On average, our results show that horizontal mixing loss of Cs from the coastal zone was ∝ 10{sup 9} greater than vertical exchange below the surface mixed layer. Finally, a mixing/dilution model that utilized our Ra-based and oceanographic model water mass ages produced a direct ocean discharge of {sup 134}Cs from the FNPP of 11-16 PBq at the time of the peak release in early April 2011

  6. Development of procedural requirements for life extension of nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sang Hun; Son, Moon Kyu [Korea Association for Nuclear Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Ham, Cheol Hun [The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Keun Sun [Sunmoon Univ., Asan (Korea, Republic of); Paek, Won Phil [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, Ji Hwan [Baekseok College Cultural Studies, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-15

    Current status of regulatory aspects of life extension and upgrading of NPPs is reviewed for major foreign countries. Most countries require similar technical requirements; however, procedural aspects differ country by country. Regulatory systems suitable for NPP life extension is investigated. The procedure and requirements for reassessment of design life should be established first; then it can be incorporated into the PSR system. The concept of 'Current Licensing Basis (CLB)' can be adopted in Korea, but further elaboration for terms and definitions is needed for common understanding between interested groups. The procedure for maintenance and backfitting should also be improved. The Systems, Structures, and Components (SSCs) that require development of regulatory requirements for life extension are identified based on extensive analysis of foreign experiences. By analyzing the rules and regulations related to life extension. Basic directions are suggested to harmonize or establish regulatory systems for life extension, two-step licensing, PSR, and backfitting.

  7. Quality assurance requirements for the reliability of nuclear power plants in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhutta, S.M.

    1978-01-01

    Quality Assurance (QA) has not been taken very seriously in developing countries despite their having significant nuclear power programmes. This may affect plant reliability and demands that urgent and serious attention be given to the development and implementation of Quality Assurance programmes according to local conditions. Confusion has been created by the differences in definitions and interpretations of terminologies of Quality Assurance and Control. Problems have been aggravated by the lack of clearly defined responsibilities and accountabilities during the projects execution phases of site selection, data collection, design, equipment fabrication and construction, etc. Therefore, reliability of nuclear power plants in developing countries is relatively low. But whenever some programme of QA has been implemented it has helped to improve the plant performance. This is highlighted in this paper by the practical examples for the experience of Karachi Nuclear Power Plant whose forced outages have been reduced by over a half within a period of 3 years. In view of the benefits, a QA programme for Chashma Nuclear Power Project has also been initiated. In this paper urgency is emphasized for the establishment and implementation of a formal QA programme in the developing countries if the reactor suppliers and purchasers both want to ensure higher reliability of their plants. The best way that management can play its role effectively is by setting up a strong QA organization with local personnel, thus helping to attain self-reliance and higher reliability during plant operation. (author)

  8. Prospects of and requirements for nuclear power as a contributor toward managing greenhouse gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassberger, J.A.; Schock, R.N.; Isaacs, T.H.

    1997-01-01

    The world's population, energy demand, and rate of carbon emissions are increasing, but the rates of increase are uncertain. Even modest growth rates present significant challenges to existing and developing technologies for reducing carbon and greenhouse gas emissions while meeting growing energy demands. Nuclear power is currently the most developed alternative to fossil fuel combustion and is one of the options for meeting these challenges. However, there remain significant technical, economic and institutional barriers inhibiting growth of nuclear capacity in the U.S. and slowing implementation worldwide. In the near-term, the major barriers to nuclear power, especially in the U.S., appear to be economic and institutional, with the risks such as safety, waste management and proliferation having reasonably acceptable limits considering the current installed capacity. Future growth of nuclear power, however, may well hinge on continuous evolutionary and perhaps revolutionary reduction of these risks such that the overall risk of nuclear power, aggregated over the entire installed capacity, remains at or below today's risks

  9. Optimization of Power Generation Rights Under the Requirements of Energy Conservation and Emission Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu-ping, YANY; Chong-wei, ZHONG; Fei-fei, YAN; Cheng-yi, TANG

    2018-03-01

    In recent years, the energy crisis and greenhouse effect problem have caused wide public concern, if these issues cannot be resolved quickly, they will bring troubles to people’s lives.In response, many countries around the world have implemented policies to reduce energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. In our country, the electric power industry has made great contribution to the daily life of people and the development of industry, but it is also an industry of high consumption and high emission.In order to realize the sustainable development of society, it is necessary to make energy conservation and emission reduction in the power industry as an important part of the realization of this goal.In this context, power generation trade has become a hot topic in energy conservation and emission reduction.Through the electricity consumption of the units with different power efficiency and coal consumption rate,it can achieve the target of reducing coal consumption, reducing network loss, reducing greenhouse gas emission, and increasing social benefit,and so on. This article put forward a optimal energy model on the basis of guaranteeing safety and environmental protection.In this paper, they used the IEEE30, IEEE39, IEEE57 and IEEE118 node system as an example, and set up the control groups to prove the practicality of the presented model.The solving method of this model was interior-point method.

  10. Summary of international extreme load design requirements for nuclear power plant facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, J.D.

    1978-01-01

    An attempt is made to trace the development of extreme load criteria as it applies to earthquakes, extreme wind, high energy system rupture (LOCA), floods and other manmade and natural external hazards, from 1965 until the present, in the leading nuclear power nations throughout the world. (Author)

  11. Ethnic variation in the correlation between waist to height ratio and total daily insulin requirement in children with type 1 diabetes: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uday, Suma; Gorman, Shaun; Feltbower, Richard G; Mathai, Mathew

    2017-03-01

    Total daily insulin required to achieve glycaemic control in type 1 diabetes (T1D) depends on numerous factors. Correlation of insulin requirement to body mass index and waist circumference has been variably reported in the literature and that of waist-to-height ratio has not been studied. To study the correlation between daily insulin requirement [total daily dose (TDD)] and waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) in a multiethnic population. A cross-sectional study of children (5-18 years) with T1D attending a diabetes clinic in a multiethnic population in Bradford, UK was conducted. Physical measurements were undertaken in the clinic setting and data collected from case notes and patients/carers. Sixty nine patients with mean age 12.7(±3.1) yr, duration of diabetes 5.4(±3.5) yr and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) 80(±18)mmol/mol(9.5 ± 1.6%) were recruited. Nearly 54% (n = 37) were white and 46% were non-white (29 Asian Pakistani; 1 Indian; 2 mixed White Afro-Caribbean). The two groups had similar demographics and disease profiles. Non-whites compared with whites had a higher prevalence of obesity (15 vs 5%, p 1), family history of type 2 diabetes (T2D) (49% vs. 33%), microalbuminuria (22% vs. 11%, p 1). WHtR and TDD were poorly correlated in the whole group. There was however a significant positive correlation in Caucasians (r = 0.583, N = 37, p 1) and a negative correlation in Asian Pakistanis (r = -0.472, N = 32, p 1); with a significant negative correlation seen in subjects with relatives with T2D (r = -0.86, N = 6, p = 0.02). The variation in correlations highlights that the two ethnic groups behave differently and should therefore be studied separately with regards to factors influencing insulin requirements with careful consideration to the presence of parental IR. Further prospective studies are required to explore the reasons for these differences. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. New formulas for interferometric crosstalk penalty as a function of total crosstalk power, number of crosstalk contributions and signal extinction ratio

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Christian Jørgen; Jeppesen, Palle

    2000-01-01

    Interferometric crosstalk, also called incoherent crosstalk, occurs when reception of a desired signal is disturbed by undesired crosstalk contributions having the same wavelength as the desired signal but independent amplitudes and phases. This crosstalk type is known to be among the most...... destructive phenomena in optical networks owing to its accumulative nature and strong impact on the transmission quality. New formulas state the crosstalk penalty as a function of the total crosstalk power, the number of contributions carrying this power and the signal extinction ratio. We consider both PIN...... and optically preamplified receivers. The authors know of no other published formulas which include the number of crosstalk contributions. The crosstalk penalty formulas are empirical, and they are based on a numerical model. This model is described briefly along with its experimental verification before...

  13. Identification of Combined Power Quality Disturbances Using Singular Value Decomposition (SVD and Total Least Squares-Estimation of Signal Parameters via Rotational Invariance Techniques (TLS-ESPRIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaishuo Xiao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to identify various kinds of combined power quality disturbances, the singular value decomposition (SVD and the improved total least squares-estimation of signal parameters via rotational invariance techniques (TLS-ESPRIT are combined as the basis of disturbance identification in this paper. SVD is applied to identify the catastrophe points of disturbance intervals, based on which the disturbance intervals are segmented. Then the improved TLS-ESPRIT optimized by singular value norm method is used to analyze each data segment, and extract the amplitude, frequency, attenuation coefficient and initial phase of various kinds of disturbances. Multi-group combined disturbance test signals are constructed by MATLAB and the proposed method is also tested by the measured data of IEEE Power and Energy Society (PES Database. The test results show that the new method proposed has a relatively higher accuracy than conventional TLS-ESPRIT, which could be used in the identification of measured data.

  14. Beam Dynamics Requirements for the Powering Scheme of the HL-LHC Triplet

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2075212; Fartoukh, Stephane; Giovannozzi, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    For the HL-LHC, β ∗ values as small as 15 cm are envisaged as baseline scenario for the high luminosity insertions IR1 and IR5, thus leading to an increase of the maximum β- functions in the inner triplet (IT). The larger beta-functions in the IT result in a higher sensitivity of the beam to any linear or non-linear, static or dynamic, field imperfections in the IT region. In this paper, we summarize accordingly the tolerances of the triplet power supplies in terms of current ripple, stability and reproducibility. Both the baseline IT powering scheme and other alternative schemes will be presented, the later reducing the tune shift caused by a current modulation and thus weakening its possible impact on the long term stability.

  15. Mirror and grating surface figure requirements for grazing incidence synchrotron radiation beamlines: Power loading effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Sharma, S.

    1987-01-01

    At present, grazing incidence mirrors are used almost exclusively as the first optical element in VUV and soft x-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines. The performance of these mirrors is determined by thermal and mechanical stress-induced figure errors as well as by figure errors remaining from the grinding and polishing process. With the advent of VUV and soft x-ray undulators and wigglers has come a new set of thermal stress problems related to both the magnitude and the spatial distribution of power from these devices. In many cases the power load on the entrance slits and gratings in these beamlines is no longer negligible. The dependence of thermally-induced front-end mirror figure errors on various storage ring and insertion device parameters (especially those at the National Synchrotron Light Source) and the effects of these figure errors on two classes of soft x-ray beamlines are presented.

  16. Functional requirements for an intelligent RPC. [remote power controller for spaceborne electrical distribution system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucoin, B. M.; Heller, R. P.

    1990-01-01

    An intelligent remote power controller (RPC) based on microcomputer technology can implement advanced functions for the accurate and secure detection of all types of faults on a spaceborne electrical distribution system. The intelligent RPC will implement conventional protection functions such as overcurrent, under-voltage, and ground fault protection. Advanced functions for the detection of soft faults, which cannot presently be detected, can also be implemented. Adaptive overcurrent protection changes overcurrent settings based on connected load. Incipient and high-impedance fault detection provides early detection of arcing conditions to prevent fires, and to clear and reconfigure circuits before soft faults progress to a hard-fault condition. Power electronics techniques can be used to implement fault current limiting to prevent voltage dips during hard faults. It is concluded that these techniques will enhance the overall safety and reliability of the distribution system.

  17. Requirements for class 1, 2, and 3 pressure-retaining systems and components in CANDU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    This third edition of CAN/CSA-N285.1 supersedes the 1981 and 1975 editions. It provides the specific requirements for design, fabrication, and installation of Class 1, 2 and 3 pressure-retaining systems and components in CANDU nuclear power plants, and over pressure protection of the heat transport system. The general requirements for pressure-retaining systems and components are given in CSA Standard CAN/CSA-N285.0, with which Class 1, 2 and 3 systems and components must also comply

  18. Committed emissions from existing and planned power plants and asset stranding required to meet the Paris Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeiffer, Alexander; Hepburn, Cameron; Vogt-Schilb, Adrien; Caldecott, Ben

    2018-05-01

    Over the coming decade, the power sector is expected to invest ~7.2 trillion USD in power plants and grids globally, much of it into CO2-emitting coal and gas plants. These assets typically have long lifetimes and commit large amounts of (future) CO2 emissions. Here, we analyze the historic development of emission commitments from power plants and compare the emissions committed by current and planned plants with remaining carbon budgets. Based on this comparison we derive the likely amount of stranded assets that would be required to meet the 1.5 °C–2 °C global warming goal. We find that even though the growth of emission commitments has slowed down in recent years, currently operating generators still commit us to emissions (~300 GtCO2) above the levels compatible with the average 1.5 °C–2 °C scenario (~240 GtCO2). Furthermore, the current pipeline of power plants would add almost the same amount of additional commitments (~270 GtCO2). Even if the entire pipeline was cancelled, therefore, ~20% of global capacity would need to be stranded to meet the climate goals set out in the Paris Agreement. Our results can help companies and investors re-assess their investments in fossil-fuel power plants, and policymakers strengthen their policies to avoid further carbon lock-in.

  19. Improving Deterministic Reserve Requirements for Security Constrained Unit Commitment and Scheduling Problems in Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fengyu

    Traditional deterministic reserve requirements rely on ad-hoc, rule of thumb methods to determine adequate reserve in order to ensure a reliable unit commitment. Since congestion and uncertainties exist in the system, both the quantity and the location of reserves are essential to ensure system reliability and market efficiency. The modeling of operating reserves in the existing deterministic reserve requirements acquire the operating reserves on a zonal basis and do not fully capture the impact of congestion. The purpose of a reserve zone is to ensure that operating reserves are spread across the network. Operating reserves are shared inside each reserve zone, but intra-zonal congestion may block the deliverability of operating reserves within a zone. Thus, improving reserve policies such as reserve zones may improve the location and deliverability of reserve. As more non-dispatchable renewable resources are integrated into the grid, it will become increasingly difficult to predict the transfer capabilities and the network congestion. At the same time, renewable resources require operators to acquire more operating reserves. With existing deterministic reserve requirements unable to ensure optimal reserve locations, the importance of reserve location and reserve deliverability will increase. While stochastic programming can be used to determine reserve by explicitly modelling uncertainties, there are still scalability as well as pricing issues. Therefore, new methods to improve existing deterministic reserve requirements are desired. One key barrier of improving existing deterministic reserve requirements is its potential market impacts. A metric, quality of service, is proposed in this thesis to evaluate the price signal and market impacts of proposed hourly reserve zones. Three main goals of this thesis are: 1) to develop a theoretical and mathematical model to better locate reserve while maintaining the deterministic unit commitment and economic dispatch

  20. Numerical investigation of power requirements for ultra-high-speed serial-to-parallel conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lillieholm, Mads; Mulvad, Hans Christian Hansen; Palushani, Evarist

    2012-01-01

    We present a numerical bit-error rate investigation of 160-640 Gbit/s serial-to-parallel conversion by four-wave mixing based time-domain optical Fourier transformation, showing an inverse scaling of the required pump energy per bit with the bit rate.......We present a numerical bit-error rate investigation of 160-640 Gbit/s serial-to-parallel conversion by four-wave mixing based time-domain optical Fourier transformation, showing an inverse scaling of the required pump energy per bit with the bit rate....

  1. Formulation of advanced consumables management models: Environmental control and electrical power system performance models requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, J. K.; Torian, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    Software design specifications for developing environmental control and life support system (ECLSS) and electrical power system (EPS) programs into interactive computer programs are presented. Specifications for the ECLSS program are at the detail design level with respect to modification of an existing batch mode program. The FORTRAN environmental analysis routines (FEAR) are the subject batch mode program. The characteristics of the FEAR program are included for use in modifying batch mode programs to form interactive programs. The EPS program specifications are at the preliminary design level. Emphasis is on top-down structuring in the development of an interactive program.

  2. 1E Qualification of Electrical Equipment - Requirement for Safety Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geambasu, C.; Segarceanu, D.; Albu, J.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents the qualification methods of the safety related equipment according to the safety class 1E. There are presented the qualification principles, procedure and documents, emphasis being laid on the qualification approach by type tests. This approach assumes the equipment test under both normal and accident conditions (design basis events) simulating the operational conditions and covers the largest part of electrical equipment from a nuclear power plant.The safety related equipment is to be qualified is subjected to a sequential test that will be detailed in the paper. (author)

  3. Non-catastrophic release requirements for the next generation of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroeger, W.

    1988-01-01

    In the light of the Chernobyl disaster more restrictive advanced safety criteria (ASC), originally developed for urban siting, may help to increase public acceptance of nuclear power. The basic idea is to limit the activity release resulting from beyond-design severe accidents in such a way that off-site counter (emergency)-measures do not need to be considered for the short-term and long-term protection of the public and the financial damage can be coped with easily by the society. Conservative dose calculation principles are proposed to demonstrate compliance. Severe accidents include all event sequences which dominate risk and need to be identified by PSA. (orig.)

  4. Assessment of the Electrical Power Requirements for Continued Safe Storage and Waste Feed Delivery Phase One

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MAY, T.H.

    2000-01-01

    This study evaluated the ability of the electrical distribution system to support safe storage as well as the first phase of the Waste Feed Delivery. Several recommendations are made to improve the electrical system. The ability to assure adequate Waste Feed Delivery (WFD) to the Privatization Contractor's vitrification facility is a key element in the overall Hanford cleanup schedule. An important aspect of this WFD is the availability of sufficient and appropriate electrical power in the single- and double-shell tank farms. The methodology for performing this review and the results are described

  5. Examination and testing requirements for concrete containment structures for CANDU nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-07-01

    This Standard provides the examination and testing requirements that will apply to the work of any organization participating in the construction, installation, and fabrication of parts or components of concrete containment structures, or both, that are defined as class containment. 2 tabs.

  6. Examination and testing requirements for concrete containment structures for CANDU nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    This Standard provides the examination and testing requirements that will apply to the work of any organization participating in the construction, installation, and fabrication of parts or components of concrete containment structures, or both, that are defined as class containment. 2 tabs

  7. Non-parametric probabilistic forecasts of wind power: required properties and evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinson, Pierre; Nielsen, Henrik Aalborg; Møller, Jan Kloppenborg

    2007-01-01

    of a single or a set of quantile forecasts. The required and desirable properties of such probabilistic forecasts are defined and a framework for their evaluation is proposed. This framework is applied for evaluating the quality of two statistical methods producing full predictive distributions from point...

  8. An Approach to Establish Design Requirements for Human-System Interface (HSI) of Automatic Systems in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuraslinda, Anuar; Kim, Jonghyun [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    This paper aims to demonstrate an approach to establish the design requirements for automatic systems in nuclear power plant (NPP) by using a powerful tool called Itemized Sequence Diagram (ISD). The process starts with function allocation by defining a set of levels of automation (LOAs). Then, task allocation is done using the ISD and finally the design requirements are established by examining the interaction points between human operator and automation, which are all located on the interface as modeled in the ISD. The strengths of this approach are discussed and a suggestion to integrate with that of the methodology employed to produce the existing guidelines or guidance is included in this paper. Some issues of automation have been addressed earlier in this paper and 12 design requirements that address human-system interaction were suggested by using the ISD as a tool to identify the interaction points between human operator and automation. The integration of the proposed approach in this paper with that of existing guidance could result in the new issue identification that would call for the establishment of new guidance. For example, Requirement 11 states that the HSI should provide the means for take-over from automatic to manual control was not mentioned in the existing guidance.

  9. Estimated radiological effects of the normal discharge of radioactivity from nuclear power plants in the Netherlands with a total capacity of 3500 MWe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lugt, G. van der; Wijker, H.; Kema, N.V.

    1977-01-01

    In the Netherlands discussions are going on about the installation of three nuclear power plants, leading with the two existing plants to a total capacity of 3500 MWe. To have an impression of the radiological impact of this program, calculations were carried out concerning the population doses due to the discharge of radioactivity from the plants during normal operation. The discharge via the ventilation stack gives doses due to noble gases, halogens and particulate material. The population dose due to the halogens in the grass-milk-man chain is estimated using the real distribution of grass-land around the reactor sites. It could be concluded that the population dose due to the contamination of crops and fruit is negligeable. A conservative estimation is made for the dose due to the discharge of tritium. The population dose due to the discharge in the cooling water is calculated using the following pathways: drinking water; consumption of fish; consumption of meat from animals fed with fish products. The individual doses caused by the normal discharge of a 1000 MWe plant appeared to be very low, mostly below 1 mrem/year. The population dose is in the order of some tens manrems. The total dose of the 5 nuclear power plants to the dutch population is not more than 70 manrem. Using a linear dose-effect relationship the health effects to the population are estimated and compared with the normal frequency

  10. Effect of Antihypertensive Therapy on SCORE-Estimated Total Cardiovascular Risk: Results from an Open-Label, Multinational Investigation—The POWER Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy De Backer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. High blood pressure is a substantial risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Design & Methods. The Physicians' Observational Work on patient Education according to their vascular Risk (POWER survey was an open-label investigation of eprosartan-based therapy (EBT for control of high blood pressure in primary care centers in 16 countries. A prespecified element of this research was appraisal of the impact of EBT on estimated 10-year risk of a fatal cardiovascular event as determined by the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE model. Results. SCORE estimates of CVD risk were obtained at baseline from 12,718 patients in 15 countries (6504 men and from 9577 patients at 6 months. During EBT mean (±SD systolic/diastolic blood pressures declined from 160.2 ± 13.7/94.1 ± 9.1 mmHg to 134.5 ± 11.2/81.4 ± 7.4 mmHg. This was accompanied by a 38% reduction in mean SCORE-estimated CVD risk and an improvement in SCORE risk classification of one category or more in 3506 patients (36.6%. Conclusion. Experience in POWER affirms that (a effective pharmacological control of blood pressure is feasible in the primary care setting and is accompanied by a reduction in total CVD risk and (b the SCORE instrument is effective in this setting for the monitoring of total CVD risk.

  11. Effect of Antihypertensive Therapy on SCORE-Estimated Total Cardiovascular Risk: Results from an Open-Label, Multinational Investigation—The POWER Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Backer, Guy; Petrella, Robert J.; Goudev, Assen R.; Radaideh, Ghazi Ahmad; Rynkiewicz, Andrzej; Pathak, Atul

    2013-01-01

    Background. High blood pressure is a substantial risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Design & Methods. The Physicians' Observational Work on patient Education according to their vascular Risk (POWER) survey was an open-label investigation of eprosartan-based therapy (EBT) for control of high blood pressure in primary care centers in 16 countries. A prespecified element of this research was appraisal of the impact of EBT on estimated 10-year risk of a fatal cardiovascular event as determined by the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) model. Results. SCORE estimates of CVD risk were obtained at baseline from 12,718 patients in 15 countries (6504 men) and from 9577 patients at 6 months. During EBT mean (±SD) systolic/diastolic blood pressures declined from 160.2 ± 13.7/94.1 ± 9.1 mmHg to 134.5 ± 11.2/81.4 ± 7.4 mmHg. This was accompanied by a 38% reduction in mean SCORE-estimated CVD risk and an improvement in SCORE risk classification of one category or more in 3506 patients (36.6%). Conclusion. Experience in POWER affirms that (a) effective pharmacological control of blood pressure is feasible in the primary care setting and is accompanied by a reduction in total CVD risk and (b) the SCORE instrument is effective in this setting for the monitoring of total CVD risk. PMID:23997946

  12. Power line conductor icing prevention by the Joule effect : parametric analysis and energy requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter, Z.; Farzaneh, M.; Kiss, L.I. [Quebec Univ., Chicoutimi, PQ (Canada). Industrial Chair on Atmospheric Icing of Power Network Equipment

    2005-07-01

    A mathematical model to calculate the minimum current intensity needed to prevent potentially damaging ice accretion on power line conductors was presented. The influence of atmospheric parameters such as wind speed, air temperature and liquid water were considered. Energy analysis was developed for an aluminum and steel reinforced conductor with circular cylindrical wire and concentric layers. Atmospheric parameters and the duration of the freezing conditions were considered with reference to the Joule effect. The model was then compared with experiments and simulations performed at an icing wind tunnel and in a climate room. It was determined that the equivalent thermal conductivity of the conductor should be assessed to identify the temperature distribution in the power line conductor. The radial component of the thermal conductivity was estimated on the basis of experiments performed in the wind tunnel, which provided a good estimation of the equivalent thermal conductivity and overall heat transfer coefficient around the stranded conductor. Experimental results were compared with values obtained from theoretically equivalent conductivity models. It was observed that the convective heat transfer coefficients around stranded conductors were higher than around smooth cylinders, and that the mathematical calculations slightly overestimated the wind tunnel measurements due to difficulties in estimating the wetted surface and the overall convection heat transfer coefficient around a stranded conductor. The typical range for the equivalent thermal conductivity of stranded conductors was also presented. 13 refs., 1 tab., 11 figs.

  13. Conditions of external loading of nuclear power plant structures by vapor cloud explosions and design requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geiger, W.

    1977-01-01

    In the design of nuclear power plant structures in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) the external loading by pressure waves from unconfined vapor cloud explosions is taken into account. The loading conditions used are based on simplified model considerations for the sequence of events which generates the pressure wave. The basic assumption is that the explosion of unconfined vapor clouds can evolve only in the form of a deflagration wave with a maximum overpressure of 0.3 bar. The research on gas explosions conducted in the FRG with a view to external reactor safety just as similar work in other countries demonstrates that there are still various problems which need further clarification. The principal issues are the maximum conceivable load and the modes of structrual response. This paper presents the main results of a status report commissioned by the German Ministry of the Inertior in which the whole sequence of events leading to the external loading of nuclear power plants and the corresponding response of the structure was scrutinized. Constitutive in establishing the status report have been thorough discussions with experts of the various fields. The following problem areas are discussed in the paper. Incidents leading to the release of large amounts of liquefied gas; Formation of explosive vapor clouds, ignition conditions; Development of the explosion, generation of the pressure wave; Interaction between pressure wave and reactor building. It is outlined where definite statements are possible and where uncertainties and information gaps exist. (Auth.)

  14. Current summary of international extreme load design requirements for nuclear power plant facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    The development of extreme load design criteria both as to rate and depth within any national jurisdiction as applied to nuclear power plant design is a function of several factors. The prime factor is the number of nuclear power plant facilities which are operating, under construction or planned in a given country. The second most important factor seems to be the degree of development of a domestic independent nuclear steam system supplier, NSSS vendor. Finally, countries whose domestic NSSS firms are active in the export market appear to have more active criteria development programs or at least they appear more visible to the foreign observer. For the purposes of this paper, extreme loads are defined as those loads having probability of occurence less than 10 -1 /yr and whose occurence could result in radiological consequences in excess of those permitted by national health standards. The specific loads considered include earthquake, extreme wind (tornado), airplane crash, detonation, and high energy system rupture. The paper identifies five national centers for extreme load criteria development; Canada, Great Britian, USA, USSR, and West Germany with both France and Japan also about to appear as independent centers of criteria development. Criteria under development by each national center are discussed in detail. (orig.)

  15. Material property requirements for application leak-before-break technology on nuclear power plant high-energy piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Chengliang; Deng Xiaoyun; Yin Zhiying; Liu Meng

    2012-01-01

    The application of leak-before-break (LBB) technology on nuclear power plant high-energy piping systems can improve their safety and economy, while propose some new requirements on testing material properties. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's LBB related standard review plan and implementation specifications were analyzed, and test items, object, temperature, quantity and thermal aging effect of five general requirements were summarized. In addition, four key testing technical requirements, such as specimen size, side grooves, strain range and the orientation of specimens were also discussed to ensure the test data usefulness, representativeness and integrity. This study can provide some guidance for the aforementioned test program on domestic materials. (authors)

  16. Power

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmholdt, Claus Westergård; Fogsgaard, Morten

    2016-01-01

    and creativity suggests that when managers give people the opportunity to gain power and explicate that there is reason to be more creative, people will show a boost in creative behaviour. Moreover, this process works best in unstable power hierarchies, which implies that power is treated as a negotiable....... It is thus a central point that power is not necessarily something that breaks down and represses. On the contrary, an explicit focus on the dynamics of power in relation to creativity can be productive for the organisation. Our main focus is to elaborate the implications of this for practice and theory...

  17. Satellite Power Systems (SPS) concept definition study. Volume 6: SPS technology requirements and verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, G.

    1978-01-01

    Volume 6 of the SPS Concept Definition Study is presented and also incorporates results of NASA/MSFC in-house effort. This volume includes a supporting research and technology summary. Other volumes of the final report that provide additional detail are as follows: (1) Executive Summary; (2) SPS System Requirements; (3) SPS Concept Evolution; (4) SPS Point Design Definition; (5) Transportation and Operations Analysis; and Volume 7, SPS Program Plan and Economic Analysis.

  18. Data requirements for meaningful long-term epidemiology study of the commercial nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kniazewycz, B.G.; McArthur, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    The paper briefly reviews typical data collected at nuclear plants and questions whether more definitive information is required to ensure that the risk cancer from radiation exposure can be adequately addressed in the future. Activities by the National Research Council, National Institute of Health, Department of Energy, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, are briefly reviewed, as is the recent study, Federal Research on the Biological and Health Effects of Ionizing Radiation. A potential role for the Health Physics Society is identified

  19. New safety standards of nuclear power station with no requirements of site evaluation. No public dose limit published with possible inappropriateness of reactor site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takitani, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear Regulation Authority was preparing new safety standards in order to aim at starting safety reviews of existing nuclear power station in July 2013. This article commented on issues of major accident, which was defined as severely damaged core event. Accumulated dose at the site boundary of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station totaled to about 234 mSv on March just after the accident with rare gas of 500 PBq, iodine 131 of 500 PBq, cesium 134 of 10 PBq and cesium 137 of 10 PBq released to the atmosphere, which was beyond 100 mSv. As measures for preventing containment vessel failure after core severely damaged, filtered venting system was required to be installed for low radiological risk to the public. However filter was not effective to rare gas. Accumulated doses at the site boundary of several nuclear power stations after filtered venting with 100% release of rare gas could be estimated to be 2-37 Sv mostly depending on the site condition, which might be surely greater than 100 mSv. Omitting site evaluation for major accident, which was beyond design basis accident, was great concern. (T. Tanaka)

  20. 3D Core Model for simulation of nuclear power plants: Simulation requirements, model features, and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zerbino, H.

    1999-01-01

    In 1994-1996, Thomson Training and Simulation (TT and S) earned out the D50 Project, which involved the design and construction of optimized replica simulators for one Dutch and three German Nuclear Power Plants. It was recognized early on that the faithful reproduction of the Siemens reactor control and protection systems would impose extremely stringent demands on the simulation models, particularly the Core physics and the RCS thermohydraulics. The quality of the models, and their thorough validation, were thus essential. The present paper describes the main features of the fully 3D Core model implemented by TT and S, and its extensive validation campaign, which was defined in extremely positive collaboration with the Customer and the Core Data suppliers. (author)

  1. Needs and accuracy requirements for fission product nuclear data in the physics design of power reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowlands, J.L.

    1978-01-01

    The fission product nuclear data accuracy requirements for fast and thermal reactor core performance predictions were reviewed by Tyror at the Bologna FPND Meeting. The status of the data was assessed at the Meeting and it was concluded that the requirements of thermal reactors were largely met, and the yield data requirements of fast reactors, but not the cross section requirements, were met. However, the World Request List for Nuclear Data (WRENDA) contains a number of requests for fission product capture cross sections in the energy range of interest for thermal reactors. Recent reports indicate that the fast reactor reactivity requirements might have been met by integral measurements made in zero power critical assemblies. However, there are requests for the differential cross sections of the individual isotopes to be determined in addition to the integral data requirements. The fast reactor requirements are reviewed, taking into account some more recent studies of the effects of fission products. The sodium void reactivity effect depends on the fission product cross sections in a different way to the fission product reactivity effect in a normal core. This requirement might call for different types of measurement. There is currently an interest in high burnup fuel cycles and alternative fuel cycles. These might require more accurate fission product data, data for individual isotopes and data for capture products. Recent calculations of the time dependence of fission product reactivity effects show that this is dependent upon the data set used and there are significant uncertainties. Some recent thermal reactor studies on approximations in the treatment of decay chains and the importance of xenon and samarium poisoning are also summarized. (author)

  2. An analysis of Technical Security Control Requirements For Digital I and C Systems in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Jaegu; Lee, Jungwoon; Park, Geeyong; Kwon, Keechoon; Lee, Dongyoung; Lee, Cheolkwon

    2013-01-01

    Instrumentation and control systems in nuclear power plants have been digitalized for the purpose of maintenance and precise operation. This digitalization, however, brings out issues related to cyber security. In the most recent past, international standard organizations, regulatory institutes, and research institutes have performed a number of studies addressing these systems cyber security. In order to provide information helpful to the system designers in their application of cyber security for the systems, this paper presents methods and considerations to define attack vectors in a target system, to review and select the requirements in the Regulatory Guide 5.71, and to integrate the results to identify applicable technical security control requirements. In this study, attack vectors are analyzed through the vulnerability analyses and penetration tests with a simplified safety system, and the elements of critical digital assets acting as attack vectors are identified. Among the security control requirements listed in Appendices B and C to Regulatory Guide 5.71, those that should be implemented into the systems are selected and classified in groups of technical security control requirements using the results of the attack vector analysis. For the attack vector elements of critical digital assets, all the technical security control requirements are evaluated to determine whether they are applicable and effective, and considerations in this evaluation are also discussed. The technical security control requirements in three important categories of access control, monitoring and logging, and encryption are derived and grouped according to the elements of attack vectors as results for the sample safety system

  3. An analysis of Technical Security Control Requirements For Digital I and C Systems in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jaegu; Lee, Jungwoon; Park, Geeyong; Kwon, Keechoon; Lee, Dongyoung; Lee, Cheolkwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    Instrumentation and control systems in nuclear power plants have been digitalized for the purpose of maintenance and precise operation. This digitalization, however, brings out issues related to cyber security. In the most recent past, international standard organizations, regulatory institutes, and research institutes have performed a number of studies addressing these systems cyber security. In order to provide information helpful to the system designers in their application of cyber security for the systems, this paper presents methods and considerations to define attack vectors in a target system, to review and select the requirements in the Regulatory Guide 5.71, and to integrate the results to identify applicable technical security control requirements. In this study, attack vectors are analyzed through the vulnerability analyses and penetration tests with a simplified safety system, and the elements of critical digital assets acting as attack vectors are identified. Among the security control requirements listed in Appendices B and C to Regulatory Guide 5.71, those that should be implemented into the systems are selected and classified in groups of technical security control requirements using the results of the attack vector analysis. For the attack vector elements of critical digital assets, all the technical security control requirements are evaluated to determine whether they are applicable and effective, and considerations in this evaluation are also discussed. The technical security control requirements in three important categories of access control, monitoring and logging, and encryption are derived and grouped according to the elements of attack vectors as results for the sample safety system.

  4. Power requirements and environmental impact of a pedelec. A case study based on real-life applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abagnale, Carmelina, E-mail: c.abagnale@unina.it; Cardone, Massimo, E-mail: massimo.cardone@unina.it; Iodice, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.iodice@unina.it; Strano, Salvatore, E-mail: salvatore.strano@unina.it; Terzo, Mario, E-mail: m.terzo@unina.it; Vorraro, Giovanni, E-mail: giovanni.vorraro@unina.it

    2015-07-15

    This paper describes the methodologies to appraise the power requests and environmental analysis of an electrically assisted bicycle under real driving conditions, also containing regulations and technical-science-related aspects. For this purpose, in this study, the on-road test program of an electrically assisted bicycle was executed in the urban area of Naples on different test tracks, so a general assessment about its driving behavior under several driving conditions was performed. The power requirements in different typical riding situations were estimated by a procedure based on the experimental kinematic parameters that characterize the driving dynamics collected during the real-life applications. An environmental analysis was also performed, with a methodology that takes into account the environmental assessment of a moped by measuring the experimental moped exhaust emissions of the regulated pollutants. Starting from the results acquired during the different test samples, besides, an assessment of the electric traction offered by this pedelec on the driving comfort was evaluated for different riding situations. - Highlights: • The power requirements of a pedelec in typical riding conditions were identified. • The estimated electricity consumption for battery recharging was defined. • An environmental valuation of the tested pedelec and of a moped was performed. • Emissions that could be saved utilizing a pedelec instead of a moped were derived.

  5. Power requirements and environmental impact of a pedelec. A case study based on real-life applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abagnale, Carmelina; Cardone, Massimo; Iodice, Paolo; Strano, Salvatore; Terzo, Mario; Vorraro, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the methodologies to appraise the power requests and environmental analysis of an electrically assisted bicycle under real driving conditions, also containing regulations and technical-science-related aspects. For this purpose, in this study, the on-road test program of an electrically assisted bicycle was executed in the urban area of Naples on different test tracks, so a general assessment about its driving behavior under several driving conditions was performed. The power requirements in different typical riding situations were estimated by a procedure based on the experimental kinematic parameters that characterize the driving dynamics collected during the real-life applications. An environmental analysis was also performed, with a methodology that takes into account the environmental assessment of a moped by measuring the experimental moped exhaust emissions of the regulated pollutants. Starting from the results acquired during the different test samples, besides, an assessment of the electric traction offered by this pedelec on the driving comfort was evaluated for different riding situations. - Highlights: • The power requirements of a pedelec in typical riding conditions were identified. • The estimated electricity consumption for battery recharging was defined. • An environmental valuation of the tested pedelec and of a moped was performed. • Emissions that could be saved utilizing a pedelec instead of a moped were derived

  6. Supplementary quality assurance requirements for installation, inspection, and testing of structural concrete and structural steel during the construction phase of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1974-01-01

    This standard sets forth the supplementary quality assurance requirements for installation, inspection, and testing of structural concrete and structural steel for nuclear power plant construction. The requirements may also be extended to other appropriate parts of nuclear power plants when specified in contract documents. This standard is intended to be used in conjunction with ANSI N45.2

  7. Does a thrombin-based topical haemostatic agent reduce blood loss and transfusion requirements after total knee revision surgery? A randomized, controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanò, Carlo L; Monti, Lorenzo; Logoluso, Nicola; Romanò, Delia; Drago, Lorenzo

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the efficacy of a thrombin-based topical haemostatic in reducing blood requirements after total knee replacement (TKR) revision surgery. This prospective, randomized, controlled study was designed to evaluate the haemostatic efficacy and safety of a thrombin-based topical haemostatic (Floseal) versus standard treatment in patients receiving total knee revision arthroplasty. The decrease in haemoglobin values postsurgery and the blood units transfused were recorded. The decision to transfuse was made by a surgeon blinded to the patient's group allocation. Forty-eight patients were enroled in the study; twenty-four patients each were randomized to the treatment and control groups, respectively. The median decrease in haemoglobin concentration on the first postoperative day was 2.2 g/dL in the treatment group and 2.7 g/dL in the control group. A significant reduction in units of blood transfused was also observed in the treatment group compared with the control group [1.1 ± 1.13 (range 0-4) vs. 1.9 ± 1.41 (range 0-5) blood units; P = 0.04]. No major treatment-related adverse events were recorded in the study. This study shows that a thrombin-based topical haemostatic reduces the need for blood transfusion in TKR revision surgery. A thrombin-based topical haemostatic agent can be an appropriate solution to enhance haemostasis and vessel sealing at the operative site in TKR revision surgery, in order to reduce the need for blood transfusion after surgery. II.

  8. Applicability of PSD Requirements to the Wisconsin Electric Power Company Port Washington Life Extension Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  9. The injection equipment of future high-speed DI diesel engines with respect to power and pollution requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolenc, A. (Monobloc Dieselmotoren GmbH, Vienna (AT))

    1990-01-01

    The development of high specific output DI diesel engines started at the low-speed end some 50 years ago primarily for marine and traction applications. Movement towards the high-speed end has been slow but steady with the majority of truck engines being very conservatively rated. There has been recent major effort on the automotive car and light commercial vehicle diesel application leading to lightweight DI diesel engines with an engine speed of 4000-5000 r/min and a rated power of 50 kW/litre displacement. These are expected to be on the market in a short period of time. The key point of this development has been the injection equipment including combustion control. In this area the use of modulated injection has the possibility of solving power and pollution requirements. (author).

  10. Mechanical problems in turbomachines, steam and gas turbines. Large steam turbine manufacturing requirements to fulfill customer needs for electric power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazzini, R.

    1975-01-01

    The needs of the customers in large steam turbines for electric power are examined. The choices and decisions made by the utility about the equipments are dealt with after considering the evolution of power demand on the French network. These decisions and choices mainly result from a technical and economic optimization of production equipments: choice of field-proven solutions, trend to lower steam characteristics, trend to higher output of the units (i.e. size effect), spreading out standardization of machines and components (policy of technical as well as technological levels, i.e. mass production effect). Standardization of external characteristics of units of same level of output and even standardization of some main components. The requirements turbine manufacturers have to meet may fall in two categories: on one side: gaining experience and know-how, capability of making high quality experiments, out put capacity, will to hold a high efficiency level; on the other side: meeting the technical requirements related to the contracts. Among these requirements, one can differentiate those dealing with the service expected from the turbine and that resulting in the responsibility limits of the manufacturer and those tending to gain interchangeability, to improve availability of the equipment, to increase safety, and to make operation and maintenance easier [fr

  11. Fracture toughness requirements of reactor vessel material in evaluation of the safety analysis report of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widia Lastana Istanto

    2011-01-01

    Fracture toughness requirements of reactor vessel material that must be met by applicants for nuclear power plants construction permit has been investigated in this paper. The fracture toughness should be described in the Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) document that will be evaluated by the Nuclear Energy Regulatory Agency (BAPETEN). Because BAPETEN does not have a regulations or standards/codes regarding the material used for the reactor vessel, especially in the fracture toughness requirements, then the acceptance criteria that applied to evaluate the fracture toughness of reactor vessel material refers to the regulations/provisions from the countries that have been experienced in the operation of nuclear power plants, such as from the United States, Japan and Korea. Regulations and standards used are 10 CFR Part 50, ASME and ASTM. Fracture toughness of reactor vessel materials are evaluated to ensure compliance of the requirements and provisions of the Regulatory Body and the applicable standards, such as ASME or ASTM, in order to assure a reliability and integrity of the reactor vessels as well as providing an adequate safety margin during the operation, testing, maintenance, and postulated accident conditions over the reactor vessel lifetime. (author)

  12. Technical requirements for the ASME PRA standard for nuclear power plant applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleming, Karl N.; Bernsen, Sidney A.; Simard, Ronald L.

    2000-01-01

    In 1998 the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) formed the Committee on Nuclear Risk Management (CNRM) and a Project Team to develop a standard on PRAs for use in risk informed applications. This ASME standard is being developed to help provide an adequate level of quality in PRAs that are being used to support ASME initiatives to risk informed in-service inspection (ISI) and in-service testing (IST) of nuclear power plant components. A related need supported by the industry and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission is to reduce the level of effort that is being expended in pilot applications of risk informed initiatives to address questions about the sufficiency of quality in the supporting PRA models. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the authors' views on some of the technical issues that were encountered in the effort to develop the ASME PRA standard. Draft 12 of this standard has been issued for comment, and is currently being finalized with the aim of releasing the standard in early 2001. (author)

  13. The technical requirements concerning severe accident management in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Koji; Sugiyama, Tomoyuki; Kamata, Shinya

    2014-01-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake with a magnitude of 9.0 (The 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake) occurred on March 11, 2011, and the beyond design-basis tsunami descended on the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant by the earthquake. Eventually, the core cooling systems of the units 1, 2 and 3 could not operate stably, they all suffered severe accident, and hydrogen explosions were triggered in the reactor buildings of units 1, 3 and 4. In the light of these circumstances, Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ) decided to establish a standard that consolidates the concept of maintaining and improving severe accident management. In the SAM standard, the combination of hardware and software measures based on the risk assessment enables a scientific and rational approach to apply to scenarios of various severe accidents including low-frequency, high-impact events, and assures safety with functionality and flexibility. The SAM standard is already established in March, 2014. After publication of the SAM standard, with regard to effectiveness assessment for accident management and treatment of the uncertainty of severe accident analysis code, for example, the detailed guideline will be prepared as appendices of the standard. (author)

  14. Power system requirements and concepts for a commercially viable lunar base architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenard, Roger X.; Binder, Alan B.

    1999-01-01

    Historically, space exploration has been the province of governments and major agencies within those governmental entities. Recent advances in the state-of-the-art in many subsystem technology areas and the revealed inadequacies of governments to singlehandedly underwrite major exploration ventures present the potential to expand the venue of space exploration to the commercial sector. Further, major international projects such as the International Space Station have revealed weaknesses in both international financing and management of such projects. Cost overruns are the rule and significant schedule slips and/or failures to deliver have resulted in an enormously costly and delayed program. The exorbitant costs have stymied exploration ventures beyond Earth orbit. There are many potential advantages to a commercial operation including cost, schedule and a distinct customer orientation to services. The objective of this paper is to describe the first phase of a phased strawman commercial lunar base concept which operates as a user facility for governmental entities, corporations and companies. The paper will discuss the power system options and conditions under which such a base can be made to become profitable.

  15. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Evolutionary plant designs, Chapter 1, Project No. 669

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    The staff of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has prepared Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of a safety evaluation report (SER), ''NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document -- Evolutionary Plant Designs,'' to document the results of its review of the Electric Power Research Institute's ''Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document.'' This SER gives the results of the staff's review of Volume II of the Requirements Document for evolutionary plant designs, which consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant (approximately 1300 megawatts-electric)

  16. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Evolutionary plant designs, Chapters 2--13, Project No. 669

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    The staff of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has prepared Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of a safety evaluation report (SER), ''NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document -- Evolutionary Plant Designs,'' to document the results of its review of the Electric Power Research Institute's ''Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document.'' This SER gives the results of the staff's review of Volume II of the Requirements Document for evolutionary plant designs, which consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant (approximately 1300 megawatts-electric)

  17. Time and Effort Required by Persons with Spinal Cord Injury to Learn to Use a Powered Exoskeleton for Assisted Walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, Allan J; Bryce, Thomas N; Dijkers, Marcel P

    2015-01-01

    Powered exoskeletons have been demonstrated as being safe for persons with spinal cord injury (SCI), but little is known about how users learn to manage these devices. To quantify the time and effort required by persons with SCI to learn to use an exoskeleton for assisted walking. A convenience sample was enrolled to learn to use the first-generation Ekso powered exoskeleton to walk. Participants were given up to 24 weekly sessions of instruction. Data were collected on assistance level, walking distance and speed, heart rate, perceived exertion, and adverse events. Time and effort was quantified by the number of sessions required for participants to stand up, walk for 30 minutes, and sit down, initially with minimal and subsequently with contact guard assistance. Of 22 enrolled participants, 9 screen-failed, and 7 had complete data. All of these 7 were men; 2 had tetraplegia and 5 had motor-complete injuries. Of these, 5 participants could stand, walk, and sit with contact guard or close supervision assistance, and 2 required minimal to moderate assistance. Walk times ranged from 28 to 94 minutes with average speeds ranging from 0.11 to 0.21 m/s. For all participants, heart rate changes and reported perceived exertion were consistent with light to moderate exercise. This study provides preliminary evidence that persons with neurological weakness due to SCI can learn to walk with little or no assistance and light to somewhat hard perceived exertion using a powered exoskeleton. Persons with different severities of injury, including those with motor complete C7 tetraplegia and motor incomplete C4 tetraplegia, may be able to learn to use this device.

  18. Better Building Alliance, Plug and Process Loads in Commercial Buildings: Capacity and Power Requirement Analysis (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2014-09-01

    This brochure addresses gaps in actionable knowledge that can help reduce the plug load capacities designed into buildings. Prospective building occupants and real estate brokers lack accurate references for plug and process load (PPL) capacity requirements, so they often request 5-10 W/ft2 in their lease agreements. This brochure should be used to make these decisions so systems can operate more energy efficiently; upfront capital costs will also decrease. This information can also be used to drive changes in negotiations about PPL energy demands. It should enable brokers and tenants to agree about lower PPL capacities. Owner-occupied buildings will also benefit. Overestimating PPL capacity leads designers to oversize electrical infrastructure and cooling systems.

  19. Testing, licensing, and code requirements for seismic isolation systems (for nuclear power plants)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidensticker, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    The use of seismic isolation as an earthquake hazard mitigation strategy for nuclear reactor power plants is rapidly receiving interest throughout the world. Seismic isolation has already been used on at least two French PWR plants, was to have been used for plants to be built in Iran, and is under serious consideration for advanced LMR plants (in the US, UK, France, and Japan). In addition, there is a growing use of seismic isolation throughout the world for other critical facilities such as hospitals, emergency facilities, buildings with very high-cost equipment (e.g., computers) and as a strategy to reduce loss of life and expensive equipment in earthquakes. Such a design approach is in complete contrast to the conventional seismic design strategy in which the structure and components are provided with sufficient strength and ductility to resist the earthquake forces and to prevent structural collapses or failure. The use of seismic isolation for nuclear plants can, therefore, be expected to be a significant licensing issue. For isolation, the licensing process must shift away in large measure from the superstructure and concentrate on the behavior of the seismic isolation system. This paper is not intended to promote the advantages of seismic isolation system, but to explore in some detail those technical issues which must be satisfactorily addressed to achieve full licensability of the use of seismic isolation as a viable, attractive and economical alternative to current traditional design approaches. Special problems and topics associated with testing and codes and standards development are addressed. A positive program for approach or strategy to secure licensing is presented

  20. Testing, licensing, and code requirements for seismic isolation systems (for nuclear power plants)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidensticker, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    The use of seismic isolation as an earthquake hazard mitigation strategy for nuclear reactor power plants is rapidly receiving interest throughout the world. Seismic isolation has already been used on at least two French PWR plants, was to have been used for plants to be built in Iran, and is under serious consideration for advanced LMR plants (in the US, UK, France, and Japan). In addition, there is a growing use of seismic isolation throughout the world for other critical facilities such as hospitals, emergency facilities, buildings with very high-cost equipment (e.g., computers) and as a strategy to reduce loss of life and expensive equipment in earthquakes. Such a design approach is in complete contrast to the conventional seismic design strategy in which the structure and components are provided with sufficient strength and ductility to resist the earthquake forces and to prevent structural collapses or failure. The use of seismic isolation for nuclear plants can, therefore, be expected to be a significant licensing issue. For isolation, the licensing process must shift away in large measure from the superstructure and concentrate on the behavior of the seismic isolation system. This paper is not intended to promote the advantages of seismic isolation system, but to explore in some detail those technical issues which must be satisfactorily addressed to achieve full licensability of the use of seismic isolation as a viable, attractive and economical alternative to current traditional design approaches. Special problems and topics associated with testing and codes and standards development are addressed. A positive program for approach or strategy to secure licensing is presented.

  1. Report on the seminar on supporting industrial infrastructure requirements and development for nuclear power, Vienna, 14-18 April, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    The Seminar on Supporting Industrial Infrastructure Requirements and Development for Nuclear Power reviewed the following problem areas: establishing the programmatic objectives of a realistic national participation and the technology transfer which would be necessary to qualify such a participation; promoting the level of industrialization which would be necessary to attain the targeted national participation; assuring quality in industry by enforcing comprehensive QA programme; setting-up a national R and D infrastructure to assist the transfer of technology and act as a permanent asset to solve problems as they arise in industry

  2. Technical evaluation of RETS-required reports for Browns Ferry Nuclear Power Station, Units 1, 2, and 3, for 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, T.E.; Magleby, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    A review was performed of reports required by federal regulations and the plant-specific radiological effluent technical specifications (RETS) for operations conducted at Tennessee Valley Authority's Browns Ferry Nuclear Station, Units 1, 2, and 3, during 1983. The two periodic reports reviewed were (a) the Effluents and Waste Disposal Semiannual Report, First Half 1983 and (b) the Effluents and Waste Disposal Semiannual Report, Second Half 1983. The principal review guidelines were the plant's specific RETs and NRC guidance given in NUREG-0133, ''Preparation of Radiological Effluent Technical Specifications for Nuclear Power Plants.'' The Licensee's submitted reports were found to be reasonably complete and consistent with the review guidelines

  3. Feasibility of power contrast injections and bolus triggering during CT scans in oncologic patients with totally implantable venous access ports of the forearm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goltz, Jan Peter; Machann, Wolfram; Noack, Claudia; Hahn, Dietbert; Kickuth, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    Background: Conventional totally implantable venous access ports (TIVAPs) are not approved for power contrast injections but often remain the only venous access site in oncologic patients. Therefore, these devices can play an important role if patients with a TIVAP are scheduled for a contrast-enhanced computed tomography (ceCT) as vascular access may become more difficult during the course of chemotherapy. Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and safety of power injections in conventional TIVAPs in the forearm and to analyze the feasibility of bolus triggering during CT scans. Material and Methods: In this retrospective study we analyzed 177 power injections in 141 patients with TIVAPs in the forearm. Between October 2008 and March 2010 all patients underwent power injections (1.5 mL/s, 150 psi) via the TIVAP for ceCT because conventional vascular access via a peripheral vein had failed. Adequate functioning and catheter's tip location after injection were evaluated. Peak injection pressure and attenuation levels of aorta, liver and spleen were analyzed and compared with results of 50 patients who were injected via classical peripheral cannulas (3 mL/s, 300 psi). Feasibility of automatic scan initiation was evaluated. In vitro the port was stressed with 5 mL/s (300 psi). Results: One TIVAP showed tip dislocation with catheter rupture. Three (2.1%) devices were explanted owing to assumed infection within 4 weeks after the injection. Mean injection pressure was 121.9 ±24.1 psi. Triggering with automatic scan initiation succeeded in 13/44 (29.6%) scans. Injection via classical cannulas resulted in significantly higher enhancement (p < 0.05). In vitro the port system tolerated flow rates of up to 5 mL/s, injection pressures of up to 338 psi. Conclusion: Power injection is a safe alternative for patients with TIVAPs in the forearm if classic vascular access ultimately fails. Triggering was successful in one-third of the attempts. Image quality in the arterial phase

  4. Development of an Inline Dry Power Inhaler That Requires Low Air Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Dale; Hindle, Michael; Longest, P Worth

    2017-12-20

    Inline dry powder inhalers (DPIs) are actuated by an external air source and have distinct advantages for delivering aerosols to infants and children, and to individuals with compromised lung function or who require ventilator support. However, current inline DPIs either perform poorly, are difficult to operate, and/or require large volumes (∼1 L) of air. The objective of this study was to develop and characterize a new inline DPI for aerosolizing spray-dried formulations with powder masses of 10 mg and higher using a dispersion air volume of 10 mL per actuation that is easy to load (capsule-based) and operate. Primary features of the new low air volume (LV) DPIs are fixed hollow capillaries that both pierce the capsule and provide a continuous flow path for air and aerosol passing through the device. Two different configurations were evaluated, which were a straight-through (ST) device, with the inlet and outlet capillaries on opposite ends of the capsule, and a single-sided (SS) device, with both the inlet and outlet capillaries on the same side of the capsule. The devices were operated with five actuations of a 10 mL air syringe using an albuterol sulfate (AS) excipient-enhanced growth (EEG) formulation. Device emptying and aerosol characteristics were evaluated for multiple device outlet configurations. Each device had specific advantages. The best case ST device produced the smallest aerosol [mean mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) = 1.57 μm; fine particle fraction <5 μm (FPF <5μm ) = 95.2%)] but the mean emitted dose (ED) was 61.9%. The best case SS device improved ED (84.8%), but produced a larger aerosol (MMAD = 2.13 μm; FPF <5μm  = 89.3%) that was marginally higher than the initial deaggregation target. The new LV-DPIs produced an acceptable high-quality aerosol with only 10 mL of dispersion air per actuation and were easy to load and operate. This performance should enable application in high and low flow

  5. Generic requirements specification for qualifying a commercially available PLC for safety-related applications in nuclear power plants. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostenso, A.; May, R.

    1996-12-01

    This is a specification for qualifying a commercially available PLC for application to safety systems in nuclear power plants. The specifications are suitable for evaluating a particular PLC product line as a platform for safety-related applications, establishing a suitable qualification test program, and confirming that the manufacturer has a quality assurance program that is adequate for safety-related applications or is sufficiently complete that, with a reasonable set of compensatory actions, it can be brought into conformance. The specification includes requirements for: (1) quality assurance measures applied to the qualification activities, (2) documentation to support the qualification, and (3) documentation to provide the information needed for applying the qualified PLC platform to a specific application. The specifications are designed to encompass a broad range of safety applications; however, qualifying a particular platform for a different range of applications can be accomplished by appropriate adjustments to the requirements

  6. Revamping of thermal power stations focusing on extension of service life and compliance with environmental requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichler, M.

    1996-01-01

    This paper reports on some of advanced clean coal technologies supplied by the Austrian Energy and Environment GmbH (AE). A short description is given of their main advantages and possibilities to offer optimal environmental and technical solutions for removal of SO x , NO x , HCL, HF, fine dust, aerosols, heavy metals and noise. The following technologies are considered: 1) Revamping; 2) Flue gas desulfuration - Dry Circulating Fluid Bed Scrubbing (DCFBS); MgO-based Regenerative Process (MgO-Process); Semi Dry Flue Gas Desulphurization (Spray Absorption Technology) ; Wet Flue Gas Desulphurization (limestone slurry scrubbing - IFO process); 3) Fluidized Bed Combustion - Bubbling Bed Combustion , Fast Internally Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion, External Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion. AE's objective is to cooperate with local firms which will provide benefits to the local economy in the following manner: 1) Foreign currency requirements for applying the technology to domestic sources would be minimized; 2) A substantial portion of the work involved in engineering, manufacturing and installing the system could be done by local personnel

  7. Requirement analysis of the safety-critical software implementation for the nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Hoon Seon; Jung, Jae Cheon; Kim, Jae Hack; Nam, Sang Ku; Kim, Hang Bae

    2005-01-01

    The safety critical software shall be implemented under the strict regulation and standards along with hardware qualification. In general, the safety critical software has been implemented using functional block language (FBL) and structured language like C in the real project. Software design shall comply with such characteristics as; modularity, simplicity, minimizing the use of sub-routine, and excluding the interrupt logic. To meet these prerequisites, we used the computer-aided software engineering (CASE) tool to substantiate the requirements traceability matrix that were manually developed using Word processors or Spreadsheets. And the coding standard and manual have been developed to confirm the quality of software development process, such as; readability, consistency, and maintainability in compliance with NUREG/CR-6463. System level preliminary hazard analysis (PHA) is performed by analyzing preliminary safety analysis report (PSAR) and FMEA document. The modularity concept is effectively implemented for the overall module configurations and functions using RTP software development tool. The response time imposed on the basis of the deterministic structure of the safety-critical software was measured

  8. Review of nuclear power reactor coolant system leakage events and leak detection requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chokshi, N.C.; Srinivasan, M.; Kupperman, D.S.; Krishnaswamy, P.

    2005-01-01

    In response to the vessel head event at the Davis-Besse reactor, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) formed a Lessons Learned Task Force (LLTF). Four action plans were formulated to respond to the recommendations of the LLTF. The action plans involved efforts on barrier integrity, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), operating experience, and inspection and program management. One part of the action plan on barrier integrity was an assessment to identify potential safety benefits from changes in requirements pertaining to leakage in the reactor coolant system (RCS). In this effort, experiments and models were reviewed to identify correlations between crack size, crack-tip-opening displacement (CTOD), and leak rate in the RCS. Sensitivity studies using the Seepage Quantification of Upsets In Reactor Tubes (SQUIRT) code were carried out to correlate crack parameters, such as crack size, with leak rate for various types of crack configurations in RCS components. A database that identifies the leakage source, leakage rate, and resulting actions from RCS leaks discovered in U.S. light water reactors was developed. Humidity monitoring systems for detecting leakage and acoustic emission crack monitoring systems for the detection of crack initiation and growth before a leak occurs were also considered. New approaches to the detection of a leak in the reactor head region by monitoring boric-acid aerosols were also considered. (authors)

  9. Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. Risk Informed Assessment of Regulatory and Design Requirements for Future Nuclear Power Plants. Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritterbusch, S.E.

    2000-01-01

    The overall goal of this research project is to support innovation in new nuclear power plant designs. This project is examining the implications, for future reactors and future safety regulation, of utilizing a new risk-informed regulatory system as a replacement for the current system. This innovation will be made possible through development of a scientific, highly risk-informed approach for the design and regulation of nuclear power plants. This approach will include the development and.lor confirmation of corresponding regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major impediment to long term competitiveness of new nuclear plants in the U.S. is the capital cost component--which may need to be reduced on the order of 35% to 40% for Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs) such as System 80+ and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). The required cost reduction for an ALWR such as AP600 or AP1000 would be expected to be less. Such reductions in capital cost will require a fundamental reevaluation of the industry standards and regulatory bases under which nuclear plants are designed and licensed. Fortunately, there is now an increasing awareness that many of the existing regulatory requirements and industry standards are not significantly contributing to safety and reliability and, therefore, are unnecessarily adding to nuclear plant costs. Not only does this degrade the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy, it results in unnecessary costs to the American electricity consumer. While addressing these concerns, this research project will be coordinated with current efforts of industry and NRC to develop risk-informed, performance-based regulations that affect the operation of the existing nuclear plants; however, this project will go farther by focusing on the design of new plants

  10. Nuclear Energy Research Initiative. Risk Informed Assessment of Regulatory and Design Requirements for Future Nuclear Power Plants. Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritterbusch, S.E.

    2000-08-01

    The overall goal of this research project is to support innovation in new nuclear power plant designs. This project is examining the implications, for future reactors and future safety regulation, of utilizing a new risk-informed regulatory system as a replacement for the current system. This innovation will be made possible through development of a scientific, highly risk-informed approach for the design and regulation of nuclear power plants. This approach will include the development and.lor confirmation of corresponding regulatory requirements and industry standards. The major impediment to long term competitiveness of new nuclear plants in the U.S. is the capital cost component--which may need to be reduced on the order of 35% to 40% for Advanced Light Water Reactors (ALWRs) such as System 80+ and Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR). The required cost reduction for an ALWR such as AP600 or AP1000 would be expected to be less. Such reductions in capital cost will require a fundamental reevaluation of the industry standards and regulatory bases under which nuclear plants are designed and licensed. Fortunately, there is now an increasing awareness that many of the existing regulatory requirements and industry standards are not significantly contributing to safety and reliability and, therefore, are unnecessarily adding to nuclear plant costs. Not only does this degrade the economic competitiveness of nuclear energy, it results in unnecessary costs to the American electricity consumer. While addressing these concerns, this research project will be coordinated with current efforts of industry and NRC to develop risk-informed, performance-based regulations that affect the operation of the existing nuclear plants; however, this project will go farther by focusing on the design of new plants.

  11. The impact of water use fees on dispatching and water requirements for water-cooled power plants in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Kelly T; Blackhurst, Michael F; King, Carey W; Webber, Michael E

    2014-06-17

    We utilize a unit commitment and dispatch model to estimate how water use fees on power generators would affect dispatching and water requirements by the power sector in the Electric Reliability Council of Texas' (ERCOT) electric grid. Fees ranging from 10 to 1000 USD per acre-foot were separately applied to water withdrawals and consumption. Fees were chosen to be comparable in cost to a range of water supply projects proposed in the Texas Water Development Board's State Water Plan to meet demand through 2050. We found that these fees can reduce water withdrawals and consumption for cooling thermoelectric power plants in ERCOT by as much as 75% and 23%, respectively. To achieve these water savings, wholesale electricity generation costs might increase as much as 120% based on 2011 fuel costs and generation characteristics. We estimate that water saved through these fees is not as cost-effective as conventional long-term water supply projects. However, the electric grid offers short-term flexibility that conventional water supply projects do not. Furthermore, this manuscript discusses conditions under which the grid could be effective at "supplying" water, particularly during emergency drought conditions, by changing its operational conditions.

  12. Inertia may limit efficiency of slow flapping flight, but mayflies show a strategy for reducing the power requirements of loiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usherwood, James R

    2009-01-01

    Predictions from aerodynamic theory often match biological observations very poorly. Many insects and several bird species habitually hover, frequently flying at low advance ratios. Taking helicopter-based aerodynamic theory, wings functioning predominantly for hovering, even for quite small insects, should operate at low angles of attack. However, insect wings operate at very high angles of attack during hovering; reduction in angle of attack should result in considerable energetic savings. Here, I consider the possibility that selection of kinematics is constrained from being aerodynamically optimal due to the inertial power requirements of flapping. Potential increases in aerodynamic efficiency with lower angles of attack during hovering may be outweighed by increases in inertial power due to the associated increases in flapping frequency. For simple hovering, traditional rotary-winged helicopter-like micro air vehicles would be more efficient than their flapping biomimetic counterparts. However, flapping may confer advantages in terms of top speed and manoeuvrability. If flapping-winged micro air vehicles are required to hover or loiter more efficiently, dragonflies and mayflies suggest biomimetic solutions

  13. AN ANALYSIS OF TECHNICAL SECURITY CONTROL REQUIREMENTS FOR DIGITAL I&C SYSTEMS IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JAE-GU SONG

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Instrumentation and control systems in nuclear power plants have been digitalized for the purpose of maintenance and precise operation. This digitalization, however, brings out issues related to cyber security. In the most recent past, international standard organizations, regulatory institutes, and research institutes have performed a number of studies addressing these systems cyber security. In order to provide information helpful to the system designers in their application of cyber security for the systems, this paper presents methods and considerations to define attack vectors in a target system, to review and select the requirements in the Regulatory Guide 5.71, and to integrate the results to identify applicable technical security control requirements. In this study, attack vectors are analyzed through the vulnerability analyses and penetration tests with a simplified safety system, and the elements of critical digital assets acting as attack vectors are identified. Among the security control requirements listed in Appendices B and C to Regulatory Guide 5.71, those that should be implemented into the systems are selected and classified in groups of technical security control requirements using the results of the attack vector analysis. For the attack vector elements of critical digital assets, all the technical security control requirements are evaluated to determine whether they are applicable and effective, and considerations in this evaluation are also discussed. The technical security control requirements in three important categories of access control, monitoring and logging, and encryption are derived and grouped according to the elements of attack vectors as results for the sample safety system.

  14. Simulation of RF power and multi-cusp magnetic field requirement for H{sup −} ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pathak, Manish [Ion Source Lab., Proton Linac & Superconducting Cavities Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Senecha, V.K., E-mail: kumarvsen@gmail.com [Ion Source Lab., Proton Linac & Superconducting Cavities Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Homi Bhabha National Institute, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India); Kumar, Rajnish; Ghodke, Dharmraj V. [Ion Source Lab., Proton Linac & Superconducting Cavities Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore, Madhya Pradesh 452013 (India)

    2016-12-01

    A computer simulation study for multi-cusp RF based H{sup −} ion source has been carried out using energy and particle balance equation for inductively coupled uniformly dense plasma considering sheath formation near the boundary wall of the plasma chamber for RF ion source used as high current injector for 1 Gev H{sup −} Linac project for SNS applications. The average reaction rates for different reactions responsible for H{sup −} ion production and destruction have been considered in the simulation model. The RF power requirement for the caesium free H{sup -} ion source for a maximum possible H{sup −} ion beam current has been derived by evaluating the required current and RF voltage fed to the coil antenna using transformer model for Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP). Different parameters of RF based H{sup −} ion source like excited hydrogen molecular density, H{sup −} ion density, RF voltage and current of RF antenna have been calculated through simulations in the presence and absence of multicusp magnetic field to distinctly observe the effect of multicusp field. The RF power evaluated for different H{sup −} ion current values have been compared with the experimental reported results showing reasonably good agreement considering the fact that some RF power will be reflected from the plasma medium. The results obtained have helped in understanding the optimum field strength and field free regions suitable for volume emission based H{sup −} ion sources. The compact RF ion source exhibits nearly 6 times better efficiency compare to large diameter ion source.

  15. Application of Terahertz Attenuated Total Reflection Spectroscopy to Detect Changes in the Physical Properties of Lactose during the Lubrication Process Required for Drug Formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohi, Masafumi; Momose, Wataru; Yamashita, Kazunari; Hakomori, Tadashi; Sato, Shusaku; Noguchi, Shuji; Terada, Katsuhide

    2017-02-01

    Manufacturing the solid dosage form of an orally administered drug requires lubrication to enhance manufacturability, ensuring that critical quality attributes such as disintegration and dissolution of the drug product are maintained during manufacture. Here, to evaluate lubrication performance during manufacture, we used terahertz attenuated total reflection (THz-ATR) spectroscopy to detect differences in the physical characteristics of the lubricated powder. We applied a simple formulation prepared by blending granulated lactose as filler with magnesium stearate as lubricant. A flat tablet was prepared using the lubricated powder to acquire sharp THz-ATR absorption peaks of the samples. First, we investigated the effects of lubricant concentration and compression pressure on preparation of the tablet and then determined the effect of the pressure applied to samples in contact with the ATR prism on sample absorption amplitude. We focused on the differences in the magnitudes of spectra at the lactose-specific frequency. Second, we conducted the dynamic lubrication process using a 120-L mixer to investigate differences in the magnitudes of absorption corresponding to the lactose-specific frequency during lubrication. In both studies, enriching the lubricated powder with a higher concentration of magnesium stearate or prolonging blending time correlated with higher magnitudes of spectra at the lactose-specific frequency. Further, in the dynamic lubrication study, the wettability and disintegration time of the tablets were compared with the absorption spectra amplitudes at the lactose-specific frequency. We conclude that THz-ATR spectroscopy is useful for detecting differences in densities caused by a change in the physical properties of lactose during lubrication.

  16. Application of the new environment requirements for SC Turceni power compound and their influence on the electric energy cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motocu, Marian; Banica, Valerica

    2006-01-01

    The power sector has a strategic importance. The lasting development strategy of the power sector includes long terms objectives, which represent the national economy requests relating to the resources, safety and energy efficiency assurance, the renewable resources use and the environmental protection. Nowadays, the humanity is confronting three significant challenges: economic decrease, energy and resources consumption and environment preservation. Under the specific circumstances of the power sector, there are necessary investments which imply important financial efforts. The conclusion of the negotiations relating to Chapter no.22 - Environment - and the alignment to European legislation imply special duties for the industrial and power sector, duties that can be carried out only by making use of performing techniques. The European Directive for large combustion plants -2001/80/EC- is intended to improve the air quality in the European Union countries, that is to protect against the health risks due to the air pollution. The large combustion plants contribute considerably to the sulfur dioxides and nitrogen oxides emissions, and that's why it is necessary for the large combustion plants to comply with the requirements according to the best available techniques phase. The choice of the best techniques available for the large combustion plants depends mainly on the following factors: - the polluting agent (sulphur oxides, nitrogen oxides and dust) - plant type - fuel type - combustion technology. The use of the best available techniques makes possible the combustion of inferior coals, permitting the power plants to comply with the European Environment Regulations. These regulations were established to prevent, and where it is not possible, to reduce the emissions and their impact on the environment. According with the plant of implementing the 2001/80/EC Directive, S.C. Turceni Power Compound S.A. obtained as a deadline for the transition period, the date of

  17. A direct methodology to establish design requirements for human–system interface (HSI) of automatic systems in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anuar, Nuraslinda; Kim, Jonghyun

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A systematic method to identify the design requirements for human–system interface is proposed. • Eight combinations of control agents in each control stage (levels of automation) are defined. • The use of Itemized Sequence Diagram (ISD) is discussed for task allocation to control agents. • The design requirements of human–system interface are established based on the produced ISD. - Abstract: This paper suggests a systematic approach to establish design requirements for the human–system interface (HSI) between operators and automatic systems. The role of automation in the control of a nuclear power plant (NPP) operation is to support the human operator and act as an efficient team player to help reduce the human operator’s workload. Some of the problems related to the interaction between the human operator and automation are out-of-the-loop performance, mode errors, role change to supervisory role and final authority issues. Therefore, the design of HSI is critical to avoiding breakdowns in communication between the human operator and the system. In this paper, the design requirements for human–system interface of automatic systems are constructed with the help of a tool called Itemized Sequence Diagram (ISD). Eight levels of automation (LOA) are initially defined in the function allocation and an ISD is drawn for each of the LOA for task allocation. The ISD is a modified version of sequence diagram, which is widely used in systems engineering as well as software engineering. The ISD elements of arrows, messages, actors and alternative boxes collectively show the interactions between the control agents, which are decomposed into four different roles: information acquiring, plant diagnosing, response selecting and response implementing. Eleven design requirements to optimize the human–automation interaction are suggested by using this method. The design requirements produced from the identified interaction points in the ISD are

  18. Requirements for the retrofitting an extension of the maximum voltage power grid from the point of view of environmental protection and cultivated landscape work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The project on the requirements for the retrofitting an extension of the maximum voltage power grid from the point of view of environmental protection and cultivated landscape work includes contributions on the following topics: the development of the European transmission grid, the grid extension law, restrictions for the power grid and their infrastructure, requirements for the regulations concerning the realization of the transnational grid extension, inclusion of the public - public acceptance - communication, requirements concerning the environmental compensation law, overhead line - underground cable - health hazards, ecological effects of overhead lines and underground cables, infrastructural projects, power supply in the future, structural relief by photovoltaics.

  19. Toward the ultimate goal of tritium self-sufficiency: Technical issues and requirements imposed on ARIES advanced power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Guebaly, Laila A.; Malang, Siegfried

    2009-01-01

    Due to the lack of external tritium sources, all fusion power plants must demonstrate a closed tritium fuel cycle. The tritium breeding ratio (TBR) must exceed unity by a certain margin. The key question is: how large is this margin and how high should the calculated TBR be? The TBR requirement is design and breeder-dependent and evolves with time. At present, the ARIES requirement is 1.1 for the calculated overall TBR of LiPb systems. The Net TBR during plant operation could be around 1.01. The difference accounts for deficiencies in the design elements (nuclear data evaluation, neutronics code validation, and 3D modeling tools). Such a low Net TBR of 1.01 is potentially achievable in advanced designs employing advanced physics and technology. A dedicated R and D effort will reduce the difference between the calculated TBR and Net TBR. A generic breeding issue encountered in all fusion designs is whether any fusion design will over-breed or under-breed during plant operation. To achieve the required Net TBR with sufficient precision, an online control of tritium breeding is highly recommended for all fusion designs. This can easily be achieved for liquid breeders through online adjustment of Li enrichment.

  20. FORECASTING OF PRODUCTION OUTPUT FOR LIGHT INDUSTRY ENTERPRISES WITH PURPOSE TO DETERMINE THEIR POWER RESOURCES REQUIREMENTS. Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Romaniuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an interest for those specialists who are involved in solution of efficiency problems in light industry of Belarus as one of the significant industries that forms an economic situation in the Republic, its export potential and social climate. It is extremely relevant for the Belarusian enterprises to reduce production costs in order to preserve and strengthen positions in the light industry market. Operating capacities for production of natural, synthetic textile and knit-wear materials and their subsequent treatment are in many respects unjustifiably energy intensive. Nowadays the only acceptable solution of the problem for reduction of production costs is to decrease its energy component. Such approach requires transition to creation of modern heat and power supply systems at heat technology enterprises.The most important sub-system of the enterprises is own combined production of energy flows of secondary electrical and heat energy, freeze. There is a complex of problems that arise during designing process of tri-generation unit. One of the most important problems presupposes determination of a base load demand and capacity of every energy flow generated by an energy source. The solution is directly related to production output, which in its turn is determined by the requirements of sales markets. Due to various reasons the markets have their own specificity for the enterprises under consideration. It is proposed to use statistical methods for searching requirements. In this connection it is necessary to take into account industry development rate (pre-determined by State Programs, Plans, Governmental solutions, including directive instructions, production volumes of competitive goods and actual goods situation on the sales market.The paper presents the first part of the executed complex investigations which are directed on the development of scientifically-substantiated proposals for higher energy efficiency of the

  1. Power requirements for electron cyclotron current drive and ion cyclotron resonance heating for sawtooth control in ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, I. T.; Graves, J. P.; Sauter, O.; Zucca, C.; Asunta, O.; Buttery, R. J.; Coda, S.; Goodman, T.; Igochine, V.; Johnson, T.; Jucker, M.; La Haye, R. J.; Lennholm, M.; Contributors, JET-EFDA

    2013-06-01

    gain. The power requirements for the necessary degree of sawtooth control using either destabilization or stabilization schemes are expected to be within the specification of anticipated ICRH and ECRH heating in ITER, provided the requisite power can be dedicated to sawtooth control.

  2. Total protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003483.htm Total protein To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The total protein test measures the total amount of two classes ...

  3. Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design. Specific Safety Requirements (Spanish Edition); Seguridad de las centrales nucleares: Diseno. Requisitos de seguridad especificos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-04-15

    This publication is a revision of Safety Requirements No. NS-R-1, Safety of Nuclear Power Plants: Design. It establishes requirements applicable to the design of nuclear power plants and elaborates on the safety objective, safety principles and concepts that provide the basis for deriving the safety requirements that must be met for the design of a nuclear power plant. It will be useful for organizations involved in the design, manufacture, construction, modification, maintenance, operation and decommissioning of nuclear power plants, as well as for regulatory bodies. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Applying the safety principles and concepts; 3. Management of safety in design; 4. Principal technical requirements; 5. General plant design; 6. Design of specific plant systems.

  4. Application profile and requirements on fuel cell heat-and-power stations; Einsatzprofil und Anforderungen an Brennstoffzellen-HKW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruhl, J

    1999-12-31

    In centralized power supply systems, maximum electrical efficiency is required in order to achieve competitiveness with high-efficiency combined-cycle systems. Combined systems of high-temperature fuel cells (MCFC/SOFC) with integrated gas or steam turbine processes are a promising option. In decentralized power supply, low-temperature and medium-temperature fuel cells (PEMFC/PAFC) may be feasible as well provided that the temperature characteristic of the demand side permits the use of the heat generated. In view of the decreasing heat demand of classic cogeneration structures, costly district heating will in the long run be replaced by building-specific cogeneration solutions. In this field, high-efficiency fuel cell systems have advantages over small-scale cogeneration units. If power-specific investments are low, the new technology may be more favourable than separate supply systems with networks and heating boilers and, in consequence, may gain wider acceptance. (orig.) [Deutsch] In der zentralen Stromerzeugung erfordert der Wettbewerb mit hocheffizienten GuD-Anlagen die Maximierung des elektrischen Wirkungsgrades. Hierzu bieten sich Kombianlagen aus Hochtemperatur-Brennstoffzellen (MCFC/SOFC) mit integrierten Dampf- bzw. Gasturbinen-Prozessen an. Im dezentralen Versorgungsbereich bieten zusaetzlich Nieder- und Mitteltemperatur-Brennstoffzellen (PEMFC/PAFC) ein hohes Einsatzpotential, sofern die Temperaturcharakteristik des Bedarfs eine Nutzbarkeit der entstehenden Waerme zulaesst. Unter dem Aspekt des zukuenftig sinkenden Waermebedarfs klassischer KWK-Strukturen wird die kostenintensive Nahwaermeversorgung zunehmend durch gebaeudespezifische KWK-Loesungen verdraengt werden. In diesem Bereich bieten hocheffiziente Brennstoffzellen-Systeme deutliche Vorteile gegenueber motorischen Klein-BHKW. Werden hier geringe leistungsspezifische Investitionen erreicht, kann eine Wirtschaftlichkeit gegenueber der getrennten Versorgung durch Netz und Heizkessel gegeben sein

  5. Regulatory requirements on the design and construction of nuclear power plant control and instrumentation systems in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heikkila, M.A.

    1978-01-01

    The Department of Reactor Safety of the Institute of Radiation Protection, being the nuclear regulatory authority in Finland, has set up regulations which govern the design and construction of NPP systems and components. The regulations are partly compiled from existing codes and standards, published primarily in the United States and Federal Republic of Germany, and partly worked out at the Institute. The regulations are collected to a special set of YVL guides (guides for nuclear power plants), and one of these gives requirements on the design and construction of NPPCI systems and components. The scope of the requirements is based on the safety classification of the CI systems and components. Three safety classes have been singled out: the first for CI systems which take part in reactor protection, the second for other directly safety related, and the third for remaining CI systems important enough to deserve supervision. The safety class for CI components is inherited from the system they belong to. The safety classification of IC systems has direct bearing on the initial assumptions of plant accident analysis. The design principles of IC systems are inspected as part of the preliminary and final safety reports. Focus is directed on the principles of redundancy, separation, diversity, testability, etc. The requirements on IC components are directed to different stages of manufacture, installation and operation. The type tests shall be adequate and acceptably documented. The manufacture of components is followed, the test reports reviewed and the efficiency of manufacturers quality assurance program evaluated. Further requirements concern the installation phase and tests at the end of it, and finally guides include directions for maintenance and testing during the operations phase. (author)

  6. Quality assurance requirements for installation, inspection, and testing of structural concrete and structural steel during the construction phase of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-04-01

    This guide describes a method acceptable to the NRC staff for complying with the Commission's regulations with regard to quality assurance requirements for installation, inspection, and testing of structural concrete and structural steel during the construction phase of nuclear power plants. This guide applies to all types of nuclear power plants. (U.S.)

  7. Systems analysis in the vehicle powertrain technology VI. Dynamic behaviour of the total system of vehicle power trains; Systemanalyse in der Kfz-Antriebstechnik VI. Dynamisches Gesamtsystemverhalten von Fahrzeugantrieben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laschet, Andreas

    2011-07-01

    The thematic issue under consideration sets new topics in the areas of vibration assessment, NVH optimization of vehicle drives as well as total system approach in the context of the tuning of power trains. Due to the continuously increasing demands on drive technical solutions in automotive technology the total analysis of the complete propulsion system shouldalways be highly valued.

  8. FY 1992 report on the results of the demonstration test on the methanol conversion at oil-fired power plant. Demonstration test on a methanol reformation type power generation total system; 1992 nendo sekiyu karyoku hatsudensho metanoru tenkan tou jissho shiken. Metanoru kaishitsu gata hatsuden total system jissho shiken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-03-01

    For the promotion of introduction of methanol to oil-fired power plant, based on the results of the element study, operational study was conducted of a 1,000kW class total system plant for which each of the elements was combined, and the FY 1992 results were summarized. In the operational study, data on various kinds of operational study were sampled of each of the simple cycle/regeneration cycle of liquid methanol and simple cycle/regeneration cycle of gas methanol. As to the reformed gas/water injection/regeneration cycle, all functions as a total system plant worked normally, and it was confirmed that the reformed gas/water injection/regeneration cycle operation could be made possible. Besides, the following were conducted: confirmation test on the performance of the developmental catalyst used in the operational study by bench-scale test device, trial operation for adjustment of gas turbine and combustion study such as the performance test in each cycle, manufacture/study of catalyst for the total system, study for longevity of catalyst for the total system, etc. (NEDO)

  9. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapter 1, project number 669

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the open-quotes Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Documentclose quotes, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume 1, open-quotes ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirementsclose quotes, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, open-quotes NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summaryclose quotes, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff's review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review

  10. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapters 2-13, project number 669

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the open-quotes Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Documentclose quotes, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume I, open-quotes ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirementsclose quotes, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, open-quotes NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summaryclose quotes, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff's review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review

  11. How much water is required for coal power generation: An analysis of gray and blue water footprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaotian; Yang, Donglu; Shen, Xiaoxu; Zhai, Yijie; Zhang, Ruirui; Hong, Jinglan

    2018-04-28

    Although water resource shortage is closely connected with coal-based electricity generation, relevant water footprint analyses remain limited. This study aims to address this limitation by conducting a water footprint analysis of coal-based electricity generation in China for the first time to inform decision-makers about how freshwater consumption and wastewater discharge can be reduced. In China, 1 kWh of electricity supply obtained 1.78 × 10 -3  m 3 of gray water footprint in 2015, and the value is 1.3 times the blue water footprint score of 1.35 × 10 -3  m 3 /kWh. Although water footprint of 1 kWh of electricity supply decreased, the national total gray water footprint increased significantly from 2006 to 2015 with increase in power generating capacity. An opposite trend was observed for blue water footprint. Indirect processes dominated the influence of gray water footprint, whereas direct freshwater consumption contributed 63.6% to blue water footprint. Ameliorating key processes, including transportation, direct freshwater consumption, direct air emissions, and coal washing could thus bring substantial environmental benefits. Moreover, phosphorus, mercury, hexavalent chromium, arsenic, COD, and BOD 5 were key substances of gray water footprint. Results indicated that the combination of railway and water transportation should be prioritized. The targeted transition toward high coal washing rate and pithead power plant development provides a possibility to relieve environmental burdens, but constraints on water resources in coal production sites have to be considered. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Value of a simple technique for the measurement of total renal function and each kidney functions without requiring blood or urine samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyers, A.; Chachati, A.; Godon, J.P.; Rigo, P.

    1985-01-01

    The determination of renal uptake of 99m Tc DTPA and of 131 I Hippuran (as a percentage of the administred dose) at a time interval 1-3 minutes after tracer injection, is a rapid, accurate method for the measurement of total renal function and each kidney functions. Its clinical validity has been confirmed [fr

  13. Reduced endogenous urinary total antioxidant power and its relation of plasma antioxidant activity of superoxide dismutase in individuals with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yui, Kunio; Tanuma, Nasoyuki; Yamada, Hiroshi; Kawasaki, Yohei

    2017-08-01

    Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have impaired detoxification capacity. Investigating the neurobiological bases of impaired antioxidant capacity is thus a research priority in the pathophysiology of ASD. We measured the urinary levels of hexanoyl-lysine (HEL) which is a new oxidative stress biomarker, total antioxidant power (TAP) and DNA methylation biomarker 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), and the plasma levels of superoxide dismutase (SOD), which is a major antioxidant enzyme. We examined whether the urinary levels of these enzymes and biomarkers may be related to symptoms of social impairment in 20 individuals with ASD (meanage,11.1±5.2years) and 12 age- and gender-matched healthy controls (meanage,14.3±6.2years). Symptoms of social impairment were assessed using the Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS). The dietary TAP of the fruit juice, chocolate, cookies, biscuits, jam and marmalade were significantly higher in the ASD group than in the control group, although the intake of nutrients was not significantly different between the groups. The urinary TAP levels were significantly lower in the ASD group than in the control group. There were no significantly differences in urinary HEL and 8-OHdG levels between the ASD and control groups. The SRS scores were significantly higher in the ASD group than in the control group. Stepwise regression analysis revealed that urinary TAP levels and plasma SOD levels can differences in the biomarkers and the SRS scores between the ASD group and the control group. The endogenous antioxidant capacity may be deficient without altered urinary HEL and 8-OHdG levels in individuals with ASD. The plasma SOD levels may be related to reduced endogenous antioxidant capacity. Copyright © 2016 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Feasibility study of the university of Utah TRIGA reactor power upgrade - Part I: Neutronics-based study in respect to control rod system requirements and design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćutić Avdo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a summary of extensive studies in determining the highest achievable power level of the current University of Utah TRIGA core configuration in respect to control rod requirements. Although the currently licensed University of Utah TRIGA power of 100 kW provides an excellent setting for a wide range of experiments, we investigate the possibility of increasing the power with the existing fuel elements and core structure. Thus, we have developed numerical models in combination with experimental procedures so as to assess the potential maximum University of Utah TRIGA power with the currently available control rod system and have created feasibility studies for assessing new core configurations that could provide higher core power levels. For the maximum determined power of a new University of Utah TRIGA core arrangement, a new control rod system was proposed.

  15. Defense Manpower Commission Staff Studies and Supporting Papers. Volume 2. The Total Force and Its Manpower Requirements Including Overviews of Each Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-05-01

    J^^’.Si*!** \\ ir..’’T^-.’-T*TSfn titoa i iMBi’M, OTTŕ" ,^~" fraCk k^«^;-<^»J,..;^.a,L.^t»^^ri^fc ft WBMyLmH’.’JW*^Hi,.J , Jl,l|llliln|Kli|Pffl...also develop a means to inspect tube internals to insure they are clean 11. Develop a deep tank, high volume, high head hydraulic driven pump to...and procedures that have been implemented at this Command and havs en- hanced productivity are: - Power floor cleaners Pneumatic/ hydraulic ram tire

  16. Test Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Potassium Test Loop to Support an Advanced Potassium Rankine Cycle Power Conversion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoder, JR.G.L.

    2006-03-08

    Parameters for continuing the design and specification of an experimental potassium test loop are identified in this report. Design and construction of a potassium test loop is part of the Phase II effort of the project ''Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System''. This program is supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Design features for the potassium test loop and its instrumentation system, specific test articles, and engineered barriers for ensuring worker safety and protection of the environment are described along with safety and environmental protection requirements to be used during the design process. Information presented in the first portion of this report formed the basis to initiate the design phase of the program; however, the report is a living document that can be changed as necessary during the design process, reflecting modifications as additional design details are developed. Some portions of the report have parameters identified as ''to be determined'' (TBD), reflecting the early stage of the overall process. In cases where specific design values are presently unknown, the report attempts to document the quantities that remain to be defined in order to complete the design of the potassium test loop and supporting equipment.

  17. Does IQ explain socio-economic differentials in total and cardiovascular disease mortality? Comparison with the explanatory power of traditional cardiovascular disease risk factors in the Vietnam Experience Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batty, G David; Shipley, Martin J; Dundas, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the explanatory power of intelligence (IQ) compared with traditional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in the relationship of socio-economic disadvantage with total and CVD mortality, that is the extent to which IQ may account for the variance in this ......The aim of this study was to examine the explanatory power of intelligence (IQ) compared with traditional cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in the relationship of socio-economic disadvantage with total and CVD mortality, that is the extent to which IQ may account for the variance...

  18. Bone marrow transplantation across major histocompatibility barriers in mice. II. T cell requirement for engraftment in total lymphoid irradiation-conditioned recipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallera, D.A.; Soderling, C.C.; Carlson, G.J.; Kersey, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    Studies were undertaken to examine the role of T lymphocytes in engraftment of bone marrow (BM) in animals conditioned with total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) prior to transplantation across major histocompatibility barriers. Donor BM (added as a source of lymphohematopoietic stem cells) and spleen cells (added as a source of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)-causing cells) were pretreated in vitro with monoclonal anti-Thy-1.2 plus complement (C). T cell-depleted grafts were then give to allogeneic mice conditioned with 900 rad of single dose TLI plus cyclophosphamide (CY). These mice did not engraft. Even in the absence of added spleen cells, elimination of the small T cell population from donor BM grafts prevented engraftment compared with animals that received the same conditioning regimen and untreated donor cells. These control animals demonstrated uniform evidence of engraftment about 1 month after transplantation. Similar findings were reported when recipients were conditioned with fractionated 17 x 200-rad TLI. In TLI plus CY-conditional recipients, we have also observed that increasing the donation of treated bone marrow cells still did not result in significant engraftment. Furthermore, graft failure in mice receiving normal dosages of anti-Thy-1.2 plus C-treated donor cells was not a strain-restricted phenomenon. Moreover, removal of bone marrow T cells with monoclonal anti-Lyt-1 plus complement also resulted in graft failure in TLI-conditioned recipients. In contrast to TLI conditioning, when Thy-1.2 plus C-treated donor cells were given to recipients conditioned with total body irradiation (TBI), a high percentage of engraftment was demonstrated by an H-2 microcytotoxicity assay. Plausible mechanisms for there findings are discussed

  19. Totally James

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Tom

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an interview with James Howe, author of "The Misfits" and "Totally Joe". In this interview, Howe discusses tolerance, diversity and the parallels between his own life and his literature. Howe's four books in addition to "The Misfits" and "Totally Joe" and his list of recommended books with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender,…

  20. A Preliminary Assessment of the Initial Compression Power Requirement in CO2 Pipeline “Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS Technologies”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdussalam El-Suleiman

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available CO2 captured from fossil-fueled power generation plants is said to be economically transported via pipelines over long distances. The CO2 must be compressed to pipeline specifications using compressors and pumps that are driven by gas turbine (GT or other prime movers. This paper presents the evaluation of actual work transfer or required prime power by modeling the governing equations of compression using the Peng–Robinson equation of state (PR-EOS. A computer code was developed to carry out the modeling and subsequent simulation of the compression power requirement. The simulation of prime mover power was carried out for different technology (head per stage of the compressor ranging from 10-staged compression to double stage compression. The results show that the current technology of the centrifugal compressor could require as much as 23MW of prime mover power to compress 1.5 million tonnes per year of CO2—a projected equivalent CO2 released from a 530MW combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT power generation plant.

  1. FY 2000 research and development of fundamental technologies for AC superconducting power devices. R and D of fundamental technologies for superconducting power cables and faults current limiters, R and D of superconducting magnets for power applications, and study on the total systems and related subjects; 2000 nendo koryu chodendo denryoku kiki kiban gijutsu kenkyu kaihatsu seika hokokusho. Chodendo soden cable kiban gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu, chodendo genryuki kiban gijutsu no kenkyu kaihatsu, denryokuyo chodendo magnet no kenkyu kaihatsu, total system nado no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    The project for research and development of fundamental technologies for AC superconducting power devices has been started, and the FY 2000 results are reported. The R and D of fundamental technologies for superconducting power cables include grasping the mechanical characteristics associated with integration necessary for fabrication of large current capacity and long cables; development of barrier cable materials by various methods; and development of short insulated tubes as cooling technology for long superconducting cables, and grasping its thermal/mechanical characteristics. The R and D of faults current limiters include introduction of the unit for superconducting film fabrication, determination of the structures and layouts for large currents, and improvement of performance of each device for high voltages. R and D of superconducting magnets for power applications include grasping the fundamental characteristics of insulation at cryogenic temperature, completion of the insulation designs for high voltage/current lead bushing, and development of prototype sub-cooled nitrogen cooling unit for cooling each AC power device. Study on the total systems and related subjects include analysis for stabilization of the group model systems, to confirm improved voltage stability when the superconducting cable is in service. (NEDO)

  2. Reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Kazuyori.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To automatically control the BWR type reactor power by simple and short-time searching the load pattern nearest to the required pattern at a nuclear power plant side. Constitution: The reactor power is automatically regulated by periodical modifying of coefficients fitting to a reactor core model, according as a required load pattern. When a load requirement pattern is given, a simulator estimates the total power change and the axial power distribution change from a xenon density change output calculated by a xenon dynamic characteristic estimating device, and a load pattern capable of being realized is searched. The amount to be recirculated is controlled on the basis of the load patteren thus searched, and the operation of the BWR type reactor is automatically controlled at the side of the nuclear power plant. (Kamimura, M.)

  3. FORECASTING OF PRODUCTION OUTPUT FOR LIGHT INDUSTRY ENTERPRISES WITH PURPOSE TO DETERMINE THEIR POWER RESOURCES REQUIREMENTS. Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Romaniuk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The proposed paper is a continuation of the work, published in the previous issue. It is destined for specialists who are engaged in solution of problems pertaining to efficiency of light industry in Belarus which is considered as one of the branches being significantly involved in formation of national economy, its export potential and social climate. It is extremely relevant to reduce production costs in order to preserve and add strength to the branch positions in the markets. Production of natural, synthetic and knitted materials and their subsequent treatment are unreasonably power-consuming processes. Fundamental solution of the problem for reduction of production costs is to decrease its energy component and this can be achieved due to transition to modern heat and power systems in technological complexes of enterprises.The first part of the paper has considered a range of issues that served as a basis for obtaining statistical models in order to forecast the required production volume of main knitted and textile materials.  Forecasting has been prepared   for a period of more than 20 years because it has been predetermined by development horizon of comprehensive modernization of energy supply systems at enterprises of light industry. The production volumes essentially differ from those that have been stipulated in the programs of light industry.The present paper shows selection of statistical game-type for determination of  build-up rate of the production volume for every textile enterprise. The so-called “Game with Nature” has been selected as a game which is widely used for solution of analogous demand problems. The statistical forecasting models of production obtained in the first part are applied in the second part of the paper which considers strategies for development of individual enterprises. JSC :Baranovichi Industrial Cotton Association” has been taken an example in the paper. Production volumes of any enterprise are

  4. IEEE Std 600: IEEE trial-use standard requirements for organizations that conduct qualification testing of safety systems equipment for use in nuclear power generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this standard is to provide requirements for establishing a program for conducting qualification tests of safety systems equipment used in nuclear power generating stations. Compliance with the requirements of this standard does not assure the adequacy of the qualification tests performed. This standard applies to organizations that conduct qualification tests on equipment that has a definable safety function and is an identifiable part of a safety system for use in nuclear power generating stations. It requires a technical program, a quality assurance program, and a demonstrated ability to meet specified technical requirements. It does not apply to materials tests, production tests, normal performance testing, qualification by analysis, qualification by operating experience, or reliability tests such as diesel-generator multiple start tests. The intent of this standard is to achieve greater consistency, reliability, and reproducibility of test results and to provide adequate control of qualification testing of safety systems equipment

  5. Solar Total Energy System, Large Scale Experiment, Shenandoah, Georgia. Final technical progress report. Volume II, Section 3. Facility concept design. [1. 72 MW thermal and 383. 6 kW electric power for 42,000 ft/sup 2/ knitwear plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None,

    1977-10-17

    The Stearns-Roger Engineering Company conceptual design of ERDA's Large Scale Experiment No. 2 (LSE No. 2) is presented. The various LSEs are part of ERDA's Solar Total Energy Program (STES) and a separate activity of the National Solar Thermal Power Systems Program. The object of this LSE is to design, construct, test, evaluate and operate a STES for the purpose of obtaining experience with large scale hardware systems and to establish engineering capability for subsequent demonstration projects. This particular LSE is to be located at Shenandoah, Georgia, and will provide power to the Bleyle knitwear factory. The Solar Total Energy system is sized to supply 1.720 MW thermal power and 383.6 KW electrical power. The STES is sized for the extended knitwear plant of 3902 M/sup 2/ (42,000 sq-ft) which will eventually employ 300 people. The details of studies conducted for Phase II of the Solar Total Energy System (STES) for the conceptual design requirements of the facility are presented. Included in this section are the detailed descriptions and analyses of the following subtasks: facility concept design, system concept design, performance analysis, operation plan, component and subsystem development, procurement plan, cost estimating and scheduling, and technical and management plans. (WHK)

  6. Fiscal 1998 research report on the total electric power loss reduction project for Myanmer; 1998 nendo Myanmer koku denryoku soshitsu sogo teigen project chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    As a part of Japanese clean development mechanism, study was made on reduction of greenhouse effect gas emission from thermal power plants by reduction of power transmission and distribution losses of power systems in Myanmer. Study was made on technical power transmission and distribution losses for the national grid transmission system, 33kV sub- transmission system of Thaketa substation in Yangong city, and 6.6kV and 400V distribution systems of Latha and Lanmadaw townships in the downtown area of Yangong. Countermeasures for power loss reduction were considered on the basis of the study result. The loss reduction project plan includes a construction cost of 5,134,000US$, loss reduction of 7,726kW, and loss reduction of 33,213,000kWh. The project feasibility and profitability were evaluated by comparison between a financial internal rate of return (FIRR) and an opportunity cost assuming that a discount rate is the opportunity cost. As a result, FIRR was 17.36% and the discount rate was 8.89% in Myanmer. (NEDO)

  7. Preliminary design of high-power wave-guide/transmission system for multimegawatt CW requirements of 100 MeV proton Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, Purushottam; Wanmode, Y.D.; Hannurkar, P.R.

    2002-01-01

    Development of a 100 MeV CW proton Linac has been planned at CAT. This Linac will be needing CW rf power in the frequency ranges of 350 MHz and 700 MHz for its RFQ and DTL/CCDTL/SFDTL structures respectively. The power to the accelerating structures will be produced by either 1 MW CW or 250 kW CW klystron/inductive output tubes (HOM IOTs). The power needed by respective feed points in the structure is max. 250 kW which will be powered by splitting the power from 1 MW klystron/klystrode into four channels by using a wave-guide system. In case of using 250 kW tubes the power to the structures will be provided directly from each tube. Two types of wave-guide transmission system have been considered, viz WR 2300 for 350 MHz rf needs and WR 1500 for 700 MHz rf needs. The typical wave-guide system has been designed using the 1 MW CW klystron followed by wave-guide filter, dual directional coupler, high-power circulator, three 3 dB magic TEE power dividers to split the main channel into four equal channels of 250 kW each. Each individual channel has dual directional couplers, flexible wave-guide sections and high power ceramic vacuum window. The circulator and each power divider is terminated into the isolated ports by high power CW loads. Out of the four channels three channels have phase shifters. Present paper describes the technological aspects and design specifications-considerations for these stringent requirements. (author)

  8. Power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nunez, Anibal D.

    2001-01-01

    In the second half of twentieth century, nuclear power became an industrial reality. Now the operating 433 power plants, the 37 plants under construction, near 9000 years/reactor with only one serious accident with emission of radioactive material to the environment (Chernobyl) show the maturity of this technology. Today nuclear power contribute a 17% to the global generation and an increase of 75 % of the demand of electricity is estimated for 2020 while this demand is expected to triplicate by 2050. How this requirement can be satisfied? All the indicators seems to demonstrate that nuclear power will be the solution because of the shortage of other sources, the increase of the prices of the non renewable fuels and the scarce contribution of the renewable ones. In addition, the climatic changes produced by the greenhouse effect make even more attractive nuclear power. The situation of Argentina is analyzed and compared with other countries. The convenience of an increase of nuclear power contribution to the total national generation seems clear and the conclusion of the construction of the Atucha II nuclear power plant is recommended

  9. Surgery-induced changes and early recovery of hip-muscle strength, leg-press power, and functional performance after fast-track total hip arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Bente; Thorborg, Kristian; Husted, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    By measuring very early changes in muscle strength and functional performance after fast-track total hip arthroplasty (THA), post-operative rehabilitation, introduced soon after surgery, can be designed to specifically target identified deficits.......By measuring very early changes in muscle strength and functional performance after fast-track total hip arthroplasty (THA), post-operative rehabilitation, introduced soon after surgery, can be designed to specifically target identified deficits....

  10. Workshop 'Reducing the share of drilling in the total cost of geothermal power generation'; Workshop 'Senkung des bohrtechnischen Anteils an den geothermischen Stromgestehungskosten'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    For a further development of geothermal power generation, technological adaptations of drilling technology will be required that will reduce the specific power generation cost. This workshop discussed the options for adaptation and the resulting cost improvements. Both technical and non-technical issues were tackled. The full-text documents of the workshop (overheads) can be downloaded at http://www.ie-leipzig.de. Subjects were: (1) Downhole engine technology; (2) New drilling equipment in consideration of geothermal requirements; (3) New drilling equipment in consideration of geothermal requirements; (4) Innovative drilling concepts/ Current cost allotment; (5) Higher efficiency in drilling with flushing adapted to drilling horizons; (6) MWD/LWD technologies of the KW industry; (7) Completion technology in geothermal plants; (8) Time and cost planning in drilling plans; (9) Cost-optimized drilling from a drilling contractor's view; (10) Requirements and obstacles in the licensing of new drilling equipment. (orig.)

  11. Emergency power systems at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This Guide applies to nuclear power plants for which the total power supply comprises normal power supply (which is electric) and emergency power supply (which may be electric or a combination of electric and non-electric). In its present form the Guide provides general guidance for all types of emergency power systems (EPS) - electric and non-electric, and specific guidance (see Appendix A) on the design principles and the features of the emergency electric power system (EEPS). Future editions will include a second appendix giving specific guidance on non-electric power systems. Section 3 of this Safety Guide covers information on considerations that should be taken into account relative to the electric grid, the transmission lines, the on-site electrical supply system, and other alternative power sources, in order to provide high overall reliability of the power supply to the EPS. Since the nuclear power plant operator does not usually control off-site facilities, the discussion of methods of improving off-site reliability does not include requirements for facilities not under the operator's control. Sections 4 to 11 of this Guide provide information, recommendations and requirements that would apply to any emergency power system, be it electric or non-electric

  12. Updated of the events tree of total loss of power at the site, SBO, taking into account the results of stress tests and methodological updates, convolution, and hydraulic power recovery from model RCPs; Actualizacion del arbol de sucesos de perdida total de suministro electro en el emplazamiento, SBO, teniendo en cuenta los resultados de los estres tests y actualizaciones metodologicas, convolucion, recuperacion desde centrales hidraulicas y modelo de sellos de las RCPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Lorenzo, M. A.; Perez Martin, F.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, is described a tree of events to an accident loss total power at the site (SBO) considering, first the results of stress tests arising from the Fukushima accident and moreover, various methodological updates related to this initiating event.

  13. Region-specific study of the electric utility industry: financial history and future power requirements for the VACAR region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pochan, M.J.

    1985-07-01

    Financial data for the period 1966 to 1981 are presented for the four investor-owned electric utilities in the VACAR (Virginia-Carolinas) region. This region was selected as representative for the purpose of assessing the availability, reliability, and cost of electric power for the future in the United States. The estimated demand for power and planned additions to generating capacity for the region through the year 2000 are also given

  14. Capital investment requirements for greenhouse gas emissions mitigation in power generation on near term to century time scales and global to regional spatial scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Clarke, Leon; Edmonds, James; Calvin, Katherine; Kyle, Page

    2014-01-01

    Our paper explores the implication of climate mitigation policy and electricity generation technology performance for capital investment demands by the electric power sector on near term to century time scales. We find that stabilizing GHG emissions will require additional investment in the electricity generation sector over and above investments that would be needed in the absence of climate policy, in the range of 15 to 29 trillion US$ (48–94%) depending on the stringency of climate policy during the period 2015 to 2095 under default technology assumptions. This increase reflects the higher capital intensity of power systems that control emissions as well as increased electrification of the global economy. Limits on the penetration of nuclear and carbon capture and storage technology could increase costs substantially. Energy efficiency improvements can reduce the investment requirement by 18 to 24 trillion US$ (compared to default technology climate policy assumptions), depending on climate policy scenario. We also highlight the implications of different technology evolution scenarios for different regions. Under default technology set, the heaviest investments across scenarios in power generation were observed in China, India, SE Asia and Africa regions with the latter three regions dominating in the second half of the 21st century. - Highlights: • We present electricity generation investment requirement under different scenarios. • A climate policy will lead to substantial increase in investment requirement. • Stringency of climate policy has significant implications for investments. • Technology evolution and performance alter investment requirements significantly. • China, India, Southeast Asia and Africa dominate as investment destinations

  15. Comparison of EMI/RFI requirements to qualify the equipment for nuclear power plant. (RG 1.180, EPRI TR 102323, IEC 62003 and GB/T 11684)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Tae Heon [Korea Testing Laboratory, Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jong Seog [Research Institute of Korea Electric Power Corporation, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Jeong Ho; Cho, Kyoung Youn [Korea Electric Association, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    One issue that has been problematic for new plant equipment and especially for digital instrumentation and control (I and C) systems in recent years is electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). In some reports for nuclear power plant (NPP), electromagnetic interference (EMI), radio frequency interference (RFI), and power surges have been identified as environmental conditions that can affect the performance of safety-related electrical equipment. There are mainly two reference guides for applying to qualify EMI/RFI requirements of the equipment used in a NPP: US NRC RG 1.180 and EPRI TR 102323. Recently, IEC published the standard for the equipment in the NPP, IEC 62003. This paper has compared the requirements of these, including comparing of the requirement of the Chinese national standard, GB/T 11684

  16. Comparison of EMI/RFI requirements to qualify the equipment for nuclear power plant. (RG 1.180, EPRI TR 102323, IEC 62003 and GB/T 11684)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Tae Heon; Kim, Jong Seog; Seo, Jeong Ho; Cho, Kyoung Youn

    2011-01-01

    One issue that has been problematic for new plant equipment and especially for digital instrumentation and control (I and C) systems in recent years is electromagnetic compatibility (EMC). In some reports for nuclear power plant (NPP), electromagnetic interference (EMI), radio frequency interference (RFI), and power surges have been identified as environmental conditions that can affect the performance of safety-related electrical equipment. There are mainly two reference guides for applying to qualify EMI/RFI requirements of the equipment used in a NPP: US NRC RG 1.180 and EPRI TR 102323. Recently, IEC published the standard for the equipment in the NPP, IEC 62003. This paper has compared the requirements of these, including comparing of the requirement of the Chinese national standard, GB/T 11684

  17. Power generation from bio methane. Requirements of the EEG 2012 and balancing in gas infrastructure; Verstromung von Biomethan. Anforderungen des EEG 2012 und gaswirtschaftliche Bilanzierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herz, Steffen; Bredow, Hartwig von [von Bredow Valentin Rechtsanwaelte, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    Six years ago, the first biogas infeed plant was connected to the natural gas distribution system. The infeed of biogas progressed beyond the nursery stage. The infeed of bio methane significantly is promoted by the renewable energy law. One fundamental requirement for the promotion with respect to the Renewable Energy Law is the generation of the power to be remunerated by means of the exclusive use of biomass. The Renewable Energy Law EEG 2012 contains the new requirement, that furthermore the transport of biogas from its production until removal has to be documented by means of a mass balance. Under this aspect, the authors of the contribution under consideration report on the requirements of the EEG 2012 and the balancing in gas infrastructure with respect to the power generation from biomass.

  18. The total artificial heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jason A; Shah, Keyur B; Quader, Mohammed A; Cooke, Richard H; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar; Rao, Kris K; Smallfield, Melissa C; Tchoukina, Inna; Tang, Daniel G

    2015-12-01

    The total artificial heart (TAH) is a form of mechanical circulatory support in which the patient's native ventricles and valves are explanted and replaced by a pneumatically powered artificial heart. Currently, the TAH is approved for use in end-stage biventricular heart failure as a bridge to heart transplantation. However, with an increasing global burden of cardiovascular disease and congestive heart failure, the number of patients with end-stage heart failure awaiting heart transplantation now far exceeds the number of available hearts. As a result, the use of mechanical circulatory support, including the TAH and left ventricular assist device (LVAD), is growing exponentially. The LVAD is already widely used as destination therapy, and destination therapy for the TAH is under investigation. While most patients requiring mechanical circulatory support are effectively treated with LVADs, there is a subset of patients with concurrent right ventricular failure or major structural barriers to LVAD placement in whom TAH may be more appropriate. The history, indications, surgical implantation, post device management, outcomes, complications, and future direction of the TAH are discussed in this review.

  19. EXCESS RF POWER REQUIRED FOR RF CONTROL OF THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE (SNS) LINAC, A PULSED HIGH-INTENSITY SUPERCONDUCTING PROTON ACCELERATOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, M.; Kwon, S.

    2001-01-01

    A high-intensity proton linac, such as that being planned for the SNS, requires accurate RF control of cavity fields for the entire pulse in order to avoid beam spill. The current design requirement for the SNS is RF field stability within ±0.5% and ±0.5 o [1]. This RF control capability is achieved by the control electronics using the excess RF power to correct disturbances. To minimize the initial capital costs, the RF system is designed with 'just enough' RF power. All the usual disturbances exist, such as beam noise, klystron/HVPS noise, coupler imperfections, transport losses, turn-on and turn-off transients, etc. As a superconducting linac, there are added disturbances of large magnitude, including Lorentz detuning and microphonics. The effects of these disturbances and the power required to correct them are estimated, and the result shows that the highest power systems in the SNS have just enough margin, with little or no excess margin

  20. Estimation of requirements of eolic energy equivalent to the electric generation of the Laguna Verde nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia V, M.A.; Hernandez M, I.A.; Martin del Campo M, C.

    2004-01-01

    The advantages are presented that have the nuclear and eolic energy as for their low environmental impact and to the human health. An exercise is presented in the one that is supposed that the electric power generated by the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power plant (CNLV), with capacity of 1365 M W, it should be produced by eolic energy when in the years 2020 and 2025 the units 1 and 2 of the CNLV reach its useful life and be moved away. It is calculated the number of aero generators that would produce the electric power average yearly of the CNLV, that which is equal to install eolic parks with capacity of 2758 M W, without considering that it will also be invested in systems of back generation to produce electricity when the aero generators stops for lack of wind. (Author)